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Sample records for in-situ gas analysis

  1. Versatile in situ gas analysis apparatus for nanomaterials reactors.

    PubMed

    Meysami, Seyyed Shayan; Snoek, Lavina C; Grobert, Nicole

    2014-09-01

    We report a newly developed technique for the in situ real-time gas analysis of reactors commonly used for the production of nanomaterials, by showing case-study results obtained using a dedicated apparatus for measuring the gas composition in reactors operating at high temperature (<1000 °C). The in situ gas-cooled sampling probe mapped the chemistry inside the high-temperature reactor, while suppressing the thermal decomposition of the analytes. It thus allows a more accurate study of the mechanism of progressive thermocatalytic cracking of precursors compared to previously reported conventional residual gas analyses of the reactor exhaust gas and hence paves the way for the controlled production of novel nanomaterials with tailored properties. Our studies demonstrate that the composition of the precursors dynamically changes as they travel inside of the reactor, causing a nonuniform growth of nanomaterials. Moreover, mapping of the nanomaterials reactor using quantitative gas analysis revealed the actual contribution of thermocatalytic cracking and a quantification of individual precursor fragments. This information is particularly important for quality control of the produced nanomaterials and for the recycling of exhaust residues, ultimately leading toward a more cost-effective continuous production of nanomaterials in large quantities. Our case study of multiwall carbon nanotube synthesis was conducted using the probe in conjunction with chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. Given the similarities of this particular CVD setup to other CVD reactors and high-temperature setups generally used for nanomaterials synthesis, the concept and methodology of in situ gas analysis presented here does also apply to other systems, making it a versatile and widely applicable method across a wide range of materials/manufacturing methods, catalysis, as well as reactor design and engineering. PMID:25090251

  2. Methodology for in situ gas sampling, transport and laboratory analysis of gases from stranded cetaceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Díaz, Óscar; Saavedra, Pedro; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Jepson, Paul D.; Mazzariol, Sandro; di Guardo, Giovanni; Fernández, Antonio

    2011-12-01

    Gas-bubble lesions were described in cetaceans stranded in spatio-temporal concordance with naval exercises using high-powered sonars. A behaviourally induced decompression sickness-like disease was proposed as a plausible causal mechanism, although these findings remain scientifically controversial. Investigations into the constituents of the gas bubbles in suspected gas embolism cases are highly desirable. We have found that vacuum tubes, insulin syringes and an aspirometer are reliable tools for in situ gas sampling, storage and transportation without appreciable loss of gas and without compromising the accuracy of the analysis. Gas analysis is conducted by gas chromatography in the laboratory. This methodology was successfully applied to a mass stranding of sperm whales, to a beaked whale stranded in spatial and temporal association with military exercises and to a cetacean chronic gas embolism case. Results from the freshest animals confirmed that bubbles were relatively free of gases associated with putrefaction and consisted predominantly of nitrogen.

  3. Methodology for in situ gas sampling, transport and laboratory analysis of gases from stranded cetaceans

    PubMed Central

    de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Díaz, Óscar; Saavedra, Pedro; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Jepson, Paul D.; Mazzariol, Sandro; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Fernández, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Gas-bubble lesions were described in cetaceans stranded in spatio-temporal concordance with naval exercises using high-powered sonars. A behaviourally induced decompression sickness-like disease was proposed as a plausible causal mechanism, although these findings remain scientifically controversial. Investigations into the constituents of the gas bubbles in suspected gas embolism cases are highly desirable. We have found that vacuum tubes, insulin syringes and an aspirometer are reliable tools for in situ gas sampling, storage and transportation without appreciable loss of gas and without compromising the accuracy of the analysis. Gas analysis is conducted by gas chromatography in the laboratory. This methodology was successfully applied to a mass stranding of sperm whales, to a beaked whale stranded in spatial and temporal association with military exercises and to a cetacean chronic gas embolism case. Results from the freshest animals confirmed that bubbles were relatively free of gases associated with putrefaction and consisted predominantly of nitrogen. PMID:22355708

  4. Methodology for in situ gas sampling, transport and laboratory analysis of gases from stranded cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Bernaldo de Quirós, Yara; González-Díaz, Oscar; Saavedra, Pedro; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Jepson, Paul D; Mazzariol, Sandro; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Fernández, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Gas-bubble lesions were described in cetaceans stranded in spatio-temporal concordance with naval exercises using high-powered sonars. A behaviourally induced decompression sickness-like disease was proposed as a plausible causal mechanism, although these findings remain scientifically controversial. Investigations into the constituents of the gas bubbles in suspected gas embolism cases are highly desirable. We have found that vacuum tubes, insulin syringes and an aspirometer are reliable tools for in situ gas sampling, storage and transportation without appreciable loss of gas and without compromising the accuracy of the analysis. Gas analysis is conducted by gas chromatography in the laboratory. This methodology was successfully applied to a mass stranding of sperm whales, to a beaked whale stranded in spatial and temporal association with military exercises and to a cetacean chronic gas embolism case. Results from the freshest animals confirmed that bubbles were relatively free of gases associated with putrefaction and consisted predominantly of nitrogen. PMID:22355708

  5. In situ gas analysis for high pressure applications using property measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, J.; Span, R.; Fieback, T.

    2013-10-01

    As the production, distribution, and storage of renewable energy based fuels usually are performed under high pressures and as there is a lack of in situ high pressure gas analysis instruments on the market, the aim of this work was to develop a method for in situ high pressure gas analysis of biogas and hydrogen containing gas mixtures. The analysis is based on in situ measurements of optical, thermo physical, and electromagnetic properties in gas mixtures with newly developed high pressure sensors. This article depicts the calculation of compositions from the measured properties, which is carried out iteratively by using highly accurate equations of state for gas mixtures. The validation of the method consisted of the generation and measurement of several mixtures, of which three are presented herein: a first mixture of 64.9 mol. % methane, 17.1 mol. % carbon dioxide, 9 mol. % helium, and 9 mol. % ethane at 323 K and 423 K in a pressure range from 2.5 MPa to 17 MPa; a second mixture of 93.0 mol. % methane, 4.0 mol. % propane, 2.0 mol. % carbon dioxide, and 1.0 mol. % nitrogen at 303 K, 313 K, and 323 K in a pressure range from 1.2 MPa to 3 MPa; and a third mixture of 64.9 mol. % methane, 30.1 mol. % carbon dioxide, and 5.0 mol. % nitrogen at 303 K, 313 K, and 323 K in a pressure range from 2.5 MPa to 4 MPa. The analysis of the tested gas mixtures showed that with measured density, velocity of sound, and relative permittivity the composition can be determined with deviations below 1.9 mol. %, in most cases even below 1 mol. %. Comparing the calculated compositions with the generated gas mixture, the deviations were in the range of the combined uncertainty of measurement and property models.

  6. In situ search for organics by gas chromatography analysis: new derivatization / thermochemolysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geffroy, Claude; Buch, Arnaud; David, Marc; Aissat, Lyes; El Mufleh, Amel; Papot, S.; Sternberg, Robert

    Many organic molecules are present in interstellar clouds and might be carried to the early Earth by comets and meteorites during the heavy bombardment phase in the first few hundred million years of the solar system. It has been suggested that extraterrestrial organic material may well represent an important part of the organic material available for the origin of life. Until samples, brought by future space missions, are available on Earth, in situ measurements are one of the way to get unaltered and non-contaminated samples for analysis. The analytical technique has to be robust, sensitive and non-specific due to the large scope of targets molecules. The only currently flight qualified technique of analysis of organic molecules in space is gas chromatography (Viking, Cassini-Huygens, SAM-MSL, COSAC-Rosetta). The main objective of this work is to present a new approach with multi step analysis using derivatisation and thermochemolysis reagents for a one pot in situ analysis of volatile and refractory organics in surface or sub-surface samples (Mars, comets).Indeed, no single technology enables to identify all organic compounds because naturally occurring molecules have different polarities, molecular weights, being extractible or recalcitrant, bonded trapped or adsorbed on minerals. Thus, we propose to wider the scope of chemical reagent already validated for in situ wet chemistry such as MTBSTFA (Rodier et al. 2001, 2002), DMF-DMA (Rodier et al. 2002), or TMAH (Rodier et al, 2005, Geffroy-Rodier et al; 2009) to analyze enantiomers of amino acids, carbohydrates and lipids in a one pot several steps sub system using a multi reagent and multi step approach. Thus using a new derivatizing agent, we successfully identified twenty one amino acids including twelve of the twenty proteinic amino acids without inhibiting following multi step thermochemolysis. *Geffroy-Rodier C, Grasset L, Sternberg R. Buch A. Amblès A. (2009) Thermochemolysis in search for organics in

  7. Modeling and Analysis of the Reverse Water Gas Shift Process for In-Situ Propellant Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlow, Jonathan E.

    2000-01-01

    This report focuses on the development of mathematical models and simulation tools developed for the Reverse Water Gas Shift (RWGS) process. This process is a candidate technology for oxygen production on Mars under the In-Situ Propellant Production (ISPP) project. An analysis of the RWGS process was performed using a material balance for the system. The material balance is very complex due to the downstream separations and subsequent recycle inherent with the process. A numerical simulation was developed for the RWGS process to provide a tool for analysis and optimization of experimental hardware, which will be constructed later this year at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Attempts to solve the material balance for the system, which can be defined by 27 nonlinear equations, initially failed. A convergence scheme was developed which led to successful solution of the material balance, however the simplified equations used for the gas separation membrane were found insufficient. Additional more rigorous models were successfully developed and solved for the membrane separation. Sample results from these models are included in this report, with recommendations for experimental work needed for model validation.

  8. In situ Analysis of Organic Compounds on Mars using Chemical Derivatization and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Buch, A.; Cabane, M.; Coll, P.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2005-01-01

    One of the core science objectives of NASA's 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission is to determine the past or present habitability of Mars. The search for key organic compounds relevant to terrestrial life will be an important part of that assessment. We have developed a protocol for the analysis of amino acids and carboxylic acids in Mars analogue materials using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). As shown, a variety of carboxylic acids were readily identified in soil collected from the Atacama Desert in Chile at part-per-billion levels by GCMS after extraction and chemical derivatization using the reagent N,N-tert.-butyl (dimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). Several derivatized amino acids including glycine and alanine were also detected by GCMS in the Atacama soil at lower concentrations (chromatogram not shown). Lacking derivatization capability, the Viking pyrolysis GCMS instruments could not have detected amino acids and carboxylic acids, since these non-volatile compounds require chemical transformation into volatile species that are stable in a GC column. We are currently optimizing the chemical extraction and derivatization technique for in situ GCMS analysis on Mars. Laboratory results of analyses of Atacama Desert samples and other Mars analogue materials using this protocol will be presented.

  9. Analysis of Tropical Forest Fire Emissions Using in Situ Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry during Sambba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaeian, J.; Lewis, A. C.; Edwards, P. M.; Evans, M. J.; Hopkins, J. R.; Lee, J. D.; Purvis, R.

    2014-12-01

    Vertical atmospheric profiles of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were made over Amazonia using an in situ gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GC/MS), including isoprene, methacrolein, methyl vinyl ketone and products of biomass burning such as benzene. Measurements were made in the Amazonian (Rondônia and Amazonas) region during September 2012, a period of extensive biomass burning. Data was obtained between 100m and 8500m from the FAAM BAe 146 research aircraft. Isoprene was observed to be constrained overwhelmingly to the boundary layer (height typically ~2500m) with mean boundary layer mixing ratio of ~2 ppbv and a peak of ~5 ppbv at the lowest flight levels of 100 m. First generation isoprene oxidation products, methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein, were quantified individually rather than as the sum of the pair, which is more commonly found in the literature. Both MACR and MVK were constrained primarily to the boundary layer, however trace quantities could be seen in the free troposphere to a height of 8000 m. Benzene from biomass burning was observed in both boundary layer and free troposphere, with a peak mixing ratio of ~0.8 ppbv at 750 m. This work will present the spatial distribution of isoprene within the boundary as a function of underlying surface type. The vertical profiles of all species are then compared to representative simulations from the GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model and conclusions drawn on the success of the model in representing emissions and oxidation chemistry.

  10. Stakeholder acceptance analysis: In-well vapor stripping, in-situ bioremediation, gas membrane separation system (membrane separation)

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    This document provides stakeholder evaluations on innovative technologies to be used in the remediation of volatile organic compounds from soils and ground water. The technologies evaluated are; in-well vapor stripping, in-situ bioremediation, and gas membrane separation.

  11. Improving the Detection Limit in a Capillary Raman System for In Situ Gas Analysis by Means of Fluorescence Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Simone; Off, Andreas; Seitz-Moskaliuk, Hendrik; James, Timothy M.; Telle, Helmut H.

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy for low-pressure or trace gas analysis is rather challenging, in particular in process control applications requiring trace detection and real-time response; in general, enhancement techniques are required. One possible enhancement approach which enjoys increasing popularity makes use of an internally-reflective capillary as the gas cell. However, in the majority of cases, such capillary systems were often limited in their achievable sensitivity by a significant fluorescence background, which is generated as a consequence of interactions between the laser light and optical glass components in the setup. In order to understand and counteract these problems we have investigated a range of fluorescence-reducing measures, including the rearrangement of optical elements, and the replacement of glass components—including the capillary itself—by metal alternatives. These studies now have led to a capillary setup in which fluorescence is practically eliminated and substantial signal enhancement over standard Raman setups is achieved. With this improved (prototype) setup, detection limits of well below 1 mbar could be obtained in sub-second acquisition times, demonstrating the potential of capillary Raman spectroscopy for real-time, in situ gas sensing and process control applications, down to trace level concentrations. PMID:26378545

  12. Improving the Detection Limit in a Capillary Raman System for In Situ Gas Analysis by Means of Fluorescence Reduction.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Simone; Off, Andreas; Seitz-Moskaliuk, Hendrik; James, Timothy M; Telle, Helmut H

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy for low-pressure or trace gas analysis is rather challenging, in particular in process control applications requiring trace detection and real-time response; in general, enhancement techniques are required. One possible enhancement approach which enjoys increasing popularity makes use of an internally-reflective capillary as the gas cell. However, in the majority of cases, such capillary systems were often limited in their achievable sensitivity by a significant fluorescence background, which is generated as a consequence of interactions between the laser light and optical glass components in the setup. In order to understand and counteract these problems we have investigated a range of fluorescence-reducing measures, including the rearrangement of optical elements, and the replacement of glass components--including the capillary itself--by metal alternatives. These studies now have led to a capillary setup in which fluorescence is practically eliminated and substantial signal enhancement over standard Raman setups is achieved. With this improved (prototype) setup, detection limits of well below 1 mbar could be obtained in sub-second acquisition times, demonstrating the potential of capillary Raman spectroscopy for real-time, in situ gas sensing and process control applications, down to trace level concentrations. PMID:26378545

  13. GAS TURBINE REHEAT USING IN SITU COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. Bachovchin; T.E. Lippert; R.A. Newby P.G.A. Cizmas

    2004-05-17

    In situ reheat is an alternative to traditional gas turbine reheat design in which fuel is fed through airfoils rather than in a bulky discrete combustor separating HP and LP turbines. The goals are to achieve increased power output and/or efficiency without higher emissions. In this program the scientific basis for achieving burnout with low emissions has been explored. In Task 1, Blade Path Aerodynamics, design options were evaluated using CFD in terms of burnout, increase of power output, and possible hot streaking. It was concluded that Vane 1 injection in a conventional 4-stage turbine was preferred. Vane 2 injection after vane 1 injection was possible, but of marginal benefit. In Task 2, Combustion and Emissions, detailed chemical kinetics modeling, validated by Task 3, Sub-Scale Testing, experiments, resulted in the same conclusions, with the added conclusion that some increase in emissions was expected. In Task 4, Conceptual Design and Development Plan, Siemens Westinghouse power cycle analysis software was used to evaluate alternative in situ reheat design options. Only single stage reheat, via vane 1, was found to have merit, consistent with prior Tasks. Unifying the results of all the tasks, a conceptual design for single stage reheat utilizing 24 holes, 1.8 mm diameter, at the trailing edge of vane 1 is presented. A development plan is presented.

  14. Performance and microbial community analysis of the anaerobic reactor with coke oven gas biomethanation and in situ biogas upgrading.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Xie, Li; Luo, Gang; Zhou, Qi; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-10-01

    A new method for simultaneous coke oven gas (COG) biomethanation and in situ biogas upgrading in anaerobic reactor was developed in this study. The simulated coke oven gas (SCOG) (92% H2 and 8% CO) was injected directly into the anaerobic reactor treating sewage sludge through hollow fiber membrane (HFM). With pH control at 8.0, the added H2 and CO were fully consumed and no negative effects on the anaerobic degradation of sewage sludge were observed. The maximum CH4 content in the biogas was 99%. The addition of SCOG resulted in enrichment and dominance of homoacetogenetic genus Treponema and hydrogenotrophic genus Methanoculleus in the liquid, which indicated that H2 were converted to methane by both direct (hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis) and indirect (homoacetogenesis+aceticlastic methanogenesis) pathways in the liquid. However, the aceticlasitic genus Methanosaeta was dominant for archaea in the biofilm on the HFM, which indicated indirect (homoacetogenesis+aceticlastic methanogenesis) H2 conversion pathway on the biofilm. PMID:23941705

  15. Quantitative Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Analysis of Microbial Consortia from a Biogenic Gas Field in Alaska's Cook Inlet Basin

    PubMed Central

    Strąpoć, Dariusz; Huizinga, Brad; Lidstrom, Ulrika; Ashby, Matt; Macalady, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Filter-collected production water samples from a methane-rich gas field in the Cook Inlet basin of Alaska were investigated using whole-cell rRNA-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and 16S rRNA tag pyrosequencing. Both techniques were consistent in determining the microbial community composition, including the archaeal or bacterial dominance of samples. The archaeal community is dominated by the obligate methylotrophic methanogen genus Methanolobus as well as the nutritional generalist methanogen genus Methanosarcina, which is capable of utilizing acetate, CO2, and methyl-bearing compounds. The most-abundant bacterial groups are Firmicutes, notably of the Acetobacterium genus, and Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides species (CFBs) affiliated with the order Bacteroidales. We observed spatial variation among samples in both the percentage of members of Archaea compared to that of members of Bacteria and the dominant members of the bacterial community, differences which could not be explained with the available geochemical data. Based upon the microbial community composition and the isotopic signature of methane associated with the Cook Inlet basin site, we propose a simplified reaction network beginning with the breakdown of coal macromolecules, followed by fermentation and methylotrophic and acetoclastic methane production. PMID:22427501

  16. In situ bioremediation of chlorinated solvent with natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rabold, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    A bioremediation system for the removal of chlorinated solvents from ground water and sediments is described. The system involves the the in-situ injection of natural gas (as a microbial nutrient) through an innovative configuration of horizontal wells.

  17. In Situ Analysis of Gas Generation in Lithium-Ion Batteries with Different Carbonate-Based Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Teng, Xin; Zhan, Chun; Bai, Ying; Ma, Lu; Liu, Qi; Wu, Chuan; Wu, Feng; Yang, Yusheng; Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil

    2015-10-21

    Gas generation in lithium-ion batteries is one of the critical issues limiting their safety performance and lifetime. In this work, a set of 900 mAh pouch cells were applied to systematically compare the composition of gases generated from a serial of carbonate-based composite electrolytes, using a self-designed gas analyzing system. Among electrolytes used in this work, the composite γ-butyrolactone/ethyl methyl carbonate (GBL/EMC) exhibited remarkably less gassing because of the electrochemical stability of the GBL, which makes it a promising electrolyte for battery with advanced safety and lifetime. PMID:26417916

  18. Treatment of gas from an in situ conversion process

    DOEpatents

    Diaz, Zaida; Del Paggio, Alan Anthony; Nair, Vijay; Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria

    2011-12-06

    A method of producing methane is described. The method includes providing formation fluid from a subsurface in situ conversion process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. At least the olefins in the first gas stream are contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more catalysts and steam to produce a second gas stream. The second gas stream is contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more additional catalysts to produce a third gas stream. The third gas stream includes methane.

  19. Seeking organic compounds on Mars : in situ analysis of organic compounds by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry on MOMA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, A.; Freissinet, C.; Sternberg, R.; Pinnick, V.; Szopa, C.; Coll, P. J.; Rodier, C.; Garnier, C.; Steininger, H.; Moma Team

    2010-12-01

    The search for signs of past or present life is one of the primary goals of future Mars exploratory missions. The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) experiment of the ExoMars mission (set to launch 2016-2018) is a joint venture by the European Space Agency and NASA to develop a sensitive detector for organics on Mars. MOMA will be one of the main analytical instruments aboard the ExoMars Rover aimed at characterizing possible “signs-of-life molecules” in the Martian environment such as amino acids, carboxylic acids, nucleobases or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). With the aim to separate and detect organic compounds from Martian soil, the French MOMA team has built a gas chromatograph able to work in standalone mode by using a TCD detector. The gas chromatograph can also be coupled with an ion trap mass spectrometer developed by the US MOMA team. Moreover, a GC-MS compatible sample processing system (SPS) allowing the extraction and the chemical transformation of the organic compounds from the soil, that fits within space flight conditions, has also been developed. The sample processing is performed in an oven, dedicated to the MOMA experiment containing the solid sample (50-100mg). The internal temperature of oven can be ranged from 20 to 1000 °C which allows for pyrolysis, thermochemolysis or derivatization. The organic extraction step is achieved by using thermodesorption in the range of 100 to 300°C for 0.5 to 5 min. Then, the chemical derivatization and/or thermochemolysis of the extracted compounds is performed directly on the soil with a mixture of MTBSTFA-DMF, TMAH or DMF-DMA solution when enantiomeric separation is required. By decreasing the polarity of the target molecules, this step allows for their volatilization at a temperature below 250°C without any chemical degradation. Once derivatized, the volatile target molecules are trapped in a cold chemical trap and promptly desorbed into the gas chromatograph coupled to the mass

  20. STEREO In-situ Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, P. C.; Luhmann, J. G.; Davis, A. J.; Russell, C. T.

    2006-12-01

    STEREO's IMPACT (In-situ Measurements of Particles and CME Transients) investigation provides the first opportunity for long duration, detailed observations of 1 AU magnetic field structures, plasma and suprathermal electrons, and energetic particles at points bracketing Earth's heliospheric location. The PLASTIC instrument takes plasma ion composition measurements completing STEREO's comprehensive in-situ perspective. Stereoscopic/3D information from the STEREO SECCHI imagers and SWAVES radio experiment make it possible to use both multipoint and quadrature studies to connect interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICME) and solar wind structures to CMEs and coronal holes observed at the Sun. The uniqueness of the STEREO mission requires novel data analysis tools and techniques to take advantage of the mission's full scientific potential. An interactive browser with the ability to create publication-quality plots has been developed which integrates STEREO's in-situ data with data from a variety of other missions including WIND and ACE. Also, an application program interface (API) is provided allowing users to create custom software that ties directly into STEREO's data set. The API allows for more advanced forms of data mining than currently available through most web-based data services. A variety of data access techniques and the development of cross-spacecraft data analysis tools allow the larger scientific community to combine STEREO's unique in-situ data with those of other missions, particularly the L1 missions, and, therefore, to maximize STEREO's scientific potential in gaining a greater understanding of the heliosphere.

  1. Selection of adsorption traps for in situ gas chromatographic analysis of polar regolith volatiles on board of the Luna-Resource lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aseev, Sergey; Gerasimov, Mikhail; Zaitsev, Maxim

    Investigation of volatile species in the polar regions of the Moon is an important task for better understanding of its evolution and for further exploration, in particular, to provide resources for future permanent stations. Gas chromatographic complex of Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Science is focused on measurements of volatile compounds composition, supposedly existing in the polar regions of the Moon in the area of Luna-Resource probe landing (2017). Also, this devise can be used on the Mars in the area of ExoMars landing mission (2018). One of the features of this gas analytical system is the use of adsorption traps, which can retain volatile compounds continuously coming into the gas chromatograph as a result of pyrolysis of the regolith sample and shortly release them for injection into chromatographic system for analysis. To improve sensitivity and analytical properties of the gas chromatograph, it’s necessary to provide concentrated injection of all the volatile components, which were released during pyrolysis of the regolith sample. It takes ~15 minutes to complete this pyrolysis operation. Such permanent gases as noble gases and N2, Ar, CO on the left hand have low dynamic viscosity, which cause their short retention time in adsorption traps, but on the right hand - these gases are released from the soil sample close to the end of the heating cycle. Summarizing these principles, we can say that 5 minutes of trapping for specified gases is efficient enough for their accumulation with consequent heating of adsorption trap up to 150°C to produce concentrated injection of all these compounds to the analytical columns of gas chromatography system. In the most of space missions (Viking, Phoenix, MSL, Rosetta), which use gas chromatography as the main method for in situ chemical analysis of volatiles, chromatography columns are usually mounted in parallel scheme. It is well known that water has a negative influence on analytical

  2. Analysis and modeling of PEM fuel cell stack performance: Effect of in situ reverse water gas shift reaction and oxygen bleeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, G.; Li, Xianguo

    In this study the performance of a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack is analyzed with a mathematical model when the stack operates on hydrocarbon reformate gas as the anode feed stream. It is shown that the effect of carbon dioxide dilution of the hydrogen dominated reformate gas has a minimal impact on the stack performance. However, the CO-poisoning effect due to the in situ reverse water gas shift reaction in the anode feed stream could have a very serious adverse impact on the stack performance, especially at high current densities. Thermodynamic calculations indicate that the equilibrium concentrations of CO could be as high as 100 ppm, generated by the in situ reverse water gas shift reaction, under the typical conditions of PEM fuel cell operation; and are influenced by the stack operating temperature and water content of the reformate anode feed. This CO-poisoning of the stack performance is shown mitigated effectively by introducing about 0.5-1% oxygen to the anode feed.

  3. In-Situ Planetary Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kounaves, S. P.; Buehler, M. G.; Grannan, S. M.; Hecht, M. H.; Kuhlman, K. R.

    2000-01-01

    Both, the search for evidence of life on Mars and the assessment of the Martian environment in respect to its compatibility with human explorers, will require the ability to measure and understand the aqueous chemistry of the Martian regolith. Direct in-situ chemical analysis is the only method by which chemical biosignatures can be reliably recognized and the toxicity of the regolith accurately assessed. Qualitative and quantitative determination of the aqueous ionic constituents and their concentrations is critical in developing kinetic and thermodynamic models that can be used to accurately predict the potential of the past or present Martian geochemical environment to have either generated or still sustain life. In-situ chemical characterization could provide evidence as to whether the chemical composition of the regolith or evaporates in suspected ancient water bodies have been biologically influenced.

  4. STEREO In-situ Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, P. C.; Luhmann, J. G.; Davis, A. J.; Russell, C. T.

    2007-05-01

    STEREO's IMPACT (In-situ Measurements of Particles and CME Transients) investigation provides the first opportunity for long duration, detailed observations of 1 AU magnetic field structures, plasma and suprathermal electrons, and energetic particles at points bracketing Earth's heliospheric location. The PLASTIC instrument takes plasma ion composition measurements completing STEREO's comprehensive in-situ perspective. Stereoscopic/3D information from the STEREO SECCHI imagers and SWAVES radio experiment make it possible to use both multipoint and quadrature studies to connect interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICME) and solar wind structures to CMEs and coronal holes observed at the Sun. The uniqueness of the STEREO mission requires novel data analysis tools and techniques to take advantage of the mission's full scientific potential. An interactive browser with the ability to create publication-quality plots has been developed which integrates STEREO's in-situ data with data from a variety of other missions including WIND and ACE. Static summary plots and a key-parameter type data set with a related online browser provide alternative data access. Finally, an application program interface (API) is provided allowing users to create custom software that ties directly into STEREO's data set. The API allows for more advanced forms of data mining than currently available through most web-based data services. A variety of data access techniques and the development of cross- spacecraft data analysis tools allow the larger scientific community to combine STEREO's unique in-situ data with those of other missions, particularly the L1 missions, and, therefore, to maximize STEREO's scientific potential in gaining a greater understanding of the heliosphere.

  5. Design, Control and in Situ Visualization of Gas Nitriding Processes

    PubMed Central

    Ratajski, Jerzy; Olik, Roman; Suszko, Tomasz; Dobrodziej, Jerzy; Michalski, Jerzy

    2010-01-01

    The article presents a complex system of design, in situ visualization and control of the commonly used surface treatment process: the gas nitriding process. In the computer design conception, analytical mathematical models and artificial intelligence methods were used. As a result, possibilities were obtained of the poly-optimization and poly-parametric simulations of the course of the process combined with a visualization of the value changes of the process parameters in the function of time, as well as possibilities to predict the properties of nitrided layers. For in situ visualization of the growth of the nitrided layer, computer procedures were developed which make use of the results of the correlations of direct and differential voltage and time runs of the process result sensor (magnetic sensor), with the proper layer growth stage. Computer procedures make it possible to combine, in the duration of the process, the registered voltage and time runs with the models of the process. PMID:22315536

  6. Design, control and in situ visualization of gas nitriding processes.

    PubMed

    Ratajski, Jerzy; Olik, Roman; Suszko, Tomasz; Dobrodziej, Jerzy; Michalski, Jerzy

    2010-01-01

    The article presents a complex system of design, in situ visualization and control of the commonly used surface treatment process: the gas nitriding process. In the computer design conception, analytical mathematical models and artificial intelligence methods were used. As a result, possibilities were obtained of the poly-optimization and poly-parametric simulations of the course of the process combined with a visualization of the value changes of the process parameters in the function of time, as well as possibilities to predict the properties of nitrided layers. For in situ visualization of the growth of the nitrided layer, computer procedures were developed which make use of the results of the correlations of direct and differential voltage and time runs of the process result sensor (magnetic sensor), with the proper layer growth stage. Computer procedures make it possible to combine, in the duration of the process, the registered voltage and time runs with the models of the process. PMID:22315536

  7. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  8. High Throughput In Situ DDA Analysis of Neuropeptides by Coupling Novel Multiplex Mass Spectrometric Imaging (MSI) with Gas-Phase Fractionation.

    PubMed

    OuYang, Chuanzi; Chen, Bingming; Li, Lingjun

    2015-12-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool to map the spatial distribution of biomolecules on tissue sections. Recent developments of hybrid MS instruments allow combination of different types of data acquisition by various mass analyzers into a single MSI analysis, which reduces experimental time and sample consumptions. Here, using the well-characterized crustacean nervous system as a test-bed, we explore the utility of high resolution and accurate mass (HRAM) MALDI Orbitrap platform for enhanced in situ characterization of the neuropeptidome with improved chemical information. Specifically, we report on a multiplex-MSI method, which combines HRAM MSI with data dependent acquisition (DDA) tandem MS analysis in a single experiment. This method enables simultaneous mapping of neuropeptide distribution, sequence validation, and novel neuropeptide discovery in crustacean neuronal tissues. To enhance the dynamic range and efficiency of in situ DDA, we introduced a novel approach of fractionating full m/z range into several sub-mass ranges and embedding the setup using the multiplex-DDA-MSI scan events to generate pseudo fractionation before MS/MS scans. The division of entire m/z into multiple segments of m/z sub-ranges for MS interrogation greatly decreased the complexity of molecular species from tissue samples and the heterogeneity of the distribution and variation of intensities of m/z peaks. By carefully optimizing the experimental conditions such as the dynamic exclusion, the multiplex-DDA-MSI approach demonstrates better performance with broader precursor coverage, less biased MS/MS scans towards high abundance molecules, and improved quality of tandem mass spectra for low intensity molecular species. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26438126

  9. High Throughput In Situ DDA Analysis of Neuropeptides by Coupling Novel Multiplex Mass Spectrometric Imaging (MSI) with Gas-Phase Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    OuYang, Chuanzi; Chen, Bingming; Li, Lingjun

    2015-12-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool to map the spatial distribution of biomolecules on tissue sections. Recent developments of hybrid MS instruments allow combination of different types of data acquisition by various mass analyzers into a single MSI analysis, which reduces experimental time and sample consumptions. Here, using the well-characterized crustacean nervous system as a test-bed, we explore the utility of high resolution and accurate mass (HRAM) MALDI Orbitrap platform for enhanced in situ characterization of the neuropeptidome with improved chemical information. Specifically, we report on a multiplex-MSI method, which combines HRAM MSI with data dependent acquisition (DDA) tandem MS analysis in a single experiment. This method enables simultaneous mapping of neuropeptide distribution, sequence validation, and novel neuropeptide discovery in crustacean neuronal tissues. To enhance the dynamic range and efficiency of in situ DDA, we introduced a novel approach of fractionating full m/z range into several sub-mass ranges and embedding the setup using the multiplex-DDA-MSI scan events to generate pseudo fractionation before MS/MS scans. The division of entire m/z into multiple segments of m/z sub-ranges for MS interrogation greatly decreased the complexity of molecular species from tissue samples and the heterogeneity of the distribution and variation of intensities of m/z peaks. By carefully optimizing the experimental conditions such as the dynamic exclusion, the multiplex-DDA-MSI approach demonstrates better performance with broader precursor coverage, less biased MS/MS scans towards high abundance molecules, and improved quality of tandem mass spectra for low intensity molecular species.

  10. A probe for in situ, remote, detection of defects in buried plastic natural gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, M.P.; Spenik, J.L.; Condon, C.M.; Monazam, E.R.; Fincham, W.L.

    2007-12-18

    Several techniques are available to determine the integrity of in situ metal pipeline but very little is available in the literature to determine the integrity of plastic pipelines. Since the decade of the 1970s much of the newly installed gas distribution and transmission lines in the United States are fabricated from polyethylene or other plastic. A probe has been developed to determine the in situ integrity of plastic natural gas pipelines that can be installed on a traversing mechanism (pig) to detect abnormalities in the walls of the plastic natural gas pipeline from the interior. This probe has its own internal power source and can be deployed into existing natural gas supply lines. Utilizing the capacitance parameter, the probe inspects the pipe for flaws and records the data internally which can be retrieved later for analysis.

  11. Gas cell for in situ soft X-ray transmission-absorption spectroscopy of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Drisdell, W. S.; Kortright, J. B.

    2014-07-15

    A simple gas cell design, constructed primarily from commercially available components, enables in situ soft X-ray transmission-absorption spectroscopy of materials in contact with gas at ambient temperature. The cell has a minimum X-ray path length of 1 mm and can hold gas pressures up to ∼300 Torr, and could support higher pressures with simple modifications. The design enables cycling between vacuum and gas environments without interrupting the X-ray beam, and can be fully sealed to allow for measurements of air-sensitive samples. The cell can attach to the downstream port of any appropriate synchrotron beamline, and offers a robust and versatile method for in situ measurements of certain materials. The construction and operation of the cell are discussed, as well as sample preparation and proper spectral analysis, illustrated by examples of spectral measurements. Potential areas for improvement and modification for specialized applications are also mentioned.

  12. An in situ sparging sampler for volatile organic hydrocarbon analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Morlock, C.R.

    1995-12-31

    A device has been designed which enables a ground water sample to be sparged within a well or probe and purged of volatile organic compounds (patent pending). The purged gas is collected in an absorbent trap for conventional purge and trap gas chromatograph analysis or analysis by other hydrocarbon detectors. This method is applicable: as a rapid screening technique when used in conjunction with an on-site gas chromatograph; as a sample collection procedure where an absorbent trap is transported to a lab rather than a water sample; and, as part of a long term monitoring system for unattended ground water analysis. This method was tested using laboratory standards and by on-site gas chromatography analysis. No water sample is required when using the in situ sparger--eliminating hazardous waste generation. Analysis can be performed at discrete depths within the well. There is no sample storage or preparation involved, removing several sources of error. Since the objective of the procedure is to liberate volatiles from a water sample in a well, the problems with pumps and handling procedures that cause poor volatile retention in a water sample are eliminated. The authors are currently in the process of developing a commercial product called EMACS{trademark} (Environmental Monitoring Analysis and Control System) based on this concept.

  13. In situ Gas Conditioning in Fuel Reforming for Hydrogen Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Bandi, A.; Specht, M.; Sichler, P.; Nicoloso, N.

    2002-09-20

    The production of hydrogen for fuel cell applications requires cost and energy efficient technologies. The Absorption Enhanced Reforming (AER), developed at ZSW with industrial partners, is aimed to simplify the process by using a high temperature in situ CO2 absorption. The in situ CO2 removal results in shifting the steam reforming reaction equilibrium towards increased hydrogen concentration (up to 95 vol%). The key part of the process is the high temperature CO2 absorbent. In this contribution results of Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) investigations on natural minerals, dolomites, silicates and synthetic absorbent materials in regard of their CO2 absorption capacity and absorption/desorption cyclic stability are presented and discussed. It has been found that the inert parts of the absorbent materials have a structure stabilizing effect, leading to an improved cyclic stability of the materials.

