Science.gov

Sample records for in-situ gamma spectrometry

  1. Radioactivity measurements in the aquatic environment using in-situ and laboratory gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriou, G; Tsabaris, C; Androulakaki, E G; Patiris, D L; Kokkoris, M; Kalfas, C A; Vlastou, R

    2013-12-01

    The in-situ underwater gamma-ray spectrometry method is validated by inter-comparison with laboratory method. Deployments of the spectrometer KATERINA on a submarine spring and laboratory measurements of water samples with HPGe detector were performed. Efficiency calibrations, Monte Carlo simulations and the Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) estimations were realized. MDAs varied from 0.19 to 10.4 (lab) and 0.05 to 0.35 (in-situ) Bq/L, while activity concentrations differed from 7% (for radon progenies) up to 10% (for (40)K), between the two methods. PMID:24103707

  2. Application of in-situ gamma spectrometry in the remediation of radioactively contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, C.; Yesso, J.D.; Danahy, R.J.; Cox, T.

    1999-06-01

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) is a US Department of Energy site that is undergoing total remediation and closure. Most of the remediation effort entails massive excavation of soil for disposal, both offsite and onsite, at an engineered disposal facility. In-situ gamma spectrometry is routinely used to support soil excavation operations to accurately and quickly identify soil areas as being above or below regulatory remediation criteria. Two different in-situ gamma spectrometry systems are used. The first is a sodium iodide (NaI) detector mounted either on a tractor or a jogging stroller, depending on the terrain to be measured. The NaI system allows the collection of a gamma energy spectrum which can be analyzed to identify and quantify radioactive isotopes which are present within the detector`s viewing area. Each energy spectrum is tagged by location coordinates provided by an on-board global positioning system (GPS) to precisely locate elevated contamination areas. The second is a tripod-mounted, high purity germanium detector (HPGe) gamma spectrometry system that is functionally similar to the NaI system. The principal advantage of the HPGe is its superior resolution, which allows much more accurate identification and quantification of radionuclide contaminants in soils. In order to effectively utilize the data quality objective process with these systems, three quality assurance (QA) elements had to be performed.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation by GEANT 4 and GESPECOR of in situ gamma-ray spectrometry measurements.

    PubMed

    Chirosca, Alecsandru; Suvaila, Rares; Sima, Octavian

    2013-11-01

    The application of GEANT 4 and GESPECOR Monte Carlo simulation codes for efficiency calibration of in situ gamma-ray spectrometry was studied. The long computing time required by GEANT 4 prevents its use in routine simulations. Due to the application of variance reduction techniques, GESPECOR is much faster. In this code specific procedures for incorporating the depth profile of the activity were implemented. In addition procedures for evaluating the effect of non-homogeneity of the source were developed. The code was validated by comparison with test simulations carried out with GEANT 4 and by comparison with published results. PMID:23566809

  4. Contribution of atmospherical radon to in-situ scintillation gamma spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Klusoň, J; Thinová, L

    2011-08-01

    In-situ gamma spectrometry can be used for monitoring and determining natural and man-made radionuclide concentrations in the environment. The low detection limit of potential contaminants depends on the natural background variations, including variations in the atmospheric concentrations of radon and its decay products. The scintillation spectrometer response for atmospheric radon was simulated by the Monte Carlo method, and the results were compared with the experimental measurements over large water surfaces. The contributions of atmospheric radon to the natural background were assessed. PMID:21129988

  5. In situ gamma-ray spectrometry in the environment using dose rate spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Young-Yong; Kim, Chang-Jong; Chung, Kun Ho; Choi, Hee-Yeoul; Lee, Wanno; Kang, Mun Ja; Park, Sang Tae

    2016-02-01

    In order to expand the application of dose rate spectroscopy to the environment, in situ gamma-ray spectrometry was first conducted at a height of 1 m above the ground to calculate the ambient dose rate and individual dose rate at that height, as well as the radioactivity in the soil layer for the detected gamma nuclides from the dose rate spectroscopy. The reliable results could be obtained by introducing the angular correction factor to correct the G-factor with respect to incident photons distributed in a certain range of angles. The intercomparison results of radioactivity using ISOCS software, an analysis of a sample taken from the soil around a detector, and dose rate spectroscopy had a difference of <20% for 214Pb, 214Bi, 228Ac, 212Bi, 208Tl, and 40K, except for 212Pb with low-energy photons, that is, <300 keV. In addition, the drawback of using dose rate spectroscopy, that is, all gamma rays from a nuclide should be identified to accurately assess the individual dose rate, was overcome by adopting the concept of contribution ratio of the key gamma ray to the individual dose rate of a nuclide, so that it could be accurately calculated by identifying only a key gamma ray from a nuclide.

  6. In situ gamma-ray spectrometry: A tutorial for environmental radiation scientists

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.M.; Shebell, P.

    1993-10-01

    This tutorial is intended for those in the environmental field who perform assessments in areas where there is radioactive contamination in the surface soil. Techniques will be introduced for performing on-site quantitative measurements of gamma radiation in the environment using high resolution germanium detectors. A basic understanding of ionizing radiation principles is assumed; however, a detailed knowledge of gamma spectrometry systems is not required. Emphasized is the practical end of operations in the field and the conversion of measured full absorption peak count rates in a collected spectrum to meaningful radiological quantities, such as the concentration of a radionuclide in the soil, activity per unit area, and dose rate in the air. The theory of operation and calibration procedures will be covered in detail to provide the necessary knowledge to adapt the technique to site-specific problems. Example calculations for detector calibration are also provided.

  7. Spatially-Dependent Measurements of Surface and Near-Surface Radioactive Material Using In situ Gamma Ray Spectrometry (ISGRS) For Final Status Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Chapman, A. J. Boerner, E. W. Abelquist

    2006-11-15

    In-situ, high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry (ISGRS) measurements were conducted at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) field laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of these tests was to provide analytical data for assessing how “fit for use” this technology is for detecting discrete particles in soil.

  8. Survey of the {sup 137}Cs contamination in Belgium by in-situ gamma spectrometry, a decade after the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Uyttenhove, J.; Pomme, S.; Hardenman, F.; Culot, J.P.

    1997-10-01

    The residual radiocesium concentration, nearly 10 y after the Chernobyl accident, is measured at different sites on the Belgian territory by means of in-situ gamma-spectrometry. A possible link between the rainfall at the beginning of May 1986 and the actual cesium concentration is investigated. The radiological impact of this contamination, even in the most affected regions in the Ardennes, is very small (<6 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}). 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Assay for uranium and determination of disequilibrium by means of in situ high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, Allan B.; Moxham, Robert M.; Senftle, F.E.

    1977-01-01

    Two sealed sondes, using germanium gamma-ray detectors cooled by melting propane, have been field tested to depths of 79 m in water-filled boreholes at the Pawnee Uranium Mine in Bee Co., Texas. When, used as total-count devices, the sondes are comparable in logging speed and counting rate with conventional scintillation detectors for locating zones of high radioactivity. When used with a multichannel analyzer, the sondes are detectors with such high resolution that individual lines from the complex spectra of the uranium and thorium series can be distinguished. Gamma rays from each group of the uranium series can be measured in ore zones permitting determination of the state of equilibrium at each measurement point. Series of 10-minute spectra taken at 0.3- to 0.5-m intervals in several holes showed zones where maxima from the uranium group and from the 222Rn group were displaced relative to each other. Apparent excesses of 230Th at some locations suggest that uranium-group concentrations at those locations were severalfold greater some tens of kiloyears, ago. At the current state of development a 10-minute count yields a sensitivity of about 80 ppm U308. Data reduction could in practice be accomplished in about 5 minutes. The result is practically unaffected by disequilibrium or radon contamination. In comparison with core assay, high-resolution spectrometry samples a larger volume; avoids problems due to incomplete core recovery, loss of friable material to drilling fluids, and errors in depth and marking; and permits use of less expensive drilling methods. Because gamma rays from the radionuclides are accumulated simultaneously, it also avoids the problems inherent in trying to correlate logs made in separate runs with different equipment. Continuous-motion delayed-gamma activation by a 163-?g 252Cf neutron source attached to the sonde yielded poor sensitivity. A better neutron-activation method, in which the sonde is moved in steps so as to place the detector at the previous activation point, could not be evaluated because of equipment failure.

  10. A Users' Guide for the Computer Program ISDMAP: Analysis and Mapping of In-Situ Gamma-Ray Spectrometry and Soil Sample Data

    SciTech Connect

    Reginatto, Marcel; Bailey, Paul; Shebell, Peter

    2000-11-30

    The computer program ISDMAP was written to analyze data from a set of in situ gamma-ray spectrometry measurements on a grid. It can also do a combined analysis of this type of data and data from soil samples. One well-known difficulty with attempting this type of analysis is that such sets of data can never provide enough information to determine a unique solution. This can be understood intuitively since a finite number of measurements cannot be sufficient to determine a continuous distribution (this observation is not restricted to data collected with the in situ technique, but holds for any set of discrete measurements, such as a series of soil samples). One can, however, restrict to particular types of solutions by requiring that they satisfy other conditions in addition to the measurements, and this is the approach taken by ISDMAP. In ISDMAP, the data are analyzed in a different manner depending on whether the data is from a characterization survey or from a post-remediation survey. The ''characterization'' option creates a map of contamination in surface soil that is smooth and fits the data. The ''post-remediation'' option creates a map with a summary of potential hot spots over a constant background level, providing a map of hot spots that might be ''hidden'' in the data. This report describes the operation of ISDMAP in sufficient detail to allow a user to prepare the necessary input files and run the program. The program requires a PC with DOS or a DOS emulator (most Windows machines have this).

  11. Assessment of natural and anthropogenic radioactivity levels in rocks and soils in the environs of Swieradow Zdroj in Sudetes, Poland, by in situ gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Malczewski, D; Teper, L; Dorda, J

    2004-01-01

    The natural radioactivity of 40K, 208Ti, 212Pb, 214Pb, 228Ac, and the fallout of 137Cs in typical rocks and soils of Swieradów Zdrój area (Sudetes Mountains, Poland) were measured in situ using a portable gamma-ray spectrometry workstation. The measurement points were chosen for different regional lithology: within hornfelses of the Szklarska Poreba schist-belt, quartz rocks, gneisses of the Swieradów Zdrój unit, leucogranites, leptinites, mica schists of the Stara Kamienica belt, and finally the zones of the southern and northern contacts of the Stara Kamienica schist-belt with leucogranites and gneisses of the Lesna unit, respectively. 40K activity varied in the range from about 320 Bq kg(-1) (quartz) to 1200 Bq kg(-1) (gneisses). The activity concentrations associated with 228Ac (232Th series) varied in the range from 25 Bq kg(-1) (quartz) to 62 Bq kg(-1) (leucogranites), whereas activity concentration of 226Ra varied in the range from about 31 Bq kg(-1) (hornfelses) to 122 Bq kg(-1) (leucogranites). Relatively low deposits of 137Cs were noted in the investigated area, where the activity concentrations ranged from 4001 (hornfelses) Bq m(-2) to less than 154 Bq m(-2) (leucogranites). PMID:15050357

  12. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  13. An improved in situ method for determining depth distributions of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benke, Roland R.; Kearfott, Kimberlee J.

    2001-05-01

    In situ gamma-ray spectrometry determines the quantities of radionuclides in some medium with a portable detector. The main limitation of in situ gamma-ray spectrometry lies in determining the depth distribution of radionuclides. This limitation is addressed by developing an improved in situ method for determining the depth distributions of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides in large area sources. This paper implements a unique collimator design with conventional radiation detection equipment. Cylindrically symmetric collimators were fabricated to allow only those gamma-rays emitted from a selected range of polar angles (measured off the detector axis) to be detected. Positioned with its axis normal to surface of the media, each collimator enables the detection of gamma-rays emitted from a different range of polar angles and preferential depths. Previous in situ methods require a priori knowledge of the depth distribution shape. However, the absolute method presented in this paper determines the depth distribution as a histogram and does not rely on such assumptions. Other advantages over previous in situ methods are that this method only requires a single gamma-ray emission, provides more detailed depth information, and offers a superior ability for characterizing complex depth distributions. Collimated spectrometer measurements of buried area sources demonstrated the ability of the method to yield accurate depth information. Based on the results of actual measurements, this method increases the potential of in situ gamma-ray spectrometry as an independent characterization tool in situations with unknown radionuclide depth distributions.

  14. Small Scale Assessment of Spatial and Vertical Redistribution of Fukushima Fallouts Radiocaesium in Contaminated Soil Using in-situ HPGe Gamma Ray Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patin, J.; Onda, Y.; Yoda, H.; Kato, H.

    2011-12-01

    After Tohoku earthquake on March 11th 2011, the subsequent tsunami and the resulting Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster, gamma emitting particles, first release into the atmosphere, were quickly deposited on the soil surface, with potentially harmful level in the surroundings of the nuclear power plant. Thus, the evaluation of soil deposition pattern, depth migration and afterward radionuclides redistribution and export by erosion and hydrological processes is fundamental for contamination assessments and to plan future actions. Our study site is located 37km from Fukushima power plant, inside the evacuated zone. In this study, we used a bounded erosion plot of 22.1m x 5m to assess global export of sediments and 137Cs. This plot, previously cropped with tobacco, is morphologically divided into inter-rill areas separated by rills that formed into former wheel tracks. The bottom of the plot is subject to deposition of sediments. In order to determine and quantify the internal processes responsible of the export of sediment, the depth distribution of 137Cs is estimated using a portable High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. Such a portable device, associated to the high radiation levels, allow an acquisition of spatially distributed data within the plot in a reasonable time (1 min/sample). At the same time, depth distribution of 137Cs are measured using the scrapper plate technique, adapted to obtain a fine resolution in the first, highly contaminated, centimeters of soil. Finally, 137Cs depth profiles, associated with in situ and laboratory gamma spectrums acquired with the portable detector, allow for the detector calibration. Although the initial deposit can reasonably be supposed homogeneous at the plot scale, the dataset obtained 3 months later shows high spatial and temporal variability due to erosion processes. Measurements with the portable HPGe detector proved to be useful at this small scale, avoiding the needs of a large number of soil samples, and our results are promising to understand erosion at larger scale where horizontal patterns of deposition and redistribution are usually supposed homogeneous over quite larger areas.

  15. Spatial mapping of soil and radioactivity redistribution at the hillslope scale using in-situ gamma spectrometry, terrestrial laser scanning and RFID tags after the Fukushima nuclear accident fallout.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patin, Jeremy; Onda, Yuichi; Noguchi, Takehiro; Parsons, Anthony

    2013-04-01

    In March 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster, triggered by the Tohoku earthquake and the consequent tsunami, released a large amount of radionuclides in the environment. To provide a rapid assessment of the soil contamination and its potential redistribution, intensive scientific monitoring has been conducted since July 2011 in our study site, located in the Yamakiya district of Kawamata town, in Fukushima prefecture, Japan, about 37 km from the power plant. In this paper, we summarize and analyze a dataset combining multiple innovative methods deployed inside a 5m x 22m bounded hillslope plot. In addition to runoff volumes and sediments radiocesium concentrations, each major rainfall event was followed by in situ gamma spectrometry measurements. In 2012, to trace the complex behavior of sediments inside the plot, about 300 RFID (Radio-Frequency IDentification) tags representing coarse sediments were scattered and their spatial position was periodically checked using a total station. Finally, several high resolutions Digital Elevation Models were acquired with a terrestrial laser scanner to assess the surface structure and changes. The observed processes at the event scale include interrill and rill erosion, as well as local deposition and remobilization phenomenon. Not only do they directly provide information on the erosion spatio-temporal variability and the associated radionuclides transfers, but combined together they can constitute a solid basis to improve and challenge process-based distributed erosion models.

  16. Indoor and outdoor in situ high-resolution gamma radiation measurements in urban areas of Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Svoukis, E; Tsertos, H

    2007-01-01

    In situ, high-resolution, gamma-ray spectrometry of a total number of 70 outdoor and 20 indoor representative measurements were performed in preselected, common locations of the main urban areas of Cyprus. Specific activities and gamma absorbed dose rates in air due to the naturally occurring radionuclides of (232)Th and (238)U series, and (40)K are determined and discussed. Effective dose rate to the Cyprus population due to terrestrial gamma radiation is derived directly from this work. The results obtained outdoors match very well with those derived previously by high-resolution gamma spectrometry of soil samples, which were collected from the main island bedrock surface. This implies that the construction and building materials in urban areas do not affect the external gamma dose rate; thus they are mostly of local origin. Finally, the indoor/outdoor gamma dose ratio was found to be 1.4 +/- 0.5. PMID:17065195

  17. Uncertainty analysis of in-situ gamma spectrometry measurements of air cleaning filter cartridges and 200 L drums by a HPGe detector.

    PubMed

    Slaninka, Alojz; Slávik, Ondrej; Necas, Vladimír

    2010-01-01

    This work deals with most significant sources of uncertainty in determination of radionuclides massic activity in 200 L drums with radioactive waste (RAW) from decommissioning of nuclear power plant (NPP) A1 and operational air cleaning filters coming from different parts of NPP's ventilation system. It turned out that the most significant source of uncertainty is determination of photo peak detection efficiency, in particular measurement geometry. The detection efficiency of HPGe detector has been determined by calculation using ISOCS software (In Situ Object Counting System) and detector characteristics delivered by the manufacturer (LABSOCS). The detector efficiency is influenced by various factors like measurement geometry, deviation from standard geometry, environmental characteristics, sample properties (density, material composition), used collimator etc. Mentioned factors and their contributions to the uncertainty of detection efficiency and thus to the total uncertainty of massic activity determination have been individually evaluated in the paper. The main part of the work consists of evaluation of maximum uncertainty factor due to presence of hypothetical point source in measurement volume for both types of measurement geometry. PMID:19945884

  18. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis. 1992 Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  19. In situ mass spectrometry of autoimmune liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Bowlus, Christopher L; Seeley, Erin H; Roder, Joanna; Grigorieva, Julia; Roder, Heinrich; Caprioli, Richard M; Gershwin, Meric

    2011-05-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) are the major forms of autoimmune liver diseases each characterized by the destruction of a specific liver cell type and the presence of differing auto-antibodies. We took a proteomic approach utilizing in situ matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) to obtain profiles directly from liver samples of patients with PBC, PSC, AIH and controls. The ability to precisely localize the region for acquisition of MALDI MS allowed us to obtain profiles from bile ducts, inflammatory infiltrates and hepatocytes from each biopsy sample. Analysis tools developed to identify peaks and compare peaks across diseases and cell types were used to develop models to classify the samples. Using an initial set of testing samples from PBC patients and controls, we identified unique peaks present in bile ducts, inflammatory infiltrates and hepatocytes that could classify samples in a validation cohort with 88-91% accuracy. Interestingly, profiles of PSC and AIH did not differ significantly from PBC. Identification of proteins in these peaks may represent novel autoantigens or effector molecules. These findings illustrate the potential of a proteomic approach to autoimmune diseases with in situ MALDI MS. PMID:21258365

  20. Airborne Gamma-Spectrometry in Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Butterweck, Gernot; Bucher, Benno; Rybach, Ladislaus

    2008-08-07

    Airborne gamma-spectrometry is able to obtain fast radiological information over large areas. The airborne gamma-spectrometry unit deployed in Switzerland by the Swiss National Emergency Operations Centre (NEOC) consists of a Swiss army Super Puma helicopter equipped with four NaI-Detectors with a total volume of 17 liters, associated electronics and a real-time data evaluation and mapping unit developed by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) and the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). The operational readiness of the airborne gamma-spectrometry system is validated in annual exercises of one week duration. Data from 2005 and 2006 exercises are represented in maps of {sup 137}Cs activity concentration for two towns located in southern and western Switzerland. An indicator of man-made radioactivity (MMGC ratio) is demonstrated for an area with four different types of nuclear installations. The intercomparison between airborne gamma-spectrometry and ground measurements showed good agreement between both methods.

  1. Airborne Gamma-Spectrometry in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterweck, Gernot; Bucher, Benno; Rybach, Ladislaus

    2008-08-01

    Airborne gamma-spectrometry is able to obtain fast radiological information over large areas. The airborne gamma-spectrometry unit deployed in Switzerland by the Swiss National Emergency Operations Centre (NEOC) consists of a Swiss army Super Puma helicopter equipped with four NaI-Detectors with a total volume of 17 liters, associated electronics and a real-time data evaluation and mapping unit developed by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) and the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). The operational readiness of the airborne gamma-spectrometry system is validated in annual exercises of one week duration. Data from 2005 and 2006 exercises are represented in maps of 137Cs activity concentration for two towns located in southern and western Switzerland. An indicator of man-made radioactivity (MMGC ratio) is demonstrated for an area with four different types of nuclear installations. The intercomparison between airborne gamma-spectrometry and ground measurements showed good agreement between both methods.

  2. Factors influencing in situ gamma-ray measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loonstra, E. H.; van Egmond, F. M.

    2009-04-01

    Introduction In situ passive gamma-ray sensors are very well suitable for mapping physical soil properties. In order to make a qualitative sound soil map, high quality input parameters for calibration are required. This paper will focus on the factors that affect the output of in situ passive gamma-ray sensors, the primary source, soil, not taken into account. Factors The gamma-ray spectrum contains information of naturally occurring nuclides 40K, 238U and 232Th and man-made nuclides like 137Cs, as well as the total count rate. Factors that influence the concentration of these nuclides and the count rate can be classified in 3 categories. These are sensor design, environmental conditions and operational circumstances. Sensor design The main elements of an in situ gamma-ray sensor that influence the outcome and quality of the output are the crystal and the spectrum analysis method. Material and size of the crystal determine the energy resolution. Though widely used, NaI crystals are not the most efficient capturer of gamma radiation. Alternatives are BGO and CsI. BGO has a low peak resolution, which prohibits use in cases where man-made nuclides are subject of interest. The material is expensive and prone to temperature instability. CsI is robust compared to NaI and BGO. The density of CsI is higher than NaI, yielding better efficiency, especially for smaller crystal sizes. More volume results in higher energy efficiency. The reduction of the measured spectral information into concentration of radionuclides is mostly done using the Windows analysis method. In Windows, the activities of the nuclides are found by summing the intensities of the spectrum found in a certain interval surrounding a peak. A major flaw of the Windows method is the limited amount of spectral information that is incorporated into the analysis. Another weakness is the inherent use of ‘stripping factors' to account for contributions of radiation from nuclide A into the peak of nuclide B. This can be overcome using Full Spectrum Analysis (FSA). This method incorporates virtually all data present in the measured gamma spectrum. In FSA, a Chi-squared algorithm is used to fit a set of "Standard Spectra" to the measured spectrum. The uncertainty in the FSA method is at least a factor 2 lower compared to the Windows method. Environmental conditions Environmental conditions can influence the signal output and therefore the quality. In general, the density of the medium through which gamma-radiation travels determines the interaction of the radiation with matter and thus affects the sensor readings. Excluding soil as being the source; water is the most important external factor in this respect. The amount of water in soil will affect the signal. In general, energy loss occurs as water content in soil increases. As a result, the nuclide concentrations will be lower. Monte Carlo simulations show a difference of 16% in nuclide concentration for completely dry and fully saturated sandy soils. Another water related issue is rainfall. With rain radon gas, a product of 238U, will precipitate. This causes spectral noise effects. Snow and fog have the same effect to a minor degree. Another aspect is the openness of soil. From experience we know that the concentration of 40K differs if soil is tilled. Finally, on earth there is always radioactive noise present from the galaxy. The "Standard Spectra" used in the FSA method can take noise and geometric effects into account. Operational circumstances During a survey an operator should be aware of the effects of driving speed and measurement height. In general, a larger crystal has better energy efficiency and is therefore more suitable for high speed. E.g. a 70 x 150 mm CsI crystal provides qualitative satisfactory output for soil mapping up to 10 km/hr. Sample locations, however, are best measured during a longer period (3 to 5 minutes). The measurement height affects the measurement resolution; the lower the sensor, the smaller the measured area. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations show that the mass of the survey vehicle has to be taken into account. A large tractor e.g. can lead to spectral shape disruptions of 5 to 10%. Conclusion Several factors can effect the measured concentrations of radioactive nuclides. Potential users should take mentioned factors into account in respect to their needs when building and applying gamma-ray sensors. For purposes of soil mapping the use of FSA method is preferred, as it incorporates several disturbing factors. This allows the user to create a consistent dataset which will lead to a better understanding of the relation between nuclide concentrations and physical soil properties.

  3. Demonstration of a collimated in situ method for determining depth distributions using γ-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benke, Roland R.; Kearfott, Kimberlee J.

    2002-04-01

    In situ γ-ray spectrometry uses a portable detector to quantify radionuclides in materials. The main shortcoming of in situ γ-ray spectrometry has been its inability to determine radionuclide depth distributions. Novel collimator designs were paired with a commercial in situ γ-ray spectrometry system to overcome this limitation for large area sources. Positioned with their axes normal to the material surface, the cylindrically symmetric collimators limited the detection of unattenuated γ-rays from a selected range of polar angles (measured off the detector axis). Although this approach does not alleviate the need for some knowledge of the γ-ray attenuation characteristics of the materials being measured, the collimation method presented in this paper represents an absolute method that determines the depth distribution as a histogram, while other in situ methods require a priori knowledge of the depth distribution shape. Other advantages over previous in situ methods are that this method does not require multiple γ-ray emission energies, provides the capability for characterizing complex depth distributions. The disadvantages are that collimation adds weight to the in situ system and increases the counting time by reducing the detector's field of view. Using a high-purity germanium spectrometry system, collimated in situ measurements of large area sources buried in attenuating materials were performed in laboratory settings and demonstrated the method's capability to yield accurate depth information.

  4. Monitoring genetic and metabolic potential for in situ bioremediation: Mass spectrometry. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, M.V.; Hurst, G.B.; Britt, P.F.; McLuckey, S.A.; Doktycz, M.J.

    1997-09-01

    'A number of US Department of Energy (DOE) sites are contaminated with mixtures of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) such as carbon tetrachloride, chloroform,. perchloroethylene, and trichloroethylene. At many of these sites, in situ microbial bioremediation is an attractive strategy for cleanup because it has the potential to degrade DNAPLs in situ without producing toxic byproducts. A rapid screening method to determine the broad range metabolic and genetic potential for contaminant degradation would greatly reduce the cost and time involved in assessment for in situ bioremediation as well as for monitoring ongoing bioremediation treatment. In this project, the ORNL Organic Mass Spectrometry (OMS) group is developing mass-spectrometry-based methods to screen for the genetic and metabolic potential for assessment and monitoring of in situ bioremediation of DNAPLs. In close collaboration, Professor Mary Lidstrom''s group at the University of Washington is identifying short DNA sequences related to microbial processes involved in the biodegradation of pollutants. This work will lay the foundation for development of a field-portable mass-spectrometry-based technique for rapid assessment and monitoring of bioremediation processes on site.'

  5. Review of in situ derivatization techniques for enhanced bioanalysis using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Baghdady, Yehia Z; Schug, Kevin A

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and specific analysis of target molecules in complex biological matrices remains a significant challenge, especially when ultra-trace detection limits are required. Liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry is often the method of choice for bioanalysis. Conventional sample preparation and clean-up methods prior to the analysis of biological fluids such as liquid-liquid extraction, solid-phase extraction, or protein precipitation are time-consuming, tedious, and can negatively affect target recovery and detection sensitivity. An alternative or complementary strategy is the use of an off-line or on-line in situ derivatization technique. In situ derivatization can be incorporated to directly derivatize target analytes in their native biological matrices, without any prior sample clean-up methods, to substitute or even enhance the extraction and preconcentration efficiency of these traditional sample preparation methods. Designed appropriately, it can reduce the number of sample preparation steps necessary prior to analysis. Moreover, in situ derivatization can be used to enhance the performance of the developed liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry-based bioanalysis methods regarding stability, chromatographic separation, selectivity, and ionization efficiency. This review presents an overview of the commonly used in situ derivatization techniques coupled to liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry-based bioanalysis to guide and to stimulate future research. PMID:26496130

  6. Mass spectrometry guided in situ proteolysis to obtain crystals for X-ray structure determination.

    PubMed

    Gheyi, Tarun; Rodgers, Logan; Romero, Richard; Sauder, J Michael; Burley, Stephen K

    2010-10-01

    A strategy for increasing the efficiency of protein crystallization/structure determination with mass spectrometry has been developed. This approach combines insights from limited proteolysis/mass spectrometry and crystallization via in situ proteolysis. The procedure seeks to identify protease-resistant polypeptide chain segments from purified proteins on the time-scale of crystal formation, and subsequently crystallizing the target protein in the presence of the optimal protease at the right relative concentration. We report our experience with 10 proteins of unknown structure, two of which yielded high-resolution X-ray structures. The advantage of this approach comes from its ability to select only those structure determination candidates that are likely to benefit from application of in situ proteolysis, using conditions most likely to result in formation of a stable proteolytic digestion product suitable for crystallization. PMID:20685133

  7. Mass Spectrometry Guided In Situ Proteolysis to Obtain Crystals for X-ray Structure Determination

    PubMed Central

    Gheyi, Tarun; Rodgers, Logan; Romero, Richard; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.

    2010-01-01

    A strategy for increasing the efficiency of protein crystallization/structure determination with mass spectrometry has been developed. This approach combines insights from limited proteolysis/mass spectrometry and crystallization via in situ proteolysis. The procedure seeks to identify protease-resistant polypeptide chain segments from purified proteins on the time-scale of crystal formation, and subsequently crystallizing the target protein in the presence of the optimal protease at the right relative concentration. We report our experience with ten proteins of unknown structure, two of which yielded high-resolution X-ray structures. The advantage of this approach comes from its ability to select only those structure determination candidates that are likely to benefit from application of in situ proteolysis, using conditions most likely to result in formation of a stable proteolytic digestion product suitable for crystallization. PMID:20685133

  8. Mass Spectrometry Guided In Situ Proteolysis to Obtain Crystals for X-ray Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Gheyi, Tarun; Rodgers, Logan; Romero, Richard; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.

    2012-04-30

    A strategy for increasing the efficiency of protein crystallization/structure determination with mass spectrometry has been developed. This approach combines insights from limited proteolysis/mass spectrometry and crystallization via in situ proteolysis. The procedure seeks to identify protease-resistant polypeptide chain segments from purified proteins on the time-scale of crystal formation, and subsequently crystallizing the target protein in the presence of the optimal protease at the right relative concentration. We report our experience with 10 proteins of unknown structure, two of which yielded high-resolution X-ray structures. The advantage of this approach comes from its ability to select only those structure determination candidates that are likely to benefit from application of in situ proteolysis, using conditions most likely to result in formation of a stable proteolytic digestion product suitable for crystallization.

  9. Comparison of in situ and laboratory gamma spectroscopy of natural radionuclides in desert soil.

    PubMed

    Benke, R R; Kearfott, K J

    1997-08-01

    In situ and laboratory gamma spectroscopy were used to characterize natural background levels of radiation in the soil at eight sites around the Yucca Mountain Range. The purpose of this practical field analysis was to determine if published empirical in situ calibration factors would yield accurate quantitative specific activities (Bq kg(-1)) in a desert environment. Corrections were made to the in situ calibration factors to account for the on-axis response of a detector with a thin beryllium end window. The in situ gamma spectroscopy results were compared to laboratory gamma spectroscopy of soil samples gathered from each site. Five natural radionuclides were considered: 40K, 214Pb, 214Bi, 208Tl, and 228Ac. The in situ determined specific activities were consistently within +/-15% of the laboratory soil sample results. A quantitative discussion of the factors contributing to the uncertainty in the in situ and laboratory results is included. Analysis on the specific activity data using statistical hypothesis tests determined that three nuclides, 214Pb, 214Bi, and 228Ac showed a weak site dependence while the other two nuclides, 40K and 208Tl, did not exhibit a site dependence. Differing radiation background levels from site to site along with in situ and laboratory uncertainties in excess of 10% are two factors that account for the weak site dependence. Despite the good correlation between data, it was recommended that the in situ detector be calibrated by a detector-specific Monte Carlo code which would accurately model more complex geometries and source distributions. PMID:9228170

  10. Planetary Geochemistry Techniques: Probing In-Situ with Neutron and Gamma Rays (PING) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Burger, D.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lin, L.; McClanahan, T.; Nankung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Probing In situ with Neutrons and Gamma rays (PING) instrument is a promising planetary science application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology so successfully used in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth. The objective of our technology development program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (NASA/GSFC) Astrochemistry Laboratory is to extend the application of neutron interrogation techniques to landed in situ planetary composition measurements by using a 14 MeV Pulsed Neutron Generator (PNG) combined with neutron and gamma ray detectors, to probe the surface and subsurface of planetary bodies without the need to drill. We are thus working to bring the PING instrument to the point where it can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Venus, asteroids, comets and the satellites of the outer planets.

  11. Parametric Studies for 233U Gamma Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Scheffing, C.C.; Krichinsky, A.

    2004-01-01

    Quantification of special nuclear material is a necessary aspect to assuring material accountability and is often accomplished using non-destructive gamma spectrometry. For 233U, gamma rays are affected by matrix and packaging attenuation and by a strong Compton continuum from decay products of 232U (inherently found in 233U) that obscure 233U gamma photopeaks. This project, based on current work at the national repository for separated 233U located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), explores the effects of various parameters on the quantification of 233U– including material form and geometry. Using an attenuation correction methodology for calculating the mass of 233U from NDA analysis, a bias of almost 75% less than the actual 233U mass was identified. The source of the bias needs to be understood at a more fundamental level for further use of this quantification method. Therefore, controlled experiments using well characterized packages of 233U were conducted at the repository and are presented in this paper.

  12. Novel Equipment for In Situ Alpha Spectrometry with Good Energy Resolution.

    PubMed

    Pöllänen, Roy; Turunen, Jani; Karhunen, Tero; Peräjärvi, Kari; Siiskonen, Teemu; Wirta, Markus; Turunen, Asko

    2015-12-01

    An approach for in situ alpha spectrometry that allows one to measure the spectra with good energy resolution at ambient air pressure has been developed recently. Here, novel equipment is introduced for in situ measurements. Neither vacuum pumps nor radiochemical sample processing are necessary. Flat and smooth surfaces are ideal sources provided that the radionuclide contamination represents a thin layer on the surface. Other sources, such as air filters or evaporation residues, are also possible. Alpha particle collimation is used to obtain good energy resolution, but the equipment can also be used without collimation. An estimation of the detection efficiency with and without collimation is given using an extended area source containing 241Am. PMID:26509627

  13. In situ laser ablation sampling for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. R.; Horlick, Gary

    1995-06-01

    In this report an in situ laser ablation system for inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) is described that eliminates the aerosol transport step associated with conventional laser ablation sample introduction systems. The concept of this system is to place the sample inside the ICP torch immediately below the plasma discharge. This can be accomplished using a direct sample insertion system. The laser is then focused on the sample by a lens placed above the plasma and ablated material is directly injected into the plasma. For ablation with a Q-switched Nd-YAG laser (single pulse) this results in an emission signal that has a duration of about 0.7 ms, in contrast to a conventional ablation system where signal durations are measured in seconds. This translates to a dramatic improvement in sensitivity for the in situ system over a conventional system. Measurement considerations are discussed, results are presented for the analysis of Al and steel samples, and the in situ system is briefly compared with a conventional laser ablation system.

  14. Study of environmental radioactivity in Palestine by in situ gamma-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lahham, Adnan; Al-Masri, Hussein; Judeh, Adnan

    2009-07-01

    This work presents qualitative and quantitative evaluation of environmental radioactivity in the central and southern areas of the West Bank, Palestine. For this purpose, the technology of in situ gamma-ray spectroscopy is used with a scintillation of 7.6 x 7.6 cm NaI(Tl) crystal connected to multichannel analyzer InSpector 2000 from Canberra instruments and laptop computer. Gamma-ray spectra were collected using the detector placed 1 m above the ground surface. Calibration of the detection system for in situ measurements of gamma-emitting radionuclides in open terrain is performed theoretically using Monte Carlo techniques. Measurements are conducted in 18 locations in 3 regions across the West Bank. The vast majority of identified radionuclides are naturally occurring gamma-emitting sources (the decay products of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K). The only identified anthropogenic radionuclide is (137)Cs. Activity concentrations of (40)K, (238)U, (232)Th as well as the total outdoor gamma dose rate from these radionuclides were determined from the gamma-ray spectra. The highest activity concentrations of the three primordial radionuclides were 203 Bq kg(-1) for (40)K, 32 Bq kg(-1) for (238)U and 30 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th. The total outdoor gamma dose rate calculated for the whole study area at 1 m above ground ranged from 6 to 30 nGy h(-1) with a mean of 18 +/- 7 nGy h(-1), which represents about 30% of the world average value. PMID:19470444

  15. Application of PERALS™ alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry for analysis and investigation of environmental spills at ISL uranium mining projects.

    PubMed

    Borysenko, A; Ostrowski, A; Bellifemine, D; Palmer, G; Haigh, P; Johnston, A

    2014-03-01

    Radiation protection and environmental monitoring in mining requires effective and reliable radionuclide analysis at all stages of the mine project-prior to mining, during operation and through to remediation and decommissioning. The approach presented in this paper was specially developed for the monitoring of radioactive waste resulting from spills during mining and mineral processing operations and uses a combination of high resolution gamma spectrometry, and PERALS™ alpha spectrometry to identify and reliably quantify the activity of the major members of the U-238 decay chain at activities down to 10 mBq g(-1) by direct radionuclide counting and by assessment of the activity of their decay products. This approach has reduced sample preparation and analysis time while providing effective analysis and quantification of naturally occurring radionuclides in environmental samples. It has been successfully applied to several in situ leach (ISL) mining-related projects involving investigations of process material spill impacts and also to routine environmental monitoring. PMID:24270399

  16. In situ mass analysis of particles by surface ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lassiter, W. S.; Moen, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    A qualitative study of the application of surface ionization and mass spectrometry to the in situ detection and constituent analysis of atmospheric particles was conducted. The technique consists of mass analysis of ions formed as a result of impingement of a stream of particles on a hot filament where, it is presumed, surface ionization takes place. Laboratory air particles containing K, Ca, and possibly hydrocarbons were detected. Other known particles such as Al2O3, Pb(NO3)2, and Cr2O3 were analyzed by detecting the respective metal atoms making up the particles. In some cases, mass numbers indicative of compounds making up the particles were detected showing surface ionization of particles sometimes leads to chemical analysis as well as to elemental analysis. Individual particles were detected, and it was shown that the technique is sensitive to Al2O3 particles with a mass of a few nanograms.

  17. Laser Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry for Future In Situ Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Getty, S. A.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Cornish, T.; Ecelberger, S. A.; Li, X.; Floyd, M. A. Merrill; Chanover, N.; Uckert, K.; Voelz, D.; Xiao, X.; Tawalbeh, R.; Glenar, D.; Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LD-TOF-MS) is a versatile, low-complexity instrument class that holds significant promise for future landed in situ planetary missions that emphasize compositional analysis of surface materials. Here we describe a 5kg-class instrument that is capable of detecting and analyzing a variety of analytes directly from rock or ice samples. Through laboratory studies of a suite of representative samples, we show that detection and analysis of key mineral composition, small organics, and particularly, higher molecular weight organics are well suited to this instrument design. A mass range exceeding 100,000 Da has recently been demonstrated. We describe recent efforts in instrument prototype development and future directions that will enhance our analytical capabilities targeting organic mixtures on primitive and icy bodies. We present results on a series of standards, simulated mixtures, and meteoritic samples.

  18. Laser-induced shock wave plasma spectrometry using a small chamber designed for in situ analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurniawan, Hendrik; Jie Lie, Tjung; Kagawa, Kiichiro; On Tjia, May

    2000-07-01

    Direct spectrochemical analyses on large bulk samples such as metal plates have been performed by using a small vacuum chamber, which was attached directly to the sample surface through an o-ring. This technique allowed the in situ generation of laser plasma and hence overcome to a good extent the inconvenient and sometime clumsy sample preparation procedure required in Laser-Induced Shock Wave Plasma Spectrometry. Additionally, the presence of the o-ring near the target surface effectively shielded off the surrounding area from the undesirable continuum emission from the primary plasma, and thereby enhanced the detection sensitivity of this technique. Using zinc plate and Pb glass as samples, it was further demonstrated in this experiment that even the time-integrated spectra, obtained by employing an OMA system, still exhibited a lower background than those obtained by ordinary time-resolved Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy.

  19. Direct analysis of reference biofluids by coupled in situ electrodeposition-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matousek, Jaroslav P.; Powell, Kipton J.

    1999-12-01

    The application of coupled in situ electrodeposition-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ED-ETAAS) to the determination of Pb in biological standard reference materials is described. In situ electrodeposition at a cell voltage of 3.0 V from 25-μl samples onto electrodeposited Pd is used to quantitatively separate the analyte from blood and urine matrices. With subsequent withdrawal of spent electrolyte, this overcomes the atomisation problems inherent with high salt and organic contents. ED-ETAAS is applied with minimal sample pre-treatment (acidification). The electrolysis process aids decomposition of the organic matrix, and the release of trace elements. Evolution of H 2 at the cathode counters fouling of the Pd modifier surface. The palladium deposit is renewed in situ for each determination. For AMI certified lyophilised blood, diluted 1+3 with 0.1 M HCl (18.1 μg/l Pb), the R.S.D. was 3.0% (peak height; n=5) and the detection limit (3 σ blank; n=5) was 1.5 μg/l. Results for certified blood samples were AMI 72.3±4.3 μg/l (certified 76.2±7.6 μg/l) and Seronorm 34.2±2.0 μg/l (36±4 μg/l). The result for NIST SRM 2670 normal urine acidified to 1% HNO 3 was 8.1±0.6 μg/l (recommended value 10 μg/l).

  20. MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging for Visualizing In Situ Metabolism of Endogenous Metabolites and Dietary Phytochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Yoshinori; Miura, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the spatial distribution of bioactive small molecules is indispensable for elucidating their biological or pharmaceutical roles. Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) enables determination of the distribution of ionizable molecules present in tissue sections of whole-body or single heterogeneous organ samples by direct ionization and detection. This emerging technique is now widely used for in situ label-free molecular imaging of endogenous or exogenous small molecules. MSI allows the simultaneous visualization of many types of molecules including a parent molecule and its metabolites. Thus, MSI has received much attention as a potential tool for pathological analysis, understanding pharmaceutical mechanisms, and biomarker discovery. On the other hand, several issues regarding the technical limitations of MSI are as of yet still unresolved. In this review, we describe the capabilities of the latest matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-MSI technology for visualizing in situ metabolism of endogenous metabolites or dietary phytochemicals (food factors), and also discuss the technical problems and new challenges, including MALDI matrix selection and metabolite identification, that need to be addressed for effective and widespread application of MSI in the diverse fields of biological, biomedical, and nutraceutical (food functionality) research. PMID:24957029

  1. In situ capture gamma-ray analysis of coal in an oversize borehole

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mikesell, J.L.; Dotson, D.W.; Senftle, F.E.; Zych, R.S.; Koger, J.; Goldman, L.

    1983-01-01

    In situ capture gamma-ray analysis in a coal seam using a high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer in a close-fitting borehole has been reported previously. In order to check the accuracy of the method under adverse conditions, similar measurements were made by means of a small-diameter sonde in an oversize borehole in the Pittsburgh seam, Greene County, Pennsylvania. The hole was 5 times the diameter of the sonde, a ratio that substantially increased the contribution of water (hydrogen) to the total spectral count and reduced the size of the sample measured by the detector. The total natural count, the 40K,count, and the intensities of capture gamma rays from Si, Ca, H, and Al were determined as a function of depth above, through, and below the coal seam. From these logs, the depth and width of the coal seam and its partings were determined. Spectra were accumulated in the seam for 1 h periods by using neutron sources of different strengths. From the spectra obtained by means of several 252Cf neutron sources of different sizes, the ultimate elemental analysis and ash content were determined. The results were not as good as those obtained previously in a close-fitting borehole. However, the results did improve with successively larger source-to-detector distances, i.e.,as the count contribution due to hydrogen in the water decreased. It was concluded that in situ borehole analyses should be made in relatively close-fitting boreholes. ?? 1983.

  2. In situ capture gamma-ray analysis of coal in an oversize borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikesell, Jon L.; Dotson, Danny W.; Senftle, Frank E.; Zych, Richard S.; Koger, Joseph; Goldman, Leonard

    1983-10-01

    In situ capture gamma-ray analysis in a coal seam using a high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer in a close-fitting borehole has been reported previously. In order to check the accuracy of the method under adverse conditions, similar measurements were made by means of a small-diameter sonde in an oversize borehole in the Pittsburgh seam, Greene County, Pennsylvania. The hole was 5 times the diameter of the sonde, a ratio that substantially increased the contribution of water (hydrogen) to the total spectral count and reduced the size of the sample measured by the detector. The total natural count, the 40K,count, and the intensities of capture gamma rays from Si, Ca, H, and Al were determined as a function of depth above, through, and below the coal seam. From these logs, the depth and width of the coal seam and its partings were determined. Spectra were accumulated in the seam for 1 h periods by using neutron sources of different strengths. From the spectra obtained by means of several 252Cf neutron sources of different sizes, the ultimate elemental analysis and ash content were determined. The results were not as good as those obtained previously in a close-fitting borehole. However, the results did improve with successively larger source-to-detector distances, i.e.,as the count contribution due to hydrogen in the water decreased. It was concluded that in situ borehole analyses should be made in relatively close-fitting boreholes.

  3. EML Gamma Spectrometry Data Evaluation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, Karin M.

    1998-02-28

    This report represents the results of the analyses for the second EML Gamma Spectrometry Data Evaluation Program (August 1997). A calibration spectrum, a background spectrum and three sample spectra were included for each software format as part of the evaluation. The calibration spectrum contained nuclides covering the range from 59.5 keV to 1836 keV. The participants were told fallout and fission product nuclides as well as naturally occurring nuclides could be present. The samples were designed to test the detection and quantification of very low levels of nuclides and the ability of the software and user to properly resolve multiplets. The participants were asked to report values and uncertainties as Becquerel per sample with no decay correction. Twenty-nine sets of results were reported from a total of 70 laboratories who received the spectra. The percentage of the results within 1 F of the expected value was 76, 67, and 55 for samples 1, 2, and 3, respectively. From all three samples, 12% of the results were more than 3 F from the expected value. Sixty-two nuclides out of a total of 580 expected results were not reported for the three samples. Sixty percent of these false negatives were due to nuclides which were present at the minimum detectable activity level. There were 53 false positives reported with 60% of the responses due to problems with background subtraction. The results indicate that the Program is beneficial to the participating laboratories in that it provides them with analysis problems that are difficult to create with spiked samples due to the unavailability of many nuclides and the short half-lives of others. EML will continue its annual distribution, the third is to be held in March 1999.

  4. Monitoring Genetic and Metabolic Potential for in situ Bioremediation: Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, Michelle V.

    2000-12-31

    A number of DOE sites are contaminated with mixtures of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) such as carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, perchloroethylene, and trichloroethylene. At many of these sites, in situ microbial bioremediation is an attractive strategy for cleanup, since it has the potential to degrade DNAPLs in situ without the need for pump-and-treat or soil removal procedures, and without producing toxic byproducts. A rapid screening method to determine broad range metabolic and genetic potential for contaminant degradation would greatly reduce the cost and time involved in assessment for in situ bioremediation, as well as for monitoring ongoing bioremediation treatment. The objective of this project was the development of mass-spectrometry-based methods to screen for genetic potential for both assessment and monitoring of in situ bioremediation of DNAPLs. These methods were designed to provide more robust and routine methods for DNA based characterization of th e genetic potential of subsurface microbes for degrading pollutants. Specifically, we sought to (1) Develop gene probes that yield information equivalent to conventional probes, but in a smaller size that is more amenable to mass spectrometric detection, (2) Pursue improvements to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) methodology in order to allow its more general application to gene probe detection, (3) Increase the throughput of microbial characterization by integrating gene probe preparation, purification, and MALDI-MS analysis. Effective decision-making regarding remediation strategies requires information on the contaminants present and the relevant hydrogeology. However, it also should include information on the relevant bacterial populations present and the biodegradative processes they carry out. For each site at which bioremediation is considered, it is necessary to determine whether sufficient intrinsic degradative capability is present to suggest intrinsic bioremediation as a viable option, or whether a strategy involving addition of specific nutrients is more likely to be successful. In addition, if the existing genetic potential does not include the desired processes, it may be necessary to add external organisms as well as nutrients, which would negatively impact cost and feasibility scenarios. Once a bioremediation strategy is decided upon and initiated, it is important to carry out monitoring of the bacteria and their activities. Real-time data of this type during the treatment process can allow ongoing evaluation to optimize biodegradation, reducing cost and avoiding possible toxic byproducts. Clearly, the development of novel bioremediation technologies and informed decision-making regarding bioremediation as a treatment option will require in-depth information on the bacteria present at each site and the processes they carry out. Currently such information is generated by labor- and time-intensive treatability tests in the laboratory, and these do not generally assess a broad range of metabolic processes. We undertook this project because a rapid screening method to evaluate genetic potential is an important development to reduce costs for implementing in situ bioremediation strategies at DOE sites. At the outset of this project, it was clear that the explosion of information in the DNA sequence database raised the possibility of developing diagnostic DNA signatures for key microbial processes, as a means for assessing genetic potential. The methods developed in our project would be able to take advantage of the growing information on sequences from environmental samples as well as from microbial genome sequencing projects. An increasing number of metabolic functions could be screened as the depth of information available for designing diagnostic sequences increased.

  5. Active neutron and gamma-ray instrumentation for in situ planetary science applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2011-10-01

    We describe the development of an instrument capable of detailed in situ bulk geochemical analysis of the surface of planets, moons, asteroids, and comets. This instrument technology uses a pulsed neutron generator to excite the solid materials of a planet and measures the resulting neutron and gamma-ray emission with its detector system. These time-resolved neutron and gamma-ray data provide detailed information about the bulk elemental composition, chemical context, and density distribution of the soil within 50 cm of the surface. While active neutron scattering and neutron-induced gamma-ray techniques have been used extensively for terrestrial nuclear well logging applications, our goal is to apply these techniques to surface instruments for use on any solid solar system body. As described, experiments at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center use a prototype neutron-induced gamma-ray instrument and the resulting data presented show the promise of this technique for becoming a versatile, robust, workhorse technology for planetary science, and exploration of any of the solid bodies in the solar system. The detection of neutrons at the surface also provides useful information about the material. This paper focuses on the data provided by the gamma-ray detector.

  6. Active Neutron and Gamma-Ray Instrumentation for In Situ Planetary Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, A.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the development of an instrument capable of detailed in situ bulk geochemical analysis of the surface of planets, moons, asteroids, and comets. This instrument technology uses a pulsed neutron generator to excite the solid materials of a planet and measures the resulting neutron and gamma-ray emission with its detector system. These time-resolved neutron and gamma-ray data provide detailed information about the bulk elemental composition, chemical context, and density distribution of the soil within 50 cm of the surface. While active neutron scattering and neutron-induced gamma-ray techniques have been used extensively for terrestrial nuclear well logging applications, our goal is to apply these techniques to surface instruments for use on any solid solar system body. As described, experiments at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center use a prototype neutron-induced gamma-ray instrument and the resulting data presented show the promise of this technique for becoming a versatile, robust, workhorse technology for planetary science, and exploration of any of the solid bodies in the solar system. The detection of neutrons at the surface also provides useful information about the material. This paper focuses on the data provided by the gamma-ray detector.

  7. The Probing In-Situ With Neutron and Gamma Rays (PING) Instrument for Planetary Composition Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.

    2012-01-01

    The Probing In situ with Neutrons and Gamma rays (PING) instrument (formerly named PNG-GRAND) [I] experiment is an innovative application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology successfully used in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth over many decades. The objective of our active neutron-gamma ray technology program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC) is to bring PING to the point where it can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Venus, asteroids, comets and the satellites of the outer planets and measure their bulk surface and subsurface elemental composition without the need to drill into the surface. Gamma-Ray Spectrometers (GRS) have been incorporated into numerous orbital planetary science missions. While orbital measurements can map a planet, they have low spatial and elemental sensitivity due to the low surface gamma ray emission rates reSUlting from using cosmic rays as an excitation source, PING overcomes this limitation in situ by incorporating a powerful neutron excitation source that permits significantly higher elemental sensitivity elemental composition measurements. PING combines a 14 MeV deuterium-tritium Pulsed Neutron Generator (PNG) with a gamma ray spectrometer and two neutron detectors to produce a landed instrument that can determine the elemental composition of a planet down to 30 - 50 cm below the planet's surface, The penetrating nature of .5 - 10 MeV gamma rays and 14 MeV neutrons allows such sub-surface composition measurements to be made without the need to drill into or otherwise disturb the planetary surface, thus greatly simplifying the lander design, We are cun'ently testing a PING prototype at a unique outdoor neutron instrumentation test facility at NASA/GSFC that provides two large (1.8 m x 1.8 m x ,9 m) granite and basalt test formations placed outdoors in an empty field, Since an independent trace elemental analysis has been performed on both these Columbia River basalt and Concord Gray granite materials, these large samples present two known standards with which to compare PING's experimentally measured elemental composition results, We will present both gamma ray and neutron experimental results from PING measurements of the granite and basalt test formations in various layering configurations and compare the results to the known composition.

  8. Analysis of G protein gamma subunit heterogeneity using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, M D; Schey, K L; Dingus, J; Mehta, N D; Tatum, B S; Halushka, M; Finch, J W; Hildebrandt, J D

    1994-04-29

    The diversity of the gamma subunits in bovine brain G protein preparations was investigated using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. Analysis of these G protein mixtures revealed at least four gamma subunit masses by the following four criteria. 1) The measured masses were in the same mass range as the predicted molecular weights of gamma isoforms. 2) The masses were reproducible between the same or different preparations of G proteins. 3) The masses were independent of the matrix used for MALDI analysis. 4) The masses comigrated with the gamma subunit, as part of the heterotrimer, the beta gamma dimer, or the separated gamma subunit. These measured masses were compared with those calculated from cDNA sequences of known bovine brain gamma isoforms with the addition of plausible post-translational modifications. The mass of each spectral peak was consistent with the calculated mass for only one of four known bovine brain gamma subunit isoforms, but the data suggest modifications of the gamma subunits in addition to those already known or suspected at their carboxyl termini. Besides these four major masses, several additional, less resolved spectral peaks were observed whose measured masses did not correlate with any known gamma subunit or plausible modification. MALDI mass spectrometry promises to be a powerful technique for the analysis of the diversity of the gamma subunit in G proteins and for the characterization of their post-translational modifications. PMID:8175659

  9. Time-resolved Neutron-gamma-ray Data Acquisition for in Situ Subsurface Planetary Geochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodnarik, Julie G.; Burger, Dan Michael; Burger, A.; Evans, L. G.; Parsons, A. M.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Starr R. D.; Stassun, K. G.

    2013-01-01

    The current gamma-ray/neutron instrumentation development effort at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center aims to extend the use of active pulsed neutron interrogation techniques to probe the subsurface elemental composition of planetary bodies in situ. Previous NASA planetary science missions, that used neutron and/or gamma-ray spectroscopy instruments, have relied on neutrons produced from galactic cosmic rays. One of the distinguishing features of this effort is the inclusion of a high intensity 14.1 MeV pulsed neutron generator synchronized with a custom data acquisition system to time each event relative to the pulse. With usually only one opportunity to collect data, it is difficult to set a priori time-gating windows to obtain the best possible results. Acquiring time-tagged, event-by-event data from nuclear induced reactions provides raw data sets containing channel/energy, and event time for each gamma ray or neutron detected. The resulting data set can be plotted as a function of time or energy using optimized analysis windows after the data are acquired. Time windows can now be chosen to produce energy spectra that yield the most statistically significant and accurate elemental composition results that can be derived from the complete data set. The advantages of post-processing gamma-ray time-tagged event-by-event data in experimental tests using our prototype instrument will be demonstrated.

  10. MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry for In Situ Proteomic Analysis of Preneoplastic Lesions in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grüner, Barbara M.; Hahne, Hannes; Mazur, Pawel K.; Trajkovic-Arsic, Marija; Maier, Stefan; Esposito, Irene; Kalideris, Evdokia; Michalski, Christoph W.; Kleeff, Jörg; Rauser, Sandra; Schmid, Roland M.; Küster, Bernhard; Walch, Axel; Siveke, Jens T.

    2012-01-01

    The identification of new biomarkers for preneoplastic pancreatic lesions (PanINs, IPMNs) and early pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is crucial due to the diseasés high mortality rate upon late detection. To address this task we used the novel technique of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) on genetically engineered mouse models (GEM) of pancreatic cancer. Various GEM were analyzed with MALDI IMS to investigate the peptide/protein-expression pattern of precursor lesions in comparison to normal pancreas and PDAC with cellular resolution. Statistical analysis revealed several discriminative m/z-species between normal and diseased tissue. Intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) could be distinguished from normal pancreatic tissue and PDAC by 26 significant m/z-species. Among these m/z-species, we identified Albumin and Thymosin-beta 4 by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), which were further validated by immunohistochemistry, western blot, quantitative RT-PCR and ELISA in both murine and human tissue. Thymosin-beta 4 was found significantly increased in sera of mice with PanIN lesions. Upregulated PanIN expression of Albumin was accompanied by increased expression of liver-restricted genes suggesting a hepatic transdifferentiation program of preneoplastic cells. In conclusion we show that GEM of endogenous PDAC are a suitable model system for MALDI-IMS and subsequent LC-MS/MS analysis, allowing in situ analysis of small precursor lesions and identification of differentially expressed peptides and proteins. PMID:22761793

  11. In situ Analysis of Organic Compounds on Mars using Chemical Derivatization and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Buch, A.; Cabane, M.; Coll, P.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2005-01-01

    One of the core science objectives of NASA's 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission is to determine the past or present habitability of Mars. The search for key organic compounds relevant to terrestrial life will be an important part of that assessment. We have developed a protocol for the analysis of amino acids and carboxylic acids in Mars analogue materials using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). As shown, a variety of carboxylic acids were readily identified in soil collected from the Atacama Desert in Chile at part-per-billion levels by GCMS after extraction and chemical derivatization using the reagent N,N-tert.-butyl (dimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). Several derivatized amino acids including glycine and alanine were also detected by GCMS in the Atacama soil at lower concentrations (chromatogram not shown). Lacking derivatization capability, the Viking pyrolysis GCMS instruments could not have detected amino acids and carboxylic acids, since these non-volatile compounds require chemical transformation into volatile species that are stable in a GC column. We are currently optimizing the chemical extraction and derivatization technique for in situ GCMS analysis on Mars. Laboratory results of analyses of Atacama Desert samples and other Mars analogue materials using this protocol will be presented.

  12. Membrane-Extraction Ion Mobility Spectrometry for In-Situ Detection of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Water

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yongzhai; Zhang, Wei; Whitten, William B; Li, Haiyang; Watson, David B; Xu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-extraction ion mobility spectrometry (ME-IMS) has been developed for in-situ sampling and analysis of trace chlorinated hydrocarbons in water in a single procedure. The sampling is configured so that aqueous contaminants permeate through a spiral hollow polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane and are carried away by a vapor flow through the membrane tube. The extracted analyte flows into an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) chamber and is analyzed in a home-made IMS analyzer. PDMS membrane is found to effectively extract chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents from liquid phase to vapor. The specialized IMS analyzer has been found to have resolutions of R=33 and 41, respectively, for negative- and positive-modes and is capable of detecting aqueous tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) as low as 80 g/L and 74 g/L in negative ion mode, respectively. The time-dependent characteristics of sampling and detection of TCE are both experimentally and theoretically studied for various concentrations, membrane lengths, and flow rates. These characteristics demonstrate that membrane-extraction IMS is feasible for the continuous monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water.

  13. Comet nucleus gamma-ray spectrometer penetrator - An in situ nucleus composition experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, B. L.; Mascy, A. C.; Edsinger, L. E.; Squyres, S. W.; Mckay, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    An engineering design study of a comet nucleus penetrator system for in situ determinations of comet composition is presented. The system is designed for participation in the Comet Rendezvous/Asteroid Flyby mission to comet Kopff in 1996. The instrumentation payload of the penetrator system will include a passive gamma-ray spectrometer; a high frequency response accelerometer for measurements of the impact deceleration profile of the system as it penetrates to the nucleus of the comet; and several thermocouples mounted along the length of the penetrator to measure temperature and temperature gradients. The mechanical, electrical and thermal interfaces between the penetrator and the Mariner Mark II spacecraft are described. A series of line drawings is provided which illustrates the proposed configuration of the system.

  14. In Situ Characterizing Membrane Lipid Phenotype of Human Lung Cancer Cell Lines Using Mass Spectrometry Profiling

    PubMed Central

    He, Manwen; Guo, Shuai; Ren, Junling; Li, Zhili

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal lipid metabolisms are closely associated with cancers. In this study, mass spectrometry was employed to in situ investigate the associations of membrane lipid phenotypes of six human lung cancer cell lines (i.e., A549, H1650, H1975 from adenocarcinoma, H157 and H1703 from squamous cell carcinomas, and H460 from a large cell carcinoma) with cancer cell types and finally total 230 lipids were detected. Based these 230 lipids, partial least-square discriminant analysis indicated that fifteen lipids (i.e., PE 18:0_18:1, PI 18:0_20:4, SM 42:2, PE 16:0_20:4, PE 36:2, PC 36:2, SM 34:1, PA 38:3,C18:0, C22:4, PA 34:2, C20:5, C20:2, C18:2, and CerP 36:2) with variable importance in the projection (VIP) value of > 1.0 could be used to differentiate six cancer cell lines with the Predicted Residual Sum of Square (PRESS) score of 0.1974. Positive correlation between polyunsaturated fatty acids (i.e., C20:4, C22:4, C22:5, and C22:6) and polyunsaturated phospholipids (PE 16:0_20:4, PE 38:4, and PI 18:0_20:4) was observed in lung adenocarcinoma cells, especially for H1975 cells. Three adenocarcinoma cell lines (i.e., A549, H1650, and H1975) could be differentiated from other lung cancer cell lines based on the expression of C18:1, C20:1, C20:2, C20:5, and C22:6. PMID:27162539

  15. In situ digestion for the determination of Ca in beverages by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Santos, Luana N; Gonzalez, Mrio H; Moura, Monise F; Donati, George L; Nbrega, Joaquim A

    2012-08-15

    Tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES) is employed for the determination of calcium in juice, mineral and coconut water samples. A sample aliquot of 20 ?L is placed directly on the coil and a constant-voltage power source is used to dry and atomize the sample, as well as to promote Ca atomic emission. Analytical signals are resolved and detected using a Czerny-Turner spectrometer and a charge coupled device detector. Some experimental parameters such as coil position related to the spectrometer entrance slit and integration time are critically evaluated. A heating program with relatively constant drying temperatures is used in all measurements. An in situ digestion procedure is used to partially decompose organic matrices and improve WCAES precision and accuracy. By adding an oxidizing mixture to the sample and including a digestion step in the heating cycle, no statistical difference was observed between WCAES and ICP OES results for Ca in juice and coconut water samples. Mineral water samples were simply diluted with 1% vv(-1) HNO(3) before analysis and no significant interference was observed for concomitants such as Na and K. Despite severe positive interference caused by Mg, good agreement was obtained between WCAES and ICP OES results for Ca in several mineral water samples. Limits of detection and quantification obtained were 0.02 and 0.07 mg L(-1), respectively. The method precision, calculated as the relative standard deviation for 10 consecutive measurements of a 2.5 mg L(-1) Ca solution, is 3.8%. PMID:22841081

  16. Determination of tellurium by hydride generation with in situ trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusiewicz, Henryk; Krawczyk, Magdalena

    2007-03-01

    The analytical performance of coupled hydride generation — integrated atom trap (HG-IAT) atomizer flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) system was evaluated for determination of Te in reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment), coal fly ash and garlic. Tellurium, using formation of H 2Te vapors, is atomized in air-acetylene flame-heated IAT. A new design HG-IAT-FAAS hyphenated technique that would exceed the operational capabilities of existing arrangements (a water-cooled single silica tube, double-slotted quartz tube or an "integrated trap") was investigated. An improvement in detection limit was achieved compared with using either of the above atom trapping techniques separately. The concentration detection limit, defined as 3 times the blank standard deviation (3 σ), was 0.9 ng mL - 1 for Te. For a 2 min in situ pre-concentration time (sample volume of 2 mL), sensitivity enhancement compared to flame AAS, was 222 fold, using the hydride generation — atom trapping technique. The sensitivity can be further improved by increasing the collection time. The precision, expressed as RSD, was 7.0% ( n = 6) for Te. The designs studied include slotted tube, single silica tube and integrated atom trap-cooled atom traps. The accuracy of the method was verified using a certified reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment) by aqueous standard calibration curves. The measured Te contents of the reference material was in agreement with the information value. The method was successfully applied to the determination of tellurium in coal fly ash and garlic.

  17. Medium-resolution Autonomous in situ Gamma Detection System for Marine and Coastal Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Davidson, Joseph D.; Douglas, Matthew; Meier, David E.; Mullen, O Dennis; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Jones, Mark E.; Woodring, Mitchell L.; Johnson, Bryce; Santschi, Peter H.

    2009-12-01

    We are developing a medium-resolution autonomous in situ gamma detection system for marine and coastal waters. The system is designed to extract and preconcentrate isotopes of interest from natural waters prior to detection in order to eliminate signal attenuation of the gamma rays traveling through water and lower the overall background due to the presence of naturally occurring radioactive isotopes (40K and U/Th series radionuclides). Filtration is used to preconcentrate target isotopes residing on suspended particles, while chemosorption is employed to preferentially extract truly dissolved components from the water column. A variety of commercial and in-house nano-porus chemosorbents have been selected, procured or produced, and tested. Used filter and chemosorbent media are counted autonomously using two LaBr3 detectors in a near 4-pi configuration around the samples. A compact digital pulse processing system developed in-house and capable of running in coincidence mode is used to process the signal from the detectors to a small on-board computer. The entire system is extremely compact (9” dia. x 30” len.) and platform independent, but designed for initial deployment on a research buoy.

  18. New shield for gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brar, S. S.; Gustafson, P. F.; Nelson, D. M.

    1969-01-01

    Gamma-ray shield that can be evacuated, refilled with a clean gas, and pressurized for exclusion of airborne radioactive contaminants effectively lowers background noise. Under working conditions, repeated evacuation and filling procedures have not adversely affected the sensitivity and resolution of the crystal detector.

  19. In situ determination of radon concentration and total gamma radiation in Kastel Gomilica, Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovrencic, Ivanka; Barisic, Delko; Orescanin, Visnja; Lulic, Stipe

    2007-10-01

    To determine current radiation background of the environment at the "Giricic" location in Kastel Gomilica, Croatia, in situ measurement of radon concentration (222Rn and 220Rn) in an open atmosphere on a ground level and at the height of 1.5 m has been made as well as total gamma radiation at the height of 1 m in an energy range of 15 keV to 2 MeV. The researched location was divided in three specific parts: (i) regulated area with the bottom ash and flying ash in the basis ("old" depot), (ii) unregulated area with waste materials, including bottom ash and flying ash, in the basis ("new" depot), (iii) uncontaminated area with no waste materials deposited on. Average radon concentration on a ground level was 213 Bq/m3 for the "old" depot, 214 Bq/m3 for the "new" depot and 59 Bq/m3 for the uncontaminated area and at the height of 1.5 m 20 Bq/m3 for the "old" depot, 34 Bq/m3 for the "new" depot and 26 Bq/m3 for the uncontaminated area. Average total gamma radiation values in selected energy range were 109.92 cps (counts per second) for the "old" depot, 357.76 cps for the "new" depot and 65.97 cps for the uncontaminated area. For selected radionuclides (214Pb, 137Cs, 228Ac, 234mPa, 40K and 214Bi) average gamma radiation values at characteristic energies have been determined as well.

  20. Detection of soil microorganism in situ by combined gas chromatography mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, M.; Duxbury, J. M.; Francis, A. J.; Adamson, J.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental tests were made to determine whether analysis of volatile metabolic products, formed in situ, is a viable procedure for an extraterrestrial life detection system. Laboratory experiments, carried out under anaerobic conditions with addition of carbon source, extended to include a variety of soils and additional substrates. In situ experiments were conducted without amendment using a vacuum sampling system.

