Science.gov

Sample records for in-situ verification techniques

  1. Simulation verification techniques study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoonmaker, P. B.; Wenglinski, T. H.

    1975-01-01

    Results are summarized of the simulation verification techniques study which consisted of two tasks: to develop techniques for simulator hardware checkout and to develop techniques for simulation performance verification (validation). The hardware verification task involved definition of simulation hardware (hardware units and integrated simulator configurations), survey of current hardware self-test techniques, and definition of hardware and software techniques for checkout of simulator subsystems. The performance verification task included definition of simulation performance parameters (and critical performance parameters), definition of methods for establishing standards of performance (sources of reference data or validation), and definition of methods for validating performance. Both major tasks included definition of verification software and assessment of verification data base impact. An annotated bibliography of all documents generated during this study is provided.

  2. Environmental Technology Verification Program Materials Management and Remediation Center Generic Protocol for Verification of In Situ Chemical Oxidation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The protocol provides generic procedures for implementing a verification test for the performance of in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO), focused specifically to expand the application of ISCO at manufactured gas plants with polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination (MGP/PAH) an...

  3. In situ timing and pointing verification of the ICESat altimeter using a ground-based system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magruder, L.; Silverberg, E.; Webb, C.; Schutz, B.

    2005-11-01

    To provide validation of the ICESat laser altimeter time of measurement and geolocation, a ground-based technique was implemented at White Sands Space Harbor (WSSH), during the Laser 2a and 3a operational periods. The activities used an electro-optical detection system and a passive array of corner cube retro reflectors (CCR). The detectors and the CCRs were designed to provide an independent assessment of the laser footprint location, while the detectors also provide timing verification. This ground-based system unambiguously validated the elevation product time tag to 3 μsec +/- 1 μsec. In addition, the ground equipment provided in situ geolocations of the laser pulse. Comparing the in situ results to the ICESat GLA14 data product the positions differ by 10.6 m +/- 4.5 m for Laser 2a (Release 21) operations and 7.5 m +/- 6.6 m for Laser 3a (Release 23). These comparisons correlate to pointing validations at this site, for the specific overflight configurations.

  4. Techniques for in situ HVEM mechanical deformation of nanostructural materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, M.A.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Dahmen, U.

    1995-08-07

    We have developed two in-situ HVEM techniques which allow us to begin fundamental investigations into the mechanisms of deformation and fracture in nonstructured materials. A procedure for the observation of tensile deformation and failure in multilayers materials in cross-section is given and also the development of an in-situ HVEM nanoindentor of surfaces and films on surfaces in cross-section.

  5. IN SITU RESTORATION TECHNIQUES FOR AQUIFERS CONTAMINATED WITH HAZARDOUS WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improper disposal of hazardous wastes is a threat to the nation's ground water supply. Methods which prevent contamination are probably the most effective techniques to protect ground water. Once contamination problems occur, there are a number of in situ techniques that can be u...

  6. Mars Atmosphere Resource Verification INsitu (MARVIN) - In Situ Resource Demonstration for the Mars 2020 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Gerald B.; Araghi, Koorosh; Ess, Kim M.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Muscatello, Anthony C.; Calle, Carlos I.; Clark, Larry; Iacomini, Christie

    2014-01-01

    The making of oxygen from resources in the Martian atmosphere, known as In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), has the potential to provide substantial benefits for future robotic and human exploration. In particular, the ability to produce oxygen on Mars for use in propulsion, life support, and power systems can provide significant mission benefits such as a reducing launch mass, lander size, and mission and crew risk. To advance ISRU for possible incorporation into future human missions to Mars, NASA proposed including an ISRU instrument on the Mars 2020 rover mission, through an announcement of opportunity (AO). The purpose of the the Mars Atmosphere Resource Verification INsitu or (MARVIN) instrument is to provide the first demonstration on Mars of oxygen production from acquired and stored Martian atmospheric carbon dioxide, as well as take measurements of atmospheric pressure and temperature, and of suspended dust particle sizes and amounts entrained in collected atmosphere gases at different times of the Mars day and year. The hardware performance and environmental data obtained will be critical for future ISRU systems that will reduce the mass of propellants and other consumables launched from Earth for robotic and human exploration, for better understanding of Mars dust and mitigation techniques to improve crew safety, and to help further define Mars global circulation models and better understand the regional atmospheric dynamics on Mars. The technologies selected for MARVIN are also scalable for future robotic sample return and human missions to Mars using ISRU.

  7. In situ sensor techniques in modern bioprocess monitoring.

    PubMed

    Beutel, Sascha; Henkel, Steffen

    2011-09-01

    New reactor concepts as multi-parallel screening systems or disposable bioreactor systems for decentralized and reproducible production increase the need for new and easy applicable sensor technologies to access data for process control. These sophisticated reactor systems require sensors to work with the lowest sampling volumes or, even better, to measure directly in situ, but in situ sensors are directly incorporated into a reactor or fermenter within the sterility barrier and have therefore to stand the sterilization procedures. Consequently, these in situ sensor technologies should enable the measurement of multi-analytes simultaneously online and in real-time at a low price for the robust sensing element. Current research therefore focuses on the implementation of noninvasive spectroscopic and optical technologies, and tries to employ them through fiber optics attached to disposable sensing connectors. Spectroscopic methods reach from ultraviolet to infrared and further comprising fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. Also, optic techniques like microscopy are adapted for the direct use in bioreactor systems (Ulber et al. in Anal Bioanal Chem 376:342-348, 2003) as well as various electrochemical methods (Joo and Brown in Chem Rev 108:638-651, 2008). This review shows the variety of modern in situ sensing principles in bioprocess monitoring with emphasis on spectroscopic and optical techniques and the progress in the adaption to latest reactor concepts. PMID:21785932

  8. Development of geotechnical models for verification of in situ coal conversion impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, H.; Kempka, T.; Schlüter, R.; Ziegler, M.; Azzam, R.

    2009-04-01

    results of the models; and coupling geotechnical models with multiphase flow models to assess the environmental risk of geological CO2 storage and to provide basic data support for designing and adjusting the in situ conversion process considering impacts of CO2 injection and migration on surrounding rocks. The adapted geotechnical models will be applied for verification of in situ coal conversion impacts on the development of ground subsidence in deep coal deposits as available in Central and Western Europe. A further development of these models will allow a site specific best-fit calculation of the conversion field dimensions aiming at maximum utilization and minimum environmental impact by ground subsidence.

  9. In-Situ Safeguards Verification of Low Burn-up Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Fuel Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Y S; Sitaraman, S; Park, I; Kim, J; Ahn, G

    2008-04-16

    A novel in-situ gross defect verification method for light water reactor spent fuel assemblies was developed and investigated by a Monte Carlo study. This particular method is particularly effective for old pressurized water reactor spent fuel assemblies that have natural uranium in their upper fuel zones. Currently there is no method or instrument that does verification of this type of spent fuel assemblies without moving the spent fuel assemblies from their storage positions. The proposed method uses a tiny neutron detector and a detector guiding system to collect neutron signals inside PWR spent fuel assemblies through guide tubes present in PWR assemblies. The data obtained in such a manner are used for gross defect verification of spent fuel assemblies. The method uses 'calibration curves' which show the expected neutron counts inside one of the guide tubes of spent fuel assemblies as a function of fuel burn-up. By examining the measured data in the 'calibration curves', the consistency of the operator's declaration is verified.

  10. Evaluation of Mesoscale Model Phenomenological Verification Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Winifred

    2006-01-01

    Forecasters at the Spaceflight Meteorology Group, 45th Weather Squadron, and National Weather Service in Melbourne, FL use mesoscale numerical weather prediction model output in creating their operational forecasts. These models aid in forecasting weather phenomena that could compromise the safety of launch, landing, and daily ground operations and must produce reasonable weather forecasts in order for their output to be useful in operations. Considering the importance of model forecasts to operations, their accuracy in forecasting critical weather phenomena must be verified to determine their usefulness. The currently-used traditional verification techniques involve an objective point-by-point comparison of model output and observations valid at the same time and location. The resulting statistics can unfairly penalize high-resolution models that make realistic forecasts of a certain phenomena, but are offset from the observations in small time and/or space increments. Manual subjective verification can provide a more valid representation of model performance, but is time-consuming and prone to personal biases. An objective technique that verifies specific meteorological phenomena, much in the way a human would in a subjective evaluation, would likely produce a more realistic assessment of model performance. Such techniques are being developed in the research community. The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) was tasked to conduct a literature search to identify phenomenological verification techniques being developed, determine if any are ready to use operationally, and outline the steps needed to implement any operationally-ready techniques into the Advanced Weather Information Processing System (AWIPS). The AMU conducted a search of all literature on the topic of phenomenological-based mesoscale model verification techniques and found 10 different techniques in various stages of development. Six of the techniques were developed to verify precipitation forecasts, one

  11. Pion treatment procedures and verification techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Zink, S.R.; Bush, S.E.; Gilman, C.J.; Hilko, R.H.; Justice, R.K.; Osborne, E.C.; Smith, A.R.; Berardo, P.A.

    1984-05-01

    Procedures and techniques developed for the negative pi-meson (pion) radiotherapy program at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility, Los Alamos, NM, are reviewed and described. A particular pion patient is followed through the entire planning and treatment sequence to describe CT scanning procedures, bolus and collimator and treatment techniques developed to minimize positioning errors (less than 5 mm). Comparison of 2-D and 3-d isodose calculation developed at Los Alamos showed differences of less than 10% attributable to multiple scattering effects and the computational models used. Treatment verification methods using in vivo ion chamber dosimetry generally confirmed the prescribed dose delivery within 10% and using TLD within 18%.

  12. A comparison of software verification techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A controlled experiment performed by the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) to compare the effectiveness of code reading, functional testing, and structural testing as software verification techniques is described. The experiment results indicate that code reading provides the greatest error detection capability at the lowest cost, whereas structural testing is the least effective technique. The experiment plan is explained, the experiment results are described, related results from other studies are discussed. The application of these results to the development of software in the flight dynamics environment is considered. Appendices summarize the experiment data and list the test programs.

  13. In-situ characterization technique for screening contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Jaselskis, E.J.; Anderson, M.S.; D`Silva, A.P.; Baldwin, D.P.; Zamzow, D.S.

    1995-07-01

    An innovative field sampling system for screening contaminated soils has been developed using laser ablation coupled with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-AES) technology. This sampling approach provides in-situ real-time analysis of trace inorganic elements and is conducted through a mobile testing facility that consists of an instrumentation vehicle called the Mobile Demonstration Laboratory for Environmental Screening Technologies (MDLEST) and an attached trailer called the Robotic Sampling Accessory (RSA). The RSA provides automated sampling capabilities through an attached three-degree-of-freedom robot that is equipped with a surface-sampling probe. The MDLEST-RSA was successfully tested at a Department of Energy (DOE) site in Fernald, Ohio, during the fall of 1992. This paper provides a description of the analysis technique, the MDLEST and RSA, and results of the field demonstration. In addition, benefits, limitations, and future plans are also discussed.

  14. An in Situ Technique for Elemental Analysis of Lunar Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, K. Y.; Cremers, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    An in situ analytical technique that can remotely determine the elemental constituents of solids has been demonstrated. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a form of atomic emission spectroscopy in which a powerful laser pulse is focused on a solid to generate a laser spark, or microplasma. Material in the plasma is vaporized, and the resulting atoms are excited to emit light. The light is spectrally resolved to identify the emitting species. LIBS is a simple technique that can be automated for inclusion aboard a remotely operated vehicle. Since only optical access to a sample is required, areas inaccessible to a rover can be analyzed remotely. A single laser spark both vaporizes and excites the sample so that near real-time analysis (a few minutes) is possible. This technique provides simultaneous multielement detection and has good sensitivity for many elements. LIBS also eliminates the need for sample retrieval and preparation preventing possible sample contamination. These qualities make the LIBS technique uniquely suited for use in the lunar environment.

  15. In Situ Techniques for Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Small Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacksberg, J.; Rossman, G. R.; Webster, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    In situ exploration of planetary surfaces employs multiple techniques that, when used together, yield important information about their formation histories and evolution. Combined geochemistry and mineralogy measurements reveal the phases present, their composition, morphology, and isotope ratios of constituents. Small and primitive bodies often present a special case where little to no compositional information has been obtained from ground-based or remote measurements. For example, Trojan asteroids and other D-type objects as well as Phobos and Deimos exhibit relatively featureless reflectance spectra as obtained by remote measurements. Yet samples of primitive material in the meteorite collection (e.g. Allende) reveal a fine grained structure with many phases and a wealth of chemical information. On-surface measurements are therefore a necessary component for understanding the origins of these solar system bodies. We will present measurement techniques that could provide microscopic mineralogy and isotope geochemistry. We will discuss instrumentation and measurements relevant to small body exploration - focusing more specifically on our recent results from the techniques of microscopic time-resolved Raman spectroscopy, Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), and Tunable Laser Spectroscopy (TLS). The research described here was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This work was performed in part at the California Institute of Technology for the Keck Institute for Space Studies, which is funded by the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  16. Epoxy nanodielectrics fabricated with in situ and ex situ techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Polyzos, Georgios; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R; More, Karren Leslie

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we report fabrication and characterisation of a nanocomposite system composed of a commercial resin and extremely small (several nanometres in diameter) titanium dioxide particles. Nanoparticles were synthesised in situ with particle nucleation occurring inside the resin matrix. In this nanodielectric fabrication method, the nanoparticle precursor was mixed to the resin solution, and the nanoparticles were in situ precipitated. Note that no high shear mixing equipment was needed to improve particle dispersion - nanoparticles were distributed in the polymer matrix uniformly since particle nucleation occurs uniformly throughout the matrix. The properties of in situ nanodielectrics are compared to the unfilled resin and an ex situ nanocomposite. We anticipate that the presented in situ nanocomposite would be employed in high-temperature superconductivity applications. In additions, the improvement shown in the dielectric breakdown indicates that conventional high-voltage components and systems can be reduced in size with novel nanodielectrics.

  17. Development of an in situ loop-mediated isothermal amplification technique for chromosomal localization of DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qinglei; Wang, Shi; Zhang, Lingling; Huang, Xiaoting; Bao, Zhenmin

    2013-01-01

    In situ loop-mediated isothermal amplification (in situ LAMP) combines in situ hybridization and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) techniques for chromosomal localization of DNA sequences. In situ LAMP is a method that is generally more specific and sensitive than conventional techniques such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), primed in situ labeling (PRINS), and cycling primed in situ labeling (C-PRINS). Here, we describe the development and application of in situ LAMP to identify the chromosomal localization of DNA sequences. To benchmark this technique, we successfully applied this technique to localize the major ribosomal RNA gene on the chromosomes of the Zhikong scallop ( Chlamys farreri).

  18. Infrared sequence transformation technique for in situ measurement of thermal diffusivity and monitoring of thermal diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Huilong; Zheng, Boyu; Chen, Feifan

    2015-11-01

    An infrared (IR) sequence transformation technique for visualization of thermal diffusion process and in situ measurement of radial thermal diffusivity is reported. It consists of heating the sample surface instantaneously by an angle-adjustable Gaussian beam and recording the temperature evolution by an IR camera. Compared to common techniques requiring the excitation beam to be fixed approximately perpendicular to the measurement surface, the proposed method allows a dynamic adjustment of the excitation incidence angle according to the actual operating space, which contributes to a fast and efficient in situ measurement approach. To achieve this, a new heat transfer model considering the elliptical distortion of the Gaussian beam caused by tilted incidence is established. Through decoupling analysis it is discovered that the area s surrounded by the maximum temperature curve rTmax (θ) grows linearly over time. The thermal diffusivity can be obtained from the growth rate at any incidence angle. Based on this s-time relation, an automatic thermal diffusivity characterization framework which involves extracting the rTmax (θ) sequence through a distance regularized level set evolution (DRLSE) formulation is proposed. For verification, samples of 304 stainless steel, titanium and zirconium are measured with the excitation incidence angles ranging from 30 ° to 60 ° , and the relative deviations from the literature values are - 6.28 % to 3.27 %, - 3.22 % to 5.79%, and - 1.61 % to 4.03% respectively. Besides, the thermal diffusion process of two typical printed circuit boards (PCBs) are monitored and analyzed visually with this technique.

  19. VAMOS: The verification and monitoring options study: Current research options for in-situ monitoring and verification of contaminant remediation and containment within the vadose zone

    SciTech Connect

    Betsill, J.D.; Gruebel, R.D.

    1995-09-01

    The Verification and Monitoring Options Study Project (VAMOS) was established to identify high-priority options for future vadose-zone environmental research in the areas of in-situ remediation monitoring, post-closure monitoring, and containment emplacement and verification monitoring. VAMOS examined projected needs not currently being met with applied technology in order to develop viable monitoring and verification research options. The study emphasized a compatible systems approach to reinforce the need for utilizing compatible components to provide user friendly site monitoring systems. To identify the needs and research options related to vadose-zone environmental monitoring and verification, a literature search and expert panel forums were conducted. The search included present drivers for environmental monitoring technology, technology applications, and research efforts. The forums included scientific, academic, industry, and regulatory environmental professionals as well as end users of environmental technology. The experts evaluated current and future monitoring and verification needs, methods for meeting these needs, and viable research options and directions. A variety of high-priority technology development, user facility, and technology guidance research options were developed and presented as an outcome of the literature search and expert panel forums.

  20. TECHNIQUE FOR IN SITU CALIBRATION OF PARTICULATE MASS MONITORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two types of aerosol generators, the Riker Laboratories metered spray can and the Mistogen EN145 ultrasonic nebulizer, were evaluated by laboratory measurements for application to the in situ calibration of particulate mass monitors for stationary sources. The metered spray can d...

  1. Verification of component mode techniques for flexible multibody systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiens, Gloria J.

    1990-01-01

    Investigations were conducted in the modeling aspects of flexible multibodies undergoing large angular displacements. Models were to be generated and analyzed through application of computer simulation packages employing the 'component mode synthesis' techniques. Multibody Modeling, Verification and Control Laboratory (MMVC) plan was implemented, which includes running experimental tests on flexible multibody test articles. From these tests, data was to be collected for later correlation and verification of the theoretical results predicted by the modeling and simulation process.

  2. In Situ Mechanical Testing Techniques for Real-Time Materials Deformation Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, Chris; Boesl, Benjamin; Agarwal, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    In situ mechanical property testing has the ability to enhance quantitative characterization of materials by revealing the occurring deformation behavior in real time. This article will summarize select recent testing performed inside a scanning electron microscope on various materials including metals, ceramics, composites, coatings, and 3-Dimensional graphene foam. Tensile and indentation testing methods are outlined with case studies and preliminary data. The benefits of performing a novel double-torsion testing technique in situ are also proposed.

  3. In Situ Techniques for Monitoring Electrochromism: An Advanced Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saricayir, Hakan; Uce, Musa; Koca, Atif

    2010-01-01

    This experiment employs current technology to enhance and extend existing lab content. The basic principles of spectroscopic and electroanalytical techniques and their use in determining material properties are covered in some detail in many undergraduate chemistry programs. However, there are limited examples of laboratory experiments with in…

  4. Survey of Product-line Verification and Validation Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, Robyn

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the results from the first task of the SARP Center Initiative, 'Product Line Verification of Safety-Critical Software.' Task 1 is a literature survey of available techniques for product line verification and validation. Section 1 of the report provides an introduction to product lines and motivates the survey of verification techniques. It describes what is reused in product-line engineering and explains the goal of verifiable conformance of the developed system to its product-line specifications. Section 2 of the report describes six lifecycle steps in product-line verification and validation. This description is based on, and refers to, the best practices extracted from the readings. It ends with a list of verification challenges for NASA product lines (2.7) and verification enablers for NASA product lines (2.8) derived from the survey. Section 3 provides resource lists of related conferences, workshops, industrial and defense industry experiences and case studies of product lines, and academic/industrial consortiums. Section 4 is a bibliography of papers and tutorials with annotated entries for relevant papers not previously discussed in sections 2 or 3.

  5. In situ attosecond pulse characterization techniques to measure the electromagnetic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanner, M.; Bertrand, J. B.; Villeneuve, D. M.

    2016-08-01

    A number of techniques have been developed to characterize the attosecond emission from high-order-harmonic sources. These techniques are broadly classified as ex situ, where the attosecond pulse train photoionizes a target gas in the presence of an infrared field, and in situ, where the measurement takes place in the medium in which the attosecond pulses are generated. It is accepted that ex situ techniques measure the characteristics of the electromagnetic field, including the phase of the recombination transition moment of the emitting atom or molecule, when the phase of the second medium is known. However, there is debate about whether in situ techniques measure the electromagnetic field, or only the characteristics of the recolliding electron before recombination occurs. We show numerically that in situ measurements are not sensitive to the recombination phase, when implemented in the perturbative regime as originally envisioned, and that they do not measure the electromagnetic phase of the emission.

  6. Security Verification Techniques Applied to PatchLink COTS Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliam, David P.; Powell, John D.; Bishop, Matt; Andrew, Chris; Jog, Sameer

    2006-01-01

    Verification of the security of software artifacts is a challenging task. An integrated approach that combines verification techniques can increase the confidence in the security of software artifacts. Such an approach has been developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the University of California at Davis (UC Davis). Two security verification instruments were developed and then piloted on PatchLink's UNIX Agent, a Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) software product, to assess the value of the instruments and the approach. The two instruments are the Flexible Modeling Framework (FMF) -- a model-based verification instrument (JPL), and a Property-Based Tester (UC Davis). Security properties were formally specified for the COTS artifact and then verified using these instruments. The results were then reviewed to determine the effectiveness of the approach and the security of the COTS product.

  7. Development of an in situ calibration technique for combustible gas detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumar, J. W.; Wynveen, R. A.; Lance, N., Jr.; Lantz, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an in situ calibration procedure for combustible gas detectors (CGD). The CGD will be a necessary device for future space vehicles as many subsystems in the Environmental Control/Life Support System utilize or produce hydrogen (H2) gas. Existing calibration techniques are time-consuming and require support equipment such as an environmental chamber and calibration gas supply. The in situ calibration procedure involves utilization of a water vapor electrolysis cell for the automatic in situ generation of a H2/air calibration mixture within the flame arrestor of the CGD. The development effort concluded with the successful demonstration of in situ span calibrations of a CGD.

  8. Verification of joint input-state estimation for force identification by means of in situ measurements on a footbridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, K.; Nimmen, K. Van; Lourens, E.; Rezayat, A.; Guillaume, P.; Roeck, G. De; Lombaert, G.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a verification of a joint input-state estimation algorithm using data obtained from in situ experiments on a footbridge. The estimation of the input and the system states is performed in a minimum-variance unbiased way, based on a limited number of response measurements and a system model. A dynamic model of the footbridge is obtained using a detailed finite element model that is updated using a set of experimental modal characteristics. The joint input-state estimation algorithm is used for the identification of two impact, harmonic, and swept sine forces applied to the bridge deck. In addition to these forces, unknown stochastic forces, such as wind loads, are acting on the structure. These forces, as well as measurement errors, give rise to uncertainty in the estimated forces and system states. Quantification of the uncertainty requires determination of the power spectral density of the unknown stochastic excitation, which is identified from the structural response under ambient loading. The verification involves comparing the estimated forces with the actual, measured forces. Although a good overall agreement is obtained between the estimated and measured forces, modeling errors prohibit a proper distinction between multiple forces applied to the structure for the case of harmonic and swept sine excitation.

  9. Damage Detection and Verification System (DDVS) for In-Situ Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Lewis, Mark; Szafran, J.; Shelton, C.; Ludwig, L.; Gibson, T.; Lane, J.; Trautwein, T.

    2015-01-01

    Project presentation for Game Changing Program Smart Book Release. Detection and Verification System (DDVS) expands the Flat Surface Damage Detection System (FSDDS) sensory panels damage detection capabilities and includes an autonomous inspection capability utilizing cameras and dynamic computer vision algorithms to verify system health. Objectives of this formulation task are to establish the concept of operations, formulate the system requirements for a potential ISS flight experiment, and develop a preliminary design of an autonomous inspection capability system that will be demonstrated as a proof-of-concept ground based damage detection and inspection system.

  10. Using geophysical techniques to control in situ thermal remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, S.; Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; Wilt, M.; Goldman, R.; Kayes, D.; Kenneally, K.; Udell, K.; Hunter, R.

    1994-01-22

    Monitoring the thermal and hydrologic processes that occur during thermal environmental remediation programs in near real-time provides essential information for controlling the process. Geophysical techniques played a crucial role in process control as well as for characterization during the recent Dynamic Underground Stripping Project demonstration in which several thousand gallons of gasoline were removed from heterogeneous soils both above and below the water table. Dynamic Underground Stripping combines steam injection and electrical heating for thermal enhancement with ground water pumping and vacuum extraction for contaminant removal. These processes produce rapid changes in the subsurface properties including changes in temperature fluid saturation, pressure and chemistry. Subsurface imaging methods are used to map the heated zones and control the thermal process. Temperature measurements made in wells throughout the field reveal details of the complex heating phenomena. Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) provides near real-time detailed images of the heated zones between boreholes both during electrical heating and steam injection. Borehole induction logs show close correlation with lithostratigraphy and, by identifying the more permeable gravel zones, can be used to predict steam movement. They are also useful in understanding the physical changes in the field and in interpreting the ERT images. Tiltmeters provide additional information regarding the shape of the steamed zones in plan view. They were used to track the growth of the steam front from individual injectors.

  11. Wind estimates from cloud motions: Phase 1 of an in situ aircraft verification experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. F.; Shenk, W. E.; Skillman, W.

    1974-01-01

    An initial experiment was conducted to verify geostationary satellite derived cloud motion wind estimates with in situ aircraft wind velocity measurements. Case histories of one-half hour to two hours were obtained for 3-10km diameter cumulus cloud systems on 6 days. Also, one cirrus cloud case was obtained. In most cases the clouds were discrete enough that both the cloud motion and the ambient wind could be measured with the same aircraft Inertial Navigation System (INS). Since the INS drift error is the same for both the cloud motion and wind measurements, the drift error subtracts out of the relative motion determinations. The magnitude of the vector difference between the cloud motion and the ambient wind at the cloud base averaged 1.2 m/sec. The wind vector at higher levels in the cloud layer differed by about 3 m/sec to 5 m/sec from the cloud motion vector.

  12. First in situ TOF-PET study using digital photon counters for proton range verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambraia Lopes, P.; Bauer, J.; Salomon, A.; Rinaldi, I.; Tabacchini, V.; Tessonnier, T.; Crespo, P.; Parodi, K.; Schaart, D. R.