  14. Preliminary development of a wall-less gas-flow proportional counter for in-situ field analysis of nuclear contamination in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, S.P.; Hamby, D.M.; Martin, J.E.

    1997-03-01

    This study resulted in the design, construction and testing of a gas flow proportional counter for in-situ determination of soil contamination. The uniqueness of this detector is the screened material used for the cathode. A Pu-239 source of 0.006 {micro}Ci was mounted to the outside of the cathode to simulate radioactive soil. The detector probe was placed into a laboratory mock-up and tested to determine operating voltage, efficiency and energy resolution. Two gas flow proportional counters were built and tested. The detectors are cylindrical, each with a radius of 1.905 cm, having an anode wire with a radius of 0.0038 cm. The length of the smaller detector S anode was 2.54 cm, and the length of the larger detector S anode was 7.64 cm. Therefore, the active volumes were 28.96 cm{sup 3} and 87.10 cm{sup 3}, respectively, for the small and large detector. An operating voltage of 1975 volts was determined to be sufficient for both detectors. The average efficiency was 2.59 {+-} 0.12% and 76.71 {+-} 10.81% for the small volume and large volume detectors, respectively. The average energy resolution for the low-energy peak of the small detector was 4.24 {+-} 1.28% and for the large-energy peak was 1.37 {+-} 0.66%. The large detectors energy resolution was 17.75 {+-} 3.74%. The smaller detector, with better energy resolution, exhibited a bi-modal spectrum, whereas the larger detector S spectrum centered around a single broad peak.

  15. Gas production by accelerated in situ bioleaching of landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.

    1982-04-06

    A process for improved gas production and accelerated stabilization of landfills by accelerated in situ bioleaching of organic wastes by acid forming bacteria in substantially sealed landfills, passing the leachate of hydrolysis and liquefaction products of microbial action of the microorganisms with the organic material to an acid phase digester to regenerate the activated culture of acid forming microorganisms for recirculation to the landfill, passing the supernatant from the acid phase digester to a methane phase digester operated under conditions to produce methane rich gas. The supernatant from the methane phase digester containing nutrients for the acid forming microorganisms and added sewage sludge or other desired nutrient materials are circulated through the landfill. Low Btu gas is withdrawn from the acid phase digester while high Btu gas is withdrawn from the methane phase digester and may be upgraded for use as SNG. The process of this invention is applicable to small as well as large organic waste landfills, provides simultaneous disposal of municipal solid waste and sewage sludge or other aqueous organic waste in a landfill which may be stabilized much more quickly than an uncontrolled landfill as presently utilized.

  16. Resonant optical transducers for in-situ gas detection

    DOEpatents

    Bond, Tiziana C; Cole, Garrett; Goddard, Lynford

    2016-06-28

    Configurations for in-situ gas detection are provided, and include miniaturized photonic devices, low-optical-loss, guided-wave structures and state-selective adsorption coatings. High quality factor semiconductor resonators have been demonstrated in different configurations, such as micro-disks, micro-rings, micro-toroids, and photonic crystals with the properties of very narrow NIR transmission bands and sensitivity up to 10.sup.-9 (change in complex refractive index). The devices are therefore highly sensitive to changes in optical properties to the device parameters and can be tunable to the absorption of the chemical species of interest. Appropriate coatings applied to the device enhance state-specific molecular detection.

  17. In-situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering (INS) is based on the emission of 4.43 MeV gamma rays from carbon nuclei excited by fast neutrons. This in-situ method has excellent potential for easily measuring soil carbon since it does not require soil core sampling and processing ...

  18. Foreword: In situ gas surface interactions: approaching realistic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, Edvin; Over, Herbert

    2008-03-01

    This special issue is devoted to the application of in situ surface-sensitive techniques in the elucidation of catalysed reactions at (model) catalyst surfaces. Both reaction intermediates and the nature of the catalytically active phase are the targets of these investigations. In situ surface science techniques are also used to study the interaction of water with surfaces under realistic conditions. Since 80% of all technical chemicals are manufactured by utilizing (heterogeneous) catalysis, scientific understanding and technological development of catalysis are of central practical importance in modern society [1]. Heterogeneously catalysed reactions take place at the gas/solid interface. Therefore one of the major topics in surface chemistry and physics is closely related to heterogeneous catalysis, with the aim of developing novel catalysts and to improve catalysts' performances on the basis of atomic scale based knowledge. Despite the economical and environmental rewards—if such a goal is achieved—and despite 40 years of intensive research, practical catalysis is still safely in a black box: the reactivity and selectivity of a catalyst are commercially still optimized on a trial and error basis, applying the high throughput screening approach. The reason for this discrepancy between ambition and reality lies in the inherent complexity of the catalytic system, consisting of the working catalyst and the interaction of the catalyst with the reactant mixture. Practical (solid) catalysts consist of metal or oxide nanoparticles which are dispersed and stabilized on a support and which may be promoted by means of additives. These particles catalyse a reaction in pressures as high as 100 bar. Practical catalysis is in general considered to be far too complex for gaining atomic-scale understanding of the mechanism of the catalysed reaction of an industrial catalyst during its operation. Therefore it has been necessary to introduce idealization and simplification of

  19. Direct comparative study on the energy level alignments in unoccupied/occupied states of organic semiconductor/electrode interface by constructing in-situ photoemission spectroscopy and Ar gas cluster ion beam sputtering integrated analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Dong-Jin Chung, JaeGwan; Kim, Yongsu; Park, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Heon; Heo, Sung

    2014-10-21

    Through the installation of electron gun and photon detector, an in-situ photoemission and damage-free sputtering integrated analysis system is completely constructed. Therefore, this system enables to accurately characterize the energy level alignments including unoccupied/occupied molecular orbital (LUMO/HOMO) levels at interface region of organic semiconductor/electrode according to depth position. Based on Ultraviolet Photoemission Spectroscopy (UPS), Inverse Photoemission Spectroscopy (IPES), and reflective electron energy loss spectroscopy, the occupied/unoccupied state of in-situ deposited Tris[4-(carbazol-9-yl)phenyl]amine (TCTA) organic semiconductors on Au (E{sub LUMO}: 2.51 eV and E{sub HOMO}: 1.35 eV) and Ti (E{sub LUMO}: 2.19 eV and E{sub HOMO}: 1.69 eV) electrodes are investigated, and the variation of energy level alignments according to work function of electrode (Au: 4.81 eV and Ti: 4.19 eV) is clearly verified. Subsequently, under the same analysis condition, the unoccupied/occupied states at bulk region of TCTA/Au structures are characterized using different Ar gas cluster ion beam (Ar GCIB) and Ar ion sputtering processes, respectively. While the Ar ion sputtering process critically distorts both occupied and unoccupied states in UPS/IPES spectra, the Ar GCIB sputtering process does not give rise to damage on them. Therefore, we clearly confirm that the in-situ photoemission spectroscopy in combination with Ar GCIB sputtering allows of investigating accurate energy level alignments at bulk/interface region as well as surface region of organic semiconductor/electrode structure.

  20. NMR apparatus for in situ analysis of fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald, II, Rex E; Rathke, Jerome W

    2012-11-13

    The subject apparatus is a fuel cell toroid cavity detector for in situ analysis of samples through the use of nuclear magnetic resonance. The toroid cavity detector comprises a gas-tight housing forming a toroid cavity where the housing is exposed to an externally applied magnetic field B.sub.0 and contains fuel cell component samples to be analyzed. An NMR spectrometer is electrically coupled and applies a radiofrequency excitation signal pulse to the detector to produce a radiofrequency magnetic field B.sub.1 in the samples and in the toroid cavity. Embedded coils modulate the static external magnetic field to provide a means for spatial selection of the recorded NMR signals.

  1. Enantiomeric separation of volatile organics by gas chromatography for the in situ analysis of extraterrestrial materials: kinetics and thermodynamics investigation of various chiral stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Freissinet, C; Buch, A; Szopa, C; Sternberg, R

    2013-09-01

    The performances of several commercial chiral capillary columns have been evaluated with the aim of determining the one most suitable for enantiomeric separation in a gas chromatograph onboard a space probe. We compared the GC-MS response of three capillary columns coated with different chiral stationary phases (CSP) using volatile chiral organic molecules which are potential markers of a prebiotic organic chemistry. The three different chiral capillary columns are Chirasil-Val, with an amino acid derivative CSP, ChiralDex-β-PM, with a CSP composed of dissolved permethylated β-cyclodextrins in polysiloxane, and Chirasil-Dex, with a CSP made of modified cyclodextrins chemically bonded to the polysiloxane backbone. Both kinetics and thermodynamics studies have been carried out to evaluate the chiral recognition potential in these different types of columns. The thermodynamic parameters also allow a better understanding of the driving forces affecting the retention and separation of the enantiomers. The Chirasil-Dex-CSP displays the best characteristics for an optimal resolution of the chiral compounds, without preliminary derivatization. This CSP had been chosen to be the only chiral column in the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment onboard the current Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, and is also part of the Mars Organic Molecules Analyzer (MOMA) gas chromatograph onboard the next Martian mission ExoMars. The use of this column could also be extended to all space missions aimed at studying chirality in space. PMID:23921265

  2. A (S)TEM Gas Cell Holder with Localized Laser Heating for In Situ Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mehraeen, S.; McKeown, J.; Deshmukh, Pushkarraj V.; Evans, James E.; Abellan Baeza, Patricia; Xu, Pinghong; Reed, Bryan W.; Taheri, Mitra L.; Fischione, Paul E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2013-04-01

    The advent of aberration correction for transmission electron microscopy has transformed atomic resolution imaging into a nearly routine technique for structural analysis. Now an emerging frontier in electron microscopy is the development of in situ capabilities to observe reactions at atomic resolution in real time and within realistic environments. Here we present a new in situ gas cell holder that is designed for compatibility with a wide variety of sample type (i.e., dimpled 3-mm discs, standard mesh grids, various types of focused ion beam lamellae attached to half grids). Its capabilities include localized heating and precise control of the gas pressure and composition while simultaneously allowing atomic resolution imaging at ambient pressure. The results show that 0.25-nm lattice fringes are directly visible for nanoparticles imaged at ambient pressure with gas path lengths up to 20 μm. Additionally, we quantitatively demonstrate that while the attainable contrast and resolution decrease with increasing pressure and gas path length, resolutions better than 0.2 nm should be accessible at ambient pressure with gas path lengths less than the 15 μm utilized for these experiments.

  3. An in situ method for real-time monitoring of soil gas diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laemmel, Thomas; Maier, Martin; Schack-Kirchner, Helmer; Lang, Friederike

    2016-04-01

    Soil aeration is an important factor for the biogeochemistry of soils. Generally, gas exchange between soil and atmosphere is assumed to be governed by molecular diffusion and by this way fluxes can be calculated using by Fick's Law. The soil gas diffusion coefficient DS represents the proportional factor between the gas flux and the gas concentration gradient in the soil and reflects the ability of the soil to "transport passively" gas through the soil. One common way to determine DS is taking core samples in the field and measuring DS in the lab. Unfortunately this method is destructive and laborious and it can only reflect a small fraction of the whole soil. As a consequence, uncertainty about the resulting effective diffusivity on the profile scale, i.e. the real aeration status remains. We developed a method to measure and monitor DS in situ. The set-up consists of a custom made gas sampling device, the continuous injection of an inert tracer gas and inverse gas transport modelling in the soil. The gas sampling device has seven sampling depths (from 0 to -43 cm of depth) and can be easily installed into vertical holes drilled by an auger, which allows for fast installation of the system. Helium (He) as inert tracer gas was injected continuously at the lower end of the device. The resulting steady state distribution of He was used to deduce the DS depth distribution of the soil. For Finite Element Modeling of the gas-sampling-device/soil system the program COMSOL was used. We tested our new method both in the lab and in a field study and compared the results with a reference lab method using soil cores. DS profiles obtained by our in-situ method were consistent with DS profiles determined based on soil core analyses. Soil gas profiles could be measured with a temporal resolution of 30 minutes. During the field study, there was an important rain event and we could monitor the decrease in soil gas diffusivity in the top soil due to water infiltration. The effect

  4. In situ neutron radiography of lithium-ion batteries: the gas evolution on graphite electrodes during the charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goers, D.; Holzapfel, M.; Scheifele, W.; Lehmann, E.; Vontobel, P.; Novák, P.

    In situ neutron radiography (NR) was used to study the gas evolution on graphite electrodes in lithium-ion cells containing different PVDF-based gel-type electrolytes. The amount of gas bubbles and channels was calculated by image analysis. Gas production was extremely high in the case of the electrolyte containing ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC) (2:3, w/w), 1 M LiClO 4. About 60% of the electrode surface consisted of the gas phase which resulted in an inhomogeneous local current distribution. In contrast, the electrolyte containing EC and γ-butyrolactone (GBL) (1:1, w/w), 1 M LiBF 4 only showed a small increase of the gas volume between the electrodes of about 3%. In situ NR also revealed the displacement of the electrolyte due to gas evolution and volume changes of the electrodes.

  5. Foreword: In situ gas surface interactions: approaching realistic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, Edvin; Over, Herbert

    2008-03-01

    This special issue is devoted to the application of in situ surface-sensitive techniques in the elucidation of catalysed reactions at (model) catalyst surfaces. Both reaction intermediates and the nature of the catalytically active phase are the targets of these investigations. In situ surface science techniques are also used to study the interaction of water with surfaces under realistic conditions. Since 80% of all technical chemicals are manufactured by utilizing (heterogeneous) catalysis, scientific understanding and technological development of catalysis are of central practical importance in modern society [1]. Heterogeneously catalysed reactions take place at the gas/solid interface. Therefore one of the major topics in surface chemistry and physics is closely related to heterogeneous catalysis, with the aim of developing novel catalysts and to improve catalysts' performances on the basis of atomic scale based knowledge. Despite the economical and environmental rewards—if such a goal is achieved—and despite 40 years of intensive research, practical catalysis is still safely in a black box: the reactivity and selectivity of a catalyst are commercially still optimized on a trial and error basis, applying the high throughput screening approach. The reason for this discrepancy between ambition and reality lies in the inherent complexity of the catalytic system, consisting of the working catalyst and the interaction of the catalyst with the reactant mixture. Practical (solid) catalysts consist of metal or oxide nanoparticles which are dispersed and stabilized on a support and which may be promoted by means of additives. These particles catalyse a reaction in pressures as high as 100 bar. Practical catalysis is in general considered to be far too complex for gaining atomic-scale understanding of the mechanism of the catalysed reaction of an industrial catalyst during its operation. Therefore it has been necessary to introduce idealization and simplification of

  6. In-situ Data Analysis Framework for ACME Land Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Yao, C.; Jia, Y.; Steed, C.; Atchley, S.

    2015-12-01

    The realistic representation of key biogeophysical and biogeochemical functions is the fundamental of process-based ecosystem models. Investigating the behavior of those ecosystem functions within real-time model simulation can be a very challenging due to the complex of both model and software structure of an environmental model, such as the Accelerated Climate Model for Energy (ACME) Land Model (ALM). In this research, author will describe the urgent needs and challenges for in-situ data analysis for ALM simulations, and layouts our methods/strategies to meet these challenges. Specifically, an in-situ data analysis framework is designed to allow users interactively observe the biogeophyical and biogeochemical process during ALM simulation. There are two key components in this framework, automatically instrumented ecosystem simulation, in-situ data communication and large-scale data exploratory toolkit. This effort is developed by leveraging several active projects, including scientific unit testing platform, common communication interface and extreme-scale data exploratory toolkit. Authors believe that, based on advanced computing technologies, such as compiler-based software system analysis, automatic code instrumentation, and in-memory data transport, this software system provides not only much needed capability for real-time observation and in-situ data analytics for environmental model simulation, but also the potentials for in-situ model behavior adjustment via simulation steering.

  7. Aerogel dust collection for in situ mass spectrometry analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S. M.; Anderson, M. S.; Davies, A. G.; Kirby, J. P.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.

    2015-02-01

    The current technique for conducting in situ mass spectroscopic analysis of dust around extraterrestrial bodies is to have the dust impact a solid plate and analyze the atoms and molecular fragments resulting from the high speed impact. Due to the fact that the kinetic energy from the impact is converted primarily to thermal energy, much of the organic compounds present in the dust may be significantly altered or destroyed. To avoid this problem, aerogel could be used to capture the dust grains, largely intact, maintaining the integrity of the organic compounds in the interior of the dust grains. To demonstrate that organic molecules, present as minor components of silica particles, would survive hypervelocity capture in aerogel and can then be analyzed with mass spectrometry, several light gas gun impact tests and analyses were conducted. Fine particles containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were captured in aerogel at 5.5 km s-1. The flow of metastable helium from a Direct Analysis Real Time (DART) source was used to desorb and ionize the organics, which were then analyzed with a mass spectrometer. The PAHs were detected and identified by the DART-MS, demonstrating that this method could be used on future flight instruments.

  8. The development of an electrochemical technique for in situ calibrating of combustible gas detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumar, J. W.; Lantz, J. B.; Schubert, F. H.

    1976-01-01

    A program to determine the feasibility of performing in situ calibration of combustible gas detectors was successfully completed. Several possible techniques for performing the in situ calibration were proposed. The approach that showed the most promise involved the use of a miniature water vapor electrolysis cell for the generation of hydrogen within the flame arrestor of a combustible gas detector to be used for the purpose of calibrating the combustible gas detectors. A preliminary breadboard of the in situ calibration hardware was designed, fabricated and assembled. The breadboard equipment consisted of a commercially available combustible gas detector, modified to incorporate a water vapor electrolysis cell, and the instrumentation required for controlling the water vapor electrolysis and controlling and calibrating the combustible gas detector. The results showed that operation of the water vapor electrolysis at a given current density for a specific time period resulted in the attainment of a hydrogen concentration plateau within the flame arrestor of the combustible gas detector.

  9. Genesis and Evolution of Surface Species during Pt Atomic Layer Deposition on Oxide Supports Characterized by in Situ XAFS Analysis and Water-Gas Shift Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Setthapun, Worajit; Williams, W. Damion; Kim, Seung Min; Feng, Hao; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Rabuffetti, Federico A.; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.; Stair, Peter C.; Stach, Eric A.; Ribeiro, Fabio H.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Marshall, Christopher L.

    2010-06-03

    Platinum atomic layer deposition (ALD) using MeCpPtMe₃ was employed to prepare high loadings of uniform-sized, 1-2 nm Pt nanoparticles on high surface area Al₂O₃, TiO₂, and SrTiO₃ supports. X-ray absorption fine structure was utilized to monitor the changes in the Pt species during each step of the synthesis. The temperature, precursor exposure time, treatment gas, and number of ALD cycles were found to affect the Pt particle size and density. Lower-temperature MeCpPtMe₃ adsorption yielded smaller particles due to reduced thermal decomposition. A 300 °C air treatment of the adsorbed MeCpPtMe₃ leads to PtO. In subsequent ALD cycles, the MeCpPtMe₃ reduces the PtO to metallic Pt in the ratio of one precursor molecule per PtO. A 200 °C H₂ treatment of the adsorbed MeCpPtMe₃ leads to the formation of 1-2 nm, metallic Pt nanoparticles. During subsequent ALD cycles, MeCpPtMe₃ adsorbs on the support, which, upon reduction, yields additional Pt nanoparticles with a minimal increase in size of the previously formed nanoparticles. The catalysts produced by ALD had identical water-gas shift reaction rates and reaction kinetics to those of Pt catalysts prepared by standard solution methods. ALD synthesis of catalytic nanoparticles is an attractive method for preparing novel model and practical catalysts.

  10. Genesis and evolution of surface species during Pt atomic layer deposition on oxide supports characterized by in-situ XAFS analysis and water-gas shift reaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Setthapun, W.; Williams, W.; Kim, S.; Feng, H.; Elam, J.; Rabuffetti, F.; Poeppelmeier, K.; Stair, P.; Stach, E.; Ribeiro, F.; Miller, J.; Marshall, C.; Northwestern Univ.; Purdue Univ.

    2010-06-03

    Platinum atomic layer deposition (ALD) using MeCpPtMe{sub 3} was employed to prepare high loadings of uniform-sized, 1-2 nm Pt nanoparticles on high surface area Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2}, and SrTiO{sub 3} supports. X-ray absorption fine structure was utilized to monitor the changes in the Pt species during each step of the synthesis. The temperature, precursor exposure time, treatment gas, and number of ALD cycles were found to affect the Pt particle size and density. Lower-temperature MeCpPtMe{sub 3} adsorption yielded smaller particles due to reduced thermal decomposition. A 300 C air treatment of the adsorbed MeCpPtMe{sub 3} leads to PtO. In subsequent ALD cycles, the MeCpPtMe{sub 3} reduces the PtO to metallic Pt in the ratio of one precursor molecule per PtO. A 200 C H{sub 2} treatment of the adsorbed MeCpPtMe{sub 3} leads to the formation of 1-2 nm, metallic Pt nanoparticles. During subsequent ALD cycles, MeCpPtMe{sub 3} adsorbs on the support, which, upon reduction, yields additional Pt nanoparticles with a minimal increase in size of the previously formed nanoparticles. The catalysts produced by ALD had identical water-gas shift reaction rates and reaction kinetics to those of Pt catalysts prepared by standard solution methods. ALD synthesis of catalytic nanoparticles is an attractive method for preparing novel model and practical catalysts.

  11. Development of an in situ calibration technique for combustible gas detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumar, J. W.; Wynveen, R. A.; Lance, N., Jr.; Lantz, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an in situ calibration procedure for combustible gas detectors (CGD). The CGD will be a necessary device for future space vehicles as many subsystems in the Environmental Control/Life Support System utilize or produce hydrogen (H2) gas. Existing calibration techniques are time-consuming and require support equipment such as an environmental chamber and calibration gas supply. The in situ calibration procedure involves utilization of a water vapor electrolysis cell for the automatic in situ generation of a H2/air calibration mixture within the flame arrestor of the CGD. The development effort concluded with the successful demonstration of in situ span calibrations of a CGD.

  12. Comparisons of in situ and core gas measurements in ODP Leg 164 bore holes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paull, C.K.; Lorenson, T.D.; Dickens, G.; Borowski, W.S.; Ussler, W., III; Kvenvolden, K.

    2000-01-01

    During Ocean Drilling Program Leg 164, an unprecedented effort was made to determine the amounts of gas and gas hydrate in the sediments from Sites 994, 995, and 997. For the first time in the history of academic drilling, a pressure core sampler (PCS) worked well enough to generate an independent stratigraphy of in situ gas concentrations and compositions with depth. Here, gas concentrations and composition data produced by routine shipboard gas sampling techniques are compared with PCS data.

  13. In Situ Control of Gas Flow by Modification of Gas-Solid Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Dongjin; Ducker, William A.

    2013-10-01

    The boundary condition for gas flow at the solid-gas interface can be altered by in situ control of the state of a thin film adsorbed to the solid. A monolayer of ocatadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) reversibly undergoes a meltinglike transition. When the temperature of an OTS-coated particle and plate is moved through the range of OTS “melting” temperatures, there is a change in the lubrication force between the particle and plate in 1 atm of nitrogen gas. This change is interpreted in terms of a change in the flow of gas mediated by the slip length and tangential momentum accommodation coefficient (TMAC). There is a minimum in slip length (290 nm) at 18°C, which corresponds to a maximum in TMAC (0.44). The slip length increases to 590 nm at 40°C which corresponds to a TMAC of 0.25. We attribute the decrease in TMAC with increasing temperature to a decrease in roughness of the monolayer on melting, which allows a higher fraction of specular gas reflections, thereby conserving tangential gas momentum. The importance of this work is that it demonstrates the ability to control gas flow simply by altering the interface for fixed geometry and gas properties.

  14. In situ analysis of subsurface materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coradini, A.; de Sanctis, M. C.; Piccioni, G.; Amici, S.; Bianchi, R.; Capaccioni, F.; Capria, M. T.; di Lellis, A. M.; Espinasse, S.; Federico, C.

    2003-04-01

    situated inside the drill will permit to observe details from few tenths of microns to hundreds of microns and to perform low resolution spectroscopy in the range 0.8-2.8 microns. The linear array of optical fibers mimics the slit. The focal plane is a two-dimensional matrix of HgCdTe or PbS of 32-64 pixels in the spatial direction by 25-256 pixels in the spectral direction. The spectral reflectance in the visible and near infrared can provide information on the mineralogy and petrology of surface materials, and therefore on crust composition and Fe mineralogy. Analysis of VIS and NIR reflectance spectra of low albedo areas is a primary source of evidence for basaltic crust on Mars, with the identification of abundant clinopyroxenes and other mafic minerals. The instrument prototype has already been tested in laboratory and we will show some of the obtained results.

  15. In situ analysis of martian regolith with the SAM experiment during the first mars year of the MSL mission: Identification of organic molecules by gas chromatography from laboratory measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millan, M.; Szopa, C.; Buch, A.; Coll, P.; Glavin, D. P.; Freissinet, C.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; François, P.; Coscia, D.; Bonnet, J. Y.; Teinturier, S.; Cabane, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2016-09-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument onboard the Curiosity rover, is specifically designed for in situ molecular and isotopic analyses of martian surface materials and atmosphere. It contributes to the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) missions primary scientific goal to characterize the potential past, present or future habitability of Mars. In all of the analyses of solid samples delivered to SAM so far, chlorinated organic compounds have been detected above instrument background levels and identified by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) (Freissinet et al., 2015; Glavin et al., 2013). While some of these may originate from reactions between oxychlorines and terrestrial organic carbon present in the instrument background (Glavin et al., 2013), others have been demonstrated to originate from indigenous organic carbon present in samples (Freissinet et al., 2015). We present here laboratory calibrations that focused on the analyses performed with the MXT-CLP GC column (SAM GC-5 channel) used for nearly all of the GC-MS analyses of the martian soil samples carried out with SAM to date. Complementary to the mass spectrometric data, gas chromatography allows us to separate and identify the species analyzable in a nominal SAM-GC run time of about 21 min. To characterize the analytical capabilities of this channel within the SAM Flight Model (FM) operating conditions on Mars, and their implications on the detection of organic matter, it is required to perform laboratory experimental tests and calibrations on spare model components. This work assesses the SAM flight GC-5 column efficiency, confirms the identification of the molecules based on their retention time, and enables a better understanding of the behavior of the SAM injection trap (IT) and its release of organic molecules. This work will enable further optimization of the SAM-GC runs for additional samples to be analyzed during the MSL mission.

  16. Detection of soil microorganism in situ by combined gas chromatography mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, M.; Duxbury, J. M.; Francis, A. J.; Adamson, J.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental tests were made to determine whether analysis of volatile metabolic products, formed in situ, is a viable procedure for an extraterrestrial life detection system. Laboratory experiments, carried out under anaerobic conditions with addition of carbon source, extended to include a variety of soils and additional substrates. In situ experiments were conducted without amendment using a vacuum sampling system.

  17. CO2 Storage and Enhance Gas Recovery from Shales: Insights from In Situ Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaef, T.; McGrail, P.; Miller, Q. R.; Glezakou, V.; Loring, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    Recent developments in hydraulic fracturing technologies have provided a basis for dramatic increases in natural gas production from shale and tight gas reservoirs. GIS data analysis shows that approximately 60% of U.S. stationary CO2 emission sources are within 50 miles of a currently operating or potential shale gas play. Those emission sources represent a potential supply of CO2 to support enhanced gas recovery operations to extend the economic production life of these shale gas fields. Conservative estimates of the CO2 storage capacity in these depleted shale gas reservoirs are around 10 GtCO2 potentially producing up to an additional 100 Tcf of gas. Hence, there is a critical need to better understand the fundamental factors controlling CO2 storage and secondary gas production in shales. Mineralogy of shale formations are complicated, often times containing varying amounts of different clay minerals (illite, kaolinite, chlorite, and montmorillonite) carbonates (calcite, siderite, and dolomite), feldspar, quartz, gypsum, and pyrite. Interactions of these minerals with wet scCO2 are mostly unknown and will ultimately control injectivity, methane production, and CO2 storage capacity through mineral volume changes. To investigate the interactions between important clay minerals and wet scCO2, we have conducted a series of experiments exposing selected clay minerals to scCO2 containing variable amounts of dissolved water. Observations by in situ XRD indicate the montmorillonite structure contracts when in contact with dry scCO2. Expansion is observed when the same mineral is exposed to wet scCO2. Degrees of expansion and contraction are related to total dissolved water content in the scCO2 and the amount of water in the interlayer and type of interlayer cation. Other clays such as kaolinite, chlorite, and illite appear stable and undergo no observable structural change during exposure to scCO2. Experiments are in progress with in situ optical spectroscopic probes

  18. Gas Turbine Reheat Using In-Situ Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R. A.; Bachovchin, D. M.; Lippert, T. E.

    2004-04-29

    Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) is developing in-situ reheat (fuel injection via airfoil injection) as a means for increasing cycle efficiency and power output, with possibly reduced emissions. This report discusses engineering cycle evaluations on various reheat approaches, using GateCycle and ChemCad software simulations of typical F-class and G-class engines, modified for alternative reheat cycles. The conclusion that vane 1 reheat offers the most advantageous design agrees with the conclusions of the detailed chemical kinetics (Task 2) as verified by high temperature testing (Task 3) and Blade path CFD (Task 1) tasks. The second choice design option (vane 2 reheat after vane 1 reheat) is also validated in all tasks. A conceptual design and next recommended development tasks are presented.

  19. Gas Turbine Reheat Using In-Situ Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    T.E. Lippert; D.M. Bachovchin

    2004-03-31

    Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) is developing in-situ reheat (fuel injection via airfoil injection) as a means for increasing cycle efficiency and power output, with possibly reduced emissions. In addition to kinetic modeling and experimental task, CFD modeling (by Texas A&M) of airfoil injection and its effects on blade aerodynamics and turbine performance. This report discusses validation of the model against single-vane combustion test data from Siemens Westinghouse, and parametric studies of injection reheat in a modern turbine. The best location for injection is at the trailing edge of the inlet guide vane. Combustion is incomplete at trailing edges of subsequent vanes. Recommendations for further development are presented.

  20. Estimates of in situ gas hydrate concentration from resistivity monitoring of gas hydrate bearing sediments during temperature equilibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riedel, M.; Long, P.E.; Collett, T.S.

    2006-01-01

    As part of Ocean Drilling Program Leg 204 at southern Hydrate Ridge off Oregon we have monitored changes in sediment electrical resistivity during controlled gas hydrate dissociation experiments. Two cores were used, each filled with gas hydrate bearing sediments (predominantly mud/silty mud). One core was from Site 1249 (1249F-9H3), 42.1 m below seafloor (mbsf) and the other from Site 1248 (1248C-4X1), 28.8 mbsf. At Site 1247, a third experiment was conducted on a core without gas hydrate (1247B-2H1, 3.6 mbsf). First, the cores were imaged using an infra-red (IR) camera upon recovery to map the gas hydrate occurrence through dissociation cooling. Over a period of several hours, successive runs on the multi-sensor track (includes sensors for P-wave velocity, resistivity, magnetic susceptibility and gamma-ray density) were carried out complemented by X-ray imaging on core 1249F-9H3. After complete equilibration to room temperature (17-18??C) and complete gas hydrate dissociation, the final measurement of electrical resistivity was used to calculate pore-water resistivity and salinities. The calculated pore-water freshening after dissociation is equivalent to a gas hydrate concentration in situ of 35-70% along core 1249F-9H3 and 20-35% for core 1248C-4X1 assuming seawater salinity of in situ pore fluid. Detailed analysis of the IR scan, X-ray images and split-core photographs showed the hydrate mainly occurred disseminated throughout the core. Additionally, in core 1249F-9H3, a single hydrate filled vein, approximately 10 cm long and dipping at about 65??, was identified. Analyses of the logging-while-drilling (LWD) resistivity data revealed a structural dip of 40-80?? in the interval between 40 and 44 mbsf. We further analyzed all resistivity data measured on the recovered core during Leg 204. Generally poor data quality due to gas cracks allowed analyses to be carried out only at selected intervals at Sites 1244, 1245, 1246, 1247, 1248, 1249, and 1252. With a few

  1. Turbine engine exhaust gas measurements using in-situ FT-IR emission/transmission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marran, David F.; Cosgrove, Joseph E.; Neira, Jorge; Markham, James R.; Rutka, Ronald; Strange, Richard R.

    2001-02-01

    12 An advanced multiple gas analyzer based on in-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy has been used to successfully measure the exhaust plume composition and temperature of an operating gas turbine engine at a jet engine test stand. The sensor, which was optically coupled to the test cell using novel broadband hollow glass waveguides, performed well in this harsh environment (high acoustical noise and vibration, considerable temperature swings in the ambient with engine operation), providing quantitative gas phase information. Measurements were made through the diameter of the engine's one meter exhaust plume, about 0.7 meters downstream of the engine exit plane. The sensor performed near simultaneous infrared transmission and infrared emission measurements through the centerline of the plume. Automated analysis of the emission and transmission spectra provided the temperature and concentration information needed for engine tuning and control that will ensure optimal engine operation and reduced emissions. As a demonstration of the utility and accuracy of the technique, carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, water, and carbon dioxide were quantified in spite of significant variations in the exhaust gas temperature. At some conditions, unburned fuel, particulates (soot/fuel droplets), methane, ethylene and aldehydes were identified, but not yet quantified.

  2. Gas seal for an in situ oil shale retort and method of forming thermal barrier

    DOEpatents

    Burton, III, Robert S.

    1982-01-01

    A gas seal is provided in an access drift excavated in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The access drift is adjacent an in situ oil shale retort and is in gas communication with the fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale formed in the in situ oil shale retort. The mass of formation particles extends into the access drift, forming a rubble pile of formation particles having a face approximately at the angle of repose of fragmented formation. The gas seal includes a temperature barrier which includes a layer of heat insulating material disposed on the face of the rubble pile of formation particles and additionally includes a gas barrier. The gas barrier is a gas-tight bulkhead installed across the access drift at a location in the access drift spaced apart from the temperature barrier.

  3. Gas seal for an in situ oil shale retort and method of forming thermal barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, R.S.

    1982-02-16

    A gas seal is provided in an access drift excavated in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The access drift is adjacent an in situ oil shale retort and is in gas communication with the fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale formed in the in situ oil shale retort. The mass of formation particles extends into the access drift, forming a rubble pile of formation particles having a face approximately at the angle of repose of fragmented formation. The gas seal includes a temperature barrier which includes a layer of heat insulating material disposed on the face of the rubble pile of formation particles and additionally includes a gas barrier. The gas barrier is a gas-tight bulkhead installed across the access drift at a location in the access drift spaced apart from the temperature barrier.

  4. Trace Gas Emission from in-Situ Denitrifying Bioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluer, W.; Walter, M. T.; Geohring, L.

    2014-12-01

    Despite decades of concerted effort to mitigate nonpoint source nitrate (NO3-) pollution from agricultural lands, these efforts have not been sufficient to arrest eutrophication. A primary process for removing excess NO3- from water is denitrification, where denitrifying bacteria use NO3- for respiration in the absence of oxygen. Denitrification results in reduced forms of nitrogen, often dinitrogen gas (N2) but also nitrous oxide (N2O), an aggressive greenhouse gas. A promising solution to NO3- pollution is to intercept agricultural discharges with denitrifying bioreactors (DNBRs). DNBRs provide conditions ideal for denitrifiers: an anaerobic environment, sufficient organic matter, and excess NO3-. These conditions are also ideal for methanogens, which produce methane (CH4), another harmful trace gas. While initial results from bioreactor studies show that they can cost-effectively remove NO3-, trace gas emissions are an unintended consequence. This study's goal was to determine how bioreactor design promotes denitrification while limiting trace gas production. Reactor inflow and outflow water samples were tested for nutrients, including NO3-, and dissolved inflow and outflow gas samples were tested for N2O and CH4. NO3- reduction and trace gas production were evaluated at various residence times, pHs, and inflow NO3- concentrations in field and lab-scale reactors. Low NO3- reduction indicated conditions that stressed denitrifying bacteria while high reductions indicated designs that optimized pollutant treatment for water quality. Several factors influenced high N2O, suggesting non-ideal conditions for the final step of complete denitrification. High CH4 emissions pointed to reactor media choice for discouraging methanogens, which may remove competition with denitrifiers. It is critical to understand all of potential impacts that DNBRs may have, which means identifying processes and design specifications that may affect them.