  1. In situ calibration of a high-resolution gamma-ray borehole sonde for assaying uranium-bearing sandstone deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, J.H., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A method is presented for assaying radioactive sandstone deposits in situ by using a high-resolution borehole gamma-ray spectrometer. Gamma-ray photopeaks from the same spectrum acquired to analyze a sample are used to characterize gamma-ray attenuation properties, from which a calibration function is determined. Assay results are independent of differences between properties of field samples and those of laboratory or test-hole standards generally used to calibrate a borehole sonde. This assaying technique is also independent of the state of radioactive disequilibrium that usually exists in nature among members of the natural-decay chains. ?? 1985.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of in situ LaBr gamma-ray spectrometer for marine environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Su, Genghua; Zeng, Zhi; Cheng, Jianping

    2011-07-01

    Monte Carlo simulation of energy-response functions of gamma rays from natural/artificial radionuclides in seawater and simulation of energy spectrum due to self-activity in LaBr crystal were carried out using MCNPX codes and MATLAB programs for the in situ LaBr gamma-ray spectrometer immersed in homogeneous seawater. The effective detection distance, the detection efficiency and the minimum detectable activity concentration (MDAC) for artificial radionuclides (137)Cs were worked out as an instance. Similar researches for NaI detector was also implemented for comparison. The results indicate that the self-activity in LaBr deteriorates the MDAC to merely several times of that of NaI detector. The LaBr detector is possible to be used as in situ gamma-ray spectrometer for monitoring of artificial radionuclides in seawater. PMID:21613267

  3. Rapid in situ identification of bioactive compounds in plants by in vivo nanospray high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Peng, Yue'e; Dan, Conghui; Shuai, Qin; Hu, Shenghong

    2015-03-25

    A method for the rapid in situ identification of bioactive compounds in fresh plants has been developed using in vivo nanospray coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS). Using a homemade in vivo nanospray ion source, the plant liquid was drawn out from a target region and ionized in situ. The ionized bioactive compounds were then identified using Q-Orbitrap HR-MS. The accurate mass measurements of these bioactive compounds were performed by full-scan or selected ion monitoring (SIM), and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used in the structural elucidation. Without sample pretreatment, 12 bioactive compounds in 7 different plant species were identified, namely, isoalliin in onion; butylphthalide in celery; N-methylpelletierine, pelletierine, and pseudopelletierine in pomegranate; chlorogenic acid in crabapple; solamargine, solasonine, and solasodine in nightshade; aloin and aloe-emodin in aloe; and menthone in mint. This work demonstrates that in vivo nanospray HR-MS is a good method for rapid in situ identification of bioactive compounds in plants. PMID:25749134

  4. Gamma-ray spectrometry of LDEF samples

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    A total of 31 samples from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), including materials of aluminum, vanadium, and steel trunnions were analyzed by ultra-low-level gamma spectroscopy. The study quantified particle induced activations of (sup 22)Na, {sup 46}Sc, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 56}Co, {sup 57}Co, {sup 58}Co, and {sup 60}Co. The samples of trunnion sections exhibited increasing activity toward the outer end of the trunnion and decreasing activity toward its radial center. The trunnion sections did not include end pieces, which have been reported to collect noticeable {sup 7}Be on their leading surfaces. No significant {sup 7}Be was detected in the samples analyzed. The Underground Counting Facility at Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) was used in this work. The facility is 50 ft. underground, constructed with low-background shielding materials, and operated as a clean room. The most sensitive analyses were performed with a 90%-efficient HPGe gamma-ray detector, which is enclosed in a purged active/passive shield. Each sample was counted for one to six days in two orientations to yield more representative average activities for the sample. The non-standard geometries of the LDEF samples prompted the development of a novel calibration method, whereby the efficiency about the samples surfaces (measured with point sources) predicted the efficiency for the bulk sample.

  5. Gamma-ray spectrometry of LDEF samples

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1991-12-31

    A total of 31 samples from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), including materials of aluminum, vanadium, and steel trunnions were analyzed by ultra-low-level gamma spectroscopy. The study quantified particle induced activations of (sup 22)Na, {sup 46}Sc, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 56}Co, {sup 57}Co, {sup 58}Co, and {sup 60}Co. The samples of trunnion sections exhibited increasing activity toward the outer end of the trunnion and decreasing activity toward its radial center. The trunnion sections did not include end pieces, which have been reported to collect noticeable {sup 7}Be on their leading surfaces. No significant {sup 7}Be was detected in the samples analyzed. The Underground Counting Facility at Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) was used in this work. The facility is 50 ft. underground, constructed with low-background shielding materials, and operated as a clean room. The most sensitive analyses were performed with a 90%-efficient HPGe gamma-ray detector, which is enclosed in a purged active/passive shield. Each sample was counted for one to six days in two orientations to yield more representative average activities for the sample. The non-standard geometries of the LDEF samples prompted the development of a novel calibration method, whereby the efficiency about the samples surfaces (measured with point sources) predicted the efficiency for the bulk sample.

  6. Proficiency test of gamma spectrometry laboratories in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Pantelić, G; Vuletić, V; Mitrović, R

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the statistical evaluation of results from the analysis of 8 radionuclides in water samples within the frame of the First Proficiency Test of gamma spectrometry Laboratories in Serbia organized in 2008. The water samples used in this proficiency test were prepared using certified radioactive solution containing gamma emitting radionuclides. This solution was diluted and used as a master solution for preparation of test samples. The overall performance evaluation showed that 64.7% of all reported results met the individual proficiency test criteria, where 26.5% of all reported results did not pass the overall PT acceptance criterion. PMID:19945291

  7. A numerical method for the calibration of in situ gamma ray spectroscopy systems.

    PubMed

    Dewey, S C; Whetstone, Z D; Kearfott, K J

    2010-05-01

    High purity germanium in situ gamma ray spectroscopy systems are typically calibrated using pre-calculated tables and empirical formulas to estimate the response of a detector to an exponentially distributed source in a soil matrix. Although this method is effective, it has estimated uncertainties of 10-15%, is limited to only a restricted set of measurement scenarios, and the approach only applies to an exponentially distributed source. In addition, the only soil parameters that can be varied are density and moisture content, while soil attenuation properties are fixed. This paper presents a more flexible method for performing such calibrations. For this new method, a three- or four-dimensional analytical expression is derived that is a combination of a theoretical equation and experimentally measured data. Numerical methods are used to integrate this expression, which approximates the response of a detector to a large variety of source distributions within any soil, concrete, or other matrix. The calculation method is flexible enough to allow for the variation of multiple parameters, including media attenuation properties and the measurement geometry. The method could easily be adapted to horizontally non-uniform sources as well. Detector responses are calculated analytically and Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations are used to verify the results. Results indicate that the method adds an uncertainty of only approximately 5% to the other uncertainties typically associated with the calibration of a detector system. PMID:20386196

  8. Rapid, in situ detection of cocaine residues based on paper spray ionization coupled with ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Zhang, Jingjing; Jiang, Jie; Zhang, Jing; Gao, Jing; Qiao, Xiaolin

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, a novel approach based on paper spray ionization coupled with ion mobility spectrometry (PSI-IMS) was developed for rapid, in situ detection of cocaine residues in liquid samples and on various surfaces (e.g. glass, marble, skin, wood, fingernails), without tedious sample pretreatment. The obvious advantages of PSI are its low cost, easy operation and simple configuration without using nebulizing gas or discharge gas. Compared with mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) takes advantage of its low cost, easy operation, and simple configuration without requiring a vacuum system. Therefore, IMS is a more congruous detection method for PSI in the case of rapid, in situ analysis. For the analysis of cocaine residues in liquid samples, dynamic responses from 5 μg mL(-1) to 200 μg mL(-1) with a linear coefficient (R(2)) of 0.992 were obtained. In this case, the limit of detection (LOD) was calculated to be 2 μg mL(-1) as signal to noise (S/N) was 3 with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 6.5% for 11 measurements (n = 11). Cocaine residues on various surfaces such as metal, glass, marble, wood, skin, and fingernails were also directly analyzed before wiping the surfaces with a piece of paper. The LOD was calculated to be as low as 5 ng (S/N = 3, RSD = 6.3%, n = 11). This demonstrates the capability of the PSI-IMS method for direct detection of cocaine residues at scenes of cocaine administration. Our results show that PSI-IMS is a simple, sensitive, rapid and economical method for in situ detection of this illicit drug, which could help governments to combat drug abuse. PMID:24563903

  9. Determination of environmental radiation flux and organ doses using in-situ gamma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ghamdi, Abdulrahman S.

    Contamination of buildings represent a unique problem during Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. It is necessary to determine the long-lived radionuclides and their respective specific activities in building materials before the right D&D decision can be made. At the same time, radiation risk of workers or potential occupants in the facility must be assessed as part of the D&D process. The goal of this project was to develop a methodology of obtaining gamma radiation flux and organ doses from in-situ gamma spectroscopy. Algorithms were developed to simulate the response functions of the HPGe detector and to convert the spectra into photon fluences. A Monte Carlo code, MCNP4C, was used to simulate HPGe detector response and to develop the conversion algorithm. The simulated spectra obtained for an HPGe detector were converted to flux using the algorithm for various different geometries. The response functions of the detector are presented in this document for the gamma energies from 60 keV to 2.2 MeV. Published fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients were used to calculate organ doses and effective dose equivalent. We then tested the theory at a 100-MeV linear electron accelerator at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Samples of the activated concrete walls and floor in the target room of the Linac facility as well as some steel samples were taken to quantify the specific activities of the structures. The results show that the most important long-lived radionuclides include 22 Na, 46Sc, 54 Mn, 57Co, 60 Co, 65Zn, 152 Eu and 154Eu, depending on the location and composition of the material. The specific activities at the Linac facility range from 1.15E-01 to 765.31 muCi/Kg. The annual effective dose equivalent was assessed to be 2.44 mSv y-1 (0.244 rem y-1 ), which is about 5% of the Annual EDE limits to workers.

  10. REAL-TIME IN-SITU MEASUREMENT OF MATERIAL ELASTIC PROPERTIES IN A HIGH GAMMA IRRADIATION ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Telschow; Rob Schley; Dave Cottle

    2006-05-01

    The first measurements of elastic vibrations of an object in-situ to a high gamma irradiation field using a laser coupled resonant ultrasound method are described. A vibration mode of an Inconel hollow capped cylinder was measured throughout a period of 170 hours as the gamma radiation field was increased to 104 Gray/hour. The vibration mode frequency was observed to change in a manner consistent with the temperature dependence of the elastic stiffness coefficients of the material. These results illustrate the efficacy of the laser approach for real-time resonant ultrasound measurements in this severely hostile nuclear environment.

  11. Investigating the Origin and Evolution of Venus with In Situ Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainer, M. G.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Johnson, N. M.; Glaze, L. S.

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of noble gas abundances on Venus remain a high priority for planetary science. These studies are only possible through in situ measurement, and can be accomplished by a modern neutral mass spectrometer (NMS) such as that developed at NASA Goddard, based on flight-proven technology. Here we show how the measurement of noble gases can be secured using demonstrated enrichment techniques.

  12. Slow elimination of phosphorylated histone {gamma}-H2AX from DNA of terminally differentiated mouse heart cells in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilov, Boris; Vezhenkova, Irina; Firsanov, Denis; Solovjeva, Liudmila; Svetlova, Maria; Mikhailov, Vyacheslav; Tomilin, Nikolai . E-mail: nvtom@hotmail.com

    2006-09-08

    Phosphorylation of replacement histone H2AX occurs in megabase chromatin domains around double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) and this modification (called {gamma}-H2AX) may serve as a useful marker of genome damage and repair in terminally differentiated cells. Here using immunohistochemistry we studied kinetics of {gamma}-H2AX formation and elimination in the X-irradiated mouse heart and renal epithelial tissues in situ. Unirradiated tissues have 3-5% {gamma}-H2AX-positive cells and in tissues fixed 1 h after X-irradiation {gamma}-H2AX-positive nuclei are induced in a dose-dependent manner approaching 20-30% after 3 Gy of IR. Analysis of mouse tissues at different times after 3 Gy of IR showed that maximal induction of {gamma}-H2AX in heart is observed 20 min after IR and then is decreased slowly with about half remaining 23 h later. In renal epithelium maximum of the {gamma}-H2AX-positive cells is observed 40 min after IR and then decreases to control values in 23 h. This indicates that there are significant variations between non-proliferating mammalian tissues in the initial H2AX phosphorylation rate as well as in the rate of {gamma}-H2AX elimination after X-irradiation, which should be taken into account in the analysis of radiation responses.

  13. Investigating the Origin and Evolution of Venus with In Situ Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainer, M. G.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Johnson, N. M.; Glaze, L. S.

    2015-10-01

    Measurement of noble gas abundances on Venus remain a high priority for planetary science [1,2]. These studies are only possible through in situ measurement, and can be accomplished by a modern neutral mass spectrometer (NMS) such as that developed at NASA Goddard, based on flight-proven technology. Here we show how the measurement of noble gases can be secured using demonstrated enrichment techniques.

  14. Touch Spray Mass Spectrometry for In Situ Analysis of Complex Samples

    PubMed Central

    Kerian, Kevin S.; Jarmusch, Alan K.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2014-01-01

    Touch spray, a spray-based ambient in-situ ionization method, uses a small probe, e.g. a teasing needle to pick up sample and the application of voltage and solvent to cause field-induced droplet emission. Compounds extracted from the microsample are incorporated into the sprayed micro droplets. Performance tests include disease state of tissue, microorganism identification, and therapeutic drug quantitation. Chemical derivatization is performed simultaneously with ionization. PMID:24756256

  15. Dating the age of a nuclear event by gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nir-El, Y

    2004-01-01

    The age of a nuclear event can be determined by measuring the activity of two fission products. The event studied was a short irradiation, of a small sample of uranium, in a nuclear reactor. Two types of a clock were investigated: non-isobaric and isobaric parent-daughter fission products. Measurements of the source by gamma spectrometry yielded very good agreement between true and measured ages. The accuracy of each clock and the upper and lower age limits of applicability were studied. PMID:14987642

  16. Gamma ray spectrometry of LDEF samples at SRL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winn, Willard G.

    1992-01-01

    A total of 31 samples from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), including materials of aluminum, vanadium, and steel trunnions were analyzed by ultra-low-level gamma spectrometry. The study quantified particle induced activations of Na-22, Sc-46, Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, Co-58, and Co-60. The samples of trunnion sections exhibited increasing activity toward the outer end of the trunnion and decreasing activity toward its radial center. The trunnion sections did not include end pieces, which were reported to collect noticeable Be-7 on their leading surfaces. No significant Be-7 was detected in the samples analyzed.

  17. Analysis of size-fractionated soil samples by gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Savva, M I; Karangelos, D J; Anagnostakis, M J; Simopoulos, S E

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of particle size on radionuclides in soil, particularly in relation to depth. A set of soil samples at the 0-10cm and 10-20cm depth layers were collected, separated into size fractions using a sieving machine and analyzed by gamma spectrometry to determine (238)U, (226)Ra, (210)Pb, and (137)Cs. Significant variations between different size fractions and depth layers were observed. A 0-20cm depth profile was also investigated. PMID:26671791

  18. Gamma ray spectrometry of LDEF samples at SRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winn, Willard G.

    1991-01-01

    A total of 31 samples from Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), including materials of Al, V, and steel trunnions were analyzed by ultralow level gamma spectrometry. The study quantified particle induced activations of Na-22, Sc-46, Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, Co-58, and Co-60. The samples of trunnion sections exhibited increasing activity toward the outer end of the trunnion and decreasing activity toward its radial center. The trunnion sections did not include an end piece that collects noticeable Be-7 on its leading surface. No significant Be-7 was detected in the samples analyzed. The most sensitive analyses were performed with a 90 pct. efficient HPGe gamma ray detector, which is enclosed in a purged active/passive active shield.

  19. Physiologically active hydrogel (in situ gel) of sparfloxacin and its evaluation for ocular retention using gamma scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Himanshu; Malik, Aqil; Khar, R. K.; Ali, Asgar; Bhatnagar, Aseem; Mittal, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Due to the structure and physiological barrier of eye, only 1% of instilled dose is available for action on the corneal surface. In this work, we developed and evaluated chitosan (pH sensitive) and gellan gum (ion sensitive) in situ gel of sparfloxacin to improve precorneal residence time. Materials and Methods: A protocol for radiolabeling of sparfloxacin with Tc-99m was optimized to study the ocular retention using gamma scintigraphy technique. Results: The clear formulation was developed. In vitro release showed a sustained and prolonged release compared to plain eye drop solution. Dynamic and static gamma scintigraphy showed better retention than plain eye drops. The ocular tolerance test (hen's egg test-chorioallantoic membrane test and infra-red study) showed that the formulation is nonirritant and can be used as ocular vehicle. Conclusion: Radiolabel protocol for sparfloxacin was successfully developed and evaluated on ocular retention studies of developed in situ gel. The developed in situ gel is non irritant and can go further with clinical evaluation. PMID:26229353

  20. In situ cell-by-cell imaging and analysis of small cell populations by mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular imaging by mass spectrometry (MS) is emerging as a tool to determine the distribution of proteins, lipids and metabolites in tissues. The existing imaging methods, however, rely on predefined typically rectangular grids for sampling that ignore the natural cellular organization of the tiss...

  1. Gamma spectrometry of 234Th (238U) in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    El-Daoushy, Farid; Hernndez, Francisco

    2002-07-01

    Environmental samples from a wide-range of aquatic and soil deposits, mainly of Scandinavian origin, were analysed for 234Th (238U) using low-level gamma-spectrometry. The diversity of the samples, in terms of composition and ages, allowed a detailed evaluation of the analytical problems associated with gamma-ray spectrometry with focus on the reliability of the 234Th peaks for absolute determination of the 234Th activities. The X-ray contributions in the 93 keV peak were compared with the corresponding self-absorption corrected activities of the 63 keV peak. These X-ray contributions were, also, correlated with the 238U, 232Th, 235U, 40K and 137Cs activities of the samples. Despite the difficulties imposed by the self-absorption corrections, the 63 keV peak is still the best option. Large variability in the 93 keV peak interferences, due to X-rays from Th, exists in sediment and soil samples. Only in the case of young ombrotrophic peat samples was it possible to conclude that the 93 keV peak is free from X-ray contributions and can be as good as the 63 keV Monte-Carlo self-absorption corrected peak. X-ray contributions in the samples correlated with the 238U and 232Th activities, only, in closed environmental systems where a secular equilibrium with the daughters of the U/Th series can occur. PMID:12173662

  2. The Laser Ablation Ion Funnel: Sampling for in situ Mass Spectrometry on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Paul V.; Hodyss, Robert; Tang, Keqi; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    A considerable investment has been made by NASA and other space agencies to develop instrumentation suitable for in situ analytical investigation of extra terrestrial bodies including various mass spectrometers (time-of-flight, quadrupole ion trap, quadrupole mass filters, etc.). However, the front-end sample handling that is needed to collect and prepare samples for interrogation by such instrumentation remains underdeveloped. Here we describe a novel approach tailored to the exploration of Mars where ions are created in the ambient atmosphere via laser ablation and then efficiently transported into a mass spectrometer for in situ analysis using an electrodynamic ion funnel. This concept would enable elemental and isotopic analysis of geological samples with the analysis of desorbed organic material a possibility as well. Such an instrument would be suitable for inclusion on all potential missions currently being considered such as the Mid-Range Rover, the Astrobiology Field Laboratory, and Mars Sample Return (i.e., as a sample pre-selection triage instrument), among others.

  3. In situ analysis of soybeans and nuts by probe electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Petroselli, Gabriela; Mandal, Mridul K; Chen, Lee C; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Nonami, Hiroshi; Erra-Balsells, Rosa

    2015-04-01

    The probe electrospray ionization (PESI) is an ESI-based ionization technique that generates electrospray from the tip of a solid metal needle. In the present work, we describe the PESI mass spectra obtained by in situ measurement of soybeans and several nuts (peanuts, walnuts, cashew nuts, macadamia nuts and almonds) using different solid needles as sampling probes. It was found that PESI-MS is a valuable approach for in situ lipid analysis of these seeds. The phospholipid and triacylglycerol PESI spectra of different nuts and soybean were compared by principal component analysis (PCA). PCA shows significant differences among the data of each family of seeds. Methanolic extracts of nuts and soybean were exposed to air and sunlight for several days. PESI mass spectra were recorded before and after the treatment. Along the aging of the oil (rancidification), the formation of oxidated species with variable number of hydroperoxide groups could be observed in the PESI spectra. The relative intensity of oxidated triacylglycerols signals increased with days of exposition. Monitoring sensitivity of PESI-MS was high. This method provides a fast, simple and sensitive technique for the analysis (detection and characterization) of lipids in seed tissue and degree of oxidation of the oil samples. PMID:26149112

  4. The laser ablation ion funnel: Sampling for in situ mass spectrometry on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Paul V.; Hodyss, Robert; Tang, Keqi; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-04-01

    A considerable investment has been made by NASA and other space agencies to develop instrumentation suitable for in situ analytical investigation of extra terrestrial bodies including various mass spectrometers (time-of-flight, quadrupole ion trap, quadrupole mass filters, etc.). However, the front-end sample handling that is needed to collect and prepare samples for interrogation by such instrumentation remains underdeveloped. Here we describe a novel approach tailored to the exploration of Mars where ions are created in the ambient atmosphere via laser ablation and then efficiently transported into a mass spectrometer for in situ analysis using an electrodynamic ion funnel. This concept would enable elemental and isotopic analysis of geological samples with the analysis of desorbed organic material a possibility as well. Such an instrument would be suitable for inclusion on all potential missions currently being considered such as the Mid-Range Rover, the Astrobiology Field Laboratory, and Mars Sample Return (i.e., as a sample pre-selection triage instrument), among others.

  5. Multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometry for in situ applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickel, T.; Plaß, W. R.; Lang, J.; Ebert, J.; Geissel, H.; Haettner, E.; Jesch, C.; Lippert, W.; Petrick, M.; Scheidenberger, C.; Yavor, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    Multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometers (MR-TOF-MS) have recently been installed at different low-energy radioactive ion beam facilities. They are used as isobar separators with high ion capacity and as mass spectrometers with high mass resolving power and accuracy for short-lived nuclei. Furthermore, MR-TOF-MS have a huge potential for applications in other fields, such as chemistry, biology, medicine, space science, and homeland security. The development, commissioning and results of an MR-TOF-MS is presented, which serves as proof-of-principle to show that very high mass resolving powers (∼105) can be achieved in a compact device (length ∼30 cm). Based on this work, an MR-TOF-MS for in situ application has been designed. For the first time, this device combines very high mass resolving power (>105), mobility, and an atmospheric pressure inlet in one instrument. It will enable in situ measurements without sample preparation at very high mass accuracy. Envisaged applications of this mobile MR-TOF-MS are discussed.

  6. In situ detection of histone variants and modifications in mouse brain using imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Shibojyoti; Sun, Na; Solis-Mezarino, Victor; Fedisch, Andreas; Ninkovic, Jovica; Feuchtinger, Annette; Götz, Magdalena; Walch, Axel; Imhof, Axel

    2016-02-01

    Histone posttranslational modifications and histone variants control the epigenetic regulation of gene expression and affect a wide variety of biological processes. A complex pattern of such modifications and variants defines the identity of cells within complex organ systems and can therefore be used to characterize cells at a molecular level. However, their detection and identification in situ has been limited so far due to lack of specificity, selectivity, and availability of antihistone antibodies. Here, we describe a novel MALDI imaging MS based workflow, which enables us to detect and characterize histones by their intact mass and their correlation with cytological properties of the tissue using novel statistical and image analysis tools. The workflow allows us to characterize the in situ distribution of the major histone variants and their modification in the mouse brain. This new analysis tool is particularly useful for the investigation of expression patterns of the linker histone H1 variants for which suitable antibodies are so far not available. PMID:26593131

  7. In situ biomarker discovery and label-free molecular histopathological diagnosis of lung cancer by ambient mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiegang; He, Jiuming; Mao, Xinxin; Bi, Ying; Luo, Zhigang; Guo, Chengan; Tang, Fei; Xu, Xin; Wang, Xiaohao; Wang, Mingrong; Chen, Jie; Abliz, Zeper

    2015-01-01

    Sensitive and spatial exploration of the metabolism of tumors at the metabolome level is highly challenging. In this study, we developed an in situ metabolomics method based on ambient mass spectrometry imaging using air flow-assisted desorption electrospray ionization (AFADESI), which can spatially explore the alteration of global metabolites in tissues with high sensitivity. Using this method, we discovered potential histopathological diagnosis biomarkers (including lipids, amino acids, choline, peptides, and carnitine) from 52 postoperative lung cancer tissue samples and then subsequently used these biomarkers to generate images for rapid and label-free histopathological diagnosis. These biomarkers were validated with a sensitivity and a specificity of 93.5% and 100%, respectively. Moreover, a single imaging analysis of a cryosection that visualized all these biomarkers, taking tens of minutes, revealed the type and subtype of the cancer. This method could potentially be used as a molecular pathological tool for rapid clinical lung cancer diagnosis and immediate image-guided surgery. PMID:26404114

  8. In situ biomarker discovery and label-free molecular histopathological diagnosis of lung cancer by ambient mass spectrometry imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiegang; He, Jiuming; Mao, Xinxin; Bi, Ying; Luo, Zhigang; Guo, Chengan; Tang, Fei; Xu, Xin; Wang, Xiaohao; Wang, Mingrong; Chen, Jie; Abliz, Zeper

    2015-01-01

    Sensitive and spatial exploration of the metabolism of tumors at the metabolome level is highly challenging. In this study, we developed an in situ metabolomics method based on ambient mass spectrometry imaging using air flow-assisted desorption electrospray ionization (AFADESI), which can spatially explore the alteration of global metabolites in tissues with high sensitivity. Using this method, we discovered potential histopathological diagnosis biomarkers (including lipids, amino acids, choline, peptides, and carnitine) from 52 postoperative lung cancer tissue samples and then subsequently used these biomarkers to generate images for rapid and label-free histopathological diagnosis. These biomarkers were validated with a sensitivity and a specificity of 93.5% and 100%, respectively. Moreover, a single imaging analysis of a cryosection that visualized all these biomarkers, taking tens of minutes, revealed the type and subtype of the cancer. This method could potentially be used as a molecular pathological tool for rapid clinical lung cancer diagnosis and immediate image-guided surgery. PMID:26404114

  9. Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) for direct visualization of plant metabolites in situ.

    PubMed

    Sturtevant, Drew; Lee, Young-Jin; Chapman, Kent D

    2016-02-01

    Direct visualization of plant tissues by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) has revealed key insights into the localization of metabolites in situ. Recent efforts have determined the spatial distribution of primary and secondary metabolites in plant tissues and cells. Strategies have been applied in many areas of metabolism including isotope flux analyses, plant interactions, and transcriptional regulation of metabolite accumulation. Technological advances have pushed achievable spatial resolution to subcellular levels and increased instrument sensitivity by several orders of magnitude. It is anticipated that MALDI-MSI and other MSI approaches will bring a new level of understanding to metabolomics as scientists will be encouraged to consider spatial heterogeneity of metabolites in descriptions of metabolic pathway regulation. PMID:26613199

  10. Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) for direct visualization of plant metabolites in situ

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sturtevant, Drew; Lee, Young -Jin; Chapman, Kent D.

    2015-11-22

    Direct visualization of plant tissues by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) has revealed key insights into the localization of metabolites in situ. Recent efforts have determined the spatial distribution of primary and secondary metabolites in plant tissues and cells. Strategies have been applied in many areas of metabolism including isotope flux analyses, plant interactions, and transcriptional regulation of metabolite accumulation. Technological advances have pushed achievable spatial resolution to subcellular levels and increased instrument sensitivity by several orders of magnitude. Furthermore, it is anticipated that MALDI-MSI and other MSI approaches will bring a new level of understanding tomore » metabolomics as scientists will be encouraged to consider spatial heterogeneity of metabolites in descriptions of metabolic pathway regulation.« less

  11. In situ GaN decomposition analysis by quadrupole mass spectrometry and reflection high-energy electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Calleja, E.; Koblmueller, G.; Speck, J. S.

    2008-08-01

    Thermal decomposition of wurtzite (0001)-oriented GaN was analyzed: in vacuum, under active N exposure, and during growth by rf plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The GaN decomposition rate was determined by measurements of the Ga desorption using in situ quadrupole mass spectrometry, which showed Arrhenius behavior with an apparent activation energy of 3.1 eV. Clear signatures of intensity oscillations during reflection high-energy electron diffraction measurements facilitated complementary evaluation of the decomposition rate and highlighted a layer-by-layer decomposition mode in vacuum. Exposure to active nitrogen, either under vacuum or during growth under N-rich growth conditions, strongly reduced the GaN losses due to GaN decomposition.

  12. In-situ suspended aggregate microextraction of gold nanoparticles from water samples and determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Choleva, Tatiana G; Kappi, Foteini A; Tsogas, George Z; Vlessidis, Athanasios G; Giokas, Dimosthenis L

    2016-05-01

    This work describes a new method for the extraction and determination of gold nanoparticles in environmental samples by means of in-situ suspended aggregate microextraction and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The method relies on the in-situ formation of a supramolecular aggregate phase through ion-association between a cationic surfactant and a benzene sulfonic acid derivative. Gold nanoparticles are physically entrapped into the aggregate phase which is separated from the bulk aqueous solution by vacuum filtration on the surface of a cellulose filter in the form of a thin film. The film is removed from the filter surface and is dissociated into an acidified methanolic solution which is used for analysis. Under the optimized experimental conditions, gold nanoparticles can be efficiently extracted from water samples with recovery rates between 81.0-93.3%, precision 5.4-12.0% and detection limits as low as 75femtomolL(-1) using only 20mL of sample volume. The satisfactory analytical features of the method along with the simplicity indicate the efficiency of this new approach to adequately collect and extract gold nanoparticle species from water samples. PMID:26946014

  13. Tellurium speciation analysis using hydride generation in situ trapping electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and ruthenium or palladium modified graphite tubes.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Emrah; Akay, Pınar; Arslan, Yasin; Bakirdere, Sezgin; Ataman, O Yavuz

    2012-12-15

    Speciation of tellurium can be achieved by making use of different kinetic behaviors of Te(IV) and Te(VI) upon their reaction with sodium borohydride using hydride generation. While Te(IV) can form H(2)Te, Te(VI) will not form any volatile species during the course of hydride formation and measurement by atomic absorption spectrometry. Quantitative reduction of Te(VI) was achieved through application of a microwave assisted prereduction of Te(VI) in 6.0 mol/L HCl solution. Enhanced sensitivity was achieved by in situ trapping of the generated H(2)Te species in a previously heated graphite furnace whose surface was modified using Pd or Ru. Overall efficiency for in situ trapping in pyrolytically coated graphite tube surface was found to be 15% when volatile analyte species are trapped for 60s at 300°C. LOD and LOQ values were calculated as 0.086 ng/mL and 0.29 ng/mL, respectively. Efficiency was increased to 46% and 36% when Pd and Ru surface modifiers were used, respectively. With Ru modified graphite tube 173-fold enhancement was obtained over 180 s trapping period with respect to ETAAS; the tubes could be used for 250 cycles. LOD values were 0.0064 and 0.0022 ng/mL for Pd and Ru treated ETAAS systems, respectively, for 180 s collection of 9.6 mL sample solution. PMID:23182575

  14. In Situ Analysis of Small Populations of Adherent Mammalian Cells Using Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry in Transmission Geometry.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Rachelle S; Thurston, Richard L; Shrestha, Bindesh; Vertes, Akos

    2015-12-15

    Most cultured cells used for biomedical research are cultured adherently, and the requisite detachment prior to biochemical analysis might induce chemical changes. This is especially crucial if accurate metabolic measurements are desired, given the rapid turnover of metabolites in living organisms. There are only a few methods available for the nontargeted in situ analysis of small adherent cell populations. Here we show that laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) mass spectrometry (MS) can be used to analyze adherent cells directly, while still attached to the culture surface. To reduce the size of the analyzed cell population, the spot size constraints of conventional focusing in reflection geometry (rg) LAESI had to be eliminated. By introducing transmission geometry (tg) LAESI and incorporating an objective with a high numerical aperture, spot sizes of 10-20 ?m were readily achieved. As few as five adherent cells could be specifically selected for analysis in their culturing environment. The importance of in situ analysis was highlighted by comparing the metabolite composition of adherent versus suspended cells. For example, we observed that cells analyzed adherently yielded higher values for the adenylate energy charge (0.90 0.09 for adherent cells vs 0.09 0.03 for suspended cells). Additionally, due to the smaller focal spot size, tg-LAESI enabled the analysis of ?20 times smaller cell populations compared to rg-LAESI. PMID:26558336

  15. Development of the Probing In-Situ with Neutron and Gamma Rays (PING) Instrument for Planetary Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Burger, D.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Probing In situ with Neutrons and Gamma rays (PING) instrument is a promising planetary science application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology that has been used successfully in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth for decades. Similar techniques can be very powerful for non-invasive in situ measurements of the subsurface elemental composition on other planets. The objective of our active neutron-gamma ray technology program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC) is to bring instruments using this technology to the point where they can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Venus, asteroids, comets and the satellites of the outer planets. PING combines a 14 MeV deuterium-tritium pulsed neutron generator with a gamma ray spectrometer and two neutron detectors to produce a landed instrument that can determine the elemental composition of a planet down to 30 - 50 cm below the planet's surface. The penetrating nature of.5 - 10 MeV gamma rays and 14 MeV neutrons allows such sub-surface composition measurements to be made without the need to drill into or otherwise disturb the planetary surface, thus greatly simplifying the lander design. We are currently testing a PING prototype at a unique outdoor neutron instrumentation test facility at NASA/GSFC that provides two large (1.8 m x 1.8 m x.9 m) granite and basalt test formations placed outdoors in an empty field. Since an independent trace elemental analysis has been performed on both the Columbia River basalt and Concord Gray granite materials, these samples present two known standards with which to compare PING's experimentally measured elemental composition results. We will present experimental results from PING measurements of both the granite and basalt test formations and show how and why the optimum PING instrument operating parameters differ for studying the two materials.

  16. Elastic and plastic properties of gamma + laves phase in-situ composite alloys using nanoindentation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, M.L.; Stevenson, M.E.; Shamsuzzoha, M.; Ott, R.D.; Brady, M.P.

    1999-07-01

    In the present study, the local elastic and plastic properties of the {gamma}-TiAl and the Laves phases have been investigated in a series of {gamma} + Laves alloys using room-temperature compression. Vickers microhardness, and nanoindentation with an emphasis on elucidating the local property changes in {gamma} + Laves alloys deformed at room temperature. This study shows that nanoindentation can be used to provide useful information on plastic flow in multiphase intermetallic alloys.

  17. Two-Step Resonance-Enhanced Desorption Laser Mass Spectrometry for In Situ Analysis of Organic-Rich Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Getty, S. A.; Grubisic, A.; Uckert, K.; Li, X.; Cornish, T.; Cook, J. E.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.

    2016-01-01

    A wide diversity of planetary surfaces in the solar system represent high priority targets for in situ compositional and contextual analysis as part of future missions. The planned mission portfolio will inform our knowledge of the chemistry at play on Mars, icy moons, comets, and primitive asteroids, which can lead to advances in our understanding of the interplay between inorganic and organic building blocks that led to the evolution of habitable environments on Earth and beyond. In many of these environments, the presence of water or aqueously altered mineralogy is an important indicator of habitable environments that are present or may have been present in the past. As a result, the search for complex organic chemistry that may imply the presence of a feedstock, if not an inventory of biosignatures, is naturally aligned with targeted analyses of water-rich surface materials. Here we describe the two-step laser mass spectrometry (L2MS) analytical technique that has seen broad application in the study of organics in meteoritic samples, now demonstrated to be compatible with an in situ investigation with technique improvements to target high priority planetary environments as part of a future scientific payload. An ultraviolet (UV) pulsed laser is used in previous and current embodiments of laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDMS) to produce ionized species traceable to the mineral and organic composition of a planetary surface sample. L2MS, an advanced technique in laser mass spectrometry, is selective to the aromatic organic fraction of a complex sample, which can provide additional sensitivity and confidence in the detection of specific compound structures. Use of a compact two-step laser mass spectrometer prototype has been previously reported to provide specificity to key aromatic species, such as PAHs, nucleobases, and certain amino acids. Recent improvements in this technique have focused on the interaction between the mineral matrix and the organic analyte. The majority of planetary targets of astrobiological interest are characterized by the presence of water or hydrated mineral phases. Water signatures can indicate a history of available liquid water that may have played an important role in the chemical environment of these planetary surfaces and subsurfaces. The studies we report here investigate the influence of water content on the detectability of organics by L2MS in planetary analog samples.

  18. Laser Ablation Electrodynamic Ion Funnel for In Situ Mass Spectrometry on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Paul V.; Hodyss, Robert P.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    A front-end instrument, the laser ablation ion funnel, was developed, which would ionize rock and soil samples in the ambient Martian atmosphere, and efficiently transport the product ions into a mass spectrometer for in situ analysis. Laser ablation creates elemental ions from a solid with a high-power pulse within ambient Mars atmospheric conditions. Ions are captured and focused with an ion funnel into a mass spectrometer for analysis. The electrodynamic ion funnel consists of a series of axially concentric ring-shaped electrodes whose inside diameters (IDs) decrease over the length of the funnel. DC potentials are applied to each electrode, producing a smooth potential slope along the axial direction. Two radio-frequency (RF) AC potentials, equal in amplitude and 180 out of phase, are applied alternately to the ring electrodes. This creates an effective potential barrier along the inner surface of the electrode stack. Ions entering the funnel drift axially under the influence of the DC potential while being restricted radially by the effective potential barrier created by the applied RF. The net result is to effectively focus the ions as they traverse the length of the funnel.

  19. Analysis of Tropical Forest Fire Emissions Using in Situ Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry during Sambba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaeian, J.; Lewis, A. C.; Edwards, P. M.; Evans, M. J.; Hopkins, J. R.; Lee, J. D.; Purvis, R.

    2014-12-01

    Vertical atmospheric profiles of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were made over Amazonia using an in situ gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GC/MS), including isoprene, methacrolein, methyl vinyl ketone and products of biomass burning such as benzene. Measurements were made in the Amazonian (Rondônia and Amazonas) region during September 2012, a period of extensive biomass burning. Data was obtained between 100m and 8500m from the FAAM BAe 146 research aircraft. Isoprene was observed to be constrained overwhelmingly to the boundary layer (height typically ~2500m) with mean boundary layer mixing ratio of ~2 ppbv and a peak of ~5 ppbv at the lowest flight levels of 100 m. First generation isoprene oxidation products, methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein, were quantified individually rather than as the sum of the pair, which is more commonly found in the literature. Both MACR and MVK were constrained primarily to the boundary layer, however trace quantities could be seen in the free troposphere to a height of 8000 m. Benzene from biomass burning was observed in both boundary layer and free troposphere, with a peak mixing ratio of ~0.8 ppbv at 750 m. This work will present the spatial distribution of isoprene within the boundary as a function of underlying surface type. The vertical profiles of all species are then compared to representative simulations from the GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model and conclusions drawn on the success of the model in representing emissions and oxidation chemistry.

  20. Evaluation of uncertainties in in situ and ex situ gamma measurements on land areas with low contamination levels.

    PubMed

    Rostron, Peter D; Heathcote, John A; Ramsey, Michael H

    2015-06-01

    Previous work on the characterisation of land areas with moderate contamination levels showed that in situ measurements made with a gamma detector can achieve lower levels of the random component of uncertainty than laboratory measurements of extracted samples. This was found when the variance caused by small-scale lateral heterogeneity of contaminants was included in the uncertainty estimation. The present paper documents the results of applying the same techniques of uncertainty estimation to an area with contamination levels that were lower by a factor of 10. If the same counting times were used, it would be expected that both measurement types would be affected by higher levels of random uncertainty in the individual measurements because of increased uncertainty from counting statistics and other factors such as interpretation of gamma spectra. However, when uncertainty due to sampling was included, it was found that both measurements methods were subject to similar combined uncertainties at individual locations. Using an assumption of the depth distributions of radionuclides that was supported by ex situ measurements, in situ measurements were able to produce averaging estimates with an approximate reduction of 50% in the standard error on the mean at ~50% of the cost of the ex situ measurements. PMID:25928900

  1. Efficiency Calibration for Environmental Gamma Spectrometry Using GATE.

    PubMed

    Alrefae, Tareq

    2016-06-01

    This work investigated the utility of performing efficiency calibration for environmental gamma spectrometry using the Monte Carlo based, free of charge GATE toolbox. The validity of this approach was tested by comparing output efficiency values of an in-house developed GATE-based program with experimental measurements covering various geometries and primary photon energies. The results of this comparison revealed relative deviations within ±20%, thus validating the employed computational approach. Moreover, the GATE-based method was able to predict quantities that are generally difficult to measure experimentally, such as the number of interactions preceding full energy absorption. These computationally obtained predictions were found to be in agreement with theory. PMID:27115226

  2. In situ monitoring of powder blending by non-invasive Raman spectrometry with wide area illumination.

    PubMed

    Allan, Pamela; Bellamy, Luke J; Nordon, Alison; Littlejohn, David; Andrews, John; Dallin, Paul

    2013-03-25

    A 785nm diode laser and probe with a 6mm spot size were used to obtain spectra of stationary powders and powders mixing at 50rpm in a high shear convective blender. Two methods of assessing the effect of particle characteristics on the Raman sampling depth for microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel), aspirin or sodium nitrate were compared: (i) the information depth, based on the diminishing Raman signal of TiO(2) in a reference plate as the depth of powder prior to the plate was increased, and (ii) the depth at which a sample became infinitely thick, based on the depth of powder at which the Raman signal of the compound became constant. The particle size, shape, density and/or light absorption capability of the compounds were shown to affect the "information" and "infinitely thick" depths of individual compounds. However, when different sized fractions of aspirin were added to Avicel as the main component, the depth values of aspirin were the same and matched that of the Avicel: 1.7mm for the "information" depth and 3.5mm for the "infinitely thick" depth. This latter value was considered to be the minimum Raman sampling depth when monitoring the addition of aspirin to Avicel in the blender. Mixing profiles for aspirin were obtained non-invasively through the glass wall of the vessel and could be used to assess how the aspirin blended into the main component, identify the end point of the mixing process (which varied with the particle size of the aspirin), and determine the concentration of aspirin in real time. The Raman procedure was compared to two other non-invasive monitoring techniques, near infrared (NIR) spectrometry and broadband acoustic emission spectrometry. The features of the mixing profiles generated by the three techniques were similar for addition of aspirin to Avicel. Although Raman was less sensitive than NIR spectrometry, Raman allowed compound specific mixing profiles to be generated by studying the mixing behaviour of an aspirin-aspartame-Avicel mixture. PMID:23291440

  3. Waste Characterization Using Gamma Ray Spectrometry with Automated Efficiency Optimization - 13404

    SciTech Connect

    Bosko, A.; Venkataraman, R.; Bronson, F.L.; Ilie, G.; Russ, W.R.

    2013-07-01

    Gamma ray spectrometry using High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors is commonly employed in assaying radioactive waste streams from a variety of sources: nuclear power plants, Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, medical facilities, decontamination and decommissioning activities etc. The radioactive material is typically packaged in boxes or drums (for e.g. B-25 boxes or 208 liter drums) and assayed to identify and quantify radionuclides. Depending on the origin of the waste stream, the radionuclides could be special nuclear materials (SNM), fission products, or activation products. Efficiency calibration of the measurement geometry is a critical step in the achieving accurate quantification of radionuclide content. Due to the large size of the waste items, it is impractical and expensive to manufacture gamma ray standard sources for performing a measurement based calibration. For well over a decade, mathematical efficiency methods such as those in Canberra's In Situ Object Counting System (ISOCS) have been successfully employed in the efficiency calibration of gamma based waste assay systems. In the traditional ISOCS based calibrations, the user provides input data such as the dimensions of the waste item, the average density and fill height of the matrix, and matrix composition. As in measurement based calibrations, the user typically defines a homogeneous matrix with a uniform distribution of radioactivity. Actual waste containers can be quite nonuniform, however. Such simplifying assumptions in the efficiency calibration could lead to a large Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU), thus limiting the amount of waste that can be disposed of as intermediate or low activity level waste. To improve the accuracy of radionuclide quantification, and reduce the TMU, Canberra has developed the capability to optimize the efficiency calibration using the ISOCS method. The optimization is based on benchmarking the efficiency shape and magnitude to the data available in the analyzed gamma ray spectra. Data from measurements of a given item in multiple counting geometries are among the powerful benchmarks that could be used in the optimization. Also, while assaying a waste stream with fission products and activation products emitting gamma lines of multiple energies, optimizing the efficiency on the basis of line activity consistency is very effective. In the present paper, the ISOCS- based optimization methodology is applied to measurement scenarios involving multiple counting geometries, and multi-gamma-line radionuclides. Results will be presented along with accuracy and precision estimates for each measurement. (authors)

  4. Miniaturized laser-induced plasma spectrometry for planetary in situ analysis - The case for Jupiter's moon Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, S. G.; Jessberger, E. K.; Hübers, H.-W.; Schröder, S.; Rauschenbach, I.; Florek, S.; Neumann, J.; Henkel, H.; Klinkner, S.

    2011-08-01

    Jupiter's icy moon Europa is one of most promising places in our Solar System where possible extraterrestrial life forms could exist either in the past or even presently. The Europa Lander mission, an exciting part of the international Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM/Laplace), considers in situ planetary exploration of the moon. The distance of Europa from the Earth and the Sun asks for autonomous analytical tools that maximize the scientific return at minimal resources, demanding new experimental concepts. We propose a novel instrument, based on the atomic spectroscopy of laser generated plasmas for the elemental analysis of Europa's surface materials as far as it is in reach of the lander for example by a robotic arm or a mole, or just onboard the lander. The technique of laser-induced plasma spectrometry provides quantitative elemental analysis of all major and many trace elements. It is a fast technique, i.e. an analysis can be performed in a few seconds, which can be applied to many different types of material such as ice, dust or rocks and it does not require any sample preparation. The sensitivity is in the range of tens of ppm and high lateral resolution, down to 50 μm, is feasible. In addition, it provides the potential of depth profiling, up to 2 mm in rock material and up to a few cm in more transparent icy matrices. Key components of the instrument are presently developed in Germany for planetary in situ missions. This development program is accompanied by an in-depth methodical investigation of this technique under planetary environmental conditions.

  5. High-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry in uranium exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moxham, Robert M.; Tanner, Allan B.

    1977-01-01

    Sedimentary-type uranium deposits accumulate at favorable sites along a migration path which may be kilometers in length. Their source is a large volume of rock from which the uranium has been leached. The geochemical mobilities and half lives of uranium and its daughter products vary widely so that they are transported from the source rocks, at different rates, along the migration path to their ultimate site. The radioactive disequilibrium resulting from this process has been well documented in the immediate vicinity of ore deposits, and disequilibrium is commonly recorded on gamma-ray logs up the hydraulic gradient from uranium ore. Little is known about the state of secular equilibrium in the leached host rocks, which often represent the only part of the migration path that is at or near the surface and is thus most accessible to the exploration geophysicist. High-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry provides a means of investigating the disequilibrium associated with uranium leaching and migration. Direct measurement of uranium can be made by this method, and the equivalent weight percents can be determined for six of the seven daughter-product decay groups that characterize the state of radioactive equilibrium. The technique has been used quantitatively in laboratory studies, where the results compare favorably with radiochemical analyses; field experiments suggest that semi-quantitative data may be obtained at the outcrop.

  6. High-Speed Tandem Mass Spectrometric in Situ Imaging by Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Thomas, Mathew; Short, Joshua TL; Carson, James P.; Cha, Jeeyeon; Dey, Sudhansu K.; Yang, Pengxiang; Prieto Conaway, Maria C.; Laskin, Julia

    2013-10-15

    Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) combined with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), high-resolution mass analysis (m/m=17,500 at m/z 200), and rapid spectral acquisition enabled simultaneous imaging and identification of more than 300 molecules from 92 selected m/z windows (± 1 Da) with a spatial resolution of better than 150 um. Uterine sections of implantation sites on day 6 of pregnancy were analyzed in the ambient environment without any sample pre-treatment. MS/MS imaging was performed by scanning the sample under the nano-DESI probe at 10 um/s while acquiring higher-energy collision-induced dissociation (HCD) spectra for a targeted inclusion list of 92 m/z values at a rate of ~6.3 spectra/s. Molecular ions and their corresponding fragments, separated using high-resolution mass analysis, were assigned based on accurate mass measurement. Using this approach, we were able to identify and image both abundant and low-abundance isobaric species within each m/z window. MS/MS analysis enabled efficient separation and identification of isobaric sodium and potassium adducts of phospholipids. Furthermore, we identified several metabolites associated with early pregnancy and obtained the first 2D images of these molecules.

  7. Mass spectrometry imaging: an expeditious and powerful technique for fast in situ lignin assessment in Eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Pedro; Ferreira, Mônica Siqueira; de Oliveira, Diogo Noin; Pereira, Luciano; Sawaya, Alexandra Christine Helena Frankland; Catharino, Rodrigo Ramos; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2014-04-01

    Plant biomass has been suggested as an alternative to produce bioethanol. The recalcitrance of plant biomass to convert cellulose into simpler carbohydrates used in the fermentation process is partially due to lignin, but the standard methods used to analyze lignin composition frequently use toxic solvents and are laborious and time-consuming. MS imaging was used to study lignin in Eucalyptus, since this genus is the main source of cellulose in the world. Hand-cut sections of stems of two Eucalyptus species were covered with silica and directly analyzed by matrix-assisted laser sesorption ionization (MALDI)-imaging mass spectrometry (MS). Information available in the literature about soluble lignin subunits and structures were used to trace their distribution in the sections and using a software image a relative quantification could be made. Matrixes routinely used in MALDI-imaging analysis are not satisfactory to analyze plant material and were efficiently substituted by thin layer chromatography (TLC) grade silica. A total of 22 compounds were detected and relatively quantified. It was also possible to establish a proportion between syringyl and guaiacyl monolignols, characteristic for each species. Because of the simple way that samples are prepared, the MALDI-imaging approach presented here can replace, in routine analysis, complex and laborious MS methods in the study of lignin composition. PMID:24451041

  8. Planetary In Situ Sample Analysis with Tandem Two-Step Laser Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Getty, S. A.; Cornish, T. J.; Ecelberger, S. A.; Li, X.; Merrill Floyd, M. A.; Arevalo, R.; Elsila, J.; Callahan, M. P.

    2012-12-01

    Future surface missions to comets and outer solar system satellites such as Europa, Enceladus, and Titan will benefit strongly from investigations that can detect a wide range of organics in complex sample mixtures and ices, as well as determine the structure of selected molecules, to provide insight into their origin and evolution. At the same time, such missions are likely to be among the most highly constrained in mass and power resources, particularly those flown within the tightly focused Discovery and New Frontiers programs. Techniques requiring minimal or no sample manipulation or preparation may be needed to reduce complexity. Pulsed laser-based mass spectrometry may satisfy such requirements, with total instrument masses potentially less than 5 kg, particularly where analysis of higher-molecular weight, nonvolatile species is a priority objective. Prototype flight-compatible mass spectrometers under active development in our lab are based on direct ultraviolet Nd:YAG laser desorption and ionization (LDI) of solid samples under high vacuum. Prompt ions from a single few ns-duration laser pulse are accelerated into a compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). Both inorganic species including elements and oxides such as M_xO_y (M = Mg, Al, Cl, Ca, Fe; x, y = 1-4) from the mineral matrix as well as organics with molecular weights up to several kDa are readily detected over a range of laser intensities. To improve our ability to distinguish among peaks and patterns in the often-complex LDI spectra obtained from natural samples, we have recently begun systematically testing several critical instrument enhancements. First, by moving the common voltage bias of the ion flight tube and detector to a common negative potential, we are able to switch between positive and negative ion detection modes with only electrostatic switching. Inter-comparison of cation and anion spectra can provide highly diagnostic information on both inorganic (e.g., Na+ and K+ vs. Cl-) and organic moieties. Second, by focusing a separate "post-ionization" laser pulse just above the sample surface, we can achieve two-step laser mass spectrometry, or L2MS, in the same highly-miniaturized TOF-MS. L2MS enables selective analysis of aromatic organics even in the presence of a complex mineral matrix. Finally, by introducing an ion optical gate in the flight path, we are able to take advantage of the broad focusing capabilities of the "curved field" reflectron at the core of the TOF-MS to achieve pseudo-tandem structural analysis of selected organics. The high-speed gate is used to admit only the molecular ion/s of interest into the reflectron. Diagnostic fragments of the ion/s obtained through metastable decay or active collision-induced dissociation (CID) remain in focus despite having widely variable velocities and masses. As such even molecular isomers with differing fragmentation pathways may be distinguished through a series of pseudo-tandem mass spectra that could be obtained in an automatic process during a mission. The "real-world" benefits of these enhancements are being fully characterized using a set of synthetic and natural standard samples as well as several planetary analogs and meteorites.

  9. In situ gamma ray measurements of radionuclides at a disused phosphate mine on the West Coast of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Bezuidenhout, Jacques

    2015-12-01

    High levels of uranium and its radioactive progeny like radium is normally associated with phosphate mining. In Situ gamma ray spectroscopy as a survey tool has been successfully applied to assess radionuclide concentrations in various geographical environments. A transportable and robust gamma ray detection system (GISPI) was therefore employed to determine the concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides at a disused phosphate mine on the West Coast of South Africa. The concentrations of radium, thorium and potassium were measured and plotted. The measurements showed fairly high concentrations with medians of 320 Bq/kg for (226)Ra, 64 Bq/kg for (232)Th and 390 Bq/kg for (40)K. The highest concentrations were however confined to specific areas of the mine. The effective dose due to gamma irradiation for the various areas of the mine was also estimated and the highest estimated level was 0.45 mSv/y. The article finally draws conclusions as to the origins and impact of the radiation. PMID:26254719

  10. In situ assays demonstrate that interferon-gamma suppresses infection-stimulated hepatic fibrin deposition by promoting fibrinolysis

    PubMed Central

    Mullarky, Isis K.; Szaba, Frank M.; Winchel, Caylin G.; Parent, Michelle A.; Kummer, Lawrence W.; Mackman, Nigel; Johnson, Lawrence L.; Smiley, Stephen T.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Inflammatory cytokines potently impact hemostatic pathways during infection, but the tissue-specific regulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis complicates studies of the underlying mechanisms. Here, we describe assays that quantitatively measuring prothrombinase (PTase), protein C-ase (PCase) and plasminogen activator (PA) activities in situ, thereby facilitating studies of tissue-specific hemostasis. Using these assays, we investigate the mechanisms regulating hepatic fibrin deposition during murine toxoplasmosis and the means by which interferon-gamma (IFN?) suppresses infection-stimulated fibrin deposition. We demonstrate that Toxoplasma infection upregulates hepatic PTase, PCase, and PA activity. Wild type and gene-targeted IFN?-deficient mice exhibit similar levels of infection-stimulated PTase activity. By contrast, IFN?-deficiency is associated with increased PCase activity and reduced PA activity during infection. Parallel analyses of hepatic gene expression reveal that IFN?-deficiency is associated with increased expression of thrombomodulin (TM), a key component of the PCase, increased expression of thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI), a PC substrate, and reduced expression of urokinase PA (uPA). These findings suggest that IFN? suppresses infection-stimulated hepatic fibrin deposition by suppressing TM-mediated activation of TAFI, thereby destabilizing fibrin deposits, and concomitantly increasing hepatic uPA activity, thereby promoting fibrinolysis. We anticipate that further application of these in situ assays will improve our understanding of tissue-specific hemostasis, its regulation by cytokines, and its dysregulation during coagulopathy. PMID:16839357

  11. Active Neutron and Gamma Ray Instrumentation for In Situ Planetary Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Pulsed Neutron Generator-Gamma Ray And Neutron Detectors (PNG-GRAND) experiment is an innovative application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology so successfully used in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth. The objective of our active neutron-gamma ray technology program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA-GSFC) is to bring the PNG-GRAND instrument to the point where it can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Menus, asteroids, comets and the satellites of the outer planets. Gamma-Ray Spectrometers (GRS) have been incorporated into numerous orbital planetary science missions and, especially its the case of the Mars Odyssey GRS, have contributed detailed maps of the elemental composition over the entire surface of Mars. However, orbital gamma ray measurements have low spatial sensitivity (100's of km) due to their low surface emission rates from cosmic rays and subsequent need to be averaged over large surface areas. PNG-GRAND overcomes this impediment by incorporating a powerful neutron excitation source that permits high sensitivity surface and subsurface measurements of bulk elemental compositions. PNG-GRAND combines a pulsed neutron generator (PNG) with gamma ray and neutron detectors to produce a landed instrument to determine subsurface elemental composition without needing to drill into a planet's surface a great advantage in mission design. We are currently testing PNG-GRAND prototypes at a unique outdoor neutron instrumentation test facility recently constructed at NASA/GSFC that consists of a 2 m x 2 in x 1 m granite structure placed outdoors in an empty field. Because an independent trace elemental analysis has been performed on the material, this granite sample is a known standard with which to compare both Monte Carlo simulations and our experimentally measured elemental composition data. We will present data from operating PNG-GRAND in various experimental configurations on a known sample in a geometry that is identical to that on a planetary surface. We will also illustrate the use of gamma ray timing techniques to improve sensitivity and will compare the material composition results from our experiments to both an independent laboratory elemental composition analysis and MCNPX computer modeling results.

  12. A Team Approach to the Development of Gamma Ray and x Ray Remote Sensing and in Situ Spectroscopy for Planetary Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trombka, J. I.; Floyd, S.; Ruitberg, A.; Evans, L.; Starr, R.; Metzger, A.; Reedy, R.; Drake, D.; Moss, C.; Edwards, B.

    1993-01-01

    An important part of the investigation of planetary origin and evolution is the determination of the surface composition of planets, comets, and asteroids. Measurements of discrete line X-ray and gamma ray emissions from condensed bodies in space can be used to obtain both qualitative and quantitative elemental composition information. The Planetary Instrumentation Definition and Development Program (PIDDP) X-Ray/Gamma Ray Team has been established to develop remote sensing and in situ technologies for future planetary exploration missions.

  13. Assessment of hand-held Raman instrumentation for in situ screening for potentially counterfeit artesunate antimalarial tablets by FT-Raman spectroscopy and direct ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Camilla; Nyadong, Leonard; Yang, Felicia; Fernandez, Facundo M; Brown, Christopher D; Newton, Paul N; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2008-08-15

    Pharmaceutical counterfeiting has become a significant public health problem worldwide and new, rapid, user-friendly, reliable and inexpensive methods for drug quality screening are needed. This work illustrates the chemical characterization of genuine and fake artesunate antimalarial tablets by portable Raman spectroscopy and validation by FT-Raman spectroscopy and ambient mass spectrometry. The applicability of a compact and robust portable Raman spectrometer (TruScan) for the in situ chemical identification of counterfeit tablets is reported. PMID:18620922

  14. In-situ gamma-ray assay of the west cell line in the 235-F plutonium fuel form facility

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, A. H.; Diprete, D.

    2014-09-01

    On August 29th, 2013, scientists from SRNL took a series of in-situ gamma-ray measurements in the maintenance trench beneath Cells 6-9 on the west line of the PuFF facility using an uncollimated, highpurity germanium detector. The detector efficiency was estimated using a combination of MCNP simulations and empirical measurements. Data analysis was performed using three gamma-rays emitted by Pu-238 (99.85 keV, 152.7 keV, and 766.4 keV) providing three independent estimates of the mass of Pu-238 holdup in each of the cells. The weighted mean of these three results was used as the best estimate of Pu-238 holdup in the West Cell Line of PuFF. The results of the assay measurements are found in the table below along with the results from the scoping assay performed in 2006. All uncertainties in this table (as well as the rest of the report) are given as 1σ. The total holdup in the West Cell Line was 2.4 ± 0.7 grams. This result is 0.6 g higher than the previous estimate, a 0.4σ difference.

  15. Gamma irradiation testing of montan wax barrier materials for in-situ waste containment

    SciTech Connect

    Soo, P.; Heiser, J.

    1996-02-01

    A scoping study was carried out to quantify the potential use of a montan wax as a barrier material for subsurface use. If it possesses resistance to chemical and structural change, it could be used in a barrier to minimize the migration of contaminants from their storage or disposal locations. Properties that were evaluated included hardness, melting point, molecular weight, and biodegradation as a function of gamma radiation dose. The main emphasis was to quantify the wax`s long-term ability to withstand radiation-induced mechanical, chemical, and microbial degradation.

  16. Use of a Shielded High Resolution Gamma Spectrometry System to Segregate LLW from Contact Handleable ILW Containing Plutonium - 13046

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, Rosemary; Wilkins, Colin; Chard, Patrick; Jaederstroem, Henrik; LeBlanc, Paul; Mowry, Rick; MacDonald, Sanders; Gunn, William

    2013-07-01

    Dounreay Site Restoration Limited (DSRL) have a number of drums of solid waste that may contain Plutonium Contaminated Material. These are currently categorised as Contact Handleable Intermediate Level Waste (CHILW). A significant fraction of these drums potentially contain waste that is in the Low Level Waste (LLW) category. A Canberra Q2 shielded high resolution gamma spectrometry system is being used to quantify the total activity of drums that are potentially in the LLW category in order to segregate those that do contain LLW from CHILW drums and thus to minimise the total volume of waste in the higher category. Am-241 is being used as an indicator of the presence of plutonium in the waste from its strong 59.54 keV gamma-ray; a knowledge of the different waste streams from which the material originates allows a pessimistic waste 'fingerprint' to be used in order to determine an upper limit to the activities of the weak and non-gamma-emitting plutonium and associated radionuclides. This paper describes the main features of the high resolution gamma spectrometry system being used by DSRL to perform the segregation of CHILW and LLW and how it was configured and calibrated using the Canberra In-Situ Object Counting System (ISOCS). It also describes how potential LLW drums are selected for assay and how the system uses the existing waste stream fingerprint information to determine a reliable upper limit for the total activity present in each measured drum. Results from the initial on-site commissioning trials and the first measurements of waste drums using the new monitor are presented. (authors)

  17. Deformation and fracture behavior of Ni-Mo-Al(gamma/gamma prime-alpha) in situ composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sriramamurthy, A. M.; Tewari, S. N.

    1984-01-01

    Tensile properties of a directionally solidified (DS) eutectic alloy of the nominal composition Ni-33 Mo-5.7 Al (weight percent) have been investigated both at room temperature and elevated temperatures. The microstructure-mechanical property relationship has been studied for the alloy both in the as-DS and heat-treated conditions. Changes in the yield strength, the work hardening behavior, and the fracture morphology have been explained in terms of the microstructural changes due to the heat treatment. The yield drops observed have been attributed to the microdebonding due to the possible segregation of impurities at the fiber-matrix interface, and partly to the strain aging. The deformation mechanism has been identified to be the cutting of gamma prime particles.

  18. Low level measurement of (60)Co by gamma ray spectrometry using γ-γ coincidence.

    PubMed

    Paradis, H; de Vismes Ott, A; Luo, M; Cagnat, X; Piquemal, F; Gurriaran, R

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the latest development of the laboratory to measure the natural and artificial massic activities in environmental samples. The measurement method of coincident emitters by gamma-gamma coincidence using an anti-Compton device and its digital electronics is described. Results obtained with environmental samples are shown. Despite its low efficiency, this method decreases detection limits of (60)Co for certain samples compared to conventional gamma-ray spectrometry due to its very low background. PMID:26682892

  19. Monte carlo simulation of in situ gamma-spectra recorded by NaI (Tl) detector in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiming; Zhang, Yingying; Wu, Ning; Wu, Bingwei; Liu, Yan; Cao, Xuan; Wang, Qian

    2015-06-01

    To develop a NaI (Tl) detector for in situ radioactivity monitoring in the marine environment and enhance the confidence of the probability of the gamma-spectrum analysis, Monte Carlo simulations using the Monte Carlo N-Particle ( MNCP ) code were performed to provide the response spectra of some interested radionuclides and the background spectra originating from the natural radionuclides in seawater recorded by a NaI (Tl) detector. A newly developed 75 mm × 75 mm NaI (Tl) detector was calibrated using four reference radioactive sources 137Cs, 60Co, 40K and 54Mn in the laboratory before the field measurements in seawater. A simulation model was established for the detector immersed in seawater. The simulated spectra were all broadened with Gaussian pulses to reflect the statistical fluctuations and electrical noise in the real measurement. The simulated spectra show that the single-energy photons into the detector are mostly scattering low-energy photons and the high background in the low energy region mainly originates from the Compton effect of the high energy ?-rays of natural radionuclides in seawater. The simulated background spectrum was compared with the experimental one recorded in field measurement and they seem to be in good agreement. The simulation method and spectra can be used for the accurate analysis of the filed measurement results of low concentration radioactivity in seawater.

  20. Surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry used to screen serum diagnostic markers of colon cancer recurrence in situ following surgery

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, ZHONG-YIN; JI, TUO; LUO, HE-SHENG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify specific serum biomarkers in patients with colon cancer recurrence in situ following surgery. The study was conducted at the Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University (Wuhan, China) between January 2012 and January 2014. Surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to compare and analyze the serum protein profiles of patients with (n=50) and patients without (n=50) recurrence in situ. Biomarker Wizard software was used to analyze and obtain the protein spectrum. In total, nine protein peaks demonstrated statistically significant differences between the recurrence and non-recurrence group (P<0.05), which included two protein peaks (7,731.3 Da and 8,266.5 Da). The two protein peaks were highly expressed in patients with colon cancer recurrence in situ following surgery, but lowly expressed in patients without recurrence. Therefore, the two protein peaks may represent potential biomarkers for the prediction of colon cancer recurrence in situ following surgical treatment. PMID:26137063

  1. QUALITY CONTROL FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MEASUREMENTS USING GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the quality control procedures, calibration, collection, analysis, and interpretation of data in measuring the activity of gamma ray-emitting radionuclides in environmental samples. Included in the appendices are basic data for selected gamma ray-emitting ra...

  2. The Dortmund Low Background Facility - Low-background gamma ray spectrometry with an artificial overburden.

    PubMed

    Gastrich, Holger; Gößling, Claus; Klingenberg, Reiner; Kröninger, Kevin; Neddermann, Till; Nitsch, Christian; Quante, Thomas; Zuber, Kai

    2016-06-01

    The Dortmund Low Background Facility is an instrument for low-level gamma ray spectrometry with an artificial overburden of ten meters of water equivalent, an inner shielding, featuring a neutron absorber, and an active muon veto. An integral background count rate between 40keV and 2700keV of (2.528±0.004)counts/(kgmin) enables low-background gamma ray spectrometry with sensitivities in the range of some 10mBq/kg within a week of measurement time. PMID:27082973

  3. ADONIS, high count-rate HP-Ge {gamma} spectrometry algorithm: Irradiated fuel assembly measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, P.; Barat, E.; Dautremer, T.; Montagu, T.; Normand, S.

    2011-07-01

    ADONIS is a digital system for gamma-ray spectrometry, developed by CEA. This system achieves high count-rate gamma-ray spectrometry with correct dynamic dead-time correction, up to, at least, more than an incoming count rate of 3.10{sup 6} events per second. An application of such a system at AREVA NC's La Hague plant is the irradiated fuel scanning facility before reprocessing. The ADONIS system is presented, then the measurement set-up and, last, the measurement results with reference measurements. (authors)

  4. Comparison between in situ and ex situ gamma measurements on land areas within a decommissioning nuclear site: a case study at Dounreay.

    PubMed

    Rostron, Peter D; Heathcote, John A; Ramsey, Michael H

    2014-09-01

    Measurements made in situ with gamma detectors and ex situ measurements of soil samples in a laboratory can have complementary roles in the assessment of radioactively contaminated land on decommissioning nuclear sites. Both in situ and ex situ methods were used to characterize (137)Cs contamination within an area at the Dounreay site in Scotland. The systematic difference (bias) between estimates of the mean activity concentration was found to be non-significant when in situ measurements were interpreted using a linear depth model, based on ex situ measurements made at two different depths. An established method of evaluating the random components of measurement uncertainty was used. The random component of analytical uncertainty in the in situ measurements, made in field conditions, was found to exceed that for the ex situ measurements, made in the controlled conditions of a laboratory. However, contamination by the target radionuclide was found to be heterogeneous over small spatial scales. This resulted in significantly higher levels of random sampling uncertainty in individual ex situ measurements. As in situ measurements are substantially less costly, a greater number of measurements can be made, which potentially reduces the uncertainty on the mean. Providing the depth profile of contaminants can be modelled with confidence, this can enable estimates of mean activity concentration over an averaging area to be made with lower overall uncertainties than are possible using ex situ methods. PMID:24938421

  5. A simple method for the absolute determination of uranium enrichment by high-resolution gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Korob, R O; Blasiyh Nuño, G A

    2006-05-01

    A simple method for the determination of uranium enrichment using high-resolution gamma spectrometry is presented in this paper. The method relies solely on the gamma-ray emission probabilities of 235U and 234mPa, and an iterative procedure for the least squares fit of a polynomial to a set of experimentally determined data. To ensure the reliability of the 234mPa gamma-ray emission probabilities employed, a new determination of these probabilities was carried out using a combination of gamma spectrometry and Cerenkov counting of a purified 234Th solution. Using these new data, a maximum difference of approximately 5% has been found between the experimental and declared uranium enrichment in a set of solid and liquid samples containing uranium compounds. PMID:16311038

  6. Calculation of the decision thresholds in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Korun, M; Vodenik, B; Zorko, B

    2014-12-01

    A method was developed for calculating the decision thresholds for gamma-ray spectrometric measurements. At the energies where gamma-ray emitters that are present in the nuclide library, but were not identified in the spectrum, radiate, peaks are supposed to appear. The peak areas are calculated by fitting, using the method of least squares, the spectral region of the supposed peaks with a continuous background and the spectrometer response function at the gamma-ray energies where the supposed peaks are positioned. The null measurement uncertainty of a gamma-ray emitter is obtained as the uncertainty of the weighted average of the activities calculated from the areas of the supposed peaks in a spectrum where the specified activity of the gamma-ray emitter is zero. For the calculation of the decision threshold the null measurement uncertainty is used. These decision thresholds overestimate the critical limits calculated with the Currie formula by about 10% in the case of single gamma-ray emitters. For multi-gamma-ray emitters the decision thresholds yield smaller values than the Currie formula. The presence of a peaked background or peaks that are near the supposed peaks increases the decision threshold considerably. PMID:25233528

  7. In-situ gamma-ray assay of the east cell line in the 235-F Plutonium fuel form facility

    SciTech Connect

    Diprete, D.