    2016-08-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is the imaging modality most extensively tested for treatment monitoring in particle therapy. Optimal use of PET in proton therapy requires in situ acquisition of the relatively strong 15O signal due to its relatively short half-life (~2 min) and high oxygen content in biological tissues, enabling shorter scans that are less sensitive to biological washout. This paper presents the first performance tests of a scaled-down in situ time-of-flight (TOF) PET system based on digital photon counters (DPCs) coupled to Cerium-doped Lutetium Yttrium Silicate (LYSO:Ce) crystals, providing quantitative results representative of a dual-head tomograph that complies with spatial constraints typically encountered in clinical practice (2  ×  50°, of 360°, transaxial angular acceptance). The proton-induced activity inside polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polyethylene (PE) phantoms was acquired within beam pauses (in-beam) and immediately after irradiation by an actively-delivered synchrotron pencil-beam, with clinically relevant 125.67 MeV/u, 4.6  ×  108 protons s‑1, and 1010 total protons. 3D activity maps reconstructed with and without TOF information are compared to FLUKA simulations, demonstrating the benefit of TOF-PET to reduce limited-angle artefacts using a 382 ps full width at half maximum coincidence resolving time. The time-dependent contributions from different radionuclides to the total count-rate are investigated. We furthermore study the impact of the acquisition time window on the laterally integrated activity depth-profiles, with emphasis on 2 min acquisitions starting at different time points. The results depend on phantom composition and reflect the differences in relative contributions from the radionuclides originating from carbon and oxygen. We observe very good agreement between the shapes of the simulated and measured activity depth-profiles for post-beam protocols. However, our results also

  13. First in situ TOF-PET study using digital photon counters for proton range verification.

    PubMed

    Cambraia Lopes, P; Bauer, J; Salomon, A; Rinaldi, I; Tabacchini, V; Tessonnier, T; Crespo, P; Parodi, K; Schaart, D R

    2016-08-21

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is the imaging modality most extensively tested for treatment monitoring in particle therapy. Optimal use of PET in proton therapy requires in situ acquisition of the relatively strong (15)O signal due to its relatively short half-life (~2 min) and high oxygen content in biological tissues, enabling shorter scans that are less sensitive to biological washout. This paper presents the first performance tests of a scaled-down in situ time-of-flight (TOF) PET system based on digital photon counters (DPCs) coupled to Cerium-doped Lutetium Yttrium Silicate (LYSO:Ce) crystals, providing quantitative results representative of a dual-head tomograph that complies with spatial constraints typically encountered in clinical practice (2  ×  50°, of 360°, transaxial angular acceptance). The proton-induced activity inside polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polyethylene (PE) phantoms was acquired within beam pauses (in-beam) and immediately after irradiation by an actively-delivered synchrotron pencil-beam, with clinically relevant 125.67 MeV/u, 4.6  ×  10(8) protons s(-1), and 10(10) total protons. 3D activity maps reconstructed with and without TOF information are compared to FLUKA simulations, demonstrating the benefit of TOF-PET to reduce limited-angle artefacts using a 382 ps full width at half maximum coincidence resolving time. The time-dependent contributions from different radionuclides to the total count-rate are investigated. We furthermore study the impact of the acquisition time window on the laterally integrated activity depth-profiles, with emphasis on 2 min acquisitions starting at different time points. The results depend on phantom composition and reflect the differences in relative contributions from the radionuclides originating from carbon and oxygen. We observe very good agreement between the shapes of the simulated and measured activity depth-profiles for post-beam protocols. However, our results

  14. In-situ vacuum deposition technique of lithium on neutron production target for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, S.; Baba, Y.; Fujii, R.; Nakamura, M.; Imahori, Y.

    2012-10-01

    For the purpose of avoiding the radiation blistering of the lithium target for neutron production in BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) device, trilaminar Li target, of which palladium thin layer was inserted between cupper substrate and Li layer, was newly designed. In-situ vacuum deposition and electrolytic coating techniques were applied to validate the method of fabrication of the Li/Pd/Cu target, and the layered structures of the synthesized target were characterized. In-situ vacuum re-deposition technique was also established for repairing and maintenance for lithium target damaged. Following conclusions were derived; (1) Uniform lithium layers with the thickness from 1.6 nm to a few hundreds nanometer were formed on Pd/Cu multilayer surface by in situ vacuum deposition technique using metallic lithium as a source material. (2) Re-deposition of lithium layer on Li surface can be achieved by in situ vacuum deposition technique. (3) Small amount of water and carbonate was observed on the top surface of Li. But the thickness of the adsorbed layer was less than monolayer, which will not affect the quality of the Li target. (4) The formation of Pd-Li alloy layer was observed at the Pd and Li interface. The alloy layer would contribute to the stability of the Li layer.

  15. Numerical Verification of a 2-D PSF Equalization Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood, Shane; Kankelborg, C.

    2013-07-01

    The Multi-Order Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrograph (MOSES) forms images of the transition region at HE II 30.4 in three spectral orders. Subtle differences between these images encode line profile information. However, differences in instrument point-spread function (PSF) in the three orders lead to non-negligible systematic errors in the retrieval of the line profiles. We describe a technique for equalizing the PSFs, and provide numerical verification of the technique's validity.

  16. A comparison of adjoint and data-centric verification techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Wildey, Timothy Michael; Cyr, Eric Christopher; Shadid, John Nicolas; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Smith, Thomas Michael

    2013-03-01

    This document summarizes the results from a level 3 milestone study within the CASL VUQ effort. We compare the adjoint-based a posteriori error estimation approach with a recent variant of a data-centric verification technique. We provide a brief overview of each technique and then we discuss their relative advantages and disadvantages. We use Drekar::CFD to produce numerical results for steady-state Navier Stokes and SARANS approximations. 3

  17. Improved Detection Technique for Solvent Rinse Cleanliness Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornung, S. D.; Beeson, H. D.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) has an ongoing effort to reduce or eliminate usage of cleaning solvents such as CFC-113 and its replacements. These solvents are used in the final clean and cleanliness verification processes for flight and ground support hardware, especially for oxygen systems where organic contaminants can pose an ignition hazard. For the final cleanliness verification in the standard process, the equivalent of one square foot of surface area of parts is rinsed with the solvent, and the final 100 mL of the rinse is captured. The amount of nonvolatile residue (NVR) in the solvent is determined by weight after the evaporation of the solvent. An improved process of sampling this rinse, developed at WSTF, requires evaporation of less than 2 mL of the solvent to make the cleanliness verification. Small amounts of the solvent are evaporated in a clean stainless steel cup, and the cleanliness of the stainless steel cup is measured using a commercially available surface quality monitor. The effectiveness of this new cleanliness verification technique was compared to the accepted NVR sampling procedures. Testing with known contaminants in solution, such as hydraulic fluid, fluorinated lubricants, and cutting and lubricating oils, was performed to establish a correlation between amount in solution and the process response. This report presents the approach and results and discusses the issues in establishing the surface quality monitor-based cleanliness verification.

  18. Verification of Orthogrid Finite Element Modeling Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steeve, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    The stress analysis of orthogrid structures, specifically with I-beam sections, is regularly performed using finite elements. Various modeling techniques are often used to simplify the modeling process but still adequately capture the actual hardware behavior. The accuracy of such 'Oshort cutso' is sometimes in question. This report compares three modeling techniques to actual test results from a loaded orthogrid panel. The finite element models include a beam, shell, and mixed beam and shell element model. Results show that the shell element model performs the best, but that the simpler beam and beam and shell element models provide reasonable to conservative results for a stress analysis. When deflection and stiffness is critical, it is important to capture the effect of the orthogrid nodes in the model.

  19. The development of an electrochemical technique for in situ calibrating of combustible gas detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumar, J. W.; Lantz, J. B.; Schubert, F. H.

    1976-01-01

    A program to determine the feasibility of performing in situ calibration of combustible gas detectors was successfully completed. Several possible techniques for performing the in situ calibration were proposed. The approach that showed the most promise involved the use of a miniature water vapor electrolysis cell for the generation of hydrogen within the flame arrestor of a combustible gas detector to be used for the purpose of calibrating the combustible gas detectors. A preliminary breadboard of the in situ calibration hardware was designed, fabricated and assembled. The breadboard equipment consisted of a commercially available combustible gas detector, modified to incorporate a water vapor electrolysis cell, and the instrumentation required for controlling the water vapor electrolysis and controlling and calibrating the combustible gas detector. The results showed that operation of the water vapor electrolysis at a given current density for a specific time period resulted in the attainment of a hydrogen concentration plateau within the flame arrestor of the combustible gas detector.

  20. Laser Based In Situ Techniques: Novel Methods for Generating Extreme Conditions in TEM Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Taheri, M; Lagrange, T; Reed, B; Armstrong, M; Campbell, G; DeHope, W; Kim, J; King, W; Masiel, D; Browning, N

    2008-02-25

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) is introduced as a novel tool for in situ processing of materials. Examples of various types of dynamic studies outline the advantages and differences of laser-based heating in the DTEM in comparison to conventional (resistive) heating in situ TEM methods. We demonstrate various unique capabilities of the drive laser, namely, in situ processing of nanoscale materials, rapid and high temperature phase transformations, and controlled thermal activation of materials. These experiments would otherwise be impossible without the use of the DTEM drive laser. Thus, the potential of the DTEM to as a new technique to process and characterize the growth of a myriad of micro and nanostructures is demonstrated.

  1. Lithographically fabricated silicon microreactor for in situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts—Enabling correlative characterization techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Baier, S.; Rochet, A.; Hofmann, G.; Kraut, M.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2015-06-15

    We report on a new modular setup on a silicon-based microreactor designed for correlative spectroscopic, scattering, and analytic on-line gas investigations for in situ studies of heterogeneous catalysts. The silicon microreactor allows a combination of synchrotron radiation based techniques (e.g., X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy) as well as infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy. Catalytic performance can be determined simultaneously by on-line product analysis using mass spectrometry. We present the design of the reactor, the experimental setup, and as a first example for an in situ study, the catalytic partial oxidation of methane showing the applicability of this reactor for in situ studies.

  2. Lithographically fabricated silicon microreactor for in situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts—Enabling correlative characterization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, S.; Rochet, A.; Hofmann, G.; Kraut, M.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2015-06-01

    We report on a new modular setup on a silicon-based microreactor designed for correlative spectroscopic, scattering, and analytic on-line gas investigations for in situ studies of heterogeneous catalysts. The silicon microreactor allows a combination of synchrotron radiation based techniques (e.g., X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy) as well as infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy. Catalytic performance can be determined simultaneously by on-line product analysis using mass spectrometry. We present the design of the reactor, the experimental setup, and as a first example for an in situ study, the catalytic partial oxidation of methane showing the applicability of this reactor for in situ studies.

  3. Lithographically fabricated silicon microreactor for in situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts—Enabling correlative characterization techniques.

    PubMed

    Baier, S; Rochet, A; Hofmann, G; Kraut, M; Grunwaldt, J-D

    2015-06-01

    We report on a new modular setup on a silicon-based microreactor designed for correlative spectroscopic, scattering, and analytic on-line gas investigations for in situ studies of heterogeneous catalysts. The silicon microreactor allows a combination of synchrotron radiation based techniques (e.g., X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy) as well as infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy. Catalytic performance can be determined simultaneously by on-line product analysis using mass spectrometry. We present the design of the reactor, the experimental setup, and as a first example for an in situ study, the catalytic partial oxidation of methane showing the applicability of this reactor for in situ studies. PMID:26133867

  4. Two-dimensional in situ metrology of X-ray mirrors using the speckle scanning technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Laundy, David; Sawhney, Kawal

    2015-07-01

    In situ metrology overcomes many of the limitations of existing metrology techniques and is capable of exceeding the performance of present-day optics. A novel technique for precisely characterizing an X-ray bimorph mirror and deducing its two-dimensional (2D) slope error map is presented. This technique has also been used to perform fast optimization of a bimorph mirror using the derived 2D piezo response functions. The measured focused beam size was significantly reduced after the optimization, and the slope error map was then verified by using geometrical optics to simulate the focused beam profile. This proposed technique is expected to be valuable for in situ metrology of X-ray mirrors at synchrotron radiation facilities and in astronomical telescopes. PMID:26134795

  5. An overview on in situ micronization technique – An emerging novel concept in advanced drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Vandana, K.R.; Prasanna Raju, Y.; Harini Chowdary, V.; Sushma, M.; Vijay Kumar, N.

    2013-01-01

    The use of drug powders containing micronized drug particles has been increasing in several pharmaceutical dosage forms to overcome the dissolution and bioavailability problems. Most of the newly developed drugs are poorly water soluble which limits dissolution rate and bioavailability. The dissolution rate can be enhanced by micronization of the drug particles. The properties of the micronized drug substance such as particle size, size distribution, shape, surface properties, and agglomeration behaviour and powder flow are affected by the type of micronization technique used. Mechanical communition, spray drying and supercritical fluid (SCF) technology are the most commonly employed techniques for production of micronized drug particles but the characteristics of the resulting drug product cannot be controlled using these techniques. Hence, a newer technique called in situ micronization is developed in order to overcome the limitations associated with the other techniques. This review summarizes the existing knowledge on in situ micronization techniques. The properties of the resulting drug substance obtained by in situ micronization were also compared. PMID:25161371

  6. The development of in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques in hydrogen environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei; Tan, Ting; Liu, Ken C

    2014-01-01

    Fracture behavior and fracture toughness are of great interest regarding reliability of hydrogen pipelines and storage tanks, however, many conventional fracture testing techniques are difficult to be realized under the presence of hydrogen, in addition to the inherited specimen size effect. Thus it is desired to develop novel in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques to study the fracture behavior of structural materials in hydrogen environments. In this study, a torsional fixture was developed to utilize an emerging fracture testing technique, Spiral Notch Torsion Test (SNTT). The in situ testing results indicated that the exposure to H2 significantly reduces the fracture toughness of 4340 high strength steels by up to 50 percent. Furthermore, SNTT tests conducted in air demonstrated a significant fracture toughness reduction in samples subject to simulated welding heat treatment using Gleeble, which illustrated the effect of welding on the fracture toughness of this material.

  7. Review of in situ derivatization techniques for enhanced bioanalysis using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Baghdady, Yehia Z; Schug, Kevin A

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and specific analysis of target molecules in complex biological matrices remains a significant challenge, especially when ultra-trace detection limits are required. Liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry is often the method of choice for bioanalysis. Conventional sample preparation and clean-up methods prior to the analysis of biological fluids such as liquid-liquid extraction, solid-phase extraction, or protein precipitation are time-consuming, tedious, and can negatively affect target recovery and detection sensitivity. An alternative or complementary strategy is the use of an off-line or on-line in situ derivatization technique. In situ derivatization can be incorporated to directly derivatize target analytes in their native biological matrices, without any prior sample clean-up methods, to substitute or even enhance the extraction and preconcentration efficiency of these traditional sample preparation methods. Designed appropriately, it can reduce the number of sample preparation steps necessary prior to analysis. Moreover, in situ derivatization can be used to enhance the performance of the developed liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry-based bioanalysis methods regarding stability, chromatographic separation, selectivity, and ionization efficiency. This review presents an overview of the commonly used in situ derivatization techniques coupled to liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry-based bioanalysis to guide and to stimulate future research. PMID:26496130

  8. Diagnosis of In Situ Metabolic State and Rates of Microbial Metabolism During In Situ Uranium Bioremediation with Molecular Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, Derek R

    2012-11-28

    The goal of these projects was to develop molecule tools to tract the metabolic activity and physiological status of microorganisms during in situ uranium bioremediation. Such information is important in able to design improved bioremediation strategies. As summarized below, the research was highly successful with new strategies developed for estimating in situ rates of metabolism and diagnosing the physiological status of the predominant subsurface microorganisms. This is a first not only for groundwater bioremediation studies, but also for subsurface microbiology in general. The tools and approaches developed in these studies should be applicable to the study of microbial communities in a diversity of soils and sediments.

  9. In situ technique for measurement and control of transistor characteristics during remote plasma etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lishan, David; Hu, Evelyn

    1991-09-01

    In situ electrical monitoring has been carried out in a remote plasma etching system allowing accurate control of device electrical parameters. We have used this technique to gate recess-etch two different high electron mobility transistor structures while recording device source-drain I-V characteristics throughout the etching. Current versus etching time data and time elapsed I-V curves are presented.

  10. The development of in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques in hydrogen environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, John Jy-An; Ren, Fei; Tan, Tin; Liu, Ken

    2014-12-19

    Reliability of hydrogen pipelines and storage tanks is significantly influenced by the mechanical performance of the structural materials exposed in the hydrogen environment. Fracture behavior and fracture toughness are of specific interest since they are relevant to many catastrophic failures. However, many conventional fracture testing techniques are difficult to be realized under the presence of hydrogen. Thus it is desired to develop novel in situ techniques to study the fracture behavior of structural materials in hydrogen environments. In this study, special testing apparatus were designed to facilitate in situ fracture testing in H2. A torsional fixture was developed to utilize an emerging fracture testing technique, Spiral Notch Torsion Test (SNTT). The design concepts will be discussed. Preliminary in situ testing results indicated that the exposure to H2 significantly reduces the fracture toughness of 4340 high strength steels by up to 50 percent. Furthermore, SNTT tests conducted in air demonstrated a significant fracture toughness reduction in samples subject to simulated welding heat treatment using Gleeble, which illustrated the effect of welding on the fracture toughness of this material.

  11. The development of in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques in hydrogen environment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, John Jy-An; Ren, Fei; Tan, Tin; Liu, Ken

    2014-12-19

    Reliability of hydrogen pipelines and storage tanks is significantly influenced by the mechanical performance of the structural materials exposed in the hydrogen environment. Fracture behavior and fracture toughness are of specific interest since they are relevant to many catastrophic failures. However, many conventional fracture testing techniques are difficult to be realized under the presence of hydrogen. Thus it is desired to develop novel in situ techniques to study the fracture behavior of structural materials in hydrogen environments. In this study, special testing apparatus were designed to facilitate in situ fracture testing in H2. A torsional fixture was developed to utilizemore » an emerging fracture testing technique, Spiral Notch Torsion Test (SNTT). The design concepts will be discussed. Preliminary in situ testing results indicated that the exposure to H2 significantly reduces the fracture toughness of 4340 high strength steels by up to 50 percent. Furthermore, SNTT tests conducted in air demonstrated a significant fracture toughness reduction in samples subject to simulated welding heat treatment using Gleeble, which illustrated the effect of welding on the fracture toughness of this material.« less

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF IN SITU TECHNIQUES FOR TORSION AND TENSION TESTING IN HYDROGEN ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei; Zhang, Wei; Feng, Zhili; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Chen, Zhe; Xu, Hanbing

    2011-01-01

    Reliability of hydrogen storage tanks is significantly influenced by the mechanical performance of the container materials in the hydrogen environment. Fracture behavior and fracture toughness are of specific interest since they are relevant to many catastrophic failures. However, many conventional fracture testing techniques are difficult to be realized under the presence of hydrogen. Thus it is desired to develop novel in situ techniques to study the fracture behavior of structural materials in hydrogen environments. In this study, special testing apparatus were designed to facilitate in situ fracture testing in H2. In addition to a multi-notch tensile fixture, a torsional fixture was developed to utilize an emerging fracture testing technique, Spiral Notch Torsion Test (SNTT). The design concepts will be discussed. Preliminary in situ testing results indicated that the presence of H2 significantly reduces the fracture toughness of 4340 pipeline steels by up to 50 percent. On the other hand, SNTT tests conducted in air demonstrated a significant fracture toughness reduction in samples subject to Gleeble heat treatment, which illustrated the effect of welding on the fracture toughness of this material.

  13. Making a Hybrid Microfluidic Platform Compatible for In Situ Imaging by Vacuum-Based Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Li; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zhu, Zihua; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Cowin, James P.

    2011-10-26

    A self-contained microfluidic-based device was designed and fabricated for in situ imaging of aqueous surfaces using vacuum techniques. The device is a hybrid between a microfluidic PDMS block and external accessories, all portable on a small platform (10 cm-8 cm). The key feature is that a small aperture with a diameter of 2-3 micrometers is opened to the vacuum, which serves as a detection window for in situ imaging of aqueous surfaces. Vacuum compatibility and temperature drop due to water vaporization are the two most important challenges in this invention. Theoretical calculations and fabrication strategies are presented from multiple design aspects. In addition, results from the time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) of aqueous surfaces are presented.

  14. Planetary Geochemistry Techniques: Probing In-Situ with Neutron and Gamma Rays (PING) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Burger, D.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lin, L.; McClanahan, T.; Nankung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Probing In situ with Neutrons and Gamma rays (PING) instrument is a promising planetary science application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology so successfully used in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth. The objective of our technology development program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (NASA/GSFC) Astrochemistry Laboratory is to extend the application of neutron interrogation techniques to landed in situ planetary composition measurements by using a 14 MeV Pulsed Neutron Generator (PNG) combined with neutron and gamma ray detectors, to probe the surface and subsurface of planetary bodies without the need to drill. We are thus working to bring the PING instrument to the point where it can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Venus, asteroids, comets and the satellites of the outer planets.

  15. Simulation verification techniques study. Subsystem simulation validation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, L. M.; Reddell, J. P.; Schoonmaker, P. B.

    1974-01-01

    Techniques for validation of software modules which simulate spacecraft onboard systems are discussed. An overview of the simulation software hierarchy for a shuttle mission simulator is provided. A set of guidelines for the identification of subsystem/module performance parameters and critical performance parameters are presented. Various sources of reference data to serve as standards of performance for simulation validation are identified. Environment, crew station, vehicle configuration, and vehicle dynamics simulation software are briefly discussed from the point of view of their interfaces with subsystem simulation modules. A detailed presentation of results in the area of vehicle subsystems simulation modules is included. A list of references, conclusions and recommendations are also given.

  16. Meteoric smoke and mesospheric ice particles studied with in-situ techniques: Science highlights from the ECOMA-project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Markus; Strelnikova, Irina; Strelnikov, Boris; Latteck, Ralph; Baumgarten, Gerd; Friedrich, Martin; Gumbel, Jorg; Hoppe, Ulf-Peter

    A total of six sounding rockets were launched during three field campaigns in the years 2006, 2007, and 2008 from the North-Norwegian Andøya Rocket Range to study the Existence and Charge state Of Meteoric smoke in the middle Atmosphere (ECOMA) and its relation to mesospheric ice particles. A new particle detector was successfully developed which combines the conventional technique of a Faraday-Cup with the active photo ionization of particles and subsequent detection of corresponding photo electrons. In this paper we will give an overview of results from these rocket campaigns. Some noteworthy findings are the experimental verification of meteor smoke existence throughout the entire mesosphere, the first direct in situ measurement of mesospheric ice volume, and new insights into the charging properties of meteoric smoke under the conditions of polar summer. Finally, we will outline future plans for a concluding ECOMA campaign that is scheduled for December 2010 to study the effect of the Geminid meteor shower on the properties of meteor smoke particles in the middle atmosphere.

  17. Insights into hydrophobic molecule release from polyelectrolyte multilayer films using in situ and ex situ techniques.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yongjin; Cheung, Weng Hou; Ho, Tracey T M; Bremmell, Kristen E; Beattie, David A

    2014-10-28

    We report on the loading and release of curcumin (a hydrophobic polyphenol with anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties) from polyelectrolyte multilayers composed of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS). We have used the in situ techniques of attenuated total reflectance (ATR) FTIR spectroscopy and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) to study the formation of the PEM and the incorporation of curcumin, providing direct evidence of the incorporation, in terms of molecular vibrations and gravimetric detection. The release of curcumin was followed using ex situ measurements of UV-visible spectroscopy of PEM films on quartz plates, in addition to in situ ATR FTIR measurements. Release was studied as a function of salt concentration of the release solution (0.001 M NaCl; 1 M NaCl). UV-visible spectroscopy indicated that salt concentration of the release solution had a major impact on release rates, with higher salt giving faster/more extensive release. However, prolonged timescale immersion and monitoring with UV-visible spectroscopy indicated that sample dehydration/rehydration cycling (required to measure UV absorbance) was responsible for the release of curcumin, rather than immersion time. In situ measurements of release kinetics with ATR FTIR confirmed that release does not occur spontaneously while the multilayer remains hydrated. PMID:25226281

  18. Implementation of In-Situ Impedance Techniques on a Full Scale Aero-Engine System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaeta, R. J.; Mendoza, J. M.; Jones, M. G.

    2007-01-01

    Determination of acoustic liner impedance for jet engine applications remains a challenge for the designer. Although suitable models have been developed that take account of source amplitude and the local flow environment experienced by the liner, experimental validation of these models has been difficult. This is primarily due to the inability of researchers to faithfully mimic the environment in jet engine nacelles in the laboratory. An in-situ measurement technique, one that can be implemented in an actual engine, is desirable so an accurate impedance can be determined for future modeling and quality control. This paper documents the implementation of such a local acoustic impedance measurement technique that is used under controlled laboratory conditions as well as on full scale turbine engine liner test article. The objective for these series of in-situ measurements is to substantiate treatment design, provide understanding of flow effects on installed liner performance, and provide modeling input for fan noise propagation computations. A series of acoustic liner evaluation tests are performed that includes normal incidence tube, grazing incidence tube, and finally testing on a full scale engine on a static test stand. Lab tests were intended to provide insight and guidance for accurately measuring the impedance of the liner housed in the inlet of a Honeywell Tech7000 turbofan. Results have shown that one can acquire very reasonable liner impedance data for a full scale engine under realistic test conditions. Furthermore, higher fidelity results can be obtained by using a three-microphone coherence technique that can enhance signal-to-noise ratio at high engine power settings. This research has also confirmed the limitations of this particular type of in-situ measurement. This is most evident in the installation of instrumentation and its effect on what is being measured.

  19. Measurement technique for in situ characterizing aberrations of projection optics in lithographic tools

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Fan; Wang Xiangzhao; Ma Mingying

    2006-08-20

    As the feature size decreases, degradation of image quality caused by wavefront aberrations of projection optics in lithographic tools has become a serious problem in the low-k1 process. We propose a novel measurement technique for in situ characterizing aberrations of projection optics in lithographic tools.Considering the impact of the partial coherence illumination, we introduce a novel algorithm that accurately describes the pattern displacement and focus shift induced by aberrations. Employing the algorithm, the measurement condition is extended from three-beam interference to two-, three-, and hybrid-beam interferences. The experiments are performed to measure the aberrations of projection optics in an ArF scanner.

  20. In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Techniques for the Study of Lithium Battery Materials

    SciTech Connect

    McBreen, J.; Mukerjee, S.; Yang, X. Q.; Sun, X., Ein-Eli, Y.

    1998-11-01

    The combination of in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a very powerful technique in the study of lithium battery cathode materials. XRD identifies the phase changes that occur during cycling and XAS gives information on the redox charge compensation processes that occur on the transition metal oxides. Because of its element specific nature XAS can identify the occurrence of redox processes on the various cations in doped oxide cathode materials. Since XAS probes short range order and is particularly useful in the study of amorphous tin based composite oxide anode materials.

  1. Bioreactors and in situ product recovery techniques for acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Si-Yu; Chiang, Chung-Jen; Tseng, I-Ting; He, Chi-Ruei; Chao, Yun-Peng

    2016-07-01

    The microbial fermentation process is one of the sustainable and environment-friendly ways to produce 1-butanol and other bio-based chemicals. The success of the fermentation process greatly relies on the choice of bioreactors and the separation methods. In this review, the history and the performance of bioreactors for the acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation is discussed. The subject is then focused on in situ product recovery (ISPR) techniques, particularly for the integrated extraction-gas stripping. The usefulness of this promising hybrid ISPR device is acknowledged by its incorporation with batch, fed-batch and continuous processes to improve the performance of ABE fermentation. PMID:27190167

  2. Development of a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique for visualizing CGMMV in plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Shargil, D; Zemach, H; Belausov, E; Lachman, O; Kamenetsky, R; Dombrovsky, A

    2015-10-01

    Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV), which belongs to the genus Tobamovirus, is a major pathogen of cucurbit crops grown indoors and in open fields. Currently, immunology (e.g., ELISA) and molecular amplification techniques (e.g., RT-PCR) are employed extensively for virus detection in plant tissues and commercial seed lots diagnostics. In this study, a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, using oligonucleotides whose 5'-terminals were labeled with red cyanine 3 (Cy3) or green fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), was developed for the visualization of the pathogen in situ. This simple and reliable method allows detection and localization of CGMMV in the vegetative and reproductive tissues of cucumber and melon. When this technique was applied in male flowers, anther tissues were found to be infected; whereas the pollen grains were found to be virus-free. These results have meaningful epidemiological implications for the management of CGMMV, particularly with regard to virus transfer via seed and the role of insects as CGMMV vectors. PMID:26231788

  3. Inverse problem solution techniques as applied to indirect in situ estimation of fish target strength.

    PubMed

    Stepnowski, A; Moszyński, M

    2000-05-01

    In situ indirect methods of fish target strength (TS) estimation are analyzed in terms of the inverse techniques recently applied to the problem in question. The solution of this problem requires finding the unknown probability density function (pdf) of fish target strength from acoustic echoes, which can be estimated by solving the integral equation, relating pdf's of echo variable, target strength, and beam pattern of the echosounder transducer. In the first part of the paper the review of existing indirect in situ TS-estimation methods is presented. The second part introduces the novel TS-estimation methods, viz.: Expectation, Maximization, and Smoothing (EMS), Windowed Singular Value Decomposition (WSVD), Regularization and Wavelet Decomposition, which are compared using simulations as well as actual data from acoustic surveys. The survey data, acquired by the dual-beam digital echosounder, were thoroughly analyzed by numerical algorithms and the target strength and acoustical backscattering length pdf's estimates were calculated from fish echoes received in the narrow beam channel of the echosounder. Simultaneously, the estimates obtained directly from the dual-beam system were used as a reference for comparison of the estimates calculated by the newly introduced inverse techniques. The TS estimates analyzed in the paper are superior to those obtained from deconvolution or other conventional techniques, as the newly introduced methods partly avoid the problem of ill-conditioned equations and matrix inversion. PMID:10830379

  4. Measurement techniques for in situ stresses around underground constructions in a deep clay formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstricht, J.; Areias, L.; Bastiaens, W.; Li, X. L.