  5. Sour gas injection for use with in situ heat treatment

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Thomas David

    2009-11-03

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for providing acidic gas to a subsurface formation is described herein. The method may include providing heat from one or more heaters to a portion of a subsurface formation; producing fluids that include one or more acidic gases from the formation using a heat treatment process. At least a portion of one of the acidic gases may be introduced into the formation, or into another formation, through one or more wellbores at a pressure below a lithostatic pressure of the formation in which the acidic gas is introduced.

  6. In situ structural analysis of the Yersinia enterocolitica injectisome

    PubMed Central

    Kudryashev, Mikhail; Stenta, Marco; Schmelz, Stefan; Amstutz, Marlise; Wiesand, Ulrich; Castaño-Díez, Daniel; Degiacomi, Matteo T; Münnich, Stefan; Bleck, Christopher KE; Kowal, Julia; Diepold, Andreas; Heinz, Dirk W; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Cornelis, Guy R; Stahlberg, Henning

    2013-01-01

    Injectisomes are multi-protein transmembrane machines allowing pathogenic bacteria to inject effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells, a process called type III secretion. Here we present the first three-dimensional structure of Yersinia enterocolitica and Shigella flexneri injectisomes in situ and the first structural analysis of the Yersinia injectisome. Unexpectedly, basal bodies of injectisomes inside the bacterial cells showed length variations of 20%. The in situ structures of the Y. enterocolitica and S. flexneri injectisomes had similar dimensions and were significantly longer than the isolated structures of related injectisomes. The crystal structure of the inner membrane injectisome component YscD appeared elongated compared to a homologous protein, and molecular dynamics simulations documented its elongation elasticity. The ring-shaped secretin YscC at the outer membrane was stretched by 30–40% in situ, compared to its isolated liposome-embedded conformation. We suggest that elasticity is critical for some two-membrane spanning protein complexes to cope with variations in the intermembrane distance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00792.001 PMID:23908767

  7. [Application of in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy to analysis of fluid inclusions in reservoirs].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Lin, Cheng-yan; Yu, Wen-quan; Zheng, Jie; Wang, Ai-guo

    2010-01-01

    Identification of salts is a principal problem for analysis of fluid inclusions in reservoirs. The fluid inclusions from deep natural gas reservoirs in Minfeng sub-sag were analyzed by in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy. The type of fluid inclusions was identified by Raman spectroscopy at room temperature. The Raman spectra show that the inclusions contain methane-bearing brine aqueous liquids. The fluid inclusions were analyzed at -180 degrees C by in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy. The spectra show that inclusions contain three salts, namely NaCl2, CaCl2 and MgCl2. Sodium chloride is most salt component, coexisting with small calcium chloride and little magnesium chloride. The origin of fluids in inclusions was explained by analysis of the process of sedimentation and diagenesis. The mechanism of diagenesis in reservoirs was also given in this paper. The results of this study indicate that in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy is an available method to get the composition of fluid inclusions in reservoirs. Based on the analysis of fluid inclusions in reservoirs by in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy with combination of the history of sedimentation and diagenesis, the authors can give important evidence for the type and mechanism of diagenesis in reservoirs. PMID:20302090

  8. In-situ analysis of hydrazine decomposition products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Whalen, Margaret V.

    1987-01-01

    A gas analyzer utilizing a nondispersive infrared (NDIR) detection system was used to monitor the ammonia and water vapor content of the products of a previously unused hydrazine gas generator. This provided an in-situ measurement of the generator's efficiency difficult to obtain by other means. The analyzer was easily installed in both the calibration and hydrazine systems, required no maintenance other than periodic zero adjustments, and performed well for extended periods in the operating range tested. The catalyst bed operated smoothly and repeatably during the 28 hr of testing. No major transients were observed on startup or during steady state operation. The amount of ammonia in the output stream of the gas generator was found to be a strong function of temperature at catalyst bed temperatures below 450 C. At temperatures above this, the efficiency remained nearly constant. On startup the gas generator efficiency was found to decrease with time until a steady state value was attained. Elevated catalyst bed temperatures in the periods before steady state operation was found to be responsible for this phenomenon.

  9. In Situ Analysis of Organics with a Portable Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soparawalla, Santosh

    2011-01-01

    The search for extra-terrestrial life starts at home. In order to find life on other planets, we start by examining life processes we understand on the earth. Though it may not be possible to see the life in the form of macroscopic organisms, telltale signs of life can exist in the form of small organic molecules such as peptides and amino acids. Our overall goal is to test a portable mass spectrometer (MS) system, the Mini 10.5, for astrobiological applications including in situ hydrocarbon analysis and sediments analysis using an additional automated sample processing system (ASPS). The collaborative research focuses on two current projects in the field of astrobiology. Both projects are geared towards examining organics distributed in extreme environments. One portion of study attempts to qualitatively analyze the effect of volatile organic compounds (VOC) produced by diesel exhaust on lichens growing in the desert. This requires measurements to be taken by bringing the instrument to the Mojave Desert and monitoring atmospheric composition of VOCs in situ. The second project is to evaluate the miniature MS system as a detector for the ASPS extraction system. A major obstacle of any chemometric in situ analysis is the suppression of analyte signal by concomitant signal from the surrounding environment. The ASPS extraction device has been developed at JPL to extract amino acids from sediment samples and elute them in solution. The solution is eluted at a high pH and needs to be conditioned to a more neutral pH so that dissolved amino acids can be readily protonated and subsequently analyzed by electrospray MS.

  10. Greenhouse Gas Emission from In-situ Denitrifying Bioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluer, W.; Walter, M. T.; Geohring, L.

    2013-12-01

    Despite decades of concerted effort to mitigate nonpoint source nitrate (NO3-) pollution from agricultural lands, these efforts have not been sufficient to arrest eutrophication, which continues to be a serious and chronic problem. Two primary processes for removing excess NO3- from water are biological assimilation and denitrification. Denitrifying bacteria use NO3- as the electron acceptor for respiration in the absence of oxygen. Denitrification results in reduced forms of nitrogen, often dinitrogen gas (N2) but also nitrous oxide (N2O), an aggressive greenhouse gas (GHG). A promising solution to NO3- pollution is to intercept agricultural discharges with denitrifying bioreactors (DNBRs), though research has been limited to NO3- level reduction and omitted process mechanisms. DNBRs work by providing an anaerobic environment with plenty of organic matter (commonly woodchips) for denitrifying bacteria to flourish. While, initial results from bioreactor studies show that they can cost-effectively remove NO3-, GHG emission could be an unintended consequence. The study's goal is to determine how bioreactor design promotes microbial denitrification while limiting N2O production. It specifically focuses on expanding the body of knowledge concerning DNBRs in the areas of design implications and internal processes by measuring intermediate compounds and not solely NO3-. Nutrient samples are collected at inflow and outflow structures and tested for NO3- and nitrite (NO2-). Dissolved and headspace gas samples are collected and tested for N2O. Additional gas samples will be analyzed for naturally-occurring isotopic N2 to support proposed pathways. Designs will be analyzed both through the N2O/N2 production ratio and NO2- production caused by various residence times and inflow NO3- concentrations. High GHG ratios and NO2- production suggest non-ideal conditions or flow patterns for complete denitrification. NO3- reduction is used for comparison with previous studies. Few

  11. Gas Turbine Reheat Using In-Situ Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. Bachovchin; T.E. Lippert

    2004-04-30

    Gas turbine reheat is a well-known technique for increasing the power output of gas turbine, as well as the efficiency in combined cycle operation with higher heat recovery inlet temperatures. The technique also could allow development of an advanced high efficiency turbine with an additional stage, but without a higher inlet temperature. A novel reheat approach, with fuel added via internal passages in turbine airfoils, has been proposed [1]. This avoids the bulky and possible high-NOx discrete reheat combustors used in traditional approaches. The key questions regarding this approach are whether there is sufficient residence time at high temperature for fuel burnout, and whether increased emissions of NOx and CO result. This project examines the chemical kinetics basis of these questions. In the present task detailed chemical kinetics models were used to evaluate injection reheat combustion. Models used included a Siemens Westinghouse diffusion flame model, the set of CHEMKIN gas-phase kinetics equation solvers, and the GRI 3.0 detailed kinetics data base. These modules are called by a reheat-specific main program, which also provides them with data, including gas path conditions that change with distance through the turbine. Conceptually, injection could occur in either of two ways: (1) direct injection via holes in airfoil trailing edges; or (2) injection at the downstream faces of small bluff bodies placed at these edges. In the former case, combustion could occur as a diffusion flame at the hole, as a plume or streak following this zone, or as a substantially mixed out homogeneous region downstream. In the latter case, combustion could occur as a lower temperature, well-mixed, recirculating flame in the wake of the bluff body, followed by burnout in the same sequence of diffusion flame, streak, and mixed out. The results were as follows. In the case of a conventional four-stage engine, vane 1 trailing edge injection can be achieved with complete burnout

  12. Molecular recognition in gas sensing: Results from acoustic wave and in-situ FTIR measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hierlemann, A.; Ricco, A.J.; Bodenhoefer, K.; Goepel, W.

    1998-06-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) measurements were combined with direct, in-situ molecular spectroscopy to understand the interactions of surface-confined sensing films with gas-phase analytes. This was accomplished by collecting Fourier-transform infrared external-reflectance spectra (FTIR-ERS) on operating SAW devices during dosing of their specifically coated surfaces with key analytes.

  13. In situ and in-transit analysis of cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesen, Brian; Almgren, Ann; Lukić, Zarija; Weber, Gunther; Morozov, Dmitriy; Beckner, Vincent; Day, Marcus

    2016-08-01

    Modern cosmological simulations have reached the trillion-element scale, rendering data storage and subsequent analysis formidable tasks. To address this circumstance, we present a new MPI-parallel approach for analysis of simulation data while the simulation runs, as an alternative to the traditional workflow consisting of periodically saving large data sets to disk for subsequent `offline' analysis. We demonstrate this approach in the compressible gasdynamics/ N-body code Nyx, a hybrid MPI+OpenMP code based on the BoxLib framework, used for large-scale cosmological simulations. We have enabled on-the-fly workflows in two different ways: one is a straightforward approach consisting of all MPI processes periodically halting the main simulation and analyzing each component of data that they own (` in situ'). The other consists of partitioning processes into disjoint MPI groups, with one performing the simulation and periodically sending data to the other `sidecar' group, which post-processes it while the simulation continues (`in-transit'). The two groups execute their tasks asynchronously, stopping only to synchronize when a new set of simulation data needs to be analyzed. For both the in situ and in-transit approaches, we experiment with two different analysis suites with distinct performance behavior: one which finds dark matter halos in the simulation using merge trees to calculate the mass contained within iso-density contours, and another which calculates probability distribution functions and power spectra of various fields in the simulation. Both are common analysis tasks for cosmology, and both result in summary statistics significantly smaller than the original data set. We study the behavior of each type of analysis in each workflow in order to determine the optimal configuration for the different data analysis algorithms.

  14. Mineral exploration and soil analysis using in situ neutron activation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Hoyte, A.F.

    1966-01-01

    A feasibility study has been made to operate by remote control an unshielded portable positive-ion accelerator type neutron source to induce activities in the ground or rock by "in situ" neutron irradiation. Selective activation techniques make it possible to detect some thirty or more elements by irradiating the ground for periods of a few minutes with either 3-MeV or 14-MeV neutrons. The depth of penetration of neutrons, the effect of water content of the soil on neutron moderation, gamma ray attenuation in the soil and other problems are considered. The analysis shows that, when exploring for most elements of economic interest, the reaction 2H(d,n)3He yielding ??? 3-MeV neutrons is most practical to produce a relatively uniform flux of neutrons of less than 1 keV to a depth of 19???-20???. Irradiation with high energy neutrons (??? 14 MeV) can also be used and may be better suited for certain problems. However, due to higher background and lower sensitivity for the heavy minerals, it is not a recommended neutron source for general exploration use. Preliminary experiments have been made which indicate that neutron activation in situ is feasible for a mineral exploration or qualititative soil analysis. ?? 1976.

  15. In situ reaction kinetic analysis of dental restorative materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younas, Basma; Samad Khan, Abdul; Muzaffar, Danish; Hussain, Ijaz; Chaudhry, Aqif Anwar; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate in situ structural and thermal changes of dental restorative materials at periodical time intervals. The commercial materials included zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE), zinc phosphate type I (ZnPO4), glass ionomer cement type II (GIC) and resin-based nano-omposite (Filtek Z350 XT). These materials were processed according to manufacturer's instructions. For the structural analysis Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used at high resolution. TGA was used to evaluate thermal weight-loss. The FTIR spectra were collected at periodic time intervals. FTIR spectra showed that with time passing all materials exhibited an increase in peak intensities and a new appearance of shoulders and shifting of peaks for example, ZnPO4 (P-O), ZOE (C═O, C═N, C-O-C), GIC (COO-, C-H, Si-OH), composites (C═O, C═C, C═N, C-N-H). The peaks were replaced by bands and these bands became broader with time interval. Composites showed a degree of conversion and new peaks corresponded to the cross-linking of polymer composites. TGA analysis showed that significant changes in weight loss of set materials were observed after 24 h, where ZOE showed continuous changes in thermal degradation. The spectral changes and thermal degradation with time interval elucidated in situ setting behaviour and understanding of their bonding compatibility with tooth structure and change in relation to time.

  16. Conceptual designs for in situ analysis of Mars soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, C. P.; Zent, A. P.; Hartman, H.

    1991-01-01

    A goal of this research is to develop conceptual designs for instrumentation to perform in situ measurements of the Martian soil in order to determine the existence and nature of any reactive chemicals. Our approach involves assessment and critical review of the Viking biology results which indicated the presence of a soil oxidant, an investigation of the possible application of standard soil science techniques to the analysis of Martian soil, and a preliminary consideration of non-standard methods that may be necessary for use in the highly oxidizing Martian soil. Based on our preliminary analysis, we have developed strawman concepts for standard soil analysis on Mars, including pH, suitable for use on a Mars rover mission. In addition, we have devised a method for the determination of the possible strong oxidants on Mars.

  17. A new in-situ method to determine the apparent gas diffusion coefficient of soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laemmel, Thomas; Paulus, Sinikka; Schack-Kirchner, Helmer; Maier, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Soil aeration is an important factor for the biological activity in the soil and soil respiration. Generally, gas exchange between soil and atmosphere is assumed to be governed by diffusion and Fick's Law is used to describe the fluxes in the soil. The "apparent soil gas diffusion coefficient" represents the proportional factor between the flux and the gas concentration gradient in the soil and reflects the ability of the soil to "transport passively" gases through the soil. One common way to determine this coefficient is to take core samples in the field and determine it in the lab. Unfortunately this method is destructive and needs laborious field work and can only reflect a small fraction of the whole soil. As a consequence insecurity about the resulting effective diffusivity on the profile scale must remain. We developed a new in-situ method using new gas sampling device, tracer gas and inverse soil gas modelling. The gas sampling device contains several sampling depths and can be easily installed into vertical holes of an auger, which allows for fast installation of the system. At the lower end of the device inert tracer gas is injected continuously. The tracer gas diffuses into the surrounding soil. The resulting distribution of the tracer gas concentrations is used to deduce the diffusivity profile of the soil. For Finite Element Modeling of the gas sampling device/soil system the program COMSOL is used. We will present the results of a field campaign comparing the new in-situ method with lab measurements on soil cores. The new sampling pole has several interesting advantages: it can be used in-situ and over a long time; so it allows following modifications of diffusion coefficients in interaction with rain but also vegetation cycle and wind.

  18. Analysis of in situ measurements of cirrus anvil outflow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederman, J. I.; Whiteway, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The airborne campaign, EMERALD 2 (Egrett Microphysics Experiment with Radiation, Lidar, and Dynamics,) was conducted out of Darwin, Australia in 2002. Objectives included characterization of the dynamics in the cirrus anvil outflow from tropical deep convection. Two aircraft, the Egrett and King Air, were flown in tandem in the upper troposphere (7 km - 15 km) to collect in situ measurements in the anvil outflow from a storm named "Hector" that occurs on a regular basis over the Tiwi Islands north of Darwin during November and December. Turbulence probes mounted on the wings of the Egrett aircraft were used to measure the wind fluctuations across the anvil and along its length with a spatial resolution of 2 meters. The in situ measurements from the Egrett were coincident with lidar measurements of the cloud structure from the King Air aircraft flying directly below. The presentation will show results of the analysis of the measurements with an emphasis on the turbulence, gravity waves, and coherent structures that are particular to the cirrus anvil outflow environment. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics associated with the generation of mammatus formations at the base of the anvil clouds.

  19. In situ structural analysis of the human nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    von Appen, Alexander; Kosinski, Jan; Sparks, Lenore; Ori, Alessandro; DiGuilio, Amanda L; Vollmer, Benjamin; Mackmull, Marie-Therese; Banterle, Niccolo; Parca, Luca; Kastritis, Panagiotis; Buczak, Katarzyna; Mosalaganti, Shyamal; Hagen, Wim; Andres-Pons, Amparo; Lemke, Edward A; Bork, Peer; Antonin, Wolfram; Glavy, Joseph S; Bui, Khanh Huy; Beck, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear pore complexes are fundamental components of all eukaryotic cells that mediate nucleocytoplasmic exchange. Determining their 110-megadalton structure imposes a formidable challenge and requires in situ structural biology approaches. Of approximately 30 nucleoporins (Nups), 15 are structured and form the Y and inner-ring complexes. These two major scaffolding modules assemble in multiple copies into an eight-fold rotationally symmetric structure that fuses the inner and outer nuclear membranes to form a central channel of ~60 nm in diameter. The scaffold is decorated with transport-channel Nups that often contain phenylalanine-repeat sequences and mediate the interaction with cargo complexes. Although the architectural arrangement of parts of the Y complex has been elucidated, it is unclear how exactly it oligomerizes in situ. Here we combine cryo-electron tomography with mass spectrometry, biochemical analysis, perturbation experiments and structural modelling to generate, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive architectural model of the human nuclear pore complex to date. Our data suggest previously unknown protein interfaces across Y complexes and to inner-ring complex members. We show that the transport-channel Nup358 (also known as Ranbp2) has a previously unanticipated role in Y-complex oligomerization. Our findings blur the established boundaries between scaffold and transport-channel Nups. We conclude that, similar to coated vesicles, several copies of the same structural building block--although compositionally identical--engage in different local sets of interactions and conformations. PMID:26416747

  20. Learning deformation and structure simultaneously: in situ endograft deformation analysis.

    PubMed

    Langs, Georg; Paragios, Nikos; Desgranges, Pascal; Rahmouni, Alain; Kobeiter, Hicham

    2011-02-01

    The learning of the shape and appearance behavior of complex anatomical structures is of growing importance in the successful use of medical imaging data. We propose a method to simultaneously learn a model of shape variation and the behavioral structure of objects in volumetric data sets. The algorithm performs a group-wise registration of a set of examples, and accounts for the heterogeneous deformation or variability properties of the data. We use the method for the in situ analysis of endograft deformation in the thoracic aorta during the cardiac cycle. The method is based on an emerging model of the shape variation, which is learned autonomously from a gated computed tomography sequence. It automatically adapts to the highly non-uniform elasticity properties of the structure during learning. The resulting deformation model is used for the measurement of global and local characteristics of the endograft movement. The method allows for the in situ localization of the stent during the cardiac cycle, and the measurement of its deformation. Furthermore, it makes the comparison of different endograft designs possible, and can serve as a basis for fitting a physical model of the endograft- and vessel surface to individual patients. The latter is essential for long-term risk assessment of the impact of endografts in highly mobile areas. We evaluate the approach on 10 data sets from patients that underwent endograft placement after traumatic ruptures of the thoracic aorta. PMID:20675181

  1. In situ structural analysis of the human nuclear pore complex

    PubMed Central

    Ori, Alessandro; DiGuilio, Amanda L.; Vollmer, Benjamin; Mackmull, Marie-Therese; Banterle, Niccolo; Parca, Luca; Kastritis, Panagiotis; Buczak, Katarzyna; Mosalaganti, Shyamal; Hagen, Wim; Andres-Pons, Amparo; Lemke, Edward A.; Bork, Peer; Antonin, Wolfram; Glavy, Joseph S.; Bui, Khanh Huy; Beck, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are fundamental components of all eukaryotic cells that mediate nucleocytoplasmic exchange. Elucidating their 110 MDa structure imposes a formidable challenge and requires in situ structural biology approaches. Fifteen out of about thirty nucleoporins (Nups) are structured and form the Y- and inner ring complexes. These two major scaffolding modules assemble in multiple copies into an eight-fold rotationally symmetric structure that fuses the inner and outer nuclear membranes to form a central channel of ∼60 nm in diameter 1. The scaffold is decorated with transport channel Nups that often contain phenylalanine (FG)-repeat sequences and mediate the interaction with cargo complexes. Although the architectural arrangement of parts of the Y-complex has been elucidated, it is unclear how exactly it oligomerizes in situ. Here, we combined cryo electron tomography with mass spectrometry, biochemical analysis, perturbation experiments and structural modeling to generate the most comprehensive architectural model of the NPC to date. Our data suggest previously unknown protein interfaces across Y-complexes and to inner ring complex members. We demonstrate that the higher eukaryotic transport channel Nup358 (RanBP2) has a previously unanticipated role in Y-complex oligomerization. Our findings blur the established boundaries between scaffold and transport channel Nups. We conclude that, similarly to coated vesicles, multiple copies of the same structural building block - although compositionally identical - engage in different local sets of interactions and conformations. PMID:26416747

  2. An Improved In Situ and Satellite SST Analysis for Climate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Richard W.; Rayner, Nick A.; Smith, Thomas M.; Stokes, Diane C.; Wang, Wanqiu

    2002-07-01

    A weekly 1° spatial resolution optimum interpolation (OI) sea surface temperature (SST) analysis has been produced at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) using both in situ and satellite data from November 1981 to the present. The weekly product has been available since 1993 and is widely used for weather and climate monitoring and forecasting. Errors in the satellite bias correction and the sea ice to SST conversion algorithm are discussed, and then an improved version of the OI analysis is developed. The changes result in a modest reduction in the satellite bias that leaves small global residual biases of roughly 0.03°C. The major improvement in the analysis occurs at high latitudes due to the new sea ice algorithm where local differences between the old and new analysis can exceed 1°C. Comparisons with other SST products are needed to determine the consistency of the OI. These comparisons show that the differences among products occur on large time- and space scales with monthly rms differences exceeding 0.5°C in some regions. These regions are primarily the mid- and high-latitude Southern Oceans and the Arctic where data are sparse, as well as high-gradient areas such as the Gulf Stream and Kuroshio where the gradients cannot be properly resolved on a 1° grid. In addition, globally averaged differences of roughly 0.05°C occur among the products on decadal scales. These differences primarily arise from the same regions where the rms differences are large. However, smaller unexplained differences also occur in other regions of the midlatitude Northern Hemisphere where in situ data should be adequate.

  3. In situ gas concentrations in the Kumano forearc basin from drilling mud gas monitoring and sonic velocity data (IODP NanTroSEIZE Exp. 319 Site C0009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersberg, T.; Doan, M.-L.; Schleicher, A. M.; Horiguchi, K.; Eguchi, N.; Erzinger, J.

    2012-04-01

    Conventional IODP shipboard methods of gas investigations comprise gas sampling from core voids and headspace gas sampling followed by shipboard gas analysis. These methods possibly underestimate the in situ gas concentration due to core degassing during retrieval and handling on deck. In few cases, a Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) was used in the past to overcome this problem, providing gas concentrations one or two order of magnitude higher than headspace gas analysis from corresponding depths. Here, we describe two new techniques applied during IODP NanTroSEIZE Exp. 319 Site C0009 riser drilling in the Kumano forearc basin to estimate in situ gas concentrations without drill core recovery. During riser drilling of site C0009 between 703 to 1594 mbsf, gas was continuously extracted from returing drilling mud and analysed in real-time (drill mud gas monitoring). This method results in information on the gas composition and gas concentration at depth. The chemical (C1-C3) and isotope (δ13C, H/D) composition of hydrocarbons, the only formation-derived gases identified in drill mud, demonstrate a microbial hydrocarbon gas source mixing with small but increasing amounts of thermogenic gas at greater depth. Methane content in drilling mud semi-quantitatively correlates with visible allochtonous material (wood, lignite) in drilling cuttings. In situ gas concentration determination from drill mud gas monitoring based on the assumption that gas is either liberated from the rock into the drilling mud during drilling and ascent with the mud column or remains in the pore space of the drilling cuttings. Drilling mud gas data were calibrated with a defined amount of C2H2 (175 l [STP]) from a carbide test and result in methane concentrations reaching up to 24 lgas/lsediment, in good agreement with findings from other IODP Legs using the PCS. Hydrocarbon gas concentrations in drilling cuttings from C0009 are significantly lower, indicating cuttings outgassing during ascent of the

  4. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis. 1992 Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  5. INTEGRATION OF HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS REACTORS WITH IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING

    SciTech Connect

    Eric P. Robertson; Michael G. McKellar; Lee O. Nelson

    2011-05-01

    This paper evaluates the integration of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) to an in situ oil shale retort operation producing 7950 m3/D (50,000 bbl/day). The large amount of heat required to pyrolyze the oil shale and produce oil would typically be provided by combustion of fossil fuels, but can also be delivered by an HTGR. Two cases were considered: a base case which includes no nuclear integration, and an HTGR-integrated case.

  6. In situ analysis of ash deposits from black liquor combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Bernath, P. |; Sinquefield, S.A. |; Baxter, L.L.; Sclippa, G.; Rohlfing, C.; Barfield, M. |

    1996-05-01

    Aerosols formed during combustion of black liquor cause a significant fire-side fouling problem in pulp mill recovery boilers. The ash deposits reduce heat transfer effectiveness, plug gas passages, and contribute to corrosion. Both vapors and condensation aerosols lead to the formation of such deposits. The high ash content of the fuel and the low dew point of the condensate salts lead to a high aerosol and vapor concentration in most boilers. In situ measurements of the chemical composition of these deposits is an important step in gaining a fundamental understanding of the deposition process. Infrared emission spectroscopy is used to characterize the composition of thin film deposits resulting from the combustion of black liquor and the deposition of submicron aerosols and vapors. New reference spectra of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} pure component films were recorded and compared with the spectra of the black liquor deposit. All of the black liquor emission bands were identified using a combination of literature data and ab initio calculations. Ab initio calculations also predict the locations and intensities of bands for the alkali vapors of interest. 39 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Evaluation of in situ stress changes with gas depletion of coalbed methane reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shimin; Harpalani, Satya

    2014-08-01

    A sound knowledge of the stress path for coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs is critical for a variety of applications, including dynamic formation stability evaluation, long-term gas production management, and carbon sequestration in coals. Although this problem has been extensively studied for traditional oil and gas reservoirs, it is somewhat unclear for CBM reservoirs. The difference between the stress paths followed in the two reservoir types is expected to be significant given the unique sorption-induced deformation phenomenon associated with gas production from coal. This results in an additional reservoir volumetric strain, which induces a rather "abnormal" loss of horizontal stress with depletion, leading to continuous changes in the subsurface formation stresses, both effective as well as total. It is suspected that stress changes within the reservoir triggers formation failure after significant depletion. This paper describes an experimental study, carried out to measure the horizontal stress under in situ depletion conditions. The results show that the horizontal stress decreases linearly with depletion under in situ conditions. The dynamic stress evolution is theoretically analyzed, based on modified poroelasticity associated with sorption-induced strain effect. Additionally, the failure tendency of the reservoir under in situ conditions is analyzed using the traditional Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. The results indicate that depletion may lead to coal failure, particularly in deeper coalbeds and ones exhibiting large matrix shrinkage.

  8. Airborne In-Situ Trace Gas Measurements of Multiple Wildfires in California (2013-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iraci, L. T.; Yates, E. L.; Tanaka, T.; Roby, M.; Gore, W.; Clements, C. B.; Lareau, N.; Ambrosia, V. G.; Quayle, B.; Schroeder, W.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning emissions are an important source of a wide range of trace gases and particles that can impact local, regional and global air quality, climate forcing, biogeochemical cycles and human health. In the western US, wildfires dominate over prescribed fires, contributing to atmospheric trace gas budgets and regional and local air pollution. Limited sampling of emissions from wildfires means western US emission estimates rely largely on data from prescribed fires, which may not be a suitable proxy for wildfire emissions. We report here in-situ measurements of carbon dioxide, methane, ozone and water vapor from the plumes of a variety of wildfires sampled in California in the fire seasons of 2013 and 2014. Included in the analysis are the Rim Fire (August - October 2013, near Yosemite National Park), the Morgan Fire (September 2013, near Clayton, CA), and the El Portal Fire (July - August 2014, in Yosemite National Park), among others. When possible, fires were sampled on multiple days. Emission ratios and estimated emission factors will be presented and discussed in the context of fuel composition, plume structure, and fire phase. Correlations of plume chemical composition to MODIS/VIIRS Fire Radiative Power (FRP) and other remote sensing information will be explored. Furthermore, the role of plumes in delivery of enhanced ozone concentrations to downwind municipalities will be discussed.

  9. Method for increasing the calorific value of gas produced by the in situ combustion of coal

    DOEpatents

    Shuck, Lowell Z.

    1978-01-01

    The present invention relates to the production of relatively high Btu gas by the in situ combustion of subterranean coal. The coal bed is penetrated with a horizontally-extending borehole and combustion is initiated in the coal bed contiguous to the borehole. The absolute pressure within the resulting combustion zone is then regulated at a desired value near the pore pressure within the coal bed so that selected quantities of water naturally present in the coal will flow into the combustion zone to effect a hydrogen and carbon monoxide-producing steam-carbon reaction with the hot carbon in the combustion zone for increasing the calorific value of the product gas.

  10. Aberration corrected environmental STEM (AC ESTEM) for dynamic in-situ gas reaction studies of nanoparticle catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyes, E. D.; Gai, P. L.

    2014-06-01

    Environmental scanning transmission electron microscopy (ESTEM) with aberration correction (AC) has recently been added to the capabilities of the more established ETEM for analysis of heterogeneous nanoparticle based catalysts. It has helped to reveal the importance and potentially unique properties of individual atoms as active sites in their own right as well as pathways between established nanoparticles. A new capability is introduced for dynamic in-situ experiments under controlled conditions of specimen temperature and gas environment related to real world conditions pertinent to a range of industrial and societal priorities for new and improved chemical processes, materials, fuels, pharmaceutical products and processes, and in control or remediation of environmental emissions.

  11. In Situ Chemical Characterization of Organic Aerosol Surfaces using Direct Analysis in Real Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, M.; Nah, T.; Wilson, K. R.

    2012-12-01

    Obtaining in situ information on the molecular composition of atmospheric aerosol is important for understanding the sources, formation mechanisms, aging and physiochemical properties of atmospheric aerosol. Most recently, we have used Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART), which is a "soft" atmospheric pressure ionization technique, for in situ chemical characterization of a variety of laboratory generated organic aerosol and heterogeneous processing oleic acid aerosol. A stream of aerosol particles is crossed with a thermal flow of metastable He atoms (produced by the DART source) in front of an inlet of a mass spectrometer. The thermally desorbed analytes are subsequently ionized with minimal fragmentation by reactive species in the DART ionization source (e.g., metastable He atoms). The ion signal scales with the aerosol surface area rather than aerosol volume, suggesting that aerosol particles are not completely vaporized in the ionization region. The DART can thus measure the chemical composition as a function of aerosol depth. Probing aerosol depth is determined by the thermal desorption rates of aerosol particles. Here, we investigate how the experimental parameters (e.g., DART gas temperature and residence time) and the physiochemical properties of aerosol particles (e.g., enthalpy of vaporization) affect the probing aerosol depth and the desorption-ionization mechanism of aerosol particles in the DART using a series of model organic compounds. We also demonstrate the potential application of DART for in situ chemically analyzing wet aerosol particles undergoing oxidation reactions.

  12. Extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry toward in situ analysis without sample pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Hu, Bin; Li, Jianqiang; Chen, Rong; Zhang, Xie; Chen, Huanwen

    2009-09-15

    A homemade novel nanoextractive electrospray ionization (nanoEESI) source has been characterized for in situ mass spectrometric analysis of ambient samples without sample pretreatment. The primary ions generated using a nanospray emitter interact with the neutral sample plume created by manually nebulizing liquid samples, allowing production of the analyte ions in the spatial cross section of the nanoEESI source. The performance of nanoEESI is experimentally investigated by coupling the nanoEESI source to a commercial LTQ mass spectrometer for rapid analysis of various ambient samples using positive/negative ion detection modes. Compounds of interest in actual samples such as aerosol drug preparations, beverages, milk suspensions, farmland water, and groundwater were unambiguously detected using tandem nanoEESI ion trap mass spectrometry. The limit of detection was low picogram per milliliter levels for the compounds tested. Acceptable relative standard deviation (RSD) values (5-10%) were obtained for direct measurement of analytes in complex matrixes, providing linear dynamic signal responses using manual sample introduction. A single sample analysis was completed within 1.2 s. Requiring no sheath gas for either primary ion production or neutral sample introduction, the nanoEESI has advantages including readiness for miniaturization and integration, simple maintenance, easy operation, and low cost. The experimental data demonstrate that the nanoEESI is a promising tool for high-throughput, sensitive, quantitative, in situ analysis of ambient complex samples, showing potential applications for in situ analysis in multiple disciplines including but not limited to pharmaceutical analysis, food quality control, pesticides residue detection, and homeland security. PMID:19673501

  13. Tunable photonic cavities for in-situ spectroscopic trace gas detection

    DOEpatents

    Bond, Tiziana; Cole, Garrett; Goddard, Lynford

    2012-11-13

    Compact tunable optical cavities are provided for in-situ NIR spectroscopy. MEMS-tunable VCSEL platforms represents a solid foundation for a new class of compact, sensitive and fiber compatible sensors for fieldable, real-time, multiplexed gas detection systems. Detection limits for gases with NIR cross-sections such as O.sub.2, CH.sub.4, CO.sub.x and NO.sub.x have been predicted to approximately span from 10.sup.ths to 10s of parts per million. Exemplary oxygen detection design and a process for 760 nm continuously tunable VCSELS is provided. This technology enables in-situ self-calibrating platforms with adaptive monitoring by exploiting Photonic FPGAs.

  14. Development of an in situ derivatization technique for rapid analysis of levoglucosan and polar compounds in atmospheric organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheesley, Rebecca J.; Mieritz, Mark; DeMinter, Jeff T.; Shelton, Brandon R.; Schauer, James J.

    2015-12-01

    A novel thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry (TD-GCMS) technique was developed for the analysis of levoglucosan and other polar compounds in atmospheric organic aerosol. The method employs an in situ derivatization to add tri-methylsilyl groups to alcohol functional groups on simple carbohydrates, like levoglucosan and sterols. The new method was then demonstrated on a set of 40 filter samples collected in Fresno, CA. The results from the in situ silylation TD-GCMS method were compared, using levoglucosan, with a solvent extraction, high-volume injection GCMS method resulting in an r2 = 0.91.

  15. Development of an in situ derivatization technique for rapid analysis of levoglucosan and polar compounds in atmospheric organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheesley, Rebecca J.; Mieritz, Mark; DeMinter, Jeff T.; Shelton, Brandon R.; Schauer, James J.

    2015-12-01

    A novel thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry (TD-GCMS) technique was developed for the analysis of levoglucosan and other polar compounds in atmospheric organic aerosol. The method employs an in situ derivatization to add tri-methylsilyl groups to alcohol functional groups on simple carbohydrates, like levoglucosan and sterols. The new method was then demonstrated on a set of 40 filter samples collected in Fresno, CA. The results from the in situ silylation TD-GCMS method were compared, using levoglucosan, with a solvent extraction, high-volume injection GCMS method resulting in an r2 = 0.91.