    2015-08-21

    On September 17th -19th , 2013, scientists from SRNL took a series of in-situ gamma-ray measurements in the maintenance trench beneath Cells 1-5 on the east line of the PuFF facility using a well-collimated, high-purity germanium detector. The cell interiors were assayed along with the furnaces and storage coolers that protrude beneath the cells. The detector efficiency was estimated using a combination of MCNP simulations and empirical measurements. Data analysis was performed using three gamma-rays emitted by Pu-238 (99.85 keV, 152.7 keV, and 766.4 keV) providing three independent estimates of the mass of Pu-238 holdup in each of the cells. The weighted mean of these three results was used as the best estimate of Pu-238 holdup in the East Cell Line of PuFF. The results of the assay measurements are found in the table on the following page along with the results from the scoping assay performed in 2006. All uncertainties in this table (as well as the rest of the report) are reported at 1σ. Summing the assay results and treating MDAs as M238Pu= 0 ± MDA, the total holdup in the East Cell Line was 240 ± 40 grams. This result is 100 grams lower than the previous estimate, a 0.55σ difference. The uncertainty in the Pu-238 holdup is also reduced substantially relative to the 2006 scoping assay. However, the current assay results are in agreement with the 2006 scoping assay results due to the large uncertainty associated with the 2006 scoping assays. The current assay results support the conclusion that the 2006 results bound the Pu-238 mass in Cells 1-5. These results should be considered preliminary since additional measurements of the East Cell line are scheduled for 2017 and 2018. Those measurements will provide detailed information about the distribution of Pu-238 in the cells to be used to refine the results of the current assay.

  8. Determination of tributyltin in environmental water matrices using stir bar sorptive extraction with in-situ derivatisation and large volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Neng, N R; Santalla, R P; Nogueira, J M F

    2014-08-01

    Stir bar sorptive extraction with in-situ derivatization using sodium tetrahydridoborate (NaBH4) followed by liquid desorption and large volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detection under the selected ion monitoring mode (SBSE(NaBH4)in-situ-LD/LVI-GC-MS(SIM)) was successfully developed for the determination of tributyltin (TBT) in environmental water matrices. NaBH4 proved to be an effective and easy in-situ speciation agent for TBT in aqueous media, allowing the formation of adducts with enough stability and suitable polarity for SBSE analysis. Assays performed on water samples spiked at the 10.0μg/L, yielded convenient recoveries (68.2±3.0%), showed good accuracy, suitable precision (RSD<9.0%), low detection limits (23ng/L) and excellent linear dynamic range (r(2)=0.9999) from 0.1 to 170.0µg/L, under optimized experimental conditions. By using the standard addition method, the application of the present methodology to real surface water samples allowed very good performance at the trace level. The proposed methodology proved to be a feasible alternative for routine quality control analysis, easy to implement, reliable and sensitive to monitor TBT in environmental water matrices. PMID:24881528

  9. Pulser injection with subsequent removal for gamma-ray spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Hartwell, Jack K.; Goodwin, Scott G.; Johnson, Larry O.; Killian, E. Wayne

    1990-01-01

    An improved system for gamma-ray spectroscopy characterized by an interface module that controls the injection of electronic pulses as well as separation logic that enables storage of pulser events in a region of the spectrum of a multichannel analyzer distinct from the region reserved for storage of gamma-ray events. The module accomplishes this by tagging pulser events (high or low) injected into the amplification circuitry, adding an offset to the events so identified at the time the events are at the output of the analog to digital converter, and storing such events in the upper portion of the spectrum stored in the multichannel analyzer. The module can be adapted for use with existing gamma-ray spectroscopy equipment to provide for automatic analyses of radioisotopes.

  10. Fission studies by prompt gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materna, T.; Letourneau, A.; Amouroux, Ch.; Marchix, A.; Litaize, O.; Sérot, O.; Regnier, D.; Blanc, A.; Jentschel, M.; Köster, U.; Mutti, P.; Soldner, T.; Simpson, G.; Leoni, S.; de France, G.; Urban, W.

    2015-05-01

    The feasibility of retrieving accurate fission observables with a Ge-detector array around a fissile target placed in a cold neutron beam was tested. In three measurement campaigns performed at ILL with the EXILL setup, 235U and 241Pu targets were placed in the high flux cold neutron beam available at the PF1B neutron guide. Gamma-rays following fission were detected by an array of 16 Ge detectors. In the following study, part of data was analyzed as a proof of principle. A set of yields belonging to the Kr-Ba pair were extracted using a gamma-gamma coincidence technique. Preliminary results were compared to the predictions of two phenomenological models: GEF and FIFRELIN.

  11. Characterization of coal and charcoal by alpha-particle and gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco Lourtau, A. M.; Rubio Montero, M. P.; Jurado Vargas, M.

    2015-11-01

    Although coal and charcoal have similar physical and chemical characteristics, there are several crystallographic procedures used to distinguish and characterize them. But if the matrix is crushed, there is no standard procedure to distinguish coal from charcoal. In this work, a procedure to characterize coal and charcoal samples based on the radioactive content is proposed. The first assay is by gamma-ray spectrometry, which allows a part of the radioactive content to be determined rapidly and non-destructively. Then, alpha-particle spectrometry is applied to assay the content of those radionuclides which are difficult to determine precisely by gamma-ray spectrometry. This second technique requires prior chemical purification of the carbon sample in order to separate the corresponding radionuclides of interest.

  12. Latent transforming growth factor beta1 activation in situ: quantitative and functional evidence after low-dose gamma-irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrhart, E. J.; Segarini, P.; Tsang, M. L.; Carroll, A. G.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The biological activity of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta) is controlled by its secretion as a latent complex in which it is noncovalently associated with latency-associated peptide (LAP). Activation is the extracellular process in which TGF-beta is released from LAP, and is considered to be a primary regulatory control. We recently reported rapid and persistent changes in TGF-beta immunoreactivity in conjunction with extracellular matrix remodeling in gamma-irradiated mouse mammary gland. Our hypothesis is that these specific changes in immunoreactivity are indicative of latent TGF-beta activation. In the present study, we determined the radiation dose response and tested whether a functional relationship exists between radiation-induced TGF-beta and collagen type III remodeling. After radiation exposures as low as 0.1 Gy, we detected increased TGF-beta immunoreactivity in the mammary epithelium concomitant with decreased LAP immunostaining, which are events consistent with activation. Quantitative image analysis demonstrated a significant (P=0.0005) response at 0.1 Gy without an apparent threshold and a linear dose response to 5 Gy. However, in the adipose stroma, loss of LAP demonstrated a qualitative threshold at 0.5 Gy. Loss of LAP paralleled induction of collagen III immunoreactivity in this tissue compartment. We tested whether TGF-beta mediates collagen III expression by treating animals with TGF-beta panspecific monoclonal antibody, 1D11.16, administered i.p. shortly before irradiation. Radiation-induced collagen III staining in the adipose stroma was blocked in an antibody dose-dependent manner, which persisted through 7 days postirradiation. RNase protection assay revealed that radiation-induced elevation of total gland collagen III mRNA was also blocked by neutralizing antibody treatment. These data provide functional confirmation of the hypothesis that radiation exposure leads to latent TGF-beta activation, support our interpretation of the reciprocal shift in immunoreactivity as evidence of activation, and implicate TGF-beta as a mediator of tissue response to ionizing radiation. The sensitivity of activation to low radiation doses points to a potential role for TGF-beta in orchestrating tissue response to oxidative stress. As such, radiation may be useful as a probe to delineate the consequences of latent TGF-beta activation in situ.

  13. Monitoring of Martian atmosphere with gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasnault, O.; D'Uston, C.; Forni, O.; Maurice, S.

    Mars Odyssey has been monitoring the leakage gamma-rays from Mars since 2002 [1]. The spectrum of these gamma-rays is made of a dominating continuum plus lines (only 4% of the count rates) [2]. The latter have been used to build compositional maps of the surface [3]; the former can be analyzed to monitor atmospheric variations with time and place [4, 5]. Sometimes both aspects can be combined when during polar winters it is possible to track the argon in the atmosphere through its discrete gamma-ray line [6]. The Martian atmosphere is quite transparent (free mean path of about 100km) at these energies (100 keV - 10 MeV), and consequently the continuum varies by only a few percents over the Martian year. However the statistics are good enough to see these variations. Previous studies revealed short and long term time variations, as well as regional differences. In particular we noticed earlier that the atmospheric cycle looks slightly different from one year to the other. Deep basins (Argyre and Hellas) seem also to act as reservoirs at some seasons. We will present an update of the study of the gamma-ray continuum, including the latest data available, in terms of transparency of the Martian atmosphere. [1] Boynton et al. (2004) Space Sci. Rev., 110 (1), 37-83; [2] Evans et al. (2006) J. Geophys. Res., accepted; [3] Boynton et al. (2006) J. Geophys. Res., in preparation; [4] Gasnault et al. (2003) LPSC 34, abstract #1649 CD-ROM; [5] Gasnault et al. (2005) 1st Mars Express Sci. Conf., Noordwijk, Netherlands; [6] Sprague et al. (2006) J. Geophys. Res., accepted.

  14. On line gamma-ray spectrometry at open sea.

    PubMed

    Tsabaris, C; Ballas, D

    2005-01-01

    Set up and application of a stationary monitoring network for measuring specific gamma- activities in the Aegean Sea are described. Three NaI scintillator based spectrometers have been used to detect the gamma rays. The gross counting rate of each system was found to be nearly constant, when there was no rainfall. The volumetric activity of the natural gamma-ray emitter 40K in open sea varied from 12,200 to 13,000 Bq/m3. The counting rate for 1461 keV 40K radiation was measured by intercalibration with an appropriate salinity sensor mounted close to the NaI-detector system. A simple relation between the counting rate and the salt concentration has been observed. The amount of the artificial radioactivity from 137Cs was increased up to seven times higher after strong rainfall, compared to the radiation level as given in literature (3.5-5.5 Bq/m3), while the 214Bi counting rate was increased up to ten times compared to the data without rainfall. PMID:15498689

  15. Quantification of uranium-238 in environmental samples using gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hult, M.; Andreotti, E.; González de Orduña, R.; Pommé, S.; Yeltepe, E.

    2012-04-01

    A large number of environmental samples are routinely measured world-wide using gamma-ray spectrometry some of its assets being easy sample preparation and comprehensive data for many radionu-clides in one analysis. Although other techniques can be considered more suitable for analysing 238U in environmental samples, it is also routinely done by gamma-ray spectrometry. One mainly uses γ-ray emissions following the decay of the first daughter, 234Th, for determining the 238U activity. However, the low-energy gamma-rays at 63 keV and 92.5 keV are very difficult to quantify in a robust way due to high attenuation and interferences. This paper quantifies parameters affecting the possibility of making robust quantification of 238U via 234Th using gamma-ray spectrometry. It addresses the use of correct decay data, suitable detectors, optimised sample size, enhanced spectral amplification, correction for peak interferences and control of background.

  16. Desorption mass spectrometry: Revisiting the in-situ calibration technique for mixed group-V alloy MBE growth of ~3.3 μm diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Ron; Lu, Chunte; Yang, Chi; Newell, Timothy C.; Luong, Sanh

    2015-09-01

    We apply the desorption mass spectrometry (DMS) technique and analyze the desorbed Sb species in-situ during MBE growth of mixed As/Sb heterostructures. We demonstrate how DMS is useful in pre-growth calibration of the V/III ratio, the group-III ratio, as well as the Sb-content in quaternary or quinary mixed As/Sb alloys. We also apply DMS to the digital alloy growth method. For demonstration purposes, we start with an un-calibrated MBE system, use the DMS technique to calibrate all of the previously undetermined MBE parameters and grow a ~3.3 μm diode laser heterostructure in only one attempt. The results demonstrate that the DMS technique will allow the MBE to quickly converge toward a set of acceptable growth parameters without the need for ex-situ calibration of alloy composition.

  17. Messenger RNA Detection in Leukemia Cell lines by Novel Metal-Tagged in situ Hybridization using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ornatsky, Olga I; Baranov, Vladimir I; Bandura, Dmitry R; Tanner, Scott D; Dick, John

    2006-01-01

    Conventional gene expression profiling relies on using fluorescent detection of hybridized probes. Physical characteristics of fluorophores impose limitations on achieving a highly multiplex gene analysis of single cells. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of using metal-tagged in situ hybridization for mRNA detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). ICP-MS as an analytical detector has a number of unique and relevant properties: 1) metals and their stable isotopes generate non-overlapping distinct signals that can be detected simultaneously; 2) these signals can be measured over a wide dynamic range; 3) ICP-MS is quantitative and very sensitive. We used commercial antibodies conjugated to europium (Eu) and gold together with biotinylated oligonucleotide probes reacted with terbium-labeled streptavidin to demonstrate simultaneous mRNA and protein detection by ICP-MS in leukemia cells. PMID:23662035

  18. Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) for direct visualization of plant metabolites in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Sturtevant, Drew; Lee, Young -Jin; Chapman, Kent D.

    2015-11-22

    Direct visualization of plant tissues by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) has revealed key insights into the localization of metabolites in situ. Recent efforts have determined the spatial distribution of primary and secondary metabolites in plant tissues and cells. Strategies have been applied in many areas of metabolism including isotope flux analyses, plant interactions, and transcriptional regulation of metabolite accumulation. Technological advances have pushed achievable spatial resolution to subcellular levels and increased instrument sensitivity by several orders of magnitude. Furthermore, it is anticipated that MALDI-MSI and other MSI approaches will bring a new level of understanding to metabolomics as scientists will be encouraged to consider spatial heterogeneity of metabolites in descriptions of metabolic pathway regulation.

  19. Rapid analysis of fatty acid profiles in raw nuts and seeds by microwave-ultrasonic synergistic in situ extraction-derivatisation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Lin; Song, Shuang-Hong; Wu, Mei; He, Tian; Zhang, Zhi-Qi

    2013-12-15

    Based on microwave-ultrasonic synergistic in situ extraction-derivatisation (MUED), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was proposed for rapid analysis of fatty acid profiles in raw nut and seed materials. Several critical experimental parameters for MUED, including reaction temperature, microwave power, amounts of catalyst and derivatisation reagent, have been optimised using response surface methodology. The results showed that the chromatographic peak areas of total fatty acids and the content of total unsaturated fatty acids obtained with MUED were markedly higher than those obtained by the conventional method (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively). The MUED method simplified the handling steps compared to the conventional procedure, shortened the sample preparation time whilst improving the extraction and derivatisation efficiency of lipids, and reduced oxidisation and decomposition of the unsaturated fatty acids. The simplicity, robustness and practicality of this method highlighted its significant potential for application in the rapid analysis of fatty acids in natural food resource samples. PMID:23993615

  20. Photosensitized degradation kinetics of trace halogenated contaminants in natural waters using membrane introduction mass spectrometry as an in situ reaction monitor.

    PubMed

    Letourneau, Dane R; Gill, Chris G; Krogh, Erik T

    2015-11-01

    The photochemically mediated dechlorination of polyhalogenated compounds represents a potential decontamination strategy and a relevant environmental process in chemically reducing media. We report the UV irradiation of natural and artificial waters containing natural dissolved organic matter to effect the photo-sensitized degradation of chlorinated organic compounds, including tetrachloromethane, 1,1,1-tricloroethane, perchloroethene, 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane and chlorobenzene at trace (ppb) levels in aqueous solution. The degradation kinetics are followed in situ using membrane introduction mass spectrometry. By re-circulating the reaction mixture in a closed loop configuration over a semi-permeable hollow fiber polydimethylsiloxane membrane in a flow cell interface, volatile and semi-volatile compounds are continuously monitored using a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The time resolved quantitative information provides useful mechanistic insights, including kinetic data. Pseudo first-order rate constants for the degradation of contaminant mixtures in natural waters are reported. PMID:26439106

  1. In situ Measurement of Pore-Water pH in Anoxic Sediments Using Laser Raman Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltzer, E. T.; Luna, M.; Walz, P. M.; Zhang, X.; Brewer, P. G.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate measurement of the geochemical properties of sediment pore waters is of fundamental importance in ocean geochemistry and microbiology. Recent work has shown that the properties of pore waters can be measured rapidly in situ with a novel Raman based insertion probe (Zhang et al., 2010), and that data obtained from anoxic sediments on in situ dissolved methane concentrations are very different (~30x) than from recovered cores due the large scale degassing that occurs during core recovery (Zhang et al., submitted). Degassing of methane must carry with it via Henry’s Law partioning significant quantities of H2S, which is clearly detectable by smell during sample processing, and thus in situ measurement of H2S is also highly desirable. In practice, dissolved H2S is partitioned between the HS- and H2S species as a function of pH with pKa ~7 for the acid dissociation reaction. Since both species are Raman active full determination of the sulfide system is possible if the relative Raman cross sections are known. The diagenetic equations for these reactions are commonly summarized as: 2CH2O + SO4= ↔ 2HCO3- + H2S CH4 + SO4= ↔ HCO3- + HS- + H2O Three of the major components of these equations, CH4, SO4=, and H2S/HS-, are all observable directly by Raman spectroscopy; but the detection of HCO3- presents a challenge due to its low Raman cross section and thus poor sensitivity. We show that pore water pH, which is a good estimator of HCO3- if total CO2 or alkalinity are known, can be measured by observing the H2S / HS- ratio via the equation: pH = pKa + log([HS-]/[H2S]) thereby fully constraining these equations within a single measurement protocol. The Raman peak for HS- is at 2573 cm-1 and for H2S is at 2592 cm-1; thus the peaks are well separated and may easily be deconvoluted from the observed spectrum. We have determined the relative Raman cross sections by a series of laboratory measurements over a range of pH and by using the definition that when pH = pKa then the mole fractions are equal. We find by this means that the HS-/H2S factor is 2.744:1. We report here both the process for determining the relative Raman cross-sections and show the application of the technique via deconvolution of the species present in the spectra. We present results of in situ pore water measurements made on highly reducing sediments on the Santa Monica Basin Mounds and determine the in situ pH to have a mean value of 7.12 at 20 - 30 cm insertion depth into a zone of dense bacterial mat. References: Zhang, X., P.M. Walz, W.J. Kirkwood, K.C. Hester, W.Ussler, E.T. Peltzer, P.G. Brewer (2010). Development and deployment of a deep-sea Raman probe for measurement of pore water geochemistry. Deep-Sea Res. I 57: 297-306. Zhang, X., K.C. Hester, W. Ussler, P.M. Walz, E.T. Peltzer, P.G. Brewer (submitted). Observing Deep Ocean Sediment Methane Concentrations. Science.

  2. Natural Radiation from Soil using Gamma-Ray Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, M. A. G.; Moreira, R. H.; de Paula, A. L. C.; Medina, N. H.

    2009-06-01

    We have studied the distribution of natural radioactivity in the soil of Interlagos, in São Paulo city and Billings Reservoir, in São Bernardo do Campo, São Paulo, Brazil. The main contribution of the effective radiation dose is due to the elements of the 238Th decay series, with smaller contributions from 40K and the elements of the series of 238U. The results indicate the dose in all of the studied areas is around the average international dose due to external exposure to gamma rays (0.48 mSv/yr) proceeding from natural terrestrial elements.

  3. In situ metathesis ionic liquid formation dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for copper determination in water samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stanisz, Ewa; Zgoła-Grześkowiak, Agnieszka

    2013-10-15

    In situ synthesis of ionic liquid extractant for dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (in situ IL DLLME) combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS) for determination of copper in water samples was developed. Analytical signals were obtained without the back-extraction of copper from the IL phase prior to its determination by AAS. Some essential parameters of the microextraction and detection techniques such as the pH of sample solution, volume of components for in situ synthesis, matrix interferences and main parameters of graphite furnace atomizer have been studied. Under optimal conditions, high extraction efficiency for copper was achieved for the extraction of 0.7 µg L(-1) in 10.0 mL of sample solution employing 8 μL of 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide (HmimNTf2) as the extraction solvent. The detection limit was found as 0.004 µg L(-1) with an enrichment factor of 200. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for seven replicate measurements of 0.7 µg L(-1) in sample solution was 4%. The accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated by analysis of the Certified Reference Materials: NIST SRM 2709 (San Joaquin Soil), NBS SRM 2704 (Buffalo River Sediment), NRCC DOLT-2 (Dogfish Liver) and NIST SRM 1643e (Trace Element in Water). The measured copper contents in the reference materials were in satisfactory agreement with the certified values. The method was successfully applied to analysis of the tap, lake and mineral water samples. PMID:24054576

  4. Rechargeable alkaline manganese dioxide batteries. I - In situ X-ray diffraction investigation of the H(+)/gamma-MnO2 (EMD-type) insertion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondoloni, Christian; Laborde, Marc; Rioux, Jacques; Andoni, Edouard; Levy-Clement, Claude

    1992-04-01

    The influence of the electrochemical insertion and deinsertion of H(+) on the evolution of the crystallographic structure of EMD-type gamma-MnO2 insertion system during the discharge and recharge of an alkaline H(+)/MnO2 battery was investigated using in situ XRD observations. Results of voltage measurements are presented together with XRD profiles and measurements of variations of lattice parameters during the first discharge of alcaline cells. Mechanisms involved in the electrochemical insertion and deinsertion of H(+) are discussed.

  5. Characterising in situ activation and degradation of hindered amine light stabilisers using liquid extraction surface analysis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Paine, Martin R L; Barker, Philip J; Blanksby, Stephen J

    2014-01-15

    Changes in the molecular structure of polymer antioxidants such as hindered amine light stabilisers (HALS) is central to their efficacy in retarding polymer degradation and therefore requires careful monitoring during their in-service lifetime. The HALS, bis-(1-octyloxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidinyl) sebacate (TIN123) and bis-(1,2,2,6,6-pentamethyl-4-piperidinyl) sebacate (TIN292), were formulated in different polymer systems and then exposed to various curing and ageing treatments to simulate in-service use. Samples of these coatings were then analysed directly using liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) coupled with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Analysis of TIN123 formulated in a cross-linked polyester revealed that the polymer matrix protected TIN123 from undergoing extensive thermal degradation that would normally occur at 292°C, specifically, changes at the 1- and 4-positions of the piperidine groups. The effect of thermal versus photo-oxidative degradation was also compared for TIN292 formulated in polyacrylate films by monitoring the in situ conversion of N-CH3 substituted piperidines to N-H. The analysis confirmed that UV light was required for the conversion of N-CH3 moieties to N-H - a major pathway in the antioxidant protection of polymers - whereas this conversion was not observed with thermal degradation. The use of tandem mass spectrometric techniques, including precursor-ion scanning, is shown to be highly sensitive and specific for detecting molecular-level changes in HALS compounds and, when coupled with LESA, able to monitor these changes in situ with speed and reproducibility. PMID:24370104

  6. Speciation of inorganic arsenic in drinking water by wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry after in situ preconcentration with miniature solid-phase extraction disks.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Kenta; Inui, Tetsuo; Koike, Yuya; Aizawa, Mamoru; Nakamura, Toshihiro

    2015-03-01

    A rapid and simple method using wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometry after in situ solid-phase extraction (SPE) was developed for the speciation and evaluation of the concentration of inorganic arsenic (As) in drinking water. The method involves the simultaneous collection of As(III) and As(V) using 13 mm ϕ SPE miniature disks. The removal of Pb(2+) from the sample water was first conducted to avoid the overlapping PbLα and AsKα spectra on the XRF spectrum. To this end, a 50 mL aqueous sample (pH 5-9) was passed through an iminodiacetate chelating disk. The filtrate was adjusted to pH 2-3 with HCl, and then ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate solution was added. The solution was passed through a hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene filter placed on a Zr and Ca loaded cation-exchange disk at a flow rate of 12.5 mL min(-1) to separate As(III)-pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate complex and As(V). Each SPE disk was affixed to an acrylic plate using adhesive cellophane tape, and then examined by WDXRF spectrometry. The detection limits of As(III) and As(V) were 0.8 and 0.6 μg L(-1), respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to screening for As speciation and concentration evaluation in spring water and well water. PMID:25618730

  7. Correction for radon distribution in solid/liquid and air phases in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Carconi, P; Cardellini, F; Cozzella, M L; De Felice, P; Fazio, A

    2012-09-01

    The effect of radon diffusion and distribution between a (226)Ra matrix and the top air gap inside sample containers for gamma-ray spectrometry was studied. Containers filled at almost 100% or just 70% of total capacity yielded correction factors of about 7% and 20% respectively. Applying these correction factors allowed activity values calculated from (226)Ra or radon decay products to agree within 2%. PMID:22476014

  8. The potential of gamma-ray spectrometry as supplementary information for mapping central European soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuler, U.; Bock, M.; Baritz, R.; Willer, J.; Pickert, E.; Kardel, K.; Herrmann, L.

    2012-04-01

    Permanently updated soil maps are needed inter alia for the prediction of landslide hazards, flooding and drought effects, land degradation monitoring, and precision farming. Since comprehensive and intensive field mapping is not affordable, alternative mapping approaches are required. A promising tool, with quite unrecognised potential for modern soil science is gamma-ray spectrometry. As the radioelements potassium, thorium and uranium respond differently to soil forming processes, it should be possible to infer from their concentration on weathering status, and after calibration on soil properties and types. This paper aims to investigate the potential of airborne gamma spectrometry for mapping of central European soils and soil properties. The study was conducted for a test site in Southern Saxony, Germany, 140*85 km wide, representing diverse soil landscapes. Seven different petrographic training and validation areas were chosen each. To assess the potential of gamma-ray spectrometry as additional data layer, predictions were carried out (i) with and (ii) without radiometric data. The outputs were compared with independent soil information of the validation areas. Both prediction runs used the following predictors: elevation, slope, curvature, planform curvature, profile curvature, terrain ruggedness index, relative altitude, vertical distance above drainage network, wetness index, and convergence index. As additional predictor parent material derived from a reclassification of the official geological map (1:1M scale) was used. As radiometric properties potassium, thorium and uranium were used. The radiometric raster datasets were generated by universal kriging using relative altitude as covariate. Training and validation datasets were selected from a comprehensive dataset representing more than 14.000 point data. Point data include soil types and substrates, and for more than 800 sites soil profiles with analysed texture, pH, exchangeable cations, nutrients, and efficient cation exchange capacity. The study shows that gamma spectrometry is suitable to enhance the prediction of soil types and properties such as texture significantly.

  9. Determination of impurities in (124)I samples by high resolution gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, M C M; da Silva, R L; Delgado, J U; Poledna, R; de Araújo, M T F; Laranjeira, A S; de Veras, E; Braghirolli, A M S; Dos Santos, G R; Lopes, R T

    2016-03-01

    (124)I is a radionuclide used in the diagnosis of tumors. The National Health Agency requires identification and activity measurement of impurities. Using gamma spectrometry with an efficiency calibrated high-purity germanium detector, impurities (125)I and (126)I in an (1)(24)I production sample were identified. Activity ratios of (125)I and (126)I to (124)I were approximately 0.5% and 98%, respectively. PMID:26653211

  10. Cadium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) Gamma Ray Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    William Quam

    2001-09-01

    This report describes CZT crystals and their use in large arrays for generation of gamma ray spectra. Laboratory spectra will be shown together with spectra accumulated by various battery powered portable instruments (see Appendix A). One of these portable instruments was specifically constructed to minimize power consumption and yet provide reasonable isotope identification capability. Detailed data will be presented covering gamma energy resolution, gamma peak shapes, system background, and detector efficiency. Nearly all data were taken with very small crystals of CZT; cubes 5 mm on a side. A few spectra will be presented from cylindrical crystals of about the same size (see Appendix A). The small crystal size leads to low counting rates and extended counting times for reliable isotope identification. We have addressed this problem by using arrays of CZT crystals, initially two crystals and, at present, arrays of eight crystals. Data will be shown relating spectral parameters for these two arrays. System MDA is one way of combining resolution, efficiency, and background that will enable direct comparison of various detector types for individual isotope identification. We have calculated the MDA for an early dual crystal array and the current eight crystal array. Data derived from each array will be presented. In addition, it is possible to extrapolate the MDA methodology to much larger arrays. A 32-crystal array is under construction and extrapolations to 256 and 1024 crystals are considered possible. Estimated MDA values for these larger arrays are also presented. Several 8-crystal arrays have been constructed and versions have been incorporated into portable instruments. Descriptions of these small instruments are given covering physical size, weight, and general configuration. These instruments have been tested for shock and temperature effects and data will be presented on the results of these tests. The MDA concept will also allow extrapolation to large source to detector distances. The usual laboratory measurements are done with small sources at 20 to 50 cm ranges. Practical ranges for aerial work will be 50 to 100 meters or greater. These distances will require correction for air attenuation for most of the low energy isotopes. The approximations used in the present note for aerial measurements involve small diameter sources (diameter approximately equal to the altitude), a 1 kt pass, and a planar array with no aircraft attenuation material in the field of view. The array will have a collimator to limit the side-looking sensitivity to enable a more accurate extrapolation from the laboratory data. Large arrays will have significant physical size and weight compared to the small hand-held instruments thus far constructed. We estimate these parameters and extrapolate the power consumption to provide a realistic estimate of a suitable airborne system. In all cases these larger systems are lighter and physically more compact than the usual NaI or high purity Germanium (HPGe) systems used in aerial work. Thus deployment should be simple. The power consumption is much less as well.

  11. NMIS With Gamma Spectrometry for Attributes of Pu and HEU, Explosives and Chemical Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J. T.; Mattingly, J. K.; Mullens, J. A.; Neal, J. S.

    2002-05-10

    The concept for the system described herein is an active/passive Nuclear Materials Identification System{sup 2} (NMIS) that incorporates gamma ray spectrometry{sup 3}. This incorporation of gamma ray spectrometry would add existing capability into this system. This Multiple Attribute System can determine a wide variety of attributes for Pu and highly enriched uranium (HEU) of which a selected subset could be chosen. This system can be built using commercial off the shelf (COTS) components. NMIS systems are at All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) and Russian Federal Nuclear Center Institute of Technical Physics, (VNIITF) and measurements with Pu have been performed at VNIIEF and analyzed successfully for mass and thickness of Pu. NMIS systems are being used successfully for HEU at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The use of active gamma ray spectrometry for high explosive HE and chemical agent detection is a well known activation analysis technique, and it is incorporated here. This report describes the system, explains the attribute determination methods for fissile materials, discusses technical issues to be resolved, discusses additional development needs, presents a schedule for building from COTS components, and assembly with existing components, and discusses implementation issues such as lack of need for facility modification and low radiation exposure.

  12. Beam-folding ultraviolet-visible Fourier transform spectrometry and underwater cytometry for in situ measurement of marine phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuzhu

    The system complexity and hence high cost needed for generating the high-resolution and precise position-sampling triggers over very long distances is one of main hindrances to the popularization of the UV-visible Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). In part one of this thesis, the specially designed beam-folding and improved beam-folding methods to optically subdivide the laser fringes are presented. The Near-UV to Near-infrared FTSs based on 4-fold beam-folding systems were developed. The experimental results have demonstrated that these techniques are promising methods to produce the high-resolution and high-precision sampling triggers of scanning mechanism of UV-visible FTSs without the need for complicated optics, sophisticated detector electronics and high-stability motion control systems. The FTS based on the beam-folding technique can reach a spectral resolution of ˜4 cm-1 (0.1nm) in the visible wavelengths; The FTS based on the improved beam-folding technique can achieve a spectral resolution of ˜0.28 cm-1 (0.01nm) in the visible wavelengths. In the improved beam-folding FTS, The adoption of retroreflectors and the symmetrical arrangement of two back-to back interferometers produced much higher performance than that of the beam-folding FTS employing prism mirrors. The replacement of prism mirrors by retroreflectors and the symmetrical optical arrangement maintain the FTS in perfect optical alignment during scanning process by keeping all beams parallel with the incident beams. The vertex of the movable retroreflector in the measurement interferometer is arranged very close to the midpoint of the vertices of the movable retroreflectors in the tracking interferometer so that the optical symmetrical axes for both interferometers always keep in line with each other. That is, the change of the OPD of the tracking interferometer always remains synchronous to that of the OPD of the measurement interferometer even for any moving misalignments, making the FTS itself insensitive to these fluctuations. In addition, an attempt on fast-scanning visible IFTS based on the improved beam-folding technique was done. Preliminary experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the fast-scanning visible IFTS based on the improved beam-folding technique. In part two, an underwater cytometer for in situ measurement of marine phytoplankton using a combining technique of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and laser differential Doppler velocimetry (LDDV) was developed. The advancement compared to the previous work done in the laboratory is to realize an in situ underwater measurement system by means of improving the optical design. The experimental results in June and August 2004 in the coastal area of Hong Kong demonstrated that the new cytometer can be used for in situ measurement of marine phytoplankton. The mean concentration detected by this instrument agreed closely with the experimental data measured by the traditional cell counting under a microscope. With an underwater optical sensing unit that does not rely on an electrical power source, the sensing unit can stay submerged underwater for long periods, making a long-term real-time monitoring system possible.

  13. In situ nucleophilic substitution reaction of N,N-dialkylaminoethyl-2-chlorides monitored by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, V V S; Reddy, T Jagadeshwar; Murty, M R V S; Prabhakar, S; Vairamani, M

    2006-01-01

    The detection and identification of degradation products of scheduled chemicals, which are characteristic markers of Chemical Warfare agents (CWAs), plays a key role in verification analysis. Identification of such non-scheduled but specific markers of CWAs helps in deciphering the kind of agent that was present in the sample submitted for off-site analysis. This paper describes the stability of N,N-dialkylaminoethyl-2-chlorides, which are precursors for highly toxic chemicals like VX, in different solvents. These compounds are stable in chloroform, acetonitrile, hexane and dichloromethane but tend to undergo in situ nucleophilic substitution reaction in the presence of alcohols giving the corresponding alkyl ether. The study shows that N,N-dialkylaminoethyl alkyl ethers can be used as markers of N,N-dialkylaminoethyl-2-chlorides. A detailed degradation study of these compounds in the presence of alcohols was carried out and it was found that the reaction follows pseudo-first order kinetics. Electron ionization mass spectral data for the methyl ethers of all the compounds are briefly discussed. PMID:16791867

  14. Coupled in situ electrodeposition-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: a new approach in quantitative matrix free analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matousek, J. P.; Powell, H. K. J.

    1995-07-01

    A new approach for in situ matrix elimination in electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy (ETAAS) is described. In an initial electrodeposition step (possible by use of a Pt/Ir delivery tube on the autosampler) the furnace is coated with about 0.25 μg Pd. Quantitative deposition of metallic analytes onto this renewable substrate is achieved from 25-40 μl samples by electrolysis for 60 s at 3.5-5.0 V (35-45 mA). Reprogramming of the autosampler to remove spent electrolyte after the electrolyses and to provide a rinse cycle facilitates removal of > 99.5% of a 0.5 M NaCl matrix prior to atomization. It is proposed that the analyte is bound onto the metallic modifier, rather than encapsulated within it. Binding of the analyte with Pd significantly increases the appearance temperature for Cd and Pb. The ashing loss for these analytes deposited onto Pd from a Cl - matrix is observed above 900°C and 1300°C, respectively. This stabilization facilitates separation of the residual NaCl matrix before atomization. It has been established for Cd that sensitivity of the determination remains constant for matrices as diverse as 1% HNO 3, 0.5 M NaCl and sea water.

  15. Testing of regolith of celestial bolides with active neutron gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vostrukhin, Andrey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Golovin, Dmitry; Litvak, Maxim; Sanin, Anton

    2015-04-01

    Current space instruments for studying planet's surface include gamma ray spectrometers that detect natural radioactive isotopes as well as gamma-rays induced in subsurface by galactic cosmic rays. When measuring from celestial body's surface, statistics and amount of detected elements can be dramatically increased with active methods, where soil exposed to artificial flux of particles. One good example is the Russian Dynamic Albedo of Neutron (DAN) instrument onboard Martian Science Laboratory mission (Curiosity rover) developed in 2005-2011. It is the first active neutron spectrometer flown to another planet as part of a landed mission to investigate subsurface water distribution and which has now successfully operated for more than two years on the Martian surface. Presentation describes a number of space instruments for different landers and rovers being developed in Russian Space Research Institute for studying Moon and Mars, as well as method of active neutron and gamma spectrometry overview.

  16. A new extraction technique for in situ analyses of amino and carboxylic acids on Mars by gas chromatography mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, A.; Glavin, D. P.; Sternberg, R.; Szopa, C.; Rodier, C.; Navarro-González, R.; Raulin, F.; Cabane, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2006-12-01

    In order to target key organic compounds in the Martian regolith using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS), we have developed a new extraction procedure coupled with chemical derivatization. This new technique was tested on a Mars analog soil sample collected from the Atacama Desert in Chile. We found that amino and carboxylic acids can be extracted from the Atacama soil in a 1:1 mixture of isopropanol and water after ultrasonic treatment for 30 min. The extracted organic compounds were then derivatized in a single-step reaction using N-methyl- N-( tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) as the silylating agent in order to transform these compounds into volatile species that can then be detected by GC-MS. We are currently developing a miniaturized reaction cell suited for spaceflight, where both organic extraction and chemical derivatization processes can take place in a single step.

  17. Rapid and simultaneous in situ assessment of aflatoxins and stilbenes using silica plate imprinting mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Diogo N; Ferreira, Mônica S; Catharino, Rodrigo R

    2014-01-01

    A fast and direct combination of techniques for simultaneous mycotoxin and phytoalexin identification in peanut skin and kernel is described. Silica Plate Imprinting Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (SPILDI-MSI) is a powerful technique that exhibits great advantages, such as solvent-free and matrix-free characteristics, as well as no sample preparation or separation steps. It also permits accurate identification of mycotoxins and phytoalexins with unique fingerprint profiles in just a few seconds. Results are expressed as chemical images of the 4 identified types of aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1 and G2) and a stilbenoid (resveratrol). Also, SPILDI-MSI allows the comparison between the spatial distribution of aflatoxins and resveratrol found in kernel and skin. This novel application has proven to be useful for instantaneous qualitative assessment of aflatoxins and stilbenoids both in the peanut skin and kernel and offers precise tracking of fungal contamination in nuts and other foodstuffs. PMID:24595464

  18. Rapid and Simultaneous In Situ Assessment of Aflatoxins and Stilbenes Using Silica Plate Imprinting Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Diogo N.; Ferreira, Mônica S.; Catharino, Rodrigo R.

    2014-01-01

    A fast and direct combination of techniques for simultaneous mycotoxin and phytoalexin identification in peanut skin and kernel is described. Silica Plate Imprinting Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (SPILDI-MSI) is a powerful technique that exhibits great advantages, such as solvent-free and matrix-free characteristics, as well as no sample preparation or separation steps. It also permits accurate identification of mycotoxins and phytoalexins with unique fingerprint profiles in just a few seconds. Results are expressed as chemical images of the 4 identified types of aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1 and G2) and a stilbenoid (resveratrol). Also, SPILDI-MSI allows the comparison between the spatial distribution of aflatoxins and resveratrol found in kernel and skin. This novel application has proven to be useful for instantaneous qualitative assessment of aflatoxins and stilbenoids both in the peanut skin and kernel and offers precise tracking of fungal contamination in nuts and other foodstuffs. PMID:24595464

  19. Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Samples Fractured In Situ with a Spring-Loaded Trap System

    PubMed Central

    Lanekoff, Ingela; Kurczy, Michael E.; Hill, Rowland; Fletcher, John S.; Vickerman, John C.; Winograd, Nick; Sjövall, Peter; Ewing, Andrew G.

    2010-01-01

    An in situ freeze fracture device featuring a spring-loaded trap system has been designed and characterized for TOF SIMS analysis of single cells. The device employs the sandwich assembly, which is typically used in freeze fracture TOF SIMS experiments to prepare frozen, hydrated cells for high-resolution SIMS imaging. The addition of the spring-loaded trap system to the sandwich assembly offers two advances to this sample preparation method. First, mechanizing the fracture by adding a spring standardizes each fracture by removing the need to manually remove the top of the sandwich assembly with a cryogenically cooled knife. A second advance is brought about because the top of the sandwich is not discarded after the sandwich assembly has been fractured. This results in two imaging surfaces effectively doubling the sample size and providing the unique ability to image both sections of a cell bifurcated by the fracture. Here we report TOF SIMS analysis of freeze fractured rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells using a Bi cluster ion source. This work exhibits the ability to obtain single cell chemical images with sub-cellular lateral resolution from cells preserved in an ice matrix. In addition to preserving the cells, the signal from lipid fragment ions rarely identified in single cells are better observed in the freeze-fractured samples for these experiments. Furthermore, using the accepted argument that K+ signal indicates a cell that has been fractured though the cytoplasm, we have also identified different fracture planes of cells over the surface. Coupling a mechanized freeze fracture device to high-resolution cluster SIMS imaging will provide the sensitivity and resolution as well as the number of trials required to carry out biologically relevant SIMS experiments. PMID:20593800

  20. In situ emulsification microextraction using a dicationic ionic liquid followed by magnetic assisted physisorption for determination of lead prior to micro-sampling flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shokri, Masood; Beiraghi, Asadollah; Seidi, Shahram

    2015-08-19

    For the first time, a simple and efficient in situ emulsification microextraction method using a dicationic ionic liquid followed by magnetic assisted physisorption was presented to determine trace amounts of lead. In this method, 400 μL of 1.0 mol L(-1) lithium bis (trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide aqueous solution, Li[NTf2], was added into the sample solution containing 100 μL of 1.0 mol L(-1) 1,3-(propyl-1,3-diyl) bis (3-methylimidazolium) chloride, [pbmim]Cl2, to form a water immiscible ionic liquid, [pbmim][NTf2]2. This new in situ formed dicationic ionic liquid was applied as the acceptor phase to extract the lead-ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (Pb-APDC) complexes from the sample solution. Subsequently, 30 mg of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were added into the sample solution to collect the fine droplets of [pbmim][NTf2]2, physisorptively. Finally, MNPs were eluted by acetonitrile, separated by an external magnetic field and the obtained eluent was subjected to micro-sampling flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) for further analysis. Comparing with other microextraction methods, no special devices and centrifugation step are required. Parameters influencing the extraction efficiency such as extraction time, pH, concentration of chelating agent, amount of MNPs and coexisting interferences were studied. Under the optimized conditions, this method showed high extraction recovery of 93% with low LOD of 0.7 μg L(-1). Good linearity was obtained in the range of 2.5-150 μg L(-1) with determination coefficient (r(2)) of 0.9921. Relative standard deviation (RSD%) for seven repeated measurements at the concentration of 10 μg L(-1) was 4.1%. Finally, this method was successfully applied for determination of lead in some water and plant samples. PMID:26343434

  1. The Mars Organic Molecule Analyser : in situ analysis of organic compounds on Mars by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, Arnaud; Sternberg, Robert; Freissinet, Caroline; Pinnick, Veronika; Szopa, Cyril; Coll, Patrice; Geffroy-Rodier, Claude; Raulin, Francois; Goesmann, Fred

    The search for signs of past or present life is one of the primary goals of the future Mars exploratory missions. With this aim the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) experiment of the ExoMars 2016-2018 next coming joint ESA/NASA mission is designed to perform the in situ analysis of exobiological organic molecules of exobiological interest in the Martian soil such as amino acids, carboxylic acids, nucleobases or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). With the aim to separate and detect organic compounds from Martian soil, US and European teams have respectively built an ion trap mass spectrometer and a gas chromatograph. The mass spectrometer prototype has been coupled with the gas chromatograph prototype which is able to work in standalone mode by using a TCD detector. A GC-MS compatible sample processing system (SPS) allowing the extraction and the chemical transformation of the organic compounds from the soil, within space compatible operating conditions, has also been devel-oped. The sample processing is performed in an oven, dedicated to the MOMA experiment containing the solid sample (50-100mg). The internal temperature of which can be ranged from 20 to 1000 C. The extraction step is achieved by using thermodesorption in the range of 100 to 300C for 5 to 20 min. Then, the chemical derivatization and/or thermochemolysis of the extracted compounds is performed directly on the soil with a mixture of MTBSTFA-DMF, TMAH or DMF-DMA solution when enantiomeric separation is required. By decreasing the polarity of the target molecules, this step allows their volatilization at a temperature below 250C without any chemical degradation. Once derivatized, the volatile target molecules are trapped in a cold and chemical trap and promptly desorbed into the gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer. Preliminary tests, performed on Martian analogue soils (Atacama), with the MOMA SPS-GC/MS experiment, allowed the detection of organic compounds such as amino and carboxylic acids below the ppm level.

  2. Combination of ESI and MALDI mass spectrometry for qualitative, semi-quantitative and in situ analysis of gangliosides in brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yangyang; Wang, Jun; Liu, Jian’an; Han, Juanjuan; Xiong, Shaoxiang; Yong, Weidong; Zhao, Zhenwen

    2016-01-01

    Gangliosides are a family of complex lipids that are abundant in the brain. There is no doubt the investigations about the distribution of gangliosides in brian and the relationship between gangliosides and Alzheimer’s disease is profound. However, these investigations are full of challenges due to the structural complexity of gangliosides. In this work, the method for efficient extraction and enrichment of gangliosides from brain was established. Moreover, the distribution of gangliosides in brain was obtained by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). It was found that 3-aminoquinoline (3-AQ) as matrix was well-suited for MALDI MS analysis of gangliosides in negative ion mode. In addition, the pretreatment by ethanol (EtOH) cleaning brain section and the addition of ammonium formate greatly improved the MS signal of gangliosides in the brain section when MALDI MSI analysis was employed. The distribution of ganliosides in cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum was respectively acquired by electrospray ionization (ESI) MS and MALDI MSI, and the data were compared for reliability evaluation of MALDI MSI. Further, applying MALDI MSI technology, the distribution of gangliosides in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mouse brain was obtained, which may provide a new insight for bioresearch of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). PMID:27142336

  3. Combination of ESI and MALDI mass spectrometry for qualitative, semi-quantitative and in situ analysis of gangliosides in brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yangyang; Wang, Jun; Liu, Jian'an; Han, Juanjuan; Xiong, Shaoxiang; Yong, Weidong; Zhao, Zhenwen

    2016-01-01

    Gangliosides are a family of complex lipids that are abundant in the brain. There is no doubt the investigations about the distribution of gangliosides in brian and the relationship between gangliosides and Alzheimer's disease is profound. However, these investigations are full of challenges due to the structural complexity of gangliosides. In this work, the method for efficient extraction and enrichment of gangliosides from brain was established. Moreover, the distribution of gangliosides in brain was obtained by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). It was found that 3-aminoquinoline (3-AQ) as matrix was well-suited for MALDI MS analysis of gangliosides in negative ion mode. In addition, the pretreatment by ethanol (EtOH) cleaning brain section and the addition of ammonium formate greatly improved the MS signal of gangliosides in the brain section when MALDI MSI analysis was employed. The distribution of ganliosides in cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum was respectively acquired by electrospray ionization (ESI) MS and MALDI MSI, and the data were compared for reliability evaluation of MALDI MSI. Further, applying MALDI MSI technology, the distribution of gangliosides in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mouse brain was obtained, which may provide a new insight for bioresearch of Alzheimer's disease (AD). PMID:27142336

  4. Determination of methylmercury by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using headspace single-drop microextraction with in situ hydride generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Sandra; Fragueiro, Sandra; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    A new method is proposed for preconcentration and matrix separation of methylmercury prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Generation of methylmercury hydride (MeHgH) from a 5-ml solution is carried out in a closed vial and trapped onto an aqueous single drop (3-μl volume) containing Pd(II) or Pt(IV) (50 and 10 mg/l, respectively). The hydrogen evolved in the headspace (HS) after decomposition of sodium tetrahydroborate (III) injected for hydride generation caused the formation of finely dispersed Pd(0) or Pt(0) in the drop, which in turn, were responsible for the sequestration of MeHgH. A preconcentration factor of ca. 40 is achieved with both noble metals used as trapping agents. The limit of detection of methylmercury was 5 and 4 ng/ml (as Hg) with Pd(II) or Pt(IV) as trapping agents, and the precision expressed as relative standard deviation was about 7%. The preconcentration system was fully characterised through optimisation of the following variables: Pd(II) or Pt(IV) concentration in the drop, extraction time, pH of the medium, temperatures of both sample solution and drop, concentration of salt in the sample solution, sodium tetrahydroborate (III) concentration in the drop and stirring rate. The method has been successfully validated against two fish certified reference materials (CRM 464 tuna fish and CRM DORM-2 dogfish muscle) following selective extraction of methylmercury in 2 mol/l HCl medium.

  5. Real time in situ chemical characterization of submicrometer organic particles using direct analysis in real time-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nah, Theodora; Chan, ManNin; Leone, Stephen R; Wilson, Kevin R

    2013-02-19

    Direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) is used to analyze the surface chemical composition of nanometer-sized organic aerosol particles in real time at atmospheric pressure. By introducing a stream of particles in between the DART ionization source and the atmospheric pressure inlet of the mass spectrometer, the aerosol is exposed to a thermal flow of helium or nitrogen gas containing some fraction of metastable helium atoms or nitrogen molecules. In this configuration, the molecular constituents of organic particles are desorbed, ionized, and detected with reduced molecular ion fragmentation, allowing for compositional identification. Aerosol particles detected include alkanes, alkenes, acids, esters, alcohols, aldehydes, and amino acids. The ion signal produced by DART-MS scales with the aerosol surface area rather than volume, suggesting that DART-MS is a viable technique to measure the chemical composition of the particle interface. For oleic acid, particle size measurements of the aerosol stream exiting the ionization region suggest that the probing depth depends upon the desorption temperature, and the probing depth is estimated to be on the order of 5 nm for a 185 nm diameter particle at a DART heater temperature of 500 °C with nitrogen as the DART gas. The reaction of ozone with submicrometer oleic acid particles is measured to demonstrate the ability of this technique to identify products and quantify reaction rates in a heterogeneous reaction. PMID:23330910

  6. In-situ monitoring of actinides and rare earth elements by electrothermal hollow cathode discharge spectrometry. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.C.; Edelson, M.C.

    1992-12-01

    This report describes an Electrothermal Hollow Cathode Discharge Spectrometry (ET-HCDS) source being constructed for the analytical determination of actinides and rare earth elements. This work was initiated with the support of the Office of Safeguards and Security; the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration began funding work in this area in mid-FY1992 and the work is continuing into FY1993 with funds from both sources. Special features of this instrument should permit it to be used for the determination of individual isotopic species, which is important for safeguard`s materials control and accountancy. ET-HCDS can be achieved using compact instrumentation suitable for use in field laboratories. The technique is capable of determining a suite of environmentally-important species, such as the actinides and the heavy metals, in a variety of physical forms (e.g., in solution, as found on air particulates, or in soils). ET-HCDS should be capable of very sensitive analyses and should require very small samples (e.g., microgram). Since ET-HCDS is possible in an air atmosphere (at reduced pressures), it may be useful for the real-time determination of hazardous materials, both radioactive and non radioactive, contained in dusts released during waste retrieval operations; ET-HCDS should also be useful for the rapid and sensitive analysis of metals in soils.

  7. In Situ Analysis of Bacterial Lipopeptide Antibiotics by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    PubMed

    Debois, Delphine; Ongena, Marc; Cawoy, Hélène; De Pauw, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is a technique developed in the late 1990s enabling the two-dimensional mapping of a broad variety of biomolecules present at the surface of a sample. In many applications including pharmaceutical studies or biomarker discovery, the distribution of proteins, lipids or drugs, and metabolites may be visualized within tissue sections. More recently, MALDI MSI has become increasingly applied in microbiology where the versatility of the technique is perfectly suited to monitor the metabolic dynamics of bacterial colonies. The work described here is focused on the application of MALDI MSI to map secondary metabolites produced by Bacilli, especially lipopeptides, produced by bacterial cells during their interaction with their environment (bacteria, fungi, plant roots, etc.). This chapter addresses the advantages and challenges that the implementation of MALDI MSI to microbiological samples entails, including detailed protocols on sample preparation (from both microbiologist and mass spectrometrist points of view), matrix deposition, and data acquisition and interpretation. Lipopeptide images recorded from confrontation plates are also presented. PMID:26831708

  8. A Case Study Correlating Innovative Gamma Ray Scanning Detection Systems Data to Surface Soil Gamma Spectrometry Results - 13580

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Shannon; Rodriguez, Rene; Billock, Paul; Lit, Peter

    2013-07-01

    HydroGeoLogic (HGL), Inc. completed a United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) study to characterize radiological contamination at a site near Canoga Park, California. The characterized area contained 470 acres including the site of a prototype commercial nuclear reactor and other nuclear design, testing, and support operations from the 1950's until 1988 [1]. The site history included radiological releases during operation followed by D and D activities. The characterization was conducted under an accelerated schedule and the results will support the project remediation. The project has a rigorous cleanup to background agenda and does not allow for comparison to risk-based guidelines. To target soil sample locations, multiple lines of evidence were evaluated including a gamma radiation survey, geophysical surveys, historical site assessment, aerial photographs, and former worker interviews. Due to the time since production and decay, the primary gamma emitting radionuclide remaining is cesium-137 (Cs-137). The gamma ray survey covered diverse, rugged terrain using custom designed sodium iodide thallium-activated (NaI(Tl)) scintillation detection systems. The survey goals included attaining 100% ground surface coverage and detecting gamma radiation as sensitively as possible. The effectiveness of innovative gamma ray detection systems was tested by correlating field Cs-137 static count ratios to Cs-137 laboratory gamma spectrometry results. As a case study, the area encompassing the former location of the first nuclear power station in the U. S. was scanned, and second by second global positioning system (GPS)-linked gamma spectral data were evaluated by examining total count rate and nuclide-specific regions of interest. To compensate for Compton scattering from higher energy naturally occurring radionuclides (U-238, Th-232 and their progeny, and K-40), count rate ratios of anthropogenic nuclide-specific regions of interest to the total count rate were calculated. From the scanning data, locations with observed Cs-137 ratios exceeding six standard deviations above the mean ratio were mapped in high resolution [2]. Field teams returned to those locations to collect static count measurements using the same detection systems. Soil surface samples were collected at 30 locations and analyzed for Cs-137. An exponential correlation was identified between Cs-137 concentrations in surface soil and field-scanned Cs-137 ratios. The data indicate field minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of Cs-137 at 0.02 Bq/g (0.5 pCi/g) or lower depending on contaminant distribution in soil. (authors)

  9. Apparatus for measuring the stopping power of active materials evaporated in situ and characterized by Auger electron spectrometry and Rutherford backscattering

    SciTech Connect

    Semrad, D.; Bauer, P.; Eder, K.; Obermann, W.

    1986-07-01

    An ultrahigh-vacuum scattering chamber working in the low 10/sup -9/-mbar range is described. It is attached to a standard O-ring sealed beam transport system of an electrostatic accelerator. Twelve targets can be prepared in situ, one by one, by evaporating the material onto backings, which are mounted on tiltable target holders on a wheel. Backscattering spectra are obtained from these targets and the stopping cross section is deduced from their widths. A cooled high-resolution surface barrier detector is used for this purpose. The integral concentrations of light impurities in the target are obtained using Rutherford backscattering (RBS), whereas Auger electron spectrometry (AES) together with a sputtering device is used to determine the depth composition. As a test of the assembly we determined the stopping power of aluminum for protons and deuterons, respectively. The results are compared to published tables based upon fits to experiments. The influence of impurities on the result is discussed for an aluminum target prepared under standard evaporation conditions.

  10. Real Time in Situ Gamma Radiation Measurements of the Plume Evolution from the Full-Scale Radiological Dispersal Device Field Trials.

    PubMed

    Korpach, Ed; Berg, Rodney; Erhardt, Lorne; Lebel, Luke; Liu, Chuanlei

    2016-05-01

    During the Full-Scale Radiological Dispersal Device Field Trials carried out in Suffield in 2012, several suites of detection and sampling equipment were used to measure and characterize the explosive dispersal of the short half-life radioactive tracer Lanthanum-140 (La). The equipment deployed included networks of in situ real-time radiation monitoring detectors providing measurements of different sensitivities and characteristics. A dense array of lower sensitivity detectors was established near field, ranging from 10 to 450 m from the detonation location. A sparser array of more sensitive detectors was established in the far field (150 m to 3.5 km from the detonation location). Each was used to collect and report the dose rate data from the radioactive plume passage with a sample time resolution of 1 s. The two systems went through independent calibrations and were compared and shown to be consistent with each other. The in situ gamma radiation measurements have allowed the movement and evolution of the plume to be described and to identify deposition rates and non-uniformities in the temporal shape of the plume. This knowledge could be applied for emergency planning guidance for the case of release of radioactive material by a radiological dispersive device. PMID:27023030

  11. Development of a method for in situ measurement of denitrification in aquifers using 15N tracer tests and membrane inlet mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschenbach, W.; Well, R.; Flessa, H.; Walther, W.; Duijnisveld, W. H. M.

    2009-04-01

    In NO3- contaminated aquifers containing reduced compounds like organic carbon or sulfides, denitrification is an intense process. Its characterization is of interest because NO3- consump-tion improves water quality and N2O production can cause emission of this greenhouse gas to the atmosphere. Spatial distribution of NO3- and N2 produced by denitrification in groundwa-ter (excess N2) reflects the NO3- input as well as cumulative denitrification during aquifer pas-sage. Reaction progress (RP) at a given location, i.e. the relative consumption by denitrifica-tion of the NO3- that had been leached to the aquifers, characterizes the stage of the denitrifi-cation process. RP can be derived from the ratio between accumulated gaseous denitrification products and initial NO3- concentrations. The amount and spatial distribution of reduced com-pounds within denitrifying aquifers is not well known. Recent findings from parallel investi-gations on in situ denitrification and reactive compounds suggests that single-well 15N tracer tests might be suitable to characterize the stock of reduced compounds in aquifers (Konrad 2007). The overall objective of our studies is measure the spatial dynamics of denitrification within two sandy aquifers in northern Germany. This includes measurement of the actually occurring denitrification process. Moreover we want to determine the long-term denitrification potential which is governed by the stock of reactive material. Here we present a new approach for in situ-measurement of denitrification at monitoring wells using a combination of 15N-tracer push-pull experiments with in situ analysis of 15N-labled N2 and N2O using membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS). We will present first results from a laboratory test with aquifer mesocosms using the MIMS method. In this test we supplemented aquifer material of two depths (2 and 7 m below surface) of a drinking water catchment in Northwest Germany with K15NO3 solution. After tracer application we took wa-ter samples at regular intervals with an automated sampling device over 5 days. A small part of the sample was directly conducted in the membrane inlet of our mass spectrometer and the other part was collected in serum bottles which were immediately sealed with rubber septa and stored for later measurement by isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). Results available up to now showed for both types of measurement a linear increase of deni-trification products (15(N2O+N2)) over time. At the end of our laboratory test we measured up to 270 and 2400 µg/L 15(N2O+N2) in the water samples from the supplemented aquifer mate-rial of 3 and 7 m depth respectively. Because of the online measurement with MIMS we were able to see during the experiment if and when the production of the labeled denitrification products started. Later-on this approach will be used in the field. Here, the MIMS-technique will be especially advantageous, because the success of tracer test can be immediately seen during in situ sampling. Results of excess-N2 measurements at the monitoring wells within the two aquifers showed a range of 0 to 30 mg L-1 excess-N2 and a RP between 0 and 100%. References: Konrad, C. (2007): Methoden zur Bestimmung des Umsatzes von Stickstoff, dargestellt für drei Pleistozäne Grundwasserleiter Norddeutschlands, PhD thesis, Dresden Univ. of Techn., Germany, 157 pp.

  12. Radioactivity Levels and Gamma-Ray Dose Rate in Soil Samples from Kohistan (Pakistan) Using Gamma-Ray Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, M. Khan; Ismail, M.; K., Khan; Akhter, P.

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of naturally occurring radionuclides (226Ra, 232Th and 40K) and an anthropogenic radionuclide 137Cs is carried out in some soil samples collected from Kohistan district of N.W.F.P. (Pakistan), using gamma-ray spectrometry. The gamma spectrometry is operated using a high purity Germanium (HPGe) detector coupled with a computer based high resolution multi channel analyzer. The specific activity in soil ranges from 24.72 to 78.48Bq·kg-1 for 226Ra, 21.73 to 75.28Bq·kg-1 for 232Th, 7.06 to 14.9Bq·kg-1 for 137Cs and 298.46 to 570.77Bq·kg-1 for 40K with the mean values of 42.11, 43.27, 9.5 and 418.27Bq·kg-1, respectively. The radium equivalent activity in all the soil samples is lower than the safe limit set in the OECD report (370Bq·kg-1). Man-made radionuclide 137Cs is also present in detectable amount in all soil samples. Presence of 137Cs indicates that the samples in this remote area also receive some fallout from nuclear accident in Chernobyl power plant in 1986. The internal and external hazard indices have the mean values of 0.48 and 0.37 respectively. Absorbed dose rates and effective dose equivalents are also determined for the samples. The concentration of radionuclides found in the soil samples during the present study is nominal and does not pose any potential health hazard to the general public.

  13. Nuclear chemistry of returned lunar samples: Nuclide analysis by gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okelley, G. D.

    1975-01-01

    Primordial and cosmogenic radionuclide concentrations are determined nondestructively by gamma-ray spectrometry in soil and rock samples from the returned Apollo 17 sample collection from Taurus-Littrow and Descartes. Geochemical evidence in support of field geology speculation concerning layering of the subfloor basalt flows is demonstrated along with a possible correlation of magmatic fractionation of K/U as a function of depth. The pattern of radionuclide concentrations observed in these samples is distinct due to proton bombardment by the intense solar flares of August 4-9, 1972. Such radionuclide determinations are used in determining lunar sample orientation and characterizing solar flare activity.

  14. Thorium determination in intercomparison samples and in some Romanian building materials by gamma ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pantelica, A; Georgescu, I I; Murariu-Magureanu, M D; Margaritescu, I; Cincu, E

    2001-01-01

    Thorium content in zircon sand, thorium ore and a thorium liquid sample (EU Laboratories Network Intercomparison), as well as in some Romanian building materials: sand, wood, tufa, asbestos-cement. cement mill dust, coal fly ash, bricks, and tile (28 samples) was deterimined by gamma ray spectrometry. For the building materials, 226Ra, 40K and 137Cs specific activities were also measured. The results were compared with the Romanian legal norms concerning the highest admissible levels for 232Th, 226Ra. and 40K radioactivity. and to Th, U, and K concentration values previously determined in our laboratory on similar types of samples. PMID:11843363

  15. Low Background Gamma-Ray Spectrometry in the 'Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane'

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert, Ph.; Hubert, F.

    2007-03-28

    Most of the underground experiments in physics and many studies in geology, biology or environmental sciences face a common requirement with the necessity of using experimental devices with ultra-low background radioactivity. Many developments involving many different techniques have been used in order to be able to measure extremely low levels of radioactivity in materials. This report will focus on low background gamma-ray spectrometry and will describe the work which has been carried out over the last fifteen years in the 'Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane' (LSM)

  16. Comparison of LabSOCS and GESPECOR codes used in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Done, L; Tugulan, L C; Gurau, D; Dragolici, F; Alexandru, C

    2016-03-01

    Two dedicated software packages -LabSOCS and GESPECOR- for efficiency evaluation in gamma-ray spectrometry, were compared for equivalence. The detection efficiency and the coincidence-summing corrections coefficients were calculated for a specific HPGe detector, for different sample parameters and energies typically encountered in environmental radioactivity measurements. The discrepancy between the results obtained with the two codes were acceptable for most of the applications. Furthermore, the deviations between the values of the standard sources/ reference materials activities from the certificate and the values obtained after Monte Carlo simulation were less than 8% for LabSOCS and 9% for GESPECOR. PMID:26625727

  17. Precipitation correction of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry data using monitoring profiles: methodology and case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahl, Andreas; Motschka, Klaus; Slapansky, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Variations of soil moisture content caused by precipitation often complicate the interpretation of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry data. This is particularly the case in repeated surveys designed to monitor the change of near surface abundances of radioactive elements or in large and time-consuming surveys. To counter this precipitation effect we propose a correction method based on repeated survey flights over a monitoring profile. Assuming that the weather and the soil conditions at the monitoring profile are representative for the survey area, the weather dependent effect of soil moisture can be observed and sufficiently corrected.

  18. GEANT4 calibration of gamma spectrometry efficiency for measurements of airborne radioactivity on filter paper.

    PubMed

    Alrefae, Tareq

    2014-11-01

    A simple method of efficiency calibration for gamma spectrometry was performed. This method, which focused on measuring airborne radioactivity collected on filter paper, was based on Monte Carlo simulations using the toolkit GEANT4. Experimentally, the efficiency values of an HPGe detector were calculated for a multi-gamma disk source. These efficiency values were compared to their counterparts produced by a computer code that simulated experimental conditions. Such comparison revealed biases of 24, 10, 1, 3, 7, and 3% for the radionuclides (photon energies in keV) of Ce (166), Sn (392), Cs (662), Co (1,173), Co (1,333), and Y (1,836), respectively. The output of the simulation code was in acceptable agreement with the experimental findings, thus validating the proposed method. PMID:25271933

  19. Evaluation of radiological data of some saturated fatty acids using gamma ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kore, Prashant S.; Pawar, Pravina P.; Palani Selvam, T.

    2016-02-01

    Radiological parameters such as mass attenuation coefficients (μm), total attenuation cross section (σtot), molar extinction coefficient (ε), mass energy absorption coefficient (μen/ρ) and effective electronic cross section (σt, el) of saturated fatty acids, namely butyric acid (C4H8O2), caproic acid (C6H12O2), enanthic acid (C7H14O2), caprylic acid (C8H16O2), pelargonic acid (C9H18O2) and valeric acid (C5H10O2) were measured using NaI(Tl)-based gamma spectrometry. Radioactive sources used in the study are 57Co, 133Ba, 137Cs, 54Mn, 60Co and 22Na. Gamma ray transmission method in a narrow beam good geometry set up was used in the study. The measured data were compared against Win-XCOM-based data. The agreement is within 1%.

  20. Measurement of uranium series radionuclides in rock and groundwater at the Koongarra ore deposit, Australia, by gamma spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yanase, Nobuyuki; Sekine, Keiichi

    1995-12-31

    Gamma spectrometry without any self-absorption correction was developed to measure low energy gamma rays emitted by uranium and actinium series radionuclides in rock samples and groundwater residues collected at the Koongarra ore deposit, Australia. Thin samples were prepared to minimize the self-absorption by uranium in the samples. The present method gave standard deviations of 0.9 to 18% for the measurements of concentrations of uranium and actinium series radionuclides. The concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 230}Th and {sup 235}U measured by gamma spectrometry were compared with those by alpha spectrometry that requires a complicated chemical separation procedure. The results obtained by both methods were in fairly good agreement, and it was found that the gamma spectrometry is applicable to rock and groundwater samples having uranium content sup to 8.1% (10{sup 3} B1/g) and 3 Bq/l of {sup 238}U, respectively. The detection limits were calculated to be of the order of 10{sup {minus}2} Bq/g for rock samples and 10{sup {minus}1} Bq/l for groundwater samples. The concentrations of uranium and actinium series radionuclides can be determined precisely in these samples using gamma spectrometry without any self-absorption correction.

  1. In situ calibration of the Gamma Reaction History instrument using reference samples ("pucks") for areal density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, N. M.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; Hsu, H. H.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Wilson, D. C.; Stoeffl, W. W.; Young, C. S.; Mack, J. M.; Miller, E. K.; Grafil, E.; Evans, S. C.; Sedillo, T. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Duffy, T.

    2013-11-01

    The introduction of a sample of carbon, for example a disk or "puck", near an imploding DT-filled capsule creates a source of 12C gamma rays that can serve as a reference for calibrating the response of the Gamma Reaction History (GRH) detector [1]. Such calibration is important in the measurement of ablator areal density ⟨ρR⟩abl in plastic-ablator DT-filled capsules at OMEGA [2], by allowing ⟨ρR⟩abl to be inferred as a function of ratios of signals rather than from absolute measurements of signal magnitudes. Systematic uncertainties in signal measurements and detector responses therefore cancel, permitting more accurate measurements of ⟨ρR⟩abl.

  2. An analysis of nuclear fuel burnup in the AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment using gamma spectrometry, mass spectrometry, and computational simulation techniques

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Harp, Jason M.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Winston, Philip L.; Sterbentz, James W.