    2010-06-01

    Disposal in deep underground geological formations is internationally recognized as the most viable option for the long-term management of high-level radioactive waste. In Belgium, the Boom clay formation is extensively studied in this context, in particular at the 225 m deep HADES Underground Research Facility in Mol. A cost-effective design of deep underground structures requires an accurate assessment of the in situ stresses; a good estimation of these stresses is also essential when interpreting in situ experiments regarding the hydro-mechanical behaviour of the host formation. Different measurement techniques are available to provide data on the stress evolution and other mechanical properties of the geological formation. The measurement can be direct (measurement of total pressure), or it can be an indirect technique, deriving the stress from related quantities such as strain (changes) in structural members. Most total stress measurements are performed through permanently installed sensors; also once-only measurements are performed through specific methods (e.g. pressuremeter). Direct measurement of the stress state is challenging due to the complex mechanical behaviour of the clay, and the fact that the sensor installation inevitably disturbs the original stress field. This paper describes ways to deal with these problems and presents the results obtained using different techniques at HADES.

  5. Measuring wind on Mars: an overview of in situ sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C. F.

    2005-08-01

    Measurement of near-surface winds on Mars is doubly useful. It is scientifically important in that the near-surface winds control surface-atmosphere exchanges of water, dust, heat, and momentum; and vital for the safe landing of spacecraft. However, in situ measurement of wind is difficult due to the low density of the Martian atmosphere. There is an unusually broad variety of wind sensing techniques which are viable for use on Mars. Most past sensors have been of the hot-wire or hot-film type; however, dynamic pressure anemometers (e.g. windsocks or vanes) and ion drift anemometers have also been included on past missions. Two further promising techniques being developed for future Mars missions are ultrasonic and laser-doppler anemometry. We review the current status of sensors based on the different techniques, and suggest which may be most appropriate for the achievement of different science goals.

  6. An in situ electron microscopy technique for the study of thermally activated reactions in multilayered materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, M.A.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Weihs, T.P.

    1995-04-14

    A novel in situ transmission electron microscopy technique for the observation of reaction processes in multilayered materials is reported. The technique involves constant heating rate experiments of multilayered materials in image and diffraction modes. Because the fine scale microstructure of multilayered materials is typically a small fraction of the TEM specimen thickness, realistic comparison of the microstructural evolution with that of similarly processed thick foil samples is possible. Such experiments, when well designed, can provide rapid characterization of phase transformations and stability of nano-structured materials. The results of these experiments can be recorded in both video and micrograph format. The results and limitations of this technique will be shown for the Al/Zr and Al/Monel multilayered systems.

  7. Novel, in-situ Raman and fluorescence measurement techniques: Imaging using optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Jerry Chance

    The following dissertation describes the development of methods for performing standoff and in- situ Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy for chemical imaging and non-imaging analytical applications. The use of Raman spectroscopy for the in- situ identification of crack cocaine and cocaine.HCl using a fiberoptic Raman probe and a portable Raman spectrograph has been demonstrated. We show that the Raman spectra of both forms of cocaine are easily distinguishable from common cutting agents and impurities such as benzocaine and lidocaine. We have also demonstrated the use of Raman spectroscopy for in-situ identification of drugs separated by thin layer chromatography. We have investigated the use of small, transportable, Raman systems for standoff Raman spectroscopy (e.g. <20 m). For this work, acousto-optical (AOTF) and liquid crystal tunable filters (LCTF) are being used both with, and in place of dispersive spectrographs and fixed filtering devices. In addition, we improved the flexibility of the system by the use of a modified holographic fiber-optic probe for light and image collection. A comparison of tunable filter technologies for standoff Raman imaging is discussed along with the merits of image transfer devices using small diameter image guides. A standoff Raman imaging system has been developed that utilizes a unique polymer collection mirror. The techniques used to produce these mirrors make it easy to design low f/# polymer mirrors. The performance of a low f/# polymer mirror system for standoff Raman chemical imaging has been demonstrated and evaluated. We have also demonstrated remote Raman hyperspectral imaging using a dimension-reduction, 2-dimensional (2-D) to 1-dimensional (1-D), fiber optic array. In these studies, a modified holographic fiber-optic probe was combined with the dimension-reduction fiber array for remote Raman imaging. The utility of this setup for standoff Raman imaging is demonstrated by monitoring the polymerization of

  8. Studies of ferroelectric heterostructure thin films and interfaces via in situ analytical techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Auciello, O.; Dhote, A.; Gao, Y.; Gruen, D. M.; Im, J.; Irene, E. A.; Krauss, A. R.; Mueller, A. H.; Ramesh, R.

    1999-08-30

    The science and technology of ferroelectric thin films has experienced an explosive development during the last ten years. Low-density non-volatile ferroelectric random access memories (NVFRAMs) are now incorporated in commercial products such as ''smart cards'', while high permittivity capacitors are incorporated in cellular phones. However, substantial work is still needed to develop materials integration strategies for high-density memories. We have demonstrated that the implementation of complementary in situ characterization techniques is critical to understand film growth and interface processes, which play critical roles in film microstructure and properties. We are using uniquely integrated time of flight ion scattering and recoil spectroscopy (TOF-ISARS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) techniques to perform in situ, real-time studies of film growth processes in the high background gas pressure required to growth ferroelectric thin films. TOF-ISARS provides information on surface processes, while SE permits the investigation of buried interfaces as they are being formed. Recent studies on SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} (SBT) and Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1{minus}x}TiO{sub 3} (BST) film growth and interface processes are discussed.

  9. Development of Advanced In-Situ Techniques for Chemistry Monitoring and Corrosion Mitigation in SCWO Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D. D.; Lvov, S. N.

    2000-03-31

    This project is developing sensing technologies and corrosion monitoring techniques for use in super critical water oxidation (SCWO) systems to reduce the volume of mixed low-level nuclear waste by oxidizing organic components in a closed cycle system where CO2 and other gaseous oxides are produced, leaving the radioactive elements concentrated in ash. The technique uses water at supercritical temperatures under highly oxidized conditions by maintaining a high fugacity of molecular oxygen in the system, which causes high corrosion rates of even the most corrosive resistant reactor materials. This project significantly addresses the high corrosion shortcoming through development of (a) advanced electrodes and sensors for in situ potentiometric monitoring of pH in high subcritical and supercritical aqueous solutions, (b) an approach for evaluating the association constants for 1-1 aqueous electrolytes using a flow-through electrochemical thermocell; (c) an electrochemical noise sensor for the in situ measurement of corrosion rate in subcritical and supercritical aqueous systems; (d) a model for estimating the effect of pressure on reaction rates, including corrosion reactions, in high subcritical and supercritical aqueous systems. The project achieved all objectives, except for installing some of the sensors into a fully operating SCWO system.

  10. In-situ stress measurement in a jointed basalt: the suitability of five overcoring techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, E.C.; Rundle, T.A.; McCabe, W.M.; Kim, K.

    1983-05-01

    Overcoring tests were conducted at the Near-Surface Test Facility (NSTF) to assess the suitability of five techniques (US Bureau of Mines borehole deformation gauge (BDG), Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) hollow inclusion stress cell, epoxy inclusion, Lulea triaxial gauge (LuH gauge), and Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) doorstopper) for in situ stress determination in a closely jointed basalt. This effort is in support of the Basalt Waste Isolation project, which is studying the feasibility of locating a nuclear waste repository in the basalts of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. This paper preents the results from the overcoring study that formed the basis for selection of two techniques to be used during the further exploration of the basalt formations at depth.

  11. Calibration of an in-situ BEGe detector using semi-empirical and Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Agrafiotis, K; Karfopoulos, K L; Anagnostakis, M J

    2011-08-01

    In the case of a nuclear or radiological accident a rapid estimation of the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of the potential radioactive pollution is needed. For aerial releases the radioactive pollutants are finally deposited on the ground forming a surface source. In this case, in-situ γ-ray spectrometry is a powerful tool for the determination of ground pollution. In this work, the procedure followed at the Nuclear Engineering Department of the National Technical University of Athens (NED-NTUA) for the calibration of an in-situ Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detector, for the determination of gamma-emitting radionuclides deposited on the ground surface, is presented. BEGe detectors due to their technical characteristics are suitable for the analysis of photons in a wide energy region. Two different techniques were applied for the full-energy peak efficiency calibration of the BEGe detector in the energy region 60-1600 keV: Full-energy peak efficiencies determined using the two methods agree within statistical uncertainties. PMID:21193317

  12. Evaluation of 157-nm resist structure: outgassing relationship using in situ QCM technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Masamitsu; Shinozuka, Toyofumi; Takashiba, Shinichi; Horiguchi, Yusuke; Irie, Shigeo; Itani, Toshiro

    2004-05-01

    An in-situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) method was applied to quantitatively measure the outgassing from 157-nm resists, i.e., fluorinated cyclopolymer (FCP) and its derivatives blocked with alkoxymethyl ether units, in real time. The frequency change of quartz crystal coated with resist films was monitored during exposure and the mass desorbed from the resist films was calculated as amounts of outgassing. The sensitivity of the present QCM system was about 1 ng. The outgassing rate from FCP was much lower than FCP blocked with alkoxymethyl ether moiety, suggesting that the outgassing was mainly caused from the blocking units. Acidic components in outgassing were quantitatively measured by in-situ QCM technique using the quartz crystal coated with poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP) or a copolymer (DMEST) of 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate and styrene. The acidic materials adsorbed on quart crystal were monitored during exposure and the mass adsorbed was calculated. The amount of acidic compounds in outgassing was dependent on fluorine content of the resist polymers.

  13. Novel temporary endovascular shunt technique to assist in situ fenestration for endovascular reconstruction of the distal aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jiang; Guo, Wei; Liu, Xiaoping; Jia, Xin; Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Lijun

    2015-07-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) of arch pathology presents special challenges for revascularization. To obtain an anatomic reconstruction of the arch arteries, in situ fenestration with extra-anatomic bypass has been increasingly used in TEVAR. We report a case involving TEVAR for a pseudoaneurysm at zone 2 of the thoracic aorta in a 37-year-old man with the use of in situ fenestration assisted by a temporary endovascular shunt technique. PMID:24560242

  14. Use of noninvasive geophysical techniques for the In Situ Vitrification Program

    SciTech Connect

    Josten, N.E.; Marts, S.T.; Carpenter, G.S.

    1991-11-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a waste pit remediation technology that can potentially eliminate the need for pit excavation. The ISV program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) funded this study to evaluate geophysical techniques that might be useful for performing detailed screening of the materials, soil conditions, and local geology of waste pits targeted for remediation. The evaluation focuses on a specific set of characterization objectives developed by ISV engineers. The objectives are based on their assessment of safety, environmental, and cost efficiency issues associated with the ISV process. A literature review of geophysical case histories was conducted and a geophysical survey was performed at the INEL simulated waste pit so that the evaluation could be based on demonstrable results.

  15. Temperature-dependent properties of silver-poly(methylmethacrylate) nanocomposites synthesized by in-situ technique

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ag/PMMA nanocomposites were successfully synthesized by in-situ technique. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images show that the particles are spherical in shape and their sizes are dependent on temperature. The smallest particle achieved high stability as indicated from Zeta sizer analysis. The red shift of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) indicated the increases of particle sizes. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns exhibit a two-phase (crystalline and amorphous) structure of Ag/PMMA nanocomposites. The complexation of Ag/PMMA nanocomposites was confirmed using Raman spectroscopy. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra confirmed that the bonding was dominantly influenced by the PMMA and DMF solution. Finally, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) results indicate that the total weight loss increases as the temperature increases. PMID:24450850

  16. Combustion synthesis of advanced materials. [using in-situ infiltration technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. J.; Feng, H. J.; Perkins, N.; Readey, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    The combustion synthesis of ceramic-metal composites using an in-situ liquid infiltration technique is described. The effect of varying the reactants and their stoichiometry to provide a range of reactant and product species i.e. solids, liquids and gases, with varying physical properties e.g. thermal conductivity, on the microstructure and morphology of synthesized products is also described. Alternatively, conducting the combustion synthesis reaction in a reactive gas environment is also discussed, in which advantages can be gained from the synergistic effects of combustion synthesis and vapor phase transport. In each case, the effect of the presence or absence of gravity (density) driven fluid flow and vapor transport is discussed as is the potential for producing new and perhaps unique materials by conducting these SHS reactions under microgravity conditions.

  17. In situ characterization of natural pyrite bioleaching using electrochemical noise technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guo-bao; Yang, Hong-ying; Li, Hai-jun

    2016-02-01

    An in situ characterization technique called electrochemical noise (ECN) was used to investigate the bioleaching of natural pyrite. ECN experiments were conducted in four active systems (sulfuric acid, ferric-ion, 9k culture medium, and bioleaching solutions). The ECN data were analyzed in both the time and frequency domains. Spectral noise impedance spectra obtained from power spectral density (PSD) plots for different systems were compared. A reaction mechanism was also proposed on the basis of the experimental data analysis. The bioleaching system exhibits the lowest noise resistance of 0.101 MΩ. The bioleaching of natural pyrite is considered to be a bio-battery reaction, which distinguishes it from chemical oxidation reactions in ferric-ion and culture-medium (9k) solutions. The corrosion of pyrite becomes more severe over time after the long-term testing of bioleaching.

  18. Polycaprolactone-based in situ implant containing curcumin-PLGA nanoparticles prepared using the multivariate technique.

    PubMed

    Kasinathan, Narayanan; Amirthalingam, Muthukumar; Reddy, Neetinkumar D; Vanthi, Meenashi B; Volety, Subrahmanyam M; Rao, Josyula Venkata

    2016-09-01

    Studies on the effect of curcumin/PLGA ratio (CPR), stabilizer (PVA) concentration, homogenization speed, homogenization time, and sonication time on mean particle size (MPS) and percentage drug encapsulation (PDE) were performed using the multivariate technique. MPS and PDE were found to be more dependent on the interaction of sonication time with the other variables. Curcumin was released in a sustained manner from curcumin-PLGA nanoparticles (CPN). CPN improved the survival rate of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC)-bearing mice and controlled the EAC-induced change in hematological parameters. Histopathology of vital organs showed that the formulation was safe. Polycaprolactone was used in preparing an in situ implant containing CPN. PMID:26121330

  19. The ID-KArD technique: In-situ dating on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, J. A.; Farley, K. A.; Hurowitz, J.; Asimow, P. D.; Jacobson, N. S.

    2013-12-01

    The ability to measure absolute ages on the Martian surface is crucial for understanding the planet's evolution. A detailed geological history of the Moon has been determined through analysis of returned samples from specific units, and relative ages calculated by crater counting techniques. However, without returned samples or in-situ dating analyses, we lack absolute age markers for Mars and thus cannot accurately or precisely date its well-documented surface. Instead, we have relied on an estimated Mars/Moon cratering ratio and relative crater counting techniques in an attempt to calculate surface ages and classify geological units. The use of such relative parameters diminishes the precision and accuracy for surface age calculations, and thus highlights the need for independent age determinations from returned samples or in-situ dating. In this research, we describe our technique - ID-KArD (Isotope Dilution K-Ar Dating) - intended for in-situ age dating of geological units on the Martian surface. ID-KArD resolves two challenges that have previously obstructed in-situ age dating on Mars: 1) High fusion temperatures are avoided with the use of a lithium-borate flux; 2) Sample mass measurement is not required, due to the addition of an isotope dilution doubly-spiked glass. The glass has a known 39Ar/41K ratio, which removes the need for concentration measurements. Thus, only isotope ratios are required for a K-Ar age determination. ID-KArD has the potential to address Mars chronology inaccuracies, and would be a suitable technique for consideration on future missions. In the first phase of ID-KArD proof of concept, we selected a Viluy trap basalt (K2O ~ 0.7 wt%), with concordant K-Ar and Ar-Ar ages of 354.3 × 3.5 and 357.7 × 1.4 Ma respectively (Courtillot et al., 2010). An aliquot was combined into a crucible with the flux and the spike glass for separate Ar (MAP 215:50, Caltech), followed by K (KEMS, GRC) isotopic analysis. Combining our results, we obtained

  20. The erythrasma microorganism in situ: studies using the skin surface biopsy technique

    PubMed Central

    Marks, R.; Ramnarain, N. D.; Bhogal, B.; Moore, N. T.

    1972-01-01

    The skin surface biopsy technique has been used to investigate the erythrasma organism in situ in the stratum corneum in 11 patients. Staining by PAS and Gram stain showed the presence of a large number of organisms arranged haphazardly in some areas and in microcolonies in others. With the scanning electron microscope it was possible to see that smooth filamentous chains of microorganisms had penetrated horn cells and caused disturbance of the surface structure of these cells. Enzyme histochemical tests showed that the erythrasma microorganism possessed a strong reactivity for NAD diaphorase and other mitochondrial enzymes. The reactivity was focal confirming a complex subcellular organization of organelles. It is suggested that the erythrasma microorganism secretes a mucopolysaccharide sheath in some circumstances. Images PMID:4117542

  1. In situ tagging technique for fishes provides insight into growth and movement of invasive lionfish.

    PubMed

    Akins, John L; Morris, James A; Green, Stephanie J

    2014-10-01

    Information on fish movement and growth is primarily obtained through the marking and tracking of individuals with external tags, which are usually affixed to anesthetized individuals at the surface. However, the quantity and quality of data obtained by this method is often limited by small sample sizes owing to the time associated with the tagging process, high rates of tagging-related mortality, and displacement of tagged individuals from the initial capture location. To address these issues, we describe a technique for applying external streamer and dart tags in situ, which uses SCUBA divers to capture and tag individual fish on the sea floor without the use of anesthetic. We demonstrate this method for Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois volitans/P. miles), species which are particularly vulnerable to barotrauma when transported to and handled at the surface. To test our method, we tagged 161 individuals inhabiting 26 coral reef locations in the Bahamas over a period of 3 years. Our method resulted in no instances of barotrauma, reduced handling and recovery time, and minimal post-tagging release displacement compared with conventional ex situ tag application. Opportunistic resighting and recapture of tagged individuals reveals that lionfish exhibit highly variable site fidelity, movement patterns, and growth rates on invaded coral reef habitats. In total, 24% of lionfish were resighted between 29 and 188 days after tagging. Of these, 90% were located at the site of capture, while the remaining individuals were resighted between 200 m and 1.1 km from initial site of capture over 29 days later. In situ growth rates ranged between 0.1 and 0.6 mm/day. While individuals tagged with streamer tags posted slower growth rates with increasing size, as expected, there was no relationship between growth rate and fish size for individuals marked with dart tags, potentially because of large effects of tag presence on the activities of small bodied lionfish (i.e., <150

  2. In situ tagging technique for fishes provides insight into growth and movement of invasive lionfish

    PubMed Central

    Akins, John L; Morris, James A; Green, Stephanie J

    2014-01-01

    Information on fish movement and growth is primarily obtained through the marking and tracking of individuals with external tags, which are usually affixed to anesthetized individuals at the surface. However, the quantity and quality of data obtained by this method is often limited by small sample sizes owing to the time associated with the tagging process, high rates of tagging-related mortality, and displacement of tagged individuals from the initial capture location. To address these issues, we describe a technique for applying external streamer and dart tags in situ, which uses SCUBA divers to capture and tag individual fish on the sea floor without the use of anesthetic. We demonstrate this method for Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois volitans/P. miles), species which are particularly vulnerable to barotrauma when transported to and handled at the surface. To test our method, we tagged 161 individuals inhabiting 26 coral reef locations in the Bahamas over a period of 3 years. Our method resulted in no instances of barotrauma, reduced handling and recovery time, and minimal post-tagging release displacement compared with conventional ex situ tag application. Opportunistic resighting and recapture of tagged individuals reveals that lionfish exhibit highly variable site fidelity, movement patterns, and growth rates on invaded coral reef habitats. In total, 24% of lionfish were resighted between 29 and 188 days after tagging. Of these, 90% were located at the site of capture, while the remaining individuals were resighted between 200 m and 1.1 km from initial site of capture over 29 days later. In situ growth rates ranged between 0.1 and 0.6 mm/day. While individuals tagged with streamer tags posted slower growth rates with increasing size, as expected, there was no relationship between growth rate and fish size for individuals marked with dart tags, potentially because of large effects of tag presence on the activities of small bodied lionfish (i.e., <150

  3. Direct push driven in situ color logging tool (CLT): technique, analysis routines, and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werban, U.; Hausmann, J.; Dietrich, P.; Vienken, T.

    2014-12-01

    Direct push technologies have recently seen a broad development providing several tools for in situ parameterization of unconsolidated sediments. One of these techniques is the measurement of soil colors - a proxy information that reveals to soil/sediment properties. We introduce the direct push driven color logging tool (CLT) for real-time and depth-resolved investigation of soil colors within the visible spectrum. Until now, no routines exist on how to handle high-resolved (mm-scale) soil color data. To develop such a routine, we transform raw data (CIEXYZ) into soil color surrogates of selected color spaces (CIExyY, CIEL*a*b*, CIEL*c*h*, sRGB) and denoise small-scale natural variability by Haar and Daublet4 wavelet transformation, gathering interpretable color logs over depth. However, interpreting color log data as a single application remains challenging. Additional information, such as site-specific knowledge of the geological setting, is required to correlate soil color data to specific layers properties. Hence, we exemplary provide results from a joint interpretation of in situ-obtained soil color data and 'state-of-the-art' direct push based profiling tool data and discuss the benefit of additional data. The developed routine is capable of transferring the provided information obtained as colorimetric data into interpretable color surrogates. Soil color data proved to correlate with small-scale lithological/chemical changes (e.g., grain size, oxidative and reductive conditions), especially when combined with additional direct push vertical high resolution data (e.g., cone penetration testing and soil sampling). Thus, the technique allows enhanced profiling by means of providing another reproducible high-resolution parameter for analysis subsurface conditions. This opens potential new areas of application and new outputs for such data in site investigation. It is our intention to improve color measurements by means method of application and data

  4. An in situ high voltage electron microscopy technique for the study of deformation and fracture: In multilayered materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, M.A.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Weihs, T.P.

    1995-04-14

    A novel, in situ, high voltage electron microscopy technique for the direct observation of the micromechanisms of tensile deformation and fracture in nanostructured materials is detailed. This technique is particularly well suited for the dynamic observations of deformation and fracture in multilayered materials. The success of this type of in situ technique is highly dependent upon unique specimen preparation procedures and sample design, the importance thereof will be discussed. The initial observations discussed here are expected to aid in the understanding of the mechanical behavior of this new class of atomically engineered materials.

  5. Selective evaluation of high density lipoprotein from mouse small intestine by an in situ perfusion technique[S

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Zhang, Bo; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Seino, Utako; Kanagawa, Akiko; Segawa, Masaru; Nagasaka, Hironori; Suzuki, Akira; Miida, Takashi; Yamada, Sohsuke; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki; Doi, Takefumi; Saku, Keijiro; Okazaki, Mitsuyo; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Hirano, Ken-ichi

    2014-01-01

    The small intestine (SI) is the second-greatest source of HDL in mice. However, the selective evaluation of SI-derived HDL (SI-HDL) has been difficult because even the origin of HDL obtained in vivo from the intestinal lymph duct of anesthetized rodents is doubtful. To shed light on this question, we have developed a novel in situ perfusion technique using surgically isolated mouse SI, with which the possible filtration of plasma HDL into the SI lymph duct can be prevented. With the developed method, we studied the characteristics of and mechanism for the production and regulation of SI-HDL. Nascent HDL particles were detected in SI lymph perfusates in WT mice, but not in ABCA1 KO mice. SI-HDL had a high protein content and was smaller than plasma HDL. SI-HDL was rich in TG and apo AIV compared with HDL in liver perfusates. SI-HDL was increased by high-fat diets and reduced in apo E KO mice. In conclusion, with our in situ perfusion model that enables the selective evaluation of SI-HDL, we demonstrated that ABCA1 plays an important role in intestinal HDL production, and SI-HDL is small, dense, rich in apo AIV, and regulated by nutritional and genetic factors. PMID:24569139

  6. Study of techniques for redundancy verification without disrupting systems, phases 1-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The problem of verifying the operational integrity of redundant equipment and the impact of a requirement for verification on such equipment are considered. Redundant circuits are examined and the characteristics which determine adaptability to verification are identified. Mutually exclusive and exhaustive categories for verification approaches are established. The range of applicability of these techniques is defined in terms of signal characteristics and redundancy features. Verification approaches are discussed and a methodology for the design of redundancy verification is developed. A case study is presented which involves the design of a verification system for a hypothetical communications system. Design criteria for redundant equipment are presented. Recommendations for the development of technological areas pertinent to the goal of increased verification capabilities are given.

  7. Evaluation of Select Surface Processing Techniques for In Situ Application During the Additive Manufacturing Build Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Book, Todd A.; Sangid, Michael D.

    2016-07-01

    Although additive manufacturing offers numerous performance advantages for different applications, it is not being used for critical applications due to uncertainties in structural integrity as a result of innate process variability and defects. To minimize uncertainty, the current approach relies on the concurrent utilization of process monitoring, post-processing, and non-destructive inspection in addition to an extensive material qualification process. This paper examines an alternative approach by evaluating the application of select surface process techniques, to include sliding severe plastic deformation (SPD) and fine particle shot peening, on direct metal laser sintering-produced AlSi10Mg materials. Each surface processing technique is compared to baseline as-built and post-processed samples as a proof of concept for surface enhancement. Initial results pairing sliding SPD with the manufacture's recommended thermal stress relief cycle demonstrated uniform recrystallization of the microstructure, resulting in a more homogeneous distribution of strain among the microstructure than as-built or post-processed conditions. This result demonstrates the potential for the in situ application of various surface processing techniques during the layerwise direct metal laser sintering build process.

  8. Evaluation of Select Surface Processing Techniques for In Situ Application During the Additive Manufacturing Build Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Book, Todd A.; Sangid, Michael D.

    2016-03-01

    Although additive manufacturing offers numerous performance advantages for different applications, it is not being used for critical applications due to uncertainties in structural integrity as a result of innate process variability and defects. To minimize uncertainty, the current approach relies on the concurrent utilization of process monitoring, post-processing, and non-destructive inspection in addition to an extensive material qualification process. This paper examines an alternative approach by evaluating the application of select surface process techniques, to include sliding severe plastic deformation (SPD) and fine particle shot peening, on direct metal laser sintering-produced AlSi10Mg materials. Each surface processing technique is compared to baseline as-built and post-processed samples as a proof of concept for surface enhancement. Initial results pairing sliding SPD with the manufacture's recommended thermal stress relief cycle demonstrated uniform recrystallization of the microstructure, resulting in a more homogeneous distribution of strain among the microstructure than as-built or post-processed conditions. This result demonstrates the potential for the in situ application of various surface processing techniques during the layerwise direct metal laser sintering build process.