  16. Regulatory pathway analysis by high-throughput in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Visel, Axel; Carson, James P.; Oldekamp, Judit; Warnecke, Marei; Jakubcakova, Vladimira; Zhou, Xunlei; Shaw, Chad; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo; Eichele, Gregor

    2007-10-01

    Automated in situ hybridization (ISH) permits construction of comprehensive atlases of gene expression patterns in mammals. When web-accessible, such atlases become searchable digital expression maps of individual genes and offer an entryway to elucidate genetic interactions and signaling pathways. An atlas housing ~1,000 spatial gene expression patterns of the mid-gestation mouse embryo was generated. Patterns were textually annotated using a controlled vocabulary comprising 90 anatomical features. Hierarchical clustering of annotations was carried out using distance scores calculated from the similarity between pairs of patterns across all anatomical structures. This ordered hundreds of complex expression patterns into a matrix that reflected the embryonic architecture and the relatedness of patterns of expression. Clustering yielded twelve distinct groups of expression pattern. Because of similarity of expression patterns within a group, members of this group may be components of regulatory cascades. We focused on one group, which is composed of 83 genes, including Pax6, an evolutionary conserved transcriptional master mediator of the development. Using functional studies, ISH on Pax6-deficient embryos and Pax6 binding site identification and validation by means of electromobility shift assays, we identified numerous genes that are transcriptionally regulated by Pax6. Hence cluster analysis of annotated gene expression patterns obtained by robotic ISH is an entryway for identification of components of signaling cascades in mammals.

  17. An in Situ Technique for Elemental Analysis of Lunar Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, K. Y.; Cremers, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    An in situ analytical technique that can remotely determine the elemental constituents of solids has been demonstrated. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a form of atomic emission spectroscopy in which a powerful laser pulse is focused on a solid to generate a laser spark, or microplasma. Material in the plasma is vaporized, and the resulting atoms are excited to emit light. The light is spectrally resolved to identify the emitting species. LIBS is a simple technique that can be automated for inclusion aboard a remotely operated vehicle. Since only optical access to a sample is required, areas inaccessible to a rover can be analyzed remotely. A single laser spark both vaporizes and excites the sample so that near real-time analysis (a few minutes) is possible. This technique provides simultaneous multielement detection and has good sensitivity for many elements. LIBS also eliminates the need for sample retrieval and preparation preventing possible sample contamination. These qualities make the LIBS technique uniquely suited for use in the lunar environment.

  18. A piezoelectric electrospun platform for in situ cardiomyocyte contraction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beringer, Laura Toth

    hyperpolarized state, proving their potential use as contractile analysis microdevices. The third and final aim of this dissertation was to be able to measure contraction events from both cultured cardiomyocytes and whole tissues in situ. Rat neonatal cardiomyocytes grew on the prepared collagen/PVDF-TrFe nanogenerators and yielded a distinct signal after 8 days of growth. These contractions were verified with live cell imaging and video recording. In addition, cardiomyocyte exposure to the drug isoproterenol increased contraction strength and frequency, which was reflected in the nanogenerator recordings. Frog whole heart and heart tissue slices also were interfaced with the fabricated nanogenerators and signals were recorded. The same held true for heart slices from male Sprague-Dawley rats. These signals were determined to be statistically different compared to the control baseline nanogenerator recordings in media in the absence of cell culture. Overall the fabricated nanogenerators have demonstrated their potential to be used as in situ analysis tools for contractile events and have potential in the field of personalized medicine and drug diagnostic assays. The facile fabrication and ease of setup to obtain the electrical voltage signal corresponding to the contractile events are what sets the nanogenerator apart from any polymer based sensor available today.

  19. Balloonborne in situ gas chromatograph for measurements in the troposphere and stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, F. L.; Elkins, J. W.; Ray, E. A.; Dutton, G. S.; Dunn, R. E.; Fahey, D. W.; McLaughlin, R. J.; Thompson, T. L.; Romashkin, P. A.; Hurst, D. F.; Wamsley, P. R.

    2003-03-01

    An in situ gas chromatograph (GC) instrument on a balloonborne package is described in detail and data from seven science deployments are presented. This instrument, the Lightweight Airborne Chromatograph Experiment (LACE), operates on the Observations of the Middle Stratosphere (OMS) in situ gondola and has taken data from the upper troposphere to near 32 km with a vertical resolution of better than 300 m. LACE chromatography has been developed to measure halon-1211, the chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-113, CFC-12), nitrous oxide (N2O), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) every 70 s and methyl chloroform (CH3CCl3), carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), hydrogen (H2), methane (CH4), and carbon monoxide (CO) every 140 s. In the introduction we present scientific motivation for choosing this suite of molecules and for the use of faster sample rates resulting in unprecedented vertical resolution from an in situ GC. Results from an intercomparison with the Airborne Chromatograph for Atmospheric Trace Species (ACATS-IV) instrument are shown to quantitatively connect this LACE data set to the complementary data set generated on board the NASA ER-2 aircraft.

  20. Chemical composition and the nutritive value of pistachio epicarp (in situ degradation and in vitro gas production techniques)

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshizadeh, Somayeh; Taghizadeh, Akbar; Janmohammadi, Hossein; Alijani, Sadegh

    2014-01-01

    The nutritive value of pistachio epicarp (PE) was evaluated by in situ and in vitro techniques. Chemical analysis indicated that PE was high in crude protein (11.30%) and low in neutral detergent fiber (26.20%). Total phenols, total tannins, condensed tannins and hydrolysable tannins contents in PE were 8.29%, 4.48%, 0.49% and 3.79%, respectively. Ruminal dry matter and crude protein degradation after 48 hr incubation were 75.21% and 82.52%, respectively. The gas production volume at 48 hr for PE was 122.47 mL g-1DM. As a whole, adding polyethylene glycol (PEG) to PE increased (p < 0.05) gas production volumes, organic matter digestibility and the metabolizable energy that illustrated inhibitory effect of phenolics on rumen microbial fermentation and the positive influence of PEG on digestion PE. The results showed that PE possessed potentials to being used as feed supplements. PMID:25568691

  1. IN-SITU FENTON OXIDATION: A CRITICAL ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In-situ Fenton oxidation (ISFO) is a rapidly emerging technology which involves the injection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and other chemical reagents into the subsurface for the purpose of oxidizing and transforming contaminants. ISFO is being applied at an increasing number of ...

  2. Versatile in situ powder X-ray diffraction cells for solid–gas investigations

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Torben R.; Nielsen, Thomas K.; Filinchuk, Yaroslav; Jørgensen, Jens-Erik; Cerenius, Yngve; Gray, Evan MacA.; Webb, Colin J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes new sample cells and techniques for in situ powder X-ray diffraction specifically designed for gas absorption studies up to ca 300 bar (1 bar = 100 000 Pa) gas pressure. The cells are for multipurpose use, in particular the study of solid–gas reactions in dosing or flow mode, but can also handle samples involved in solid–liquid–gas studies. The sample can be loaded into a single-crystal sapphire (Al2O3) capillary, or a quartz (SiO2) capillary closed at one end. The advantages of a sapphire single-crystal cell with regard to rapid pressure cycling are discussed, and burst pressures are calculated and measured to be ∼300 bar. An alternative and simpler cell based on a thin-walled silicate or quartz glass capillary, connected to a gas source via a VCR fitting, enables studies up to ∼100 bar. Advantages of the two cell types are compared and their applications are illustrated by case studies. PMID:22477780

  3. In Situ Analysis of Organics and Isotopes at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Atreya, S. K.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Cabane, M.; Coll, P.; Demick, J.; Harpold, D. N.; Ming, D.; Niemann, H.; Owen, T.; Raulin, F.; Scott, J.; Webster, C.

    2003-05-01

    The recent success of the "follow the water" imperative for Mars exploration is tempered by the fact that more than 2 decades after Viking, much remains unknown about the state of carbon at the planet's surface. Therefore, a key objective for lander missions that follow MER will be a search for the location and nature of organic molecules and other carbon containing species. Reduced or partially oxidized compounds may reveal the nature of ancient or even present biotic or prebiotic processes. Ongoing definition and development of advanced techniques and protocols to "follow the carbon" will be described. For example, an instrument suite presently under development to be proposed for inclusion on the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory consists of an advanced gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) with derivatization capability coupled with a laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LDMS) and a tunable laser spectrometer (TLS). The suite is designated SAM (for Sample Analysis at Mars) and is designed to carry out analysis of both atmospheric gases and volatiles released from solid phase soils, rock samples, and ices. Volatile organic molecules and their pyrolysis products are analyzed by the GCMS and TLS, and refractory organics and elements by the LDMS. Additional objectives include higher precision measurements than have been obtained, to date, of the abundances and isotope ratios of the noble gases and a range of light elements including H, C, O, and N in both the atmosphere and soil. SAM can also contribute to geochemical objectives with the identification of various minerals through evolved gas analysis (EGA) of stable thermal decomposition products such as H2O, CO2, and oxides of nitrogen and sulfur using the MS and TLS as the detector. Recent EGA studies on Mars analogue materials that illustrate this capability are described. This work is supported by funding from NASA and CNES

  4. High-temperature in situ crystallographic observation of reversible gas sorption in impermeable organic cages.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seung Bin; Moon, Dohyun; Graf, Robert; Cho, Woo Jong; Park, Sung Woo; Yoon, Tae-Ung; Cho, Seung Joo; Hwang, In-Chul; Bae, Youn-Sang; Spiess, Hans W; Lee, Hee Cheon; Kim, Kwang S

    2015-11-17

    Crystallographic observation of adsorbed gas molecules is a highly difficult task due to their rapid motion. Here, we report the in situ single-crystal and synchrotron powder X-ray observations of reversible CO2 sorption processes in an apparently nonporous organic crystal under varying pressures at high temperatures. The host material is formed by hydrogen bond network between 1,3,5-tris-(4-carboxyphenyl)benzene (H3BTB) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and by π-π stacking between the H3BTB moieties. The material can be viewed as a well-ordered array of cages, which are tight packed with each other so that the cages are inaccessible from outside. Thus, the host is practically nonporous. Despite the absence of permanent pathways connecting the empty cages, they are permeable to CO2 at high temperatures due to thermally activated molecular gating, and the weakly confined CO2 molecules in the cages allow direct detection by in situ single-crystal X-ray diffraction at 323 K. Variable-temperature in situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction studies also show that the CO2 sorption is reversible and driven by temperature increase. Solid-state magic angle spinning NMR defines the interactions of CO2 with the organic framework and dynamic motion of CO2 in cages. The reversible sorption is attributed to the dynamic motion of the DMF molecules combined with the axial motions/angular fluctuations of CO2 (a series of transient opening/closing of compartments enabling CO2 molecule passage), as revealed from NMR and simulations. This temperature-driven transient molecular gating can store gaseous molecules in ordered arrays toward unique collective properties and release them for ready use. PMID:26578758

  5. High-temperature in situ crystallographic observation of reversible gas sorption in impermeable organic cages

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Seung Bin; Moon, Dohyun; Graf, Robert; Cho, Woo Jong; Park, Sung Woo; Yoon, Tae-Ung; Cho, Seung Joo; Hwang, In-Chul; Bae, Youn-Sang; Spiess, Hans W.; Lee, Hee Cheon; Kim, Kwang S.

    2015-01-01

    Crystallographic observation of adsorbed gas molecules is a highly difficult task due to their rapid motion. Here, we report the in situ single-crystal and synchrotron powder X-ray observations of reversible CO2 sorption processes in an apparently nonporous organic crystal under varying pressures at high temperatures. The host material is formed by hydrogen bond network between 1,3,5-tris-(4-carboxyphenyl)benzene (H3BTB) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and by π–π stacking between the H3BTB moieties. The material can be viewed as a well-ordered array of cages, which are tight packed with each other so that the cages are inaccessible from outside. Thus, the host is practically nonporous. Despite the absence of permanent pathways connecting the empty cages, they are permeable to CO2 at high temperatures due to thermally activated molecular gating, and the weakly confined CO2 molecules in the cages allow direct detection by in situ single-crystal X-ray diffraction at 323 K. Variable-temperature in situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction studies also show that the CO2 sorption is reversible and driven by temperature increase. Solid-state magic angle spinning NMR defines the interactions of CO2 with the organic framework and dynamic motion of CO2 in cages. The reversible sorption is attributed to the dynamic motion of the DMF molecules combined with the axial motions/angular fluctuations of CO2 (a series of transient opening/closing of compartments enabling CO2 molecule passage), as revealed from NMR and simulations. This temperature-driven transient molecular gating can store gaseous molecules in ordered arrays toward unique collective properties and release them for ready use. PMID:26578758

  6. Numerical studies of heat transfer and gas migration processes in relation to in situ vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkes, G.L.; MacKinnon, R.J.; Murray, P.E.

    1990-09-01

    This document presents numerical studies conducted in support of the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) treatability study. These results will be used for support of hardware design and performance assessments of ISV processes. Four models are presented and analyzed using finite element techniques: (1) heat transport and melting during the ISV process, (2) heat transfer calculations on the Intermediate Field Test (IFT) off-gas confinement hood, (3) gas migration in permeable soil surrounding the vitrified zone, and (4) melt rate calculations. Heat transport in the ISV process describes the temperature field and melt growth in the soil. Thermal radiation heat transfer calculations for the IFT hood demonstrate the sensitivity of the hood temperatures to melt temperature, melt radius, and exterior hood emissivity. The study of gas migration in permeable soil resulting from a buried source predicts that gas may migrate to the soil surface. The one-dimensional melt rate calculations conservatively predict a melt rate of 6 cm/hr. 11 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. In-situ gamma-analysis support for Phase I, Middlesex cleanup project, Middlesex, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Reiman, R.T.

    1983-07-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, the Energy Measurements Group of EG and G participated in the Remedial Action program for the former Middlesex Sampling Plant and associated properties at Middlesex, New Jersey from July to November 1980. EG and G provided real time analysis of the radiological character of the soil of each property included in the Phase I cleanup before, during, and after decontamination. The method used for the analysis was in situ gamma spectroscopy employing a high purity germanium detector. This report describes the in situ system and displays the results of the in situ measurements before and after decontamination of the properties surveyed during Phase I.

  8. Continuous in situ fluorescence imaging of an ultracold Fermi gas in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Rhys; Edge, Graham; Day, Ryan; Nino, Daniel; Trotzky, Stefan; Thywissen, Joseph

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate continuous in situ fluorescence imaging of ultracold fermionic 40K atoms held in a three-dimensional optical lattice with 527 nm periodicity. Using a 4S-4P1/2 grey molasses cooling scheme with a coherent dark state, we obtain a photon scattering rate exceeding 1 kHz while measuring a steady-state population of the vibrational ground state of 80%. Collecting the scattered photons through a 200 μm thin sapphire vacuum window and into a microscope objective allows us to image the in situ density distribution of the lattice gas. Spatially selective state manipulation is used to reduce the number of occupied lattice planes along the imaging direction, as well as to create density patterns along the transverse direction. We characterize the performance of the imaging protocol over a wide range of parameters. For larger-than-unity site occupation we observe efficient removal of atoms due to light-assisted collisions. Singly occupied lattice sites can be continuously imaged for several seconds. This method is suitable for high-resolution imaging of a many-body system in the Fermi-Hubbard regime.

  9. In situ and laboratory toxicity of coalbed natural gas produced waters with elevated sodium bicarbonate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farag, Aida M.; Harper, David D.; Skaar, Don

    2014-01-01

    Some tributaries in the Powder River Structural Basin, USA, were historically ephemeral, but now contain water year round as a result of discharge of coalbed natural gas (CBNG)-produced waters. This presented the opportunity to study field sites with 100% effluent water with elevated concentrations of sodium bicarbonate. In situ experiments, static renewal experiments performed simultaneously with in situ experiments, and static renewal experiments performed with site water in the laboratory demonstrated that CBNG-produced water reduces survival of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus). Age affected survival of fathead minnow, where fish 2 d posthatch (dph) were more sensitive than 6 dph fish, but pallid sturgeon survival was adversely affected at both 4 and 6 dph. This may have implications for acute assays that allow for the use of fish up to 14 dph. The survival of early lifestage fish is reduced significantly in the field when concentrations of NaHCO3 rise to more than 1500 mg/L (also expressed as >1245 mg HCO3 (-) /L). Treatment with the Higgin's Loop technology and dilution of untreated water increased survival in the laboratory. The mixing zones of the 3 outfalls studied ranged from approximately 800 m to 1200 m below the confluence. These experiments addressed the acute toxicity of effluent waters but did not address issues related to the volumes of water that may be added to the watershed.

  10. In situ and laboratory toxicity of coalbed natural gas produced waters with elevated sodium bicarbonate.

    PubMed

    Farag, Aïda M; Harper, David D; Skaar, Don

    2014-09-01

    Some tributaries in the Powder River Structural Basin, USA, were historically ephemeral, but now contain water year round as a result of discharge of coalbed natural gas (CBNG)-produced waters. This presented the opportunity to study field sites with 100% effluent water with elevated concentrations of sodium bicarbonate. In situ experiments, static renewal experiments performed simultaneously with in situ experiments, and static renewal experiments performed with site water in the laboratory demonstrated that CBNG-produced water reduces survival of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus). Age affected survival of fathead minnow, where fish 2 d posthatch (dph) were more sensitive than 6 dph fish, but pallid sturgeon survival was adversely affected at both 4 and 6 dph. This may have implications for acute assays that allow for the use of fish up to 14 dph. The survival of early lifestage fish is reduced significantly in the field when concentrations of NaHCO(3) rise to more than 1500 mg/L (also expressed as >1245 mg HCO(3) (-) /L). Treatment with the Higgin's Loop technology and dilution of untreated water increased survival in the laboratory. The mixing zones of the 3 outfalls studied ranged from approximately 800 m to 1200 m below the confluence. These experiments addressed the acute toxicity of effluent waters but did not address issues related to the volumes of water that may be added to the watershed. PMID:24909548

  11. An update on in situ cosmogenic 14C analysis at ETH Zürich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippe, K.; Kober, F.; Wacker, L.; Fahrni, S. M.; Ivy-Ochs, S.; Akçar, N.; Schlüchter, C.; Wieler, R.

    2013-01-01

    We present the improved performance of the modified in situ cosmogenic 14C extraction system at ETH Zürich. Samples are now processed faster (2 days in total) and are measured with a high analytical precision of usually <2% using the gas ion source of the MICADAS AMS facility. Measurements of the PP-4 standard sample show a good reproducibility and consistency with published values. Procedural blanks are very low at currently ∼4.0 × 10414C atoms. Analyses of samples from a ∼300 year old rock avalanche prove that we can successfully apply in situ14C exposure dating to very young surfaces. Additionally, we present a modified calculation scheme for in situ14C concentrations which differs from that used for conventional radiocarbon dating. This new approach explicitly accounts for the characteristics of in situ14C production.

  12. A broadband absorption spectrometer using light emitting diodes for ultrasensitive, in situ trace gas detection

    SciTech Connect

    Langridge, Justin M.; Shillings, Alexander J. L.; Jones, Roderic L.; Ball, Stephen M.

    2008-12-15

    A broadband absorption spectrometer has been developed for highly sensitive and target-selective in situ trace gas measurements. The instrument employs two distinct modes of operation: (i) broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS) is used to quantify the concentration of gases in sample mixtures from their characteristic absorption features, and (ii) periodic measurements of the cavity mirrors' reflectivity are made using step-scan phase shift cavity ringdown spectroscopy (PSCRDS). The latter PSCRDS method provides a stand-alone alternative to the more usual method of determining mirror reflectivities by measuring BBCEAS absorption spectra for calibration samples of known composition. Moreover, the instrument's two modes of operation use light from the same light emitting diode transmitted through the cavity in the same optical alignment, hence minimizing the potential for systematic errors between mirror reflectivity determinations and concentration measurements. The ability of the instrument to quantify absorber concentrations is tested in instrument intercomparison exercises for NO{sub 2} (versus a laser broadband cavity ringdown spectrometer) and for H{sub 2}O (versus a commercial hygrometer). A method is also proposed for calculating effective absorption cross sections for fitting the differential structure in BBCEAS spectra due to strong, narrow absorption lines that are under-resolved and hence exhibit non-Beer-Lambert law behavior at the resolution of the BBCEAS measurements. This approach is tested on BBCEAS spectra of water vapor's 4v+{delta} absorption bands around 650 nm. The most immediate analytical application of the present instrument is in quantifying the concentration of reactive trace gases in the ambient atmosphere. The instrument's detection limits for NO{sub 3} as a function of integration time are considered in detail using an Allan variance analysis. Experiments under laboratory conditions produce a 1{sigma} detection limit

  13. Intact Capture and In-situ Analysis System for Possible Biomarkers of Enceladus Plume Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Hajime; Fujishima, Kosuke; Rothschild, Lynn; Carbonnier, Benjamin; Guerrouache, Mohamed; Dziomba, Szymon; Tabata, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    A combination of intact capture and in-situ detection of organic molecules from extraterrestrial environments is a key step towards understanding the variety and distribution of the building blocks of life other than the terrestrial one. The best candidate in terms of technical feasibility of our time is to sample currently ejecting icy plumes of the Satrun's satellite Enceladus. While gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been dominantly used as successful and robust organic detection system in space, it is not suited for the separation and detection of non-volatile, heat-degradable organic molecules. Using polypeptides as a candidate molecule target, we we able to separate 16 out of the 17 tripeptides consisting of abiotically available amino acids by using capillary electrophoresis (CE). This can be regarded an example of possible bio-signatures that can be found in habitable extraterrestrial environments such as deep habitats of internal oceans of satellites of gas giants like Enceladus. We further used these peptides for the simulated Enceladus sample return using hypervelocity impact experiment facility at the same encountering velocity (i.e., 4-6 km/s) as flying through sampling mission to its plumes like the LIFE mission concept. As a result by using the space-proven 0.01g/cc aerogels, two peptide peaks corresponding to negatively charged peptides were detected, thus representing a full simulation of the capture, extraction and analysis of peptides from plume particles. Since the aerogel module is crushable and can be soaked with the electrophoresis agents/solutions and injected to capillary, this media can be used for in-situ wet analysis, in addition to previously known usage for sample return missions.

  14. In Situ Analysis of Refractory Metal Nugget Crystallography Providing Clues to Early Solar System Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, L.; Bland, P. A.; Forman, L. V.; Trimby, P. W.; Moody, S.; Yang, L.; Liu, H. W.; Ringer, S. P.; Saunders, M.

    2015-07-01

    In situ analysis of refractory metal nuggets has revealed several textural features that have not previously been reported, such as twinning and crystallographic relationships with associated minerals; as well as the discovery of a new mineral phase.

  15. Setup for in situ investigation of gases and gas/solid interfaces by soft x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Benkert, A; Blum, M; Meyer, F; Wilks, R G; Yang, W; Bär, M; Reinert, F; Heske, C; Weinhardt, L

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel gas cell designed to study the electronic structure of gases and gas/solid interfaces using soft x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopies. In this cell, the sample gas is separated from the vacuum of the analysis chamber by a thin window membrane, allowing in situ measurements under atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the gas can be regulated from room temperature up to approximately 600 °C. To avoid beam damage, a constant mass flow can be maintained to continuously refresh the gaseous sample. Furthermore, the gas cell provides space for solid-state samples, allowing to study the gas/solid interface for surface catalytic reactions at elevated temperatures. To demonstrate the capabilities of the cell, we have investigated a TiO2 sample behind a mixture of N2 and He gas at atmospheric pressure. PMID:24517824

  16. Setup for in situ investigation of gases and gas/solid interfaces by soft x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Benkert, A. E-mail: l.weinhardt@kit.edu; Blum, M.; Meyer, F.; Wilks, R. G.; Yang, W.; Bär, M.; and others

    2014-01-15

    We present a novel gas cell designed to study the electronic structure of gases and gas/solid interfaces using soft x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopies. In this cell, the sample gas is separated from the vacuum of the analysis chamber by a thin window membrane, allowing in situ measurements under atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the gas can be regulated from room temperature up to approximately 600 °C. To avoid beam damage, a constant mass flow can be maintained to continuously refresh the gaseous sample. Furthermore, the gas cell provides space for solid-state samples, allowing to study the gas/solid interface for surface catalytic reactions at elevated temperatures. To demonstrate the capabilities of the cell, we have investigated a TiO{sub 2} sample behind a mixture of N{sub 2} and He gas at atmospheric pressure.

  17. In situ NMR analysis of fluids contained in sedimentary rock

    PubMed

    de Swiet TM; Tomaselli; Hurlimann; Pines

    1998-08-01

    Limitations of resolution and absorption in standard chemical spectroscopic techniques have made it difficult to study fluids in sedimentary rocks. In this paper, we show that a chemical characterization of pore fluids may be obtained in situ by magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), which is normally used for solid samples. 1H MAS-NMR spectra of water and crude oil in Berea sandstone show sufficient chemical shift resolution for a straightforward determination of the oil/water ratio. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. PMID:9716484

  18. Functional materials analysis using in situ and in operando X-ray and neutron scattering

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Vanessa K.; Papadakis, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    In situ and in operando studies are commonplace and necessary in functional materials research. This review highlights recent developments in the analysis of functional materials using state-of-the-art in situ and in operando X-ray and neutron scattering and analysis. Examples are given covering a number of important materials areas, alongside a description of the types of information that can be obtained and the experimental setups used to acquire them. PMID:25866665

  19. Functional materials analysis using in situ and in operando X-ray and neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Vanessa K; Papadakis, Christine M

    2015-03-01

    In situ and in operando studies are commonplace and necessary in functional materials research. This review highlights recent developments in the analysis of functional materials using state-of-the-art in situ and in operando X-ray and neutron scattering and analysis. Examples are given covering a number of important materials areas, alongside a description of the types of information that can be obtained and the experimental setups used to acquire them. PMID:25866665

  20. Are ionic liquids pairwise in gas phase? A cluster approach and in situ IR study.

    PubMed

    Dong, Kun; Zhao, Lidong; Wang, Qian; Song, Yuting; Zhang, Suojiang

    2013-04-28

    In this work, we discussed the vaporization and gas species of ionic liquids (ILs) by a cluster approach of quantum statistical thermodynamics proposed by R. Luwig (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 10, 4333), which is a controversial issue up to date. Based on the different sized clusters (2-12 ion-pairs) of the condensed phase, the molar enthalpies of vaporization (ΔvapH, 298.15 K, 1bar) of four representative ILs, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Emim][NTf2]) 1-ethyl-2,3-dimethylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Emmim][NTf2]) 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Emim]Cl) and ethylammonium nitrate ([EtAm][NO3]), were calculated. The predicted ΔvapH were increased remarkably; even the values of [EtAm][NO3] were larger than 700 kJ mol(-1) when the charged isolated ions were assumed to be gas species. However, the ΔvapH were close to experimental measurements when the gas species assumed to be anion-cation pairwise, indicating that the different conformational ion-pairs can coexist in the gas phase when the IL is evaporated. Particularly for the protic IL, [EtAm][NO3], even the neutral precursor molecules by proton transfer can occur in gas phase. In addition, it's found that the effect of hydrogen bonds on the vaporization cannot be negligible by comparing the ΔvapH of [Emim][NTf2] with [Emmim][NTf2]. The in situ and calculated IR spectra provided the further proof that the ions are pairwise in gas phase. PMID:23493905

  1. Laboratory Studies Of Titan Haze: Simultaneous In Situ Detection Of Gas And Particle Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, Sarah; Li, R.; Yoon, H.; Hicks, R.; de Gouw, J.; Tolbert, M.

    2012-10-01

    Analyses of data obtained by multiple instruments carried by Cassini and Huygens have increased our knowledge of the composition of Titan’s atmosphere. While a wealth of new information about the aerosols in Titan’s atmosphere was obtained, their composition is still not well constrained. Laboratory experiments will therefore play a key role in furthering our understanding of the chemical processes resulting in the formation of haze in Titan’s atmosphere and its possible composition. We have obtained simultaneous in situ measurements of the gas- and particle-phase compositions produced by our Titan atmosphere simulation experiments (see e.g. [1]). The gas phase composition was measured using a Proton-Transfer Ion-Trap Mass Spectrometer (PIT-MS) and the aerosol composition was measured using a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). This complementary set of measurements will allow us to address the partitioning of gas- and aerosol-phase species. Knowledge of the gas phase composition in which the particles in our experiments form allows both for better comparison to the chemistry that is occurring in Titan’s atmosphere and for enabling more accurate determination of the possible pathways involved in the transition from gas phase to aerosol. We will compare the results from experiments that used two different initial gas mixtures (98% N2/2% CH4 and 98%N2/2%CH4/50 ppm CO) and two different energy sources to initiate the chemical reactions that result in particle formation (spark discharge using a Tesla coil or FUV irradiation from a deuterium lamp (115-400 nm)). [1] Trainer, M.G., et al. (2012) Astrobiology, 12, 315-326. SMH is supported by NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship AST-1102827.

  2. Detecting different correlation regimes in a 1D Bose gas using in-situ absorption imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salces-Carcoba, Francisco; Sugawa, Seiji; Yue, Yuchen; Putra, Andika; Spielman, Ian

    2016-05-01

    We present the realization of a single 1D Bose gas (1DBG) using a tightly focused Laguerre-Gauss beam as a waveguide for a 87Rb cloud. Axial confinement is provided by a weak trap that also sets the final density profile. A homogeneous 1DBG at T = 0 can be fully described by the dimensionless interaction parameter γ ~ 1/n, where n is the linear density; at sufficiently low densities the system becomes strongly interacting. An inhomogeneous (trapped) system can enter this description within the local density approximation (LDA) where the interaction parameter becomes position dependent γ(x) ~ 1/n(x). The system then displays different correlation regimes over its extension which can be detected by measuring its equation of state (EoS) or the density density correlations in real space using in-situ absorption imaging.

  3. Collagen bioengineered systems: in situ advanced optical spatiotemporal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yu Jer; Lang, Xuye; Granelli, Joseph; Turgman, Cassandra C.; Gigante, Jackie; Lyubovitsky, Julia G.

    2014-05-01

    The architecture of collagen is important in maintenance and regeneration of higher vertebrates' tissues. We had been studying the changes to this architecture with in situ multi-photon optical microscopy that combines nonlinear optical phenomena of second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon fluorescence (TPF) signals from collagen hydrogels prepared from different collagen solid content, polymerized at different temperatures, with different ions as well as modified with reducing sugars. We incubated 2 g/l collagen hydrogels with 0.1 M fructose at 37 °C and after about 20 days observed a significant induction of in situ fluorescence. The twophoton fluorescence emission was centered at about 460 nm for 730 nm excitation wavelength and shifted to 480 nm when we changed the excitation wavelength to 790 nm. The one-photon fluorescence emission was centered at about 416 nm when excitation was 330 nm. It red shifted and split into two peaks centered at about 430 nm and 460 nm for 370 nm excitation; 460 nm peak became predominant for 385 nm excitation and further shifted to 470 nm for 390 nm excitation. SHG and TPF imaging showed restructuring of hydrogels upon this modification. We will discuss these findings within the context of our ongoing dermal wound repair research.

  4. Telomere analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Hultdin, M; Grönlund, E; Norrback, K; Eriksson-Lindström, E; Just, T; Roos, G

    1998-01-01

    Determination of telomere length is traditionally performed by Southern blotting and densitometry, giving a mean telomere restriction fragment (TRF) value for the total cell population studied. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of telomere repeats has been used to calculate telomere length, a method called quantitative (Q)-FISH. We here present a quantitative flow cytometric approach, Q-FISHFCM, for evaluation of telomere length distribution in individual cells based on in situ hybridization using a fluorescein-labeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) (CCCTAA)3probe and DNA staining with propidium iodide. A simple and rapid protocol with results within 30 h was developed giving high reproducibility. One important feature of the protocol was the use of an internal cell line control, giving an automatic compensation for potential differences in the hybridization steps. This protocol was tested successfully on cell lines and clinical samples from bone marrow, blood, lymph nodes and tonsils. A significant correlation was found between Southern blotting and Q-FISHFCMtelomere length values ( P = 0.002). The mean sub-telomeric DNA length of the tested cell lines and clinical samples was estimated to be 3.2 kbp. With the Q-FISHFCMmethod the fluorescence signal could be determined in different cell cycle phases, indicating that in human cells the vast majority of telomeric DNA is replicated early in S phase. PMID:9685479

  5. Free gas bubbles in the hydrate stability zone: evidence from CT investigation under in situ conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abegg, F.; Freitag, J.; Bohrmann, G.; Brueckmann, W.; Eisenhauer, A.; Amann, H.; Hohnberg, H.-J.

    2003-04-01

    Determination of the internal structures and the fabric of natural marine gas hydrate as well as its distribution in shallow subseafloor depth was restricted because of dissociation during recovery. Investigation under in situ conditions becomes possible with a pressure coring device. The newly developed MultiAutoclaveCorer (MAC) can take up to four cores which are housed in a pressure vessel called LabTransferChamber (LTC), which is compatible with CT imaging technology. During a video-guided deployment on Hydrate Ridge, a well known near-surface gas hydrate-rich environment, two LTCs were filled and recovered under pressure. CT imaging was performed four days after retrieval in a medical clinic in Palo Alto/Ca., a second round was run 2 months later in Kiel/Germany, still under pressure. The same type of scanner was used for both rounds of imaging. The function and the pressure preserving capability of the MAC was confirmed. Although only 0.8 m apart, both cores showed different gas hydrate contents, varying between a maximum of 5 vol-% in LTC 3 and 48 vol-% in LTC 4, documenting the high variability of gas hydrate occurrences in near-surface sediments. The uppermost layer of gas hydrate was observed 0.1 m below the seafloor. The high gas hydrate content in LTC 4 is concentrated in a horizon between 0.28 and 0.32 m subseafloor depth. Within this hoizon a significant quantity of bubbles was detected with a free gas content of up to 2.4 vol-%. Bubble sizes reach a maximum of 1.8 x 10-2 m in either x, y or z direction. Integrating across the mentioned core interval, the gas hydrate content is 19 vol-% and the free gas content is 0.8 vol-%. Assuming several simplifications, the normalised calculated methane volume of the gas hydrate is 9.15 x 10-3 m^3 and the amount of methane in the bubbles is 1.49 x 10-4 m^3.

  6. Kinematic analysis of in situ measurement during chemical mechanical planarization process

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongkai; Wang, Tongqing; Zhao, Qian; Meng, Yonggang; Lu, Xinchun

    2015-10-15

    Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) is the most widely used planarization technique in semiconductor manufacturing presently. With the aid of in situ measurement technology, CMP tools can achieve good performance and stable productivity. However, the in situ measurement has remained unexplored from a kinematic standpoint. The available related resources for the kinematic analysis are very limited due to the complexity and technical secret. In this paper, a comprehensive kinematic analysis of in situ measurement is provided, including the analysis model, the measurement trajectory, and the measurement time of each zone of wafer surface during the practical CMP process. In addition, a lot of numerical calculations are performed to study the influences of main parameters on the measurement trajectory and the measurement velocity variation of the probe during the measurement process. All the efforts are expected to improve the in situ measurement system and promote the advancement in CMP control system.

  7. Method of monitoring photoactive organic molecules in-situ during gas-phase deposition of the photoactive organic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Vartanian, Garen; Rolin, Cedric

    2015-06-23

    A method for in-situ monitoring of gas-phase photoactive organic molecules in real time while depositing a film of the photoactive organic molecules on a substrate in a processing chamber for depositing the film includes irradiating the gas-phase photoactive organic molecules in the processing chamber with a radiation from a radiation source in-situ while depositing the film of the one or more organic materials and measuring the intensity of the resulting photoluminescence emission from the organic material. One or more processing parameters associated with the deposition process can be determined from the photoluminescence intensity data in real time providing useful feedback on the deposition process.