    2014-09-03

    AGR 1 was the first in a series of experiments designed to test US TRISO fuel under high temperature gas-cooled reactor irradiation conditions. This experiment was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is currently undergoing post irradiation examination (PIE) at INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. One component of the AGR 1 PIE is the experimental evaluation of the burnup of the fuel by two separate techniques. Gamma spectrometry was used to non destructively evaluate the burnup of all 72 of the TRISO fuel compacts that comprised the AGR 1 experiment. Two methodsmore » for evaluating burnup by gamma spectrometry were developed, one based on the Cs 137 activity and the other based on the ratio of Cs 134 and Cs 137 activities. Burnup values determined from both methods compared well with the values predicted from simulations. The highest measured burnup was 20.1% FIMA for the direct method and 20.0% FIMA for the ratio method (compared to 19.56% FIMA from simulations). An advantage of the ratio method is that the burnup of the cylindrical fuel compacts can determined in small (2.5 mm) axial increments and an axial burnup profile can be produced. Destructive chemical analysis by inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP MS) was then performed on selected compacts that were representative of the expected range of fuel burnups in the experiment to compare with the burnup values determined by gamma spectrometry. The compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry had a burnup range of 19.3% FIMA to 10.7% FIMA. The mass spectrometry evaluation of burnup for the four compacts agreed well with the gamma spectrometry burnup evaluations and the expected burnup from simulation. For all four compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry, the maximum range in the three experimentally determined values and the predicted value was 6% or less. Furthermore, the results confirm the accuracy of the nondestructive burnup evaluation from gamma spectrometry for TRISO fuel compacts across a burnup range of approximately 10 to 20% FIMA and also validate the approach used in the physics simulation of the AGR 1 experiment.« less

  3. An Analysis of Nuclear Fuel Burnup in the AGR 1 TRISO Fuel Experiment Using Gamma Spectrometry, Mass Spectrometry, and Computational Simulation Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jason M. Harp; Paul A. Demkowicz; Phillip L. Winston; James W. Sterbentz

    2014-10-01

    AGR 1 was the first in a series of experiments designed to test US TRISO fuel under high temperature gas-cooled reactor irradiation conditions. This experiment was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is currently undergoing post irradiation examination (PIE) at INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. One component of the AGR 1 PIE is the experimental evaluation of the burnup of the fuel by two separate techniques. Gamma spectrometry was used to non destructively evaluate the burnup of all 72 of the TRISO fuel compacts that comprised the AGR 1 experiment. Two methods for evaluating burnup by gamma spectrometry were developed, one based on the Cs 137 activity and the other based on the ratio of Cs 134 and Cs 137 activities. Burnup values determined from both methods compared well with the values predicted from simulations. The highest measured burnup was 20.1 %FIMA for the direct method and 20.0 %FIMA for the ratio method (compared to 19.56% FIMA from simulations). An advantage of the ratio method is that the burnup of the cylindrical fuel compacts can determined in small (2.5 mm) axial increments and an axial burnup profile can be produced. Destructive chemical analysis by inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP MS) was then performed on selected compacts that were representative of the expected range of fuel burnups in the experiment to compare with the burnup values determined by gamma spectrometry. The compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry had a burnup range of 19.3 % FIMA to 10.7 % FIMA. The mass spectrometry evaluation of burnup for the four compacts agreed well with the gamma spectrometry burnup evaluations and the expected burnup from simulation. For all four compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry, the maximum range in the three experimentally determined values and the predicted value was 6% or less. The results confirm the accuracy of the nondestructive burnup evaluation from gamma spectrometry for TRISO fuel compacts across a burnup range of approximately 10 to 20 % FIMA and also validate the approach used in the physics simulation of the AGR 1 experiment.

  4. An analysis of nuclear fuel burnup in the AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment using gamma spectrometry, mass spectrometry, and computational simulation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Jason M.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Winston, Philip L.; Sterbentz, James W.

    2014-09-03

    AGR 1 was the first in a series of experiments designed to test US TRISO fuel under high temperature gas-cooled reactor irradiation conditions. This experiment was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is currently undergoing post irradiation examination (PIE) at INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. One component of the AGR 1 PIE is the experimental evaluation of the burnup of the fuel by two separate techniques. Gamma spectrometry was used to non destructively evaluate the burnup of all 72 of the TRISO fuel compacts that comprised the AGR 1 experiment. Two methods for evaluating burnup by gamma spectrometry were developed, one based on the Cs 137 activity and the other based on the ratio of Cs 134 and Cs 137 activities. Burnup values determined from both methods compared well with the values predicted from simulations. The highest measured burnup was 20.1% FIMA for the direct method and 20.0% FIMA for the ratio method (compared to 19.56% FIMA from simulations). An advantage of the ratio method is that the burnup of the cylindrical fuel compacts can determined in small (2.5 mm) axial increments and an axial burnup profile can be produced. Destructive chemical analysis by inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP MS) was then performed on selected compacts that were representative of the expected range of fuel burnups in the experiment to compare with the burnup values determined by gamma spectrometry. The compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry had a burnup range of 19.3% FIMA to 10.7% FIMA. The mass spectrometry evaluation of burnup for the four compacts agreed well with the gamma spectrometry burnup evaluations and the expected burnup from simulation. For all four compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry, the maximum range in the three experimentally determined values and the predicted value was 6% or less. Furthermore, the results confirm the accuracy of the nondestructive burnup evaluation from gamma spectrometry for TRISO fuel compacts across a burnup range of approximately 10 to 20% FIMA and also validate the approach used in the physics simulation of the AGR 1 experiment.

  5. In-situ determination of cross-over point for overcoming plasma-related matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2008-03-01

    A novel method is described for overcoming plasma-related matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The method is based on measurement of the vertically resolved atomic emission of analyte within the plasma and therefore requires the addition of no reagents to the sample solution or to the plasma. Plasma-related matrix effects enhance analyte emission intensity low in the plasma but depress the same emission signal at higher positions. Such bipolar behavior is true for all emission lines and matrices that induce plasma-related interferences. The transition where the enhancement is balanced by the depression (the so-called cross-over point) results in a spatial region with no apparent matrix effects. Although it would be desirable always to perform determinations at this cross-over point, its location varies between analytes and from matrix to matrix, so it would have to be found separately for every analyte and for every sample. Here, a novel approach is developed for the in-situ determination of the location of this cross-over point. It was found that the location of the cross-over point is practically invariant for a particular analyte emission line when the concentration of the matrix was varied. As a result, it is possible to determine in-situ the location of the cross-over point for all analyte emission lines in a sample by means of a simple one-step sample dilution. When the original sample is diluted by a factor of 2 and the diluted sample is analyzed again, the extent of the matrix effect is identical (zero) between the original sample and the diluted sample at one and only one location — the cross-over point. This novel method was verified with several single-element matrices (0.05 M Na, Ca, Ba and La) and some mixed-element matrices (mixtures of Na-Ca, Ca-Ba, and a plant-sample digest). The inaccuracy in emission intensity due to the matrix effect could be as large as - 30% for conventional measurements in the normal analytical zone, but is reduced to within 5% with this new method. The major currently known limitation is that the accuracy of the method is highly sensitive to fluctuations and noise in the vertical emission-intensity profile, so the stability of the ICP system must be controlled to preferably within 1%.

  6. Monte Carlo based method for conversion of in-situ gamma ray spectra obtained with a portable Ge detector to an incident photon flux energy distribution.

    PubMed

    Clouvas, A; Xanthos, S; Antonopoulos-Domis, M; Silva, J

    1998-02-01

    A Monte Carlo based method for the conversion of an in-situ gamma-ray spectrum obtained with a portable Ge detector to photon flux energy distribution is proposed. The spectrum is first stripped of the partial absorption and cosmic-ray events leaving only the events corresponding to the full absorption of a gamma ray. Applying to the resulting spectrum the full absorption efficiency curve of the detector determined by calibrated point sources and Monte Carlo simulations, the photon flux energy distribution is deduced. The events corresponding to partial absorption in the detector are determined by Monte Carlo simulations for different incident photon energies and angles using the CERN's GEANT library. Using the detector's characteristics given by the manufacturer as input it is impossible to reproduce experimental spectra obtained with point sources. A transition zone of increasing charge collection efficiency has to be introduced in the simulation geometry, after the inactive Ge layer, in order to obtain good agreement between the simulated and experimental spectra. The functional form of the charge collection efficiency is deduced from a diffusion model. PMID:9450590

  7. In-situ gamma-ray site characterization of the Tatum Salt Dome Test Site in Lamar County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Faller, S.H. )

    1992-06-01

    Field surveys of gamma-ray emitting nuclides and soil core sampling were conducted at 12 sites on the Tatum Salt Dome Test Site and surrounding control areas to determine exposure rates from surficial radioactivity. 137Cs was the only man-made radionuclide detected and was most abundant at three off-site locations on cultivated lawns. 137Cs inventories at all of the on-site survey locations were lower than expected, given the high annual precipitation in the area. The vertical distributions were more extended than those reported for undisturbed sites. Pressurized ion chamber measurements indicated no significant differences in exposure rates on and off the test site.

  8. Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectrometer (TAGS) Intensity Distributions from INL's Gamma-Ray Spectrometry Center

    DOE Data Explorer

    Greenwood, R. E.

    A 252Cf fission-product source and the INL on-line isotope separator were used to supply isotope-separated fission-product nuclides to a total absorption -ray spectrometer. This spectrometer consisted of a large (25.4-cm diameter x 30.5-cm long) NaI(Tl) detector with a 20.3-cm deep axial well in which is placed a 300-mm2 x 1.0-mm Si detector. The spectra from the NaI(Tl) detector are collected both in the singles mode and in coincidence with the B-events detected in the Si detector. Ideally, this detector would sum all the energy of the B- rays in each cascade following the population of daughter level by B- decay, so that the event could be directly associated with a particular daughter level. However, there are losses of energy from attenuation of the rays before they reach the detector, transmission of rays through the detector, escape of secondary photons from Compton scattering, escape of rays through the detector well, internal conversion, etc., and the measured spectra are thus more complicated than the ideal case and the analysis is more complex. Analysis methods have been developed to simulate all of these processes and thus provide a direct measure of the B- intensity distribution as a function of the excitation energy in the daughter nucleus. These data yield more accurate information on the B- distribution than conventional decay-scheme studies for complex decay schemes with large decay energies, because in the latter there are generally many unobserved and observed but unplaced rays. The TAGS data have been analyzed and published [R. E. Greenwood et al., Nucl Instr. and metho. A390(1997)] for 40 fission product-nuclides to determine the B- intensity distributions. [Copied from the TAGS page at http://www.inl.gov/gammaray/spectrometry/tags.shtml]. Those values are listed on this page for quick reference.

  9. Let them fly or light them up: matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Schweickert, Birgitta; Moter, Annette; Lefmann, Michael; Göbel, Ulf B

    2004-01-01

    This review focuses on clinical bacteriology and by and large does not cover the detection of fungi, viruses or parasites. It discusses two completely different but complementary approaches that may either supplement or replace classic culture-based bacteriology. The latter view may appear provocative in the light of the actual market penetration of molecular genetic testing in clinical bacteriology. Despite its elegance, high specificity and sensitivity, molecular genetic diagnostics has not yet reached the majority of clinical laboratories. The reasons for this are manifold: Many microbiologists and medical technologists are more familiar with classical microbiological methods than with molecular biology techniques. Culture-based methods still represent the work horse of everyday routine. The number of available FDA-approved molecular genetic tests is limited and external quality control is still under development. Finally, it appears difficult to incorporate genetic testing in the routine laboratory setting due to the limited number of samples received or the lack of appropriate resources. However, financial and time constraints, particularly in hospitals as a consequence of budget cuts and reduced length of stay, lead to a demand for significantly shorter turnaround times that cannot be met by culture-dependent diagnosis. As a consequence, smaller laboratories that do not have the technical and personal equipment required for molecular genetic amplification techniques may adopt alternative methods such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) that combines easy-to-perform molecular hybridization with microscopy, a technique familiar to every microbiologist. FISH is hence one of the technologies presented here. For large hospital or reference laboratories with a high sample volume requiring massive parallel high-throughput testing we discuss matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) of nucleic acids, a technology that has evolved from the post-genome sequencing era, for high-throughput sequence variation analysis (1, 2). PMID:15638841

  10. Differentiation of three pairs of Boc-beta,gamma- and gamma,beta-hybrid peptides by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, V; Srinivas, R; Sharma, G V M; Jayaprakash, P; Kunwar, A C

    2008-09-01

    A new series of Boc-N-beta(3), gamma(4)-/gamma(4), beta(3)-isomeric hybrid peptides (containing repeats of beta(3)-Caa and gamma(4)-Caa's, Caa = C-linked carbo beta(3)-/gamma(4)-amino acids derived from D-xylose) have been differentiated by both positive and negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) ion-trap and high resolution quadrupole time-of-flight/tandem mass spectrometry (Q-TOF MS/MS). MS(n) of protonated isomeric peptides and [M+H-Boc+H](+) produce characteristic fragmentation involving the peptide backbone, the Boc-group, and the side chain. The positional isomers are differentiated from one another by the presence of y(n)(+), b(n)(+), and other fragment ions of different m/z values. It is observed that the peptides with beta-Caa at the N-terminus produce extensive fragmentation, whereas gamma-Caa gave rise to much less fragmentation. Peptides with gamma-Caa at the N-terminus lose NH(3), whereas this process is absent for the carbopeptides with beta-Caa at the N-terminus. Two pairs of dipeptide diastereomers are clearly differentiated by the collision-induced dissociation (CID) of their protonated molecules. The loss of 2-methylprop-1-ene is more pronounced for Boc-NH-(R)-beta-Caa-(R)-gamma-Caa-OCH(3) (6) and Boc-NH-(R)-gamma-Caa-(R)-beta-Caa-OCH(3) (12), whereas it is insignificant or totally absent for its protonated diastereomeric pair Boc-NH-(S)-beta-Caa-(S)-gamma-Caa-OCH(3) (1) and Boc-NH-(S)-gamma-Caa-(S)-beta-Caa-OCH(3) (7). Further, ESI negative ion tandem mass spectrometry has also been found to be useful for differentiating these isomeric peptide acids. PMID:18320536

  11. The 124Sb activity standardization by gamma spectrometry for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, M. C. M.; Iwahara, A.; Delgado, J. U.; Poledna, R.; da Silva, R. L.

    2010-07-01

    This work describes a metrological activity determination of 124Sb, which can be used as radiotracer, applying gamma spectrometry methods with hyper pure germanium detector and efficiency curves. This isotope with good activity and high radionuclidic purity is employed in the form of meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime) or sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam) to treat leishmaniasis. 124Sb is also applied in animal organ distribution studies to solve some questions in pharmacology. 124Sb decays by β-emission and it produces several photons (X and gamma rays) with energy varying from 27 to 2700 keV. Efficiency curves to measure point 124Sb solid sources were obtained from a 166mHo standard that is a multi-gamma reference source. These curves depend on radiation energy, sample geometry, photon attenuation, dead time and sample-detector position. Results for activity determination of 124Sb samples using efficiency curves and a high purity coaxial germanium detector were consistent in different counting geometries. Also uncertainties of about 2% ( k=2) were obtained.

  12. Cosmic veto gamma-spectrometry for Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, J. L.; Davies, A. V.

    2014-05-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) is supported by a global network of monitoring stations that perform high-resolution gamma-spectrometry on air filter samples for the identification of 85 radionuclides. At the UK CTBT Radionuclide Laboratory (GBL15), a novel cosmic veto gamma-spectrometer has been developed to improve the sensitivity of station measurements, providing a mean background reduction of 80.8% with mean MDA improvements of 45.6%. The CTBT laboratory requirement for a 140Ba MDA is achievable after 1.5 days counting compared to 5-7 days using conventional systems. The system consists of plastic scintillation plates that detect coincident cosmic-ray interactions within an HPGe gamma-spectrometer using the Canberra LynxTM multi-channel analyser. The detector is remotely configurable using a TCP/IP interface and requires no dedicated coincidence electronics. It would be especially useful in preventing false-positives at remote station locations (e.g. Halley, Antarctica) where sample transfer to certified laboratories is logistically difficult. The improved sensitivity has been demonstrated for a CTBT air filter sample collected after the Fukushima incident.

  13. First Year PIDDP Report on gamma-ray and x-ray spectroscopy: X-ray remote sensing and in situ spectroscopy for planetary exploration missions and gamma-ray remote sensing and in situ spectroscopy for planetary exploration missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahdavi, M.; Giboni, K. L.; Vajda, S.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Truax, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Detectors that will be used for planetary missions must have their responses calibrated in a reproducible manner. In addition, it is important to characterize a detector system at uneven portions of its life cycle, for example after exposure to different amounts of radiation. A calibration and response characterization facility has been constructed at Schlumberger-Doll Research for all types of gamma- and x-ray detectors that may be used for planetary measurement. This facility is currently being tested. Initial use is expected for the MARS 94 detectors. The facility will then also be available for calibrating other detectors as well as arrays of detectors such as the NEAR detector with its central Nal(TI) crystal surrounded with a large BGO crystal. Cadmium telluride detectors are investigated for applications in space explorations. These detectors show an energy resolution of 5 keV for the 122 keV 57Co line. Earlier reported polarization effects are not observed. The detectors can be used at temperatures up to 100 C, although with reduced energy resolution. The thickness of standard detectors is limited to 2 mm. These detectors become fully efficient at bias voltages above 200 V. Initial results for a 1 cm thick detector show that the quality of the material is inferior to the thinner standard detectors and hole trapping affects the pulse height. A detailed characterization of the detector is in progress. Prototypes of photomultipliers based on a Channel Electron Multiplier (CEM) are being built to study their performance. Such photomultipliers promise better timing characteristics and a higher dynamic range while being more compact and of lower in weight.

  14. NMIS with Imaging and Gamma Ray Spectrometry for Pu, HEU, HE and Other Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, John T; Mullens, James Allen

    2012-03-01

    The Nuclear Material Identification System (NMIS) has been under development at ORNL and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Y-12 National Security Complex since 1984. In the mid-1990s, what is now the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Verification (ONV) realized that it was a useful technology for future arms control treaty applications and supported further development of the system. In 2004, fast-neutron imaging was incorporated into the system. In 2007, the ONV decided to develop a fieldable version of the system, designated as FNMIS, for potential use in future treaties. The FNMIS is being developed to be compatible with the eventual incorporation of gamma-ray spectrometry and an information barrier. This report addresses how and what attributes could be determined by the FNMIS system with gamma-ray spectrometry. The NMIS is a time-dependent coincidence system that incorporates tomographic imaging (including mapping of the fission sites) and gamma-ray spectrometry. It utilizes a small, lightweight (30 lb), portable deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron (14.1 MeV) generator (4 x 10{sup 7} neutrons/second) for active interrogation and can also perform passive interrogation. A high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray detector with multichannel analysis can be utilized in conjunction with the source for active interrogation or passively. The system uses proton recoil scintillators: 32 small 2.5 x 2.5 x 10.2-cm-thick plastic scintillators for imaging and at least two 2 x 2 arrays of 27 x 27 x 10-cm-thick plastic scintillators that detect induced fission radiation. The DT generator contains an alpha detector that time and directionally tags a fan beam of some of the neutrons emitted and subdivides it into pixels. A fast (1 GHz) time correlation processor measures the time-dependent coincidence among all detectors in the system. A computer-controlled scanner moves the small detectors and the source appropriately for scanning a target object for imaging. The system is based on detection of transmitted 14.1 MeV neutrons, fission neutrons, and gamma rays from spontaneous, inherent source fission of the target, fission neutrons and gamma rays induced by the external DT source, gamma rays from natural emissions of uranium and plutonium, and induced gamma-ray emission by the interaction of the 14.1 MeV neutrons from the DT source. The NMIS can and has been used with a time-tagged californium spontaneous fission source. It has also been used with pulsed interrogation sources such as LINACs, DT, and deuterium-deuterium (DD) sources. This system is uniquely suited for detection of shielded highly enriched uranium (HEU), plutonium, and other special nuclear materials and detection of high explosives (HE) and chemical agents. The NMIS will be adapted to utilize a trusted processor that incorporates information barrier and authentication techniques using open software and then be useful in some international applications for materials whose characteristics may be classified. The proposed information barrier version of the NMIS system would consist of detectors and cables, the red (classified side) computer system, which processes the data, and the black (unclassified side) computer, which handles the computer interface. The system could use the 'IB wrapper' concept proposed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and the software integrity (digital signatures) system proposed by Sandia. Since it is based entirely on commercially available components, the entire system, including NMIS data acquisition boards, can be built with commercial off-the-shelf components. This system is being developed into a fieldable system (FNMIS) for potential arms control treaties by the ONV. The system will be modularly constructed with the RF shielded modules connected to the processor by appropriate control and signal cable in metal conduit. The FNMIS is presently being designed for eventual incorporation of gamma-ray spectrometry and an information barrier to protect classified information. The system hardware and software can be configured to obtain the following: plutonium presence, plutonium mass, Pu-240/239 ratio, plutonium geometry, plutonium metal vs non-metallic (absence of metal), time (age) since processing for plutonium (or last purification), uranium presence, uranium mass, uranium enrichment, uranium geometry, uranium metal vs non-metallic compound (absence of metal), beryllium presence and mass, tritium and deuterium gas bottle presence, HE, and chemical weapons. A matrix of the quantities determined, the method of determination, whether active (external neutron source) or passive, and the measurement equipment involved is given in the Tables 1-4. Some of these attributes can be obtained by multiple data analysis methods. The gamma-ray spectrometry methods for HEU, plutonium, and HE have been developed by other laboratories, are well known, and will be incorporated.

  15. In situ composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D. III; Singh, M.; Fishman, S.G.

    1995-07-01

    The in situ formation of reinforcements, matrices, and interphases is a promising approach to decreasing the cost of high performance metal-ceramic composites. It develops high mechanical properties, and allows significant savings to be achieved by reducing or eliminating processing steps, reinforcing fibers, and reinforcement-matrix interfacial coatings. Several types of in situ composite materials are already being tested in real-world components, and others are expected to undergo such trials soon. Those closest to commercial application include in situ-toughened silicon nitride, in which high toughness comes from the development of high aspect-ratio grains during processing; some of the Lanxide materials, in which toughening phases (in the form of particles or metallic inclusions) are produced during processing; and the XD materials, notably {gamma}-TiAl intermetallics toughened by in situ-produced titanium diboride particulates, developed primarily by Martin Marietta. This article compares composites produced by in situ technologies with those produced by conventional means, and provides examples of several current and near-term applications of these materials.

  16. In situ gamma ray survey for geological mapping of Kmetasomatized metavolcanics at Bükkszentkereszt, Bükk Mts, Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Norbert; Pethõ, Gábor; Zajzon, Norbert

    2015-09-01

    The Middle-Upper Triassic Bagolyhegy Metarhyolite Formation of the Bükk Mts. (Hungary) hosts silicified bodies with high potassic feldspar content formed by Kmetasomatism. The rocks underwent a multistage deformation history including syn- and postmetamorphic folding and faulting. As the outcrop area is covered by soil and debris with some exposed silicified cliffs only, and potassium content is a characteristic feature of the metasomatized rocks, geological mapping was supported by a spectral gamma ray survey with a scintillation detector of NaI(Tl) crystal. A thunderstorm felling the beech forest made the soil horizon B also accessible in several pits, providing the opportunity to make measurements on the weathered debris instead of the topsoil (horizon A). Measurements in different arrangements were designed to test the effects of measuring time, measuring geometry and soil horizon. Our results show that concentration values obtained on the debris with a 2 min measuring time can be compared with those measured on exposed rock surfaces, producing a more reliable geological map than measurements on the topsoil with randomly variable K depletion. Pit geometry effects can be eliminated by the K/(eU+eTh) ratio. This results in a more realistic K distribution map if neither U nor Th enrichments are present. The survey successfully delineated the unexposed outcrop of K-enriched rocks on the survey area.

  17. Analysis of spectra from portable handheld gamma-ray spectrometry for terrain comparative assessment.

    PubMed

    Dias, Flávio; Lima, Marco; Sanjurjo-Sánchez, Jorge; Alves, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Geological characteristics can have impacts on societal development by, e.g., geotechnical issues and radiological hazard levels. Due to urban sprawl, there is an increasing need for detailed geological assessment. In this work are analysed data from portable handheld gamma-ray spectra (K, eU and eTh) obtained in granitic and Silurian metaclastic outcrops as well as in an profile, roughly N-S, on soil covered terrains transecting a mapped contact between these rock types (the profile's northern extremity is at locations mapped as granite). Estimations from gamma-ray spectra were studied by univariate and multivariate analyses. K, eU and eTh values were higher on granite in relation to Silurian metaclastic rocks. The northern extremity of the profile showed clearly higher contents of eTh and this contrast was supported by univariate statistical tools (normality plot and Wilk-Shapiro test; boxplots). A ternary plot with the contribution of the elements to gamma-ray absorbed dose showed the separation of granite from Silurian metaclastic rocks with the former being nearer the eTh vertex. The points in the northern extremity of the profile are nearer the eTh vertex than the other points on the profile. These visual suggestions were supported by hierarchical cluster analysis, which was able to differentiate between granite and metaclastic outcrops and separate portions of the profile located on different terrains. Portable gamma-ray spectrometry showed, hence, the potential to distinguish granite and metaclastic terrains at a scale useful for engineering works. These results can also be useful for a first comparative zoning of radiological hazards (which are higher for granite). PMID:26867098

  18. A review of the nationwide proficiency test on natural radioactivity measurements by gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Şahin, N K; Yeltepe, E; Yücel, Ü

    2016-03-01

    This study is the review of the first proficiency test on radioactivity measurement organized in Turkey by Sarayköy Nuclear Research and Training Center (SANAEM) of Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEK) in 2013. The objective of the test was to determine (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K activity concentrations in natural soil samples using gamma-ray spectrometry. The bulk material consisting of uranium- and thorium-rich soil and sand was milled, mixed thoroughly and sieved. Homogeneity of the final mix was tested with 6 randomly taken samples. 16 proficiency test samples were distributed to 16 participating laboratories. 12 laboratories reported results. The results were evaluated on the accuracy and precision criteria adopted by the IAEA Proficiency Testing Group. The percentage of acceptable scores was 49%. Some recommendations have been provided to the laboratories to improve the quality of their results. It is planned to extend these proficiency tests periodically for various radionuclides in various matrices. PMID:26750585

  19. Fast-ion energy resolution by one-step reaction gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salewski, M.; Nocente, M.; Gorini, G.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Kiptily, V. G.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Madsen, J.; Moseev, D.; Nielsen, S. K.; Rasmussen, J.; Stejner, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Contributors, JET

    2016-04-01

    The spectral broadening of γ-rays from fusion plasmas can be measured in high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry (GRS). We derive weight functions that determine the observable velocity space and quantify the velocity-space sensitivity of one-step reaction high-resolution GRS measurements in magnetized fusion plasmas. The weight functions suggest that GRS resolves the energies of fast ions directly without the need for tomographic inversion for selected one-step reactions at moderate plasma temperatures. The D(p,γ)3He reaction allows the best direct fast-ion energy resolution. We illustrate our general formalism using reactions with and without intrinsic broadening of the γ-rays for the GRS diagnostic at JET.

  20. Contribution of a germanium detector in mobile gamma-ray spectrometry. Spectral analysis and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, S.; Guillot, L.; Bourgeois, C.

    2002-04-01

    The sensitivity of the germanium semi-conductor detector is 30 times lower than that of the sodium iodide (NaI) detectors frequently used in airborne spectrometry. Its energy resolution however, is 20 times better, giving more accurate identification of radionuclides, especially when complex spectra are involved. The use of the germanium detector in mobile gamma-ray spectrometry provides a large amount of qualitative and quantitative information. In post-accident situations a germanium detector will be sufficient, and should therefore be used in preference to a NaI detector. An algorithm for detecting the total absorption peaks by studying the variations in the spectral profile of germanium gamma-ray spectra has been developed at the CEA. The use of digital filters that take into account the characteristics of the absorption peaks reduces the statistical fluctuations, making possible detection based on the analysis of the first and second derivatives. The absorption peak is then estimated by subtracting the background noise modelled in the detection window. This method of analysis offers the advantage of not requiring prior knowledge of the number or nature of the radionuclides to be detected. A study has been carried out to assess the specific performances of this detection software in different situations: average background noise in France and detection of artificial sources with varying activity levels. This analysis showed that the performance of our detection algorithm is very close to the theoretical detection limits, for both natural and artificial radionuclides. This algorithm is therefore well suited to the germanium type of spectral profile and to low count rates.

  1. Profiling of urinary amino-carboxylic metabolites by in-situ heptafluorobutyl chloroformate mediated sample preparation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hušek, Petr; Švagera, Zdeněk; Hanzlíková, Dagmar; Řimnáčová, Lucie; Zahradníčková, Helena; Opekarová, Iva; Šimek, Petr

    2016-04-22

    A novel 1,1,1,2,2,3,3-heptafluorobutyl chloroformate reagent (HFBCF) was examined for in-situ derivatization of amino-carboxylic metabolites in human urine. The arising reaction products exhibit greatly reduced polarity which facilitates combining the derivatization and liquid-liquid microextraction (LLME) from an aqueous urine into an isooctane phase and immediate gas chromatographic-mas spectrometric analysis (GC-MS). The sample preparation protocol is simple, proceeds without an alcohol excess and provides cleaner extracts than other urinary GC-MS based methods. Moreover, thiol metabolites bound in disulfide bonds can be released by reduction with tris(3-hydroxypropyl)phosphine (THP) prior to the developed derivatization and LLME step. In order to evaluate potential of the novel method for GC-MS metabolomics, reaction products of 153 urinary metabolites with HFBCF, particularly those possessing amino and carboxyl groups (56 amino acids and their conjugates, 84 organic acids, 9 biogenic amines, 4 other polar analytes) and two internal standards were investigated in detail by GC-MS and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). One hundred and twenty metabolites (78%) yielded a single product, 25 (16%) and 2 metabolites (2-methylcitrate, citrate) generated two and more derivatives. From the examined set, analytically applicable products of 5 metabolites were not detected; the derivatives of 3 metabolites were only suitable for LC-MS analysis. Electron ionization (EI) of the examined analytes contained characteristic, diagnostic ions enabling to distinguish related and isomeric structures. The new method was validated for 132 metabolites using two internal standards in artificial urine and with special attention to potential disease biomarker candidates. The developed sample preparation protocol was finally evaluated by means of a certified organic acid standard mixture in urine and by GC-MS analysis of 100 morning urines obtained from healthy patients (50 males and 50 females), where 112 physiological metabolites were quantified in a 25μL sample aliquot. The quantification data for the set were satisfactory, most metabolites were found within the range reported in the reference human metabolome (HMDB) database and literature. The reported results suggest that the described method has been a novel promising tool for targeted GC-MS based metabolomic analysis in urine. PMID:27012787

  2. A mobile high resolution gamma ray spectrometry system for radiological surveys. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Meehan, A.R.

    1998-09-01

    Magnox Electric has developed a mobile large area radiological survey system designed to produce a rapid and cost effective characterization of outdoor land areas. The system combines the technique of high resolution gamma ray spectrometry, which is capable of rapidly identifying and quantifying specific radionuclides at levels well below those normally associated with natural background radiation, with modern automated surveying techniques that facilitate navigation and provide assurance as to the location of contamination. A dedicated software system supports survey operations, providing real time displays detailing spectrometry and navigational data capture, and enabling seamless remote switching between positioning methods. In open areas with an unrestricted line of sight to satellites Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) technology provides positional data, in areas where a significant portion of the sky is obscured a laser ranging device known as an Automatic Total Station (ATS) is employed and in the most restricted and confined areas manual surveying resorted to. In this report the system is described, its advantages and limitations compared with conventional survey methodologies are discussed, and its perceived role within the wider framework of the site investigation process is detailed, particularly with respect to current and proposed legislation in the US describing conditions for the release of nuclear licensed sites from regulatory controls. Experience at recent termination surveys on large nuclear licensed facilities is considered in detail, along with the principal features of the Magnox system that will enable it to overcome the difficulties and problems encountered.

  3. Development and application of compact denuder sampling techniques with in situ derivatization followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for halogen speciation in volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüdiger, Julian; Bobrowski, Nicole; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    Volcanoes are a large source for several reactive atmospheric trace gases including sulphur and halogen containing species. The detailed knowledge of volcanic plume chemistry can give insights into subsurface processes and can be considered as a useful geochemical tool for monitoring of volcanic activity, especially halogen to sulphur ratios (e.g. Bobrowski and Giuffrida, 2012; Donovan et al., 2014). The reactive bromine species bromine monoxide (BrO) is of particular interest, because BrO as well as SO2 are readily measurable by UV spectrometers at a safe distance. Furthermore it is formed in the plume by a multiphase reaction mechanism under depletion of ozone in the plume. The abundance of BrO changes as a function of the reaction time and therefore distance from the vent as well as the spatial position in the plume. Due to the lack of analytical approaches for the accurate speciation of certain halogens (HBr, Br2, Br, BrCl, HOBr etc.) there are still uncertainties about the magnitude of volcanic halogen emissions and in particular their specificationtheir species and therefore also in the understanding of the bromine chemistry in volcanic plumes (Bobrowski et al., 2007). In this study, the first application of a 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene (1,3,5-TMB)-coated gas diffusion denuder (Huang and Hoffmann, 2008) on volcanic gases proved to be suitable to collect selectively gaseous bromine species with oxidation states of +1 or 0 (Br2 and BrO(H)), while being ignorant to HBr (OS -1). The reaction of 1,3,5-TMB with bromine gives 1-bromo-2,4,6-trimethoxybenzene (1-bromo-2,4,6-TMB) - other halogens give corresponding products. The diffusion denuder technique allows sampling of gaseous compounds exclusively without collecting particulate matter. Choosing a flow rate of 500 mL-min-1 and a denuder length of 0.5 m a nearly quantitative collection efficiency was achieved. Solvent elution of the derivatized analytes and subsequent analysis with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry gives a limit of detection below 1 ng of bromine. The method was applied on volcanic gas plumes at Mt. Etna and Mt. Stromboli in Italy in July 2014 and on fumarolic gas emissions at Mt. Lastarria in Chile in November 2014. The results show significant amounts of the concerning bromine species (lower ppb range). Comprehensive data evaluation and comparison with results of impinger extraction with NaOH solution as well as chamber experiments are still in progress. References Bobrowski, N. and G. Giuffrida: Bromine monoxide / sulphur dioxide ratios in relation to volcanological observations at Mt. Etna 2006-2009. Solid Earth, 3, 433-445, 2012 Bobrowski, N., R. von Glasow, A. Aiuppa, S. Inguaggiato, I. Louban, O. W. Ibrahim and U. Platt: Reactive halogen chemistry in volcanic plumes. J. Geophys. Res., 112, 2007 Donovan A., V. Tsanev, C. Oppenheimer and M. Edmonds: Reactive halogens (BrO and OClO) detected in the plume of Soufrière Hills Volcano during an eruption hiatus. Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 15, 3346-3363, 2014 Huang, R.-J. and T. Hoffmann: A denuder-impinger system with in situ derivatization followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of gaseous iodine-containing halogen species. Journal of Chromatography A, 1210, 135-141, 2008

  4. Application of gamma-ray spectrometry in a NORM industry for its radiometrical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantero, J.; Gázquez, M. J.; Hurtado, S.; Bolívar, J. P.; García-Tenorio, R.

    2015-11-01

    Industrial activities involving Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) are found among the most important industrial sectors worldwide as oil/gas facilities, metal production, phosphate Industry, zircon treatment, etc. being really significant the radioactive characterization of the materials involved in their production processes in order to assess the potential radiological risk for workers or natural environment. High resolution gamma spectrometry is a versatile non-destructive radiometric technique that makes simultaneous determination of several radionuclides possible with little sample preparation. However NORM samples cover a wide variety of densities and composition, as opposed to the standards used in gamma efficiency calibration, which are either water-based solutions or standard/reference sources of similar composition. For that reason self-absorption correction effects (especially in the low energy range) must be considered individually in every sample. In this work an experimental and a semi-empirical methodology of self-absorption correction were applied to NORM samples, and the obtained results compared critically, in order to establish the best practice in relation to the circumstances of an individual laboratory. This methodology was applied in samples coming from a TiO2 factory (NORM industry) located in the south-west of Spain where activity concentration of several radionuclides from the Uranium and Thorium series through the production process was measured. These results will be shown in this work.

  5. Gamma-ray spectrometry data collection and reduction by simple computing systems.

    PubMed

    Op de Beeck, J

    1975-12-01

    The review summarizes the present state of the involvement of relatively small computing devices in the collection and processing of gamma-ray spectrum data. An economic and utilitarian point of view has been chosen with regard to data collection in order to arrive at practically valuable conclusions in terms of feasibility of possible configurations with respect to their eventual application. A unified point of view has been adopted with regard to data processing by developing an information theoretical approach on a more or less intuitive level in an attempt to remove the largest part of the virtual disparity between the several processing methods described in the literature. A synoptical introduction to the most important mathematical methods has been incorporated, together with a detailed theoretical description of the concept gamma-ray spectrum. In accordance with modern requirements, the discussions are mainly oriented towards high-resolution semiconductor detector-type spectra. The critical evaluation of the processing methods reviewed is done with respect to a set of predefined criteria. Smoothing, peak detection, peak intensity determination, overlapping peak resolving and detection and upper limits are discussed in great detail. A preferred spectrum analysis method combining powerful data reduction properties with extreme simplicity and speed of operation is suggested. The general discussion is heavily oriented towards activation analysis application, but other disciplines making use of gamma-ray spectrometry will find the material presented equally useful. Final conclusions are given pointing to future developments and shifting their centre of gravity towards improving the quality of the measurements rather than expanding the use of tedious and sophisticated mathematical techniques requiring the limits of available computational power. PMID:769794

  6. Recent achievements for In-situ measurement: applications to an actual decommissioning project

    SciTech Connect

    Lamadie, F.; Girones, P.; Le Goaller, C.; Mahe, C.; Kohler, J.Y.; Risser, M.A.

    2007-07-01

    Decommissioning a nuclear facility implies a policy of limiting the waste volume and its chemical - and especially radiological - toxicity. It is therefore important to determine the activity level contained in each component that will be dismantled. A variety of methods and analysis techniques are used for this purpose, ranging from simple dose rate measurements to {gamma} spectrometry and {gamma} imaging. The results of several measurement campaigns in a reactor currently in operation but for which decommissioning studies have now been undertaken are discussed. The measurements provide additional radiological data for the waste inventory, which is one of the first issues to be examined. This discussion focuses on the methods used ({gamma} imaging, in situ {gamma} spectrometry, etc.), the results obtained, and their implications for the project, as well as the technological and methodological innovations implemented during these campaigns. (authors)

  7. On-line interrogation of pebble bed reactor fuel using passive gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianwei

    The Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) is a helium-cooled, graphite-moderated high temperature nuclear power reactor. In addition to its inherently safe design, a unique feature of this reactor is its multipass fuel cycle in which graphite fuel pebbles (of varying enrichment) are randomly loaded and continuously circulated through the core until they reach their prescribed end-of-life burnup limit (80,000--100,000 MWD/MTU). Unlike the situation with conventional light water reactors (LWRs), depending solely on computational methods to perform in-core fuel management will be highly inaccurate. As a result, an on-line measurement approach becomes the only accurate method to assess whether a particular pebble has reached its end-of-life burnup limit. In this work, an investigation was performed to assess the feasibility of passive gamma-ray spectrometry assay as an approach for on-line interrogation of PBR fuel for the simultaneous determination of burnup and enrichment on a pebble-by-pebble basis. Due to the unavailability of irradiated or fresh pebbles, Monte Carlo simulations were used to study the gamma-ray spectra of the PBR fuel at various levels of burnup. A pebble depletion calculation was performed using the ORIGEN code, which yielded the gamma-ray source term that was introduced into the input of an MCNP simulation. The MCNP simulation assumed the use of a high-purity coaxial germanium detector. Due to the lack of one-group high temperature reactor cross sections for ORIGEN, a heterogeneous MCNP model was developed to describe a typical PBR core. Subsequently, the code MONTEBURNS was used to couple the MCNP model and ORIGEN. This approach allowed the development of the burnup-dependent, one-group spectral-averaged PBR cross sections to be used in the ORIGEN pebble depletion calculation. Based on the above studies, a relative approach for performing the measurements was established. The approach is based on using the relative activities of Np-239/I-132 in combination with the relative activities of Cs-134/Co-60 (Co-60 is introduced as a dopant) to yield the burnup and enrichment for each pebble. Furthermore, a direct consequence of the relative approach is the ability to apply a self-calibration scheme using the multiple gamma lines of Ba-La-140 to establish the relative efficiency curve of the HPGe detector. An assessment of the expected uncertainty components in this approach showed that a maximum uncertainty of less than 5% should be feasible. To confirm the above findings, gamma-ray scans were performed on irradiated PULSTAR reactor fuel assemblies at North Carolina Sate University. The measurements used a 40% efficient n-type coaxial HPGe detector connected to an ORTEC DSPEC plus digital Gamma-Ray Spectrometer, and a data acquisition computer. The obtained results showed consistency with the predictions of the simulations including the observation of the I-132, Cs-134, Np-239 uncontaminated gamma lines. In addition, the Ba-La-140 lines were clearly observed confirming the ability to perform relative calibration of the spectrometer.

  8. In-situ gamma-ray survey of rare-earth tailings dams--A case study in Baotou and Bayan Obo Districts, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Baochuan; Wang, Nanping; Wan, Jianhua; Xiong, Shengqing; Liu, Hongtao; Li, Shijun; Zhao, Rong

    2016-01-01

    An in-situ gamma-ray spectrometer survey with a scintillation detector of NaI(Tl) (Φ75 mm × 75 mm) was carried out in the Baotou and Bayan Obo Districts in order to estimate the levels of natural radionuclides near rare-earth (RE) tailings dams. In the RE tailings dam of Baotou, the mean concentrations of (238)U and (232)Th were 3.0 ± 1.0 mg/kg (range: 1.9-4.6 mg/kg) and 321 ± 31 mg/kg (range: 294-355 mg/kg), respectively. In the Bayan Obo tailings dam, the mean concentrations of (238)U and (232)Th were 5.7 ± 0.5 mg/kg (range: 5.3-6.1 mg/kg) and 276 ± 0.5 mg/kg (range: 275.5-276.3 mg/kg), respectively. The average (232)Th concentrations in the mining areas of the Bayan Obo Mine and the living areas of the Bayan Obo Town were 18.7 ± 7.5 and 26.2 ± 9.1 mg/kg, respectively. The (232)Th concentration recorded in the tailings dams was much higher than the global average (7.44 mg/kg). Our investigation shows that the (232)Th concentration in the tailings in the Baotou dam was 34.6 times greater than that in the local soil (in Guyang County); the average concentrations of (232)Th in the soil in the Baotou District and Bayan Obo Districts were about 1.35 and 2.82 times greater, respectively, than that in the soil in Guyang County. Based on our results, the highest estimated effective dose due to gamma irradiation was 1.15 mSv per year, estimated from the data observed in the Baotou tailings dams. The results of this preliminary study indicate the potential importance of radioactivity in RE tailings dams and that remedial measures may be required. PMID:26555365

  9. High Throughput In Situ XAFS Screening of Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Tsapatsaris, Nikolaos; Beesley, Angela M.; Weiher, Norbert; Tatton, Helen; Schroeder, Sven L. M.; Dent, Andy J.; Mosselmans, Frederick J. W.; Tromp, Moniek; Russu, Sergio; Evans, John; Harvey, Ian; Hayama, Shu

    2007-02-02

    We outline and demonstrate the feasibility of high-throughput (HT) in situ XAFS for synchrotron radiation studies. An XAS data acquisition and control system for the analysis of dynamic materials libraries under control of temperature and gaseous environments has been developed. The system is compatible with the 96-well industry standard and coupled to multi-stream quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) analysis of reactor effluents. An automated analytical workflow generates data quickly compared to traditional individual spectrum acquisition and analyses them in quasi-real time using an HT data analysis tool based on IFFEFIT. The system was used for the automated characterization of a library of 91 catalyst precursors containing ternary combinations of Cu, Pt, and Au on {gamma}-Al2O3, and for the in situ characterization of Au catalysts supported on Al2O3 and TiO2.

  10. Application of low-background gamma-ray spectrometry to monitor radioactivity in the environment and food.

    PubMed

    Khan, A J; Semkow, T M; Beach, S E; Haines, D K; Bradt, C J; Bari, A; Syed, U-F; Torres, M; Marrantino, J; Kitto, M E; Menia, T; Fielman, E

    2014-08-01

    The results are described of an upgrade of the low-background gamma-ray spectrometry laboratory at New York State Department of Health by acquiring sensitivity to low-energy gamma rays. Tuning of the spectrometer and its low-energy response characteristics are described. The spectrometer has been applied to monitor the environment by measuring aerosols and water in New York State contaminated by the 2011 Fukushima accident plume. In addition, the spectrometer has been used to monitor radioactivity in food by performing a study of cesium in Florida milk. PMID:24836905

  11. Assessment of measurement result uncertainty in determination of (210)Pb with the focus on matrix composition effect in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Iurian, A R; Pitois, A; Kis-Benedek, G; Migliori, A; Padilla-Alvarez, R; Ceccatelli, A

    2016-03-01

    Reference materials were used to assess measurement result uncertainty in determination of (210)Pb by gamma-ray spectrometry, liquid scintillation counting, or indirectly by alpha-particle spectrometry, using its daughter (210)Po in radioactive equilibrium. Combined standard uncertainties of (210)Pb massic activities obtained by liquid scintillation counting are in the range 2-12%, depending on matrices and massic activity values. They are in the range 1-3% for the measurement of its daughter (210)Po using alpha-particle spectrometry. Three approaches (direct computation of counting efficiency and efficiency transfer approaches based on the computation and, respectively, experimental determination of the efficiency transfer factors) were applied for the evaluation of (210)Pb using gamma-ray spectrometry. Combined standard uncertainties of gamma-ray spectrometry results were found in the range 2-17%. The effect of matrix composition on self-attenuation was investigated and a detailed assessment of uncertainty components was performed. PMID:26653212

  12. Assessment of radiological hazards of Lawrencepur sand, Pakistan using gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Aziz Ahmed; Ali, Muhammad; Waheed, Abdul; Manzoor, Shahid; Siddique, Rehan Ul Haq; Ahmed Khan, Hameed

    2013-11-01

    The Lawrencepur sand had remained refrigerated during a long period of glaciations in the study area. Owing to its derivation from the granitic rocks of the Himalayas and its preservation under glacial environment, the sand grains are still fresh and may contain high level of primordial radioactivity. For that reason, radiological hazards of Lawrencepur sand were assessed using a high-purity germanium gamma spectrometry technique. The average activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K were found to be 15.973.05, 27.984.89 and 498.2015.91 Bq kg(-1), respectively. These values are higher than those of the sands of many countries of the world but lower than those of some of the Pakistani, Indian and Egyptian sands. The outdoor and indoor hazard indices and annual effective doses of the Lawrencepur sand are higher than those of some of the sand deposits of European, African and American countries but lower than those of nearby Pakistani and Indian sands. However, the hazard indices and annual effective doses of the Lawrencepur sand are within the safe limits. Overall, the Lawrencepur sand does not pose any radiological health hazard as a building material. PMID:23630384

  13. Using gamma ray spectrometry for fingerprinting sources of estuarine and coastal sediment in Mukawa coast, Hokkaido, northern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizugaki, S.; Ohtsuka, J.; Murakami, Y.; Ishiya, T.; Hamamoto, S.

    2010-12-01

    To seek the geological tracers of environmental radionuclide for fingerprinting sources of estuarine and coastal sediment, the gamma ray spectrometry was conducted for the soil and sediment samples collected from subcatchments, rivers, estuaries and coast in Mukawa and Sarugawa river watersheds and Mukawa coast, Hokkaido, northern Japan. Gamma ray spectrometry was conducted to determine the activities of environmental radionuclides associated with each soil and sediment samples using HP Ge well-type detector. Gamma ray spectrometry could determine 15 environmental radionuclides, including U-series, Th-series, cesium-137 and potassium-40. Lead-210 excess was also determined by subtracting the activities of Pb-214 from that of Pb-210. The Kruskal-Wallis H test was conducted to assess the ability of each tracer property to discriminate between surface soil samples from the categories divided by subcatchment, geological era and period, suggesting that more than 11 tracer properties were available. Subsequently, the stepwise discriminant function analysis was conducted to identify which combination of tracer properties provides the best composite fingerprint for differentiating source materials on the basis of subcatchment and geology source groups. This analysis suggested that the composite fingerprints of Pb-212, Ac-228 and K-40 can classify the geology into 6 groups based on rock type. Using these tracer properties, the contribution of rock to estuarine and coastal sediment can be evaluated with the multivariate sediment mixing model.

  14. X-ray fluorescence and gamma-ray spectrometry combined with multivariate analysis for topographic studies in agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    de Castilhos, Natara D B; Melquiades, Fábio L; Thomaz, Edivaldo L; Bastos, Rodrigo Oliveira

    2014-10-15

    Physical and chemical properties of soils play a major role in the evaluation of different geochemical signature, soil quality, discrimination of land use type, soil provenance and soil degradation. The objectives of the present study are the soil elemental characterization and soil differentiation in topographic sequence and depth, using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) as well as gamma-ray spectrometry data combined with Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The study area is an agricultural region of Boa Vista catchment which is located at Guamiranga municipality, Brazil. PCA analysis was performed with four different data sets: spectral data from EDXRF, spectral data from gamma-ray spectrometry, concentration values from EDXRF measurements and concentration values from gamma-ray spectrometry. All PCAs showed similar results, confirmed by hierarchical cluster analysis, allowing the data grouping into top, bottom and riparian zone samples, i.e. the samples were separated due to its landscape position. The two hillslopes present the same behavior independent of the land use history. There are distinctive and characteristic patterns in the analyzed soil. The methodologies presented are promising and could be used to infer significant information about the region to be studied. PMID:25464179

  15. Jarosite as a Storage Mineral for Small Organic Molecules: Investigations of Natural Samples Using an 'In Situ' Laser Desorption Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, J. M.; Hinman, N. W.; Yan, B.; Stoner, D. L.; Scott, J. R.

    2007-03-01

    The use of laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometry has revealed the presence of organic matter in several jarosite samples from various locations worldwide including jarosite precipitated in the lab by acidothiobacillus ferroxidans.

  16. A NEW METHDOLOGY FOR DETERMINING FISSILE MASS IN INDIVIDUAL ACCOUNTING ITEMS WITH THE USE OF GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETRY.

    SciTech Connect

    KANE,W.R.; VANIER,P.E.; ZUHOSKI,P.B.; LEMLEY,J.R.

    2000-07-16

    In the safeguards, arms control, and nonproliferation regimes measurements are required which give the quantity of fissile material in an accounting item, e.g., a standard container of plutonium or uranium oxide. Because of the complexity of modeling the absorption of gamma rays in high-Z materials, gamma-ray spectrometry is not customarily used for this purpose. Gamma-ray measurements can be used to determine the fissile mass when two conditions are met: (1) The material is in a standard container, and (2) The material is finely divided, or a solid item with a reproducible shape. The methodology consists of: (A) Measurement of the emitted gamma rays, and (B) Measurement of the transmission through the item of the high-energy gamma rays of Co-60 and Th-228. We have demonstrated that items containing nuclear materials possess a characteristic ''fingerprint'' of gamma rays which depends not only on the nuclear properties, but also on the mass, density, shape, etc.. The material's spectrum confirms its integrity, homogeneity, and volume as well. While there is attenuation of radiation from the interior, the residual radiation confirms the homogeneity of the material throughout the volume. Transmission measurements, where the attenuation depends almost entirely on Compton scattering, determine the material mass. With well-characterized standards, this methodology can provide an accurate measure of the contained fissile material.

  17. Accurate gamma-ray spectrometry measurements of the half-life of 92Sr.

    PubMed

    Leconte, P; Hudelot, J P; Antony, M

    2008-10-01

    Studies of the nuclear fuel cycle require an accurate knowledge of the energy release from the decay of radioactive nuclides produced in a reactor, including precise half-life data for the short-lived radionuclides. Moreover, short-lived fission products are crucial for fission rate distribution measurements performed in low-power facilities, such as EOLE and MINERVE of CEA Cadarache [Fougeras, P., 2005. EOLE, MINERVE and MASURCA facilities and their associated neutron experimental programs. In: 13th International Conference on Nuclear Engineering, Beijing, China, 16-20 May 2005], and their nuclear decay data need to be known to high precision. For these reasons, the half-life of (92)Sr has been measured to solve a recently observed inconsistency identified with the quoted value in the main nuclear applications libraries (including JEFF3.1): T(1/2)=2.71+/-0.01 h [Parsa, B., Ashari, A., Goolvard, L., Nobar, Y.M., 1971. Decay scheme of 2.71 h (92)Sr. Nucl. Phys. A 175, 629-640]. An overestimation of 4.5% has been identified in this work, based on two independent methods. Specific gamma-ray spectrometry measurements on activated fissile foils have been carried out, using two HPGe detectors. Influencing factors such as net area measurements of photopeaks, pulse pile-up accuracy and dead time corrections in the presence of decaying activity are discussed. A new value has been obtained by combining eight series of measurements: T(1/2)=2.594+/-0.006 h. The uncertainty has been reduced by a factor of two with respect to previous evaluations. This measured value also shows good agreement with the most recent studies of T(1/2)=2.627+/-0.009 h [Nir-El, Y., 2003. Private Communications. Soreq Research Centre, Yavne, Israel]. PMID:18456504

  18. Neanderthal skeleton from Tabun: U-series data by gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schwarcz, H P; Simpson, J J; Stringer, C B

    1998-12-01

    The Neanderthal hominid Tabun C1, found in Israel by Garrod & Bate, was attributed to either layer B or C of their stratigraphic sequence. We have used gamma-ray spectrometry to determine the 230Th/234U and 231Pa/235U ratios of two bones from this skeleton, the mandible and a femur. The ages calculated from these ratios depend on the uranium uptake history of the bones. Assuming a model of early U (EU) uptake the age of the Tabun C1 mandible is 34+/-5 ka. The EU age of the femur is 19+/-2 ka. The femur may have experienced continuous (linear) U uptake which would give an age of 33+/-4 ka, in agreement with the mandible's EU age, but implies marked inhomogeneity in U uptake history at the site. These new age estimates for the skeleton suggest that it was younger than deposits of layer C. This apparent age is less than those of other Neanderthals found in Israel, and distinctly younger than the ages of the Skhul and Qafzeh burials. This suggests that Neanderthals did not necessarily coexist with the earliest modern humans in the region. All of the more complete Neanderthal fossils from Israel are now dated to the cool period of the last glacial cycle, suggesting that Neanderthals may have arrived in this region as a result of the southward expansion of their habitable range. The young age determined for the Tabun skeleton would suggest that Neanderthals survived as late in the Levant as they did in Europe. PMID:9929173

  19. Multi-scale monitoring of a marine geologic methane source in the Santa Barbara Channel using imaging spectrometry, ARCTAS-CARB in situ sampling and coastal hourly total hydrocarbon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, E. S.; Leifer, I.; Roberts, D.; Dennison, P. E.; Margolis, J.; Moritsch, M.; Diskin, G. S.; Sachse, G. W.

    2009-12-01

    The Coal Oil Point (COP) hydrocarbon seep field off the coast of Santa Barbara, CA is one of the most active and best-studied marine geologic methane sources in the world and contributes to elevated terrestrial methane concentrations downwind. In this study, we investigate the spatiotemporal variability of this local source and the influence of meteorological conditions on transport and concentration. A methane plume emanating from Trilogy Seep was mapped with the Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer at a 7.5 m resolution with a short-wave infrared band ratio technique. This structure agrees with the local wind speed and direction and is orthogonal to the surface currents. ARCTAS-CARB aircraft in situ sampling of lower-troposphere methane is compared to sub-hour total hydrocarbon concentration (THC) measurements from the Santa Barbara Air Pollution Control District (SBAPCD) station located near COP. Hourly SBAPCD THC values from 1980-2008 demonstrate a decrease in seep source strength until the late 1990s, followed by a consistent increase. The occurrence of elevated SBAPCD THC values for onshore wind conditions as well as numerous positive outliers as high as 17 ppm suggests that seep field emissions are both quasi-steady state and transient, direct (bubble) and diffuse (outgassing). As demonstrated for the COP seeps, the combination of imaging spectrometry, aircraft in situ sampling, and ground-based monitoring provides a powerful approach for understanding local methane sources and transport processes.

  20. In situ solvent formation microextraction in the presence of ionic liquid for preconcentration and speciation of arsenic in saline samples and total arsenic in biological samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Majidi, Behrooz; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2011-10-01

    In this modality, the extraction phase is formed in situ while simultaneously extracting analytes. First, a water-miscible ionic liquid (IL) ([Hmim][BF(4)]), capable of complete dissolving in the aqueous solution, was added to the sample. Then, an ion-exchange reagent (NaPF(6)) was added to obtain the hydrophobic IL ([Hmim][PF(6)]) that acted as the analyte extractant to form the cloudy homogeneous solution for the preconcentration and speciation of trace amounts of As (III) and As (V) with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) detection. In situ solvent formation microextraction is a simple and rapid method for extraction and preconcentration of metal ions from sample solutions containing high concentration of salt. Some effective factors that influence the microextraction efficiency were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the limit of detection (3 σ) and the enrichment factor were 6 ng L(-1) and 198, respectively. The obtained relative standard deviation was 4.78%. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of As (III) and As (V) in water samples, food salts, and total As in biological samples. PMID:20857342

  1. IN-SITU ASSAY OF TRANSURANIC RADIONUCLIDES IN THE VADOSE ZONE USING HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTRAL GAMMA LOGGING - A HANFORD CASE STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    ROHAY VJ; HENWOOD P; MCCAIN R

    2009-11-30

    High-resolution spectral gamma logging in steel-cased boreholes is used to detect and quantify transuranic radionuclides in the subsurface. Pu-239, Pu-241, Am-241, and Np-237 are identified based on characteristic decay gammas. Typical minimum detectable levels are on the order of 20 to 40 nCi/g. In intervals of high transuranic concentrations, gamma rays from other sources may complicate analysis and interpretation. Gamma rays detected in the borehole may originate from three sources: decay of the parent transuranic radionuclide or a daughter; alpha interactions; and interactions with neutrons resulting from either spontaneous fission or alpha particle interactions.

  2. Gamma spectrometry efficiency calibration using Monte Carlo methods to measure radioactivity of 137Cs in food samples.

    PubMed

    Alrefae, T

    2014-12-01

    A simple method of efficiency calibration for gamma spectrometry was performed. This method, which focused on measuring the radioactivity of (137)Cs in food samples, was based on Monte Carlo simulations available in the free-of-charge toolkit GEANT4. Experimentally, the efficiency values of a high-purity germanium detector were calculated for three reference materials representing three different food items. These efficiency values were compared with their counterparts produced by a computer code that simulated experimental conditions. Interestingly, the output of the simulation code was in acceptable agreement with the experimental findings, thus validating the proposed method. PMID:24214912

  3. A revision factor to the Cutshall self-attenuation correction in (210)Pb gamma-spectrometry measurements.

    PubMed

    Jod?owski, Pawe?

    2016-03-01

    The Cutshall transmission method of determination of self-attenuation correction in (210)Pb measurements by gamma-spectrometry gives the results burdened with errors of up to 10%. The author proposes introducing into the Cutshall correction Cs,Cuts an additional revision factor CCs,Cuts to eliminate errors. The proposed formula of the revision factor describes the CCs,Cuts value depending on the experimentally obtained Cs,Cuts correction. Formula holds true in wide ranges of the measurement geometries and linear attenuation coefficients of both the standard and the sample. PMID:26702546

  4. X-ray remote sensing and in-situ spectroscopy for planetary exploration missions and gamma-ray remote sensing and in-situ spectroscopy for planetary exploration missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahdavi, M.; Giboni, K. L.; Vajda, S.; Schweitzer, J.

    1994-01-01

    Detectors that will be used for planetary missions must have their responses calibrated in a reproducible manner. A calibration facility is being constructed at Schlumberger-Doll Research for gamma and x ray detectors. With this facility the detector response can be determined in an invariant and reproducible fashion. Initial use of the facility is expected for the MARS94 detectors. Work is continuing to better understand the rare earth oxyorthosilicates and to define their characteristics. This will allow a better use of these scintillators for planetary missions. In a survey of scintillating materials two scintillators were identified as promising candidates besides GSO, LSO, and YSO. These are CdWO4 and CsI(Tl). It will be investigated if a detector with a better overall performance can be assembled with various photon converters. Considerable progress was achieved in photomultiplier design. The length of an 1 inch diameter PMT could be reduced from 4.2 to 2.5 inches without performance degradation. This technology is being employed in the gamma ray detector for the NEAR project. A further weight and size reduction of the detector package can be achieved with miniaturized integrated power supplies.

  5. Particulate-matter distribution and its flow from power plants using infrared spectrometry and thermodynamics for in situ continuous emissions monitoring.

    PubMed

    Shlifshteyn, A; Lang, F D; Ayrapetian, R

    1996-01-20

    Spectroscopy measurements made through a continuum having suspended particulate matter are addressed. The applications presented permit correction of spectral transmissions as effected by particulate-producing fossil-fuel combustion. The research is especially applicable to large effluent flows from coal-fired power plants, whose effluents are studied with in situ (smokestack) radiometers. Methods involving fast calculation procedures based on measured irradiances in unabsorbed regions of the IR spectrum are presented. The methodology is based on wavelength-dependent extinction of radiation by small particles, considering both elastic scattering and absorbing effects. This extinction leads to an observed skeweness (or shift) of the blackbody spectral shape. Based on such skeweness, the particulate number distribution is determined with Mie theory. In order to simplify, and to speed up the routine for real-time application, a two-step procedure is presented. During preinstallation calibration with Mie theory, sets of integral tables are computed for all possible solution values and stored in computer memory. Based on instantaneous spectral measurements, the appropriate integral tables are retrieved, then used as inputs in a process leading to particulate number distribution. Because all time-consuming calculations associated with Mie theory are performed during preinstallation calibration, the technique is capable of monitoring particulate emission in real time. Furthermore, given resolution of the number distribution in combination with thermodynamic analysis of the system, determination of particulate apparent density and particulate mass flow rate is made. These values have importance for environmental reporting. Comparisons of calculated particulate distributions with in situ measurements are also presented. Confirmatory testing programs conducted at several power plants are discussed. PMID:21069018

  6. A rapid dissolution procedure to aid initial nuclear forensics investigations of chemically refractory compounds and particles prior to gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reading, David G; Croudace, Ian W; Warwick, Phillip E; Britton, Richard

    2015-11-01

    A rapid and effective preparative procedure has been evaluated for the accurate determination of low-energy (40-200 keV) gamma-emitting radionuclides ((210)Pb, (234)Th, (226)Ra, (235)U) in uranium ores and uranium ore concentrates (UOCs) using high-resolution gamma ray spectrometry. The measurement of low-energy gamma photons is complicated in heterogeneous samples containing high-density mineral phases and in such situations activity concentrations will be underestimated. This is because attenuation corrections, calculated based on sample mean density, do not properly correct where dense grains are dispersed within a less dense matrix (analogous to a nugget effect). The current method overcomes these problems using a lithium tetraborate fusion that readily dissolves all components including high-density, self-attenuating minerals/compounds. This is the ideal method for dissolving complex, non-volatile components in soils, rocks, mineral concentrates, and other materials where density reduction is required. Lithium borate fusion avoids the need for theoretical efficiency corrections or measurement of matrix matched calibration standards. The resulting homogeneous quenched glass produced can be quickly dissolved in nitric acid producing low-density solutions that can be counted by gamma spectrometry. The effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated using uranium-bearing Certified Reference Materials and provides accurate activity concentration determinations compared to the underestimated activity concentrations derived from direct measurements of a bulk sample. The procedure offers an effective solution for initial nuclear forensic studies where complex refractory minerals or matrices exist. It is also significantly faster, safer and simpler than alternative approaches. PMID:26572834

  7. A method for determining the analytical form of a radionuclide depth distribution using multiple gamma spectrometry measurements.

    PubMed

    Dewey, Steven Clifford; Whetstone, Zachary David; Kearfott, Kimberlee Jane

    2011-06-01

    When characterizing environmental radioactivity, whether in the soil or within concrete building structures undergoing remediation or decommissioning, it is highly desirable to know the radionuclide depth distribution. This is typically modeled using continuous analytical expressions, whose forms are believed to best represent the true source distributions. In situ gamma ray spectroscopic measurements are combined with these models to fully describe the source. Currently, the choice of analytical expressions is based upon prior experimental core sampling results at similar locations, any known site history, or radionuclide transport models. This paper presents a method, employing multiple in situ measurements at a single site, for determining the analytical form that best represents the true depth distribution present. The measurements can be made using a variety of geometries, each of which has a different sensitivity variation with source spatial distribution. Using non-linear least squares numerical optimization methods, the results can be fit to a collection of analytical models and the parameters of each model determined. The analytical expression that results in the fit with the lowest residual is selected as the most accurate representation. A cursory examination is made of the effects of measurement errors on the method. PMID:21482447

  8. Determination of endogenous brassinosteroids using sequential magnetic solid phase extraction followed by in situ derivatization/desorption method coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jun; Mao, Li-Jing; Guo, Ning; Yu, Lei; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-05-13

    In this study, a sequential magnetic solid phase extraction followed by in situ derivatization/desorption method was proposed for the fast, selective and sensitive determination of brassinosteroids (BRs) in plant tissues. Magnetic sorbent for quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe method (mQuEChERS) and polymer(4-vinylphenylboronic acid-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) coated Fe3O4@SiO2 (p(4-VPBA-co-EGDMA) coated Fe3O4@SiO2) were prepared and characterized. Using them as sorbents, pigments and hydrophilic interferents were firstly removed from plant extract by mQuEChERS, and then endogenous BRs were selectively enriched by p(4-VPBA-co-EGDMA) coated Fe3O4@SiO2 through boronate affinity interaction. After loading BRs on p(4-VPBA-co-EGDMA) coated Fe3O4@SiO2, instead of directly eluting free BRs, the adsorbed BRs were released by adding 4-(N,N-dimethyamino)phenylboronic acid (4-DMAPBA) solution for in situ derivatizaiton/desorption of BRs based on a transesterification reaction between the boronate moieties of p(4-VPBA-co-EGDMA) coated Fe3O4@SiO2 and 4-DMAPBA, finally the resultant solution was submitted to LC-MS/MS for quantification. The whole procedure of the sequential MSPE could be accomplished within 1h, and the matrix effect to MS signal after the sample pretreatment was estimated to be in the range of 93.0-97.4%. The established method provided broad linear dynamics ranges (1.0-100.0pg/mL) with correlation coefficients (R) >0.9978, substantial sensitivity (limits of detection ranged from 0.27 to 1.29pg/mL), high reproducibility (intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 14.8%) and satisfactory accuracy (recoveries ranged from 74.0%-116.6%). Furthermore, endogenous BRs were successfully detected in one flower of Brassica napus L. (22.5-542.7pg/g fresh weight) and other plant tissues (13.7-289.8pg/g fresh weight). PMID:27072523

  9. Application of a fast and cost-effective in situ derivatization method prior to gas chromatography with mass spectrometry to monitor endocrine disruptors in water matrices.

    PubMed

    Melo, Armindo; Ferreira, Isabel M P L V O; Mansilha, Catarina

    2015-06-01

    This work deals with the optimization of a rapid, cost-effective, and eco-friendly gas chromatography with mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous determination of four endocrine disruptor compounds in water matrices: estrone, 17β-estradiol, 17α-ethinylestradiol, and bisphenol A, that are currently considered to be of main concern in the field of water policy and that could became candidates for future regulations. The method involves simultaneous derivatization and extraction of compounds by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry analysis. Derivatization and extraction parameters were optimized with the aid of experimental design approach. An excellent linear response was achieved for all analytes (r(2) ≥ 0.999). Limits of detection and quantification are 0.003-0.005 and 0.0094-0.0164 μg/L, respectively. Intraday precision ranged between 1.1 and 12.6%, whereas interday precision ranged between 0.5 and 14.7%. For accuracy, bias values varied between -15.0 and 13.7%. Recoveries at three concentration levels ranged from 86.4 to 118.2%. The proposed method can be applied to the routine analysis of groundwater, river, sea, tap, and mineral water samples with excellent sensitivity, precision, and accuracy. PMID:25821146

  10. Dating of sediments from four Swiss prealpine lakes with (210)Pb determined by gamma-spectrometry: progress and problems.

