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Sample records for in-situ gamma spectrometry

  1. Fluence Evaluations For Applications of In Situ Gamma-Ray Spectrometry in Non-Flat Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Kevin M.

    1999-02-28

    Evaluations of gamma-ray fluence are made for source geometries that depart from the flat ground geometry that is used in standard applications of in situ spectrometry. Geometries considered include uniform source distributions for soil mounds on top of flat terrain, cylindrical wells, and rectangular trenches. The results indicate that scaling the standard fluence values for flat terrain by the ratio of solid angle subtended by the soil to 2? leads to fluence estimates that are accurate to within a few percent. Practical applications of in situ spectrometry in non-flat terrain also appears to be simplified by the fact that the angular correction factor for a typical coaxial detector in these geometries may typically be about the same as that computed for flat ground.

  2. In situ gamma-ray spectrometry in the environment using dose rate spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Young-Yong; Kim, Chang-Jong; Chung, Kun Ho; Choi, Hee-Yeoul; Lee, Wanno; Kang, Mun Ja; Park, Sang Tae

    2016-02-01

    In order to expand the application of dose rate spectroscopy to the environment, in situ gamma-ray spectrometry was first conducted at a height of 1 m above the ground to calculate the ambient dose rate and individual dose rate at that height, as well as the radioactivity in the soil layer for the detected gamma nuclides from the dose rate spectroscopy. The reliable results could be obtained by introducing the angular correction factor to correct the G-factor with respect to incident photons distributed in a certain range of angles. The intercomparison results of radioactivity using ISOCS software, an analysis of a sample taken from the soil around a detector, and dose rate spectroscopy had a difference of <20% for 214Pb, 214Bi, 228Ac, 212Bi, 208Tl, and 40K, except for 212Pb with low-energy photons, that is, <300 keV. In addition, the drawback of using dose rate spectroscopy, that is, all gamma rays from a nuclide should be identified to accurately assess the individual dose rate, was overcome by adopting the concept of contribution ratio of the key gamma ray to the individual dose rate of a nuclide, so that it could be accurately calculated by identifying only a key gamma ray from a nuclide.

  3. Spatially-Dependent Measurements of Surface and Near-Surface Radioactive Material Using In situ Gamma Ray Spectrometry (ISGRS) For Final Status Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Chapman, A. J. Boerner, E. W. Abelquist

    2006-11-15

    In-situ, high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry (ISGRS) measurements were conducted at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) field laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of these tests was to provide analytical data for assessing how “fit for use” this technology is for detecting discrete particles in soil.

  4. Survey of the {sup 137}Cs contamination in Belgium by in-situ gamma spectrometry, a decade after the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Uyttenhove, J.; Pomme, S.; Hardenman, F.; Culot, J.P.

    1997-10-01

    The residual radiocesium concentration, nearly 10 y after the Chernobyl accident, is measured at different sites on the Belgian territory by means of in-situ gamma-spectrometry. A possible link between the rainfall at the beginning of May 1986 and the actual cesium concentration is investigated. The radiological impact of this contamination, even in the most affected regions in the Ardennes, is very small (<6 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}). 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Assay for uranium and determination of disequilibrium by means of in situ high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, Allan B.; Moxham, Robert M.; Senftle, F.E.

    1977-01-01

    Two sealed sondes, using germanium gamma-ray detectors cooled by melting propane, have been field tested to depths of 79 m in water-filled boreholes at the Pawnee Uranium Mine in Bee Co., Texas. When, used as total-count devices, the sondes are comparable in logging speed and counting rate with conventional scintillation detectors for locating zones of high radioactivity. When used with a multichannel analyzer, the sondes are detectors with such high resolution that individual lines from the complex spectra of the uranium and thorium series can be distinguished. Gamma rays from each group of the uranium series can be measured in ore zones permitting determination of the state of equilibrium at each measurement point. Series of 10-minute spectra taken at 0.3- to 0.5-m intervals in several holes showed zones where maxima from the uranium group and from the 222Rn group were displaced relative to each other. Apparent excesses of 230Th at some locations suggest that uranium-group concentrations at those locations were severalfold greater some tens of kiloyears, ago. At the current state of development a 10-minute count yields a sensitivity of about 80 ppm U308. Data reduction could in practice be accomplished in about 5 minutes. The result is practically unaffected by disequilibrium or radon contamination. In comparison with core assay, high-resolution spectrometry samples a larger volume; avoids problems due to incomplete core recovery, loss of friable material to drilling fluids, and errors in depth and marking; and permits use of less expensive drilling methods. Because gamma rays from the radionuclides are accumulated simultaneously, it also avoids the problems inherent in trying to correlate logs made in separate runs with different equipment. Continuous-motion delayed-gamma activation by a 163-?g 252Cf neutron source attached to the sonde yielded poor sensitivity. A better neutron-activation method, in which the sonde is moved in steps so as to place the detector at the previous activation point, could not be evaluated because of equipment failure.

  6. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  7. Small Scale Assessment of Spatial and Vertical Redistribution of Fukushima Fallouts Radiocaesium in Contaminated Soil Using in-situ HPGe Gamma Ray Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patin, J.; Onda, Y.; Yoda, H.; Kato, H.

    2011-12-01

    After Tohoku earthquake on March 11th 2011, the subsequent tsunami and the resulting Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster, gamma emitting particles, first release into the atmosphere, were quickly deposited on the soil surface, with potentially harmful level in the surroundings of the nuclear power plant. Thus, the evaluation of soil deposition pattern, depth migration and afterward radionuclides redistribution and export by erosion and hydrological processes is fundamental for contamination assessments and to plan future actions. Our study site is located 37km from Fukushima power plant, inside the evacuated zone. In this study, we used a bounded erosion plot of 22.1m x 5m to assess global export of sediments and 137Cs. This plot, previously cropped with tobacco, is morphologically divided into inter-rill areas separated by rills that formed into former wheel tracks. The bottom of the plot is subject to deposition of sediments. In order to determine and quantify the internal processes responsible of the export of sediment, the depth distribution of 137Cs is estimated using a portable High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. Such a portable device, associated to the high radiation levels, allow an acquisition of spatially distributed data within the plot in a reasonable time (1 min/sample). At the same time, depth distribution of 137Cs are measured using the scrapper plate technique, adapted to obtain a fine resolution in the first, highly contaminated, centimeters of soil. Finally, 137Cs depth profiles, associated with in situ and laboratory gamma spectrums acquired with the portable detector, allow for the detector calibration. Although the initial deposit can reasonably be supposed homogeneous at the plot scale, the dataset obtained 3 months later shows high spatial and temporal variability due to erosion processes. Measurements with the portable HPGe detector proved to be useful at this small scale, avoiding the needs of a large number of soil samples, and our results are promising to understand erosion at larger scale where horizontal patterns of deposition and redistribution are usually supposed homogeneous over quite larger areas.

  8. Spatial mapping of soil and radioactivity redistribution at the hillslope scale using in-situ gamma spectrometry, terrestrial laser scanning and RFID tags after the Fukushima nuclear accident fallout.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patin, Jeremy; Onda, Yuichi; Noguchi, Takehiro; Parsons, Anthony

    2013-04-01

    In March 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster, triggered by the Tohoku earthquake and the consequent tsunami, released a large amount of radionuclides in the environment. To provide a rapid assessment of the soil contamination and its potential redistribution, intensive scientific monitoring has been conducted since July 2011 in our study site, located in the Yamakiya district of Kawamata town, in Fukushima prefecture, Japan, about 37 km from the power plant. In this paper, we summarize and analyze a dataset combining multiple innovative methods deployed inside a 5m x 22m bounded hillslope plot. In addition to runoff volumes and sediments radiocesium concentrations, each major rainfall event was followed by in situ gamma spectrometry measurements. In 2012, to trace the complex behavior of sediments inside the plot, about 300 RFID (Radio-Frequency IDentification) tags representing coarse sediments were scattered and their spatial position was periodically checked using a total station. Finally, several high resolutions Digital Elevation Models were acquired with a terrestrial laser scanner to assess the surface structure and changes. The observed processes at the event scale include interrill and rill erosion, as well as local deposition and remobilization phenomenon. Not only do they directly provide information on the erosion spatio-temporal variability and the associated radionuclides transfers, but combined together they can constitute a solid basis to improve and challenge process-based distributed erosion models.

  9. Uncertainty analysis of in-situ gamma spectrometry measurements of air cleaning filter cartridges and 200 L drums by a HPGe detector.

    PubMed

    Slaninka, Alojz; Slávik, Ondrej; Necas, Vladimír

    2010-01-01

    This work deals with most significant sources of uncertainty in determination of radionuclides massic activity in 200 L drums with radioactive waste (RAW) from decommissioning of nuclear power plant (NPP) A1 and operational air cleaning filters coming from different parts of NPP's ventilation system. It turned out that the most significant source of uncertainty is determination of photo peak detection efficiency, in particular measurement geometry. The detection efficiency of HPGe detector has been determined by calculation using ISOCS software (In Situ Object Counting System) and detector characteristics delivered by the manufacturer (LABSOCS). The detector efficiency is influenced by various factors like measurement geometry, deviation from standard geometry, environmental characteristics, sample properties (density, material composition), used collimator etc. Mentioned factors and their contributions to the uncertainty of detection efficiency and thus to the total uncertainty of massic activity determination have been individually evaluated in the paper. The main part of the work consists of evaluation of maximum uncertainty factor due to presence of hypothetical point source in measurement volume for both types of measurement geometry. PMID:19945884

  10. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis. 1992 Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  11. Aerogel dust collection for in situ mass spectrometry analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S. M.; Anderson, M. S.; Davies, A. G.; Kirby, J. P.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.

    2015-02-01

    The current technique for conducting in situ mass spectroscopic analysis of dust around extraterrestrial bodies is to have the dust impact a solid plate and analyze the atoms and molecular fragments resulting from the high speed impact. Due to the fact that the kinetic energy from the impact is converted primarily to thermal energy, much of the organic compounds present in the dust may be significantly altered or destroyed. To avoid this problem, aerogel could be used to capture the dust grains, largely intact, maintaining the integrity of the organic compounds in the interior of the dust grains. To demonstrate that organic molecules, present as minor components of silica particles, would survive hypervelocity capture in aerogel and can then be analyzed with mass spectrometry, several light gas gun impact tests and analyses were conducted. Fine particles containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were captured in aerogel at 5.5 km s-1. The flow of metastable helium from a Direct Analysis Real Time (DART) source was used to desorb and ionize the organics, which were then analyzed with a mass spectrometer. The PAHs were detected and identified by the DART-MS, demonstrating that this method could be used on future flight instruments.

  12. Time series data from routine in situ gamma spectroscopy measurements.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Helmut W; Hettwig, Bernd

    2013-11-01

    Time series of in situ gamma spectroscopy data from 6 sites, obtained over a period of 13 years as part of a routine surveillance program, have been investigated for variability, reproducibility and occurrence of trends. Natural isotopes ((40)K, (208)Tl, (212)Pb and (214)Pb) show variability up to a factor of 2, with time patterns varying from site to site. At five (level) sites (137)Cs values decreased at a rate higher than given by the physical half-life, consistent with literature data on migration of Cs. At one (downhill) site, an increase of (137)Cs with time was observed. The finding can be explained by erosion processes from uphill territories. The observed variations were larger than the experimental uncertainty, and the equipment long-term stability appeared to be satisfactory. It can be concluded that the obtained routine in situ data provide a valuable data pool with potential usefulness for scientific work. PMID:23395136

  13. MONITORING GENETIC & METABOLIC POTENTIAL FOR IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION: MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of DOE sites are contaminated with mixtures of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) such as carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, perchloroethylene, and trichloroethylene. At many of these sites, in situ microbial bioremediation is an attractive strategy for cleanup, sin...

  14. Airborne Gamma-Spectrometry in Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Butterweck, Gernot; Bucher, Benno; Rybach, Ladislaus

    2008-08-07

    Airborne gamma-spectrometry is able to obtain fast radiological information over large areas. The airborne gamma-spectrometry unit deployed in Switzerland by the Swiss National Emergency Operations Centre (NEOC) consists of a Swiss army Super Puma helicopter equipped with four NaI-Detectors with a total volume of 17 liters, associated electronics and a real-time data evaluation and mapping unit developed by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) and the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). The operational readiness of the airborne gamma-spectrometry system is validated in annual exercises of one week duration. Data from 2005 and 2006 exercises are represented in maps of {sup 137}Cs activity concentration for two towns located in southern and western Switzerland. An indicator of man-made radioactivity (MMGC ratio) is demonstrated for an area with four different types of nuclear installations. The intercomparison between airborne gamma-spectrometry and ground measurements showed good agreement between both methods.

  15. Airborne Gamma-Spectrometry in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterweck, Gernot; Bucher, Benno; Rybach, Ladislaus

    2008-08-01

    Airborne gamma-spectrometry is able to obtain fast radiological information over large areas. The airborne gamma-spectrometry unit deployed in Switzerland by the Swiss National Emergency Operations Centre (NEOC) consists of a Swiss army Super Puma helicopter equipped with four NaI-Detectors with a total volume of 17 liters, associated electronics and a real-time data evaluation and mapping unit developed by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) and the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). The operational readiness of the airborne gamma-spectrometry system is validated in annual exercises of one week duration. Data from 2005 and 2006 exercises are represented in maps of 137Cs activity concentration for two towns located in southern and western Switzerland. An indicator of man-made radioactivity (MMGC ratio) is demonstrated for an area with four different types of nuclear installations. The intercomparison between airborne gamma-spectrometry and ground measurements showed good agreement between both methods.

  16. Mass spectrometry imaging for in situ kinetic histochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Katherine B.; Bowen, Benjamin P.; McAlhany, Stephanie; Huang, Yurong; Price, John C.; Mao, Jian-hua; Hellerstein, Marc; Northen, Trent R.

    2013-01-01

    Tissues are composed of diverse cell subpopulations each with distinct metabolic characteristics that influence overall behavior. Unfortunately, traditional histopathology imaging techniques are ‘blind’ to the spatially ordered metabolic dynamics within tissue. While mass spectrometry imaging enables spatial mapping of molecular composition, resulting images are only a static snapshot in time of molecules involved in highly dynamic processes; kinetic information of flux through metabolic pathways is lacking. To address this limitation, we developed kinetic mass spectrometry imaging (kMSI), a novel technique integrating soft desorption/ionization mass spectrometry with clinically accepted in vivo metabolic labeling of tissue with deuterium to generate images of kinetic information of biological processes. Applied to a tumor, kMSI revealed heterogeneous spatial distributions of newly synthesized versus pre-existing lipids, with altered lipid synthesis patterns distinguishing region-specific intratumor subpopulations. Images also enabled identification and correlation of metabolic activity of specific lipids found in tumor regions of varying grade. PMID:23584513

  17. Mass Spectrometry Guided In Situ Proteolysis to Obtain Crystals for X-ray Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Gheyi, Tarun; Rodgers, Logan; Romero, Richard; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.

    2012-04-30

    A strategy for increasing the efficiency of protein crystallization/structure determination with mass spectrometry has been developed. This approach combines insights from limited proteolysis/mass spectrometry and crystallization via in situ proteolysis. The procedure seeks to identify protease-resistant polypeptide chain segments from purified proteins on the time-scale of crystal formation, and subsequently crystallizing the target protein in the presence of the optimal protease at the right relative concentration. We report our experience with 10 proteins of unknown structure, two of which yielded high-resolution X-ray structures. The advantage of this approach comes from its ability to select only those structure determination candidates that are likely to benefit from application of in situ proteolysis, using conditions most likely to result in formation of a stable proteolytic digestion product suitable for crystallization.

  18. Novel Equipment for In Situ Alpha Spectrometry with Good Energy Resolution.

    PubMed

    Pöllänen, Roy; Turunen, Jani; Karhunen, Tero; Peräjärvi, Kari; Siiskonen, Teemu; Wirta, Markus; Turunen, Asko

    2015-12-01

    An approach for in situ alpha spectrometry that allows one to measure the spectra with good energy resolution at ambient air pressure has been developed recently. Here, novel equipment is introduced for in situ measurements. Neither vacuum pumps nor radiochemical sample processing are necessary. Flat and smooth surfaces are ideal sources provided that the radionuclide contamination represents a thin layer on the surface. Other sources, such as air filters or evaporation residues, are also possible. Alpha particle collimation is used to obtain good energy resolution, but the equipment can also be used without collimation. An estimation of the detection efficiency with and without collimation is given using an extended area source containing Am. PMID:26509627

  19. In situ mapping of nutrient uptake in the rhizosphere using nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Clode, Peta L; Kilburn, Matt R; Jones, David L; Stockdale, Elizabeth A; Cliff, John B; Herrmann, Anke M; Murphy, Daniel V

    2009-12-01

    Plant roots and microorganisms interact and compete for nutrients within the rhizosphere, which is considered one of the most biologically complex systems on Earth. Unraveling the nitrogen (N) cycle is key to understanding and managing nutrient flows in terrestrial ecosystems, yet to date it has proved impossible to analyze and image N transfer in situ within such a complex system at a scale relevant to soil-microbe-plant interactions. Linking the physical heterogeneity of soil to biological processes marks a current frontier in plant and soil sciences. Here we present a new and widely applicable approach that allows imaging of the spatial and temporal dynamics of the stable isotope (15)N assimilated within the rhizosphere. This approach allows visualization and measurement of nutrient resource capture between competing plant cells and microorganisms. For confirmation we show the correlative use of nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy, to image differential partitioning of (15)NH(4)(+) between plant roots and native soil microbial communities at the submicron scale. It is shown that (15)N compounds can be detected and imaged in situ in individual microorganisms in the soil matrix and intracellularly within the root. Nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry has potential to allow the study of assimilatory processes at the submicron level in a wide range of applications involving plants, microorganisms, and animals. PMID:19812187

  20. Quantification of cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) camouflage: a study of color and luminance using in situ spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Akkaynak, Derya; Allen, Justine J; Mäthger, Lydia M; Chiao, Chuan-Chin; Hanlon, Roger T

    2013-03-01

    Cephalopods are renowned for their ability to adaptively camouflage on diverse backgrounds. Sepia officinalis camouflage body patterns have been characterized spectrally in the laboratory but not in the field due to the challenges of dynamic natural light fields and the difficulty of using spectrophotometric instruments underwater. To assess cuttlefish color match in their natural habitats, we studied the spectral properties of S. officinalis and their backgrounds on the Aegean coast of Turkey using point-by-point in situ spectrometry. Fifteen spectrometry datasets were collected from seven cuttlefish; radiance spectra from animal body components and surrounding substrates were measured at depths shallower than 5 m. We quantified luminance and color contrast of cuttlefish components and background substrates in the eyes of hypothetical di- and trichromatic fish predators. Additionally, we converted radiance spectra to sRGB color space to simulate their in situ appearance to a human observer. Within the range of natural colors at our study site, cuttlefish closely matched the substrate spectra in a variety of body patterns. Theoretical calculations showed that this effect might be more pronounced at greater depths. We also showed that a non-biological method ("Spectral Angle Mapper"), commonly used for spectral shape similarity assessment in the field of remote sensing, shows moderate correlation to biological measures of color contrast. This performance is comparable to that of a traditional measure of spectral shape similarity, hue and chroma. This study is among the first to quantify color matching of camouflaged cuttlefish in the wild. PMID:23254307

  1. Advanced Mass Spectrometry for In Situ Analysis of Comet and Primitive Asteroid Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getty, Stephanie; Mahaffy, P. R.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Benna, M.; Arevalo, R. D.; Cornish, T.; Elsila, J.

    2013-10-01

    The study of the composition of comets and icy, carbonaceous asteroids has benefitted greatly by sustained efforts in recent years to observe and conduct spectroscopy on these objects from terrestrial and orbital observatories. Our ability to classify these small bodies and conduct comparisons between individual objects has broadened our understanding of the commonalities and diversity that they exhibit. To contribute to and complement our understanding of the formation, distribution, and evolution of small bodies throughout the solar system, it will be critical to form connections between broad surveys of coma composition and in situ measurements of evolved compounds at various distances from the nuclei of representative objects. Future missions that can inform our understanding of coma-nucleus interactions could take the form of a close flyby, an orbiter, or a lander, or some combination. We present recent efforts by our group to develop compact but capable analytical instrumentation that spans the scope of mission opportunities, offering advanced mass spectrometric analysis of the composition of near-surface volatiles and the parent species at the surface. It is now feasible, with mature instrumentation and recent advances in mass spectrometry and sampling, to address the connection between surface materials and the evolution of gases and small organic species, thereby establishing the relationship between in situ measurements of parent compounds and remote observations of product species in the coma. Three instrument development efforts will be presented, spanning the opportunities for sampling the in situ composition of a comet or active asteroid: (1) highly sensitive and mature mass analyzers to sample volatile production near the surface of the body, (2) a gas and dust collector that is optimized for the analysis of trace volatiles, such as astrochemically important small organics, and dust that may be lofted by surface activity, and (3) laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry that is well suited to landed analyses of non-volatile inorganic and organic composition of nucleus surface materials.

  2. Laser Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry for Future In Situ Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Getty, S. A.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Cornish, T.; Ecelberger, S. A.; Li, X.; Floyd, M. A. Merrill; Chanover, N.; Uckert, K.; Voelz, D.; Xiao, X.; Tawalbeh, R.; Glenar, D.; Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LD-TOF-MS) is a versatile, low-complexity instrument class that holds significant promise for future landed in situ planetary missions that emphasize compositional analysis of surface materials. Here we describe a 5kg-class instrument that is capable of detecting and analyzing a variety of analytes directly from rock or ice samples. Through laboratory studies of a suite of representative samples, we show that detection and analysis of key mineral composition, small organics, and particularly, higher molecular weight organics are well suited to this instrument design. A mass range exceeding 100,000 Da has recently been demonstrated. We describe recent efforts in instrument prototype development and future directions that will enhance our analytical capabilities targeting organic mixtures on primitive and icy bodies. We present results on a series of standards, simulated mixtures, and meteoritic samples.

  3. MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging for Visualizing In Situ Metabolism of Endogenous Metabolites and Dietary Phytochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Yoshinori; Miura, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the spatial distribution of bioactive small molecules is indispensable for elucidating their biological or pharmaceutical roles. Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) enables determination of the distribution of ionizable molecules present in tissue sections of whole-body or single heterogeneous organ samples by direct ionization and detection. This emerging technique is now widely used for in situ label-free molecular imaging of endogenous or exogenous small molecules. MSI allows the simultaneous visualization of many types of molecules including a parent molecule and its metabolites. Thus, MSI has received much attention as a potential tool for pathological analysis, understanding pharmaceutical mechanisms, and biomarker discovery. On the other hand, several issues regarding the technical limitations of MSI are as of yet still unresolved. In this review, we describe the capabilities of the latest matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-MSI technology for visualizing in situ metabolism of endogenous metabolites or dietary phytochemicals (food factors), and also discuss the technical problems and new challenges, including MALDI matrix selection and metabolite identification, that need to be addressed for effective and widespread application of MSI in the diverse fields of biological, biomedical, and nutraceutical (food functionality) research. PMID:24957029

  4. Planetary Geochemistry Techniques: Probing In-Situ with Neutron and Gamma Rays (PING) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Burger, D.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lin, L.; McClanahan, T.; Nankung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Probing In situ with Neutrons and Gamma rays (PING) instrument is a promising planetary science application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology so successfully used in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth. The objective of our technology development program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (NASA/GSFC) Astrochemistry Laboratory is to extend the application of neutron interrogation techniques to landed in situ planetary composition measurements by using a 14 MeV Pulsed Neutron Generator (PNG) combined with neutron and gamma ray detectors, to probe the surface and subsurface of planetary bodies without the need to drill. We are thus working to bring the PING instrument to the point where it can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Venus, asteroids, comets and the satellites of the outer planets.

  5. Rapid In-Situ Measurement of Gamma Activity in Soil for Environmental Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeycutt, T. K.

    2003-12-01

    In-situ measurements of gamma radiation in soil are used as a rapid, low-cost, non-intrusive alternative to conventional sampling and analysis methods in the preliminary assessment of environmental impacts to watersheds at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The method resolves the ambient gamma-radiation field near ground surface into background and residual components and provides radionuclide-specific soil activity determination. The efficacy of the method has been evaluated and compares favorably with conventional gamma-PHA soil analyses and aerial survey data. The method has garnered regulatory approval and is being successfully deployed to evaluate the impact of Cs-137 contamination from CERCLA sites.

  6. In situ Analysis of Organic Compounds on Mars using Chemical Derivatization and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Buch, A.; Cabane, M.; Coll, P.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2005-01-01

    One of the core science objectives of NASA's 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission is to determine the past or present habitability of Mars. The search for key organic compounds relevant to terrestrial life will be an important part of that assessment. We have developed a protocol for the analysis of amino acids and carboxylic acids in Mars analogue materials using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). As shown, a variety of carboxylic acids were readily identified in soil collected from the Atacama Desert in Chile at part-per-billion levels by GCMS after extraction and chemical derivatization using the reagent N,N-tert.-butyl (dimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). Several derivatized amino acids including glycine and alanine were also detected by GCMS in the Atacama soil at lower concentrations (chromatogram not shown). Lacking derivatization capability, the Viking pyrolysis GCMS instruments could not have detected amino acids and carboxylic acids, since these non-volatile compounds require chemical transformation into volatile species that are stable in a GC column. We are currently optimizing the chemical extraction and derivatization technique for in situ GCMS analysis on Mars. Laboratory results of analyses of Atacama Desert samples and other Mars analogue materials using this protocol will be presented.

  7. In situ characterizing membrane lipid phenotype of breast cancer cells using mass spectrometry profiling

    PubMed Central

    He, Manwen; Guo, Shuai; Li, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Lipid composition in cell membrane is closely associated with cell characteristics. Here, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization- Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was employed to in situ determine membrane components of human mammary epithelial cells (MCF-10?A) and six different breast cancer cell lines (i.e., BT-20, MCF-7, SK-BR-3, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-157, and MDA-MB-361) without any lipid extraction and separation. Partial least-square discriminant analysis indicated that changes in the levels of these membrane lipids were closely correlated with the types of breast cell lines. Elevated levels of polyunsaturated lipids in MCF-10?A cells relative to six breast cancer cells and in BT-20 cells relative to other breast cancer cell lines were detected. The Western blotting assays indicated that the expression of five lipogenesis-related enzymes (i.e., fatty acid synthase 1(FASN1), stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1), stearoyl-CoA desaturase 5 (SCD5), choline kinase ? (CK?), and sphingomyelin synthase 1) was associated with the types of the breast cells, and that the SCD1 level in MCF-7 cells was significantly increased relative to other breast cell lines. Our findings suggest that elevated expression levels of FASN1, SCD1, SCD5, and CK? may closely correlated with enhanced levels of saturated and monounsaturated lipids in breast cancer cell lines. PMID:26061164

  8. In situ cell-by-cell imaging and analysis of small cell populations by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Bindesh; Patt, Joseph M; Vertes, Akos

    2011-04-15

    Molecular imaging by mass spectrometry (MS) is emerging as a tool to determine the distribution of proteins, lipids, and metabolites in tissues. The existing imaging methods, however, mostly rely on predefined rectangular grids for sampling that ignore the natural cellular organization of the tissue. Here we demonstrate that laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) MS can be utilized for in situ cell-by-cell imaging of plant tissues. The cell-by-cell molecular image of the metabolite cyanidin, the ion responsible for purple pigmentation in onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells, correlated well with the color of cells in the tissue. Chemical imaging using single-cells as voxels reflects the spatial distribution of biochemical differences within a tissue without the distortion stemming from sampling multiple cells within the laser focal spot. Microsampling by laser ablation also has the benefit of enabling the analysis of very small cell populations for biochemical heterogeneity. For example, with a ?30 ?m ablation spot we were able to analyze 3-4 achlorophyllous cells within an oil gland on a sour orange (Citrus aurantium) leaf. To explore cell-to-cell variations within and between tissues, multivariate statistical analysis on LAESI-MS data from epidermal cells of an A. cepa bulb and a C. aurantium leaf and from human buccal epithelial cell populations was performed using the method of orthogonal projections to latent structures discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). The OPLS-DA analysis of mass spectra, containing over 300 peaks each, provided guidance in identifying a small number of metabolites most responsible for the variance between the cell populations. These metabolites can be viewed as promising candidates for biomarkers that, however, require further verification. PMID:21388149

  9. Determination of tellurium by hydride generation with in situ trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusiewicz, Henryk; Krawczyk, Magdalena

    2007-03-01

    The analytical performance of coupled hydride generation — integrated atom trap (HG-IAT) atomizer flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) system was evaluated for determination of Te in reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment), coal fly ash and garlic. Tellurium, using formation of H 2Te vapors, is atomized in air-acetylene flame-heated IAT. A new design HG-IAT-FAAS hyphenated technique that would exceed the operational capabilities of existing arrangements (a water-cooled single silica tube, double-slotted quartz tube or an "integrated trap") was investigated. An improvement in detection limit was achieved compared with using either of the above atom trapping techniques separately. The concentration detection limit, defined as 3 times the blank standard deviation (3 ?), was 0.9 ng mL - 1 for Te. For a 2 min in situ pre-concentration time (sample volume of 2 mL), sensitivity enhancement compared to flame AAS, was 222 fold, using the hydride generation — atom trapping technique. The sensitivity can be further improved by increasing the collection time. The precision, expressed as RSD, was 7.0% ( n = 6) for Te. The designs studied include slotted tube, single silica tube and integrated atom trap-cooled atom traps. The accuracy of the method was verified using a certified reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment) by aqueous standard calibration curves. The measured Te contents of the reference material was in agreement with the information value. The method was successfully applied to the determination of tellurium in coal fly ash and garlic.

  10. In situ capture gamma-ray analysis of coal in an oversize borehole

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mikesell, J.L.; Dotson, D.W.; Senftle, F.E.; Zych, R.S.; Koger, J.; Goldman, L.

    1983-01-01

    In situ capture gamma-ray analysis in a coal seam using a high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer in a close-fitting borehole has been reported previously. In order to check the accuracy of the method under adverse conditions, similar measurements were made by means of a small-diameter sonde in an oversize borehole in the Pittsburgh seam, Greene County, Pennsylvania. The hole was 5 times the diameter of the sonde, a ratio that substantially increased the contribution of water (hydrogen) to the total spectral count and reduced the size of the sample measured by the detector. The total natural count, the 40K,count, and the intensities of capture gamma rays from Si, Ca, H, and Al were determined as a function of depth above, through, and below the coal seam. From these logs, the depth and width of the coal seam and its partings were determined. Spectra were accumulated in the seam for 1 h periods by using neutron sources of different strengths. From the spectra obtained by means of several 252Cf neutron sources of different sizes, the ultimate elemental analysis and ash content were determined. The results were not as good as those obtained previously in a close-fitting borehole. However, the results did improve with successively larger source-to-detector distances, i.e.,as the count contribution due to hydrogen in the water decreased. It was concluded that in situ borehole analyses should be made in relatively close-fitting boreholes. ?? 1983.

  11. Usefulness of systematic in situ gamma-ray surveys in the radiometric characterization of natural systems with poorly contrasting geological features (examples from NE of Portugal).

    PubMed

    Duarte, Pedro; Mateus, António; Paiva, Isabel; Trindade, Romão; Santos, Pedro

    2011-02-01

    This paper focuses on the starting point of various studies that are being carried out in two possible locations being considered to host a hypothetical site for a repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) produced in Portugal in compliance with international requirements on the long-term safety of this kind of repository. Previous studies concerning the geology of the much larger geographical areas where these locations are included were fundamental in the choice of these locations and for the design of the survey strategy. One of the fundamental assessment studies during the site-selection is the overall radiological characterization of the locations and its relation to the geology. This paper pretends to show the adequability of using a fast and reasonably inexpensive survey technique such as in situ gamma-ray portable detectors, to access the radiometric response of the systems in study by providing the radiometric mapping of the areas. The existence of adequate radiometric maps represents a critical pre-requisite to constrain both the number and spatial distribution of samples to be collected for further analysis, sustaining as well the subsequent extrapolation of results needed to fully characterise the surveyed system. Both areas were surveyed using portable gamma-ray spectrometers with NaI(Tl) detectors. In situ gamma-ray measurements have clearly shown not only the poorly contrasting geological features, but also their differences representing: (i) a deformed/metamorphosed ophiolite complex and (ii) a monotonous meta-sedimentary sequence. The radiometric maps obtained have show heterogeneities that reflect mostly changes in rock-forming mineral assemblages, even in the presence of small variations of gamma radiation. These maps support objective criteria about the number/distribution of samples to be collected for subsequent comprehensive studies and reinforce the valuable contribution of in situ gamma spectrometry to assess, in radiological terms, the prevalent geological features. PMID:20971016

  12. Detection of soil microorganism in situ by combined gas chromatography mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, M.; Duxbury, J. M.; Francis, A. J.; Adamson, J.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental tests were made to determine whether analysis of volatile metabolic products, formed in situ, is a viable procedure for an extraterrestrial life detection system. Laboratory experiments, carried out under anaerobic conditions with addition of carbon source, extended to include a variety of soils and additional substrates. In situ experiments were conducted without amendment using a vacuum sampling system.

  13. Active Neutron and Gamma-Ray Instrumentation for In Situ Planetary Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, A.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the development of an instrument capable of detailed in situ bulk geochemical analysis of the surface of planets, moons, asteroids, and comets. This instrument technology uses a pulsed neutron generator to excite the solid materials of a planet and measures the resulting neutron and gamma-ray emission with its detector system. These time-resolved neutron and gamma-ray data provide detailed information about the bulk elemental composition, chemical context, and density distribution of the soil within 50 cm of the surface. While active neutron scattering and neutron-induced gamma-ray techniques have been used extensively for terrestrial nuclear well logging applications, our goal is to apply these techniques to surface instruments for use on any solid solar system body. As described, experiments at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center use a prototype neutron-induced gamma-ray instrument and the resulting data presented show the promise of this technique for becoming a versatile, robust, workhorse technology for planetary science, and exploration of any of the solid bodies in the solar system. The detection of neutrons at the surface also provides useful information about the material. This paper focuses on the data provided by the gamma-ray detector.

  14. The Probing In-Situ With Neutron and Gamma Rays (PING) Instrument for Planetary Composition Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.

    2012-01-01

    The Probing In situ with Neutrons and Gamma rays (PING) instrument (formerly named PNG-GRAND) [I] experiment is an innovative application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology successfully used in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth over many decades. The objective of our active neutron-gamma ray technology program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC) is to bring PING to the point where it can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Venus, asteroids, comets and the satellites of the outer planets and measure their bulk surface and subsurface elemental composition without the need to drill into the surface. Gamma-Ray Spectrometers (GRS) have been incorporated into numerous orbital planetary science missions. While orbital measurements can map a planet, they have low spatial and elemental sensitivity due to the low surface gamma ray emission rates reSUlting from using cosmic rays as an excitation source, PING overcomes this limitation in situ by incorporating a powerful neutron excitation source that permits significantly higher elemental sensitivity elemental composition measurements. PING combines a 14 MeV deuterium-tritium Pulsed Neutron Generator (PNG) with a gamma ray spectrometer and two neutron detectors to produce a landed instrument that can determine the elemental composition of a planet down to 30 - 50 cm below the planet's surface, The penetrating nature of .5 - 10 MeV gamma rays and 14 MeV neutrons allows such sub-surface composition measurements to be made without the need to drill into or otherwise disturb the planetary surface, thus greatly simplifying the lander design, We are cun'ently testing a PING prototype at a unique outdoor neutron instrumentation test facility at NASA/GSFC that provides two large (1.8 m x 1.8 m x ,9 m) granite and basalt test formations placed outdoors in an empty field, Since an independent trace elemental analysis has been performed on both these Columbia River basalt and Concord Gray granite materials, these large samples present two known standards with which to compare PING's experimentally measured elemental composition results, We will present both gamma ray and neutron experimental results from PING measurements of the granite and basalt test formations in various layering configurations and compare the results to the known composition.

  15. Rapid in situ identification of bioactive compounds in plants by in vivo nanospray high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Peng, Yue'e; Dan, Conghui; Shuai, Qin; Hu, Shenghong

    2015-03-25

    A method for the rapid in situ identification of bioactive compounds in fresh plants has been developed using in vivo nanospray coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS). Using a homemade in vivo nanospray ion source, the plant liquid was drawn out from a target region and ionized in situ. The ionized bioactive compounds were then identified using Q-Orbitrap HR-MS. The accurate mass measurements of these bioactive compounds were performed by full-scan or selected ion monitoring (SIM), and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used in the structural elucidation. Without sample pretreatment, 12 bioactive compounds in 7 different plant species were identified, namely, isoalliin in onion; butylphthalide in celery; N-methylpelletierine, pelletierine, and pseudopelletierine in pomegranate; chlorogenic acid in crabapple; solamargine, solasonine, and solasodine in nightshade; aloin and aloe-emodin in aloe; and menthone in mint. This work demonstrates that in vivo nanospray HR-MS is a good method for rapid in situ identification of bioactive compounds in plants. PMID:25749134

  16. Gamma spectrometry of the minor bodies of the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Surkov, Yu.A.; Moskaleva, L.P.; Manvelyan, O.S.

    1987-01-01

    The authors investigate the possibility of determining the elemental composition of the surfaces of minor bodies of the solar system (asteroids, the Martian satellites Phobos and Deimos, etc.) using spacecraft-based ..gamma..-spectrometry. The dependence of ..gamma..-photon flux on altitude above the body was calculated for body radii from 13 to 500 km. Estimates were made of the sensitivity of the determination of basic rock-forming elements with respect to changes in geometry of a factor of two, using ..gamma..-spectrometry with a 100 mm by 100 mm crystal of NaI(Tl). Finally, the time required to determine the stipulated characteristic ..gamma..-radiation of surface rocks with the given precision was derived as a function of altitude.

  17. Time-resolved Neutron-gamma-ray Data Acquisition for in Situ Subsurface Planetary Geochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodnarik, Julie G.; Burger, Dan Michael; Burger, A.; Evans, L. G.; Parsons, A. M.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Starr R. D.; Stassun, K. G.

    2013-01-01

    The current gamma-ray/neutron instrumentation development effort at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center aims to extend the use of active pulsed neutron interrogation techniques to probe the subsurface elemental composition of planetary bodies in situ. Previous NASA planetary science missions, that used neutron and/or gamma-ray spectroscopy instruments, have relied on neutrons produced from galactic cosmic rays. One of the distinguishing features of this effort is the inclusion of a high intensity 14.1 MeV pulsed neutron generator synchronized with a custom data acquisition system to time each event relative to the pulse. With usually only one opportunity to collect data, it is difficult to set a priori time-gating windows to obtain the best possible results. Acquiring time-tagged, event-by-event data from nuclear induced reactions provides raw data sets containing channel/energy, and event time for each gamma ray or neutron detected. The resulting data set can be plotted as a function of time or energy using optimized analysis windows after the data are acquired. Time windows can now be chosen to produce energy spectra that yield the most statistically significant and accurate elemental composition results that can be derived from the complete data set. The advantages of post-processing gamma-ray time-tagged event-by-event data in experimental tests using our prototype instrument will be demonstrated.

  18. Photon energy conversion efficiency in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Švec, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Photon energy conversion efficiency coefficient is presented as the ratio of total energy registered in the collected spectrum to the emitted photon energy. This parameter is calculated from the conventional gamma-ray histogram and in principle is not affected by coincidence phenomena. This feature makes it particularly useful for calibration and measurement of radionuclide samples at close geometries. It complements the number of efficiency parameters used in gamma-ray spectrometry and can partly change the view as to how the gamma-ray spectra are displayed and processed. PMID:26474210

  19. Monte Carlo based calibration of scintillation detectors for laboratory and in situ gamma ray measurements.

    PubMed

    van der Graaf, E R; Limburg, J; Koomans, R L; Tijs, M

    2011-03-01

    The calibration of scintillation detectors for gamma radiation in a well characterized setup can be transferred to other geometries using Monte Carlo simulations to account for the differences between the calibration and the other geometry. In this study a calibration facility was used that is constructed from bricks of well-known activity concentrations of ??K and of radionuclides from the ²³?U- and ²³²Th-series. Transfer of the calibration was attempted to a Marinelli beaker geometry with the detector inside a lead shield and to an in situ application with the detector positioned on a sand bed. In general this resulted in good correspondence (within 5-10%) between the activity concentrations derived using the transferred calibration and activities that were derived by independent measurements. Some discrepancies were identified that were attributed to coincident summing in the natural decay series and interference of radon. PMID:21251733

  20. In Situ Mapping of Nutrient Uptake in the Rhizosphere Using Nanoscale Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Clode, Peta L.; Kilburn, Matt R.; Jones, David L.; Stockdale, Elizabeth A.; Cliff, John B.; Herrmann, Anke M.; Murphy, Daniel V.

    2009-01-01

    Plant roots and microorganisms interact and compete for nutrients within the rhizosphere, which is considered one of the most biologically complex systems on Earth. Unraveling the nitrogen (N) cycle is key to understanding and managing nutrient flows in terrestrial ecosystems, yet to date it has proved impossible to analyze and image N transfer in situ within such a complex system at a scale relevant to soil-microbe-plant interactions. Linking the physical heterogeneity of soil to biological processes marks a current frontier in plant and soil sciences. Here we present a new and widely applicable approach that allows imaging of the spatial and temporal dynamics of the stable isotope 15N assimilated within the rhizosphere. This approach allows visualization and measurement of nutrient resource capture between competing plant cells and microorganisms. For confirmation we show the correlative use of nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy, to image differential partitioning of 15NH4+ between plant roots and native soil microbial communities at the submicron scale. It is shown that 15N compounds can be detected and imaged in situ in individual microorganisms in the soil matrix and intracellularly within the root. Nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry has potential to allow the study of assimilatory processes at the submicron level in a wide range of applications involving plants, microorganisms, and animals. PMID:19812187

  1. Ion funnel augmented Mars atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry for in situ detection of organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Paul V; Hodyss, Robert; Beauchamp, J L

    2014-11-01

    Laser desorption is an attractive technique for in situ sampling of organics on Mars given its relative simplicity. We demonstrate that under simulated Martian conditions (~2.5 Torr CO(2)) laser desorption of neutral species (e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), followed by ionization with a simple ultraviolet light source such as a discharge lamp, offers an effective means of sampling organics for detection and identification with a mass spectrometer. An electrodynamic ion funnel is employed to provide efficient ion collection in the ambient Martian environment. This experimental methodology enables in situ sampling of Martian organics with minimal complexity and maximum flexibility. PMID:24986759

  2. Investigating the Origin and Evolution of Venus with In Situ Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainer, M. G.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Johnson, N. M.; Glaze, L. S.

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of noble gas abundances on Venus remain a high priority for planetary science. These studies are only possible through in situ measurement, and can be accomplished by a modern neutral mass spectrometer (NMS) such as that developed at NASA Goddard, based on flight-proven technology. Here we show how the measurement of noble gases can be secured using demonstrated enrichment techniques.

  3. Investigating the Origin and Evolution of Venus with In Situ Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainer, M. G.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Johnson, N. M.; Glaze, L. S.

    2015-10-01

    Measurement of noble gas abundances on Venus remain a high priority for planetary science [1,2]. These studies are only possible through in situ measurement, and can be accomplished by a modern neutral mass spectrometer (NMS) such as that developed at NASA Goddard, based on flight-proven technology. Here we show how the measurement of noble gases can be secured using demonstrated enrichment techniques.

  4. Natural radioactivity of paleozoic and mesozoic sedimentary rocks from the Upper Silesian Coal Basin borders (Poland) — in situ gamma ray measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizurek, G.; Dorda, J.

    2006-01-01

    Sedimentary rocks from the borders of the Upper Silesian Coal Basin are the most popular origin of building materials in whole Silesia region. In situ gamma ray spectrometry was used to determine the activity concentration of nuclides from U series, Th series and potassium 40K in almost every kind of sedimentary rocks outcropping in the studied region. Measured activity concentration of particular nuclides such as 40K, U series, and Th series are mostly not higher than average activity concentrations of these nuclides in the continental crust. However, there are some significant exceptions such as clays from Blanowice and Krasiejow. In spite of that there isn’t any reason to stop using these rocks as building or other industrial material sources.

  5. In situ calibration of a high-resolution gamma-ray borehole sonde for assaying uranium-bearing sandstone deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, J.H., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A method is presented for assaying radioactive sandstone deposits in situ by using a high-resolution borehole gamma-ray spectrometer. Gamma-ray photopeaks from the same spectrum acquired to analyze a sample are used to characterize gamma-ray attenuation properties, from which a calibration function is determined. Assay results are independent of differences between properties of field samples and those of laboratory or test-hole standards generally used to calibrate a borehole sonde. This assaying technique is also independent of the state of radioactive disequilibrium that usually exists in nature among members of the natural-decay chains. ?? 1985.

  6. In situ biomarker discovery and label-free molecular histopathological diagnosis of lung cancer by ambient mass spectrometry imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiegang; He, Jiuming; Mao, Xinxin; Bi, Ying; Luo, Zhigang; Guo, Chengan; Tang, Fei; Xu, Xin; Wang, Xiaohao; Wang, Mingrong; Chen, Jie; Abliz, Zeper

    2015-01-01

    Sensitive and spatial exploration of the metabolism of tumors at the metabolome level is highly challenging. In this study, we developed an in situ metabolomics method based on ambient mass spectrometry imaging using air flow-assisted desorption electrospray ionization (AFADESI), which can spatially explore the alteration of global metabolites in tissues with high sensitivity. Using this method, we discovered potential histopathological diagnosis biomarkers (including lipids, amino acids, choline, peptides, and carnitine) from 52 postoperative lung cancer tissue samples and then subsequently used these biomarkers to generate images for rapid and label-free histopathological diagnosis. These biomarkers were validated with a sensitivity and a specificity of 93.5% and 100%, respectively. Moreover, a single imaging analysis of a cryosection that visualized all these biomarkers, taking tens of minutes, revealed the type and subtype of the cancer. This method could potentially be used as a molecular pathological tool for rapid clinical lung cancer diagnosis and immediate image-guided surgery. PMID:26404114

  7. Multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometry for in situ applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickel, T.; Plaß, W. R.; Lang, J.; Ebert, J.; Geissel, H.; Haettner, E.; Jesch, C.; Lippert, W.; Petrick, M.; Scheidenberger, C.; Yavor, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    Multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometers (MR-TOF-MS) have recently been installed at different low-energy radioactive ion beam facilities. They are used as isobar separators with high ion capacity and as mass spectrometers with high mass resolving power and accuracy for short-lived nuclei. Furthermore, MR-TOF-MS have a huge potential for applications in other fields, such as chemistry, biology, medicine, space science, and homeland security. The development, commissioning and results of an MR-TOF-MS is presented, which serves as proof-of-principle to show that very high mass resolving powers (?105) can be achieved in a compact device (length ?30 cm). Based on this work, an MR-TOF-MS for in situ application has been designed. For the first time, this device combines very high mass resolving power (>105), mobility, and an atmospheric pressure inlet in one instrument. It will enable in situ measurements without sample preparation at very high mass accuracy. Envisaged applications of this mobile MR-TOF-MS are discussed.

  8. In situ analysis of soybeans and nuts by probe electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Petroselli, Gabriela; Mandal, Mridul K; Chen, Lee C; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Nonami, Hiroshi; Erra-Balsells, Rosa

    2015-04-01

    The probe electrospray ionization (PESI) is an ESI-based ionization technique that generates electrospray from the tip of a solid metal needle. In the present work, we describe the PESI mass spectra obtained by in situ measurement of soybeans and several nuts (peanuts, walnuts, cashew nuts, macadamia nuts and almonds) using different solid needles as sampling probes. It was found that PESI-MS is a valuable approach for in situ lipid analysis of these seeds. The phospholipid and triacylglycerol PESI spectra of different nuts and soybean were compared by principal component analysis (PCA). PCA shows significant differences among the data of each family of seeds. Methanolic extracts of nuts and soybean were exposed to air and sunlight for several days. PESI mass spectra were recorded before and after the treatment. Along the aging of the oil (rancidification), the formation of oxidated species with variable number of hydroperoxide groups could be observed in the PESI spectra. The relative intensity of oxidated triacylglycerols signals increased with days of exposition. Monitoring sensitivity of PESI-MS was high. This method provides a fast, simple and sensitive technique for the analysis (detection and characterization) of lipids in seed tissue and degree of oxidation of the oil samples. PMID:26149112

  9. The Laser Ablation Ion Funnel: Sampling for in situ Mass Spectrometry on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Paul V.; Hodyss, Robert; Tang, Keqi; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    A considerable investment has been made by NASA and other space agencies to develop instrumentation suitable for in situ analytical investigation of extra terrestrial bodies including various mass spectrometers (time-of-flight, quadrupole ion trap, quadrupole mass filters, etc.). However, the front-end sample handling that is needed to collect and prepare samples for interrogation by such instrumentation remains underdeveloped. Here we describe a novel approach tailored to the exploration of Mars where ions are created in the ambient atmosphere via laser ablation and then efficiently transported into a mass spectrometer for in situ analysis using an electrodynamic ion funnel. This concept would enable elemental and isotopic analysis of geological samples with the analysis of desorbed organic material a possibility as well. Such an instrument would be suitable for inclusion on all potential missions currently being considered such as the Mid-Range Rover, the Astrobiology Field Laboratory, and Mars Sample Return (i.e., as a sample pre-selection triage instrument), among others.

  10. Determination of environmental radiation flux and organ doses using in-situ gamma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ghamdi, Abdulrahman S.

    Contamination of buildings represent a unique problem during Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. It is necessary to determine the long-lived radionuclides and their respective specific activities in building materials before the right D&D decision can be made. At the same time, radiation risk of workers or potential occupants in the facility must be assessed as part of the D&D process. The goal of this project was to develop a methodology of obtaining gamma radiation flux and organ doses from in-situ gamma spectroscopy. Algorithms were developed to simulate the response functions of the HPGe detector and to convert the spectra into photon fluences. A Monte Carlo code, MCNP4C, was used to simulate HPGe detector response and to develop the conversion algorithm. The simulated spectra obtained for an HPGe detector were converted to flux using the algorithm for various different geometries. The response functions of the detector are presented in this document for the gamma energies from 60 keV to 2.2 MeV. Published fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients were used to calculate organ doses and effective dose equivalent. We then tested the theory at a 100-MeV linear electron accelerator at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Samples of the activated concrete walls and floor in the target room of the Linac facility as well as some steel samples were taken to quantify the specific activities of the structures. The results show that the most important long-lived radionuclides include 22 Na, 46Sc, 54 Mn, 57Co, 60 Co, 65Zn, 152 Eu and 154Eu, depending on the location and composition of the material. The specific activities at the Linac facility range from 1.15E-01 to 765.31 muCi/Kg. The annual effective dose equivalent was assessed to be 2.44 mSv y-1 (0.244 rem y-1 ), which is about 5% of the Annual EDE limits to workers.

  11. REAL-TIME IN-SITU MEASUREMENT OF MATERIAL ELASTIC PROPERTIES IN A HIGH GAMMA IRRADIATION ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Telschow; Rob Schley; Dave Cottle

    2006-05-01

    The first measurements of elastic vibrations of an object in-situ to a high gamma irradiation field using a laser coupled resonant ultrasound method are described. A vibration mode of an Inconel hollow capped cylinder was measured throughout a period of 170 hours as the gamma radiation field was increased to 104 Gray/hour. The vibration mode frequency was observed to change in a manner consistent with the temperature dependence of the elastic stiffness coefficients of the material. These results illustrate the efficacy of the laser approach for real-time resonant ultrasound measurements in this severely hostile nuclear environment.

  12. Gamma ray spectrometry of LDEF samples at SRL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winn, Willard G.

    1992-01-01

    A total of 31 samples from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), including materials of aluminum, vanadium, and steel trunnions were analyzed by ultra-low-level gamma spectrometry. The study quantified particle induced activations of Na-22, Sc-46, Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, Co-58, and Co-60. The samples of trunnion sections exhibited increasing activity toward the outer end of the trunnion and decreasing activity toward its radial center. The trunnion sections did not include end pieces, which were reported to collect noticeable Be-7 on their leading surfaces. No significant Be-7 was detected in the samples analyzed.

  13. Analysis of Tropical Forest Fire Emissions Using in Situ Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry during Sambba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaeian, J.; Lewis, A. C.; Edwards, P. M.; Evans, M. J.; Hopkins, J. R.; Lee, J. D.; Purvis, R.

    2014-12-01

    Vertical atmospheric profiles of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were made over Amazonia using an in situ gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GC/MS), including isoprene, methacrolein, methyl vinyl ketone and products of biomass burning such as benzene. Measurements were made in the Amazonian (Rondônia and Amazonas) region during September 2012, a period of extensive biomass burning. Data was obtained between 100m and 8500m from the FAAM BAe 146 research aircraft. Isoprene was observed to be constrained overwhelmingly to the boundary layer (height typically ~2500m) with mean boundary layer mixing ratio of ~2 ppbv and a peak of ~5 ppbv at the lowest flight levels of 100 m. First generation isoprene oxidation products, methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein, were quantified individually rather than as the sum of the pair, which is more commonly found in the literature. Both MACR and MVK were constrained primarily to the boundary layer, however trace quantities could be seen in the free troposphere to a height of 8000 m. Benzene from biomass burning was observed in both boundary layer and free troposphere, with a peak mixing ratio of ~0.8 ppbv at 750 m. This work will present the spatial distribution of isoprene within the boundary as a function of underlying surface type. The vertical profiles of all species are then compared to representative simulations from the GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model and conclusions drawn on the success of the model in representing emissions and oxidation chemistry.

  14. Laser Ablation Electrodynamic Ion Funnel for In Situ Mass Spectrometry on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Paul V.; Hodyss, Robert P.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    A front-end instrument, the laser ablation ion funnel, was developed, which would ionize rock and soil samples in the ambient Martian atmosphere, and efficiently transport the product ions into a mass spectrometer for in situ analysis. Laser ablation creates elemental ions from a solid with a high-power pulse within ambient Mars atmospheric conditions. Ions are captured and focused with an ion funnel into a mass spectrometer for analysis. The electrodynamic ion funnel consists of a series of axially concentric ring-shaped electrodes whose inside diameters (IDs) decrease over the length of the funnel. DC potentials are applied to each electrode, producing a smooth potential slope along the axial direction. Two radio-frequency (RF) AC potentials, equal in amplitude and 180 out of phase, are applied alternately to the ring electrodes. This creates an effective potential barrier along the inner surface of the electrode stack. Ions entering the funnel drift axially under the influence of the DC potential while being restricted radially by the effective potential barrier created by the applied RF. The net result is to effectively focus the ions as they traverse the length of the funnel.

  15. In situ monitoring of powder blending by non-invasive Raman spectrometry with wide area illumination.

    PubMed

    Allan, Pamela; Bellamy, Luke J; Nordon, Alison; Littlejohn, David; Andrews, John; Dallin, Paul

    2013-03-25

    A 785nm diode laser and probe with a 6mm spot size were used to obtain spectra of stationary powders and powders mixing at 50rpm in a high shear convective blender. Two methods of assessing the effect of particle characteristics on the Raman sampling depth for microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel), aspirin or sodium nitrate were compared: (i) the information depth, based on the diminishing Raman signal of TiO(2) in a reference plate as the depth of powder prior to the plate was increased, and (ii) the depth at which a sample became infinitely thick, based on the depth of powder at which the Raman signal of the compound became constant. The particle size, shape, density and/or light absorption capability of the compounds were shown to affect the "information" and "infinitely thick" depths of individual compounds. However, when different sized fractions of aspirin were added to Avicel as the main component, the depth values of aspirin were the same and matched that of the Avicel: 1.7mm for the "information" depth and 3.5mm for the "infinitely thick" depth. This latter value was considered to be the minimum Raman sampling depth when monitoring the addition of aspirin to Avicel in the blender. Mixing profiles for aspirin were obtained non-invasively through the glass wall of the vessel and could be used to assess how the aspirin blended into the main component, identify the end point of the mixing process (which varied with the particle size of the aspirin), and determine the concentration of aspirin in real time. The Raman procedure was compared to two other non-invasive monitoring techniques, near infrared (NIR) spectrometry and broadband acoustic emission spectrometry. The features of the mixing profiles generated by the three techniques were similar for addition of aspirin to Avicel. Although Raman was less sensitive than NIR spectrometry, Raman allowed compound specific mixing profiles to be generated by studying the mixing behaviour of an aspirin-aspartame-Avicel mixture. PMID:23291440

  16. Gamma ray spectrometry of LDEF samples at SRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winn, Willard G.

    1991-01-01

    A total of 31 samples from Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), including materials of Al, V, and steel trunnions were analyzed by ultralow level gamma spectrometry. The study quantified particle induced activations of Na-22, Sc-46, Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, Co-58, and Co-60. The samples of trunnion sections exhibited increasing activity toward the outer end of the trunnion and decreasing activity toward its radial center. The trunnion sections did not include an end piece that collects noticeable Be-7 on its leading surface. No significant Be-7 was detected in the samples analyzed. The most sensitive analyses were performed with a 90 pct. efficient HPGe gamma ray detector, which is enclosed in a purged active/passive active shield.

  17. Miniaturized laser-induced plasma spectrometry for planetary in situ analysis - The case for Jupiter's moon Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, S. G.; Jessberger, E. K.; Hübers, H.-W.; Schröder, S.; Rauschenbach, I.; Florek, S.; Neumann, J.; Henkel, H.; Klinkner, S.

    2011-08-01

    Jupiter's icy moon Europa is one of most promising places in our Solar System where possible extraterrestrial life forms could exist either in the past or even presently. The Europa Lander mission, an exciting part of the international Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM/Laplace), considers in situ planetary exploration of the moon. The distance of Europa from the Earth and the Sun asks for autonomous analytical tools that maximize the scientific return at minimal resources, demanding new experimental concepts. We propose a novel instrument, based on the atomic spectroscopy of laser generated plasmas for the elemental analysis of Europa's surface materials as far as it is in reach of the lander for example by a robotic arm or a mole, or just onboard the lander. The technique of laser-induced plasma spectrometry provides quantitative elemental analysis of all major and many trace elements. It is a fast technique, i.e. an analysis can be performed in a few seconds, which can be applied to many different types of material such as ice, dust or rocks and it does not require any sample preparation. The sensitivity is in the range of tens of ppm and high lateral resolution, down to 50 ?m, is feasible. In addition, it provides the potential of depth profiling, up to 2 mm in rock material and up to a few cm in more transparent icy matrices. Key components of the instrument are presently developed in Germany for planetary in situ missions. This development program is accompanied by an in-depth methodical investigation of this technique under planetary environmental conditions.