  8. BOREAS TE-9 In Situ Diurnal Gas Exchange of NAS Boreal Forest Stands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Margolis, Hank; Coyea, Marie; Dang, Qinglai

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-9 team collected several data sets related to chemical and photosynthetic properties of leaves in boreal forest tree species. The purpose of the BOREAS TE-09 study was threefold: 1) to provide in situ gas exchange data that will be used to validate models of photosynthetic responses to light, temperature, and carbon dioxide (CO2); 2) to compare the photosynthetic responses of different tree crown levels (upper and lower); and 3) to characterize the diurnal water potential curves for these sites to get an indication of the extent to which soil moisture supply to leaves might be limiting photosynthesis. The gas exchange data of the BOREAS NSA were collected to characterize diurnal gas exchange and water potential of two canopy levels of five boreal canopy cover types: young jack pine, old jack pine, old aspen, lowland old black spruce, and upland black spruce. These data were collected between 27-May-1994 and 17-Sep-1994. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  9. In-situ Micro-structural Studies of Gas Hydrate Formation in Sedimentary Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhs, Werner F.; Chaouachi, Marwen; Falenty, Andrzej; Sell, Kathleen; Schwarz, Jens-Oliver; Wolf, Martin; Enzmann, Frieder; Kersten, Michael; Haberthür, David

    2015-04-01

    The formation process of gas hydrates in sedimentary matrices is of crucial importance for the physical and transport properties of the resulting aggregates. This process has never been observed in-situ with sub-micron resolution. Here, we report on synchrotron-based micro-tomographic studies by which the nucleation and growth processes of gas hydrate were observed in different sedimentary matrices (natural quartz, glass beds with different surface properties, with and without admixtures of kaolinite and montmorillonite) at varying water saturation. The nucleation sites can be easily identified and the growth pattern is clearly established. In under-saturated sediments the nucleation starts at the water-gas interface and proceeds from there to form predominantly isometric single crystals of 10-20μm size. Using a newly developed synchrotron-based method we have determined the crystallite size distributions (CSD) of the gas hydrate in the sedimentary matrix confirming in a quantitative and statistically relevant manner the impressions from the tomographic reconstructions. It is noteworthy that the CSDs from synthetic hydrates are distinctly smaller than those of natural gas hydrates [1], which suggest that coarsening processes take place in the sedimentary matrix after the initial hydrate formation. Understanding the processes of formation and coarsening may eventually permit the determination of the age of gas hydrates in sedimentary matrices [2], which are largely unknown at present. Furthermore, the full micro-structural picture and its evolution will enable quantitative digital rock physics modeling to reveal poroelastic properties and in this way to support the exploration and exploitation of gas hydrate resources in the future. [1] Klapp S.A., Hemes S., Klein H., Bohrmann G., McDonald I., Kuhs W.F. Grain size measurements of natural gas hydrates. Marine Geology 2010; 274(1-4):85-94. [2] Klapp S.A., Klein H, Kuhs W.F. First determination of gas hydrate

  10. A Strategy for In Situ Analysis of the Martian Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. R.

    1996-03-01

    It is proposed that for future exploration of the martian surface with roving vehicles, surface-analytical (as opposed to meteorological or seismological) instruments on-board should aim, whenever possible, for a dual capability for both cursory and intense interrogation of sample materials. At the very least, the explorational platform itself should embody this capability within the suite of on-board instruments. The development of analytical instrumentation for planetary exploration commonly does not follow this philosophy. In essence, a roving vehicle's scientific payload should act as a surrogate geologist who has the capacity for site reconnaissance, but who also has a well-equipped backpack for conducting in situ analyses as desired. We are developing a field-deployable x-ray diffraction-fluorescence instrument that can perform the dual role required of the surrogate geologist.

  11. In situ structural analysis of Golgi intracisternal protein arrays.

    PubMed

    Engel, Benjamin D; Schaffer, Miroslava; Albert, Sahradha; Asano, Shoh; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    We acquired molecular-resolution structures of the Golgi within its native cellular environment. Vitreous Chlamydomonas cells were thinned by cryo-focused ion beam milling and then visualized by cryo-electron tomography. These tomograms revealed structures within the Golgi cisternae that have not been seen before. Narrow trans-Golgi lumina were spanned by asymmetric membrane-associated protein arrays that had ∼6-nm lateral periodicity. Subtomogram averaging showed that the arrays may determine the narrow central spacing of the trans-Golgi cisternae through zipper-like interactions, thereby forcing cargo to the trans-Golgi periphery. Additionally, we observed dense granular aggregates within cisternae and intracisternal filament bundles associated with trans-Golgi buds. These native in situ structures provide new molecular insights into Golgi architecture and function. PMID:26311849

  12. In situ structural analysis of Golgi intracisternal protein arrays

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Benjamin D.; Schaffer, Miroslava; Albert, Sahradha; Asano, Shoh; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    We acquired molecular-resolution structures of the Golgi within its native cellular environment. Vitreous Chlamydomonas cells were thinned by cryo-focused ion beam milling and then visualized by cryo-electron tomography. These tomograms revealed structures within the Golgi cisternae that have not been seen before. Narrow trans-Golgi lumina were spanned by asymmetric membrane-associated protein arrays that had ∼6-nm lateral periodicity. Subtomogram averaging showed that the arrays may determine the narrow central spacing of the trans-Golgi cisternae through zipper-like interactions, thereby forcing cargo to the trans-Golgi periphery. Additionally, we observed dense granular aggregates within cisternae and intracisternal filament bundles associated with trans-Golgi buds. These native in situ structures provide new molecular insights into Golgi architecture and function. PMID:26311849

  13. Method for in-situ calibration of electrophoretic analysis systems

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Changsheng; Zhao, Hequan

    2005-05-08

    An electrophoretic system having a plurality of separation lanes is provided with an automatic calibration feature in which each lane is separately calibrated. For each lane, the calibration coefficients map a spectrum of received channel intensities onto values reflective of the relative likelihood of each of a plurality of dyes being present. Individual peaks, reflective of the influence of a single dye, are isolated from among the various sets of detected light intensity spectra, and these can be used to both detect the number of dye components present, and also to establish exemplary vectors for the calibration coefficients which may then be clustered and further processed to arrive at a calibration matrix for the system. The system of the present invention thus permits one to use different dye sets to tag DNA nucleotides in samples which migrate in separate lanes, and also allows for in-situ calibration with new, previously unused dye sets.

  14. Predicting the in-situ stress state for deep wells using differential strain curve analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, F.G.; Ren, N.K.

    1980-01-01

    Recent developments in energy exploration at depths of 5000 to 25,000 ft have made it necessary to quickly and reliably determine the in situ stresses acting on the well bore. Differential strain analysis (DSA) is being investigated as a technique applied to core samples to indirectly determine the in situ stress state. Testing is being pursued in 3 steps. First, field measurements of strain are made in situ as the core is pulled out of the well. Second, the cores are brought to the lab and DSA is performed under in situ hydrostatic conditions. Third, the rock is examined microscopically. It appears favorable that a reasonably accurate estimate of the 3-dimensional stress state can be obtained using the strain curve analysis method. 12 references.

  15. Technology on In-Situ Gas Generation to Recover Residual Oil Reserves

    SciTech Connect

    Sayavur Bakhtiyarov

    2008-02-29

    of the in-situ generated CO{sub 2} gas. A set of core flood experiments were conducted to define effect of surfactant on recovery efficiency. The results demonstrated obvious advantages of the foamy system over the brine solution in order to achieve higher sweep efficiency and recovery coefficient. It is shown that a slug injection is not an efficient method for mixing GY and GF solutions and it can't generate considerable gas inside the slim-tube.

  16. In-situ observation for growth of hierarchical metal-organic frameworks and their self-sequestering mechanism for gas storage

    PubMed Central

    Hyo Park, Jung; Min Choi, Kyung; Joon Jeon, Hyung; Jung Choi, Yoon; Ku Kang, Jeung

    2015-01-01

    Although structures with the single functional constructions and micropores were demonstrated to capture many different molecules such as carbon dioxide, methane, and hydrogen with high capacities at low temperatures, their feeble interactions still limit practical applications at room temperature. Herein, we report in-situ growth observation of hierarchical pores in pomegranate metal-organic frameworks (pmg-MOFs) and their self-sequestering storage mechanism, not observed for pristine MOFs. Direct observation of hierarchical pores inside the pmg-MOF was evident by in-situ growth X-ray measurements while self-sequestering storage mechanism was revealed by in-situ gas sorption X-ray analysis and molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that meso/macropores are created at the early stage of crystal growth and then enclosed by micropore crystalline shells, where hierarchical pores are networking under self-sequestering mechanism to give enhanced gas storage. This pmg-MOF gives higher CO2 (39%) and CH4 (14%) storage capacity than pristine MOF at room temperature, in addition to fast kinetics with robust capacity retention during gas sorption cycles, thus giving the clue to control dynamic behaviors of gas adsorption. PMID:26155988

  17. In-situ observation for growth of hierarchical metal-organic frameworks and their self-sequestering mechanism for gas storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyo Park, Jung; Min Choi, Kyung; Joon Jeon, Hyung; Jung Choi, Yoon; Ku Kang, Jeung

    2015-07-01

    Although structures with the single functional constructions and micropores were demonstrated to capture many different molecules such as carbon dioxide, methane, and hydrogen with high capacities at low temperatures, their feeble interactions still limit practical applications at room temperature. Herein, we report in-situ growth observation of hierarchical pores in pomegranate metal-organic frameworks (pmg-MOFs) and their self-sequestering storage mechanism, not observed for pristine MOFs. Direct observation of hierarchical pores inside the pmg-MOF was evident by in-situ growth X-ray measurements while self-sequestering storage mechanism was revealed by in-situ gas sorption X-ray analysis and molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that meso/macropores are created at the early stage of crystal growth and then enclosed by micropore crystalline shells, where hierarchical pores are networking under self-sequestering mechanism to give enhanced gas storage. This pmg-MOF gives higher CO2 (39%) and CH4 (14%) storage capacity than pristine MOF at room temperature, in addition to fast kinetics with robust capacity retention during gas sorption cycles, thus giving the clue to control dynamic behaviors of gas adsorption.

  18. In situ gas phase measurements during metal alkylamide atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Maslar, J E; Kimes, W A; Sperling, B A

    2011-09-01

    Metal alkylamide compounds, such as tetrakis(ethylmethylamido) hafnium (TEMAH), represent a technologically important class of metalorganic precursors for the deposition of metal oxides and metal nitrides via atomic layer deposition (ALD) or chemical vapor deposition. The development of in situ diagnostics for processes involving these compounds could be beneficial in, e.g., developing deposition recipes and validating equipment-scale simulations. This report describes the performance of the combination of two techniques for the simultaneous, rapid measurement of the three major gas phase species during hafnium oxide thermal ALD using TEMAH and water: TEMAH, water, and methylethyl amine (MEA), the only major reaction by-product. For measurement of TEMAH and MEA, direct absorption methods based on a broadband infrared source with different mid-IR bandpass filters and utilizing amplitude modulation and synchronous detection were developed. For the measurement of water, wavelength modulation spectroscopy utilizing a near-IR distributed feedback diode laser was used. Despite the relatively simple reactor geometry employed here (a flow tube), differences were easily observed in the time-dependent species distributions in 300 mL/min of a helium carrier gas and in 1000 mL/min of a nitrogen carrier gas. The degree of TEMAH entrainment was lower in 300 mL/min of helium compared to that in 1000 mL/min of nitrogen. The capability to obtain detailed time-dependent species concentrations during ALD could potentially allow for the selection of carrier gas composition and flow rates that would minimize parasitic wall reactions. However, when nitrogen was employed at the higher flow rates, various flow effects were observed that, if detrimental to a deposition process, would effectively limit the upper range of useful flow rates. PMID:22097559

  19. Preparation and Loading Process of Single Crystalline Samples into a Gas Environmental Cell Holder for In Situ Atomic Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopic Observation.

    PubMed

    Straubinger, Rainer; Beyer, Andreas; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-06-01

    A reproducible way to transfer a single crystalline sample into a gas environmental cell holder for in situ transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analysis is shown in this study. As in situ holders have only single-tilt capability, it is necessary to prepare the sample precisely along a specific zone axis. This can be achieved by a very accurate focused ion beam lift-out preparation. We show a step-by-step procedure to prepare the sample and transfer it into the gas environmental cell. The sample material is a GaP/Ga(NAsP)/GaP multi-quantum well structure on Si. Scanning TEM observations prove that it is possible to achieve atomic resolution at very high temperatures in a nitrogen environment of 100,000 Pa. PMID:27026281

  20. Assessment of a multi-species in situ FTIR for precise atmospheric greenhouse gas observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, S.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Konrad, G.; Vardag, S.; Caldow, C.; Levin, I.

    2013-05-01

    We thoroughly evaluate the performance of a multi-species, in situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analyser with respect to high-accuracy needs for greenhouse gas monitoring networks. The in situ FTIR analyser is shown to measure CO2, CO, CH4 and N2O mole fractions continuously, all with better reproducibility than the inter-laboratory compatibility (ILC) goals, requested by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) for the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) programme. Simultaneously determined δ13CO2 reaches reproducibility as good as 0.03‰. Second-order dependencies between the measured components and the thermodynamic properties of the sample, (temperature, pressure and flow rate) and the cross sensitivities among the sample constituents are investigated and quantified. We describe an improved sample delivery and control system that minimises the pressure and flow rate variations, making post-processing corrections for those quantities non-essential. Temperature disequilibrium effects resulting from the evacuation of the sample cell are quantified and improved by the usage of a faster temperature sensor. The instrument has proven to be linear for all measured components in the ambient concentration range. The temporal stability of the instrument is characterised on different time scales. Instrument drifts on a weekly time scale are only observed for CH4 (0.04 nmol mol-1 day-1) and δ13CO2 (0.02‰ day-1). Based on 10 months of continuously collected quality control measures, the long-term reproducibility of the instrument is estimated to ±0.016 μmol mol-1 CO2, ±0.03‰ δ13CO2, ±0.14 nmol mol-1 CH4, ±0.1 nmol mol-1 CO and ±0.04 nmol mol-1 N2O. We propose a calibration and quality control scheme with weekly calibrations of the instrument that is sufficient to reach WMO-GAW inter-laboratory compatibility goals.

  1. In situ gasification process for producing product gas enriched in carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Capp, John P.; Bissett, Larry A.

    1978-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an in situ coal gasification process wherein the combustion zone within the underground coal bed is fed with air at increasing pressure to increase pressure and temperature in the combustion zone for forcing product gases and water naturally present in the coal bed into the coal bed surrounding the combustion zone. No outflow of combustion products occurs during the build-up of pressure and temperature in the combustion zone. After the coal bed reaches a temperature of about 2000.degree. F and a pressure in the range of about 100-200 psi above pore pressure the airflow is terminated and the outflow of the combustion products from the combustion zone is initiated. The CO.sub.2 containing gaseous products and the water bleed back into the combustion zone to react endothermically with the hot carbon of the combustion zone to produce a burnable gas with a relatively high hydrogen and carbon monoxide content. About 11 to 29 percent of the gas recovered from the combustion zone is carbon monoxide which is considerably better than the 4 to 10 percent carbon monoxide obtained by employing previously known coal gasification techniques.

  2. In-situ stress analysis of multilayer environmental barrier coatings.

    SciTech Connect

    Harder, B. J.; Almer, J.; Lee, K. N.; Faber, K. T.; Northwestern Univ.; Rolls-Royce Corp.

    2009-06-01

    The biaxial stress and thermal expansion of multilayer doped-aluminosilicate environmental barrier coatings were measured in situ during cooling using microfocused high-energy X-rays in transmission. Coating stresses during cooling from 1000 C were measured for as-sprayed and thermally cycled samples. In the as-sprayed state, tensile stresses as high as 75 MPa were measured in the doped-aluminosilicate topcoat at 375 C, after which a drop in the stress occurred accompanied by through-thickness cracking of the two outermost layers. After thermally cycling the samples, the stress in the topcoat was reduced to approximately 50 MPa, and there was no drop in stress upon cooling. This stress reduction was attributed to a crystallographic phase transformation of the topcoat and the accompanying change in thermal expansion coefficient. The addition of a doped aluminosilicate to the mullite layer did not lower the stress in the topcoat, but may offer increased durability due to an increased compressive stress.

  3. Analysis of Marine Stratocumulus Drizzle Variability Using In Situ Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, M.; Chuang, P. Y.; Rossiter, D.

    2013-12-01

    Precipitation is an important factor in the dynamics and large-scale organization of marine stratocumulus, yet it remains poorly understood. We aim to elucidate the factors driving the amount and variability of marine stratocumulus drizzle using in situ observations. We use aircraft measurements from two regions: a) in the near-coastal region of Monterey, CA during the Physics of Stratocumulus Top (POST) project from July and August 2008 and b) in the near-coastal region of Iquique, Chile during the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study (VOCALS) from October 2008. Using these two different projects, we examine whether or not changes in conditions such as boundary layer depth, cloud top liquid water content, aerosol or drop concentrations, turbulence strength and inversion strength affect drizzle amount and variability. Interpreting which of these factors tend to associate most closely with various measures of drizzle intensity and variability will give insight into processes relevant to both precipitation formation and maintenance, and hopefully help explain how stratocumulus organize into the large-scale cellular patterns observed.

  4. Novel Modified Optical Fibers for High Temperature In-Situ Miniaturized Gas Sensors in Advanced Fossil Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, Gary; Scott, Brian

    2014-06-30

    This report covers the technical progress on the program “Novel Modified Optical Fibers for High Temperature In-Situ Miniaturized Gas Sensors in Advanced Fossil Energy Systems”, funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Materials Science & Engineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering Departments at Virginia Tech, and summarizes technical progress from July 1st, 2005 –June 30th, 2014. The objective of this program was to develop novel fiber materials for high temperature gas sensors based on evanescent wave absorption in optical fibers. This project focused on two primary areas: the study of a sapphire photonic crystal fiber (SPCF) for operation at high temperature and long wavelengths, and a porous glass based fiber optic sensor for gas detection. The sapphire component of the project focused on the development of a sapphire photonic crystal fiber, modeling of the new structures, fabrication of the optimal structure, development of a long wavelength interrogation system, testing of the optical properties, and gas and temperature testing of the final sensor. The fabrication of the 6 rod SPCF gap bundle (diameter of 70μm) with a hollow core was successfully constructed with lead-in and lead-out 50μm diameter fiber along with transmission and gas detection testing. Testing of the sapphire photonic crystal fiber sensor capabilities with the developed long wavelength optical system showed the ability to detect CO2 at or below 1000ppm at temperatures up to 1000°C. Work on the porous glass sensor focused on the development of a porous clad solid core optical fiber, a hollow core waveguide, gas detection capabilities at room and high temperature, simultaneous gas species detection, suitable joining technologies for the lead-in and lead-out fibers and the porous sensor, sensor system sensitivity improvement, signal processing improvement, relationship between pore structure and fiber

  5. In-situ monitoring and analysis of GaSb(100) substrate deoxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, K.; Töben, L.; Kollonitsch, Z.; Giesen, Ch.; Heuken, M.; Willig, F.; Hannappel, T.

    2005-04-01

    The thermal deoxidation procedure of GaSb(100) substrates has been investigated with in-situ reflectance difference spectroscopy (RDS). The "epi-ready" substrates were loaded in a metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) reactor either "as-supplied" or after etching with HCl to remove the native oxide layer. Annealing between 475-575 °C and in-situ monitoring reveals RDS features associated with the surface morphology and the development of oxide desorption. This process is supported by molecular hydrogen utilized as carrier gas. Photoemission spectroscopy was applied to benchmark the surface of selected samples with regard to the electronic structure and the chemical composition during the deoxidation of GaSb(100) substrates. Based on the in-situ and UHV data, a model of the oxide desorption process and recommendations for the GaSb substrate deoxidation procedure in MOVPE environment are proposed.

  6. NOAA In Situ - Satellite Blended Analysis of Surface Salinity (BASS): Prototype Algorithm and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, P.; Boyer, T.; Bayler, E. J.; Xue, Y.; Byrne, D. A.; Reagan, J. R.; Locarnini, R. A.; Kumar, A.

    2012-12-01

    A prototype analysis of monthly sea surface salinity (SSS) has been constructed on a 1olat/lon grid over the global ocean by blending information from in situ measurements and satellite retrievals. Three data sets are included as inputs to the blended analysis, i.e., in situ SSS measurements aggregated and quality controlled by NOAA/NODC, and the passive microwave (PMW) retrievals from the Aquarius/SAC-D and SMOS satellites, received and post-processed at NOAA/STAR. The in situ SSS measurements used here are mainly from the Argo program, but also include those from the tropical moored buoy array (TAO/TRITON, PIRATA, RAMA) data and CTDs and glider data. The blended analysis is defined in two sequential steps. First, the bias in the satellite retrievals is removed through PDF matching against the co-located in situ measurements. The final blended analysis is then defined through the optimal interpolation (OI), where the analysis for the previous time step is used as the first guess while the in situ measurements and the bias-corrected satellite retrievals are employed as the observations to update the first guess. Cross-validations tests are conducted by comparing the blended analysis against the withdrawn SSS measurements from the PIRATA arrays. Results showed improved quantitative accuracy of the blended analysis compared to the satellite estimates and the in situ data alone analysis in the tropical Atlantic. The blended analysis, constructed from January 2010 to the present, is used to examine the co-variability among the SSS, E-P, SST, SSH, and surface wind stress in the annual cycle over the tropical Atlantic and to estimate the SSS bias in the NCEP's Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) and Global Ocean Data Assimilation System (GODAS) . Results will be reported at the meeting.

  7. Unmanned Aerial Mass Spectrometer Systems for In-Situ Volcanic Plume Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Jorge Andres; Pieri, David; Wright, Kenneth; Sorensen, Paul; Kline-Shoder, Robert; Arkin, C. Richard; Fladeland, Matthew; Bland, Geoff; Buongiorno, Maria Fabrizia; Ramirez, Carlos; Corrales, Ernesto; Alan, Alfredo; Alegria, Oscar; Diaz, David; Linick, Justin

    2015-02-01

    Technology advances in the field of small, unmanned aerial vehicles and their integration with a variety of sensor packages and instruments, such as miniature mass spectrometers, have enhanced the possibilities and applications of what are now called unmanned aerial systems (UAS). With such technology, in situ and proximal remote sensing measurements of volcanic plumes are now possible without risking the lives of scientists and personnel in charge of close monitoring of volcanic activity. These methods provide unprecedented, and otherwise unobtainable, data very close in space and time to eruptions, to better understand the role of gas volatiles in magma and subsequent eruption products. Small mass spectrometers, together with the world's smallest turbo molecular pump, have being integrated into NASA and University of Costa Rica UAS platforms to be field-tested for in situ volcanic plume analysis, and in support of the calibration and validation of satellite-based remote sensing data. These new UAS-MS systems are combined with existing UAS flight-tested payloads and assets, such as temperature, pressure, relative humidity, SO2, H2S, CO2, GPS sensors, on-board data storage, and telemetry. Such payloads are capable of generating real time 3D concentration maps of the Turrialba volcano active plume in Costa Rica, while remote sensing data are simultaneously collected from the ASTER and OMI space-borne instruments for comparison. The primary goal is to improve the understanding of the chemical and physical properties of emissions for mitigation of local volcanic hazards, for the validation of species detection and abundance of retrievals based on remote sensing, and to validate transport models.

  8. Unmanned aerial mass spectrometer systems for in-situ volcanic plume analysis.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Jorge Andres; Pieri, David; Wright, Kenneth; Sorensen, Paul; Kline-Shoder, Robert; Arkin, C Richard; Fladeland, Matthew; Bland, Geoff; Buongiorno, Maria Fabrizia; Ramirez, Carlos; Corrales, Ernesto; Alan, Alfredo; Alegria, Oscar; Diaz, David; Linick, Justin

    2015-02-01

    Technology advances in the field of small, unmanned aerial vehicles and their integration with a variety of sensor packages and instruments, such as miniature mass spectrometers, have enhanced the possibilities and applications of what are now called unmanned aerial systems (UAS). With such technology, in situ and proximal remote sensing measurements of volcanic plumes are now possible without risking the lives of scientists and personnel in charge of close monitoring of volcanic activity. These methods provide unprecedented, and otherwise unobtainable, data very close in space and time to eruptions, to better understand the role of gas volatiles in magma and subsequent eruption products. Small mass spectrometers, together with the world's smallest turbo molecular pump, have being integrated into NASA and University of Costa Rica UAS platforms to be field-tested for in situ volcanic plume analysis, and in support of the calibration and validation of satellite-based remote sensing data. These new UAS-MS systems are combined with existing UAS flight-tested payloads and assets, such as temperature, pressure, relative humidity, SO2, H2S, CO2, GPS sensors, on-board data storage, and telemetry. Such payloads are capable of generating real time 3D concentration maps of the Turrialba volcano active plume in Costa Rica, while remote sensing data are simultaneously collected from the ASTER and OMI space-borne instruments for comparison. The primary goal is to improve the understanding of the chemical and physical properties of emissions for mitigation of local volcanic hazards, for the validation of species detection and abundance of retrievals based on remote sensing, and to validate transport models. PMID:25588720

  9. In Situ Analysis of the Martian Regolith Using Solvent Extraction and Chemical Derivatization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, A.; Glavin, D. P.; Cabane, M.; Szopa, C.; Gonzalez, R. R.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2004-12-01

    Mars is presently the most likely planet on which there is a possibility of finding extinct and/or extant life. Future exploratory missions to Mars in search of evidence for life will focus on key organic molecules such as carboxylic and amino acids. The 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission will offer an opportunity to carry out in situ measurements for organic compounds on Mars. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is one technique that will be proposed for MSL. We are currently developing an automated extraction process coupled to chemical derivatization in order to target several key organic compounds using GC-MS. This paper presents a solid-liquid extraction method (1) that can be coupled with in situ GC-MS analyses of organic compounds on Mars. Amino acid and carboxylic acid extraction efficiencies from a soil sample collected from the Atacama Desert, Chile (2) using several different organic solvents including (isopropanol and water) have been determined. We found that a 1:1 mixture of isopropanol and water was the best solvent with high extraction yields for both amino and carboxylic acids in less than 30 minutes when the extraction procedure is assisted by ultrasonic treatment. A highly sensititive and quantitative single-step derivatization reaction was carried out using N-methyl, N-tert.-butyl (dimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) as the silylating agent prior to GC-MS analysis. The effect of pH and salt concentration on the derivatization reaction was also studied. We have also demonstrated the feasibility of carrying out extraction and derivatization directly on the soil in a one-step procedure The development of a miniaturized reactor, where both the extraction and the derivatization processes could take place is currently under investigation. This method is discussed for an easy automation with coupling to an in situ GC-MS space instrument. (1) A. Buch et al., J.of Chrom. A, 999 (2003) 165-174 (2) R. Navarro-Gonzàlez et al

  10. In situ measurements of plasma properties during gas-condensation of Cu nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koten, M. A.; Voeller, S. A.; Patterson, M. M.; Shield, J. E.

    2016-03-01

    Since the mean, standard deviation, and modality of nanoparticle size distributions can vary greatly between similar input conditions (e.g., power and gas flow rate), plasma diagnostics were carried out in situ using a double-sided, planar Langmuir probe to determine the effect the plasma has on the heating of clusters and their final size distributions. The formation of Cu nanoparticles was analyzed using cluster-plasma physics, which relates the processes of condensation and evaporation to internal plasma properties (e.g., electron temperature and density). Monitoring these plasma properties while depositing Cu nanoparticles with different size distributions revealed a negative correlation between average particle size and electron temperature. Furthermore, the modality of the size distributions also correlated with the modality of the electron energy distributions. It was found that the maximum cluster temperature reached during plasma heating and the material's evaporation point regulates the growth process inside the plasma. In the case of Cu, size distributions with average sizes of 8.2, 17.3, and 24.9 nm in diameter were monitored with the Langmuir probe, and from the measurements made, the cluster temperatures for each deposition were calculated to be 1028, 1009, and 863 K. These values are then compared with the onset evaporation temperature of particles of this size, which was estimated to be 1059, 1068, and 1071 K. Thus, when the cluster temperature is too close to the evaporation temperature, less particle growth occurs, resulting in the formation of smaller particles.

  11. Characterization of Gas-Hydrate Sediment: In Situ Evaluation of Hydrate Saturation in Pores of Pressured Sedimental Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Y.; Konno, Y.; Kida, M.; Nagao, J.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrate saturation of gas-hydrate bearing sediment is a key of gas production from natural gas-hydrate reservoir. Developable natural gas-hydrates by conventional gas/oil production apparatus almost exist in unconsolidated sedimental layer. Generally, hydrate saturations of sedimental samples are directly estimated by volume of gas generated from dissociation of gas hydrates in pore spaces, porosity data and volume of the sediments. Furthermore, hydrate saturation can be also assessed using velocity of P-wave through sedimental samples. Nevertheless, hydrate saturation would be changed by morphological variations (grain-coating, cementing and pore-filling model) of gas hydrates in pore spaces. Jin et al.[1,2] recently observed the O-H stretching bands of H2O molecules of methane hydrate in porous media using an attenuated total reflection IR (ATR-IR) spectra. They observed in situ hydrate formation/dissociation process in sandy samples (Tohoku Keisya number 8, grain size of ca. 110 μm). In this presentation, we present IR spectroscopy approach to in situ evaluation of hydrate saturation of pressured gas-hydrate sediments. This work was supported by funding from the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21 Research Consortium) planned by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), Japan. [1] Jin, Y.; Konno, Y.; Nagao, J. Energy Fules, 2012, 26, 2242-2247. [2] Jin, Y.; Oyama, H.; Nagao, J. Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 2009, 48, No. 108001.

  12. Gas injection to inhibit migration during an in situ heat treatment process

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlman, Myron Ira; Vinegar; Harold J.; Baker, Ralph Sterman; Heron, Goren

    2010-11-30

    Methods of treating a subsurface formation are described herein. Methods for treating a subsurface treatment area in a formation may include introducing a fluid into the formation from a plurality of wells offset from a treatment area of an in situ heat treatment process to inhibit outward migration of formation fluid from the in situ heat treatment process.

  13. In Situ Trace Gas Measurements from the Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Altair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, D. F.; Moore, F. L.; Dutton, G. S.; Vasel, B.; Elkins, J. W.; Oltmans, S. J.; Summers, S.; Fahey, D. W.; Jennison, C. D.

    2006-12-01

    It is anticipated that Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs) will soon become an integral part of the effort to monitor global atmospheric composition because they provide a unique combination of payload capacity, altitude range, and especially endurance. The NOAA UAS Demonstration Project in 2005 was designed to test the flight endurance of the Altair UAS (General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc.) and its suitability as an airborne platform for atmospheric measurements. Instrumentation included an ozone photometer (OZ), a 2- channel gas chromatograph (GC), an ocean color sensor, and a passive microwave vertical sounder. Altair was interactively controlled by a ground-based pilot via line-of-sight or satellite-based communications which also allowed instrument data and commands to be telemetered between the aircraft and ground. The NOAA project demonstrated that Altair was able to fly continuously for at least 18 hours and reach an altitude of 14 km with an internal payload >300 kg. The GC obtained ~2500 in situ measurements each of CFC-11, CFC-12, Halon-1211, N2O, and SF6 during 65 flight hours (10 flights) of Altair. These gases and ozone were measured at 250 m vertical resolution during two ~7 km deep spiral dive/climb maneuvers performed over the Pacific Ocean as part of the 18.4 long-endurance flight. During a different flight, GC and OZ sampled a tongue of stratospheric air that had intruded into the upper troposphere through a tropopause fold. In September 2006, GC and OZ were operated aboard Altair as part of the NASA/USDA-Forest Service Fire Mission. One GC channel (CFCs and Halon-1211) was changed to instead measure H2, CH4, and CO every 140 s, and the combined GC and OZ instrument package was expanded to include in situ measurements of water vapor (laser hygrometer) along with temperature and relative humidity (external probe). Data obtained during these two missions of the UAS Altair, including comparisons of relative humidity and water vapor measurements

  14. In situ measurement of gas composition changes in radio frequency plasmas using a quartz sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Atsushi; Nonaka, Hidehiko

    2009-09-15

    A simple method using a quartz sensor (Q-sensor) was developed to observe gas composition changes in radio frequency (rf) plasmas. The output depends on the gases' absolute pressure, molecular weight, and viscosity. The pressure-normalized quartz sensor output depends only on the molecular weight and viscosity of the gas. Consequently, gas composition changes can be detected in the plasmas if a sensor can be used in the plasmas. Influences imparted by the plasmas on the sensor, such as those by reactive particles (e.g., radicals and ions), excited species, electrons, temperature, and electric potentials during measurements were investigated to test the applicability of this quartz sensor measurement to plasma. The Q-sensor measurement results for rf plasmas with argon, hydrogen, and their mixtures are reproducible, demonstrating that the Q-sensor measurement is applicable for plasmas. In this work, pressure- and temperature-normalized Q-sensor output (NQO) were used to obtain the gas composition information of plasma. Temperature-normalization of the Q-sensor output enabled quartz sensor measurements near plasma electrodes, where the quartz sensor temperature increases. The changes in NQO agreed with results obtained by gas analysis using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Results confirmed that the change in NQO is mainly attributable to changes in the densities and kinds of gas molecules in the plasma gas phase, not by other extrinsic influences of plasma. For argon, hydrogen, and argon-hydrogen plasmas, these changes correspond to reduction in nitrogen, production of carbon monoxide, and dissociation of hydrogen molecules, respectively. These changes in NQO qualitatively and somewhat quantitatively agreed with results obtained using gas analysis, indicting that the measurement has a potential application to obtain the gas composition in plasmas without disturbing industrial plasma processes.

  15. An in situ-satellite blended analysis of global sea surface salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, P.; Boyer, T.; Bayler, E.; Xue, Y.; Byrne, D.; Reagan, J.; Locarnini, R.; Sun, F.; Joyce, R.; Kumar, A.

    2014-09-01

    The blended monthly sea surface salinity (SSS) analysis, called the NOAA "Blended Analysis of Surface Salinity" (BASS), is constructed for the 4 year period from 2010 to 2013. Three data sets are employed as inputs to the blended analysis: in situ SSS measurements aggregated and quality controlled by NOAA/NODC, and passive microwave (PMW) retrievals from both the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Aquarius/SAC-D and the European Space Agency's (ESA) Soil Moisture-Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellites. The blended analysis comprises two steps. First, the biases in the satellite retrievals are removed through probability distribution function (PDF) matching against temporally spatially colocated in situ measurements. The blended analysis is then achieved through optimal interpolation (OI), where the analysis for the previous time step is used as the first guess while the in situ measurements and bias-corrected satellite retrievals are employed as the observations to update the first guess. Cross validations illustrate improved quality of the blended analysis, with reduction in bias and random errors over most of the global oceans as compared to the individual inputs. Large uncertainty, however, remains in high-latitude oceans and coastal regions where the in situ networks are sparse and current-generation satellite retrievals have limitations. Our blended SSS analysis shows good agreements with the NODC in situ-based analysis over most of the tropical and subtropical oceans, but large differences are observed for high-latitude oceans and along coasts. In the tropical oceans, the BASS is shown to have coherent variability with precipitation and evaporation associated with the evolution of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

  16. The Hummingbird GC-IMS: In Situ Analysis of a Cometary Nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Carle, Glenn C.; Cohen, Martin J.; Wernlund, Roger F.; Stimac, Robert M.; Takeuchi, Norishige; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Comets are of enormous scientific interest for many reasons. They are primitive bodies that date back to the earliest stages of solar system formation and, because of their small size and because they have been stored in the outer reaches of the solar system, their pristine nature has been preserved better than for any other class of body. They are extremely rich in highly volatile elements, many in the form of ices, and are richer in organic matter than any other known solar system body. It is strongly suspected that in addition to their content of primordial solar nebular material, they also incorporate unprocessed matter from the interstellar medium. Impacts by comets occur onto all the planets and satellites, often with major consequences (e.g., the dinosaur extinction event at the KIT boundary), or sometimes just providing a spectacular cosmic event (e.g., the collision of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 with Jupiter). A mission to analyze a cometary nucleus must be capable of detecting and identifying over 30 molecular species among several different chemical groups. The Hummingbird Mission will rendezvous with, orbit, characterize, and make multiple descents to the nucleus of a comet. Hummingbird will employ a Gas Chromatograph - Ion Mobility Spectrometer (GC-IMS) as part-of a suite of sophisticated instruments for a comprehensive in situ elemental, molecular, and isotopic analysis of the comet.

  17. Enhanced spectroscopic gas sensors using in-situ grown carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, A.; Cole, M. T.; Hopper, R. H.; Boual, S.; Warner, J. H.; Robertson, A. R.; Ali, S. Z.; Udrea, F.; Gardner, J. W.; Milne, W. I.

    2015-05-01

    In this letter, we present a fully complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatible microelectromechanical system thermopile infrared (IR) detector employing vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) as an advanced nano-engineered radiation absorbing material. The detector was fabricated using a commercial silicon-on-insulator (SOI) process with tungsten metallization, comprising a silicon thermopile and a tungsten resistive micro-heater, both embedded within a dielectric membrane formed by a deep-reactive ion etch following CMOS processing. In-situ CNT growth on the device was achieved by direct thermal chemical vapour deposition using the integrated micro-heater as a micro-reactor. The growth of the CNT absorption layer was verified through scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The functional effects of the nanostructured ad-layer were assessed by comparing CNT-coated thermopiles to uncoated thermopiles. Fourier transform IR spectroscopy showed that the radiation absorbing properties of the CNT adlayer significantly enhanced the absorptivity, compared with the uncoated thermopile, across the IR spectrum (3 μm-15.5 μm). This led to a four-fold amplification of the detected infrared signal (4.26 μm) in a CO2 non-dispersive-IR gas sensor system. The presence of the CNT layer was shown not to degrade the robustness of the uncoated devices, whilst the 50% modulation depth of the detector was only marginally reduced by 1.5 Hz. Moreover, we find that the 50% normalized absorption angular profile is subsequently more collimated by 8°. Our results demonstrate the viability of a CNT-based SOI CMOS IR sensor for low cost air quality monitoring.