    PubMed

    Putyrskaya, V; Klemt, E; Röllin, S; Astner, M; Sahli, H

    2015-07-01

    In this paper the most important problems in dating lake sediments with unsupported (210)Pb are summarized and the progress in gamma-spectrometry of the unsupported (210)Pb is discussed. The main topics of these studies concern sediment samples preparation for gamma-spectrometry, measurement techniques and data analysis, as well as understanding of accumulation and sedimentation processes in lakes. The vertical distributions of artificial ((137)Cs, (241)Am, (239)Pu) and natural radionuclides ((40)K, (210,214)Pb, (214)Bi) as well as stable trace elements (Fe, Mn, Pb) in sediment cores from four Swiss lakes were used as examples for the interpretation, inter-comparison and validation of depth-age relations established by three (210)Pb-based models (CF-CSR, CRS and SIT). The identification of turbidite layers and the influence of the turbidity flows on the accuracy of sediment dating is demonstrated. Time-dependent mass sedimentation rates in lakes Brienz, Thun, Biel and Lucerne are discussed and compared with published data. PMID:25875007

  11. Self-absorption correction factor applied to 129I measurement by direct gamma-X spectrometry for Fucus serratus samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefèvre, O.; Bouisset, P.; Germain, P.; Barker, E.; Kerlau, G.; Cagnat, X.

    2003-06-01

    Self-absorption corrections have been determined for the energies characterising 129I below 40 keV in the frame of studying Fucus serratus samples by direct gamma-X spectrometry. This work was performed on a large spatio-temporal scale in order to integrate the fluctuations of the matrix. More than 200 samples monthly collected from January 1983 to December 1996 along the French Atlantic and English Channel coasts, have been measured as part of the Permanent Observatory of the radioactivity programme of the Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN). A relationship has been established between experimental mass attenuation coefficients at low energy and the 40K concentrations of the samples, where the latter showed the same temporal variation as the 127I concentration (iodine stable isotope). Based on the mean correction factors determined in the present work, a simplified method is proposed to quantify the content of 129I. The direct gamma-X spectrometry results obtained in this way are in good agreement with those reported by Patti et al. (Radioprotection 23 (1988) 381) using neutron activation analysis for the samples collected between October 1983 and December 1984 at Herquemoulin, located near the La Hague reprocessing plant.

  12. A portable gas chromatograph with simultaneous detection by mass spectrometry and electroantennography for the highly sensitive in situ measurement of volatiles.

    PubMed

    Schott, Matthias; Wehrenfennig, Christoph; Gasch, Tina; Düring, Rolf-Alexander; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    Mating disruption is a sustainable method for the control of insect pests, involving the release of synthetic sex pheromones that disrupt the olfactory localization of females by males. However, the development and refinement of this strategy is hampered because current instruments lack the sensitivity to detect volatile organic chemicals in the field, and portable electroantennograms produce non-comparable relative units and distorted results in the presence of plant volatiles. To address the demand for more sensitive instruments that are suitable for the rapid in situ detection of airborne pheromones, we have developed a portable, automated needle trap device connected to a gas chromatograph, mass spectrometer, and electroantennographic detector (NTD-GC-MS/EAD) suitable for field applications. We tested the instrument by measuring the concentration of the sex pheromone (E,Z)-7,9-dodecadienyl acetate, which is used to disrupt the mating of the European grapevine moth Lobesia botrana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). Our data confirm that the instrument generates highly reproducible results and is highly sensitive, with a detection threshold of 3 ng/m(3) (E,Z)-7,9-dodecadienyl acetate in outside air. PMID:23954942

  13. Graphene oxide-based dispersive solid-phase extraction combined with in situ derivatization and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of acidic pharmaceuticals in water.

    PubMed

    Naing, Nyi Nyi; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Lee, Hian Kee

    2015-12-24

    A fast and low-cost sample preparation method of graphene based dispersive solid-phase extraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis, was developed. The procedure involves an initial extraction with water-immiscible organic solvent, followed by a rapid clean-up using amine functionalized reduced graphene oxide as sorbent. Simple and fast one-step in situ derivatization using trimethylphenylammonium hydroxide was subsequently applied on acidic pharmaceuticals serving as model analytes, ibuprofen, gemfibrozil, naproxen, ketoprofen and diclofenac, before GC-MS analysis. Extraction parameters affecting the derivatization and extraction efficiency such as volume of derivatization agent, effect of desorption solvent, effect of pH and effect of ionic strength were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, the method demonstrated good limits of detection ranging from 1 to 16ngL(-1), linearity (from 0.01 to 50 and 0.05 to 50μgL(-1), depending on the analytes) and satisfactory repeatability of extractions (relative standard deviations, below 13%, n=3). PMID:26684593

  14. In Situ Determination of Trace Elements in Fish Otoliths by Laser Ablation Double Focusing Sector Field Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Using a Solution Standard Addition Calibration Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Jones, C. M.

    2002-05-01

    Microchemistry of fish otoliths (fish ear bones) is a very useful tool for monitoring aquatic environments and fish migration. However, determination of the elemental composition in fish otolith by ICP-MS has been limited to either analysis of dissolved sample solution or measurement of limited number of trace elements by laser ablation (LA)- ICP-MS due to low sensitivity, lack of available calibration standards, and complexity of polyatomic molecular interference. In this study, a method was developed for in situ determination of trace elements in fish otoliths by laser ablation double focusing sector field ultra high sensitivity Finnigan Element 2 ICP-MS using a solution standard addition calibration method. Due to the lack of matrix-match solid calibration standards, sixteen trace elements (Na, Mg, P, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Rb, Sr, Y, Cd, La, Ba, Pb and U) were determined using a solution standard calibration with Ca as an internal standard. Flexibility, easy preparation and stable signals are the advantages of using solution calibration standards. In order to resolve polyatomic molecular interferences, medium resolution (M/delta M > 4000) was used for some elements (Na, Mg, P, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Cu). Both external calibration and standard addition quantification strategies are compared and discussed. Precision, accuracy, and limits of detection are presented.

  15. In situ derivatization combined to automated microextraction by packed sorbents for the determination of chlorophenols in soil samples by gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    González Paredes, Rosa María; García Pinto, Carmelo; Pérez Pavón, José Luis; Moreno Cordero, Bernardo

    2014-09-12

    A method based on the coupling of in situ extraction and derivatization of chlorophenols (CPs) (2-chlorophenol, 4-chloro-3-methylphenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol) from soils, accomplishing their preconcentration by means of automated microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS), is proposed. After extraction and acylation of the chlorophenols in aqueous medium, the liquid phase obtained is subjected to the MEPS procedure. The QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) and MEPS techniques were compared and the results confirmed the preconcentration carried out with MEPS. The existence of a matrix effect was checked and the analytical characteristics of the method were determined in a soil sample. The method provided good linearity (from 1 to 12μgkg(-1)), together with good repeatability and reproducibility values (RSD equal to or less than 10%). The limits of detection were in the 0.118-0.894μgkg(-1) range. A certified reference material was applied to validate the proposed methodology. PMID:25113872

  16. Detection of in-situ derivatized peptides in microbial biofilms by laser desorption 7.87 eV postionizaton mass spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Edirisinghe, P. D.; Moore, J. F.; Skinner-Nemec, K. A.; Lindberg, C.; Giometti, C. S.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Hunt, J. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Hanley, L.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; MassThink

    2007-01-01

    A novel analytical method based on laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS) was developed to investigate the competence and sporulation factor-a pentapeptide of amino acid sequence ERGMT-within intact Bacillus subtilis biofilms. Derivatization of the neat ERGMT peptide with quinoline- and anthracene-based tags was separately used to lower the peptide ionization potential and permit direct ionization by 7.87-eV vacuum ultraviolet radiation. The techniques of mass shifting and selective ionization of the derivatized peptide were combined here to permit detection of ERGMT peptide within intact biofilms by LDPI-MS, without any prior extraction or chromatographic separation. Finally, imaging MS specific to the derivatized peptide was demonstrated on an intact biofilm using LDPI-MS. The presence of ERGMT in the biofilms was verified by bulk extraction/LC-MS. However, MALDI imaging MS analyses were unable to detect ERGMT within intact biofilms.

  17. Determination of Vanadium by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis in Conjunction with Compton Suppression Gamma-Ray Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    W. H. Zhang; A. Chatt

    2000-11-12

    The toxicity of vanadium has been known for a long time. It is only recently that vanadium has been recognized as an essential trace element. The determination of vanadium with high precision and accuracy in tissues, foods, and other biological materials is needed for the purpose of studying its effect on human nutrition and health. Several techniques such as spectrophotometry, atomic absorption, X-ray fluorescence, and neutron activation analysis (NAA) can be used for its determination. Vanadium can be determined by NAA through its short-lived nuclide {sup 52}V produced via the {sup 51}V(n, {gamma}){sup 52}V reaction; it has a 1434.2-keV gamma ray and a half-life of 3.74 min. It has been reported that {sup 52}V has sufficient sensitivity for its measurement down to nanogram levels. However, it is seldom assayed in practice by instrumental NAA (INAA) in conjunction with conventional gamma-ray spectrometry, in particular for low vanadium content in high-salt biological materials, due to the Compton background interference from nuclides such as {sup 28}Al, {sup 38}Cl, {sup 56}Mn, and {sup 24}Na. Alternatively, radiochemical NAA or preconcentration NAA methods are used to separate vanadium from the major and interfering elements. A Compton suppression counting technique can be beneficially used under such situations. One of the objectives of this work was to fully explore the advantages of Compton suppression counting for the determination of vanadium in biological samples.

  18. A broadband gamma-ray spectrometry using novel unfolding algorithms for characterization of laser wakefield-generated betatron radiation.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong Ho; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Kim, Hyung Taek; Rhee, Yong Joo; Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Cho, Myung Hoon; Shin, Jung Hun; Yoo, Byung Ju; Hojbota, Calin; Jo, Sung Ha; Shin, Kang Woo; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seung Ku; Cho, Byeoung Ick; Choi, Il Woo; Nam, Chang Hee

    2015-12-01

    We present a high-flux, broadband gamma-ray spectrometry capable of characterizing the betatron radiation spectrum over the photon energy range from 10 keV to 20 MeV with respect to the peak photon energy, spectral bandwidth, and unique discrimination from background radiations, using a differential filtering spectrometer and the unfolding procedure based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. These properties are experimentally verified by measuring betatron radiation from a cm-scale laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) driven by a 1-PW laser, using a differential filtering spectrometer consisting of a 15-filter and image plate stack. The gamma-ray spectra were derived by unfolding the photostimulated luminescence (PSL) values recorded on the image plates, using the spectrometer response matrix modeled with the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The accuracy of unfolded betatron radiation spectra was assessed by unfolding the test PSL data simulated with GEANT4, showing an ambiguity of less than 20% and clear discrimination from the background radiation with less than 10%. The spectral analysis of betatron radiation from laser wakefield-accelerated electron beams with energies up to 3 GeV revealed radiation spectra characterized by synchrotron radiation with the critical photon energy up to 7 MeV. The gamma-ray spectrometer and unfolding method presented here facilitate an in-depth understanding of betatron radiation from LWFA process and a novel radiation source of high-quality photon beams in the MeV regime. PMID:26724015

  19. A broadband gamma-ray spectrometry using novel unfolding algorithms for characterization of laser wakefield-generated betatron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jong Ho; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Kim, Hyung Taek; Rhee, Yong Joo; Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Cho, Myung Hoon; Shin, Jung Hun; Yoo, Byung Ju; Hojbota, Calin; Jo, Sung Ha; Shin, Kang Woo; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seung Ku; Cho, Byeoung Ick; Choi, Il Woo; Nam, Chang Hee

    2015-12-01

    We present a high-flux, broadband gamma-ray spectrometry capable of characterizing the betatron radiation spectrum over the photon energy range from 10 keV to 20 MeV with respect to the peak photon energy, spectral bandwidth, and unique discrimination from background radiations, using a differential filtering spectrometer and the unfolding procedure based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. These properties are experimentally verified by measuring betatron radiation from a cm-scale laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) driven by a 1-PW laser, using a differential filtering spectrometer consisting of a 15-filter and image plate stack. The gamma-ray spectra were derived by unfolding the photostimulated luminescence (PSL) values recorded on the image plates, using the spectrometer response matrix modeled with the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The accuracy of unfolded betatron radiation spectra was assessed by unfolding the test PSL data simulated with GEANT4, showing an ambiguity of less than 20% and clear discrimination from the background radiation with less than 10%. The spectral analysis of betatron radiation from laser wakefield-accelerated electron beams with energies up to 3 GeV revealed radiation spectra characterized by synchrotron radiation with the critical photon energy up to 7 MeV. The gamma-ray spectrometer and unfolding method presented here facilitate an in-depth understanding of betatron radiation from LWFA process and a novel radiation source of high-quality photon beams in the MeV regime.

  20. In situ submicron organic aerosol characterization at a boreal forest research station during HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 using soft and hard ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, A. L.; Äijälä, M.; Corrigan, A. L.; Junninen, H.; Ehn, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kulmala, M.; Russell, L. M.; Williams, J.; Hoffmann, T.

    2013-11-01

    The chemical composition of submicron aerosol during the comprehensive field campaign HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 at Hyytiälä, Finland, is presented. The focus lies on online measurements of organic acids, which were achieved by using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) ion trap mass spectrometry (IT-MS). These measurements were accompanied by aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of filter samples, all showing a high degree of correlation. The soft ionization mass spectrometer alternated between gas-phase measurements solely and measuring the sum of gas and particle phase. The AMS measurements of C, H and O elemental composition show that the aerosol during the campaign was highly oxidized, which appears reasonable due to high and prolonged radiation during the boreal summer measurement period as well as the long transport times of some of the aerosol. In order to contrast ambient and laboratory aerosol, an average organic acid pattern, measured by APCI-IT-MS during the campaign, was compared to terpene ozonolysis products in a laboratory reaction chamber. Identification of single organic acid species remains a major challenge due to the complexity of the boreal forest aerosol. Unambiguous online species identification was attempted by the combinatorial approach of identifying unique fragments in the MS2 mode of standards, and then comparing these results with MS2 field spectra. During the campaign, unique fragments of limonene-derived organic acids (limonic acid and ketolimononic acid) and of the biomass burning tracer vanillic acid were detected. Other specific fragments (neutral loss of 28 Da) in the MS2 suggest the occurrence of semialdehydes. Furthermore, an approach to determine the average molecular weight of the aerosol is presented. The campaign average organic molecular weight was determined to be 300 g mol-1. However, a plume of aged biomass burning aerosol, arriving at Hyytiälä from Russia, contained organic compounds up to 800 Da (MWom≈450 g mol-1), showing that the average molecular weight can vary significantly. The high measurement frequency of both AMS and APCI-IT-MS enabled the partitioning of selected organic acids between gas and particle phase as a function of the total particulate mass to be quantified. Surprisingly high fractions of the higher molecular weight organic acids were observed to reside in the gas phase. These observations might be a consequence of large equilibration timescales for semi-solid boreal forest aerosol, as has been recently hypothesized by Shiraiwa and Seinfeld (2012).

  1. In-situ submicron organic aerosol characterization at a boreal forest research station during HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 using soft and hard ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, A. L.; Äijälä, M.; Corrigan, A. L.; Junninen, H.; Ehn, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kulmala, M.; Russell, L. M.; Williams, J.; Hoffmann, T.

    2013-07-01

    The chemical composition of submicron aerosol during the comprehensive field campaign HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 at Hyytiälä, Finland is presented. The focus lies on online measurements of organic acids, which was achieved by using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) ion trap mass spectrometry (IT-MS). These measurements were accompanied by Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (AMS) measurements and Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) of filter samples, all showing a high degree of correlation. The soft ionization mass spectrometer alternated between gas phase measurements solely and measuring the sum of gas- and particle-phase. The AMS measurements of C, H and O elemental composition show that the aerosol during the campaign was highly oxidized, which appears reasonable due to high and prolonged radiation during the boreal summer measurement period as well as the long transport times of some of the aerosol. In order to contrast ambient and laboratory aerosol, an average organic acid pattern, measured by APCI-IT-MS during the campaign, was compared to terpene ozonolysis products in a laboratory reaction chamber. Identification of single organic acid species remains a major challenge due to the complexity of the boreal forest aerosol. Unambiguous online species identification was attempted by the combinatorial approach of identifying unique fragments in the MS2-mode of standards, and then comparing these results with MS2 field spectra. During the campaign, unique fragments of limonene derived organic acids (limonic acid and ketolimononic acid) and of the biomass burning tracer vanillic acid were detected. Other specific fragments (neutral loss of 28 Da) in the MS2 suggest the occurrence of semialdehydes. Furthermore, an approach to determine the average molecular weight of the aerosol is presented. The campaign average organic molecular weight was determined to be 300 g mol-1. However, a plume of aged biomass burning aerosol, arriving at Hyytiälä from Russia, contained organic compounds up to 800 Da (MWom ≈ 450 g mol-1), showing that the average molecular weight can vary significantly. The high measurement frequency of both, AMS and APCI-IT-MS, enabled the partitioning of selected organic acids between gas- and particle-phase as a function of the total particulate mass to be quantified. Surprisingly high fractions of the higher molecular weight organic acids were observed to reside in the gas phase. These observations might be a consequence of large equilibration timescales for semi-solid boreal forest aerosol, as it has been recently hypothesised by Shiraiwa and Seinfeld (2012).

  2. A prototype of radioactive waste drum monitor by non-destructive assays using gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Tran Thien; Trang, Hoang Thi Kieu; Chuong, Huynh Dinh; Nguyen, Vo Hoang; Tran, Le Bao; Tam, Hoang Duc; Tao, Chau Van

    2016-03-01

    In this work, segmented gamma scanning and the gamma emission tomography were used to locate unknown sources in a radioactive waste drum. The simulated detector response function and full energy peak efficiency are compared to corresponding experimental data and show about 5.3% difference for an energy ranging from 81keV to 1332.5keV for point sources. Computation of the corresponding activity is in good agreement with the true values. PMID:26717796

  3. In situ real-time studies of oxygen incorporation in complex oxide thin films using spectroscopic ellipsometry and ion scattering and recoil spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, A. H.; Gao, Y.; Irene, E. A.; Auciello, O.; Krauss, A. R.; Achultz, J. A.

    2000-05-25

    The surface termination of c-axis oriented YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} (YBCO) and the oxygen incorporation mechanism has been investigated using a unique combination of spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and time of flight ion scattering and recoil spectrometry (ToF-ISARS). The high surface sensitivity of the ToF-ISARS technique combined with the bulk oxygen sensitivity of SE are shown to yield complimentary information. The SE provided the film orientation and quality, while ToF-ISARS supplied surface compositional and structural information and enabled isotopic {sup 18}O tracer studies. It was determined that the O content of the film had little effect on the surface termination of the film, indicating a lack of labile Cu(1) sites at the c-axis oriented YBCO surface. Also, strong evidence for a Ba or BaO terminated structure is shown. The data related to the {sup 18}O tracer studies indicate that O from the reaction ambient incorporates only into the labile Cu(1) sites during both deposition and annealing, while stable O sites were populated with O from the sputtered target, indicating either the need for sputtered atomic O or sputtered YCuO complexes to occupy the stable Cu(2) sites.

  4. Suitability of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the in situ silylation of chlorophenols in water samples before gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saraji, Mohammad; Ghambari, Hoda

    2015-10-01

    Trace analysis of chlorophenols in water was performed by simultaneous silylation and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was carried out using an organic solvent lighter than water (n-hexane). The effect of different silylating reagents on the method efficiency was investigated. The influence of derivatization reagent volume, presence of catalyst and derivatization/extraction time on the yield of the derivatization reaction was studied. Different parameters affecting extraction efficiency such as kind and volume of extraction and disperser solvents, pH of the sample and addition of salt were also investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration graphs were linear in the range of 0.05-100 ng/mL and the limit of detection was 0.01 ng/mL. The enrichment factors were 242, 351, and 363 for 4-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, respectively. The values of intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations were in the range of 3.0-6.4 and 6.1-9.9%, respectively. The applicability of the method was investigated by analyzing water and wastewater samples. PMID:26257251

  5. In situ analysis of precious metals in polished mineral samples and sulphido "standards" by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at concentrations of parts-per-billion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Graham C.; Kilius, Linas R.; Rucklidge, John C.

    1991-08-01

    This article addresses the analysis of eight precious metals (Au and Ag, plus the six Platinum Group Elements (PGE): Pt, Ir, Os, Ru, Rh, and Pd). The metals are measured in Fe-Ni-(Cu) sulphidos by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). Samples are analysed in the form of small polished cores, derived from sulphido- and oxide-rich rocks, and from Ni-S-dominated fire assay beads. The chosen analytical strategies are shown to have essentially zero background for Au, Ag, and the PGE, with the notable result that detection limits, like precision, are limited only by the time available for analysis. Sensitivities for monatomic negative ions are in the order Au ≈ Ag > Pt ≈ Rh > Pd ≈ Ir > Ru > Os, with nominal detection limits (quoted on the basis of equal counting times of 100 sec) ranging from 0.1 ppb for Au to <600 ppb for Os. The utility of the method is exemplified in terms of analysis of specific sulphidic precious-metal ores. Although optical and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) studies reveal substantial heterogeneities in the NiS beads, on scales varying from 1 μm to 100 μm, reproducible results to a precision of < 10% can be obtained because the probing beam of Cs, ≈ 500 μm in diameter, averages out these inhomogeneities, but still has the spatial resolution to provide grain-by-grain analysis of coarse ore samples. The magnitudes of PGE partition coefficients between the sulphido components of the beads, which await determination with a collimated probing beam, provide a limiting factor in the attainable precision of the results. These samples have become the reference material of choice for precious metal analysis within this laboratory. The technique permits direct measurement of the partitioning of precious metals between coexisting ore minerals, and of PGE patterns within single crystals of such phases as pyrite and chromite.

  6. Development of a Method for the Quantitation of Three Thiols in Beer, Hop, and Wort Samples by Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction with in Situ Derivatization and Thermal Desorption-Gas Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo; Kishimoto, Toru

    2015-08-01

    A method for analysis of hop-derived polyfunctional thiols, such as 4-sulfanyl-4-methylpentan-2-one (4S4M2Pone), 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol (3SHol), and 3-sulfanylhexyl acetate (3SHA), in beer, hop water extract, and wort at nanogram per liter levels was developed. The method employed stir bar sorptive extraction with in situ derivatization (der-SBSE) using ethyl propiolate (ETP), followed by thermal desorption and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS/MS) with selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. A prior step involved structural identification of the ETP derivatives of the thiols by TD-GC-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry with parallel sulfur chemiluminescence detection (Q-TOF-MS/SCD) after similar der-SBSE. The der-SBSE conditions of the ETP concentration, buffer concentration, salt addition, and extraction time profiles were investigated, and the performance of the method was demonstrated with spiked beer samples. The limits of detection (LODs) (0.19-27 ng/L) are below the odor threshold levels of all analytes. The apparent recoveries at 10-100 ng/L (99-101%) and the repeatabilities [relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.3-7.2%; n = 6] are also good. The method was successfully applied to the determination of target thiols at nanogram per liter levels in three kinds of beer samples (hopped with Cascade, Citra, and Nelson Sauvin) and the corresponding hop water extracts and wort samples. There was a clear correlation between the determined values and the characteristics of citrus hop aroma for each sample. PMID:26166150

  7. High resolution gamma-ray spectrometry of culverts containing transuranic waste at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Sigg, R.

    1990-12-31

    A number of concrete culverts used to retrievably store drummed, dry, radioactive waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS), were suspected of containing ambiguous quantities of transuranic (TRU) nuclides. These culverts were assayed in place for Pu-239 content using thermal and fast neutron counting techniques. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy on 17 culverts, having neutron emission rates several times higher than expected, showed characteristic gamma-ray signatures of neutron emitters other than Pu-239 (e.g., Pu-238, Pu/Be, or Am/Be neutron sources). This study confirmed the Pu-239 content of the culverts with anomalous neutron rates and established limits on the Pu-239 mass in each of the 17 suspect culverts by in-field, non-intrusive gamma-ray measurements.

  8. High resolution gamma-ray spectrometry of culverts containing transuranic waste at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Sigg, R.

    1990-01-01

    A number of concrete culverts used to retrievably store drummed, dry, radioactive waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS), were suspected of containing ambiguous quantities of transuranic (TRU) nuclides. These culverts were assayed in place for Pu-239 content using thermal and fast neutron counting techniques. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy on 17 culverts, having neutron emission rates several times higher than expected, showed characteristic gamma-ray signatures of neutron emitters other than Pu-239 (e.g., Pu-238, Pu/Be, or Am/Be neutron sources). This study confirmed the Pu-239 content of the culverts with anomalous neutron rates and established limits on the Pu-239 mass in each of the 17 suspect culverts by in-field, non-intrusive gamma-ray measurements.

  9. A convenient method for discriminating between natural and depleted uranium by gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shoji, M; Hamajima, Y; Takatsuka, K; Honoki, H; Nakajima, T; Kondo, T; Nakanishi, T

    2001-08-01

    A convenient method for discriminating between natural and depleted uranium reagent was developed by measuring and analyzing the gamma-ray spectra of some reagents with no standard source. The counting rates (R) of photoelectric peaks of gamma-rays from nuclides with the same radioactivity divided by their emission probability (B) are expressed as a function of gamma-ray energy. The radioactivities of 234Th and 234mPa and 21.72 times that of 235U are equal to the radioactivity of 235U in natural uranium. Therefore, the plot of 21.72-fold R/B for 235U should be on a curve fitted to the points for 234Th and 234mPa in natural uranium. Depleted uranium with a 235U isotopic composition of less than 0.68% could be discriminated from natural uranium in the case of a reagent containing 4.0 g of uranium. PMID:11393763

  10. Calculation of the decision threshold in gamma-ray spectrometry using sum peaks.

    PubMed

    Korun, M; Vodenik, B; Zorko, B

    2016-03-01

    In the presence of radon daughters, gamma rays from (88)Y with energies at 898.0keV or 1836.1keV appear on a high, continuous background or overlap with other peaks. Therefore a calculation of the decision threshold from the sum peak at 2734.1keV represents a useful alternative, because here the continuous background is low. The decision threshold calculated from this peak can attain a value being comparable to the decision threshold calculated from the gamma-ray peak at 898.0keV. PMID:26625726

  11. Mathematical model of gamma-ray spectrometry borehole logging for quantitative analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schimschal, Ulrich

    1981-01-01

    A technique for analyzing gamma-ray spectral-logging data has been developed, in which a digital computer is used to calculate the effects of gamma-ray attentuation in a borehole environment. The computer model allows for the calculation of the effects of lithology, porosity, density, and the thickness of a horizontal layer of uniformly distributed radioactive material surrounding a centralized probe in a cylindrical borehole. The computer program also contains parameters for the calculation of the effects of well casing, drilling fluid, probe housing, and losses through the sodium-iodide crystal. Errors associated with the commonly used mathematical assumption of a point detector are eliminated in this model. (USGS)

  12. Three Independent Techniques Localize Expression of Transcript afp-11 and Its Bioactive Peptide Products to the Paired AVK Neurons in Ascaris suum: In Situ Hybridization, Immunocytochemistry, and Single Cell Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We utilized three independent techniques, immunocytochemistry (ICC), single cell mass spectrometry (MS), and in situ hybridization (ISH), to localize neuropeptides and their transcripts in the nervous system of the nematode Ascaris suum. AF11 (SDIGISEPNFLRFa) is an endogenous peptide with potent paralytic effects on A. suum locomotory behavior. A highly specific antibody to AF11 showed robust immunostaining for AF11 in the paired AVK neurons in the ventral ganglion. We traced the processes from the AVK neurons into the ventral nerve cord and identified them as ventral cord interneurons. MS and MS/MS of single dissected AVKs detected AF11, two previously characterized peptides (AF25 and AF26), seven novel sequence-related peptides, including several sharing a PNFLRFamide C-terminus, and peptide NY, a peptide with an unrelated sequence. Also present in a subset of AVKs was AF2, a peptide encoded by the afp-4 transcript. By sequencing the afp-11 transcript, we discovered that it encodes AF11, all the AF11-related peptides detected by MS in AVK, and peptide NY. ISH detected the afp-11 transcript in AVK neurons, consistent with other techniques. ISH did not detect afp-11 in the ALA neuron, although both ICC and MS found AF11 in ca. 30% of ALAs. All 10 AF11-related peptides reduced acetylcholine-induced muscle contraction, but they differed in their rate of reversal of inhibition after removal of the peptide. PMID:23509978

  13. Infrared spectra of U.S. automobile original finishes (post - 1989). VIII: In situ identification of bismuth vanadate using extended range FT-IR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Edward M

    2014-03-01

    Chrome Yellow (PbCrO4 ·xPbSO4 ) was a common pigment in U.S. automobile OEM finishes for more than three decades, but in the early 1990s its use was discontinued. One of its main replacements was Bismuth Vanadate (BiVO4 ·nBi2 MoO6 , n = 0-2), which was commercially introduced in 1985, as this inorganic pigment also produces a very bright hue and has excellent outdoor durability. This paper describes the in situ identification of Bismuth Vanadate in automotive finishes using FT-IR and dispersive Raman spectroscopy and XRF spectrometry. Some differentiation of commercial formulations of this pigment is possible based on far-infrared absorptions, Raman data, and elemental analysis. The spectral differences arise from the presence or absence of molybdenum, the use of two crystal polymorphs of BiVO4 , and differences in pigment stabilizers. Bismuth Vanadate is usually not used alone, and it is typically found with Isoindoline Yellow, hydrous ferric oxide, rutile, Isoindolinone Yellow 3R, or various combinations of these. PMID:24261821

  14. An intercomparison of gamma-spectrometry on two samples of biological origin by eight laboratories in four countries.

    PubMed

    Twining, J R

    1996-08-01

    This report gives details of the first inter-laboratory comparison of gamma-spectrometry to be run within SPERA, the South Pacific Environmental Radioactivity Association since its inauguration in 1991. Laboratories in Australia, Chile, French Polynesia and New Zealand participated in the exercise. Two 'unknown' samples of biological origin were analysed. The first was a sample of milk powder derived from IAEA reference material. This sample provided an assessment of overall accuracy of 134Cs, 137Cs and 40K determinations. The second sample consisted of dried fish flesh including natural 40K and spiked with a mixed nuclide solution containing 210Pb, 109Cd, 54Mn, 60Co and trace 133Ba. Together the samples gave information on analytical precision over a range of energies and activities. When the results were compared with the recommended values and confidence intervals of the IAEA reference material, the overall accuracy of the gamma-spectrometry analytical procedures was found to be good. The average mean values for combined laboratory data fell within the recommended value ranges for each isotope. Ninety percent of the individual laboratory isotope mean values were within two standard errors of the 95% confidence interval of the standard, 75% were within 1 s.e., and 33% of the analyses fell within the confidence interval. Technical precision was also adequate with the overall errors being of the same magnitude as that of the reference material values for each isotope with relative standard deviations of 5-10%. There was a tendency for standard deviations of the combined results to be larger than those reported or derived from individual laboratory results by a factor between 1.2-5.6. This result suggested an under-estimate of systematic errors within individual laboratories. The largest sources of error were derived from reporting and calculation of results which gave a 16% gross error rate. PMID:8828161

  15. The efficiency calibration and development of environmental correction factors for an in situ high-resolution gamma spectroscopy well logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Giles, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    A Gamma Spectroscopy Logging System (GSLS) has been developed to study sub-surface radionuclide contamination. Absolute efficiency calibration of the GSLS was performed using simple cylindrical borehole geometry. The calibration source incorporated naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) that emitted photons ranging from 186-keV to 2,614-keV. More complex borehole geometries were modeled using commercially available shielding software. A linear relationship was found between increasing source thickness and relative photon fluence rates at the detector. Examination of varying porosity and moisture content showed that as porosity increases, relative photon fluence rates increase linearly for all energies. Attenuation effects due to iron, water, PVC, and concrete cylindrical shields were found to agree with previous studies. Regression analyses produced energy-dependent equations for efficiency corrections applicable to spectral gamma-ray well logs collected under non-standard borehole conditions.

  16. The influence of exogenous conditions on mobile measured gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierke, C.; Werban, U.; Dietrich, P.

    2012-12-01

    In the past, gamma ray measurements have been used for geological surveys and exploration using airborne and borehole logging systems. For these applications, the relationships between the measured physical parameter - the concentration of natural gamma emitters 40K, 238U and 232Th - and geological origin or sedimentary developments are well described. Based on these applications and knowledge in combination with adjusted sensor systems, gamma ray measurements are used to derive soil parameters to create detailed soil maps e.g., in digital soil mapping (DSM) and monitoring of soils. Therefore, not only qualitative but also quantitative comparability is necessary. Grain size distribution, type of clay minerals and organic matter content are soil parameters which directly influence the gamma ray emitter concentration. Additionally, the measured concentration is influenced by endogenous processes like soil moisture variation due to raining events, foggy weather conditions, or erosion and deposition of material. A time series of gamma ray measurements was used to observe changes in gamma ray concentration on a floodplain area in Central Germany. The study area is characterised by high variations in grain size distribution and occurrence of flooding events. For the survey, we used a 4l NaI(Tl) detector with GPS connection mounted on a sledge, which is towed across the field sites by a four-wheel-vehicle. The comparison of data from different time steps shows similar structures with minor variation between the data ranges and shape of structures. However, the data measured during different soil moisture contents differ in absolute value. An average increase of soil moisture of 36% leads to a decrease of Th (by 20%), K (by 29%), and U (by 41%). These differences can be explained by higher attenuation of radiation during higher soil moisture content. The different changes in nuclide concentration will also lead to varying ratios. We will present our experiences concerning the measurement under variable field conditions and their impacts on gamma ray data quality. These activities are done within the iSOIL project. iSOIL- Interactions between soil related sciences - Linking geophysics, soil science and digital soil mapping is a Collaborative Project (Grant Agreement number 211386) co-funded by the Research DG of the European Commission within the RTD activities of the FP7 Thematic Priority Environment; iSOIL is one member of the SOIL TECHNOLOGY CLUSTER of Research Projects funded by the EC.

  17. A review of nationwide radioactivity comparisons on gamma-ray spectrometry organized by the NIRP, China.

    PubMed

    Tuo, Fei; Xu, Cuihua; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Qiang; Li, Wenhong; Zhang, Jianfeng; Su, Xu

    2014-05-01

    Six comparison exercises on radioactivity measurement by γ-spectrometry have been organized by NIRP in China since 2007. The type of measured nuclides changed from natural to man-made over this period. A total of 188 samples were prepared and distributed to 39 different participating laboratories and 528 radionuclide assays have been performed. A perceptible laboratory performance improvement was observed with the average percentage of acceptable scores being 87% in 2008, increasing to 92% in 2012. PMID:24369889

  18. Determination of the stellar (n,{gamma}) cross section of {sup 40}Ca with accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Heil, M.; Kaeppeler, F.; Wallner, A.; Forstner, O.; Golser, R.; Kutschera, W.; Priller, A.; Steier, P.; Mengoni, A.; Gallino, R.; Paul, M.; Vockenhuber, C.

    2009-06-15

    The stellar (n,{gamma}) cross section of {sup 40}Ca at kT=25 keV has been measured with a combination of the activation technique and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). This combination is required when direct off-line counting of the produced activity is compromised by the long half-life and/or missing {gamma}-ray transitions. The neutron activations were performed at the Karlsruhe Van de Graaff accelerator using the quasistellar neutron spectrum of kT=25 keV produced by the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction. The subsequent AMS measurements were carried out at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) with a 3 MV tandem accelerator. The doubly magic {sup 40}Ca is a bottle-neck isotope in incomplete silicon burning, and its neutron capture cross section determines the amount of leakage, thus impacting on the eventual production of iron group elements. Because of its high abundance, {sup 40}Ca can also play a secondary role as ''neutron poison'' for the s-process. Previous determinations of this value at stellar energies were based on time-of-flight measurements. Our method uses an independent approach, and yields for the Maxwellian-averaged cross section at kT=30 keV a value of <{sigma}>{sub 3}0 keV=5.73{+-}0.34 mb.

  19. Prospecting for Lunar Oxygen with Gamma-Ray Spectrometry and Multispectral Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Weitz, Catherine M.; McKay, David S.

    1998-01-01

    Oxygen is a potentially abundant lunar resource that could be used for life support and spacecraft propulsion. The recent identification by Prospector of ice at the lunar poles has renewed interest in the use of in situ 0 production to supply a future base. Siting a lunar base at any significant distance from the poles, however, would require costly transport of 0 or its extraction from the local regolith. More than 20 different processes have been proposed for regolith 0 extraction. Among the simplest and best studied of these processes is the reduction of oxides in lunar minerals and glass using H gas. Oxides, predominantly those containing FeO, are first reduced; 0 is then liberated to form water. The water is then electrolyzed to yield 0, and the H is recycled to the reactor.

  20. The Study of Equilibrium factor between Radon-222 and its Daughters in Bangkok Atmosphere by Gamma-ray Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rujiwarodom, Rachanee

    2010-05-01

    To study the Equilibrium between radon-222 and its daughters in Bangkok atmosphere by Gamma-ray spectrometry, air sample were collected on 48 activated charcoal canister and 360 glass fiber filters by using a high volume jet-air sampler during December 2007 to November 2008.The Spectra of gamma-ray were measured by using a HPGe (Hyper Pure Germanium Detector). In the condition of secular equilibrium obtaining between Radon-222 and its decay products, radon-222 on activated charcoal canister and its daughters on glass fiber filters collected in the same time interval were calculated. The equilibrium factor (F) in the open air had a value of 0.38 at the minimum ,and 0.75 at the maximum. The average value of equilibrium factor (F) was 0.56±0.12. Based on the results, F had variations with a maximum value in the night to the early morning and decreased in the afternoon. In addition, F was higher in the winter than in the summer. This finding corresponds with the properties of the Earth atmosphere. The equilibrium factor (F) also depended on the concentration of dust in the atmosphere. People living in Bangkok were exposed to average value of 30 Bq/m3 of Radon-222 in the atmosphere. The equilibrium factor (0.56±0.12) and the average value of Radon-222 showed that people were exposed to alpha energy from radon-222 and its daughters decay at 0.005 WL(Working Level) which is lower than the safety standard at 0.02 WL. Keywords: Radon, Radon daughters , equilibrium factor, Gamma -ray spectrum analysis ,Bangkok ,Thailand

  1. Measurement of gamma radiation levels in soil samples from Thanjavur using γ-ray spectrometry and estimation of population exposure

    PubMed Central

    Senthilkumar, B.; Dhavamani, V.; Ramkumar, S.; Philominathan, P.

    2010-01-01

    This study assesses the level of terrestrial gamma radiation and associated dose rates from the naturally occurring radionuclides 232Th, 238U and 40K in 10 soil samples collected from Thanjavur (Tamil Nadu, India) using γ-ray spectrometry. The activity profile of radionuclides has clearly showed the existence of low level activity in Thanjavur. The geometric mean activity concentrations of 232Th, 238U and 40K is 42.9±9.4 Bq.kg−1, 14.7±1.7 Bq.kg−1 and 149.5±3.1 Bq.kg−1 respectively are derived from all the soil samples studied. The activity concentration of 232Th, 238U and 40K in soil is due to the presence of metamorphic rocks like shale, hornblende-biotite gneiss and quartzofeldspathic gneiss in these areas. Gamma absorbed dose rates in air outdoors were calculated to be in the range between 32 nGy.h−1 and 59.1 nGy.h−1 with an arithmetic mean of 43.3 ±9 nGy.h−1. This value is lesser than the population weighted world-averaged of 60 nGy.h−1. Inhabitants of Thanjavur are subjected to external gamma radiation exposure (effective dose) ranging between 39.2 and 72.6 μSv.y−1 with an arithmetic mean of 53.1±11 μSv.y−1. The values of the external hazard index determined from the soil radioactivity of the study area are less than the recommended safe levels. PMID:20177570

  2. Characterisation of imperial college reactor centre legacy waste using gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuhaimi, Alif Imran Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Waste characterisation is a principal component in waste management strategy. The characterisation includes identification of chemical, physical and radiochemical parameters of radioactive waste. Failure to determine specific waste properties may result in sentencing waste packages which are not compliant with the regulation of long term storage or disposal. This project involved measurement of intensity and energy of gamma photons which may be emitted by radioactive waste generated during decommissioning of Imperial College Reactor Centre (ICRC). The measurement will use High Purity Germanium (HPGe) as Gamma-ray detector and ISOTOPIC-32 V4.1 as analyser. In order to ensure the measurements provide reliable results, two quality control (QC) measurements using difference matrices have been conducted. The results from QC measurements were used to determine the accuracy of the ISOTOPIC software.

  3. Gamma ray spectrometry logs as a hydrocarbon indicator for clastic reservoir rocks in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Al-Alfy, I M; Nabih, M A; Eysa, E A

    2013-03-01

    Petroleum oil is an important source for the energy in the world. The Gulf of Suez, Nile Delta and South Valley are important regions for studying hydrocarbon potential in Egypt. A thorium normalization technique was applied on the sandstone reservoirs in the three regions to determine the hydrocarbon potentialities zones using the three spectrometric radioactive gamma ray-logs (eU, eTh and K% logs). The conventional well logs (gamma-ray, deep resistivity, shallow resistivity, neutron, density and sonic logs) are analyzed to determine the net pay zones in these wells. Indices derived from thorium normalized spectral logs indicate the hydrocarbon zones in petroleum reservoirs. The results of this technique in the three regions (Gulf of Suez, Nile Delta and South Valley) are in agreement with the results of the conventional well log analyses by ratios of 82%, 78% and 71% respectively. PMID:23306160

  4. Elemental analysis of a comet nucleus by passive gamma ray spectrometry from a penetrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, L. G.; Trombka, J. I.; Boynton, W. V.

    1986-01-01

    The Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) spacecraft, to be launched in 1991, was designed to study the physical and chemical properties of cometary and asteroid bodies. It is proposed that these properties can be determined by utilizing a penetrator experiment delivery system aboard the CRAF, which would deliver a passive gamma ray spectrometer to the comet and determine the composition of subsurface materials. Results of calculations for a model comet (50 percent CI carbonaceous chrondrite, 50 percent ices) provide data on the expected gamma ray fluxes, the minimum detectable limits, and the detection uncertainties for 35 isotopes. These results confirm that this technique can determine the composition of both the rocky and ice components, and the rock-to-ice ratio in the nucleus. In addition, useful information regarding the formation of the solar system is provided.

  5. An axially symmetric gamma-ray backscatter system for DuMond spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenzie, Innes K.

    1990-12-01

    An axially symmetric spectrometer is described which evolved from a program of measuring Compton profiles with unusually high geometric efficiency. When fitted with a large-volume Ge detector for combined X-ray and γ-ray spectrometry, such as the 51 mm diameter LO-AX detector from EG&G, it allows Compton profiles to be measured at counting rates in excess of 20000 cps. The axially symmetric configuration is also suited to high-efficiency analyses of thick targets by both XRF and Rayleigh/Compton R/C ratios. The same spectra permit a competitive binary-system analysis based on the shape of the Compton profile. Both this new analysis, which we call DuMond spectrometry, and R/C analysis are applied to studies of osteoporosis in the calcaneus with promising results. The combination of high intrinsic and geometric detection efficiency makes it practical to use very weak sources ( ˜ 100 MBq) and unusually low, localized doses ( ˜ 1 μGy) per reading.

  6. Uncertainty assessment in the free release measurement by gamma spectrometry of rotating waste drums.

    PubMed

    Stanga, D; Sima, O; Gurau, D

    2016-03-01

    The assessment of uncertainty in free release measurements by integral gamma scanning method is described and applied to the measurement of homogeneous and heterogeneous waste drums. It is based on the propagation of distributions using the Monte Carlo method. In addition, two techniques for the uncertainty reduction are also described. The first technique makes use of containers constructed from two concentric cylinders and the second technique is based on the measurement of a group of waste drums. It is proved that the uncertainty of clearance measurements can be reduced using both techniques. PMID:26653210

  7. Microprobe sampling--photo ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry for in situ chemical analysis of pyrolysis and combustion gases: examination of the thermo-chemical processes within a burning cigarette.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Romy; Streibel, Thorsten; Liu, Chuan; McAdam, Kevin; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2012-02-10

    A microprobe sampling device (μ-probe) has been developed for in situ on-line photo ionization mass spectrometric analysis of volatile chemical species formed within objects consisting of organic matter during thermal processing. With this approach the chemical signature occurring during heating, pyrolysis, combustion, roasting and charring of organic material within burning objects such as burning fuel particles (e.g., biomass or coal pieces), lit cigarettes or thermally processed food products (e.g., roasting of coffee beans) can be investigated. Due to its dynamic changes between combustion and pyrolysis phases the cigarette smoking process is particularly interesting and has been chosen as first application. For this investigation the tip of the μ-probe is inserted directly into the tobacco rod and volatile organic compounds from inside the burning cigarette are extracted and real-time analyzed as the glowing front (or coal) approaches and passes the μ-probe sampling position. The combination of micro-sampling with photo ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PI-TOFMS) allows on-line intrapuff-resolved analysis of species formation inside a burning cigarette. Monitoring volatile smoke compounds during cigarette puffing and smoldering cycles in this way provides unparalleled insights into formation mechanisms and their time-dependent change. Using this technique the changes from pyrolysis conditions to combustion conditions inside the coal of a cigarette could be observed directly. A comparative analysis of species formation within a burning Kentucky 2R4F reference cigarette with μ-probe analysis reveals different patterns and behaviors for nicotine, and a range of semi-volatile aromatic and aliphatic species. PMID:22244143

  8. Modern aerial gamma-ray spectrometry and regional potassium map of the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duval, Joseph S.

    1990-01-01

    The aerial gamma-ray data were obtained as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy during the period 1975-1983. References for the Open-File Reports that describe the surveys and data collection can be found in Bendix Field Engineering Corp. (1983). The aerial surveys were flown by contractors using fixed-wing and helicopter systems with 33-50 L (liters) of thallium-activated sodium iodide (NaI (TI)) crystals. The nominal survey altitude used is 122 m. The survey lines were generally east-west with line spacings of 1.6-10 km. Tie lines were flown perpendicular to the flight lines at intervals of 16- 30 km. The data were corrected for background from aircraft contamination and cosmic rays, altitude variations, airborne 214Bi, and Compton scattering. The gamma-ray systems were calibrated using the calibrations pads at Grand Junction, Colorado (Ward, 1978 ) and the dynamic test strip at Lake Mead, Arizona (Geodata International, Inc., 1977).  

  9. The in situ exobiological investigation of the Martian surface mineralogy during unmanned missions. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancinelli, Rocco L.; White, Melisa R.

    1994-01-01

    An important goal of exobiological research is to determine if life arose on planets other than Earth. The only other planet known, to date, on which life may have arisen is Mars. The data suggest that the physical environment of early Mars (i.e., temperature, pressure, and radiation regimes) was suitable for life to arise. Thus far, the data also suggest that early Mars possessed sufficient quantities of the required building blocks and a number of the chemical compounds necessary for life to arise. It is not known, however, if water existed in the appropriate state (i.e., liquid) in sufficient quantities long enough for life to arise. Determining the mineralogy and components of the Martian soil through in situ analyses during missions to Mars will provide information from which an assessment can be made for the probability of the origin of life on Mars. Missions to Mars in the near future will be unmanned and capable of in situ analyses. Our studies have shown that differential thermal analysis coupled with gas chromatography (DTA/GC) is a more appropriate analytical technique than, x-ray fluorescence, x-ray diffraction, alpha-proton backscatter, gamma-ray spectrometry, differential scanning calorimetry coupled with mass spectrometry (DSC/MS), or DSC/GC to identify the mineralogy of the Martian surface material in situ. DTA/GC is an advancement over the pyrolytic techniques flown on previous missions that have supplied only limited mineralogical information (Biemann et al. 1977).

  10. Recent progress in low-level gamma imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mahe, C.; Girones, Ph.; Lamadie, F.; Le Goaller, C.

    2007-07-01

    The CEA's Aladin gamma imaging system has been operated successfully for several years in nuclear plants and during decommissioning projects with additional tools such as gamma spectrometry detectors and dose rate probes. The radiological information supplied by these devices is becoming increasingly useful for establishing robust and optimized decommissioning scenarios. Recent technical improvements allow this gamma imaging system to be operated in low-level applications and with shorter acquisition times suitable for decommissioning projects. The compact portable system can be used in places inaccessible to operators. It is quick and easy to implement, notably for onsite component characterization. Feasibility trials and in situ measurements were recently carried out under low-level conditions, mainly on waste packages and glove boxes for decommissioning projects. This paper describes recent low-level in situ applications. These characterization campaigns mainly concerned gamma emitters with {gamma} energy < 700 keV. In many cases, the localization of hot spots by gamma camera was confirmed by additional measurements such as dose rate mapping and gamma spectrometry measurements. These complementary techniques associated with advanced calculation codes (MCNP, Mercure 6.2, Visiplan and Siren) offer a mobile and compact tool for specific assessment of waste packages and glove boxes. (authors)

  11. In-Situ Spectrometry of Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, Richard H.

    1999-01-01

    High energy charged particles of extra-galactic, galactic and solar origin collide with spacecraft structures in Earth orbit outside the atmosphere and in interplanetary travel beyond the Earth's magnetosphere. These primaries create a number of secondary particles inside the structures that can produce a significant ionizing radiation environment. This radiation is a threat to long term inhabitants or travelers for space missions and produces an increased risk of cancer and DNA damage. The primary high energy cosmic rays and trapped protons collide with common spacecraft materials such as aluminum and silicon and create secondary particles inside structures that are mostly protons and neutrons. Charged protons are readily detected and instruments are already in existence for this task. Neutrons are electrically neutral and therefore much more difficult to measure and detect. These neutrons are reported to contribute 30-60% of the dose inside space structures and cannot be ignored. Currently there is no compact, portable and real time neutron detector instrumentation available for use inside spacecraft or on planetary surfaces where astronauts will live and work. We propose to design and build a portable, low power and robust neutron spectrometer that will measure the neutron spectrum from 10 KeV to 500 MeV with at least 10% energy resolution in the various energy intervals. This instrument will monitor the existing neutron environment both inside spacecraft structures and on planetary surfaces to determine the safest living areas, warn of high fluxes associated with solar storms and assist the NSBRI Radiation Effects Team in making an accurate assessment of increased cancer risk and DNA damage to astronauts. The instrument uses a highly efficient proportional counter Helium 3 tube at the lowest energy intervals where .equivalent damage factors for tissue are the highest (10 KeV-2 MeV). The Helium 3 tube may be shielded with a cadmium absorber to eliminate the much less damaging, but more prevalent, thermal and epithermal neutrons and to make the structure of the spectrum more accurate in the 20 KeV-2 MeV range; or a pair of tubes, one shielded and one unshielded, can be combined so that the difference in their counts yields the thermal neutron contribution. The spectrometer also uses a 5mm lithium drifted bulk silicon solid state detector in the medium energy range of 2-20 Mev and two standard silicon surface barrier detectors separated by tens of millimeters behind a I cm thick polyethylene moderator in a stack or telescope arrangement for the high energy neutrons (>20 MeV). In the medium and high energy regions equivalent damage factors are lower but hits from one or a small number of neutrons may prove to be important. The silicon detector systems for medium and high energy neutrons will discriminate against charged particles by using a plastic cesium iodide scintillator of an appropriate geometry monitored by a silicon PIN photodiode.

  12. Detection of frozen salt in pipes using gamma-ray spectrometry of potassium self-activity

    SciTech Connect

    Grena, Roberto; Scafe, Raffaele; Pisacane, Fabrizio; Pilato, Renzo; Crescenzi, Tommaso; Mazzei, Domenico

    2010-01-15

    Solar plants that use molten salts as heat transfer fluid need careful control to avoid the freezing of the salt in the pipes; if such a problem occurs, a diagnostic instrument to localize where is the frozen salt plug and to determine its length is useful. If the salt contains potassium (as is the case of the most common mixture used in solar plants, NaNO{sub 3}/KNO{sub 3} 60/40% by weight), the gamma decay of the natural unstable isotope {sup 40}K can be exploited to detect the frozen salt in a non-invasive way. Simulations and experimental results regarding the detectability of such plugs with different masses/lengths are presented. (author)

  13. Determination of Copper by Neutron Activation Analysis in Conjunction with Compton Suppression Gamma Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    W. H. Zhang; A. Chatt

    2000-06-04

    Copper is considered to be an essential element. Its accurate determination in tissues, foods, and other biological materials is needed to study the effect of copper on human nutrition and health. Using and Advance Prediction Computer Program, it has been shown that short-lived {sup 66}Cu (half-life = 5.09 min) can be used to determine copper in biological materials by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). However, it is seldom done in practice-in particular, for low copper content in high-salt biological materials-because of the Compton background interference from nuclides such as {sup 28}Al, {sup 38}Cl, and {sup 24}Na. To eliminate the Compton interference, a preconcentration NAA method has recently been developed in our laboratory using reversed-phase extraction chromatography of copper followed by short irradiation and conventional gamma-spectrometric counting of {sup 66}Cu; the detection limit is {approx}5 ppb.

  14. High Throughput In Situ EXAFS Instrumentation for the Automatic Characterization of Materials and Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Tsapatsaris, Nikolaos; Beesley, A. M.; Weiher, Norbert; Schroeder, Sven L. M.; Tromp, Moniek; Evans, John; Dent, A. J.; Harvey, Ian

    2007-01-19

    An XAS data acquisition and control system for the in situ analysis of dynamic materials libraries under control of temperature and gaseous environment has been developed. It was integrated at the SRS in Daresbury, UK, beamline 9.3, using a Si (220) monochromator and a 13 element solid state Ge fluorescence detector. The core of the system is an intelligent X, Y, Z, {theta} positioning system coupled to multi-stream quadrupole mass spectrometry analysis (QMS). The system is modular and can be adapted to other synchrotron radiation beamlines. The entire software control was implemented using Labview and allows the scan of a variety of library sizes, in several positions, angles, gas compositions and temperatures with minimal operator intervention. The system was used for the automated characterization of a library of 91 catalyst precursors containing ternary combinations of Cu, Pt, and Au on {gamma}-Al2O3, and for the evaluation and structural characterization of eight Au catalysts supported on Al2O3 and TiO2 Mass spectrometer traces reveal conversion rate oscillations in 6wt % Au/{gamma}Al2O3 catalysts. The use of HT experimentation for in situ EXAFS studies demonstrates the feasibility and potential of HT in situ XAFS for synchrotron radiation studies.

  15. In-situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering (INS) is based on the emission of 4.43 MeV gamma rays from carbon nuclei excited by fast neutrons. This in-situ method has excellent potential for easily measuring soil carbon since it does not require soil core sampling and processing ...

  16. International Workshop on Gamma Spectrometry Analysis Codes for U and Pu Isotopics: Workshop Results and Next Steps

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, Brent R; Solodov, Alexander A; Shipwash, Jacqueline L; Zhernosek, Alena V; McKinney, Teressa L; Pickett, Chris A; Peerani, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    In November 2008, the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) and the European Safeguards Research and Development Association (ESARDA) co-hosted the International Workshop on Gamma Spectrometry Analysis Codes for U and Pu Isotopics at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This workshop was conducted in response to needs expressed by the international safeguards community to understand better the capabilities and limitations of the codes; to ensure these codes are sustained; and to ensure updates or revisions are performed in a controlled manner. The workshop was attended by approximately 100 participants. The participants included code developers, code suppliers, safeguards specialists, domestic and international inspectors, process operators, regulators, and programme sponsors from various government agencies. The workshop provided a unique opportunity for code developers, commercial distributors and end users to interact in a hands-on laboratory environment to develop solutions for programmatic and technical issues associated with the various codes. The workshop also provided an international forum for discussing development of an internationally accepted standard test method. This paper discusses the organization of the workshop, its goals and objectives and feedback received from the participants. The paper also describes the significance of the working group's contribution to improving codes that are commonly used during inspections to verify that nuclear facilities are compliant with treaty obligations that ensure nuclear fuel cycle facilities are used for peaceful purposes.

  17. Data acquisition ATCA system for neutron and gamma-rays spectrometries

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, R.; Fernandes, A. G.; Sousa, J.; Varandas, C. A. F.

    2006-10-15

    Digital pulse processing (DPP) systems are known to have better performance than analog ones for neutron and/or gamma-ray pulses. DPP can synthesize almost any pulse response shape without the associated signal degradation which happens in a complex analog path. Measuring techniques involving detectors/spectrometers for fusion diagnostics rely on real-time algorithms, implemented in field programmable gate array (FPGA), for pulse height analysis, pulse shape discrimination, and pileup rejection of digitized pulses in real time for reduced data throughput, monitoring, and control. This article describes a data acquisition system for real-time pulse analysis based on ATCA and contains a 6 GFLPOS ix86-based control unit and a number of transient recorder (TR) modules interconnected through PCI Express links. Each TR module features (i) eight channels of 12 bit resolution with accuracy equal or higher than 10 bits, (ii) 200 Msamples/s of sampling rate achieving 400 Msamples/s in an interleaved architecture, (iii) 2 or 4 Gbytes of local memory, and (iv) two field FPGAs able to perform real-time processing algorithms.

  18. Data acquisition ATCA system for neutron and gamma-rays spectrometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, R.; Fernandes, A. G.; Sousa, J.; Varandas, C. A. F.

    2006-10-01

    Digital pulse processing (DPP) systems are known to have better performance than analog ones for neutron and/or gamma-ray pulses. DPP can synthesize almost any pulse response shape without the associated signal degradation which happens in a complex analog path. Measuring techniques involving detectors/spectrometers for fusion diagnostics rely on real-time algorithms, implemented in field programmable gate array (FPGA), for pulse height analysis, pulse shape discrimination, and pileup rejection of digitized pulses in real time for reduced data throughput, monitoring, and control. This article describes a data acquisition system for real-time pulse analysis based on ATCA and contains a 6 GFLPOS i ×86-based control unit and a number of transient recorder (TR) modules interconnected through PCI Express links. Each TR module features (i) eight channels of 12bit resolution with accuracy equal or higher than 10bits, (ii) 200Msamples/s of sampling rate achieving 400Msamples/s in an interleaved architecture, (iii) 2 or 4Gbytes of local memory, and (iv) two field FPGAs able to perform real-time processing algorithms.

  19. Subsurface In Situ Elemental Composition Measurements with PING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, Ann; McClanahan, Timothy; Bodnarik, Julia; Evans, Larry; Nowicki, Suzanne; Schweitzer, Jeffrey; Starr, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the Probing In situ with Neutron and Gamma rays (PING) instrument, that can measure the subsurface elemental composition in situ for any rocky body in the solar system without the need for digging into the surface. PING consists of a Pulsed Neutron Generator (PNG), a gamma ray spectrometer and neutron detectors. Subsurface elements are stimulated by high-energy neutrons to emit gamma rays at characteristic energies. This paper will show how the detection of these gamma rays results in a measurement of elemental composition. Examples of the basalt to granite ratios for aluminum and silicon abundance are provided.

  20. In Situ Measurements of Natural Radioactivity in Selected Igneous Rocks of the Opava Mountain Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dżaluk, Agnieszka; Malczewski, Dariusz; Żaba, Jerzy; Dziurowicz, Maria

    2014-09-01

    In situ gamma-ray measurements of four igneous rocks were taken in the Opava Mountains (Eastern Sudetes, Poland). The activity of naturally occurring radionuclides was measured using a portable GX3020 gamma-ray spectrometry workstation. The activity concentrations of 40K varied from 914 ± 17 Bqkg-1 (gneiss, Kamienna Góra) to 2019 ± 37 Bqkg-1 (weathered granite, Sławniowice), while those of 232Th from 7.5 ± 0.6 Bqkg-1 (weathered granite, Sławniowice) to 68 ± 0.9 Bqkg-1 (migmatitic gneiss, Nadziejów). The activities associated with 238U decay series ranged from 10 ± 0.4 Bqkg-1 (weathered granite, Sławniowice) to 62 ± 1.6 Bqkg-1 (gneiss, Kamienna Góra). The results will be used in compiling Radiological Atlas of the Sudetes

  1. Regional Crustal Components of Martian Heat Flow from Mars Odyssey Gamma-Ray Spectrometry (GRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, B. C.; McLennan, S. M.

    2009-12-01

    Martian thermal state and evolution depend principally on the heat-producing element distributions in the planet’s crust and mantle, specifically the incompatible radiogenic isotopes of K, Th, and U. Normally these elements are preferentially sequestered into a planet’s crust during differentiation, and this is especially true for Mars, which possesses a thick and mostly ancient crust that is proportionally large with respect to the planet’s total volume. The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) instrument on board the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft can detect all three of these elements and has been used to map the K and Th abundances across nearly the entire Martian surface. It has been estimated that as much as 50% or more of the Martian planetary budget of heat producing elements has seen sequestered into the crust during planetary differentiation due to their incompatibility in igneous processes; a process that mostly took place very early in Martian geological history. As such, the crustal component of heat flow represents as much as half of the total planetary output of radiogenic heat. While GRS measurements can not constrain heat flow from mantle sources, previous work calculated the average crustal component of heat flow of 6.43 mW/m2 based on radiogenic elemental abundances. Orbital GRS data are of lower spatial resolution (5°x5° per pixel) than most other orbital remote sensing instruments and, accordingly, are best suited for global or large, regional-scale studies, rather than detailed, local analyses of geographically small features and landforms. Here we present detailed calculations for specific, areally-large, regions and geologic provinces on Mars, reporting the present-day crustal component of heat flow, the crustal heat flow at time of regional formation, and constraints of geothermal gradients from these measurements.

  2. In situ mapping of radionuclides in subsurface and surface soils: 1994 Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Schilk, A.J.; Hubbard, C.W.; Knopf, M.A.; Abel, K.H.

    1995-04-01

    Uranium production and support facilities at several DOE sites occasionally caused local contamination of some surface and subsurface soils. The thorough cleanup of these sites is a major public concern and a high priority for the US Department of Energy, but before any effective remedial protocols can be established, the three-dimensional distributions of target contaminants must be characterized. Traditional means of measuring radionuclide activities in soil are cumbersome, expensive, time-consuming, and often do not accurately reflect conditions over very large areas. New technologies must be developed, or existing ones improved, to allow cheaper, faster, and safer characterization of radionuclides in soils at these sites. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was tasked with adapting, developing, and demonstrating technologies to measure uranium in surface and subsurface soils. In partial completion of this effort, PNL developed an improved in situ gamma-ray spectrometry system to satisfy the technical requirements. This document summarizes fiscal-year 1994 efforts at PNL to fulfill requirements for TTP {number_sign}321103 (project {number_sign}19307). These requirements included (a) developing a user-friendly software package for reducing field-acquired gamma-ray spectra, (b) constructing an improved data-acquisition hardware system for use with high-purity germanium detectors, (c) ensuring readiness to conduct field mapping exercises as specified by the sponsor, (d) evaluating the in situ gamma-ray spectrometer for the determination of uranium depth distribution, and (e) documenting these efforts.

  3. Gamma-carboxylation and fragmentation of osteocalcin in human serum defined by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rehder, Douglas S; Gundberg, Caren M; Booth, Sarah L; Borges, Chad R

    2015-06-01

    Serum osteocalcin (Oc) concentration is a highly specific measure of bone turnover, but its circulating proteoform(s) have not been well defined. Based on immunological methods, the major forms are thought to be the intact polypeptide and a large N-terminal-mid molecule fragment for which there is no consensus on the precise sequence. Vitamin K-dependent gamma (γ)-carboxylated variants of Oc are also found in circulation but there have been no methods that can define how many of the three potential γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) residues are γ-carboxylated or provide their relative abundances. Recent reports that uncarboxylated and partially γ-carboxylated Oc forms have hormonal function underscore the need for precise evaluation of Oc at all three potential γ-carboxylation sites. Herein, mass spectrometric immunoassay (MSIA) was used to provide qualitative and semiquantitative (relative percent abundance) information on Oc molecular variants as they exist in individual plasma and serum samples. Following verification that observable Oc proteoforms were accurately assigned and not simply ex vivo artifacts, MALDI-MSIA and ESI-MSIA were used to assess the relative abundance of Oc truncation and γ-carboxylation, respectively, in plasma from 130 patients enrolled in vitamin K supplementation trials. Human Oc was found to circulate in over a dozen truncated forms with each of these displaying anywhere from 0-3 Gla residues. The relative abundance of truncated forms was consistent and unaffected by vitamin K supplementation. In contrast, when compared with placebo, vitamin K supplementation dramatically increased the fractional abundance of Oc with three Gla residues, corresponding to a decrease in the fractional abundance of Oc with zero Gla residues. These findings unequivocally document that increased vitamin K intake reduces the uncarboxylated form of Oc. Several reports of a positive effect of vitamin K intake on insulin sensitivity in humans have shown that un- or undercarboxylation of Oc, unlike in mice, is not associated with insulin resistance. Analyses similar to those described here will be useful to understand the functional significance of Oc γ-carboxylation in human health and disease. PMID:25855755

  4. Improvements on Low Level Activity Gamma Measurements and X-ray Spectrometry at the CEA-MADERE Measurement Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeyeva, Victoria; Domergue, Christophe; Destouches, Christophe; Girard, Jean Michel; Philibert, Hervé; Bonora, Jonathan; Thiollay, Nicolas; Lyoussi, Abdallah

    2016-02-01

    The CEA MADERE platform (Measurement Applied to DosimEtry in REactors) is a part of the Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory (LDCI). This facility is dedicated to the specific activity measurements of solid and radioactive samples using Gamma and X-ray spectrometry. MADERE is a high-performance facility devoted to neutron dosimetry for experimental programs performed in CEA and for the irradiation surveillance programmes of PWR vessels. The MADERE platform is engaged in a continuous improvement process. Recently, two High Efficiency diodes have been integrated to the MADERE platform in order to manage the accurate low level activity measurements (few Bq per sample). This new equipment provides a good level of efficiency over the energy range from 60 keV to 2 MeV. The background continuum is reduced due to the use of a Ultra Low Background (ULB) lead shielding. Relative and absolute X-ray measurement techniques have been improved in order to facilitate absolute rhodium activity measurement (Rh103m) on solid samples. Additional efforts have been made to increase the accuracy of the relative niobium (Nb93m) activity measurement technique. The way of setting up an absolute measurement method for niobium is under investigation. After a presentation of the MADERE's measurement devices, this paper focuses on the technological options taken into account for the design of high efficiency measurement devices. Then, studies performed on X-ray measurement techniques are presented. Some details about the calculation of uncertainties and correction factors are also mentioned. Finally, future research and development axes are exposed.

  5. Gamma-ray spectrometry method used for radioactive waste drums characterization for final disposal at National Repository for Low and Intermediate Radioactive Waste--Baita, Romania.

    PubMed

    Done, L; Tugulan, L C; Dragolici, F; Alexandru, C

    2014-05-01

    The Radioactive Waste Management Department from IFIN-HH, Bucharest, performs the conditioning of the institutional radioactive waste in concrete matrix, in 200 l drums with concrete shield, for final disposal at DNDR - Baita, Bihor county, in an old exhausted uranium mine. This paper presents a gamma-ray spectrometry method for the characterization of the radioactive waste drums' radionuclides content, for final disposal. In order to study the accuracy of the method, a similar concrete matrix with Portland cement in a 200 l drum was used. PMID:24331854

  6. Monte Carlo validation of the self-attenuation correction determination with the Cutshall transmission method in ²¹⁰Pb measurements by gamma-spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jodłowski, Paweł; Wachniew, Przemysław; Dinh, Chau Nguyen

    2014-05-01

    The accuracy of estimation of the self-attenuation correction Cs with the Cutshall transmission method in (210)Pb measurements by gamma-spectrometry was assessed using the Monte Carlo method. The Cutshall method overestimates the correction for samples with linear attenuation coefficient at 46.5 keV higher than that of the standard and underestimates it in the opposite case. The highest bias was found for thick samples. C(s,Cuts)/C(s) ratio grows linearly with sample linear attenuation coefficient. PMID:24387906

  7. Building-up a code for the purpose of TRUE coincidence summing correction in gamma-ray spectrometry with EGS4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Necati; Altin, Duygu; Cevik, Ugur

    2015-10-01

    In the presented study, a code was created for the purpose of true coincidence summing (TCS) correction factors for 134Cs. The created code was implemented in EGS4 Monte Carlo simulation package. TCS factors were determined for nine different energies for different detector-source geometries. The calculated results were successfully validated by an empirical method using a point 134Cs radioactive source and a p-type HPGe detector having 55% relative efficiency. Although the code created gives TCS factors only for 134Cs, the technique presented can be used to obtain the factors for any radionuclide used in gamma-ray spectrometry.

  8. Measurement of {sup 25}Mg(p, {gamma}){sup 26}Al{sup g} resonance strengths via accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Arazi, A.; Niello, J. O. Fernandez; Faestermann, T.; Knie, K.; Korschinek, G.; Poutivtsev, M.; Rugel, G.; Richter, E.; Wallner, A.

    2006-08-15

    The strengths of resonances located at center-of-mass energies of E{sub c.m.}=189, 304, 374, and 418 keV for the {sup 25}Mg(p,{gamma}) reaction have been measured for the first time with an off-line method: Mg targets were firstly activated with protons at the resonance energies and the produced {sup 26}Al{sup g} nuclei were counted by means of highly sensitive accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Thus, the production of {sup 26}Al in its ground state is determined independently from the {gamma}-decay branching ratio. While the 304, 374, and 418 keV resonances show fair agreement with previous measurements, the 189 keV resonance yield a significantly less strength. In addition, an experimental upper limit for the E{sub c.m.}=92 keV resonance was determined.