  9. Using genetic techniques to quantify reinvasion, survival and in situ breeding rates during control operations.

    PubMed

    Veale, A J; Edge, K-A; McMurtrie, P; Fewster, R M; Clout, M N; Gleeson, D M

    2013-10-01

    Determining the origin of individuals caught during a control/eradication programme enables conservation managers to assess the reinvasion rates of their target species and evaluate the level of success of their control methods. We examine how genetic techniques can focus management by distinguishing between hypotheses of 'reinvasion' and 'survivor', and defining kin groups for invasive stoats (Mustela erminea) on Secretary Island, New Zealand. 205 stoats caught on the island were genotyped at 16 microsatellite loci, along with 40 stoats from the opposing mainland coast, and the age and sex were determined for each individual. Using these data, we compare and combine a variety of genetic techniques including genetic clustering, population assignment and kinship-based techniques to assess the origin of each stoat. The population history and individual movement could be described in fine detail, with results indicating that both in-situ survival and breeding, and reinvasion are occurring. Immigration to the island was found to be generally low, apart from in 1 year where around 8 stoats emigrated from the mainland. This increased immigration was probably linked to a stoat population spike on the mainland in that year, caused by a masting event of southern beech forest (Nothofagus sp.) and the subsequent rodent irruption. Our study provides an example of some of the ways genetic analyses can feed directly into informing management practices for invasive species. PMID:24033616

  10. Simulation verification techniques study: Simulation self test hardware design and techniques report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The final results are presented of the hardware verification task. The basic objectives of the various subtasks are reviewed along with the ground rules under which the overall task was conducted and which impacted the approach taken in deriving techniques for hardware self test. The results of the first subtask and the definition of simulation hardware are presented. The hardware definition is based primarily on a brief review of the simulator configurations anticipated for the shuttle training program. The results of the survey of current self test techniques are presented. The data sources that were considered in the search for current techniques are reviewed, and results of the survey are presented in terms of the specific types of tests that are of interest for training simulator applications. Specifically, these types of tests are readiness tests, fault isolation tests and incipient fault detection techniques. The most applicable techniques were structured into software flows that are then referenced in discussions of techniques for specific subsystems.

  11. Novel, In-situ NAPL Modification Technique for Persistent Source Zone Control and Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateas, D. J.; Tick, G. R.; Carroll, K. C.

    2014-12-01

    Non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), such as fuels and solvents, are a major cause of groundwater and soil contamination. This environmental issue has led to concerted efforts to remediate subsurface systems impacted by NAPL pollution, but unfortunately, few of these remediation techniques have succeeded in lowering target contaminant levels below regulatory thresholds. To overcome these limitations, a novel, in-situ source remediation method was tested in the laboratory using equilibrium batch tests and two-dimensional flow cell experiments. The goal of this remediation method was to reduce the aqueous solubility, mass flux, and mass discharge of the target NAPL by the in-situ creation of a NAPL mixture source zone. Predetermined volumes of insoluble n-hexadecane or vegetable oil ("benign" NAPL) were injected into a trichloroethene or toluene ("toxic" NAPL) source zone through a simulated well within the flow cell to form a NAPL mixture. Initial NAPL-aqueous phase batch tests were conducted prior to the flow cell experiments to evaluate the effects of various NAPL mixture ratios on equilibrium aqueous-phase concentrations, and thus, to design optimal benign NAPL injection volumes for the flow cell experiments. Overall, this study indicated that the delivery of benign NAPL into the target, toxic NAPL source zone was effective in significantly reducing contaminant aqueous-phase concentration, mass flux, and mass discharge at intermediate scales. Variations in remediation performance did occur among the various predetermined injection volumes of benign NAPL and the target, toxic NAPL but were consistent to trends observed in batch tests. This novel remediation method may be feasible at larger scales, such as pilot field-scale studies, and may be a cost-effective solution to efficiently mitigate environmental pollution, attain regulatory compliance, and expedite site closure.

  12. In Situ Thermal Ion Temperature Measurements in the E Region Ionosphere: Techniques, Results, and Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchill, J. K.; Archer, W. E.; Clemmons, J. H.; Knudsen, D. J.; Nicolls, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    In situ measurements of thermal ion temperature are rare at E region altitudes, which are too low for satellites. Here we present ion temperature measurements from a Thermal Ion Imager (TII) that flew on NASA sounding rocket 36.234 (the "Joule-2" mission) into the nightside E region ionosphere on 19 January 2007 from Poker Flat, AK. The TII is an electrostatic ion energy/angle imager that provides 2D ion distributions at 8 ms resolution. Ion temperatures are derived at altitudes between 100 km and 190 km by modelling the detector total count rate versus ion bulk flow angle with respect to the plane of the imager's field of view. Modelling this count rate spin profile shows that the analysis technique is robust against a number of error sources, including variability in payload floating potential, ion upflow, and aperture widening due to reflections from electrode surfaces. A significant uncertainty is associated with the average mass of the ions, which is not measured independently. Using the International Reference Ionosphere model to estimate ion mass, we obtain an ion temperature of 1300 K at 125 km, increasing to more than 3000 K at 180 km. These temperatures are much larger than neutral temperatures obtained from an ionization gauge on the same rocket (Tn˜500 K at 125 km, ˜600 K at 180 km), and do not agree with incoherent scatter radar observations in the vicinity of the rocket. These anomalous ion temperatures are, however, consistent with results from an independent analysis of the shape of the ion distribution images from a similar instrument on a separate payload flown 10 minutes earlier [Archer, MSc Thesis, University of Calgary, 2009]. We conclude that the high ion temperature readings are an artifact related to the environment in the vicinity of the probe, and investigate mechanisms for the cause. We discuss the implications of this effect for future in situ attempts to measure ion temperature in the E region ionosphere.

  13. Pilot demonstration for containment using in situ soil mixing techniques at a chemical disposal superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Zarlinski, S.J.; Kingham, N.W.; Semenak, R.

    1997-12-31

    Kiber Environmental Services, Inc. (Kiber), under contract to McLaren-Hart Corporation and the site PRP group, performed technical oversight and on-site sampling and analyses at the confidential site located in Texas. The site consists of 15,000 cubic meters (20,000 cubic yards) of contaminated materials that were to be solidified on-site. The contaminants included heavy metals, PAHs, oil and grease, and volatile organics. Groundwater is less than 1 meter from the surface. Kiber was retained after several unsuccessful efforts to find on-site containment methods that effectively solidified the waste pits while achieving the performance goals. The PRP group then contracted with Kiber to perform the treatability and pilot oversight studies. The full-scale pilot demonstration was performed by Geo-Con. Pilot-scale treatment was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of in situ solidification treatment at achieving the site specific performance criteria, including an unconfined compressive strength of greater than 170 kPa (25 psi) and a permeability of less than 1x10{sup -6} cm/sec. Technical oversight and on-site sampling and analysis were provided to evaluate pilot-scale application of the selected technology and verify treatment effectiveness. The project was divided into several subtasks. First, laboratory treatability testing was conducted to verify that performance specifications were achievable using the proposed reagent formulations. Next, a pilot demonstration was performed by Geo-Con using a Manotowoc 4000 crane equipped with a 1.5-meter diameter auger to evaluate shallow soil mixing. The final task included a comparative study between the performance of test specimens collected using wet sampling techniques versus in situ post-treatment coring.

  14. Intercomparison of four different in-situ techniques for ambient formaldehyde measurements in urban air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hak, C.; Pundt, I.; Kern, C.; Platt, U.; Dommen, J.; Ordóñez, C.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Junkermann, W.; Astorga-Lloréns, C.; Larsen, B. R.; Mellqvist, J.; Strandberg, A.; Yu, Y.; Galle, B.; Kleffmann, J.; Lörzer, J. C.; Braathen, G. O.; Volkamer, R.

    2005-05-01

    Results from an intercomparison of several currently used in-situ techniques for the measurement of atmospheric formaldehyde (CH2O) are presented. The measurements were carried out at Bresso, an urban site in the periphery of Milan (Italy) as part of the FORMAT-I field campaign. Eight instruments were employed by six independent research groups using four different techniques: Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS), Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) interferometry, the fluorimetric Hantzsch reaction technique (five instruments) and a chromatographic technique employing C18-DNPH-cartridges (2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine). White type multi-reflection systems were employed for the optical techniques in order to avoid spatial CH2O gradients and ensure the sampling of nearly the same air mass by all instruments. Between 23 and 31 July 2002, up to 13 ppbv of CH2O were observed. The concentrations lay well above the detection limits of all instruments. The formaldehyde concentrations determined with DOAS, FTIR and the Hantzsch instruments were found to agree within ±11%, with the exception of one Hantzsch instrument, which gave systematically higher values. The two hour integrated samples by DNPH yielded up to 25% lower concentrations than the data of the continuously measuring instruments averaged over the same time period. The consistency between the DOAS and the Hantzsch method was better than during previous intercomparisons in ambient air with slopes of the regression line not significantly differing from one. The differences between the individual Hantzsch instruments could be attributed in part to the calibration standards used. Possible systematic errors of the methods are discussed.

  15. Intercomparison of four different in-situ techniques for ambient formaldehyde measurements in urban air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hak, C.; Pundt, I.; Trick, S.; Kern, C.; Platt, U.; Dommen, J.; Ordóñez, C.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Junkermann, W.; Astorga-Lloréns, C.; Larsen, B. R.; Mellqvist, J.; Strandberg, A.; Yu, Y.; Galle, B.; Kleffmann, J.; Lörzer, J. C.; Braathen, G. O.; Volkamer, R.

    2005-11-01

    Results from an intercomparison of several currently used in-situ techniques for the measurement of atmospheric formaldehyde (CH2O) are presented. The measurements were carried out at Bresso, an urban site in the periphery of Milan (Italy) as part of the FORMAT-I field campaign. Eight instruments were employed by six independent research groups using four different techniques: Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS), Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) interferometry, the fluorimetric Hantzsch reaction technique (five instruments) and a chromatographic technique employing C18-DNPH-cartridges (2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine). White type multi-reflection systems were employed for the optical techniques in order to avoid spatial CH2O gradients and ensure the sampling of nearly the same air mass by all instruments. Between 23 and 31 July 2002, up to 13 ppbv of CH2O were observed. The concentrations lay well above the detection limits of all instruments. The formaldehyde concentrations determined with DOAS, FTIR and the Hantzsch instruments were found to agree within ±11%, with the exception of one Hantzsch instrument, which gave systematically higher values. The two hour integrated samples by DNPH yielded up to 25% lower concentrations than the data of the continuously measuring instruments averaged over the same time period. The consistency between the DOAS and the Hantzsch method was better than during previous intercomparisons in ambient air with slopes of the regression line not significantly differing from one. The differences between the individual Hantzsch instruments could be attributed in part to the calibration standards used. Possible systematic errors of the methods are discussed.

  16. Comparison of In Situ Polymerization and Solution-Dispersion Techniques in the Preparation of Polyimide/Montmorillonite (MMT) Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Gharayebi, Yadollah; Salit, Mohd. Sapuan; Hussein, Mohd. Zobir; Shameli, Kamyar

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, Polyimide/Montmorillonite Nanocomposites (PI/MMT NCs), based on aromatic diamine (4-Aminophenyl sulfone) (APS) and aromatic dianhydride (3,3′,4,4′-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride) (BTDA) were prepared using in situ polymerization and solution-dispersion techniques. The prepared PI/MMT NCs films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The XRD results showed that at the content of 1.0 wt % Organo Montmorillonite (OMMT) for two techniques and 3.0 wt % OMMT for the in situ polymerization technique, the OMMT was well-intercalated, exfoliated and dispersed into polyimide matrix. The OMMT agglomerated when its amount exceeded 10 wt % and 3.0 wt % for solution-dispersion and in situ polymerization techniques respectively. These results were confirmed by the TEM images of the prepared PI/MMT NCs. The TGA thermograms indicated that thermal stability of prepared PI/MMT NCs were increased with the increase of loading that, the effect is higher for the samples prepared by in situ polymerization technique. PMID:22016643

  17. In-situ turbulence measurement technique using state-of-the-art kite/blimp platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsley, Ben B.; Jensen, Michael L.; Frehlich, Rod G.; Eaton, Frank D.; Bishop, Kenneth P.; Hugo, Ronald J.

    1999-08-01

    Results of a campaign to measure boundary layer/lower troposphere turbulence quantities over New Mexico's Tularosa basin are described in a companion paper. The present contribution outlines the technical developments that enabled these measurements. Basically, instrumented 'payloads' were carried aloft using either a relatively large aerodynamic blimp or a large parafoil kite. The choice between these platforms was dictated by wind velocity. The kite size was determined by the payload weight and the wind velocity. In addition to providing a brief history in CU involvement in kite/blimp atmospheric measurements, we will outline launching methods, tether winching techniques, and payload attachment schemes that were used during the WSMR campaign. Although very low wind conditions during the New Mexico test precluded the use of payloads up and down the kite tether under reasonable wind conditions. We also describe (1) the instrument package designed to measure in- situ temperature and velocity fluctuations, and (2) the 'basic payload' that measures standard atmospheric variables. System operation is illustrated via examples of the resulting data set.

  18. Towards a more realistic picture of in situ biocide actions: combining physiological and microscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Speranza, M; Wierzchos, J; De Los Rios, A; Perez-Ortega, S; Souza-Egipsy, V; Ascaso, C

    2012-11-15

    In this study, we combined chlorophyll a fluorescence (ChlaF) measurements, using pulse-amplitude-modulate (PAM) equipment, with scanning electron microscopy in backscattered electron mode (SEM-BSE) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images to evaluate the actions of Koretrel at lower concentrations on Verrucaria nigrescens colonising a dolostone. ChlaF measurements are good indicators of the damaging effects of biocides. However, these indicators only provide an incomplete view of the mechanism of biocides used to control biodeterioration agents. The death of the V. nigrescens photobiont at two biocide concentrations was revealed by PAM, SEM-BSE and TEM. Once Koretrel was applied, the Fv/Fm ratios markedly fell in the first few hours after the 1.5% treatment, and ratios for the 3% dilution remained close to zero throughout the study. The algal zone shows the plasmolysed appearance of the photobiont cells, and important aspects related to the action of the biocide on free and lichenised fungi were also detected using SEM-BSE. Many of the mycobiont cells had only their cell walls preserved; although, some fungal hyphae in lichen thalli and some microorganisms in endolithic clusters maintained lipid storage in their cytoplasm. These results indicated that the combination of physiological and microscopy techniques improves the assessment of biocide action in situ and this will help to optimize protocols in order to reduce the emission of these compounds to the environment. PMID:23063916

  19. Development of an in situ derivatization technique for rapid analysis of levoglucosan and polar compounds in atmospheric organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheesley, Rebecca J.; Mieritz, Mark; DeMinter, Jeff T.; Shelton, Brandon R.; Schauer, James J.

    2015-12-01

    A novel thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry (TD-GCMS) technique was developed for the analysis of levoglucosan and other polar compounds in atmospheric organic aerosol. The method employs an in situ derivatization to add tri-methylsilyl groups to alcohol functional groups on simple carbohydrates, like levoglucosan and sterols. The new method was then demonstrated on a set of 40 filter samples collected in Fresno, CA. The results from the in situ silylation TD-GCMS method were compared, using levoglucosan, with a solvent extraction, high-volume injection GCMS method resulting in an r2 = 0.91.

  20. Development of an in situ derivatization technique for rapid analysis of levoglucosan and polar compounds in atmospheric organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheesley, Rebecca J.; Mieritz, Mark; DeMinter, Jeff T.; Shelton, Brandon R.; Schauer, James J.

    2015-12-01

    A novel thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry (TD-GCMS) technique was developed for the analysis of levoglucosan and other polar compounds in atmospheric organic aerosol. The method employs an in situ derivatization to add tri-methylsilyl groups to alcohol functional groups on simple carbohydrates, like levoglucosan and sterols. The new method was then demonstrated on a set of 40 filter samples collected in Fresno, CA. The results from the in situ silylation TD-GCMS method were compared, using levoglucosan, with a solvent extraction, high-volume injection GCMS method resulting in an r2 = 0.91.

  1. Cyanea capillata bell kinematics analysis through corrected in situ imaging and modeling using strategic discretization techniques.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Alex A; Priya, Shashank

    2014-01-01

    Obtaining accurate kinematic data of animals is essential for many biological studies and bio-inspired engineering. Many animals, however, are either too large or too delicate to transport to controlled environments where accurate kinematic data can be easily obtained. Often, in situ recordings are the only means available but are often subject to multi-axis motion and relative magnification changes with time leading to large discrepancies in the animal kinematics. Techniques to compensate for these artifacts were applied to a large jellyfish, Cyanea capillata, freely swimming in ocean waters. The bell kinematics were captured by digitizing exumbrella profiles for two full swimming cycles. Magnification was accounted for by tracking a reference point on the ocean floor and by observing the C. capillata exumbrella arclength in order to have a constant scale through the swimming cycles. A linear fit of the top bell section was used to find the body angle with respect to the camera coordinate system. Bell margin trajectories over two swimming cycles confirmed the accuracy of the correction techniques. The corrected profiles were filtered and interpolated to provide a set of time-dependent points along the bell. Discrete models of the exumbrella were used to analyze the bell kinematics. Exumbrella discretization was conducted using three different methods. Fourier series were fitted to the discretized models and subsequently used to analyze the bell kinematics of the C. capillata. The analysis showed that the bell did not deform uniformly over time with different segments lagging behind each other. Looping of the bell trajectory between contraction and relaxation was also present through most of the exumbrella. The bell margin had the largest looping with an outer path during contraction and inner path during relaxation. The subumbrella volume was approximated based on the exumbrella kinematics and was found to increase during contraction. PMID:25541980

  2. Cyanea capillata Bell Kinematics Analysis through Corrected In Situ Imaging and Modeling Using Strategic Discretization Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Alex A.; Priya, Shashank

    2014-01-01

    Obtaining accurate kinematic data of animals is essential for many biological studies and bio-inspired engineering. Many animals, however, are either too large or too delicate to transport to controlled environments where accurate kinematic data can be easily obtained. Often, in situ recordings are the only means available but are often subject to multi-axis motion and relative magnification changes with time leading to large discrepancies in the animal kinematics. Techniques to compensate for these artifacts were applied to a large jellyfish, Cyanea capillata, freely swimming in ocean waters. The bell kinematics were captured by digitizing exumbrella profiles for two full swimming cycles. Magnification was accounted for by tracking a reference point on the ocean floor and by observing the C. capillata exumbrella arclength in order to have a constant scale through the swimming cycles. A linear fit of the top bell section was used to find the body angle with respect to the camera coordinate system. Bell margin trajectories over two swimming cycles confirmed the accuracy of the correction techniques. The corrected profiles were filtered and interpolated to provide a set of time-dependent points along the bell. Discrete models of the exumbrella were used to analyze the bell kinematics. Exumbrella discretization was conducted using three different methods. Fourier series were fitted to the discretized models and subsequently used to analyze the bell kinematics of the C. capillata. The analysis showed that the bell did not deform uniformly over time with different segments lagging behind each other. Looping of the bell trajectory between contraction and relaxation was also present through most of the exumbrella. The bell margin had the largest looping with an outer path during contraction and inner path during relaxation. The subumbrella volume was approximated based on the exumbrella kinematics and was found to increase during contraction. PMID:25541980

  3. The development of sensors and techniques for in situ water quality monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. C.

    1976-01-01

    Enzyme electrodes and chloride ion electrodes were investigated for in situ monitoring of water quality. Preliminary results show that miniature chloride ion electrodes and a phenol sensor are most promising in determining trace contaminants in water.

  4. Transmission Electron Microscope In Situ Straining Technique to Directly Observe Defects and Interfaces During Deformation in Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, B. M.; Cerreta, E. K.; McCabe, R. J.; Tomé, C. N.

    2015-08-01

    In situ straining was used to study deformation behavior of hexagonal close-packed (hcp) metals. Twinning and dislocation motion, both essential to plasticity in hcp materials, were observed. Typically, these processes are characterized postmortem by examining remnant microstructural features after straining has occurred. By imposing deformation during imaging, direct observation of active deformation mechanisms is possible. This work focuses on straining of structural metals in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), and a recently developed technique that utilizes familiar procedures and equipment to increase ease of experiments. In situ straining in a TEM presents several advantages over conventional postmortem characterization, most notably time resolution of deformation and streamlined identification of active deformation mechanisms. Drawbacks to the technique and applicability to other studies are also addressed. In situ straining is used to study twin boundary motion in hcp magnesium. A twin was observed during tensile and compressive loading. Twin-dislocation interactions are directly observed. Notably, dislocations are observed to remain mobile, even after multiple interactions with twin boundaries; this result suggests that Basinki's dislocation transformation mechanism by twinning is not present in hcp metals. The coupling of in situ straining with traditional postmortem characterization yields more detailed information about material behavior during deformation than either technique alone.

  5. Transmission Electron Microscope In Situ Straining Technique to Directly Observe Defects and Interfaces During Deformation in Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, Benjamin M.; Cerreta, E. K.; McCabe, R. J.; Tomé, C. N.

    2015-05-14

    In-situ straining was used to study deformation behavior of hexagonal close-packed (hcp) metals.Twinning and dislocation motion, both essential to plasticity in hcp materials, were observed.Typically, these processes are characterized post-mortem by examining remnant microstructural features after straining has occurred. By imposing deformation during imaging, direct observation of active deformation mechanisms is possible. This work focuses on straining of structural metals in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), and a recently developed technique that utilizes familiar procedures and equipment to increase ease of experiments. In-situ straining in a TEM presents several advantages over conventional post-mortem characterization, most notably time-resolution of deformation and streamlined identification of active deformation mechanisms. Drawbacks to the technique and applicability to other studies are also addressed. In-situ straining is used to study twin boundary motion in hcp magnesium. A {101¯2} twin was observed during tensile and compressive loading. Twin-dislocation interactions are directly observed. Notably, dislocations are observed to remain mobile, even after multiple interactions with twin boundaries, a result which suggests that Basinki’s dislocation transformation mechanism by twinning is not present in hcp metals. The coupling of in-situ straining with traditional post-mortem characterization yields more detailed information about material behavior during deformation than either technique alone.

  6. Transmission Electron Microscope In Situ Straining Technique to Directly Observe Defects and Interfaces During Deformation in Magnesium

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Morrow, Benjamin M.; Cerreta, E. K.; McCabe, R. J.; Tomé, C. N.

    2015-05-14

    In-situ straining was used to study deformation behavior of hexagonal close-packed (hcp) metals.Twinning and dislocation motion, both essential to plasticity in hcp materials, were observed.Typically, these processes are characterized post-mortem by examining remnant microstructural features after straining has occurred. By imposing deformation during imaging, direct observation of active deformation mechanisms is possible. This work focuses on straining of structural metals in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), and a recently developed technique that utilizes familiar procedures and equipment to increase ease of experiments. In-situ straining in a TEM presents several advantages over conventional post-mortem characterization, most notably time-resolution of deformation andmore » streamlined identification of active deformation mechanisms. Drawbacks to the technique and applicability to other studies are also addressed. In-situ straining is used to study twin boundary motion in hcp magnesium. A {101¯2} twin was observed during tensile and compressive loading. Twin-dislocation interactions are directly observed. Notably, dislocations are observed to remain mobile, even after multiple interactions with twin boundaries, a result which suggests that Basinki’s dislocation transformation mechanism by twinning is not present in hcp metals. The coupling of in-situ straining with traditional post-mortem characterization yields more detailed information about material behavior during deformation than either technique alone.« less

  7. Applying Formal Verification Techniques to Ambient Assisted Living Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benghazi, Kawtar; Visitación Hurtado, María; Rodríguez, María Luisa; Noguera, Manuel

    This paper presents a verification approach based on timed traces semantics and MEDISTAM-RT [1] to check the fulfillment of non-functional requirements, such as timeliness and safety, and assure the correct functioning of the Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) systems. We validate this approach by its application to an Emergency Assistance System for monitoring people suffering from cardiac alteration with syncope.

  8. Following the Transient Reactions in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries Using In an In Situ Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jie; Hu, Jian Z.; Chen, Honghao; Vijayakumar, M.; Zheng, Jianming; Pan, Huilin; Walter, Eric D.; Hu, Mary Y.; Deng, Xuchu; Feng, Ju; Liaw, Bor Yann; Gu, Meng; Deng, Zhiqun; Lu, Dongping; Xu, Suochang; Wang, Chong M.; Liu, Jun

    2015-05-13

    Li-S batteries hold great potential for next-generation, large-format power source applications; yet, the fundamental understanding of the electrochemical reaction pathways remains lacking to enable their functionality as promised. Here, in situ NMR technique employing a specially designed cylindrical micro battery was used to monitor the chemical environments around Li+ ions during repetitive charge-discharge process and track the transient electrochemical and chemical reactions occurring in the whole Li-S system. The in situ NMR provides real time, quantitative information related to the temporal concentration variations of the polysulfides with various chain lengths, providing important clues for the reaction pathways during both discharge and charge processes. The in-situ technique also reveals that redox reactions may involve transient species that are difficult to detect in ex-situ NMR study. Intermediate species such as charged free radicals may play an important role in the formation of the polysulfide products. Additionally, in situ NMR measurement simultaneously reveals vital information on the 7Li chemical environments in the electrochemical and parasitic reactions on the lithium anode that promotes the understanding of the failure mechanism in the Li-S system. These new insights could help design effective strategies to accelerate the development of Li-S battery technology.

  9. Verification and validation in railway signalling engineering - an application of enterprise systems techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiangxian; Wang, Dong; Huang, Hai; Wang, Zheng

    2014-07-01

    Verification and validation of a railway signalling system is a crucial part of the workflow in railway signalling enterprises. Typically, the verification and validation of this type of safety-critical system is performed by means of an on-site test, which leads to a low efficiency and high costs. A novel method for the verification and validation of a railway signalling system is proposed as an application of the enterprise information system (EIS) technique. In this application, the EIS and the simulation test platform are combined together, which enhances the coherence and consistency of the information exchange between the system development and the system verification, to improve the work efficiency. The simulation and auto-test technology used in the system verification also lowers the human and financial costs.

  10. Techniques for assessing the performance of in situ bioreduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides in contaminated subsurface environments

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, P.M.; Watson, D.B.; Blake, D.A.; Beard, L.P.; Brooks, S.C.; Carley, J.M.; Criddle, C.S.; Doll, W.E.; Fields, M.W.; Fendorf, S.E.; Geesey, G.G.; Ginder-Vogel, M.; Hubbard, S.S.; Istok, J.D.; Kelly, S.; Kemner, K.M.; Peacock, A.D.; Spalding, B.P.; White, D.C.; Wolf, A.; Wu, W.; Zhou, J.

    2004-11-14

    monitoring of coupled hydrological, geochemical/geophysical, and microbial processes. In the following manuscript we will (1) discuss contaminant fate and transport problems in humid regimes, (2) efforts to immobilize metals and radionuclides in situ via bioremediation, and (3) state-of-the-art techniques for assessing the performance of in situ bioreduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides. These included (a) in situ solution and solid phase monitoring, (b) in situ and laboratory microbial community analysis, (c) noninvasive geophysical methods, and (d) solid phase speciation via high resolution spectroscopy.

  11. Techniques for Assessing the Performance of In Situ Bioreduction and Immobilization of Metals and Radionuclides in Contaminated Subsurface Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, D. B.; Jardine, P. M.