  18. In situ droplet surface tension and viscosity measurements in gas metal arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, B.; Siewert, E.; Schein, J.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we present an adaptation of a drop oscillation technique that enables in situ measurements of thermophysical properties of an industrial pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process. Surface tension, viscosity, density and temperature were derived expanding the portfolio of existing methods and previously published measurements of surface tension in pulsed GMAW. Natural oscillations of pure liquid iron droplets are recorded during the material transfer with a high-speed camera. Frame rates up to 30 000 fps were utilized to visualize iron droplet oscillations which were in the low kHz range. Image processing algorithms were employed for edge contour extraction of the droplets and to derive parameters such as oscillation frequencies and damping rates along different dimensions of the droplet. Accurate surface tension measurements were achieved incorporating the effect of temperature on density. These are compared with a second method that has been developed to accurately determine the mass of droplets produced during the GMAW process which enables precise surface tension measurements with accuracies up to 1% and permits the study of thermophysical properties also for metals whose density highly depends on temperature. Thermophysical properties of pure liquid iron droplets formed by a wire with 1.2 mm diameter were investigated in a pulsed GMAW process with a base current of 100 A and a pulse current of 600 A. Surface tension and viscosity of a sample droplet were 1.83 ± 0.02 N m-1 and 2.9 ± 0.3 mPa s, respectively. The corresponding droplet temperature and density are 2040 ± 50 K and 6830 ± 50 kg m-3, respectively.

  19. Enhanced spectroscopic gas sensors using in-situ grown carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    De Luca, A.; Cole, M. T.; Milne, W. I.; Hopper, R. H.; Boual, S.; Ali, S. Z.; Warner, J. H.; Robertson, A. R.; Udrea, F.; Gardner, J. W.

    2015-05-11

    In this letter, we present a fully complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatible microelectromechanical system thermopile infrared (IR) detector employing vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) as an advanced nano-engineered radiation absorbing material. The detector was fabricated using a commercial silicon-on-insulator (SOI) process with tungsten metallization, comprising a silicon thermopile and a tungsten resistive micro-heater, both embedded within a dielectric membrane formed by a deep-reactive ion etch following CMOS processing. In-situ CNT growth on the device was achieved by direct thermal chemical vapour deposition using the integrated micro-heater as a micro-reactor. The growth of the CNT absorption layer was verified through scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The functional effects of the nanostructured ad-layer were assessed by comparing CNT-coated thermopiles to uncoated thermopiles. Fourier transform IR spectroscopy showed that the radiation absorbing properties of the CNT adlayer significantly enhanced the absorptivity, compared with the uncoated thermopile, across the IR spectrum (3 μm–15.5 μm). This led to a four-fold amplification of the detected infrared signal (4.26 μm) in a CO{sub 2} non-dispersive-IR gas sensor system. The presence of the CNT layer was shown not to degrade the robustness of the uncoated devices, whilst the 50% modulation depth of the detector was only marginally reduced by 1.5 Hz. Moreover, we find that the 50% normalized absorption angular profile is subsequently more collimated by 8°. Our results demonstrate the viability of a CNT-based SOI CMOS IR sensor for low cost air quality monitoring.

  20. Toward total automation of microfluidics for extraterrestial in situ analysis.

    PubMed

    Mora, Maria F; Greer, Frank; Stockton, Amanda M; Bryant, Sherrisse; Willis, Peter A

    2011-11-15

    Despite multiple orbiter and landed missions to extraterrestrial bodies in the solar system, including Mars and Titan, we still know relatively little about the detailed chemical composition and quantity of organics and biomolecules in those bodies. For chemical analysis on astrobiologically relevant targets such as Mars, Europa, Titan, and Enceladus, instrumentation should be extremely sensitive and capable of analyzing a broad range of organic molecules. Microchip capillary electrophoresis (μCE) with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection provides this required sensitivity and targets a wide range of relevant markers but, to date, has lacked the necessary degree of automation for spaceflight applications. Here we describe a fully integrated microfluidic device capable of performing automated end-to-end analyses of amino acids by μCE with LIF detection. The device integrates an array of pneumatically actuated valves and pumps for autonomous fluidic routing with an electrophoretic channel. Operation of the device, including manipulation of liquids for sample pretreatment and electrophoretic analysis, was performed exclusively via computer control. The device was validated by mixing of laboratory standards and labeling of amino acids with Pacific Blue succinimidyl ester followed by electrophoretic analysis. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of completely automated end-to-end μCE analyses on a single, fully integrated microfluidic device. PMID:21972965

  1. Soil characterization by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence: sampling strategy for in situ analysis.

    PubMed

    Custo, Graciela; Boeykens, Susana; Dawidowski, L; Fox, L; Gómez, D; Luna, F; Vázquez, Cristina

    2005-07-01

    This work describes a sampling strategy that will allow the use of portable EDXRF (energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence) instruments for "in situ" soil analysis. The methodology covers a general approach to planning field investigations for any type of environmental studies and it was applied for a soil characterization study in the zone of Campana, Argentina, by evaluating data coming from an EDXRF spectrometer with a radioisotope excitation source. Simulating non-treated sampled as "in situ" samples and a soil characterization for Campana area was intended. "In situ" EDXRF methodology is a powerful analytical modality with the advantage of providing data immediately, allowing a fast general screening of the soil composition. PMID:16038489

  2. In situ/operando studies for the production of hydrogen through the water-gas shift on metal oxide catalysts.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, José A; Hanson, Jonathan C; Stacchiola, Dario; Senanayake, Sanjaya D

    2013-08-01

    In this perspective article, we show how a series of in situ techniques {X-ray diffraction (XRD), pair-distribution-function analysis (PDF), X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM), infrared spectroscopy (IR), ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS)} can be combined to perform detailed studies of the structural, electronic and chemical properties of metal oxide catalysts used for the production of hydrogen through the water-gas shift reaction (WGS, CO + H2O → H2 + CO2). Under reaction conditions most WGS catalysts undergo chemical transformations that drastically modify their composition with respect to that obtained during the synthesis process. Experiments of time-resolved in situ XRD, XAFS, and PDF indicate that the active phase of catalysts which combine Cu, Au or Pt with oxides such as ZnO, CeO2, TiO2, CeOx/TiO2 and Fe2O3 essentially involves nanoparticles of the reduced noble metals. The oxide support undergoes partial reduction and is not a simple spectator, facilitating the dissociation of water and in some cases modifying the chemical properties of the supported metal. Therefore, to optimize the performance of these catalysts one must take into consideration the properties of the metal and oxide phases. IR and AP-XPS have been used to study the reaction mechanism for the WGS on metal oxide catalysts. Data of IR spectroscopy indicate that formate species are not necessarily involved in the main reaction path for the water-gas shift on Cu-, Au- and Pt-based catalysts. Thus, a pure redox mechanism or associative mechanisms that involve either carbonate-like (CO3, HCO3) or carboxyl (HOCO) species should be considered. In the last two decades, there have been tremendous advances in our ability to study catalytic materials under reaction conditions and we are moving towards the major goal of fully understanding how the active sites for the production of hydrogen through the WGS actually

  3. OGRE/MOD1: A computer model for predicting off-gas release from In Situ Vitrification melts

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, R.J.; Mousseau, V.A.

    1990-07-01

    The OGRE program is designed to compute off-gas release from In Situ Vitrification melt pools. This document describes the theoretical basis and computational algorithms used in the program. An outline of the computer program is described including presentation of an example user input deck. Two model problems are examined to verify the program and an example problem is given to demonstrate program usage.

  4. Micro/Nano Gas Sensors: A New Strategy Towards In-Situ Wafer-Level Fabrication of High-Performance Gas Sensing Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lei; Dai, Zhengfei; Duan, Guotao; Guo, Lianfeng; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Hong; Liu, Yanxiang; Cai, Weiping; Wang, Yuelin; Li, Tie

    2015-05-01

    Nano-structured gas sensing materials, in particular nanoparticles, nanotubes, and nanowires, enable high sensitivity at a ppb level for gas sensors. For practical applications, it is highly desirable to be able to manufacture such gas sensors in batch and at low cost. We present here a strategy of in-situ wafer-level fabrication of the high-performance micro/nano gas sensing chips by naturally integrating microhotplatform (MHP) with nanopore array (NPA). By introducing colloidal crystal template, a wafer-level ordered homogenous SnO2 NPA is synthesized in-situ on a 4-inch MHP wafer, able to produce thousands of gas sensing units in one batch. The integration of micromachining process and nanofabrication process endues micro/nano gas sensing chips at low cost, high throughput, and with high sensitivity (down to ~20 ppb), fast response time (down to ~1 s), and low power consumption (down to ~30 mW). The proposed strategy of integrating MHP with NPA represents a versatile approach for in-situ wafer-level fabrication of high-performance micro/nano gas sensors for real industrial applications.

  5. In situ auger analysis of surface composition during high fluence ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, D. A.; Sartwell, B. D.; Singer, I. L.

    1985-03-01

    A multi-technique ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) target chamber has been used to perform in situ Auger electron spectroscopic (AES) analysis during ion implantation and AES sputter depth profiling of the substrate within 1-2 min after implantation. Iron was implanted with 150 keV Ti + at a 45° angle of incidence in a target chamber with pressures ranging from 8 × 10 -9 Torr of residual gases up to 1 × 10 -5 Torr of intentionally admitted CO gas. A fluence of ∼1.0 × 10 16cm -2 was needed to sputter away the C-covered air-formed oxide. The implanted Ti reached the surface at the 1 at.% level by ∼1.5 × 10 16cm -2. With increasing fluence, the Ti surface concentration increased to ∼15 at.% at steady-state with a curve shape that was concave downward at all fluences. The surface C concentration was found to be proportional to that of Ti for implants in CO, supporting a vacuum carburization model. Substantial O surface concentration (15-20 at.%) was detected for these runs but depth profiles showed only carburization, not oxidation, of the implanted layer. Even in the best vacuum available (8 × 10 -9Torr), some carburization was observed and was attributed to residual gas absorption. An increase in Ti retained dose with increasing CO pressure has been observed but not yet independently confirmed. The Ti/Fe surface concentration ratio is higher for implants done in CO, and this is discussed in terms of modification of the sputter yield for Ti.

  6. In situ video and diffraction analysis of marine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunven, Michel; Gentien, P.; Kononen, K.; Le Gall, E.; Daniélou, M. M.

    2003-08-01

    A design for a new underwater video-system to detect and observe suspended particles is presented. Particles are collected and isolated in a rectangular box where they are highly illuminated by a white light plane. The total field of view is determined. The camera, equipped with a remote controlled zoom, can resolve particles sizes ranging from 25 μm to several millimetres. Real-time image analyses are therefore performed. Particle counts and size spectra are calculated and displayed. Total light intensity scattered by the illuminated particles is closely related to the back-scattering values determined by an optical back-scatter sensor. A particle size analyser using diffraction analysis is associated to this video-system on a custom profiler. Hydrological parameters are measured by a standard CTD probe associated to a chlorophyll sensor. Results are acquired and graphically presented in real time. This custom profiler presents numerous advantages in oceanographic research. Two examples of its use in different coastal areas are presented. In an estuary, temporal evolution of particle characteristics was described in relation to the tide cycle. While the video-system allows direct visualization and characterization of the largest particles, the particle-size analyser performs precise quantification of the finest ones. It was shown that the two methods were in accordance for quantification of large aggregates, which were observed around slack tide when salinity decreased. Video analyses cannot be performed above 25 mg l -1 dry weight equivalent. The system reliability, resolution and limits were also demonstrated during a cruise in the Gulf of Finland. A typical profile is presented here showing different layers, one characterized by the association of heterotrophic flagellates and detritals, and another dominated by zooplankton, the surface layer being characterized by cyanobacterial colonies. Video associated to diffraction analyses allows the study of

  7. In Situ Space Gas Dynamic Measurements by the ROSINA Comet Pressure Sensor COPS Onboard Rosetta Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzou, Chia-Yu; Altwegg, Kathrin; Fiethe, Björn; Gasc, Sébastien; Rubin, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Rosetta is part of the cornerstone missions executed by the European Space Agency. It is the first space mission to orbit and also land on a comet. The Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA) is one of the core payloads on board of the Rosetta spacecraft [Balsiger et al, 2007]. ROSINA's main objective is to determine the major atmospheric and ionospheric composition in the coma and to investigate the gas dynamics around the comet. ROSINA consists of two mass spectrometers and a pressure sensor. The COmet Pressure Sensor (COPS) includes two gauges: the "nude gauge" measures total neutral density in the coma and the "ram gauge" measures the dynamic pressure of the cometary gas flux. The combination of these two gauges makes COPS capable to derive the gas dynamics (velocity and temperature) at the location of the spacecraft. Over several months Rosetta has been carrying out a close study of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. In early August 2014 COPS detected the faint and expanding atmosphere of the comet while it was still outside of 3.5 AU from the Sun. We will present ROSINA COPS observations of the evolution and gas dynamics of the cometary coma following these first observations until spring 2015. Reference: Balsiger, H. et al.: ROSINA-Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis, Space Science Reviews, Vol. 128, 745-801, 2007.

  8. In situ analysis of copper electrodeposition reaction using unilateral NMR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, B. F.; Nunes, L. M. S.; Lobo, C. M. S.; Carvalho, A. S.; Cabeça, L. F.; Colnago, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The uses of high-resolution NMR spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) to study electrochemical reactions in situ have greatly increased in the last decade. However, most of these applications are limited to specialized NMR laboratories and not feasible for routine analysis. Recently we have shown that a bench top, time domain NMR spectrometer can be used to monitor in situ copper electrodeposition reaction and the effect of Lorentz force in the reaction rate. However these spectrometers limit the cell size to the magnet gap and cannot be used with standard electrochemical cells. In this paper we are demonstrating that unilateral NMR sensor (UNMR), which does not limit sample size/volume, can be used to monitor electrodeposition of paramagnetic ions in situ. The copper electrodeposition reaction was monitored remotely and in situ, placing the electrochemical cell on top of the UNMR sensor. The Cu2+ concentration was measured during three hours of the electrodeposition reactions, by using the transverse relaxation rate (R2) determined with the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequence. The reaction rate increased fourfold when the reaction was performed in the presence of a magnetic field (in situ), in comparison to the reactions in the absence of the magnetic field (ex situ). The increase of reaction rate, in the presence of the UNMR magnet, was related to the magneto hydrodynamic force (FB) and magnetic field gradient force (F∇B). F∇B was calculated to be one order of magnitude stronger than FB. The UNMR sensor has several advantages for in situ measurements when compared to standard NMR spectrometers. It is a low cost, portable, open system, which does not limit sample size/volume and can be easily be adapted to standard electrochemical cells or large industrial reactors.

  9. In situ analysis of copper electrodeposition reaction using unilateral NMR sensor.

    PubMed

    Gomes, B F; Nunes, L M S; Lobo, C M S; Carvalho, A S; Cabeça, L F; Colnago, L A

    2015-12-01

    The uses of high-resolution NMR spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) to study electrochemical reactions in situ have greatly increased in the last decade. However, most of these applications are limited to specialized NMR laboratories and not feasible for routine analysis. Recently we have shown that a bench top, time domain NMR spectrometer can be used to monitor in situ copper electrodeposition reaction and the effect of Lorentz force in the reaction rate. However these spectrometers limit the cell size to the magnet gap and cannot be used with standard electrochemical cells. In this paper we are demonstrating that unilateral NMR sensor (UNMR), which does not limit sample size/volume, can be used to monitor electrodeposition of paramagnetic ions in situ. The copper electrodeposition reaction was monitored remotely and in situ, placing the electrochemical cell on top of the UNMR sensor. The Cu(2+) concentration was measured during three hours of the electrodeposition reactions, by using the transverse relaxation rate (R2) determined with the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequence. The reaction rate increased fourfold when the reaction was performed in the presence of a magnetic field (in situ), in comparison to the reactions in the absence of the magnetic field (ex situ). The increase of reaction rate, in the presence of the UNMR magnet, was related to the magneto hydrodynamic force (FB) and magnetic field gradient force (F∇B). F∇B was calculated to be one order of magnitude stronger than FB. The UNMR sensor has several advantages for in situ measurements when compared to standard NMR spectrometers. It is a low cost, portable, open system, which does not limit sample size/volume and can be easily be adapted to standard electrochemical cells or large industrial reactors. PMID:26540649

  10. Performance evaluation of a green process for microalgal CO2 sequestration in closed photobioreactor using flue gas generated in-situ.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Geetanjali; Karemore, Ankush; Dash, Sukanta Kumar; Sen, Ramkrishna

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, carbon-dioxide capture from in situ generated flue gas was carried out using Chlorella sp. in bubble column photobioreactors to develop a cost effective process for concomitant carbon sequestration and biomass production. Firstly, a comparative analysis of CO2 sequestration with varying concentrations of CO2 in air-CO2 and air-flue gas mixtures was performed. Chlorella sp. was found to be tolerant to 5% CO2 concentration. Subsequently, inhibitory effect of pure flue gas was minimized using various strategies like use of high initial cell density and photobioreactors in series. The final biofixation efficiency was improved by 54% using the adopted strategies. Further, sequestered microalgal biomass was analyzed for various biochemical constituents for their use in food, feed or biofuel applications. PMID:25921786

  11. In-Situ Quantification of Methanotrophic Activity in a Landfill Cover Soil Using Gas Push-Pull Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, K. E.; Gonzalez-Gil, G.; Schroth, M. H.; Zeyer, J.

    2007-12-01

    Landfills are both a major anthropogenic source and a sink for the greenhouse gas CH4. Methanogenic bacteria produce CH4 during the anaerobic digestion of landfill waste, whereas, methanotrophic bacteria consume CH4 as it is transported through a landfill cover soil. Methanotrophs are thought to be ubiquitous in soils, but typically exist in large numbers at oxic/anoxic interfaces, close to anaerobic methane sources but exposed to oxygen required for metabolism. Accurate in-situ quantification of the sink strength of methanotrophs in landfill cover soils is needed for global carbon balances and for local emissions mitigation strategies. We measured in-situ CH4 concentrations at 30, 60, and 100 cm depth at 18 evenly spaced locations across a landfill cover soil. Furthermore, we performed Gas Push-Pull Tests (GPPTs) to estimate in-situ rates of methanotrophic activity in the cover soil. The GPPT is a gas-tracer test in which a gas mixture containing CH4, O2, and non-reactive tracer gases is injected (pushed) into the soil followed by extraction (pull) from the same location. Quantification of CH4 oxidation rates is based upon comparison of the breakthrough curves of CH4 and tracer gases. We present the results of a series of GPPTs conducted at two locations in the cover soil to assess the feasibility and reproducibility of this technique to quantify methanotrophic activity. Additional GPPTs were performed with a methanotrophic inhibitor in the injection gas mixture to confirm the appropriate choice of tracers to quantify CH4 oxidation. Estimated CH4 oxidation rate constants indicate that the cover soil contains a highly active methanotrophic community.

  12. Gas Evolution in Operating Lithium-Ion Batteries Studied In Situ by Neutron Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Michalak, Barbara; Sommer, Heino; Mannes, David; Kaestner, Anders; Brezesinski, Torsten; Janek, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Gas generation as a result of electrolyte decomposition is one of the major issues of high-performance rechargeable batteries. Here, we report the direct observation of gassing in operating lithium-ion batteries using neutron imaging. This technique can be used to obtain qualitative as well as quantitative information by applying a new analysis approach. Special emphasis is placed on high voltage LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/graphite pouch cells. Continuous gassing due to oxidation and reduction of electrolyte solvents is observed. To separate gas evolution reactions occurring on the anode from those associated with the cathode interface and to gain more insight into the gassing behavior of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/graphite cells, neutron experiments were also conducted systematically on other cathode/anode combinations, including LiFePO4/graphite, LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/Li4Ti5O12 and LiFePO4/Li4Ti5O12. In addition, the data were supported by gas pressure measurements. The results suggest that metal dissolution in the electrolyte and decomposition products resulting from the high potentials adversely affect the gas generation, particularly in the first charge cycle (i.e., during graphite solid-electrolyte interface layer formation). PMID:26496823

  13. Gas Evolution in Operating Lithium-Ion Batteries Studied In Situ by Neutron Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalak, Barbara; Sommer, Heino; Mannes, David; Kaestner, Anders; Brezesinski, Torsten; Janek, Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Gas generation as a result of electrolyte decomposition is one of the major issues of high-performance rechargeable batteries. Here, we report the direct observation of gassing in operating lithium-ion batteries using neutron imaging. This technique can be used to obtain qualitative as well as quantitative information by applying a new analysis approach. Special emphasis is placed on high voltage LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/graphite pouch cells. Continuous gassing due to oxidation and reduction of electrolyte solvents is observed. To separate gas evolution reactions occurring on the anode from those associated with the cathode interface and to gain more insight into the gassing behavior of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/graphite cells, neutron experiments were also conducted systematically on other cathode/anode combinations, including LiFePO4/graphite, LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/Li4Ti5O12 and LiFePO4/Li4Ti5O12. In addition, the data were supported by gas pressure measurements. The results suggest that metal dissolution in the electrolyte and decomposition products resulting from the high potentials adversely affect the gas generation, particularly in the first charge cycle (i.e., during graphite solid-electrolyte interface layer formation).

  14. Gas Evolution in Operating Lithium-Ion Batteries Studied In Situ by Neutron Imaging.

    PubMed

    Michalak, Barbara; Sommer, Heino; Mannes, David; Kaestner, Anders; Brezesinski, Torsten; Janek, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Gas generation as a result of electrolyte decomposition is one of the major issues of high-performance rechargeable batteries. Here, we report the direct observation of gassing in operating lithium-ion batteries using neutron imaging. This technique can be used to obtain qualitative as well as quantitative information by applying a new analysis approach. Special emphasis is placed on high voltage LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/graphite pouch cells. Continuous gassing due to oxidation and reduction of electrolyte solvents is observed. To separate gas evolution reactions occurring on the anode from those associated with the cathode interface and to gain more insight into the gassing behavior of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/graphite cells, neutron experiments were also conducted systematically on other cathode/anode combinations, including LiFePO4/graphite, LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/Li4Ti5O12 and LiFePO4/Li4Ti5O12. In addition, the data were supported by gas pressure measurements. The results suggest that metal dissolution in the electrolyte and decomposition products resulting from the high potentials adversely affect the gas generation, particularly in the first charge cycle (i.e., during graphite solid-electrolyte interface layer formation). PMID:26496823

  15. In situ precipitation preparation of ZnO hollow spheres and their photocatalysis and gas-sensing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xiaohua; Tian, Minggang; Liu, Yingying; Wu, Xiangyang; Song, Haojie

    2015-06-01

    ZnO hollow spheres were synthesized by in situ precipitation method in the presence of surfactant polyvinylpyrrolidone combined with subsequent calcination. The prepared ZnO was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results indicated that the prepared ZnO hollow spheres were well crystalline with wurtzite hexagonal phase. The formation mechanism of ZnO hollow spheres was discussed. Furthermore, the gas-sensing properties for detection of organic gas and photocatalytic activities for the degradation of rhodamine B (RhB) of the prepared ZnO hollow spheres were investigated. The results indicated that the prepared ZnO hollow spheres exhibited superior photocatalysis properties on decomposition of RhB and high gas-sensing properties for detection of acetone gas.

  16. VAPoR - Volatile Analysis by Pyrolysis of Regolith - an Instrument for In Situ Detection of Water, Noble Gases, and Organics on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ten Kate, I. L.; Cardiff, E. H.; Feng, S. H.; Holmes, V.; Malespin, C.; Stern, J. G.; Swindle, T. D.; Glavin, D. P.

    2010-01-01

    We present the Volatile Analysis by Pyrolysis of Regolith (VAPoR) instrument design and demonstrate the validity of an in situ pyrolysis mass spectrometer for evolved gas analyses of lunar and planetary regolith samples. In situ evolved gas analyses of the lunar regolith have not yet been carried out and no atmospheric or evolved gas measurements have been made at the lunar poles. VAPoR is designed to do both kinds of measurements, is currently under development at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, and will be able to heat powdered regolith samples or rock drill fines up to 1400 C in vacuo. To validate the instrument concept, evolved gas species released from different planetary analogs were determined as a function of temperature using a laboratory breadboard. Evolved gas measurements of an Apollo 16 regolith sample and a fragment of the carbonaceous meteorite Murchison were made by VAPoR and our results compared with existing data. The results imply that in situ evolved gas measurements of the lunar regolith at the polar regions by VAPoR will be a very powerful tool for identifying water and other volatile signatures of lunar or exogenous origin as potential resources for future human exploration.

  17. Application of in situ stress estimation methods in wellbore stability analysis under isotropic and anisotropic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, Raoof; Rasouli, Vamegh; Aadnoy, Bernt; Mohammadi, Ramin

    2015-08-01

    Estimation of in situ stresses is a key step in many petroleum engineering applications, ranging from wellbore stability to sanding analysis and hydraulic fracturing design. Direct techniques conventionally used to determine in situ stresses are indeed very time consuming and expensive. These measurements would also be restricted as to the depth of acquisition, and generalization of the results to entire rock masses may not yield representative results. In this paper, applications of three indirect methods-Zoback’s polygon, shear moduli, and poroelastic-are studied to assess their applicability in providing reliable stress estimation under isotropic and anisotropic conditions. Determination of elastic, strength, and in situ stress parameters according to the assumption of each method for one of the vertical wells drilled in south Iran indicated that the shear moduli method is an appropriate approach for prediction of maximum horizontal stress within an interval where sufficient field data including leak-off tests are acquired. However, the poroelastic method seems to be a better method in prediction of in situ stresses under anisotropic conditions. This might be due to the presence of excessive shale formations in subsurface layers, causing structural or intrinsic anisotropy-based methods such as poroelastic equations to deliver more accurate results. However, making general conclusions based on studying a single vertical wellbore may not be sufficient, and therefore further studies are required.

  18. The Determination of Pesticidal and Non-Pesticidal Organotin Compounds by in situ Ethylation and Capillary Gas Chromatography with Pulsed Flame Photometric Detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concurrent determination of pesticidal and non-pesticidal organotin compounds in several water matrices, using a simultaneous in situ ethylation and liquid-liquid extraction followed by splitless injection mode capillary gas chromatography with pulsed flame photometric detect...

  19. The Determination of Pesticidal and Non-Pesticidal Organotin Compounds in Water Matrices by in situ Ethylation and Gas Chromatography with Pulsed Flame Photometric Detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concurrent determination of pesticidal and non-pesticidal organotin compounds in several water matrices, using a simultaneous in situ ethylation and liquid-liquid extraction followed by splitless injection mode capillary gas chromatography with pulsed flame photometric detect...

  20. Combining In-situ and In-transit Processing to Enable Extreme-Sscale Scientific Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Janine C.; Abbasi, Hasan; Bremer, Peer-Timo; Grout, Ray; Gyulassy, Attila; Jin, Tong; Klasky, Scott A; Kolla, Hemanth; Parashar, Manish; Pascucci, Valerio; Pebay, Philippe; Thompson, David; Yu, Hongfeng; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Jacqueline H

    2012-01-01

    With the onset of extreme-scale computing, I/O constraints make it increasingly difficult for scientists to save a sufficient amount of raw simulation data to persistent storage. One potential solution is to change the data analysis pipeline from a post-process centric to a concurrent approach based on either in-situ or in-transit processing. In this context computations are considered in-situ if they utilize the primary compute resources, while in-transit processing refers to offloading computations to a set of secondary resources using asynchronous data transfers. In this paper we explore the design and implementation of three common analysis techniques typically performed on large-scale scientific simulations: topological analysis, descriptive statistics, and visualization. We summarize algorithmic developments, describe a resource scheduling system to coordinate the execution of various analysis workflows, and discuss our implementation using the DataSpaces and ADIOS frameworks that support efficient data movement between in-situ and in-transit computations. We demonstrate the efficiency of our lightweight, flexible framework by deploying it on the Jaguar XK6 to analyze data generated by S3D, a massively parallel turbulent combustion code. Our framework allows scientists dealing with the data deluge at extreme scale to perform analyses at increased temporal resolutions, mitigate I/O costs, and significantly improve the time to insight.

  1. Simulation study of the in-situ formation deformation behavior of a shallow formation in the Southern Kanto Natural gas field, Chiba Prefecture, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, M.; Matsuyama, R.; Nakagawa, T.; Kuroshima, S.; Ogatsu, T.; Adachi, R.

    2015-11-01

    In 2010, eight companies which are exploiting natural gas and brine water in the Southern Kanto natural gas field, Chiba prefecture, Japan constructed an in-situ formation deformation monitoring well with a depth of approximately 80 m, and in-situ formation deformation was measured on a trial basis. After this field test, by conducting the simulation study, we verified whether the deformation behavior at the monitoring well was perfectly elastic or not. In addition, we compared in-situ rock properties like Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio which were estimated by the simulation study with those determined from a triaxial compression test.

  2. A new instrument adapted to in situ Raman analysis of objects of art.

    PubMed

    Vandenabeele, P; Weis, T L; Grant, E R; Moens, L J

    2004-05-01

    The analysis of precious artefacts and antiquities demands care in order to minimise the risk of accidental damage during measurement. Mobile fibre-optic-based Raman instruments offer a means to avoid destructive sampling and eliminate the need to transport artefacts for spectrochemical analysis. In this work we present a new mobile instrument developed and optimised for the in situ Raman investigation of objects of art and antiquities. The instrument is controlled by a portable computer. Selected mounts cover many types of artefacts. Newly written software routines organise spectra together with measurement parameters and facilitate calibration of the instrument. The present paper describes this new Raman instrument and discusses some challenges in the transition from a laboratory environment to in situ investigations in museums. PMID:15045464

  3. In-situ source path contribution analysis of structure borne road noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, A. S.; Moorhouse, A. T.; Huntley, T.; Tate, S.

    2013-11-01

    Source-path-contribution (SPC) analysis, also known as transfer path analysis (TPA), is a technique widely used in the automotive industry for rank ordering noise and vibration sources. The SPC approach is known to provide reliable diagnostic information but is time consuming to apply. In this paper, a faster SPC approach that allows all measurements to be performed in-situ is outlined and tested. For validation purposes a classic example consisting of a vehicle's suspension system (considered a vibration source) attached to a vehicle body (receiver) is analysed. It is found that structure borne noise inside the vehicle can be predicted well by either the conventional or the novel in-situ SPC approaches and that both methods give the same diagnostic information in terms of the rank ordering of path contributions. Thus, the new in-situ approach provides results at least as reliable as the conventional inverse SPC approach but has significant practical advantages in terms of reduced test time, transferability of data and flexibility in the location of the source-receiver interface. An additional investigation also demonstrates the feasibility of including rotational motions and moments in the analysis and it is shown that improved accuracy can be achieved as a result.

  4. Analysis of the cyanolichen Lichina pygmaea metabolites using in situ DART-MS: from detection to thermochemistry of mycosporine serinol.

    PubMed

    Le Pogam, Pierre; Legouin, Béatrice; Le Lamer, Anne-Cécile; Boustie, Joël; Rondeau, David

    2015-03-01

    Direct Analysis in Real Time DART-HRMS is here first applied to the detection of molecules from a lichen, Lichina pygmaea. The aim was to propose an innovative method of in situ detection of lichen secondary metabolites using the possibilities of elemental composition determination available when a DART source is interfaced with a TOF analyzer. Three kinds of samples have been submitted to DART ionization, i.e. an intact thallus, a powder obtained from the crushed lichen and an aqueous extract. In situ analysis of crushed lichen, yields an extensive chemical profile, comparable to what is obtained from the aqueous extract, comprising both major polar metabolites described in literature along with some other signals that could correspond to potentially unknown metabolites. One of the detected secondary metabolites, mycosporine serinol, underwent a dehydration reaction prior to its transfer in the gas-phase by DART ionization. The consideration of the thermal transfers involved in the DART ionization process and the possibility to record time-dependent mass spectra through the use of the TOF analyzer allowed establishing Arrhenius plots of this water molecule loss to obtain associated thermodynamic quantities. The low values of corresponding activation enthalpy (Δr‡Hm° of the order of 25 kJ mol(-1)) enabled formulating some assumption regarding a possible role of such metabolites in the lichen. PMID:25800181

  5. Radon in soil gas--exhalation tests and in situ measurements.

    PubMed

    Lindmark, A; Rosen, B

    1985-10-01

    Radon in soil can move into buildings resulting in high radon daughter concentrations. The foundation of a dwelling should be adapted to the radon "risk" which is determined by the radon concentration and the air permeability of the soil. Different measuring procedures are discussed in this paper, both in situ measurements of radon content and laboratory tests on radon exhalation from different types of soils at different water contents. PMID:4081740

  6. In situ characterization of catalysts and membranes in a microchannel under high-temperature water gas shift reaction conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavusoglu, G.; Dallmann, F.; Lichtenberg, H.; Goldbach, A.; Dittmeyer, R.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2016-05-01

    Microreactor technology with high heat transfer in combination with stable catalysts is a very attractive approach for reactions involving major heat effects such as methane steam reforming and to some extent, also the high temperature water gas shift (WGS) reaction. For this study Rh/ceria catalysts and an ultrathin hydrogen selective membrane were characterized in situ in a microreactor specially designed for x-ray absorption spectroscopic measurements under WGS conditions. The results of these experiments can serve as a basis for further development of the catalysts and membranes.

  7. Modi: a new mobile instrument for in situ standardless LIBS analysis of cultural heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristoforetti, Gabriele; Legnaioli, Stefano; Palleschi, Vincenzo; Pardini, Lorenzo; Salvetti, Azenio; Tognoni, Elisabetta

    2005-06-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a promising technique for in-situ analysis of Cultural Heritage. The potential of this technique for accurate quantitative analysis could be greatly improved using an innovative experimental setup - based on the use of two laser pulses suitably retarded - and analyzing the results with a standard-less procedure which overcomes the problems related to matrix effects. A new mobile instrument for Cultural Heritage analysis, developed at the Applied Laser Spectroscopy Laboratory in Pisa, is presented, and some experimental results are given.

  8. NMR bioreactor development for live in-situ microbial functional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Majors, Paul D.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Scholten, Johannes C.

    2008-05-01

    A live in-situ metabolomics capability was developed for prokaryotic cultures under controlled-growth conditions. Toward this goal, a radiofrequency-transparent bioreactor was developed and integrated with a commercial wide-bore nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging spectrometer and a commercial bioreactor controller. Water suppressed 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to monitor glucose and fructose utilization and byproduct excretion by Eubacterium aggregans (an anaerobic bacterial species relevant for biofuels production) under controlled batch and continuous culture conditions. The resulting metabolite profiles (short chain organic acids and ethanol) and trends are consistent with existing knowledge of its metabolism. However, our study showed the Eubacterium aggregans produces lactate end product in significant concentrations – a result not previously reported. The advantages of live in-situ microbial metabolomics analysis and its complementariness with functional genomics / systems biology methods are discussed.

  9. Miniature Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope for In-Situ Imaging and Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory; Gregory, Don; Sampson, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is leading an effort to develop a Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM) for in-situ imaging and chemical analysis of uncoated samples. This instrument development will be geared towards operation on Mars and builds on a previous MSFC design of a mini-SEM for the moon (funded through the NASA Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program). Because Mars has a dramatically different environment than the moon, modifications to the MSFC lunar mini-SEM are necessary. Mainly, the higher atmospheric pressure calls for the use of an electron gun that can operate at High Vacuum, rather than Ultra-High Vacuum. The presence of a CO2-rich atmosphere also allows for the incorporation of a variable pressure system that enables the in-situ analysis of nonconductive geological specimens. Preliminary testing of Mars meteorites in a commercial Environmental SEM(Tradmark) (FEI) confirms the usefulness of lowcurrent/low-accelerating voltage imaging and highlights the advantages of using the Mars atmosphere for environmental imaging. The unique capabilities of the MVP-SEM make it an ideal tool for pursuing key scientific goals of NASA's Flagship Mission Max-C; to perform in-situ science and collect and cache samples in preparation for sample return from Mars.