  18. In situ assessment of atorvastatin impurity using MALDI mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI).

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Lívia Riberti; de Oliveira, Diogo Noin; Ferreira, Mônica Siqueira; Catharino, Rodrigo Ramos

    2014-03-25

    The analysis of impurities and degradation products in pharmaceutical preparations are usually performed by chromatographic techniques such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This approach demands extensive analysis time, mostly due to extraction and separation phases. These steps must be carried out in samples in order to adapt them to the requirements of the analytical method of choice. In the present contribution, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) was employed to quantify an important degradation product in atorvastatin calcium 80 mg tablets: the atorvastatin lactone. Through the standard of the impurity, it was possible to perform quantitative analysis directly on the drug tablet, using a quick and novel approach, suitable for quality control processes in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:24626400

  19. High-speed tandem mass spectrometric in situ imaging by nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lanekoff, Ingela; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin; Thomas, Mathew; Short, Joshua; Carson, James P; Cha, Jeeyeon; Dey, Sudhansu K; Yang, Pengxiang; Prieto Conaway, Maria C; Laskin, Julia

    2013-10-15

    Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) combined with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), high-resolution mass analysis of the fragment ions (m/?m = 17?500 at m/z 200), and rapid spectral acquisition enabled simultaneous imaging and identification of a large number of metabolites and lipids from 92 selected m/z windows (±1 Da) with a spatial resolution of better than 150 ?m. Mouse uterine sections of implantation sites on day 6 of pregnancy were analyzed in the ambient environment without any sample pretreatment. MS/MS imaging was performed by scanning the sample under the nano-DESI probe at 10 ?m/s, while higher-energy collision-induced dissociation (HCD) spectra were acquired for a targeted inclusion list of 92 m/z values at a rate of ?6.3 spectra/s. Molecular ions and their corresponding fragments, separated by high-resolution mass analysis, were assigned on the basis of accurate mass measurement. Using this approach, we were able to identify and image both abundant and low-abundance isobaric and isomeric species within each m/z window. MS/MS analysis enabled efficient separation and identification of isomeric and isobaric phospholipids that are difficult to separate in full-scan mode. Furthermore, we identified several metabolites associated with early pregnancy and obtained the first 2D images of these molecules. PMID:24040919

  20. High-Speed Tandem Mass Spectrometric in Situ Imaging by Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Thomas, Mathew; Short, Joshua TL; Carson, James P.; Cha, Jeeyeon; Dey, Sudhansu K.; Yang, Pengxiang; Prieto Conaway, Maria C.; Laskin, Julia

    2013-10-15

    Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) combined with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), high-resolution mass analysis (m/m=17,500 at m/z 200), and rapid spectral acquisition enabled simultaneous imaging and identification of more than 300 molecules from 92 selected m/z windows (± 1 Da) with a spatial resolution of better than 150 um. Uterine sections of implantation sites on day 6 of pregnancy were analyzed in the ambient environment without any sample pre-treatment. MS/MS imaging was performed by scanning the sample under the nano-DESI probe at 10 um/s while acquiring higher-energy collision-induced dissociation (HCD) spectra for a targeted inclusion list of 92 m/z values at a rate of ~6.3 spectra/s. Molecular ions and their corresponding fragments, separated using high-resolution mass analysis, were assigned based on accurate mass measurement. Using this approach, we were able to identify and image both abundant and low-abundance isobaric species within each m/z window. MS/MS analysis enabled efficient separation and identification of isobaric sodium and potassium adducts of phospholipids. Furthermore, we identified several metabolites associated with early pregnancy and obtained the first 2D images of these molecules.

  1. Mass spectrometry imaging: an expeditious and powerful technique for fast in situ lignin assessment in Eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Pedro; Ferreira, Mônica Siqueira; de Oliveira, Diogo Noin; Pereira, Luciano; Sawaya, Alexandra Christine Helena Frankland; Catharino, Rodrigo Ramos; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2014-04-01

    Plant biomass has been suggested as an alternative to produce bioethanol. The recalcitrance of plant biomass to convert cellulose into simpler carbohydrates used in the fermentation process is partially due to lignin, but the standard methods used to analyze lignin composition frequently use toxic solvents and are laborious and time-consuming. MS imaging was used to study lignin in Eucalyptus, since this genus is the main source of cellulose in the world. Hand-cut sections of stems of two Eucalyptus species were covered with silica and directly analyzed by matrix-assisted laser sesorption ionization (MALDI)-imaging mass spectrometry (MS). Information available in the literature about soluble lignin subunits and structures were used to trace their distribution in the sections and using a software image a relative quantification could be made. Matrixes routinely used in MALDI-imaging analysis are not satisfactory to analyze plant material and were efficiently substituted by thin layer chromatography (TLC) grade silica. A total of 22 compounds were detected and relatively quantified. It was also possible to establish a proportion between syringyl and guaiacyl monolignols, characteristic for each species. Because of the simple way that samples are prepared, the MALDI-imaging approach presented here can replace, in routine analysis, complex and laborious MS methods in the study of lignin composition. PMID:24451041

  2. A Prototype of LaBr3:Ce in situ Gamma-Ray Spectrometer for Marine Environmental Monitoring

    E-print Network

    Ming Zeng; Zhi Zeng; Jirong Cang; Xingyu Pan; Tao Xue; Hao Ma; Hongchang Yi; Jianping Cheng

    2015-04-20

    A prototype of LaBr3:Ce in situ gamma-ray spectrometer for marine environmental monitoring is developed and applied for in situ measurement. A 3-inch LaBr3:Ce scintillator is used in the detector, and a digital pulse process electronics is chosen as the pulse height analyzer. For this prototype, the energy response of the spectrometer is linear and the energy resolution of 662keV is 2.6% (much better than NaI). With the measurement of the prototype in a water tank filled with 137Cs, the detect efficiency for 137Cs is (0.288 0.01)cps/(Bq/L), which is close to the result of Monte Carlo simulation, 0.283cps/(Bq/L). With this measurement, the MDAC for 137Cs in one hour has been calculated to 0.78Bq/L, better than that of NaI(Tl) in-situ gamma spectrometer, which is ~1.0Bq/L.

  3. Slow elimination of phosphorylated histone {gamma}-H2AX from DNA of terminally differentiated mouse heart cells in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilov, Boris; Vezhenkova, Irina; Firsanov, Denis; Solovjeva, Liudmila; Svetlova, Maria; Mikhailov, Vyacheslav; Tomilin, Nikolai . E-mail: nvtom@hotmail.com

    2006-09-08

    Phosphorylation of replacement histone H2AX occurs in megabase chromatin domains around double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) and this modification (called {gamma}-H2AX) may serve as a useful marker of genome damage and repair in terminally differentiated cells. Here using immunohistochemistry we studied kinetics of {gamma}-H2AX formation and elimination in the X-irradiated mouse heart and renal epithelial tissues in situ. Unirradiated tissues have 3-5% {gamma}-H2AX-positive cells and in tissues fixed 1 h after X-irradiation {gamma}-H2AX-positive nuclei are induced in a dose-dependent manner approaching 20-30% after 3 Gy of IR. Analysis of mouse tissues at different times after 3 Gy of IR showed that maximal induction of {gamma}-H2AX in heart is observed 20 min after IR and then is decreased slowly with about half remaining 23 h later. In renal epithelium maximum of the {gamma}-H2AX-positive cells is observed 40 min after IR and then decreases to control values in 23 h. This indicates that there are significant variations between non-proliferating mammalian tissues in the initial H2AX phosphorylation rate as well as in the rate of {gamma}-H2AX elimination after X-irradiation, which should be taken into account in the analysis of radiation responses.

  4. Planetary In Situ Sample Analysis with Tandem Two-Step Laser Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Getty, S. A.; Cornish, T. J.; Ecelberger, S. A.; Li, X.; Merrill Floyd, M. A.; Arevalo, R.; Elsila, J.; Callahan, M. P.

    2012-12-01

    Future surface missions to comets and outer solar system satellites such as Europa, Enceladus, and Titan will benefit strongly from investigations that can detect a wide range of organics in complex sample mixtures and ices, as well as determine the structure of selected molecules, to provide insight into their origin and evolution. At the same time, such missions are likely to be among the most highly constrained in mass and power resources, particularly those flown within the tightly focused Discovery and New Frontiers programs. Techniques requiring minimal or no sample manipulation or preparation may be needed to reduce complexity. Pulsed laser-based mass spectrometry may satisfy such requirements, with total instrument masses potentially less than 5 kg, particularly where analysis of higher-molecular weight, nonvolatile species is a priority objective. Prototype flight-compatible mass spectrometers under active development in our lab are based on direct ultraviolet Nd:YAG laser desorption and ionization (LDI) of solid samples under high vacuum. Prompt ions from a single few ns-duration laser pulse are accelerated into a compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). Both inorganic species including elements and oxides such as M_xO_y (M = Mg, Al, Cl, Ca, Fe; x, y = 1-4) from the mineral matrix as well as organics with molecular weights up to several kDa are readily detected over a range of laser intensities. To improve our ability to distinguish among peaks and patterns in the often-complex LDI spectra obtained from natural samples, we have recently begun systematically testing several critical instrument enhancements. First, by moving the common voltage bias of the ion flight tube and detector to a common negative potential, we are able to switch between positive and negative ion detection modes with only electrostatic switching. Inter-comparison of cation and anion spectra can provide highly diagnostic information on both inorganic (e.g., Na+ and K+ vs. Cl-) and organic moieties. Second, by focusing a separate "post-ionization" laser pulse just above the sample surface, we can achieve two-step laser mass spectrometry, or L2MS, in the same highly-miniaturized TOF-MS. L2MS enables selective analysis of aromatic organics even in the presence of a complex mineral matrix. Finally, by introducing an ion optical gate in the flight path, we are able to take advantage of the broad focusing capabilities of the "curved field" reflectron at the core of the TOF-MS to achieve pseudo-tandem structural analysis of selected organics. The high-speed gate is used to admit only the molecular ion/s of interest into the reflectron. Diagnostic fragments of the ion/s obtained through metastable decay or active collision-induced dissociation (CID) remain in focus despite having widely variable velocities and masses. As such even molecular isomers with differing fragmentation pathways may be distinguished through a series of pseudo-tandem mass spectra that could be obtained in an automatic process during a mission. The "real-world" benefits of these enhancements are being fully characterized using a set of synthetic and natural standard samples as well as several planetary analogs and meteorites.

  5. Guide to plutonium isotopic measurements using gamma-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lemming, J.F.; Rakel, D.A.

    1982-08-26

    Purpose of this guide is to assist those responsible for plutonium isotopic measurements in the application of gamma-ray spectrometry. Objectives are to promote an understanding of the measurement process, including its limitations and applicability, by reviewing the general features of a plutonium spectrum and identifying the quantities which must be extracted from the data; to introduce state-of-the-art analysis techniques by reviewing four isotopic analysis packages and identifying their differences; to establish the basis for measurement control and assurance by discussing means of authenticating the performance of a measurement system; and to prepare for some specific problems encountered in plutonium isotopic analyses by providing solutions from the practical experiences of several laboratories. 29 references, 12 figures, 17 tables.

  6. Development of the Probing In-Situ with Neutron and Gamma Rays (PING) Instrument for Planetary Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Burger, D.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Probing In situ with Neutrons and Gamma rays (PING) instrument is a promising planetary science application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology that has been used successfully in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth for decades. Similar techniques can be very powerful for non-invasive in situ measurements of the subsurface elemental composition on other planets. The objective of our active neutron-gamma ray technology program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC) is to bring instruments using this technology to the point where they can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Venus, asteroids, comets and the satellites of the outer planets. PING combines a 14 MeV deuterium-tritium pulsed neutron generator with a gamma ray spectrometer and two neutron detectors to produce a landed instrument that can determine the elemental composition of a planet down to 30 - 50 cm below the planet's surface. The penetrating nature of.5 - 10 MeV gamma rays and 14 MeV neutrons allows such sub-surface composition measurements to be made without the need to drill into or otherwise disturb the planetary surface, thus greatly simplifying the lander design. We are currently testing a PING prototype at a unique outdoor neutron instrumentation test facility at NASA/GSFC that provides two large (1.8 m x 1.8 m x.9 m) granite and basalt test formations placed outdoors in an empty field. Since an independent trace elemental analysis has been performed on both the Columbia River basalt and Concord Gray granite materials, these samples present two known standards with which to compare PING's experimentally measured elemental composition results. We will present experimental results from PING measurements of both the granite and basalt test formations and show how and why the optimum PING instrument operating parameters differ for studying the two materials.

  7. High-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry in uranium exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moxham, Robert M.; Tanner, Allan B.

    1977-01-01

    Sedimentary-type uranium deposits accumulate at favorable sites along a migration path which may be kilometers in length. Their source is a large volume of rock from which the uranium has been leached. The geochemical mobilities and half lives of uranium and its daughter products vary widely so that they are transported from the source rocks, at different rates, along the migration path to their ultimate site. The radioactive disequilibrium resulting from this process has been well documented in the immediate vicinity of ore deposits, and disequilibrium is commonly recorded on gamma-ray logs up the hydraulic gradient from uranium ore. Little is known about the state of secular equilibrium in the leached host rocks, which often represent the only part of the migration path that is at or near the surface and is thus most accessible to the exploration geophysicist. High-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry provides a means of investigating the disequilibrium associated with uranium leaching and migration. Direct measurement of uranium can be made by this method, and the equivalent weight percents can be determined for six of the seven daughter-product decay groups that characterize the state of radioactive equilibrium. The technique has been used quantitatively in laboratory studies, where the results compare favorably with radiochemical analyses; field experiments suggest that semi-quantitative data may be obtained at the outcrop.

  8. Elastic and plastic properties of gamma + laves phase in-situ composite alloys using nanoindentation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, M.L.; Stevenson, M.E.; Shamsuzzoha, M.; Ott, R.D.; Brady, M.P.

    1999-07-01

    In the present study, the local elastic and plastic properties of the {gamma}-TiAl and the Laves phases have been investigated in a series of {gamma} + Laves alloys using room-temperature compression. Vickers microhardness, and nanoindentation with an emphasis on elucidating the local property changes in {gamma} + Laves alloys deformed at room temperature. This study shows that nanoindentation can be used to provide useful information on plastic flow in multiphase intermetallic alloys.

  9. In situ detoxification of the fermentation medium during gamma-decalactone production with the yeast sporidiobolus salmonicolor

    PubMed

    Dufosse; Souchon; Feron; Latrasse; Spinnler

    1999-01-01

    gamma-Decalactone (gamma-C10) is known to be highly toxic for the microorganims used for its production. In this work, three techniques were studied in order to overcome this toxicity during a bioconversion process using ricinoleic acid as precursor of the lactone: in situ trapping in oily phases, in porous hydrophobic sorbents and in beta-cyclodextrins. Oily phases added to the media (olive, Miglyol, tributyrin, and paraffin) had a protective effect on Sp. salmonicolor, and they improved the lactone production. beta-cyclodextrins, which have a hydrophobic cavity that can trap molecules such as gamma-C10, have been used to protect the yeasts. The results showed insufficient preservation of cell viability. Some sorbents (activated carbon and polystyrene-based sorbents) were successfully tested during bioconversion. In all cases viability exceeded the reference one. Nevertheless the aroma production was 30% lower than the reference. All of these solutions led to some enhancement of the cell viability during bioconversion of methyl ricinoleate to gamma-C10. For improvement of the lactone production, the oil trapping method seemed to be the best with the experimental conditions tested. PMID:9933524

  10. Surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry used to screen serum diagnostic markers of colon cancer recurrence in situ following surgery

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, ZHONG-YIN; JI, TUO; LUO, HE-SHENG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify specific serum biomarkers in patients with colon cancer recurrence in situ following surgery. The study was conducted at the Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University (Wuhan, China) between January 2012 and January 2014. Surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to compare and analyze the serum protein profiles of patients with (n=50) and patients without (n=50) recurrence in situ. Biomarker Wizard software was used to analyze and obtain the protein spectrum. In total, nine protein peaks demonstrated statistically significant differences between the recurrence and non-recurrence group (P<0.05), which included two protein peaks (7,731.3 Da and 8,266.5 Da). The two protein peaks were highly expressed in patients with colon cancer recurrence in situ following surgery, but lowly expressed in patients without recurrence. Therefore, the two protein peaks may represent potential biomarkers for the prediction of colon cancer recurrence in situ following surgical treatment. PMID:26137063

  11. In situ trace element determination of carbonates by laserProbe inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using nonmatrix matched standardization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Rui

    1994-03-01

    The LaserProbe Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LP-ICP-MS) has shown great potential to precisely and quickly determine trace element compositions of minerals in situ at a scale of ? 60 ?m. However, standardization is complicated, due to the lack of matrix-matched, homogeneous mineral standards. In this study, a nonmatrix matched calibration standard, the NIST 612 silicate glass, was employed to determine Sr, Y, Ba and REE concentrations in calcite and dolomite grain mounts. Using 43Ca as an internal standard, the results demonstrate that it is not essential to have a matrix-matched mineral standard by LP-ICP-MS. Routine limits of detection are ~10 ppb for REEs and ~200 ppb for Sr, Y and Ba, depending on laser operating conditions. Evaluation of precision and accuracy is made complex by heterogeneity of trace elements within single mineral grains. However, the best within-grain precision (determined from several LP sampling pits within an individual mineral grain) is considered to represent the maximum analytical error and is generally <5% RSD for REEs ? 1 ppm, <10% RSD for REEs between 0.1-1 ppm and ~ 15-25% for lower concentrations. Accuracy was established through comparison of LP-ICP-MS results with those of solution ICP-MS analysis of bulk calcite and dolomite powders and is generally better than 10% for relatively homogeneous samples and also for heterogeneous samples when large numbers of grains (>10 grains) were analyzed. Nonmatrix matched standardization for quantitative analysis can successfully be used, because the small size laser probe ( ~ 10 ?m) used in this study can generate much higher power density than the conventional size laser beam. At high power density, the sample ablation mainly results from plasma plume expansion induced by the laser, not from absorption of the laser beam and related thermal vaporization, as for conventional, low power density laser analysis. The plasma plume expansion as a major ablation process permits the ablation of even those materials usually transparent to laser (e.g., calcite). This technique can be applied to the analysis of trace elements of carbonates in thin sections, grain mounts and rock or mineral chips, thus avoiding extensive sample preparation with significant implications for studies of near-surface and environmental processes.

  12. In situ identification of organic components of ink used in books from the 1900s by atmospheric pressure matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurato, Laura; Candura, Andrea; Grasso, Giuseppe; Spoto, Giuseppe

    2009-11-01

    This paper describes the use of atmospheric pressure/matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (AP/MALDI-MS) as a spatially resolved analytical technique for the study of organic components of inks used to print coloured parts of ancient books. The possibility to operate at atmospheric pressure makes MALDI-MS a new in situ micro-destructive diagnostic tool suitable for analysing samples in air, simplifying the investigation of the organic components of artistic and archaeological objects. In this work, several organic dyes and pigments were identified in situ by analysing different coloured areas of books printed in the years 1911 and 1920. The detected colouring materials, which were available since the 1890s, were often identified as a mixture, confirming the typical procedures used in the lithographic printing processes. The matrix deposition and the laser desorption process did not cause visible alteration of the sample surface.

  13. In situ gamma ray measurements of radionuclides at a disused phosphate mine on the West Coast of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Bezuidenhout, Jacques

    2015-12-01

    High levels of uranium and its radioactive progeny like radium is normally associated with phosphate mining. In Situ gamma ray spectroscopy as a survey tool has been successfully applied to assess radionuclide concentrations in various geographical environments. A transportable and robust gamma ray detection system (GISPI) was therefore employed to determine the concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides at a disused phosphate mine on the West Coast of South Africa. The concentrations of radium, thorium and potassium were measured and plotted. The measurements showed fairly high concentrations with medians of 320 Bq/kg for (226)Ra, 64 Bq/kg for (232)Th and 390 Bq/kg for (40)K. The highest concentrations were however confined to specific areas of the mine. The effective dose due to gamma irradiation for the various areas of the mine was also estimated and the highest estimated level was 0.45 mSv/y. The article finally draws conclusions as to the origins and impact of the radiation. PMID:26254719

  14. Use of a Shielded High Resolution Gamma Spectrometry System to Segregate LLW from Contact Handleable ILW Containing Plutonium - 13046

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, Rosemary; Wilkins, Colin; Chard, Patrick; Jaederstroem, Henrik; LeBlanc, Paul; Mowry, Rick; MacDonald, Sanders; Gunn, William

    2013-07-01

    Dounreay Site Restoration Limited (DSRL) have a number of drums of solid waste that may contain Plutonium Contaminated Material. These are currently categorised as Contact Handleable Intermediate Level Waste (CHILW). A significant fraction of these drums potentially contain waste that is in the Low Level Waste (LLW) category. A Canberra Q2 shielded high resolution gamma spectrometry system is being used to quantify the total activity of drums that are potentially in the LLW category in order to segregate those that do contain LLW from CHILW drums and thus to minimise the total volume of waste in the higher category. Am-241 is being used as an indicator of the presence of plutonium in the waste from its strong 59.54 keV gamma-ray; a knowledge of the different waste streams from which the material originates allows a pessimistic waste 'fingerprint' to be used in order to determine an upper limit to the activities of the weak and non-gamma-emitting plutonium and associated radionuclides. This paper describes the main features of the high resolution gamma spectrometry system being used by DSRL to perform the segregation of CHILW and LLW and how it was configured and calibrated using the Canberra In-Situ Object Counting System (ISOCS). It also describes how potential LLW drums are selected for assay and how the system uses the existing waste stream fingerprint information to determine a reliable upper limit for the total activity present in each measured drum. Results from the initial on-site commissioning trials and the first measurements of waste drums using the new monitor are presented. (authors)

  15. Adsorbers for in-situ collection and at-sea gamma analysis of dissolved thorium-234 in seawater. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, M.C.; Buesseler, K.O.

    1994-07-01

    Two polypropylene cartridge types (Beta Pure and Hytrex II) were tested in the laboratory as adsorbers for in-situ collection of dissolved Thorium-234 (234Th) in seawater. Using a uranyl nitrate tracer, we determined that a MnO2 impregnated 3.25-inch Hytrex II cartridge with a flow rate of 8 liters/minute would collect 234Th with a greater than 60% efficiency. The smaller size and composition of the 3.25 inch Hytrex II cartridge enabled it to be pressed into a permanent 1-inch puck for direct gamma counting. This protocol significantly reduced the handling between collection and counting. When field tested in the Gulf of Maine as a large volume (> 500 liters) collector, the new adsorbers produced a greater than 80% collection efficiency and a dissolved 234Th concentration which was consistent with independent samples collected at the same station and depth. These adsorbers were used successfully for the in-situ collection of 234Th in large volumes of seawater during the 1992 NOAA and NSF sponsored JGOFS EqPac program, with a mean collection efficiency of 0.79 +/-9% (n = 104 cartridge pairs). jg p.3.

  16. Active Neutron and Gamma Ray Instrumentation for In Situ Planetary Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Pulsed Neutron Generator-Gamma Ray And Neutron Detectors (PNG-GRAND) experiment is an innovative application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology so successfully used in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth. The objective of our active neutron-gamma ray technology program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA-GSFC) is to bring the PNG-GRAND instrument to the point where it can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Menus, asteroids, comets and the satellites of the outer planets. Gamma-Ray Spectrometers (GRS) have been incorporated into numerous orbital planetary science missions and, especially its the case of the Mars Odyssey GRS, have contributed detailed maps of the elemental composition over the entire surface of Mars. However, orbital gamma ray measurements have low spatial sensitivity (100's of km) due to their low surface emission rates from cosmic rays and subsequent need to be averaged over large surface areas. PNG-GRAND overcomes this impediment by incorporating a powerful neutron excitation source that permits high sensitivity surface and subsurface measurements of bulk elemental compositions. PNG-GRAND combines a pulsed neutron generator (PNG) with gamma ray and neutron detectors to produce a landed instrument to determine subsurface elemental composition without needing to drill into a planet's surface a great advantage in mission design. We are currently testing PNG-GRAND prototypes at a unique outdoor neutron instrumentation test facility recently constructed at NASA/GSFC that consists of a 2 m x 2 in x 1 m granite structure placed outdoors in an empty field. Because an independent trace elemental analysis has been performed on the material, this granite sample is a known standard with which to compare both Monte Carlo simulations and our experimentally measured elemental composition data. We will present data from operating PNG-GRAND in various experimental configurations on a known sample in a geometry that is identical to that on a planetary surface. We will also illustrate the use of gamma ray timing techniques to improve sensitivity and will compare the material composition results from our experiments to both an independent laboratory elemental composition analysis and MCNPX computer modeling results.

  17. In-situ gamma-ray assay of the west cell line in the 235-F plutonium fuel form facility

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, A. H.; Diprete, D.

    2014-09-01

    On August 29th, 2013, scientists from SRNL took a series of in-situ gamma-ray measurements in the maintenance trench beneath Cells 6-9 on the west line of the PuFF facility using an uncollimated, highpurity germanium detector. The detector efficiency was estimated using a combination of MCNP simulations and empirical measurements. Data analysis was performed using three gamma-rays emitted by Pu-238 (99.85 keV, 152.7 keV, and 766.4 keV) providing three independent estimates of the mass of Pu-238 holdup in each of the cells. The weighted mean of these three results was used as the best estimate of Pu-238 holdup in the West Cell Line of PuFF. The results of the assay measurements are found in the table below along with the results from the scoping assay performed in 2006. All uncertainties in this table (as well as the rest of the report) are given as 1?. The total holdup in the West Cell Line was 2.4 ± 0.7 grams. This result is 0.6 g higher than the previous estimate, a 0.4? difference.

  18. Gamma irradiation testing of montan wax barrier materials for in-situ waste containment

    SciTech Connect

    Soo, P.; Heiser, J.

    1996-02-01

    A scoping study was carried out to quantify the potential use of a montan wax as a barrier material for subsurface use. If it possesses resistance to chemical and structural change, it could be used in a barrier to minimize the migration of contaminants from their storage or disposal locations. Properties that were evaluated included hardness, melting point, molecular weight, and biodegradation as a function of gamma radiation dose. The main emphasis was to quantify the wax`s long-term ability to withstand radiation-induced mechanical, chemical, and microbial degradation.

  19. Intestinal absorption of gamma-tocotrienol is mediated by Niemann-Pick C1-like 1: in situ rat intestinal perfusion studies.

    PubMed

    Abuasal, Bilal; Sylvester, Paul W; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2010-06-01

    gamma-Tocotrienol (gamma-T3) is a member of the vitamin E family that displays potent anticancer activity and other therapeutic benefits. The objective of this study was to evaluate gamma-T3 intestinal uptake and metabolism using the in situ rat intestinal perfusion model. Isolated segments of rat jejunum and ileum were perfused with gamma-T3 solution, and measurements were made as a function of concentration (5-150 microM). Intestinal permeability (P(eff)) and metabolism were studied by measuring total compound disappearance and major metabolite, 2,7,8-trimethyl-2-(beta-carboxy-ethyl)-6-hydroxychroman, appearance in the intestinal lumen. gamma-T3 and metabolite levels were also determined in mesenteric blood. The P(eff) of gamma-T3 was similar in both intestinal segments and significantly decreased at concentrations > or =25 microM in jejunum and ileum (p < 0.05), whereas metabolite formation was minimal and mesenteric blood concentrations of gamma-T3 and metabolite remained very low. These results indicate that gamma-T3 intestinal uptake is a saturable carrier-mediated process and metabolism is minimal. Results from subsequent in situ inhibition studies with ezetimibe, a potent and selective inhibitor of Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) transporter, suggested gamma-T3 intestinal uptake is mediated by NPC1L1. Comparable findings were obtained when Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells that express endogenous NPC1L1 were incubated with increasing concentrations of gamma-T3 or gamma-T3 with increasing concentrations of ezetimibe. The present data show for the first time that gamma-T3 intestinal absorption is partly mediated by NPC1L1. PMID:20207946

  20. In situ gamma ray survey for geological mapping of Kmetasomatized metavolcanics at Bükkszentkereszt, Bükk Mts, Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Norbert; Pethõ, Gábor; Zajzon, Norbert

    2015-09-01

    The Middle-Upper Triassic Bagolyhegy Metarhyolite Formation of the Bükk Mts. (Hungary) hosts silicified bodies with high potassic feldspar content formed by Kmetasomatism. The rocks underwent a multistage deformation history including syn- and postmetamorphic folding and faulting. As the outcrop area is covered by soil and debris with some exposed silicified cliffs only, and potassium content is a characteristic feature of the metasomatized rocks, geological mapping was supported by a spectral gamma ray survey with a scintillation detector of NaI(Tl) crystal. A thunderstorm felling the beech forest made the soil horizon B also accessible in several pits, providing the opportunity to make measurements on the weathered debris instead of the topsoil (horizon A). Measurements in different arrangements were designed to test the effects of measuring time, measuring geometry and soil horizon. Our results show that concentration values obtained on the debris with a 2 min measuring time can be compared with those measured on exposed rock surfaces, producing a more reliable geological map than measurements on the topsoil with randomly variable K depletion. Pit geometry effects can be eliminated by the K/(eU+eTh) ratio. This results in a more realistic K distribution map if neither U nor Th enrichments are present. The survey successfully delineated the unexposed outcrop of K-enriched rocks on the survey area.

  1. Monte carlo simulation of in situ gamma-spectra recorded by NaI (Tl) detector in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiming; Zhang, Yingying; Wu, Ning; Wu, Bingwei; Liu, Yan; Cao, Xuan; Wang, Qian

    2015-06-01

    To develop a NaI (Tl) detector for in situ radioactivity monitoring in the marine environment and enhance the confidence of the probability of the gamma-spectrum analysis, Monte Carlo simulations using the Monte Carlo N-Particle ( MNCP ) code were performed to provide the response spectra of some interested radionuclides and the background spectra originating from the natural radionuclides in seawater recorded by a NaI (Tl) detector. A newly developed 75 mm × 75 mm NaI (Tl) detector was calibrated using four reference radioactive sources 137Cs, 60Co, 40K and 54Mn in the laboratory before the field measurements in seawater. A simulation model was established for the detector immersed in seawater. The simulated spectra were all broadened with Gaussian pulses to reflect the statistical fluctuations and electrical noise in the real measurement. The simulated spectra show that the single-energy photons into the detector are mostly scattering low-energy photons and the high background in the low energy region mainly originates from the Compton effect of the high energy ?-rays of natural radionuclides in seawater. The simulated background spectrum was compared with the experimental one recorded in field measurement and they seem to be in good agreement. The simulation method and spectra can be used for the accurate analysis of the filed measurement results of low concentration radioactivity in seawater.

  2. ADONIS, high count-rate HP-Ge {gamma} spectrometry algorithm: Irradiated fuel assembly measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, P.; Barat, E.; Dautremer, T.; Montagu, T.; Normand, S.

    2011-07-01

    ADONIS is a digital system for gamma-ray spectrometry, developed by CEA. This system achieves high count-rate gamma-ray spectrometry with correct dynamic dead-time correction, up to, at least, more than an incoming count rate of 3.10{sup 6} events per second. An application of such a system at AREVA NC's La Hague plant is the irradiated fuel scanning facility before reprocessing. The ADONIS system is presented, then the measurement set-up and, last, the measurement results with reference measurements. (authors)

  3. Photosensitized degradation kinetics of trace halogenated contaminants in natural waters using membrane introduction mass spectrometry as an in situ reaction monitor.

    PubMed

    Letourneau, Dane R; Gill, Chris G; Krogh, Erik T

    2015-10-28

    The photochemically mediated dechlorination of polyhalogenated compounds represents a potential decontamination strategy and a relevant environmental process in chemically reducing media. We report the UV irradiation of natural and artificial waters containing natural dissolved organic matter to effect the photo-sensitized degradation of chlorinated organic compounds, including tetrachloromethane, 1,1,1-tricloroethane, perchloroethene, 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane and chlorobenzene at trace (ppb) levels in aqueous solution. The degradation kinetics are followed in situ using membrane introduction mass spectrometry. By re-circulating the reaction mixture in a closed loop configuration over a semi-permeable hollow fiber polydimethylsiloxane membrane in a flow cell interface, volatile and semi-volatile compounds are continuously monitored using a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The time resolved quantitative information provides useful mechanistic insights, including kinetic data. Pseudo first-order rate constants for the degradation of contaminant mixtures in natural waters are reported. PMID:26439106

  4. Environmental gamma dosimetry with OSL of alpha-Al(2)O(3):C for in situ sediment measurements.

    PubMed

    Richter, D; Dombrowski, H; Neumaier, S; Guibert, P; Zink, A C

    2010-09-01

    The physical properties of alpha-Al(2)O(3):C are very similar to that of quartz, which make it an attractive dosimetric material for geological and archaeological dating applications. Storage experiments in an ultra-low-radiation underground environment (UDO at PTB) and gamma-ray spectrometry show that the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signal of this material does neither suffer from a significant inherent background caused by traces of radionuclides (<6 microGy a(-1)) nor from fading. After having performed a simple calibration procedure, gamma dosimetry based on alpha-Al(2)O(3):C detectors, which were exposed in a brick block and a lead castle for different periods of time, provided concordant results with dose values derived from independent gamma-ray spectrometric measurements using high-purity germanium and NaI:Tl detectors. These investigations indirectly confirm both the absence of a significant inherent background and fading of the detector material. Small doses of a few micro gray accumulated in short exposure times to environmental radiation can be accurately measured, even when doses (i.e. transport dose) much larger than the actual environmental dose have to be subtracted. It is shown that the OSL signal caused by small transport doses can be easily and reproducibly reset even under difficult field conditions by illuminating the dosemeters with the blue light from Luxeon LEDs. Summarised, alpha-Al(2)O(3):C appears to be the material of choice for dosimetric dating applications of quartz or related materials, when analysed by using OSL. PMID:20534630

  5. QUALITY CONTROL FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MEASUREMENTS USING GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the quality control procedures, calibration, collection, analysis, and interpretation of data in measuring the activity of gamma ray-emitting radionuclides in environmental samples. Included in the appendices are basic data for selected gamma ray-emitting ra...

  6. Feasibility of using in situ fusion for the determination of Co, Cr and Mn in Portland cement by direct solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intima, Danielle Polidorio; de Oliveira, Elisabeth; Oliveira, Pedro Vitoriano

    2009-06-01

    In situ fusion on the boat-type graphite platform has been used as a sample pretreatment for the direct determination of Co, Cr and Mn in Portland cement by solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-GF AAS). The 3-field Zeeman technique was adopted for background correction to decrease the sensitivity during measurements. This strategy allowed working with up to 200 µg of sample. The in situ fusion was accomplished using 10 µL of a flux mixture 4.0% m/v Na 2CO 3 + 4.0% m/v ZnO + 0.1% m/v Triton® X-100 added over the cement sample and heated at 800 °C for 20 s. The resulting mould was completely dissolved with 10 µL of 0.1% m/v HNO 3. Limits of detection were 0.11 µg g - 1 for Co, 1.1 µg g - 1 for Cr and 1.9 µg g - 1 for Mn. The accuracy of the proposed method has been evaluated by the analysis of certified reference materials. The values found presented no statistically significant differences compared to the certified values (Student's t-test, p < 0.05). In general, the relative standard deviation was lower than 12% ( n = 5).

  7. Nondestructive determination of plutonium by gamma spectrometry and neutron well coincidence counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Chhavi; Poi, Sanhita; Nathaniel, T. N.; Mhatre, Amol; Kalsi, P. C.; Singh, Sarbjit; Goswami, A.

    2009-03-01

    Different NDA methods based on gamma ray and neutron measurements developed for the determination of Pu in solid samples is reported. In the gamma spectrometric measurements for solid samples, a method which takes advantage of the multiple ?-rays emitted by Pu and relies on the empirical relation between apparent mass of the sample and ?-ray energy was used. The method is applicable for the determination of small quantities of plutonium samples of non standard geometry by gamma ray spectrometry. The gross and coincidence neutron count rates for two different sets of standard Pu oxide powder samples were found to fall on different calibration lines. Isotopic composition of the two sets were determined using gamma ray spectrometry to obtain effective 240Pu content in the samples. A common calibration curve could be obtained when coincidence count rates were plotted vs. effective 240Pu content.

  8. Comparison between in situ and ex situ gamma measurements on land areas within a decommissioning nuclear site: a case study at Dounreay.

    PubMed

    Rostron, Peter D; Heathcote, John A; Ramsey, Michael H

    2014-09-01

    Measurements made in situ with gamma detectors and ex situ measurements of soil samples in a laboratory can have complementary roles in the assessment of radioactively contaminated land on decommissioning nuclear sites. Both in situ and ex situ methods were used to characterize (137)Cs contamination within an area at the Dounreay site in Scotland. The systematic difference (bias) between estimates of the mean activity concentration was found to be non-significant when in situ measurements were interpreted using a linear depth model, based on ex situ measurements made at two different depths. An established method of evaluating the random components of measurement uncertainty was used. The random component of analytical uncertainty in the in situ measurements, made in field conditions, was found to exceed that for the ex situ measurements, made in the controlled conditions of a laboratory. However, contamination by the target radionuclide was found to be heterogeneous over small spatial scales. This resulted in significantly higher levels of random sampling uncertainty in individual ex situ measurements. As in situ measurements are substantially less costly, a greater number of measurements can be made, which potentially reduces the uncertainty on the mean. Providing the depth profile of contaminants can be modelled with confidence, this can enable estimates of mean activity concentration over an averaging area to be made with lower overall uncertainties than are possible using ex situ methods. PMID:24938421

  9. In situ Measurement of Pore-Water pH in Anoxic Sediments Using Laser Raman Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltzer, E. T.; Luna, M.; Walz, P. M.; Zhang, X.; Brewer, P. G.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate measurement of the geochemical properties of sediment pore waters is of fundamental importance in ocean geochemistry and microbiology. Recent work has shown that the properties of pore waters can be measured rapidly in situ with a novel Raman based insertion probe (Zhang et al., 2010), and that data obtained from anoxic sediments on in situ dissolved methane concentrations are very different (~30x) than from recovered cores due the large scale degassing that occurs during core recovery (Zhang et al., submitted). Degassing of methane must carry with it via Henry’s Law partioning significant quantities of H2S, which is clearly detectable by smell during sample processing, and thus in situ measurement of H2S is also highly desirable. In practice, dissolved H2S is partitioned between the HS- and H2S species as a function of pH with pKa ~7 for the acid dissociation reaction. Since both species are Raman active full determination of the sulfide system is possible if the relative Raman cross sections are known. The diagenetic equations for these reactions are commonly summarized as: 2CH2O + SO4= ? 2HCO3- + H2S CH4 + SO4= ? HCO3- + HS- + H2O Three of the major components of these equations, CH4, SO4=, and H2S/HS-, are all observable directly by Raman spectroscopy; but the detection of HCO3- presents a challenge due to its low Raman cross section and thus poor sensitivity. We show that pore water pH, which is a good estimator of HCO3- if total CO2 or alkalinity are known, can be measured by observing the H2S / HS- ratio via the equation: pH = pKa + log([HS-]/[H2S]) thereby fully constraining these equations within a single measurement protocol. The Raman peak for HS- is at 2573 cm-1 and for H2S is at 2592 cm-1; thus the peaks are well separated and may easily be deconvoluted from the observed spectrum. We have determined the relative Raman cross sections by a series of laboratory measurements over a range of pH and by using the definition that when pH = pKa then the mole fractions are equal. We find by this means that the HS-/H2S factor is 2.744:1. We report here both the process for determining the relative Raman cross-sections and show the application of the technique via deconvolution of the species present in the spectra. We present results of in situ pore water measurements made on highly reducing sediments on the Santa Monica Basin Mounds and determine the in situ pH to have a mean value of 7.12 at 20 - 30 cm insertion depth into a zone of dense bacterial mat. References: Zhang, X., P.M. Walz, W.J. Kirkwood, K.C. Hester, W.Ussler, E.T. Peltzer, P.G. Brewer (2010). Development and deployment of a deep-sea Raman probe for measurement of pore water geochemistry. Deep-Sea Res. I 57: 297-306. Zhang, X., K.C. Hester, W. Ussler, P.M. Walz, E.T. Peltzer, P.G. Brewer (submitted). Observing Deep Ocean Sediment Methane Concentrations. Science.

  10. Speciation of inorganic arsenic in drinking water by wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry after in situ preconcentration with miniature solid-phase extraction disks.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Kenta; Inui, Tetsuo; Koike, Yuya; Aizawa, Mamoru; Nakamura, Toshihiro

    2015-03-01

    A rapid and simple method using wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometry after in situ solid-phase extraction (SPE) was developed for the speciation and evaluation of the concentration of inorganic arsenic (As) in drinking water. The method involves the simultaneous collection of As(III) and As(V) using 13 mm ? SPE miniature disks. The removal of Pb(2+) from the sample water was first conducted to avoid the overlapping PbL? and AsK? spectra on the XRF spectrum. To this end, a 50 mL aqueous sample (pH 5-9) was passed through an iminodiacetate chelating disk. The filtrate was adjusted to pH 2-3 with HCl, and then ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate solution was added. The solution was passed through a hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene filter placed on a Zr and Ca loaded cation-exchange disk at a flow rate of 12.5 mL min(-1) to separate As(III)-pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate complex and As(V). Each SPE disk was affixed to an acrylic plate using adhesive cellophane tape, and then examined by WDXRF spectrometry. The detection limits of As(III) and As(V) were 0.8 and 0.6 ?g L(-1), respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to screening for As speciation and concentration evaluation in spring water and well water. PMID:25618730

  11. Characterization of coal and charcoal by alpha-particle and gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco Lourtau, A. M.; Rubio Montero, M. P.; Jurado Vargas, M.

    2015-11-01

    Although coal and charcoal have similar physical and chemical characteristics, there are several crystallographic procedures used to distinguish and characterize them. But if the matrix is crushed, there is no standard procedure to distinguish coal from charcoal. In this work, a procedure to characterize coal and charcoal samples based on the radioactive content is proposed. The first assay is by gamma-ray spectrometry, which allows a part of the radioactive content to be determined rapidly and non-destructively. Then, alpha-particle spectrometry is applied to assay the content of those radionuclides which are difficult to determine precisely by gamma-ray spectrometry. This second technique requires prior chemical purification of the carbon sample in order to separate the corresponding radionuclides of interest.

  12. In-situ gamma-ray assay of the east cell line in the 235-F Plutonium fuel form facility

    SciTech Connect

    Diprete, D.

    2015-08-21

    On September 17th -19th , 2013, scientists from SRNL took a series of in-situ gamma-ray measurements in the maintenance trench beneath Cells 1-5 on the east line of the PuFF facility using a well-collimated, high-purity germanium detector. The cell interiors were assayed along with the furnaces and storage coolers that protrude beneath the cells. The detector efficiency was estimated using a combination of MCNP simulations and empirical measurements. Data analysis was performed using three gamma-rays emitted by Pu-238 (99.85 keV, 152.7 keV, and 766.4 keV) providing three independent estimates of the mass of Pu-238 holdup in each of the cells. The weighted mean of these three results was used as the best estimate of Pu-238 holdup in the East Cell Line of PuFF. The results of the assay measurements are found in the table on the following page along with the results from the scoping assay performed in 2006. All uncertainties in this table (as well as the rest of the report) are reported at 1?. Summing the assay results and treating MDAs as M238Pu= 0 ± MDA, the total holdup in the East Cell Line was 240 ± 40 grams. This result is 100 grams lower than the previous estimate, a 0.55? difference. The uncertainty in the Pu-238 holdup is also reduced substantially relative to the 2006 scoping assay. However, the current assay results are in agreement with the 2006 scoping assay results due to the large uncertainty associated with the 2006 scoping assays. The current assay results support the conclusion that the 2006 results bound the Pu-238 mass in Cells 1-5. These results should be considered preliminary since additional measurements of the East Cell line are scheduled for 2017 and 2018. Those measurements will provide detailed information about the distribution of Pu-238 in the cells to be used to refine the results of the current assay.

  13. Efficiency corrections in low-energy gamma spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakar, K.; Realo, K.; Kiisk, M.; Realo, E.

    2007-09-01

    In HPGe gamma spectrometric analysis of 210Pb in aerosol filter samples, the activity concentrations were corrected for self-attenuation and sample heights. Corrections were evaluated using the Monte Carlo simulation toolkit Geant4 and the Gespecor software. Calculations were made for 46.5 keV gamma line of 210Pb in Petryanoff (FPP) and fiberglass aerosol filters of varying heights. The IAEA RGU-1 reference material of different heights in a similar beaker served as a standard source. As a result, the approximations were found to calculate corrected efficiencies for samples with different heights. The method was applied for the study of 210Pb content in air in Estonia.

  14. In situ and time resolved study of the {gamma}/{alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} transition in nanometric particles

    SciTech Connect

    Belin, T. Millot, N. Bovet, N.; Gailhanou, M.

    2007-08-15

    In situ and real-time study of the {gamma} to {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} transition is carried out on the H10 beamline at LURE (France). {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles are synthesized by soft chemistry. These particles have an average diameter evaluated by X-ray diffraction of 9{+-}1nm and a specific surface area of 116m{sup 2}g{sup -1}. The size of produced {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles is determined by in situ and time resolved X-ray diffraction measurements at different temperatures. An amazing evolution of size with time is revealed: an abrupt doubling of the {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle size is observed whatever the heating temperature. Some assumptions are given in order to explain this phenomenon which implies at the same time surface energy, granulometric distribution and coalescence of particles. -- A brutal increase of the X-rays coherent domain sizes of the {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles during the {gamma}/{alpha} transition at nanometric scale. Maghemite {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles ({phi}=9{+-}1nm) were heated at 723 K. First germs (or grains) of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were detected with a size of 2 nm.

  15. Rapid and simultaneous in situ assessment of aflatoxins and stilbenes using silica plate imprinting mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Diogo N; Ferreira, Mônica S; Catharino, Rodrigo R

    2014-01-01

    A fast and direct combination of techniques for simultaneous mycotoxin and phytoalexin identification in peanut skin and kernel is described. Silica Plate Imprinting Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (SPILDI-MSI) is a powerful technique that exhibits great advantages, such as solvent-free and matrix-free characteristics, as well as no sample preparation or separation steps. It also permits accurate identification of mycotoxins and phytoalexins with unique fingerprint profiles in just a few seconds. Results are expressed as chemical images of the 4 identified types of aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1 and G2) and a stilbenoid (resveratrol). Also, SPILDI-MSI allows the comparison between the spatial distribution of aflatoxins and resveratrol found in kernel and skin. This novel application has proven to be useful for instantaneous qualitative assessment of aflatoxins and stilbenoids both in the peanut skin and kernel and offers precise tracking of fungal contamination in nuts and other foodstuffs. PMID:24595464

  16. Latent transforming growth factor beta1 activation in situ: quantitative and functional evidence after low-dose gamma-irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrhart, E. J.; Segarini, P.; Tsang, M. L.; Carroll, A. G.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The biological activity of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta) is controlled by its secretion as a latent complex in which it is noncovalently associated with latency-associated peptide (LAP). Activation is the extracellular process in which TGF-beta is released from LAP, and is considered to be a primary regulatory control. We recently reported rapid and persistent changes in TGF-beta immunoreactivity in conjunction with extracellular matrix remodeling in gamma-irradiated mouse mammary gland. Our hypothesis is that these specific changes in immunoreactivity are indicative of latent TGF-beta activation. In the present study, we determined the radiation dose response and tested whether a functional relationship exists between radiation-induced TGF-beta and collagen type III remodeling. After radiation exposures as low as 0.1 Gy, we detected increased TGF-beta immunoreactivity in the mammary epithelium concomitant with decreased LAP immunostaining, which are events consistent with activation. Quantitative image analysis demonstrated a significant (P=0.0005) response at 0.1 Gy without an apparent threshold and a linear dose response to 5 Gy. However, in the adipose stroma, loss of LAP demonstrated a qualitative threshold at 0.5 Gy. Loss of LAP paralleled induction of collagen III immunoreactivity in this tissue compartment. We tested whether TGF-beta mediates collagen III expression by treating animals with TGF-beta panspecific monoclonal antibody, 1D11.16, administered i.p. shortly before irradiation. Radiation-induced collagen III staining in the adipose stroma was blocked in an antibody dose-dependent manner, which persisted through 7 days postirradiation. RNase protection assay revealed that radiation-induced elevation of total gland collagen III mRNA was also blocked by neutralizing antibody treatment. These data provide functional confirmation of the hypothesis that radiation exposure leads to latent TGF-beta activation, support our interpretation of the reciprocal shift in immunoreactivity as evidence of activation, and implicate TGF-beta as a mediator of tissue response to ionizing radiation. The sensitivity of activation to low radiation doses points to a potential role for TGF-beta in orchestrating tissue response to oxidative stress. As such, radiation may be useful as a probe to delineate the consequences of latent TGF-beta activation in situ.

  17. In situ derivatization reaction and determination of ibuprofen in water samples using headspace generation-programmed temperature vaporization-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pérez Pavón, José Luis; Casas Ferreira, Ana María; Fernández Laespada, María Esther; Moreno Cordero, Bernardo

    2009-09-25

    The aim of the present work is to propose a method for the determination of ibuprofen, as a typical representative of pharmaceutical compounds, in aqueous samples. To do so, an in situ derivatization reaction in aqueous medium was employed in the vial of a headspace sampler (HS), after which instrumental measurements were made with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). As the injection system we propose a programmed temperature vaporizer (PTV) where, in solvent vent mode, better results can be obtained than with the conventional split and splitless injection modes. Since the derivatization reaction takes place in the HS vial, after the mixing of reagents and the sealing of the vial, the whole process takes place on-line, with no need for intermediate steps. The simplicity and speed of the method--analysis throughput: 10.5 min--together with the limit of detection obtained (0.23 microg/L), bearing in mind that no preconcentration step or later clean-up step are required, make this a good method for the analysis of ibuprofen in aqueous samples of urban waste water. PMID:19700164

  18. Sublimation extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: A new technique for future in situ analyses of purines and pyrimidines on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Cleaves, H. J.; Buch, A.; Schubert, M.; Aubrey, A.; Bada, J. L.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2006-12-01

    We have developed a sublimation technique coupled with chemical derivatization and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to detect nucleobases and other volatile organic compounds derived from bacteria in Mars analog materials. To demonstrate this technique, a sample of serpentine inoculated with Escherichia coli ( E. coli) cells was heated to 500 °C for several seconds under Martian ambient pressure. The sublimate was collected on a cold finger, then derivatized and analyzed by GC-MS. We found that adenine, cytosine, thymine and uracil were the most abundant molecules detected in the sublimed E. coli extract by GC-MS. In addition, nucleobases were also detected in sublimed extracts of a deep-sea sediment sample, seawater, and soil collected from the Atacama Desert in Chile after heating the samples under the same conditions. Our results indicate that nucleobases can be easily isolated directly from natural samples using sublimation and then detected by GC-MS after chemical derivatization. The sublimation-based extraction technique is one approach that should be considered for use by future in situ instruments designed to detect organic compounds relevant to life in the Martian regolith.

  19. Apparatus for measuring the stopping power of active materials evaporated in situ and characterized by Auger electron spectrometry and Rutherford backscattering

    SciTech Connect

    Semrad, D.; Bauer, P.; Eder, K.; Obermann, W.

    1986-07-01

    An ultrahigh-vacuum scattering chamber working in the low 10/sup -9/-mbar range is described. It is attached to a standard O-ring sealed beam transport system of an electrostatic accelerator. Twelve targets can be prepared in situ, one by one, by evaporating the material onto backings, which are mounted on tiltable target holders on a wheel. Backscattering spectra are obtained from these targets and the stopping cross section is deduced from their widths. A cooled high-resolution surface barrier detector is used for this purpose. The integral concentrations of light impurities in the target are obtained using Rutherford backscattering (RBS), whereas Auger electron spectrometry (AES) together with a sputtering device is used to determine the depth composition. As a test of the assembly we determined the stopping power of aluminum for protons and deuterons, respectively. The results are compared to published tables based upon fits to experiments. The influence of impurities on the result is discussed for an aluminum target prepared under standard evaporation conditions.

  20. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of enantiomers by mass spectrometry: application of a simple chiral chloride probe via rapid in-situ reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Chai, Yunfeng; Ni, Zhangqin; Wang, Lu; Hu, Ruilin; Pan, Yuanjiang; Sun, Cuirong

    2014-01-27

    A tandem mass spectrometry method for high-sensitivity qualitative and quantitative discrimination of chiral amino compounds is conducted. The method is based on a chemical derivation process that uses a simple reagent, L-1-(phenylsulfonyl)pyrrolidine-carbonyl chloride, as the probe. The method is applicable in both organic solutions and biological conditions. Twenty-one pairs of enantiomer containing amino acids, amino alcohols, and amines are used to produce diastereomers using the probe via in situ reaction for 20 s at room temperature. The resulting diastereomers are successfully recognized based on the relative peak intensities of their fragments in positive mode, with the chiral recognition ability values ranging from 0.35 to 3.83. The L/D ratio of Pro spiked at different concentrations (enantiomeric excess) in both acetonitrile and dog plasma is determined by establishing calibration curves. This method achieves a lower limit of quantification of 50 pmol in analyzing amino acids using an extract ion chromatograph. The relative standard deviation for both qualitative and quantitative results is <5%. Thus, the present method is demonstrated as a new and practical technique of rapidly and sensitively determining enantiomers of amino compounds. PMID:24418139

  1. In situ metabolic analysis of single plant cells by capillary microsampling and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with ion mobility separation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linwen; Foreman, Daniel P; Grant, Paaqua A; Shrestha, Bindesh; Moody, Sally A; Villiers, Florent; Kwak, June M; Vertes, Akos

    2014-10-21

    Advances in single cell analysis techniques have demonstrated cell-to-cell variability in both homogeneous and heterogeneous cell populations strengthening our understanding of multicellular organisms and individual cell behaviour. However, additional tools are needed for non-targeted metabolic analysis of live single cells in their native environment. Here, we combine capillary microsampling with electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility separation (IMS) for the analysis of various single A. thaliana epidermal cell types, including pavement and basal cells, and trichomes. To achieve microsampling of different cell types with distinct morphology, custom-tailored microcapillaries were used to extract the cell contents. To eliminate the isobaric interferences and enhance the ion coverage in single cell analysis, a rapid separation technique, IMS, was introduced that retained ions based on their collision cross sections. For each cell type, the extracted cell material was directly electrosprayed resulting in ?200 peaks in ESI-MS and ?400 different ions in ESI-IMS-MS, the latter representing a significantly enhanced coverage. Based on their accurate masses and tandem MS, 23 metabolites and lipids were tentatively identified. Our results indicated that profound metabolic differences existed between the trichome and the other two cell types but differences between pavement and basal cells were hard to discern. The spectra indicated that in all three A. thaliana cell types the phenylpropanoid metabolism pathway had high coverage. In addition, metabolites from the subpathway, sinapic acid ester biosynthesis, were more abundant in single pavement and basal cells, whereas compounds from the kaempferol glycoside biosynthesis pathway were present at significantly higher level in trichomes. Our results demonstrate that capillary microsampling coupled with ESI-IMS-MS captures metabolic differences between A. thaliana epidermal cell types, paving the way for the non-targeted analysis of single plant cells and subcellular compartments. PMID:25109271

  2. NMIS With Gamma Spectrometry for Attributes of Pu and HEU, Explosives and Chemical Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J. T.; Mattingly, J. K.; Mullens, J. A.; Neal, J. S.

    2002-05-10

    The concept for the system described herein is an active/passive Nuclear Materials Identification System{sup 2} (NMIS) that incorporates gamma ray spectrometry{sup 3}. This incorporation of gamma ray spectrometry would add existing capability into this system. This Multiple Attribute System can determine a wide variety of attributes for Pu and highly enriched uranium (HEU) of which a selected subset could be chosen. This system can be built using commercial off the shelf (COTS) components. NMIS systems are at All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) and Russian Federal Nuclear Center Institute of Technical Physics, (VNIITF) and measurements with Pu have been performed at VNIIEF and analyzed successfully for mass and thickness of Pu. NMIS systems are being used successfully for HEU at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The use of active gamma ray spectrometry for high explosive HE and chemical agent detection is a well known activation analysis technique, and it is incorporated here. This report describes the system, explains the attribute determination methods for fissile materials, discusses technical issues to be resolved, discusses additional development needs, presents a schedule for building from COTS components, and assembly with existing components, and discusses implementation issues such as lack of need for facility modification and low radiation exposure.

  3. In-situ determination of cross-over point for overcoming plasma-related matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2008-03-01

    A novel method is described for overcoming plasma-related matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The method is based on measurement of the vertically resolved atomic emission of analyte within the plasma and therefore requires the addition of no reagents to the sample solution or to the plasma. Plasma-related matrix effects enhance analyte emission intensity low in the plasma but depress the same emission signal at higher positions. Such bipolar behavior is true for all emission lines and matrices that induce plasma-related interferences. The transition where the enhancement is balanced by the depression (the so-called cross-over point) results in a spatial region with no apparent matrix effects. Although it would be desirable always to perform determinations at this cross-over point, its location varies between analytes and from matrix to matrix, so it would have to be found separately for every analyte and for every sample. Here, a novel approach is developed for the in-situ determination of the location of this cross-over point. It was found that the location of the cross-over point is practically invariant for a particular analyte emission line when the concentration of the matrix was varied. As a result, it is possible to determine in-situ the location of the cross-over point for all analyte emission lines in a sample by means of a simple one-step sample dilution. When the original sample is diluted by a factor of 2 and the diluted sample is analyzed again, the extent of the matrix effect is identical (zero) between the original sample and the diluted sample at one and only one location — the cross-over point. This novel method was verified with several single-element matrices (0.05 M Na, Ca, Ba and La) and some mixed-element matrices (mixtures of Na-Ca, Ca-Ba, and a plant-sample digest). The inaccuracy in emission intensity due to the matrix effect could be as large as - 30% for conventional measurements in the normal analytical zone, but is reduced to within 5% with this new method. The major currently known limitation is that the accuracy of the method is highly sensitive to fluctuations and noise in the vertical emission-intensity profile, so the stability of the ICP system must be controlled to preferably within 1%.

  4. Evaluation of TASTEX task H: measurement of plutonium isotopic abundances by gamma-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gunnink, R.; Prindle, A.L.; Asakura, Y.; Masui, J.; Ishiguro, N.; Kawasaki, A.; Kataoka, S.

    1981-10-01

    This report describes a computer-based gamma spectrometer system that was developed for measuring isotopic and total plutonium concentrations in nitric acid solutions. The system was installed at the Tokai reprocessing plant where it is undergoing testing and evaluation as part of the Tokai Advanced Safeguards Exercise (TASTEX). Objectives of TASTEX Task H, High-Resolution Gamma Spectrometer for Plutonium Isotopic Analysis, the methods and equipment used, the installation and calibration of the system, and the measurements obtained from several reprocessing campaigns are discussed and described. In general, we find that measurements for gamma spectroscopy agree well with those of mass spectrometry and of other chemical analysis. The system measures both freshly processed plutonium from the product accountability tank and aged plutonium solutions from storage tanks. 14 figures, 15 tables.

  5. Testing of regolith of celestial bolides with active neutron gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vostrukhin, Andrey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Golovin, Dmitry; Litvak, Maxim; Sanin, Anton

    2015-04-01

    Current space instruments for studying planet's surface include gamma ray spectrometers that detect natural radioactive isotopes as well as gamma-rays induced in subsurface by galactic cosmic rays. When measuring from celestial body's surface, statistics and amount of detected elements can be dramatically increased with active methods, where soil exposed to artificial flux of particles. One good example is the Russian Dynamic Albedo of Neutron (DAN) instrument onboard Martian Science Laboratory mission (Curiosity rover) developed in 2005-2011. It is the first active neutron spectrometer flown to another planet as part of a landed mission to investigate subsurface water distribution and which has now successfully operated for more than two years on the Martian surface. Presentation describes a number of space instruments for different landers and rovers being developed in Russian Space Research Institute for studying Moon and Mars, as well as method of active neutron and gamma spectrometry overview.

  6. A gamma-ray detector for in-situ measurement of 137Cs radioactivity in snowfields and glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunphy, Philip P.; Dibb, Jack E.; Chupp, Edward L.