    2005-05-01

    monitoring of coupled hydrological, geochemical/geophysical, and microbial processes. In the following presentation we will (1) discuss contaminant fate and transport problems in humid regimes, (2) efforts to immobilize metals and radionuclides in situ via bioremediation, and (3) state-of -the-art techniques for assessing the performance of in situ bioreduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides. These included (a) in situ solution and solid phase monitoring, (b) in situ and laboratory microbial community analysis, (c) noninvasive geophysical methods, and (d) solid phase speciation via high resolution spectroscopy.

  12. Software Validation, Verification, and Testing Technique and Tool Reference Guide. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Patricia B., Ed.

    Intended as an aid in the selection of software techniques and tools, this document contains three sections: (1) a suggested methodology for the selection of validation, verification, and testing (VVT) techniques and tools; (2) summary matrices by development phase usage, a table of techniques and tools with associated keywords, and an…

  13. Verification of a numerical simulation technique for natural convection

    SciTech Connect

    Gadgil, A.; Bauman, F.; Altmayer, E.; Kammerud, R.C.

    1983-03-01

    The present paper describes a verification of CONVEC2 for single-zone geometries by comparison with the results of two natural convection experiments performed in small-scale rectangular enclosures. These experiments were selected because of the high Rayleigh numbers obtained and the small heat loss through the insulated surfaces. Comparisons are presented for (1) heat transfer rates, (2) fluid temperature profiles, and (3) surface heat flux distributions.

  14. Investigation of cleanliness verification techniques for rocket engine hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritzemeier, Marilyn L.; Skowronski, Raymund P.

    1995-01-01

    Oxidizer propellant systems for liquid-fueled rocket engines must meet stringent cleanliness requirements for particulate and nonvolatile residue. These requirements were established to limit residual contaminants which could block small orifices or ignite in the oxidizer system during engine operation. Limiting organic residues in high pressure oxygen systems is particularly important. The current method of cleanliness verification used by Rocketdyne requires an organic solvent flush of the critical hardware surfaces. The solvent is filtered and analyzed for particulate matter, followed by gravimetric determination of the nonvolatile residue (NVR) content of the filtered solvent. The organic solvents currently specified for use (1,1,1-trichloroethane and CFC-113) are ozone-depleting chemicals slated for elimination by December 1995. A test program is in progress to evaluate alternative methods for cleanliness verification that do not require the use of ozone-depleting chemicals and that minimize or eliminate the use of solvents regulated as hazardous air pollutants or smog precursors. Initial results from the laboratory test program to evaluate aqueous-based methods and organic solvent flush methods for NVR verification are provided and compared with results obtained using the current method. Evaluation of the alternative methods was conducted using a range of contaminants encountered in the manufacture of rocket engine hardware.

  15. Investigation of Cleanliness Verification Techniques for Rocket Engine Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritzemeier, Marilyn L.; Skowronski, Raymund P.

    1994-01-01

    Oxidizer propellant systems for liquid-fueled rocket engines must meet stringent cleanliness requirements for particulate and nonvolatile residue. These requirements were established to limit residual contaminants which could block small orifices or ignite in the oxidizer system during engine operation. Limiting organic residues in high pressure oxygen systems, such as in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), is particularly important. The current method of cleanliness verification for the SSME uses an organic solvent flush of the critical hardware surfaces. The solvent is filtered and analyzed for particulate matter followed by gravimetric determination of the nonvolatile residue (NVR) content of the filtered solvent. The organic solvents currently specified for use (1, 1, 1-trichloroethane and CFC-113) are ozone-depleting chemicals slated for elimination by December 1995. A test program is in progress to evaluate alternative methods for cleanliness verification that do not require the use of ozone-depleting chemicals and that minimize or eliminate the use of solvents regulated as hazardous air pollutants or smog precursors. Initial results from the laboratory test program to evaluate aqueous-based methods and organic solvent flush methods for NVR verification are provided and compared with results obtained using the current method. Evaluation of the alternative methods was conducted using a range of contaminants encountered in the manufacture of rocket engine hardware.

  16. In-situ groundwater aeration as an effective technique for remediation of petroleum-contaminated aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, B.W.; Hoffman, G.D. ); Gan, D.R. )

    1994-08-01

    Petroleum contamination of groundwater is a widespread occurrence and is traditionally remediated using groundwater extraction with surface treatment. This remediation scheme is ineffective due to irregular groundwater flow paths, and the low solubility and high soil sorption tendencies of petroleum products in the subsurface. In-situ groundwater aeration, sometimes referred to as air sparging, provides a more effective approach. In-situ groundwater aeration technology takes advantage of the high volatility and biodegradability of many health concerned petroleum constituents. By injecting air into the subsurface, volatile organic compounds readily partition into the vapor phase and are subsequently transported to the vadose zone for collection by a soil vapor extraction system. The system also provides sufficient amounts of oxygen to the groundwater to promote biodegradation of petroleum contaminants. Development of an in-situ groundwater aeration system for petroleum releases within a regulatory framework includes several steps. First, site specific fate and transport mechanisms relevant to petroleum releases must be evaluated. Next, key design parameters, such as injection well construction, well locations, and air injection rates are discussed. Approximate capital, operation, and maintenance costs are given along with typical system remedial time frames. A case history involving a gasoline release from an underground storage tank is presented to illustrate the development and success of an in-situ aeration system.

  17. IMPROVED FLOTATION TECHNIQUE FOR MICROSCOPY OF 'IN SITU' SOIL AND SEDIMENT MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An improved flotation method for microscopical examination of in situ soil and sediment microorganisms was developed. Microbial cells were released into gel-like flotation films that were stripped from soil and sediment aggregates as these aggregates were submerged in 0.5% soluti...

  18. Simultaneous in situ Optical Monitoring Techniques during Crystal Growth of ZnSe by Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, C.- H.; Feth, S.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1998-01-01

    ZnSe crystals grown in sealed ampoules by the physical vapor transport method were monitored in situ using three techniques, simultaneously. A Michelson interferometer was set-up to observe the growth rate and surface morphological evolution. An interference pattern (interferogram) is formed by the interaction between the reflection of a HeNe laser (632.8 nm wavelength) off the crystal-vapor interface and a reference beam from the same laser. Preliminary results indicate that the rate of growth/thermal-etching can be calculated using analog data acquisition and simple fringe counting techniques. Gross surface features may also be observed using a digital frame grabber and fringe analysis software. The second in situ technique uses optical absorption to determine the partial pressures of the vapor species. The Se2 and Zn vapor species present in the sealed ampoule absorb light at characteristic wavelengths. The optical absorption is determined by monitoring the light intensity difference between the sample and reference beams. The Se2 Partial pressure profile along the length of the ampoule was estimated from the vibronic absorption peaks at 340.5, 350.8, 361.3 and 379.2 nm using the Beer's law constants established in the calibration runs of pure Se. Finally, because the high temperature crystal growth furnace contains windows, in situ visual observation of the growing crystal is also possible. The use of these techniques not only permits in situ investigation of high temperature vapor growth of semiconductors, but also offers the potential for real time feed back on the growing crystal and allows the possibility of actively controlling the growth process.

  19. High temperature in-situ observations of multi-segmented metal nanowires encapsulated within carbon nanotubes by in-situ filling technique

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Multi-segmented one-dimensional metal nanowires were encapsulated within carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through in-situ filling technique during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and environmental TEM were employed to characterize the as-prepared sample at room temperature and high temperature. The selected area electron diffractions revealed that the Pd4Si nanowire and face-centered-cubic Co nanowire on top of the Pd nanowire were encapsulated within the bottom and tip parts of the multiwall CNT, respectively. Although the strain-induced deformation of graphite walls was observed, the solid-state phases of Pd4Si and Co-Pd remain even at above their expected melting temperatures and up to 1,550 ± 50°C. Finally, the encapsulated metals were melted and flowed out from the tip of the CNT after 2 h at the same temperature due to the increase of internal pressure of the CNT. PMID:22873841

  20. European methodology for testing the airborne sound insulation characteristics of noise barriers in situ: experimental verification and comparison with laboratory data

    PubMed

    Garai; Guidorzi

    2000-09-01

    In the frame of the 1994-1997 Standard, Measurement and Testing program, the European Commission funded a research project, named Adrienne, to define new test methods for measuring the intrinsic characteristics of road traffic noise reducing devices in situ. The research team produced innovative methods for testing the sound reflection/absorption and the airborne sound insulation characteristics of noise barriers. These methods are now under consideration at CEN (European Committee for Standardization), to become European standards. The present work reports a detailed verification of the test method for airborne sound insulation over a selection of 17 noise barriers, representative of the Italian and European production. The samples were tested both outdoors, using the new Adrienne method, and in laboratory, following the European standard EN 1793-2. In both cases the single number rating for airborne sound insulation recommended by the European standard was calculated. The new method proved to be easy to use and reliable for all kinds of barriers. It has been found sensitive to quality of mounting, presence of seals, and other details typical of outdoor installations. The comparison between field and laboratory results shows a good correlation, while existing differences can be explained with the different sound fields and mounting conditions between the outdoor and laboratory tests. It is concluded that the Adrienne method is adequate for its intended use. PMID:11008808

  1. Impact of Delivery Techniques and Timing on Science from In-Situ Vehicles at Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, Thomas R.; Strange, N. J.; TSSM Study Team

    2008-09-01

    NASA and ESA are currently conducting studies of a potential collaborative flagship mission Titan, Enceladus, and the Saturn system. The Saturn mission study, named the "Titan Saturn System Mission" (TSSM) study until an official name is adopted, is a combination of the "Titan and Enceladus Mission" (TandEM) proposed to and accepted for study by ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015-25 Program, and restructurings of two NASA flagship mission concept studies performed in 2007, "Titan Explorer" and "Enceladus Explorer". The combined mission is reminiscent of the Cassini/Huygens (CH) collaboration. It would have a NASA Titan-orbiting element and one or more ESA in situ elements that could be carried to Titan by the NASA element. There are multiple architecture options for implementing such a mission, and those architectures influence the options for delivering and supporting the ESA in situ elements. For instance, the decision to launch all elements on one launch vehicle, or to launch the NASA and ESA elements separately, greatly influences the options for delivery timing. In turn, the suite of options for delivery and support (which go beyond timing), especially constraints on timing that arise from them, influence the science return expected from the in situ elements. If the common launch architecture is chosen there are five primary options for effecting delivery of the in situ elements, mostly tied to timing of the delivery: upon Saturn approach, just after Saturn orbit insertion (SOI), during pumpdown, just before Titan orbit insertion (TOI), and after TOI. Each carries implications for how much mass can be delivered, what locations on Titan can be targeted, and how much science data might be returned to Earth. For all the primary architectural options, the presentation will discuss the ramifications of these differences on the science to be achieved. This work is funded by NASA.

  2. Science implications of delivery techniques and timing for in situ vehicles at Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, T.; Strange, N.

    2008-09-01

    NASA and ESA are currently conducting studies of a potential collaborative flagship mission either to Titan, Enceladus, and the Saturn system, or to Europa and the Jupiter system. The Saturn mission study, named the "Titan Saturn System Mission" (TSSM) study until an official name is adopted, is a combination of the "Titan and Enceladus Mission" (TandEM) [1] proposed to and accepted for study by ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015-25 Program, and restructurings of two NASA flagship mission concept studies, "Titan Explorer" [2] and "Enceladus Explorer" [3]. The combined mission is reminiscent of the Cassini/Huygens (CH) collaboration. It would have a NASA Titan-orbiting element and one or more ESA in situ elements that could be carried to Titan by the NASA element. There are multiple architecture options for implementing such a mission, and those architectures influence the options for delivering and supporting the ESA in situ elements. In turn, the options for delivery and support, especially constraints on timing that arise from them, influence the science return expected from the in situ elements.

  3. A comprehensive approach for the assessment of in-situ pavement density using GPR technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plati, Christina; Georgiou, Panos; Loizos, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Proper construction of the asphalt pavement is a prerequisite to developing a long lasting roadway that does not require extensive future maintenance. This goal is achieved by verifying that design specifications are met through the use of quality assurance (QA) practices. The in-situ density is regarded as one of the most important controls used to ensure that a pavement being placed is of high quality because it is a good indicator of future performance. In-situ density is frequently assessed utilizing one or more of the following three methods: cores, nuclear density gauge measurements or non-nuclear density gauge measurements. Each of the above mentioned methods, however, have their distinct disadvantages. Cores, for example, are generally considered to be the most accurate means of measuring in-situ density, however, they are a time consuming and destructive test that introduces a defect into asphalt pavements. Because of the destructive nature associated with coring, contractors and agencies have alternatively used non-destructive nuclear and non-nuclear density gauges for quality control purposes. These instruments allow for a more rapid assessment of the in-situ density, allowing measurements to be taken even during the pavement's construction. The disadvantage of these gauges are that they provide density readings only at discrete locations of the asphalt pavement mat, while no consensus exists among pavement researchers on the proper correlation between the gauges and core density. In recent years, numerous alternative methods have been introduced for the assessment of in-situ density, both during asphalt pavement construction and afterwards. These methods include, amongst others, intelligent compaction, thermal imaging and ground penetrating radar (GPR). Among these methods, GPR has been defined as both a technically feasible and promising method for the nondestructive, rapid, and continuous evaluation of in-situ asphalt pavement density based on

  4. Synchrotron Techniques for in-situ Characterization of Hydrogen Storage Materials and Their Applications to NaAlH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yan; Rijssenbeek, Job T.; Morris, William; Heward, William; Smentkowski, Vincent; Hanson, Jon; Wang, Xianqin; Chupas, Peter; Lee, Peter; Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Jensen, Craig M.

    2004-03-01

    Several synchrotron techniques, including time-resolved powder diffraction (XRD), X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) and Rapid Acquisition Pair-Distribution Function (RA-PDF) analysis, for in-situ characterization of hydrogen storage materials will be discussed. Studies on NaAlH4 will be used as an example but these techniques are useful for hydrogen storage materials in general. We will demonstrate the capabilities of powder diffraction with high speed data acquisition (3 seconds per pattern) and under high-pressure (2000 psi) recently achieved using synchrotron sources, which are of importance for studying fast kinetics and high-pressure charging reactions. The superior angular resolution of synchrotron radiation allows the detection of subtle changes in crystallite size (such as the Al phase in the case of NaAlH_4) during cycling of these materials, which often is not possible with in-house sources. We will also describe in-situ XAFS at high-temperatures for studying the oxidation state and chemical environment of low level catalysts (such as Ti) commonly used in these materials. Finally, we will discuss the time-resolved RA-PDF technique, which follows the change of interatomic distances in the course of phase transformation. These techniques are complementary and each probes the microstructure of these materials from a unique perspective; the combined use of these techniques will open an unprecedented opportunity for improving our understanding of hydrogen storage materials.

  5. Measurement techniques for the verification of excess weapons materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tape, J.W.; Eccleston, G.W.; Yates, M.A.

    1998-12-01

    The end of the superpower arms race has resulted in an unprecedented reduction in stockpiles of deployed nuclear weapons. Numerous proposals have been put forward and actions have been taken to ensure the irreversibility of nuclear arms reductions, including unilateral initiatives such as those made by President Clinton in September 1993 to place fissile materials no longer needed for a deterrent under international inspection, and bilateral and multilateral measures currently being negotiated. For the technologist, there is a unique opportunity to develop the technical means to monitor nuclear materials that have been declared excess to nuclear weapons programs, to provide confidence that reductions are taking place and that the released materials are not being used again for nuclear explosive programs. However, because of the sensitive nature of these materials, a fundamental conflict exists between the desire to know that the bulk materials or weapon components in fact represent evidence of warhead reductions, and treaty commitments and national laws that require the protection of weapons design information. This conflict presents a unique challenge to technologists. The flow of excess weapons materials, from deployed warheads through storage, disassembly, component storage, conversion to bulk forms, and disposition, will be described in general terms. Measurement approaches based on the detection of passive or induced radiation will be discussed along with the requirement to protect sensitive information from release to unauthorized parties. Possible uses of measurement methods to assist in the verification of arms reductions will be described. The concept of measuring attributes of items rather than quantitative mass-based inventory verification will be discussed along with associated information-barrier concepts required to protect sensitive information.

  6. SU-D-BRF-02: In Situ Verification of Radiation Therapy Dose Distributions From High-Energy X-Rays Using PET Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q; Kai, L; Wang, X; Hua, B; Chui, L; Wang, Q; Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the possibility of in situ verification of radiation therapy dose distributions using PET imaging based on the activity distribution of 11C and 15O produced via photonuclear reactions in patient irradiated by 45MV x-rays. Methods: The method is based on the photonuclear reactions in the most elemental composition {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O in body tissues irradiated by bremsstrahlung photons with energies up to 45 MeV, resulting primarily in {sup 11}C and {sup 15}O, which are positron-emitting nuclei. The induced positron activity distributions were obtained with a PET scanner in the same room of a LA45 accelerator (Top Grade Medical, Beijing, China). The experiments were performed with a brain phantom using realistic treatment plans. The phantom was scanned at 20min and 2-5min after irradiation for {sup 11}C and {sup 15}, respectively. The interval between the two scans was 20 minutes. The activity distributions of {sup 11}C and {sup 15}O within the irradiated volume can be separated from each other because the half-life is 20min and 2min for {sup 11}C and {sup 15}O, respectively. Three x-ray energies were used including 10MV, 25MV and 45MV. The radiation dose ranged from 1.0Gy to 10.0Gy per treatment. Results: It was confirmed that no activity was detected at 10 MV beam energy, which was far below the energy threshold for photonuclear reactions. At 25 MV x-ray activity distribution images were observed on PET, which needed much higher radiation dose in order to obtain good quality. For 45 MV photon beams, good quality activation images were obtained with 2-3Gy radiation dose, which is the typical daily dose for radiation therapy. Conclusion: The activity distribution of {sup 15}O and {sup 11}C could be used to derive the dose distribution of 45MV x-rays at the regular daily dose level. This method can potentially be used to verify in situ dose distributions of patients treated on the LA45 accelerator.

  7. Quartz Crystal Microbalance Technique for in Situ Analysis of Supersaturation in Cooling Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Shang; Kim, Jong-Min; Kim, Woo-Sik

    2016-06-01

    A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) is used as a novel in situ strategy for analyzing the supersaturation profile during cooling crystallization. The main concept is based on preventing any solid mass loading on the QCM sensor by modifying the sensor surface. As a result, the QCM responses only depend on the solution concentration changes during the crystallization. The proposed strategy is confirmed on the basis of an analysis of sulfamerazine (SMZ) crystallization. When the QCM sensor is modified using 11-amino-1-undecanethiol (AUT), crystal formation on the sensor is completely prevented due to a repulsive interaction between the -NH2 functional groups of the AUT and SMZ crystals. Thus, the QCM responses reflect only the property changes in the solution phase during the crystallization. The supersaturation in the solution is then estimated on the basis of the difference in the frequency shifts between the SMZ solution and a blank solution. The accuracy of the in situ QCM analysis of supersaturation is confirmed using an off-line gravimetric method. PMID:27161190

  8. Studies of ferroelectric heterostructure thin films, interfaces, and device-related processes via in situ analytical techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, S.; Auciello, O.; Dhote, A. M.; Gao, Y.; Gruen, D. M.; Im, J.; Irene, E. A.; Krauss, A. R.; Muller, A. H.; Ramesh, R.

    1999-06-29

    The science and technology of ferroelectric thin films has experienced an explosive development during the last ten years. Low-density non-volatile ferroelectric random access memories (NVFRAMS) are now incorporated in commercial products such as ''smart cards'', while high permittivity capacitors are incorporated in cellular phones. However, substantial work is still needed to develop materials integration strategies for high-density memories. We have demonstrated that the implementation of complementary in situ characterization techniques is critical to understand film growth and device processes relevant to device development. We are using uniquely integrated time of flight ion scattering and recoil spectroscopy (TOF-ISARS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) techniques to perform in situ, real-time studies of film growth processes in the high background gas pressure required to growth ferroelectric thin films. TOF-ISARS provides information on surface processes, while SE permits the investigation of buried interfaces as they are being formed. Recent studies on SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} (SBT) and Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1{minus}x}TiO{sub 3} (BST) film growth and interface processes are discussed. Direct imaging of ferroelectric domains under applied electric fields can provide valuable information to understand domain dynamics in ferroelectric films. We discuss results of piezoresponse scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging for nanoscale studies of polarization reversal and retention loss in Pb(Zr{sub x}Ti{sub 1{minus}x})O{sub 3} (PZT)-based capacitors. Another powerful technique suitable for in situ, real-time characterization of film growth processes and ferroelectric film-based device operation is based on synchrotrons X-ray scattering, which is currently being implemented at Argonne National Laboratory.

  9. In situ synthesis of lead sulfide nanoclusters on eggshell membrane fibers by an ambient bio-inspired technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Huilan; Han, Jie; Wang, Na; Dong, Qun; Zhang, Di; Zhang, Chunfu

    2008-02-01

    An ambient aqueous soakage technique is successfully developed to prepare PbS nanoclusters on eggshell membrane (ESM) fibers containing some active functional groups (hydroxyl, amine, imine, etc). Based on the biomaterial ESM serving as the reactive substrate and some ESM biomacromolecules acting as the surfactant, PbS nanocrystallites are in situ formed and further assembled into well-distributed nanoparticle aggregations. This moderate bio-inspired strategy would be of great value in preparing novel functional nanomaterials. The as-prepared hybrid PbS/ESM nanocomposites could have great potential for applications in semiconductor industries, optoelectronic fields, and nanostructured devices.

  10. A review of in situ propellant production techniques for solar system exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    Representative studies done in the area of extraterrestrial chemical production as it applies to solar system exploration are presented. A description of the In Situ Propellant Production (ISPP) system is presented. Various propellant combinations and direct applications along with the previously mentioned benefits and liens are discussed. A series of mission scenarios is presented which is studied in the greatest detail. A general description of the method(s) of analysis used to study each mission is provided. Each section will be closed by an assessment of the performance advantage, if any, that can be provided by ISPP. A final section briefly summarizes those missions which, as a result of the studies completed thus far, should see a sizable benefit from the use of ISPP.

  11. In situ electrical characterization of palladium-based single electron transistors made by electromigration technique

    SciTech Connect

    Arzubiaga, L.; Llopis, R.; Golmar, F.; Casanova, F.; Hueso, L. E.

    2014-11-15

    We report the fabrication of single electron transistors (SETs) by feedback-controlled electromigration of palladium and palladium-nickel alloy nanowires. We have optimized a gradual electromigration process for obtaining devices consisting of three terminals (source, drain and gate electrodes), which are capacitively coupled to a metallic cluster of nanometric dimensions. This metal nanocluster forms into the inter-electrode channel during the electromigration process and constitutes the active element of each device, acting as a quantum dot that rules the electron flow between source and drain electrodes. The charge transport of the as-fabricated devices shows Coulomb blockade characteristics and the source to drain conductance can be modulated by electrostatic gating. We have thus achieved the fabrication and in situ measurement of palladium-based SETs inside a liquid helium cryostat chamber.

  12. In situ non-invasive investigation on the painting techniques of early Meissen Stoneware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miliani, Costanza; Doherty, Brenda; Daveri, Alessia; Loesch, Anette; Ulbricht, Heike; Brunetti, Brunetto G.; Sgamellotti, Antonio

    2009-08-01

    In situ, non-invasive investigations by means of portable X-ray fluorescence and fibre optic reflectance mid-infrared (mid-FTIR) spectroscopy of painted Böttger Stoneware objects have been carried out through the MOLAB transnational access to the Porcelain Collection of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen in Dresden. It has been possible to gather information regarding the composition of the black glaze by applying a principal component analysis to the elemental analysis to distinguish between the variations of lead, iron and manganese compositions of each glaze. It has been furthermore feasible to combine molecular spectroscopy for characterization of the constituent painting materials, namely lead white as cerusite and hydrocerusite, the use of cinnabar, azurite and Prussian blue leading to a better knowledge of the state of conservation and utility of certain pigments that may give rise to chronology of the decorative artwork. The identification of oxalates namely whedellite and moolooite are assigned as degradation products relative to the decorative areas.

  13. Ensemble averaged surface normal impedance of material using an in-situ technique: preliminary study using boundary element method.

    PubMed

    Otsuru, Toru; Tomiku, Reiji; Din, Nazli Bin Che; Okamoto, Noriko; Murakami, Masahiko

    2009-06-01

    An in-situ measurement technique of a material surface normal impedance is proposed. It includes a concept of "ensemble averaged" surface normal impedance that extends the usage of obtained values to various applications such as architectural acoustics and computational simulations, especially those based on the wave theory. The measurement technique itself is a refinement of a method using a two-microphone technique and environmental anonymous noise, or diffused ambient noise, as proposed by Takahashi et al. [Appl. Acoust. 66, 845-865 (2005)]. Measured impedance can be regarded as time-space averaged normal impedance at the material surface. As a preliminary study using numerical simulations based on the boundary element method, normal incidence and random incidence measurements are compared numerically: results clarify that ensemble averaging is an effective mode of measuring sound absorption characteristics of materials with practical sizes in the lower frequency range of 100-1000 Hz, as confirmed by practical measurements. PMID:19507960

  14. Low-dose phase-based X-ray imaging techniques for in situ soft tissue engineering assessments.

    PubMed

    Izadifar, Zohreh; Honaramooz, Ali; Wiebe, Sheldon; Belev, George; Chen, Xiongbiao; Chapman, Dean

    2016-03-01

    In tissue engineering, non-invasive imaging of biomaterial scaffolds and tissues in living systems is essential to longitudinal animal studies for assessments without interrupting the repair process. Conventional X-ray imaging is inadequate for use in soft tissue engineering due to the limited absorption difference between the soft tissue and biomaterial scaffolds. X-ray phase-based imaging techniques that derive contrast from refraction or phase effects rather than absorption can provide the necessary contrast to see low-density biomaterial scaffolds and tissues in large living systems. This paper explores and compares three synchrotron phase-based X-ray imaging techniques-computed tomography (CT)-diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI), -analyzer based imaging (ABI), and -phase contrast imaging (PCI)-for visualization and characterization of low-density biomaterial scaffolds and tissues in situ for non-invasive soft tissue engineering assessments. Intact pig joints implanted with polycaprolactone scaffolds were used as the model to assess and compare the imaging techniques in terms of different qualitative and quantitative criteria. For long-term in vivo live animal imaging, different strategies for reducing the imaging radiation dose and scan time-reduced number of CT projections, region of interest, and low resolution imaging-were examined with the presented phase-based imaging techniques. The results demonstrated promising capabilities of the phase-based techniques for visualization of biomaterial scaffolds and soft tissues in situ. The low-dose imaging strategies were illustrated effective for reducing the radiation dose to levels appropriate for live animal imaging. The comparison among the imaging techniques suggested that CT-DEI has the highest efficiency in retaining image contrast at considerably low radiation doses. PMID:26761779

  15. In situ characterization of organic matter in two primitive chondrites through correlated microanalytical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wende, A. M.; Nittler, L.; Steele, A.; Herd, C. D.