  10. Analysis of ocean in situ observations and web-based visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Alexander; Watelet, Sylvain; Troupin, Charles; Alvera Azcarate, Aida; Santinelli, Giorgio; Hendriksen, Gerrit; Giorgetti, Alessandra; Beckers, Jean-Marie

    2016-04-01

    The sparsity of observations poses a challenge common to various ocean science disciplines. Even for physical parameters where the spatial and temporal coverage is higher, current observational networks undersample a broad spectrum of scales. The situation is generally more severe for chemical and biological parameters because related sensors are less widely deployed. The analysis tool DIVA (Data-Interpolating Variational Analysis) is designed to generate gridded fields from in situ observations. DIVA has been applied to various physical (temperature and salinity), chemical (concentration of nitrate, nitrite and phosphate) and biological parameters (abundance of a species) in the context of different European projects (SeaDataNet, EMODnet Chemistry and EMODnet Biology). We show the technologies used to visualize the gridded fields based on the Web Map Services standard. Visualization of analyses from in situ observations provides a unique set of challenges since the accuracy of the analysed field is not spatially uniform as it strongly depends on the observations location. In addition, an adequate handling of depth and time dimensions is essential. Beside visualizing the gridded fields, access is also given to the underlying observations. It is thus also possible to view more detailed information about the variability of the observations. The in situ observation visualization service allows one to display vertical profiles and time series and it is built upon OGC standards (the Web Feature Service and Web Processing Services) and following recommendation from the INSPIRE directive.

  11. Method of estimating the amount of in situ gas hydrates in deep marine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Hutchinson, D.R.; Dillon, William P.; Miller, J.J.; Agena, W.F.; Swift, B.A.

    1993-01-01

    The bulk volume of gas hydrates in marine sediments can be estimated by measuring interval velocities and amplitude blanking of hydrated zones from true amplitude processed multichannel seismic reflection data. In general, neither velocity nor amplitude information is adequate to independently estimate hydrate concentration. A method is proposed that uses amplitude blanking calibrated by interval velocity information to quantify hydrate concentrations in the Blake Ridge area of the US Atlantic continental margin. On the Blake Ridge, blanking occurs in conjunction with relatively low interval velocities. The model that best explains this relation linearly mixes two end-member sediments: hydrated and unhydrated sediment. Hydrate concentration in the hydrate end-member can be calculated from a weighted equation that uses velocity estimated from the seismic data, known properties of the pure hydrate, and porosity inferred from a velocity-porosity relationship. Amplitude blanking can be predicted as the proportions of hydrated and unhydrated sediment change across a reflection boundary. Our analysis of a small area near DSDP 533 indicates that the amount of gas hydrates is about 6% in total volume when the interval velocity is used as a criterion and about 9.5% when amplitude information is used. This compares with a calculated value of about 8% derived from the only available measurement in DSDP 533. ?? 1993.

  12. In situ analysis of Titan's tholins by Laser 2 steps Desorption Ionisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benilan, Y.; Carrasco, N.; Cernogora, G.; Gazeau, M.; Mahjoub, A.; Szopa, C.; Schwell, M.

    2013-12-01

    The main objective of the whole project developed in collaboration (LISA/LATMOS) is to provide a better understanding of the chemical composition of Titan aerosols laboratory analogs, called tholins, and thereby of their formation pathways. The tholins are produced in the PAMPRE reactor (French acronyme for Aerosols Microgravity Production by Reactives Plasmas) developed at LATMOS. These tholins are generated in levitation (wall effects are thus limited) in a low pressure radiofrequency plasma. Up to now, the determination of the physical and chemical properties of these tholins was achieved after their collection and ex-situ analysis by several methods. Their bulk composition was then determined but their insoluble part is still unknown. Other studies were performed after the transfer of the soluble part of the aerosols to different analytical instruments. Therefore, possible artifacts could have influenced the results. We present the SMARD (a French acronym for Mass Spectrometry of Aerosols by InfraRed Laser Desorption) program. A challenging issue of our work is to perform the soluble and unsoluble parts of PAMPRE tholins' analysis in real time and in situ. The coupling of the PAMPRE reactor to a unique instrument (Single Particle Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry) developed at LISA should allow determining in real time and in situ the characteristics (chemical composition together with granulometry) of the nanometric aerosols. The later are introduced in the analytical instrument using an aerodynamic lens device. Their detection and aerodynamic diameter are determined using two continuous diode lasers operating at λ = 403 nm. Then, the L2DI (Laser 2 steps Desorption Ionisation) technique is used in order to access to the chemical composition of individual particles: they are vaporized using a 10 μm CO2 pulsed laser and the gas produced is then ionized by a 248 nm KrF Excimer laser. Finally, the molecular ions are analyzed by a 1 m linear time-of-flight mass

  13. In situ rheology and gas volume in Hanford double-shell waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Brewster, M.E.; Chen, G.; Reid, H.C.; Shepard, C.L.; Terrones, G.; Mendoza, R.E.

    1996-09-01

    This report is a detailed characterization of gas retention and release in 6 Hanford DS waste tanks. The results came from the ball rheometer and void fraction instrument in (flammable gas watch list) tanks SY-101, SY-103, AW-101, AN-103, AN-104, and AN-105 are presented. Instrument operation and derivation of data reduction methods are presented. Gas retention and release information is summarized for each tank and includes tank fill history and instrumentation, waste configuration, gas release, void fraction distribution, gas volumes, rheology, and photographs of the waste column from extruded core samples. Potential peak burn pressure is computed as a function of gas release fraction to portray the `hazard signature` of each tank. It is shown that two tanks remain well below the maximum allowable pressure, even if the entire gas content were released and ignited, and that none of the others present a hazard with their present gas release behavior.

  14. Residual gas analysis device

    DOEpatents

    Thornberg, Steven M.

    2012-07-31

    A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

  15. Application of meta-transcriptomics and -proteomics to analysis of in situ physiological state

    SciTech Connect

    Konopka, Allan; Wilkins, Michael J.

    2012-05-18

    Analysis of the growth-limiting factor or environmental stressors affecting microbes in situ is of fundamental importance but analytically difficult. Microbes can reduce in situ limiting nutrient concentrations to sub-micromolar levels, and contaminated ecosystems may contain multiple stressors. The patterns of gene or protein expression by microbes in nature can be used to infer growth limitations, because they are regulated in response to environmental conditions. Experimental studies under controlled conditions in the laboratory provide the physiological underpinnings for developing these physiological indicators. Although regulatory networks may differ among specific microbes, there are some broad principles that can be applied, related to limiting nutrient acquisition, resource allocation, and stress responses. As technologies for transcriptomics and proteomics mature, the capacity to apply these approaches to complex microbial communities will accelerate. Global proteomics has the particular advantage that it reflects expressed catalytic activities. Furthermore, the high mass accuracy of some proteomic approaches allows mapping back to specific microbial strains. For example, at the Rifle IFRC field site in Western Colorado, the physiological status of Fe(III)-reducing populations has been tracked over time. Members of a 'subsurface clade' within the Geobacter predominated during carbon amendment to the subsurface environment. At the functional level, proteomic identifications produced inferences regarding (i) temporal changes in anabolism and catabolism of acetate, (ii) the onset of N2 fixation when N became limiting, and (iii) expression of phosphate transporters during periods of intense growth. The application of these approaches in situ can lead to discovery of novel physiological adaptations.

  16. In situ measurement of leaf chlorophyll concentration: analysis of the optical/absolute relationship.

    PubMed

    Parry, Christopher; Blonquist, J Mark; Bugbee, Bruce

    2014-11-01

    In situ optical meters are widely used to estimate leaf chlorophyll concentration, but non-uniform chlorophyll distribution causes optical measurements to vary widely among species for the same chlorophyll concentration. Over 30 studies have sought to quantify the in situ/in vitro (optical/absolute) relationship, but neither chlorophyll extraction nor measurement techniques for in vitro analysis have been consistent among studies. Here we: (1) review standard procedures for measurement of chlorophyll; (2) estimate the error associated with non-standard procedures; and (3) implement the most accurate methods to provide equations for conversion of optical to absolute chlorophyll for 22 species grown in multiple environments. Tests of five Minolta (model SPAD-502) and 25 Opti-Sciences (model CCM-200) meters, manufactured from 1992 to 2013, indicate that differences among replicate models are less than 5%. We thus developed equations for converting between units from these meter types. There was no significant effect of environment on the optical/absolute chlorophyll relationship. We derive the theoretical relationship between optical transmission ratios and absolute chlorophyll concentration and show how non-uniform distribution among species causes a variable, non-linear response. These results link in situ optical measurements with in vitro chlorophyll concentration and provide insight to strategies for radiation capture among diverse species. PMID:24635697

  17. On-line gas chromatographic analysis of airborne particles

    DOEpatents

    Hering, Susanne V.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2012-01-03

    A method and apparatus for the in-situ, chemical analysis of an aerosol. The method may include the steps of: collecting an aerosol; thermally desorbing the aerosol into a carrier gas to provide desorbed aerosol material; transporting the desorbed aerosol material onto the head of a gas chromatography column; analyzing the aerosol material using a gas chromatograph, and quantizing the aerosol material as it evolves from the gas chromatography column. The apparatus includes a collection and thermal desorption cell, a gas chromatograph including a gas chromatography column, heated transport lines coupling the cell and the column; and a quantization detector for aerosol material evolving from the gas chromatography column.

  18. Extent of gas hydrate filled fracture planes: Implications for in situ methanogenesis and resource potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Ann E.; Goldberg, David

    2008-08-01

    High-angle gas hydrate filled fracture planes were identified along a 31 m interval in logging while drilling images in two holes located ~11 m apart drilled during the Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01, offshore India. Using Monte Carlo simulations to account for uncertainty in hole location, hole deviation, strike and dip, we assert with 95% confidence that the fracture planes in the two holes are not the same. The gas hydrate filled fracture planes likely only extend a few meters laterally from each borehole and occur in an isolated interval in the middle of the gas hydrate stability zone. This suggests gas generated microbially within in the gas hydrate stability zone may have supplied the gas hydrate-filled fracture interval. Production of methane from these reservoirs using conventional methods may be quite challenging.

  19. Incidence and Outcomes of Anterior Chamber Gas Bubble during Femtosecond Flap Creation for Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Rush, Sloan W; Cofoid, Philip; Rush, Ryan B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To report the incidence and outcomes of anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation for laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Methods. The charts of 2,886 consecutive eyes that underwent femtosecond LASIK from May 2011 through August 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The incidence, preoperative characteristics, intraoperative details, and postoperative outcomes were analyzed in subjects developing anterior chamber gas bubble formation during the procedure. Results. A total of 4 cases (0.14%) developed anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation. In all four cases, the excimer laser was unable to successfully track the pupil immediately following the anterior chamber bubble formation, temporarily postponing the completion of the procedure. There was an ethnicity predilection of anterior chamber gas formation toward Asians (p = 0.0055). An uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 was ultimately achieved in all four cases without further complications. Conclusions. Anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation for LASIK is an uncommon event that typically results in a delay in treatment completion; nevertheless, it does influence final positive visual outcome. PMID:25954511

  20. Incidence and Outcomes of Anterior Chamber Gas Bubble during Femtosecond Flap Creation for Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis

    PubMed Central

    Rush, Sloan W.; Cofoid, Philip; Rush, Ryan B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To report the incidence and outcomes of anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation for laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Methods. The charts of 2,886 consecutive eyes that underwent femtosecond LASIK from May 2011 through August 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The incidence, preoperative characteristics, intraoperative details, and postoperative outcomes were analyzed in subjects developing anterior chamber gas bubble formation during the procedure. Results. A total of 4 cases (0.14%) developed anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation. In all four cases, the excimer laser was unable to successfully track the pupil immediately following the anterior chamber bubble formation, temporarily postponing the completion of the procedure. There was an ethnicity predilection of anterior chamber gas formation toward Asians (p = 0.0055). An uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 was ultimately achieved in all four cases without further complications. Conclusions. Anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation for LASIK is an uncommon event that typically results in a delay in treatment completion; nevertheless, it does influence final positive visual outcome. PMID:25954511

  1. In situ ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and direct microvial insert thermal desorption for gas chromatographic determination of bisphenol compounds.

    PubMed

    Cacho, Juan Ignacio; Campillo, Natalia; Viñas, Pilar; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    A new procedure based on direct insert microvial thermal desorption injection allows the direct analysis of ionic liquid extracts by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). For this purpose, an in situ ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (in situ IL DLLME) has been developed for the quantification of bisphenol A (BPA), bisphenol Z (BPZ) and bisphenol F (BPF). Different parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of the microextraction technique and the thermal desorption step were studied. The optimized procedure, determining the analytes as acetyl derivatives, provided detection limits of 26, 18 and 19 ng L(-1) for BPA, BPZ and BPF, respectively. The release of the three analytes from plastic containers was monitored using this newly developed analytical method. Analysis of the migration test solutions for 15 different plastic containers in daily use identified the presence of the analytes at concentrations ranging between 0.07 and 37 μg L(-1) in six of the samples studied, BPA being the most commonly found and at higher concentrations than the other analytes. PMID:26476920

  2. Analysis of in-situ rock joint strength using digital borehole scanner images

    SciTech Connect

    Thapa, B.B.

    1994-09-01

    The availability of high resolution digital images of borehole walls using the Borehole Scanner System has made it possible to develop new methods of in-situ rock characterization. This thesis addresses particularly new approaches to the characterization of in-situ joint strength arising from surface roughness. An image processing technique is used to extract the roughness profile from joints in the unrolled image of the borehole wall. A method for estimating in-situ Rengers envelopes using this data is presented along with results from using the method on joints in a borehole in porphyritic granite. Next, an analysis of the joint dilation angle anisotropy is described and applied to the porphyritic granite joints. The results indicate that the dilation angle of the joints studied are anisotropic at small scales and tend to reflect joint waviness as scale increases. A procedure to unroll the opposing roughness profiles to obtain a two dimensional sample is presented. The measurement of apertures during this process is shown to produce an error which increases with the dip of the joint. The two dimensional sample of opposing profiles is used in a new kinematic analysis of the joint shear stress-shear deformation behavior. Examples of applying these methods on the porphyritic granite joints are presented. The unrolled opposing profiles were used in a numerical simulation of a direct shear test using Discontinuous Deformation Analysis. Results were compared to laboratory test results using core samples containing the same joints. The simulated dilatancy and shear stress-shear deformation curves were close to the laboratory curves in the case of a joint in porphyritic granite.

  3. Quantitative analysis of chromosome in situ hybridization signal in paraffin-embedded tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Dhingra, K; Sneige, N; Pandita, T K; Johnston, D A; Lee, J S; Emami, K; Hortobagyi, G N; Hittelman, W N

    1994-06-01

    Interphase cytogenetic analysis using chromosome-specific probes is increasingly being used to detect chromosomal aberrations on paraffin-embedded tissue sections. However, quantitative analysis of the hybridization signal is confounded by the nuclear slicing that occurs during sectioning. To determine the sensitivity and accuracy of chromosome in situ hybridization for detecting numerical chromosomal aberrations on paraffin-embedded sections, in situ hybridization was performed on sections derived from mixtures of cell populations with known frequencies of numerical chromosomal aberrations and the Chromosome Index (CI) was calculated (i.e., total number of signal spots/number of nuclei counted) as a quantitative measure of chromosome copy number. The presence of 25% or more monosomic or tetrasomic cells in a given population was easily detected as a change in CI (P < 0.05). Lower degrees of polysomy could be detected as a small percentage of nuclear fragments with > 2 signal spots. The CI was not significantly influenced by a change in section thickness from 4 to 8 microM, by an increase in cell size from 478 to 986 microM3, or by the choice of detection method (fluorescence vs. conventional bright-field microscopy). Comparative analysis of touch preparations and tissue sections from the corresponding breast tumors showed that CI accurately reflects the average copy number of chromosomes in intact nuclei and may actually be superior to in situ hybridization on whole nuclei for the detection of numerical chromosomal changes in defined histologic areas. This method is thus a sensitive and accurate means of studying genetic changes in premalignant and malignant tissue, and of assessing the genetic changes associated with specific phenotypes. PMID:7924678

  4. In Situ Eddy Analysis in a High-Resolution Ocean Climate Model.

    PubMed

    Woodring, Jonathan; Petersen, Mark; Schmeißer, Andre; Patchett, John; Ahrens, James; Hagen, Hans

    2016-01-01

    An eddy is a feature associated with a rotating body of fluid, surrounded by a ring of shearing fluid. In the ocean, eddies are 10 to 150 km in diameter, are spawned by boundary currents and baroclinic instabilities, may live for hundreds of days, and travel for hundreds of kilometers. Eddies are important in climate studies because they transport heat, salt, and nutrients through the world's oceans and are vessels of biological productivity. The study of eddies in global ocean-climate models requires large-scale, high-resolution simulations. This poses a problem for feasible (timely) eddy analysis, as ocean simulations generate massive amounts of data, causing a bottleneck for traditional analysis workflows. To enable eddy studies, we have developed an in situ workflow for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of MPAS-Ocean, a high-resolution ocean climate model, in collaboration with the ocean model research and development process. Planned eddy analysis at high spatial and temporal resolutions will not be possible with a postprocessing workflow due to various constraints, such as storage size and I/O time, but the in situ workflow enables it and scales well to ten-thousand processing elements. PMID:26353372

  5. In-situ monitoring of ammonia gas using an optical fibre based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooly, G.; Manap, H.; O'Keeffe, S.; Lewis, E.

    2011-08-01

    An optical fibre sensor for the monitoring of low level atmospheric ammonia concentrations is presented. The measuring technique employed is based on a differential optical absorption approach, rather than a semiconductor based technique which is generally exploited within comparable commercially available products. The sensor described herein demonstrates vast improvements in terms of sensitivity, selectivity and lifespan over ammonia sensors currently available commercially. Extensive laboratory-based experimental tests demonstrate the sensor's ability to monitor concentrations as low as 1ppm without any notable cross-sensitivity issues to atmospheric gases such as nitrogen, oxygen and carbon dioxide. Furthermore, in-situ experimental tests within an agricultural cattle enclosure demonstrate sensor's suitability to environments where low concentration monitoring of ammonia over extended periods of time is necessary.

  6. In situ microbial metabolism as a cause of gas anomalies in ice

    PubMed Central

    Rohde, Robert A.; Price, P. Buford; Bay, Ryan C.; Bramall, Nathan E.

    2008-01-01

    Isolated spikes of anomalously high concentrations of N2O have been reported at depths in Greenland and Antarctic ice cores corresponding to narrow time intervals over the past ≈105 years. Now, using a calibrated spectrofluorimeter to map protein-bound Trp, a proxy for microbes, versus depth in the 3,053-m GISP2 ice core, we find six depths at which localized spikes of high cell concentrations coincide with N2O spikes. We show that the excess gases are consistent with accumulation of in situ metabolic wastes during residence times of the excess microbes in the ice. Because of sparseness of N2O measurements and our spectrofluorimetry versus depth, the total number of microbially produced N2O spikes in GISP2 is probably much larger than six. Spikes of excess methanogens coincident with CH4 spikes are found at three depths in the bottom 3% of GISP2, most likely because of methanogenic metabolism in the underlying silty ice, followed by turbulent flow of the lowest ≈90 m of ice. The apparent rates of in situ production of N2O and CH4 spikes by metabolism are observed to be consistent with a single activation energy, U, and maintain proportionality to exp(−U/RT) over the entire temperature range down to −40°C. Fluorescence of nonmicrobial aerosols in GISP2 ice is distinguishable from microbial fluorescence by its different emission spectra. Our spectrofluorimetric scans throughout the GISP2 ice core lead us to conclude that both microbes and nonmicrobial aerosols are deposited in discontinuous bursts, which may provide a tool for studying wind storms in the distant past. PMID:18550836

  7. In-situ LIF Analysis of Biological and Petroleum-based Hydraulic Oils on Soil

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Matthias; Fernández-Trujillo, Rebeca; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd

    2005-01-01

    Absorption and fluorescence properties of 4 hydraulic oils (3 biological and 1 petroleum-based) were investigated. In-situ LIF (laser-induced fluorescence) analysis of the oils on a brown sandy loam soil was performed. With calibration, quantitative detection was achieved. Estimated limits of detection were below ca. 500 mg/kg for the petroleum-based oil and ca. 2000 mg/kg for one biological oil. A semi-quantitative classification scheme is proposed for monitoring of the biological oils. This approach was applied to investigate the migration of a biological oil in soil-containing compartments, namely a soil column and a soil bed.

  8. Nuclear spectroscopy for in situ soil elemental analysis: Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski L.; Doron, O.

    2012-07-01

    We developed a model to simulate a novel inelastic neutron scattering (INS) system for in situ non-destructive analysis of soil using standard Monte Carlo Neutron Photon (MCNP5a) transport code. The volumes from which 90%, 95%, and 99% of the total signal are detected were estimated to be 0.23 m{sup 3}, 0.37 m{sup 3}, and 0.79 m{sup 3}, respectively. Similarly, we assessed the instrument's sampling footprint and depths. In addition we discuss the impact of the carbon's depth distribution on sampled depth.

  9. An atomic layer deposition chamber for in situ x-ray diffraction and scattering analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Geyer, Scott M.; Methaapanon, Rungthiwa; Kim, Woo-Hee; Bent, Stacey F.; Johnson, Richard W.; Van Campen, Douglas G.; Metha, Apurva

    2014-05-15

    The crystal structure of thin films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) will determine important performance properties such as conductivity, breakdown voltage, and catalytic activity. We report the design of an atomic layer deposition chamber for in situ x-ray analysis that can be used to monitor changes to the crystal structural during ALD. The application of the chamber is demonstrated for Pt ALD on amorphous SiO{sub 2} and SrTiO{sub 3} (001) using synchrotron-based high resolution x-ray diffraction, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and grazing incidence small angle scattering.

  10. An in-situ gas chromatography investigation into the suppression of oxygen gas evolution by coated amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles on oxide electrode

    PubMed Central

    Gim, Jihyeon; Song, Jinju; Kim, Sungjin; Jo, Jeonggeun; Kim, Seokhun; Yoon, Jaegu; Kim, Donghan; Hong, Suk-Gi; Park, Jin-Hwan; Mathew, Vinod; Han, Junhee; Song, Sun-Ju; Kim, Jaekook

    2016-01-01

    The real time detection of quantitative oxygen release from the cathode is performed by in-situ Gas Chromatography as a tool to not only determine the amount of oxygen release from a lithium-ion cell but also to address the safety concerns. This in-situ gas chromatography technique monitoring the gas evolution during electrochemical reaction presents opportunities to clearly understand the effect of surface modification and predict on the cathode stability. The oxide cathode, 0.5Li2MnO3∙0.5LiNi0.4Co0.2Mn0.4O2, surface modified by amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles (a-CoPO4) is prepared by a simple co-precipitation reaction followed by a mild heat treatment. The presence of a 40 nm thick a-CoPO4 coating layer wrapping the oxide powders is confirmed by electron microscopy. The electrochemical measurements reveal that the a-CoPO4 coated overlithiated layered oxide cathode shows better performances than the pristine counterpart. The enhanced performance of the surface modified oxide is attributed to the uniformly coated Co-P-O layer facilitating the suppression of O2 evolution and offering potential lithium host sites. Further, the formation of a stable SEI layer protecting electrolyte decomposition also contributes to enhanced stabilities with lesser voltage decay. The in-situ gas chromatography technique to study electrode safety offers opportunities to investigate the safety issues of a variety of nanostructured electrodes. PMID:27001370

  11. An in-situ gas chromatography investigation into the suppression of oxygen gas evolution by coated amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles on oxide electrode.

    PubMed

    Gim, Jihyeon; Song, Jinju; Kim, Sungjin; Jo, Jeonggeun; Kim, Seokhun; Yoon, Jaegu; Kim, Donghan; Hong, Suk-Gi; Park, Jin-Hwan; Mathew, Vinod; Han, Junhee; Song, Sun-Ju; Kim, Jaekook

    2016-01-01

    The real time detection of quantitative oxygen release from the cathode is performed by in-situ Gas Chromatography as a tool to not only determine the amount of oxygen release from a lithium-ion cell but also to address the safety concerns. This in-situ gas chromatography technique monitoring the gas evolution during electrochemical reaction presents opportunities to clearly understand the effect of surface modification and predict on the cathode stability. The oxide cathode, 0.5Li2MnO3∙0.5LiNi0.4Co0.2Mn0.4O2, surface modified by amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles (a-CoPO4) is prepared by a simple co-precipitation reaction followed by a mild heat treatment. The presence of a 40 nm thick a-CoPO4 coating layer wrapping the oxide powders is confirmed by electron microscopy. The electrochemical measurements reveal that the a-CoPO4 coated overlithiated layered oxide cathode shows better performances than the pristine counterpart. The enhanced performance of the surface modified oxide is attributed to the uniformly coated Co-P-O layer facilitating the suppression of O2 evolution and offering potential lithium host sites. Further, the formation of a stable SEI layer protecting electrolyte decomposition also contributes to enhanced stabilities with lesser voltage decay. The in-situ gas chromatography technique to study electrode safety offers opportunities to investigate the safety issues of a variety of nanostructured electrodes. PMID:27001370

  12. An in-situ gas chromatography investigation into the suppression of oxygen gas evolution by coated amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles on oxide electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gim, Jihyeon; Song, Jinju; Kim, Sungjin; Jo, Jeonggeun; Kim, Seokhun; Yoon, Jaegu; Kim, Donghan; Hong, Suk-Gi; Park, Jin-Hwan; Mathew, Vinod; Han, Junhee; Song, Sun-Ju; Kim, Jaekook

    2016-03-01

    The real time detection of quantitative oxygen release from the cathode is performed by in-situ Gas Chromatography as a tool to not only determine the amount of oxygen release from a lithium-ion cell but also to address the safety concerns. This in-situ gas chromatography technique monitoring the gas evolution during electrochemical reaction presents opportunities to clearly understand the effect of surface modification and predict on the cathode stability. The oxide cathode, 0.5Li2MnO3•0.5LiNi0.4Co0.2Mn0.4O2, surface modified by amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles (a-CoPO4) is prepared by a simple co-precipitation reaction followed by a mild heat treatment. The presence of a 40 nm thick a-CoPO4 coating layer wrapping the oxide powders is confirmed by electron microscopy. The electrochemical measurements reveal that the a-CoPO4 coated overlithiated layered oxide cathode shows better performances than the pristine counterpart. The enhanced performance of the surface modified oxide is attributed to the uniformly coated Co-P-O layer facilitating the suppression of O2 evolution and offering potential lithium host sites. Further, the formation of a stable SEI layer protecting electrolyte decomposition also contributes to enhanced stabilities with lesser voltage decay. The in-situ gas chromatography technique to study electrode safety offers opportunities to investigate the safety issues of a variety of nanostructured electrodes.

  13. In situ analysis of soybeans and nuts by probe electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Petroselli, Gabriela; Mandal, Mridul K; Chen, Lee C; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Nonami, Hiroshi; Erra-Balsells, Rosa

    2015-04-01

    The probe electrospray ionization (PESI) is an ESI-based ionization technique that generates electrospray from the tip of a solid metal needle. In the present work, we describe the PESI mass spectra obtained by in situ measurement of soybeans and several nuts (peanuts, walnuts, cashew nuts, macadamia nuts and almonds) using different solid needles as sampling probes. It was found that PESI-MS is a valuable approach for in situ lipid analysis of these seeds. The phospholipid and triacylglycerol PESI spectra of different nuts and soybean were compared by principal component analysis (PCA). PCA shows significant differences among the data of each family of seeds. Methanolic extracts of nuts and soybean were exposed to air and sunlight for several days. PESI mass spectra were recorded before and after the treatment. Along the aging of the oil (rancidification), the formation of oxidated species with variable number of hydroperoxide groups could be observed in the PESI spectra. The relative intensity of oxidated triacylglycerols signals increased with days of exposition. Monitoring sensitivity of PESI-MS was high. This method provides a fast, simple and sensitive technique for the analysis (detection and characterization) of lipids in seed tissue and degree of oxidation of the oil samples. PMID:26149112

  14. In situ X-ray pair distribution function analysis of geopolymer gel nanostructure formation kinetics.

    PubMed

    White, Claire E; Provis, John L; Bloomer, Breaunnah; Henson, Neil J; Page, Katharine

    2013-06-14

    With the ever-increasing environmentally-driven demand for technologically advanced structural materials, geopolymer cement is fast becoming a viable alternative to traditional cements due to its proven engineering characteristics and the reduction in CO2 emitted during manufacturing (as much as 80% less CO2 emitted in manufacture, compared to ordinary Portland cement). Nevertheless, much remains unknown regarding the kinetics of reaction responsible for nanostructural evolution during the geopolymerisation process. Here, in situ X-ray total scattering measurements and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis are used to quantify the extent of reaction as a function of time for alkali-activated metakaolin/slag geopolymer binders, including the impact of various activators (alkali hydroxide/silicate) on the kinetics of the geopolymerisation reaction. Quantifying the reaction process in situ from X-ray PDF data collected during the initial ten hours can provide an estimate of the total reaction extent, but when combined with data obtained at longer times (128 days here) enables more accurate determination of the overall rate of reaction. To further assess the initial stages of the geopolymerisation reaction process, a pseudo-single step first order rate equation is fitted to the extent of reaction data, which reveals important mechanistic information regarding the role of free silica in the activators in the evolution of the binder systems. Hence, it is shown that in situ X-ray PDF analysis is an ideal experimental local structure tool to probe the reaction kinetics of complex reacting systems involving transitions between disordered/amorphous phases, of which geopolymerisation is an important example. PMID:23450172

  15. Two-stage in situ gas stripping for enhanced butanol fermentation and energy-saving product recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, C; Zhao, JB; Liu, FF; Lu, CC; Yang, ST; Bai, FW

    2013-05-01

    Two-stage gas stripping for butanol recovery from acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation with Clostridium acetobutylicum JB200 in a fibrous bed bioreactor was studied. Compared to fermentation without in situ gas stripping, more ABE (10.0 g/L acetone, 19.2 g/L butanol, 1.7 g/L ethanol vs. 7.9 g/L acetone, 16.2 g/L butanol, 1.4 g/L ethanol) were produced, with a higher butanol yield (0.25 g/g vs. 0.20 g/g) and productivity (0.40 g/L.h vs. 0.30 g/L-h) due to reduced butanol inhibition. The first-stage gas stripping produced a condensate containing 175.6 g/L butanol (227.0 g/L ABE), which after phase separation formed an organic phase containing 612.3 g/L butanol (660.7 g/L ABE) and an aqueous phase containing 101.3 g/L butanol (153.2 g/L ABE). After second-stage gas stripping, a highly concentrated product containing 420.3 g/L butanol (532.3 g/L ABE) was obtained. The process is thus effective in producing high-titer butanol that can be purified with much less energy. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Sensitivity analysis of free vibration characteristics of an in situ railway concrete sleeper to variations of rail pad parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaewunruen, Sakdirat; Remennikov, Alex M.

    2006-11-01

    The vibration of in situ concrete sleepers in a railway track structure is a major factor causing cracking of prestressed concrete sleepers and excessive railway track maintenance cost. Not only does the ballast interact with the sleepers, but the rail pads also take part in affecting their free vibration characteristics. This paper presents a sensitivity analysis of free vibration behaviors of an in situ railway concrete sleeper (standard gauge sleeper), incorporating sleeper/ballast interaction, subjected to the variations of rail pad properties. Through finite element analysis, Timoshenko-beam and spring elements were used in the in situ railway concrete sleeper modeling. This model highlights the influence of rail pad parameters on the free vibration characteristics of in situ sleepers. In addition, information on the first five flexural vibration modes indicates the dynamic performance of railway track when using different types of rail pads, as it plays a vital role in the cracking deterioration of concrete sleepers.

  17. Laser-based mass spectrometry for in situ chemical composition analysis of planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Samira; Neuland, Maike B.; Grimaudo, Valentine; Moreno-García, Pavel; Riedo, Andreas; Tulej, Marek; Broekmann, Peter; Wurz, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Mass spectrometry is an important analytical technique in space research. The chemical composition of planetary surface material is a key scientific question on every space mission to a planet, moon or asteroid. Chemical composition measurements of rocky material on the surface are of great importance to understand the origin and evolution of the planetary body.[1] A miniature laser ablation/ionisation reflectron- type time-of-flight mass spectrometer (instrument name LMS) was designed and built at the University of Bern for planetary research.[2] Despite its small size and light weight, the LMS instrument still maintains the same capabilities as large laboratory systems, which makes it suitable for its application on planetary space missions.[3-5] The high dynamic range of about eight orders of magnitude, high lateral (μm-level) and vertical (sub-nm level) resolution and high detection sensitivity for almost all elements (10 ppb, atomic fraction) make LMS a versatile instrument for various applications. LMS is a suitable instrument for in situ measurements of elemental and isotope composition with high precision and accuracy. Measurements of Pb- isotope abundances can be used for dating of planetary material. Measurements of bio-relevant elements allow searching for past or present life on a planetary surface. The high spatial resolution, both in lateral and vertical direction, is of considerable interest, e.g. for analysis of inhomogeneous, extraterrestrial samples as well as weathering processes of planetary material. References [1] P. Wurz, D. Abplanalp, M. Tulej, M. Iakovleva, V.A. Fernandes, A. Chumikov, and G. Managadze, "Mass Spectrometric Analysis in Planetary Science: Investigation of the Surface and the Atmosphere", Sol. Sys. Res., 2012, 46, 408. [2] U. Rohner, J.A. Whitby, P. Wurz, "A miniature laser ablation time of flight mass spectrometer for in situ planetary exploration" Meas. Sci. Tch., 2003, 14, 2159. [3] M. Tulej, A. Riedo, M.B. Neuland, S

  18. In-Situ Ion Analysis of Fresh Waters via an ISE Multiprobe and Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, A. V.; Hemond, H.

    2010-12-01

    The ecological and geochemical sciences stand to substantially gain from capability for comprehensive, real-time, in-situ characterization of the chemical constituents of natural waters, e.g. by facilitating rapid high-resolution adaptive sampling campaigns and avoiding the potential errors and high costs related to traditional grab sample collection, transportation and in-lab analysis. In-situ chemical instrumentation also promotes the goals of large-scale monitoring networks, such as CUASHI and WATERS, by reducing the financial and human resources overhead required for traditional sampling at this scale. Problems of environmental remediation and monitoring of industrial waste waters would additionally benefit from such instrumental capacity. We have pursued in-situ measurement of all major ions contributing to the charge makeup (>99%) of oxic natural fresh waters via an instrument combining an array of ion-selective electrode (ISE) hardware with an appropriate multivariate signal processing architecture. Commercially available electrochemical sensors promote low cost and a fast development schedule, as well as easy maintenance and reproduction. Data processing techniques are adapted from artificial intelligence and chemometrics to extract accurate information from the corresponding in-situ data matrix. This architecture takes into account temperature, conductivity, and non-linearity effects, as well as taking advantage of sensor cross-selectivities traditionally considered as interferences. Chemical and mathematical constraints, e.g. charge balance and total ionic strength, provide further system-level information. Maximizing data recovery from the sensor array allows use of the instrument without the standard additions or ionic strength adjustment traditionally-required with use of ISEs. Initial work demonstrates the effectiveness of this methodology at predicting inorganic cations (sodium, potassium, calcium, and ammonium ) and hydrogen ion in a simplified

  19. Gene numerical imbalances in cytological specimens based on fluorescence/chromogenic in situ hybridization analysis.

    PubMed

    Tsiambas, E; Karameris, A; Lygeros, M; Athanasiou, A E; Salemis, N S; Gourgiotis, S; Ragkos, V; Metaxas, G E; Vilaras, G; Patsouris, E

    2012-01-01

    Design and development of novel targeted therapeutic strategies is an innovation in handling patients with solid malignancies including breast, colon, lung, head & neck or even pancreatic and hepatocellular carcinoma. For a long time, immunohistocytochemistry (IHC/ICC) has been performed as a routine method in almost all labs for evaluating protein expression. Modern molecular approaches show that identification of specific structural and numerical imbalances regarding genes involved in signal transduction pathways provide important data to the oncologists. Alterations in molecules such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), HER2/neu, PTEN or Topoisomerase IIa affect the response rates to specific chemotherapeutic agents modifying also patients' prognostic rates. In situ hybridization (ISH) techniques based on fluorescence and chromogenic variants (FISH/CISH) or silver in situ hybridization (SISH) are applicable in both tissue and cell substrates. Concerning cytological specimens, FISH/CISH analysis appears to be a fast and very accurate method in estimating gene/chromosome ratios. In this paper, we sought to evaluate the usefulness of FISH/ CISH analysis in cytological specimens, describing also the advantages and disadvantages of these methods from the technical point of view. PMID:23033306

  20. In situ capture gamma-ray analysis of coal in an oversize borehole

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mikesell, J.L.; Dotson, D.W.; Senftle, F.E.; Zych, R.S.; Koger, J.; Goldman, L.