    1994-12-01

    The rate of snow deposition at various cold regions on the earth is an important quantity for glaciological and climatological studies. Radioactive debris from above-ground tests of nuclear weapons (mainly 1954-1970) and from the Chernobyl accident (1986) have been deposited on glaciers and snowfields, where they can be used as time and depth markers to determine the subsequent accumulation of snow. We discuss a technique to locate these markers that has been used just recently — in-situ measurement of ?-rays from 137Cs. These ?-rays, which are associated with radioactive fallout, have a distinctive depth profile and serve as markers of the historical nuclear events. The ?-ray measurement involves lowering a scintillation detector down a borehole in the snow or ice and recording the response to the 137Cs ?-rays as a function of depth. The in-situ measurement can be done relatively quickly and can replace sample retrieval, or it can be used to decide which ice or snow samples should be transported for later analysis in the laboratory. The feasibility of in-situ ?-ray measurement has been demonstrated at sites in the French Alps and Greenland. We report on a portable detector system that is being developed for use in Antarctica. It is based, as much as possible, on inexpensive, commercially available detectors and electronics. The advantages and disadvantages of this approach are discussed. The problems involved with making these measurements in a harsh environment and the steps taken to deal with them are also presented.

  7. An Analysis of Nuclear Fuel Burnup in the AGR 1 TRISO Fuel Experiment Using Gamma Spectrometry, Mass Spectrometry, and Computational Simulation Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jason M. Harp; Paul A. Demkowicz; Phillip L. Winston; James W. Sterbentz

    2014-10-01

    AGR 1 was the first in a series of experiments designed to test US TRISO fuel under high temperature gas-cooled reactor irradiation conditions. This experiment was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is currently undergoing post irradiation examination (PIE) at INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. One component of the AGR 1 PIE is the experimental evaluation of the burnup of the fuel by two separate techniques. Gamma spectrometry was used to non destructively evaluate the burnup of all 72 of the TRISO fuel compacts that comprised the AGR 1 experiment. Two methods for evaluating burnup by gamma spectrometry were developed, one based on the Cs 137 activity and the other based on the ratio of Cs 134 and Cs 137 activities. Burnup values determined from both methods compared well with the values predicted from simulations. The highest measured burnup was 20.1 %FIMA for the direct method and 20.0 %FIMA for the ratio method (compared to 19.56% FIMA from simulations). An advantage of the ratio method is that the burnup of the cylindrical fuel compacts can determined in small (2.5 mm) axial increments and an axial burnup profile can be produced. Destructive chemical analysis by inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP MS) was then performed on selected compacts that were representative of the expected range of fuel burnups in the experiment to compare with the burnup values determined by gamma spectrometry. The compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry had a burnup range of 19.3 % FIMA to 10.7 % FIMA. The mass spectrometry evaluation of burnup for the four compacts agreed well with the gamma spectrometry burnup evaluations and the expected burnup from simulation. For all four compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry, the maximum range in the three experimentally determined values and the predicted value was 6% or less. The results confirm the accuracy of the nondestructive burnup evaluation from gamma spectrometry for TRISO fuel compacts across a burnup range of approximately 10 to 20 % FIMA and also validate the approach used in the physics simulation of the AGR 1 experiment.

  8. Measurement of uranium series radionuclides in rock and groundwater at the Koongarra ore deposit, Australia, by gamma spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yanase, Nobuyuki; Sekine, Keiichi

    1995-12-31

    Gamma spectrometry without any self-absorption correction was developed to measure low energy gamma rays emitted by uranium and actinium series radionuclides in rock samples and groundwater residues collected at the Koongarra ore deposit, Australia. Thin samples were prepared to minimize the self-absorption by uranium in the samples. The present method gave standard deviations of 0.9 to 18% for the measurements of concentrations of uranium and actinium series radionuclides. The concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 230}Th and {sup 235}U measured by gamma spectrometry were compared with those by alpha spectrometry that requires a complicated chemical separation procedure. The results obtained by both methods were in fairly good agreement, and it was found that the gamma spectrometry is applicable to rock and groundwater samples having uranium content sup to 8.1% (10{sup 3} B1/g) and 3 Bq/l of {sup 238}U, respectively. The detection limits were calculated to be of the order of 10{sup {minus}2} Bq/g for rock samples and 10{sup {minus}1} Bq/l for groundwater samples. The concentrations of uranium and actinium series radionuclides can be determined precisely in these samples using gamma spectrometry without any self-absorption correction.

  9. Nuclear chemistry of returned lunar samples: Nuclide analysis by gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okelley, G. D.

    1975-01-01

    Primordial and cosmogenic radionuclide concentrations are determined nondestructively by gamma-ray spectrometry in soil and rock samples from the returned Apollo 17 sample collection from Taurus-Littrow and Descartes. Geochemical evidence in support of field geology speculation concerning layering of the subfloor basalt flows is demonstrated along with a possible correlation of magmatic fractionation of K/U as a function of depth. The pattern of radionuclide concentrations observed in these samples is distinct due to proton bombardment by the intense solar flares of August 4-9, 1972. Such radionuclide determinations are used in determining lunar sample orientation and characterizing solar flare activity.

  10. Thorium determination in intercomparison samples and in some Romanian building materials by gamma ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pantelica, A; Georgescu, I I; Murariu-Magureanu, M D; Margaritescu, I; Cincu, E

    2001-01-01

    Thorium content in zircon sand, thorium ore and a thorium liquid sample (EU Laboratories Network Intercomparison), as well as in some Romanian building materials: sand, wood, tufa, asbestos-cement. cement mill dust, coal fly ash, bricks, and tile (28 samples) was deterimined by gamma ray spectrometry. For the building materials, 226Ra, 40K and 137Cs specific activities were also measured. The results were compared with the Romanian legal norms concerning the highest admissible levels for 232Th, 226Ra. and 40K radioactivity. and to Th, U, and K concentration values previously determined in our laboratory on similar types of samples. PMID:11843363

  11. Determination of 226Ra Activity Using Gamma Spectrometry with 226Ra-222Rn Disequilibrium.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Wang, Shilian; Zhao, Yungang; Liu, Shujiang; Fan, Yuanqing; Shi, Jianfang; Jia, Huaimao; Yu, Weixiang

    2015-08-01

    Radium-226 (Ra) activity is normally determined indirectly by gamma spectrometry, in particular by measuring the characteristic ?-ray emitted from its progeny (Pb and Bi) when Ra-Rn secular equilibrium is reached. This article describes a measurement method involving the measurement of Pb ingrowth. The activity of Ra determined by this method agrees with that measured after Ra-Rn equilibrium. The method of Pb ingrowth allows rapid and sufficiently accurate determination of Ra activity without the need to wait for Ra-Rn equilibrium. PMID:26107431

  12. A Case Study Correlating Innovative Gamma Ray Scanning Detection Systems Data to Surface Soil Gamma Spectrometry Results - 13580

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Shannon; Rodriguez, Rene; Billock, Paul; Lit, Peter

    2013-07-01

    HydroGeoLogic (HGL), Inc. completed a United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) study to characterize radiological contamination at a site near Canoga Park, California. The characterized area contained 470 acres including the site of a prototype commercial nuclear reactor and other nuclear design, testing, and support operations from the 1950's until 1988 [1]. The site history included radiological releases during operation followed by D and D activities. The characterization was conducted under an accelerated schedule and the results will support the project remediation. The project has a rigorous cleanup to background agenda and does not allow for comparison to risk-based guidelines. To target soil sample locations, multiple lines of evidence were evaluated including a gamma radiation survey, geophysical surveys, historical site assessment, aerial photographs, and former worker interviews. Due to the time since production and decay, the primary gamma emitting radionuclide remaining is cesium-137 (Cs-137). The gamma ray survey covered diverse, rugged terrain using custom designed sodium iodide thallium-activated (NaI(Tl)) scintillation detection systems. The survey goals included attaining 100% ground surface coverage and detecting gamma radiation as sensitively as possible. The effectiveness of innovative gamma ray detection systems was tested by correlating field Cs-137 static count ratios to Cs-137 laboratory gamma spectrometry results. As a case study, the area encompassing the former location of the first nuclear power station in the U. S. was scanned, and second by second global positioning system (GPS)-linked gamma spectral data were evaluated by examining total count rate and nuclide-specific regions of interest. To compensate for Compton scattering from higher energy naturally occurring radionuclides (U-238, Th-232 and their progeny, and K-40), count rate ratios of anthropogenic nuclide-specific regions of interest to the total count rate were calculated. From the scanning data, locations with observed Cs-137 ratios exceeding six standard deviations above the mean ratio were mapped in high resolution [2]. Field teams returned to those locations to collect static count measurements using the same detection systems. Soil surface samples were collected at 30 locations and analyzed for Cs-137. An exponential correlation was identified between Cs-137 concentrations in surface soil and field-scanned Cs-137 ratios. The data indicate field minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of Cs-137 at 0.02 Bq/g (0.5 pCi/g) or lower depending on contaminant distribution in soil. (authors)

  13. Standard test method for quantitative determination of americium 241 in plutonium by Gamma-Ray spectrometry

    E-print Network

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1994-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the quantitative determination of americium 241 by gamma-ray spectrometry in plutonium nitrate solution samples that do not contain significant amounts of radioactive fission products or other high specific activity gamma-ray emitters. 1.2 This test method can be used to determine the americium 241 in samples of plutonium metal, oxide and other solid forms, when the solid is appropriately sampled and dissolved. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  14. Development and application of compact denuder sampling techniques with in situ derivatization followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for halogen speciation in volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüdiger, Julian; Bobrowski, Nicole; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    Volcanoes are a large source for several reactive atmospheric trace gases including sulphur and halogen containing species. The detailed knowledge of volcanic plume chemistry can give insights into subsurface processes and can be considered as a useful geochemical tool for monitoring of volcanic activity, especially halogen to sulphur ratios (e.g. Bobrowski and Giuffrida, 2012; Donovan et al., 2014). The reactive bromine species bromine monoxide (BrO) is of particular interest, because BrO as well as SO2 are readily measurable by UV spectrometers at a safe distance. Furthermore it is formed in the plume by a multiphase reaction mechanism under depletion of ozone in the plume. The abundance of BrO changes as a function of the reaction time and therefore distance from the vent as well as the spatial position in the plume. Due to the lack of analytical approaches for the accurate speciation of certain halogens (HBr, Br2, Br, BrCl, HOBr etc.) there are still uncertainties about the magnitude of volcanic halogen emissions and in particular their specificationtheir species and therefore also in the understanding of the bromine chemistry in volcanic plumes (Bobrowski et al., 2007). In this study, the first application of a 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene (1,3,5-TMB)-coated gas diffusion denuder (Huang and Hoffmann, 2008) on volcanic gases proved to be suitable to collect selectively gaseous bromine species with oxidation states of +1 or 0 (Br2 and BrO(H)), while being ignorant to HBr (OS -1). The reaction of 1,3,5-TMB with bromine gives 1-bromo-2,4,6-trimethoxybenzene (1-bromo-2,4,6-TMB) - other halogens give corresponding products. The diffusion denuder technique allows sampling of gaseous compounds exclusively without collecting particulate matter. Choosing a flow rate of 500 mL-min-1 and a denuder length of 0.5 m a nearly quantitative collection efficiency was achieved. Solvent elution of the derivatized analytes and subsequent analysis with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry gives a limit of detection below 1 ng of bromine. The method was applied on volcanic gas plumes at Mt. Etna and Mt. Stromboli in Italy in July 2014 and on fumarolic gas emissions at Mt. Lastarria in Chile in November 2014. The results show significant amounts of the concerning bromine species (lower ppb range). Comprehensive data evaluation and comparison with results of impinger extraction with NaOH solution as well as chamber experiments are still in progress. References Bobrowski, N. and G. Giuffrida: Bromine monoxide / sulphur dioxide ratios in relation to volcanological observations at Mt. Etna 2006-2009. Solid Earth, 3, 433-445, 2012 Bobrowski, N., R. von Glasow, A. Aiuppa, S. Inguaggiato, I. Louban, O. W. Ibrahim and U. Platt: Reactive halogen chemistry in volcanic plumes. J. Geophys. Res., 112, 2007 Donovan A., V. Tsanev, C. Oppenheimer and M. Edmonds: Reactive halogens (BrO and OClO) detected in the plume of Soufrière Hills Volcano during an eruption hiatus. Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 15, 3346-3363, 2014 Huang, R.-J. and T. Hoffmann: A denuder-impinger system with in situ derivatization followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of gaseous iodine-containing halogen species. Journal of Chromatography A, 1210, 135-141, 2008

  15. The Dortmund Low Background Facility - Low-Background Gamma Ray Spectrometry with an Artificial Overburden

    E-print Network

    Holger Gastrich; Claus Gößling; Reiner Klingenberg; Kevin Kröninger; Till Neddermann; Christian Nitsch; Thomas Quante; Kai Zuber

    2015-12-06

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors used for low-background gamma ray spectrometry are usually operated under either a fairly low overburden of the order of one meter of water equivalent (mw.e.) or a high overburden of the order of 100mw.e. or more, e.g. in specialized underground laboratories. The Dortmund Low Background Facility (DLB) combines the advantages of both approaches. The artificial overburden of 10mw.e. already shields the hadronic component of cosmic rays. The inner shielding, featuring a state-of-the-art neutron shielding and an active muon veto, enables low-background gamma ray spectrometry at an easy-accessible location at the campus of the Technische Universit\\"at Dortmund. The integral background count rate between 40keV and 2700keV is 2.528+-0.004counts/kg/minute. This enables activity measurements of primordial radionuclides in the range of some 10mBq/kg within a week of measurement time.

  16. The Dortmund Low Background Facility - Low-Background Gamma Ray Spectrometry with an Artificial Overburden

    E-print Network

    Gastrich, Holger; Klingenberg, Reiner; Kröninger, Kevin; Neddermann, Till; Nitsch, Christian; Quante, Thomas; Zuber, Kai

    2015-01-01

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors used for low-background gamma ray spectrometry are usually operated under either a fairly low overburden of the order of one meter of water equivalent (mw.e.) or a high overburden of the order of 100mw.e. or more, e.g. in specialized underground laboratories. The Dortmund Low Background Facility (DLB) combines the advantages of both approaches. The artificial overburden of 10mw.e. already shields the hadronic component of cosmic rays. The inner shielding, featuring a state-of-the-art neutron shielding and an active muon veto, enables low-background gamma ray spectrometry at an easy-accessible location at the campus of the Technische Universit\\"at Dortmund. The integral background count rate between 40keV and 2700keV is 2.528+-0.004counts/kg/minute. This enables activity measurements of primordial radionuclides in the range of some 10mBq/kg within a week of measurement time.

  17. In situ calibration of the Gamma Reaction History instrument using reference samples ("pucks") for areal density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, N. M.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; Hsu, H. H.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Wilson, D. C.; Stoeffl, W. W.; Young, C. S.; Mack, J. M.; Miller, E. K.; Grafil, E.; Evans, S. C.; Sedillo, T. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Duffy, T.

    2013-11-01

    The introduction of a sample of carbon, for example a disk or "puck", near an imploding DT-filled capsule creates a source of 12C gamma rays that can serve as a reference for calibrating the response of the Gamma Reaction History (GRH) detector [1]. Such calibration is important in the measurement of ablator areal density ??R?abl in plastic-ablator DT-filled capsules at OMEGA [2], by allowing ??R?abl to be inferred as a function of ratios of signals rather than from absolute measurements of signal magnitudes. Systematic uncertainties in signal measurements and detector responses therefore cancel, permitting more accurate measurements of ??R?abl.

  18. Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectrometer (TAGS) Intensity Distributions from INL's Gamma-Ray Spectrometry Center

    DOE Data Explorer

    Greenwood, R. E.

    A 252Cf fission-product source and the INL on-line isotope separator were used to supply isotope-separated fission-product nuclides to a total absorption -ray spectrometer. This spectrometer consisted of a large (25.4-cm diameter x 30.5-cm long) NaI(Tl) detector with a 20.3-cm deep axial well in which is placed a 300-mm2 x 1.0-mm Si detector. The spectra from the NaI(Tl) detector are collected both in the singles mode and in coincidence with the B-events detected in the Si detector. Ideally, this detector would sum all the energy of the B- rays in each cascade following the population of daughter level by B- decay, so that the event could be directly associated with a particular daughter level. However, there are losses of energy from attenuation of the rays before they reach the detector, transmission of rays through the detector, escape of secondary photons from Compton scattering, escape of rays through the detector well, internal conversion, etc., and the measured spectra are thus more complicated than the ideal case and the analysis is more complex. Analysis methods have been developed to simulate all of these processes and thus provide a direct measure of the B- intensity distribution as a function of the excitation energy in the daughter nucleus. These data yield more accurate information on the B- distribution than conventional decay-scheme studies for complex decay schemes with large decay energies, because in the latter there are generally many unobserved and observed but unplaced rays. The TAGS data have been analyzed and published [R. E. Greenwood et al., Nucl Instr. and metho. A390(1997)] for 40 fission product-nuclides to determine the B- intensity distributions. [Copied from the TAGS page at http://www.inl.gov/gammaray/spectrometry/tags.shtml]. Those values are listed on this page for quick reference.

  19. The 124Sb activity standardization by gamma spectrometry for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, M. C. M.; Iwahara, A.; Delgado, J. U.; Poledna, R.; da Silva, R. L.

    2010-07-01

    This work describes a metrological activity determination of 124Sb, which can be used as radiotracer, applying gamma spectrometry methods with hyper pure germanium detector and efficiency curves. This isotope with good activity and high radionuclidic purity is employed in the form of meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime) or sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam) to treat leishmaniasis. 124Sb is also applied in animal organ distribution studies to solve some questions in pharmacology. 124Sb decays by ?-emission and it produces several photons (X and gamma rays) with energy varying from 27 to 2700 keV. Efficiency curves to measure point 124Sb solid sources were obtained from a 166mHo standard that is a multi-gamma reference source. These curves depend on radiation energy, sample geometry, photon attenuation, dead time and sample-detector position. Results for activity determination of 124Sb samples using efficiency curves and a high purity coaxial germanium detector were consistent in different counting geometries. Also uncertainties of about 2% ( k=2) were obtained.

  20. Cosmic veto gamma-spectrometry for Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, J. L.; Davies, A. V.

    2014-05-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) is supported by a global network of monitoring stations that perform high-resolution gamma-spectrometry on air filter samples for the identification of 85 radionuclides. At the UK CTBT Radionuclide Laboratory (GBL15), a novel cosmic veto gamma-spectrometer has been developed to improve the sensitivity of station measurements, providing a mean background reduction of 80.8% with mean MDA improvements of 45.6%. The CTBT laboratory requirement for a 140Ba MDA is achievable after 1.5 days counting compared to 5-7 days using conventional systems. The system consists of plastic scintillation plates that detect coincident cosmic-ray interactions within an HPGe gamma-spectrometer using the Canberra LynxTM multi-channel analyser. The detector is remotely configurable using a TCP/IP interface and requires no dedicated coincidence electronics. It would be especially useful in preventing false-positives at remote station locations (e.g. Halley, Antarctica) where sample transfer to certified laboratories is logistically difficult. The improved sensitivity has been demonstrated for a CTBT air filter sample collected after the Fukushima incident.

  1. Summary of gamma spectrometry on local air samples from 1985--1995

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1997-04-02

    This report summarizes the 1985--1995 results of low-level HPGe gamma spectrometry analysis of high-volume air samples collected at the Aiken Airport, which is about 25 miles north of SRS. The author began analyzing these samples with new calibrations using the newly developed GRABGAM code in 1985. The air sample collections were terminated in 1995, as the facilities at the Aiken Airport were no longer available. Air sample measurements prior to 1985 were conducted with a different analysis system (and by others prior to 1984), and the data were not readily available. The report serves to closeout this phase of local NTS air sample studies, while documenting the capabilities and accomplishments. Hopefully, the information will guide other applications for this technology, both locally and elsewhere.

  2. Recent achievements for In-situ measurement: applications to an actual decommissioning project

    SciTech Connect

    Lamadie, F.; Girones, P.; Le Goaller, C.; Mahe, C.; Kohler, J.Y.; Risser, M.A.

    2007-07-01

    Decommissioning a nuclear facility implies a policy of limiting the waste volume and its chemical - and especially radiological - toxicity. It is therefore important to determine the activity level contained in each component that will be dismantled. A variety of methods and analysis techniques are used for this purpose, ranging from simple dose rate measurements to {gamma} spectrometry and {gamma} imaging. The results of several measurement campaigns in a reactor currently in operation but for which decommissioning studies have now been undertaken are discussed. The measurements provide additional radiological data for the waste inventory, which is one of the first issues to be examined. This discussion focuses on the methods used ({gamma} imaging, in situ {gamma} spectrometry, etc.), the results obtained, and their implications for the project, as well as the technological and methodological innovations implemented during these campaigns. (authors)

  3. Investigation of the soil-plant transfer of primordial radionuclides in tomatoes by low-level gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Köhler, M; Gleisberg, B; Niese, S

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents actual data from investigations of the soil-plant transfer of the primordial radionuclides 40K, 238U, 226Ra, 210Pb and 227Ac for tomatoes growing at soils from former uranium mining areas. The analysis were carried out using low-level gamma-ray spectrometry in a 47 m deep underground laboratory. For tomato fruits transfer factors of (0.0007 +/- 0.0006) for 235U, (0.0021 +/- 0.0017) for 226Ra, (0.0015 +/- 0.0009) for 210Pb and (0.0018 +/- 0.0012) for 227Ac were obtained. The investigation of the soil-plant transfer by low-level gamma-ray spectrometry is often limited by the Compton-continuum from the always present high-energy gamma-ray emitter 40K. PMID:10879862

  4. First Year PIDDP Report on gamma-ray and x-ray spectroscopy: X-ray remote sensing and in situ spectroscopy for planetary exploration missions and gamma-ray remote sensing and in situ spectroscopy for planetary exploration missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahdavi, M.; Giboni, K. L.; Vajda, S.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Truax, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Detectors that will be used for planetary missions must have their responses calibrated in a reproducible manner. In addition, it is important to characterize a detector system at uneven portions of its life cycle, for example after exposure to different amounts of radiation. A calibration and response characterization facility has been constructed at Schlumberger-Doll Research for all types of gamma- and x-ray detectors that may be used for planetary measurement. This facility is currently being tested. Initial use is expected for the MARS 94 detectors. The facility will then also be available for calibrating other detectors as well as arrays of detectors such as the NEAR detector with its central Nal(TI) crystal surrounded with a large BGO crystal. Cadmium telluride detectors are investigated for applications in space explorations. These detectors show an energy resolution of 5 keV for the 122 keV 57Co line. Earlier reported polarization effects are not observed. The detectors can be used at temperatures up to 100 C, although with reduced energy resolution. The thickness of standard detectors is limited to 2 mm. These detectors become fully efficient at bias voltages above 200 V. Initial results for a 1 cm thick detector show that the quality of the material is inferior to the thinner standard detectors and hole trapping affects the pulse height. A detailed characterization of the detector is in progress. Prototypes of photomultipliers based on a Channel Electron Multiplier (CEM) are being built to study their performance. Such photomultipliers promise better timing characteristics and a higher dynamic range while being more compact and of lower in weight.

  5. Application of gamma-ray spectrometry in a NORM industry for its radiometrical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantero, J.; Gázquez, M. J.; Hurtado, S.; Bolívar, J. P.; García-Tenorio, R.

    2015-11-01

    Industrial activities involving Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) are found among the most important industrial sectors worldwide as oil/gas facilities, metal production, phosphate Industry, zircon treatment, etc. being really significant the radioactive characterization of the materials involved in their production processes in order to assess the potential radiological risk for workers or natural environment. High resolution gamma spectrometry is a versatile non-destructive radiometric technique that makes simultaneous determination of several radionuclides possible with little sample preparation. However NORM samples cover a wide variety of densities and composition, as opposed to the standards used in gamma efficiency calibration, which are either water-based solutions or standard/reference sources of similar composition. For that reason self-absorption correction effects (especially in the low energy range) must be considered individually in every sample. In this work an experimental and a semi-empirical methodology of self-absorption correction were applied to NORM samples, and the obtained results compared critically, in order to establish the best practice in relation to the circumstances of an individual laboratory. This methodology was applied in samples coming from a TiO2 factory (NORM industry) located in the south-west of Spain where activity concentration of several radionuclides from the Uranium and Thorium series through the production process was measured. These results will be shown in this work.

  6. In-situ gamma-ray survey of rare-earth tailings dams - A case study in Baotou and Bayan Obo Districts, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Baochuan; Wang, Nanping; Wan, Jianhua; Xiong, Shengqing; Liu, Hongtao; Li, Shijun; Zhao, Rong

    2016-01-01

    An in-situ gamma-ray spectrometer survey with a scintillation detector of NaI(Tl) (?75 mm × 75 mm) was carried out in the Baotou and Bayan Obo Districts in order to estimate the levels of natural radionuclides near rare-earth (RE) tailings dams. In the RE tailings dam of Baotou, the mean concentrations of (238)U and (232)Th were 3.0 ± 1.0 mg/kg (range: 1.9-4.6 mg/kg) and 321 ± 31 mg/kg (range: 294-355 mg/kg), respectively. In the Bayan Obo tailings dam, the mean concentrations of (238)U and (232)Th were 5.7 ± 0.5 mg/kg (range: 5.3-6.1 mg/kg) and 276 ± 0.5 mg/kg (range: 275.5-276.3 mg/kg), respectively. The average (232)Th concentrations in the mining areas of the Bayan Obo Mine and the living areas of the Bayan Obo Town were 18.7 ± 7.5 and 26.2 ± 9.1 mg/kg, respectively. The (232)Th concentration recorded in the tailings dams was much higher than the global average (7.44 mg/kg). Our investigation shows that the (232)Th concentration in the tailings in the Baotou dam was 34.6 times greater than that in the local soil (in Guyang County); the average concentrations of (232)Th in the soil in the Baotou District and Bayan Obo Districts were about 1.35 and 2.82 times greater, respectively, than that in the soil in Guyang County. Based on our results, the highest estimated effective dose due to gamma irradiation was 1.15 mSv per year, estimated from the data observed in the Baotou tailings dams. The results of this preliminary study indicate the potential importance of radioactivity in RE tailings dams and that remedial measures may be required. PMID:26555365

  7. Efficiency transfer using the GEANT4 code of CERN for HPGe gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chagren, S; Tekaya, M Ben; Reguigui, N; Gharbi, F

    2016-01-01

    In this work we apply the GEANT4 code of CERN to calculate the peak efficiency in High Pure Germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometry using three different procedures. The first is a direct calculation. The second corresponds to the usual case of efficiency transfer between two different configurations at constant emission energy assuming a reference point detection configuration and the third, a new procedure, consists on the transfer of the peak efficiency between two detection configurations emitting the gamma ray in different energies assuming a "virtual" reference point detection configuration. No pre-optimization of the detector geometrical characteristics was performed before the transfer to test the ability of the efficiency transfer to reduce the effect of the ignorance on their real magnitude on the quality of the transferred efficiency. The obtained and measured efficiencies were found in good agreement for the two investigated methods of efficiency transfer. The obtained agreement proves that Monte Carlo method and especially the GEANT4 code constitute an efficient tool to obtain accurate detection efficiency values. The second investigated efficiency transfer procedure is useful to calibrate the HPGe gamma detector for any emission energy value for a voluminous source using one point source detection efficiency emitting in a different energy as a reference efficiency. The calculations preformed in this work were applied to the measurement exercise of the EUROMET428 project. A measurement exercise where an evaluation of the full energy peak efficiencies in the energy range 60-2000keV for a typical coaxial p-type HpGe detector and several types of source configuration: point sources located at various distances from the detector and a cylindrical box containing three matrices was performed. PMID:26623928

  8. Application of low-background gamma-ray spectrometry to monitor radioactivity in the environment and food.

    PubMed

    Khan, A J; Semkow, T M; Beach, S E; Haines, D K; Bradt, C J; Bari, A; Syed, U-F; Torres, M; Marrantino, J; Kitto, M E; Menia, T; Fielman, E

    2014-08-01

    The results are described of an upgrade of the low-background gamma-ray spectrometry laboratory at New York State Department of Health by acquiring sensitivity to low-energy gamma rays. Tuning of the spectrometer and its low-energy response characteristics are described. The spectrometer has been applied to monitor the environment by measuring aerosols and water in New York State contaminated by the 2011 Fukushima accident plume. In addition, the spectrometer has been used to monitor radioactivity in food by performing a study of cesium in Florida milk. PMID:24836905

  9. Facile access to 154Eu, a new reference source for calibration in gamma ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vimalnath, K V; Das, M K; Ananthakrishnan, M; Ramamoorthy, N

    2005-01-01

    Europium-154 can be obtained as a by-product from the large-scale production of Samarium-153 and possesses attractive features (t1/2 8.592 yr; Egamma 0.12-1.6 MeV) for use as a reference source similar to 152Eu (t1/2 13.516 yr; Egamma 0.12-1.4 MeV), which is the gold standard for calibration in gamma ray spectrometry. Thermal neutron irradiation of 5mg of 98% enriched 153Sm2O3 target in the reactor led to approximately 200 GBq 153Sm and 1.26 MBq 154Eu. A typical batch control sample of 153SmCl3 solution and final radiopharmaceutical product formulation of 153Sm-phosphonate (153Sm-EDTMP) pooled together contained about 20% of total yield, requiring post decay disposal of 153Sm as radioactive waste. Such spent solutions pooled on quarterly basis led to availing 756 kBq of 154Eu. The radioactivity content and radionuclide purity (approximately 82%) of the recovered 154Eu sample were envisaged as adequate to prepare reference sources for calibration of gamma ray spectrometers. At present, one batch of 153Sm is handled per month at our institution, with the possibility for weekly processing in future. Access to approximately 3.5 MBq of 154Eu on quarterly basis is envisaged, apart from obviating the need for instituting steps to tackle disposal of the long-lived 154Eu in the spent solution. Up to 60-120 units of 20-100 kBq of 154Eu reference sources per year could thus be available by the proposed strategy. PMID:15498680

  10. [An automatic and sensitive method for the determination of endogenous brassinosteroids in plant tissues by an online trapping-in situ derivatization-ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry system].

    PubMed

    Ding, Jun; Jiang, Li; Feng, Yuqi

    2014-10-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are a class of naturally occurring phytohormones with poly- hydroxy steroid structure, which regulate general plant growth and many physiological processes. The reported methods for BR analysis were complicated, and the detection sensitivity was relatively low. To realize the automatic analysis of trace BRs in limited plant tissues, an in-tube solid phase microextraction-ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (SPME-UPLC-MS/MS) system was constructed based on two valves-two pumps. Using C18 PEEK column as the trapping column and 4-(dimethylamino) phenylboronic acid (4-DMAPBA) as the derivatization reagent, an on line trapping and in situ derivatization assay method of BRs was developed. BRs could be programmed to fulfill the procedures of injection, extraction, derivatization, LC separation and MS detection in the system. The detection limits of BRs were improved more than one order of magnitude by the online trapping and in situ derivatization techniques, thus endogenous BRs could be quantified in only 300 mg plant tissues. PMID:25739270

  11. Using gamma ray spectrometry for fingerprinting sources of estuarine and coastal sediment in Mukawa coast, Hokkaido, northern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizugaki, S.; Ohtsuka, J.; Murakami, Y.; Ishiya, T.; Hamamoto, S.

    2010-12-01

    To seek the geological tracers of environmental radionuclide for fingerprinting sources of estuarine and coastal sediment, the gamma ray spectrometry was conducted for the soil and sediment samples collected from subcatchments, rivers, estuaries and coast in Mukawa and Sarugawa river watersheds and Mukawa coast, Hokkaido, northern Japan. Gamma ray spectrometry was conducted to determine the activities of environmental radionuclides associated with each soil and sediment samples using HP Ge well-type detector. Gamma ray spectrometry could determine 15 environmental radionuclides, including U-series, Th-series, cesium-137 and potassium-40. Lead-210 excess was also determined by subtracting the activities of Pb-214 from that of Pb-210. The Kruskal-Wallis H test was conducted to assess the ability of each tracer property to discriminate between surface soil samples from the categories divided by subcatchment, geological era and period, suggesting that more than 11 tracer properties were available. Subsequently, the stepwise discriminant function analysis was conducted to identify which combination of tracer properties provides the best composite fingerprint for differentiating source materials on the basis of subcatchment and geology source groups. This analysis suggested that the composite fingerprints of Pb-212, Ac-228 and K-40 can classify the geology into 6 groups based on rock type. Using these tracer properties, the contribution of rock to estuarine and coastal sediment can be evaluated with the multivariate sediment mixing model.

  12. A NEW METHDOLOGY FOR DETERMINING FISSILE MASS IN INDIVIDUAL ACCOUNTING ITEMS WITH THE USE OF GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETRY.

    SciTech Connect

    KANE,W.R.; VANIER,P.E.; ZUHOSKI,P.B.; LEMLEY,J.R.

    2000-07-16

    In the safeguards, arms control, and nonproliferation regimes measurements are required which give the quantity of fissile material in an accounting item, e.g., a standard container of plutonium or uranium oxide. Because of the complexity of modeling the absorption of gamma rays in high-Z materials, gamma-ray spectrometry is not customarily used for this purpose. Gamma-ray measurements can be used to determine the fissile mass when two conditions are met: (1) The material is in a standard container, and (2) The material is finely divided, or a solid item with a reproducible shape. The methodology consists of: (A) Measurement of the emitted gamma rays, and (B) Measurement of the transmission through the item of the high-energy gamma rays of Co-60 and Th-228. We have demonstrated that items containing nuclear materials possess a characteristic ''fingerprint'' of gamma rays which depends not only on the nuclear properties, but also on the mass, density, shape, etc.. The material's spectrum confirms its integrity, homogeneity, and volume as well. While there is attenuation of radiation from the interior, the residual radiation confirms the homogeneity of the material throughout the volume. Transmission measurements, where the attenuation depends almost entirely on Compton scattering, determine the material mass. With well-characterized standards, this methodology can provide an accurate measure of the contained fissile material.

  13. Neanderthal skeleton from Tabun: U-series data by gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schwarcz, H P; Simpson, J J; Stringer, C B

    1998-12-01

    The Neanderthal hominid Tabun C1, found in Israel by Garrod & Bate, was attributed to either layer B or C of their stratigraphic sequence. We have used gamma-ray spectrometry to determine the 230Th/234U and 231Pa/235U ratios of two bones from this skeleton, the mandible and a femur. The ages calculated from these ratios depend on the uranium uptake history of the bones. Assuming a model of early U (EU) uptake the age of the Tabun C1 mandible is 34+/-5 ka. The EU age of the femur is 19+/-2 ka. The femur may have experienced continuous (linear) U uptake which would give an age of 33+/-4 ka, in agreement with the mandible's EU age, but implies marked inhomogeneity in U uptake history at the site. These new age estimates for the skeleton suggest that it was younger than deposits of layer C. This apparent age is less than those of other Neanderthals found in Israel, and distinctly younger than the ages of the Skhul and Qafzeh burials. This suggests that Neanderthals did not necessarily coexist with the earliest modern humans in the region. All of the more complete Neanderthal fossils from Israel are now dated to the cool period of the last glacial cycle, suggesting that Neanderthals may have arrived in this region as a result of the southward expansion of their habitable range. The young age determined for the Tabun skeleton would suggest that Neanderthals survived as late in the Levant as they did in Europe. PMID:9929173

  14. Correction factors to account for minor sample height variations in gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jod?owski, P.

    2007-09-01

    It often happens in gamma-ray spectrometry measurements that there is less sample material than required for the given measuring geometry. One approach to this problem is to stick to the original geometry, though a correction factor is to be introduced to account for the difference in the height of the sample material. This correction factor Ch is expressed as the ratio of spectrometer efficiency for the nominal sample height ?( h0) to that obtained for the actual height ?( h). The author determined the correction factor Ch for several radiation energies E, 81.0, 356.0, 661.7 and 1173.2 keV. Two measurement geometries were considered: a Marinelli beaker 710 cm 3 in volume, and a cylindrical sample 31.5 mm in height. The correction factors were obtained experimentally and by Monte Carlo simulation method for h falling within the range h0±8 mm. Ch values obtained by these two methods are consistent. For E?356 keV, Ch value almost does not depend on energy. Ch value varies linearly with d h. For Marinelli beaker for E?356 keV, the correction is 0.9% (1.0% for E=81 keV) for each millimeter of sample height change; for a cylindrical geometry the correction is 1.5% (1.7%). Monte Carlo method was further used to compute Ch values for several other cylindrical geometries. The lower the nominal height of the cylindrical samples, the more sensitive the method to sample height variations. The knowledge of the value Ch enables us to estimate the uncertainty of the measurements, associated with the sample height uncertainty.

  15. Graphene oxide-based dispersive solid-phase extraction combined with in situ derivatization and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of acidic pharmaceuticals in water.

    PubMed

    Naing, Nyi Nyi; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Lee, Hian Kee

    2015-12-24

    A fast and low-cost sample preparation method of graphene based dispersive solid-phase extraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis, was developed. The procedure involves an initial extraction with water-immiscible organic solvent, followed by a rapid clean-up using amine functionalized reduced graphene oxide as sorbent. Simple and fast one-step in situ derivatization using trimethylphenylammonium hydroxide was subsequently applied on acidic pharmaceuticals serving as model analytes, ibuprofen, gemfibrozil, naproxen, ketoprofen and diclofenac, before GC-MS analysis. Extraction parameters affecting the derivatization and extraction efficiency such as volume of derivatization agent, effect of desorption solvent, effect of pH and effect of ionic strength were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, the method demonstrated good limits of detection ranging from 1 to 16ngL(-1), linearity (from 0.01 to 50 and 0.05 to 50?gL(-1), depending on the analytes) and satisfactory repeatability of extractions (relative standard deviations, below 13%, n=3). PMID:26684593

  16. In Situ Determination of Trace Elements in Fish Otoliths by Laser Ablation Double Focusing Sector Field Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Using a Solution Standard Addition Calibration Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Jones, C. M.

    2002-05-01

    Microchemistry of fish otoliths (fish ear bones) is a very useful tool for monitoring aquatic environments and fish migration. However, determination of the elemental composition in fish otolith by ICP-MS has been limited to either analysis of dissolved sample solution or measurement of limited number of trace elements by laser ablation (LA)- ICP-MS due to low sensitivity, lack of available calibration standards, and complexity of polyatomic molecular interference. In this study, a method was developed for in situ determination of trace elements in fish otoliths by laser ablation double focusing sector field ultra high sensitivity Finnigan Element 2 ICP-MS using a solution standard addition calibration method. Due to the lack of matrix-match solid calibration standards, sixteen trace elements (Na, Mg, P, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Rb, Sr, Y, Cd, La, Ba, Pb and U) were determined using a solution standard calibration with Ca as an internal standard. Flexibility, easy preparation and stable signals are the advantages of using solution calibration standards. In order to resolve polyatomic molecular interferences, medium resolution (M/delta M > 4000) was used for some elements (Na, Mg, P, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Cu). Both external calibration and standard addition quantification strategies are compared and discussed. Precision, accuracy, and limits of detection are presented.

  17. Detection of in-situ derivatized peptides in microbial biofilms by laser desorption 7.87 eV postionizaton mass spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Edirisinghe, P. D.; Moore, J. F.; Skinner-Nemec, K. A.; Lindberg, C.; Giometti, C. S.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Hunt, J. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Hanley, L.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; MassThink

    2007-01-01

    A novel analytical method based on laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS) was developed to investigate the competence and sporulation factor-a pentapeptide of amino acid sequence ERGMT-within intact Bacillus subtilis biofilms. Derivatization of the neat ERGMT peptide with quinoline- and anthracene-based tags was separately used to lower the peptide ionization potential and permit direct ionization by 7.87-eV vacuum ultraviolet radiation. The techniques of mass shifting and selective ionization of the derivatized peptide were combined here to permit detection of ERGMT peptide within intact biofilms by LDPI-MS, without any prior extraction or chromatographic separation. Finally, imaging MS specific to the derivatized peptide was demonstrated on an intact biofilm using LDPI-MS. The presence of ERGMT in the biofilms was verified by bulk extraction/LC-MS. However, MALDI imaging MS analyses were unable to detect ERGMT within intact biofilms.

  18. In situ submicron organic aerosol characterization at a boreal forest research station during HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 using soft and hard ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, A. L.; Äijälä, M.; Corrigan, A. L.; Junninen, H.; Ehn, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kulmala, M.; Russell, L. M.; Williams, J.; Hoffmann, T.

    2013-11-01

    The chemical composition of submicron aerosol during the comprehensive field campaign HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 at Hyytiälä, Finland, is presented. The focus lies on online measurements of organic acids, which were achieved by using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) ion trap mass spectrometry (IT-MS). These measurements were accompanied by aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of filter samples, all showing a high degree of correlation. The soft ionization mass spectrometer alternated between gas-phase measurements solely and measuring the sum of gas and particle phase. The AMS measurements of C, H and O elemental composition show that the aerosol during the campaign was highly oxidized, which appears reasonable due to high and prolonged radiation during the boreal summer measurement period as well as the long transport times of some of the aerosol. In order to contrast ambient and laboratory aerosol, an average organic acid pattern, measured by APCI-IT-MS during the campaign, was compared to terpene ozonolysis products in a laboratory reaction chamber. Identification of single organic acid species remains a major challenge due to the complexity of the boreal forest aerosol. Unambiguous online species identification was attempted by the combinatorial approach of identifying unique fragments in the MS2 mode of standards, and then comparing these results with MS2 field spectra. During the campaign, unique fragments of limonene-derived organic acids (limonic acid and ketolimononic acid) and of the biomass burning tracer vanillic acid were detected. Other specific fragments (neutral loss of 28 Da) in the MS2 suggest the occurrence of semialdehydes. Furthermore, an approach to determine the average molecular weight of the aerosol is presented. The campaign average organic molecular weight was determined to be 300 g mol-1. However, a plume of aged biomass burning aerosol, arriving at Hyytiälä from Russia, contained organic compounds up to 800 Da (MWom?450 g mol-1), showing that the average molecular weight can vary significantly. The high measurement frequency of both AMS and APCI-IT-MS enabled the partitioning of selected organic acids between gas and particle phase as a function of the total particulate mass to be quantified. Surprisingly high fractions of the higher molecular weight organic acids were observed to reside in the gas phase. These observations might be a consequence of large equilibration timescales for semi-solid boreal forest aerosol, as has been recently hypothesized by Shiraiwa and Seinfeld (2012).

  19. In-situ submicron organic aerosol characterization at a boreal forest research station during HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 using soft and hard ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, A. L.; Äijälä, M.; Corrigan, A. L.; Junninen, H.; Ehn, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kulmala, M.; Russell, L. M.; Williams, J.; Hoffmann, T.

    2013-07-01

    The chemical composition of submicron aerosol during the comprehensive field campaign HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 at Hyytiälä, Finland is presented. The focus lies on online measurements of organic acids, which was achieved by using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) ion trap mass spectrometry (IT-MS). These measurements were accompanied by Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (AMS) measurements and Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) of filter samples, all showing a high degree of correlation. The soft ionization mass spectrometer alternated between gas phase measurements solely and measuring the sum of gas- and particle-phase. The AMS measurements of C, H and O elemental composition show that the aerosol during the campaign was highly oxidized, which appears reasonable due to high and prolonged radiation during the boreal summer measurement period as well as the long transport times of some of the aerosol. In order to contrast ambient and laboratory aerosol, an average organic acid pattern, measured by APCI-IT-MS during the campaign, was compared to terpene ozonolysis products in a laboratory reaction chamber. Identification of single organic acid species remains a major challenge due to the complexity of the boreal forest aerosol. Unambiguous online species identification was attempted by the combinatorial approach of identifying unique fragments in the MS2-mode of standards, and then comparing these results with MS2 field spectra. During the campaign, unique fragments of limonene derived organic acids (limonic acid and ketolimononic acid) and of the biomass burning tracer vanillic acid were detected. Other specific fragments (neutral loss of 28 Da) in the MS2 suggest the occurrence of semialdehydes. Furthermore, an approach to determine the average molecular weight of the aerosol is presented. The campaign average organic molecular weight was determined to be 300 g mol-1. However, a plume of aged biomass burning aerosol, arriving at Hyytiälä from Russia, contained organic compounds up to 800 Da (MWom ? 450 g mol-1), showing that the average molecular weight can vary significantly. The high measurement frequency of both, AMS and APCI-IT-MS, enabled the partitioning of selected organic acids between gas- and particle-phase as a function of the total particulate mass to be quantified. Surprisingly high fractions of the higher molecular weight organic acids were observed to reside in the gas phase. These observations might be a consequence of large equilibration timescales for semi-solid boreal forest aerosol, as it has been recently hypothesised by Shiraiwa and Seinfeld (2012).

  20. In situ real-time studies of oxygen incorporation in complex oxide thin films using spectroscopic ellipsometry and ion scattering and recoil spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, A. H.; Gao, Y.; Irene, E. A.; Auciello, O.; Krauss, A. R.; Achultz, J. A.

    2000-05-25

    The surface termination of c-axis oriented YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} (YBCO) and the oxygen incorporation mechanism has been investigated using a unique combination of spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and time of flight ion scattering and recoil spectrometry (ToF-ISARS). The high surface sensitivity of the ToF-ISARS technique combined with the bulk oxygen sensitivity of SE are shown to yield complimentary information. The SE provided the film orientation and quality, while ToF-ISARS supplied surface compositional and structural information and enabled isotopic {sup 18}O tracer studies. It was determined that the O content of the film had little effect on the surface termination of the film, indicating a lack of labile Cu(1) sites at the c-axis oriented YBCO surface. Also, strong evidence for a Ba or BaO terminated structure is shown. The data related to the {sup 18}O tracer studies indicate that O from the reaction ambient incorporates only into the labile Cu(1) sites during both deposition and annealing, while stable O sites were populated with O from the sputtered target, indicating either the need for sputtered atomic O or sputtered YCuO complexes to occupy the stable Cu(2) sites.

  1. Determination of the natural radioactivity in Qatarian building materials using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sulaiti, Huda; Alkhomashi, N.; Al-Dahan, N.; Al-Dosari, M.; Bradley, D. A.; Bukhari, S.; Matthews, M.; Regan, P. H.; Santawamaitre, T.

    2011-10-01

    This study is aimed at the determination of the activity concentrations of naturally occurring and technically enhanced levels of radiation in building materials used across the State of Qatar. Samples from a range of common building materials, including Qatarian cement, Saudi cement, white cement, sand and washed sand, have been analyzed, in addition to other samples of cement's raw materials and additives collected from the main suppliers in Qatar. In order to establish the activity concentrations associated with the 235,8U and 232Th natural decay chains and 40K, the samples have been studied using a high-resolution, low-background gamma-ray spectrometry set-up. Details of the sample preparation and the gamma-ray spectroscopic analysis techniques are presented, together with the preliminary results of the activity concentrations associated with the naturally occurring radionuclide chains for the building materials collected across the Qatarian peninsula.

  2. Investigation of Failed TRISO Fuel Assay Using Gamma-Ray Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, Jason Michael

    TRISO microsphere fuel is the fundamental fuel unit for Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR). A single TRISO particle consists of an inner kernel of Uranium Oxycarbide surrounded by layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. The silicon carbide serves as the primary barrier to the release of fission products into the core. If the silicon carbide layer fails, fission gas, especially Kr and Xe, will begin to escape the failed particle. In order to understand the behavior of TRISO fuel under in-core conditions, a series of experiments is being conducted by Idaho National Lab at the Advanced Test Reactor. AGR-1 is the first of these experiments. It will measure fission product release due to failed TRISO particles. Simulations of this experiment have been conducted at North Carolina State University to develop a method for the analysis of the results of the experiment. The ATR core was simulated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP to calculate the expected neutron energy spectrum for the AGR-1 experimental test train. This spectrum was used to create one-group cross sections for implementation in ORIGEN calculations of the amount of activity produced in the experiment. Several theoretical models have been developed to describe the phenomenon of gas release. While each model is based on similar physics, different models contain unique features that distinguish them from one another. These Release to Birth (R/B) models are developed and applied to the activity found in the ORIGEN calculations to create expected release activities. The release activity is used to create gamma-ray spectra that are representative of the different R/B models. Expected R/B due to a model can be calculated for comparison to the experiment with knowledge of the number of failed particles in the spectra. The comparison of measured to predicted R/B ratios gives insight into the physics of release and also helps validate specific models. Direct comparison is possible, but many of the uncertainties associated with direct comparison are nullified through the use of relative indicators. Each R/B model has a unique set of indicators that reflect the physical processes simulated in the model. Trends in the model indicators can be matched up with trends in indicators derived from the release spectra to validate either an entire model or validate the need to consider certain parameters in the creation of a complete and successful release to birth model. Gamma spectrometry is a useful tool for the understanding of fission gas release from failed TRISO particles. A better understanding of the processes that influence fission gas release will influence the fuel manufacturing and quality assurance protocols during the continued development of the VHTR. Future work in this area includes experiment in which the conditions can be better controlled to document the effects of temperature and fission rate in the fuel.

  3. A rapid dissolution procedure to aid initial nuclear forensics investigations of chemically refractory compounds and particles prior to gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reading, David G; Croudace, Ian W; Warwick, Phillip E; Britton, Richard

    2015-11-01

    A rapid and effective preparative procedure has been evaluated for the accurate determination of low-energy (40-200 keV) gamma-emitting radionuclides ((210)Pb, (234)Th, (226)Ra, (235)U) in uranium ores and uranium ore concentrates (UOCs) using high-resolution gamma ray spectrometry. The measurement of low-energy gamma photons is complicated in heterogeneous samples containing high-density mineral phases and in such situations activity concentrations will be underestimated. This is because attenuation corrections, calculated based on sample mean density, do not properly correct where dense grains are dispersed within a less dense matrix (analogous to a nugget effect). The current method overcomes these problems using a lithium tetraborate fusion that readily dissolves all components including high-density, self-attenuating minerals/compounds. This is the ideal method for dissolving complex, non-volatile components in soils, rocks, mineral concentrates, and other materials where density reduction is required. Lithium borate fusion avoids the need for theoretical efficiency corrections or measurement of matrix matched calibration standards. The resulting homogeneous quenched glass produced can be quickly dissolved in nitric acid producing low-density solutions that can be counted by gamma spectrometry. The effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated using uranium-bearing Certified Reference Materials and provides accurate activity concentration determinations compared to the underestimated activity concentrations derived from direct measurements of a bulk sample. The procedure offers an effective solution for initial nuclear forensic studies where complex refractory minerals or matrices exist. It is also significantly faster, safer and simpler than alternative approaches. PMID:26572834

  4. Online in situ analysis of selected semi-volatile organic compounds in water by automated microscale solid-phase extraction with large-volume injection/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongtao; George, John E; McCarty, Christina L

    2007-12-28

    A fully automated analytical method was developed for the online in situ analysis of selected semi-volatile organic compounds in water. The method used a large-volume injection/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry coupled with a fully automated microscale solid-phase extraction technique, which was based on x-y-z robotic techniques. Water samples were extracted by using a 96-well solid-phase extraction plate. For most analytes included in this study, the obtained linear calibrations ranged from 0.05 to 5.0 microg/L with correlation coefficients of 0.996-1.000, the method detection limits were less than 0.1 microg/L, and the relative recoveries were in the range of 70-120% with a relative standard deviation of less than 15% for fortified reagent water samples. The applications to chlorinated tap water, well water, and river water have been validated. The obtained results were similar to those resulting from fortified reagent water samples for all analytes except metribuzin, bromacil, aldrin, and methoxychlor. Matrix effects were observed for these analytes. In general, this fully automated analytical method was rugged, reliable, and easy to operate, and was capable of providing real-time data to water treatment and distribution systems as well as water reservation and protection systems. In addition, the method could reduce the analytical costs associated with sample collection, transportation, storage, and preparation. PMID:18036538

  5. X-ray remote sensing and in-situ spectroscopy for planetary exploration missions and gamma-ray remote sensing and in-situ spectroscopy for planetary exploration missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahdavi, M.; Giboni, K. L.; Vajda, S.; Schweitzer, J.

    1994-01-01

    Detectors that will be used for planetary missions must have their responses calibrated in a reproducible manner. A calibration facility is being constructed at Schlumberger-Doll Research for gamma and x ray detectors. With this facility the detector response can be determined in an invariant and reproducible fashion. Initial use of the facility is expected for the MARS94 detectors. Work is continuing to better understand the rare earth oxyorthosilicates and to define their characteristics. This will allow a better use of these scintillators for planetary missions. In a survey of scintillating materials two scintillators were identified as promising candidates besides GSO, LSO, and YSO. These are CdWO4 and CsI(Tl). It will be investigated if a detector with a better overall performance can be assembled with various photon converters. Considerable progress was achieved in photomultiplier design. The length of an 1 inch diameter PMT could be reduced from 4.2 to 2.5 inches without performance degradation. This technology is being employed in the gamma ray detector for the NEAR project. A further weight and size reduction of the detector package can be achieved with miniaturized integrated power supplies.

  6. IN-SITU ASSAY OF TRANSURANIC RADIONUCLIDES IN THE VADOSE ZONE USING HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTRAL GAMMA LOGGING - A HANFORD CASE STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    ROHAY VJ; HENWOOD P; MCCAIN R

    2009-11-30

    High-resolution spectral gamma logging in steel-cased boreholes is used to detect and quantify transuranic radionuclides in the subsurface. Pu-239, Pu-241, Am-241, and Np-237 are identified based on characteristic decay gammas. Typical minimum detectable levels are on the order of 20 to 40 nCi/g. In intervals of high transuranic concentrations, gamma rays from other sources may complicate analysis and interpretation. Gamma rays detected in the borehole may originate from three sources: decay of the parent transuranic radionuclide or a daughter; alpha interactions; and interactions with neutrons resulting from either spontaneous fission or alpha particle interactions.

  7. A broadband gamma-ray spectrometry using novel unfolding algorithms for characterization of laser wakefield-generated betatron radiation.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong Ho; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Kim, Hyung Taek; Rhee, Yong Joo; Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Cho, Myung Hoon; Shin, Jung Hun; Yoo, Byung Ju; Hojbota, Calin; Jo, Sung Ha; Shin, Kang Woo; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seung Ku; Cho, Byeoung Ick; Choi, Il Woo; Nam, Chang Hee

    2015-12-01

    We present a high-flux, broadband gamma-ray spectrometry capable of characterizing the betatron radiation spectrum over the photon energy range from 10 keV to 20 MeV with respect to the peak photon energy, spectral bandwidth, and unique discrimination from background radiations, using a differential filtering spectrometer and the unfolding procedure based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. These properties are experimentally verified by measuring betatron radiation from a cm-scale laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) driven by a 1-PW laser, using a differential filtering spectrometer consisting of a 15-filter and image plate stack. The gamma-ray spectra were derived by unfolding the photostimulated luminescence (PSL) values recorded on the image plates, using the spectrometer response matrix modeled with the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The accuracy of unfolded betatron radiation spectra was assessed by unfolding the test PSL data simulated with GEANT4, showing an ambiguity of less than 20% and clear discrimination from the background radiation with less than 10%. The spectral analysis of betatron radiation from laser wakefield-accelerated electron beams with energies up to 3 GeV revealed radiation spectra characterized by synchrotron radiation with the critical photon energy up to 7 MeV. The gamma-ray spectrometer and unfolding method presented here facilitate an in-depth understanding of betatron radiation from LWFA process and a novel radiation source of high-quality photon beams in the MeV regime. PMID:26724015

  8. A method for the comparison of performance of gamma-ray spectrometry calibration cocktails.

    PubMed

    Legarda, F; Los Arcos, J M; Herranz, M

    2004-01-01

    In order to make quantitative assessments about the usefulness of different gamma-ray emitting radionuclide cocktails to carry out efficiency calibrations of gamma-ray spectrometers, a method has been developed that allows the comparison of their different performances and to optimize the choice of gamma energy lines for the radionuclides within a specific cocktail. The method has been applied to compare different cocktail configurations obtained from measurements made in the laboratory with monoenergetic radionuclides, and their relative performances are presented and discussed. PMID:14987701

  9. Microprobe sampling--photo ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry for in situ chemical analysis of pyrolysis and combustion gases: examination of the thermo-chemical processes within a burning cigarette.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Romy; Streibel, Thorsten; Liu, Chuan; McAdam, Kevin; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2012-02-10

    A microprobe sampling device (?-probe) has been developed for in situ on-line photo ionization mass spectrometric analysis of volatile chemical species formed within objects consisting of organic matter during thermal processing. With this approach the chemical signature occurring during heating, pyrolysis, combustion, roasting and charring of organic material within burning objects such as burning fuel particles (e.g., biomass or coal pieces), lit cigarettes or thermally processed food products (e.g., roasting of coffee beans) can be investigated. Due to its dynamic changes between combustion and pyrolysis phases the cigarette smoking process is particularly interesting and has been chosen as first application. For this investigation the tip of the ?-probe is inserted directly into the tobacco rod and volatile organic compounds from inside the burning cigarette are extracted and real-time analyzed as the glowing front (or coal) approaches and passes the ?-probe sampling position. The combination of micro-sampling with photo ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PI-TOFMS) allows on-line intrapuff-resolved analysis of species formation inside a burning cigarette. Monitoring volatile smoke compounds during cigarette puffing and smoldering cycles in this way provides unparalleled insights into formation mechanisms and their time-dependent change. Using this technique the changes from pyrolysis conditions to combustion conditions inside the coal of a cigarette could be observed directly. A comparative analysis of species formation within a burning Kentucky 2R4F reference cigarette with ?-probe analysis reveals different patterns and behaviors for nicotine, and a range of semi-volatile aromatic and aliphatic species. PMID:22244143

  10. The in situ exobiological investigation of the Martian surface mineralogy during unmanned missions. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancinelli, Rocco L.; White, Melisa R.

    1994-01-01

    An important goal of exobiological research is to determine if life arose on planets other than Earth. The only other planet known, to date, on which life may have arisen is Mars. The data suggest that the physical environment of early Mars (i.e., temperature, pressure, and radiation regimes) was suitable for life to arise. Thus far, the data also suggest that early Mars possessed sufficient quantities of the required building blocks and a number of the chemical compounds necessary for life to arise. It is not known, however, if water existed in the appropriate state (i.e., liquid) in sufficient quantities long enough for life to arise. Determining the mineralogy and components of the Martian soil through in situ analyses during missions to Mars will provide information from which an assessment can be made for the probability of the origin of life on Mars. Missions to Mars in the near future will be unmanned and capable of in situ analyses. Our studies have shown that differential thermal analysis coupled with gas chromatography (DTA/GC) is a more appropriate analytical technique than, x-ray fluorescence, x-ray diffraction, alpha-proton backscatter, gamma-ray spectrometry, differential scanning calorimetry coupled with mass spectrometry (DSC/MS), or DSC/GC to identify the mineralogy of the Martian surface material in situ. DTA/GC is an advancement over the pyrolytic techniques flown on previous missions that have supplied only limited mineralogical information (Biemann et al. 1977).

  11. Gamma spectrometry and chemical characterization of ceramic seeds with samarium-153 and holmium-166 for brachytherapy proposal.

    PubMed

    Valente, Eduardo S; Campos, Tarcísio P R

    2010-12-01

    Ceramic seeds were synthesized by the sol-gel technique with Si:Sm:Ca and Si:Ho:Ca. One set of seeds was irradiated in the TRIGA type nuclear reactor IPR-R1 and submitted to instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), K(0) method, to determine mass percentage concentration of natural samarium and holmium in the seed as well as to determine all existing radionuclides and their activities. Attention was paid to discrimination of Si-31, Ca-40, Ca-45, Ca-47, Ca-49, Sm-145, Sm-155, Sm-153 and Ho-166. A second sample was submitted to atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) also to determine samarium and holmium concentrations in weight. A third sample was submitted to X-ray fluorescence spectrometry to qualitatively determine chemical composition. The measured activity was due to Sm-153 and Ho-166 with a well-characterized gamma spectrum. The X-ray fluorescence spectrum demonstrated that there is no discrepancy in seed composition. The maximum ranges in the water of beta particles from Sm-153 and Ho-166 decay were evaluated, as well as the dose rate and total dose delivered within the volume delimited by the range of the beta particles. The results are relevant for investigation of the viability of producing Sm-153 and Ho-166 radioactive seeds for use in brachytherapy. PMID:20685128

  12. Natural radioactivity of sand samples by low-level gamma spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbady, A.; Saied, M. H.; El-Kamel, A. H.; El-Arabi, A.