    2009-12-01

    Primitive meteorites contain up to 2 wt % C, much of it in the form of insoluble organic matter (IOM). Bulk analyses have revealed the IOM to be marked by large D and 15N enrichments relative to terrestrial values. Isotopic imaging studies have revealed the presence of `hotspots’, sub-μm to μm-sized regions of IOM exhibiting extreme isotope enrichments. An interesting subpopulation of organic grains, ’nanoglobules’, which have hollow, spherical morphologies, is known to account for a portion of these hot spots. Previous work has suggested that nanoglobules can be identified in situ by native UV fluorescence. The isotopic enrichments are believed to point to low-T chemical fractionations either in the interstellar medium (ISM) or the outer regions of the early Solar System. As part of a larger study investigating the origin and evolution of IOM in the Solar System, a correlated, in situ, microanalytical approach was employed to characterize local isotopic and morphological heterogeneities in IOM in the highly primitive chondrites QUE 99177 (CR3) and Tagish Lake (C-ung). Previous NanoSIMS ion imaging of a QUE 99177 section revealed the spatial and isotopic distribution of C in the matrix with a spatial resolution of 200 nm. Manual definition of >3300 C-rich regions in the NanoSIMS images indicates that grains smaller than 1 μm across, which account for 80% of the IOM area, have a size distribution that is similar to estimates of the size distribution of carbonaceous dust in the diffuse ISM, supporting an interstellar origin for the IOM. Micro-Raman spectroscopy, which is highly sensitive to the degree of disorder in carbonaceous materials, was attempted on the same regions analyzed by NanoSIMS in QUE 99177. Unfortunately, surface damage due to both the prior SIMS analyses and removal of a prior C coat precluded acquisition of useful Raman spectra. Consequently, future correlated work will entail performing Raman analyses on uncoated samples prior to SIMS

  16. Simulator verification techniques study. Integrated simulator self test system concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, G.; Wenglinski, T. H.

    1974-01-01

    Software and hardware requirements for implementing hardware self tests are presented in support of the development of training and procedures development simulators for the space shuttle program. Self test techniques for simulation hardware and the validation of simulation performance are stipulated. The requirements of an integrated simulator self system are analyzed. Readiness tests, fault isolation tests, and incipient fault detection tests are covered.

  17. CT imaging techniques for two-phase and three-phase in-situ saturation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, B.C.; Brigham, W.E.; Castanier, L.M.

    1997-06-01

    The aim of this research is to use the SUPRI 3D steam injection laboratory model to establish a reliable method for 3-phase in-situ saturation measurements, and thereafter investigate the mechanism of steamflood at residual oil saturation. Demiral et al. designed and constructed a three dimensional laboratory model that can be used to measure temperature, pressure and heat loss data. The model is also designed so that its construction materials are not a limiting factor for CT scanning. We have used this model for our study. In this study, we saturated the model with mineral oil, and carried out waterflood until residual oil saturation. Steamflood was then carried out. A leak appeared at the bottom of the model. Despite this problem, the saturation results, obtained by using 2-phase and 3-phase saturation equations and obtained from the Cat scanner, were compared with the saturations obtained from material balance. The errors thus obtained were compared with those obtained by an error analysis carried out on the saturation equations. This report gives details of the experimental procedures, the data acquisition and data processing computer programs, and the analysis of a steamflood experiment carried out at residual oil saturation.

  18. A novel fluidized bed respirometric technique for determination of in situ biofilm kinetics.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Nabin; Nakhla, George; Zhu, Jesse

    2012-01-01

    A respirometric approach has been developed to determine heterotrophic biofilm kinetics using fluidized bioparticles--particles with attached biomass. Lava rock particles of 600 microm were used as a biomass carrier medium. The modified respirometer successfully estimates in situ biofilm kinetics of the bioparticles collected from a pilot-scale liquid-solid circulating fluidized bed (LSCFB) bioreactor. The observed maximum specific growth rates (micro(max)) of 3.69 +/- 0.44 d(-1) and biomass yields (Y(H)) of 0.36 +/- 0.03 g COD/g COD in the fluidized bed respirometers were significantly different from the micro(max) of 5.57-5.72 d(-1) and Y(H) of 0.54-0.59 g COD/g COD observed in the conventional respirometric tests for bioparticles and detached biomass. The higher Monod half-saturation coefficient (K(S)) of 186-219mg COD/L observed in the fluidized bed respirometers relative to the 49-58 mg COD/L in the conventional respirometers reveals the presence of mass transfer resistance in the LSCFB despite fluidization. Significantly reduced yields in the fluidized bed respirometers and the estimated maintenance coefficient of 1.16 d(-1) for the particulate biofilm in the LSCFB clearly emphasize that a substantial amount of substrate was utilized for cell maintenance at the low food to microorganism (S/X) ratio of 0.5 g COD/g VSS. PMID:22629617

  19. Computer-assisted techniques for the verification of the Chebyshev property of Abelian integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueras, Jordi-Lluís; Tucker, Warwick; Villadelprat, Jordi

    We develop techniques for the verification of the Chebyshev property of Abelian integrals. These techniques are a combination of theoretical results, analysis of asymptotic behavior of Wronskians, and rigorous computations based on interval arithmetic. We apply this approach to tackle a conjecture formulated by Dumortier and Roussarie in [F. Dumortier, R. Roussarie, Birth of canard cycles, Discrete Contin. Dyn. Syst. 2 (2009) 723-781], which we are able to prove for q≤2.

  20. In-situ technique for checking the calibration of platinum resistance thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Dillon-Townes, Lawrence A.

    1987-01-01

    The applicability of the self-heating technique for checking the calibration of platinum resistance thermometers located inside wind tunnels was investigated. This technique is based on a steady state measurement of resistance increase versus joule heating. This method was found to be undesirable, mainly because of the fluctuations of flow variables during any wind tunnel testing.

  1. In situ NMR and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance techniques reveal the structure of the electrical double layer in supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, John M.; Forse, Alexander C.; Tsai, Wan-Yu; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Grey, Clare P.

    2015-08-01

    Supercapacitors store charge through the electrosorption of ions on microporous electrodes. Despite major efforts to understand this phenomenon, a molecular-level picture of the electrical double layer in working devices is still lacking as few techniques can selectively observe the ionic species at the electrode/electrolyte interface. Here, we use in situ NMR to directly quantify the populations of anionic and cationic species within a working microporous carbon supercapacitor electrode. Our results show that charge storage mechanisms are different for positively and negatively polarized electrodes for the electrolyte tetraethylphosphonium tetrafluoroborate in acetonitrile; for positive polarization charging proceeds by exchange of the cations for anions, whereas for negative polarization, cation adsorption dominates. In situ electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance measurements support the NMR results and indicate that adsorbed ions are only partially solvated. These results provide new molecular-level insight, with the methodology offering exciting possibilities for the study of pore/ion size, desolvation and other effects on charge storage in supercapacitors.

  2. In situ NMR and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance techniques reveal the structure of the electrical double layer in supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John M; Forse, Alexander C; Tsai, Wan-Yu; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Grey, Clare P

    2015-08-01

    Supercapacitors store charge through the electrosorption of ions on microporous electrodes. Despite major efforts to understand this phenomenon, a molecular-level picture of the electrical double layer in working devices is still lacking as few techniques can selectively observe the ionic species at the electrode/electrolyte interface. Here, we use in situ NMR to directly quantify the populations of anionic and cationic species within a working microporous carbon supercapacitor electrode. Our results show that charge storage mechanisms are different for positively and negatively polarized electrodes for the electrolyte tetraethylphosphonium tetrafluoroborate in acetonitrile; for positive polarization charging proceeds by exchange of the cations for anions, whereas for negative polarization, cation adsorption dominates. In situ electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance measurements support the NMR results and indicate that adsorbed ions are only partially solvated. These results provide new molecular-level insight, with the methodology offering exciting possibilities for the study of pore/ion size, desolvation and other effects on charge storage in supercapacitors. PMID:26099110

  3. Development of laser-based techniques for in situ characterization of the first wall in ITER and future fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipps, V.; Malaquias, A.; Hakola, A.; Karhunen, J.; Maddaluno, G.; Almaviva, S.; Caneve, L.; Colao, F.; Fortuna, E.; Gasior, P.; Kubkowska, M.; Czarnecka, A.; Laan, M.; Lissovski, A.; Paris, P.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Petersson, P.; Rubel, M.; Huber, A.; Zlobinski, M.; Schweer, B.; Gierse, N.; Xiao, Q.; Sergienko, G.

    2013-09-01

    Analysis and understanding of wall erosion, material transport and fuel retention are among the most important tasks for ITER and future devices, since these questions determine largely the lifetime and availability of the fusion reactor. These data are also of extreme value to improve the understanding and validate the models of the in vessel build-up of the T inventory in ITER and future D-T devices. So far, research in these areas is largely supported by post-mortem analysis of wall tiles. However, access to samples will be very much restricted in the next-generation devices (such as ITER, JT-60SA, W7-X, etc) with actively cooled plasma-facing components (PFC) and increasing duty cycle. This has motivated the development of methods to measure the deposition of material and retention of plasma fuel on the walls of fusion devices in situ, without removal of PFC samples. For this purpose, laser-based methods are the most promising candidates. Their feasibility has been assessed in a cooperative undertaking in various European associations under EFDA coordination. Different laser techniques have been explored both under laboratory and tokamak conditions with the emphasis to develop a conceptual design for a laser-based wall diagnostic which is integrated into an ITER port plug, aiming to characterize in situ relevant parts of the inner wall, the upper region of the inner divertor, part of the dome and the upper X-point region.

  4. Recent trends in non-invasive in situ techniques to monitor bacterial colonies in solid (model) food

    PubMed Central

    Lobete, María M.; Fernandez, Estefania Noriega; Van Impe, Jan F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Planktonic cells typically found in liquid systems, are routinely used for building predictive models or assessing the efficacy of food preserving technologies. However, freely suspended cells often show different susceptibility to environmental hurdles than colony cells in solid matrices. Limited oxygen, water and nutrient availability, metabolite accumulation and physical constraints due to cell immobilization in the matrix, are main factors affecting cell growth. Moreover, intra- and inter-colony interactions, as a consequence of the initial microbial load in solid systems, may affect microbial physiology. Predictive food microbiology approaches are moving toward a more realistic resemblance to food products, performing studies in structured solid systems instead of liquids. Since structured systems promote microbial cells to become immobilized and grow as colonies, it is essential to study the colony behavior, not only for food safety assurance systems, but also for understanding cell physiology and optimizing food production processes in solid matrices. Traditionally, microbial dynamics in solid systems have been assessed with a macroscopic approach by applying invasive analytical techniques; for instance, viable plate counting, which yield information about overall population. In the last years, this approach is being substituted by more mechanistically inspired ones at mesoscopic (colony) and microscopic (cell) levels. Therefore, non-invasive and in situ monitoring is mandatory for a deeper insight into bacterial colony dynamics. Several methodologies that enable high-throughput data collection have been developed, such as microscopy-based techniques coupled with image analysis and OD-based measurements in microplate readers. This research paper provides an overview of non-invasive in situ techniques to monitor bacterial colonies in solid (model) food and emphasizes their advantages and inconveniences in terms of accuracy, performance and output information

  5. Evaluation of three new laser spectrometer techniques for in-situ carbon monoxide measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellweger, C.; Steinbacher, M.; Buchmann, B.

    2012-07-01

    Long-term time series of the atmospheric composition are essential for environmental research and thus require compatible, multi-decadal monitoring activities. However, the current data quality objectives of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) for carbon monoxide (CO) in the atmosphere are very challenging to meet with the measurement techniques that have been used until recently. During the past few years, new spectroscopic techniques came on the market with promising properties for trace gas analytics. The current study compares three instruments that are recently commercially available (since 2011) with the up to now best available technique (vacuum UV fluorescence) and provides a link to previous comparison studies. The instruments were investigated for their performance regarding repeatability, reproducibility, drift, temperature dependence, water vapour interference and linearity. Finally, all instruments were examined during a short measurement campaign to assess their applicability for long-term field measurements. It could be shown that the new techniques provide a considerably better performance compared to previous techniques, although some issues such as temperature influence and cross sensitivities need further attention.

  6. Evaluation of new laser spectrometer techniques for in-situ carbon monoxide measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellweger, C.; Steinbacher, M.; Buchmann, B.

    2012-10-01

    Long-term time series of the atmospheric composition are essential for environmental research and thus require compatible, multi-decadal monitoring activities. The current data quality objectives of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) for carbon monoxide (CO) in the atmosphere are very challenging to meet with the measurement techniques that have been used until recently. During the past few years, new spectroscopic techniques came to market with promising properties for trace gas analytics. The current study compares three instruments that have recently become commercially available (since 2011) with the best currently available technique (Vacuum UV Fluorescence) and provides a link to previous comparison studies. The instruments were investigated for their performance regarding repeatability, reproducibility, drift, temperature dependence, water vapour interference and linearity. Finally, all instruments were examined during a short measurement campaign to assess their applicability for long-term field measurements. It could be shown that the new techniques perform considerably better compared to previous techniques, although some issues, such as temperature influence and cross sensitivities, need further attention.

  7. Neutron, fluorescence, and optical imaging: An in situ combination of complementary techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, D.; Egelhaaf, S. U.; Hermes, H. E.; Börgardts, M.; Müller, T. J. J.; Grünzweig, C.; Lehmann, E.

    2015-09-15

    An apparatus which enables the simultaneous combination of three complementary imaging techniques, optical imaging, fluorescence imaging, and neutron radiography, is presented. While each individual technique can provide information on certain aspects of the sample and their time evolution, a combination of the three techniques in one setup provides a more complete and consistent data set. The setup can be used in transmission and reflection modes and thus with optically transparent as well as opaque samples. Its capabilities are illustrated with two examples. A polymer hydrogel represents a transparent sample and the diffusion of fluorescent particles into and through this polymer matrix is followed. In reflection mode, the absorption of solvent by a nile red-functionalized mesoporous silica powder and the corresponding change in fluorescent signal are studied.

  8. Neutron, fluorescence, and optical imaging: An in situ combination of complementary techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, D.; Börgardts, M.; Grünzweig, C.; Lehmann, E.; Müller, T. J. J.; Egelhaaf, S. U.; Hermes, H. E.

    2015-09-01

    An apparatus which enables the simultaneous combination of three complementary imaging techniques, optical imaging, fluorescence imaging, and neutron radiography, is presented. While each individual technique can provide information on certain aspects of the sample and their time evolution, a combination of the three techniques in one setup provides a more complete and consistent data set. The setup can be used in transmission and reflection modes and thus with optically transparent as well as opaque samples. Its capabilities are illustrated with two examples. A polymer hydrogel represents a transparent sample and the diffusion of fluorescent particles into and through this polymer matrix is followed. In reflection mode, the absorption of solvent by a nile red-functionalized mesoporous silica powder and the corresponding change in fluorescent signal are studied.

  9. Neutron, fluorescence, and optical imaging: An in situ combination of complementary techniques.

    PubMed

    Wagner, D; Börgardts, M; Grünzweig, C; Lehmann, E; Müller, T J J; Egelhaaf, S U; Hermes, H E

    2015-09-01

    An apparatus which enables the simultaneous combination of three complementary imaging techniques, optical imaging, fluorescence imaging, and neutron radiography, is presented. While each individual technique can provide information on certain aspects of the sample and their time evolution, a combination of the three techniques in one setup provides a more complete and consistent data set. The setup can be used in transmission and reflection modes and thus with optically transparent as well as opaque samples. Its capabilities are illustrated with two examples. A polymer hydrogel represents a transparent sample and the diffusion of fluorescent particles into and through this polymer matrix is followed. In reflection mode, the absorption of solvent by a nile red-functionalized mesoporous silica powder and the corresponding change in fluorescent signal are studied. PMID:26429447

  10. System design and verification of the precession electron diffraction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Own, Christopher Su-Yan

    2005-07-01

    Bulk structural crystallography is generally a two-part process wherein a rough starting structure model is first derived, then later refined to give an accurate model of the structure. The critical step is the determination of the initial model. As materials problems decrease in length scale, the electron microscope has proven to be a versatile and effective tool for studying many problems. However, study of complex bulk structures by electron diffraction has been hindered by the problem of dynamical diffraction. This phenomenon makes bulk electron diffraction very sensitive to specimen thickness, and expensive equipment such as aberration-corrected scanning transmission microscopes or elaborate methodology such as high resolution imaging combined with diffraction and simulation are often required to generate good starting structures. The precession electron diffraction technique (PED), which has the ability to significantly reduce dynamical effects in diffraction patterns, has shown promise as being a "philosopher's stone" for bulk electron diffraction. However, a comprehensive understanding of its abilities and limitations is necessary before it can be put into widespread use as a standalone technique. This thesis aims to bridge the gaps in understanding and utilizing precession so that practical application might be realized. Two new PED systems have been built, and optimal operating parameters have been elucidated. The role of lens aberrations is described in detail, and an alignment procedure is given that shows how to circumvent aberration in order to obtain high-quality patterns. Multislice simulation is used for investigating the errors inherent in precession, and is also used as a reference for comparison to simple models and to experimental PED data. General trends over a large sampling of parameter space are determined. In particular, we show that the primary reflection intensity errors occur near the transmitted beam and decay with increasing angle and

  11. Verification of Experimental Techniques for Flow Surface Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissenden, Cliff J.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Ellis, John R.; Robinson, David N.

    1996-01-01

    The concept of a yield surface is central to the mathematical formulation of a classical plasticity theory. However, at elevated temperatures, material response can be highly time-dependent, which is beyond the realm of classical plasticity. Viscoplastic theories have been developed for just such conditions. In viscoplastic theories, the flow law is given in terms of inelastic strain rate rather than the inelastic strain increment used in time-independent plasticity. Thus, surfaces of constant inelastic strain rate or flow surfaces are to viscoplastic theories what yield surfaces are to classical plasticity. The purpose of the work reported herein was to validate experimental procedures for determining flow surfaces at elevated temperatures. Since experimental procedures for determining yield surfaces in axial/torsional stress space are well established, they were employed -- except inelastic strain rates were used rather than total inelastic strains. In yield-surface determinations, the use of small-offset definitions of yield minimizes the change of material state and allows multiple loadings to be applied to a single specimen. The key to the experiments reported here was precise, decoupled measurement of axial and torsional strain. With this requirement in mind, the performance of a high-temperature multi-axial extensometer was evaluated by comparing its results with strain gauge results at room temperature. Both the extensometer and strain gauges gave nearly identical yield surfaces (both initial and subsequent) for type 316 stainless steel (316 SS). The extensometer also successfully determined flow surfaces for 316 SS at 650 C. Furthermore, to judge the applicability of the technique for composite materials, yield surfaces were determined for unidirectional tungsten/Kanthal (Fe-Cr-Al).

  12. Use of noninvasive geophysical techniques for the In Situ Vitrification Program. Volume 1, Literature review: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Josten, N.E.; Marts, S.T.; Carpenter, G.S.

    1991-11-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a waste pit remediation technology that can potentially eliminate the need for pit excavation. The ISV program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) funded this study to evaluate geophysical techniques that might be useful for performing detailed screening of the materials, soil conditions, and local geology of waste pits targeted for remediation. The evaluation focuses on a specific set of characterization objectives developed by ISV engineers. The objectives are based on their assessment of safety, environmental, and cost efficiency issues associated with the ISV process. A literature review of geophysical case histories was conducted and a geophysical survey was performed at the INEL simulated waste pit so that the evaluation could be based on demonstrable results.

  13. Chemical composition and the nutritive value of pistachio epicarp (in situ degradation and in vitro gas production techniques)

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshizadeh, Somayeh; Taghizadeh, Akbar; Janmohammadi, Hossein; Alijani, Sadegh

    2014-01-01

    The nutritive value of pistachio epicarp (PE) was evaluated by in situ and in vitro techniques. Chemical analysis indicated that PE was high in crude protein (11.30%) and low in neutral detergent fiber (26.20%). Total phenols, total tannins, condensed tannins and hydrolysable tannins contents in PE were 8.29%, 4.48%, 0.49% and 3.79%, respectively. Ruminal dry matter and crude protein degradation after 48 hr incubation were 75.21% and 82.52%, respectively. The gas production volume at 48 hr for PE was 122.47 mL g-1DM. As a whole, adding polyethylene glycol (PEG) to PE increased (p < 0.05) gas production volumes, organic matter digestibility and the metabolizable energy that illustrated inhibitory effect of phenolics on rumen microbial fermentation and the positive influence of PEG on digestion PE. The results showed that PE possessed potentials to being used as feed supplements. PMID:25568691

  14. Observation of localized heating phenomena during microwave heating of mixed powders using in situ x-ray diffraction technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sabelström, N. Hayashi, M.; Watanabe, T.; Nagata, K.

    2014-10-28

    In materials processing research using microwave heating, there have been several observations of various phenomena occurring known as microwave effects. One significant example of such a phenomenon is increased reaction kinetics. It is believed that there is a possibility that this might be caused by localized heating, were some reactants would attain a higher than apparent temperature. To examine whether such thermal gradients are indeed possible, mixed powders of two microwave non-absorbers, alumina and magnesia, were mixed with graphite, a known absorber, and heated in a microwave furnace. During microwave irradiation, the local temperatures of the respective sample constituents were measured using an in situ x-ray diffraction technique. In the case of the alumina and graphite sample, a temperature difference of around 100 °C could be observed.

  15. Flow characterization of electroconvective micromixer with a nanoporous polymer membrane in-situ fabricated using a laser polymerization technique

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sangbeom; Song, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Electroconvection is known to cause strong convective mixing in a microchannel near a nanoporous membrane or a nanochannel in contact with an electrolyte solution due to the external electric field. This study addresses micromixer behavior subject to electroconvection occurring near a nanoporous membrane in-situ fabricated by a laser polymerization technique on a microfluidic chip. We found that the micromixer behavior can be categorized into three regimes. Briefly, the weak electroconvection regime is characterized by weak mixing performance at a low applied voltage and KCl concentration, whereas the strong electroconvection regime has a high mixing performance when the applied voltage and KCl concentration are moderately high. Finally, the incomplete electroconvection regime has an incomplete electric double-layer overlap in the nanopores of the membrane when the electrolyte concentration is very high. The mixing index reached 0.92 in the strong electroconvection regime. The detailed fabrication methods for the micromixer and characterization results are discussed in this paper. PMID:26064195

  16. Monitoring Nitrate, Chlorophyll, and CDOM Cycling in a Reservoir using In Situ Mapping Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    OConnor, J.; Showers, W. J.; Osburn, C. L.; DeMaster, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Degradation of surface waters due to increased nutrient loading and subsequent eutrophication is a persistent problem on a global scale. Expanding human populations and their associated development create increased pressure on local watersheds in terms of both point and non-point source pollution. In this study a suite of in situ sensors measuring nitrate concentration, chlorophyll a concentration (Chl a), and chromophoric dissolved organic material (CDOM) fluorescence were deployed from a rapidly moving boat (~32 km/h) in order to identify sources of nutrients and CDOM, and to determine their relationship to eutrophication symptoms in Falls Lake, North Carolina. In addition, water samples were collected throughout the lake and from tributaries of interest for laboratory analysis. Results indicated the three main tributaries at the north end of the lake were the important contributors of both nitrate and CDOM. While two of the three were degraded due to significant effluent discharge from Waste Water Treatment Plants, the third appeared to be impacted by diffuse nutrient sources. However, atmospheric deposition of nitrate and ammonium exceeded tributary input, and the net nutrient loading to the lake was dominated by sediment release of both ammonium and phosphate. No direct relationship between nitrate and Chl a concentrations was observed, but bays that sewage impacted rivers emptied into displayed elevated Chl a values. Water samples from both the lake and streams were analyzed for stable isotopic analysis of δ15N and δ18O composition and were consistent with waste as the primary source of nitrate. Samples were also analyzed for CDOM absorbance and fluorescence through the creation of Excitation and Emission Matrices (EEMs) and the development of a nine component PARAFAC model. Fluorescence values consistently declined from the north end of the lake to the southern end at the dam and water treatment plant intake. Absorbance values at 254 nm (a254) also showed

  17. Experimental verification of photon angular momentum and vorticity with radio techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburini, Fabrizio; Mari, Elettra; Thidé, Bo; Barbieri, Cesare; Romanato, Filippo

    2011-11-01

    The experimental evidence that radio techniques can be used for synthesizing and analyzing non-integer electromagnetic (EM) orbital angular momentum (OAM) of radiation is presented. The technique used amounts to sample, in space and time, the EM field vectors and digitally processing the data to calculate the vortex structure, the spatial phase distribution, and the OAM spectrum of the radiation. The experimental verification that OAM-carrying beams can be readily generated and exploited by using radio techniques paves the way to an entirely new paradigm of radar and radio communication protocols.

  18. ECR plasma cleaning: an in-situ processing technique for RF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, G.; Moeller, W-D.; Antoine, C.; Jiang, H.; Pechenezhskiy, I.; Cooley, L.; Khabiboulline, T.; Terechkine, Y.; Edwards, H.; Koeth, T.; Romanenko, A.; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept. /Jefferson Lab

    2008-01-01

    A condition for Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) can be established inside a fully assembled RF cavity without the need for removing high-power couplers. As such, plasma generated by this process can be used as a final cleaning step, or as an alternative cleaning step in place of other techniques. Tests showed filtered dry air plasma can successfully remove sulfur particles on niobium surface while the surface oxygen content remains intact.

  19. Characterization of Cathode Materials for Rechargeable Lithium Batteries using Synchrotron Based In Situ X-ray Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiao-Qing

    2007-05-23

    not be representative for the full picture of the structural changes during charge (discharge). In other words, the important information might be missed for those charge (discharge) states which were not selected for ex situ XRD studies. Secondly, the structure of the sample may have changed after removed from the cell. Finally, it is impossible to use the ex situ XRD to study the dynamic effects during high rate charge-discharge, which is crucial for the application of lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicle. A few in situ studies have been done using conventional x-ray tube sources. All of the in situ XRD studies using conventional x-ray tube sources have been done in the reflection mode in cells with beryllium windows. Because of the weak signals, data collection takes a long time, often several hundred hours for a single charge-discharge cycle. This long time data collection is not suitable for dynamic studies at all. Furthermore, in the reflection mode, the x-ray beam probes mainly the surface layer of the cathode materials. Iri collaboration with LG Chemical Ltd., BNL group designed and constructed the cells for in situ studies. LG Chemical provided several blended samples and pouch cells to BNL for preliminary in situ study. The LG Chemical provided help on integrate the blended cathode into these cells. The BNL team carried out in situ XAS and XRD studies on the samples and pouch cells provided by LG Chemical under normal charge-discharge conditions at elevated temperature.

  20. A chromism-based assay (CHROBA) technique for in situ detection of protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Tomizaki, Kin-ya; Jie, Xu; Mihara, Hisakazu

    2005-03-15

    A unique chromism-based assay technique (CHROBA) using photochromic spiropyran-containing peptides has been firstly established for detection of protein kinase A-catalyzed phosphorylation. The alternative method has advantages that avoid isolation and/or immobilization of kinase substrates to remove excess reagents including nonreactive isotope-labeled ATP or fluorescently-labeled anti-phosphoamino acid antibodies from the reaction mixture. Such a novel protocol based on thermocoloration of the spiropyran moiety in the peptide can offer not only an efficient screening method of potent kinase substrates but also a versatile analytical tool for monitoring other post-translational modification activities. PMID:15745830

  1. A Technique for Verification of Isocenter Position in Tangential Field Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhakar, Ramachandran Pande, Manish; Harsh, Kumar; Julka, Pramod K.; Ganesh, Tharmar; Rath, Goura K.

    2009-04-01

    Treatment verification and reproducibility of the breast treatment portals play a very important role in breast radiotherapy. We propose a simple technique to verify the planned isocenter position during treatment using an electronic portal imaging device. Ten patients were recruited in this study and (CT) computed tomography-based planning was performed with a conventional tangential field technique. For verification purposes, in addition to the standard medial (F1) and lateral (F2) tangential fields, a field (F3) perpendicular to the medial field was used for verification of the treatment portals. Lead markers were placed along the central axis of the 2 defined fields (F1 and F3) and the separation between the markers was measured on the portal images and verified with the marker separation on the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Any deviation will identify the shift in the planned isocenter position during treatment. The average deviation observed between the markers measured from the DRR and portal image was 1.6 and 2.1 mm, with a standard deviation of 0.4 and 0.9 mm for fields F1 and F3, respectively. The maximum deviation observed was 3.0 mm for field F3. This technique will be very useful in patient setup for tangential breast radiotherapy.