  9. In situ groundwater bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-01

    In situ groundwater bioremediation of hydrocarbons has been used for more than 40 years. Most strategies involve biostimulation; however, recently bioaugmentation have been used for dehalorespiration. Aquifer and contaminant profiles are critical to determining the feasibility and strategy for in situ groundwater bioremediation. Hydraulic conductivity and redox conditions, including concentrations of terminal electron acceptors are critical to determine the feasibility and strategy for potential bioremediation applications. Conceptual models followed by characterization and subsequent numerical models are critical for efficient and cost effective bioremediation. Critical research needs in this area include better modeling and integration of remediation strategies with natural attenuation.

  10. In Situ Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, T. F.; Schechter, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes research on in situ processing to develop necessary theory and understanding of the underground process to facilitate commercialization of a wide range of mineral deposits. Goal is to produce laboratory and computer-based tools to allow site evaluation based on field and laboratory measurements of mineral and associated overburdens.…

  11. In Situ Cometary Cosmochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, I. P.; Andrews, D. J.; Barber, S. J.; Sheridan, S.; Morgan, G. H.; Morse, A. D.

    2013-09-01

    In 2014 the Rosetta space mission arrives at comet 67P. Herein we describe the ambitions of one of the instruments, Ptolemy, included on the lander. Our aim is to make in situ measurements of isotopic compositions of elements such as H, C, N and O.

  12. Portable gamma spectrometry system for simultaneous monitoring of radiotracers in vivo using CdTe and CdZnTe radiation detector probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, M.; Van Ryn, J.; Merk, H.; Markert, M.; Eisert, W. G.

    1994-12-01

    A portable gamma spectrometry system has been designed to simultaneously monitor various radiotracers in vivo. This system includes a portable IBM® compatible personal computer and miniaturized gamma radiation detector probes based on the semiconductor materials CdTe and CdZnTe. The computer has been expanded with pulse processing and analyzing electronics for three independent inputs and a software package. A portable NIM Bin cabinet, equipped with charge loss correction electronics, is an optional addition. This can be used to improve the peak to valley ratio, the spectral resolution and the peak efficiency of the CdTe detectors. Two different probe housings have been developed, a rectangular and a cylindrical shaped housing. The rectangular probe is designed for clinical use. This device contains one CdTe or CdZnTe crystal with a sensitive area of 10 × 2 mm (2 mm thick) or 10 × 3 mm (3 mm thick) and a preamplifier circuit. The probes can be attached to each other, in order to form a linear array. The cylindrical detector probe is developed for implantation in animals and contains two parallel switched CdTe crystals with a sensitive area of 5 × 5 mm (2 mm thick) and a preamplifier circuit. Both probe housings were made from a tungsten alloy (2 mm thick), which provides good shielding for low-energy gamma radiation isotopes frequently used in clinical settings ( 111In, 123I, 99mTc, 125I). The detection sensitivity of the probes was very similar to the sensitivity of a standard gamma camera when comparing measurements in different in vitro models and in patients. In addition, the detector probes more accurately measured small, local radiation sources as compared to the gamma camera. This gamma spectrometry system has also been used to simultaneously measure the accumulation of 99mTc-labelled platelets and 123I-labelled fibrin after arterial injury in rabbits. This has allowed the in vivo monitoring of different doses of antithrombotic therapies in animals by observing the dynamic growth and interactions between different blood components during thrombotic processes.

  13. On background radiation gradients--the use of airborne surveys when searching for orphan sources using mobile gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kock, Peder; Rääf, Christopher; Samuelsson, Christer

    2014-02-01

    Systematic background radiation variations can lead to both false positives and failures to detect an orphan source when searching using car-borne mobile gamma-ray spectrometry. The stochastic variation at each point is well described by Poisson statistics, but when moving in a background radiation gradient the mean count rate will continually change, leading to inaccurate background estimations. Airborne gamma spectrometry (AGS) surveys conducted on the national level, usually in connection to mineral exploration, exist in many countries. These data hold information about the background radiation gradients which could be used at the ground level. This article describes a method that aims to incorporate the systematic as well as stochastic variations of the background radiation. We introduce a weighted moving average where the weights are calculated from existing AGS data, supplied by the Geological Survey of Sweden. To test the method we chose an area with strong background gradients, especially in the thorium component. Within the area we identified two roads which pass through the high-variability locations. The proposed method is compared with an unweighted moving average. The results show that the weighting reduces the excess false positives in the positive background gradients without introducing an excess of failures to detect a source during passage in negative gradients. PMID:24321866

  14. Spiked environmental matrix for use as a reference material for gamma-ray spectrometry: Production and homogeneity test.

    PubMed

    Sobiech-Matura, K; Máté, B; Altzitzoglou, T

    2016-03-01

    The application of a spiking method for reference material production and its utilisation for a food matrix is presented. The raw rice powder was tested by means of γ-ray spectrometry and spiked with a (137)Cs solution. The spiked material was mixed and tested for homogeneity. The future use of the rice powder reference material after the entire characterisation cycle will be for γ-ray spectrometry method validation. PMID:26610369

  15. In situ reactor

    DOEpatents

    Radtke, Corey William; Blackwelder, David Bradley

    2004-01-27

    An in situ reactor for use in a geological strata, is described and which includes a liner defining a centrally disposed passageway and which is placed in a borehole formed in the geological strata; and a sampling conduit is received within the passageway defined by the liner and which receives a geological specimen which is derived from the geological strata, and wherein the sampling conduit is in fluid communication with the passageway defined by the liner.

  16. Comparison of optimised germanium gamma spectrometry and multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of 134Cs, 137Cs and 154Eu single ratios in highly burnt UO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, S.; Günther-Leopold, I.; Murphy, M. F.; Jatuff, F.; Chawla, R.

    2008-05-01

    Non-destructive and destructive methods have been compared to validate their corresponding assessed accuracies in the measurement of 134Cs/137Cs and 154Eu/137Cs isotopic concentration ratios in four spent UO2 fuel samples with very high (52 and 71 GWd/t) and ultra-high (91 and 126 GWd/t) burnup values, and about 10 (in the first three samples) and 4 years (in the latter sample) cooling time. The non-destructive technique tested was high-resolution gamma spectrometry using a high-purity germanium detector (HPGe) and a special tomographic station for the handling of highly radioactive 400 mm spent fuel segments that included a tungsten collimator, lead filter (to enhance the signal to Compton background ratio and reduce the dead time) and paraffin wax (to reduce neutron damage). The non-destructive determination of these isotopic concentration ratios has been particularly challenging for these segments because of the need to properly derive non-Gaussian gamma-peak areas and subtract the background from perturbing capture gammas produced by the intrinsic high-intensity neutron emissions from the spent fuel. Additionally, the activity distribution within each pin was determined tomographically to correct appropriately for self-attenuation and geometrical effects. The ratios obtained non-destructively showed a 1σ statistical error in the range 1.9-2.9%. The destructive technique used was a high-performance liquid chromatographic separation system, combined online to a multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (HPLC-MC-ICP-MS), for the analysis of dissolved fuel solutions. During the mass spectrometric analyses, special care was taken in the optimisation of the chromatographic separation for Eu and the interfering element Gd, as also in the mathematical correction of the 154Gd background from the 154Eu signal. The ratios obtained destructively are considerably more precise (1σ statistical error in the range 0.4-0.8% for most of the samples, but up to 2.8% for one sample). The HPGe gamma spectrometry can achieve a high degree of accuracy (agreement with HPLC-MC-ICP-MS within a few percent), only by virtue of the optimised setup, and the refined measurement strategy and data treatment employed.

  17. In Situ Fabrication Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rolin, Terry D.; Hammond, Monica

    2005-01-01

    A manufacturing system is described that is internal to controlled cabin environments which will produce functional parts to net shape with sufficient tolerance, strength and integrity to meet application specific needs such as CEV ECLS components, robotic arm or rover components, EVA suit items, unforeseen tools, conformal repair patches, and habitat fittings among others. Except for start-up and shut-down, fabrication will be automatic without crew intervention under nominal scenarios. Off-nominal scenarios may require crew and/or Earth control intervention. System will have the ability to fabricate using both provisioned feedstock materials and feedstock refined from in situ regolith.

  18. Evaluation of comparison and proficiency test results of gamma ray spectrometry at Jožef Stefan Institute from 1986 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Glavič-Cindro, Denis; Korun, Matjaž; Nečemer, Marijan; Vodenik, Branko; Zorko, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    One of the best ways to demonstrate the performance and capabilities of testing laboratories is to participate successfully in different international comparison schemes and proficiency tests. The overview of all results of such schemes in the field of high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry where the Laboratory for Radioactivity Measurements (LMR) of the Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI), Slovenia, participated in years 1986-2014 is presented. Different schemes are compared, strong points and drawbacks of different providers and schemes regarding evaluation procedures, determination of reference values, reporting time, sets of radionuclides included in the samples and range of activities of different radionuclides are discussed. One of the main conclusions is that the comparison and proficiency test samples normally contain substantially larger activities than are usually detected in environmental samples. Therefore the capability of determination of activities close to detection limits is usually covered only by few schemes. PMID:26706285

  19. Determination of thorium-232 in Canadian soils by gamma-ray spectrometry via lead-212 and actinium-228, interference from uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Zikovsky, L.; Blagoeva, R.

    1994-12-31

    Thorium-232 background levels in non-cultivated Canadian soils (southern and northern Quebec and the Northwest Territories) are presented. Gamma-ray spectrometry was used to determine the activity of {sup 232}Th by measuring the activities of {sup 228}Ac and {sup 212}Pb at 37 sites. The specific activity levels ranged from 2.7 to 95.5 Bq/kg with an overall mean of 24.0 {+-} 15.4 Bq/kg. This activity generated an annual absorbed dose equivalent in air of 0.1 mSv. The activities of {sup 228}Ac and {sup 212}Pb in the soil increased with increasing depth. IT was found that uranium, via its decay product radium, can interfere with the determination of thorium in the soil.

  20. In Situ Surface Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.; Leger, Patrick C.; Yanovsky, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Operation of in situ space assets, such as rovers and landers, requires operators to acquire a thorough understanding of the environment surrounding the spacecraft. The following programs help with that understanding by providing higher-level information characterizing the surface, which is not immediately obvious by just looking at the XYZ terrain data. This software suite covers three primary programs: marsuvw, marsrough, and marsslope, and two secondary programs, which together use XYZ data derived from in situ stereo imagery to characterize the surface by determining surface normal, surface roughness, and various aspects of local slope, respectively. These programs all use the Planetary Image Geometry (PIG) library to read mission-specific data files. The programs themselves are completely multimission; all mission dependencies are handled by PIG. The input data consists of images containing XYZ locations as derived by, e.g., marsxyz. The marsuvw program determines surface normals from XYZ data by gathering XYZ points from an area around each pixel and fitting a plane to those points. Outliers are rejected, and various consistency checks are applied. The result shows the orientation of the local surface at each point as a unit vector. The program can be run in two modes: standard, which is typically used for in situ arm work, and slope, which is typically used for rover mobility. The difference is primarily due to optimizations necessary for the larger patch sizes in the slope case. The marsrough program determines surface roughness in a small area around each pixel, which is defined as the maximum peak-to-peak deviation from the plane perpendicular to the surface normal at that pixel. The marsslope program takes a surface normal file as input and derives one of several slope-like outputs from it. The outputs include slope, slope rover direction (a measure of slope radially away from the rover), slope heading, slope magnitude, northerly tilt, and solar energy (compares the slope with the Sun s location at local noon). The marsuvwproj program projects a surface normal onto an arbitrary plane in space, resulting in a normalized 3D vector, which is constrained to lie in the plane. The marsuvwrot program rotates the vectors in a surface normal file, generating a new surface normal file. It also can change coordinate systems for an existing surface normal file. While the algorithms behind this suite are not particularly unique, what makes the programs useful is their integration into the larger in situ image processing system via the PIG library. They work directly with space in situ data, understanding the appropriate image metadata fields and updating them properly. The secondary programs (marsuvwproj, marsuvwrot) were originally developed to deal with anomalous situations on Opportunity and Spirit, respectively, but may have more general applicability.

  1. Determination of (241)Pu by the method of disturbed radioactive equilibrium using 2πα-counting and precision gamma-spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alekseev, I; Kuzmina, T

    2016-04-01

    A simple technique is proposed for the determination of the content of (241)Pu, which is based on disturbance of radioactive equilibrium in the genetically related (237)U←(241)Pu→(241)Am decay chain of radionuclides, with the subsequent use of 2πα-counting and precision gamma-spectroscopy for monitoring the process of restoration of that equilibrium. It has been shown that the data on dynamics of accumulation of the daughter (241)Am, which were obtained from the results of measurements of α- and γ-spectra of the samples, correspond to the estimates calculated for the chain of two genetically related radionuclides, the differences in the estimates of (241)Pu radioactivity not exceeding 2%. Combining the different methods of registration (2πα-counting, semiconductor alpha- and gamma-spectrometry) enables the proposed method to be efficiently applied both for calibration of (241)Pu-sources (from several hundreds of kBq and higher) and for radioisotopic analysis of plutonium mixtures. In doing so, there is a deep purification of (241)Pu from its daughter decay products required due to unavailability of commercial detectors that could make it possible, based only on analysis of alpha-spectra, to conduct quantitative analysis of the content of (238)Pu and (241)Am. PMID:26868275

  2. In situ measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Lord, D.E.

    1980-11-24

    A multipurpose in situ underground measurement system comprising a plurality of long electrical resistance elements in the form of rigid reinforcing bars, each having an open loop hairpin configuration of shorter length than the other resistance elements. The resistance elements are arranged in pairs in a unitized structure, and grouted in place in the underground volume. Measurement means are provided for obtaining for each pair the electrical resistance of each element and the difference in electrical resistance of the paired elements, which difference values may be used in analytical methods involving resistance as a function of temperature. A scanner means sequentially connects the resistance-measuring apparatus to each individual pair of elements. A source of heating current is also selectively connectable for heating the elements to an initial predetermined temperature prior to electrical resistance measurements when used as an anemometer.

  3. Natural gamma-ray spectrometry, lithofacies, and depositional environments of selected upper Cretaceous marine mudrocks, western United States, including tropic shale and tununk member of Mancos shale

    SciTech Connect

    Zelt, F.B.

    1985-01-01

    In-situ measurements of gamma-ray spectra provide estimates of the potassium, thorium, the pre-weathering uranium contents of outcropping marine mudrocks. Th/U is a sensitive indicator of the oxidation potential of paleoenvironments of deposition of Phanerozoic epi- and pericontinental marine deposits. High (>10 x 10/sup -4/) ratios of uranium or organic carbon occur in phosphatic and cherty mudrocks; low (<1.5 x 10/sup -4/) ratios occur in nonmarine mudrocks and in epicontinental marine strata that were deposited during unusual paleo-oceanographic conditions, which sometimes accompanied global extinction events. Spectrometric data compliment sedimentologic data in defining five lithologic/geochemical facies in marine mudrocks of the Cenomanian-Turonian Greenhorn marine cycle. The rock units that were studied in Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah are the Graneros Shale, Greenhorn Limestone, Garlile Shale, Mancos Shale, and Tropic Shale. Results of analyses of the different rock units are used to explain various geological structures of the area under investigation. Outcrops and geophysical well logs combine to indicate the distribution of lithologic/geochemical focus of marine mudrocks.

  4. Mapping the spatial distribution and activity of (226)Ra at legacy sites through Machine Learning interpretation of gamma-ray spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Varley, Adam; Tyler, Andrew; Smith, Leslie; Dale, Paul; Davies, Mike

    2016-03-01

    Radium ((226)Ra) contamination derived from military, industrial, and pharmaceutical products can be found at a number of historical sites across the world posing a risk to human health. The analysis of spectral data derived using gamma-ray spectrometry can offer a powerful tool to rapidly estimate and map the activity, depth, and lateral distribution of (226)Ra contamination covering an extensive area. Subsequently, reliable risk assessments can be developed for individual sites in a fraction of the timeframe compared to traditional labour-intensive sampling techniques: for example soil coring. However, local heterogeneity of the natural background, statistical counting uncertainty, and non-linear source response are confounding problems associated with gamma-ray spectral analysis. This is particularly challenging, when attempting to deal with enhanced concentrations of a naturally occurring radionuclide such as (226)Ra. As a result, conventional surveys tend to attribute the highest activities to the largest total signal received by a detector (Gross counts): an assumption that tends to neglect higher activities at depth. To overcome these limitations, a methodology was developed making use of Monte Carlo simulations, Principal Component Analysis and Machine Learning based algorithms to derive depth and activity estimates for (226)Ra contamination. The approach was applied on spectra taken using two gamma-ray detectors (Lanthanum Bromide and Sodium Iodide), with the aim of identifying an optimised combination of detector and spectral processing routine. It was confirmed that, through a combination of Neural Networks and Lanthanum Bromide, the most accurate depth and activity estimates could be found. The advantage of the method was demonstrated by mapping depth and activity estimates at a case study site in Scotland. There the method identified significantly higher activity (<3Bqg(-1)) occurring at depth (>0.4m), that conventional gross counting algorithms failed to identify. It was concluded that the method could easily be employed to identify areas of high activity potentially occurring at depth, prior to intrusive investigation using conventional sampling techniques. PMID:26795756

  5. Calibration of an in-situ BEGe detector using semi-empirical and Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Agrafiotis, K; Karfopoulos, K L; Anagnostakis, M J

    2011-08-01

    In the case of a nuclear or radiological accident a rapid estimation of the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of the potential radioactive pollution is needed. For aerial releases the radioactive pollutants are finally deposited on the ground forming a surface source. In this case, in-situ γ-ray spectrometry is a powerful tool for the determination of ground pollution. In this work, the procedure followed at the Nuclear Engineering Department of the National Technical University of Athens (NED-NTUA) for the calibration of an in-situ Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detector, for the determination of gamma-emitting radionuclides deposited on the ground surface, is presented. BEGe detectors due to their technical characteristics are suitable for the analysis of photons in a wide energy region. Two different techniques were applied for the full-energy peak efficiency calibration of the BEGe detector in the energy region 60-1600 keV: Full-energy peak efficiencies determined using the two methods agree within statistical uncertainties. PMID:21193317

  6. Savannah River Site Experiences in In Situ Field Measurements of Radioactive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, F.S.

    1999-10-07

    This paper discusses some of the field gamma-ray measurements made at the Savannah River Site, the equipment used for the measurements, and lessons learned during in situ identification and characterization of radioactive materials.

  7. Determination of the natural radioactivity levels in north west of Dukhan, Qatar using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Al-Sulaiti, Huda; Nasir, Tabassum; Al Mugren, K S; Alkhomashi, N; Al-Dahan, N; Al-Dosari, M; Bradley, D A; Bukhari, S; Matthews, M; Regan, P H; Santawamaitre, T; Malain, D; Habib, A

    2012-07-01

    This study is aimed at the determination of the activity concentrations of naturally occuring and technologically enhanced levels of radiation in 34 representative soil samples that have been collected from an inshore oil field area which was found to have, in a previous study, the highest observed value of 226Ra concentration among 129 soil samples. The activity concentrations of 238U and 226Ra have been inferred from gamma-ray transitions associated with their decay progenies and measured using a hyper-pure germanium detector. Details of the sample preparation and the gamma-ray spectroscopic analysis techniques are presented, together with the values of the activity concentrations associated with the naturally occuring radionuclide chains for all the samples collected from NW Dukhan. Discrete-line, gamma-ray energy transitions from spectral lines ranging in energy from ∼100 keV up to 2.6 MeV have been associated with characteristic decays of the various decay products within the 235.8U and 232Th radioactive decay chains. These data have been analyzed, under the assumption of secular equilibrium for the U and Th decay chains. Details of the sample preparation and the gamma-ray spectroscopic analysis techniques are presented. The weighted mean value of the activity concentrations of 226Ra in one of the samples was found to be around a factor of 2 higher than the values obtained in the previous study and approximately a factor of 10 higher than the accepted worldwide average value of 35 Bq/kg. The weighted mean values of the activity concentrations of 232Th and 40K were also deduced and found to be within the worldwide average values of 30 and 400 Bq/kg, respectively. Our previous study reported a value of 201.9±1.5Stat.±13Syst.Bq/kg for 226Ra in one sample and further investigation in the current work determined a measured value for 226Ra of 342.00±1.9Stat.±25Syst.Bq/kg in a sample taken from the same locality. This is significantly higher than all the other investigated soil samples in the current and previous works. Notably, the Th levels in the same sample are within the worldwide average expectations, implying that the increased 226Ra concentration arises from TENORM processes. PMID:22244196

  8. Assessing sample attenuation parameters for use in low-energy efficiency transfer in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bruggeman, M; Verheyen, L; Vidmar, T; Liu, B

    2016-03-01

    We present a numerical fitting method for transmission data that outputs an equivalent sample composition. This output is used as input to a generalised efficiency transfer model based on the EFFTRAN software integrated in a LIMS. The procedural concept allows choosing between efficiency transfer with a predefined sample composition or with an experimentally determined composition based on a transmission measurement. The method can be used for simultaneous quantification of low-energy gamma emitters like (210)Pb, (241)Am, (234)Th in typical environmental samples. PMID:26688363

  9. IN SITU STEAM EXTRACTION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In situ steam extraction removes volatile and semivolatile hazardous contaminants from soil and groundwater without excavation of the hazardous waste. aste constituents are removed in situ by the technology and are not actually treated. he use of steam enhances the stripping of v...

  10. In Situ Nuclear Characterization Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; J. Rory Kennedy

    2011-11-01

    To be able to evolve microstructure with a prescribed in situ process, an effective measurement infrastructure must exist. This interdisciplinary infrastructure needs to be developed in parallel with in situ sensor technology. This paper discusses the essential elements in an effective infrastructure.

  11. Technical review: In situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Ellen

    2014-08-01

    In situ hybridization is a technique that is used to detect nucleotide sequences in cells, tissue sections, and even whole tissue. This method is based on the complementary binding of a nucleotide probe to a specific target sequence of DNA or RNA. These probes can be labeled with either radio-, fluorescent-, or antigen-labeled bases. Depending on the probe used, autoradiography, fluorescence microscopy, or immunohistochemistry, respectively, are used for visualization. In situ hybridization is extensively used in research, as well as clinical applications, especially for diagnostic purposes. This review discusses the basic technique of in situ hybridization. The standard in situ hybridization process is reviewed, and different types of in situ hybridization, their applications, and advantages and disadvantages are discussed. PMID:24810158

  12. Continued Development of in Situ Geochronology for Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devismes, D.; Cohen, B. A.

    2015-01-01

    The instrument 'Potassium (K) Argon Laser Experiment' (KArLE) is developed and designed for in situ absolute dating of rocks on planetary surfaces. It is based on the K-Ar dating method and uses the Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy - Laser Ablation - Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry (LIBSLA- QMS) technique. We use a dedicated interface to combine two instruments similar to SAM of Mars Science Laboratory (for the QMS) and ChemCam (for the LA and LIBS). The prototype has demonstrated that KArLE is a suitable and promising instrument for in situ absolute dating.

  13. Rapid determination of radon daughters and of artificial radionuclides in air by online gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hötzl, H; Winkler, R

    1993-01-01

    For the determination of airborne radionuclide concentrations in real time, a fixed filter device was constructed which fits directly onto a germanium detector with standard nuclear electronics and a multichannel analyzer buffer connected via a data line to a personal computer for remote control and on-line spectrum evaluation. The on-line gamma-ray spectrometer was applied to the study of radon decay product concentrations in ground-level air and to the rapid detection of any contamination of the environmental air by artificial radionuclides. At Munich-Neuherberg, depending on the meterological conditions, the measured air concentrations of 214Pb, the first gamma-ray-emitting member of the 222Rn decay series, varied from about 1 to 50 Bq m-3. For the artificial radionuclides 60Co, 131I and 137Cs the detection limits were determined as a function of the varying natural radon daughter concentrations at sampling and counting times of 1 h or 1 day. For these radionuclides minimum detectable air activity concentrations of 0.3 or 0.001 Bq m-3, respectively, were obtained at low radon daughter levels. At high radon daughter levels the respective detection limits were found to be higher by a factor of only about 2. PMID:8393198

  14. The natural radioactivity measurements in coastal sediment samples along the East Coast of Tamilnadu using gamma spectrometry technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandramohan, J.; Tholkappian, M.; Harikrishnan, N.; Ravisankar, R.

    2015-08-01

    The natural radioactivity concentration in beach sediment samples collected from Pattipulam to Devanampattinam of East Coast of Tamilnadu have been determined by NaI (TI) gamma ray spectrometer. The specific activity concentrations range from ≤ 2.21 (BDL) to 37.02 Bq kg-1 with a mean of 3.79 Bqkg-1 for 238U, ≤ 2.11 (BDL) to 643.77 Bqkg-1 with a mean of 49.60 Bqkg-1 for 232Th and 300.34 Bqkg-1 to 449.08 Bqkg-1 with a mean of 360.23 Bqkg-1 for 40K. The potential radiological hazards due to natural radionuclides content such as Radium Equivalent activity (Raeq), Representative level index (RLI), External hazard index (Hex), absorbed gamma does rate (DR), and Annual effective dose rate (AEDR) are estimated to assess the radiation hazard associated with the sediments. The obtained data are compared with the recommended safety limits and international approved values. All the values are well below the recommended safety limits indicating that radiation levels do not poses any significant health hazard to the public in the area as a result of the natural radioactivity of beach sediments. This study may help the baseline data for more extensive works in the same subjects of future studies.

  15. Real-time monitoring of in situ gas-phase H/D exchange reactions of cations by atmospheric pressure helium plasma ionization mass spectrometry (HePI-MS).

    PubMed

    Attygalle, Athula B; Gangam, Rekha; Pavlov, Julius

    2014-01-01

    An enclosed atmospheric-pressure helium-plasma ionization (HePI-MS) source avoids, or minimizes, undesired back-exchange reactions usually encountered during deuterium incorporation experiments under ambient-pressure open-source conditions. A simple adaptation of an ESI source provides an economical way of conducting gas phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reactions (HDX) in real time without the need for complicated hardware modifications. For example, the spectrum of [(2)H8]toluene recorded under exposed ambient conditions showed the base peak at m/z 96 due to fast leaching of ring hydrogens because of interactions with H2O vapor present in the open source. Such D/H exchanges are rapidly reversed if the deuterium-depleted [(2)H8]toluene is exposed to D2O vapor. In addition to the enumeration of labile protons, our procedure enables the identification of protonation sites in molecules unambiguously, by the number of H/D exchanges observed in real time. For example, molecules such as tetrahydrofuran and pyridine protonate at the heteroatom and consequently undergo only one H/D exchange, whereas ethylbenzene, which protonates at a ring position of the aromatic ring, undergoes six H/D exchanges. In addition, carbocations generated in situ by in-source fragmentation of precursor protonated species, such as benzyl alcohol, do not undergo any rapid H/D exchanges. Because radical cations, second-generation cations (ions formed by losing a small molecule from a precursor ion), or those formed by hydride abstraction do not undergo rapid H/D exchanges, our technique provides a way to distinguish these ions from protonated molecules. PMID:24325360

  16. Human CD4+ T cells present within the microenvironment of human lung tumors are mobilized by the local and sustained release of IL-12 to kill tumors in situ by indirect effects of IFN-gamma.

    PubMed

    Hess, Stephen D; Egilmez, Nejat K; Bailey, Nicola; Anderson, Timothy M; Mathiowitz, Edith; Bernstein, Steven H; Bankert, Richard B

    2003-01-01

    By implanting nondisrupted pieces of human lung tumor biopsy tissues into SCID mice, it has been possible to establish viable grafts of the tumor, as well as the tumor-associated microenvironment, including inflammatory cells, fibroblasts, tumor vasculature, and the extracellular matrix. Using this xenograft model, we have evaluated and characterized the effects of a local and sustained release of human rIL-12 (rhIL-12) from biodegradable microspheres. In response to rhIL-12, the human CD45+ inflammatory cells present within the xenograft mediate the suppression or the complete arrest of tumor growth in SCID mice. Analysis of the cellular events reveals that human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are induced by rhIL-12 to produce and secrete IFN-gamma. Serum levels of human IFN-gamma in mice bearing rhIL-12-treated tumor xenografts correlate directly with the degree of tumor suppression, while neutralizing Abs to human IFN-gamma abrogate the IL-12-mediated tumor suppression. Gene expression profiling of tumors responding to intratumoral rhIL-12 demonstrates an up-regulation of IFN-gamma and IFN-gamma-dependent genes not observed in control-treated tumors. Genes encoding a number of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines (and their receptors), adhesion molecules, activation markers, and the inducible NO synthase are up-regulated following the introduction of rhIL-12, while genes associated with tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis are decreased in expression. NO contributes to the tumor killing because an inhibitor of inducible NO synthase prevents IL-12-induced tumor suppression. Cell depletion studies reveal that the IL-12-induced tumor suppression, IFN-gamma production, and the associated changes in gene expression are all dependent upon CD4+ T cells. PMID:12496425

  17. Investigation of the environmental impacts of naturally occurring radionuclides in the processing of sulfide ores for gold using gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gbadago, J K; Faanhof, A; Darko, E O; Schandorf, C

    2011-09-01

    The possible environmental impacts of naturally occurring radionuclides on workers and a critical community, as a result of milling and processing sulfide ores for gold by a mining company at Bogoso in the western region of Ghana, have been investigated using gamma spectroscopy. Indicative doses for the workers during sulfide ore processing were calculated from the activity concentrations measured at both physical and chemical processing stages. The dose rate, annual effective dose equivalent, radium equivalent activity, external and internal hazard indices, and radioactivity level index for tailings, for the de-silted sediments of run-off from the vicinity of the tailings dam through the critical community, and for the soils of the critical community's basic schools were calculated and found to be lower than their respective permissible limits. The environmental impact of the radionuclides is therefore expected to be low in this mining environment. PMID:21865616

  18. An analytical calculation of the peak efficiency for cylindrical sources perpendicular to the detector axis in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Julio C

    2008-08-01

    An analytical expression for the so-called full-energy peak efficiency epsilon(E) for cylindrical source with perpendicular axis to an HPGe detector is derived, using point-source measurements. The formula covers different measuring distances, matrix compositions, densities and gamma-ray energies; the only assumption is that the radioactivity is homogeneously distributed within the source. The term for the photon self-attenuation is included in the calculation. Measurements were made using three different sized cylindrical sources of 241Am, 57Co, 137Cs, 54Mn, and 60Co with corresponding peaks of 59.5, 122, 662, 835, 1173, and 1332 keV, respectively, and one measurement of radioactive waste drum for 662, 1173, and 1332 keV. PMID:18249126

  19. Iron and titanium distribution on the moon from orbital gamma ray spectrometry with implications for crustal evolutionary models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, P. A., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A set of Fe and Ti maps and regional values are obtained from the Apollo 15 and 16 orbital gamma ray data by energy band analysis. High-Ti basalts predominate the early and late stages of mare volcanism with high-Fe basaltic volcanism in the interim. The first evidence of a high-Ti-KREEP basalt association is found in the Aristarchus region. A N-S asymmetry for Fe and Ti in the east limb and farside highlands complicates the E-W asymmetry for Th but substantiates crustal inhomogeneity. The observed crustal inhomogeneity adds an additional objection to the primitive source model for crustal evolution. The high-Ti-KREEP basalt association and the general trend of decreasing mare basalt Ti with time lend support to the cumulate source model; however, this model cannot account for young, high-Ti maria. The dynamic assimilation model better accounts for chemical variations observed on the moon.

  20. Linking environmental processes to the in situ functioning of microorganisms by high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM).

    PubMed

    Behrens, Sebastian; Kappler, Andreas; Obst, Martin

    2012-11-01

    Environmental microbiology research increasingly focuses on the single microbial cell as the defining entity that drives environmental processes. The interactions of individual microbial cells with each other, the environment and with higher organisms shape microbial communities and control the functioning of whole ecosystems. A single-cell view of microorganisms in their natural environment requires analytical tools that measure both cell function and chemical speciation at the submicrometre scale. Here we review the technical capabilities and limitations of high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) and scanning transmission (soft) X-ray microscopy (STXM) and give examples of their applications. Whereas NanoSIMS can be combined with isotope-labelling, thereby localizing the distribution of cellular activities (e.g. carbon/nitrogen fixation/turnover), STXM provides information on the location and chemical speciation of metabolites and products of redox reactions. We propose the combined use of both techniques and discuss the technical challenges of their joint application. Both techniques have the potential to enhance our understanding of cellular mechanisms and activities that contribute to microbially mediated processes, such as the biogeochemical cycling of elements, the transformation of contaminants and the precipitation of mineral phases. PMID:22409443

  1. LAFARA: a new underground laboratory in the French Pyrénées for ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    van Beek, P; Souhaut, M; Lansard, B; Bourquin, M; Reyss, J-L; von Ballmoos, P; Jean, P

    2013-02-01

    We describe a new underground laboratory, namely LAFARA (for "LAboratoire de mesure des FAibles RAdioactivités"), that was recently created in the French Pyrénées. This laboratory is primarily designed to analyze environmental samples that display low radioactivity levels using gamma-ray spectrometry. Two high-purity germanium detectors were placed under 85 m of rock (ca. 215 m water equivalent) in the tunnel of Ferrières (Ariège, France). The background is thus reduced by a factor of ∼20 in comparison to above-ground laboratories. Both detectors are fully equipped so that the samples can be analyzed in an automatic mode without requiring permanent presence of a technician in the laboratory. Auto-samplers (twenty positions) and systems to fill liquid nitrogen automatically provide one month of autonomy to the spectrometers. The LAFARA facility allows us to develop new applications in the field of environmental sciences based on the use of natural radionuclides present at low levels in the environment. As an illustration, we present two of these applications: i) dating of marine sediments using the decay of (226)Ra in sedimentary barite (BaSO(4)), ii) determination of (227)Ac ((231)Pa) activities in marine sediment cores. PMID:23164692

  2. LAFARA: a new underground laboratory in the French Pyrénées for ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    van Beek P; Souhaut M; Lansard B; Bourquin M; Reyss JL; von Ballmoos P; Jean P

    2013-02-01

    We describe a new underground laboratory, namely LAFARA (for "LAboratoire de mesure des FAibles RAdioactivités"), that was recently created in the French Pyrénées. This laboratory is primarily designed to analyze environmental samples that display low radioactivity levels using gamma-ray spectrometry. Two high-purity germanium detectors were placed under 85 m of rock (ca. 215 m water equivalent) in the tunnel of Ferrières (Ariège, France). The background is thus reduced by a factor of ∼20 in comparison to above-ground laboratories. Both detectors are fully equipped so that the samples can be analyzed in an automatic mode without requiring permanent presence of a technician in the laboratory. Auto-samplers (twenty positions) and systems to fill liquid nitrogen automatically provide one month of autonomy to the spectrometers. The LAFARA facility allows us to develop new applications in the field of environmental sciences based on the use of natural radionuclides present at low levels in the environment. As an illustration, we present two of these applications: i) dating of marine sediments using the decay of (226)Ra in sedimentary barite (BaSO(4)), ii) determination of (227)Ac ((231)Pa) activities in marine sediment cores.

  3. Evaluation of natural radioactivity content in high-volume surface water samples along the northern coast of Oman Sea using portable high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zare, Mohammad Reza; Kamali, Mahdi; Omidi, Zohre; Khorambagheri, Mahdi; Mortazavi, Mohammad Seddigh; Ebrahimi, Mahmood; Akbarzadeh, Gholamali

    2015-06-01

    Portable high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry was carried out to determine the natural radioactivity levels in high volume surface water samples of the northern coast of Oman Sea, covering the coastal strip from Hormoz strait to Goatr seaport, for the first time. The water samples from 36 coastal and near shore locations were collected for analysis. Analyses on the samples collected were carried out to determine (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K contents. The concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in surface water samples ranged between 2.19 and 2.82 Bq/L, 1.66-2.17 Bq/L and 132.6-148.87 Bq/L, respectively. The activity profile of radionuclides shows low activity across the study area. The study also examined some radiation hazard indices. The external hazard index was found to be less than 1, indicating a low dose. The results of measurements will serve as background reference level for Oman Sea coastlines. PMID:25847859

  4. Radionuclides in the ground-level atmosphere in Vilnius, Lithuania, in March 2011, detected by gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gudelis, A; Druteikienė, R; Lujanienė, G; Maceika, E; Plukis, A; Remeikis, V

    2012-07-01

    This study presents the ground-level air monitoring results obtained in Vilnius, the capital of Lithuania, on 14 March-14 April 2011 after the recent earthquake and subsequent Tsunami having a crucial impact on Japanese nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) on 11 March 2011. To collect representative diurnal aerosol samples a powerful sampling system ensuring the air filtration rate of 5500 m(3) h(-1) was used. The following artificial gamma-ray emitting radionuclides have been determined: (129m)Te, (132)Te (in equilibrium with its daughter (132)I), (131)I, (134)Cs, (136)Cs and (137)Cs. Activity concentration of the globally distributed fission product (137)Cs has increased from a background value of 1.6 μBq m(-3) to the value of 0.9 mBq m(-3) at the beginning of April. The activity ratio (134)Cs/(137)Cs was found to be close to 1, with a slightly higher activity of (134)Cs. The maximum aerosol-associated (131)I activity concentration of 3.45 mBq m(-3) was by four orders of magnitude lower than that measured at the same location in April-May 1986 as a consequence of the Chernobyl NPP accident. The estimated gaseous fraction of iodine-131 constituted about 70% of the total (131)I activity. PMID:22541992

  5. Systematic influences of gamma-ray spectrometry data near the decision threshold for radioactivity measurements in the environment.

    PubMed

    Zorko, Benjamin; Korun, Matjaž; Mora Canadas, Juan Carlos; Nicoulaud-Gouin, Valerie; Chyly, Pavol; Blixt Buhr, Anna Maria; Lager, Charlotte; Aquilonius, Karin; Krajewski, Pawel

    2016-07-01

    Several methods for reporting outcomes of gamma-ray spectrometric measurements of environmental samples for dose calculations are presented and discussed. The measurement outcomes can be reported as primary measurement results, primary measurement results modified according to the quantification limit, best estimates obtained by the Bayesian posterior (ISO 11929), best estimates obtained by the probability density distribution resembling shifting, and the procedure recommended by the European Commission (EC). The annual dose is calculated from the arithmetic average using any of these five procedures. It was shown that the primary measurement results modified according to the quantification limit could lead to an underestimation of the annual dose. On the other hand the best estimates lead to an overestimation of the annual dose. The annual doses calculated from the measurement outcomes obtained according to the EC's recommended procedure, which does not cope with the uncertainties, fluctuate between an under- and overestimation, depending on the frequency of the measurement results that are larger than the limit of detection. In the extreme case, when no measurement results above the detection limit occur, the average over primary measurement results modified according to the quantification limit underestimates the average over primary measurement results for about 80%. The average over best estimates calculated according the procedure resembling shifting overestimates the average over primary measurement results for 35%, the average obtained by the Bayesian posterior for 85% and the treatment according to the EC recommendation for 89%. PMID:27085965

  6. The use of MCNP and gamma spectrometry in supporting the evaluation of NORM in Libyan oil pipeline scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Ahmed S.; Bradley, D. A.; Regan, P. H.; Shutt, A. L.

    2010-07-01

    The accumulation of scales in production pipes is a common problem in the oil industry, reducing fluid flow and also leading to costly remedies and disposal issues. Typical materials found in such scale are sulphates and carbonates of calcium and barium, or iron sulphide. Radium arising from the uranium/thorium present in oil-bearing rock formations may replace the barium or calcium in these salts to form radium salts. This creates what is known as technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM or simply NORM). NORM is a serious environmental and health and safety issue arising from commercial oil and gas extraction operations. Whilst a good deal has been published on the characterisation and measurement of radioactive scales from offshore oil production, little information has been published regarding NORM associated with land-based facilities such as that of the Libyan oil industry. The ongoing investigation described in this paper concerns an assessment of NORM from a number of land based Libyan oil fields. A total of 27 pipe scale samples were collected from eight oil fields, from different locations in Libya. The dose rates, measured using a handheld survey meter positioned on sample surfaces, ranged from 0.1-27.3 μSv h -1. In the initial evaluations of the sample activity, use is being made of a portable HPGe based spectrometry system. To comply with the prevailing safety regulations of the University of Surrey, the samples are being counted in their original form, creating a need for correction of non-homogeneous sample geometries. To derive a detection efficiency based on the actual sample geometries, a technique has been developed using a Monte Carlo particle transport code (MCNPX). A preliminary activity determination has been performed using an HPGe portable detector system.

  7. In Situ Activation of Microcapsules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed are microcapsules comprising a polymer shell enclosing two or more immiscible liquid phases in which a drug, or a prodrug and a drug activator are partitioned into separate phases. or prevented from diffusing out of the microcapsule by a liquid phase in which the drug is poorly soluble. Also disclosed are methods of using the microcapsules for in situ activation of drugs where upon exposure to an appropriate energy source the internal phases mix and the drug is activated in situ.

  8. Assessing soil erosion at landscape level: A step forward in the up-scaling of 137Cs measurements through the use of in-situ lanthanum bromide scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonsalves, Basil C.; Darby, Iain G.; Toloza, Arsenio; Mabit, Lionel; Kaiser, Ralf B.; Dercon, Gerd

    2014-05-01

    Measuring Fallout Radionuclides (FRN), in particular 137Cs, is a well-established method to estimate soil erosion and deposition in agricultural landscapes. While extremely sensitive, laboratory based gamma-ray spectrometry requires careful handling and preparation of measurement samples with a lengthy measuring time (~1 day), In-situ gamma-ray spectrometry can give near instantaneous results, allowing prompt decisions to be made and identification of critical spots of soil erosion, while the equipment is in the field. The aim of this investigation was to compare the precision of the in-situ FRN measurements, made by a cost-effective lanthanum bromide (LaBr3 (Ce)) scintillation detector of 137Cs against those from conventional (high-purity germanium HPGe detector) but laborious laboratory based gamma-ray spectrometry for assessing soil erosion. As preliminary test, five cores of a gleyic Cambisol - per increments of 5 cm until 1 m depth - were collected at the experimental research station of the Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety located in Grabenegg 130 km west of Vienna. Three soil cores were sampled at the study site and, in the vicinity of this experimental site, two additional cores were collected at two different undisturbed reference sites. Laboratory gamma analyses were carried out during 50 000 seconds using a HPGe coaxial detector. The gamma measurements performed at the laboratory confirmed the undisturbed status of the two selected reference sites (i.e. exponential decrease with depth of the 137Cs content). Using the surface area of the sampling tool, the 137Cs areal activities of the cores sampled in the study site have been established at 2134±465 Bq m-2, 1835±356 Bq m-2 and 2553±340 Bq m-2, and, for the two reference sites at 3221±444 Bq m-2 and 3946±527 Bq m-2. At the same location and prior to collect the five soil cores, in-situ measurements using a lanthanum bromide (LaBr3 (Ce)) scintillator were performed. The detector was placed at 2 cm above ground and each measurement was conducted for 900 seconds. A significant positive correlation (i.e. R2=0.82; p < 0.001) has been established between the 137Cs areal activities obtained with the in-situ and laboratory based measurements. The first results relating to in-situ measurement of 137Cs offer an exciting potential for the application of FRN measurements and their up-scaling in the framework of soil erosion assessments at the landscape level. This includes cost, time, and portability, the potential to work in remote areas, pre-screening to develop more effective sampling strategies and rapid repeat surveys. This work is still in its initial stage and more research is required to validate this innovative in-situ technique.

  9. In Situ Instrumentation for Sub-Surface Planetary Geochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Parsons, A.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2010-01-01

    Novel instrumentation is under development at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, building upon earth-based techniques for hostile environments, to infer geochemical processes important to formation and evolution of solid bodies in our Solar System. A prototype instrument, the Pulsed Neutron Generator Gamma Ray and Neutron Detectors (PNG-GRAND), has a 14 MeV pulsed neutron generator coupled with gamma ray and neutron detectors to measure quantitative elemental concentrations and bulk densities of a number of major, minor and trace elements at or below the surfaces with approximately a meter-sized spatial resolution down to depths of about 50 cm without the need to drill. PNG-GRAND's in situ a meter-scale measurements and adaptability to a variety of extreme space environments will complement orbital kilometer-scale and in-situ millimeter scale elemental and mineralogical measurements to provide a more complete picture of the geochemistry of planets, moons, asteroids and comets.

  10. Evaluating airborne and ground based gamma spectrometry methods for detecting particulate radioactivity in the environment: a case study of Irish Sea beaches.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, A J; Sanderson, D C W

    2012-10-15

    In several places, programmes are in place to locate and recover radioactive particles that have the potential to cause detrimental health effects in any member of the public who may encounter them. A model has been developed to evaluate the use of mobile gamma spectrometry systems within such programmes, with particular emphasis on large volume (16l) NaI(Tl) detectors mounted in low flying helicopters. This model uses a validated Monte Carlo code with assessment of local geochemistry and natural and anthropogenic background radiation concentrations and distributions. The results of the model, applied to the example of particles recovered from beaches in the vicinity of Sellafield, clearly show the ability of rapid airborne surveys conducted at 75 m ground clearance and 120 kph speeds to demonstrate the absence of sources greater than 5 MBq (137)Cs within large areas (10-20 km(2)h(-1)), and identify areas requiring further ground based investigation. Lowering ground clearance for airborne surveys to 15m whilst maintaining speeds covering 1-2 km(2) h(-1) can detect buried (137)Cs sources of 0.5MBq or greater activity. A survey design to detect 100 kBq (137)Cs sources at 10 cm depth has also been defined, requiring surveys at <15m ground clearance and <2 ms(-1) ground speed. The response of airborne systems to the Sellafield particles recovered to date has also been simulated, and the proportion of the existing radiocaesium background in the vicinity of the nuclear site has been established. Finally the rates of area coverage and sensitivities of both airborne and ground based approaches are compared, demonstrating the ability of airborne systems to increase the rate of particle recovery in a cost effective manner. The potential for equipment and methodological developments to improve performance are discussed. PMID:22947616

  11. TRIO-01 experiment: in-situ tritium recovery results

    SciTech Connect

    Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Billone, M.C.; Misra, B.; Greenwood, L.R.; Dyer, F.F.; Dudley, I.T.; Bate, L.C.; Clemmer, E.D.; Fisher, P.W.

    1983-01-01

    The TRIO-01 experiment was designed to test in-situ tritium recovery and heat transfer performance of a candidate solid breeder, ..gamma..-LiAlO/sub 2/. The results showed that nearly all the tritium generated was recovered. Only < 0.1 wppM tritium remained in the solid after irradiation testing. The heat transfer performance showed that temperature profiles can be effectively controlled.

  12. In situ microbial filter used for bioremediation

    DOEpatents

    Carman, M. Leslie; Taylor, Robert T.

    2000-01-01

    An improved method for in situ microbial filter bioremediation having increasingly operational longevity of an in situ microbial filter emplaced into an aquifer. A method for generating a microbial filter of sufficient catalytic density and thickness, which has increased replenishment interval, improved bacteria attachment and detachment characteristics and the endogenous stability under in situ conditions. A system for in situ field water remediation.

  13. Nanoparticles laden in situ gel for sustained ocular drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Himanshu; Aqil, Mohammed; Khar, Roop K.; Ali, Asgar; Bhatnagar, Aseem; Mittal, Gaurav

    2013-01-01

    Proper availability of drug on to corneal surface is a challenging task. However, due to ocular physiological barriers, conventional eye drops display poor ocular bioavailability of drugs (< 1%). To improve precorneal residence time and ocular penetration, earlier our group developed and evaluated in situ gel and nanoparticles for ocular delivery. In interest to evaluate the combined effect of in situ gel and nanoparticles on ocular retention, we combined them. We are the first to term this combination as “nanoparticle laden in situ gel”, that is, poly lactic co glycolic acid nanoparticle incorporated in chitosan in situ gel for sparfloxacin ophthalmic delivery. The formulation was tested for various physicochemical properties. It showed gelation pH near pH 7.2. The observation of acquired gamma camera images showed good retention over the entire precorneal area for sparfloxacin nanoparticle laden in situ gel (SNG) as compared to marketed formulation. SNG formulation cleared at a very slow rate and remained at corneal surface for longer duration as no radioactivity was observed in systemic circulation. The developed formulation was found to be better in combination and can go up to the clinical evaluation and application. PMID:23833523

  14. Triplex in-situ hybridization

    DOEpatents

    Fresco, Jacques R.; Johnson, Marion D.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are methods for detecting in situ the presence of a target sequence in a substantially double-stranded nucleic acid segment, which comprises: a) contacting in situ under conditions suitable for hybridization a substantially double-stranded nucleic acid segment with a detectable third strand, said third strand being capable of hybridizing to at least a portion of the target sequence to form a triple-stranded structure, if said target sequence is present; and b) detecting whether hybridization between the third strand and the target sequence has occured.

  15. In situ biofilm coupon device

    DOEpatents

    Peyton, B.M.; Truex, M.J.

    1997-06-24

    An apparatus is disclosed for characterization of in-situ microbial biofilm populations in subsurface groundwater. The device permits biofilm-forming microorganisms to adhere to packing material while emplaced in a groundwater strata, so that the packing material can be later analyzed for quantity and type of microorganisms, growth rate, and nutrient requirements. 3 figs.

  16. In situ biofilm coupon device

    DOEpatents

    Peyton, Brent M.; Truex, Michael J.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus for characterization of in-situ microbial biofilm populations in subsurface groundwater. The device permits biofilm-forming microorganisms to adhere to packing material while emplaced in a groundwater strata, so that the packing material can be later analyzed for quantity and type of microorganisms, growth rate, and nutrient requirements.

  17. Strategies for In situ and Sample Return Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanastassiou, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    There is general agreement that planetary exploration proceeds from orbital reconnaissance of a planet, to surface and near-surface in situ exploration, to sample return missions, which bring back samples for investigations in terrestrial laboratories, using the panoply of state-of-the-art analytical techniques. The applicable techniques may depend on the nature of the returned material and complementary and multi- disciplinary techniques can be used to best advantage. High precision techniques also serve to provide the "ground truth" and calibrate past and future orbital and in situ measurements on a planet. It is also recognized that returned samples may continue to be analyzed by novel techniques as the techniques become developed, in part to address specific characteristics of returned samples. There are geophysical measurements such as those of the moment of inertia of a planet, seismic activity, and surface morphology that depend on orbital and in-situ science. Other characteristics, such as isotopic ages and isotopic compositions (e.g., initial Sr and Nd) as indicators of planetary mantle or crust evolution and sample provenance require returned samples. In situ analyses may be useful for preliminary characterization and for optimization of sample selection for sample return. In situ analyses by Surveyor on the Moon helped identify the major element chemistry of lunar samples and the need for high precision mass spectrometry (e. g., for Rb-Sr ages, based on extremely low alkali contents). The discussion of in-situ investigations vs. investigations on returned samples must be directly related to available instrumentation and to instrumentation that can be developed in the foreseeable future. The discussion of choices is not a philosophical but instead a very practical issue: what precision is required for key investigations and what is the instrumentation that meets or exceeds the required precision. This must be applied to potential in situ instruments and to laboratory instruments. Age determinations and use of isotopes for deciphering planetary evolution are viewed as off-limits for in-situ determinations, as they require: a) typically high precision mass spectrometry (at 0.01% and below); b) the determination of parent-daughter element ratios at least at the percent level; c) the measurement of coexisting minerals (for internal isochron determinations); d) low contamination (e. g., for U-Pb and Pb-Pb); and e) removal of adhering phases and contaminants, not related to the samples to be analyzed. Total K-Ar age determinations are subject to fewer requirements and may be feasible, in situ, but in the absence of neutron activation, as required for 39Ar-40Ar, the expected precision is at the level of ~20%, with trapped Ar in the samples introducing further uncertainty. Precision of 20% for K-Ar may suffice to address some key cratering rate uncertainties on Mars, especially as applicable to the Middle Amazonian(1). For in situ, the key issues, which must be addressed for all measurements are: what precision is required and are there instruments available, at the required precision levels. These issues must be addressed many years before a mission gets defined. Low precision instruments on several in situ missions that do not address key scientific questions may in fact be more expensive, in their sum, than a sample return mission. In summary, all missions should undergo similar intense scrutiny with regard to desired science and feasibility, based on available instrumentation (with demonstrated and known capabilities) and cost. 1. P. T. Doran et al. (2004) Earth Sci. Rev. 67, 313-337.

  18. Integrated in-situ remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Fustos, V.; Lieberman, P.

    1996-01-01

    This article presents an integrated approach to ex-situ and in-situ remediation. A sequence of processes, used successfully in their own right, but used synergistically in this approach, have achieved short-term, economic remediation. In addition the range of contaminants that can be treated is extended. The Process uses ozone, compressed oxygen, water vapor, heat, bioaugmentation and vapor extraction to remediate lower molecular weight hydrocarbons and higher molecular weight hydrocarbons. 3 figs.

  19. DGT as an in situ tool for measuring radiocesium in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Murdock, C; Kelly, M; Chang, L Y; Davison, W; Zhang, H

    2001-11-15

    The application of diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT) samplers for the measurement of cesium radionuclides in solution, using an ammonium molybdophosphate (AMP) binding agent, was tested under both laboratory and field conditions. In the former they proved able to reproduce known 134Cs concentrations (60 Bq L(-1)) with a high degree of accuracy and precision over periods up to approximately 1 d, in freshwaters over a wide range of pH and temperature, and in saline water. In field trials in a freshwater lake receiving nuclear power station discharges, mean concentrations of 137CS (47-61 mBq L(-1)) were measured over periods from 5 d to 1 month. These agreed, within error, with mean concentrations determined from grab samples but rigorous field validation of long-term (month) deployments of DGT devices proved impossible using conventional sampling procedures, due to loss of 137Cs to container walls. Identified limitations of the DGT technique included probable AMP degradation over longer periods and calibration problems if large changes in temperature and concentration occurred together. Potential limitations due to biofilm growth were considered not to be significant. Despite the limitations, the technique appears to measure concentrations accurately for deployment times of 1 month or less. It has several advantages over traditional sampling methods for monitoring radionuclides in the solution/dissolved phase, including its simplicity, provision of time-averaged mean concentrations, and automatic in-situ concentration onto a medium with ideal counting geometry for gamma spectrometry. PMID:11757612

  20. High Throughput In Situ XAFS Screening of Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsapatsaris, Nikolaos; Beesley, Angela M.; Weiher, Norbert; Tatton, Helen; Dent, Andy J.; Mosselmans, Frederick J. W.; Tromp, Moniek; Russu, Sergio; Evans, John; Harvey, Ian; Hayama, Shu; Schroeder, Sven L. M.

    2007-02-01

    We outline and demonstrate the feasibility of high-throughput (HT) in situ XAFS for synchrotron radiation studies. An XAS data acquisition and control system for the analysis of dynamic materials libraries under control of temperature and gaseous environments has been developed. The system is compatible with the 96-well industry standard and coupled to multi-stream quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) analysis of reactor effluents. An automated analytical workflow generates data quickly compared to traditional individual spectrum acquisition and analyses them in quasi-real time using an HT data analysis tool based on IFFEFIT. The system was used for the automated characterization of a library of 91 catalyst precursors containing ternary combinations of Cu, Pt, and Au on γ-Al2O3, and for the in situ characterization of Au catalysts supported on Al2O3 and TiO2.

  1. In-situ Rb-Sr geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, F. S.; Nowicki, K.; Whitaker, T.

    This paper reports on the first rubidium-strontium (Rb-Sr) radiometric dates using a Laser Desorption Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (LDRIMS) instrument capable of being miniaturized for flight to another planet. The LDRIMS instrument produces dates in under 24 hours, requires minimal sample preparation, and avoids the interference and mass resolution issues associated with other geochronology measurements. We have begun testing the bench-top prototype on the Boulder Creek Granite (BCG), from Colorado, comprised primarily of a gneissic quartz monzonite and granodiorite; whole rock Rb-Sr TIMS measurements result in dates of 1700± 40 Ma [1]. Data reduction of the LDRIMS Rb-Sr measurements on calibrated repeat runs result in a date for the BCG of 1.727± 0.087 Ga (n=288, MSWD=1). Most geochronology applications are willing to accept an MSWD up to ~2.7; at MSWD=2, the precision improves to ± 0.062 Ga. This technology is moving from lab prototype to field deployable instrument, and provides an opportunity to directly address the science goals of Mars Sample Return (MSR) within the bounds posed by current scientific, fiscal, and political pressures on the Mars program. Additionally, LDRIMS could potentially be flown to the Moon under the Discovery or New Frontiers program. We posit that in-situ geochronology missions to Mars to triage and validate samples for Mars Sample Return (MSR) are technically feasible in the 2018-2022 time frame.

  2. Noise canceling in-situ detection

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, David O.

    2014-08-26

    Technologies applicable to noise canceling in-situ NMR detection and imaging are disclosed. An example noise canceling in-situ NMR detection apparatus may comprise one or more of a static magnetic field generator, an alternating magnetic field generator, an in-situ NMR detection device, an auxiliary noise detection device, and a computer.

  3. Measurement of Absolute Fission Yields in the Fast Neutron-Induced Fission of Actinides: {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 243}Am, and {sup 244}Cm by Track-Etch-cum-Gamma Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, R.H.; Naik, H.; Pandey, A.K.; Kalsi, P.C.; Singh, R.J.; Ramaswami, A.; Nair, A.G.C.

    2000-07-15

    The absolute fission yields of 46 fission products in {sup 238}U (99.9997 at.%), 46 fission products in {sup 237}Np, 27 fission products in {sup 238}Pu (99.21 at.%), 30 fission products in {sup 240}Pu (99.48 at.%), 30 fission products in {sup 243}Am (99.998 at.%), and 32 fission products in {sup 244}Cm (99.43 at.%) induced by fast neutrons were determined using a fission track-etch-cum-gamma spectrometric technique. In the case of highly alpha-active and sparingly available actinides - e.g., {sup 238}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 243}Am, and {sup 244}Cm - a novel recoil catcher technique to collect the fission products on a Lexan polycarbonate foil followed by gamma-ray spectrometry was developed during the course of this work. This completely removed interferences from (a) gamma rays of daughter products in secular equilibrium with the target nuclide (e.g., {sup 243}Am-{sup 239}Np), (b) activation products of the catcher foil [e.g., {sup 24}Na from Al(n,{alpha})], and (c) activation products of the target [e.g., {sup 238}Np from {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}) and {sup 239}Np from {sup 238}U(n,{gamma})] reactions, making the gamma spectrometric analysis very simple and accurate. The high-yield asymmetric fission products were analyzed by direct gamma spectrometry, whereas the low-yield symmetric products (e.g., Ag, Cd, and Sb) as well as some of the asymmetric fission products (e.g., Br) and rare earths (in the case of {sup 238}U and {sup 237}Np) were radiochemically separated and then analyzed by gamma-ray spectrometry. The neutron spectra in the irradiation positions of the reactors were measured and delineated in the thermal to 10-MeV region using threshold activation detectors. The present data were compared with the ENDF/VI and UKFY2 evaluated data files. From the measured cumulative yields, the mass-chain yields have been deduced using charge distribution systematics. The mass yields, along with similar data for other fast neutron-induced fissioning systems, show several important features:1. Fine structure in the interval of five mass units in even-Z fissioning systems due to odd-even effects. The fine structure decreases from lighter to heavier even-Z actinides, in accordance with their odd-even effect.2. Higher yields in the mass regions 133 to 135, 138 to 140, and 143 to 145 and their complementary mass regions, depending on the mass of the fissioning systems due to the presence of 82n-66n, 86n-62n, and 88n-56n shells.3. For odd-Z fissioning systems having no odd-even effect, the fine structure is very feeble and is due only to shell effects.4. Unusually high yields observed in the mass region 133 to 139 in the fissioning system {sup 239}U* as compared to other U isotopes are explained on the basis of a higher neutron-to-proton ratio (N/Z) of {sup 238}U compared to lower-mass uranium isotopes. The {nu}-bar, full-width at tenth-maximum, and A{sub L}-bar increase with increasing mass of the fissioning systems, whereas A{sub H}-bar of {approx}139 {+-} 1 remains constant throughout due to the strong preference for the formation of the deformed 88n shell, which is also favorable from the N/Z point of view.

  4. Composite with In Situ Plenums

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montesano, Mark

    2012-01-01

    A document describes a high-performance thermal distribution panel (TDP) concept using high-conductivity (greater than 800 W/mK) macro composite skin with in situ heat pipes. The processing technologies proposed to build such a panel result in a one-piece, inseparable assembly with high conductance in both the X and Y planes. The TDP configuration can also be used to produce panels with high structural stiffness. The one-piece construction of the TDP eliminates the thermal interface between the cooling plenums and the heat spreader base, and obviates the need for bulky mounting flanges and thick heat spreaders used on baseline designs. The conductivity of the TDP can be configured to exceed 800 W/mK with a mass density below 2.5 grams per cubic centimeter. This material can provide efficient conductive heat transfer between the in situ heat plenums, permitting the use of thinner panel thicknesses. The plenums may be used as heat pipes, loop heat pipes, or liquid cooling channels. The panel technology used in the TDP is a macro-composite comprised of aluminum-encapsulated annealed pyrolytic graphite (APG). APG is highly aligned crystalline graphite with an in-plane thermal conductivity of 1,700 W/mK. APG has low shear strength and does not constrain the encapsulating material. The proposed concept has no thermal interfaces between the heat pipes and the spreader plate, further improving the overall conductance of the system. The in situ plenums can also be used for liquid cooling applications. The process can be used to fabricate structural panels by adding a second thin sheet.

  5. In Situ Mosaic Brightness Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.; Lorre, Jean J.

    2012-01-01

    In situ missions typically have pointable, mast-mounted cameras, which are capable of taking panoramic mosaics comprised of many individual frames. These frames are mosaicked together. While the mosaic software applies radiometric correction to the images, in many cases brightness/contrast seams still exist between frames. This is largely due to errors in the radiometric correction, and the absence of correction for photometric effects in the mosaic processing chain. The software analyzes the overlaps between adjacent frames in the mosaic and determines correction factors for each image in an attempt to reduce or eliminate these brightness seams.

  6. Toward prompt gamma spectrometry for monitoring boron distributions during extra corporal treatment of liver metastases by boron neutron capture therapy: a Monte Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Khelifi, R; Nievaart, V A; Bode, P; Moss, R L; Krijger, G C

    2009-07-01

    A Monte Carlo calculation was carried out for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of extra corporal liver phantom. The present paper describes the basis for a subsequent clinical application of the prompt gamma spectroscopy set-up aimed at in vivo monitoring of boron distribution. MCNP code was used first to validate the homogeneity in thermal neutron field in the liver phantom and simulate the gamma ray detection system (collimator and detector) in the treatment room. The gamma ray of 478 keV emitted by boron in small specific region can be detected and a mathematical formalism was used for the tomography image reconstruction. PMID:19394243

  7. Simulations of Terrestrial in-situ Cosmogenic-Nuclide Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Lal, D.; Arnold, J. R.; Englert, P. A. J.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.; Jull, A. J. T.; Donahue, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    Targets of silicon and silicon dioxide were irradiated with spallation neutrons to simulate the production of long-lived radionuclides in the surface of the Earth. Gamma-ray spectroscopy was used to measure Be-7 and Na-22, and accelerator mass spectrometry was used to measure Be-10, C-14, and Al-26. The measured ratios of these nuclides are compared with calculated ratios and with ratios from other simulations and agree well with ratios inferred from terrestrial samples.

  8. In situ trace element microanalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    The use of particle-track-radiography and X-ray- fluorescence techniques in the in situ measurement of trace (less than 1000 ppm) elements in single mineral phases of polished sections is surveyed, and examples of their application to ordinary, carbonaceous and enstatite chondrites are provided. Radiographic methods surveyed include fission-track radiography (for U, Th, and Pu-244), alpha radiography using nuclear reactions (for Li and B), alpha autoradiography (for Bi and Pb), and beta autoradiography (for several elements in synthetic or biological samples). Two X-ray-fluorescence methods are compared: (1) photon-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), and (2) the potential use of synchrotron radiation. The latter is shown to allow much greater sensitivity than current PIXE technology and a much broader range of elements than particle-track radiography: the ppm analysis of 10-micron grains for all elements heavier than Na. These advantages are seen as balancing the high cost of accelerator use.

  9. In-situ spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, William S.

    1992-01-01

    A spectrophotometric probe for in situ absorption spectra measurements comprising a first optical fiber carrying light from a remote light source, a second optical fiber carrying light to a remote spectrophotometer, the proximal ends of the first and second optical fibers parallel and coterminal, a planoconvex lens to collimate light from the first optical fiber, a reflecting grid positioned a short distance from the lens to reflect the collimated light back to the lens for focussing on the second optical fiber. The lens is positioned with the convex side toward the optical fibers. A substrate for absorbing analyte or an analyte and reagent mixture may be positioned between the lens and the reflecting grid.

  10. In-situ measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Lord, David E.

    1983-01-01

    A multipurpose in situ underground measurement system comprising a plurality of long electrical resistance elements in the form of rigid reinforcing bars, each having an open loop "hairpin" configuration of shorter length than the other resistance elements. The resistance elements are arranged in pairs in a unitized structure, and grouted in place in the underground volume. The electrical resistance of each element and the difference in electrical resistance of the paired elements are obtained, which difference values may be used in analytical methods involving resistance as a function of temperature. A scanner sequentially connects the resistance-measuring apparatus to each individual pair of elements. A source of heating current is also selectively connectable for heating the elements to an initial predetermined temperature prior to electrical resistance measurements when used as an anemometer.

  11. In-situ spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, W.S.

    1992-12-15

    A spectrophotometric probe is described for in situ absorption spectra measurements comprising a first optical fiber carrying light from a remote light source, a second optical fiber carrying light to a remote spectrophotometer, the proximal ends of the first and second optical fibers parallel and co-terminal, a planoconvex lens to collimate light from the first optical fiber, a reflecting grid positioned a short distance from the lens to reflect the collimated light back to the lens for focusing on the second optical fiber. The lens is positioned with the convex side toward the optical fibers. A substrate for absorbing analyte or an analyte and reagent mixture may be positioned between the lens and the reflecting grid. 5 figs.

  12. The Tensions of In Situ Visualization.

    PubMed

    Moreland, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    In situ visualization is the coupling of visualization software with a simulation or other data producer to process the data "in memory" before the data are offloaded to a storage system. Although in situ visualization provides superior analysis, it has implementation tradeoffs resulting from conflicts with some traditional expected requirements. Numerous conflicting requirements create tensions that lead to difficult implementation tradeoffs. This article takes a look at the most prevailing tensions of in situ visualization. PMID:26960023

  13. Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ

    DOEpatents

    Christian, Allen T.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Tucker, James D.

    2002-01-01

    Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ to increase the amount of DNA associated with a chromosome or chromosome region is described. The amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ provides for the synthesis of Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) painting probes from single dissected chromosome fragments, the production of cDNA libraries from low copy mRNAs and improved in Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) procedures.

  14. In Situ Measurements of Interstellar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landgraf, M.; Grün, E.

    We present the mass distribution of interstellar grains measured in situ by the Galileo and Ulysses space probes as cumulative flux. The derived in situ mass distribution per logarithmic size interval is compared to the distribution determined by fitting extinction measurements. Large grains measured in situ contribute significantly to the overall mass of dust in the local interstellar cloud. The problem of a dust-to-gas mass ratio that contradicts cosmic abundances is discussed.