    1994-07-01

    The natural radioactivities of compressed powdered sand samples from different locations along the Qena-Safaga highway were measured in face to face geometry applying a low-level ?-ray spectrometry method. The average measured values of U, Th and K are: 6.3, 6.2 and 1.5 × 104 ppm, respectively. Some samples were found to be free from thorium to the minimum detectable activity of the spectrometer. Results are discussed and compared with other results presented.

  13. A convenient method for discriminating between natural and depleted uranium by gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shoji, M; Hamajima, Y; Takatsuka, K; Honoki, H; Nakajima, T; Kondo, T; Nakanishi, T

    2001-08-01

    A convenient method for discriminating between natural and depleted uranium reagent was developed by measuring and analyzing the gamma-ray spectra of some reagents with no standard source. The counting rates (R) of photoelectric peaks of gamma-rays from nuclides with the same radioactivity divided by their emission probability (B) are expressed as a function of gamma-ray energy. The radioactivities of 234Th and 234mPa and 21.72 times that of 235U are equal to the radioactivity of 235U in natural uranium. Therefore, the plot of 21.72-fold R/B for 235U should be on a curve fitted to the points for 234Th and 234mPa in natural uranium. Depleted uranium with a 235U isotopic composition of less than 0.68% could be discriminated from natural uranium in the case of a reagent containing 4.0 g of uranium. PMID:11393763

  14. Prospecting for Lunar Oxygen with Gamma-Ray Spectrometry and Multispectral Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Weitz, Catherine M.; McKay, David S.

    1998-01-01

    Oxygen is a potentially abundant lunar resource that could be used for life support and spacecraft propulsion. The recent identification by Prospector of ice at the lunar poles has renewed interest in the use of in situ 0 production to supply a future base. Siting a lunar base at any significant distance from the poles, however, would require costly transport of 0 or its extraction from the local regolith. More than 20 different processes have been proposed for regolith 0 extraction. Among the simplest and best studied of these processes is the reduction of oxides in lunar minerals and glass using H gas. Oxides, predominantly those containing FeO, are first reduced; 0 is then liberated to form water. The water is then electrolyzed to yield 0, and the H is recycled to the reactor.

  15. Mathematical model of gamma-ray spectrometry borehole logging for quantitative analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schimschal, Ulrich

    1981-01-01

    A technique for analyzing gamma-ray spectral-logging data has been developed, in which a digital computer is used to calculate the effects of gamma-ray attentuation in a borehole environment. The computer model allows for the calculation of the effects of lithology, porosity, density, and the thickness of a horizontal layer of uniformly distributed radioactive material surrounding a centralized probe in a cylindrical borehole. The computer program also contains parameters for the calculation of the effects of well casing, drilling fluid, probe housing, and losses through the sodium-iodide crystal. Errors associated with the commonly used mathematical assumption of a point detector are eliminated in this model. (USGS)

  16. The Application of High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometry (HRGS) to Nuclear Safeguards, Nonproliferation, and Arms Control Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, Walter R.; Lemley, James R.; Forman, Leon

    1997-12-31

    While well-developed methodologies exist for the employment of high- resolution gamma ray spectrometry (HRGS) in determining the isotopic composition of plutonium samples, the potential capabilities of such measurements in determining the properties of nuclear materials otherwise remain largely unexploited. These measurements contain information sufficiently detailed such that not only can the isotopic composition of uranium and plutonium materials be determined, but the details of the spectrum obtained will depend reproducibly upon other factors including the total mass, density, chemical composition, and geometrical configuration of the material, and for certain materials, the elapsed time since chemical processing. The potential thus exists to obtain a `gamma-ray fingerprint` for typical containers or assemblies of nuclear material which will then serve to identify that class of item in a later confirmatory measurement. These measurements have the additional advantage that, by comparison with active interrogation techniques which usually require the introduction of some extraneous form of radiation or other intrusive activity, they are totally passive, and thus impose only minimal additional safety or regulatory burdens on the operators. In the application of these measurements to the verification of treaty-limited items, where the information acquired may be sensitive in nature, the use of the CIVET (Controlled Intrusiveness Verification Technique) approach, where a computer-based interface is employed to limit access to the information obtained, may be followed.

  17. Large-area proportional counter for in situ transuranic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.M.

    1994-12-31

    Improved methods for site characterization are desired for environmental restoration at nuclear facilities. Measurements of transuranics, in particular several isotopes of plutonium, are especially difficult due to the low penetrating nature of the radiations involved, namely, alpha particles and X rays. The effects of attenuation by soil and vegetation generally render direct alpha survey methods useless. For this reason, thin scintillators, such as the FIDLER (field instrument for detection of low-energy radiation) or its more sophisticated successor, the VIOLINIST, that rely on the detection of the L shell X rays (13 to 21 keV) are used for survey work. Semiconductor detectors (germanium and silicon), used singly or in arrays, can be effective, especially for situations where {sup 241}Am (60 keV) is present in the isotropic mix. In principle, in situ spectrometric techniques that have been successfully applied at higher photon energies for the measurement of gamma-emitting radionuclides in the environment can be extended to the X-ray region as well. For situations where {sup 241}Am is not present or its ratio to plutonium is unknown, an alternative detector that we have explored for in situ X-ray spectrometry is a large-area proportional counter (LAPC). These instruments were developed for X-ray astronomical measurements in space and offer the combination of large window area and medium energy resolution. Smaller versions have also been used for lung counting.

  18. Measurement of gamma radiation levels in soil samples from Thanjavur using ?-ray spectrometry and estimation of population exposure

    PubMed Central

    Senthilkumar, B.; Dhavamani, V.; Ramkumar, S.; Philominathan, P.

    2010-01-01

    This study assesses the level of terrestrial gamma radiation and associated dose rates from the naturally occurring radionuclides 232Th, 238U and 40K in 10 soil samples collected from Thanjavur (Tamil Nadu, India) using ?-ray spectrometry. The activity profile of radionuclides has clearly showed the existence of low level activity in Thanjavur. The geometric mean activity concentrations of 232Th, 238U and 40K is 42.9±9.4 Bq.kg?1, 14.7±1.7 Bq.kg?1 and 149.5±3.1 Bq.kg?1 respectively are derived from all the soil samples studied. The activity concentration of 232Th, 238U and 40K in soil is due to the presence of metamorphic rocks like shale, hornblende-biotite gneiss and quartzofeldspathic gneiss in these areas. Gamma absorbed dose rates in air outdoors were calculated to be in the range between 32 nGy.h?1 and 59.1 nGy.h?1 with an arithmetic mean of 43.3 ±9 nGy.h?1. This value is lesser than the population weighted world-averaged of 60 nGy.h?1. Inhabitants of Thanjavur are subjected to external gamma radiation exposure (effective dose) ranging between 39.2 and 72.6 ?Sv.y?1 with an arithmetic mean of 53.1±11 ?Sv.y?1. The values of the external hazard index determined from the soil radioactivity of the study area are less than the recommended safe levels. PMID:20177570

  19. Assessment of calibration parameters for an aerial gamma spectrometry system using Monte-Carlo technique.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, P; Raman, Anand; Sharma, D N

    2002-04-01

    During a radiation emergency subsequent to a nuclear accident or weapon fallout, quick assessment of the ground contamination and the resulting exposure is of prime importance in planning and execution of effective counter measures. For an online assessment of ground contamination, it is essential to calibrate the detector system for several parameters viz. the source energy, source deployment matrix, the flight altitude and position above the contaminated surface. This article discusses the methodology to predict all the necessary parameters like photon fluence at various altitudes, the photo-peak counts in different energy windows, Air to Ground Correlation Factors IAGCF) and the dose rate at any height due to air scattered gamma ray photons. The methodology includes generation of theoretically simulated gamma spectra at a required detector position for a given source distribution on the ground using Monte-Carlo method provided by general purpose coupled neutron/photon transport code (MCNP CCC-200). Thus generated gamma spectra are analyzed to arrive at the required parameters mentioned above. PMID:15900666

  20. In-situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering (INS) is based on the emission of 4.43 MeV gamma rays from carbon nuclei excited by fast neutrons. This in-situ method has excellent potential for easily measuring soil carbon since it does not require soil core sampling and processing ...

  1. Modern aerial gamma-ray spectrometry and regional potassium map of the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duval, Joseph S.

    1990-01-01

    The aerial gamma-ray data were obtained as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy during the period 1975-1983. References for the Open-File Reports that describe the surveys and data collection can be found in Bendix Field Engineering Corp. (1983). The aerial surveys were flown by contractors using fixed-wing and helicopter systems with 33-50 L (liters) of thallium-activated sodium iodide (NaI (TI)) crystals. The nominal survey altitude used is 122 m. The survey lines were generally east-west with line spacings of 1.6-10 km. Tie lines were flown perpendicular to the flight lines at intervals of 16- 30 km. The data were corrected for background from aircraft contamination and cosmic rays, altitude variations, airborne 214Bi, and Compton scattering. The gamma-ray systems were calibrated using the calibrations pads at Grand Junction, Colorado (Ward, 1978 ) and the dynamic test strip at Lake Mead, Arizona (Geodata International, Inc., 1977).  

  2. Detection of frozen salt in pipes using gamma-ray spectrometry of potassium self-activity

    SciTech Connect

    Grena, Roberto; Scafe, Raffaele; Pisacane, Fabrizio; Pilato, Renzo; Crescenzi, Tommaso; Mazzei, Domenico

    2010-01-15

    Solar plants that use molten salts as heat transfer fluid need careful control to avoid the freezing of the salt in the pipes; if such a problem occurs, a diagnostic instrument to localize where is the frozen salt plug and to determine its length is useful. If the salt contains potassium (as is the case of the most common mixture used in solar plants, NaNO{sub 3}/KNO{sub 3} 60/40% by weight), the gamma decay of the natural unstable isotope {sup 40}K can be exploited to detect the frozen salt in a non-invasive way. Simulations and experimental results regarding the detectability of such plugs with different masses/lengths are presented. (author)

  3. Radon loss from encapsulated sediments in Ge gamma-ray spectrometry for the annual radiation dose determination in luminescence dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Corte, F.; Vandenberghe, D.; de Wispelaere, A.; Buylaert, J.-P.; van den Haute, P.

    2006-01-01

    In Ge gamma-ray spectrometry for the annual radiation dose determination in the luminescence dating of sediments, the picture of 226Ra enrichment or depletion (in the 238U decay series) obtained via measurement of its 214Pb and 214Bi daughters may be disturbed by the 222Rn-content of the sample being decreased due to manipulations such as drying and pulverizing. Therefore, it is common practice to start the measurement only about 1 month after encapsulating the material, after which the 226Ra(1600 a)- 222Rn(3.82 d) mother-daughter equilibrium is re-established. Evidently, this only holds on condition that no significant escape of Rn occurs out of the sediment after making it up for counting. In order to experimentally investigate this effect, in the present work measurements were carried out with various types of dried and pulverized sediments that were either encapsulated in screw-cap polystyrene vials or in sealed glass containers, or that were mixed with molten wax followed by solidification in a cylindrical geometry. From the results obtained, it could be concluded that preparation and counting of the sediment-wax mixture is the method of choice.

  4. LAFARA: a new underground laboratory in the French Pyrénées for ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    van Beek, P; Souhaut, M; Lansard, B; Bourquin, M; Reyss, J-L; von Ballmoos, P; Jean, P

    2013-02-01

    We describe a new underground laboratory, namely LAFARA (for "LAboratoire de mesure des FAibles RAdioactivités"), that was recently created in the French Pyrénées. This laboratory is primarily designed to analyze environmental samples that display low radioactivity levels using gamma-ray spectrometry. Two high-purity germanium detectors were placed under 85 m of rock (ca. 215 m water equivalent) in the tunnel of Ferrières (Ariège, France). The background is thus reduced by a factor of ?20 in comparison to above-ground laboratories. Both detectors are fully equipped so that the samples can be analyzed in an automatic mode without requiring permanent presence of a technician in the laboratory. Auto-samplers (twenty positions) and systems to fill liquid nitrogen automatically provide one month of autonomy to the spectrometers. The LAFARA facility allows us to develop new applications in the field of environmental sciences based on the use of natural radionuclides present at low levels in the environment. As an illustration, we present two of these applications: i) dating of marine sediments using the decay of (226)Ra in sedimentary barite (BaSO(4)), ii) determination of (227)Ac ((231)Pa) activities in marine sediment cores. PMID:23164692

  5. International Workshop on Gamma Spectrometry Analysis Codes for U and Pu Isotopics: Workshop Results and Next Steps

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, Brent R; Solodov, Alexander A; Shipwash, Jacqueline L; Zhernosek, Alena V; McKinney, Teressa L; Pickett, Chris A; Peerani, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    In November 2008, the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) and the European Safeguards Research and Development Association (ESARDA) co-hosted the International Workshop on Gamma Spectrometry Analysis Codes for U and Pu Isotopics at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This workshop was conducted in response to needs expressed by the international safeguards community to understand better the capabilities and limitations of the codes; to ensure these codes are sustained; and to ensure updates or revisions are performed in a controlled manner. The workshop was attended by approximately 100 participants. The participants included code developers, code suppliers, safeguards specialists, domestic and international inspectors, process operators, regulators, and programme sponsors from various government agencies. The workshop provided a unique opportunity for code developers, commercial distributors and end users to interact in a hands-on laboratory environment to develop solutions for programmatic and technical issues associated with the various codes. The workshop also provided an international forum for discussing development of an internationally accepted standard test method. This paper discusses the organization of the workshop, its goals and objectives and feedback received from the participants. The paper also describes the significance of the working group's contribution to improving codes that are commonly used during inspections to verify that nuclear facilities are compliant with treaty obligations that ensure nuclear fuel cycle facilities are used for peaceful purposes.

  6. Subsurface In Situ Elemental Composition Measurements with PING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, Ann; McClanahan, Timothy; Bodnarik, Julia; Evans, Larry; Nowicki, Suzanne; Schweitzer, Jeffrey; Starr, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the Probing In situ with Neutron and Gamma rays (PING) instrument, that can measure the subsurface elemental composition in situ for any rocky body in the solar system without the need for digging into the surface. PING consists of a Pulsed Neutron Generator (PNG), a gamma ray spectrometer and neutron detectors. Subsurface elements are stimulated by high-energy neutrons to emit gamma rays at characteristic energies. This paper will show how the detection of these gamma rays results in a measurement of elemental composition. Examples of the basalt to granite ratios for aluminum and silicon abundance are provided.

  7. In situ groundwater bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-01

    In situ groundwater bioremediation of hydrocarbons has been used for more than 40 years. Most strategies involve biostimulation; however, recently bioaugmentation have been used for dehalorespiration. Aquifer and contaminant profiles are critical to determining the feasibility and strategy for in situ groundwater bioremediation. Hydraulic conductivity and redox conditions, including concentrations of terminal electron acceptors are critical to determine the feasibility and strategy for potential bioremediation applications. Conceptual models followed by characterization and subsequent numerical models are critical for efficient and cost effective bioremediation. Critical research needs in this area include better modeling and integration of remediation strategies with natural attenuation.

  8. Mass spectrometry in ionospheric research.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Eldon E

    2007-01-01

    Mass spectrometry played a key role in the development of the understanding of the earth's ionosphere. Of primary importance was its use for in situ atmospheric measurements of the ion and neutral composition of the atmosphere. Mass spectrometry has also played an essential role in the laboratory measurement of critical ionospheric molecular processes. Examples of both are given. PMID:17099890

  9. In Situ Cometary Cosmochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, I. P.; Andrews, D. J.; Barber, S. J.; Sheridan, S.; Morgan, G. H.; Morse, A. D.

    2013-09-01

    In 2014 the Rosetta space mission arrives at comet 67P. Herein we describe the ambitions of one of the instruments, Ptolemy, included on the lander. Our aim is to make in situ measurements of isotopic compositions of elements such as H, C, N and O.

  10. In Situ Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, T. F.; Schechter, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes research on in situ processing to develop necessary theory and understanding of the underground process to facilitate commercialization of a wide range of mineral deposits. Goal is to produce laboratory and computer-based tools to allow site evaluation based on field and laboratory measurements of mineral and associated overburdens.…

  11. Building-up a code for the purpose of TRUE coincidence summing correction in gamma-ray spectrometry with EGS4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Necati; Altin, Duygu; Cevik, Ugur

    2015-10-01

    In the presented study, a code was created for the purpose of true coincidence summing (TCS) correction factors for 134Cs. The created code was implemented in EGS4 Monte Carlo simulation package. TCS factors were determined for nine different energies for different detector-source geometries. The calculated results were successfully validated by an empirical method using a point 134Cs radioactive source and a p-type HPGe detector having 55% relative efficiency. Although the code created gives TCS factors only for 134Cs, the technique presented can be used to obtain the factors for any radionuclide used in gamma-ray spectrometry.

  12. Measurement of {sup 25}Mg(p, {gamma}){sup 26}Al{sup g} resonance strengths via accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Arazi, A.; Niello, J. O. Fernandez; Faestermann, T.; Knie, K.; Korschinek, G.; Poutivtsev, M.; Rugel, G.; Richter, E.; Wallner, A.

    2006-08-15

    The strengths of resonances located at center-of-mass energies of E{sub c.m.}=189, 304, 374, and 418 keV for the {sup 25}Mg(p,{gamma}) reaction have been measured for the first time with an off-line method: Mg targets were firstly activated with protons at the resonance energies and the produced {sup 26}Al{sup g} nuclei were counted by means of highly sensitive accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Thus, the production of {sup 26}Al in its ground state is determined independently from the {gamma}-decay branching ratio. While the 304, 374, and 418 keV resonances show fair agreement with previous measurements, the 189 keV resonance yield a significantly less strength. In addition, an experimental upper limit for the E{sub c.m.}=92 keV resonance was determined.

  13. In situ reactor

    DOEpatents

    Radtke, Corey William; Blackwelder, David Bradley

    2004-01-27

    An in situ reactor for use in a geological strata, is described and which includes a liner defining a centrally disposed passageway and which is placed in a borehole formed in the geological strata; and a sampling conduit is received within the passageway defined by the liner and which receives a geological specimen which is derived from the geological strata, and wherein the sampling conduit is in fluid communication with the passageway defined by the liner.

  14. Research paper In situ sulfur isotope analysis of sulfide minerals by SIMS: Precision and accuracy,

    E-print Network

    Meyers, Stephen R.

    Research paper In situ sulfur isotope analysis of sulfide minerals by SIMS: Precision and accuracy: Sphalerite Ion microprobe SIMS Sulfur isotopes NBS-123 Crystal orientation effects Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurement of sulfur isotope ratios is a potentially powerful technique for in situ

  15. In Situ Fabrication Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rolin, Terry D.; Hammond, Monica

    2005-01-01

    A manufacturing system is described that is internal to controlled cabin environments which will produce functional parts to net shape with sufficient tolerance, strength and integrity to meet application specific needs such as CEV ECLS components, robotic arm or rover components, EVA suit items, unforeseen tools, conformal repair patches, and habitat fittings among others. Except for start-up and shut-down, fabrication will be automatic without crew intervention under nominal scenarios. Off-nominal scenarios may require crew and/or Earth control intervention. System will have the ability to fabricate using both provisioned feedstock materials and feedstock refined from in situ regolith.

  16. In Situ Surface Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.; Leger, Patrick C.; Yanovsky, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Operation of in situ space assets, such as rovers and landers, requires operators to acquire a thorough understanding of the environment surrounding the spacecraft. The following programs help with that understanding by providing higher-level information characterizing the surface, which is not immediately obvious by just looking at the XYZ terrain data. This software suite covers three primary programs: marsuvw, marsrough, and marsslope, and two secondary programs, which together use XYZ data derived from in situ stereo imagery to characterize the surface by determining surface normal, surface roughness, and various aspects of local slope, respectively. These programs all use the Planetary Image Geometry (PIG) library to read mission-specific data files. The programs themselves are completely multimission; all mission dependencies are handled by PIG. The input data consists of images containing XYZ locations as derived by, e.g., marsxyz. The marsuvw program determines surface normals from XYZ data by gathering XYZ points from an area around each pixel and fitting a plane to those points. Outliers are rejected, and various consistency checks are applied. The result shows the orientation of the local surface at each point as a unit vector. The program can be run in two modes: standard, which is typically used for in situ arm work, and slope, which is typically used for rover mobility. The difference is primarily due to optimizations necessary for the larger patch sizes in the slope case. The marsrough program determines surface roughness in a small area around each pixel, which is defined as the maximum peak-to-peak deviation from the plane perpendicular to the surface normal at that pixel. The marsslope program takes a surface normal file as input and derives one of several slope-like outputs from it. The outputs include slope, slope rover direction (a measure of slope radially away from the rover), slope heading, slope magnitude, northerly tilt, and solar energy (compares the slope with the Sun s location at local noon). The marsuvwproj program projects a surface normal onto an arbitrary plane in space, resulting in a normalized 3D vector, which is constrained to lie in the plane. The marsuvwrot program rotates the vectors in a surface normal file, generating a new surface normal file. It also can change coordinate systems for an existing surface normal file. While the algorithms behind this suite are not particularly unique, what makes the programs useful is their integration into the larger in situ image processing system via the PIG library. They work directly with space in situ data, understanding the appropriate image metadata fields and updating them properly. The secondary programs (marsuvwproj, marsuvwrot) were originally developed to deal with anomalous situations on Opportunity and Spirit, respectively, but may have more general applicability.

  17. Continued Development of in Situ Geochronology for Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devismes, D.; Cohen, B. A.

    2015-01-01

    The instrument 'Potassium (K) Argon Laser Experiment' (KArLE) is developed and designed for in situ absolute dating of rocks on planetary surfaces. It is based on the K-Ar dating method and uses the Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy - Laser Ablation - Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry (LIBSLA- QMS) technique. We use a dedicated interface to combine two instruments similar to SAM of Mars Science Laboratory (for the QMS) and ChemCam (for the LA and LIBS). The prototype has demonstrated that KArLE is a suitable and promising instrument for in situ absolute dating.

  18. Determination of thorium-232 in Canadian soils by gamma-ray spectrometry via lead-212 and actinium-228, interference from uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Zikovsky, L.; Blagoeva, R.

    1994-12-31

    Thorium-232 background levels in non-cultivated Canadian soils (southern and northern Quebec and the Northwest Territories) are presented. Gamma-ray spectrometry was used to determine the activity of {sup 232}Th by measuring the activities of {sup 228}Ac and {sup 212}Pb at 37 sites. The specific activity levels ranged from 2.7 to 95.5 Bq/kg with an overall mean of 24.0 {+-} 15.4 Bq/kg. This activity generated an annual absorbed dose equivalent in air of 0.1 mSv. The activities of {sup 228}Ac and {sup 212}Pb in the soil increased with increasing depth. IT was found that uranium, via its decay product radium, can interfere with the determination of thorium in the soil.

  19. Intercomparison of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, quantitative neutron capture radiography, and prompt gamma activation analysis for the determination of boron in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Schütz, C L; Brochhausen, C; Hampel, G; Iffland, D; Kuczewski, B; Otto, G; Schmitz, T; Stieghorst, C; Kratz, J V

    2012-10-01

    Boron determination in blood and tissue samples is a crucial task especially for treatment planning, preclinical research, and clinical application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Comparison of clinical findings remains difficult due to a variety of analytical methods, protocols, and standard reference materials in use. This paper addresses the comparability of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, quantitative neutron capture radiography, and prompt gamma activation analysis for the determination of boron in biological samples. It was possible to demonstrate that three different methods relying on three different principles of sample preparation and boron detection can be validated against each other and yield consistent results for both blood and tissue samples. The samples were obtained during a clinical study for the application of BNCT for liver malignancies and therefore represent a realistic situation for boron analysis. PMID:22918535

  20. In situ measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Lord, D.E.

    1980-11-24

    A multipurpose in situ underground measurement system comprising a plurality of long electrical resistance elements in the form of rigid reinforcing bars, each having an open loop hairpin configuration of shorter length than the other resistance elements. The resistance elements are arranged in pairs in a unitized structure, and grouted in place in the underground volume. Measurement means are provided for obtaining for each pair the electrical resistance of each element and the difference in electrical resistance of the paired elements, which difference values may be used in analytical methods involving resistance as a function of temperature. A scanner means sequentially connects the resistance-measuring apparatus to each individual pair of elements. A source of heating current is also selectively connectable for heating the elements to an initial predetermined temperature prior to electrical resistance measurements when used as an anemometer.

  1. In situ zymography.

    PubMed

    George, Sarah J; Johnson, Jason L

    2010-01-01

    In situ zymography is a unique laboratory technique that enables the localisation of matrix-degrading metalloproteinase (MMP) activity in histological sections. Frozen sections are placed on glass slides coated with fluorescently labelled matrix proteins. After incubation MMP activity can be observed as black holes in the fluorescent background due to proteolysis of the matrix protein. Alternatively frozen sections can be incubated with matrix proteins conjugated to quenched fluorescein. Proteolysis of the substrate by MMPs leads to the release of fluorescence. This technique can be combined with immunohistochemistry to enable co-location of proteins such as cell type markers or other proteins of interest. Additionally, this technique can be adapted for use with cell cultures, permitting precise location of MMP activity within cells, time-lapse analysis of MMP activity and analysis of MMP activity in migrating cells. PMID:20135289

  2. Real-time monitoring of in situ gas-phase H/D exchange reactions of cations by atmospheric pressure helium plasma ionization mass spectrometry (HePI-MS).

    PubMed

    Attygalle, Athula B; Gangam, Rekha; Pavlov, Julius

    2014-01-01

    An enclosed atmospheric-pressure helium-plasma ionization (HePI-MS) source avoids, or minimizes, undesired back-exchange reactions usually encountered during deuterium incorporation experiments under ambient-pressure open-source conditions. A simple adaptation of an ESI source provides an economical way of conducting gas phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reactions (HDX) in real time without the need for complicated hardware modifications. For example, the spectrum of [(2)H8]toluene recorded under exposed ambient conditions showed the base peak at m/z 96 due to fast leaching of ring hydrogens because of interactions with H2O vapor present in the open source. Such D/H exchanges are rapidly reversed if the deuterium-depleted [(2)H8]toluene is exposed to D2O vapor. In addition to the enumeration of labile protons, our procedure enables the identification of protonation sites in molecules unambiguously, by the number of H/D exchanges observed in real time. For example, molecules such as tetrahydrofuran and pyridine protonate at the heteroatom and consequently undergo only one H/D exchange, whereas ethylbenzene, which protonates at a ring position of the aromatic ring, undergoes six H/D exchanges. In addition, carbocations generated in situ by in-source fragmentation of precursor protonated species, such as benzyl alcohol, do not undergo any rapid H/D exchanges. Because radical cations, second-generation cations (ions formed by losing a small molecule from a precursor ion), or those formed by hydride abstraction do not undergo rapid H/D exchanges, our technique provides a way to distinguish these ions from protonated molecules. PMID:24325360

  3. In Situ Nuclear Characterization Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; J. Rory Kennedy

    2011-11-01

    To be able to evolve microstructure with a prescribed in situ process, an effective measurement infrastructure must exist. This interdisciplinary infrastructure needs to be developed in parallel with in situ sensor technology. This paper discusses the essential elements in an effective infrastructure.

  4. 13 In Situ: Groundwater Bioremediation

    E-print Network

    Hazen, Terry

    13 In Situ: Groundwater Bioremediation T. C. Hazen Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley and Bioaugmentation of Groundwater ............................ 2589 5 Intrinsic Bioremediation and Modeling.1007/978-3-540-77587-4_191, # Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, 2010 #12;Abstract: In situ groundwater bioremediation of hydrocarbons

  5. Analysis of gamma-irradiated melon, pumpkin, and sunflower seeds by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sin, Della W M; Wong, Yiu Chung; Yao, Wai Yin

    2006-09-20

    Seeds of melon (Citrullus lanatus var. sp.), pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata), and sunflower (Heliantus annus) were gamma-irradiated at 1, 3, 5, and 10 kGy and analyzed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) according to EN1787:2000 and EN1785:2003, respectively. Distinguishable triplet signals due to the presence of induced cellulose radicals were found at 2.0010-2.0047 g in the EPR spectra. The gamma-irradiated radiolytic markers of 2-dodecylcyclobutanone (2-DCB) and 2-tetradecylcyclobutanone (2-TCB) were identified in all irradiated seed samples. Both the free radicals and the alkylcyclobutanones were found to increase with irradiation dose. In general, linear relationships between the amount of radicals and irradiation dosage could be established. Studies at an ambient temperature (20-25 degrees C) in a humidity-controlled environment showed a complete disappearance of the cellulosic peaks for irradiated samples upon 60 days of storage. Such instability behavior was considered to render the usefulness of using EPR alone in the determination of irradiated seed samples. On the other hand, 2-DCB and 2-TCB were also found to decompose rapidly (>85% loss after 120 days of storage), but the radiolytic markers remained quantifiable after 120 days of postirradiation storage. These results suggest that GC-MS is a versatile and complimentary technique for the confirmation of irradiation treatment to seeds. PMID:16968077

  6. Performance of cerium-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (GAGG:Ce) scintillator in gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwanowska, Joanna; Swiderski, Lukasz; Szczesniak, Tomasz; Sibczynski, Pawel; Moszynski, Marek; Grodzicka, Martyna; Kamada, Kei; Tsutsumi, Kousuke; Usuki, Yoshiyuki; Yanagida, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2013-06-01

    Performance of cerium-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (GAGG:Ce) scintillator in gamma-ray spectrometry has been investigated. The measurements of two samples of GAGG:Ce cover the tests of emission spectra (maximum of emission at about 530 nm), light output, non-proportionality, energy resolution, time resolution and decay time of light pulses. We compare the results with commonly known scintillators, such as NaI(Tl), LSO, LuAG etc. The results show that GAGG:Ce has a high light yield of about 33000 ph/MeV as measured with Hamamatsu S3590-18 Si PiN photodiode [1]. The total energy resolution for 662 keV gamma-rays from 137Cs source is equal to about 6%, whereas intrinsic resolution is equal to 5.2%. Additionally, we made basic measurements of photoelectron yield, non-proportionality and total energy resolution of small sample (5×5×5 mm3) of GAGG:Ce crystal coupled to Hamamatsu MPPC array (6×6 mm2). The results show that the performance of GAGG:Ce measured with the MPPC array are similar to those measured with the PMT.

  7. Standard test method for nondestructive analysis of special nuclear materials in homogeneous solutions by Gamma-Ray spectrometry

    E-print Network

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the concentration of gamma-ray emitting special nuclear materials dissolved in homogeneous solutions. The test method corrects for gamma-ray attenuation by the solution and its container by measurement of the transmission of a beam of gamma rays from an external source (Refs. (1), (2), and (3)). 1.2 Two solution geometries, slab and cylinder, are considered. The solution container that determines the geometry may be either a removable or a fixed geometry container. This test method is limited to solution containers having walls or a top and bottom of equal transmission through which the gamma rays from the external transmission correction source must pass. 1.3 This test method is typically applied to radionuclide concentrations ranging from a few milligrams per litre to several hundred grams per litre. The assay range will be a function of the specific activity of the nuclide of interest, the physical characteristics of the solution container, counting equip...

  8. In-situ measurement of residual carbon content in flyash

    SciTech Connect

    Bonanno, A.S.; Knight, K.S.; Kinsella, K.; Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.

    1995-12-31

    An on-line carbon-in-ash monitor based on in-situ infrared emission spectrometry is described. Laboratory measurements of the infrared spectral emissivity of flyash are presented in order to demonstrate that emissivity can be correlated to the residual carbon content in the range of interest for pulverized coal-fired power plants. Data collected during a field test at a pilot-scale combustor are presented in order to demonstrate that the emissivity measurements could be made in-situ on a realistic facility, and that the spectral emissivity could be correlated to the residual carbon content. Since this measurement can be made in-situ in a few seconds using an FT-IR spectrometer, an infrared emissivity based carbon-in-ash monitoring will be capable of providing data on a time scale appropriate for implementation in combustion control strategies while avoiding the disadvantages associated with extractive ash sampling.

  9. Experimental study on neptunium migration under in situ geochemical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumata, M.; Vandergraaf, T. T.

    1998-12-01

    Results are reported for migration experiments performed with Np under in situ geochemical conditions over a range of groundwater flow rates in columns of crushed rock in a specially designed facility at the 240-level of the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) near Pinawa, Manitoba, Canada. This laboratory is situated in an intrusive granitic rock formation, the Lac du Bonnet batholith. Highly altered granitic rock and groundwater were obtained from a major subhorizontal fracture zone at a depth of 250 m in the URL. The granite was wet-crushed and wet-sieved with groundwater from this fracture zone. The 180-850-?m size fraction was selected and packed in 20-cm long, 2.54-cm in diameter Teflon™-lined stainless steel columns. Approximately 30-ml vols of groundwater containing 3HHO and 237Np were injected into the columns at flow rates of 0.3, 1, and 3 ml/h, followed by elution with groundwater, obtained from the subhorizontal fracture, at the same flow rates, for a period of 95 days. Elution profiles for 3HHO were obtained, but no 237Np was detected in the eluted groundwater. After terminating the migration experiments, the columns were frozen, the column material was removed and cut into twenty 1-cm thick sections and each section was analyzed by gamma spectrometry. Profiles of 237Np were obtained for the three columns. A one-dimensional transport model was fitted to the 3HHO breakthrough curves to obtain flow parameters for this experiment. These flow parameters were in turn applied to the 237Np concentration profiles in the columns to produce sorption and dispersion coefficients for Np. The results show a strong dependence of retardation factors ( Rf) on flow rate. The decrease in the retarded velocity of the neptunium ( Vn) varied over one order of magnitude under the geochemical conditions for these experiments.

  10. Assessing soil erosion at landscape level: A step forward in the up-scaling of 137Cs measurements through the use of in-situ lanthanum bromide scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonsalves, Basil C.; Darby, Iain G.; Toloza, Arsenio; Mabit, Lionel; Kaiser, Ralf B.; Dercon, Gerd

    2014-05-01

    Measuring Fallout Radionuclides (FRN), in particular 137Cs, is a well-established method to estimate soil erosion and deposition in agricultural landscapes. While extremely sensitive, laboratory based gamma-ray spectrometry requires careful handling and preparation of measurement samples with a lengthy measuring time (~1 day), In-situ gamma-ray spectrometry can give near instantaneous results, allowing prompt decisions to be made and identification of critical spots of soil erosion, while the equipment is in the field. The aim of this investigation was to compare the precision of the in-situ FRN measurements, made by a cost-effective lanthanum bromide (LaBr3 (Ce)) scintillation detector of 137Cs against those from conventional (high-purity germanium HPGe detector) but laborious laboratory based gamma-ray spectrometry for assessing soil erosion. As preliminary test, five cores of a gleyic Cambisol - per increments of 5 cm until 1 m depth - were collected at the experimental research station of the Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety located in Grabenegg 130 km west of Vienna. Three soil cores were sampled at the study site and, in the vicinity of this experimental site, two additional cores were collected at two different undisturbed reference sites. Laboratory gamma analyses were carried out during 50 000 seconds using a HPGe coaxial detector. The gamma measurements performed at the laboratory confirmed the undisturbed status of the two selected reference sites (i.e. exponential decrease with depth of the 137Cs content). Using the surface area of the sampling tool, the 137Cs areal activities of the cores sampled in the study site have been established at 2134±465 Bq m-2, 1835±356 Bq m-2 and 2553±340 Bq m-2, and, for the two reference sites at 3221±444 Bq m-2 and 3946±527 Bq m-2. At the same location and prior to collect the five soil cores, in-situ measurements using a lanthanum bromide (LaBr3 (Ce)) scintillator were performed. The detector was placed at 2 cm above ground and each measurement was conducted for 900 seconds. A significant positive correlation (i.e. R2=0.82; p < 0.001) has been established between the 137Cs areal activities obtained with the in-situ and laboratory based measurements. The first results relating to in-situ measurement of 137Cs offer an exciting potential for the application of FRN measurements and their up-scaling in the framework of soil erosion assessments at the landscape level. This includes cost, time, and portability, the potential to work in remote areas, pre-screening to develop more effective sampling strategies and rapid repeat surveys. This work is still in its initial stage and more research is required to validate this innovative in-situ technique.

  11. In-situ chemical imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kossakovski, D. A.; Bearman, G. H.; Kirschvink, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    A variety of in-situ planetary exploration tasks such as particulate analysis or life detection require a tool with a capability for combined imaging and chemical analysis with sub-micron spatial resolution.

  12. IN SITU ENHANCED SOURCE REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This html report describes and compares the performance of in situ technologies designed to accelerate the removal of organic contaminants from unconsolidated soils and aquifers. The research was conducted through the Enhanced Source Removal (ESR) Program within the Subsurface Pr...

  13. Direct determination of half-life of (214)Pb by gamma spectrometry and comparison with previous indirect measurements.

    PubMed

    Voltaggio, M; Spadoni, M

    2011-04-01

    A new value of half-life of (214)Pb was determined using (214)Pb-enriched radioactive sources made of polyurethane foam filters treated with Rn-enriched water. Measurements based on cumulative gamma rays countings yielded a value of 27.06 (7) min. This result is 0.17 min longer than the most recent value measured by indirect methods reported in the scientific literature (Martz et al., 1991). The difference between these two measurements is caused by beta recoil whose effects in glass substrates had been neglected. PMID:21236689

  14. In Situ Activation of Microcapsules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed are microcapsules comprising a polymer shell enclosing two or more immiscible liquid phases in which a drug, or a prodrug and a drug activator are partitioned into separate phases. or prevented from diffusing out of the microcapsule by a liquid phase in which the drug is poorly soluble. Also disclosed are methods of using the microcapsules for in situ activation of drugs where upon exposure to an appropriate energy source the internal phases mix and the drug is activated in situ.

  15. The natural radioactivity measurements in coastal sediment samples along the East Coast of Tamilnadu using gamma spectrometry technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandramohan, J.; Tholkappian, M.; Harikrishnan, N.; Ravisankar, R.

    2015-08-01

    The natural radioactivity concentration in beach sediment samples collected from Pattipulam to Devanampattinam of East Coast of Tamilnadu have been determined by NaI (TI) gamma ray spectrometer. The specific activity concentrations range from ? 2.21 (BDL) to 37.02 Bq kg-1 with a mean of 3.79 Bqkg-1 for 238U, ? 2.11 (BDL) to 643.77 Bqkg-1 with a mean of 49.60 Bqkg-1 for 232Th and 300.34 Bqkg-1 to 449.08 Bqkg-1 with a mean of 360.23 Bqkg-1 for 40K. The potential radiological hazards due to natural radionuclides content such as Radium Equivalent activity (Raeq), Representative level index (RLI), External hazard index (Hex), absorbed gamma does rate (DR), and Annual effective dose rate (AEDR) are estimated to assess the radiation hazard associated with the sediments. The obtained data are compared with the recommended safety limits and international approved values. All the values are well below the recommended safety limits indicating that radiation levels do not poses any significant health hazard to the public in the area as a result of the natural radioactivity of beach sediments. This study may help the baseline data for more extensive works in the same subjects of future studies.

  16. First search for double beta decay of platinum by ultra-low background HP Ge gamma spectrometry

    E-print Network

    Belli, P; Cappella, F; Cerulli, R; Danevich, F A; Di Marco, A; Incicchitti, A; Laubenstein, M; Nagorny, S S; Nisi, S; Polischuk, O G; Tretyak, V I

    2011-01-01

    A search for double beta processes in 190Pt and 198Pt was realized with the help of ultra-low background HP Ge 468 cm^3 gamma spectrometer in the underground Gran Sasso National Laboratories of the INFN (Italy). After 1815 h of data taking with 42.5 g platinum sample, T_{1/2} limits on 2beta processes in 190Pt (\\epsilon\\beta^+ and 2\\epsilon) have been established on the level of 10^{14}-10^{16} yr, 3 to 4 orders of magnitude higher than those known previously. In particular, a possible resonant double electron capture in 190Pt was restricted on the level of 2.9 \\times 10^{16} yr at 90% C.L. In addition, T_{1/2} limit on 2 beta^- decay of 198Pt (2\

  17. First search for double beta decay of platinum by ultra-low background HP Ge gamma spectrometry

    E-print Network

    P. Belli; R. Bernabei; F. Cappella; R. Cerulli; F. A. Danevich; A. Di Marco; A. Incicchitti; M. Laubenstein; S. S. Nagorny; S. Nisi; O. G. Polischuk; V. I. Tretyak

    2011-04-29

    A search for double beta processes in 190Pt and 198Pt was realized with the help of ultra-low background HP Ge 468 cm^3 gamma spectrometer in the underground Gran Sasso National Laboratories of the INFN (Italy). After 1815 h of data taking with 42.5 g platinum sample, T_{1/2} limits on 2beta processes in 190Pt (\\epsilon\\beta^+ and 2\\epsilon) have been established on the level of 10^{14}-10^{16} yr, 3 to 4 orders of magnitude higher than those known previously. In particular, a possible resonant double electron capture in 190Pt was restricted on the level of 2.9 \\times 10^{16} yr at 90% C.L. In addition, T_{1/2} limit on 2 beta^- decay of 198Pt (2\

  18. Evaluation of natural radioactivity content in high-volume surface water samples along the northern coast of Oman Sea using portable high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zare, Mohammad Reza; Kamali, Mahdi; Omidi, Zohre; Khorambagheri, Mahdi; Mortazavi, Mohammad Seddigh; Ebrahimi, Mahmood; Akbarzadeh, Gholamali

    2015-06-01

    Portable high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry was carried out to determine the natural radioactivity levels in high volume surface water samples of the northern coast of Oman Sea, covering the coastal strip from Hormoz strait to Goatr seaport, for the first time. The water samples from 36 coastal and near shore locations were collected for analysis. Analyses on the samples collected were carried out to determine (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K contents. The concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in surface water samples ranged between 2.19 and 2.82 Bq/L, 1.66-2.17 Bq/L and 132.6-148.87 Bq/L, respectively. The activity profile of radionuclides shows low activity across the study area. The study also examined some radiation hazard indices. The external hazard index was found to be less than 1, indicating a low dose. The results of measurements will serve as background reference level for Oman Sea coastlines. PMID:25847859

  19. In situ microbial filter used for bioremediation

    DOEpatents

    Carman, M. Leslie (San Ramon, CA); Taylor, Robert T. (Roseville, CA)

    2000-01-01

    An improved method for in situ microbial filter bioremediation having increasingly operational longevity of an in situ microbial filter emplaced into an aquifer. A method for generating a microbial filter of sufficient catalytic density and thickness, which has increased replenishment interval, improved bacteria attachment and detachment characteristics and the endogenous stability under in situ conditions. A system for in situ field water remediation.

  20. In Situ Instrumentation for Sub-Surface Planetary Geochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Parsons, A.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2010-01-01

    Novel instrumentation is under development at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, building upon earth-based techniques for hostile environments, to infer geochemical processes important to formation and evolution of solid bodies in our Solar System. A prototype instrument, the Pulsed Neutron Generator Gamma Ray and Neutron Detectors (PNG-GRAND), has a 14 MeV pulsed neutron generator coupled with gamma ray and neutron detectors to measure quantitative elemental concentrations and bulk densities of a number of major, minor and trace elements at or below the surfaces with approximately a meter-sized spatial resolution down to depths of about 50 cm without the need to drill. PNG-GRAND's in situ a meter-scale measurements and adaptability to a variety of extreme space environments will complement orbital kilometer-scale and in-situ millimeter scale elemental and mineralogical measurements to provide a more complete picture of the geochemistry of planets, moons, asteroids and comets.

  1. Triplex in-situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Fresco, Jacques R.; Johnson, Marion D.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are methods for detecting in situ the presence of a target sequence in a substantially double-stranded nucleic acid segment, which comprises: a) contacting in situ under conditions suitable for hybridization a substantially double-stranded nucleic acid segment with a detectable third strand, said third strand being capable of hybridizing to at least a portion of the target sequence to form a triple-stranded structure, if said target sequence is present; and b) detecting whether hybridization between the third strand and the target sequence has occured.

  2. Application of a Quantum Cascade Laser for Time-Resolved, in Situ Probing of CH4/H2 and C2H2/H2 Gas Mixtures during Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor

    E-print Network

    Bristol, University of

    Application of a Quantum Cascade Laser for Time-Resolved, in Situ Probing of CH4/H2 and C2H2/H2 Gas 10, 2006 First illustrations of the utility of pulsed quantum cascade lasers for in situ probing on such issues span optical emission spectroscopy, in situ mass spectrometry,4,5 and a number of laser

  3. TRIO-01 experiment: in-situ tritium-recovery results

    SciTech Connect

    Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Billone, M.C.; Misra, B.; Arons, R.M.; Poeppel, R.B.; Dyer, F.F.; Dudley, I.T.; Bate, L.C.; Clemmer, E.D.

    1983-08-01

    The TRIO-01 experiment is a test of in-situ tritium recovery from ..gamma..-LiAlO/sub 2/ with test conditions chosen to simulate those anticipated in fusion power reactors. A status report is presented which describes qualitatively the results observed during the irradiation phase of the experiment. Both the rate of tritium release and the chemical forms of tritium were measured using a helium sweep gas which flowed past the breeder material to a gas analysis system.

  4. TRIO-01 experiment: in-situ tritium recovery results

    SciTech Connect

    Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Billone, M.C.; Misra, B.; Greenwood, L.R.; Dyer, F.F.; Dudley, I.T.; Bate, L.C.; Clemmer, E.D.; Fisher, P.W.

    1983-01-01

    The TRIO-01 experiment was designed to test in-situ tritium recovery and heat transfer performance of a candidate solid breeder, ..gamma..-LiAlO/sub 2/. The results showed that nearly all the tritium generated was recovered. Only < 0.1 wppM tritium remained in the solid after irradiation testing. The heat transfer performance showed that temperature profiles can be effectively controlled.

  5. In situ biofilm coupon device

    DOEpatents

    Peyton, Brent M. (Kennewick, WA); Truex, Michael J. (Richland, WA)

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus for characterization of in-situ microbial biofilm populations in subsurface groundwater. The device permits biofilm-forming microorganisms to adhere to packing material while emplaced in a groundwater strata, so that the packing material can be later analyzed for quantity and type of microorganisms, growth rate, and nutrient requirements.

  6. In situ biofilm coupon device

    DOEpatents

    Peyton, B.M.; Truex, M.J.

    1997-06-24

    An apparatus is disclosed for characterization of in-situ microbial biofilm populations in subsurface groundwater. The device permits biofilm-forming microorganisms to adhere to packing material while emplaced in a groundwater strata, so that the packing material can be later analyzed for quantity and type of microorganisms, growth rate, and nutrient requirements. 3 figs.

  7. In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Graetz J.; Meng, Y.S.; McGilvray, T.; Yang, M.-C.; Gostovic, D.; Wang, F.; Zeng, D.; Zhu, Y.

    2011-10-31

    Oxides and their tailored structures are at the heart of electrochemical energy storage technologies and advances in understanding and controlling the dynamic behaviors in the complex oxides, particularly at the interfaces, during electrochemical processes will catalyze creative design concepts for new materials with enhanced and better-understood properties. Such knowledge is not accessible without new analytical tools. New innovative experimental techniques are needed for understanding the chemistry and structure of the bulk and interfaces, more importantly how they change with electrochemical processes in situ. Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is used extensively to study electrode materials ex situ and is one of the most powerful tools to obtain structural, morphological, and compositional information at nanometer scale by combining imaging, diffraction and spectroscopy, e.g., EDS (energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry) and Electron Energy Loss Spectrometry (EELS). Determining the composition/structure evolution upon electrochemical cycling at the bulk and interfaces can be addressed by new electron microscopy technique with which one can observe, at the nanometer scale and in situ, the dynamic phenomena in the electrode materials. In electrochemical systems, for instance in a lithium ion battery (LIB), materials operate under conditions that are far from equilibrium, so that the materials studied ex situ may not capture the processes that occur in situ in a working battery. In situ electrochemical operation in the ultra-high vacuum column of a TEM has been pursued by two major strategies. In one strategy, a 'nano-battery' can be fabricated from an all-solid-state thin film battery using a focused ion beam (FIB). The electrolyte is either polymer based or ceramic based without any liquid component. As shown in Fig. 1a, the interfaces between the active electrode material/electrolyte can be clearly observed with TEM imaging, in contrast to the composite electrodes/electrolyte interfaces in conventional lithium ion batteries, depicted in Fig.1b, where quantitative interface characterization is extremely difficult if not impossible. A second strategy involves organic electrolyte, though this approach more closely resembles the actual operation conditions of a LIB, the extreme volatility In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry by Ying Shirley Meng, Thomas McGilvray, Ming-Che Yang, Danijel Gostovic, Feng Wang, Dongli Zeng, Yimei Zhu, and Jason Graetz of the organic electrolytes present significant challenges for designing an in situ cell that is suitable for the vacuum environment of the TEM. Significant progress has been made in the past few years on the development of in situ electron microscopy for probing nanoscale electrochemistry. In 2008, Brazier et al. reported the first cross-section observation of an all solid-state lithium ion nano-battery by TEM. In this study the FIB was used to make a 'nano-battery,' from an all solid-state battery prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). In situ TEM observations were not possible at that time due to several key challenges such as the lack of a suitable biasing sample holder and vacuum transfer of sample. In 2010, Yamamoto et al. successfully observed changes of electric potential in an all-solid-state lithium ion battery in situ with electron holography (EH). The 2D potential distribution resulting from movement of lithium ions near the positive-electrode/electrolyte interface was quantified. More recently Huang et al. and Wang et al. reported the in situ observations of the electrochemical lithiation of a single SnO{sub 2} nanowire electrode in two different in situ setups. In their approach, a vacuum compatible ionic liquid is used as the electrolyte, eliminating the need for complicated membrane sealing to prevent the evaporation of carbonate based organic electrolyte into the TEM column. One main limitation of this approach is that EELS spectral imaging is not possible due to the high plasmon signal of the ionic li

  8. Using Gamma ray and Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) to Evaluate Elemental Sequences in Cap-carbonates and Cap-like Carbonates of the Death Valley Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holter, S. A.; Theissen, K. M.; Hickson, T. A.; Bostick, B.

    2004-12-01

    The Snowball Earth theory of Hoffman et al. (1998) proposes dramatic post-glacial chemical weathering as large concentrations of carbon were removed from the atmosphere. This would result in a large input of terrigenous material into the oceans; hence, we might expect that carbonates formed under these conditions would demonstrate elevated K, U, Th levels in comparison to carbonates formed under more typical conditions. In January of 2004 we collected spectral gamma data (K, U, Th) and hand samples from cap carbonates (Noonday Dolomite) and cap-like carbonates (Beck Spring Dolomite) of the Death Valley region in order to explore elemental changes in post-snowball Earth oceans. Based on our spectral gamma results, Th/U ratio trends suggested variations in the oxidation state of the Precambrian ocean. We pursued further investigations of trace elements to ascertain the reliability of these results by using ICP-OES. A suite of 25 trace elements was measured, most notably including U and Th. The ICP-OES data not only allow us to compare elemental changes between cap-carbonates and cap-like carbonates, but they also allow for a comparison of optical emission spectrometry and hand held gamma spectrometry methods. Both methods show similar trends in U and Th values for both the cap-carbonates and cap-like carbonates.

  9. Construction of a Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometer for In-Situ probing of a

    E-print Network

    Bristol, University of

    for the production of synthetic diamond. In this study we have used molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMSConstruction of a Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometer for In-Situ probing of a Diamond Chemical Vapour environment of diamond deposition. Attempts were made to apply a previous MBMS system to analyse `Ultra

  10. In-situ Rb-Sr geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, F. S.; Nowicki, K.; Whitaker, T.

    This paper reports on the first rubidium-strontium (Rb-Sr) radiometric dates using a Laser Desorption Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (LDRIMS) instrument capable of being miniaturized for flight to another planet. The LDRIMS instrument produces dates in under 24 hours, requires minimal sample preparation, and avoids the interference and mass resolution issues associated with other geochronology measurements. We have begun testing the bench-top prototype on the Boulder Creek Granite (BCG), from Colorado, comprised primarily of a gneissic quartz monzonite and granodiorite; whole rock Rb-Sr TIMS measurements result in dates of 1700± 40 Ma [1]. Data reduction of the LDRIMS Rb-Sr measurements on calibrated repeat runs result in a date for the BCG of 1.727± 0.087 Ga (n=288, MSWD=1). Most geochronology applications are willing to accept an MSWD up to ~2.7; at MSWD=2, the precision improves to ± 0.062 Ga. This technology is moving from lab prototype to field deployable instrument, and provides an opportunity to directly address the science goals of Mars Sample Return (MSR) within the bounds posed by current scientific, fiscal, and political pressures on the Mars program. Additionally, LDRIMS could potentially be flown to the Moon under the Discovery or New Frontiers program. We posit that in-situ geochronology missions to Mars to triage and validate samples for Mars Sample Return (MSR) are technically feasible in the 2018-2022 time frame.

  11. Integrated in-situ remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Fustos, V.; Lieberman, P.

    1996-01-01

    This article presents an integrated approach to ex-situ and in-situ remediation. A sequence of processes, used successfully in their own right, but used synergistically in this approach, have achieved short-term, economic remediation. In addition the range of contaminants that can be treated is extended. The Process uses ozone, compressed oxygen, water vapor, heat, bioaugmentation and vapor extraction to remediate lower molecular weight hydrocarbons and higher molecular weight hydrocarbons. 3 figs.

  12. In situ MHD energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy conversion of blanket neutron heat in a magnetic fusion reactor is proposed using MHD generators within the existing magnet coils, called in situ MHD energy conversion. X-ray bremsstrahlung and microwave synchrotron radiation from the plasma is used to enhance the in situ MHD conversion efficiency by superheating the MHD generator vapor to temperatures higher than local wall temperatures, and by enhancing the vapor conductivity through nonequilibrium ionization (T/sub e/ >> T/sub gas/). Rankine cycles using cesium-seeded mercury, cadmium, zinc, or magnesium metal vapors keep the power-conversion loop within the reactor, to minimize total plant capital costs. Development of in situ MHD for tokamak reactors should be quite consistent with the development of fusion itself. The basic ingredients are similar: plasmas, large magnets, radiation, and high-performance materials. There already exists a large data base on MHD generators that have achieved up to 10 to 15% efficiency, at temperatures (3000 K) twice as high as contemplated here, for many hours at a time. To help achieve the modest (but important) efficiency improvement factors of 2 to 3, this concept proposes a new ingredient-synchrotron radiation-which is unique to magnetic fusion. Experiments with microwave heating in MHD channels could be done in advance with gryotrons and magnets available in many fusion laboratories. High tokamak plasma temperatures and moderate betas are required to produce synchrotron radiation for in situ MHD. The MHD generators could be incorporated in modular tokamak architectures and silo vaults. Refractory materials with > 100 dpa life at 1000 K and > 1 dpa life at 1500 to 1800 K are needed. Microwave heating in MHD channel experiments could be tested with gyrotrons and magnets available in fusion laboratories.

  13. Oldest biliary endoprosthesis in situ.

    PubMed

    Consolo, Pierluigi; Scalisi, Giuseppe; Crinò, Stefano F; Tortora, Andrea; Giacobbe, Giuseppa; Cintolo, Marcello; Familiari, Luigi; Pallio, Socrate

    2013-07-16

    The advantages of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography over open surgery have made it the predominant method of treating patients with choledocholithiasis. After sphincterotomy, however, 10%-15% of common bile duct stones cannot be removed with a basket or balloon. The methods for managing "irretrievable stones" include surgery, mechanical lithotripsy, intraductal or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and biliary stenting. The case presented was a referred 82-year-old Caucasian woman with a 7-year-old plastic biliary endoprosthesis in situ. To the best of our knowledge the examined endoprosthesis is the oldest endoprosthesis in situ reported in the literature. Endoscopic biliary endoprosthesis placement remains a simple and safe procedure for patients with stones that are difficult to manage by conventional endoscopic methods and for patients who are unfit for surgery or who are high surgical risks. To date no consensus has been reached regarding how long a biliary prosthesis should remain in situ. Long-term biliary stenting may have a role in selected elderly patients if stones extraction has failed because the procedure may prevent stones impaction and cholangitis. PMID:23858381

  14. Oldest biliary endoprosthesis in situ

    PubMed Central

    Consolo, Pierluigi; Scalisi, Giuseppe; Crinò, Stefano F; Tortora, Andrea; Giacobbe, Giuseppa; Cintolo, Marcello; Familiari, Luigi; Pallio, Socrate

    2013-01-01

    The advantages of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography over open surgery have made it the predominant method of treating patients with choledocholithiasis. After sphincterotomy, however, 10%-15% of common bile duct stones cannot be removed with a basket or balloon. The methods for managing “irretrievable stones” include surgery, mechanical lithotripsy, intraductal or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and biliary stenting. The case presented was a referred 82-year-old Caucasian woman with a 7-year-old plastic biliary endoprosthesis in situ. To the best of our knowledge the examined endoprosthesis is the oldest endoprosthesis in situ reported in the literature. Endoscopic biliary endoprosthesis placement remains a simple and safe procedure for patients with stones that are difficult to manage by conventional endoscopic methods and for patients who are unfit for surgery or who are high surgical risks. To date no consensus has been reached regarding how long a biliary prosthesis should remain in situ. Long-term biliary stenting may have a role in selected elderly patients if stones extraction has failed because the procedure may prevent stones impaction and cholangitis. PMID:23858381

  15. A transportable high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer and analysis system applicable to mobile, autonomous or unattended applications

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, W.M.; Neufeld, K.W.

    1995-07-01

    The Safeguards Technology Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing systems based on a compact electro-mechanically cooled high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. This detector system broadens the practicality of performing high- resolution gamma-ray spectrometry in the field. Utilizing portable computers, multi-channel analyzers and software these systems greatly improve the ease of performing mobile high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. Using industrial computers, we can construct systems that will run autonomously for extended periods of time without operator input or maintenance. These systems can start or make decisions based on sensor inputs rather than operator interactions. Such systems can provide greater capability for wider domain of safeguards, treaty verification application, and other unattended, autonomous or in-situ applications.

  16. Noise canceling in-situ detection

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, David O.

    2014-08-26

    Technologies applicable to noise canceling in-situ NMR detection and imaging are disclosed. An example noise canceling in-situ NMR detection apparatus may comprise one or more of a static magnetic field generator, an alternating magnetic field generator, an in-situ NMR detection device, an auxiliary noise detection device, and a computer.

  17. Chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometer for the in situ measurement of methyl hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    St Clair, Jason M.; McCabe, David C.; Crounse, John D.; Steiner, Urs; Wennberg, Paul O.

    2010-09-15

    A new approach for measuring gas-phase methyl hydrogen peroxide [(MHP) CH{sub 3}OOH] utilizing chemical ionization mass spectrometry is presented. Tandem mass spectrometry is used to avoid mass interferences that hindered previous attempts to measure atmospheric CH{sub 3}OOH with CF{sub 3}O{sup -} clustering chemistry. CH{sub 3}OOH has been successfully measured in situ using this technique during both airborne and ground-based campaigns. The accuracy and precision for the MHP measurement are a function of water vapor mixing ratio. Typical precision at 500 pptv MHP and 100 ppmv H{sub 2}O is {+-}80 pptv (2 sigma) for a 1 s integration period. The accuracy at 100 ppmv H{sub 2}O is estimated to be better than {+-}40%. Chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry shows considerable promise for the determination of in situ atmospheric trace gas mixing ratios where isobaric compounds or mass interferences impede accurate measurements.