  2. Technique for measuring 14 CO 2 uptake by soil microorganisms in situ.

    PubMed

    Smith, D W; Fliermans, C B; Brock, T D

    1972-03-01

    Uptake of (14)CO(2) in soils due to algae or sulfur-oxidizing bacteria was examined by incubation of soil samples with gaseous (14)CO(2) and subsequent chemical oxidation of biologically fixed radioactive isotope to (14)CO(2) for detection with a liquid scintillation counting system. The (14)CO(2) was added to the soil in the gas phase so that no alteration of the moisture or ionic strength of the soil occurred. Wet oxidation of radioactive organic matter was carried out in sealed ampoules, and the (14)CO(2) produced was transferred to a phenethylamine-liquid scintillation counting system with a simply constructed apparatus. The technique is inexpensive and efficient and does not require elaborate traps since several possible interfering factors were found to have no harmful effects. Experiments in coal mine regions and in geothermal habitats have demonstrated the ecological applicability of this technique for measurement of CO(2) fixation by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and soil algae. PMID:4553805

  3. Electrochemical noise measurement: The definitive in-situ technique for corrosion applications?

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    A review is presented of electrochemical noise (EN), the generic term given to fluctuations of current and potential seen in high-temperature corrosion, molten salt corrosion, and aqueous corrosion. EN levels in corrosion and particularly localized corrosion are significantly greater than EN observed in redox systems. EN associated with corrosion is the result of stochastic pulses of current generated by, for example, sudden film rupture, crack propagation, discrete events involving metal dissolution at etch pits, grain boundaries and kink sites, and hydrogen discharge with gas bubble formation and detachment. EN in corrosion includes low-frequency, nonstationary, and weakly stationary processes; transients; and cyclic or oscillatory phenomena. The use of EN, obtained either by potentiostatic/galvanostatic measurements or at freely corroding potentials, has been shown to offer advantages over conventional DC and AC techniques in research studies, testing, and corrosion monitoring. In many cases, reaction mechanisms can be elucidated and corrosion rate information can be obtained. Assessment of individual transients, use of signal analysis techniques, modeling of ensembles of transients as developed for electrocrystallization studies, and use of the chaos theory have all been used in EN evaluations.

  4. Probabilistic risk assessment techniques help in identifying optimal equipment design for in-situ vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Lucero, V.; Meale, B.M.; Purser, F.E.

    1990-01-01

    The analysis discussed in this paper was performed as part of the buried waste remediation efforts at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The specific type of remediation discussed herein involves a thermal treatment process for converting contaminated soil and waste into a stable, chemically-inert form. Models of the proposed process were developed using probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) fault tree and event tree modeling techniques. The models were used to determine the appropriateness of the conceptual design by identifying potential hazards of system operations. Additional models were developed to represent the reliability aspects of the system components. By performing various sensitivities with the models, optimal design modifications are being identified to substantiate an integrated, cost-effective design representing minimal risk to the environment and/or public with maximum component reliability. 4 figs.

  5. Advancing in situ modeling of ICMEs: New techniques for new observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, T.; Reinard, Alysha A.; Lynch, Benjamin J.

    2013-04-01

    It is generally known that multispacecraft observations of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are more likely to reveal their three-dimensional structure than single-spacecraft observations. The launch of STEREO in October 2006 has greatly increased the number of multipoint ICME studies, but the field is still in its infancy. To date, many studies still use flux rope models that rely on single track observations through a vast, multifaceted structure, which oversimplifies the problem and hinders interpretation of the large-scale geometry. This oversimplification is especially problematic for multispacecraft ICME observations in which only one spacecraft observes a flux rope structure. To tackle these complex problems, we describe two new techniques and combine them to analyze two ICMEs observed at the twin STEREO spacecraft on 22-23 May 2007, when the spacecraft were separated by ˜ 9∘. We find a combination of non-force-free flux rope multispacecraft modeling, together with a new non-flux rope ICME plasma flow deflection model, better constrains the large-scale structure of these ICMEs. We also introduce a new spatial mapping technique that allows us to put multispacecraft observations and the new ICME model results in context with the convecting solar wind. What is distinctly different about this analysis is that it reveals aspects of ICME geometry and dynamics in a far more visually intuitive way than previously accomplished. In the case of the 22-23 May ICMEs, the analysis facilitates a more physical understanding of ICME large-scale structure, the location and geometry of flux rope substructures within these ICMEs, and their dynamic interaction with the ambient solar wind.

  6. In situ studies of pesticides photodegradation on soils using PD-TOFMS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, J. P.; Bejjani, A.; Nsouli, B.; Gardon, A.; Chovelon, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    As we have demonstrated that plasma desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PD-TOFMS) is well adapted to the direct characterization of pesticides adsorbed on agricultural soils the technique has been applied for the first time to the study of their evolution under sunlight-like irradiation. Two pesticides have been selected: norflurazon which is the most documentated (both from the literature and from our previous experiments) and oxyfluorfen in order to assess the capability of the technique. The photodegradation process has been investigated both for a deposit onto a metallic substrate and for a soil impregnated with the product. For norflurazon degradation parameters have been extracted from the yield variation of ions representative of the molecule and breakdown products and particularly the time required for 50% dissipation of their initial concentration (DT50 values). The comparison between deposits and soils indicates clearly that the degradation is slower in the latter case with an increase of about 3.5 for the DT50 of the molecule, and about 2 for its breakdown products. These values are in agreement with the decays of other ions. As expected, the degradation is faster when the UV of the sunlight is unfiltered, more significantly for the breakdown products. This is also observed for the oxyfluorfen deposited onto aluminium although at a lower level (twice less). The trends are only qualitative for the impregnated soil but definitely there. A discussion is presented for the interpretation of the photodegradation process in both cases together with suggestions of improvement in the data acquisition.

  7. Use of Sensitive and Specific Biomolecular and Mass Spectrometric Techniques to Monitor the Performance of In-Situ Hydrocarbon Biodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, H. R.; Kane, S. R.; Legler, T. C.

    2008-12-01

    Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) can be a cost-effective and viable approach for remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated groundwater. However, regulatory acceptance of the approach is often contingent on monitoring that can convincingly demonstrate the role of microbial degradation. Recent advances in anaerobic hydrocarbon biochemistry, analytical chemistry, and molecular biology have fostered the development of powerful techniques that can be applied to MNA of BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes). Here, I discuss two independent methods that have been developed to monitor in situ, anaerobic biodegradation of toluene and xylenes. A method has been developed for rapid, sensitive, and highly selective detection of distinctive indicators of anaerobic alkylbenzene metabolism. The target metabolites, benzylsuccinic acid and methylbenzylsuccinic acid isomers, have no known sources other than anaerobic toluene or xylene degradation; thus, their mere presence in groundwater provides definitive evidence of in situ metabolism. The method, which involves small sample size (<1 mL) and no extraction/concentration steps, relies on isotope dilution liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) with selected reaction monitoring. Detection limits for benzylsuccinates were determined to be ca. 0.3 μg/L and accuracy and precision were favorable in a groundwater matrix. A monitoring method based on quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) analysis has been developed to specifically quantify populations of anaerobic methylbenzene-degrading bacteria in aquifer sediment. The method targets a catabolic gene (bssA) associated with the first step of anaerobic toluene and xylene degradation. The method has proven to be sensitive (detection limit ca. 5 gene copies) and has a linear range of > 7 orders of magnitude. Application of these two methods in field studies will be discussed in the context of the methods' strengths and limitations. Field data will

  8. Technique for routine output verification of Leipzig applicators with a well chamber.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Calatayud, J; Granero, D; Ballester, F; Crispín, V; Van der Laarse, R

    2006-01-01

    The H-type Leipzig applicators are accessories of the microSelectron-HDR system (Nucletron, Veenendaal, The Netherlands) for treatment of superficial malignancies. Recently, the dose rate distributions in liquid water for the whole set of applicators using both source models available for the microSelectron-HDR afterloaders have been obtained by means of the experimentally validated Monte Carlo (MC) code GEANT4. Also an output table (cGy/hU) at 3 mm depth on the applicator central axis was provided. The output verification of these applicators by the user, prior to their clinical use, present practical problems: small detectors such as thermoluminescent dosimeters or parallel-plate ionization chambers are not easily used for verification in a clinical environment as they require a rigid setup with the Leipzig applicator and a phantom. In contrast, well-type ionization chambers are readily available in radiotherapy departments. This study presents a technique based on the HDR1000Plus well chamber (Standar Imaging) measurements with a special insert, which allows the output verification of the H-type Leipzig applicators on a routine basis. This technique defines correspondence factors (CF) between the in water dose rate output of the Leipzig applicators (cGy/hU) obtained with MC and the reading on the well chamber with the special insert, normalized to the HDR calibration factor with the HDR insert and to the source strength. To commission the applicators (with the well chamber and the special insert used), the physicist should check if the CF value agrees with its tabulated values presented in this work. If the differences are within 5% the tabulated output values can be used in clinical dosimetry. This technique allows the output validation of the Leipzig applicators with a well chamber widely used for HDR Ir-192 source strength measurements. It can easily be adapted to other types of well chambers for HDR source output verification. PMID:16485404

  9. Technique for routine output verification of Leipzig applicators with a well chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Calatayud, J.; Granero, D.; Ballester, F.; Crispin, V.; Laarse, R. van der

    2006-01-15

    The H-type Leipzig applicators are accessories of the microSelectron-HDR system (Nucletron, Veenendaal, The Netherlands) for treatment of superficial malignancies. Recently, the dose rate distributions in liquid water for the whole set of applicators using both source models available for the microSelectron-HDR afterloaders have been obtained by means of the experimentally validated Monte Carlo (MC) code GEANT4. Also an output table (cGy/hU) at 3 mm depth on the applicator central axis was provided. The output verification of these applicators by the user, prior to their clinical use, present practical problems: small detectors such as thermoluminescent dosimeters or parallel-plate ionization chambers are not easily used for verification in a clinical environment as they require a rigid setup with the Leipzig applicator and a phantom. In contrast, well-type ionization chambers are readily available in radiotherapy departments. This study presents a technique based on the HDR1000Plus well chamber (Standar Imaging) measurements with a special insert, which allows the output verification of the H-type Leipzig applicators on a routine basis. This technique defines correspondence factors (CF) between the in water dose rate output of the Leipzig applicators (cGy/hU) obtained with MC and the reading on the well chamber with the special insert, normalized to the HDR calibration factor with the HDR insert and to the source strength. To commission the applicators (with the well chamber and the special insert used), the physicist should check if the CF value agrees with its tabulated values presented in this work. If the differences are within 5% the tabulated output values can be used in clinical dosimetry. This technique allows the output validation of the Leipzig applicators with a well chamber widely used for HDR Ir-192 source strength measurements. It can easily be adapted to other types of well chambers for HDR source output verification.

  10. An in-situ technique to measure erosion and deposition in fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzic, David N.; Gerdin, Glenn A.

    1987-02-01

    Erosion or deposition of sub-micron layers of graphite or other materials can be measured by bombarding a sub-surface layer of 10B or 6Li with thermal neutrons and observing with a surface-barrier detector the energy loss of the prompt alphas or tritons produced. To demonstrate the feasibility of this technique, a (5250 ± 250) Å layer of boron and a (1.25 ± 0.05) μm layer of Li 2B 4O 7 were electron-beam evaporated onto graphite substrates and exposed to a thermal neutron flux of (8.0 ± 0.5) × 10 5 cm -2 s -1. The (n,α) reactions of the 10B produce a 1.78 MeV α, a 1.48 MeV α, and a 0.848 MeV 7Li. The reactions of 6Li produce a 2.73 MeV 3H and a 2.05 MeV α. Carbon coatings of (600 ± 25) Å, (8250 ± 500) Å, (2.0 ± 0.2) μm, and (4.0 ± 0.4) μm were placed between the active layers and a surface barrier detector in vacuuo. The thinner layers shifted the 1.48 MeV α peak by (31.7 ± 4.5) keV and (431 ± 43) keV respectively. The thicker layers shifted the 2.73 MeV 3H peak by (206 ± 15) keV and (346 ± 20) keV respectfully. Therefore, utilizing boron implants, 100 Å to 1 μm of graphite erosion or redeposition can be determined. Utilizing lithium implants, thicknesses in the range of 1 μm to 10 μm can be determined. Theoretical energy shifts, thermal diffusion, and the feasibility of this technique as a between shot diagnostic for limiters, divertor plates, and/or first-wall armor are discussed.

  11. Ambient in-situ immersion freezing measurements - findings from the ZAMBIS 2014 field campaign for three ice nucleation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Monika; Atkinson, James D.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Kanji, Zamin A.

    2015-04-01

    To estimate the influence of clouds on the Earth's radiation budget, it is crucial to understand cloud formation processes in the atmosphere. A key process, which significantly affects cloud microphysical properties and the initiation of precipitation thus contributing to the hydrological cycle, is the prevailing type of ice nucleation mechanism. In mixed-phase clouds immersion freezing is the dominant ice crystal forming mechanism, whereby ice nucleating particles (INP) first act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and are activated to cloud droplets followed by freezing upon supercooling. There are a number of experimental methods and techniques to investigate the ice nucleating ability in the immersion mode, however most techniques are offline for field sampling or only suitable for laboratory measurements. In-situ atmospheric studies are needed to understand the ice formation processes of 'real world' particles. Laboratory experiments simulate conditions of atmospheric processes like ageing or coating but are still idealized. Our method is able to measure ambient in-situ immersion freezing on single immersed aerosol particles. The instrumental setup consists of the recently developed portable immersion mode cooling chamber (PIMCA) as a vertical extension to the portable ice nucleation chamber (PINC, [1]), where the frozen fraction of activated aerosol particles are detected by the ice optical depolarization detector (IODE, [2]). Two additional immersion freezing techniques based on a droplet freezing array [3,4] are used to sample ambient aerosol particles either in a suspension (fraction larger ~0.6 μm) or on PM10-filters to compare different ice nucleation techniques. Here, we present ambient in-situ measurements at an urban forest site in Zurich, Switzerland held during the Zurich ambient immersion freezing study (ZAMBIS) in spring 2014. We investigated the ice nucleating ability of natural atmospheric aerosol with the PIMCA/PINC immersion freezing setup as

  12. Swept frequency acoustic interferometry technique for chemical weapons verification and monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, D.N.; Anthony, B.W.; Lizon, D.C.

    1995-03-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques are important for rapid on-site verification and monitoring of chemical munitions, such as artillery shells and bulk containers. Present NDE techniques provide only limited characterizations of such munitions. This paper describes the development of a novel noninvasive technique, swept-frequency acoustic interferometry (SFAI), that significantly enhances the capability of munitions characterizations. The SFAI technique allows very accurate and simultaneous determination of sound velocity and attenuation of chemical agents over a large frequency range inside artillery shells, in addition to determining agent density. The frequency-dependent sound velocity and attenuation can, in principle, provide molecular relaxation properties of the chemical agent. The same instrument also enables a direct fill-level measurement in bulk containers. Industrial and other applications of this general-purpose technique are also discussed.

  13. An electronic brachytherapy technique for treating squamous cell carcinoma in situ of the digit: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Squamous cell carcinoma in situ of the digit presents a complex management problem, which is usually treated with surgery or radiation or topical agents. The outcome of the surgical treatment can be an undesirable cosmetic result and loss of function. We report a unique Electronic Brachytherapy technique to treat the digit, which uses a 50 Kv miniaturized X-ray source with specialized applicators. Case presentation A 62-year-old African-American male was presented with a 12-month history of gradual darkening of the dorsal-distal middle left finger. Examination revealed a hyper pigmented scaly patch on the proximal to lateral nail fold of the L 3rd finger, nail dystrophy, and vertical split in the lateral section of the nail. The patient underwent evaluation of the lesion by Plastic Surgery with the removal of the lateral nail and a nail bed biopsy. Pathology revealed squamous cell carcinoma in situ with a possible focal positive, deep margin. The patient deliberated over surgical opinions, and eventually decided on radiation. A high dose rate Electronic Brachytherapy system using the XOFT Accent controller delivered dose of 4000 cGy in eight fractions, twice weekly, with at least 48 hours between fractions and treatment prescribed to a depth of 0 to 2 mm. The Xoft unit has specialized skin applicators that permit superficial treatment. Parameters assessed included the efficacy, cosmetic results feasibility, and acute safety of the Electronic Brachytherapy technique. Conclusions The patient exhibited moderate redness, hyperpigmentation erythema, desquamation, and Grade 1 to 2 edema acutely (following radiation), which resolved within 1 month of the treatment. Electronic brachytherapy treatment delivery took about 6 minutes, and the total procedure time was about 15 minutes. At the median follow-up of one year, the area revealed excellent cosmesis, and there was no infection or fat necrosis, desquamation, no cancer recurrence, and no evidence of

  14. Application of image restoration and three-dimensional visualization techniques to frog microvessels in-situ loaded with fluorescent indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagakis, Stamatis N.; Curry, Fitz-Roy E.; Lenz, Joyce F.

    1993-07-01

    In situ experiments on microvessels require image sensors of wide dynamic range due to large variations of the intensity in the scene, and 3D visualization due to the thickness of the preparation. The images require restoration because of the inherent tissue movement, out-of- focus-light contamination, and blur. To resolve the above problems, we developed an imaging system for quantitative imaging based on a 12 bits/pixel cooled CCD camera and a PC based digital imaging system. We applied the optical sectioning technique with image restoration using a modified nearest neighbor algorithm and iterative constrained deconvolution on each of the 2D optical sections. For the 3D visualization of the data, a volume rendering software was used. The data provided 3D images of the distribution of fluorescent indicators in intact microvessels. Optical cross sections were also compared with cross sections of the same microvessels examined in the electron microscope after their luminal surfaces were labeled with a tracer which was both electron dense and fluorescent. This procedure enabled precise identification of the endothelial cells in the microvessel wall as the principal site of accumulation of the fluorescent calcium indicator, fura-2, during microperfusion experiments.

  15. Characterization of K+ currents using an in situ patch clamp technique in body wall muscle cells from Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Jospin, Maëlle; Mariol, Marie-Christine; Ségalat, Laurent; Allard, Bruno

    2002-01-01

    The properties of K+ channels in body wall muscle cells acutely dissected from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans were investigated at the macroscopic and unitary level using an in situ patch clamp technique. In the whole-cell configuration, depolarizations to potentials positive to −40 mV gave rise to outward currents resulting from the activation of two kinetically distinct voltage-dependent K+ currents: a fast activating and inactivating 4-aminopyridine-sensitive component and a slowly activating and maintained tetraethylammonium-sensitive component. In cell-attached patches, voltage-dependent K+ channels, with unitary conductances of 34 and 80 pS in the presence of 5 and 140 mm external K+, respectively, activated at membrane potentials positive to −40 mV. Excision revealed that these channels corresponded to Ca2+-activated K+ channels exhibiting an unusual sensitivity to internal Cl− and whose activity progressively decreased in inside-out conditions. After complete run-down of these channels, one third of inside-out patches displayed activity of another Ca2+-activated K+ channel of smaller unitary conductance (6 pS at 0 mV in the presence of 5 mm external K+). In providing a detailed description of native K+ currents in body wall muscle cells of C. elegans, this work lays the basis for further comparisons with mutants to assess the function of K+ channels in this model organism that is highly amenable to molecular and classical genetics. PMID:12381812

  16. Tuning of colossal dielectric constant in gold-polypyrrole composite nanotubes using in-situ x-ray diffraction techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Sarma, Abhisakh; Sanyal, Milan K.

    2014-09-15

    In-situ x-ray diffraction technique has been used to study the growth process of gold incorporated polypyrrole nanotubes that exhibit colossal dielectric constant due to existence of quasi-one-dimensional charge density wave state. These composite nanotubes were formed within nanopores of a polycarbonate membrane by flowing pyrrole monomer from one side and mixture of ferric chloride and chloroauric acid from other side in a sample cell that allows collection of x-ray data during the reaction. The size of the gold nanoparticle embedded in the walls of the nanotubes was found to be dependent on chloroauric acid concentration for nanowires having diameter more than 100 nm. For lower diameter nanotubes the nanoparticle size become independent of chloroauric acid concentration and depends on the diameter of nanotubes only. The result of this study also shows that for 50 nm gold-polypyrrole composite nanotubes obtained with 5.3 mM chloroauric acid gives colossal dielectric constant of about 10{sup 7}. This value remain almost constant over a frequency range from 1Hz to 10{sup 6} Hz even at 80 K temperature.

  17. Deciphering the thermal behavior of lithium rich cathode material by in situ X-ray diffraction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, Shoaib; Lee, Sangwoo; Kim, Hyunchul; Yoon, Jeongbae; Jang, Donghyuk; Yoon, Jaegu; Park, Jin-Hwan; Yoon, Won-Sub

    2015-07-01

    Thermal stability is one of the critical requirements for commercial operation of high energy lithium-ion batteries. In this study, we use in situ X-ray diffraction technique to elucidate the thermal degradation mechanism of 0.5Li2MnO3-0.5LiNi0.33Co0.33Mn0.33O2 lithium rich cathode material in the absence and presence of electrolyte to simulate the real life battery conditions and compare its thermal behavior with the commercial LiNi0.33Co0.33Mn0.33O2 cathode material. We show that the thermal induced phase transformations in delithiated lithium rich cathode material are much more intense compared to similar single phase layered cathode material in the presence of electrolyte. The structural changes in both cathode materials with the temperature rise follow different trends in the absence and presence of electrolyte between 25 and 600 °C. Phase transitions are comparatively simple in the absence of electrolyte, the fully charged lithium rich cathode material demonstrates better thermal stability by maintaining its phase till 379 °C, and afterwards spinel structure is formed. In the presence of electrolyte, however, the spinel structure appears at 207 °C, subsequently it transforms to rock salt type cubic phase at 425 °C with additional metallic, metal fluoride, and metal carbonate phases.

  18. Development of advanced image analysis techniques for the in situ characterization of multiphase dispersions occurring in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Enrique; Larralde-Corona, C Patricia; Brito, Teresa; Córdova-Aguilar, Ma Soledad; Taboada, Blanca; Vega-Alvarado, Leticia; Corkidi, Gabriel

    2005-03-30

    Fermentation bioprocesses typically involve two liquid phases (i.e. water and organic compounds) and one gas phase (air), together with suspended solids (i.e. biomass), which are the components to be dispersed. Characterization of multiphase dispersions is required as it determines mass transfer efficiency and bioreactor homogeneity. It is also needed for the appropriate design of contacting equipment, helping in establishing optimum operational conditions. This work describes the development of image analysis based techniques with advantages (in terms of data acquisition and processing), for the characterization of oil drops and bubble diameters in complex simulated fermentation broths. The system consists of fully digital acquisition of in situ images obtained from the inside of a mixing tank using a CCD camera synchronized with a stroboscopic light source, which are processed with a versatile commercial software. To improve the automation of particle recognition and counting, the Hough transform (HT) was used, so bubbles and oil drops were automatically detected and the processing time was reduced by 55% without losing accuracy with respect to a fully manual analysis. The system has been used for the detailed characterization of a number of operational conditions, including oil content, biomass morphology, presence of surfactants (such as proteins) and viscosity of the aqueous phase. PMID:15707687

  19. Development of Ground-Based Auroral Photometry Techniques Using In-Situ Electron Precipitation Measurements from the GREECE Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubbs, G. A., II; Samara, M.; Michell, R.; Hampton, D.

    2014-12-01

    The Ground-to-Rocket Electrodynamics-Electrons Correlative Experiment (GREECE) mission successfully launched from Poker Flat, Alaska on 03 March 2014 at 11:09:50 UT and reached an apogee of approximately 335 km during a luminous auroral event. Multiple ground-based electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) imagers were positioned at Venetie, Alaska and aimed along magnetic zenith in order to observe the brightness of different auroral emission lines (427.8, 557.7, and 844.6 nm with a 47 degree field of view) at the magnetic footpoint of the payload, near apogee. Emission line brightness data are presented at the footpoint of the rocket flight and correlated with electron characteristics taken by the Acute Precipitating Electron Spectrometer (APES) on-board instrument. Ratios of different auroral emission lines are also compared to previously published methods and models. This research aims to describe the auroral emissions produced from a known precipitating electron distribution, such that we can more accurately use ground-based imaging and photometry to infer the characteristics of the precipitating electrons. These techniques can then be applied over larger scales and longer times, when only multi-spectral imaging data are available with no corresponding in situ data.

  20. Laser-induced thermotherapy: an in-situ ablation technique for the local treatment of irresectable colorectal liver metastases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritz, Joerg-Peter; Isbert, Christoph M.; Roggan, Andre; Wacker, Frank; Buhr, Heinz-Johannes; Germer, Christoph-Thomas

    2000-11-01

    Laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) is a so called in-situ- ablation technique which is used for the treatment of liver tumors. Coagulation necrosis is induced by transmitting the laser irradiation via quartz fibers directly into the tumor tissue. LITT represents similarly to surgical liver resection a local treatment form for liver metastases. The Nd-YAG laser (1064 nm) was used. The application system was placed percutaneously under open MRI control. On-line monitoring was done with MRI for evaluation of the postoperative follow-up we performed MRI-controls every 3 months. A total of 20 patients were treated. Due to the irradiation plan performed preoperatively, the treated tumors could be completely ablated by hyperthermia in all procedures. Complications were pleural effusion in 7 patients and a bile fistula and subcapsulary liver hematoma in one patient each. Local control of tumor growth can be achieved in tumors having undergone complete hyperthermic ablation. An assessment of the method regarding a prognostic benefit is not yet possible due to the short follow-up period and the small patient population.