  15. The architecture of outer dynein arms in situ.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takashi; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Oiwa, Kazuhiro

    2007-05-18

    Outer dynein arms, the force generators for axonemal motion, form arrays on microtubule doublets in situ, although they are bouquet-like complexes with separated heads of multiple heavy chains when isolated in vitro. To understand how the three heavy chains are folded in the array, we reconstructed the detailed 3D structure of outer dynein arms of Chlamydomonas flagella in situ by electron cryo-tomography and single-particle averaging. The outer dynein arm binds to the A-microtubule through three interfaces on two adjacent protofilaments, two of which probably represent the docking complex. The three AAA rings of heavy chains, seen as stacked plates, are connected in a striking manner on microtubule doublets. The tail of the alpha-heavy chain, identified by analyzing the oda11 mutant, which lacks alpha-heavy chain, extends from the AAA ring tilted toward the tip of the axoneme and towards the inside of the axoneme at 50 degrees , suggesting a three-dimensional power stroke. The neighboring outer dynein arms are connected through two filamentous structures: one at the exterior of the axoneme and the other through the alpha-tail. Although the beta-tail seems to merge with the alpha-tail at the internal side of the axoneme, the gamma-tail is likely to extend at the exterior of the axoneme and join the AAA ring. This suggests that the fold and function of gamma-heavy chain are different from those of alpha and beta-chains. PMID:17391698

  16. Distribution of natural and anthropogenic radionuclides in soil and beach sand samples of Kalpakkam (India) using hyper pure germanium (HPGe) gamma ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kannan, V; Rajan, M P; Iyenga, M A R; Ramesh, R

    2002-07-01

    Pre-operational survey at Kalpakkam coast, indicated elevated gamma background radiation levels in the range of 100-4000 nGy h(-1) over the large tracts of the coastal sands due to the presence of pockets of monazite mineral in beach sands. In view of the prevalence of monazite, a systematic gamma spectrometric study of distribution of natural radionuclides in soil and beach sand samples collected from the terrestrial and coastal environment of Kalpakkam was performed and concentrations of primordial radionuclides such as 238U, 232Th and 40K and anthropogenic radionuclide 137Cs were determined. The concentrations of 238U, 232Th and 40K in soil samples were 5-71, 15-776 and 200-854 Bq kg(-1) dry, respectively. In beach sand samples, 238U, 232Th and 40K contents varied in the range of 36-258, 352-3872 and 324-405 Bq kg(-1) dry, respectively. The total absorbed gamma dose rate in air due to the presence of 238U, 232Th and 40K in Kalpakkam soil samples varied between 24 and 556 nGy h(-1) with a mean of 103 nGy h(-1). The contribution to the total absorbed gamma dose rate in air in the decreasing order was due to the presence of 232Th (76.4%), followed by 40K (16.9%) and 238U (6.7%) in Kalpakkam soils. However, in beach areas of Kalpakkam, the presence of 232Th in beach sand contributed maximum (94.0%) to the total absorbed gamma dose rate in air followed by 238U (4.7%) and minimum contribution was by 40K (1.3%). 137Cs in Kalpakkam soils ranged from < or = 1.0 to 2.8 Bq kg(-1) dry, which was 1-3 order of magnitude less than the concentration of primordial radionuclides in soil. PMID:12137019

  17. In situ bioremediation in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Porta, A.; Young, J.K.; Molton, P.M.

    1993-06-01

    Site remediation activity in Europe is increasing, even if not at the forced pace of the US. Although there is a better understanding of the benefits of bioremediation than of other approaches, especially about in situ bioremediation of contaminated soils, relatively few projects have been carried out full-scale in Europe or in the US. Some engineering companies and large industrial companies in Europe are investigating bioremediation and biotreatment technologies, in some cases to solve their internal waste problems. Technologies related to the application of microorganisms to the soil, release of nutrients into the soil, and enhancement of microbial decontamination are being tested through various additives such as surfactants, ion exchange resins, limestone, or dolomite. New equipment has been developed for crushing and mixing or injecting and sparging the microorganisms, as have new reactor technologies (e.g., rotating aerator reactors, biometal sludge reactors, and special mobile containers for simultaneous storage, transportation, and biodegradation of contaminated soil). Some work has also been done with immobilized enzymes to support and restore enzymatic activities related to partial or total xenobiotic decontamination. Finally, some major programs funded by public and private institutions confirm that increasing numbers of firms have a working interest in bioremediation.

  18. BCG for carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Jakse, G

    1992-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the most effective intravesical therapy of carcinoma in situ of the urinary bladder. Six, weekly instillations of BCG result in a complete remission in about 70-80% of patients. The optimal dose however has still to be defined, and the value of maintenance therapy is also a matter of debate. Recurrent tumours after complete remission occur mainly in the distal ureter and prostatic urethra. In these patients, cystectomy may be required. In about 60-80% of patients, local (e.g. cystitis) and/or systemic (e.g. fever, malaise) side effects are observed. The occurrence of cystitis is associated with the number of instillations, BCG dose and a positive skin test. Systemic side effects are connected with pre-existing dysuria or bacterial cystitis and with traumatic catheterization. Severe toxicity occurs in about 5% of the patients. Prognostic parameters indicating complete remission have yet to be determined, but there is evidence that cytokines detected in the urine and immune-cell infiltration into the bladder wall revealed by immunohistochemistry, can be of value in this respect. PMID:1396945

  19. Method for in situ combustion

    DOEpatents

    Pasini, III, Joseph; Shuck, Lowell Z.; Overbey, Jr., William K.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved in situ combustion method for the recovery of hydrocarbons from subterranean earth formations containing carbonaceous material. The method is practiced by penetrating the subterranean earth formation with a borehole projecting into the coal bed along a horizontal plane and extending along a plane disposed perpendicular to the plane of maximum permeability. The subterranean earth formation is also penetrated with a plurality of spaced-apart vertical boreholes disposed along a plane spaced from and generally parallel to that of the horizontal borehole. Fractures are then induced at each of the vertical boreholes which project from the vertical boreholes along the plane of maximum permeability and intersect the horizontal borehole. The combustion is initiated at the horizontal borehole and the products of combustion and fluids displaced from the earth formation by the combustion are removed from the subterranean earth formation via the vertical boreholes. Each of the vertical boreholes are, in turn, provided with suitable flow controls for regulating the flow of fluid from the combustion zone and the earth formation so as to control the configuration and rate of propagation of the combustion zone. The fractures provide a positive communication with the combustion zone so as to facilitate the removal of the products resulting from the combustion of the carbonaceous material.

  20. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: IN SITU STEAM EXTRACTION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In situ steam extraction removes volatile and semivolatile hazardous contaminants from soil and groundwater without excavation of the hazardous waste. Waste constituents are removed in situ by the technology and are not actually treated. The use of steam enhances the stripping of...

  1. In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Graetz J.; Meng, Y.S.; McGilvray, T.; Yang, M.-C.; Gostovic, D.; Wang, F.; Zeng, D.; Zhu, Y.

    2011-10-31

    Oxides and their tailored structures are at the heart of electrochemical energy storage technologies and advances in understanding and controlling the dynamic behaviors in the complex oxides, particularly at the interfaces, during electrochemical processes will catalyze creative design concepts for new materials with enhanced and better-understood properties. Such knowledge is not accessible without new analytical tools. New innovative experimental techniques are needed for understanding the chemistry and structure of the bulk and interfaces, more importantly how they change with electrochemical processes in situ. Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is used extensively to study electrode materials ex situ and is one of the most powerful tools to obtain structural, morphological, and compositional information at nanometer scale by combining imaging, diffraction and spectroscopy, e.g., EDS (energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry) and Electron Energy Loss Spectrometry (EELS). Determining the composition/structure evolution upon electrochemical cycling at the bulk and interfaces can be addressed by new electron microscopy technique with which one can observe, at the nanometer scale and in situ, the dynamic phenomena in the electrode materials. In electrochemical systems, for instance in a lithium ion battery (LIB), materials operate under conditions that are far from equilibrium, so that the materials studied ex situ may not capture the processes that occur in situ in a working battery. In situ electrochemical operation in the ultra-high vacuum column of a TEM has been pursued by two major strategies. In one strategy, a 'nano-battery' can be fabricated from an all-solid-state thin film battery using a focused ion beam (FIB). The electrolyte is either polymer based or ceramic based without any liquid component. As shown in Fig. 1a, the interfaces between the active electrode material/electrolyte can be clearly observed with TEM imaging, in contrast to the composite electrodes/electrolyte interfaces in conventional lithium ion batteries, depicted in Fig.1b, where quantitative interface characterization is extremely difficult if not impossible. A second strategy involves organic electrolyte, though this approach more closely resembles the actual operation conditions of a LIB, the extreme volatility In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry by Ying Shirley Meng, Thomas McGilvray, Ming-Che Yang, Danijel Gostovic, Feng Wang, Dongli Zeng, Yimei Zhu, and Jason Graetz of the organic electrolytes present significant challenges for designing an in situ cell that is suitable for the vacuum environment of the TEM. Significant progress has been made in the past few years on the development of in situ electron microscopy for probing nanoscale electrochemistry. In 2008, Brazier et al. reported the first cross-section observation of an all solid-state lithium ion nano-battery by TEM. In this study the FIB was used to make a 'nano-battery,' from an all solid-state battery prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). In situ TEM observations were not possible at that time due to several key challenges such as the lack of a suitable biasing sample holder and vacuum transfer of sample. In 2010, Yamamoto et al. successfully observed changes of electric potential in an all-solid-state lithium ion battery in situ with electron holography (EH). The 2D potential distribution resulting from movement of lithium ions near the positive-electrode/electrolyte interface was quantified. More recently Huang et al. and Wang et al. reported the in situ observations of the electrochemical lithiation of a single SnO{sub 2} nanowire electrode in two different in situ setups. In their approach, a vacuum compatible ionic liquid is used as the electrolyte, eliminating the need for complicated membrane sealing to prevent the evaporation of carbonate based organic electrolyte into the TEM column. One main limitation of this approach is that EELS spectral imaging is not possible due to the high plasmon signal of the ionic liquid. To this end, we have developed a novel in situ instrumental system combining analytical electron microscopy with advanced spectroscopy to probe the dynamic phenomena in an all solid-state nano-battery. In situ electron microscopy is a versatile technique that yields insights into challenging questions that could not be obtained using other techniques. However, in order to fully exploit the capabilities, a very carefully thought-out plan of action is essential. It is important to recognize that this is not just a simple characterization tool, but a collection of tools that make up a complete experimental set-up: the choice of FIB operation conditions, specimen holder for biasing, grid materials and design as well as microscope environment must be thoroughly considered before performing an experiment.

  2. Frontiers of in situ electron microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zheng, Haimei; Zhu, Yimei; Meng, Shirley Ying

    2015-01-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has become an increasingly important tool for materials characterization. It provides key information on the structural dynamics of a material during transformations and the correlation between structure and properties of materials. With the recent advances in instrumentation, including aberration corrected optics, sample environment control, the sample stage, and fast and sensitive data acquisition, in situ TEM characterization has become more and more powerful. In this article, a brief review of the current status and future opportunities of in situ TEM is included. It also provides an introduction to the six articles covered by inmore » this issue of MRS Bulletin explore the frontiers of in situ electron microscopy, including liquid and gas environmental TEM, dynamic four-dimensional TEM, nanomechanics, ferroelectric domain switching studied by in situ TEM, and state-of-the-art atomic imaging of light elements (i.e., carbon atoms) and individual defects.« less

  3. Toward the next TRL of KArLE (in situ geochronology for planetary experiment)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devismes, D.; Cohen, B. A.; Haight, H.

    2015-10-01

    The instrument 'Potassium (K) Argon Laser Experiment' (KArLE) is developed and designed for in situ absolute dating of rocks on planetary surfaces. It is based on the K-Ar dating method and uses the Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy - Laser Ablation - Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry (LIBSLA- QMS) technique. We use a dedicated interface to combine two instruments similar to SAM of Mars Science Laboratory (for the QMS) and ChemCam (for the LA and LIBS). The prototype has demonstrated that KArLE is a suitable and promising instrument for in situ absolute dating.

  4. Multiple NEO Rendezvous, Reconnaissance and In Situ Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, K.; Elsperman, M. S.; Cook, T.; Smith, D.

    2010-12-01

    We propose a two spacecraft mission (Mother Ship and Small Body Lander) rendezvous with multiple Near Earth Objects (NEO). This two spacecraft mission mimics the likely architecture approach that human explorers will use: a “mother ship”(MS) designed to get from Earth to the NEO and a “Small Body Lander”(SBL) that performs in situ investigation on or close to the NEO’s surface. The MS carries the SBL to the target NEO. Once at the target NEO, the MS conducts an initial reconnaissance in order to produce a high resolution map of the surface. This map is used to identify coordinates of interest which are sent to the SBL. The SBL un-docks from the MS to rendezvous with the NEO and collect data. Landings are possible, though the challenges of anchoring to the NEO surface are significant. The SBL design is flexible and adaptable, enabling science data collection on or near the surface. After surface investigations are completed on the first NEO, the SBL will return and autonomously rendezvous and dock with the MS. The MS then goes to the next NEO target. During transit to the next NEO, the SBL could be refueled by the MS, a TRL8 capability demonstrated on the DARPA/NASA Orbital Express mission in 2007, or alternately sized to operate without requiring refueling depending on the mission profile. The mission goals are to identify surface hazards; quantify engineering boundary conditions for future human visits, and identify resources for future exploitation. The mission goals will be accomplished through the execution of key mission objectives: (1) high-resolution surface topography; (2) surface composition and mineralogy; (3) radiation environment near NEO; and (4) mechanical properties of the surface. Essential SBL instruments include: a) LIDAR (Obj. 1); b) 3D, high- resolution hyperspectral imaging cameras (Obj. 2); c) radiation sensor package (Obj. 3); and d) strain gauges (Obj. 4). Additional or alternative instruments could include: e) x-ray fluorescence or laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) sensor package (Obj. 2); f) gamma ray/neutron spectrometry package (Obj. 2); and g) radiometer package (to address variations in thermal environment). The ability to reach, survey, sample, and analyze multiple NEOs at close proximity is an enormous capability that can enable NASA to rapidly achieve the primary Exploration Precursor Robotic Mission (xPRM) Program goal of characterizing NEOs for future human exploration. Instead of launching multiple dedicated missions to each NEO of interest, a multi-NEO sortie mission can be planned and executed to achieve the same mission objectives with one launch, dramatically reducing the cost of NEO exploration. Collectively, our NEO Exploration System Architecture provides solutions for a wide variety of exploration activities using a common spacecraft bus and common core instrumentation for the spacecraft. This engineering consistency will substantially improve the probability of mission success, increase the likelihood of maintaining an aggressive launch schedule, and decrease the total cost of multiple missions. NASA successfully used this approach with the robotic precursors leading up to the Apollo missions, and we see significant benefits from this same programmatic approach for the xPRM program.

  5. In situ bioremediation using horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    In Situ Bioremediation (ISB), which is the term used in this report for Gaseous Nutrient Injection for In Situ Bioremediation, remediates soils and ground water contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) both above and below the water table. ISB involves injection of air and nutrients (sparging and biostimulation) into the ground water and vacuum extraction to remove .VOCs from the vadose zone concomitant with biodegradation of VOCs. The innovation is in the combination of 3 emerging technologies, air stripping, horizontal wells, and bioremediation via gaseous nutrient injection with a baseline technology, soil vapor extraction, to produce a more efficient in situ remediation system.

  6. In-situ characterization technique for screening contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Jaselskis, E.J.; Anderson, M.S.; D`Silva, A.P.; Baldwin, D.P.; Zamzow, D.S.

    1995-07-01

    An innovative field sampling system for screening contaminated soils has been developed using laser ablation coupled with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-AES) technology. This sampling approach provides in-situ real-time analysis of trace inorganic elements and is conducted through a mobile testing facility that consists of an instrumentation vehicle called the Mobile Demonstration Laboratory for Environmental Screening Technologies (MDLEST) and an attached trailer called the Robotic Sampling Accessory (RSA). The RSA provides automated sampling capabilities through an attached three-degree-of-freedom robot that is equipped with a surface-sampling probe. The MDLEST-RSA was successfully tested at a Department of Energy (DOE) site in Fernald, Ohio, during the fall of 1992. This paper provides a description of the analysis technique, the MDLEST and RSA, and results of the field demonstration. In addition, benefits, limitations, and future plans are also discussed.

  7. Toward In Situ Monitoring of Water Contamination by Nitroenergetic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brandy J.; Leska, Iwona A.; Medina, Alejandro; Dyson, Norris F.; Nasir, Mansoor; Melde, Brian J.; Taft, Jenna R.; Charles, Paul T.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously described the application of novel porous organosilicate materials to the preconcentration of nitroenergetic targets from aqueous solution prior to HPLC analysis. The performance of the sorbents and the advantages of these types of materials over commercially available solid phase extraction sorbents have been demonstrated. Here, the development of systems for application of those sorbents to in situ monitoring is described. Considerations such as column pressure, particulate filtration, and component durability are discussed. The diameter of selected column housings, the sorbent bed depth, and the frits utilized significantly impact the utility of the sorbent columns in the prototype system. The impact of and necessity for improvements in the morphological characteristics of the sorbents as they relate to reduction in column pressure are detailed. The results of experiments utilizing a prototype system are presented. Data demonstrating feasibility for use of the sorbents in preconcentration prior to ion mobility spectrometry is also presented. PMID:23202195

  8. Lithographically fabricated silicon microreactor for in situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts—Enabling correlative characterization techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Baier, S.; Rochet, A.; Hofmann, G.; Kraut, M.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2015-06-15

    We report on a new modular setup on a silicon-based microreactor designed for correlative spectroscopic, scattering, and analytic on-line gas investigations for in situ studies of heterogeneous catalysts. The silicon microreactor allows a combination of synchrotron radiation based techniques (e.g., X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy) as well as infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy. Catalytic performance can be determined simultaneously by on-line product analysis using mass spectrometry. We present the design of the reactor, the experimental setup, and as a first example for an in situ study, the catalytic partial oxidation of methane showing the applicability of this reactor for in situ studies.

  9. Lithographically fabricated silicon microreactor for in situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts—Enabling correlative characterization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, S.; Rochet, A.; Hofmann, G.; Kraut, M.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2015-06-01

    We report on a new modular setup on a silicon-based microreactor designed for correlative spectroscopic, scattering, and analytic on-line gas investigations for in situ studies of heterogeneous catalysts. The silicon microreactor allows a combination of synchrotron radiation based techniques (e.g., X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy) as well as infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy. Catalytic performance can be determined simultaneously by on-line product analysis using mass spectrometry. We present the design of the reactor, the experimental setup, and as a first example for an in situ study, the catalytic partial oxidation of methane showing the applicability of this reactor for in situ studies.

  10. Lithographically fabricated silicon microreactor for in situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts—Enabling correlative characterization techniques.

    PubMed

    Baier, S; Rochet, A; Hofmann, G; Kraut, M; Grunwaldt, J-D

    2015-06-01

    We report on a new modular setup on a silicon-based microreactor designed for correlative spectroscopic, scattering, and analytic on-line gas investigations for in situ studies of heterogeneous catalysts. The silicon microreactor allows a combination of synchrotron radiation based techniques (e.g., X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy) as well as infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy. Catalytic performance can be determined simultaneously by on-line product analysis using mass spectrometry. We present the design of the reactor, the experimental setup, and as a first example for an in situ study, the catalytic partial oxidation of methane showing the applicability of this reactor for in situ studies. PMID:26133867

  11. Preliminary survey of outdoor gamma dose rates in Lesvos Island (Greece).

    PubMed

    Petalas, Anastasios B; Vogiannis, Efstratios; Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios; Halvadakis, Constantinos P

    2005-01-01

    This study reports the first attempt to record the radioactive background due to gamma radiation in Lesvos Island (Greece). The study reports the results from 335 outdoor total gamma effective dose rate measurements conducted using GPS navigation and a Geiger-Muller detector (Bicron, Micro Sievert) on the whole surface of the island together with a digital map produced by appropriate mapping GIS programme. The study also reports the measurements of outdoor gamma dose rates due to the 238U, 232Th and 40K radionuclides as estimated via in situ gamma-ray spectrometry measurements performed at 26 sites using a 3 x 3 inch NaI (thallium activated) portable detector. The results from the outdoor total gamma effective dose rates range between 0.0023 and 0.28 microSv h(-1). The highest outdoor total gamma effective dose rates (0.013-0.28 microSv h(-1)) were detected in the northeastern part of the island and the intermediate rates (0.066-0.13 microSv h(-1)) in the central region. The outdoor gamma dose rates due to 238U, 232Th and 40K radionuclides range between 1.7 +/- 0.8 and 154 +/- 7 nGy h(-1) with an average of 86 +/- 6 nGy h(-1). The average contribution of each of the examined radionuclides (238U, 232Th and 40K) to the total gamma dose rate was found to be equal to 12 +/- 4% for 238U, 58 +/- 6% for 232Th and 29 +/- 7% for 40K, respectively. PMID:15728423

  12. ENHANCED BIODEGRADATION THROUGH IN-SITU AERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provided an overview of enhanced aerobic bioremediation using in-situ aeration or venting. The following topics were covered: (1) Basic discussion on biodegradation and respiration testing; (2) Basic discussion on volatilization, rate-limited mass transport, an...

  13. Direct in situ rt-PCR.

    PubMed

    Lossi, Laura; Gambino, Graziana; Salio, Chiara; Merighi, Adalberto

    2011-01-01

    In situ polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a histological technique that exploits the advantages of PCR for detection of mRNA directly in tissue sections. It somehow conjugates together PCR and in situ hybridization that is more traditionally employed for mRNA localization in cell organelles, intact cells, or tissue sections. This chapter describes the application of in situ PCR for neuropeptide mRNA localization. We provide here a detailed protocol for direct in situ reverse transcription (RT) PCR (RT-PCR) with nonradioactive probes after fixation and paraffin embedding or cryosectioning. Digoxigenin-labeled nucleotides (digoxigenin-11-dUTP) are incorporated in the PCR product after RT and subsequently detected with an anti-digoxigenin antibody conjugated with alkaline phosphatase. The procedure can be modified for use with fluorescent probes and employed in combination with enzyme/fluorescence immunocytochemical labeling. PMID:21922403

  14. Highly multiplexed subcellular RNA sequencing in situ

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Je Hyuk; Daugharthy, Evan R.; Scheiman, Jonathan; Kalhor, Reza; Ferrante, Thomas C.; Yang, Joyce L.; Terry, Richard; Jeanty, Sauveur S. F.; Li, Chao; Amamoto, Ryoji; Peters, Derek T.; Turczyk, Brian M.; Marblestone, Adam H.; Inverso, Samuel A.; Bernard, Amy; Mali, Prashant; Rios, Xavier; Aach, John; Church, George M.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the spatial organization of gene expression with single nucleotide resolution requires localizing the sequences of expressed RNA transcripts within a cell in situ. Here we describe fluorescent in situ RNA sequencing (FISSEQ), in which stably cross-linked cDNA amplicons are sequenced within a biological sample. Using 30-base reads from 8,742 genes in situ, we examined RNA expression and localization in human primary fibroblasts using a simulated wound healing assay. FISSEQ is compatible with tissue sections and whole mount embryos, and reduces the limitations of optical resolution and noisy signals on single molecule detection. Our platform enables massively parallel detection of genetic elements, including gene transcripts and molecular barcodes, and can be used to investigate cellular phenotype, gene regulation, and environment in situ. PMID:24578530

  15. Gum containing calcium fluoride reinforces enamel subsurface lesions in situ.

    PubMed

    Kitasako, Y; Sadr, A; Hamba, H; Ikeda, M; Tagami, J

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of chewing gum containing phosphoryl oligosaccharides of calcium (POs-Ca) and a low concentration of fluoride (F) on the hardness of enamel subsurface lesions, utilizing a double-blind, randomized, and controlled in situ model. Fifteen individuals wore removable lingual appliances with 3 bovine-enamel insets containing subsurface demineralized lesions. Three times a day for 14 days, they chewed one of the 3 chewing gums (placebo, POs-Ca, POs-Ca+F). After the treatment period, cross-sectional mineral content, nanoindentation hardness, and fluoride ion mapping by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) were evaluated. Although there were no statistical differences in overall mineral content and hardness recovery rates between POs-Ca and POs-Ca+F subsurface lesions (p > 0.05), nanoindentation at 1-μm distance increments from the surface showed statistical differences in hardness recovery rate between POs-Ca and POs-Ca+F in the superficial 20-μm region (p < 0.05). Fluoride mapping revealed distribution of the ion up to 20 μm from the surface in the POs-Ca+F group. Nanoindentation and TOF-SIMS results highlighted the benefits of bioavailability of fluoride ion on reinforcement of the superficial zone of subsurface lesions in situ (NCT01377493). PMID:22337700

  16. In situ structural analysis of the human nuclear pore complex

    PubMed Central

    Ori, Alessandro; DiGuilio, Amanda L.; Vollmer, Benjamin; Mackmull, Marie-Therese; Banterle, Niccolo; Parca, Luca; Kastritis, Panagiotis; Buczak, Katarzyna; Mosalaganti, Shyamal; Hagen, Wim; Andres-Pons, Amparo; Lemke, Edward A.; Bork, Peer; Antonin, Wolfram; Glavy, Joseph S.; Bui, Khanh Huy; Beck, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are fundamental components of all eukaryotic cells that mediate nucleocytoplasmic exchange. Elucidating their 110 MDa structure imposes a formidable challenge and requires in situ structural biology approaches. Fifteen out of about thirty nucleoporins (Nups) are structured and form the Y- and inner ring complexes. These two major scaffolding modules assemble in multiple copies into an eight-fold rotationally symmetric structure that fuses the inner and outer nuclear membranes to form a central channel of ∼60 nm in diameter 1. The scaffold is decorated with transport channel Nups that often contain phenylalanine (FG)-repeat sequences and mediate the interaction with cargo complexes. Although the architectural arrangement of parts of the Y-complex has been elucidated, it is unclear how exactly it oligomerizes in situ. Here, we combined cryo electron tomography with mass spectrometry, biochemical analysis, perturbation experiments and structural modeling to generate the most comprehensive architectural model of the NPC to date. Our data suggest previously unknown protein interfaces across Y-complexes and to inner ring complex members. We demonstrate that the higher eukaryotic transport channel Nup358 (RanBP2) has a previously unanticipated role in Y-complex oligomerization. Our findings blur the established boundaries between scaffold and transport channel Nups. We conclude that, similarly to coated vesicles, multiple copies of the same structural building block - although compositionally identical - engage in different local sets of interactions and conformations. PMID:26416747

  17. Cancer Cell Imaging Using in Situ Generated Gold Nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Chattoraj, Shyamtanu; Amin, Md Asif; Mohapatra, Saswat; Ghosh, Surajit; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2016-01-01

    In situ generated fluorescent gold nanoclusters (Au-NCs) are used for bio-imaging of three human cancer cells, namely, lung (A549), breast (MCF7), and colon (HCT116), by confocal microscopy. The amount of Au-NCs in non-cancer cells (WI38 and MCF10A) is 20-40 times less than those in the corresponding cancer cells. The presence of a larger amount of glutathione (GSH) capped Au-NCs in the cancer cell is ascribed to a higher glutathione level in cancer cells. The Au-NCs exhibit fluorescence maxima at 490-530?nm inside the cancer cells. The fluorescence maxima and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry suggest that the fluorescent Au-NCs consist of GSH capped clusters with a core structure (Au8-13 ). Time-resolved confocal microscopy indicates a nanosecond (1-3?ns) lifetime of the Au-NCs inside the cells. This rules out the formation of aggregated Au-thiolate complexes, which typically exhibit microsecond (?1000?ns) lifetimes. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) in live cells indicates that the size of the Au-NCs is ?1-2?nm. For in situ generation, we used a conjugate consisting of a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL, [pmim][Br]) and HAuCl4 . Cytotoxicity studies indicate that the conjugate, [pmim][AuCl4 ], is non-toxic for both cancer and non-cancer cells. PMID:26437799

  18. Quantification of the 2-deoxyribonolactone and nucleoside 5'-aldehyde products of 2-deoxyribose oxidation in DNA and cells by isotope-dilution gas chromatography mass spectrometry: differential effects of gamma-radiation and Fe2+-EDTA.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wan; Chen, Bingzi; Wang, Lianrong; Taghizadeh, Koli; Demott, Michael S; Dedon, Peter C

    2010-05-01

    The oxidation of 2-deoxyribose in DNA has emerged as a critical determinant of the cellular toxicity of oxidative damage to DNA, with oxidation of each carbon producing a unique spectrum of electrophilic products. We have developed and validated an isotope-dilution gas chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the rigorous quantification of two major 2-deoxyribose oxidation products: the 2-deoxyribonolactone abasic site of 1'-oxidation and the nucleoside 5'-aldehyde of 5'-oxidation chemistry. The method entails elimination of these products as 5-methylene-2(5H)-furanone (5MF) and furfural, respectively, followed by derivatization with pentafluorophenylhydrazine (PFPH), addition of isotopically labeled PFPH derivatives as internal standards, extraction of the derivatives, and quantification by GC-MS analysis. The precision and accuracy of the method were validated with oligodeoxynucleotides containing the 2-deoxyribonolactone and nucleoside 5'-aldehyde lesions. Further, the well-defined 2-deoxyribose oxidation chemistry of the enediyne antibiotics, neocarzinostatin and calicheamicin gamma(1)(I), was exploited in control studies, with neocarzinostatin producing 10 2-deoxyribonolactone and 300 nucleoside 5'-aldehyde per 10(6) nt per microM in accord with its established minor 1'- and major 5'-oxidation chemistry. Calicheamicin unexpectedly caused 1'-oxidation at a low level of 10 2-deoxyribonolactone per 10(6) nt per microM in addition to the expected predominance of 5'-oxidation at 560 nucleoside 5'-aldehyde per 10(6) nt per microM. The two hydroxyl radical-mediated DNA oxidants, gamma-radiation and Fe(2+)-EDTA, produced nucleoside 5'-aldehyde at a frequency of 57 per 10(6) nt per Gy (G-value 74 nmol/J) and 3.5 per 10(6) nt per microM, respectively, which amounted to 40% and 35%, respectively, of total 2-deoxyribose oxidation as measured by a plasmid nicking assay. However, gamma-radiation and Fe(2+)-EDTA produced different proportions of 2-deoxyribonolactone at 7% and 24% of total 2-deoxyribose oxidation, respectively, with frequencies of 10 lesions per 10(6) nt per Gy (G-value, 13 nmol/J) and 2.4 lesions per 10(6) nt per microM. Studies in TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells, in which the analytical data were corrected for losses sustained during DNA isolation, revealed background levels of 2-deoxyribonolactone and nucleoside 5'-aldehyde of 9.7 and 73 lesions per 10(6) nt, respectively. Gamma-irradiation of the cells caused increases of 0.045 and 0.22 lesions per 10(6) nt per Gy, respectively, which represents a approximately 250-fold quenching effect of the cellular environment similar to that observed in previous studies. The proportions of the various 2-deoxyribose oxidation products generated by gamma-radiation are similar for purified DNA and cells. These results are consistent with solvent exposure as a major determinant of hydroxyl radical reactivity with 2-deoxyribose in DNA, but the large differences between gamma-radiation and Fe(2+)-EDTA suggest that factors other than hydroxyl radical reactivity govern DNA oxidation chemistry. PMID:20377226

  19. Non-destructive in-situ method and apparatus for determining radionuclide depth in media

    DOEpatents

    Xu, X. George; Naessens, Edward P.

    2003-01-01

    A non-destructive method and apparatus which is based on in-situ gamma spectroscopy is used to determine the depth of radiological contamination in media such as concrete. An algorithm, Gamma Penetration Depth Unfolding Algorithm (GPDUA), uses point kernel techniques to predict the depth of contamination based on the results of uncollided peak information from the in-situ gamma spectroscopy. The invention is better, faster, safer, and/cheaper than the current practice in decontamination and decommissioning of facilities that are slow, rough and unsafe. The invention uses a priori knowledge of the contaminant source distribution. The applicable radiological contaminants of interest are any isotopes that emit two or more gamma rays per disintegration or isotopes that emit a single gamma ray but have gamma-emitting progeny in secular equilibrium with its parent (e.g., .sup.60 Co, .sup.235 U, and .sup.137 Cs to name a few). The predicted depths from the GPDUA algorithm using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) simulations and laboratory experiments using .sup.60 Co have consistently produced predicted depths within 20% of the actual or known depth.

  20. DOE In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. In situ manipulation technologies subprogram plan

    SciTech Connect

    Yow, J.L. Jr.

    1993-12-22

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISRP) supports and manages a balanced portfolio of applied research and development activities in support of DOE environmental restoration and waste management needs. ISRP technologies are being developed in four areas: containment, chemical and physical treatment, in situ bioremediation, and in situ manipulation (including electrokinetics). the focus of containment is to provide mechanisms to stop contaminant migration through the subsurface. In situ bioremediation and chemical and physical treatment both aim to destroy or eliminate contaminants in groundwater and soils. In situ manipulation (ISM) provides mechanisms to access contaminants or introduce treatment agents into the soil, and includes other technologies necessary to support the implementation of ISR methods. Descriptions of each major program area are provided to set the technical context of the ISM subprogram. Typical ISM needs for major areas of in situ remediation research and development are identified.

  1. Potential of natural gamma-ray spectrometry for mapping and environmental monitoring of black-sand beach deposits on the northern coast of Sinai, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Aboelkhair, Hatem; Zaaeimah, Mostafa

    2013-04-01

    The concentrations and distributions of naturally occurring radioactive materials were studied with the aim of detecting and mapping radioactive anomalies as well as monitoring the environment for black-sand beach deposits in Northern Sinai, Egypt. For this purpose, ground gamma-ray spectrometric surveys were conducted using a portable GS-512 spectrometer, with an NaI (Tl) detector, on an area 77.5 km(2) in surface area located between the cities of Rafah and Elareish on the Mediterranean Sea coast. The results revealed that the black-sand beach deposits could be differentiated according to their total-count (TC) radioactivity into five normally distributed interpreted radiometric lithologic (IRL) units denoted by U1, U2, U3, U4 and U5. The computed characteristic TC radiometric statistics of these five IRL units range from 4.67  to 9.96 Ur for their individual arithmetic means. The computed arithmetic means for the three radioelements K, eU and eTh reach 0.46 %, 2.25 and 6.17 ppm, respectively for the whole study area. Monitoring the environmental effects of radioelement concentrations on the study area showed that the mean natural equivalent radiation dose rate from the terrestrial gamma-radiation of the whole area attains 0.33 mSv y(-1). This average value remains on the safe side and within the maximum permissible safe radiation dose (<1.0 mSv y(-1)) without harm to the individual, except at three scattered points reaching more than these values. Some of the local inhabitants in the region sometimes use black sands as a building material. Consequently, they are not recommended for use as building materials, because the inhabitants will, then, receive a relatively high radioactive dose generated mainly by monazite and zircon minerals, two of the main constituents of black sands. PMID:22869819

  2. Mineral exploration and soil analysis using in situ neutron activation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Hoyte, A.F.

    1966-01-01

    A feasibility study has been made to operate by remote control an unshielded portable positive-ion accelerator type neutron source to induce activities in the ground or rock by "in situ" neutron irradiation. Selective activation techniques make it possible to detect some thirty or more elements by irradiating the ground for periods of a few minutes with either 3-MeV or 14-MeV neutrons. The depth of penetration of neutrons, the effect of water content of the soil on neutron moderation, gamma ray attenuation in the soil and other problems are considered. The analysis shows that, when exploring for most elements of economic interest, the reaction 2H(d,n)3He yielding ??? 3-MeV neutrons is most practical to produce a relatively uniform flux of neutrons of less than 1 keV to a depth of 19???-20???. Irradiation with high energy neutrons (??? 14 MeV) can also be used and may be better suited for certain problems. However, due to higher background and lower sensitivity for the heavy minerals, it is not a recommended neutron source for general exploration use. Preliminary experiments have been made which indicate that neutron activation in situ is feasible for a mineral exploration or qualititative soil analysis. ?? 1976.

  3. Development and evaluation of in situ gel of pregabalin

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Jyotsana R; Adokar, Bhushan R; Dua, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Aim and Background: Pregabalin (PRG), an analog of gamma-aminobutyric acid, reduces the release of many neurotransmitters, including glutamate, and noradrenaline. It is used for the treatment of epilepsy; simple and complex partial convulsion. The present research work aims to ensure a high drug absorption by retarding the advancement of PRG formulation through the gastrointestinal tract. The work aims to design a controlled release PRG formulation which is administered as liquid and further gels in the stomach and floats in gastric juice. Materials and Methods: In situ gelling formulations were prepared using sodium alginate, calcium chloride, sodium citrate, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) K100M, and sodium bicarbonate. The prepared formulations were evaluated for solution viscosity, drug content, in vitro gelling studies, gel strength, and in vitro drug release. The final formulation was optimized using a 32 full factorial design. Results: The formulation containing 2.5% w/v sodium alginate and 0.2% w/v calcium chloride were considered optimum since it showed minimum floating lag time (18 s), optimum viscosity (287.3 cps), and gel strength (4087.17 dyne/cm2). The optimized formulation follows Korsmeyer-Peppas kinetic model with n value 0.3767 representing Fickian diffusion mechanism of drug release. Conclusion: Floating in situ gelling system of PRG can be formulated using sodium alginate as a gelling polymer and calcium chloride as a complexing agent to control the drug release for about 12 h for the treatment of epilepsy. PMID:26682193

  4. Radiation resistance of sequencing chips for in situ life detection.

    PubMed

    Carr, Christopher E; Rowedder, Holli; Lui, Clarissa S; Zlatkovsky, Ilya; Papalias, Chris W; Bolander, Jarie; Myers, Jason W; Bustillo, James; Rothberg, Jonathan M; Zuber, Maria T; Ruvkun, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Life beyond Earth may be based on RNA or DNA if such life is related to life on Earth through shared ancestry due to meteoritic exchange, such as may be the case for Mars, or if delivery of similar building blocks to habitable environments has biased the evolution of life toward utilizing nucleic acids. In this case, in situ sequencing is a powerful approach to identify and characterize such life without the limitations or expense of returning samples to Earth, and can monitor forward contamination. A new semiconductor sequencing technology based on sensing hydrogen ions released during nucleotide incorporation can enable massively parallel sequencing in a small, robust, optics-free CMOS chip format. We demonstrate that these sequencing chips survive several analogues of space radiation at doses consistent with a 2-year Mars mission, including protons with solar particle event-distributed energy levels and 1 GeV oxygen and iron ions. We find no measurable impact of irradiation at 1 and 5 Gy doses on sequencing quality nor on low-level hardware characteristics. Further testing is required to study the impacts of soft errors as well as to characterize performance under neutron and gamma irradiation and at higher doses, which would be expected during operation in environments with significant trapped energetic particles such as during a mission to Europa. Our results support future efforts to use in situ sequencing to test theories of panspermia and/or whether life has a common chemical basis. PMID:23734755

  5. Mass spectrometry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Johanson, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state of mass spectrometry, indicating its unique importance for advanced scientific research. Mass spectrometry applications in computer techniques, gas chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, molecular fragmentation and ionization, and isotope labeling are covered. Details are given on mass spectrometry applications in bio-organic chemistry and biomedical research. As the subjects of these applications are indicated alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, terpenes, quinones, nucleic acid components, peptides, antibiotics, and human and animal metabolisms. Particular attention is given to the mass spectra of organo-inorganic compounds, inorganic mass spectrometry, surface phenomena such as secondary ion and electron emission, and elemental and isotope analysis. Further topics include mass spectrometry in organic geochemistry, applications in geochronology and cosmochemistry, and organic mass spectrometry.

  6. Characterization of gamma-irradiated polyethylene terephthalate by liquid-chromatography mass-spectrometry (LC MS) with atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchalla, Rainer; Begley, Timothy H.

    2006-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight (low-MW) constituents of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), irradiated with 60Co gamma rays at 25 and 50 kGy, were analyzed by HPLC-MS with atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI). Consistent with earlier results, the concentrations of the major compounds that are present in the non-irradiated PET do not change perceptibly. However, we find a small but significant increase in terephthalic acid ethylester, from less than 1 mg/kg in the non-irradiated control to ca. 2 mg/kg after 50 kGy, which has not been described before. The finding is important because it gives an impression of the sensitivity of the analytical method. Additionally, it shows that even very radiation-resistant polymers can form measurable amounts of low-MW radiolysis products. The potential and limitations of LC-MS for the analysis of radiolysis products and unidentified migrants are briefly discussed in the context of the question: How can we validate our analytical methods for unknown analytes?

  7. In-situ bioremediation via horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C.; Looney, B.B.; Enzien, M.; Franck, M.M.; Fliermans, C.B.; Eddy, C.A.

    1993-12-31

    This project is designed to demonstrate in situ bioremediation of groundwater and sediment contaminated with chlorinated solvents. Indigenous microorganisms were stimulated to degrade TCE, PCE and their daughter products in situ by addition of nutrients to the contaminated zone. In situ biodegradation is a highly attractive technology for remediation because contaminants are destroyed, not simply moved to another location or immobilized, thus decreasing costs, risks, and time, while increasing efficiency and public and regulatory acceptability. Bioremediation has been found to be among the least costly technologies in applications where it will work (Radian 1989). Subsurface soils and water adjacent to an abandoned process sewer line at the SRS have been found to have elevated levels of TCE (Marine and Bledsoe 1984). This area of subsurface and groundwater contamination is the focus of a current integrated demonstration of new remediation technologies utilizing horizontal wells. Bioremediation has the potential to enhance the performance of in situ air stripping as well as offering stand-alone remediation of this and other contaminated sites (Looney et al. 1991). Horizontal wells could also be used to enhance the recovery of groundwater contaminants for bioreactor conversions from deep or inaccessible areas (e.g., under buildings) and to enhance the distribution of nutrient or microbe additions in an in situ bioremediation.

  8. In situ forming polymeric drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Madan, M; Bajaj, A; Lewis, S; Udupa, N; Baig, J A

    2009-05-01

    In situ forming polymeric formulations are drug delivery systems that are in sol form before administration in the body, but once administered, undergo gelation in situ, to form a gel. The formation of gels depends on factors like temperature modulation, pH change, presence of ions and ultra violet irradiation, from which the drug gets released in a sustained and controlled manner. Various polymers that are used for the formulation of in situ gels include gellan gum, alginic acid, xyloglucan, pectin, chitosan, poly(DL-lactic acid), poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) and poly-caprolactone. The choice of solvents like water, dimethylsulphoxide, N-methyl pyrrolidone, triacetin and 2-pyrrolidone for these formulations depends on the solubility of polymer used. Mainly in situ gels are administered by oral, ocular, rectal, vaginal, injectable and intraperitoneal routes. The in situ gel forming polymeric formulations offer several advantages like sustained and prolonged action in comparison to conventional drug delivery systems. The article presents a detailed review of these types of polymeric systems, their evaluation, advancements and their commercial formulations. From a manufacturing point of view, the production of such devices is less complex and thus lowers the investment and manufacturing cost. PMID:20490289

  9. In Situ Forming Polymeric Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Madan, M.; Bajaj, A.; Lewis, S.; Udupa, N.; Baig, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    In situ forming polymeric formulations are drug delivery systems that are in sol form before administration in the body, but once administered, undergo gelation in situ, to form a gel. The formation of gels depends on factors like temperature modulation, pH change, presence of ions and ultra violet irradiation, from which the drug gets released in a sustained and controlled manner. Various polymers that are used for the formulation of in situ gels include gellan gum, alginic acid, xyloglucan, pectin, chitosan, poly(DL-lactic acid), poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) and poly-caprolactone. The choice of solvents like water, dimethylsulphoxide, N-methyl pyrrolidone, triacetin and 2-pyrrolidone for these formulations depends on the solubility of polymer used. Mainly in situ gels are administered by oral, ocular, rectal, vaginal, injectable and intraperitoneal routes. The in situ gel forming polymeric formulations offer several advantages like sustained and prolonged action in comparison to conventional drug delivery systems. The article presents a detailed review of these types of polymeric systems, their evaluation, advancements and their commercial formulations. From a manufacturing point of view, the production of such devices is less complex and thus lowers the investment and manufacturing cost. PMID:20490289

  10. An alternative in situ gel-formulation of levofloxacin eye drops for prolong ocular retention

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Himanshu; Aqil, M.; Khar, R. K.; Ali, Asgar; Bhatnagar, Aseem; Mittal, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Delivering drugs to ocular region is a challenging task. Eye physiological barriers lead to relatively less therapeutic and bioavailability effect by the conventional eye drops. This may be overcome by the use of in situ gel delivery system. Objective: The objective of our work was to formulate an ocular delivery system of levofloxacin, based on the concept of ion (sodium alginate) and pH (chitosan) activated in situ gelation concept. Due to its elastic properties, in situ gels resist the ocular drainage of drug leading to longer contact times with ocular surface. Materials and Methods: The formulation was evaluated for physicochemical characteristics, in vitro drug release. Ocular retention studies were carried out by Gamma scintigraphy. Time activity curve was plotted between marketed formulation and developed formulation for comparing drug drainage from the eye with time. Ocular tolerance test was performed by handheld infra-red camera. Results and Discussion: The formulations showed a first-order release pattern over 12 h. Both in vitro release studies and in vivo gamma scintigraphy precorneal retention studies indicated better therapeutic efficacy compared with standard eye drops. Conclusion: The results demonstrated that the developed in situ gel of levofloxacin is nonirritant, has prolonged action and is a better option in terms of retention, ocular bioavailability and patient compliance when compared with plain eye drops formulation. PMID:25709330

  11. In situ macromolecular crystallography using microbeams

    PubMed Central

    Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L.; Aishima, Jun; Foadi, James; Morgan, Ann W.; Robinson, James I.; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owens, Raymond J.; Moraes, Isabel; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Harlos, Karl; Kotecha, Abhay; Ren, Jingshan; Sutton, Geoff; Walter, Thomas S.; Stuart, David I.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant progress in high-throughput methods in macromolecular crystallography, the production of diffraction-quality crystals remains a major bottleneck. By recording diffraction in situ from crystals in their crystallization plates at room temperature, a number of problems associated with crystal handling and cryoprotection can be side-stepped. Using a dedicated goniometer installed on the microfocus macromolecular crystallography beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source, crystals have been studied in situ with an intense and flexible microfocus beam, allowing weakly diffracting samples to be assessed without a manual crystal-handling step but with good signal to noise, despite the background scatter from the plate. A number of case studies are reported: the structure solution of bovine enterovirus 2, crystallization screening of membrane proteins and complexes, and structure solution from crystallization hits produced via a high-throughput pipeline. These demonstrate the potential for in situ data collection and structure solution with microbeams. PMID:22525757

  12. In Situ Imaging of Atomic Quantum Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chen-Lung; Chin, Cheng

    2015-09-01

    One exciting progress in recent cold atom experiments is the development of high resolution, in situ imaging techniques for atomic quantum gases.1-3 These new powerful tools provide detailed information on the distribution of atoms in a trap with resolution approaching the level of single atom and even single lattice site, and complement the welldeveloped time-of-flight method that probes the system in momentum space. In a condensed matter analogy, this technique is equivalent to locating electrons of a material in a snap shot. In situ imaging has offered a new powerful tool to study atomic gases and inspired many new research directions and ideas. In this chapter, we will describe the experimental setup of in situ absorption imaging, observables that can be extracted from the images, and new physics that can be explored with this technique.

  13. Scientific rationale for Saturn's in situ exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousis, O.; Fletcher, L. N.; Lebreton, J.-P.; Wurz, P.; Cavalié, T.; Coustenis, A.; Courtin, R.; Gautier, D.; Helled, R.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Morse, A. D.; Nettelmann, N.; Marty, B.; Rousselot, P.; Venot, O.; Atkinson, D. H.; Waite, J. H.; Reh, K. R.; Simon, A. A.; Atreya, S.; André, N.; Blanc, M.; Daglis, I. A.; Fischer, G.; Geppert, W. D.; Guillot, T.; Hedman, M. M.; Hueso, R.; Lellouch, E.; Lunine, J. I.; Murray, C. D.; O`Donoghue, J.; Rengel, M.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Schmider, F.-X.; Spiga, A.; Spilker, T.; Petit, J.-M.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Ali-Dib, M.; Altwegg, K.; Bolton, S. J.; Bouquet, A.; Briois, C.; Fouchet, T.; Guerlet, S.; Kostiuk, T.; Lebleu, D.; Moreno, R.; Orton, G. S.; Poncy, J.

    2014-12-01

    Remote sensing observations meet some limitations when used to study the bulk atmospheric composition of the giant planets of our solar system. A remarkable example of the superiority of in situ probe measurements is illustrated by the exploration of Jupiter, where key measurements such as the determination of the noble gases' abundances and the precise measurement of the helium mixing ratio have only been made available through in situ measurements by the Galileo probe. This paper describes the main scientific goals to be addressed by the future in situ exploration of Saturn placing the Galileo probe exploration of Jupiter in a broader context and before the future probe exploration of the more remote ice giants. In situ exploration of Saturn's atmosphere addresses two broad themes that are discussed throughout this paper: first, the formation history of our solar system and second, the processes at play in planetary atmospheres. In this context, we detail the reasons why measurements of Saturn's bulk elemental and isotopic composition would place important constraints on the volatile reservoirs in the protosolar nebula. We also show that the in situ measurement of CO (or any other disequilibrium species that is depleted by reaction with water) in Saturn's upper troposphere may help constraining its bulk O/H ratio. We compare predictions of Jupiter and Saturn's bulk compositions from different formation scenarios, and highlight the key measurements required to distinguish competing theories to shed light on giant planet formation as a common process in planetary systems with potential applications to most extrasolar systems. In situ measurements of Saturn's stratospheric and tropospheric dynamics, chemistry and cloud-forming processes will provide access to phenomena unreachable to remote sensing studies. Different mission architectures are envisaged, which would benefit from strong international collaborations, all based on an entry probe that would descend through Saturn's stratosphere and troposphere under parachute down to a minimum of 10 bar of atmospheric pressure. We finally discuss the science payload required on a Saturn probe to match the measurement requirements.

  14. Terrestrial gamma radiation baseline mapping using ultra low density sampling methods.

    PubMed

    Kleinschmidt, R; Watson, D

    2016-01-01

    Baseline terrestrial gamma radiation maps are indispensable for providing basic reference information that may be used in assessing the impact of a radiation related incident, performing epidemiological studies, remediating land contaminated with radioactive materials, assessment of land use applications and resource prospectivity. For a large land mass, such as Queensland, Australia (over 1.7 million km(2)), it is prohibitively expensive and practically difficult to undertake detailed in-situ radiometric surveys of this scale. It is proposed that an existing, ultra-low density sampling program already undertaken for the purpose of a nationwide soil survey project be utilised to develop a baseline terrestrial gamma radiation map. Geoelement data derived from the National Geochemistry Survey of Australia (NGSA) was used to construct a baseline terrestrial gamma air kerma rate map, delineated by major drainage catchments, for Queensland. Three drainage catchments (sampled at the catchment outlet) spanning low, medium and high radioelement concentrations were selected for validation of the methodology using radiometric techniques including in-situ measurements and soil sampling for high resolution gamma spectrometry, and comparative non-radiometric analysis. A Queensland mean terrestrial air kerma rate, as calculated from the NGSA outlet sediment uranium, thorium and potassium concentrations, of 49 ± 69 nGy h(-1) (n = 311, 3σ 99% confidence level) is proposed as being suitable for use as a generic terrestrial air kerma rate background range. Validation results indicate that catchment outlet measurements are representative of the range of results obtained across the catchment and that the NGSA geoelement data is suitable for calculation and mapping of terrestrial air kerma rate. PMID:26063584

  15. In situ ply strengths - An initial assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    The in situ ply strengths in several composites were calculated using a computational procedure developed for this purpose. Laminate fracture data for appropriate low modulus and high modulus fiber composites were used in the laminate analysis in conjunction with the method of least squares. The laminate fracture data were obtained from tests on Modmor-I graphite/epoxy, AS-graphite/epoxy, boron/epoxy and E-glass/epoxy. The results obtained show that the calculated in situ ply strengths can be considerably different from those measured in unidirectional composites, especially the transverse strengths and those in angleplied laminates with transply cracks.

  16. In-situ observation of ettringite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Ryuichi; Mizukoshi, Norihiro; Makida, Koji; Tsukamoto, Katsuo

    2009-01-01

    In-situ observation of growing ettringite crystals in solution has been carried out and the morphology change of ettringite has been investigated under various conditions. In particular, the acceleration behavior of ettringite growth in the presence of calcite, the cause of which is not yet understood, is examined. Spherulite with calcite in its core is formed first followed by the generation of acicular crystals. Compared with the in-situ observation result of crystal growth in a solution with no calcite, the effect of added calcite can be explained as a decrease in the activation energy of nucleation for ettringite around calcite.

  17. In-situ vitrification of waste materials

    DOEpatents

    Powell, James R.; Reich, Morris; Barletta, Robert

    1997-11-14

    A method for the in-situ vitrification of waste materials in a disposable can that includes an inner container and an outer container is disclosed. The method includes the steps of adding frit and waste materials to the inner container, removing any excess water, heating the inner container such that the frit and waste materials melt and vitrify after cooling, while maintaining the outer container at a significantly lower temperature than the inner container. The disposable can is then cooled to ambient temperatures and stored. A device for the in-situ vitrification of waste material in a disposable can is also disclosed.

  18. In-situ vitrification of waste materials

    DOEpatents

    Powell, J.R.; Reich, M.; Barletta, R.

    1997-10-14

    A method for the in-situ vitrification of waste materials in a disposable can that includes an inner container and an outer container is disclosed. The method includes the steps of adding frit and waste materials to the inner container, removing any excess water, heating the inner container such that the frit and waste materials melt and vitrify after cooling, while maintaining the outer container at a significantly lower temperature than the inner container. The disposable can is then cooled to ambient temperatures and stored. A device for the in-situ vitrification of waste material in a disposable can is also disclosed. 7 figs.

  19. Assessment of ambient gamma dose rate around a prospective uranium mining area of South India - A comparative study of dose by direct methods and soil radioactivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunakara, N.; Yashodhara, I.; Sudeep Kumara, K.; Tripathi, R. M.; Menon, S. N.; Kadam, S.; Chougaonkar, M. P.

    Indoor and outdoor gamma dose rates were evaluated around a prospective uranium mining region - Gogi, South India through (i) direct measurements using a GM based gamma dose survey meter, (ii) integrated measurement days using CaSO4:Dy based thermo luminescent dosimeters (TLDs), and (iii) analyses of 273 soil samples for 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K activity concentration using HPGe gamma spectrometry. The geometric mean values of indoor and outdoor gamma dose rates were 104 nGy h-1 and 97 nGy h-1, respectively with an indoor to outdoor dose ratio of 1.09. The gamma dose rates and activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K varied significantly within a small area due to the highly localized mineralization of the elements. Correlation study showed that the dose estimated from the soil radioactivity is better correlated with that measured directly using the portable survey meter, when compared to that obtained from TLDs. This study showed that in a region having localized mineralization in situ measurements using dose survey meter provide better representative values of gamma dose rates.

  20. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: IN SITU VITRIFICATION - GEOSAFE CORPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    in Situ Vitrification (ISV) is designed to treat soils, sludges, sediments, and mine tailings contaminated with organic and inorganic compounds. The process uses electrical current to heat (mett) and vitrify the soil in place. Organic contaminants are decomposed by the extreme h...

  1. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: IN SITU BIODEGRADATION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In situ biodegradation may be used to treat low-to-intermediate concentrations of organic contaminants in place without disturbing or displacing the contaminated media. Although this technology has been used to degrade a limited number of inorganics, specifically cyanide and nitr...

  2. Transesterification in situ of sunflower seed oil

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, K.J.; D'Arch-Evans, C.

    1985-06-01

    Transesterification of sunflower seed oil in situ has produced methyl and ethyl esters in yields greater than 40% of the dry seed weight. This figure compares with a typical yield of ca. 30% when the esters were prepared in the conventional manner from preextracted seed oil. 14 references.

  3. IN SITU SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is designed to physically remove volatile compounds, generally from the vadose or unsaturated zone. t is an in situ process employing vapor extraction wells alone or in combination with air injection wells. acuum blowers supply the motive force, induci...

  4. Accelerated in situ bioremediation of groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, M.J.; Hooker, B.S.; Anderson, D.B.

    1996-07-01

    In situ bioremediation, as applied in this project, is based on the principal of biostimulation: supplying nutrients to indigenous microbes to stimulate their metabolic activity and subsequent degradation of contaminants. Typically, a network of injection and extraction wells are used to recirculate groundwater into which amendments are added and distributed within the aquifer. The objective of the in situ process is to create in the aquifer a microbially active zone that maximizes contaminant destruction while controlling the distribution of microbial growth. It is important to control microbial growth to avoid plugging the aquifer near the injection well and to establish and sustain maximum treatment zones for each injection well. Figure I illustrates this concept for in situ bioremediation. The technology described herein is innovative in its use of the computer-based Accelerated Bioremediation Design Tool (ABDT) to aid in selecting appropriate system designs and to determine optimal operating strategies. In addition, numerical simulations within the design tool proved to be valuable during remediation operations to determine appropriate changes in the` operating strategy as the bioremediation process progressed. This is particularly important because in situ bioremediation is not a steady- state process, and corrective actions to operating parameters are typically needed to maintain both rapid destruction rates and hydraulic containment.

  5. Fabrication Capabilities Utilizing In Situ Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLemore, Carole A.; Fikes, John C.; Darby, Charles A.; Good, James E.; Gilley, Scott D.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has a Space Exploration Policy that lays out a plan that far exceeds the earlier Apollo goals where landing on the moon and taking those first historic steps fulfilled the mission. The policy states that we will set roots on the moon by establishing an outpost. This outpost will be used as a test bed for residing in more distant locales, such as Mars. In order to become self-sufficient, the occupants must have the capability to fabricate component parts in situ. Additionally, in situ materials must be used to minimize valuable mission upmass and to be as efficient as possible. In situ materials can be found from various sources such as raw lunar regolith whereby specific constituents can be extracted from the regolith (such as aluminum, titanium, or iron), and existing hardware already residing on the moon from past Apollo missions. The Electron Beam Melting (EBM) process lends itself well to fabricating parts, tools, and other necessary items using in situ materials and will be discussed further in this paper.

  6. Refueling with In-Situ Produced Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2014-01-01

    In-situ produced propellants have been identified in many architecture studies as key to implementing feasible chemical propulsion missions to destinations beyond lunar orbit. Some of the more noteworthy ones include: launching from Mars to return to Earth (either direct from the surface, or via an orbital rendezvous); using the Earth-Moon Lagrange point as a place to refuel Mars transfer stages with Lunar surface produced propellants; and using Mars Moon Phobos as a place to produce propellants for descent and ascent stages bound for the Mars surface. However successful implementation of these strategies require an ability to successfully transfer propellants from the in-situ production equipment into the propellant tankage of the rocket stage used to move to the desired location. In many circumstances the most desirable location for this transfer to occur is in the low-gravity environment of space. In support of low earth orbit propellant depot concepts, extensive studies have been conducted on transferring propellants in-space. Most of these propellant transfer techniques will be applicable to low gravity operations in other locations. Even ground-based transfer operations on the Moon, Mars, and especially Phobos could benefit from the propellant conserving techniques used for depot refueling. This paper will review the literature of in-situ propellants and refueling to: assess the performance benefits of the use in-situ propellants for mission concepts; review the parallels with propellant depot efforts; assess the progress of the techniques required; and provide recommendations for future research.

  7. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: IN SITU VITRIFICATION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In situ vitrification (ISV) uses electrical power to heat and melt soil, sludge, mine tailings, buried wastes, and sediments contaminated with organic, inorganic, and metal-bearing hazardous wastes. The molten material cools to form a hard, monolithic, chemically inert, stable...

  8. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: IN SITU BIODEGRADATION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In situ biodegradation may be used to treat low-to-intermediate concentrations of organic contaminants in place without disturbing or displacing the contaminated media. lthough this technology hag been used to degrade a limited number of inorganics, specifically cyanide and nitra...

  9. FIELD STUDIES OF IN SITU SOIL WASHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA and US Air Force conducted a research test program to demonstrate the removal of hydrocarbons and chlorinated hydrocarbons from a sandy soil by in situ soil washing using surfactants. Contaminated soil from the fire training area of Volk Air National Guard Base, WI, was f...

  10. IN SITU LEAD IMMOBILIZATION BY APATITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lead contamination is of environmental concern due to its effect on human health. he purpose of this study was to develop a technology to immobilize Pb in situ in contaminated soils and wastes using apatite. ydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2]was reacted with aqueous Pb, resinexchang...

  11. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: IN SITU SOIL FLUSHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    In situ soil flushing is the extraction of contaminants from the soil with water or other suitable aqueous solutions. Soil flushing is accomplished by passing the extraction fluid through in-place soils using an injection or infiltration process. Extraction fluids must be recover...

  12. In situ calibration of sonar arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luker, L. D.; Forsythe, S. E.

    2003-10-01

    The transmitting and receiving properties of the channels of sonar arrays can change with time resulting in a degradation of the array's performance. Fortunately, the degradation in performance can be minimized, perhaps even eliminated, if the changes in a channel's transmitting or receiving properties are compensated for in the array's beamformer electronics. However, this requires up-to-date knowledge of the acoustic performance of each of the array's channels. This paper describes a procedure for the in situ calibration of sonar arrays when the vessel they are installed on is in open water. It can be used to determine changes in the electroacoustic performance of the projecting and receiving channels of the array. The method used is based on a procedure for in situ comparison calibration of transducers [A. L. Van Buren, ``Procedure for the in situ calibration of sonar transducers,'' J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 90, 48-52 (1991)] that uses sound-propagation factors measured when the vessel is first deployed to account for the influence of the vessel's structure. Results are presented that show comparisons of the measured degradation of numerous channels in a planar array using an independent acoustic measurement and the in situ method. [Work supported by ONR.

  13. In Situ Fiber-Optic Reflectance Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linton, Roger C.; Gray, Perry A.

    1996-01-01

    In situ fiber-optic reflectance monitor serves as simple means of monitoring changes in reflectance of specimen exposed to simulated outerspace or other environments in vacuum chamber. Eliminates need to remove specimen from vacuum chamber, eliminating optical changes and bleaching such removal causes in coatings.

  14. In-Situ Burning of Spilled Oil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Alan A.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews in-situ burning with particular emphasis on how it can be applied in water-related oil spill situations. Presents and discusses the use of nomograms and development of techniques cited for safe and effective ignition and controlled burning of spilled oil. Includes representative oil spill scenarios and possible responses. (15 references)…

  15. Protocol comparison for quantifying in situ mineralization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In situ mineralization methods are intended to quantify mineralization under realistic environmental conditions. This study was conducted to compare soil moisture and temperature in intake soil cores contained in cylinders to that in adjacent bulk soil, compare the effect of two resin bag techniques...

  16. Two cases of subungual melanoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Imakado, Sumihisa; Sato, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Kazutoshi

    2008-11-01

    Melanonychia, which is characterized by brown or black pigmentation within the nail plate, includes heterogeneous conditions such as pigmented nevus, subungual melanoma and lentigo. We treated two cases of subungual melanoma in situ. One case was a 58-year-old woman who suffered from a malignant melanoma in situ of the left third fingernail, who had also suffered from melanonychia of the fingers for more than 30 years. She had a past history of carcinoma of the uterine cervix. The other patient was a 42-year-old man, who suffered from a malignant melanoma in situ of the right fifth fingernail. He had a past history of carcinoma of the stomach for which he had undergone surgery 2 years earlier. Both cases were accompanied by Hutchinson's sign on the fingertip skin, and the presence of this sign led to the correct diagnosis of subungual melanoma in situ. Judging from previously reported cases, it is unlikely that patients with malignant melanoma have an increased risk of carcinoma of the uterine cervix or of the stomach. PMID:19120774

  17. Controlled in situ etch-back

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattauch, R. J.; Seabaugh, A. C. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A controlled in situ etch-back technique is disclosed in which an etch melt and a growth melt are first saturated by a source-seed crystal and thereafter etch-back of a substrate takes place by the slightly undersaturated etch melt, followed by LPE growth of a layer by the growth melt, which is slightly supersaturated.

  18. TECHNICAL REFERENCE DOCUMENT: IN SITU THERMAL TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report will describe the state of practice and current capabilities of in-situ thermal treatment technologies. PLEASE NOTE: If peer review is needed, it will be conducted by the Army Corps of Engineers who is our partner in developing this report.

  19. In Situ Vitrification software requirements specification

    SciTech Connect

    Grush, W.H.; Marwil, E.S.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes the Software Requirements Specification for the Electrical Resistance Heating and Thermal Energy Transport models of the In-Situ Vitrification (ISV) process. It contains the Data Flow Diagrams, Process Specifications, Data Structure Diagrams, and the Data Dictionary. 5 refs.

  20. Parametric melting studies for in situ vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, M.O.; Hawkes, G.L.; Murray, P.E.

    1991-11-01

    This report describes a series of simulation studies which examine heat conduction and electric heating during in situ vitrification (ISV). The simulation studies determine the effects of soil parameter changes on the ISV process. Changes in heat capacity, thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity are considered. The results of these studies provide a basis for experimental measurement accuracy requirements.

  1. IN SITU LEAD IMMOBILIZATION BY APATITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lead contamination is of environmental concern due to its effect on human health. The purpose of this study was to develop a technology to immobilize Pb in situ in contaminated soils and wastes using apatite. Hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(O...

  2. In Situ Cleanable Alternative HEPA Filter Media

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, D. J.; Terry, M. T.

    2002-02-28

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company, located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, is currently testing two types of filter media for possible deployment as in situ regenerable/cleanable High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters. The filters are being investigated to replace conventional, disposable, glass-fiber, HEPA filters that require frequent removal, replacement, and disposal. This is not only costly and subjects site personnel to radiation exposure, but adds to the ever-growing waste disposal problem. The types of filter media being tested, as part of a National Energy Technology Laboratory procurement, are sintered nickel metal and ceramic monolith membrane. These media were subjected to a hostile environment to simulate conditions that challenge the high-level waste tank ventilation systems. The environment promoted rapid filter plugging to maximize the number of filter loading/cleaning cycles that would occur in a specified period of time. The filters were challenged using nonradioactive simulated high-level waste materials and atmospheric dust; materials that cause filter pluggage in the field. The filters are cleaned in situ using an aqueous solution. The study found that both filter media were insensitive to high humidity or moisture conditions and were easily cleaned in situ. The filters regenerated to approximately clean filter status even after numerous plugging and in situ cleaning cycles. Air Techniques International is conducting particle retention testing on the filter media at the Oak Ridge Filter Test Facility. The filters are challenged using 0.3-mm di-octyl phthalate particles. Both the ceramic and sintered media have a particle retention efficiency > 99.97%. The sintered metal and ceramic filters not only can be cleaned in situ, but also hold great potential as a long life alternative to conventional HEPA filters. The Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Technical Report, ''HEPA Filters Used in the Department of Energy's Hazardous Facilities'', found that conventional glass fiber HEPA filters are structurally weak and easily damaged by water or fire. The structurally stronger sintered metal and ceramic filters would reduce the potential of a catastrophic HEPA filter failure due to filter media breakthrough in the process ventilation system. An in situ regenerable system may also find application in recovering nuclear materials, such as plutonium, collected on glove box exhaust HEPA filters. This innovative approach of the in situ regenerative filtration system may be a significant improvement upon the shortfalls of conventional disposable HEPA filters.

  3. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces, in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP intends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years. ISR IP is an applied research and development program broadly addressing known DOE environmental restoration needs. Analysis of a sample of 334 representative sites by the Office of Environmental Restoration has shown how many sites are amenable to in situ remediation: containment--243 sites; manipulation--244 sites; bioremediation--154 sites; and physical/chemical methods--236 sites. This needs assessment is focused on near-term restoration problems (FY93--FY99). Many other remediations will be required in the next century. The major focus of the ISR EP is on the long term development of permanent solutions to these problems. Current needs for interim actions to protect human health and the environment are also being addressed.

  4. Investigation of (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, (137)Cs, and heavy metal concentrations in Anzali international wetland using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry and atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zare, Mohammad Reza; Kamali, Mahdi; Fallahi Kapourchali, Maryam; Bagheri, Hashem; Khoram Bagheri, Mahdi; Abedini, Ali; Pakzad, Hamid Reza

    2016-02-01

    Measurements of natural radioactivity levels and heavy metals in sediment and soil samples of the Anzali international wetland were carried out by two HPGe-gamma ray spectrometry and atomic absorption spectroscopy techniques. The concentrations of (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, and (137)Cs in sediment samples ranged between 1.05 ± 0.51-5.81 ± 0.61, 18.06 ± 0.63-33.36 ± .0.34, 17.57 ± 0.38-45.84 ± 6.23, 371.88 ± 6.36-652.28 ± 11.60, and 0.43 ± 0.06-63.35 ± 0.94 Bq/kg, while in the soil samples they vary between 2.36-5.97, 22.71-38.37, 29.27-42.89, 472.66-533, and 1.05-9.60 Bq/kg for (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, and (137)Cs, respectively. Present results are compared with the available literature data and also with the world average values. The radium equivalent activity was well below the defined limit of 370 Bq/kg. The external hazard indices were found to be less than 1, indicating a low dose. Heavy metal concentrations were found to decrease in order as Fe > Mn > Sr > Zn > Cu > Cr > Ni > Pb > Co > Cd. These measurements will serve as background reference levels for the Anzali wetland. PMID:26490904

  5. Raman Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, Derek J.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews mainly quantitative analytical applications in the field of Raman spectrometry. Includes references to other reviews, new and analytically untested techniques, and novel sampling and instrument designs. Cites 184 references. (CS)

  6. Development of an in situ derivatization technique for rapid analysis of levoglucosan and polar compounds in atmospheric organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheesley, Rebecca J.; Mieritz, Mark; DeMinter, Jeff T.; Shelton, Brandon R.; Schauer, James J.

    2015-12-01

    A novel thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry (TD-GCMS) technique was developed for the analysis of levoglucosan and other polar compounds in atmospheric organic aerosol. The method employs an in situ derivatization to add tri-methylsilyl groups to alcohol functional groups on simple carbohydrates, like levoglucosan and sterols. The new method was then demonstrated on a set of 40 filter samples collected in Fresno, CA. The results from the in situ silylation TD-GCMS method were compared, using levoglucosan, with a solvent extraction, high-volume injection GCMS method resulting in an r2 = 0.91.