  18. Cancer statistics: Breast cancer in situ.

    PubMed

    Ward, Elizabeth M; DeSantis, Carol E; Lin, Chun Chieh; Kramer, Joan L; Jemal, Ahmedin; Kohler, Betsy; Brawley, Otis W; Gansler, Ted

    2015-11-01

    An estimated 60,290 new cases of breast carcinoma in situ are expected to be diagnosed in 2015, and approximately 1 in 33 women is likely to receive an in situ breast cancer diagnosis in her lifetime. Although in situ breast cancers are relatively common, their clinical significance and optimal treatment are topics of uncertainty and concern for both patients and clinicians. In this article, the American Cancer Society provides information about occurrence and treatment patterns for the 2 major subtypes of in situ breast cancer in the United States-ductal carcinoma in situ and lobular carcinoma in situ-using data from the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries and the 13 oldest Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registries. The authors also present an overview of in situ breast cancer detection, treatment, risk factors, and prevention and discuss research needs and initiatives. CA Cancer J Clin 2015;65:481-495. © 2015 American Cancer Society. PMID:26431342

  19. Composite with In Situ Plenums

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montesano, Mark

    2012-01-01

    A document describes a high-performance thermal distribution panel (TDP) concept using high-conductivity (greater than 800 W/mK) macro composite skin with in situ heat pipes. The processing technologies proposed to build such a panel result in a one-piece, inseparable assembly with high conductance in both the X and Y planes. The TDP configuration can also be used to produce panels with high structural stiffness. The one-piece construction of the TDP eliminates the thermal interface between the cooling plenums and the heat spreader base, and obviates the need for bulky mounting flanges and thick heat spreaders used on baseline designs. The conductivity of the TDP can be configured to exceed 800 W/mK with a mass density below 2.5 grams per cubic centimeter. This material can provide efficient conductive heat transfer between the in situ heat plenums, permitting the use of thinner panel thicknesses. The plenums may be used as heat pipes, loop heat pipes, or liquid cooling channels. The panel technology used in the TDP is a macro-composite comprised of aluminum-encapsulated annealed pyrolytic graphite (APG). APG is highly aligned crystalline graphite with an in-plane thermal conductivity of 1,700 W/mK. APG has low shear strength and does not constrain the encapsulating material. The proposed concept has no thermal interfaces between the heat pipes and the spreader plate, further improving the overall conductance of the system. The in situ plenums can also be used for liquid cooling applications. The process can be used to fabricate structural panels by adding a second thin sheet.

  20. Radiation metabolomics. 3. Biomarker discovery in the urine of gamma-irradiated rats using a simplified metabolomics protocol of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with random forests machine learning algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lanz, Christian; Patterson, Andrew D; Slavík, Josef; Krausz, Kristopher W; Ledermann, Monika; Gonzalez, Frank J; Idle, Jeffrey R

    2009-08-01

    Abstract Radiation metabolomics employing mass spectral technologies represents a plausible means of high-throughput minimally invasive radiation biodosimetry. A simplified metabolomics protocol is described that employs ubiquitous gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and open source software including random forests machine learning algorithm to uncover latent biomarkers of 3 Gy gamma radiation in rats. Urine was collected from six male Wistar rats and six sham-irradiated controls for 7 days, 4 prior to irradiation and 3 after irradiation. Water and food consumption, urine volume, body weight, and sodium, potassium, calcium, chloride, phosphate and urea excretion showed major effects from exposure to gamma radiation. The metabolomics protocol uncovered several urinary metabolites that were significantly up-regulated (glyoxylate, threonate, thymine, uracil, p-cresol) and down-regulated (citrate, 2-oxoglutarate, adipate, pimelate, suberate, azelaate) as a result of radiation exposure. Thymine and uracil were shown to derive largely from thymidine and 2'-deoxyuridine, which are known radiation biomarkers in the mouse. The radiation metabolomic phenotype in rats appeared to derive from oxidative stress and effects on kidney function. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is a promising platform on which to develop the field of radiation metabolomics further and to assist in the design of instrumentation for use in detecting biological consequences of environmental radiation release. PMID:19630524

  1. Training for teamwork through in situ simulations

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, Asta; Poehlman, Jon; Bollenbacher, John; Riggan, Scott; Davis, Stan; Miller, Kristi; Ivester, Thomas; Kahwati, Leila

    2015-01-01

    In situ simulations allow healthcare teams to practice teamwork and communication as well as clinical management skills in a team's usual work setting with typically available resources and equipment. The purpose of this video is to demonstrate how to plan and conduct in situ simulation training sessions, with particular emphasis on how such training can be used to improve communication and teamwork. The video features an in situ simulation conducted at a labour and delivery unit in response to postpartum hemorrhage. PMID:26294962

  2. Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ

    DOEpatents

    Christian, Allen T. (Tracy, CA); Coleman, Matthew A. (Livermore, CA); Tucker, James D. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ to increase the amount of DNA associated with a chromosome or chromosome region is described. The amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ provides for the synthesis of Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) painting probes from single dissected chromosome fragments, the production of cDNA libraries from low copy mRNAs and improved in Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) procedures.

  3. Toward the next TRL of KArLE (in situ geochronology for planetary experiment)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devismes, D.; Cohen, B. A.; Haight, H.

    2015-10-01

    The instrument 'Potassium (K) Argon Laser Experiment' (KArLE) is developed and designed for in situ absolute dating of rocks on planetary surfaces. It is based on the K-Ar dating method and uses the Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy - Laser Ablation - Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry (LIBSLA- QMS) technique. We use a dedicated interface to combine two instruments similar to SAM of Mars Science Laboratory (for the QMS) and ChemCam (for the LA and LIBS). The prototype has demonstrated that KArLE is a suitable and promising instrument for in situ absolute dating.

  4. In-situ spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, William S. (2419 Dickey Rd., Augusta, GA 30906)

    1992-01-01

    A spectrophotometric probe for in situ absorption spectra measurements comprising a first optical fiber carrying light from a remote light source, a second optical fiber carrying light to a remote spectrophotometer, the proximal ends of the first and second optical fibers parallel and coterminal, a planoconvex lens to collimate light from the first optical fiber, a reflecting grid positioned a short distance from the lens to reflect the collimated light back to the lens for focussing on the second optical fiber. The lens is positioned with the convex side toward the optical fibers. A substrate for absorbing analyte or an analyte and reagent mixture may be positioned between the lens and the reflecting grid.

  5. In-situ spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, W.S.

    1992-12-15

    A spectrophotometric probe is described for in situ absorption spectra measurements comprising a first optical fiber carrying light from a remote light source, a second optical fiber carrying light to a remote spectrophotometer, the proximal ends of the first and second optical fibers parallel and co-terminal, a planoconvex lens to collimate light from the first optical fiber, a reflecting grid positioned a short distance from the lens to reflect the collimated light back to the lens for focusing on the second optical fiber. The lens is positioned with the convex side toward the optical fibers. A substrate for absorbing analyte or an analyte and reagent mixture may be positioned between the lens and the reflecting grid. 5 figs.

  6. Simulations of Terrestrial in-situ Cosmogenic-Nuclide Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Lal, D.; Arnold, J. R.; Englert, P. A. J.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.; Jull, A. J. T.; Donahue, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    Targets of silicon and silicon dioxide were irradiated with spallation neutrons to simulate the production of long-lived radionuclides in the surface of the Earth. Gamma-ray spectroscopy was used to measure Be-7 and Na-22, and accelerator mass spectrometry was used to measure Be-10, C-14, and Al-26. The measured ratios of these nuclides are compared with calculated ratios and with ratios from other simulations and agree well with ratios inferred from terrestrial samples.

  7. Mass spectrometry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Johanson, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state of mass spectrometry, indicating its unique importance for advanced scientific research. Mass spectrometry applications in computer techniques, gas chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, molecular fragmentation and ionization, and isotope labeling are covered. Details are given on mass spectrometry applications in bio-organic chemistry and biomedical research. As the subjects of these applications are indicated alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, terpenes, quinones, nucleic acid components, peptides, antibiotics, and human and animal metabolisms. Particular attention is given to the mass spectra of organo-inorganic compounds, inorganic mass spectrometry, surface phenomena such as secondary ion and electron emission, and elemental and isotope analysis. Further topics include mass spectrometry in organic geochemistry, applications in geochronology and cosmochemistry, and organic mass spectrometry.

  8. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: IN SITU STEAM EXTRACTION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In situ steam extraction removes volatile and semivolatile hazardous contaminants from soil and groundwater without excavation of the hazardous waste. Waste constituents are removed in situ by the technology and are not actually treated. The use of steam enhances the stripping of...

  9. Frontiers of in situ electron microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zheng, Haimei; Zhu, Yimei; Meng, Shirley Ying

    2015-01-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has become an increasingly important tool for materials characterization. It provides key information on the structural dynamics of a material during transformations and the correlation between structure and properties of materials. With the recent advances in instrumentation, including aberration corrected optics, sample environment control, the sample stage, and fast and sensitive data acquisition, in situ TEM characterization has become more and more powerful. In this article, a brief review of the current status and future opportunities of in situ TEM is included. It also provides an introduction to the six articles covered by inmore »this issue of MRS Bulletin explore the frontiers of in situ electron microscopy, including liquid and gas environmental TEM, dynamic four-dimensional TEM, nanomechanics, ferroelectric domain switching studied by in situ TEM, and state-of-the-art atomic imaging of light elements (i.e., carbon atoms) and individual defects.« less

  10. In situ bioremediation in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Porta, A.; Young, J.K.; Molton, P.M.

    1993-06-01

    Site remediation activity in Europe is increasing, even if not at the forced pace of the US. Although there is a better understanding of the benefits of bioremediation than of other approaches, especially about in situ bioremediation of contaminated soils, relatively few projects have been carried out full-scale in Europe or in the US. Some engineering companies and large industrial companies in Europe are investigating bioremediation and biotreatment technologies, in some cases to solve their internal waste problems. Technologies related to the application of microorganisms to the soil, release of nutrients into the soil, and enhancement of microbial decontamination are being tested through various additives such as surfactants, ion exchange resins, limestone, or dolomite. New equipment has been developed for crushing and mixing or injecting and sparging the microorganisms, as have new reactor technologies (e.g., rotating aerator reactors, biometal sludge reactors, and special mobile containers for simultaneous storage, transportation, and biodegradation of contaminated soil). Some work has also been done with immobilized enzymes to support and restore enzymatic activities related to partial or total xenobiotic decontamination. Finally, some major programs funded by public and private institutions confirm that increasing numbers of firms have a working interest in bioremediation.

  11. Lithographically fabricated silicon microreactor for in situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts—Enabling correlative characterization techniques.

    PubMed

    Baier, S; Rochet, A; Hofmann, G; Kraut, M; Grunwaldt, J-D

    2015-06-01

    We report on a new modular setup on a silicon-based microreactor designed for correlative spectroscopic, scattering, and analytic on-line gas investigations for in situ studies of heterogeneous catalysts. The silicon microreactor allows a combination of synchrotron radiation based techniques (e.g., X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy) as well as infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy. Catalytic performance can be determined simultaneously by on-line product analysis using mass spectrometry. We present the design of the reactor, the experimental setup, and as a first example for an in situ study, the catalytic partial oxidation of methane showing the applicability of this reactor for in situ studies. PMID:26133867

  12. Lithographically fabricated silicon microreactor for in situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts—Enabling correlative characterization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, S.; Rochet, A.; Hofmann, G.; Kraut, M.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2015-06-01

    We report on a new modular setup on a silicon-based microreactor designed for correlative spectroscopic, scattering, and analytic on-line gas investigations for in situ studies of heterogeneous catalysts. The silicon microreactor allows a combination of synchrotron radiation based techniques (e.g., X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy) as well as infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy. Catalytic performance can be determined simultaneously by on-line product analysis using mass spectrometry. We present the design of the reactor, the experimental setup, and as a first example for an in situ study, the catalytic partial oxidation of methane showing the applicability of this reactor for in situ studies.

  13. Lithographically fabricated silicon microreactor for in situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts—Enabling correlative characterization techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Baier, S.; Rochet, A.; Hofmann, G.; Kraut, M.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2015-06-15

    We report on a new modular setup on a silicon-based microreactor designed for correlative spectroscopic, scattering, and analytic on-line gas investigations for in situ studies of heterogeneous catalysts. The silicon microreactor allows a combination of synchrotron radiation based techniques (e.g., X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy) as well as infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy. Catalytic performance can be determined simultaneously by on-line product analysis using mass spectrometry. We present the design of the reactor, the experimental setup, and as a first example for an in situ study, the catalytic partial oxidation of methane showing the applicability of this reactor for in situ studies.

  14. Toward In Situ Monitoring of Water Contamination by Nitroenergetic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brandy J.; Leska, Iwona A.; Medina, Alejandro; Dyson, Norris F.; Nasir, Mansoor; Melde, Brian J.; Taft, Jenna R.; Charles, Paul T.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously described the application of novel porous organosilicate materials to the preconcentration of nitroenergetic targets from aqueous solution prior to HPLC analysis. The performance of the sorbents and the advantages of these types of materials over commercially available solid phase extraction sorbents have been demonstrated. Here, the development of systems for application of those sorbents to in situ monitoring is described. Considerations such as column pressure, particulate filtration, and component durability are discussed. The diameter of selected column housings, the sorbent bed depth, and the frits utilized significantly impact the utility of the sorbent columns in the prototype system. The impact of and necessity for improvements in the morphological characteristics of the sorbents as they relate to reduction in column pressure are detailed. The results of experiments utilizing a prototype system are presented. Data demonstrating feasibility for use of the sorbents in preconcentration prior to ion mobility spectrometry is also presented. PMID:23202195

  15. Process optimization with in situ technologies.

    PubMed

    am Ende, D J; Preigh, M J

    2000-11-01

    In situ technologies coupled with automated laboratory reaction systems are significantly improving the way we optimize and scale-up chemical processes. In situ analytical probes are ideal for the continuous monitoring of chemical and physical changes without disturbing the reaction environment, thereby eliminating questions of sample integrity. In manufacturing settings, these tools can offer advantages of increased efficiency, safety and cost savings. This review will discuss approaches to process development and highlight important recent contributions of in situ technologies and automated systems impacting process optimization for pharmaceutical development. PMID:19649897

  16. In situ bioremediation using horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    In Situ Bioremediation (ISB), which is the term used in this report for Gaseous Nutrient Injection for In Situ Bioremediation, remediates soils and ground water contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) both above and below the water table. ISB involves injection of air and nutrients (sparging and biostimulation) into the ground water and vacuum extraction to remove .VOCs from the vadose zone concomitant with biodegradation of VOCs. The innovation is in the combination of 3 emerging technologies, air stripping, horizontal wells, and bioremediation via gaseous nutrient injection with a baseline technology, soil vapor extraction, to produce a more efficient in situ remediation system.

  17. Gum containing calcium fluoride reinforces enamel subsurface lesions in situ.

    PubMed

    Kitasako, Y; Sadr, A; Hamba, H; Ikeda, M; Tagami, J

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of chewing gum containing phosphoryl oligosaccharides of calcium (POs-Ca) and a low concentration of fluoride (F) on the hardness of enamel subsurface lesions, utilizing a double-blind, randomized, and controlled in situ model. Fifteen individuals wore removable lingual appliances with 3 bovine-enamel insets containing subsurface demineralized lesions. Three times a day for 14 days, they chewed one of the 3 chewing gums (placebo, POs-Ca, POs-Ca+F). After the treatment period, cross-sectional mineral content, nanoindentation hardness, and fluoride ion mapping by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) were evaluated. Although there were no statistical differences in overall mineral content and hardness recovery rates between POs-Ca and POs-Ca+F subsurface lesions (p > 0.05), nanoindentation at 1-?m distance increments from the surface showed statistical differences in hardness recovery rate between POs-Ca and POs-Ca+F in the superficial 20-?m region (p < 0.05). Fluoride mapping revealed distribution of the ion up to 20 ?m from the surface in the POs-Ca+F group. Nanoindentation and TOF-SIMS results highlighted the benefits of bioavailability of fluoride ion on reinforcement of the superficial zone of subsurface lesions in situ (NCT01377493). PMID:22337700

  18. In situ structural analysis of the human nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    von Appen, Alexander; Kosinski, Jan; Sparks, Lenore; Ori, Alessandro; DiGuilio, Amanda L; Vollmer, Benjamin; Mackmull, Marie-Therese; Banterle, Niccolo; Parca, Luca; Kastritis, Panagiotis; Buczak, Katarzyna; Mosalaganti, Shyamal; Hagen, Wim; Andres-Pons, Amparo; Lemke, Edward A; Bork, Peer; Antonin, Wolfram; Glavy, Joseph S; Bui, Khanh Huy; Beck, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear pore complexes are fundamental components of all eukaryotic cells that mediate nucleocytoplasmic exchange. Determining their 110-megadalton structure imposes a formidable challenge and requires in situ structural biology approaches. Of approximately 30 nucleoporins (Nups), 15 are structured and form the Y and inner-ring complexes. These two major scaffolding modules assemble in multiple copies into an eight-fold rotationally symmetric structure that fuses the inner and outer nuclear membranes to form a central channel of ~60 nm in diameter. The scaffold is decorated with transport-channel Nups that often contain phenylalanine-repeat sequences and mediate the interaction with cargo complexes. Although the architectural arrangement of parts of the Y complex has been elucidated, it is unclear how exactly it oligomerizes in situ. Here we combine cryo-electron tomography with mass spectrometry, biochemical analysis, perturbation experiments and structural modelling to generate, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive architectural model of the human nuclear pore complex to date. Our data suggest previously unknown protein interfaces across Y complexes and to inner-ring complex members. We show that the transport-channel Nup358 (also known as Ranbp2) has a previously unanticipated role in Y-complex oligomerization. Our findings blur the established boundaries between scaffold and transport-channel Nups. We conclude that, similar to coated vesicles, several copies of the same structural building block--although compositionally identical--engage in different local sets of interactions and conformations. PMID:26416747

  19. 30 CFR 828.12 - In situ processing: Monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01...2014-07-01 false In situ processing: Monitoring. 828.12 Section 828.12 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE...PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-IN SITU PROCESSING § 828.12 In situ...

  20. 30 CFR 828.12 - In situ processing: Monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01...2010-07-01 false In situ processing: Monitoring. 828.12 Section 828.12 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE...PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-IN SITU PROCESSING § 828.12 In situ...

  1. 30 CFR 828.12 - In situ processing: Monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01...2012-07-01 false In situ processing: Monitoring. 828.12 Section 828.12 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE...PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-IN SITU PROCESSING § 828.12 In situ...

  2. 30 CFR 828.12 - In situ processing: Monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01...2013-07-01 false In situ processing: Monitoring. 828.12 Section 828.12 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE...PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-IN SITU PROCESSING § 828.12 In situ...

  3. 30 CFR 828.12 - In situ processing: Monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01...2011-07-01 false In situ processing: Monitoring. 828.12 Section 828.12 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE...PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-IN SITU PROCESSING § 828.12 In situ...

  4. ENHANCED BIODEGRADATION THROUGH IN-SITU AERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provided an overview of enhanced aerobic bioremediation using in-situ aeration or venting. The following topics were covered: (1) Basic discussion on biodegradation and respiration testing; (2) Basic discussion on volatilization, rate-limited mass transport, an...

  5. Scientific rationale of Saturn's in situ exploration

    E-print Network

    Mousis, O; Lebreton, J -P; Wurz, P; Cavalié, T; Coustenis, A; Courtin, R; Gautier, D; Helled, R; Irwin, P G J; Morse, A D; Nettelmann, N; Marty, B; Rousselot, P; Venot, O; Atkinson, D H; Waite, J H; Reh, K R; Simon-Miller, A; Atreya, S; André, N; Blanc, M; Daglis, I A; Fischer, G; Geppert, W D; Guillot, T; Hedman, M M; Hueso, R; Lellouch, E; Lunine, J I; Murray, C D; O'Donoghue, J; Rengel, M; Sanchez-Lavega, A; Schmider, F -X; Spiga, A; Spilker, T; Petit, J -M; Tiscareno, M S; Ali-Dib, M; Altwegg, K; Bouquet, A; Briois, C; Fouchet, T; Guerlet, S; Kostiuk, T; Lebleu, D; Moreno, R; Orton, G S; Poncy, J

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing observations meet some limitations when used to study the bulk atmospheric composition of the giant planets of our solar system. A remarkable example of the superiority of in situ probe measurements is illustrated by the exploration of Jupiter, where key measurements such as the determination of the noble gases abundances and the precise measurement of the helium mixing ratio have only been made available through in situ measurements by the Galileo probe. This paper describes the main scientific goals to be addressed by the future in situ exploration of Saturn placing the Galileo probe exploration of Jupiter in a broader context and before the future probe exploration of the more remote ice giants. In situ exploration of Saturn's atmosphere addresses two broad themes that are discussed throughout this paper: first, the formation history of our solar system and second, the processes at play in planetary atmospheres. In this context, we detail the reasons why measurements of Saturn's bulk element...

  6. DOE In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. In situ manipulation technologies subprogram plan

    SciTech Connect

    Yow, J.L. Jr.

    1993-12-22

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISRP) supports and manages a balanced portfolio of applied research and development activities in support of DOE environmental restoration and waste management needs. ISRP technologies are being developed in four areas: containment, chemical and physical treatment, in situ bioremediation, and in situ manipulation (including electrokinetics). the focus of containment is to provide mechanisms to stop contaminant migration through the subsurface. In situ bioremediation and chemical and physical treatment both aim to destroy or eliminate contaminants in groundwater and soils. In situ manipulation (ISM) provides mechanisms to access contaminants or introduce treatment agents into the soil, and includes other technologies necessary to support the implementation of ISR methods. Descriptions of each major program area are provided to set the technical context of the ISM subprogram. Typical ISM needs for major areas of in situ remediation research and development are identified.

  7. Raman Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, Derek J.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews mainly quantitative analytical applications in the field of Raman spectrometry. Includes references to other reviews, new and analytically untested techniques, and novel sampling and instrument designs. Cites 184 references. (CS)

  8. Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is an emerging technique of great potential for investigating the chemical architecture in biological matrices. Although the potential for studying neurobiological systems is evident, the relevance of the technique for application in neuroscience is still in its infancy. In the present Review, a principal overview of the different approaches, including matrix assisted laser desorption ionization and secondary ion mass spectrometry, is provided with particular focus on their strengths and limitations for studying different neurochemical species in situ and in vitro. The potential of the various approaches is discussed based on both fundamental and biomedical neuroscience research. This Review aims to serve as a general guide to familiarize the neuroscience community and other biomedical researchers with the technique, highlighting its great potential and suitability for comprehensive and specific chemical imaging. PMID:23530951

  9. Mass Spectrometry in the Home and Garden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulliam, Christopher J.; Bain, Ryan M.; Wiley, Joshua S.; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R. Graham

    2015-02-01

    Identification of active components in a variety of chemical products used directly by consumers is described at both trace and bulk levels using mass spectrometry. The combination of external ambient ionization with a portable mass spectrometer capable of tandem mass spectrometry provides high chemical specificity and sensitivity as well as allowing on-site monitoring. These experiments were done using a custom-built portable ion trap mass spectrometer in combination with the ambient ionization methods of paper spray, leaf spray, and low temperature plasma ionization. Bactericides, garden chemicals, air fresheners, and other products were examined. Herbicide applied to suburban lawns was detected in situ on single leaves 5 d after application.

  10. Radiation resistance of sequencing chips for in situ life detection.

    PubMed

    Carr, Christopher E; Rowedder, Holli; Lui, Clarissa S; Zlatkovsky, Ilya; Papalias, Chris W; Bolander, Jarie; Myers, Jason W; Bustillo, James; Rothberg, Jonathan M; Zuber, Maria T; Ruvkun, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Life beyond Earth may be based on RNA or DNA if such life is related to life on Earth through shared ancestry due to meteoritic exchange, such as may be the case for Mars, or if delivery of similar building blocks to habitable environments has biased the evolution of life toward utilizing nucleic acids. In this case, in situ sequencing is a powerful approach to identify and characterize such life without the limitations or expense of returning samples to Earth, and can monitor forward contamination. A new semiconductor sequencing technology based on sensing hydrogen ions released during nucleotide incorporation can enable massively parallel sequencing in a small, robust, optics-free CMOS chip format. We demonstrate that these sequencing chips survive several analogues of space radiation at doses consistent with a 2-year Mars mission, including protons with solar particle event-distributed energy levels and 1 GeV oxygen and iron ions. We find no measurable impact of irradiation at 1 and 5 Gy doses on sequencing quality nor on low-level hardware characteristics. Further testing is required to study the impacts of soft errors as well as to characterize performance under neutron and gamma irradiation and at higher doses, which would be expected during operation in environments with significant trapped energetic particles such as during a mission to Europa. Our results support future efforts to use in situ sequencing to test theories of panspermia and/or whether life has a common chemical basis. PMID:23734755

  11. Mineral exploration and soil analysis using in situ neutron activation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Hoyte, A.F.

    1966-01-01

    A feasibility study has been made to operate by remote control an unshielded portable positive-ion accelerator type neutron source to induce activities in the ground or rock by "in situ" neutron irradiation. Selective activation techniques make it possible to detect some thirty or more elements by irradiating the ground for periods of a few minutes with either 3-MeV or 14-MeV neutrons. The depth of penetration of neutrons, the effect of water content of the soil on neutron moderation, gamma ray attenuation in the soil and other problems are considered. The analysis shows that, when exploring for most elements of economic interest, the reaction 2H(d,n)3He yielding ??? 3-MeV neutrons is most practical to produce a relatively uniform flux of neutrons of less than 1 keV to a depth of 19???-20???. Irradiation with high energy neutrons (??? 14 MeV) can also be used and may be better suited for certain problems. However, due to higher background and lower sensitivity for the heavy minerals, it is not a recommended neutron source for general exploration use. Preliminary experiments have been made which indicate that neutron activation in situ is feasible for a mineral exploration or qualititative soil analysis. ?? 1976.

  12. Detecting In-Situ Identity Fraud on Social Network Services

    E-print Network

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    Detecting In-Situ Identity Fraud on Social Network Services: A Case Study on In-situ identity fraud owners. The reasons that in-situ identity fraud is widespread are: v People tend to choose "yes" when make in-situ identity fraud easy in other ways, as they can be physically accessed by acquaintances

  13. The SMAP In Situ Soil Moisture Sensor Testbed: Comparing in situ sensors for satellite validation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the most valuable tools in validating satellite based soil moisture estimates, such as those from the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission are large scale in situ networks. Global validation involves networks operated by many different organizations. Existing in situ soil moisture netw...

  14. Non-destructive in-situ method and apparatus for determining radionuclide depth in media

    DOEpatents

    Xu, X. George (Clifton Park, NY); Naessens, Edward P. (West Point, NY)

    2003-01-01

    A non-destructive method and apparatus which is based on in-situ gamma spectroscopy is used to determine the depth of radiological contamination in media such as concrete. An algorithm, Gamma Penetration Depth Unfolding Algorithm (GPDUA), uses point kernel techniques to predict the depth of contamination based on the results of uncollided peak information from the in-situ gamma spectroscopy. The invention is better, faster, safer, and/cheaper than the current practice in decontamination and decommissioning of facilities that are slow, rough and unsafe. The invention uses a priori knowledge of the contaminant source distribution. The applicable radiological contaminants of interest are any isotopes that emit two or more gamma rays per disintegration or isotopes that emit a single gamma ray but have gamma-emitting progeny in secular equilibrium with its parent (e.g., .sup.60 Co, .sup.235 U, and .sup.137 Cs to name a few). The predicted depths from the GPDUA algorithm using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) simulations and laboratory experiments using .sup.60 Co have consistently produced predicted depths within 20% of the actual or known depth.

  15. In Situ Imaging of Atomic Quantum Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chen-Lung; Chin, Cheng

    2015-09-01

    One exciting progress in recent cold atom experiments is the development of high resolution, in situ imaging techniques for atomic quantum gases.1-3 These new powerful tools provide detailed information on the distribution of atoms in a trap with resolution approaching the level of single atom and even single lattice site, and complement the welldeveloped time-of-flight method that probes the system in momentum space. In a condensed matter analogy, this technique is equivalent to locating electrons of a material in a snap shot. In situ imaging has offered a new powerful tool to study atomic gases and inspired many new research directions and ideas. In this chapter, we will describe the experimental setup of in situ absorption imaging, observables that can be extracted from the images, and new physics that can be explored with this technique.

  16. Development of an in situ derivatization technique for rapid analysis of levoglucosan and polar compounds in atmospheric organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheesley, Rebecca J.; Mieritz, Mark; DeMinter, Jeff T.; Shelton, Brandon R.; Schauer, James J.

    2015-12-01

    A novel thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry (TD-GCMS) technique was developed for the analysis of levoglucosan and other polar compounds in atmospheric organic aerosol. The method employs an in situ derivatization to add tri-methylsilyl groups to alcohol functional groups on simple carbohydrates, like levoglucosan and sterols. The new method was then demonstrated on a set of 40 filter samples collected in Fresno, CA. The results from the in situ silylation TD-GCMS method were compared, using levoglucosan, with a solvent extraction, high-volume injection GCMS method resulting in an r2 = 0.91.

  17. In-situ vitrification of waste materials

    DOEpatents

    Powell, James R. (Shoreham, NY); Reich, Morris (Kew Gardens Hills, NY); Barletta, Robert (Wading River, NY)

    1997-11-14

    A method for the in-situ vitrification of waste materials in a disposable can that includes an inner container and an outer container is disclosed. The method includes the steps of adding frit and waste materials to the inner container, removing any excess water, heating the inner container such that the frit and waste materials melt and vitrify after cooling, while maintaining the outer container at a significantly lower temperature than the inner container. The disposable can is then cooled to ambient temperatures and stored. A device for the in-situ vitrification of waste material in a disposable can is also disclosed.

  18. In-situ vitrification of waste materials

    DOEpatents

    Powell, J.R.; Reich, M.; Barletta, R.

    1997-10-14

    A method for the in-situ vitrification of waste materials in a disposable can that includes an inner container and an outer container is disclosed. The method includes the steps of adding frit and waste materials to the inner container, removing any excess water, heating the inner container such that the frit and waste materials melt and vitrify after cooling, while maintaining the outer container at a significantly lower temperature than the inner container. The disposable can is then cooled to ambient temperatures and stored. A device for the in-situ vitrification of waste material in a disposable can is also disclosed. 7 figs.

  19. IN SITU LEAD IMMOBILIZATION BY APATITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lead contamination is of environmental concern due to its effect on human health. The purpose of this study was to develop a technology to immobilize Pb in situ in contaminated soils and wastes using apatite. Hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(O...

  20. IN SITU LEAD IMMOBILIZATION BY APATITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lead contamination is of environmental concern due to its effect on human health. he purpose of this study was to develop a technology to immobilize Pb in situ in contaminated soils and wastes using apatite. ydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2]was reacted with aqueous Pb, resinexchang...

  1. In situ-toughened silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Padture, N.P. . Materials Science and Engineering Lab.)

    1994-02-01

    A new processing strategy based on atmospheric pressure sintering is presented for obtaining dense SiC-based materials with microstructures consisting of (1) uniformly distributed elongate-shaped [alpha]-SiC grains and (2) relatively high amounts (20 vol%) of second-phase yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG). This strategy entails the sintering of [beta]-SiC powder doped with [alpha]-SiC, Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], and Y[sub 2]O[sub 3]. The Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and Y[sub 2]O[sub 3] aid in the liquid-phase sintering of SiC and form in situ YAG, which has a significant thermal expansion mismatch with SiC. During a subsequent grain-growth heat treatment, it is postulated that the [alpha]-SiC seeds'' assist in controlling in situ growth of the elongated [alpha]-SiC grains. The fracture pattern in the in situ-toughened SiC is intergranular with evidence of copious crack-wake bridging, akin to toughened Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] ceramics. The elongate nature of the [alpha]-SiC grains, together with the high thermal-residual stresses in the microstructure, enhance the observed crack-wake bridging. This bridging accounts for a measured twofold increase in the indentation toughness of this new class of in situ-toughened SiC relative to a commercial SiC.

  2. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: IN SITU VITRIFICATION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In situ vitrification (ISV) uses electrical power to heat and melt soil, sludge, mine tailings, buried wastes, and sediments contaminated with organic, inorganic, and metal-bearing hazardous wastes. The molten material cools to form a hard, monolithic, chemically inert, stable...

  3. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: IN SITU BIODEGRADATION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In situ biodegradation may be used to treat low-to-intermediate concentrations of organic contaminants in place without disturbing or displacing the contaminated media. Although this technology has been used to degrade a limited number of inorganics, specifically cyanide and nitr...

  4. In-Situ Burning of Spilled Oil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Alan A.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews in-situ burning with particular emphasis on how it can be applied in water-related oil spill situations. Presents and discusses the use of nomograms and development of techniques cited for safe and effective ignition and controlled burning of spilled oil. Includes representative oil spill scenarios and possible responses. (15 references)…

  5. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: IN SITU VITRIFICATION - GEOSAFE CORPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    in Situ Vitrification (ISV) is designed to treat soils, sludges, sediments, and mine tailings contaminated with organic and inorganic compounds. The process uses electrical current to heat (mett) and vitrify the soil in place. Organic contaminants are decomposed by the extreme h...

  6. Fabrication Capabilities Utilizing In Situ Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLemore, Carole A.; Fikes, John C.; Darby, Charles A.; Good, James E.; Gilley, Scott D.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has a Space Exploration Policy that lays out a plan that far exceeds the earlier Apollo goals where landing on the moon and taking those first historic steps fulfilled the mission. The policy states that we will set roots on the moon by establishing an outpost. This outpost will be used as a test bed for residing in more distant locales, such as Mars. In order to become self-sufficient, the occupants must have the capability to fabricate component parts in situ. Additionally, in situ materials must be used to minimize valuable mission upmass and to be as efficient as possible. In situ materials can be found from various sources such as raw lunar regolith whereby specific constituents can be extracted from the regolith (such as aluminum, titanium, or iron), and existing hardware already residing on the moon from past Apollo missions. The Electron Beam Melting (EBM) process lends itself well to fabricating parts, tools, and other necessary items using in situ materials and will be discussed further in this paper.

  7. In Situ Vitrification software requirements specification

    SciTech Connect

    Grush, W.H.; Marwil, E.S.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes the Software Requirements Specification for the Electrical Resistance Heating and Thermal Energy Transport models of the In-Situ Vitrification (ISV) process. It contains the Data Flow Diagrams, Process Specifications, Data Structure Diagrams, and the Data Dictionary. 5 refs.

  8. IN SITU SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is designed to physically remove volatile compounds, generally from the vadose or unsaturated zone. t is an in situ process employing vapor extraction wells alone or in combination with air injection wells. acuum blowers supply the motive force, induci...

  9. Transesterification in situ of sunflower seed oil

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, K.J.; D'Arch-Evans, C.

    1985-06-01

    Transesterification of sunflower seed oil in situ has produced methyl and ethyl esters in yields greater than 40% of the dry seed weight. This figure compares with a typical yield of ca. 30% when the esters were prepared in the conventional manner from preextracted seed oil. 14 references.

  10. Controlled in situ etch-back

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattauch, R. J.; Seabaugh, A. C. (inventors)

    1981-01-01

    A controlled in situ etch-back technique is disclosed in which an etch melt and a growth melt are first saturated by a source-seed crystal and thereafter etch-back of a substrate takes place by the slightly undersaturated etch melt, followed by LPE growth of a layer by the growth melt, which is slightly supersaturated.

  11. Accelerated in situ bioremediation of groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, M.J.; Hooker, B.S.; Anderson, D.B.

    1996-07-01

    In situ bioremediation, as applied in this project, is based on the principal of biostimulation: supplying nutrients to indigenous microbes to stimulate their metabolic activity and subsequent degradation of contaminants. Typically, a network of injection and extraction wells are used to recirculate groundwater into which amendments are added and distributed within the aquifer. The objective of the in situ process is to create in the aquifer a microbially active zone that maximizes contaminant destruction while controlling the distribution of microbial growth. It is important to control microbial growth to avoid plugging the aquifer near the injection well and to establish and sustain maximum treatment zones for each injection well. Figure I illustrates this concept for in situ bioremediation. The technology described herein is innovative in its use of the computer-based Accelerated Bioremediation Design Tool (ABDT) to aid in selecting appropriate system designs and to determine optimal operating strategies. In addition, numerical simulations within the design tool proved to be valuable during remediation operations to determine appropriate changes in the` operating strategy as the bioremediation process progressed. This is particularly important because in situ bioremediation is not a steady- state process, and corrective actions to operating parameters are typically needed to maintain both rapid destruction rates and hydraulic containment.

  12. Spatial distribution of gamma radiation levels in surface soils from Jaduguda uranium mineralization zone, Jharkhand, India, using ?-ray spectrometry, and determination of outdoor dose to the population

    PubMed Central

    Maharana, Mandakini; Krishnan, Narayani; Sengupta, D.

    2010-01-01

    The concentrations of natural radionuclides in surface soil samples around selected villages of Jaduguda were investigated and compared with the radioactivity level in the region. Concentrations of 238U, 232Th, and 40K were determined by a gamma ray spectrometer using the HPGe detector with 50% relative efficiency, and the radiation dose to the local population was estimated. The average estimated activity concentrations of 238U, 232Th, and 40K in the surface soil were 53.8, 44.2 and 464.2 Bq kg?1 respectively. The average absorbed dose rate in the study area was estimated to be 72.5 nGy h-1, where as the annual effective dose to the population was 0.09 mSv y-1. A correlation analysis was made between measured dose rate and individual radionuclides, in order to delineate the contribution of the respective nuclides towards dose rate. The radio-elemental concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium estimated for the soils, in the study area, indicated the enrichment of uranium series nuclide. The results of the present study were subsequently compared with international and national recommended values. PMID:21170189

  13. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces, in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP intends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years. ISR IP is an applied research and development program broadly addressing known DOE environmental restoration needs. Analysis of a sample of 334 representative sites by the Office of Environmental Restoration has shown how many sites are amenable to in situ remediation: containment--243 sites; manipulation--244 sites; bioremediation--154 sites; and physical/chemical methods--236 sites. This needs assessment is focused on near-term restoration problems (FY93--FY99). Many other remediations will be required in the next century. The major focus of the ISR EP is on the long term development of permanent solutions to these problems. Current needs for interim actions to protect human health and the environment are also being addressed.

  14. Predicting the denitrification capacity of sandy aquifers from in situ measurements using push-pull 15N tracer tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschenbach, W.; Well, R.; Walther, W.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge about the spatial variability of in situ denitrification rates (Dr(in situ)) and their relation to the denitrification capacity in nitrate-contaminated aquifers is crucial to predict the development of groundwater quality. Therefore, 28 push-pull 15N tracer tests for the measurement of in situ denitrification rates were conducted in two sandy Pleistocene aquifers in Northern Germany. The 15N analysis of denitrification derived 15N labelled N2 and N2O dissolved in water samples collected during the push-pull 15N tracer tests was performed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) in the lab and additionally for some tracer tests online in the field with a quadrupole membrane inlet mass spectrometer (MIMS), in order to test the feasibility of on-site real-time 15N analysis. Aquifer material from the same locations and depths as the push-pull injection points was incubated and the initial and cumulative denitrification after one year of incubation (Dcum(365)) as well as the stock of reduced compounds (SRC) was compared with in situ measurements of denitrification. This was done to derive transfer functions suitable to predict Dcum(365) and SRC from Dr(in situ). Dr(in situ) ranged from 0 to 51.5 ?g N kg-1 d-1. Denitrification rates derived from on-site isotope analysis using membrane-inlet mass spectrometry satisfactorily coincided with laboratory analysis by conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometry, thus proving the feasibility of in situ analysis. Dr(in situ) was significantly higher in the sulphidic zone of both aquifers compared to the zone of non-sulphidic aquifer material. Overall, regressions between the Dcum(365) and SRC of the tested aquifer material with Dr(in situ) exhibited only a modest linear correlation for the full data set. But the predictability of Dcum(365) and SRC from Dr(in situ) data clearly increased for aquifer samples from the zone of NO3--bearing groundwater. In the NO3--free aquifer zone a lag phase of denitrification after NO3- injections was observed, which confounded the relationship between reactive compounds and in situ denitrification activity. This finding was attributed to adaptation processes in the microbial community after NO3- injections. Exemplarily, it was demonstrated that the microbial community in the NO3--free zone close below the NO3--bearing zone can be adapted to denitrification by amending wells with NO3--injections for an extended period. In situ denitrification rates were 30 to 65% higher after pre-conditioning with NO3-. Results from this study suggest that such pre-conditioning is crucial for the measurement of Dr(in situ) in deeper aquifer material from the NO3--free groundwater zone and thus for the prediction of Dcum(365) and SRC from Dr(in situ).

  15. Making a Hybrid Microfluidic Platform Compatible for In Situ Imaging by Vacuum-Based Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Li; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zhu, Zihua; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Cowin, James P.

    2011-10-26

    A self-contained microfluidic-based device was designed and fabricated for in situ imaging of aqueous surfaces using vacuum techniques. The device is a hybrid between a microfluidic PDMS block and external accessories, all portable on a small platform (10 cm-8 cm). The key feature is that a small aperture with a diameter of 2-3 micrometers is opened to the vacuum, which serves as a detection window for in situ imaging of aqueous surfaces. Vacuum compatibility and temperature drop due to water vaporization are the two most important challenges in this invention. Theoretical calculations and fabrication strategies are presented from multiple design aspects. In addition, results from the time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) of aqueous surfaces are presented.

  16. Terrestrial gamma radiation baseline mapping using ultra low density sampling methods.

    PubMed

    Kleinschmidt, R; Watson, D

    2016-01-01

    Baseline terrestrial gamma radiation maps are indispensable for providing basic reference information that may be used in assessing the impact of a radiation related incident, performing epidemiological studies, remediating land contaminated with radioactive materials, assessment of land use applications and resource prospectivity. For a large land mass, such as Queensland, Australia (over 1.7 million km(2)), it is prohibitively expensive and practically difficult to undertake detailed in-situ radiometric surveys of this scale. It is proposed that an existing, ultra-low density sampling program already undertaken for the purpose of a nationwide soil survey project be utilised to develop a baseline terrestrial gamma radiation map. Geoelement data derived from the National Geochemistry Survey of Australia (NGSA) was used to construct a baseline terrestrial gamma air kerma rate map, delineated by major drainage catchments, for Queensland. Three drainage catchments (sampled at the catchment outlet) spanning low, medium and high radioelement concentrations were selected for validation of the methodology using radiometric techniques including in-situ measurements and soil sampling for high resolution gamma spectrometry, and comparative non-radiometric analysis. A Queensland mean terrestrial air kerma rate, as calculated from the NGSA outlet sediment uranium, thorium and potassium concentrations, of 49 ± 69 nGy h(-1) (n = 311, 3? 99% confidence level) is proposed as being suitable for use as a generic terrestrial air kerma rate background range. Validation results indicate that catchment outlet measurements are representative of the range of results obtained across the catchment and that the NGSA geoelement data is suitable for calculation and mapping of terrestrial air kerma rate. PMID:26063584

  17. 30 CFR 828.11 - In situ processing: Performance standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01...2014-07-01 false In situ processing: Performance standards...11 Section 828.11 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF...PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-IN SITU PROCESSING § 828.11 In...

  18. 30 CFR 828.11 - In situ processing: Performance standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01...2012-07-01 false In situ processing: Performance standards...11 Section 828.11 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF...PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-IN SITU PROCESSING § 828.11 In...

  19. 30 CFR 828.11 - In situ processing: Performance standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01...2011-07-01 false In situ processing: Performance standards...11 Section 828.11 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF...PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-IN SITU PROCESSING § 828.11 In...

  20. 30 CFR 828.11 - In situ processing: Performance standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01...2010-07-01 false In situ processing: Performance standards...11 Section 828.11 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF...PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-IN SITU PROCESSING § 828.11 In...

  1. 30 CFR 828.11 - In situ processing: Performance standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01...2013-07-01 false In situ processing: Performance standards...11 Section 828.11 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF...PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-IN SITU PROCESSING § 828.11 In...

  2. In-Situ Characterization of Underwater Radioactive Sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, A.P.; Clapham, M.J.; Swinson, B.

    2008-07-01

    A fundamental requirement underpinning safe clean-up technologies for legacy spent nuclear fuel (SNF) ponds, pools and wet silos is the ability to characterize the radioactive waste form prior to retrieval. The corrosion products resulting from the long term underwater storage of spent nuclear fuel, reactor components and reprocessing debris present a major hazard to facility decontamination and decommissioning in terms of their radioactive content and physical / chemical reactivity. The ability to perform in-situ underwater non-destructive characterization of sludge and debris in a safe and cost-effective manner offers significant benefits over traditional destructive sampling methods. Several techniques are available for underwater measurements including (i) Gross gamma counting, (ii) Low-, Medium- and High- Resolution Gamma Spectroscopy, (iii) Passive neutron counting and (iv) Active Neutron Interrogation. The optimum technique depends on (i) the radioactive inventory (ii) mechanical access restrictions for deployment of the detection equipment, interrogation sources etc. (iii) the integrity of plant records and (iv) the extent to which Acceptable Knowledge which may be used for 'fingerprinting' the radioactive contents to a marker nuclide. Prior deployments of underwater SNF characterization equipment around the world have been reviewed with respect to recent developments in gamma and neutron detection technologies, digital electronics advancements, data transfer techniques, remote operation capabilities and improved field ruggedization. Modeling and experimental work has been performed to determine the capabilities, performance envelope and operational limitations of the future generation of non-destructive underwater sludge characterization techniques. Recommendations are given on the optimal design of systems and procedures to provide an acceptable level of confidence in the characterization of residual sludge content of legacy wet storage facilities such that retrieval and repackaging of SNF sludges may proceed safely and efficiently with support of the regulators and the public. (author)

  3. Coordinated in Situ Analyses of Organic Nanoglobules in the Sutter's Mill Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Clemett, S. J.; Nguyen, A. N.; Gibson, E. K.

    2013-01-01

    The Sutter's Mill meteorite is a newly fallen carbonaceous chondrite that was collected and curated quickly after its fall. Preliminary petrographic and isotopic investigations suggest affinities to the CM2 carbonaceous chondrites. The primitive nature of this meteorite and its rapid recovery provide an opportunity to investigate primordial solar system organic matter in a unique new sample. Here we report in-situ analyses of organic nanoglobules in the Sutter's Mill meteorite using UV fluorescence imaging, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), NanoSIMS, and ultrafast two-step laser mass spectrometry (ultra-L2MS).

  4. In-situ droplet monitoring for self-tuning spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Montaser, Akbar (Potomac, MD); Jorabchi, Kaveh (Arlington, VA); Kahen, Kaveh (Kleinburg, CA)

    2010-09-28

    A laser scattering based imaging technique is utilized in order to visualize the aerosol droplets in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) torch from an aerosol source to the site of analytical measurements. The resulting snapshots provide key information about the spatial distribution of the aerosol introduced by direct and indirect injection devices: 1) a direct injection high efficiency nebulizer (DIHEN); 2) a large-bore DIHEN (LB-DIHEN); and 3) a PFA microflow nebulizer with a PFA Scott-type spray chamber. Moreover, particle image velocimetry (PIV) is used to study the in-situ behavior of the aerosol before interaction with, for example, plasma, while the individual surviving droplets are explored by particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). Further, the velocity distribution of the surviving droplets demonstrates the importance of the initial droplet velocities in complete desolvation of the aerosol for optimum analytical performance in ICP spectrometries. These new observations are important in the design of the next-generation direct injection devices for lower sample consumption, higher sensitivity, lower noise levels, suppressed matrix effects, and for developing smart spectrometers. For example, a controller can be provided to control the output of the aerosol source by controlling the configuration of the source or the gas flow rate via feedback information concerning the aerosol.

  5. Brazilian laterite dynamics using in situ-produced 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braucher, R.; Bourlès, D. L.; Colin, F.; Brown, E. T.; Boulangé, B.

    1998-11-01

    Concentrations of in situ-produced cosmogenic 10Be ( T1/2=1.5 Myr) were measured using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in quartz samples from three Brazilian lateritic systems in order to characterize and quantify processes involved in their development. Results from a bedrock-embedded quartz vein outcropping at Gentio do Ouro lead to a calculated mean erosion rate of 2.5 m Myr -1 for a muon participation to the total 10Be production set at 1.5%. At Itaberaba, the 10Be content of the surficial sample yields a mean erosion rate of 9.0±0.5 m Myr -1. In addition, the systematic increase in 10Be concentrations of `stone-line' quartz with distance from the quartz vein strongly suggests an autochthonous development. The data constrain a model of `stone-line' emplacement and imply a rate of lateral displacement on the order of 70 m Myr -1. By contrast, the constant 10Be concentration measured within the rounded quartz cobbles all along the Cuiaba `stone-line' suggests that it most likely results from almost contemporaneous rapid events that occurred at least 500 Kyr ago. The proposed scenario involves sheet washing at the surface of the lateritic paleolandscape leading to surficial dispersion of allochthonous quartz cobbles immediately followed by colluvial deposition of weathered lateritic material.

  6. Quantitative in situ nanoindentation of aluminum films

    SciTech Connect

    Minor, Andrew M.; Stach, Eric A.; Morris Jr., J.W.

    2001-04-04

    We report the development of a method for quantitative, in situ nanoindentation in an electron microscope and its application to study the onset of deformation during the nanoindentation of aluminum films. The load-displacement curve developed during in situ nanoindentation shows the characteristic ''staircase'' instability at the onset of plastic deformation. The instability corresponds to the first appearance of dislocations in previously defect-free grains, and occurs at a force near that measured in conventional nanoindentation experiments on similarly oriented Al grains. Plastic deformation proceeds through the formation and propagation of prismatic loops punched into the material, and half-loops that emanate from the sample surface. This new experimental technique permits the direct observation of the microstructural mechanisms that operate at the onset of deformation.

  7. Laser in situ monitoring of combustion processes.

    PubMed

    Arnold, A; Becker, H; Hemberger, R; Hentschel, W; Ketterle, W; Kollner, M; Meienburg, W; Monkhouse, P; Neckel, H; Schafer, M; Schindler, K P; Sick, V; Suntz, R; Wolfrum, J

    1990-11-20

    Several examples of laser in situ monitoring of combustion processes are presented. Using a frequency modulated (13)CO(2) waveguide laser, in situ concentrations of NH(3) down to 1 ppm were measured at temperatures up to 600 degrees C in waste incinerators and power or chemical plants. Following ignition of CH(3)OH-O(2) mixtures by a TEA CO(2) laser, gas temperature profiles were measured using rapid scanning tunable diode laser spectroscopy of CO molecules. In laminar CH(4)-air counterflow diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure absolute concentrations, temperatures, and collisional lifetimes of OH radicals were determined by 2-D and picosecond LIF and absorption spectroscopy. Two-dimensional LIF and Mie scattering were used to observe fuel injection and combustion in a diesel engine. PMID:20577480

  8. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery

    DOEpatents

    Krumhansl, James L; Brady, Patrick V

    2014-04-29

    An in situ recovery of uranium operation involves circulating reactive fluids through an underground uranium deposit. These fluids contain chemicals that dissolve the uranium ore. Uranium is recovered from the fluids after they are pumped back to the surface. Chemicals used to accomplish this include complexing agents that are organic, readily degradable, and/or have a predictable lifetime in an aquifer. Efficiency is increased through development of organic agents targeted to complexing tetravalent uranium rather than hexavalent uranium. The operation provides for in situ immobilization of some oxy-anion pollutants under oxidizing conditions as well as reducing conditions. The operation also artificially reestablishes reducing conditions on the aquifer after uranium recovery is completed. With the ability to have the impacted aquifer reliably remediated, the uranium recovery operation can be considered inherently safe.

  9. In situ remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, B.P.; Marozas, D.C.

    1997-02-01

    In an effort to develop cost-efficient techniques for remediating uranium contaminated groundwater at DOE Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites nationwide, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) deployed a pilot scale research project at an UMTRA site in Durango, CO. Implementation included design, construction, and subsequent monitoring of an in situ passive reactive barrier to remove Uranium from the tailings pile effluent. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by emplacing a reactant material (in this experiment various forms of metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. Conceptually the iron media reduces and/or adsorbs uranium in situ to acceptable regulatory levels. In addition, other metals such as Se, Mo, and As have been removed by the reductive/adsorptive process. The primary objective of the experiment was to eliminate the need for surface treatment of tailing pile effluent. Experimental design, and laboratory and field results are discussed with regard to other potential contaminated groundwater treatment applications.

  10. In situ remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, B.P.; Marozas, D.C.

    1997-12-31

    In an effort to develop cost-efficient techniques for remediating uranium contaminated groundwater at DOE Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites nationwide, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) deployed a pilot scale research project at an UMTRA site in Durango, CO. Implementation included design, construction, and subsequent monitoring of an in situ passive reactive barrier to remove Uranium from the tailings pile effluent. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by emplacing a reactant material (in this experiment - various forms of metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. Conceptually the iron media reduces and/or adsorbs uranium in situ to acceptable regulatory levels. In addition, other metals such as Se, Mo, and As have been removed by the reductive/adsorptive process. The primary objective of the experiment was to eliminate the need for surface treatment of tailing pile effluent. Experimental design, and laboratory and field preliminary results are discussed with regard to other potential contaminated groundwater treatment applications.

  11. Applications of Mass Spectrometry to Lipids and Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Harkewicz, Richard; Dennis, Edward A.

    2012-01-01

    Lipidomics, a major part of metabolomics, constitutes the detailed analysis and global characterization, both spatial and temporal, of the structure and function of lipids (the lipidome) within a living system. As with proteomics, mass spectrometry has earned a central analytical role in lipidomics, and this role will continue to grow with technological developments. Currently, there exist two mass spectrometry-based lipidomics approaches, one based on a division of lipids into categories and classes prior to analysis, the “comprehensive lipidomics analysis by separation simplification” (CLASS), and the other in which all lipid species are analyzed together without prior separation, shotgun. In exploring the lipidome of various living systems, novel lipids are being discovered, and mass spectrometry is helping characterize their chemical structure. Deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS) is being used to investigate the association of lipids and membranes with proteins and enzymes, and imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is being applied to the in situ analysis of lipids in tissues. PMID:21469951

  12. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization on Rice Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yafei; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has become one of the most important technologies applied in plant molecular cytogenetic research. FISH technique has been not only well applied in physical mapping and genomic studies, but also served as an indispensable tool in tracing the individual chromosome during cell division. This chapter provides protocols for basic FISH analysis using rice as a model, which can also be adapted to other model plant species. PMID:26659957

  13. In situ health monitoring of piezoelectric sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Scott L. (Inventor); Drouant, George J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An in situ health monitoring apparatus may include an exciter circuit that applies a pulse to a piezoelectric transducer and a data processing system that determines the piezoelectric transducer's dynamic response to the first pulse. The dynamic response can be used to evaluate the operating range, health, and as-mounted resonance frequency of the transducer, as well as the strength of a coupling between the transducer and a structure and the health of the structure.

  14. Numerical simulation of in situ bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, B.J.

    1998-12-31

    Models that couple subsurface flow and transport with microbial processes are an important tool for assessing the effectiveness of bioremediation in field applications. A numerical algorithm is described that differs from previous in situ bioremediation models in that it includes: both vadose and groundwater zones, unsteady air and water flow, limited nutrients and airborne nutrients, toxicity, cometabolic kinetics, kinetic sorption, subgridscale averaging, pore clogging and protozoan grazing.

  15. A Unique Outside Neutron and Gamma Ray Instrumentation Development Test Facility at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Parsons, A.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2010-03-01

    A unique outdoor gamma ray and neutron instrumentation development test facility has been constructed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center for evaluating in situ gamma ray and neutron instrumentation designed for future planetary missions in a controlled environment.

  16. Assessment of ambient gamma dose rate around a prospective uranium mining area of South India - A comparative study of dose by direct methods and soil radioactivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunakara, N.; Yashodhara, I.; Sudeep Kumara, K.; Tripathi, R. M.; Menon, S. N.; Kadam, S.; Chougaonkar, M. P.

    Indoor and outdoor gamma dose rates were evaluated around a prospective uranium mining region - Gogi, South India through (i) direct measurements using a GM based gamma dose survey meter, (ii) integrated measurement days using CaSO4:Dy based thermo luminescent dosimeters (TLDs), and (iii) analyses of 273 soil samples for 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K activity concentration using HPGe gamma spectrometry. The geometric mean values of indoor and outdoor gamma dose rates were 104 nGy h-1 and 97 nGy h-1, respectively with an indoor to outdoor dose ratio of 1.09. The gamma dose rates and activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K varied significantly within a small area due to the highly localized mineralization of the elements. Correlation study showed that the dose estimated from the soil radioactivity is better correlated with that measured directly using the portable survey meter, when compared to that obtained from TLDs. This study showed that in a region having localized mineralization in situ measurements using dose survey meter provide better representative values of gamma dose rates.

  17. In situ ion irradiation of zirconium carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, Christopher J.; Motta, Arthur T.; Kirk, Mark A.

    2015-11-01

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is a candidate material for use in one of the layers of TRISO coated fuel particles to be used in the Generation IV high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor, and thus it is necessary to study the effects of radiation damage on its structure. The microstructural evolution of ZrCx under irradiation was studied in situ using the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscope (IVEM) at Argonne National Laboratory. Samples of nominal stoichiometries ZrC0.8 and ZrC0.9 were irradiated in situ using 1 MeV Kr2+ ions at various irradiation temperatures (T = 20 K-1073 K). In situ experiments made it possible to continuously follow the evolution of the microstructure during irradiation using diffraction contrast imaging. Images and diffraction patterns were systematically recorded at selected dose points. After a threshold dose during irradiations conducted at room temperature and below, black-dot defects were observed which accumulated until saturation. Once created, the defect clusters did not move or get destroyed during irradiation so that at the final dose the low temperature microstructure consisted only of a saturation density of small defect clusters. No long-range migration of the visible defects or dynamic defect creation and elimination were observed during irradiation, but some coarsening of the microstructure with the formation of dislocation loops was observed at higher temperatures. The irradiated microstructure was found to be only weakly dependent on the stoichiometry.

  18. In situ denitrification in controlled landfill systems

    SciTech Connect

    Onay, T.T.; Pohland, F.G.

    1996-11-01

    The characteristics of leachate from landfill disposal sites vary according to the operational stage of the landfill. Leachates from old landfills are often rich in ammonia nitrogen due to the hydrolysis and fermentation of nitrogenous fractions of biodegradable refuse substrates. The relative concentration accumulating as stabilization progresses is also influenced by washout as leachate is collected and removed for external treatment. However, in landfills operated as bioreactors with leachate containment, collection and in situ recirculation to accelerate decomposition of readily available organic fractions of the refuse, leachate ammonia nitrogen concentrations may accumulate to much higher levels. High leachate ammonia nitrogen concentrations in landfill leachate have been reported, resulting in separate treatment challenges if direct discharge to either land or receiving waters is practiced. External treatment options for landfill leachate may involve complex physical-chemical and/or biological processes for removal of both high-strength organic and inorganic fractions, including nitrogen. Such separate leachate treatment systems are often costly and difficult to control on a continuum. Therefore, this study focused on the investigation of landfill ammonia nitrogen generation patterns, and the potential for its in situ attenuation and conversion in landfills constructed to permit sequential nitrification and denitrification using leachate recirculation. Accordingly, the landfill is constructed and operated as a controlled bioreactor system, with opportunity to convert ammonia to nitrate by nitrification and nitrate to nitrogen gas by denitrification. The results presented in this paper focus on in situ landfill denitrification of nitrified ammonia.