    1983-01-01

    In situ capture gamma-ray analysis in a coal seam using a high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer in a close-fitting borehole has been reported previously. In order to check the accuracy of the method under adverse conditions, similar measurements were made by means of a small-diameter sonde in an oversize borehole in the Pittsburgh seam, Greene County, Pennsylvania. The hole was 5 times the diameter of the sonde, a ratio that substantially increased the contribution of water (hydrogen) to the total spectral count and reduced the size of the sample measured by the detector. The total natural count, the 40K,count, and the intensities of capture gamma rays from Si, Ca, H, and Al were determined as a function of depth above, through, and below the coal seam. From these logs, the depth and width of the coal seam and its partings were determined. Spectra were accumulated in the seam for 1 h periods by using neutron sources of different strengths. From the spectra obtained by means of several 252Cf neutron sources of different sizes, the ultimate elemental analysis and ash content were determined. The results were not as good as those obtained previously in a close-fitting borehole. However, the results did improve with successively larger source-to-detector distances, i.e.,as the count contribution due to hydrogen in the water decreased. It was concluded that in situ borehole analyses should be made in relatively close-fitting boreholes. ?? 1983.

  1. An integrated, subsurface characterization system for real-time, in-situ field analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgart, C.W.; Creager, J.; Mathes, J.; Pounds, T.; VanDeusen, A.; Warthen, B.

    1996-02-01

    This paper describes current efforts at AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T) to develop and field an in-situ, data analysis platform to acquire, process, and display site survey data in near real-time. In past years, FM and T has performed a number of site survey tasks. Each of these surveys was unique in application as well as in the type of data processing and analysis that was required to extract and visualize useful site characterization information. However, common to each of these surveys were the following specific computational and operational requirements: (1) a capability to acquire, process, and visualize the site survey data in the field; (2) a capability to perform all processing in a timely fashion (ideally real-time); and (3) a technique for correlating (or fusing) data streams from multiple sensors. Two more general, but no less important, requirements include system architecture modularity and positioning capability. Potential applications include: survey, evaluation, and remediation of numerous Department of Defense and Department of Energy waste sites; real-time detection and characterization of unexploded ordnance and landmines; survey, evaluation, and remediation of industrial waste sites; location of underground utility lines; and providing law enforcement agencies with real-time surveys of crime scenes. The paper describes an integrated data acquisition, processing, and visualization platform that is capable of performing in-situ data processing, interpretation, and visualization in real-time.

  2. Final Report: Sublinear Algorithms for In-situ and In-transit Data Analysis at Exascale.

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Janine Camille; Pinar, Ali; Seshadhri, C.; Thompson, David; Salloum, Maher; Bhagatwala, Ankit; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-09-01

    Post-Moore's law scaling is creating a disruptive shift in simulation workflows, as saving the entirety of raw data to persistent storage becomes expensive. We are moving away from a post-process centric data analysis paradigm towards a concurrent analysis framework, in which raw simulation data is processed as it is computed. Algorithms must adapt to machines with extreme concurrency, low communication bandwidth, and high memory latency, while operating within the time constraints prescribed by the simulation. Furthermore, in- put parameters are often data dependent and cannot always be prescribed. The study of sublinear algorithms is a recent development in theoretical computer science and discrete mathematics that has significant potential to provide solutions for these challenges. The approaches of sublinear algorithms address the fundamental mathematical problem of understanding global features of a data set using limited resources. These theoretical ideas align with practical challenges of in-situ and in-transit computation where vast amounts of data must be processed under severe communication and memory constraints. This report details key advancements made in applying sublinear algorithms in-situ to identify features of interest and to enable adaptive workflows over the course of a three year LDRD. Prior to this LDRD, there was no precedent in applying sublinear techniques to large-scale, physics based simulations. This project has definitively demonstrated their efficacy at mitigating high performance computing challenges and highlighted the rich potential for follow-on re- search opportunities in this space.

  3. Quartz Crystal Microbalance Technique for in Situ Analysis of Supersaturation in Cooling Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Shang; Kim, Jong-Min; Kim, Woo-Sik

    2016-06-01

    A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) is used as a novel in situ strategy for analyzing the supersaturation profile during cooling crystallization. The main concept is based on preventing any solid mass loading on the QCM sensor by modifying the sensor surface. As a result, the QCM responses only depend on the solution concentration changes during the crystallization. The proposed strategy is confirmed on the basis of an analysis of sulfamerazine (SMZ) crystallization. When the QCM sensor is modified using 11-amino-1-undecanethiol (AUT), crystal formation on the sensor is completely prevented due to a repulsive interaction between the -NH2 functional groups of the AUT and SMZ crystals. Thus, the QCM responses reflect only the property changes in the solution phase during the crystallization. The supersaturation in the solution is then estimated on the basis of the difference in the frequency shifts between the SMZ solution and a blank solution. The accuracy of the in situ QCM analysis of supersaturation is confirmed using an off-line gravimetric method. PMID:27161190

  4. Phenomenological in-situ TEM gas exposure studies of palladium particles on MgO at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.; Poppa, H.; Osaka, T.

    1983-01-01

    It has been found that very small vapor-deposited catalytically active metal particles in the 1-2 nm size range on metal oxide substrates can undergo significant changes when they are exposed to gases such as oxygen or air, or even when allowed to 'anneal' at room temperature (RT) under vacuum conditions. The present investigation is concerned with continued in-situ gas exposures of as-deposited, 1 to 2 nm size palladium particles on MgO to air, oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, CO, and water vapor at RT. It is found that the low-pressure exposure to various gases at RT can significantly affect small palladium particles supported on MgO surfaces. Exposure to oxygen for 3 min at 0.0002 m bar produces a considerable amount of coalescence, flattening of the particles, and some distinct crystallographic particle shapes.

  5. Thermal decomposition of dolomite under CO2: insights from TGA and in situ XRD analysis.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Jose Manuel; Perejon, Antonio; Medina, Santiago; Perez-Maqueda, Luis A

    2015-11-28

    Thermal decomposition of dolomite in the presence of CO2 in a calcination environment is investigated by means of in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The in situ XRD results suggest that dolomite decomposes directly at a temperature around 700 °C into MgO and CaO. Immediate carbonation of nascent CaO crystals leads to the formation of calcite as an intermediate product of decomposition. Subsequently, decarbonation of this poorly crystalline calcite occurs when the reaction is thermodynamically favorable and sufficiently fast at a temperature depending on the CO2 partial pressure in the calcination atmosphere. Decarbonation of this dolomitic calcite occurs at a lower temperature than limestone decarbonation due to the relatively low crystallinity of the former. Full decomposition of dolomite leads also to a relatively low crystalline CaO, which exhibits a high reactivity as compared to limestone derived CaO. Under CO2 capture conditions in the Calcium-Looping (CaL) process, MgO grains remain inert yet favor the carbonation reactivity of dolomitic CaO especially in the solid-state diffusion controlled phase. The fundamental mechanism that drives the crystallographic transformation of dolomite in the presence of CO2 is thus responsible for its fast calcination kinetics and the high carbonation reactivity of dolomitic CaO, which makes natural dolomite a potentially advantageous alternative to limestone for CO2 capture in the CaL technology as well as SO2in situ removal in oxy-combustion fluidized bed reactors. PMID:26506285

  6. Application of meta-transcriptomics and -proteomics to analysis of in situ physiological state

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Allan; Wilkins, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of the growth-limiting factor or environmental stressors affecting microbes in situ is of fundamental importance but analytically difficult. Microbes can reduce in situ limiting nutrient concentrations to sub-micromolar levels, and contaminated ecosystems may contain multiple stressors. The patterns of gene or protein expression by microbes in nature can be used to infer growth limitations, because they are regulated in response to environmental conditions. Experimental studies under controlled conditions in the laboratory provide the physiological underpinnings for developing these physiological indicators. Although regulatory networks may differ among specific microbes, there are some broad principles that can be applied, related to limiting nutrient acquisition, resource allocation, and stress responses. As technologies for transcriptomics and proteomics mature, the capacity to apply these approaches to complex microbial communities will accelerate. Global proteomics has the particular advantage that it reflects expressed catalytic activities. Furthermore, the high mass accuracy of some proteomic approaches allows mapping back to specific microbial strains. For example, at the Rifle IFRC field site in Western Colorado, the physiological status of Fe(III)-reducing populations has been tracked over time. Members of a “subsurface clade” within the Geobacter predominated during carbon amendment to the subsurface environment. At the functional level, proteomic identifications produced inferences regarding (i) temporal changes in anabolism and catabolism of acetate, (ii) the onset of N2 fixation when N became limiting, and (iii) expression of phosphate transporters during periods of intense growth. The application of these approaches in situ can lead to discovery of novel physiological adaptations. PMID:22783237

  7. In-Situ Greenhouse Gas Measurement Comparisons in Railroad Valley, NV to Identify Local Point Sources and Quantify their Influences on Observed Background Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiro, K. A.; Yates, E. L.; Sheffner, E. J.; Iraci, L. T.; Bebout, B.; Berthold, R. W.; Bruegge, C. J.; Bui, T.; DeMarines, J.; Detweiler, A. M.; Fladeland, M. M.; Kelley, C. A.; Koyler, R.; Loewenstein, M.; McKay, C.; Tadic, J.

    2011-12-01

    In the summer of 2011, researchers from NASA Ames Research Center joined a multi-institute team on a playa in Railroad Valley, Nevada to acquire ground-based and airborne observations supporting measurements from the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT). In-situ measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) with 10 Hz temporal resolution were made using a Picarro Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Analyzer at both a ground site (Picarro G2311-f) and onboard the NASA SIERRA (Sensor Integrated Environmental Remote Research Aircraft) Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) (Picarro G2301-f). These measurements have been compared in detail with one another, and the ground-based Picarro shows outstanding agreement with the SIERRA Picarro. This validates the ability of both instruments to measure local and regional emissions within the mixed layer. Potential GHG emission sites were identified by overflights with the SIERRA UAS and confirmed by coincident ground observations. These data comparisons, when factoring in the effects of the ground and airborne meteorological conditions, allow us to identify point sources of CO2 and CH4 within the area. Soil gas samples and sediment analysis were also conducted to help distinguish emission sources. Railroad Valley, NV is an ideal site for measuring and modeling emissions on local scales because of its remote location; resulting in clean ambient air that acts as a steady control for data retrieval and dispersion modeling. Most importantly, quantifying emissions from nearby sources allows us to achieve a greater understanding of the nature of the measurements being made across the playa. Further analysis will employ mathematical dispersion models to explore the local emissions detected with the in-situ measurements.

  8. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  9. In situ X-ray observations of gas porosity interactions with dendritic microstructures during solidification of Al-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, A. G.; Browne, D. J.; Houltz, Y.; Mathiesen, R. H.

    2016-03-01

    In situ X-radiography solidification experiments were performed on Al-based alloys, using both synchrotron and laboratory-based X-ray sources, in conjunction with a gradient furnace and a newly developed isothermal furnace, respectively. The effect of gas porosity nucleation and growth within the semi-solid mush during both columnar and equiaxed solidification was thereby observed. In all experimental cases examined, gas porosity was observed to nucleate and grow within the field-of-view (FOV) causing various levels of distortion to the semi-solid mush, and thereafter disappearing from the sample leaving no permanent voids within the solidified microstructure. During columnar growth, a single bubble caused severe remelting and destruction of primary trunks leading to secondary fragmentation and evidence of blocking of the columnar front. Equiaxed solidification was performed under microgravity-like conditions with restricted grain motion in the FOV. The degree to which the nucleated gas bubbles affected the surrounding grain structure increased with increasing solid fraction. However, bubble sphericity remained unaffected by apparent solid fraction or grain coherency.

  10. Development of an online biosensor for in situ monitoring of chlorine dioxide gas disinfection efficacy.

    PubMed

    del Busto-Ramos, Maria; Budzik, Michael; Corvalan, Carlos; Morgan, Mark; Turco, Ronald; Nivens, David; Applegate, Bruce

    2008-03-01

    A prototype bioluminescence-based biosensor was designed and constructed to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) gas under various treatment conditions. The biosensor consisted of a bioluminescent bioreporter (Pseudomonas fluorescens 5RL), an optical transducer (photomultiplier tube), and a light-tight chamber housing, the bioreporter and the transducer. The bioluminescent recombinant P. fluorescens 5RL in the biosensor allowed for online monitoring of bioluminescence during ClO(2) gas disinfection. Experiments were performed to evaluate the effects of the two key physical parameters associated with ClO(2) disinfection: relative humidity (40, 60, 80%) and ClO(2) gas concentration (0.5, 1.0, 1.6, 2.1 mg/l) on the bioreporter. Results showed that increasing concentrations of ClO(2) gas corresponded to a faster decrease in luminescence. The rates of luminescence decrease from P. fluorescens 5RL, and the log reduction time (LRT, time required to obtain 1-log reduction in luminescence) were calculated for each treatment tested. The LRT values of luminescence were 103, 78, 53, and 35 s for 0.5, 1.0, 1.6, and 2.1 mg/l of ClO(2) gas treatment, respectively, at 78% relative humidity. The gas concentration which caused a tenfold change in LRT (z value) for luminescence of P. fluorescens 5RL was 3.4 mg/l of ClO(2). The prototype biosensor showed potential for many applications, such as monitoring real-time microbial inactivation and understanding parameters that influence the efficacy of gaseous decontamination procedures. PMID:18224317

  11. In situ experiments of geothermal well stimulation using gas fracturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.Y.; Warpinski, N.; Jacobson, R.D.

    1988-07-01

    The results of an experimental study of gas fracturing technology for geothermal well stimulation demonstrated that multiple fractures could be created to link water-filled boreholes with existing fractures. The resulting fracture network and fracture interconnections were characterized by mineback as well as flow tests. Commercial oil field fracturing tools were used successfully in these experiments. Simple scaling laws for gas fracturing and a brief discussion of the application of this technique to actual geothermal well stimulation are presented. 10 refs., 42 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Gas-driven filter pressing in magmas: insights into in-situ melt segregation from crystal mushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistone, M.; Arzilli, F.; Dobson, K. J.; Cordonnier, B.; Reusser, E.; Ulmer, P.; Marone, F.; Whittington, A. G.; Mancini, L.; Fife, J.; Blundy, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Gas-driven filter pressing is the process of melt expulsion from a volatile-saturated crystal mush, induced by the buildup and subsequent release of gas pressure. Filter pressing is inferred to play a major role in magma fractionation at shallow depths (<10 km) by moving melt and gas relative to the solid, crystalline framework. However, the magmatic conditions at which this process operates remain poorly constrained. We present novel experimental data that illustrate how the crystal content of the mush affects the ability of gas-driven filter pressing to segregate melt. Hydrous haplogranite (2.1 wt% water in the melt) and dacite (4.2 wt% water in the melt) crystal mushes, with a wide range of crystallinities (34-80 vol% crystals), were investigated using in-situ, high temperature (500-800 °C) synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy with high spatial (3 micron/pixel) and temporal resolution (~8 s per 3D data set). The experimental results show that gas-driven filter pressing operates only below the maximum packing of bubbles and crystals (~74 vol%). Above this threshold, the mush tends to fracture and gas escapes via fractures. Therefore, the efficiency of gas-driven filter pressing is promoted close to the percolation threshold and in situations where a mush inflates slowly relative to build-up of pressure and expulsion of melt. Such observations offer a likely explanation for the production of eruptible, crystal-poor magmas within Earth's crust. Figure = Synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy 3D renderings of representative haplogranite (A-D) and dacite (E-H) samples, with different crystal (Φ) and bubble fractions (β) at representative temperatures and experimental times (t, in minutes). Black objects are bubbles and fractures; dark gray field is silicic glass/melt; light gray objects are corundum crystals in haplogranite sample, and quartz in dacite sample. White and black arrows indicate representative fractures and directions of melt expulsion during

  13. An Asynchronous Many-Task Implementation of In-Situ Statistical Analysis using Legion.

    SciTech Connect

    Pebay, Philippe Pierre; Bennett, Janine Camille

    2015-11-01

    In this report, we propose a framework for the design and implementation of in-situ analy- ses using an asynchronous many-task (AMT) model, using the Legion programming model together with the MiniAero mini-application as a surrogate for full-scale parallel scientific computing applications. The bulk of this work consists of converting the Learn/Derive/Assess model which we had initially developed for parallel statistical analysis using MPI [PTBM11], from a SPMD to an AMT model. In this goal, we propose an original use of the concept of Legion logical regions as a replacement for the parallel communication schemes used for the only operation of the statistics engines that require explicit communication. We then evaluate this proposed scheme in a shared memory environment, using the Legion port of MiniAero as a proxy for a full-scale scientific application, as a means to provide input data sets of variable size for the in-situ statistical analyses in an AMT context. We demonstrate in particular that the approach has merit, and warrants further investigation, in collaboration with ongoing efforts to improve the overall parallel performance of the Legion system.

  14. Snow depth on Arctic sea ice derived from radar: In situ comparisons and time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Benjamin; Johnson, Michael P.; Perkovic-Martin, Dragana; Panzer, Ben

    2015-06-01

    The snow radar being flown on NASA's Operation IceBridge, ongoing aircraft campaigns to the Arctic and the Antarctic are providing unique observations of the depth of snow on the sea ice cover. In this paper, we focus on the radar-derived snow depth results from the 2009-2012 Arctic campaigns. We develop and evaluate the use of a distinct snow layer tracker to measure snow depth based on a Support Vector Machine (SVM) supervised learning algorithm. The snow radar is designed to detect both the air-snow and snow-ice interfaces using ultrawideband frequencies from 2 to 8 GHz. The quality, errors, and repeatability of the snow radar snow depth estimates are examined, based on comparisons with in situ data obtained during two separate sea ice field campaigns, the GreenArc 2009 and the CryoVEx 2011 campaigns off Greenland in the Lincoln Sea. Finally, we analyze 4 years (2009-2012) of three annually repeated sea ice flight lines obtained in early spring, located off Greenland and the Canadian Arctic. We examine the annual variations of snow depth differences between perennial and seasonal ice when available. Overall, the snow layer tracker produced consistent, accurate results for snow depths between 0.10 and ˜0.60 m. This was confirmed with comparisons with the two data sets from the in situ measurement campaigns as well as with the time series analysis, and is consistent with other published results.

  15. Confocal Raman microscopy and fluorescent in situ hybridization - A complementary approach for biofilm analysis.

    PubMed

    Kniggendorf, Ann-Kathrin; Nogueira, Regina; Kelb, Christian; Schadzek, Patrik; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Ngezahayo, Anaclet; Roth, Bernhard

    2016-10-01

    We combine confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) of wet samples with subsequent Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) without significant limitations to either technique for analyzing the same sample of a microbial community on a cell-to-cell basis. This combination of techniques allows a much deeper, more complete understanding of complex environmental samples than provided by either technique alone. The minimalistic approach is based on laboratory glassware with micro-engravings for reproducible localization of the sample at cell scale combined with a fixation and de- and rehydration protocol for the respective techniques. As proof of concept, we analyzed a floc of nitrifying activated sludge, demonstrating that the sample can be tracked with cell-scale precision over different measurements and instruments. The collected information includes the microbial content, spatial shape, variant chemical compositions of the floc matrix and the mineral microparticles embedded within. In addition, the direct comparison of CRM and FISH revealed a difference in reported cell size due to the different cell components targeted by the respective technique. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a direct cell-to-cell comparison of confocal Raman microscopy and Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis performed on the same sample. An adaptation of the method to include native samples as a starting point is planned for the near future. The micro-engraving approach itself also opens up the possibility of combining other, functionally incompatible techniques as required for further in-depth investigations of low-volume samples. PMID:27423128

  16. Portable Mass Spectrometer System for in-situ Environmental Gas Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conejo, E.; Griffin, T. P.; Diaz, J. A.; Arkin, C. R.; Soto, C.; Naylor, G. R.; Curley, C.; Floyd, D.

    2005-01-01

    A system developed by NASA has been used for monitoring air quality around different locations. The system was designed for aircraft applications but has proven to be very useful as a portable gas analyzer. The system has been used to monitor air quality around volcanoes, cities, and the surrounding areas. The transport of the system has been via aircraft, car, and hand carried.

  17. Gas Hydrates on Mars: In-situ Resources for Human Habitation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, M. D.; Pellenbarg, R. E.

    2002-05-01

    The apparent presence of abundant water on Mars, combined with the recent discovery of deep lithoautotrophic bacteria on Earth raises the possibility that a similar development of early life was established on Mars early in its history. CH4 would be a likely by-product of that deep biosphere metabolism. Where methane may have been produced over a long period of time, considerable volumes of it can be expected to have migrated toward the planet?s surface. Although confirmation of the presence of gas hydrate in the Martian subsurface has yet to be made, its occurrence is consistent with the temperature and pressure regimes expected at depth. The possible existence of substantial deposits of gas hydrates in the Martian subsurface, comparable to those now known on Earth, may be of critical importance to exploration and colonization of Mars because hydrate concentrates resources. Both CO2 and CH4 hydrates compress about 164 m3 of gas (at Earth STP) along with about 0.87m3 of pure water into each m3 of gas hydrate. The successful retrieval of concentrated CO2, CH4 and water from relatively shallow depths within the Martian cryosphere may provide the key of human occupation of Mars. In addition to the basic elements of fuel and water necessary to support the eventual expansion of human life across the surface of the planet virtually all shelter and hard goods can be fabricated from plastics produced from chemical components of these hydrate deposits.

  18. Summary of in situ vitrification modeling and analysis accomplishments for fiscal year 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.E.

    1991-11-01

    The in situ vitrification (ISV) modeling activities encompass a variety of both modeling development efforts and analysis applications in support of the ISV project. The model development effort is directed toward modifying or developing a set of computer codes to simulate the ISV process. These codes are used to perform safety and environmental hazards analyses, assist in experimental test planning and design, assist in equipment design and development of operating procedures, and provide enhanced understanding of the ISV process. This report presents a summary description of the accomplishments in Fiscal Year 1991 for both the model development and analysis areas. Brief descriptions of the models that were developed and the more important conclusions from the analytical studies are presented.

  19. Challenges and solutions for the analysis of in situ, in crystallo micro-spectrophotometric data

    PubMed Central

    Dworkowski, Florian S. N.; Hough, Michael A.; Pompidor, Guillaume; Fuchs, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Combining macromolecular crystallography with in crystallo micro-spectrophotometry yields valuable complementary information on the sample, including the redox states of metal cofactors, the identification of bound ligands and the onset and strength of undesired photochemistry, also known as radiation damage. However, the analysis and processing of the resulting data differs significantly from the approaches used for solution spectrophotometric data. The varying size and shape of the sample, together with the suboptimal sample environment, the lack of proper reference signals and the general influence of the X-ray beam on the sample have to be considered and carefully corrected for. In the present article, how to characterize and treat these sample-dependent artefacts in a reproducible manner is discussed and the SLS-APE in situ, in crystallo optical spectroscopy data-analysis toolbox is demonstrated. PMID:25615857

  20. Challenges and solutions for the analysis of in situ , in crystallo micro-spectrophotometric data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dworkowski, Florian S. N.; Hough, Michael A.; Pompidor, Guillaume; Fuchs, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Combining macromolecular crystallography with in crystallo micro-spectrophotometry yields valuable complementary information on the sample, including the redox states of metal cofactors, the identification of bound ligands and the onset and strength of undesired photochemistry, also known as radiation damage. However, the analysis and processing of the resulting data differs significantly from the approaches used for solution spectrophotometric data. The varying size and shape of the sample, together with the suboptimal sample environment, the lack of proper reference signals and the general influence of the X-ray beam on the sample have to be considered and carefully corrected for. In the presentmore » article, we discuss how to characterize and treat these sample-dependent artefacts in a reproducible manner and we demonstrate the SLS-APE in situ, in crystallo optical spectroscopy data-analysis toolbox.« less

  1. In Situ Analysis of Orthopyroxene in Diogenites Using Laser Ablation ICP-MS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elk, Mattias; Quinn, J. E.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    Howardites, eucrites and diogenites (HED) form a suit of igneous achondrite meteorites that are thought to have formed on a single asteroidal body. While there have been many different models proposed for the formation of the HED parent asteroid they can be generalized into two end member models. One is the magma ocean model (e.g. [1]) in which the entire HED parent body was continuously fractionated from a planet wide magma ocean with diogenites representing the lower crust and eucrites being upper crustal rocks. The second model hypothesizes that diogenites and eucrites were formed as a series of intrusions and/or extrusions of partial melts of a primitive proto-Vesta [2]. We use in situ trace element analysis together with major and minor element analysis to try and distinguish between these different hypotheses for the evolution of the HED parent body.

  2. In situ X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy Analysis of Aromatic Polyester Surface Treated with Argon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narushima, Kazuo; Okamoto, Nanami

    2013-10-01

    Effects of surface modification treatment by argon plasma processing of two types of aromatic polyester, poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and poly(oxybenzonate-co-oxynaphthoate) (POCO), were investigated. This paper presents a description of our experiment and a discussion of the surface modification mechanism, which uses a simple and inexpensive procedure to conduct analysis without breaking vacuum after plasma processing. In situ analysis of the chemical composition of a polymer surface was attempted without exposing the sample to air after argon plasma processing. In particular, the respective actions of each active species were investigated for electrons and ions in argon plasma. Electrons and ions in argon plasma break some polymer bonds. Specifically, ester groups are broken and oxygen atoms are kicked out in PET and POCO. No oxygen functional group is formed after argon plasma processing, but such groups are formed if the sample is exposed to air.

  3. In situ analysis of ion-induced polymer surface modification using secondary ion mass spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuji, Shigeto; Kitazawa, Hideaki; Takeda, Yoshihiko

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the surface modification process consisting of ion irradiation immediately followed by exposure to ambient gas for three types of polymers having the same main chain, sbnd Csbnd Csbnd , but different atoms bound to the main chain, using in situ secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The polymers' surface was irradiated with 30 keV Au ions at a total fluence for up to 1 × 1017 cm-2 and exposed to ambient gas in a ultra-high-vacuum chamber (1 × 10-6 Pa) for 30 min after the ion irradiation. Low density polyethylene mainly exhibited a hydrogen dissociation during the ion irradiation and a recombination with hydrogen atoms by the exposure, polytetrafluoroethylene mainly showed a main chain scission and no recombination during the exposure, and polyvinylidene difluoride lost hydrogen and fluorine atoms by the ion irradiation and partially recombined with hydrogen and fluorine atoms upon the exposure. The deposited energy density on the polymer surfaces reflects the dependence of the modification on the incident ion species, Au or Ga ions.

  4. Automated rodent in situ muscle contraction assay and myofiber organization analysis in sarcopenia animal models.

    PubMed

    Weber, H; Rauch, A; Adamski, S; Chakravarthy, K; Kulkarni, A; Dogdas, B; Bendtsen, C; Kath, G; Alves, S E; Wilkinson, H A; Chiu, C-S

    2012-06-01

    Age-related sarcopenia results in frailty and decreased mobility, which are associated with increased falls and long-term disability in the elderly. Given the global increase in lifespan, sarcopenia is a growing, unmet medical need. This report aims to systematically characterize muscle aging in preclinical models, which may facilitate the development of sarcopenia therapies. Naïve rats and mice were subjected to noninvasive micro X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) imaging, terminal in situ muscle function characterizations, and ATPase-based myofiber analysis. We developed a Definiens (Parsippany, NJ)-based algorithm to automate micro-CT image analysis, which facilitates longitudinal in vivo muscle mass analysis. We report development and characterization of translational in situ skeletal muscle performance assay systems in rat and mouse. The systems incorporate a custom-designed animal assay stage, resulting in enhanced force measurement precision, and LabVIEW (National Instruments, Austin, TX)-based algorithms to support automated data acquisition and data analysis. We used ATPase-staining techniques for myofibers to characterize fiber subtypes and distribution. Major parameters contributing to muscle performance were identified using data mining and integration, enabled by Labmatrix (BioFortis, Columbia, MD). These technologies enabled the systemic and accurate monitoring of muscle aging from a large number of animals. The data indicated that longitudinal muscle cross-sectional area measurement effectively monitors change of muscle mass and function during aging. Furthermore, the data showed that muscle performance during aging is also modulated by myofiber remodeling factors, such as changes in myofiber distribution patterns and changes in fiber shape, which affect myofiber interaction. This in vivo muscle assay platform has been applied to support identification and validation of novel targets for the treatment of sarcopenia. PMID:22461442

  5. Novel in situ setup to study the formation of nanoparticles in the gas phase by small angle x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyjumon, I.; Rappolt, M.; Sartori, B.; Amenitsch, H.; Laggner, P.

    2008-04-01

    An in-house built aerosol generator setup for in situ gas phase studies of aerosol and nanoparticles is described. The aerosol generator with an ultrasonic ceramic disk mist maker provides high enough particle concentrations for structural gas phase analysis by synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (for water ˜4×108droplets/s with a droplet size of ˜2.5μm). The working principle was proved by scattering of gold nanoparticles. For evaporation induced self-assembly studies of nanostructured particles, an additional thermal treatment chamber was included in the setup. The first on-line gas phase data with our setup for mesostructured silica particles are presented for different thermal treatments. Scanning electron microscope imaging revealed the average particle size to be ˜1μm. Furthermore, to quantify their internal nanostructure, diffraction experiments of deposited silica aerosols were carried out and the corresponding electron density map indicates a silica wall thickness of about 1nm.

  6. Novel in situ setup to study the formation of nanoparticles in the gas phase by small angle x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Shyjumon, I.; Rappolt, M.; Sartori, B.; Amenitsch, H.; Laggner, P.

    2008-04-15

    An in-house built aerosol generator setup for in situ gas phase studies of aerosol and nanoparticles is described. The aerosol generator with an ultrasonic ceramic disk mist maker provides high enough particle concentrations for structural gas phase analysis by synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (for water {approx}4x10{sup 8} droplets/s with a droplet size of {approx}2.5 {mu}m). The working principle was proved by scattering of gold nanoparticles. For evaporation induced self-assembly studies of nanostructured particles, an additional thermal treatment chamber was included in the setup. The first on-line gas phase data with our setup for mesostructured silica particles are presented for different thermal treatments. Scanning electron microscope imaging revealed the average particle size to be {approx}1 {mu}m. Furthermore, to quantify their internal nanostructure, diffraction experiments of deposited silica aerosols were carried out and the corresponding electron density map indicates a silica wall thickness of about 1 nm.

  7. Novel in situ setup to study the formation of nanoparticles in the gas phase by small angle x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Shyjumon, I; Rappolt, M; Sartori, B; Amenitsch, H; Laggner, P

    2008-04-01

    An in-house built aerosol generator setup for in situ gas phase studies of aerosol and nanoparticles is described. The aerosol generator with an ultrasonic ceramic disk mist maker provides high enough particle concentrations for structural gas phase analysis by synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (for water approximately 4 x 10(8) droplets/s with a droplet size of approximately 2.5 microm). The working principle was proved by scattering of gold nanoparticles. For evaporation induced self-assembly studies of nanostructured particles, an additional thermal treatment chamber was included in the setup. The first on-line gas phase data with our setup for mesostructured silica particles are presented for different thermal treatments. Scanning electron microscope imaging revealed the average particle size to be approximately 1 microm. Furthermore, to quantify their internal nanostructure, diffraction experiments of deposited silica aerosols were carried out and the corresponding electron density map indicates a silica wall thickness of about 1 nm. PMID:18447533

  8. Analytical/Operational Requirements for the In Situ Chemical Analysis of Cometary and Planetary Environments Using GC-IMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Stimac, Robert M.; Kaye, William J.; Takeuchi, Norishige; DeVincenizi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Exobiology flight experiments require highly sensitive instrumentation for the in situ analysis of the volatile chemical species that occur in the atmospheres and surfaces of various bodies within the solar system. The complex mixtures encountered place a heavy burden on the analytical instrumentation to detect and identify all species present. The minimal resources available onboard for such missions mandate that the instruments provide maximum analytical capabilities with minimal requirements of volume, weight and consumables. The miniCIDEX instrument was developed for the chemical analysis of a cemetery environment. It combined a Gas Chromatograph (GC) with a helium based Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS) to fulfill the analytical requirements of a cemetery exobiology mission: universal response; ppb sensitivity; low mass, volume and consumable MiniCIDEX is now a candidate for the chemical analysis instrument of a Titan Aero-rover Mission. The complexity of the analyses will be similar to the comet application with a heavier emphasis on organic molecules. Because the Titan Aero-Rover will be a balloon powered rover, much more attention is placed on the total mass of the instrument package. The GC will likely be a Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) design, smaller than the initial miniCIDEX GC by a factor of ten (with a similar reduction in consumable use). Similar miniaturization of the helium-based IMS will be necessary while maintaining the analytical capabilities. The two mission applications, the analytical requirements, and the evolution of the IMS design to accommodate these requirements will be presented.

  9. Converting oil shale to liquid fuels: energy inputs and greenhouse gas emissions of the Shell in situ conversion process.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Adam R

    2008-10-01

    Oil shale is a sedimentary rock that contains kerogen, a fossil organic material. Kerogen can be heated to produce oil and gas (retorted). This has traditionally been a CO2-intensive process. In this paper, the Shell in situ conversion process (ICP), which is a novel method of retorting oil shale in place, is analyzed. The ICP utilizes electricity to heat the underground shale over a period of 2 years. Hydrocarbons are produced using conventional oil production techniques, leaving shale oil coke within the formation. The energy inputs and outputs from the ICP, as applied to oil shales of the Green River formation, are modeled. Using these energy inputs, the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the ICP are calculated and are compared to emissions from conventional petroleum. Energy outputs (as refined liquid fuel) are 1.2-1.6 times greater than the total primary energy inputs to the process. In the absence of capturing CO2 generated from electricity produced to fuel the process, well-to-pump GHG emissions are in the range of 30.6-37.1 grams of carbon equivalent per megajoule of liquid fuel produced. These full-fuel-cycle emissions are 21%-47% larger than those from conventionally produced petroleum-based fuels. PMID:18939591

  10. POWTEX Neutron Diffractometer at FRM II - New Perspectives for In-Situ Rock Deformation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, J. M.; Stipp, M.; Ullemeyer, K.; Klein, H.; Leiss, B.; Hansen, B. T.; Kuhs, W. F.

    2012-04-01

    In Geoscience quantitative texture analysis here defined as the quantitative analysis of the crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO), is a common tool for the investigation of fabric development in mono- and polyphase rocks, their deformation histories and kinematics. Bulk texture measurements also allow the quantitative characterisation of the anisotropic physical properties of rock materials. A routine tool to measure bulk sample volumes is neutron texture diffraction, as neutrons have large penetration capabilities of several cm in geological sample materials. The new POWTEX (POWder and TEXture) Diffractometer at the neutron research reactor FRM II in Garching, Germany is designed as a high-intensity diffractometer by groups from the RWTH Aachen, Forschungszentrum Jülich and the University of Göttingen. Complementary to existing neutron diffractometers (SKAT at Dubna, Russia; GEM at ISIS, UK; HIPPO at Los Alamos, USA; D20 at ILL, France; and the local STRESS-SPEC and SPODI at FRM II) the layout of POWTEX is focused on fast time-resolved experiments and the measurement of larger sample series as necessary for the study of large scale geological structures. POWTEX is a dedicated beam line for geoscientific research. Effective texture measurements without sample tilting and rotation are possible firstly by utilizing a range of neutron wavelengths simultaneously (Time-of-Flight technique) and secondly by the high detector coverage (9.8 sr) and a high flux (~1 - 107 n/cm2s) at the sample. Furthermore the instrument and the angular detector resolution is designed also for strong recrystallisation textures as well as for weak textures of polyphase rocks. These instrument characteristics allow in-situ time-resolved texture measurements during deformation experiments on rocksalt, ice and other materials as large sample environments will be implemented at POWTEX. The in-situ deformation apparatus is operated by a uniaxial spindle drive with a maximum axial load of