  7. Gamma-ray spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. R.; Peterson, L. E.; Metzger, A. E.; Trombka, J. I.

    1972-01-01

    The experiments in gamma-ray spectrometry to determine the geochemical composition of the lunar surface are reported. The theory is discussed of discrete energy lines of natural radioactivity, and the lines resulting from the bombardment of the lunar surface by high energy cosmic rays. The gamma-ray spectrometer used in lunar orbit and during transearth coast is described, and a preliminary analysis of the results is presented.

  8. Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is an emerging technique of great potential for investigating the chemical architecture in biological matrices. Although the potential for studying neurobiological systems is evident, the relevance of the technique for application in neuroscience is still in its infancy. In the present Review, a principal overview of the different approaches, including matrix assisted laser desorption ionization and secondary ion mass spectrometry, is provided with particular focus on their strengths and limitations for studying different neurochemical species in situ and in vitro. The potential of the various approaches is discussed based on both fundamental and biomedical neuroscience research. This Review aims to serve as a general guide to familiarize the neuroscience community and other biomedical researchers with the technique, highlighting its great potential and suitability for comprehensive and specific chemical imaging. PMID:23530951

  9. The Orléans-Lithothèque - an analogue rockstore for in situ missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bost, Nicolas; Westall, Frances; Ramboz, Claire

    2010-05-01

    The Orléans-Lithothèque - an analogue rockstore for in situ missions Nicolas Bost, Frances Westall, Claire Ramboz, Axelle Hubert, Derek Pullan, Beda Hofmann, Elisabeth Vergès, Michel Viso, Jorge Vago, Christelle Briois, Bruno Scaillet, Michel Tagger Instruments for in-situ missions to extraterrestrial bodies should ideally be cross calibrated using a common suite of relevant materials. Such multi-instrument calibration would enable a better comparison of instrument performances during the mission, as well as aid in the interpretation of the in-situ measurements. At the CNRS in Orléans, the Observatoire des Sciences de l'Univers de la region Centre is creating a collection of well-characterised rocks that will be available for testing and calibrating instruments to be flown on space missions. The characteristics of the collection's analogue materials will be described in an online database. In view of the upcoming 2018 ExoMars rover mission, we are concentrating initially on materials of direct relevance to Mars. The initial collection includes basalts (ultramafic, weathered, andesitic, hydrothermally-silicified); sediments (volcanic, biolaminated, banded iron formation); and minerals (silica, evaporites, clays, Fe oxides). This set of samples will be augmented with time. All samples will be characterised petrographically, petrologically, and geochemically using the types of analyses likely to be performed during an in-situ mission: hand specimen description, optical microscopy, mineralogical analysis (XRD, Raman and IR spectrometry), elemental analysis (EDX, microprobe, ICP) and organics analysis (Raman, pyr-GCMS).

  10. In situ bioremediation of Hanford groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Skeen, R.S.; Roberson, K.R.; Workman, D.J.; Petersen, J.N.; Shouche, M.

    1992-04-01

    Liquid wastes containing radioactive, hazardous, and regulated chemicals have been generated throughout the 40+ years of operations at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site. Some of these wastes were discharged to the soil column and many of the waste components, including nitrate, carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}), and several radionuclides, have been detected in the Hanford groundwater. Current DOE policy prohibits the disposal of contaminated liquids directly to the environment, and remediation of existing contaminated groundwaters may be required. In situ bioremediation is one technology currently being developed at Hanford to meet the need for cost effective technologies to clean groundwater contaminated with CCl{sub 4}, nitrate, and other organic and inorganic contaminants. This paper focuses on the latest results of an on going effort to develop effective in situ remediation strategies through the use of predictive simulations.

  11. In situ bioremediation of chlorinated solvents.

    PubMed

    Semprini, L

    1995-06-01

    Chlorinated solvents and their natural transformation products are the most frequently observed groundwater contaminants in the United States. In situ bioremediation using anaerobic or aerobic co-metabolic processes is a promising means of cleaning up contaminated aquifers. Studies show that under natural conditions trichloroethylene can be anaerobically degraded to dichloroethylene, vinyl chloride, and ethylene. Pilot scale field studies of in situ aerobic co-metabolic transformations have shown that indigenous microbes grown on phenol are more effective at degrading trichloroethylene and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene than microbes grown on methane. Modeling studies support field observations and indicate that the removal of trichloroethylene and cis-dichloroethylene results from the biostimulation of an indigenous microbial population. Field tests and modeling studies indicate that, at high TCE concentration, degradation becomes stoichiometrically limited. PMID:8565895

  12. In situ bioremediation of chlorinated solvents.

    PubMed Central

    Semprini, L

    1995-01-01

    Chlorinated solvents and their natural transformation products are the most frequently observed groundwater contaminants in the United States. In situ bioremediation using anaerobic or aerobic co-metabolic processes is a promising means of cleaning up contaminated aquifers. Studies show that under natural conditions trichloroethylene can be anaerobically degraded to dichloroethylene, vinyl chloride, and ethylene. Pilot scale field studies of in situ aerobic co-metabolic transformations have shown that indigenous microbes grown on phenol are more effective at degrading trichloroethylene and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene than microbes grown on methane. Modeling studies support field observations and indicate that the removal of trichloroethylene and cis-dichloroethylene results from the biostimulation of an indigenous microbial population. Field tests and modeling studies indicate that, at high TCE concentration, degradation becomes stoichiometrically limited. PMID:8565895

  13. In situ, noninvasive characterization of superhydrophobic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepper, G. C.; Samaha, M. A.; Vahedi Tafreshi, H.; Gad-El-Hak, M.

    2011-11-01

    Light scattering was used to measure the time-dependent loss of air entrapped within a submerged microporous hydrophobic surface subjected to different environmental conditions. The loss of trapped air resulted in a measurable decrease in surface reflectivity and the kinetics of the process was determined in real time and compared to surface properties, such as porosity and morphology. The light-scattering results were compared with measurements of skin-friction drag, static contact angle, and contact-angle hysteresis. The In situ, noninvasive optical technique was shown to correlate well with the more conventional methods for quantifying surface hydrophobicity, such as flow slip and contact angle. In situ characterization of submerged hydrophobic surfaces using light scattering represents a new and useful tool for real-time estimation of hydrophobicity and drag reduction. Financial support from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), contract number W91CRB-10-1-0003, is acknowledged.

  14. In-Situ Planetary Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kounaves, S. P.; Buehler, M. G.; Grannan, S. M.; Hecht, M. H.; Kuhlman, K. R.

    2000-01-01

    Both, the search for evidence of life on Mars and the assessment of the Martian environment in respect to its compatibility with human explorers, will require the ability to measure and understand the aqueous chemistry of the Martian regolith. Direct in-situ chemical analysis is the only method by which chemical biosignatures can be reliably recognized and the toxicity of the regolith accurately assessed. Qualitative and quantitative determination of the aqueous ionic constituents and their concentrations is critical in developing kinetic and thermodynamic models that can be used to accurately predict the potential of the past or present Martian geochemical environment to have either generated or still sustain life. In-situ chemical characterization could provide evidence as to whether the chemical composition of the regolith or evaporates in suspected ancient water bodies have been biologically influenced.

  15. In situ bioremediation of Hanford groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Skeen, R.S.; Roberson, K.R.; Workman, D.J. ); Petersen, J.N.; Shouche, M. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-04-01

    Liquid wastes containing radioactive, hazardous, and regulated chemicals have been generated throughout the 40+ years of operations at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. Some of these wastes were discharged to the soil column and many of the waste components, including nitrate, carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}), and several radionuclides, have been detected in the Hanford groundwater. Current DOE policy prohibits the disposal of contaminated liquids directly to the environment, and remediation of existing contaminated groundwaters may be required. In situ bioremediation is one technology currently being developed at Hanford to meet the need for cost effective technologies to clean groundwater contaminated with CCl{sub 4}, nitrate, and other organic and inorganic contaminants. This paper focuses on the latest results of an on going effort to develop effective in situ remediation strategies through the use of predictive simulations.

  16. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery

    DOEpatents

    Krumhansl, James L; Brady, Patrick V

    2014-04-29

    An in situ recovery of uranium operation involves circulating reactive fluids through an underground uranium deposit. These fluids contain chemicals that dissolve the uranium ore. Uranium is recovered from the fluids after they are pumped back to the surface. Chemicals used to accomplish this include complexing agents that are organic, readily degradable, and/or have a predictable lifetime in an aquifer. Efficiency is increased through development of organic agents targeted to complexing tetravalent uranium rather than hexavalent uranium. The operation provides for in situ immobilization of some oxy-anion pollutants under oxidizing conditions as well as reducing conditions. The operation also artificially reestablishes reducing conditions on the aquifer after uranium recovery is completed. With the ability to have the impacted aquifer reliably remediated, the uranium recovery operation can be considered inherently safe.

  17. In situ soil remediation using electrokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, M.F.; Surma, J.E.; Virden, J.W.

    1994-11-01

    Electrokinetics is emerging as a promising technology for in situ soil remediation. This technique is especially attractive for Superfund sites and government operations which contain large volumes of contaminated soil. The approach uses an applied electric field to induce transport of both radioactive and hazardous waste ions in soil. The transport mechanisms include electroosmosis, electromigration, and electrophoresis. The feasibility of using electrokinetics to move radioactive {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, is discussed. A closed cell is used to provide in situ measurements of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co movement in Hanford soil. Preliminary results of ionic movement, along with the corresponding current response, are presented.

  18. Mass Spectrometry in the Home and Garden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulliam, Christopher J.; Bain, Ryan M.; Wiley, Joshua S.; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R. Graham

    2015-02-01

    Identification of active components in a variety of chemical products used directly by consumers is described at both trace and bulk levels using mass spectrometry. The combination of external ambient ionization with a portable mass spectrometer capable of tandem mass spectrometry provides high chemical specificity and sensitivity as well as allowing on-site monitoring. These experiments were done using a custom-built portable ion trap mass spectrometer in combination with the ambient ionization methods of paper spray, leaf spray, and low temperature plasma ionization. Bactericides, garden chemicals, air fresheners, and other products were examined. Herbicide applied to suburban lawns was detected in situ on single leaves 5 d after application.

  19. Calculated trends and the atmospheric abundance of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane, 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, and 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane using automated in-situ gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements recorded at Mace Head, Ireland, from October 1994 to March 1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmonds, P. G.; O'Doherty, S.; Huang, J.; Prinn, R.; Derwent, R. G.; Ryall, D.; Nickless, G.; Cunnold, D.

    1998-01-01

    The first in-situ measurements by automated gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer are reported for 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a), 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, (HCFC-141b), and 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane, (HCFC-142b). These compounds are steadily replacing the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) as refrigerants, foam-blowing agents, and solvents. The concentrations of all three compounds are shown to be rapidly increasing in the atmosphere, with 134a increasing at a rate of 2.05±0.02 ppt yr-1 over the 30 months of observations. Similarly, 141b and 142b increased at rates of 2.49±0.03 and 1.24±0.02 ppt yr-1, respectively, over the same period. The concentrations recorded at the atmospheric research station at Mace Head, Ireland, on January 1, 1996, the midpoint of the time series, were 3.67 ppt (134a), 7.38 ppt (141b), and 8.78 ppt (142b). From these observations we optimally estimate the HCFC and HFC emissions using a 12-box global model and OH concentrations derived from global 1,1,1-trichloroethane (CCl3CH3) measurements. Comparing two methods of estimating emissions with independent industry estimates shows satisfactory agreement for 134a and 141b, while for 142b, industry estimates are less than half those required to explain our observations.

  20. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization on Rice Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yafei; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has become one of the most important technologies applied in plant molecular cytogenetic research. FISH technique has been not only well applied in physical mapping and genomic studies, but also served as an indispensable tool in tracing the individual chromosome during cell division. This chapter provides protocols for basic FISH analysis using rice as a model, which can also be adapted to other model plant species. PMID:26659957

  1. In situ health monitoring of piezoelectric sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Scott L. (Inventor); Drouant, George J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An in situ health monitoring apparatus may include an exciter circuit that applies a pulse to a piezoelectric transducer and a data processing system that determines the piezoelectric transducer's dynamic response to the first pulse. The dynamic response can be used to evaluate the operating range, health, and as-mounted resonance frequency of the transducer, as well as the strength of a coupling between the transducer and a structure and the health of the structure.

  2. In situ measurements of rock mass deformability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gage, J.; Wang, H. F.; Fratta, D.; Turner, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    In order to examine how the mechanical properties of a rock mass vary from the centimeter to meter scale, we performed two field point-loading tests (89 kN and 890 kN) to determine the in situ modulus of deformation (Em) of a rock mass. The experimental setup is analogous to plate jacking-type tests, but, instead, using a point load. The experiments were done in the Poorman formation on the 1250 m (4100 ft.) level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) at the site of the former Homestake goldmine in Lead, SD. For comparison with in situ values, we also conducted laboratory mechanical tests and used two geotechnical classification systems to evaluate rock stiffness. The in situ modulus of deformation increases with depth into the rock mass. This increase in stiffness is a result of the differences in mechanical properties due to the effect of excavation of the underground space. Near the surface (0 - 1.2 m depth), the rock is weakened due to damage from blasting. Beyond this damaged zone is the stress-relief zone (1.2 -1.5 m depth), where open joint sets affect rock stiffness, and beyond that lies the undisturbed zone (>1.5 m depth) where the rock is the stiffest. Laboratory measurements of Young's modulus for the Poorman formation coincide with the Em measured at ~1.2 m depth. If done properly, in situ measurements of rock stiffness are a valuable tool to fully characterize the gradient in stiffness of a rock mass, which laboratory tests and geotechical classification systems do not fully capture.

  3. Numerical simulation of in situ bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, B.J.

    1998-12-31

    Models that couple subsurface flow and transport with microbial processes are an important tool for assessing the effectiveness of bioremediation in field applications. A numerical algorithm is described that differs from previous in situ bioremediation models in that it includes: both vadose and groundwater zones, unsteady air and water flow, limited nutrients and airborne nutrients, toxicity, cometabolic kinetics, kinetic sorption, subgridscale averaging, pore clogging and protozoan grazing.

  4. In situ rheology of yeast biofilms.

    PubMed

    Brugnoni, Lorena I; Tarifa, María C; Lozano, Jorge E; Genovese, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the in situ rheological behavior of yeast biofilms growing on stainless steel under static and turbulent flow. The species used (Rhodototula mucilaginosa, Candida krusei, Candida kefyr and Candida tropicalis) were isolated from a clarified apple juice industry. The flow conditions impacted biofilm composition over time, with a predominance of C. krusei under static and turbulent flow. Likewise, structural variations occurred, with a tighter appearance under dynamic flow. Under turbulent flow there was an increase of 112 μm in biofilm thickness at 11 weeks (p < 0.001) and cell morphology was governed by hyphal structures and rounded cells. Using the in situ growth method introduced here, yeast biofilms were determined to be viscoelastic materials with a predominantly solid-like behavior, and neither this nor the G'0 values were significantly affected by the flow conditions or the growth time, and at large deformations their weak structure collapsed beyond a critical strain of about 1.5-5%. The present work could represent a starting point for developing in situ measurements of yeast rheology and contribute to a thin body of knowledge about fungal biofilm formation. PMID:25428768

  5. Biopulsing: An in situ aeration remediation strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, H.S.; Marshall, T.R.

    1997-12-31

    In situ soil aeration is an accepted technology for remediation of soil and groundwater impacted with petroleum hydrocarbons and halogenated hydrocarbons. This technology was utilized for remediating soil and groundwater at an aerospace components manufacturing facility located in southern California, Soil and groundwater had been impacted at the facility from historical releases of petroleum and halogenated hydrocarbons. Innovations in remediation system design, installation and monitoring strategies are described in this paper. The following tasks were conducted; (1) evaluation of the extent of impacted soil and groundwater; (2) collection of site-specific data necessary to evaluate and implement an appropriate remediation system to address the hydrocarbon-impacted soil; and (3) design, installation and operation of an in situ aeration system for remediation of soil and groundwater. The in situ aeration system operates on the principles of bioventing. Air was injected weekly into the subsurface by a system of wells placed at selected locations in short pulses lasting several hours. Oxygen utilization in the subsurface was monitored using subsurface sensors. Subsurface oxygen utilization rates of up to 1.5 percent resulted in an estimate of mass reduction of 71 pounds of hydrocarbons. The concentration of halogenated hydrocarbons was reduced in groundwater following commencement of aeration was observed in subsequent sampling events. The contribution of vadose zone aeration in reducing the concentrations of halogenated hydrocarbons in groundwater is currently being evaluated.

  6. Autonomous in situ measurements of seawater alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Reggie S; DeGrandpre, Michael D; Beck, James C; Hart, Robert D; Peterson, Brittany; De Carlo, Eric H; Drupp, Patrick S; Hammar, Terry R

    2014-08-19

    Total alkalinity (AT) is an important parameter for describing the marine inorganic carbon system and understanding the effects of atmospheric CO2 on the oceans. Measurements of AT are limited, however, because of the laborious process of collecting and analyzing samples. In this work we evaluate the performance of an autonomous instrument for high temporal resolution measurements of seawater AT. The Submersible Autonomous Moored Instrument for alkalinity (SAMI-alk) uses a novel tracer monitored titration method where a colorimetric pH indicator quantifies both pH and relative volumes of sample and titrant, circumventing the need for gravimetric or volumetric measurements. The SAMI-alk performance was validated in the laboratory and in situ during two field studies. Overall in situ accuracy was -2.2 ± 13.1 μmol kg(-1) (n = 86), on the basis of comparison to discrete samples. Precision on duplicate analyses of a carbonate standard was ±4.7 μmol kg(-1) (n = 22). This prototype instrument can measure in situ AT hourly for one month, limited by consumption of reagent and standard solutions. PMID:25051401

  7. In Situ Measurement of Aerosol Extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, Anthony W.; Castaneda, R.; Owano, T. G.; Bear, D.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Aerosols are important contributors to the radiative forcing in the atmosphere. Much of the uncertainty in our knowledge of climate forcing is due to uncertainties in the radiative forcing due to aerosols as illustrated in the IPCC reports of the last ten years. Improved measurement of aerosol optical properties, therefore, is critical to an improved understanding of atmospheric radiative forcing. Additionally, attempts to reconcile in situ and remote measurements of aerosol radiative properties have generally not been successful. This is due in part to the fact that it has been impossible to measure aerosol extinction in situ in the past. In this presentation we introduce a new instrument that employs the techniques used in cavity ringdown spectroscopy to measure the aerosol extinction and scattering coefficients in situ. A prototype instrument has been designed and tested in the lab and the field. It is capable of measuring aerosol extinction coefficient to 2x10(exp -6) per meter. This prototype instrument is described and results are presented.

  8. Practical application of in situ aerosol measurement

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hern, T.J.; Rader, D.J.

    1993-09-01

    The use of in situ, real-time measurement techniques permits the characterization of airborne droplets and particles under conditions where traditional sampling methods can fail. For example, sampling method rely on the ability to sample and transport particles without biasing the properties of interest, and often are not applicable in harsh environment. Although in situ methods offer unique opportunities in these cases, these techniques introduce new concerns and must be used carefully if accurate measurement are to be made. Several in situ measurement techniques are reviewed here. As the field is rapidly evolving, the discussion is limited to those techniques which: (1) are commercially available, (2) provide real-time output, (3) measure the aerosol size distribution. Discussion is divided between single particle counters (which provide a flux-based or temporal measurement) and ensemble techniques (which provide a concentration-based or spatial measurement). Specific techniques discussed include phase Doppler, Mie scattering, and Fraunhofer diffraction, and commercial instruments based on these techniques.

  9. In situ ion irradiation of zirconium carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, Christopher J.; Motta, Arthur T.; Kirk, Mark A.

    2015-11-01

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is a candidate material for use in one of the layers of TRISO coated fuel particles to be used in the Generation IV high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor, and thus it is necessary to study the effects of radiation damage on its structure. The microstructural evolution of ZrCx under irradiation was studied in situ using the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscope (IVEM) at Argonne National Laboratory. Samples of nominal stoichiometries ZrC0.8 and ZrC0.9 were irradiated in situ using 1 MeV Kr2+ ions at various irradiation temperatures (T = 20 K-1073 K). In situ experiments made it possible to continuously follow the evolution of the microstructure during irradiation using diffraction contrast imaging. Images and diffraction patterns were systematically recorded at selected dose points. After a threshold dose during irradiations conducted at room temperature and below, black-dot defects were observed which accumulated until saturation. Once created, the defect clusters did not move or get destroyed during irradiation so that at the final dose the low temperature microstructure consisted only of a saturation density of small defect clusters. No long-range migration of the visible defects or dynamic defect creation and elimination were observed during irradiation, but some coarsening of the microstructure with the formation of dislocation loops was observed at higher temperatures. The irradiated microstructure was found to be only weakly dependent on the stoichiometry.

  10. In situ denitrification in controlled landfill systems

    SciTech Connect

    Onay, T.T.; Pohland, F.G.

    1996-11-01

    The characteristics of leachate from landfill disposal sites vary according to the operational stage of the landfill. Leachates from old landfills are often rich in ammonia nitrogen due to the hydrolysis and fermentation of nitrogenous fractions of biodegradable refuse substrates. The relative concentration accumulating as stabilization progresses is also influenced by washout as leachate is collected and removed for external treatment. However, in landfills operated as bioreactors with leachate containment, collection and in situ recirculation to accelerate decomposition of readily available organic fractions of the refuse, leachate ammonia nitrogen concentrations may accumulate to much higher levels. High leachate ammonia nitrogen concentrations in landfill leachate have been reported, resulting in separate treatment challenges if direct discharge to either land or receiving waters is practiced. External treatment options for landfill leachate may involve complex physical-chemical and/or biological processes for removal of both high-strength organic and inorganic fractions, including nitrogen. Such separate leachate treatment systems are often costly and difficult to control on a continuum. Therefore, this study focused on the investigation of landfill ammonia nitrogen generation patterns, and the potential for its in situ attenuation and conversion in landfills constructed to permit sequential nitrification and denitrification using leachate recirculation. Accordingly, the landfill is constructed and operated as a controlled bioreactor system, with opportunity to convert ammonia to nitrate by nitrification and nitrate to nitrogen gas by denitrification. The results presented in this paper focus on in situ landfill denitrification of nitrified ammonia.

  11. Making a Hybrid Microfluidic Platform Compatible for In Situ Imaging by Vacuum-Based Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Li; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zhu, Zihua; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Cowin, James P.

    2011-10-26

    A self-contained microfluidic-based device was designed and fabricated for in situ imaging of aqueous surfaces using vacuum techniques. The device is a hybrid between a microfluidic PDMS block and external accessories, all portable on a small platform (10 cm-8 cm). The key feature is that a small aperture with a diameter of 2-3 micrometers is opened to the vacuum, which serves as a detection window for in situ imaging of aqueous surfaces. Vacuum compatibility and temperature drop due to water vaporization are the two most important challenges in this invention. Theoretical calculations and fabrication strategies are presented from multiple design aspects. In addition, results from the time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) of aqueous surfaces are presented.

  12. The Potassium-Argon Laser Experiment (KArLE): In Situ Geochronology for Planetary Robotic Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The Potassium (K) - Argon (Ar) Laser Experiment (KArLE) will make in situ noble-gas geochronology measurements aboard planetary robotic landers and roverss. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is used to measure the K abun-dance in a sample and to release its noble gases; the evolved Ar is measured by mass spectrometry (MS); and rela-tive K content is related to absolute Ar abundance by sample mass, determined by optical measurement of the ablated volume. KArLE measures a whole-rock K-Ar age to 10% or better for rocks 2 Ga or older, sufficient to resolve the absolute age of many planetary samples. The LIBS-MS approach is attractive because the analytical components have been flight proven, do not require further technical development, and provide complementary measurements as well as in situ geochronology.

  13. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: IN SITU ELECTROKINETIC EXTRACTION SYSTEM - SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has developed an in situ soil remediation system that uses electrokinetic principles to remediate hexavalent chromium-contaminated unsaturated or partially saturated soils. The technology involves the in situ application of direct current to the...

  14. Predicting the denitrification capacity of sandy aquifers from in situ measurements using push-pull 15N tracer tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschenbach, W.; Well, R.; Walther, W.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge about the spatial variability of in situ denitrification rates (Dr(in situ)) and their relation to the denitrification capacity in nitrate-contaminated aquifers is crucial to predict the development of groundwater quality. Therefore, 28 push-pull 15N tracer tests for the measurement of in situ denitrification rates were conducted in two sandy Pleistocene aquifers in Northern Germany. The 15N analysis of denitrification derived 15N labelled N2 and N2O dissolved in water samples collected during the push-pull 15N tracer tests was performed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) in the lab and additionally for some tracer tests online in the field with a quadrupole membrane inlet mass spectrometer (MIMS), in order to test the feasibility of on-site real-time 15N analysis. Aquifer material from the same locations and depths as the push-pull injection points was incubated and the initial and cumulative denitrification after one year of incubation (Dcum(365)) as well as the stock of reduced compounds (SRC) was compared with in situ measurements of denitrification. This was done to derive transfer functions suitable to predict Dcum(365) and SRC from Dr(in situ). Dr(in situ) ranged from 0 to 51.5 μg N kg-1 d-1. Denitrification rates derived from on-site isotope analysis using membrane-inlet mass spectrometry satisfactorily coincided with laboratory analysis by conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometry, thus proving the feasibility of in situ analysis. Dr(in situ) was significantly higher in the sulphidic zone of both aquifers compared to the zone of non-sulphidic aquifer material. Overall, regressions between the Dcum(365) and SRC of the tested aquifer material with Dr(in situ) exhibited only a modest linear correlation for the full data set. But the predictability of Dcum(365) and SRC from Dr(in situ) data clearly increased for aquifer samples from the zone of NO3--bearing groundwater. In the NO3--free aquifer zone a lag phase of denitrification after NO3- injections was observed, which confounded the relationship between reactive compounds and in situ denitrification activity. This finding was attributed to adaptation processes in the microbial community after NO3- injections. Exemplarily, it was demonstrated that the microbial community in the NO3--free zone close below the NO3--bearing zone can be adapted to denitrification by amending wells with NO3--injections for an extended period. In situ denitrification rates were 30 to 65% higher after pre-conditioning with NO3-. Results from this study suggest that such pre-conditioning is crucial for the measurement of Dr(in situ) in deeper aquifer material from the NO3--free groundwater zone and thus for the prediction of Dcum(365) and SRC from Dr(in situ).

  15. In situ synthesis studies of silicon clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchins, Peter Thomas

    Solid state clathrates have shown considerable potential as a new class of materials over the past 30 years. Experimental and theoretical studies have shown that precise tuning and synthetic control of these materials, may lead to desirable properties. Very little is known about the mechanism of formation of the clathrates and so the desire to have accurate synthetic control was, until now, unrealistic. This thesis address the problem using in situ synchrotron x-ray techniques. In this study, experiments were designed to utilise time-resolved in situ diffraction techniques and high temperature 23Na NMR, in efforts to understand the mechanism of formation for this class of expanded framework materials. A complex high vacuum capillary synthesis cell was designed for loading under inert conditions and operation under high vacuum at station 6.2 of the SRS Daresbury. The cell was designed to operate in conjunction with a custom made furnace capable of temperatures in excess of 1000 C, as well as a vacuum system capable of 10"5 bar. The clathrate system was studied in situ, using rapid data collection to elucidate the mechanism of formation. The data were analysed using Rietveld methods and showed a structural link between the monoclinic, C2/c, Zintl precursors and the cubic, Pm3n, clathrate I phase. The phases were found to be linked by relation of the sodium planes in the silicide and the sodium atoms resident at cages centres in the clathrate system. This evidence suggests the guest species is instrumental in formation of the clathrate structure by templating the formation of the cages in the structure. Solid state 23Na NMR was utilised to complete specially design experiments, similar to those complete in situ using synchrotron x-ray techniques. The experiments showed increased spherical symmetry of the alkali metal sites and suggested increased mobility of the guest atoms during heating. In addition, cyclic heating experiments using in situ diffraction showed reversible reintroduction of the guest species on heating and cooling, during formation and subsequent dissipation of the clathrate structure. The realisation of the synthesis of a guest free type II clathrate and the theoretical prediction of negative thermal expansion behaviour at low temperature prompted the use of laboratory x-ray diffraction and a liquid helium cryostat to test the prediction. Careful study of the region from 20 to 200 K showed a region of zero or negative thermal expansion in the predicted region the effect observed showed good agreement with theory.

  16. In-situ droplet monitoring for self-tuning spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, Akbar; Jorabchi, Kaveh; Kahen, Kaveh

    2010-09-28

    A laser scattering based imaging technique is utilized in order to visualize the aerosol droplets in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) torch from an aerosol source to the site of analytical measurements. The resulting snapshots provide key information about the spatial distribution of the aerosol introduced by direct and indirect injection devices: 1) a direct injection high efficiency nebulizer (DIHEN); 2) a large-bore DIHEN (LB-DIHEN); and 3) a PFA microflow nebulizer with a PFA Scott-type spray chamber. Moreover, particle image velocimetry (PIV) is used to study the in-situ behavior of the aerosol before interaction with, for example, plasma, while the individual surviving droplets are explored by particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). Further, the velocity distribution of the surviving droplets demonstrates the importance of the initial droplet velocities in complete desolvation of the aerosol for optimum analytical performance in ICP spectrometries. These new observations are important in the design of the next-generation direct injection devices for lower sample consumption, higher sensitivity, lower noise levels, suppressed matrix effects, and for developing smart spectrometers. For example, a controller can be provided to control the output of the aerosol source by controlling the configuration of the source or the gas flow rate via feedback information concerning the aerosol.

  17. 30 CFR 828.11 - In situ processing: Performance standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... in situ processing activities shall comply with 30 CFR 817 and this section. (b) In situ processing... processing activities shall submit for approval as part of the application for permit under 30 CFR 785.22... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false In situ processing: Performance standards....

  18. 30 CFR 828.11 - In situ processing: Performance standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... in situ processing activities shall comply with 30 CFR 817 and this section. (b) In situ processing... processing activities shall submit for approval as part of the application for permit under 30 CFR 785.22... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In situ processing: Performance standards....

  19. 30 CFR 828.11 - In situ processing: Performance standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... in situ processing activities shall comply with 30 CFR 817 and this section. (b) In situ processing... processing activities shall submit for approval as part of the application for permit under 30 CFR 785.22... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false In situ processing: Performance standards....

  20. 30 CFR 828.11 - In situ processing: Performance standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... in situ processing activities shall comply with 30 CFR 817 and this section. (b) In situ processing... processing activities shall submit for approval as part of the application for permit under 30 CFR 785.22... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false In situ processing: Performance standards....

  1. 30 CFR 828.11 - In situ processing: Performance standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... in situ processing activities shall comply with 30 CFR 817 and this section. (b) In situ processing... processing activities shall submit for approval as part of the application for permit under 30 CFR 785.22... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false In situ processing: Performance standards....

  2. In-situ dust detection as a tool to study dust-plasma interactions in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srama, R.; Hsu, H. W.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Postberg, F.; Kempf, S.

    2014-12-01

    The unique results of the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyzer onboard Cassini revealed the potential of in-situ dust detection for the study of dust-plasma interactions. In-situ techniques are charge induction, impact ionization, momentum transfer, foil depolarization, light scattering or mass spectrometry. Modern instruments like dust telescopes or the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) onboard Cassini combine different methods in one sensor. This paper gives an overview about in-situ dust measurements in space using direct detection methods. A focus is given to charge induction and impact ionization and their measurement thresholds are described. Major CDA discoveries are summarized and new results of nano-dust stream measurements in the outer Saturnian system are presented. These data show periodicities related to Saturn and its moons, leading to a deeper understanding of nano-dust origins and dynamics in Saturn's magnetosphere.

  3. Coordinated in Situ Analyses of Organic Nanoglobules in the Sutter's Mill Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Clemett, S. J.; Nguyen, A. N.; Gibson, E. K.

    2013-01-01

    The Sutter's Mill meteorite is a newly fallen carbonaceous chondrite that was collected and curated quickly after its fall. Preliminary petrographic and isotopic investigations suggest affinities to the CM2 carbonaceous chondrites. The primitive nature of this meteorite and its rapid recovery provide an opportunity to investigate primordial solar system organic matter in a unique new sample. Here we report in-situ analyses of organic nanoglobules in the Sutter's Mill meteorite using UV fluorescence imaging, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), NanoSIMS, and ultrafast two-step laser mass spectrometry (ultra-L2MS).

  4. Influence of in situ ultrasound treatment during ion implantation on formation of silver nanoparticles in silica

    SciTech Connect

    Romanyuk, Andriy; Spassov, Vladislav; Melnik, Viktor

    2006-02-01

    We report on the effect of in situ ultrasound treatment on the clustering process of silver atoms in ion-implanted SiO{sub 2}. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy shows single-crystal Ag spheres with an increased cluster size when prepared using ultrasound vibrations. Time-of-flight secondary-ion-mass spectrometry demonstrates an enhanced yield of [Ag{sub 2}]{sup 216} complexes in structures treated with acoustic waves. An analysis of the influence of ultrasound on defect reaction kinetics as well as on different stages of the clustering process is performed.

  5. TSSM: The in situ exploration of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, A.; Lunine, J. I.; Lebreton, J. P.; Matson, D.; Reh, K.; Beauchamp, P.; Erd, C.

    2008-09-01

    The Titan Saturn System Mission (TSSM) mission was born when NASA and ESA decided to collaborate on two missions independently selected by each agency: the Titan and Enceladus mission (TandEM), and Titan Explorer, a 2007 Flagship study. TandEM, the Titan and Enceladus mission, was proposed as an L-class (large) mission in response to ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 Call. The mission concept is to perform remote and in situ investigations of Titan primarily, but also of Enceladus and Saturn's magentosphere. The two satellites are tied together by location and properties, whose remarkable natures have been partly revealed by the ongoing Cassini-Huygens mission. These bodies still hold mysteries requiring a complete exploration using a variety of vehicles and instruments. TSSM will study Titan as a system, including its upper atmosphere, the interactions with the magnetosphere, the neutral atmosphere, surface, interior, origin and evolution, as well as the astrobiological potential of Titan. It is an ambitious mission because its targets are two of the most exciting and challenging bodies in the Solar System. It is designed to build on but exceed the scientific and technological accomplishments of the Cassini- Huygens mission, exploring Titan and Enceladus in ways that are not currently possible (full close-up and in situ coverage over long periods of time for Titan, several close flybys of Enceladus). One overarching goal of the TSSM mission is to explore in situ the atmosphere and surface of Titan. In the current mission architecture, TSSM consists of an orbiter (under NASA's responsibility) with a large host of instruments which would perform several Enceladus and Titan flybys before stabilizing in an orbit around Titan alone, therein delivering in situ elements (a Montgolfière, or hot air balloon, and a probe/lander). The latter are being studied by ESA. The balloon will circumnavigate Titan above the equator at an altitude of about 10 km for several months. The probe will descend through Titan's atmosphere and land on a liquid surface (at the North pole, in a lake according to the current design). The currently envisaged strawman payload for these elements will be presented. Instruments aboard the balloon would provide high resolution vistas of the surface of Titan as the balloon cruises at 10 km altitude, as well as make compositional measurements of the surface, detailed sounding of crustal layering, and chemical measurements of aerosols. A magnetometer, unimpeded by Titan's ionosphere, would permit sensitive detection of induced or intrinsic fields. The short-lived probe would splash into a large northern sea and spend several hours floating during which direct chemical and physical sampling of the liquid—a carrier for many dissolved organic species— would be undertaken. During its descent the Mare Explorer would provide the first in situ profiling of the winter northern hemispheric atmosphere, which is distinctly different from the equatorial atmosphere where Huygens descended and the balloon will arrive. Coordinated radio science experiments aboard the orbiter and in situ elements would be capable of providing detailed information on Titan's tidal response, and hence its crustal rigidity and thickness.

  6. In situ surface biodegradation of restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Padovani, Gc; Fcio, Sbp; Ambrosano, Gmb; Sinhoreti, Mac; Puppin-Rontani, Rm

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY This study aimed to evaluate the surface characteristics of restorative materials (roughness, hardness, chemical changes by energy-dispersive spectroscopy [EDX], and scanning electron microscopy [SEM]) submitted to in situ biodegradation. Fifteen discs of each material (IPS e.max [EM], Filtek Supreme [FS], Vitremer [VI], Ketac Molar Easymix [KM], and Amalgam GS-80 [AM]) were fabricated in a metallic mold (4.0 mm 1.5 mm). Roughness, hardness, SEM, and EDX were then evaluated. Fifteen healthy volunteers used a palatal device containing one disc of each restorative material for seven days. After the biodegradation, the roughness, hardness, SEM, and EDX were once again evaluated. Data obtained from the roughness and hardness evaluations were submitted to Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Tukey-Kramer tests (p<0.05). All esthetic restorative materials showed a significant increase in the roughness after biodegradation. Before biodegradation, significant differences in the hardness among the materials were seen: EM>AM>FS>KM>VI. After biodegradation, the hardness was significantly altered among the materials studied: EM>AM>FS=KM>VI, along with a significant increase in the hardness for AM, KM, and VI. SEM images indicated degradation on the surface of all materials, showing porosities, cracks, and roughness. Furthermore, after biodegradation, FS showed the presence of Cl, K, and Ca on the surface, while F was not present on the VI and KM surfaces. EM and AM did not have alterations in their chemical composition after biodegradation. It was concluded that the dental biofilm accumulation in situ on different restorative materials is a material-dependent parameter. Overall, all materials changed after biodegradation: esthetic restorative materials showed increased roughness, confirmed by SEM, and the ionomer materials and silver amalgam showed a significantly higher hardness. Finally, the initial chemical composition of the composite resin and ionomer materials evaluated was significantly altered by the action of the biofilm in situ. PMID:24555699

  7. In-situ thermal testing program strategy

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    In the past year the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project has implemented a new Program Approach to the licensing process. The Program Approach suggests a step-wise approach to licensing in which the early phases will require less site information than previously planned and necessitate a lesser degree of confidence in the longer-term performance of the repository. Under the Program Approach, the thermal test program is divided into two principal phases: (1) short-term in situ tests (in the 1996 to 2000 time period) and laboratory thermal tests to obtain preclosure information, parameters, and data along with bounding information for postclosure performance; and (2) longer-term in situ tests to obtain additional data regarding postclosure performance. This effort necessitates a rethinking of the testing program because the amount of information needed for the initial licensing phase is less than previously planned. This document proposes a revised and consolidated in situ thermal test program (including supporting laboratory tests) that is structured to meet the needs of the Program Approach. A customer-supplier model is used to define the Project data needs. These data needs, along with other requirements, were then used to define a set of conceptual experiments that will provide the required data within the constraints of the Program Approach schedule. The conceptual thermal tests presented in this document represent a consolidation and update of previously defined tests that should result in a more efficient use of Project resources. This document focuses on defining the requirements and tests needed to satisfy the goal of a successful license application in 2001, should the site be found suitable.

  8. In situ raman spectroscopy studies of VPO catalyst transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Z.Y.; Schrader, G.L.

    1999-11-04

    VPO catalyst transformations were investigated using in situ laser Raman spectroscopy. During reduction-oxidation step changes, (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} was readily converted to {alpha}{sub II}, {delta}-VOPO{sub 4}, and ultimately to {beta}-VOPO{sub 4} in O{sub 2}/N{sub 2}; these V{sup 5+} phases were eliminated in n-butane/N{sub 2}. A wet N{sub 2} feed (5--10% H{sub 2}O in N{sub 2}) transformed (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} and {alpha}{sub 1}-, {alpha}{sub II}-, {beta}-, {delta}-, {gamma}-VOPO{sub 4} to V{sub 2}O{sub 5} at temperatures above 400 C. The presence of water vapor facilitated the loss of oxygen atoms involved in V-O-P bonding, and separated vanadium oxide and phosphorus oxide species were formed. The isolated vanadium oxide species could be transformed to V{sub 2}O{sub 5}; phosphorus species likely diffused from the catalyst lattice in the form of acid phosphates.

  9. In situ hydrogen loading on zirconium powder

    PubMed Central

    Maimaitiyili, Tuerdi; Blomqvist, Jakob; Steuwer, Axel; Bjerkén, Christina; Zanellato, Olivier; Blackmur, Matthew S.; Andrieux, Jérôme; Ribeiro, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    For the first time, various hydride phases in a zirconium–hydrogen system have been prepared in a high-energy synchrotron X-ray radiation beamline and their transformation behaviour has been studied in situ. First, the formation and dissolution of hydrides in commercially pure zirconium powder were monitored in real time during hydrogenation and dehydrogenation, then whole pattern crystal structure analysis such as Rietveld and Pawley refinements were performed. All commonly reported low-pressure phases presented in the Zr–H phase diagram are obtained from a single experimental arrangement. PMID:26134803

  10. In Situ Characterization of Supported Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, D. Wayne

    2002-03-01

    The ability to operate under diverse conditions makes scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) uniquely suited for in situ studies of the evolution of surface morphology at the nanoscale. An experimental approach has been developed that allows a pre-selected area of the surface to be targeted and individual supported nanoparticles imaged over a reactive pressure range spanning twelve orders of magnitude. Thus, for model supported catalyst we are able to bridge the so-called ``pressure gap" on a particle-by-particle basis and, in a single experiment, address such important issues as size effects in cluster stability, catalyst deactivation, etc.

  11. In Situ Preservation of Historic Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, R.; Brooks, R.

    The loss of the Mir space station is shown to symbolize a new consciousness of the value of space artefacts. The reasons why such artefacts as Mir become historic objects worthy of preservation are examined. Preservation of space vehicles in situ is discussed, with particular reference to safety, monitoring and long term costs. An argument is made for a wider definition for World Heritage designations to include material beyond the surface of the Earth, and for international bodies to assess, monitor and oversee these projects. Such heritage sites are seen as an economic driver for the development of space tourism in the 21st century.

  12. Robust and efficient in situ quantum control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrie, Christopher; Moussa, Osama

    2015-05-01

    Precision control of quantum systems is the driving force for both quantum technology and the probing of physics at the quantum and nanoscale levels. We propose an implementation-independent method for in situ quantum control that leverages recent advances in the direct estimation of quantum gate fidelity. Our algorithm takes account of the stochasticity of the problem, is suitable for closed-loop control, and requires only a constant number of fidelity-estimating experiments per iteration independent of the dimension of the control space. It is efficient and robust to both statistical and technical noise.

  13. In situ, noninvasive characterization of superhydrophobic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaha, Mohamed A.; Ochanda, Fredrick O.; Tafreshi, Hooman Vahedi; Tepper, Gary C.; Gad-el-Hak, Mohamed

    2011-04-01

    Light scattering was used to measure the time-dependent loss of air entrapped within a submerged microporous hydrophobic surface subjected to different environmental conditions. The loss of trapped air resulted in a measurable decrease in surface reflectivity and the kinetics of the process was determined in real time and compared to surface properties, such as porosity and morphology. The light-scattering results were compared with measurements of skin-friction drag, static contact angle, and contact-angle hysteresis. The in situ, noninvasive optical technique was shown to correlate well with the more conventional methods for quantifying surface hydrophobicity, such as flow slip and contact angle.

  14. In situ force-balance tensiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapham, G. S.; Dowling, D. R.; Schultz, W. W.

    Although a fundamental physical parameter, surface tension is difficult to measure. Common tensiometry inaccuracy comes from failure to control air-liquid-solid contact conditions, or account for liquid meniscus geometry and buoyancy corrections. This paper describes an in situ tensiometry technique, based on withdrawal of a thin-walled tube from the liquid interface, that enforces a known air-liquid-solid contact condition. This technique can be pursued at any level of experimental hygiene. Experimental results for filtered tap water, an alcohol-water solution, and a surfactant-water solution show that results repeatable to three significant digits are obtained with modest effort for a variety of geometrical parameters.

  15. Spatially controlled, in situ synthesis of polymers

    DOEpatents

    Caneba, Gerard T.; Tirumala, Vijaya Raghavan; Mancini, Derrick C.; Wang, Hsien-Hau

    2005-03-22

    An in situ polymer microstructure formation method. The monomer mixture is polymerized in a solvent/precipitant through exposure to ionizing radiation in the absence any chemical mediators. If an exposure mask is employed to block out certain regions of the radiation cross section, then a patterned microstructure is formed. The polymerization mechanism is based on the so-called free-radical retrograde-precipitation polymerization process, in which polymerization occurs while the system is phase separating above the lower critical solution temperature. This method was extended to produce a crosslinked line grid-pattern of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide), which has been known to have thermoreversible properties.

  16. In situ hydrogen loading on zirconium powder.

    PubMed

    Maimaitiyili, Tuerdi; Blomqvist, Jakob; Steuwer, Axel; Bjerkén, Christina; Zanellato, Olivier; Blackmur, Matthew S; Andrieux, Jérôme; Ribeiro, Fabienne

    2015-07-01

    For the first time, various hydride phases in a zirconium-hydrogen system have been prepared in a high-energy synchrotron X-ray radiation beamline and their transformation behaviour has been studied in situ. First, the formation and dissolution of hydrides in commercially pure zirconium powder were monitored in real time during hydrogenation and dehydrogenation, then whole pattern crystal structure analysis such as Rietveld and Pawley refinements were performed. All commonly reported low-pressure phases presented in the Zr-H phase diagram are obtained from a single experimental arrangement. PMID:26134803

  17. In-Situ Wire Damage Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Roberson, Luke B. (Inventor); Tate, Lanetra C. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor); Gibson, Tracy L. (Inventor); Jolley, Scott T. (Inventor); Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An in-situ system for detecting damage in an electrically conductive wire. The system includes a substrate at least partially covered by a layer of electrically conductive material forming a continuous or non-continuous electrically conductive layer connected to an electrical signal generator adapted to delivering electrical signals to the electrically conductive layer. Data is received and processed to identify damage to the substrate or electrically conductive layer. The electrically conductive material may include metalized carbon fibers, a thin metal coating, a conductive polymer, carbon nanotubes, metal nanoparticles or a combination thereof.

  18. Measure of Legionella penumophila activity in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.; Soracco, R.J.; Pope, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    Detection of Legionella pneumophila by serogroup-specific fluorescent antibodies was combined with a tetrazolium dye (INT) to measure electron transport activity. The biological uptake and reduction of the INT dye was studied in pure cultures and in natural water samples with respect to temperature. Uptake was complete within 60 min. Controls inhibited with formaldehyde demonstrated little activity. Both the in vitro and in situ determinations suggested that the electron transport system of Legionella was active over a temperature range of 25 to 60/sup 0/C.

  19. Measure of Legionella pneumophila activity in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.; Soracco, R.J.; Pope, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    Detection of Legionella pneumophila by serogroup-specific fluorescent antibodies was combined with a tetrazolium dye (INT) to measure electron transport activity. The biological uptake and reduction of the INT dye was studied in pure cultures and in natural water samples with respect to temperature. Uptake was complete within 60 minutes. Controls inhibited with formaldehyde demonstrated little activity. Both the in vitro and in situ determinations suggested that the electron transport system of Legionella was active over a temperature range of 25/sup 0/ to 60/sup 0/C.

  20. GAS TURBINE REHEAT USING IN SITU COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. Bachovchin; T.E. Lippert; R.A. Newby P.G.A. Cizmas

    2004-05-17

    In situ reheat is an alternative to traditional gas turbine reheat design in which fuel is fed through airfoils rather than in a bulky discrete combustor separating HP and LP turbines. The goals are to achieve increased power output and/or efficiency without higher emissions. In this program the scientific basis for achieving burnout with low emissions has been explored. In Task 1, Blade Path Aerodynamics, design options were evaluated using CFD in terms of burnout, increase of power output, and possible hot streaking. It was concluded that Vane 1 injection in a conventional 4-stage turbine was preferred. Vane 2 injection after vane 1 injection was possible, but of marginal benefit. In Task 2, Combustion and Emissions, detailed chemical kinetics modeling, validated by Task 3, Sub-Scale Testing, experiments, resulted in the same conclusions, with the added conclusion that some increase in emissions was expected. In Task 4, Conceptual Design and Development Plan, Siemens Westinghouse power cycle analysis software was used to evaluate alternative in situ reheat design options. Only single stage reheat, via vane 1, was found to have merit, consistent with prior Tasks. Unifying the results of all the tasks, a conceptual design for single stage reheat utilizing 24 holes, 1.8 mm diameter, at the trailing edge of vane 1 is presented. A development plan is presented.

  1. In situ PEM fuel cell water measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, Rodney L; Mukundan, Rangachary; Davey, John R; Spendelow, Jacob S; Hussey, Daniel S; Jacobson, David L; Arif, Muhammad

    2009-01-01

    Efficient PEM (Polymer Electrolyte Membrane) fuel cell performance requires effective water management. To achieve a deeper understanding of water transport and performance issues associated with water management, we have conducted in situ water examinations to help understand the effects of components and operations. High Frequency Resistance (HFR), AC Impedance and Neutron imaging were used to measure water content in operating fuel cells, with various conditions, including current density, relative humidity, inlet flows, flow orientation and variable Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) properties. High resolution neutron radiography was used to image fuel cells during a variety of conditions. The effect of specific operating conditions, including flow direction (co-flow or counter-flow) was examined. Counter-flow operation was found to result in higher water content than co-flow operation, which correlates to lower membrane resistivity. A variety of cells were used to quantify the membrane water in situ during exposure to saturated gases, during fuel cell operation, and during hydrogen pump operation. The quantitative results show lower membrane water content than previous results suggested.

  2. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery.

    SciTech Connect

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Beauheim, Richard Louis; Brady, Patrick Vane; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2009-05-01

    Expansion of uranium mining in the United States is a concern to some environmental groups and sovereign Native American Nations. An approach which may alleviate some problems is to develop inherently safe in situ uranium recovery ('ISR') technologies. Current ISR technology relies on chemical extraction of trace levels of uranium from aquifers that, once mined, can still contain dissolved uranium and other trace metals that are a health concern. Existing ISR operations are few in number; however, high uranium prices are driving the industry to consider expanding operations nation-wide. Environmental concerns and enforcement of the new 30 ppb uranium drinking water standard may make opening new mining operations more difficult and costly. Here we propose a technological fix: the development of inherently safe in situ recovery (ISISR) methods. The four central features of an ISISR approach are: (1) New 'green' leachants that break down predictably in the subsurface, leaving uranium, and associated trace metals, in an immobile form; (2) Post-leachant uranium/metals-immobilizing washes that provide a backup decontamination process; (3) An optimized well-field design that increases uranium recovery efficiency and minimizes excursions of contaminated water; and (4) A combined hydrologic/geochemical protocol for designing low-cost post-extraction long-term monitoring. ISISR would bring larger amounts of uranium to the surface, leave fewer toxic metals in the aquifer, and cost less to monitor safely - thus providing a 'win-win-win' solution to all stakeholders.

  3. Molecular cytogenetics using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.W.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Lucas, J.; Pinkel, D.; Weier, H-U.; Yu, Loh-Chung.

    1990-12-07

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome-specific probes enables several new areas of cytogenetic investigation by allowing visual determination of the presence and normality of specific genetic sequences in single metaphase or interphase cells. in this approach, termed molecular cytogenetics, the genetic loci to be analyzed are made microscopically visible in single cells using in situ hybridization with nucleic acid probes specific to these loci. To accomplish this, the DNA in the target cells is made single stranded by thermal denaturation and incubated with single-stranded, chemically modified probe under conditions where the probe will anneal only with DNA sequences to which it has high DNA sequence homology. The bound probe is then made visible by treatment with a fluorescent reagent such as fluorescein that binds to the chemical modification carried by the probe. The DNA to which the probe does not bind is made visible by staining with a dye such as propidium iodide that fluoresces at a wavelength different from that of the reagent used for probe visualization. We show in this report that probes are now available that make this technique useful for biological dosimetry, prenatal diagnosis and cancer biology. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Biophotonic in situ sensor for plant leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Conejo, Elian; Frangi, Jean-Pierre; Rosny, Gilles de

    2010-04-01

    Knowledge of the water concentration of plants can be helpful in several environmental and agricultural domains. There are many methods for the determination of water content in plant leaves; however, most of them give a relative moisture level or an analytical measure after a previous calibration procedure. Even for other biochemical compounds such as dry matter or chlorophyll, the measurement techniques could be destructive. For this reason, a nondestructive method has been developed to measure the biochemical compounds of a plant leaf, using an infrared spectroscopy technique. One important advantage is the simplicity of the device (RAdiometre portatif de Mesure In Situ, RAMIS) and its capability to perform measurements in situ. The prototype is a leaf-clip configuration and is made of LEDs at five wavelengths (656, 721, 843, 937, and 1550 nm), and a silicon/germanium photosensor. To compute the water content of vegetative leaves, the radiative transfer model PROSPECT was implemented. This model can accurately predict spectral transmittances in the 400 nm to 2500 nm spectral region as a function of the principal leaf biochemical contents: water, dry matter, and chlorophyll. Using the transmittance measured by RAMIS into an inversion procedure of PROSPECT: A Model of Leaf Optical Properties Spectra, we are able to compute the values of water contents that show an agreement with the water contents measured directly using dry weight procedures. This method is presented as a possibility to estimate other leaf biochemical compounds using appropriate wavelengths.

  5. In Situ Instruments: Overview of In Situ Instruments for Deployment in Extreme Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, M.; Cardell, G.

    2000-01-01

    This presentation reviews the design and specifications for several instruments for deployment in extreme environments. The instruments are: (1) In Situ Geochronology Instrument, (2) Laser Ablation Sampling Instrument, (3) Micro Hygrometer (4) Micro Lidar, (5) Atmospheric Electron X-Ray Spectrometer and (6) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometer. Included in the descriptions are the contact people and the objective of each instrument.

  6. In situ radiation influence on strain measurement performance of Brillouin sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pheron, X.; Ouerdane, Y.; Girard, S.; Marcandella, C.; Delepine-Lesoille, S.; Bertrand, J.; Taillade, F.; Merliot, E.; Sikali Mamdem, Y.; Boukenter, A.

    2011-05-01

    A new approach is proposed to monitor in situ the influence of gamma radiations on Brillouin properties of optical fiber extensometers. Experimental results are illustrated with the characterization of two fibers samples up to total dose of about 600Gy. The Brillouin frequency shift remains unaffected at such radiations level, as well as the spectral Brillouin signature or its dependence with strain. Meanwhile, propagation losses increase under radiations with an amplitude related to fiber dopants. The target application is nuclear wastes repository monitoring where higher doses are expected. UV radiation preliminary tests show that compaction phenomenon may occur at such high doses, inducing Brillouin frequency shift up to 20 MHz.

  7. Radiological aspects of in situ uranium recovery

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN, STEVEN H.

    2007-07-01

    In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed. Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunneling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium in situ leaching in situ recovery (ISL / ISR), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and may make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since 1975. Solution mining involves the pumping of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing and complexing agents into an ore body, solubilizing the uranium in situ, and then pumping the solutions to the surface where they are fed to a processing plant. Processing involves ion exchange and may also include precipitation, drying or calcining and packaging operations depending on facility specifics. This paper presents an overview of the ISR process and the health physics monitoring programs developed at a number of commercial scale ISL / ISR Uranium recovery and production facilities as a result of the radiological character of these processes. Although many radiological aspects of the process are similar to that of conventional mills, conventional-type tailings as such are not generated. However, liquid and solid byproduct materials may be generated and impounded. The quantity and radiological character of these by products are related to facility specifics. Some special monitoring considerations are presented which are required due to the manner in which Radon gas is evolved in the process and the unique aspects of controlling solution flow patterns underground. An overview of the major aspects of the health physics and radiation protection programs that were developed at these facilities are discussed and contrasted to circumstances of the current generation and state of the art of Uranium ISR technologies and facilities. (authors)

  8. Gamma Knife

    MedlinePlus

    ... equipment? How is safety ensured? What is this equipment used for? The Gamma Knife® and its associated ... in size. top of page How does the equipment work? The Gamma Knife® utilizes a technique called ...

  9. High Throughput In Situ EXAFS Instrumentation for the Automatic Characterization of Materials and Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsapatsaris, Nikolaos; Beesley, A. M.; Weiher, Norbert; Tromp, Moniek; Evans, John; Dent, A. J.; Harvey, Ian; Schroeder, Sven L. M.

    2007-01-01

    An XAS data acquisition and control system for the in situ analysis of dynamic materials libraries under control of temperature and gaseous environment has been developed. It was integrated at the SRS in Daresbury, UK, beamline 9.3, using a Si (220) monochromator and a 13 element solid state Ge fluorescence detector. The core of the system is an intelligent X, Y, Z, θ positioning system coupled to multi-stream quadrupole mass spectrometry analysis (QMS). The system is modular and can be adapted to other synchrotron radiation beamlines. The entire software control was implemented using Labview and allows the scan of a variety of library sizes, in several positions, angles, gas compositions and temperatures with minimal operator intervention. The system was used for the automated characterization of a library of 91 catalyst precursors containing ternary combinations of Cu, Pt, and Au on γ-Al2O3, and for the evaluation and structural characterization of eight Au catalysts supported on Al2O3 and TiO2 Mass spectrometer traces reveal conversion rate oscillations in 6wt % Au/γAl2O3 catalysts. The use of HT experimentation for in situ EXAFS studies demonstrates the feasibility and potential of HT in situ XAFS for synchrotron radiation studies.

  10. Alternative Surfactants for Improved Efficiency of In Situ Tryptic Proteolysis of Fingermarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ekta; Clench, Malcolm R.; West, Andy; Marshall, Peter S.; Marshall, Nathan; Francese, Simona

    2015-06-01

    Despite recent improvements to in situ proteolysis strategies, a higher efficiency is still needed to increase both the number of peptides detected and the associated ion intensity, leading to a complete and reliable set of biomarkers for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. In the study presented here, an extract of a systematic study is illustrated investigating a range of surfactants assisting trypsin proteolytic activity. Method development was trialled on fingermarks; this specimen results from a transfer of sweat from an individual's fingertip to a surface upon contact. As sweat carries a plethora of biomolecules, including peptides and proteins, fingermarks are, potentially, a very valuable specimen for non-invasive prognostic or diagnostic screening. A recent study has demonstrated the opportunity to quickly detect peptides and small proteins in fingermarks using Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry Profiling (MALDI MSP). However, intact detection bears low sensitivity and does not allow species identification; therefore, a shotgun proteomic approach was employed involving in situ proteolysis. Data demonstrate that in fingermarks, further improvements to the existing method can be achieved using MEGA-8 as surfactant in higher percentages as well as combinations of different detergents. Also, for the first time, Rapigest SF, normally used in solution digestions, has been shown to successfully work also for in situ proteolysis.

  11. Dereplicating and spatial mapping of secondary metabolites from fungal cultures in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J.; Sica, Vincent P.; Raja, Huzefa A.; El-Elimat, Tamam; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Pearce, Cedric J.

    2015-07-30

    Ambient ionization techniques coupled to mass spectrometry have recently become prevalent in natural product research due to their ability to examine secondary metabolites in situ. Identifying, mapping, and monitoring secondary metabolites directly on an organism provides invaluable spatial and temporal details that are lost through traditional extraction processes. Most ambient ionization techniques do not collect mutually supportive data, such as chromatographic retention times and/or UV/VIS spectra, and this can limit the ability to identify certain metabolites, such as differentiating isomers. To overcome this, the droplet liquid microjunction surface sampling probe (droplet LMJ SSP) was coupled with UPLC PDA HRMS MS/MS, thus providing separation, retention times, and UV/VIS data used in traditional dereplication protocols. By capturing these mutually supportive data, the identity of secondary metabolites could be confidently and rapidly assigned in situ. Using the droplet LMJ SSP, a protocol was constructed to analyze the secondary metabolite profile of fungal cultures directly without any sample preparation. The results demonstrate that fungal cultures can be dereplicated from the Petri dish, thus identifying secondary metabolites, including isomers, and confirming them against reference standards. As a result, heat maps, similar to mass spectrometry imaging, can be used to ascertain the location and relative concentration of secondary metabolites directly on the surface and/or surroundings of a fungal culture.

  12. Dereplicating and Spatial Mapping of Secondary Metabolites from Fungal Cultures in Situ.

    PubMed

    Sica, Vincent P; Raja, Huzefa A; El-Elimat, Tamam; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J; Pearce, Cedric J; Oberlies, Nicholas H

    2015-08-28

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry techniques have recently become prevalent in natural product research due to their ability to examine secondary metabolites in situ. These techniques retain invaluable spatial and temporal details that are lost through traditional extraction processes. However, most ambient ionization techniques do not collect mutually supportive data, such as chromatographic retention times and/or UV/vis spectra, and this can limit the ability to identify certain metabolites, such as differentiating isomers. To overcome this, the droplet-liquid microjunction-surface sampling probe (droplet-LMJ-SSP) was coupled with UPLC-PDA-HRMS-MS/MS, thus providing separation, retention times, MS data, and UV/vis data used in traditional dereplication protocols. By capturing these mutually supportive data, the identity of secondary metabolites can be confidently and rapidly assigned in situ. Using the droplet-LMJ-SSP, a protocol was constructed to analyze the secondary metabolite profile of fungal cultures without any sample preparation. The results demonstrate that fungal cultures can be dereplicated from the Petri dish, thus identifying secondary metabolites, including isomers, and confirming them against reference standards. Furthermore, heat maps, similar to mass spectrometry imaging, can be used to ascertain the location and relative concentration of secondary metabolites directly on the surface and/or surroundings of a fungal culture. PMID:26192135

  13. Dereplicating and spatial mapping of secondary metabolites from fungal cultures in situ

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J.; Sica, Vincent P.; Raja, Huzefa A.; El-Elimat, Tamam; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Pearce, Cedric J.

    2015-07-30

    Ambient ionization techniques coupled to mass spectrometry have recently become prevalent in natural product research due to their ability to examine secondary metabolites in situ. Identifying, mapping, and monitoring secondary metabolites directly on an organism provides invaluable spatial and temporal details that are lost through traditional extraction processes. Most ambient ionization techniques do not collect mutually supportive data, such as chromatographic retention times and/or UV/VIS spectra, and this can limit the ability to identify certain metabolites, such as differentiating isomers. To overcome this, the droplet liquid microjunction surface sampling probe (droplet LMJ SSP) was coupled with UPLC PDA HRMS MS/MS,more » thus providing separation, retention times, and UV/VIS data used in traditional dereplication protocols. By capturing these mutually supportive data, the identity of secondary metabolites could be confidently and rapidly assigned in situ. Using the droplet LMJ SSP, a protocol was constructed to analyze the secondary metabolite profile of fungal cultures directly without any sample preparation. The results demonstrate that fungal cultures can be dereplicated from the Petri dish, thus identifying secondary metabolites, including isomers, and confirming them against reference standards. As a result, heat maps, similar to mass spectrometry imaging, can be used to ascertain the location and relative concentration of secondary metabolites directly on the surface and/or surroundings of a fungal culture.« less

  14. Dereplicating and Spatial Mapping of Secondary Metabolites from Fungal Cultures in Situ

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry techniques have recently become prevalent in natural product research due to their ability to examine secondary metabolites in situ. These techniques retain invaluable spatial and temporal details that are lost through traditional extraction processes. However, most ambient ionization techniques do not collect mutually supportive data, such as chromatographic retention times and/or UV/vis spectra, and this can limit the ability to identify certain metabolites, such as differentiating isomers. To overcome this, the droplet–liquid microjunction–surface sampling probe (droplet–LMJ–SSP) was coupled with UPLC–PDA–HRMS–MS/MS, thus providing separation, retention times, MS data, and UV/vis data used in traditional dereplication protocols. By capturing these mutually supportive data, the identity of secondary metabolites can be confidently and rapidly assigned in situ. Using the droplet–LMJ–SSP, a protocol was constructed to analyze the secondary metabolite profile of fungal cultures without any sample preparation. The results demonstrate that fungal cultures can be dereplicated from the Petri dish, thus identifying secondary metabolites, including isomers, and confirming them against reference standards. Furthermore, heat maps, similar to mass spectrometry imaging, can be used to ascertain the location and relative concentration of secondary metabolites directly on the surface and/or surroundings of a fungal culture. PMID:26192135

  15. Condition of in situ unexploded ordnance.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Susan; Bigl, Susan; Packer, Bonnie

    2015-02-01

    Unexploded ordnance (UXO) become point contamination sources when their casings fail and their explosive fill dissolve. To determine the modes of failure, we documented the condition of UXO found on military training ranges and sampled soils for explosives beneath 42 in situ UXO. We found that oxidation caused the metal UXO casings to swell and fail catastrophically. Unlike previous work, pitting of the metal casings was not found to be an important release route for explosives. Of the 42 UXO sampled, eight were leaking explosives into the soil and of these, four had perforated or cracked casings, three were corroded and one was a partially detonated round. We estimated a surface density of 74 UXO per hectare for a subset of UXO sampled. We used the relative concentrations of explosives and their transformation products in the soil to determine if the explosives had recently dissolved or were from past military training. PMID:25461079

  16. Autofluorescence correction for fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Szoelloesi, J.; Balazs, M.; Waldman, F.C.

    1995-08-01

    Optimal sensitivity of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) requires bright signals and low background fluorescence. Use of locus-specific probes is especially dependent on high sensitivity. Some tissue preparations show high autofluorescence, masking small or dim signals. We have developed a new method for subtracting autofluorescence from digital images on a pixel-by-pixel basis. It is based on the observation that fluorescent labels for FISH have narrower excitation and emission spectra than the chemical components responsible for autofluorescence. Our new approach uses calculation of the ratio of autofluorescence between multiple color images for correction of autofluorescence in each individual image. By subtracting autofluorescence components, we were able to enhance centromeric signals and make previously indistiguishable cosmid signals clearly visible. This image-processing approach to autofluorescence correction may widen the applicability of gene-specific probes in FISH analysis of tumor material. 15 refs., 3 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Remote versus in situ turbulence measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Walter

    1987-01-01

    Comparisons of in situ wind and turbulence measurements made with the NASA B-57 instrumented aircraft and those remotely made with both radar and lidar systems are presented. Turbulence measurements with a lidar or radar system as compared with those from an aircraft are the principal themes. However, some discussion of mean wind speed and direction measurements is presented. First, the principle of measuring turbulence with Doppler lidar and radar is briefly and conceptually described. The comparisons with aircraft measurements are then discussed. Two studies in particular are addressed: one uses the JAWS Doppler radar data and the other uses data gathered both with the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the the NOAA Wave Propagation Lab. gound based lidars. Finally, some conclusions and recommendations are made.

  18. Guiding neuronal development with in situ microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaehr, Bryan; Allen, Richard; Javier, David J.; Currie, John; Shear, Jason B.

    2004-11-01

    We report the ability to modify microscopic 3D topographies within dissociated cultures, providing a means to alter the development of neurons as they extend neurites and establish interconnections. In this approach, multiphoton excitation is used to focally excite noncytotoxic photosensitizers that promote protein crosslinking, such as BSA, into matrices having feature sizes 250 nm. Barriers, growth lanes, and pinning structures comprised of crosslinked proteins are fabricated under conditions that do not compromise the viability of neurons both on short time scales and over periods of days. In addition, the ability to fabricate functional microstructures from crosslinked avidin enables submicrometer localization of controllable quantities of biotinylated ligands, such as indicators and biological effectors. Feasibility is demonstrated for using in situ microfabrication to guide the contact position of cortical neurons with micrometer accuracy, opening the possibility for engineering well defined sets of synaptic interactions. biofabrication | multiphoton cell patterning | growth cone

  19. Mars in Situ Resource Utilization Technology Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.; Santago-Maldonado, Edgardo

    2012-01-01

    We have examined the technologies required to enable Mars In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) because our understanding of Mars resources has changed significantly in the last five years as a result of recent robotic missions to the red planet. Two major developments, (1) confirmation of the presence of near-surface water in the form of ice in very large amounts at high latitudes by the Phoenix Lander and (2) the likely existence of water at lower latitudes in the form of hydrates or ice in the top one meter of the regolith, have the potential to change ISRU technology selection. A brief technology assessment was performed for the most promising Mars atmospheric gas processing techniques: Reverse Water Gas Shift (RWGS) and Methanation (aka Sabatier), as well as an overview of soil processing technology to extract water from Martian soil.

  20. In situ soil remediation: Bacteria or fungi?

    SciTech Connect

    Cutright, T.J.; Lee, S.

    1995-07-01

    Contamination of the environment is not a new problem. For most of recorded history, the unwanted byproducts of industrial and residential processes have been dumped into unlined pits or nearby streams. Although disposal techniques have greatly improved, significant quantities of hazardous materials are still being released to the environment via accidental spills and leaking underground storage tanks. One particular group of contaminants of critical environmental concern is polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAH-contaminated sites typically cover large areas; therefore, the development of in situ remediation techniques such as bioremediation is strongly emphasized. In situations when inherent microorganisms are not capable of degrading the contaminants, foreign strains must be used. Bioremediation experiments were conducted to compare the remediation efficiencies of a bacteria and a fungus for an industrially PAH contaminated soil. Specifically, the use of three supplemental nutrient solutions were investigated in conjunction with the bacteria Achromobacter sp. and fungus Cunninghamella echinulata var. elegans.