  19. In Situ Measurement of Aerosol Extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, Anthony W.; Castaneda, R.; Owano, T. G.; Bear, D.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Aerosols are important contributors to the radiative forcing in the atmosphere. Much of the uncertainty in our knowledge of climate forcing is due to uncertainties in the radiative forcing due to aerosols as illustrated in the IPCC reports of the last ten years. Improved measurement of aerosol optical properties, therefore, is critical to an improved understanding of atmospheric radiative forcing. Additionally, attempts to reconcile in situ and remote measurements of aerosol radiative properties have generally not been successful. This is due in part to the fact that it has been impossible to measure aerosol extinction in situ in the past. In this presentation we introduce a new instrument that employs the techniques used in cavity ringdown spectroscopy to measure the aerosol extinction and scattering coefficients in situ. A prototype instrument has been designed and tested in the lab and the field. It is capable of measuring aerosol extinction coefficient to 2x10(exp -6) per meter. This prototype instrument is described and results are presented.

  20. Analytical chemistry and the cone penetrometer : in situ chemical characterization of the subsurface.

    SciTech Connect

    Aldstadt, J. H.; Martin, A. F.; Environmental Research

    1997-01-01

    The development of novel microanalytical techniques for in situ chemical characterization of the terrestrial subsurface environment has grown significantly over the last decade, particularly those instruments that are interfaced to the cone penetrometer. Cone penetrometer testing (CPT) has emerged as an effective means to introduce samplers and probes for in situ analysis of contaminants in soil and groundwater matrices. A variety of in situ chemical samplers for CPT have been developed that can be driven into the subsurface to collect soil gas, groundwater, or soil samples at depth, thus providing a means of determining the vertical and horizontal extent of contamination. Cone penetrometer testing is also being explored as a means to deliver in situ subsurface sensor probes, including probes based on laser-induced fluorescence, Raman, and infrared spectroscopies for organics; on laser-induced breakdown and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopies for heavy metals; and on passive gamma-ray spectroscopy for radionuclides. The range of analytical technologies used in CPT for the determination of organic and inorganic species in the subsurface is described.

  1. In-situ thermal testing program strategy

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    In the past year the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project has implemented a new Program Approach to the licensing process. The Program Approach suggests a step-wise approach to licensing in which the early phases will require less site information than previously planned and necessitate a lesser degree of confidence in the longer-term performance of the repository. Under the Program Approach, the thermal test program is divided into two principal phases: (1) short-term in situ tests (in the 1996 to 2000 time period) and laboratory thermal tests to obtain preclosure information, parameters, and data along with bounding information for postclosure performance; and (2) longer-term in situ tests to obtain additional data regarding postclosure performance. This effort necessitates a rethinking of the testing program because the amount of information needed for the initial licensing phase is less than previously planned. This document proposes a revised and consolidated in situ thermal test program (including supporting laboratory tests) that is structured to meet the needs of the Program Approach. A customer-supplier model is used to define the Project data needs. These data needs, along with other requirements, were then used to define a set of conceptual experiments that will provide the required data within the constraints of the Program Approach schedule. The conceptual thermal tests presented in this document represent a consolidation and update of previously defined tests that should result in a more efficient use of Project resources. This document focuses on defining the requirements and tests needed to satisfy the goal of a successful license application in 2001, should the site be found suitable.

  2. Spatially controlled, in situ synthesis of polymers

    DOEpatents

    Caneba, Gerard T.; Tirumala, Vijaya Raghavan; Mancini, Derrick C.; Wang, Hsien-Hau

    2005-03-22

    An in situ polymer microstructure formation method. The monomer mixture is polymerized in a solvent/precipitant through exposure to ionizing radiation in the absence any chemical mediators. If an exposure mask is employed to block out certain regions of the radiation cross section, then a patterned microstructure is formed. The polymerization mechanism is based on the so-called free-radical retrograde-precipitation polymerization process, in which polymerization occurs while the system is phase separating above the lower critical solution temperature. This method was extended to produce a crosslinked line grid-pattern of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide), which has been known to have thermoreversible properties.

  3. In-Situ Wire Damage Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Roberson, Luke B. (Inventor); Tate, Lanetra C. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor); Gibson, Tracy L. (Inventor); Jolley, Scott T. (Inventor); Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An in-situ system for detecting damage in an electrically conductive wire. The system includes a substrate at least partially covered by a layer of electrically conductive material forming a continuous or non-continuous electrically conductive layer connected to an electrical signal generator adapted to delivering electrical signals to the electrically conductive layer. Data is received and processed to identify damage to the substrate or electrically conductive layer. The electrically conductive material may include metalized carbon fibers, a thin metal coating, a conductive polymer, carbon nanotubes, metal nanoparticles or a combination thereof.

  4. Alternative Surfactants for Improved Efficiency of In Situ Tryptic Proteolysis of Fingermarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ekta; Clench, Malcolm R.; West, Andy; Marshall, Peter S.; Marshall, Nathan; Francese, Simona

    2015-06-01

    Despite recent improvements to in situ proteolysis strategies, a higher efficiency is still needed to increase both the number of peptides detected and the associated ion intensity, leading to a complete and reliable set of biomarkers for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. In the study presented here, an extract of a systematic study is illustrated investigating a range of surfactants assisting trypsin proteolytic activity. Method development was trialled on fingermarks; this specimen results from a transfer of sweat from an individual's fingertip to a surface upon contact. As sweat carries a plethora of biomolecules, including peptides and proteins, fingermarks are, potentially, a very valuable specimen for non-invasive prognostic or diagnostic screening. A recent study has demonstrated the opportunity to quickly detect peptides and small proteins in fingermarks using Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry Profiling (MALDI MSP). However, intact detection bears low sensitivity and does not allow species identification; therefore, a shotgun proteomic approach was employed involving in situ proteolysis. Data demonstrate that in fingermarks, further improvements to the existing method can be achieved using MEGA-8 as surfactant in higher percentages as well as combinations of different detergents. Also, for the first time, Rapigest SF, normally used in solution digestions, has been shown to successfully work also for in situ proteolysis.

  5. Dereplicating and Spatial Mapping of Secondary Metabolites from Fungal Cultures in Situ

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry techniques have recently become prevalent in natural product research due to their ability to examine secondary metabolites in situ. These techniques retain invaluable spatial and temporal details that are lost through traditional extraction processes. However, most ambient ionization techniques do not collect mutually supportive data, such as chromatographic retention times and/or UV/vis spectra, and this can limit the ability to identify certain metabolites, such as differentiating isomers. To overcome this, the droplet–liquid microjunction–surface sampling probe (droplet–LMJ–SSP) was coupled with UPLC–PDA–HRMS–MS/MS, thus providing separation, retention times, MS data, and UV/vis data used in traditional dereplication protocols. By capturing these mutually supportive data, the identity of secondary metabolites can be confidently and rapidly assigned in situ. Using the droplet–LMJ–SSP, a protocol was constructed to analyze the secondary metabolite profile of fungal cultures without any sample preparation. The results demonstrate that fungal cultures can be dereplicated from the Petri dish, thus identifying secondary metabolites, including isomers, and confirming them against reference standards. Furthermore, heat maps, similar to mass spectrometry imaging, can be used to ascertain the location and relative concentration of secondary metabolites directly on the surface and/or surroundings of a fungal culture. PMID:26192135

  6. Dereplicating and Spatial Mapping of Secondary Metabolites from Fungal Cultures in Situ.

    PubMed

    Sica, Vincent P; Raja, Huzefa A; El-Elimat, Tamam; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J; Pearce, Cedric J; Oberlies, Nicholas H

    2015-08-28

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry techniques have recently become prevalent in natural product research due to their ability to examine secondary metabolites in situ. These techniques retain invaluable spatial and temporal details that are lost through traditional extraction processes. However, most ambient ionization techniques do not collect mutually supportive data, such as chromatographic retention times and/or UV/vis spectra, and this can limit the ability to identify certain metabolites, such as differentiating isomers. To overcome this, the droplet-liquid microjunction-surface sampling probe (droplet-LMJ-SSP) was coupled with UPLC-PDA-HRMS-MS/MS, thus providing separation, retention times, MS data, and UV/vis data used in traditional dereplication protocols. By capturing these mutually supportive data, the identity of secondary metabolites can be confidently and rapidly assigned in situ. Using the droplet-LMJ-SSP, a protocol was constructed to analyze the secondary metabolite profile of fungal cultures without any sample preparation. The results demonstrate that fungal cultures can be dereplicated from the Petri dish, thus identifying secondary metabolites, including isomers, and confirming them against reference standards. Furthermore, heat maps, similar to mass spectrometry imaging, can be used to ascertain the location and relative concentration of secondary metabolites directly on the surface and/or surroundings of a fungal culture. PMID:26192135

  7. A mass spectrometry primer for mass spectrometry imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), a rapidly growing subfield of chemical imaging, employs mass spectrometry (MS) technologies to create single- and multi-dimensional localization maps for a variety of atoms and molecules. Complimentary to other imaging approaches, MSI provides high chemical specificity and broad analyte coverage. This powerful analytical toolset is capable of measuring the distribution of many classes of inorganics, metabolites, proteins and pharmaceuticals in chemically and structurally complex biological specimens in vivo, in vitro, and in situ. The MSI approaches highlighted in this Methods in Molecular Biology volume provide flexibility of detection, characterization, and identification of multiple known and unknown analytes. The goal of this chapter is to introduce investigators who may be unfamiliar with MS to the basic principles of the mass spectrometric approaches as used in MSI. In addition to guidelines for choosing the most suitable MSI method for specific investigations, cross-references are provided to the chapters in this volume that describe the appropriate experimental protocols. PMID:20680583

  8. Partitioning tracers and in-situ fluid-saturation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J.S.

    1995-03-01

    This paper reviews applications of partitioning tracers in the petroleum industry. Partitioning between phases slows the partitioning tracers in a phenomenon known as chromatographic retardation, from which fluid saturations and surface properties can be deduced. Single-well tracer testing (SWTT) to determine residual oil saturation to waterflood, S{sub orw}, is the most common application of partitioning tracers. More than 200 tests have bene run since its invention in 1971. In addition to development of new simulators, a mass-balance method and in internally calibrated method were proposed for direct calculation of S{sub orw} from the tracer reaction rates. With the introduction of the chromatographic transformation technique, several successful interwell tests to determine residual oil saturations in watered-out and gas-saturated reservoirs have been reported. The technique involves direct comparison of the partitioning and nonpartitioning tracer profiles with no need for simulation. In a different approach, full-field simulation of a multiwell test has also been used to estimate oil saturation distribution. Other interesting applications include in-situ miscibility measurement, determining trapped gas saturation during a foam flood, relative permeability ratio measurement, and direct logging of gamma-emitting partitioning tracers through casing to determine residual oil saturation, S{sub or}, vertical distribution.

  9. Vimentin is a dominant target of in situ humoral immunity in human lupus tubulointerstitial nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Kinloch, Andrew J; Chang, Anthony; Ko, Kichul; Dunand, Carole J Henry; Henderson, Scott; Maienschein-Cleine, Mark; Kaverina, Natalya; Rovin, Brad; Ferrer, Marlene Salgado; Wolfgeher, Don; Liarski, Vladimir; Haddon, D James; Utz, Paul J; Wilson, Patrick C; Clark, Marcus R

    2014-01-01

    Objective In lupus nephritis (LuN), severe tubulointerstitial inflammation (TII) predicts progression to renal failure. Severe TII is associated with tertiary lymphoid neogenesis and in situ antigen-driven clonal B cell selection. The autoantigen(s) driving in situ B-cell selection in TII are not known. This study aimed to identify the dominant driving autoantigen(s). Methods Single CD38+ or Ki-67+ B cells were laser captured from seven LuN diagnostic biopsies. Eighteen clonally expanded immunoglobulin heavy and light chain variable region pairs were cloned and expressed as monoclonal antibodies. Seven more antibodies were cloned from flow sorted CD38+ cells from an eighth biopsy. Antigen characterization was performed using a combination of confocal microscopy, ELISA, screening protoarrays, immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. Serum IgG titers to the dominant antigen were determined in 48 LuN and 35 non-nephritic lupus samples using purified antigen-coated arrays. Autoantigen expression was localized by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence on normal and LuN kidney. Results Eleven of 25 antibodies reacted with cytoplasmic structures, four reacted with nuclei, and none with dsDNA. Vimentin was the only autoantigen identified by both mass spectrometry and by protoarray. Ten of the 11 anti-cytoplasmic TII antibodies directly bound vimentin. Vimentin was highly expressed by tubulointerstitial inflammatory cells, and tested TII antibodies preferentially bound inflamed tubulointerstitium. Finally, high-titers of serum anti-vimentin antibodies were associated with severe TII (p = 0.0001). Conclusion Vimentin, an antigenic feature of inflammation, is a dominant autoantigen targeted in situ in LuN TII. This adaptive autoimmune response likely feeds forward to worsen TII and renal damage. PMID:25306868

  10. In situ PEM fuel cell water measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, Rodney L; Mukundan, Rangachary; Davey, John R; Spendelow, Jacob S; Hussey, Daniel S; Jacobson, David L; Arif, Muhammad

    2009-01-01

    Efficient PEM (Polymer Electrolyte Membrane) fuel cell performance requires effective water management. To achieve a deeper understanding of water transport and performance issues associated with water management, we have conducted in situ water examinations to help understand the effects of components and operations. High Frequency Resistance (HFR), AC Impedance and Neutron imaging were used to measure water content in operating fuel cells, with various conditions, including current density, relative humidity, inlet flows, flow orientation and variable Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) properties. High resolution neutron radiography was used to image fuel cells during a variety of conditions. The effect of specific operating conditions, including flow direction (co-flow or counter-flow) was examined. Counter-flow operation was found to result in higher water content than co-flow operation, which correlates to lower membrane resistivity. A variety of cells were used to quantify the membrane water in situ during exposure to saturated gases, during fuel cell operation, and during hydrogen pump operation. The quantitative results show lower membrane water content than previous results suggested.

  11. In situ biodegradation of creosote contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, M.D.; Maier, W.J.

    1996-11-01

    The Reilly Tar and Chemical operated a coal tar and wood processing plant on a 80 acre site from 1917 until plant closure in 1972. Reilly disposed of wastewater from the operation in a network of ditches which discharged into a swampy area south of the Reilly site. The contamination from these sources has migrated downward into the groundwater, contaminating the shallow aquifer underlying the site. Through multi-aquifer wells the contamination has entered deeper aquifers including the Prairie Duchien-Jordan aquifer. Ongoing pump and treat operations are not viewed as ecologically or economically sound long-term solutions. All parties agreed that programs to eliminate polluting materials at the source to speed the cleanup process and minimize the potential leakage of the pollutants into interconnected aquifers is desirable. In this connection, a study was completed to examine whether source materials can be eliminated by on site and/or in situ bioremediation. In order to engineer a bioremediation strategy which optimizes degradation rates it is extremely important to determine the rate limiting steps in the treatment process. The results of this study show that if sufficient oxygen can be provided, in situ bioremediation could be effective at reducing or eliminating offsite pollutant migration and effectively remove the sources of the groundwater contamination.

  12. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery.

    SciTech Connect

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Beauheim, Richard Louis; Brady, Patrick Vane; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2009-05-01

    Expansion of uranium mining in the United States is a concern to some environmental groups and sovereign Native American Nations. An approach which may alleviate some problems is to develop inherently safe in situ uranium recovery ('ISR') technologies. Current ISR technology relies on chemical extraction of trace levels of uranium from aquifers that, once mined, can still contain dissolved uranium and other trace metals that are a health concern. Existing ISR operations are few in number; however, high uranium prices are driving the industry to consider expanding operations nation-wide. Environmental concerns and enforcement of the new 30 ppb uranium drinking water standard may make opening new mining operations more difficult and costly. Here we propose a technological fix: the development of inherently safe in situ recovery (ISISR) methods. The four central features of an ISISR approach are: (1) New 'green' leachants that break down predictably in the subsurface, leaving uranium, and associated trace metals, in an immobile form; (2) Post-leachant uranium/metals-immobilizing washes that provide a backup decontamination process; (3) An optimized well-field design that increases uranium recovery efficiency and minimizes excursions of contaminated water; and (4) A combined hydrologic/geochemical protocol for designing low-cost post-extraction long-term monitoring. ISISR would bring larger amounts of uranium to the surface, leave fewer toxic metals in the aquifer, and cost less to monitor safely - thus providing a 'win-win-win' solution to all stakeholders.

  13. In situ nanocompression testing of irradiated copper.

    PubMed

    Kiener, D; Hosemann, P; Maloy, S A; Minor, A M

    2011-08-01

    Increasing demand for energy and reduction of carbon dioxide emissions has revived interest in nuclear energy. Designing materials for radiation environments necessitates a fundamental understanding of how radiation-induced defects alter mechanical properties. Ion beams create radiation damage efficiently without material activation, but their limited penetration depth requires small-scale testing. However, strength measurements of nanoscale irradiated specimens have not been previously performed. Here we show that yield strengths approaching macroscopic values are measured from irradiated ~400 nm-diameter copper specimens. Quantitative in situ nanocompression testing in a transmission electron microscope reveals that the strength of larger samples is controlled by dislocation-irradiation defect interactions, yielding size-independent strengths. Below ~400 nm, size-dependent strength results from dislocation source limitation. This transition length-scale should be universal, but depends on material and irradiation conditions. We conclude that for irradiated copper, and presumably related materials, nanoscale in situ testing can determine bulk-like yield strengths and simultaneously identify deformation mechanisms. PMID:21706011

  14. Molecular cytogenetics using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.W.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Lucas, J.; Pinkel, D.; Weier, H-U.; Yu, Loh-Chung.

    1990-12-07

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome-specific probes enables several new areas of cytogenetic investigation by allowing visual determination of the presence and normality of specific genetic sequences in single metaphase or interphase cells. in this approach, termed molecular cytogenetics, the genetic loci to be analyzed are made microscopically visible in single cells using in situ hybridization with nucleic acid probes specific to these loci. To accomplish this, the DNA in the target cells is made single stranded by thermal denaturation and incubated with single-stranded, chemically modified probe under conditions where the probe will anneal only with DNA sequences to which it has high DNA sequence homology. The bound probe is then made visible by treatment with a fluorescent reagent such as fluorescein that binds to the chemical modification carried by the probe. The DNA to which the probe does not bind is made visible by staining with a dye such as propidium iodide that fluoresces at a wavelength different from that of the reagent used for probe visualization. We show in this report that probes are now available that make this technique useful for biological dosimetry, prenatal diagnosis and cancer biology. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Speckle interferometry in situ: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchini, Massimo

    1998-06-01

    Speckle interferometry has been successfully used in many cases where a non-contact analysis of a surface's deformation state was required. This technique has been mostly applied in favorable environment, where the absence of vibrations and a reduced ambient illumination could be assured, and for the observation of areas being not in excess of some dm2. When inspecting larger surfaces, all the problems related to the spatial resolution, to the limited sensitivity of the acquisition system, to the amount of illumination and to the extension of the observed area, should be taken into account. If the observed surface belongs to a structure directly positioned in-situ, problems of vibration, air turbulence, or ambient light saturation, become very restrictive for the application of the method. After a brief introduction about the theoretical principles of speckle interferometry, some main problems related to the inspection on quite large surfaces in-situ discussed. The problem is treated with the help of some simulations, possible solutions are proposed and some applications are presented. This work is the result of a joint collaboration between may institutes and research centers in the framework of a European project named VISILAS. Special fields of application foreseen for this project are civil engineering, aircraft industry, ship building and power plants for energy production.

  16. In situ SU-8 silver nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Uthuppu, Basil; Jakobsen, Mogens H

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nanocomposite materials containing metal nanoparticles are of considerable interest in photonics and optoelectronics applications. However, device fabrication of such materials always encounters the challenge of incorporation of preformed nanoparticles into photoresist materials. As a solution to this problem, an easy new method of fabricating silver nanocomposites by an in situ reduction of precursors within the epoxy-based photoresist SU-8 has been developed. AgNO3 dissolved in acetonitrile and mixed with the epoxy-based photoresist SU-8 forms silver nanoparticles primarily during the pre- and post-exposure soft bake steps at 95 °C. A further high-temperature treatment at 300 °C resulted in the formation of densely homogeneously distributed silver nanoparticles in the photoresist matrix. No particle growth or agglomeration of nanoparticles is observed at this point. The reported new in situ silver nanocomposite materials can be spin coated as homogeneous thin films and structured by using UV lithography. A resolution of 5 µm is achieved in the lithographic process. The UV exposure time is found to be independent of the nanoparticle concentration. The fabricated silver nanocomposites exhibit high plasmonic responses suitable for the development of new optoelectronic and optical sensing devices. PMID:26425416

  17. GAS TURBINE REHEAT USING IN SITU COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. Bachovchin; T.E. Lippert; R.A. Newby P.G.A. Cizmas

    2004-05-17

    In situ reheat is an alternative to traditional gas turbine reheat design in which fuel is fed through airfoils rather than in a bulky discrete combustor separating HP and LP turbines. The goals are to achieve increased power output and/or efficiency without higher emissions. In this program the scientific basis for achieving burnout with low emissions has been explored. In Task 1, Blade Path Aerodynamics, design options were evaluated using CFD in terms of burnout, increase of power output, and possible hot streaking. It was concluded that Vane 1 injection in a conventional 4-stage turbine was preferred. Vane 2 injection after vane 1 injection was possible, but of marginal benefit. In Task 2, Combustion and Emissions, detailed chemical kinetics modeling, validated by Task 3, Sub-Scale Testing, experiments, resulted in the same conclusions, with the added conclusion that some increase in emissions was expected. In Task 4, Conceptual Design and Development Plan, Siemens Westinghouse power cycle analysis software was used to evaluate alternative in situ reheat design options. Only single stage reheat, via vane 1, was found to have merit, consistent with prior Tasks. Unifying the results of all the tasks, a conceptual design for single stage reheat utilizing 24 holes, 1.8 mm diameter, at the trailing edge of vane 1 is presented. A development plan is presented.

  18. Biophotonic in situ sensor for plant leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Conejo, Elian; Frangi, Jean-Pierre; Rosny, Gilles de

    2010-04-01

    Knowledge of the water concentration of plants can be helpful in several environmental and agricultural domains. There are many methods for the determination of water content in plant leaves; however, most of them give a relative moisture level or an analytical measure after a previous calibration procedure. Even for other biochemical compounds such as dry matter or chlorophyll, the measurement techniques could be destructive. For this reason, a nondestructive method has been developed to measure the biochemical compounds of a plant leaf, using an infrared spectroscopy technique. One important advantage is the simplicity of the device (RAdiometre portatif de Mesure In Situ, RAMIS) and its capability to perform measurements in situ. The prototype is a leaf-clip configuration and is made of LEDs at five wavelengths (656, 721, 843, 937, and 1550 nm), and a silicon/germanium photosensor. To compute the water content of vegetative leaves, the radiative transfer model PROSPECT was implemented. This model can accurately predict spectral transmittances in the 400 nm to 2500 nm spectral region as a function of the principal leaf biochemical contents: water, dry matter, and chlorophyll. Using the transmittance measured by RAMIS into an inversion procedure of PROSPECT: A Model of Leaf Optical Properties Spectra, we are able to compute the values of water contents that show an agreement with the water contents measured directly using dry weight procedures. This method is presented as a possibility to estimate other leaf biochemical compounds using appropriate wavelengths.

  19. In situ bioremediation under high saline conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bosshard, B.; Raumin, J.; Saurohan, B.

    1995-12-31

    An in situ bioremediation treatability study is in progress at the Salton Sea Test Base (SSTB) under the NAVY CLEAN 2 contract. The site is located in the vicinity of the Salon Sea with expected groundwater saline levels of up to 50,000 ppm. The site is contaminated with diesel, gasoline and fuel oils. The treatability study is assessing the use of indigenous heterotrophic bacteria to remediate petroleum hydrocarbons. Low levels of significant macro nutrients indicate that nutrient addition of metabolic nitrogen and Orthophosphate are necessary to promote the process, requiring unique nutrient addition schemes. Groundwater major ion chemistry indicates that precipitation of calcium phosphorus compounds may be stimulated by air-sparging operations and nutrient addition, which has mandated the remedial system to include pneumatic fracturing as an option. This presentation is tailored at an introductory level to in situ bioremediation technologies, with some emphasize on innovations in sparge air delivery, dissolved oxygen uptake rates, nutrient delivery, and pneumatic fracturing that should keep the expert`s interest.

  20. In Situ Instruments: Overview of In Situ Instruments for Deployment in Extreme Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, M.; Cardell, G.

    2000-01-01

    This presentation reviews the design and specifications for several instruments for deployment in extreme environments. The instruments are: (1) In Situ Geochronology Instrument, (2) Laser Ablation Sampling Instrument, (3) Micro Hygrometer (4) Micro Lidar, (5) Atmospheric Electron X-Ray Spectrometer and (6) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometer. Included in the descriptions are the contact people and the objective of each instrument.

  1. Development of the Potassium-Argon Laser Experiment (KArLE) Instrument for In Situ Geochronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Barbara A.; Li, Z.-H.; Miller, J. S.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Clegg, S. M.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Swindle, T. D.; Wiens, R. C.

    2012-01-01

    Absolute dating of planetary samples is an essential tool to establish the chronology of geological events, including crystallization history, magmatic evolution, and alteration. Traditionally, geochronology has only been accomplishable on samples from dedicated sample return missions or meteorites. The capability for in situ geochronology is highly desired, because it will allow one-way planetary missions to perform dating of large numbers of samples. The success of an in situ geochronology package will not only yield data on absolute ages, but can also complement sample return missions by identifying the most interesting rocks to cache and/or return to Earth. In situ dating instruments have been proposed, but none have yet reached TRL 6 because the required high-resolution isotopic measurements are very challenging. Our team is now addressing this challenge by developing the Potassium (K) - Argon Laser Experiment (KArLE) under the NASA Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program (PIDDP), building on previous work to develop a K-Ar in situ instrument [1]. KArLE uses a combination of several flight-proven components that enable accurate K-Ar isochron dating of planetary rocks. KArLE will ablate a rock sample, determine the K in the plasma state using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), measure the liberated Ar using quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS), and relate the two by the volume of the ablated pit using an optical method such as a vertical scanning interferometer (VSI). Our preliminary work indicates that the KArLE instrument will be capable of determining the age of several kinds of planetary samples to +/-100 Myr, sufficient to address a wide range of geochronology problems in planetary science.

  2. In situ search for organics by gas chromatography analysis: new derivatization / thermochemolysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geffroy, Claude; Buch, Arnaud; David, Marc; Aissat, Lyes; El Mufleh, Amel; Papot, S.; Sternberg, Robert

    Many organic molecules are present in interstellar clouds and might be carried to the early Earth by comets and meteorites during the heavy bombardment phase in the first few hundred million years of the solar system. It has been suggested that extraterrestrial organic material may well represent an important part of the organic material available for the origin of life. Until samples, brought by future space missions, are available on Earth, in situ measurements are one of the way to get unaltered and non-contaminated samples for analysis. The analytical technique has to be robust, sensitive and non-specific due to the large scope of targets molecules. The only currently flight qualified technique of analysis of organic molecules in space is gas chromatography (Viking, Cassini-Huygens, SAM-MSL, COSAC-Rosetta). The main objective of this work is to present a new approach with multi step analysis using derivatisation and thermochemolysis reagents for a one pot in situ analysis of volatile and refractory organics in surface or sub-surface samples (Mars, comets).Indeed, no single technology enables to identify all organic compounds because naturally occurring molecules have different polarities, molecular weights, being extractible or recalcitrant, bonded trapped or adsorbed on minerals. Thus, we propose to wider the scope of chemical reagent already validated for in situ wet chemistry such as MTBSTFA (Rodier et al. 2001, 2002), DMF-DMA (Rodier et al. 2002), or TMAH (Rodier et al, 2005, Geffroy-Rodier et al; 2009) to analyze enantiomers of amino acids, carbohydrates and lipids in a one pot several steps sub system using a multi reagent and multi step approach. Thus using a new derivatizing agent, we successfully identified twenty one amino acids including twelve of the twenty proteinic amino acids without inhibiting following multi step thermochemolysis. *Geffroy-Rodier C, Grasset L, Sternberg R. Buch A. Amblès A. (2009) Thermochemolysis in search for organics in extraterrestrial environments, Journal of Applied Pyrolysis 85: 454-459. *Rodier C, Sternberg R, Raulin F, Vidal-Madjar C (2001). In situ detection of organic molecules in extraterrestrial environment by gas chromatography / mass spectrometry. Journal of Chromatography A 915: 199-207. *Rodier C, Laurent C, Szopa C. Sternberg R, Raulin F (2002) Chirality and the origin of life: in situ enantiomeric separation for future space missions, Chirality 14: 527-532. *Rodier C. Sternberg R, Szopa C, Buch A, Cabane M and Raulin F (2005) Search for organics in extraterrestrial environments by in situ gas chromatography analysis. Advances in Space Research 36: 195-200. This work has been funded by CNES

  3. Radiological aspects of in situ uranium recovery

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN, STEVEN H.

    2007-07-01

    In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed. Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunneling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium in situ leaching in situ recovery (ISL / ISR), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and may make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since 1975. Solution mining involves the pumping of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing and complexing agents into an ore body, solubilizing the uranium in situ, and then pumping the solutions to the surface where they are fed to a processing plant. Processing involves ion exchange and may also include precipitation, drying or calcining and packaging operations depending on facility specifics. This paper presents an overview of the ISR process and the health physics monitoring programs developed at a number of commercial scale ISL / ISR Uranium recovery and production facilities as a result of the radiological character of these processes. Although many radiological aspects of the process are similar to that of conventional mills, conventional-type tailings as such are not generated. However, liquid and solid byproduct materials may be generated and impounded. The quantity and radiological character of these by products are related to facility specifics. Some special monitoring considerations are presented which are required due to the manner in which Radon gas is evolved in the process and the unique aspects of controlling solution flow patterns underground. An overview of the major aspects of the health physics and radiation protection programs that were developed at these facilities are discussed and contrasted to circumstances of the current generation and state of the art of Uranium ISR technologies and facilities. (authors)

  4. Predicting the denitrification capacity of sandy aquifers from in situ measurements using push-pull 15N tracer tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschenbach, W.; Well, R.; Walther, W.

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge about the spatial variability of in situ denitrification rates (Dr(in situ)) and their relation to the denitrification capacity in nitrate-contaminated aquifers is crucial to predict the development of groundwater quality. Therefore, 28 push-pull 15N tracer tests for the measurement of in situ denitrification rates were conducted in two sandy Pleistocene aquifers in northern Germany. The 15N analysis of denitrification-derived 15N-labelled N2 and N2O dissolved in water samples collected during the push-pull 15N tracer tests was performed using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) in the lab and additionally for some tracer tests online in the field with a quadrupole membrane inlet mass spectrometer (MIMS) in order to test the feasibility of on-site real-time 15N analysis. Aquifer material from the same locations and depths as the push-pull injection points was incubated, and the initial and cumulative denitrification after 1 year of incubation (Dcum(365)) as well as the stock of reduced compounds (SRC) was compared with in situ measurements of denitrification. This was done to derive transfer functions suitable to predict Dcum(365) and SRC from Dr(in situ). Dr(in situ) ranged from 0 to 51.5 ?g N kg-1 d-1. Denitrification rates derived from on-site isotope analysis using MIMS satisfactorily coincided with laboratory analysis by conventional IRMS, thus proving the feasibility of in situ analysis. Dr(in situ) was significantly higher in the sulfidic zone of both aquifers compared to the zone of non-sulfidic aquifer material. Overall, regressions between the Dcum(365) and SRC of the tested aquifer material with Dr(in situ) exhibited only a modest linear correlation for the full data set. However, the predictability of Dcum(365) and SRC from Dr(in situ) data clearly increased for aquifer samples from the zone of NO3--bearing groundwater. In the NO3--free aquifer zone, a lag phase of denitrification after NO3- injections was observed, which confounded the relationship between reactive compounds and in situ denitrification activity. This finding was attributed to adaptation processes in the microbial community after NO3- injections. It was also demonstrated that the microbial community in the NO3--free zone just below the NO3--bearing zone can be adapted to denitrification by NO3- injections into wells for an extended period. In situ denitrification rates were 30 to 65 times higher after pre-conditioning with NO3-. Results from this study suggest that such pre-conditioning is crucial for the measurement of Dr(in situ) in deeper aquifer material from the NO3--free groundwater zone and thus for the prediction of Dcum(365) and SRC from Dr(in situ).

  5. Learning Geoscience Categories In Situ: Implications for Geographic Knowledge Representation

    E-print Network

    Klippel, Alexander

    1 Learning Geoscience Categories In Situ: Implications for Geographic Knowledge Representation are often the originators or arbitrators of categories used in the production of maps. In the geosciences

  6. High resolution in situ ultrasonic corrosion monitor

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Robert J. (Schenectady, NY)

    1985-01-01

    An ultrasonic corrosion monitor is provided which produces an in situ measurement of the amount of corrosion of a monitoring zone or zones of an elongate probe placed in the corrosive environment. A monitoring zone is preferably formed between the end of the probe and the junction of the zone with a lead-in portion of the probe. Ultrasonic pulses are applied to the probe and a determination made of the time interval between pulses reflected from the end of the probe and the junction referred to, both when the probe is uncorroded and while it is corroding. Corresponding electrical signals are produced and a value for the normalized transit time delay derived from these time interval measurements is used to calculate the amount of corrosion.

  7. High resolution in situ ultrasonic corrosion monitor

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, R.J.

    1984-01-10

    An ultrasonic corrosion monitor is provided which produces an in situ measurement of the amount of corrosion of a monitoring zone or zones of an elongate probe placed in the corrosive environment. A monitoring zone is preferably formed between the end of the probe and the junction of the zone with a lead-in portion of the probe. Ultrasonic pulses are applied to the probe and a determination made of the time interval between pulses reflected from the end of the probe and the junction referred to, both when the probe is uncorroded and while it is corroding. Corresponding electrical signals are produced and a value for the normalized transit time delay derived from these time interval measurements is used to calculate the amount of corrosion.

  8. Recent advances in in situ vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, W.F.; Luey, Ja-Kael

    1992-05-01

    In Situ Vitrification (ISV) is an innovative mobile remediation technology for soils and other underground contamination: Developed by the US Department of Energy`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), ISV has advanced during the past decade from a laboratory concept to a remediation technology commercially available for contaminated soils. ISV technology is currently being developed for remediation of DOE waste sites at Hanford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Idaho National Laboratory (INEL), and other sites. The incentives for application of ISV can convert contaminated sites to a solid, highly durable block similar to naturally occurring obsidian. The ISV product has been shown capable of passing US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) tests such as the Toxic Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP). Retrieval, handling and transport of untreated hazardous material would normally not be required after application of ISV. Therefore, costs, exposure to personnel, risk of releases to the environment, and generation of secondary wastes are greatly reduced compared with remove-and-treat technologies.

  9. Recent advances in in situ vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, W.F.; Luey, Ja-Kael.

    1992-05-01

    In Situ Vitrification (ISV) is an innovative mobile remediation technology for soils and other underground contamination: Developed by the US Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), ISV has advanced during the past decade from a laboratory concept to a remediation technology commercially available for contaminated soils. ISV technology is currently being developed for remediation of DOE waste sites at Hanford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Idaho National Laboratory (INEL), and other sites. The incentives for application of ISV can convert contaminated sites to a solid, highly durable block similar to naturally occurring obsidian. The ISV product has been shown capable of passing US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) tests such as the Toxic Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP). Retrieval, handling and transport of untreated hazardous material would normally not be required after application of ISV. Therefore, costs, exposure to personnel, risk of releases to the environment, and generation of secondary wastes are greatly reduced compared with remove-and-treat technologies.

  10. Mars in Situ Resource Utilization Technology Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.; Santago-Maldonado, Edgardo

    2012-01-01

    We have examined the technologies required to enable Mars In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) because our understanding of Mars resources has changed significantly in the last five years as a result of recent robotic missions to the red planet. Two major developments, (1) confirmation of the presence of near-surface water in the form of ice in very large amounts at high latitudes by the Phoenix Lander and (2) the likely existence of water at lower latitudes in the form of hydrates or ice in the top one meter of the regolith, have the potential to change ISRU technology selection. A brief technology assessment was performed for the most promising Mars atmospheric gas processing techniques: Reverse Water Gas Shift (RWGS) and Methanation (aka Sabatier), as well as an overview of soil processing technology to extract water from Martian soil.

  11. In-situ continuous water monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1998-03-31

    An in-situ continuous liquid monitoring system for continuously analyzing volatile components contained in a water source comprises: a carrier gas supply, an extraction container and a mass spectrometer. The carrier gas supply continuously supplies the carrier gas to the extraction container and is mixed with a water sample that is continuously drawn into the extraction container by the flow of carrier gas into the liquid directing device. The carrier gas continuously extracts the volatile components out of the water sample. The water sample is returned to the water source after the volatile components are extracted from it. The extracted volatile components and the carrier gas are delivered continuously to the mass spectrometer and the volatile components are continuously analyzed by the mass spectrometer. 2 figs.

  12. IN SITU URANIUM STABILIZATION BY MICROBIAL METABOLITES

    SciTech Connect

    Turick, C; Anna Knox, A; Chad L Leverette,C; Yianne Kritzas, Y

    2006-11-29

    Soil contaminated with U was the focus of this study in order to develop in-situ, U bio-immobilization technology. We have demonstrated microbial production of a metal chelating biopolymer, pyomelanin, in U contaminated soil from the Tims Branch area of the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) as a result of tyrosine amendments. Bacterial densities of pyomelanin producers were >106 cells/g wet soil. Pyomelanin demonstrated U chelating and mineral binding capacities at pH 4 and 7. In laboratory studies, in the presence of goethite or illite, pyomelanin enhanced U sequestration by these minerals. Tyrosine amended soils in field tests demonstrated increased U sequestration capacity following pyomelanin production up to 13 months after tyrosine treatments.

  13. Semiconductors: In Situ Processing of Photovoltaic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.

    1998-01-01

    Current proposals for developing an extended human presence on the Moon and Mars increasingly consider the processing of nonterrestrial materials essential for keeping the Earth launch burden reasonable. Utilization of in situ resources for construction of lunar and Mars bases will initially require assessment of resource availability followed by the development of economically acceptable and technically feasible extraction processes. In regard to materials processing and fabrication, the lower gravity level on the Moon (0.125 g) and Mars (0.367 g) will dramatically change the presently accepted hierarchy of materials in terms of specific properties, a factor that must be understood and exploited. Furthermore, significant changes are expected in the behavior of liquid materials during processing. In casting, for example, mold filling and associated solidification processes have to be reevaluated. Finally, microstructural development, and therefore material properties, presently being documented through ongoing research in microgravity science and applications, need to be understood and scaled to the reduced gravity environments.

  14. In situ photoimmunotherapy for advanced cutaneous melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, Mark F.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Teague, T. Kent; Adelson, David A.; Perry, Lisa A.; Chen, Wei R.

    2008-02-01

    Currently there are no truly effective treatments for advanced melanoma (surgically unresectable stage III and IV). In situ photoimmunotherapy (ISPI) is a recently developed therapy based on physical and immunological principles that uses lasers in combination with immunostimulants to achieve clinically significant responses in advanced melanoma patients. Results from an ongoing phase I clinical trial suggest that this form of therapy has the highest response rate of any treatment known for advanced melanoma, and in a significant number of subjects, periods of prolonged remissions from the disease can be achieved. ISPI is therefore clearly one of the most promising forms of therapy for this disease and better understanding of the immunological and physical parameters of this treatment will lead to even better clinical results.

  15. In situ PEM fuel cell water measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, Rodney L; Mukundan, Rangachary; Davey, John R; Spendalow, Jacob S

    2008-01-01

    Efficient PEM fuel cell performance requires effective water management. The materials used, their durability, and the operating conditions under which fuel cells run, make efficient water management within a practical fuel cell system a primary challenge in developing commercially viable systems. We present experimental measurements of water content within operating fuel cells. in response to operational conditions, including transients and freezing conditions. To help understand the effect of components and operations, we examine water transport in operating fuel cells, measure the fuel cell water in situ and model the water transport within the fuel cell. High Frequency Resistance (HFR), AC Impedance and Neutron imaging (using NIST's facilities) were used to measure water content in operating fuel cells with various conditions, including current density, relative humidity, inlet flows, flow orientation and variable GDL properties. Ice formation in freezing cells was also monitored both during operation and shut-down conditions.

  16. In-situ continuous water monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Cyril V. (Knoxville, TN); Wise, Marcus B. (Kingston, TN)

    1998-01-01

    An in-situ continuous liquid monitoring system for continuously analyzing volatile components contained in a water source comprises: a carrier gas supply, an extraction container and a mass spectrometer. The carrier gas supply continuously supplies the carrier gas to the extraction container and is mixed with a water sample that is continuously drawn into the extraction container by the flow of carrier gas into the liquid directing device. The carrier gas continuously extracts the volatile components out of the water sample. The water sample is returned to the water source after the volatile components are extracted from it. The extracted volatile components and the carrier gas are delivered continuously to the mass spectrometer and the volatile components are continuously analyzed by the mass spectrometer.

  17. Support Routines for In Situ Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.; Pariser, Oleg; Yeates, Matthew C.; Lee, Hyun H.; Lorre, Jean

    2013-01-01

    This software consists of a set of application programs that support ground-based image processing for in situ missions. These programs represent a collection of utility routines that perform miscellaneous functions in the context of the ground data system. Each one fulfills some specific need as determined via operational experience. The most unique aspect to these programs is that they are integrated into the large, in situ image processing system via the PIG (Planetary Image Geometry) library. They work directly with space in situ data, understanding the appropriate image meta-data fields and updating them properly. The programs themselves are completely multimission; all mission dependencies are handled by PIG. This suite of programs consists of: (1)marscahv: Generates a linearized, epi-polar aligned image given a stereo pair of images. These images are optimized for 1-D stereo correlations, (2) marscheckcm: Compares the camera model in an image label with one derived via kinematics modeling on the ground, (3) marschkovl: Checks the overlaps between a list of images in order to determine which might be stereo pairs. This is useful for non-traditional stereo images like long-baseline or those from an articulating arm camera, (4) marscoordtrans: Translates mosaic coordinates from one form into another, (5) marsdispcompare: Checks a Left Right stereo disparity image against a Right Left disparity image to ensure they are consistent with each other, (6) marsdispwarp: Takes one image of a stereo pair and warps it through a disparity map to create a synthetic opposite- eye image. For example, a right eye image could be transformed to look like it was taken from the left eye via this program, (7) marsfidfinder: Finds fiducial markers in an image by projecting their approximate location and then using correlation to locate the markers to subpixel accuracy. These fiducial markets are small targets attached to the spacecraft surface. This helps verify, or improve, the pointing of in situ cameras, (8) marsinvrange: Inverse of marsrange . given a range file, re-computes an XYZ file that closely matches the original. . marsproj: Projects an XYZ coordinate through the camera model, and reports the line/sample coordinates of the point in the image, (9) marsprojfid: Given the output of marsfidfinder, projects the XYZ locations and compares them to the found locations, creating a report showing the fiducial errors in each image. marsrad: Radiometrically corrects an image, (10) marsrelabel: Updates coordinate system or camera model labels in an image, (11) marstiexyz: Given a stereo pair, allows the user to interactively pick a point in each image and reports the XYZ value corresponding to that pair of locations. marsunmosaic: Extracts a single frame from a mosaic, which will be created such that it could have been an input to the original mosaic. Useful for creating simulated input frames using different camera models than the original mosaic used, and (12) merinverter: Uses an inverse lookup table to convert 8-bit telemetered data to its 12-bit original form. Can be used in other missions despite the name.

  18. In situ characterization of meals at extremes.

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, N. D.; Campbell, G. H.; Hawreliak, J. A.; Kirk, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    The fundamental processes taking place in metals under extreme conditions can occur on ultrafast timescales (i.e., nanoseconds to picoseconds), and yet their result can continue to have a significant impact on the structural properties for many years to follow. The challenge in developing in situ methods for characterization under extreme conditions therefore involves both the modification of the instrumentation to implement the high-temperature, strain, and radiation conditions and the definition of the timescale over which the measurement must be made. While techniques are well established for characterization of the long-term effects of extreme conditions, experiments are only just beginning to probe the initial stages of structural evolution. This article reviews recent developments in optical, x-ray, and electron probes of metals under extreme conditions and also discusses the needs for future experiments and potential pathways to achieving these goals.

  19. In Situ Field Testing of Processes

    SciTech Connect

    J. Wang

    2001-12-14

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR.

  20. Molecular Classification of Breast Carcinoma In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Usha; Mei, Lu; Seema, Sethi; Hina, Qureshi; Wolman, Sandra R.; Worsham, Maria J.

    2006-01-01

    Pleomorphic variant of invasive lobular carcinoma (PILC) is an aggressive variant of invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC). Its in situ counterpart, pleomorphic lobular carcinoma in situ (PLCIS) is a recently described entity. Morphologically it has the typical architectural pattern of LCIS, but the neoplastic cells resemble intermediate grade DCIS. Molecular signatures that distinguish PLCIS from DCIS and LCIS would provide additional tools to aid in the histopathologic classification of PLCIS as a lesion distinct from LCIS and DCIS. CIS lesions, obtained from a study cohort of 38 breast cancer patients, were divided into 18 DCIS, 14 PLCIS and 6 LCIS. DNA from microdissected archival tissue was interrogated for loss or gain of 112 breast-cancer-specific genes using the Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification Assay (MLPA). Classification Regression Tree (CART) analysis was employed to develop a gene-based molecular classification to distinguish or separate out PLCIS from DCIS and LCIS. Molecular classification via CART, based on gene copy number, agreed with histopathology in 34/38 CIS cases. Loss of CASP1 was predictive of LCIS (n=4) with one misclassified PLCIS. Gain of RELA predicted only the LCIS classification (n=2 cases). STK15 and TNFRSF1B were predictive only for DCIS with no misclassifications. Gain of EHF and TNFRSF1B and loss of NCOA3 were predictive of PLCIS, but not without misclassification. Molecular reclassification by CART was accomplished in 4 CIS cases: 1 PLCIS was reclassified as LCIS, 1 LCIS reclassified as PLCIS, and 2 DCIS cases as PLCIS. This study provides additional rationale for molecular modeling strategies in the evaluation of CIS lesions. This diagnostic aid may serve to minimize misclassification between PLCIS and DCIS, and PLCIS and LCIS, aiding to increase accuracy in the differential diagnosis of CIS lesions. PMID:17375183

  1. PERFORMANCE CONFIRMATION IN-SITU INSTRUMENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    N.T. Raczka

    2000-05-23

    The purpose of this document is to identify and analyze the types of in-situ instruments and methods that could be used in support of the data acquisition portion of the Performance Confirmation (PC) program at the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The PC program will require geomechanical , geophysical, thermal, and hydrologic instrumentation of several kinds. This analysis is being prepared to document the technical issues associated with each type of measurement during the PC period. This analysis utilizes the ''Performance Confirmation Input Criteria'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a) as its starting point. The scope of this analysis is primarily on the period after the start of waste package emplacement and before permanent closure of the repository, a period lasting between 15 and 300 years after last package emplacement (Stroupe 2000, Attachment 1, p. 1). The primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Review the design criteria as presented in the ''Performance Confirmation Input Criteria'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a). The scope of this analysis will be limited to the instrumentation related to parameters that require continuous monitoring of the conditions underground. (2) Preliminary identification and listing of the data requirements and parameters as related to the current repository layout in support of PC monitoring. (3) Preliminary identification of methods and instrumentation for the acquisition of the required data. Although the ''Performance Confirmation Input Criteria'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a) defines a broad range of data that must be obtained from a variety of methods, the focus of this analysis is on instrumentation related to the performance of the rock mass and the formation of water in the repository environment, that is obtainable from in-situ observation, testing, and monitoring.

  2. In Situ SIMS and IR Spectroscopy of Well-Defined Surfaces Prepared by Soft Landing of Mass-Selected Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Gunaratne, Kalupathirannehelage Don D.; Laskin, Julia

    2014-06-16

    Soft landing of mass-selected ions onto surfaces is a powerful approach for the highly-controlled preparation of materials that are inaccessible using conventional synthesis techniques. Coupling soft landing with in situ characterization using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) enables analysis of well-defined surfaces under clean vacuum conditions. The capabilities of three soft-landing instruments constructed in our laboratory are illustrated for the representative system of surface-bound organometallics prepared by soft landing of mass-selected ruthenium tris(bipyridine) dications, [Ru(bpy)3]2+, onto carboxylic acid terminated self-assembled monolayer surfaces on gold (COOH-SAMs). In situ time-of-flight (TOF)-SIMS provides insight into the reactivity of the soft-landed ions. In addition, the kinetics of charge reduction, neutralization and desorption occurring on the COOH-SAM both during and after ion soft landing are studied using in situ Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR)-SIMS measurements. In situ IRRAS experiments provide insight into how the structure of organic ligands surrounding metal centers is perturbed through immobilization of organometallic ions on COOH-SAM surfaces by soft landing. Collectively, the three instruments provide complementary information about the chemical composition, reactivity and structure of well-defined species supported on surfaces.

  3. In situ radiation measurements at the former Soviet Nuclear Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, W.J.

    1996-06-01

    A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted a series of in situ radiological measurements at the former Soviet Nuclear Test Site near Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan, during the period of July 21-30, 1994. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at selected areas on the site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. The survey was part of a cooperative effort between the United States team and teams of radiation scientists from the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan and the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. In addition to in situ radiation measurements made by the United States and Russian teams, soil samples were collected and analyzed by the Russian and Kazakhstani teams. All teams conducted their measurements at ten locations within the test site. The United States team also made a number of additional measurements to locate and verify the positions of three potential fallout plumes containing plutonium contamination from nonnuclear tests. In addition, the United States team made several measurements in Kurchatov City, the housing area used by personnel and their families who work(ed) at the test sites. Comparisons between the United States and Russian in situ measurements and the soil sample results are presented as well as comparisons with a Soviet aerial survey conducted in 1990-1991. The agreement between the different types of measurements made by all three countries was quite good.

  4. Polyamide 66 microspheres metallised with in situ synthesised gold nanoparticles for a catalytic application

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A simple concept is proposed to metallise polyamide 66 (PA66) spherulite structures with in situ synthesised gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) using a wet chemical method. This cost-effective approach, applied to produce a PA66/Au NP hybrid material, offers the advantages of controlling the nanoparticle size, the size distribution and the organic-inorganic interactions. These are the key factors that have to be controlled to construct consistent Au nanostructures which are essential for producing the catalytic activities of interest. The hybrid materials obtained are characterised by means of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and X-ray diffraction spectrometry. The results show that PA66 microspheres obtained via the crystallisation process are coated with Au NPs of 13 nm in size. It was found that controlling the metal coordination is the key parameter to template the Au NPs on the spherulite surfaces. The preparation processes and the key factors leading to the formation of PA66 spherulites coated with Au NPs are discussed. Moreover, the efficiency of the coated spherulites as a potential catalyst is proved by demonstrating the reduction of methylene blue via UV-visible spectrometry. PMID:22401661

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF IN SITU GASIFICATION OF TEXAS LIGNITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A general survey of the environmental effects of the in-situ gasification of Texas lignite was undertaken. The survey emphasized the following subjects: Identification of location, quality and quantity of resources; Assessment of applicable in-situ gasification technologies; Dete...

  6. DETERMINING AERODYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF SPORTS BALLS IN SITU

    E-print Network

    Ha, Taekjip

    DETERMINING AERODYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF SPORTS BALLS IN SITU By JEFFREY RYAN KENSRUD A thesis for your patience and support. #12;iv DETERMINING AERODYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF SPORTS BALLS IN SITU 2 Abstract the aerodynamic properties of the ball can lead to better predicting the path of a balls flight. Two important

  7. 30 CFR 828.11 - In situ processing: Performance standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... in situ processing activities shall comply with 30 CFR 817 and this section. (b) In situ processing...) Injecting process recovery fluids only into geologic zones or intervals approved as production zones by the... processing activities shall submit for approval as part of the application for permit under 30 CFR...

  8. 30 CFR 828.11 - In situ processing: Performance standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... in situ processing activities shall comply with 30 CFR 817 and this section. (b) In situ processing...) Injecting process recovery fluids only into geologic zones or intervals approved as production zones by the... processing activities shall submit for approval as part of the application for permit under 30 CFR...

  9. 30 CFR 828.11 - In situ processing: Performance standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... in situ processing activities shall comply with 30 CFR 817 and this section. (b) In situ processing...) Injecting process recovery fluids only into geologic zones or intervals approved as production zones by the... processing activities shall submit for approval as part of the application for permit under 30 CFR...

  10. 30 CFR 828.11 - In situ processing: Performance standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... in situ processing activities shall comply with 30 CFR 817 and this section. (b) In situ processing...) Injecting process recovery fluids only into geologic zones or intervals approved as production zones by the... processing activities shall submit for approval as part of the application for permit under 30 CFR...

  11. In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) Capability Roadmap Progress Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Gerald B.; Duke, Michael

    2005-01-01

    A progress review on In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) capability is presented. The topics include: 1) In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) Capability Roadmap: Level 1; 2) ISRU Emphasized Architecture Overview; 3) ISRU Capability Elements: Level 2 and below; and 4) ISRU Capability Roadmap Wrap-up.

  12. Development of the integrated in situ Lasagna process

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, S.; Athmer, C.; Sheridan, P.

    1995-12-31

    Contamination in deep, low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in uniform delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ methods such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, and pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low permeability soils present at many contaminated sites.

  13. Zebrafish Whole-Mount In Situ Hybridization Followed by Sectioning.

    PubMed

    Doganli, Canan; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin

    2016-01-01

    In situ hybridization is a powerful technique used for locating specific nucleic acid targets within morphologically preserved tissues and cell preparations. A labeled RNA or DNA probe hybridizes to its complementary mRNA or DNA sequence within a sample. Here, we describe RNA in situ hybridization protocol for whole-mount zebrafish embryos. PMID:26695046

  14. Some implications of in situ uranium mining technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, C.E.; Parkhurst, M.A.; Cole, R.J.; Keller, D.; Mellinger, P.J.; Wallace, R.W.

    1980-09-01

    A technology assessment was initiated in March 1979 of the in-situ uranium mining technology. This report explores the impediments to development and deployment of this technology and evaluates the environmental impacts of a generic in-situ facility. The report is divided into the following sections: introduction, technology description, physical environment, institutional and socioeconomic environment, impact assessment, impediments, and conclusions. (DLC)

  15. In Situ Colloid Mobilization in Hanford Sediments under

    E-print Network

    Kah, Linda

    In Situ Colloid Mobilization in Hanford Sediments under Unsaturated Transient Flow Conditions, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164 Colloid transport may facilitate off-site transport to examine the effect of irrigation schedule on releases of in situ colloids from two Hanford sediments

  16. Hydraulic calculations for a modified in-situ retort

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, W.G.

    1980-03-01

    This report contains brief descriptions of a numerical model and the aquifer-retort system used to investigate hydraulics in the vicinity of a modified in-situ retort. The model is used to analyze several cases involving different physical and geohydrological parameters, and possible applications of the model to in-situ oil shale recovery are discussed.

  17. ABIOTIC IN SITU TECHNOLOGIES FOR GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION CONFERENCE: PROCEEDINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA conference on Abiotic In Situ Technologies for Groundwater Remediation was held in Dallas, TX, 8/31-9/2/99. The goal of the meeting was to disseminate current information on abiotic in situ groundwater treatment echnologies. Although much information is being provided a...

  18. In situ collagen assembly for integrating microfabricated three-dimensional

    E-print Network

    Sia, Samuel K.

    LETTERS In situ collagen assembly for integrating microfabricated three-dimensional cell as fibrin and collagen I) can detach matrices from their surroundings and destroy intended geometry7­9 . Here, we demonstrate in situ collagen fibre assembly (the nucleation and growth of new collagen fibres

  19. Whole Mount In Situ Hybridization On Mouse Embryos

    E-print Network

    De Robertis, Eddy M.

    Whole Mount In Situ Hybridization On Mouse Embryos Modified by Lise Zakin and Eddy De Robertis 2008 Henrique et al., 1995. Nature 375, 787-790. Note: This protocol works well for embryos up to 10.5 days post-coïtum (d.p.c.). For older embryos, use in situ on sections. Dissections -Dissect embryos in 1X PBS; remove

  20. In situ monitoring of liquid phase electroepitaxial growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okamoto, A.; Isozumi, S.; Lagowski, J.; Gatos, H. C.

    1982-01-01

    In situ monitoring of the layer thickness during liquid phase electroepitaxy (LPEE) was achieved with a submicron resolution through precise resistance measurements. The new approach to the study and control of LPEE was applied to growth of undoped and Ge-doped GaAs layers. The in situ determined growth kinetics was found to be in excellent agreement with theory.

  1. Development of a Nanoindenter for In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    E-print Network

    Development of a Nanoindenter for In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Eric A. Stach,1 * Tony J.W. Morris, Jr.,3,4 A. Zettl,4,5 and Ulrich Dahmen1 1 National Center for Electron Microscopy, Charlottesville, VA 22903 Abstract: In situ transmission electron microscopy is an established experimental

  2. IN-SITU TRITIUM BETA DETECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    J.W. Berthold; L.A. Jeffers

    1998-04-15

    The objectives of this three-phase project were to design, develop, and demonstrate a monitoring system capable of detecting and quantifying tritium in situ in ground and surface waters, and in water from effluent lines prior to discharge into public waterways. The tritium detection system design is based on measurement of the low energy beta radiation from the radioactive decay of tritium using a special form of scintillating optical fiber directly in contact with the water to be measured. The system consists of the immersible sensor module containing the optical fiber, and an electronics package, connected by an umbilical cable. The system can be permanently installed for routine water monitoring in wells or process or effluent lines, or can be moved from one location to another for survey use. The electronics will read out tritium activity directly in units of pico Curies per liter, with straightforward calibration. In Phase 1 of the project, we characterized the sensitivity of fluor-doped plastic optical fiber to tritium beta radiation. In addition, we characterized the performance of photomultiplier tubes needed for the system. In parallel with this work, we defined the functional requirements, target specifications, and system configuration for an in situ tritium beta detector that would use the fluor-doped fibers as primary sensors of tritium concentration in water. The major conclusions from the characterization work are: A polystyrene optical fiber with fluor dopant concentration of 2% gave best performance. This fiber had the highest dopant concentration of any fibers tested. Stability may be a problem. The fibers exposed to a 22-day soak in 120 F water experienced a 10x reduction in sensitivity. It is not known whether this was due to the build up of a deposit (a potentially reversible effect) or an irreversible process such as leaching of the scintillating dye. Based on the results achieved, it is premature to initiate Phase 2 and commit to a prototype design for construction and test. Significant improvements must be made in fluor-doped fiber performance in order to use the method for in situ monitoring to verify compliance with current EPA drinking water standards. Additional Phase 1 fiber development work should be performed to increase the fluor dopant concentration above 2% until the self-absorption limit is observed. Continued fiber optimization work is expected to improve the sensitivity limits, and will enable application of the detector to verify compliance with the US EPA drinking water standard of 20,000 pico Curies per liter. However, if the need for monitoring higher levels of tritium in water at concentrations greater than 200,000 pico Curies per liter is justified, then prototype development and testing could proceed either as a Phase 2 stand-alone effort or in parallel with continued Phase 1 development work.

  3. Autonomous In-Situ Resources Prospector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dissly, R. W.; Buehler, M. G.; Schaap, M. G.; Nicks, D.; Taylor, G. J.; Castano, R.; Suarez, D.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation will describe the concept of an autonomous, intelligent, rover-based rapid surveying system to identify and map several key lunar resources to optimize their ISRU (In Situ Resource Utilization) extraction potential. Prior to an extraction phase for any target resource, ground-based surveys are needed to provide confirmation of remote observation, to quantify and map their 3-D distribution, and to locate optimal extraction sites (e.g. ore bodies) with precision to maximize their economic benefit. The system will search for and quantify optimal minerals for oxygen production feedstock, water ice, and high glass-content regolith that can be used for building materials. These are targeted because of their utility and because they are, or are likely to be, variable in quantity over spatial scales accessible to a rover (i.e., few km). Oxygen has benefits for life support systems and as an oxidizer for propellants. Water is a key resource for sustainable exploration, with utility for life support, propellants, and other industrial processes. High glass-content regolith has utility as a feedstock for building materials as it readily sinters upon heating into a cohesive matrix more readily than other regolith materials or crystalline basalts. Lunar glasses are also a potential feedstock for oxygen production, as many are rich in iron and titanium oxides that are optimal for oxygen extraction. To accomplish this task, a system of sensors and decision-making algorithms for an autonomous prospecting rover is described. One set of sensors will be located in the wheel tread of the robotic search vehicle providing contact sensor data on regolith composition. Another set of instruments will be housed on the platform of the rover, including VIS-NIR imagers and spectrometers, both for far-field context and near-field characterization of the regolith in the immediate vicinity of the rover. Also included in the sensor suite are a neutron spectrometer, ground-penetrating radar, and an instrumented cone penetrometer for subsurface assessment. Output from these sensors will be evaluated autonomously in real-time by decision-making software to evaluate if any of the targeted resources has been detected, and if so, to quantify their abundance. Algorithms for optimizing the mapping strategy based on target resource abundance and distribution are also included in the autonomous software. This approach emphasizes on-the-fly survey measurements to enable efficient and rapid prospecting of large areas, which will improve the economics of ISRU system approaches. The mature technology will enable autonomous rovers to create in-situ resource maps of lunar or other planetary surfaces, which will facilitate human and robotic exploration.

  4. Aluminum-Based Cast In Situ Composites: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramod, S. L.; Bakshi, Srinivasa R.; Murty, B. S.

    2015-06-01

    In situ composites are a class of composite materials in which the reinforcement is formed within the matrix by reaction during the processing. In situ method of composite synthesis has been widely followed by researchers because of several advantages over conventional stir casting such as fine particle size, clean interface, and good wettability of the reinforcement with the matrix and homogeneous distribution of the reinforcement compared to other processes. Besides this, in situ processing of composites by casting route is also economical and amenable for large scale production as compared to other methods such as powder metallurgy and spray forming. Commonly used reinforcements for Al and its alloys which can be produced in situ are Al2O3, AlN, TiB2, TiC, ZrB2, and Mg2Si. The aim of this paper is to review the current research and development in aluminum-based in situ composites by casting route.

  5. Visualizing T Cell Migration in situ

    PubMed Central

    Benechet, Alexandre P.; Menon, Manisha; Khanna, Kamal M.

    2014-01-01

    Mounting a protective immune response is critically dependent on the orchestrated movement of cells within lymphoid tissues. The structure of secondary lymphoid organs regulates immune responses by promoting optimal cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix interactions. Naïve T cells are initially activated by antigen presenting cells in secondary lymphoid organs. Following priming, effector T cells migrate to the site of infection to exert their functions. Majority of the effector cells die while a small population of antigen-specific T cells persists as memory cells in distinct anatomical locations. The persistence and location of memory cells in lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues is critical to protect the host from re-infection. The localization of memory T cells is carefully regulated by several factors including the highly organized secondary lymphoid structure, the cellular expression of chemokine receptors and compartmentalized secretion of their cognate ligands. This balance between the anatomy and the ordered expression of cell surface and soluble proteins regulates the subtle choreography of T cell migration. In recent years, our understanding of cellular dynamics of T cells has been advanced by the development of new imaging techniques allowing in situ visualization of T cell responses. Here, we review the past and more recent studies that have utilized sophisticated imaging technologies to investigate the migration dynamics of naïve, effector, and memory T cells. PMID:25120547

  6. In situ vitrification: Process and products

    SciTech Connect

    Kindle, C.; Koegler, S.

    1991-06-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is an electrically powered thermal treatment process that converts soil into a chemically inert and stable glass and crystalline product. It is similar in concept to bringing a simplified glass manufacturing process to a site and operating it in the ground, using the soil as a glass feed stock. Gaseous emissions are contained, scrubbed, and filtered. When the process is completed, the molten volume cools producing a block of glass and crystalline material that resembles natural obsidian commingled with crystalline phases. The product passes US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) leach resistance tests, and it can be classified as nonhazardous from a chemical hazard perspective. ISV was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) for application to contaminated soils. It is also being adapted for applications to buried waste, underground tanks, and liquid seepage sites. ISV's then-year development period has included tests on many different site conditions. As of January 1991 there have been 74 tests using PNL's ISV equipment; these tests have ranged from technology development tests using nonhazardous conditions to hazardous and radioactive tests. 2 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Photonic MEMS for NIR in-situ

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, T C; Cole, G D; Goddard, L L; Behymer, E

    2007-07-03

    We report on a novel sensing technique combining photonics and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) for the detection and monitoring of gas emissions for critical environmental, medical, and industrial applications. We discuss how MEMS-tunable vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be exploited for in-situ detection and NIR spectroscopy of several gases, such as O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, CO{sub x}, CH{sub 4}, HF, HCl, etc., with estimated sensitivities between 0.1 and 20 ppm on footprints {approx}10{sup -3} mm{sup 3}. The VCSELs can be electrostatically tuned with a continuous wavelength shift up to 20 nm, allowing for unambiguous NIR signature determination. Selective concentration analysis in heterogeneous gas compositions is enabled, thus paving the way to an integrated optical platform for multiplexed gas identification by bandgap and device engineering. We will discuss here, in particular, our efforts on the development of a 760 nm AlGaAs based tunable VCSEL for O{sub 2} detection.

  8. Modeling enhanced in situ denitrification in groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Killingstad, M.W.; Widdowson, M.A.; Smith, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    A two-dimensional numerical solute transport model was developed for simulating an enhanced in situ denitrification experiment performed in a nitrate-contaminated aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. In this experiment, formate (HCOO-) was injected for a period of 26 days into the carbon-limited aquifer to stimulate denitrification. Calibration of the vertical-profile site model was demonstrated through error analysis and comparison with formate, nitrate, and nitrite concentration data monitored along a transect of three multilevel groundwater sampling wells for 75 days after initial injection. Formate utilization rates were approximately 142 and 38 ??M/day for nitrate and nitrite reduction, respectively. Nitrate and nitrite utilization rates were approximately 29 and 8 ??M/day, respectively. Nitrate utilization rates under enhanced conditions were 1 order of magnitude greater than previously reported naturally occurring rates. The nitrite production rate was approximately 29 ??M/day. Persistence of nitrite was attributed to a combination of factors, including electron donor (formate) limitation late in the experiment, preferential utilization of nitrate as an electron acceptor, and greater nitrite production relative to nitrite utilization.

  9. Cubesat in-situ degradation detector (CIDD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rievers, Benny; Milke, Alexander; Salden, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    The design of the thermal control and management system (TCS) is a central task in satellite design. In order to evaluate and dimensionize the properties of the TCS, material parameters specifying the conductive and radiative properties of the different TCS components have to be known including their respective variations within the mission lifetime. In particular the thermo-optical properties of the outer surfaces including critical TCS components such as radiators and thermal insulation are subject to degradation caused by interaction with the space environment. The evaluation of these material parameters by means of ground testing is a time-consuming and expensive endeavor. Long-term in-situ measurements on board the ISS or large satellites not only realize a better implementation of the influence of the space environment but also imply high costs. Motivated by this we propose the utilization of low-cost nano-satellite systems to realize material tests within space at a considerably reduced cost. We present a nanosat-scale degradation sensor concept which realizes low power consumption and data rates compatible with nanosat boundaries at UHF radio. By means of a predefined measurement and messaging cycle temperature curves are measured and evaluated on ground to extract the change of absorptivity and emissivity over mission lifetime.

  10. Imaging tree root systems in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielopolski, Lucian; Hendrey, George; Daniels, Jeffrey J.; McGuigan, Michael

    2000-04-01

    Predictions of global energy use in this century suggest a continued increase in carbon emissions and rising concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere. This represents a serious environmental problem and contributes significantly to greenhouse gases that affect global warming. Terrestrial ecosystems are a huge natural biological scrubber for CO2 currently sequestering, directly from the atmosphere, about 25% (approximately 2 GtC) of the 7.4 Gt of anthropogenic carbon emitted annually into the atmosphere. The major carbon pathways into soil are through plant litter and roots. Presently, there are no means by which root morphology, distribution, and mass can be measured without serious sampling artifacts that alter these properties. The current methods are destructive and labor intensive. Preliminary results using a high frequency, 1.5 Ghz, impulse Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) for nondestructive imaging of tree root systems in situ are presented. The 3D reconstructed image is used to assess root morphology and dimensions. The constraints, limitations, and potential solutions for using GPR for tree root systems imaging and analysis are discussed.

  11. In situ vitrification on buried waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, S.O.

    1992-08-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is being evaluated as a remedial treatment technology for buried mixed and transuranic (TRU) wastes at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and can be related to buried wastes at other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. There are numerous locations around the DOE Complex where wastes were buried in the ground or stored for future burial. The Buried Waste Program (BWP) is conducting a comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the Department of Energy - Field Office Idaho (DOE-ID). As part of the RI/FS, an ISV scoping study on the treatability of the SDA mixed low-level and mixed TRU waste is being performed for applicability to remediation of the waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The ISV project being conducted at the INEL by EG&G Idaho, Inc. consists of a treatability investigation to collect data to satisfy nine CERCLA criteria with regards to the SDA. This treatability investigation involves a series of experiments and related efforts to study the feasibility of ISV for remediation of mixed and TRU waste disposed of at the SDA.

  12. In situ vitrification on buried waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, S.O.

    1992-01-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is being evaluated as a remedial treatment technology for buried mixed and transuranic (TRU) wastes at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and can be related to buried wastes at other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. There are numerous locations around the DOE Complex where wastes were buried in the ground or stored for future burial. The Buried Waste Program (BWP) is conducting a comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the Department of Energy - Field Office Idaho (DOE-ID). As part of the RI/FS, an ISV scoping study on the treatability of the SDA mixed low-level and mixed TRU waste is being performed for applicability to remediation of the waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The ISV project being conducted at the INEL by EG G Idaho, Inc. consists of a treatability investigation to collect data to satisfy nine CERCLA criteria with regards to the SDA. This treatability investigation involves a series of experiments and related efforts to study the feasibility of ISV for remediation of mixed and TRU waste disposed of at the SDA.

  13. In-situ measurements of total carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smythe, W.; Boryta, M.; Nelson, R.

    2009-04-01

    Quantitative assessment of the equilibration of biotic and pre-biotic materials and of the mechanisms leading to their presence in a planetary context requires knowledge of the relative concentrations of the organic species within a sample. The measurement of these relative concentrations is not practical for many remote sensing and in-situ techniques because of the large number of potential compounds having high variance in (for example) volatility, spectral response and/or molecular weight. One approach is to compare the concentration of identified materials to the total carbon and total organic carbon in a sample. The traditional two-stage approach for this measurement is acidification to convert "inorganic" carbon to CO2 and pyrolysis to convert the remaining "organic" carbon and carbon-based compounds the CO2. Measurement of the evolved CO2 provides a measure of organic and total carbon in the sample. These measurements are relatively successful in a laboratory context, but are difficult to implement robotically, particularly in challenging environments. A variety of alternative approaches for achieving total carbon measurements with acceptable accuracy are examined for feasibility of use in a field or robotic environment, with particular emphasis on soils on Mars.

  14. Primary Endometrial Squamous Cell Carcinoma In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Jetley, Sujata; Jairajpuri, Zeeba S.; Hassan, Mohammad J.; Madaan, Garima; Jain, Reena

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the endometrium, whether primary or secondary to cervical cancer, is a rare entity. Primary endometrial squamous cell carcinoma in situ is even more uncommon; it usually occurs in postmenopausal women and has a strong association with pyometra. We report a 60-year-old multiparous postmenopausal woman who presented to the Hakeem Abdul Hameed Centenary Hospital, New Delhi, India, in May 2014 with a lower abdominal swelling corresponding in size to a pregnancy of 26 gestational weeks and vaginal discharge of one year’s duration. A total abdominal hysterectomy with a bilateral salpingooophorectomy was performed, which revealed an enlarged uterus with pyometra. Histopathology showed that the entire endometrial lining had been replaced with malignant squamous cells without invasion of the myometrium. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the tumour cells were positive for p63 with a high Ki-67 labelling index. No adjuvant therapy was required and the patient was disease-free at a seven-month follow-up. PMID:26629388

  15. [Fluorescence in situ hybridization on histologic sections].

    PubMed

    Mrhalová, Marcela; Kodet, Roman

    2013-10-01

    I-FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization on interphasic nuclei) represents a laboratory method linking morphological investigations (histological sections of formaldehyde fixed and paraffin embedded tissues) with molecular techniques (sequence specificity of nucleic acids bases for a certain locus). I-FISH is relatively undemanding for a laboratory workout, but offering a lot of important information about the investigated cells. Within a scope of pathology departments I-FISH is utilized mostly in diagnostics of neoplasms. I-FISH is helpful in detecting gene copy numbers (amplifications or deletions), and, importantly, in establishing copy numbers of individual chromosomes (polysomies or monosomies), chromosomal breaks and translocations. At present, I-FISH is used not only for diagnosis and estimation of prognosis, but also as a method to qualify a patient for a targeted biological therapy. Because demands on investigation of solid tumors keep raising I-FISH becomes a part of routine investigations. The aim of this paper is to summarize principles and the utility of I-FISH and to help the interested readers in finding a basic orientation in this laboratory method. PMID:24289480

  16. In situ observations of Io torus plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, J. D.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1982-01-01

    The physical properties of the Io plasma formation deduced from in situ observations are described. The torus plasma is characterized by spatially distinct regions with steep gradients in plasma parameters between them. The innermost region has a cool plasma which collapses toward the centrifugal equator and gives rise to a distinctive localized concentration of plasma well inside of Io's orbit. The next region has a warm plasma which includes the L-shell of Io and is the presumed injection region of the plasma. Other regions, known as the plasma ledge and ramp, are described. The changes in plasma characteristics are accounted for by centrifugally driven flux tube interchange diffusion to provide radial mass transport. The ramp is shown to result from impoundment of the plasma by the inner edge of the energetic particle population. It is also shown how the power required to excite the ultraviolet emissions of the torus and the Jovian aurora determines the rate at which new plasma is fed into the torus.

  17. IN-SITU MINING OF PHOSPHATE ORES

    SciTech Connect

    H. El-Shall; R. Stana; A. El-Midany; S. Malekzadah

    2004-12-17

    Presently the mining of Florida phosphate requires the movement of over a 100-ton of materials (overburden, sand, clay) for every ton of phosphate concentrate recovered. Not only is this energy intensive, but it also causes significant stress on the environment. In 2003, the Department of Energy solicited ideas for innovative mining ideas that could significantly improve the efficiency of mining. An award was made to the University of Florida Engineering Research Center to evaluate the in situ mining of phosphates using an aqueous CO{sub 2} solution. Tests were carried out in a 15.2 cm (6-inch) diameter column, 1.83 meter (6 feet) long at pressures up to 117.2 kg/cm{sup 2} (40 psi). Results to date demonstrate that initially the MgO is leached from the ore and then the phosphate. While the tests are continuing, so far they have not demonstrated P{sub 2}O{sub 5} concentrations that are economically attractive.

  18. In situ produced 10Be depth profiles and luminescence data tracing climatic and tectonic control on terrace formation, Danube River, Central Europe, Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruszkiczay-Rüdiger, Zsófia; Braucher, Régis; Novothny, Ágnes; Csillag, Gábor; Fodor, László; Molnár, Gábor; Madarász, Balázs; Aster Team

    2015-04-01

    The terrace sequence of the Hungarian part of the Danube valley preserves a record of varying tectonic uplift rates along the river course and throughout several climate stages. To establish the chronology of formation of these terraces, two different dating methods on alluvial terraces were used: 1) in situ produced cosmogenic 10Be, which yield the time of abandonment of the terrace and 2) luminescence dating, which provides burial ages of the sediment. In situ produced cosmogenic 10Be samples originated from vertical depth profiles to enable the determination of both the exposure time and the denudation rate at each locality. We used Monte Carlo approach to model the denudation rate-corrected exposure ages. Post-IR IRSL measurements were carried out on K-feldspar samples to obtain the ages of sedimentation. The highest and oldest terrace remnants (tIV-VI) yield a minimum 10Be exposure age of 800 ka close to MIS 22, the onset of major continental glaciations of Quaternary age, suggesting climatic signal of the abandonment of the uppermost terrace levels. For the lower terraces it was possible to reveal close correlation with MIS stages using IRSL ages. The new chronology enables the distinction of tIIb (60-110 ka; MIS 4-5d) and tIIIa (130-190 ka; MIS 6) in the study area. Surface denudation rates were well constrained by the cosmogenic 10Be depth profiles between 5.9 m/Ma and 10.0 m/Ma for all terraces. Maximum incision rates of the Danube were calculated for middle and late Pleistocene times. These rates were increasing from west to east, toward the more elevated Transdanubian Range from 0.05 mm/a to 0.12 mm/a. Incision rates derived from the age of the low terraces (0.13 mm/a) may suggest a slight acceleration of uplift towards present. Our research was supported by the OTKA PD83610, PD100315, NK60455, K062478, K83150 and F042799, the French-Hungarian Balaton-Tét Project (FR-32/2007; TÉT_11-2-2012-0005), the Bolyai János Scholarship of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and by the 'Lendület' program of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (LP2012-27/2012). The 10Be measurements performed at the ASTER AMS national facility (CEREGE, Aix en Provence) were supported by the INSU/CNRS, the French Ministry of Research and Higher Education, IRD and CEA. The gamma-spectrometry measurements and part of the preparation of the luminescence samples were carried out at the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics, Hannover, Germany.

  19. Assessment of the use of prompt gamma emission for proton therapy range verification

    E-print Network

    Styczynski, John R

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Prompt gamma rays emitted from proton-nucleus interactions in tissue present a promising non-invasive, in situ means of monitoring proton beam based radiotherapy. This study investigates the fluence and energy ...

  20. SPECIATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANTS BY CONE PENETROMETRY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY. (R826184)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A thermal extraction cone penetrometry gas chroma tography/mass spectrometry system (TECP GC/MS) has been developed to detect subsurface contaminants in situ. The TECP can collect soil-bound organics up to depths of 30 m. In contrast to traditional cone penetrometer sample collec...

  1. Identification of Hypoxia-Regulated Proteins Using MALDI-Mass Spectrometry Imaging Combined with Quantitative Proteomics

    E-print Network

    with Quantitative Proteomics Marie-Claude Djidja,,#, Joan Chang,,,, Andreas Hadjiprocopis, Fabian Schmich,, John quantitative proteomics combined with MALDI- mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI). Here we present a compre- hensive hypoxic proteome study and are the first to investigate changes in situ using tumor samples

  2. Investigating the Origin and Evolution of Venus with In Situ Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainer, M. G.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Johnson, N. M.; Glaze, L. S.

    2015-01-01

    The exploration of Venus continues to be a top priority of planetary science. The Planetary Decadal Survey goals for inner-planet exploration seek to discern the origin and diversity of terrestrial planets, understand how the evolution of terrestrial planets relates to the evolution of life, and explore the processes that control climate on Earth-like planets. These goals can only be realized through continued and extensive exploration of Venus, the most mysterious of the terrestrial planets, remarkably different from the Earth despite the gross similarities between these "twin planets". It is unknown if this apparent divergence was intrinsic, programmed during accretion from distinct nebular reservoirs, or a consequence of either measured or catastrophic processes during planetary evolution. Even if the atmosphere of Venus is a more "recent" development, its relationship to the resurfacing of the planet's enigmatic surface is not well understood. Resolving such uncertainties directly addresses the hypothesis of a more clement, possibly water-rich era in Venus' past as well as whether Earth could become more Venus-like in the future.

  3. Investigating the Origin and Evolution of Venus with In Situ Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainer, M. G.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Johnson, N. M.; Glaze, L. S.

    2014-01-01

    The exploration of Venus continues to be a top priority of planetary science. The Planetary Decadal Survey goals for inner-planet exploration seek to discern the origin and diversity of terrestrial planets, understand how the evolution of terrestrial planets relates to the evolution of life, and explore the processes that control climate on Earth-like planets [1]. These goals can only be realized through continued and extensive exploration of Venus, the most mysterious of the terrestrial planets, remarkably different from the Earth despite the gross similarities between these twin planets. It is unknown if this apparent divergence was intrinsic, programmed during accretion from distinct nebular reservoirs, or a consequence of either measured or catastrophic processes during planetary evolution. Even if the atmosphere of Venus is a more recent development, its relationship to the resurfacing of the planets enigmatic surface is not well understood. Resolving such uncertainties directly addresses the hypothesis of a more clement, possibly water-rich era in Venus past as well as whether Earth could become more Venus-like in the future.

  4. Quantifying Stratospheric Ozone in the Upper Troposphere Using in situ Measurements of HCl

    SciTech Connect

    Atherton, C S; Bergmann, D J; Marcy, T P; Fahey, D W; Gao, R S; Popp, P J; Richard, E C; Thompson, T L; Rosenlof, K H; Ray, E A; Salawitch, R J; Ridley, B A; . Weinheimer, A J; Loewenstein, M; Weinstock, E M; Mahoney, M J

    2004-03-08

    A chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) technique has been developed for precise in situ measurements of hydrochloric acid (HCl) from a high-altitude aircraft. In measurements at subtropical latitudes, minimum HCl values found in the upper troposphere (UT) are often near or below the 0.005-ppbv detection limit of the measurements, indicating that background HCl values are much lower than a global mean estimate. However, significant abundances of HCl were observed in many UT air parcels as a result of stratosphere-to-troposphere transport events. A method for diagnosing the amount of stratospheric ozone in these UT parcels was developed using the compact linear correlation of HCl with ozone found throughout the lower stratosphere (LS). Expanded use of this method will lead to improved quantification of cross-tropopause transport events and validation of global chemical transport models.

  5. Quantifying stratospheric ozone in the upper troposphere with in situ measurements of HCl.

    PubMed

    Marcy, T P; Fahey, D W; Gao, R S; Popp, P J; Richard, E C; Thompson, T L; Rosenlof, K H; Ray, E A; Salawitch, R J; Atherton, C S; Bergmann, D J; Ridley, B A; Weinheimer, A J; Loewenstein, M; Weinstock, E M; Mahoney, M J

    2004-04-01

    We have developed a chemical ionization mass spectrometry technique for precise in situ measurements of hydrochloric acid (HCl) from a high-altitude aircraft. In measurements at subtropical latitudes, minimum HCl values found in the upper troposphere (UT) were often near or below the detection limit of the measurements (0.005 parts per billion by volume), indicating that background HCl values are much lower than a global mean estimate. However, significant abundances of HCl were observed in many UT air parcels, as a result of stratosphere-to-troposphere transport events. We developed a method for diagnosing the amount of stratospheric ozone in these UT parcels using the compact linear correlation of HCl with ozone found throughout the lower stratosphere (LS). Expanded use of this method will lead to improved quantification of cross-tropopause transport events and validation of global chemical transport models. PMID:15073371

  6. In situ chemical probing of the electrode-electrolyte interface by ToF-SIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bingwen; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zhu, Zihua; Hua, Xin; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhaoying

    2014-01-01

    A portable vacuum interface allowing direct probing of the electrode-electrolyte interface was developed. A classical electrochemical system consisting of gold working electrode, platinum counter electrode, platinum reference electrode, and potassium iodide electrolyte was used to demonstrate real-time observation of the gold iodide adlayer on the electrode and chemical species as a result of redox reactions using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and the time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS, a vacuum-based surface analytical technique) simultaneously. This microfluidic electrochemical probe provides a new way to investigate the surface region with adsorbed molecules and region of diffused layer with chemical speciation in liquids in situ by surface sensitive techniques.

  7. in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshiko Fujita; Robert W. Smith

    2009-08-01

    in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization Yoshiko Fujita (Yoshiko.fujita@inl.gov) (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Robert W. Smith (University of Idaho-Idaho Falls, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Subsurface radionuclide and trace metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE’s greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent trace ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide strontium-90, is co-precipitation in calcite. Calcite, a common mineral in the arid western U.S., can form solid solutions with trace metals. The rate of trace metal incorporation is susceptible to manipulation using either abiotic or biotic means. We have previously demonstrated that increasing the calcite precipitation rate by stimulating the activity of urea hydrolyzing microorganisms can result in significantly enhanced Sr uptake. Urea hydrolysis causes the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity, and also by liberating the reactive cations from the aquifer matrix via exchange reactions involving the ammonium ion derived from urea: H2NCONH2 + 3H2O ? 2NH4+ + HCO3- + OH- urea hydrolysis >X:2Ca + 2NH4+ ? 2>X:NH4 + Ca2+ ion exchange Ca2+ + HCO3- + OH- ? CaCO3(s) + H2O calcite precipitation where >X: is a cation exchange site on the aquifer matrix. This contaminant immobilization approach has several attractive features. Urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which is produced by many indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Addition of foreign microbes is unnecessary. In turn the involvement of the native microbes and the consequent in situ generation of reactive components in the aqueous phase (e.g., carbonate and Ca or Sr) can allow dissemination of the reaction over a larger volume and/or farther away from an amendment injection point, as compared to direct addition of the reactants at a well (which can lead to clogging). A final particularly attractive characteristic of this approach is its long-term sustainability; the remediation scheme is geared toward environments that are already saturated with respect to calcite, and in such systems the bulk of any newly precipitated calcite will remain stable once engineered manipulations cease. This means that the co-precipitated contaminants will be effectively sequestered over the long term. We are currently conducting integrated field, laboratory, and computational research to evaluate a) the relationships between urea hydrolysis rate, calcite precipitation rate, and trace metal partitioning under environmentally relevant conditions; and b) the coupling between flow/flux manipulations and calcite precipitate distribution and metal uptake. We are also assessing the application of geophysical and molecular biological tools to monitor the relevant chemical and physical processes. The primary emphasis is on field-scale processes, with the laboratory and modeling activities designed specifically to support the field studies. Field experiments are being conducted in perched water (vadose zone) at the Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP) at the Idaho National Laboratory; the VZRP provides an uncontaminated setting that is an analog of the 90Sr-contaminated vadose zone at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. A summary of results to date will be presented.

  8. MENDING THE IN SITU MANIPULATION BARRIER

    SciTech Connect

    PETERSEN, S.W.

    2006-02-06

    In early 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland and Fluor Hanford requested technical assistance from the DOE Headquarters EM-23 Technical Assistance Program to provide a team of technical experts to develop recommendations for mending the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Barrier in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site in Washington State. To accommodate this request, EM-23 provided support to convene a group of technical experts from industry, a national laboratory, and a DOE site to participate in a 2 1/2-day workshop with the objective of identifying and recommending options to enhance the performance of the 100-D Area reactive barrier and of a planned extension to the northeast. This report provides written documentation of the team's findings and recommendations. In 1995, a plume of dissolved hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], which resulted from operation of the D/DR Reactors at the Hanford site, was discovered along the Columbia River shoreline and in the 100-D Area. Between 1999 and 2003, a reactive barrier using the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) technology, was installed a distance of 680 meters along the river to reduce the Cr(VI) in the groundwater. The ISRM technology creates a treatment zone within the aquifer by injection of sodium dithionite, a strong reducing agent that scavenges dissolved oxygen (DO) from the aquifer and reduces ferric iron [Fe(III)], related metals, and oxy-ions. The reduction of Fe(III) to ferrous [Fe(II)] iron provides the primary reduction capacity to reduce Cr(VI) to the +3 state, which is less mobile and less toxic. Bench-scale and field-scale treatability tests were initially conducted to demonstrate proof-of principle and to provide data for estimation of barrier longevity. These calculations estimated barrier longevity in excess of twenty years. However, several years after initial and secondary treatment, groundwater in a number of wells has been found to contain elevated chromium (Cr) concentrations, indicating some loss of reductive capacity within the aquifer. The Technical Assistance Team (TAT) was requested to perform the following activities: (1) evaluate the most probable condition(s) that has led to the presence of Cr(VI) in 12 different barrier wells (i.e. premature loss of reductive capacity), (2) recommend methods for determining the cause of the problem, (3) recommend methods for evaluating the magnitude of the problem, (4) recommend practicable method(s) for mending the barrier that involves a long-term solution, and (5) recommend methods for extending the barrier to the northeast (e.g., changing injection procedure, changing or augmenting the injected material). Since the March 2004 workshop, a decision has been made to place a hold on the barrier extension until more is known about the cause of the problem. However, the report complies with the original request for information on all of the above activities, but focuses on determining the cause of the problem and mending of the existing barrier.

  9. In Situ Probe Science at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, David H.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Colaprete, Anthony; Coustenis, Athena; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Guillot, Tristan; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Mahaffy, Paul; Mousis, Olivier; Orton, Glenn S.; Reh, Kim; Spilker, Linda J.; Spilker, Thomas R.; Webster, Chris R.

    2014-05-01

    A fundamental goal of solar system exploration is to understand the origin of the solar system, the initial stages, conditions, and processes by which the solar system formed, how the formation process was initiated, and the nature of the interstellar seed material from which the solar system was born. Key to understanding solar system formation and subsequent dynamical and chemical evolution is the origin and evolution of the giant planets and their atmospheres. Several theories have been put forward to explain the process of solar system formation, and the origin and evolution of the giant planets and their atmospheres. Each theory offers quantifiable predictions of the abundances of noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe, and abundances of key isotopic ratios 4He/3He, D/H, 15N/14N, 18O/16O, and 13C/12C. Detection of certain disequilibrium species, diagnostic of deeper internal processes and dynamics of the atmosphere, would also help discriminate between competing theories. Many of the key atmospheric constituents needed to discriminate between alternative theories of giant planet formation and chemical evolution are either spectrally inactive or primarily located in the deeper atmosphere inaccessible to remote sensing from Earth, flyby, or orbiting spacecraft. Abundance measurements of these key constituents, including the two major molecular carriers of carbon, methane and carbon monoxide (neither of which condense in Saturn's atmosphere), sulfur which is expected to be well-mixed below the 4 to 5-bar ammonium hydrosulfide (NH4SH) cloud, and gradients of nitrogen below the NH4SH cloud and oxygen in the upper layers of the H2O and H2O-NH4 solution cloud, must be made in situ and can only be achieved by an entry probe descending through 10 bars. Measurements of the critical abundance profiles of these key constituents into the deeper well-mixed atmosphere must be complemented by measurements of the profiles of atmospheric structure and dynamics at high vertical resolution that also require in situ exploration. The atmospheres of the giant planets can also serve as laboratories to better understand the atmospheric chemistries, dynamics, processes, and climates on all planets in the solar system including Earth, and offer a context and provide a ground truth for exoplanets and exoplanetary systems. Additionally, Giant planets have long been thought to play a critical role in the development of potentially habitable planetary systems. In the context of giant planet science provided by the Galileo, Juno, and Cassini missions to Jupiter and Saturn, a small, relatively shallow Saturn probe capable of measuring abundances and isotopic ratios of key atmospheric constituents, and atmospheric structure including pressures, temperatures, dynamics, and cloud locations and properties not accessible by remote sensing can serve to test competing theories of solar system and giant planet origin, chemical, and dynamical evolution. Acknowledgements This research was carried out in part at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. Copyright 2013 California Institute of Technology. U.S. Government sponsorship acknowledged. O. Mousis acknowledges support from CNES.

  10. MODIS comparisons with northeastern Pacific in situ stratocumulus microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Stephen R.; Hudson, James G.

    2015-08-01

    Vertical sounding measurements within stratocumuli during two aircraft field campaigns, Marine Stratus/stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) and Physics of Stratocumulus Top (POST), are used to validate Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud optical thickness (COT), cloud liquid water path (LWP), and cloud effective radius (re). In situ COT, LWP, and re were calculated using 5 m vertically averaged droplet probe measurements of complete vertical cloud penetrations. MODIS COT, LWP, and re 1 km pixels were averaged along these penetrations. COT comparisons in POST showed strong correlations and a near 1:1 relationship. In MASE, comparisons showed strong correlations; however, MODIS COT exceeded in situ COT, likely due to larger temporal differences between MODIS and in situ measurements. LWP comparisons between two cloud probes show good agreement for POST but not MASE, giving confidence to POST data. Both projects provided strong LWP correlations but MODIS exceeded in situ by 14-36%. MODIS in situ re correlations were strong, but MODIS 2.1 µm re exceeded in situ re, which contributed to LWP bias; in POST, MODIS re was 20-30% greater than in situ re. Maximum in situ re near cloud top showed comparisons nearer 1:1. Other MODIS re bands (3.7 µm and 1.6 µm) showed similar comparisons. Temporal differences between MODIS and in situ measurements, airplane speed differences, and cloud probe artifacts were likely causes of weaker MASE correlations. POST COT comparison was best for temporal differences under 20 min. POST data validate MODIS COT but it also implies a positive MODIS re bias that propagates to LWP while still capturing variability.

  11. LONG TERM IN SITU DISPOSAL ENGINEERING STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    ADAMS; CARLSON; BROCKMAN

    2003-07-23

    Patent application pulled per Ken Norris (FH General Counsel). The objective of this study is to devise methods, produce conceptual designs, examine and select alternatives, and estimate costs for the demonstration of long-term (300-year) in situ disposal of an existing waste disposal site. The demonstration site selected is the 216-A-24 Crib near the 200 East Area. The site contains a fission product inventory and has experienced plant, animal, and inadvertent than intrusion. Of the potential intrusive events and transport pathways at the site, potential human intrusion has been given primary consideration in barrier design. Intrusion by wind, plants, and animals has been given secondary consideration. Groundwater modeling for a number of barrier configurations has been carried out to help select a barrier that will minimize water infiltration and waste/water contact time. The estimated effective lifetime and cost of 20 barrier schemes, using a variety of materials, have been evaluated. The schemes studied include single component surface barriers, multicomponent barriers, and massively injected grout barriers. Five barriers with high estimated effective lifetimes and relatively low costs have been selected for detailed evaluation. They are basalt riprap barriers, massive soil barriers, salt basin barriers, multi-component fine/coarse barriers, and cemented basalt barriers. A variety of materials and configurations for marking the site have also been considered. A decision analysis was completed to select a barrier scheme for demonstration. The analysis indicated that the basalt riprap alternative would be the preferred choice for a full-scale demonstration. The recommended approach is to demonstrate the basalt riprap barrier at the 216-A-24 Crib as soon as possible. Methods and costs of assessing effectiveness of the demonstration are also described. Preliminary design modifications and costs for applying the five selected barrier schemes to other site types are also presented.

  12. In-Situ Wire Damage Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Tate, Lanetra; Smith, Trent; Gibson, Tracy; Medelius, Pedro; Jolley, Scott

    2012-01-01

    An In-Situ Wire Damage Detection System (ISWDDS) has been developed that is capable of detecting damage to a wire insulation, or a wire conductor, or to both. The system will allow for realtime, continuous monitoring of wiring health/integrity and reduce the number of false negatives and false positives while being smaller, lighter in weight, and more robust than current systems. The technology allows for improved safety and significant reduction in maintenance hours for aircraft, space vehicles, satellites, and other critical high-performance wiring systems for industries such as energy production and mining. The integrated ISWDDS is comprised of two main components: (1) a wire with an innermost core conductor, an inner insulation film, a conductive layer or inherently conductive polymer (ICP) covering the inner insulation film, an outermost insulation jacket; and (2) smart connectors and electronics capable of producing and detecting electronic signals, and a central processing unit (CPU) for data collection and analysis. The wire is constructed by applying the inner insulation films to the conductor, followed by the outer insulation jacket. The conductive layer or ICP is on the outer surface of the inner insulation film. One or more wires are connected to the CPU using the smart connectors, and up to 64 wires can be monitored in real-time. The ISWDDS uses time domain reflectometry for damage detection. A fast-risetime pulse is injected into either the core conductor or conductive layer and referenced against the other conductor, producing transmission line behavior. If either conductor is damaged, then the signal is reflected. By knowing the speed of propagation of the pulse, and the time it takes to reflect, one can calculate the distance to and location of the damage.

  13. Cost performance assessment of in situ vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, W.E.; Letellier, B.C.; Booth, S.R.; Barnes-Smith, P.

    1992-09-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a thermal treatment technology with promise for the destruction or immobilization of hazardous materials in contaminated soils. It has developed over the past decade to a level of maturity where meaningful cost effectiveness studies may be performed. The ISV process melts 4 to 25 m{sup 2} of undisturbed soil to a maximum depth of 6 m into an obsidian-like glass waste form by applying electric current (3750 kill) between symmetrically spaced electrodes. Temperatures of approximately 2000{degree}C drive off and destroy complex organics which are captured in an off-gas treatment system, while radio-nuclides are incorporated into the homogeneous glass monolith. A comparative life-cycle cost evaluation between mobile rotary kiln incineration and ISV was performed to quantitatively identify appropriate performance regimes and components of cost which are sensitive to the implementation of each technology. Predictions of melt times and power consumption were obtained from an ISV performance model over ranges of several parameters including electrode spacing, soil moisture, melt depth, electrical resistivity, and soil density. These data were coupled with manpower requirements, capitalization costs, and a melt placement optimization routine to allow interpolation over a wide variety of site characteristics. For the purpose of this study, a single site scenario representative of a mixed waste evaporation pond was constructed. Preliminary comparisons between ISV and incineration show that while operating costs are comparable, ISV avoids secondary treatment and monitored storage of radioactive waste that would be required following conventional incineration. It is the long term storage of incinerated material that is the most expensive component.

  14. Cost performance assessment of in situ vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, W.E.; Letellier, B.C.; Booth, S.R. ); Barnes-Smith, P. )

    1992-01-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a thermal treatment technology with promise for the destruction or immobilization of hazardous materials in contaminated soils. It has developed over the past decade to a level of maturity where meaningful cost effectiveness studies may be performed. The ISV process melts 4 to 25 m{sup 2} of undisturbed soil to a maximum depth of 6 m into an obsidian-like glass waste form by applying electric current (3750 kill) between symmetrically spaced electrodes. Temperatures of approximately 2000{degree}C drive off and destroy complex organics which are captured in an off-gas treatment system, while radio-nuclides are incorporated into the homogeneous glass monolith. A comparative life-cycle cost evaluation between mobile rotary kiln incineration and ISV was performed to quantitatively identify appropriate performance regimes and components of cost which are sensitive to the implementation of each technology. Predictions of melt times and power consumption were obtained from an ISV performance model over ranges of several parameters including electrode spacing, soil moisture, melt depth, electrical resistivity, and soil density. These data were coupled with manpower requirements, capitalization costs, and a melt placement optimization routine to allow interpolation over a wide variety of site characteristics. For the purpose of this study, a single site scenario representative of a mixed waste evaporation pond was constructed. Preliminary comparisons between ISV and incineration show that while operating costs are comparable, ISV avoids secondary treatment and monitored storage of radioactive waste that would be required following conventional incineration. It is the long term storage of incinerated material that is the most expensive component.

  15. In situ Probe Science at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, D. H.; Mousis, O.; Lunine, J. I.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Atreya, S. K.; Brinckerhoff, W.; Colaprete, A.; Coustenis, A.; Fletcher, L. N.; Guillot, T.; Lebreton, J.-P.; Mahaffy, P.; Orton, G. S.; Reh, K.; Spilker, L. J.; Spilker, T. R.; Webster, C.

    2014-04-01

    A fundamental goal of solar system exploration is to understand the origin of the solar system, the initial stages, conditions, and processes by which the solar system formed, how the formation process was initiated, and the nature of the interstellar seed material from which the solar system was born. Key to understanding solar system formation and subsequent dynamical and chemical evolution is the origin and evolution of the giant planets and their atmospheres. Several theories have been put forward to explain the process of solar system formation, and the origin and evolution of the giant planets and their atmospheres. Each theory offers quantifiable predictions of the abundances of noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe, and abundances of key isotopic ratios 4He/3He, D/H, 15N/14N, 18O/16O, and 13C/12C. Detection of certain disequilibrium species, diagnostic of deeper internal processes and dynamics of the atmosphere, would also help discriminate between competing theories. Measurements of the critical abundance profiles of these key constituents into the deeper well-mixed atmosphere must be complemented by measurements of the profiles of atmospheric structure and dynamics at high vertical resolution and also require in situ exploration. The atmospheres of the giant planets can also serve as laboratories to better understand the atmospheric chemistries, dynamics, processes, and climates on all planets including Earth, and offer a context and provide a ground truth for exoplanets and exoplanetary systems. Additionally, Giant planets have long been thought to play a critical role in the development of potentially habitable planetary systems. In the context of giant planet science provided by the Galileo, Juno, and Cassini missions to Jupiter and Saturn, a small, relatively shallow Saturn probe capable of measuring abundances and isotopic ratios of key atmospheric constituents, and atmospheric structure including pressures, temperatures, dynamics, and cloud locations and properties not accessible by remote sensing can serve to test competing theories of solar system and giant planet origin, chemical, and dynamical evolution.

  16. In-situ bioassays using caged bivalves

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, M.H.; Salazar, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    It is important to make the distinction between chemical measurements to assess bioaccumulation potential versus biological measurements to assess potential bioeffects because bioaccumulation is not a bioeffect. Caging provides a unique opportunity to make synoptic measurements of each and facilitates making these measurements over space and time. Measuring bioaccumulation in resident and transplanted bivalves has probably been the most frequently used form of an in-situ bioassay because bivalves concentrate chemicals in their tissues. They are also easy to collect, cage, and measure. The authors have refined bivalve bioassay methods by minimizing the size range of test animals, making repetitive measurements of the same individuals, and standardizing test protocols for a variety of applications. They are now attempting to standardize criteria for accepting and interpreting data in the same way that laboratory bioassays have been standardized. Growth measurements can serve two purposes in this assessment strategy: (1) An integrated biological response endpoint that is easily quantifiable and with significance to the population, and (2) A means of calibrating bioaccumulation by assessing the relative health and physiological state of tissues that have accumulated the chemicals. In general, the authors have found the highest bioconcentration factors associated with the highest growth rates, the highest concentrations ({micro}g/g) of chemicals in juvenile mussels, and the highest chemical content ({micro}g/animal) in adult mussels. Without accounting for possible dilution of chemical concentrations by tissue growth or magnification through degrowth, contaminant concentrations can be misleading. Examples are provided for the Sudbury River in Massachusetts (Elliptio complanata), San Diego Bay (Mytilus galloprovincialis), and the Harbor Island Superfund Site in Puget Sound (Mytilus trossulus).

  17. Time-Resolved Data Acquisition for In Situ Subsurface Planetary Geochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodnarik, Julia Gates; Burger, Dan M.; Burger, Arnold; Evans, Larry G.; Parsons, Ann M.; Starr, Richard D.; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2012-01-01

    The current gamma-ray/neutron instrumentation development effort at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center aims to extend the use of active pulsed neutron interrogation techniques to probe the subsurface geochemistry of planetary bodies in situ. All previous NASA planetary science missions, that used neutron and/or gamma-ray spectroscopy instruments, have relied on a constant neutron source produced from galactic cosmic rays. One of the distinguishing features of this effort is the inclusion of a high intensity 14.1 MeV pulsed neutron generator synchronized with a custom data acquisition system to time each event relative to the pulse. With usually only one opportunity to collect data, it is difficult to set a priori time-gating windows to obtain the best possible results. Acquiring time-tagged, event-by-event data from nuclear induced reactions provides raw data sets containing channel/energy, and event time for each gamma ray or neutron detected. The resulting data set can be plotted as a function of time or energy using optimized analysis windows after the data are acquired. Time windows can now be chosen to produce energy spectra that yield the most statistically significant and accurate elemental composition results that can be derived from the complete data set. The advantages of post-processing gamma-ray time-tagged event-by-event data in experimental tests using our prototype instrument will be demonstrated.

  18. NOVEL IN-SITU METAL AND MINERAL EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn O'Gorman; Hans von Michaelis; Gregory J. Olson

    2004-09-22

    This white paper summarizes the state of art of in-situ leaching of metals and minerals, and describes a new technology concept employing improved fragmentation of ores underground in order to prepare the ore for more efficient in-situ leaching, combined with technology to continuously improve solution flow patterns through the ore during the leaching process. The process parameters and economic benefits of combining the new concept with chemical and biological leaching are described. A summary is provided of the next steps required to demonstrate the technology with the goal of enabling more widespread use of in-situ leaching.

  19. Is in-situ leaching applicable. Project evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Plouf, T.M.

    1982-01-01

    Many unsuspecting engineers can find themselves in trouble by proposing in-situ leaching as the solution to a low-grade-deposit utilization or a hard-to-get-at deposit utilization. A method of project evaluation is presented that will help clarify the steps needing evaluation before in-situ leaching should be proposed as a solution to a difficult problem. Rules-of-thumb are presented for evaluating important parameters of in-situ leaching. Case studies of copper and uranium ore bodies are also analyzed. 7 references, 5 figures, 6 tables.

  20. Development of a solenoid pumped in situ zinc analyzer for environmental monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapin, T.P.; Wanty, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    A battery powered submersible chemical analyzer, the Zn-DigiScan (Zn Digital Submersible Chemical Analyzer), has been developed for near real-time, in situ monitoring of zinc in aquatic systems. Microprocessor controlled solenoid pumps propel sample and carrier through an anion exchange column to separate zinc from interferences, add colorimetric reagents, and propel the reaction complex through a simple photometric detector. The Zn-DigiScan is capable of self-calibration with periodic injections of standards and blanks. The detection limit with this approach was 30 ??g L-1. Precision was 5-10% relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) below 100 ??g L-1, improving to 1% R.S.D. at 1000 ??g L-1. The linear range extended from 30 to 3000 ??g L-1. In situ field results were in agreement with samples analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). This pump technology is quite versatile and colorimetric methods with complex online manipulations such as column reduction, preconcentration, and dilution can be performed with the DigiScan. However, long-term field deployments in shallow high altitude streams were hampered by air bubble formation in the photometric detector. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. CdSe Quantum Rod Formation Aided By In Situ TOPO Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Wolcott, Abraham; Fitzmorris, Robert Carl; Muzaffery, Omed; Zhang, Jin Z.

    2010-01-01

    In-situ TOPO decomposition was accomplished by applying a vacuum at elevated temperatures to a precursor solution in the presence of oxygen, leading TOPO to oxidize to di-n-octylphosphinic acid (DOPA) and octylphosphonic acid (OPA). The mixed ligand system of tetradecylphosphonic acid (TDPA), DOPA and OPA produced CdSe QRs on the order of 4 nm in diameter and 20 nm in length. Solvent and ligand identification was performed by mass spectrometry and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was utilized to determine the morphology, size and crystal growth of the CdSe QRs. This method of CdSe QR synthesis is unique in that the phosphonic acids responsible for anisotropic growth are formed in situ, prior to the nucleation and growth of the nanorods. Without the oxidation of TOPO, CdSe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized instead, as reported previously. This discovery reinforces the efficacy of DOPA and OPA molecules as critical ligands in the formation of 1-dimensional (1D) nanostructures. PMID:20473338

  2. In situ molecular imaging of hydrated biofilm in a microfluidic reactor by ToF-SIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Xin; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Zhaoying; Yang, Li; Liu, Bingwen; Zhu, Zihua; Tucker, Abigail E.; Chrisler, William B.; Hill, Eric A.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Lin, Yuehe; Liu, Songqin; Marshall, Matthew J.

    2014-02-26

    The first results of using a novel single channel microfluidic reactor to enable Shewanella biofilm growth and in situ characterization using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) in the hydrated environment are presented. The new microfluidic interface allows direct probing of the liquid surface using ToF-SIMS, a vacuum surface technique. The detection window is an aperture of 2 m in diameter on a thin silicon nitride (SiN) membrane and it allows direct detection of the liquid surface. Surface tension of the liquid flowing inside the microchannel holds the liquid within the aperture. ToF-SIMS depth profiling was used to drill through the SiN membrane and the biofilm grown on the substrate. In situ 2D imaging of the biofilm in hydrated state was acquired, providing spatial distribution of the chemical compounds in the biofilm system. This data was compared with a medium filled microfluidic reactor devoid of biofilm and dried biofilm samples deposited on clean silicon wafers. Principle Component Analysis (PCA) was used to investigate these observations. Our results show that imaging biofilms in the hydrated environment using ToF-SIMS is possible using the unique microfluidic reactor. Moreover, characteristic biofilm fatty acids fragments were observed in the hydrated biofilm grown in the microfluidic channel, illustrating the advantage of imaging biofilm in its native environment.

  3. 21 CFR 866.4700 - Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 false Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration...Reagents § 866.4700 Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration...Controls Guidance Document: Automated Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH)...

  4. 21 CFR 866.4700 - Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration...Reagents § 866.4700 Automated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enumeration...Controls Guidance Document: Automated Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH)...

  5. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: IN SITU STEAM ENHANCED RECOVERY PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Technology Capsule report summarizes the findings of an evaluation of the in situ Steam Enhanced Recovery Process (SERP) operated by Hughes Environmental Systems, Inc. at the Rainbow Disposal facility in Huntington Beach, California. he technology demonstration was conducted...

  6. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: GEOSAFE CORPORATION IN SITU VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Geosafe In Situ Vitrification (ISV) Technology is designed to treat soils, sludges, sediments, and mine tallings contaminated with organic, inorganic, and radioactive compounds. The organic compounds are pyrolyzed and reduced to simple gases which are collected under a treatm...

  7. In-situ polymerization PLOT columns I: divinylbenzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, T. C.

    1992-01-01

    A novel method for preparation of porous-layer open-tubular (PLOT) columns is described. The method involves a simple and reproducible, straight-forward in-situ polymerization of monomer directly on the metal tube.

  8. Controlled Manipulation and in Situ Mechanical Measurement of Single Co

    E-print Network

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    Controlled Manipulation and in Situ Mechanical Measurement of Single Co Nanowire with a Laser bubble is used to manipulate individual Co nanowires. The short- lived ( manipulation, nanowire bending, Young's modulus, cavitation bubble A pplications of nanowires in many

  9. Developing in-situ ellipsometry for tokamak discharges in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Suk-Ho; Kim, Woong-Chae

    2010-05-01

    An in-situ ellipsometer based on four-detector polarimeter(FDP) is under development at KSTAR. In-situ ellipsometer for tokamak discharges will measure the characteristics of thin films deposited onto a quartz window near the edge region in real time. These characteristics contain local deposition/erosion rates as well as hydrogen to carbon ratio, which have to be measured in-situ, for more clear insight view of plasma-wall interaction in tokamak edge plasmas. This paper reports the status of in-situ ellipsometer development for tokamak discharges at KSTAR, to study plasma-wall interaction and fuel retention. Basic concept, design and construction of the ellipsometer are described.

  10. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Characterization of Nanomaterials 

    E-print Network

    Lee, Joon Hwan 1977-

    2012-11-27

    With the recent development of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization techniques, the real time study of property-structure correlations in nanomaterials becomes possible. This dissertation reports the direct observations...

  11. In situ quantification of genomic instability in breast cancer progression

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos; Chin, Koei; Gray, Joe W.; Lockett, Stephen J.

    2003-05-15

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of breast and other solid cancers. Presumably caused by critical telomere reduction, GI is responsible for providing the genetic diversity required in the multi-step progression of the disease. We have used multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and 3D image analysis to quantify genomic instability cell-by-cell in thick, intact tissue sections of normal breast epithelium, preneoplastic lesions (usual ductal hyperplasia), ductal carcinona is situ or invasive carcinoma of the breast. Our in situ-cell by cell-analysis of genomic instability shows an important increase of genomic instability in the transition from hyperplasia to in situ carcinoma, followed by a reduction of instability in invasive carcinoma. This pattern suggests that the transition from hyperplasia to in situ carcinoma corresponds to telomere crisis and invasive carcinoma is a consequence of telomerase reactivation afertelomere crisis.

  12. Pushing the envelope of in situ transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ramachandramoorthy, Rajaprakash; Bernal, Rodrigo; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2015-05-26

    Recent major improvements to the transmission electron microscope (TEM) including aberration-corrected electron optics, light-element-sensitive analytical instrumentation, sample environmental control, and high-speed and sensitive direct electron detectors are becoming more widely available. When these advances are combined with in situ TEM tools, such as multimodal testing based on microelectromechanical systems, key measurements and insights on nanoscale material phenomena become possible. In particular, these advances enable metrology that allows for unprecedented correlation to quantum mechanics and the predictions of atomistic models. In this Perspective, we provide a summary of recent in situ TEM research that has leveraged these new TEM capabilities as well as an outlook of the opportunities that exist in the different areas of in situ TEM experimentation. Although these advances have improved the spatial and temporal resolution of TEM, a critical analysis of the various in situ TEM fields reveals that further progress is needed to achieve the full potential of the technology. PMID:25942405

  13. In situ bioremediation of chlorinated solvent with natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rabold, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    A bioremediation system for the removal of chlorinated solvents from ground water and sediments is described. The system involves the the in-situ injection of natural gas (as a microbial nutrient) through an innovative configuration of horizontal wells.

  14. In-situ photocatalytic remediation of organic contaminants in groundwater

    E-print Network

    Lim, Leonard Lik Pueh

    2010-07-06

    This research is about the development of a photocatalytic reactor design, Honeycomb, for in-situ groundwater remediation. Photocatalysis, typically a pseudo first order advanced oxidation process, is initiated via the illumination of UVA light...

  15. In Situ Laser Raman Spectroscopy for Mars Sample Return Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, A.

    2012-03-01

    We describe the scientific advantages brought by the four characters of Mars Microbeam Raman Spectrometer (MMRS), thus demonstrate a powerful technology with high TRL for in situ mineralogy and biomarker detection for the first MSR mission in 2018.

  16. IN-SITU TREATMENT OF HAZARDOUS WASTE CONTAMINATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Techniques were investigated for in-situ treatment of hazardous wastes that could be applied to contaminated soils. Included were chemical treatment methods, biological treatment, photochemical transformations and combination methods. Techniques were developed based on fundamenta...

  17. In Situ Instrument to Detect Prebiotic Compounds in Planetary Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Getty, Stephanie A.; Dworkin, Jason; Glavin, Daniel P.; Southard, Adrian; Balvin, Manuel; Kotecki, Carl; Ferrance, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    The development of an in situ LC-MS instrument for future planetary science missions to icy surfaces that are of high astrobiology and astrochemistry potential will advance our understanding of organics in the solar system.

  18. Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Murdoch, L. |; Siegrist, B.; Meiggs, T.

    1997-12-31

    This article describes the use of hydraulic fracturing to increase permeability in geologic formations where in-situ remedial action of contaminant plumes will be performed. Several in-situ treatment strategies are discussed including the use of hydraulic fracturing to create in situ redox zones for treatment of organics and inorganics. Hydraulic fracturing methods offer a mechanism for the in-situ treatment of gently dipping layers of reactive compounds. Specialized methods using real-time monitoring and a high-energy jet during fracturing allow the form of the fracture to be influenced, such as creation of assymmetric fractures beneath potential sources (i.e. tanks, pits, buildings) that should not be penetrated by boring. Some examples of field applications of this technique such as creating fractures filled with zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate halogenated hydrocarbons, and the use of granular activated carbon to adsorb compounds are discussed.

  19. In Situ Measurement of Bioluminescence and Fluorescence in an Integrated

    E-print Network

    Sinskey, Anthony J.

    In Situ Measurement of Bioluminescence and Fluorescence in an Integrated Microbioreactor Andrea of bioluminescence and fluorescence from bacterial cultures grown in 50 mL instrumented microbioreactors. Results measurements; bioluminescence; fluorescence; instrumented microbioreactors; Escheri- chia coli; luxCDABE; gfp

  20. In Situ Iron Oxide Emplacement for Groundwater Arsenic Remediation 

    E-print Network

    Abia, Thomas Sunday

    2012-02-14

    Iron oxide-bearing minerals have long been recognized as an effective reactive media for arsenic-contaminated groundwater remediation. This research aimed to develop a technique that could facilitate in situ oxidative precipitation of Fe3+ in a soil...

  1. Accurate Measurements of Pointing Performance from In Situ Observations

    E-print Network

    Chen, Yiling

    , in situ stud- ies ACM Classification Keywords H.5.2. Information Interfaces and Presentation: User Inter interactions. In controlled laboratory stud- ies, participants are instructed to focus entirely on the task

  2. In Situ Measurements of Meteoric Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Aiken, Arthur C.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Extraterrestrial material is the source of metal ions in the Earth's atmosphere, Each year approx. 10(exp 8) kg of material is intercepted by the Earth. The origin of this material is predominantly solar orbiting interplanetary debris from comets or asteroids that crosses the Earth's orbit. It contains a very small amount of interstellar material. On occasion the Earth passes through enhanced amounts of debris associated with the orbit of a decaying comet. This leads to enhanced meteor shower displays for up to several days. The number flux of shower material is typically several times the average sporadic background influx of material. Meteoric material is some of the earliest material formed in the solar system. By studying the relative elemental abundances of atmospheric metal ions, information can be gained on the chemical composition of cometary debris and the chemical makeup of the early solar system. Using in situ sampling with rocket-borne ion mass spectrometers; there have been approximately 50 flights that made measurements of the metal ion abundances at attitudes between 80 and 130 km. It is this altitude range where incoming meteoric particles am ablated, the larger ones giving rise to visible meteor. displays. In several rocket measurements isotopic ratios of different atomic ion mass components and metal molecular ion concentrations have been determined and used to identify unambiguously the measured species and to investigate the processes controlling the metal ion distributions The composition of the Earth's ionosphere was first sampled by an ion mass spectrometer flown an a rocket in 1956. In 1958 a rocket-borne ion spectrometer identified, fbr the first time, a layer of metal ions near 95 km. These data were interpreted as evidence of an extraterrestrial rather than a terrestrial source. Istomin predicted: "It seems probable that with some improvement in the method that analysis of the ion composition in the E-region may be used for determining the chemical composition of those meteors which do not reach the ground. Particularly, we hope to get information about the composition difference between particles of different meteor showers and also sporadic and shower meteoroids". These visions categorized the aims of many subsequent rocket-borne ion mass spectrometer experiments in the lower ionosphere, Although the use such measurements to deduce the composition of different classes of meteoroids has not been successful, the past four decades of rocket observations have provided po%erful sets of data for advancing our understanding of meteor ablation, meteoric composition, metal neutral and ion chemistry as well as ionospheric dynamics.

  3. In Situ Probe Science at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, D.H.; Lunine, J.I.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Atreya, S. K.; Brinckerhoff, W.; Colaprete, A.; Coustenis, A.; Fletcher, L. N.; Guillot, T.; Lebreton, J.-P.; Mahaffy, P.; Mousis, O.; Orton, G. S.; Reh, K.; Spilker, L. J.; Spilker, T. R.; Webster, C.

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental goal of solar system exploration is to understand the origin of the solar sys-tem, the initial stages, conditions, and processes by which the solar system formed, how the formation pro-cess was initiated, and the nature of the interstellar seed material from which the solar system was born. Key to understanding solar system formation and subsequent dynamical and chemical evolution is the origin and evolution of the giant planets and their atmospheres. Several theories have been put forward to explain the process of solar system formation, and the origin and evolution of the giant planets and their atmospheres. Each theory offers quantifiable predictions of the abundances of noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe, and abundances of key isotopic ratios 4He3He, DH, 15N14N, 18O16O, and 13C12C. Detection of certain dis-equilibrium species, diagnostic of deeper internal pro-cesses and dynamics of the atmosphere, would also help discriminate between competing theories. Measurements of the critical abundance profiles of these key constituents into the deeper well-mixed at-mosphere must be complemented by measurements of the profiles of atmospheric structure and dynamics at high vertical resolution and also require in situ explora-tion. The atmospheres of the giant planets can also serve as laboratories to better understand the atmospheric chem-istries, dynamics, processes, and climates on all planets including Earth, and offer a context and provide a ground truth for exoplanets and exoplanetary systems. Additionally, Giant planets have long been thought to play a critical role in the development of potentially habitable planetary systems. In the context of giant planet science provided by the Galileo, Juno, and Cassini missions to Jupiter and Sat-urn, a small, relatively shallow Saturn probe capable of measuring abundances and isotopic ratios of key at-mospheric constituents, and atmospheric structure in-cluding pressures, temperatures, dynamics, and cloud locations and properties not accessible by remote sens-ing can serve to test competing theories of solar system and giant planet origin, chemical, and dynamical evolution.

  4. Volumetric In Situ Electrical Heating: An Unexploited Electrotechnology 

    E-print Network

    Bridges, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    systems to reduce air pollution and to provide a market for excess electrical power generation capacity. other applications of the EEOR technology include the in situ decontamination of hazardous waste spills and the disinfection of hospital wastes... environmentally benign method for decontaminating, in situ, warehouse-size blocks of earth near the surface. Further, we extended the technology to treat volumes of material such as hospital wastes and radioactive materials. When properly applied, all...

  5. In Situ Nanomechanical Testing of Crystalline Nanowires in Electron Microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yong

    2015-09-01

    This article reviews in situ mechanical testing of crystalline nanowires in scanning and transmission electron microscopes, focusing on bottom-up synthesized, single-crystalline nanowires. Major experimental methods including resonance, bending, tension and buckling are summarized. In addition to commonly encountered experimental issues, deformation mechanisms learned from the in situ nanomechanical characterization are discussed highlighting the roles of free surfaces, internal planar defects and point defects.

  6. Orientation of in situ stresses in the oceanic crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newmark, R.L.; Zoback, M.D.; Anderson, R.N.

    1984-01-01

    Two in situ measurements of principal stress directions have been made in DSDP Holes 504B, south of the Costa Rica Rift on the Nazca plate, and 597C, west of the East Pacific Rise on the Pacific plate. In both cases, the orientations of in situ principal stresses determined from borehole breakouts are consistent with the stress directions inferred from intraplate earthquakes located near the sites. ?? 1984 Nature Publishing Group.

  7. Advanced and In Situ Analytical Methods for Solar Fuel Materials.

    PubMed

    Chan, Candace K; Tüysüz, Harun; Braun, Artur; Ranjan, Chinmoy; La Mantia, Fabio; Miller, Benjamin K; Zhang, Liuxian; Crozier, Peter A; Haber, Joel A; Gregoire, John M; Park, Hyun S; Batchellor, Adam S; Trotochaud, Lena; Boettcher, Shannon W

    2016-01-01

    In situ and operando techniques can play important roles in the development of better performing photoelectrodes, photocatalysts, and electrocatalysts by helping to elucidate crucial intermediates and mechanistic steps. The development of high throughput screening methods has also accelerated the evaluation of relevant photoelectrochemical and electrochemical properties for new solar fuel materials. In this chapter, several in situ and high throughput characterization tools are discussed in detail along with their impact on our understanding of solar fuel materials. PMID:26267386

  8. Next-generation in-situ science concepts and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muirhead, Brian; Varsi, Giulio

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the concepts of a next-generation in situ science program, named Sample Acquisition, Analysis, and Preservation (SAAP), established by NASA to develop critical technologies for remote identification, acquisition, processing, analysis, and preservation of materials for the in situ science, engineering characterization, and earth return. Special attention is given to the SAAP architecture, system design, remote sensing system, sample acquisition system, and methods for sample analysis. A diagram of the SAAP preliminary system conceptual design is included.

  9. SENSITIVITY STUDIES FOR AN IN-SITU PARTIAL DEFECT DETECTOR (PDET) IN SPENT FUEL USING MONTE CARLO TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaraman, S; Ham, Y S

    2008-04-28

    This study presents results from Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations aimed at characterizing a novel methodology being developed to detect partial defects in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) spent fuel assemblies (SFAs). The methodology uses a combination of measured neutron and gamma fields inside a spent fuel assembly in an in-situ condition where no movement of the fuel assembly is required. Previous studies performed on single isolated assemblies resulted in a unique base signature that would change when some of the fuel in the assembly is replaced with dummy fuel. These studies indicate that this signature is still valid in the in-situ condition enhancing the prospect of building a practical tool, Partial Defect Detector (PDET), which can be used in the field for partial defect detection.

  10. In situ Management and Domestication of Plants in Mesoamerica

    PubMed Central

    Casas, Alejandro; Otero-Arnaiz, Adriana; Pérez-Negrón, Edgar; Valiente-Banuet, Alfonso

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Ethnobotanical studies in Mexico have documented that Mesoamerican peoples practise systems of in situ management of wild and weedy vegetation directed to control availability of useful plants. In situ management includes let standing, encouraging growing and protection of individual plants of useful species during clearance of vegetation, which in some cases may involve artificial selection. The aim of this study was to review, complement and re-analyse information from three case studies which examined patterns of morphological, physiological and genetic effects of artificial selection in plant populations under in situ management in the region. Methods Information on wild and in situ managed populations of the herbaceous weedy plants Anoda cristata and Crotalaria pumila, the tree Leucaena esculenta subsp. esculenta and the columnar cacti Escontria chiotilla, Polaskia chichipe and Stenocereus stellatus from Central Mexico was re-analysed. Analyses compared morphology and frequency of morphological variants, germination patterns, and population genetics parameters between wild and managed in situ populations of the species studied. Species of columnar cacti are under different management intensities and their populations, including cultivated stands of P. chichipe and S. stellatus, were also compared between species. Key Results Significant differences in morphology, germination patterns and genetic variation documented between wild, in situ managed and cultivated populations of the species studied are associated with higher frequencies of phenotypes favoured by humans in managed populations. Genetic diversity in managed populations of E. chiotilla and P. chichipe is slightly lower than in wild populations but in managed populations of S. stellatus variation was higher than in the wild. However, genetic distance between populations was generally small and influenced more by geographic distance than by management. Conclusions Artificial selection operating on in situ managed populations of the species analysed is causing incipient domestication. This process could be acting on any of the 600–700 plant species documented to be under in situ management in Mesoamerica. In situ domestication of plants could be relevant to understand early processes of domestication and current conditions of in situ conservation of plant genetic resources. PMID:17652338

  11. IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    J.S.Y. YANG

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes REV 02. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in REV 02 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what conditions, the tests were conducted. The descriptions and analyses provide data useful for refining and confirming the understanding of flow, drift seepage, and transport processes in the UZ. The UZ testing activities included measurement of permeability distribution, quantification of the seepage of water into the drifts, evaluation of fracture-matrix interaction, study of flow along faults, testing of flow and transport between drifts, characterization of hydrologic heterogeneity along drifts, estimation of drying effects on the rock surrounding the drifts due to ventilation, monitoring of moisture conditions in open and sealed drifts, and determination of the degree of minimum construction water migration below drift. These field tests were conducted in two underground drifts at Yucca Mountain, the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) drift, and the cross-drift for Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB), as described in Section 1.2. Samples collected in boreholes and underground drifts have been used for additional hydrochemical and isotopic analyses for additional understanding of the UZ setting. The UZ transport tests conducted at the nearby Busted Butte site (see Figure 1-4) are also described in this scientific analysis report.

  12. In situ synthesis of mixed-valent manganese oxide nanocrystals: an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction study.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiong-Fei; Ding, Yun-Shuang; Hanson, Jonathan C; Aindow, Mark; Suib, Steven L

    2006-04-12

    Phase transformations of materials can be studied by in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. However, most reported in situ synchrotron XRD studies focus on solid state/gel systems by measuring phase/structure changes during application of pressure or heat. Phase transformations during material synthesis and their applications, especially in wet chemistry processes with different media, have not drawn much attention. Here, using manganese oxides as examples, we report the successful characterization of phase transformations in in situ hydrothermal synthesis conditions by the in situ synchrotron XRD method using a quartz/sapphire capillary tube as the synthesis reactor. The results were used for better design of materials with controlled structures and properties. This method can be generally used for synthesis of manganese oxides as well as for in situ characterization of other material syntheses using hydrothermal, sol-gel, and other methods. In addition, catalytic processes in liquid-solid, gas-solid, and solid-solid systems can also be studied in such an in situ way so that catalytic mechanisms can be better understood and catalyst synthesis and catalytic processes can be optimized. PMID:16594683

  13. In situ visualization of newly synthesized proteins in environmental microbes using amino acid tagging and click chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Hatzenpichler, Roland; Scheller, Silvan; Tavormina, Patricia L; Babin, Brett M; Tirrell, David A; Orphan, Victoria J

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe the application of a new click chemistry method for fluorescent tracking of protein synthesis in individual microorganisms within environmental samples. This technique, termed bioorthogonal non-canonical amino acid tagging (BONCAT), is based on the in vivo incorporation of the non-canonical amino acid L-azidohomoalanine (AHA), a surrogate for l-methionine, followed by fluorescent labelling of AHA-containing cellular proteins by azide-alkyne click chemistry. BONCAT was evaluated with a range of phylogenetically and physiologically diverse archaeal and bacterial pure cultures and enrichments, and used to visualize translationally active cells within complex environmental samples including an oral biofilm, freshwater and anoxic sediment. We also developed combined assays that couple BONCAT with ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), enabling a direct link between taxonomic identity and translational activity. Using a methanotrophic enrichment culture incubated under different conditions, we demonstrate the potential of BONCAT-FISH to study microbial physiology in situ. A direct comparison of anabolic activity using BONCAT and stable isotope labelling by nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (15NH3 assimilation) for individual cells within a sediment-sourced enrichment culture showed concordance between AHA-positive cells and 15N enrichment. BONCAT-FISH offers a fast, inexpensive and straightforward fluorescence microscopy method for studying the in situ activity of environmental microbes on a single-cell level. PMID:24571640

  14. BIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS Mass Spectrometry

    E-print Network

    Painter, Kevin

    Single Crystal X-ray Diffractometry Mass Spectrometry Elemental Analysis (CHN) Other Analytical Methods chamber with Near field scanner Superconductor Chamber Microwave Network Analysers OPTICAL DIAGNOSTICS

  15. Analysis of expressed sequence tags from a single wheat cultivar facilitates interpretation of tandem mass spectrometry data and discrimination of gamma gliadin proteins that may play different functional roles in flour

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complement of gamma gliadin genes expressed in the wheat cultivar Butte 86 was evaluated by analyzing publicly available expressed sequence tag (EST) data. Eleven contigs were assembled from 153 Butte 86 ESTs. Nine of the contigs encoded full-length proteins and four of the proteins contained an...

  16. In situ vitrification: application analysis for stabilization of transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Oma, K.H.; Farnsworth, R.K.; Rusin, J.M.

    1982-09-01

    The in situ vitrification process builds upon the electric melter technology previously developed for high-level waste immobilization. In situ vitrification converts buried wastes and contaminated soil to an extremely durable glass and crystalline waste form by melting the materials, in place, using joule heating. Once the waste materials have been solidified, the high integrity waste form should not cause future ground subsidence. Environmental transport of the waste due to water or wind erosion, and plant or animal intrusion, is minimized. Environmental studies are currently being conducted to determine whether additional stabilization is required for certain in-ground transuranic waste sites. An applications analysis has been performed to identify several in situ vitrification process limitations which may exist at transuranic waste sites. Based on the process limit analysis, in situ vitrification is well suited for solidification of most in-ground transuranic wastes. The process is best suited for liquid disposal sites. A site-specific performance analysis, based on safety, health, environmental, and economic assessments, will be required to determine for which sites in situ vitrification is an acceptable disposal technique. Process economics of in situ vitrification compare favorably with other in-situ solidification processes and are an order of magnitude less than the costs for exhumation and disposal in a repository. Leachability of the vitrified product compares closely with that of Pyrex glass and is significantly better than granite, marble, or bottle glass. Total release to the environment from a vitrified waste site is estimated to be less than 10/sup -5/ parts per year. 32 figures, 30 tables.

  17. Particle size distribution properties in mixed-phase monsoon clouds from in situ measurements during CAIPEEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patade, Sachin; Prabha, T. V.; Axisa, D.; Gayatri, K.; Heymsfield, A.

    2015-10-01

    A comprehensive analysis of particle size distributions measured in situ with airborne instrumentation during the Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX) is presented. In situ airborne observations in the developing stage of continental convective clouds during premonsoon (PRE), transition, and monsoon (MON) period at temperatures from 25 to -22°C are used in the study. The PRE clouds have narrow drop size and particle size distributions compared to monsoon clouds and showed less development of size spectra with decrease in temperature. Overall, the PRE cases had much lower values of particle number concentrations and ice water content compared to MON cases, indicating large differences in the ice initiation and growth processes between these cloud regimes. This study provided compelling evidence that in addition to dynamics, aerosol and moisture are important for modulating ice microphysical processes in PRE and MON clouds through impacts on cloud drop size distribution. Significant differences are observed in the relationship of the slope and intercept parameters of the fitted particle size distributions (PSDs) with temperature in PRE and MON clouds. The intercept values are higher in MON clouds than PRE for exponential distribution which can be attributed to higher cloud particle number concentrations and ice water content in MON clouds. The PRE clouds tend to have larger values of dispersion of gamma size distributions than MON clouds, signifying narrower spectra. The relationships between PSDs parameters are presented and compared with previous observations.

  18. System for enhanced longevity of in situ microbial filter used for bioremediation

    DOEpatents

    Carman, M. Leslie (San Ramon, CA); Taylor, Robert T. (Roseville, CA)

    2000-01-01

    An improved method for in situ microbial filter bioremediation having increasingly operational longevity of an in situ microbial filter emplaced into an aquifer. A method for generating a microbial filter of sufficient catalytic density and thickness, which has increased replenishment interval, improved bacteria attachment and detachment characteristics and the endogenous stability under in situ conditions. A system for in situ field water remediation.

  19. Method for enhanced longevity of in situ microbial filter used for bioremediation

    DOEpatents

    Carman, M. Leslie (San Ramon, CA); Taylor, Robert T. (Roseville, CA)

    1999-01-01

    An improved method for in situ microbial filter bioremediation having increasingly operational longevity of an in situ microbial filter emplaced into an aquifer. A method for generating a microbial filter of sufficient catalytic density and thickness, which has increased replenishment interval, improved bacteria attachment and detachment characteristics and the endogenous stability under in situ conditions. A system for in situ field water remediation.

  20. In Situ Electron Microscopy Methods ``Seeing is believing'' is perhaps the mantra of every

    E-print Network

    Ferreira, Paulo J.

    In Situ Electron Microscopy Methods ``Seeing is believing'' is perhaps the mantra of every in situ of in situ microscopy is the shear breadth of experiments possible. To begin, electrons can be used advances and exciting new results at the frontier of in situ electron microscopy. Although not every

  1. Advanced physical models and monitoring methods for in situ bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, K.; Chalmer, P.

    1996-05-30

    Numerous reports have indicated that contamination at DOE facilities is widespread and pervasive. Existing technology is often too costly or ineffective in remediating these contamination problems. An effective method to address one class of contamination, petroleum hydrocarbons, is in situ bioremediation. This project was designed to provide tools and approaches for increasing the reliability of in situ bioremediation. An example of the recognition within DOE for developing these tools is in the FY-1995 Technology Development Needs Summary of the Office of Technology Development of the US DOE. This document identifies specific needs addressed by this research. For example, Section 3.3 Need Statement IS-3 identifies the need for a {open_quotes}Rapid method to detect in situ biodegradation products.{close_quotes} Also, BW-I identifies the need to recognize boundaries between clean and contaminated materials and soils. Metabolic activity could identify these boundaries. Measuring rates of in situ microbial activity is critical to the fundamental understanding of subsurface microbiology and in selecting natural attenuation as a remediation option. Given the complexity and heterogeneity of subsurface environments, a significant cost incurred during bioremediation is the characterization of microbial activity, in part because so many intermediate end points (biomass, gene frequency, laboratory measurements of activity, etc.) must be used to infer in situ activity. A fast, accurate, real-time, and cost-effective method is needed to determine success of bioremediation at DOE sites.

  2. Frontiers of in situ electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Haimei; Zhu, Yimei; Meng, Shirley Ying

    2015-01-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has become an increasingly important tool for materials characterization. It provides key information on the structural dynamics of a material during transformations and the correlation between structure and properties of materials. With the recent advances in instrumentation, including aberration corrected optics, sample environment control, the sample stage, and fast and sensitive data acquisition, in situ TEM characterization has become more and more powerful. In this article, a brief review of the current status and future opportunities of in situ TEM is included. It also provides an introduction to the six articles covered by in this issue of MRS Bulletin explore the frontiers of in situ electron microscopy, including liquid and gas environmental TEM, dynamic four-dimensional TEM, nanomechanics, ferroelectric domain switching studied by in situ TEM, and state-of-the-art atomic imaging of light elements (i.e., carbon atoms) and individual defects.

  3. In situ measurements of phytoplankton fluorescence using low cost electronics.

    PubMed

    Leeuw, Thomas; Boss, Emmanuel S; Wright, Dana L

    2013-01-01

    Chlorophyll a fluorometry has long been used as a method to study phytoplankton in the ocean. In situ fluorometry is used frequently in oceanography to provide depth-resolved estimates of phytoplankton biomass. However, the high price of commercially manufactured in situ fluorometers has made them unavailable to some individuals and institutions. Presented here is an investigation into building an in situ fluorometer using low cost electronics. The goal was to construct an easily reproducible in situ fluorometer from simple and widely available electronic components. The simplicity and modest cost of the sensor makes it valuable to students and professionals alike. Open source sharing of architecture and software will allow students to reconstruct and customize the sensor on a small budget. Research applications that require numerous in situ fluorometers or expendable fluorometers can also benefit from this study. The sensor costs US$150.00 and can be constructed with little to no previous experience. The sensor uses a blue LED to excite chlorophyll a and measures fluorescence using a silicon photodiode. The sensor is controlled by an Arduino microcontroller that also serves as a data logger. PMID:23783738

  4. In situ Measurements of Phytoplankton Fluorescence Using Low Cost Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Leeuw, Thomas; Boss, Emmanuel S.; Wright, Dana L.

    2013-01-01

    Chlorophyll a fluorometry has long been used as a method to study phytoplankton in the ocean. In situ fluorometry is used frequently in oceanography to provide depth-resolved estimates of phytoplankton biomass. However, the high price of commercially manufactured in situ fluorometers has made them unavailable to some individuals and institutions. Presented here is an investigation into building an in situ fluorometer using low cost electronics. The goal was to construct an easily reproducible in situ fluorometer from simple and widely available electronic components. The simplicity and modest cost of the sensor makes it valuable to students and professionals alike. Open source sharing of architecture and software will allow students to reconstruct and customize the sensor on a small budget. Research applications that require numerous in situ fluorometers or expendable fluorometers can also benefit from this study. The sensor costs US$150.00 and can be constructed with little to no previous experience. The sensor uses a blue LED to excite chlorophyll a and measures fluorescence using a silicon photodiode. The sensor is controlled by an Arduino microcontroller that also serves as a data logger. PMID:23783738

  5. In Situ Monitoring of Hafnium Oxide Atomic Layer Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslar, J. E.; Hurst, W. S.; Burgess, D. R.; Kimes, W. A.; Nguyen, N. V.; Moore, E. F.

    2007-09-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is increasingly being utilized as a method of depositing the thin (nanometer-scale), conformal layers required for microelectronics applications such as high ? gate dielectric layers and diffusion barriers. However, significant process development issues remain for implementation of this technology in many applications. One potential solution to some process development issues is in situ monitoring. In situ monitoring of atomic layer deposition processes has the potential to yield insights that will enable efficiencies in film growth, in the development of deposition recipes, and in the design and qualification of reactors. However, demonstrations of in situ monitoring of actual atomic layer deposition processes are limited. In this work, the species present in the gas phase during atomic layer deposition of hafnium oxide were investigated in an attempt to gain insight into the chemistry of this system and evaluate potential in situ gas phase optical monitors. Hafnium oxide was deposited on a silicon substrate using tetrakis(ethylmethylamino) hafnium (TEMAH) and water as the hafnium and oxygen sources, respectively. In situ infrared absorption spectroscopic measurements were performed near the growth surface in a research-grade, horizontal-flow reactor under a range of deposition conditions. Density functional theory quantum calculations of vibrational frequencies of expected species were used to facilitate identification of observed spectral features.

  6. Radiation Metabolomics. 3. Biomarker Discovery in the Urine of Gamma-Irradiated Rats Using a Simplified Metabolomics Protocol of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Combined with Random Forests Machine Learning Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Lanz, Christian; Patterson, Andrew D.; Slavík, Josef; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Ledermann, Monika; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Idle, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    Radiation metabolomics employing mass spectral technologies represents a plausible means of high-throughput minimally invasive radiation biodosimetry. A simplified metabolomics protocol is described that employs ubiquitous gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and open source software including random forests machine learning algorithm to uncover latent biomarkers of 3 Gy ? radiation in rats. Urine was collected from six male Wistar rats and six sham-irradiated controls for 7 days, 4 prior to irradiation and 3 after irradiation. Water and food consumption, urine volume, body weight, and sodium, potassium, calcium, chloride, phosphate and urea excretion showed major effects from exposure to ? radiation. The metabolomics protocol uncovered several urinary metabolites that were significantly up-regulated (glyoxylate, threonate, thymine, uracil, p-cresol) and down-regulated (citrate, 2-oxoglutarate, adipate, pimelate, suberate, azelaate) as a result of radiation exposure. Thymine and uracil were shown to derive largely from thymidine and 2?-deoxyuridine, which are known radiation biomarkers in the mouse. The radiation metabolomic phenotype in rats appeared to derive from oxidative stress and effects on kidney function. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is a promising platform on which to develop the field of radiation metabolomics further and to assist in the design of instrumentation for use in detecting biological consequences of environmental radiation release. PMID:19630524

  7. Gas Chromatography -Mass Spectrometry

    E-print Network

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    GCMS - 1 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS OF ETHANOL AND BENZENE IN GASOLINE Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;GCMS - 2 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS). The goal of this experiment is to separate the components in a sample of gasoline using Gas Chromatography

  8. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  9. In situ, spatially resolved biosignature detection at the microbial scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williford, K. H.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Hallmann, C.; Kitajima, K.; Kozdon, R.; Summons, R. E.; Kudryavstev, A.; Lepot, K.; Schopf, J.; Spicuzza, M.; Sugitani, K.; Ushikubo, T.; van Kranendonk, M.; Valley, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Whether life has ever existed beyond Earth is one of the great human questions. The Science Definition Team (SDT) for the proposed NASA Mars 2020 rover mission recently announced a suggested approach for NASA to 'demonstrate significant technical progress towards the future return of scientifically selected, well-documented samples to Earth' in part 'to investigate whether Mars was ever inhabited by microbial life.' The SDT further recommended a per-sample volume of 8 cm3 [1] (e.g., a core with a diameter of 1 cm and length of 10 cm). Such samples would be the first available for scientific inquiry with the potential to definitively answer the fundamental question of astrobiology, and their small volume would necessitate analysis with non- or minimally destructive techniques. Potential biosignatures include 'chemical, isotopic, mineralogical, and morphological features that can be created by life and also appear to be inconsistent with nonbiological processes'[1]. Guidelines for biosignature detection in extraterrestrial samples derive in part from the search for evidence of life in the most ancient sedimentary rocks on Earth, wherein the most compelling case for biogenicity is made when these 'chemical, isotopic, mineralogical, and morphological features' occur in association. Sedimentary rocks deposited on Earth prior to ~3.5 billion years ago (i.e., when persistent surface water [e.g., 2] likely supported habitable environments on Mars) have only very rarely escaped severe alteration by metamorphism and metasomatism. Understanding how these processes have operated on Earth through strategic interrogation of biosignature alteration records in (meta)sedimentary rocks is thus a critical task in the search for extraterrestrial life. Here we present techniques for and results of in situ, spatially resolved, non- or minimally destructive detection of morphological, elemental, molecular, and light stable isotopic biosignatures, as well as records of alteration, in Precambrian sedimentary rocks from Earth in the context of the eventual analysis of samples returned from Mars. Sample acquisition and preparation, morphological analysis by conventional light, confocal laser, and electron microscopy, elemental analysis by energy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy, molecular analysis by laser Raman microscopy, carbon isotope analysis of organic matter and carbonate minerals, and multiple sulfur isotope analysis of pyrite with secondary ion mass spectrometry will be discussed. New and recently published [3-5] results from the application of these methods towards detection of the signatures of life, environment, and alteration history in rocks containing putative and bona fide microfossils ranging in age from 0.6 to 3.5 billion years, and in rocks of similar age lacking morphological biosignatures, as well as our current understanding of key challenges and opportunities for future research will be reviewed. [1] Mustard, J.F. et al. 2013. Report of the Mars 2020 Science Definition Team, 154 pp., posted by MEPAG at http://mepag.jpl.nasa.gov/reports/MEP/Mars_2020_SDT_Report_Final.pdf. [2] Williams, R.M.E. et al. 2013. Science 340: 1068-1072. [3] Williford, K.H. et al. 2011. GCA 75: 5686-5705. [4] Williford, K.H. et al. 2013. GCA 104: 165-182. [5] Lepot, K. et al. 2013. GCA 112: 66-86.

  10. In Situ Electrochemical Transmission Electron Microscopy for Battery Research

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdi, Beata L.; Gu, Meng; Parent, Lucas R.; Xu, Wu; Nasybulin, Eduard N.; Chen, Xilin; Unocic, Raymond R.; Xu, Pinghong; Welch, David A.; Abellan, Patricia; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong M.; Arslan, Ilke; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2014-04-01

    The recent development of in situ liquid stages for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes now makes it possible for us to study the details of electrochemical processes under operando conditions. As electrochemical processes are complex, care must be taken to calibrate the system before any in situ/operando observations. In addition, as the electron beam can cause effects that look similar to electrochemical processes at the electrolyte/electrode interface, an understanding of the role of the electron beam in modifying the operando observations must also be understood. In this paper we describe the design, assembly, and operation of an in situ electrochemical cell, paying particular attention to the method for controlling and quantifying the experimental parameters. The use of this system is then demonstrated for the lithiation/delithiation of silicon nanowires.

  11. Software integration of in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maung, Sonny; Henck, Steven A.; Duncan, Walter M.; Mahlum, Doug; Sheng, Chyi

    1994-02-01

    In situ sensors are key tools for flexible manufacturing environments where wafers with diverse specifications are processed interspersed through common chambers. This is in contrast to conventional batch processing where pilot wafers, ex situ measurement, and statistical method are employed for process control. In the present work, we discuss integration of in situ spectral ellipsometry (SE) into several processes of a flexible manufacturing environment. In situ SE enables real-time wafer-to-wafer compensation for equipment and process drifts and also equipment prognosis. The capability of the TI SE is discussed together with the implementation issues of solving the inverse problem in real time. A robust endpoint detection algorithm using TI SE is presented. Also addressed are the issues in the integration of the SE with the machine control as well as with the computer integrated manufacturing factory for feedforward and feedback control.

  12. In-situ electrochemical transmission electron microscopy for battery research.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, B Layla; Gu, Meng; Parent, Lucas R; Xu, Wu; Nasybulin, Eduard N; Chen, Xilin; Unocic, Raymond R; Xu, Pinghong; Welch, David A; Abellan, Patricia; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong-Min; Arslan, Ilke; Evans, James; Browning, Nigel D

    2014-04-01

    The recent development of in-situ liquid stages for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes now makes it possible for us to study the details of electrochemical processes under operando conditions. As electrochemical processes are complex, care must be taken to calibrate the system before any in-situ/operando observations. In addition, as the electron beam can cause effects that look similar to electrochemical processes at the electrolyte/electrode interface, an understanding of the role of the electron beam in modifying the operando observations must also be understood. In this paper we describe the design, assembly, and operation of an in-situ electrochemical cell, paying particular attention to the method for controlling and quantifying the experimental parameters. The use of this system is then demonstrated for the lithiation/delithiation of silicon nanowires. PMID:24755142

  13. In situ biodegradation: Microbiological patterns in a contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, E.L.; Sinclair, J.L.; Ghiorse, W.C. )

    1991-05-10

    Conventional approaches for proving in situ biodegradation of organic pollutants in aquifers have severe limitations. In the approach described here, patterns in a comprehensive set of microbiological activity and distribution data were analyzed. Measurements were performed on sediment samples gathered at consistent depths in aquifer boreholes spanning a gradient of contaminant concentrations at a buried coal tar site. Microbial adaptation to polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was demonstrated by mineralization of naphthalene and phenanthrene in samples from PAH-contaminated, but not adjacent pristine, zones. Furthermore, contaminant-stimulated in situ bacterial growth was indicated because enhanced numbers of protozoa and their bacterial prey were found exclusively in contaminated subsurface samples. The data suggest that many convergent lines of logically linked indirect evidence can effectively document in situ biodegradation of aquifer contaminants.

  14. In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Jerry

    1998-01-01

    The question "Why In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU)?" is addressed in this presentation. The reasons given concentrate on Cost reduction, Mass reduction, Risk reduction, the expansion of human exploration and presence and the enabling of industrial exploitation. A review of the Martian and Lunar resources available for ISRU is presented. Other ISRU concepts (i.e., In-Situ Consumable production (ISCP) and In-Situ Propellant Production (ISPP)) are introduced and further explained. The objectives of a Mars ISRU System Technology (MIST) include (1) the characterization of technology and subsystem performance for mission modeling and technology funding planning, (2) reduce risk and concerns arising from sample return and human missions utilizing ISRU, and (3) demonstrate the environmental suitability of ISRU components/processes and systems. A proof of concept demonstration schedule and a facility overview for MIST is presented.

  15. NMR methods for in-situ biofilm metabolism studies

    SciTech Connect

    Majors, Paul D.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Pinchuk, Gregory E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Minard, Kevin R.; Wind, Robert A.

    2005-09-01

    Novel procedures and instrumentation are described for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging studies of live, in situ microbial films. A perfused NMR/optical microscope sample chamber containing a planar biofilm support was integrated into a recirculation/dilution flow loop growth reactor system and used to grow in situ Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 biofilms. Localized NMR techniques were developed and used to non-invasively monitor time-resolved metabolite concentrations and to image the biomass volume and distribution. As a first illustration of the feasibility of the methodology an initial 13C-labeled lactate metabolic pathway study was performed, yielding results consistent with existing genomic data for MR-1. These results represent progress toward our ultimate goal of correlating time- and depth-resolved metabolism and mass transport with gene expression in live in situ biofilms using combined NMR/optical microscopy techniques.

  16. In-Situ Electrochemical Transmission Electron Microscopy for Battery Research

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdi, Beata L; Gu, Meng; Parent, Lucas; Xu, WU; Nasybulin, Eduard; Chen, Xilin; Unocic, Raymond R; Xu, Pinghong; Welch, David; Abellan, Patricia; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chongmin; Arslan, Ilke; Evans, James E; Browning, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of in-situ liquid stages for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes now makes it possible for us to study the details of electrochemical processes under operando conditions. As electrochemical processes are complex, care must be taken to calibrate the system before any in-situ/operando observations. In addition, as the electron beam can cause effects that look similar to electrochemical processes at the electrolyte/electrode interface, an understanding of the role of the electron beam in modifying the operando observations must also be understood. In this paper we describe the design, assembly, and operation of an in-situ electrochemical cell, paying particular attention to the method for controlling and quantifying the experimental parameters. The use of this system is then demonstrated for the lithiation/delithiation of silicon nanowires.

  17. Production rates of terrestrial in-situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.; Tuniz, C.; Fink, D.

    1993-12-31

    Production rates of cosmogenic nuclides made in situ in terrestrial samples and how they are applied to the interpretation of measured radionuclide concentrations were discussed at a one-day Workshop held 2 October 1993 in Sydney, Australia. The status of terrestrial in-situ studies using the long-lived radionuclides {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, and {sup 41}Ca and of various modeling and related studies were presented. The relative uncertainties in the various factors that go into the interpretation of these terrestrial in-situ cosmogenic nuclides were discussed. The magnitudes of the errors for these factors were estimated and none dominated the final uncertainty.

  18. Robot-Assisted Antegrade In-Situ Fenestrated Stent Grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Riga, Celia V. Bicknell, Colin D.; Wallace, Daniel; Hamady, Mohamad; Cheshire, Nicholas

    2009-05-15

    To determine the technical feasibility of a novel approach of in-situ fenestration of aortic stent grafts by using a remotely controlled robotic steerable catheter system in the porcine model. A 65-kg pig underwent robot-assisted bilateral antegrade in-situ renal fenestration of an abdominal aortic stent graft with subsequent successful deployment of a bare metal stent into the right renal artery. A 16-mm iliac extension covered stent served as the porcine aortic endograft. Under fluoroscopic guidance, the graft was punctured with a 20-G customized diathermy needle that was introduced and kept in place by the robotic arm. The needle was exchanged for a 4 x 20 mm cutting balloon before successful deployment of the renal stent. Robot-assisted antegrade in-situ fenestration is technically feasible in a large mammalian model. The robotic system enables precise manipulation, stable positioning, and minimum instrumentation of the aorta and its branches while minimizing radiation exposure.

  19. In-situ Rock Spalling Strength near Excavation Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, M.; Kaiser, P. K.

    2014-03-01

    It is widely accepted that the in-situ strength of massive rocks is approximately 0.4 ± 0.1 UCS, where UCS is the uniaxial compressive strength obtained from unconfined tests using diamond drilling core samples with a diameter around 50 mm. In addition, it has been suggested that the in-situ rock spalling strength, i.e., the strength of the wall of an excavation when spalling initiates, can be set to the crack initiation stress determined from laboratory tests or field microseismic monitoring. These findings were supported by back-analysis of case histories where failure had been carefully documented, using either Kirsch's solution (with approximated circular tunnel geometry and hence ? max = 3? 1 -? 3) or simplified numerical stress modeling (with a smooth tunnel wall boundary) to approximate the maximum tangential stress ? max at the excavation boundary. The ratio of ? max /UCS is related to the observed depth of failure and failure initiation occurs when ? max is roughly equal to 0.4 ± 0.1 UCS. In this article, it is suggested that these approaches ignore one of the most important factors, the irregularity of the excavation boundary, when interpreting the in-situ rock strength. It is demonstrated that the "actual" in-situ spalling strength of massive rocks is not equal to 0.4 ± 0.1 UCS, but can be as high as 0.8 ± 0.05 UCS when surface irregularities are considered. It is demonstrated using the Mine-by tunnel notch breakout example that when the realistic "as-built" excavation boundary condition is honored, the "actual" in-situ rock strength, given by 0.8 UCS, can be applied to simulate progressive brittle rock failure process satisfactorily. The interpreted, reduced in-situ rock strength of 0.4 ± 0.1 UCS without considering geometry irregularity is therefore only an "apparent" rock strength.

  20. Improving Ion Implanter Productivity with In-situ Cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, Steve; Perry, Alfred

    2011-01-07

    Ion source lifetime is generally a critical factor in overall implanter productivity. However, extended ion source life only provides value in a manufacturing environment if the ion beam remains stable. As an ion source ages, apertures and insulators become coated with conductive dopant residues which cause beam instabilities, resulting in implant stoppages. These stoppages create failures and/or assists which are logged in the implanter's data files. Analog Devices has recently evaluated in-situ ion source cleaning based on use of xenon difluoride chemistry. The paper will describe how the in-situ cleaning decreased logged failures/assists, resulting in increased implanter productivity.

  1. In situ spectroscopic studies in hydroformylation of olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, I.T.

    1995-12-01

    Since most hydroformylation (or oxo) processes are performed above atmospheric pressure, high pressure IR and NMR have been extensively for mechanistic studies. The initial goal of these studies is to develop a molecular snapshot of reactions which are part of or connected to the catalytic cycle. A generalized catalytic cycle and relevant spectroscopic opportunities will be described. The in situ spectroscopic data combined with other mechanistic information could lead to the design of novel catalyst system(s) targeting strict process requirements. The application of in situ IR and/or NMR will be demonstrated for cobalt and rhodium based catalyst systems modified by various phosphines.

  2. In situ remediation integrated program: Success through teamwork

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, M.E.

    1994-08-01

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP), managed under the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Technology Development, focuses research and development efforts on the in-place treatment of contaminated environmental media, such as soil and groundwater, and the containment of contaminants to prevent the contaminants from spreading through the environment. As described here, specific ISR IP projects are advancing the application of in situ technologies to the demonstration point, providing developed technologies to customers within DOE. The ISR IP has also taken a lead role in assessing and supporting innovative technologies that may have application to DOE.

  3. In-Situ Investigation of Advanced Structural Coatings and Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ustundag, Ersan

    2003-01-01

    The premise of this project is a comprehensive study that involves the in-situ characterization of advanced coatings and composites by employing both neutron and x-ray diffraction techniques in a complementary manner. The diffraction data would then be interpreted and used in developing or validating advanced micromechanics models with life prediction capability. In the period covered by this report, basic work was conducted to establish the experimental conditions for various specimens and techniques. In addition, equipment was developed that will allow the in-situ studies under a range of conditions (stress, temperature, atmosphere, etc.).

  4. In-situ measurements of lunar heat flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langseth, M. G.; Keihm, S. J.

    1974-01-01

    During the Apollo program two successful heat flow measurements were made in situ on the lunar surface. At the Apollo 15 site a value of 0.0000031 watts/sqcm was measured and at the Apollo 17 site a value of 0.0000022 watts/sqcm was determined. Both measurements have uncertainty limits of + or - 20% and have been corrected for perturbing topographic effects. The apparent difference between the observations may correlate with observed variations in the surface abundance of thorium. Comparison with earlier determinations of heat flow, using the microwave emission spectrum from the moon, gives support to the high gradients and heat flows observed in situ.

  5. Electrochemical cell for in-situ x-ray characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, D.H.; Ingersoll, D.; Rodriguez, M.A.

    1998-08-04

    An electrochemical cell suitable for in-situ XRD analysis is presented. Qualitative information such as phase formation and phase stability can be easily monitored using the in-situ cell design. Quantitative information such as lattice parameters and kinetic behavior is also straightforward. Analysis of the LiMn&sub2;O&sub4; spinel using this cell design shows that the lattice undergoes two major structural shrinkages at approx. 4.0 V and approx. 4.07 V during charging. These shrinkages correlate well with the two electrochemical waves observed and indicate the likelihood of two separate redox processes which charging and discharging.

  6. A simplified In Situ cosmogenic 14C extraction system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigati, J.S.; Lifton, N.A.; Timothy, Jull A.J.; Quade, Jay

    2010-01-01

    We describe the design, construction, and testing of a new, simplified in situ radiocarbon extraction system at the University of Arizona. Blank levels for the new system are low ((234 ?? 11) ?? 103 atoms (1 ??; n = 7)) and stable. The precision of a given measurement depends on the concentration of 14C, but is typically <5% for concentrations of 100 ?? 103 atoms g-1 or more. The new system is relatively small and easy to construct, costs significantly less than the original in situ 14C extraction system at Arizona, and lends itself to future automation. ?? 2010 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona.

  7. Wh-in-Situ in Bahasa Indonesia and Choice Function

    E-print Network

    Sato, Yosuke; Yuliani, Dwi Hesti

    2008-01-01

    Indonesia and Choice Function* Yosuke Sato and Dwi Hesti Yuliani University of Arizona, Tucson and Al-Huda Islamic School, Tucson 1. Introduction This paper addresses the question of what is the licensing mechanism of wh-in-situ in Bahasa... Indonesia/BI. We argue that the relevant mechanism is choice function à la Reinhart (1997, 1998). 2. Wh-in-situ in Bahasa Indonesia BI has three ways of forming wh-questions: i) overt syntactic movement to the scopal [Spec, CP], ii) partial syntactic...

  8. In situ evaporation of lithium for LEVIS ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, B.; Lopez, M.; Lamppa, K.; Stearns, W.; Bieg, K.

    1994-05-01

    This report describes the In Situ evaporation of pure lithium on the anode of PBFA II which then can be evaporated and ionized by Laser Evaporation and Ionization Source (LEVIS). Included in this report are the necessary calculations, light laboratory experiments and details of the hardware for PBFA II. This report gives all the details of In Situ evaporation for PBFA II so when a decision is made to provide an active lithium source for PBFA II, it can be fielded in a minimum of time.

  9. In-situ Moessbauer Spectroscopy of Supported Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts During Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Motjope, Thato R.; Dlamini, Thulani H.

    2005-04-26

    The behavior of Fe based catalysts supported on ZrO2, SiO2, {gamma}-Al2O3, CeO2 and TiO2 during calcination, reduction and FT synthesis have been studied via in situ Moessbauer spectroscopy. It was found that the type of metal support interaction i.e. surface migration or bulk diffusion during calcination was dependant on the type of support used. Surface migration of Fe3+ during calcination was dominant for ZrO2, CeO2 and {gamma}-Al2O3 and this resulted in the sintering of {alpha}-Fe2O3 crystallites. Whereas bulk diffusion was observed mainly for the catalysts prepared using SiO2 and TiO2, causing a stabilization of the small crystallites of Fe3+ that interacted strongly with the support. Upon reduction, the large crystallites of {alpha}-Fe2O3 were found to reduce readily compared to the small crystallites of Fe3+, except for the catalyst prepared using {gamma}-Al2O3, as a support, where the presence of Al3+ resulted in the formation of spinel like species with the formula (Fe{sup 3+}{sub 2-x}Al{sup 3+}{sub x}Fe{sup 2+})O{sub 4} which are resistant to reduction. Upon exposure to synthesis gas, it was found that catalysts supported on ZrO2 and CeO2 carburized readily resulting in the formation of circa 80% {chi}-Fe2.5C. From this study it was observed that {gamma}-Al2O3 is not the preferred support for Fe based FT catalysts, as it forms the least amount of Fe carbides during FT synthesis.

  10. Structure formation and characterization of injectable drug loaded biodegradable devices: in situ implants versus in situ microparticles.

    PubMed

    Kranz, H; Bodmeier, R

    2008-07-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate key formulation variables affecting the release of bupivacaine hydrochloride, a local anesthetic, from different in situ forming biodegradable drug delivery devices. The formulations included ISM systems [in situ microparticles, a poly(lactide)-solvent phase dispersed into an external oil phase] and poly(lactide) solutions (in situ implant systems). The solubility of the biodegradable polymer poly(d,l-lactide) (PLA) in various organic solvents was determined using the Hansen multicomponent solubility parameter concept. The solvent release from ISM and polymer solutions into phosphate buffer which influences the polymer precipitation rate was investigated as a function of the type of solvent, polymer concentration and polymer:oil phase ratio by using a HPLC assay. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed in order to relate the drug release to the surface properties of the precipitated implants or microparticles. Suitable solvents for the preparation of the in situ forming drug delivery systems, such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and 2-pyrrolidone were found using the Hansen multicomponent solubility parameter concept. The injection of the polymer solutions (in situ implants) into the aqueous medium led to a rapid solvent/non-solvent exchange. The resulting in situ implants were porous, thus explaining the rapid initial drug release. Upon contact with the release medium, the internal polymer phase of the ISM system solidified and formed microparticles as shown by SEM measurements. Due to the presence of an external oil phase the solvent release into the buffer medium from ISM was significantly slower compared to the polymer solutions. The solvent release of the ISM systems into the phosphate buffer decreased with increasing polymer concentration and decreasing polymer:oil phase ratio. The type of solvent used also affected the solvent release. A slower solvent release into the aqueous medium resulted in less porous microparticles, thus explaining the reduced initial drug release from ISM systems compared to the polymer solutions. PMID:18501569

  11. Coupling In Situ TEM and Ex Situ Analysis to Understand Heterogeneous Sodiation of Antimony.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Tan, Xuehai; Li, Peng; Kalisvaart, Peter; Janish, Matthew T; Mook, William M; Luber, Erik J; Jungjohann, Katherine L; Carter, C Barry; Mitlin, David

    2015-10-14

    We employed an in situ electrochemical cell in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) together with ex situ time-of-flight, secondary-ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) depth profiling, and FIB-helium ion scanning microscope (HIM) imaging to detail the structural and compositional changes associated with Na/Na(+) charging/discharging of 50 and 100 nm thin films of Sb. TOF-SIMS on a partially sodiated 100 nm Sb film gives a Na signal that progressively decreases toward the current collector, indicating that sodiation does not proceed uniformly. This heterogeneity will lead to local volumetric expansion gradients that would in turn serve as a major source of intrinsic stress in the microstructure. In situ TEM shows time-dependent buckling and localized separation of the sodiated films from their TiN-Ge nanowire support, which is a mechanism of stress-relaxation. Localized horizontal fracture does not occur directly at the interface, but rather at a short distance away within the bulk of the Sb. HIM images of FIB cross sections taken from sodiated half-cells, electrically disconnected, and aged at room temperature, demonstrate nonuniform film swelling and the onset of analogous through-bulk separation. TOF-SIMS highlights time-dependent segregation of Na within the structure, both to the film-current collector interface and to the film surface where a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) exists, agreeing with the electrochemical impedance results that show time-dependent increase of the films' charge transfer resistance. We propose that Na segregation serves as a secondary source of stress relief, which occurs over somewhat longer time scales. PMID:26389786

  12. Diagnosis of In Situ Metabolic State and Rates of Microbial Metabolism During In Situ Uranium Bioremediation with Molecular Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, Derek R

    2012-11-28

    The goal of these projects was to develop molecule tools to tract the metabolic activity and physiological status of microorganisms during in situ uranium bioremediation. Such information is important in able to design improved bioremediation strategies. As summarized below, the research was highly successful with new strategies developed for estimating in situ rates of metabolism and diagnosing the physiological status of the predominant subsurface microorganisms. This is a first not only for groundwater bioremediation studies, but also for subsurface microbiology in general. The tools and approaches developed in these studies should be applicable to the study of microbial communities in a diversity of soils and sediments.

  13. Mass Spectrometry on Future Mars Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry investigations on the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and the 2018 ExoMars missions will address core science objectives related to the potential habitability of their landing site environments and more generally the near-surface organic inventory of Mars. The analysis of complex solid samples by mass spectrometry is a well-known approach that can provide a broad and sensitive survey of organic and inorganic compounds as well as supportive data for mineralogical analysis. The science value of such compositional information is maximized when one appreciates the particular opportunities and limitations of in situ analysis with resource-constrained instrumentation in the context of a complete science payload and applied to materials found in a particular environment. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation on MSL and the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation on ExoMars will thus benefit from and inform broad-based analog field site work linked to the Mars environments where such analysis will occur.

  14. Galileo In-Situ Dust Measurements in Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    E-print Network

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    collected until a spacecraft anomaly at 2.33RJ (Jupiter radii) just 16 min after a close flyby of Amalthea of these tiny motes in the Amalthea gossamer ring compared to the Thebe ring. The size distribution for the Amalthea ring derived from our in- situ measurements for the small grains agrees very well with the one

  15. In situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Minor, Andrew M.

    2002-12-02

    This dissertation presents the development of the novel mechanical testing technique of in situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). This technique makes it possible to simultaneously observe and quantify the mechanical behavior of nano-scale volumes of solids.

  16. In?situ studies of solvothermal synthesis of energy materials.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kirsten M Ø; Tyrsted, Christoffer; Bremholm, Martin; Iversen, Bo B

    2014-06-01

    Solvothermal and hydrothermal synthesis, that is, synthesis taking place in a solvent at elevated temperature and pressure, is a powerful technique for the production of advanced energy materials as it is versatile, cheap, and environmentally friendly. However, the fundamental reaction mechanisms dictating particle formation and growth under solvothermal conditions are not well understood. In order to produce tailor-made materials with specific properties for advanced energy technologies, it is essential to obtain an improved understanding of these processes and, in this context, in?situ studies are an important tool as they provide real time information on the reactions taking place. Here, we present a review of the use of powder diffraction and total scattering methods for in?situ studies of synthesis taking place under solvothermal and hydrothermal conditions. The experimental setups used for in?situ X-ray and neutron studies are presented, and methods of data analysis are described. Special attention is given to the methods used to extract structural information from the data, for example, Rietveld refinement, whole powder pattern modelling and pair distribution function analysis. Examples of in?situ studies are presented to illustrate the types of chemical insight that can be obtained. PMID:24599741

  17. Product evaluation of in situ vitrification engineering, Test 4

    SciTech Connect

    Loehr, C.A.; Weidner, J.R.; Bates, S.O.

    1991-09-01

    This report is one of several that evaluates the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) Engineering-Scale Test 4 (ES-4). This document describes the chemical and physical composition, microstructure, and leaching characteristics of ES-4 product samples; these data provide insight into the expected performance of a vitrified product in an ISV buried waste application similar to that studied in ES-4.

  18. IN-SITU FENTON OXIDATION: A CRITICAL ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In-situ Fenton oxidation (ISFO) is a rapidly emerging technology which involves the injection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and other chemical reagents into the subsurface for the purpose of oxidizing and transforming contaminants. ISFO is being applied at an increasing number of ...

  19. Penetrating the Oxide Barrier in Situ and Separating Freestanding Porous

    E-print Network

    -16 carbon nanotubes,17 and metal and alumina nanotubule membranes.18,19 Relative to other porous mediaPenetrating the Oxide Barrier in Situ and Separating Freestanding Porous Anodic Alumina Films this procedure. Porous membranes with pore diameters from nanometers to micrometers have been used extensively

  20. ELECTROCHEMICAL PROCESSES FOR IN-SITU TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project will study electrochemical processes for the in situ treatment of soils contaminated by mixed wastes, i.e., organic and inorganic. Soil samples collected from selected DOE waste sites will be characterized for specific organic and metal contaminants and hydraulic per...

  1. IN-SITU CHEMICAL OXIDATION - DNAPL MASS REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is a rapidly developing technology used at hazardous waste sites where oxidants and complimentary reagents are injected into the subsurface to transform organic contaminants into less toxic byproducts. This technology is being used at new sites ...

  2. In-situ mechanical testing during X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Van Swygenhoven, Helena Van Petegem, Steven

    2013-04-15

    Deforming metals during recording X-ray diffraction patterns is a useful tool to get a deeper understanding of the coupling between microstructure and mechanical behaviour. With the advances in flux, detector speed and focussing techniques at synchrotron facilities, in-situ mechanical testing is now possible during powder diffraction and Laue diffraction. The basic principle is explained together with illustrative examples.

  3. RETROSPECTIVE PERFORMANCE EVALUATION ON IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION: SITE CHARACTERIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Performance of in situ bioremediation was demonstrated at a shallow water site with subsurface contamination of used crankcase oil, diesel fuel, gasoline, and other oily phase products. reatment involved ground water amendment by hydrogen peroxide and nutrients by a recharge gall...

  4. Identification of dermatophyte species using genomic in situ hybridization (GISH).

    PubMed

    Worek, Mariusz; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Ciesielska, Anita; Jaworski, Adam; Kaplan, Jakub; Miedziak, Beata; Deregowska, Anna; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2014-05-01

    A genomic in situ hybridization (GISH)-based method for dermatophyte identification has been developed. Using specific GISH probes, discrimination between Trichophyton interdigitale, Trichophyton rubrum and Microsporum canis has been conducted. Moreover, GISH has been found particularly helpful when proper dermatophyte identification was difficult due to ambiguous PCR-RFLP patterns. PMID:24589627

  5. IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED UNSATURATED SUBSURFACE SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An emerging technology for the remediation of unsaturated subsurface soils involves the use of microorganisms to degrade contaminants which are present in such soils. nderstanding the processes which drive in situ bioremediation, as well as the effectiveness and efficiency of the...

  6. In Situ Enhanced Soil Mixing. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    In Situ Enhanced Soil Mixing (ISESM) is a treatment technology that has been demonstrated and deployed to remediate soils contaminated with volatile organic volatile organic (VOCs). The technology has been developed by industry and has been demonstrated with the assistance of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science and Technology and the Office of Environmental Restoration.

  7. Challenges in mobility and robotics for in-situ science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, B.

    2002-01-01

    In-situ science on planetary surfaces such as Mars, Venus, Mercury and Titan pose extreme challenges for mobile robots. Future missions will involve surface, subsurface, and atmospheric mobility which focuses the need for technology development in sensing, autonomy, and mobile robot architectures for solar system exploration.

  8. IN SITU Device for Real-Time Catalyst Deactivation Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fossil Energy Research

    2008-03-31

    SCR catalyst management has become an important operations and maintenance activity for coal-fired utility boilers in the United States. To facilitate this activity, a method to determine Catalyst Activity in situ is being developed. This report describes the methodology and presents the results of a two ozone season demonstration conducted at Alabama Power Company's Gorgas Unit 10 during the 2005 and 2006 ozone seasons. The results showed that the in situ measurements are in good agreement with the laboratory measurements and the technique has some advantages over the traditional laboratory method of determining Catalyst Activity and Reactor Potential. SCR Performance is determined by the overall Reactor Potential (the product of the Catalyst Activity and the available surface area per unit of flue gas). The in situ approach provides a direct measurement of Reactor Potential under actual operating conditions, whereas laboratory measurements of Catalyst Activity need to be coupled with estimates of catalyst pluggage and flue gas flowrate in order to assess Reactor Potential. The project also showed that the in situ activity results can easily be integrated into catalyst management software to aid in making informed catalyst decisions.

  9. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: IN-SITU VACUUM EXRACTION: TERRA VAC, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This in-situ vacuum extraction technology is a process for the removal and venting of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the vadose or unsaturated zone of soils. Often, these compounds can be removed from the vadose zone before they have a chance to contaminate groundwater. ...

  10. Terra Vac In Situ Vacuum Extraction System: Applications Analysis Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is an evaluation of the Terra Vac in situ vacuum extraction system and its applicability as a treatment method for waste site cleanup. This report analyzes the results from the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program’s 56-day demonstration at t...

  11. Bioprocessing of sweet sorghum with in situ-produced enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Tengerdy, R.P.; Szakacs, G.; Sipocz, J.

    1996-12-31

    Enzyme-assisted ensiling (ENLAC), using in situ-produced enzymes from Gliocladium sp. TUB-F-498, preserved 80% of the sugar content of sweet sorghum, and facilitated its extraction by countercurrent diffusion. The in situ enzyme was produced on the extracted sweet sorghum pulp by an 8-d solid substrate fermentation (SSF) with a yield of 4.6 cellulose and 400 IU/g dry wt xylanase. Two percent of the fermented substrate had cellulose and xylanase levels equivalent or superior to levels found in the commercial enzymes Celluclast and Viscozyme Novo at the 0.025% application level in ENLAC. The in situ-production of enzymes on recyclable substrates may reduce bioprocessing costs significantly. In this ENLAC process, the cost of the in situ enzymes is estimated to be about $0.12/metric ton (MT) substrate, compared to $9.5/metric ton for the commercial enzymes, a cost reduction of nearly 80-fold. 4 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Enhanced In Situ Bioremediation of BTEX-Contaminated Groundwater by

    E-print Network

    Bruns, Tom

    Enhanced In Situ Bioremediation of BTEX-Contaminated Groundwater by Combined Injection of Nitrate. Introduction Remediation by natural attenuation (RNA) is the preferred method (1) for addressing groundwater, at siteswherethenaturalgroundwaterflowisveryslow,intrinsic biodegradation processes can be limited by the rate at which the groundwater supplies

  13. IN SITU FIELD PORTABLE FINE PARTICLE MEASURING DEVICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the design, development, and testing of an in situ fine particle measuring device--the Fine Particle Stack Spectrometer System (FPSSS). It is a laser-fed optical system with detection by near-forward light scattering. Sample volume is established by a high-re...

  14. In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

  15. In-situ physical properties measurements using crosswell acoustic data

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.A.; Albright, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    Crosswell acoustic surveys enable the in-situ measurements of elastic moduli, Poisson's ratio, porosity, and apparent seismic Q of gas-bearing low-permeability formations represented at the Department of Energy Multi-Well Experiment (MWX) site near Rifle, Colorado. These measurements, except for Q, are compared with laboratory measurements on core taken from the same depths at which the crosswell measurements are made. Seismic Q determined in situ is compared to average values for sandstone. Porosity was determined from crosswell data using the empirical relationship between acoustic velocity, porosity, and effective pressure developed by Domenico. Domenico, S.N., ''Rock Lithology and Porosity Determination from Shear and compressional Wave Velocity,'' Geophysics, Vol. 49, No. 9, Aug. 1984, pp. 1188-1195. In-situ porosities are significantly greater than the core-derived values. Sources of the discrepancy may arise from (i) the underestimation of porosity that can result when Boyle's Law measurements are made on low-permeability core and (ii) the application of Dominico's relationship, which is developed for clean sands, to the mixed sandstone and shale lithologies represented at the MWX site. Values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio derived from crosswell measurements are comparable to values obtained from core. Apparent seismic Q measured in situ between wells is lower than Q measured on core and clearly shows the heterogeneity of sandstone deposited in a fluvial environment. 16 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Accelerating in Situ Endothelialisation of Cardiovascular Bypass Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Ee Teng; Wong, Eleanor; Farhatnia, Yasmin; Tan, Aaron; Seifalian, Alexander M.

    2014-01-01

    The patency of synthetic cardiovascular grafts in the long run is synonymous with their ability to inhibit the processes of intimal hyperplasia, thrombosis and calcification. In the human body, the endothelium of blood vessels exhibits characteristics that inhibit such processes. As such it is not surprising that research in tissue engineering is directed towards replicating the functionality of the natural endothelium in cardiovascular grafts. This can be done either by seeding the endothelium within the lumen of the grafts prior to implantation or by designing the graft such that in situ endothelialisation takes place after implantation. Due to certain difficulties identified with in vitro endothelialisation, in situ endothelialisation, which will be the focus of this article, has garnered interest in the last years. To promote in situ endothelialisation, the following aspects can be taken into account: (1) Endothelial progenital cell mobilization, adhesion and proliferation; (2) Regulating differentiation of progenitor cells to mature endothelium; (3) Preventing thrombogenesis and inflammation during endothelialisation. This article aims to review and compile recent developments to promote the in situ endothelialisation of cardiovascular grafts and subsequently improve their patency, which can also have widespread implications in the field of tissue engineering. PMID:25551605

  17. A FIVE-STAGE CYCLONE SYSTEM FOR IN SITU SAMPLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes the development and calibration of a five-stage cyclone system for in situ sampling of process streams. Cyclones may be used to advantage for collecting large samples and in sampling aerosols of high particulate concentration. At 25C, 28.3 L/min, and for a par...

  18. Method of making in-situ whisker reinforced glass ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Jesse J. (Christiansburg, VA); Hirschfeld, Deidre A. (Elliston, VA); Lee, K. H. (Blacksburg, VA)

    1993-02-16

    A heat processing procedure is used to create reinforcing whiskers of TiO.sub.2 in glass-ceramic materials in the LAS and MAS family. The heat processing procedure has particular application in creating TiO.sub.2 in-situ in a modified .beta.-eucryptite system.

  19. Operability test report for the in SITU vapor sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, J.E., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-31

    This report documents the successful completion of testing for the In Situ Vapor Sampling (ISVS) system. The report includes the test procedure (WHC-SD-WM-OTP-196, Rev OA), data sheets, exception resolutions, and a test report summary. This report conforms to the guidelines established in WHC-IP-1026, `Engineering Practice Guidelines,` Appendix L, `Operability Test Procedures and Reports.`

  20. In-Situ Use of Ground Water By Alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A replicated column lysimeter study was conducted over a 4 year period to determine the effect of groundwater salinity and depth to ground water on the in-situ use of groundwater by a salt tolerant alfalfa crop. The treatments included a control with no groundwater, and ground water with electrical ...