  1. Study of novel techniques for verification imaging and patient dose reconstruction in external beam radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarry, Genevieve

    Treatment delivery verification is an essential step of radiotherapy. The purpose of this thesis is to develop new methods to improve the verification of photon and electron beam radiotherapy treatments. This is achieved through developing and testing (1) a way to acquire portal images during electron beam treatments, (2) a method to reconstruct the dose delivered to patients during photon beam treatments and (3) a technique to improve image quality in kilovoltage (kV) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) by correcting for scattered radiation. The portal images were acquired using the Varian CL21EX linac and the Varian aS500 electronic portal imaging device (EPID). The EGSnrc code was used to model fully the CL21EX, the aS500 and the kV CBCT system. We demonstrate that portal images of electron beam treatments with adequate contrast and resolution can be produced using the bremsstrahlung photons portion of the electron beam. Monte Carlo (MC) calculations were used to characterize the bremsstrahlung photons and to obtain predicted images of various phantoms. The technique was applied on a head and neck patient. An algorithm to reconstruct the dose given to patients during photon beam radiotherapy was developed and validated. The algorithm uses portal images and MC simulations. The primary fluence at the detector is back-projected through the patient. CT geometry to obtain a reconstructed phase space file. The reconstructed phase space file is used to calculate the reconstructed dose to the patient using MC simulations. The reconstruction method was validated in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms for conventional and IMRT fields. The scattered radiation present in kV CBCT images was evaluated using MC simulations. Simulated predictions of the scatter distribution were subtracted from CBCT projection images prior to the reconstruction to improve the reconstructed image quality. Reducing the scattered radiation was found to improve contrast and reduce shading

  2. Development and application of denuder sampling techniques with in situ derivatization for the determination of hydrogenbromide in volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmann, Alexandra; Rüdiger, Julian; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    The composition of gases in volcanic plumes shifts with subsurface processes inside volcanoes. For monitoring volcanic activity by studying volcanic plumes it is essential to understand the chemical reactions inside the volcanic plume (Bobrowski and Platt, 2013). Measurements of BrO/SO2-ratio already enable insights into magmatic processes (Bobrowski and Giuffrida, 2012). Both, BrO and SO2, are measurable by Remote Sensing Techniques at a safe distance. Models suggest not a direct emission of BrO but formation due to photochemical and multiphase reactions in the gas and particle phase. These model presume HBr as first emitted species (Gerlach, 2004). So HBr is an important connecting link between easily measurable BrO/SO2-ratios and conclusions on a volcanic system. It is of high importance to know if there is a variation in the amount of HBr transformed into BrO and to gain knowledge on the factor of its dependence. Apart from depletion of surrounded ozone also decreasing or depletion of emitted HBr or even HCl could be responsible for the shift (Bobrowski and Giuffrida, 2012). Knowledge about complex processes in volcanic plumes will simplify interpretation and predictions. In this study, first applications of coated gas diffusion denuder (similar to Huang and Hoffmann, 2008) to derivatize gaseous HBr were successful. Due to the lack of adequate remote sensing techniques an in situ method was developed and will be presented in detail. The epoxide of oleic acid was determined as a suitable derivatization agent. The reaction with HBr gives 10-bromo-9-hydroxyoctadecanoic acid. Other hydrogenhalogens give corresponding products. Derivatized analytes were removed from denuder by solvent elution and subsequent analysed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A limit of quantification below 1 ng was achieved. The method was applied on volcanic gas plumes at Mt. Etna in Italy in July and August 2015. The results showed HBr in higher ppt-range. These first proof

  3. In-Situ Characterization of Tissue Blood Flow, Blood Content, and Water State Using New Techniques in Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conturo, Thomas Edward

    Tissue blood flow, blood content, and water state have been characterized in-situ with new nuclear magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The sensitivities of standard techniques to the physiologic tissue parameters spin density (N_{rm r}) and relaxation times (T_1 and T_2 ) are mathematically defined. A new driven inversion method is developed so that tissue T_1 and T_2 changes produce cooperative intensity changes, yielding high contrast, high signal to noise, and sensitivity to a wider range of tissue parameters. The actual tissue parameters were imaged by automated collection of multiple-echo data having multiple T _1 dependence. Data are simultaneously fit by three-parameters to a closed-form expression, producing lower inter-parameter correlation and parameter noise than in separate T_1 or T_2 methods or pre-averaged methods. Accurate parameters are obtained at different field strengths. Parametric images of pathology demonstrate high sensitivity to tissue heterogeneity, and water content is determined in many tissues. Erythrocytes were paramagnetically labeled to study blood content and relaxation mechanisms. Liver and spleen relaxation were enhanced following 10% exchange of animal blood volumes. Rapid water exchange between intracellular and extracellular compartments was validated. Erythrocytes occupied 12.5% of renal cortex volume, and blood content was uniform in the liver, spleen and kidney. The magnitude and direction of flow velocity was then imaged. To eliminate directional artifacts, a bipolar gradient technique sensitized to flow in different directions was developed. Phase angle was reconstructed instead of intensity since the former has a 2pi -fold higher dynamic range. Images of flow through curves demonstrated secondary flow with a centrifugally-biased laminar profile and stationary velocity peaks along the curvature. Portal vein flow velocities were diminished or reversed in cirrhosis. Image artifacts have been characterized and removed. The

  4. Fabrication of zirconia composite membrane by in-situ hydrothermal technique and its application in separation of methyl orange.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R Vinoth; Ghoshal, Aloke Kumar; Pugazhenthi, G

    2015-11-01

    The main objective of the work was preparation of zirconia membrane on a low cost ceramic support through an in-situ hydrothermal crystallization technique for the separation of methyl orange dye. To formulate the zirconia film on the ceramic support, hydrothermal reaction mixture was prepared using zirconium oxychloride as a zirconia source and ammonia as a precursor. The synthesized zirconia powder was characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared analysis (FTIR), Energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis and particle size distribution (PSD) to identify the phases and crystallinity, specific surface area, pore volume and pore size distribution, thermal behavior, chemical composition and size of the particles. The porosity, morphological structure and pure water permeability of the prepared zirconia membrane, as well as ceramic support were investigated using the Archimedes' method, Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and permeability. The specific surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution of the zirconia powder was found to be 126.58m(2)/g, 3.54nm and 0.3-10µm, respectively. The porosity, average pore size and pure water permeability of the zirconia membrane was estimated to be 42%, 0.66µm and 1.44×10(-6)m(3)/m(2)skPa, respectively. Lastly, the potential of the membrane was investigated with separation of methyl orange by means of flux and rejection as a function of operating pressure and feed concentration. The rejection was found to decrease with increasing the operating pressure and increases with increasing feed concentrations. Moreover, it showed a high ability to reject methyl orange from aqueous solution with a rejection of 61% and a high permeation flux of 2.28×10(-5)m(3)/m(2)s at operating pressure of 68kPa. PMID:25982409

  5. Verification Techniques for Parameter Selection and Bayesian Model Calibration Presented for an HIV Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentworth, Mami Tonoe

    Uncertainty quantification plays an important role when making predictive estimates of model responses. In this context, uncertainty quantification is defined as quantifying and reducing uncertainties, and the objective is to quantify uncertainties in parameter, model and measurements, and propagate the uncertainties through the model, so that one can make a predictive estimate with quantified uncertainties. Two of the aspects of uncertainty quantification that must be performed prior to propagating uncertainties are model calibration and parameter selection. There are several efficient techniques for these processes; however, the accuracy of these methods are often not verified. This is the motivation for our work, and in this dissertation, we present and illustrate verification frameworks for model calibration and parameter selection in the context of biological and physical models. First, HIV models, developed and improved by [2, 3, 8], describe the viral infection dynamics of an HIV disease. These are also used to make predictive estimates of viral loads and T-cell counts and to construct an optimal control for drug therapy. Estimating input parameters is an essential step prior to uncertainty quantification. However, not all the parameters are identifiable, implying that they cannot be uniquely determined by the observations. These unidentifiable parameters can be partially removed by performing parameter selection, a process in which parameters that have minimal impacts on the model response are determined. We provide verification techniques for Bayesian model calibration and parameter selection for an HIV model. As an example of a physical model, we employ a heat model with experimental measurements presented in [10]. A steady-state heat model represents a prototypical behavior for heat conduction and diffusion process involved in a thermal-hydraulic model, which is a part of nuclear reactor models. We employ this simple heat model to illustrate verification

  6. In situ precision electrospinning as an effective delivery technique for cyanoacrylate medical glue with high efficiency and low toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dong, R H; Qin, C C; Qiu, X; Yan, X; Yu, M; Cui, L; Zhou, Y; Zhang, H D; Jiang, X Y; Long, Y Z

    2015-12-14

    The side effects or toxicity of cyanoacrylate used in vivo have been argued since its first application in wound closure. We propose an airflow-assisted in situ precision electrospinning apparatus as an applicator and make a detailed comparison with traditional spraying via in vitro and in vivo experiments. This novel method can not only improve operational performance and safety by precisely depositing cyanoacrylate fibers onto a wound, but significantly reduce the dosage of cyanoacrylate by almost 80%. A white blood cell count, liver function test and histological analysis prove that the in situ precision electrospinning applicator produces a better postoperative outcome, e.g., minor hepatocyte injury, moderate inflammation and the significant ability for liver regeneration. This in situ precision electrospinning method may thus dramatically broaden both civilian and military applications of cyanoacrylates. PMID:26531687

  7. In situ precision electrospinning as an effective delivery technique for cyanoacrylate medical glue with high efficiency and low toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, R. H.; Qin, C. C.; Qiu, X.; Yan, X.; Yu, M.; Cui, L.; Zhou, Y.; Zhang, H. D.; Jiang, X. Y.; Long, Y. Z.

    2015-11-01

    The side effects or toxicity of cyanoacrylate used in vivo have been argued since its first application in wound closure. We propose an airflow-assisted in situ precision electrospinning apparatus as an applicator and make a detailed comparison with traditional spraying via in vitro and in vivo experiments. This novel method can not only improve operational performance and safety by precisely depositing cyanoacrylate fibers onto a wound, but significantly reduce the dosage of cyanoacrylate by almost 80%. A white blood cell count, liver function test and histological analysis prove that the in situ precision electrospinning applicator produces a better postoperative outcome, e.g., minor hepatocyte injury, moderate inflammation and the significant ability for liver regeneration. This in situ precision electrospinning method may thus dramatically broaden both civilian and military applications of cyanoacrylates.

  8. Direct Comparison of Monazite Ages Obtained By in situ Techniques: Ion-Probe Isotopic Ages Versus Electron Microprobe Chemical Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, R. J.; Loehn, C. W.; Dahl, P. S.; Aleinikoff, J. N.; Wooden, J. L.; Hamilton, M.; Mazdab, F.; Jones, C.

    2005-12-01

    In situ analytical techniques for geochronology are rapidly becoming the method of choice for characterizing compositionally and chronologically complex minerals, including monazite (mnz) and zircon (zrc). Two such techniques include Ion Microprobe (IMP) (esp. SHRIMP) for both mnz and zrc, and electron microprobe (EMP) for mnz. Debate remains concerning comparability of ages obtained by the two different techniques: U-Pb isotopic dating (IMP) versus Th-total U-total Pb (EMP). The IMP has an advantage in analytical precision whereas the EMP has an advantage in spatial resolution. We report 6 examples of individual monazite grains that have been dated by both techniques, covering a range of ages from 300 to 2850 Ma. Three of our examples are grains that have been used as IMP standards at the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) or at the USGS-Stanford SHRIMP lab; the other grains are from research samples. Most grains display complex zoning in Y, Th and U, both in BSE images and in compositional maps, reflecting complex growth and recrystallization histories. In all cases, the ages obtained by the two techniques agree within their 2-sigma associated error, except where IMP ablation pits cross age boundaries and resolve a mixed age of the two domains, or where EMP spots fall near cracks or pits in the grain surface. One prominent example is a 100-micron mnz from the Tobacco Root Mountains, Montana. It contains a low-Th older core (ca. 2.85 Ga), a higher-Th mantle domain of about 2.45 Ga, and a low-Th rim of 1.78 Ga. This grain has 6 IMP spots that range in age from 1880 Ma (near-rim) to 2785 Ma (core). Only two IMP pits fall totally within a single chemical and age zone delineated by EMP analyses or compositional maps (the medial age zone): 2451 (+/-4) and 2432 (+/-10). The weighted mean EMP age of this domain is 2452 (+/-6). IMP spots aimed at the older core are 2619 (+/-11) and 2785 (+/-9); the weighted mean core age from EMP analyses is 2859 (+/-14). This suggests

  9. Combined Microautoradiography–16S rRNA Probe Technique for Determination of Radioisotope Uptake by Specific Microbial Cell Types In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Ouverney, Cleber C.; Fuhrman, Jed A.

    1999-01-01

    We propose a novel method for studying the function of specific microbial groups in situ. Since natural microbial communities are dynamic both in composition and in activities, we argue that the microbial “black box” should not be regarded as homogeneous. Our technique breaks down this black box with group-specific fluorescent 16S rRNA probes and simultaneously determines 3H-substrate uptake by each of the subgroups present via microautoradiography (MAR). Total direct counting, fluorescent in situ hybridization, and MAR are combined on a single slide to determine (i) the percentages of different subgroups in a community, (ii) the percentage of total cells in a community that take up a radioactively labeled substance, and (iii) the distribution of uptake within each subgroup. The method was verified with pure cultures. In addition, in situ uptake by members of the α subdivision of the class Proteobacteria (α-Proteobacteria) and of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium group obtained off the California coast and labeled with fluorescent oligonucleotide probes for these subgroups showed that not only do these organisms account for a large portion of the picoplankton community in the sample examined (∼60% of the universal probe-labeled cells and ∼50% of the total direct counts), but they also are significant in the uptake of dissolved amino acids in situ. Nearly 90% of the total cells and 80% of the cells belonging to the α-Proteobacteria and Cytophaga-Flavobacterium groups were detectable as active organisms in amino acid uptake tests. We suggest a name for our triple-labeling technique, substrate-tracking autoradiographic fluorescent in situ hybridization (STARFISH), which should aid in the “dissection” of microbial communities by type and function. PMID:10103276

  10. Measurement of Bluetongue Virus Binding to a Mammalian Cell Surface Receptor by an In Situ Immune Fluorescent Staining Technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A quantifiable in situ immune fluorescent assay (IFA) was developed to measure bluetongue virus (BTV) binding to mammalian cells. The utility of the assay was demonstrated with both Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and bovine pulmonary artery endothelial (CPAE) cells. Since heparin sulfate (HS) has been ...

  11. Ground-based radiometric calibration of the Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) using in situ techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapla-Myers, J.

    2013-12-01

    Landsat 8 was successfully launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on 11 February 2013, and was placed into the orbit previously occupied by Landsat 5. Landsat 8 is the latest platform in the 40-year history of the Landsat series of satellites, and it contains two instruments that operate in the solar-reflective and the thermal infrared regimes. The Operational Land Imager (OLI) is a pushbroom sensor that contains eight multispectral bands ranging from 400-2300 nm, and one panchromatic band. The spatial resolution of the multispectral bands is 30 m, which is similar to previous Landsat sensors, and the panchromatic band has a 15-m spatial resolution, which is also similar to previous Landsat sensors. The 12-bit radiometric resolution of OLI improves upon the 8-bit resolution of the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) onboard Landsat 7. An important requirement for the Landsat program is the long-term radiometric continuity of its sensors. Ground-based vicarious techniques have been used for over 20 years to determine the absolute radiometric calibration of sensors that encompass a wide variety of spectral and spatial characteristics. This work presents the early radiometric calibration results of Landsat 8 OLI that were obtained using the traditional reflectance-based approach. University of Arizona personnel used five sites in Arizona, California, and Nevada to collect ground-based data. In addition, a unique set of in situ data were collected in March 2013, when Landsat 7 and Landsat 8 were observing the same site within minutes of each other. The tandem overfly schedule occurred while Landsat 8 was shifting to the WRS-2 orbital grid, and lasted only a few days. The ground-based data also include results obtained using the University of Arizona's Radiometric Calibration Test Site (RadCaTS), which is an automated suite of instruments located at Railroad Valley, Nevada. The results presented in this work include a comparison to the L1T at

  12. Simulation verification techniques study: Simulation performance validation techniques document. [for the space shuttle system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, L. M.; Reddell, J. P.; Schoonmaker, P. B.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques and support software for the efficient performance of simulation validation are discussed. Overall validation software structure, the performance of validation at various levels of simulation integration, guidelines for check case formulation, methods for real time acquisition and formatting of data from an all up operational simulator, and methods and criteria for comparison and evaluation of simulation data are included. Vehicle subsystems modules, module integration, special test requirements, and reference data formats are also described.

  13. SENSITIVITY STUDIES FOR AN IN-SITU PARTIAL DEFECT DETECTOR (PDET) IN SPENT FUEL USING MONTE CARLO TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaraman, S; Ham, Y S

    2008-04-28

    This study presents results from Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations aimed at characterizing a novel methodology being developed to detect partial defects in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) spent fuel assemblies (SFAs). The methodology uses a combination of measured neutron and gamma fields inside a spent fuel assembly in an in-situ condition where no movement of the fuel assembly is required. Previous studies performed on single isolated assemblies resulted in a unique base signature that would change when some of the fuel in the assembly is replaced with dummy fuel. These studies indicate that this signature is still valid in the in-situ condition enhancing the prospect of building a practical tool, Partial Defect Detector (PDET), which can be used in the field for partial defect detection.

  14. Detection and typing of human papillomavirus using the Vira Type "in situ" kit: comparison with a conventional dot blot technique.

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner-Jones, B E; Bellomarino, V M; Borg, A J; Orzeszko, K; Garland, S M

    1990-01-01

    A new commercial kit (Vira Type "in situ", Life Technologies, Inc., Molecular Diagnostics Division, Guithersburg, Maryland, USA) for the detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33 and 35 in routinely processed human anogenital tissue was compared with a conventional dot blot assay for HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18. Both systems use double-stranded genomic DNA probes for the detection of type specific HPV DNA. The probes used on the dot blots were labelled with 32P and visualised autoradiographically. The Vira Type probes were labelled with biotin and visualised using a streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase conjugate with NBT-BCIP substrate. Biopsy specimens from the cervix, vagina, and vulva of 46 women were processed by both methods and compared. The histological diagnoses ranged from benign changes, to dysplasia, and invasive carcinoma. Overall, 50% of biopsy specimens were positive for HPV DNA by dot blot hybridisation; only 39% were positive by Vira Type in situ hybridisation. Three of the specimens positive by the Vira Type "in situ" kit showed no cross hybridisation and were the same HPV type as the dot blot. A further 13 showed hybridisation, but the showed cross hybridisation, but the to the dot blot results. One biopsy specimen was positive for different HPV types by the two tests and one was positive by Vira Type and negative by dot blot. Six biopsy specimens were negative by Vira Type but positive by dot blot. It is concluded that the Vira Type "in situ" kit has a similar specificity but lower sensitivity than the dot blot hybridisation method for the detection of HPV DNA. Images PMID:2175755

  15. Vaginal micropapillary lesions are not related to human papillomavirus infection: in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction detection techniques.

    PubMed

    Garzetti, G G; Ciavattini, A; Goteri, G; Menzo, S; De Nictolis, M; Clementi, M; Brugia, M; Romanini, C

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the human papillomavirus DNA presence in vaginal papillary lesions, with particular regard to micropapillomatosis to better define their clinical significance. Prospective study: the study population was composed of 62 women who were recruited consecutively from the Colposcopy Centre of the Ancona University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, on the grounds of vaginal papillomatosis or/and typical acuminata warts. Biopsies for routine histology, and for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA detection by means of in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were taken from the papillary lesions and from 24 healthy women, who were selected as controls. Macroscopically, vaginal micropapillomatosis was ascertained in 51 cases (82.3%), while in 11 cases (17.7%) the colposcopic diagnosis was condyloma acuminatum. During in situ hybridization, HPV DNA positivity was observed in 8 (9.4%) out of 85 samples of squamous papillae and in 11 (64.7%) out of 17 samples of condylomata; in control specimens, HPV DNA was detected in 2 (8.3%) out of 24 bioptic samples. The correspondence between in situ hybridization and PCR was 96.1%, with 17.4% more diagnosis obtained by PCR. Vaginal micropapillomatosis may be regarded as a variation in the normal anatomy of the lower genital tract without any significant relationship with HPV infection, and as a lesion easily distinguishable from condylomata acuminata by clinical examination alone. PMID:7959342

  16. Survival curves for normal-tissue clonogens: a comparison of assessments using in vitro, transplantation, or in situ techniques.

    PubMed

    Hendry, J H

    1985-01-01

    A survey of survival curves in the literature, for clonogenic cells (clonogens) in normal tissues, highlights the following features: the sensitivity of some human and dog clonogens apparently is greater than that of their counterparts in mice and sheep, assessed in vitro. However, this should be interpreted with caution because of the possibility of cell selection and the ability to modify sensitivity markedly in some systems by variations in growth conditions; extrapolation numbers are in general higher when assessed in vivo than in vitro. This is due partly to the lack of measurements of repair of potentially-lethal damage using many assays in vitro. This feature increases the extrapolation number when measured using transplantation assays in vivo; epithelial clonogens in vivo demonstrate a remarkable similarity in sensitivity between tissues. The range is similar for clonogens assayed in situ or by transplantation, and this argues against the possibility that a resistant subpopulation may be selected in most assays in situ. It is emphasized from the comparisons that caution must be exercised in extrapolating results, obtained for clonogens assayed in vitro or by transplantation in vivo, to the situation in situ. PMID:3882586

  17. A Comparison of Clinical Outcomes of Dislocated Intraocular Lens Fixation between In Situ Refixation and Conventional Exchange Technique Combined with Vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Eum, Sun Jung; Kim, Myung Jun; Kim, Hong Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate surgical efficacy of in situ refixation technique for dislocated posterior chamber intraocular lens (PCIOL). Methods. This was a single-center retrospective case series. 34 patients (34 eyes) who underwent sclera fixation for dislocated IOLs combined with vitrectomy were studied. Of 34 eyes, 17 eyes underwent IOL exchange and the other 17 eyes underwent in situ refixation. Results. Mean follow-up period was 6 months. Mean logMAR best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was not significantly different between the groups 6 months after surgery (0.10 ± 0.03 in the IOL exchange group and 0.10 ± 0.05 in the refixation group; p = 0.065). Surgically induced astigmatism (SIA) was significantly lower in the refixation group (0.79 ± 0.41) than in the IOL exchange group (1.29 ± 0.46) (p = 0.004) at 3 months, which persisted to 6 months (1.13 ± 0.18 in the IOL exchange group and 0.74 ± 0.11 in the refixation group; p = 0.006). Postoperative complications occurred in 3 eyes in the IOL exchange group (17.6%) and 2 eyes in the refixation group (11.8%). However, all of the patients were well managed without additional surgery. Conclusion. The in situ refixation technique should be preferentially considered if surgery is indicated since it seemed to produce a sustained less SIA compared to IOL exchange. PMID:27119019

  18. A Comparison of Clinical Outcomes of Dislocated Intraocular Lens Fixation between In Situ Refixation and Conventional Exchange Technique Combined with Vitrectomy.

    PubMed

    Eum, Sun Jung; Kim, Myung Jun; Kim, Hong Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate surgical efficacy of in situ refixation technique for dislocated posterior chamber intraocular lens (PCIOL). Methods. This was a single-center retrospective case series. 34 patients (34 eyes) who underwent sclera fixation for dislocated IOLs combined with vitrectomy were studied. Of 34 eyes, 17 eyes underwent IOL exchange and the other 17 eyes underwent in situ refixation. Results. Mean follow-up period was 6 months. Mean logMAR best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was not significantly different between the groups 6 months after surgery (0.10 ± 0.03 in the IOL exchange group and 0.10 ± 0.05 in the refixation group; p = 0.065). Surgically induced astigmatism (SIA) was significantly lower in the refixation group (0.79 ± 0.41) than in the IOL exchange group (1.29 ± 0.46) (p = 0.004) at 3 months, which persisted to 6 months (1.13 ± 0.18 in the IOL exchange group and 0.74 ± 0.11 in the refixation group; p = 0.006). Postoperative complications occurred in 3 eyes in the IOL exchange group (17.6%) and 2 eyes in the refixation group (11.8%). However, all of the patients were well managed without additional surgery. Conclusion. The in situ refixation technique should be preferentially considered if surgery is indicated since it seemed to produce a sustained less SIA compared to IOL exchange. PMID:27119019

  19. Dosimetry verification on VMAT and IMRT radiotherapy techniques: In the case of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulana, A.; Pawiro, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    Radiotherapy treatment depends on the accuracy of the dose delivery to patients, the purpose of the study is to verify the dose in IMRT and VMAT technique in prostate cancer cases correspond to TPS dose using phantom base on ICRU No.50. The dose verification of the target and OAR was performed by placing the TLD Rod LiF100 and EBT2 Gafchromic film at slab hole of pelvic part of the Alderson RANDO phantom for prostate cancer simulation. The Exposed TLDs was evaluated using the TLD Reader Harshaw while EBT2 film was scanned using Epson scanner. The point dose measurements were compared between planned dose and measured dose at target volume and OAR. The result is the dose difference at target volume, bladder and rectum for IMRT and VMAT are less than 5%. On the other hand, the dose difference at the Femoral head is more than 5% for both techniques because the location of OAR already in low gradient dose. Furthermore, the difference dose of the target volume for IMRT technique tends to be smaller than VMAT either for TLD and EBT2 film detectors. From the measurement showed that the delivered dose on the phantom simulation match with ICRU No.50 criteria.

  20. In situ studies of lithium-ion diffusion in a lithium-rich thin film cathode by scanning probe microscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shan; Yan, Binggong; Li, Tao; Zhu, Jing; Lu, Li; Zeng, Kaiyang

    2015-09-14

    This paper presents in situ characterization of lithium-ion diffusion at nano- to micro-meter scales in a Li-rich layered oxide thin film cathode under external bias by using Electrochemical Strain Microscopy (ESM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) techniques. The local variations of the diffusion coefficient are calculated and visualized from the ESM images. The results indicate that the Li-ion movement is closely correlated with the changes in the surface topography when the Li-rich cathode is subjected to an external bias. Furthermore, bias-induced Li-ion redistribution is partially reversible. Topography evolution due to Li-ion diffusion and relaxation behaviour are observed. The results from this in situ study provide the insight into the Li-ion diffusion mechanism in the cathode material and pave the way for studying the details of the diffusion-related phenomenon in Li-ion battery materials. PMID:26242479

  1. Assessment of aneuploidy for chromosomes 8, 9, 13, 16, and 21 in human sperm by using primed in situ labeling technique

    SciTech Connect

    Pellestor, F.; Girardet, A.; Coignet, L.; Andreo, B.; Charlieu, J.P.

    1996-04-01

    The incidence of aneuploidy was estimated for chromosomes 8, 9, 13, 16, and 21 in mature human spermatozoa by primed in situ (PRINS) labeling technique. This method allows us to perform a chromosome-specific detection by in situ annealing of a centromeric specific primer. A dual color PRINS protocol was adapted to human sperm. The decondensation and the denaturation of sperm nuclei were simultaneously performed by 3-M NaOH treatment. Double labeling of spermatozoa was obtained in < 2 h. A total of 96,292 sperm nuclei were analyzed by two independent observers. The estimates of disomy were 0.31 % for chromosome 8, 0.28% for chromosome 9, 0.28% for chromosome 13, 0.26% for chromosome 16, and 0.32% for chromosome 21. These homogeneous findings suggest an equal distribution of aneuploidies among all autosomal chromosomes in males. 26 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Organic aerosol composition measurements with advanced offline and in-situ techniques during the CalNex campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timkovsky, J.; Chan, A. W. H.; Dorst, T.; Goldstein, A. H.; Oyama, B.; Holzinger, R.

    2014-12-01

    Our understanding of formation processes, physical properties and climate/health effects of organic aerosols is still limited in part due to limited knowledge of organic aerosol composition. We present speciated measurements of organic aerosol composition by two methods: in-situ thermal-desorption proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (TD-PTR-MS) and offline two-dimensional gas chromatography with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (GC×GC/TOF-MS). 153 compounds were identified using the GC×GC/TOF-MS, 123 of which were matched with 64 ions observed by the TD-PTR-MS. A reasonable overall correlation of 0.67 (r2) was found between the total matched TD-PTR-MS signal (sum of 64 ions) and the total matched GC×GC/TOF-MS signal (sum of 123 compounds). A reasonable quantitative agreement between the two methods was observed for most individual compounds with concentrations which were detected at levels above 2 ng m-3 using the GC×GC/TOF-MS. The analysis of monocarboxylic acids standards with TD-PTR-MS showed that alkanoic acids with molecular masses below 290 amu are detected well (recovery fractions above 60%). However, the concentrations of these acids were consistently higher on quartz filters (quantified offline by GC×GC/TOF-MS) than those suggested by in-situ TD-PTR-MS measurements, which is consistent with the semivolatile nature of the acids and corresponding positive filter sampling artifacts.

  3. In situ determination of the hydrothermal properties of a deep fractured medium by a single-well technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosanski, J. M.; Ledoux, E.

    1982-03-01

    The recovery of energy from deep hot rock formations with low permeability gives rise to many scientific and technological problems. This paper describes a simple method of in situ analysis of a slightly fissured medium, developed by the Centre d'Informatique Géologique of the Paris School of Mines, during experiments carried out at the site of Mayet de Montagne (Allier, France) between November 1978 and March 1980. These experiments were funded by the Commission of the European Communities and the Institut National d'Astronomie et de Géophysique, and carried out jointly with the Institut de Physique du Globe, Paris. They had a two-fold purpose: (1) Better understanding of the physical phenomena governing the heat exchange between the slightly fissured medium and the injected fluids. (2) Determination in situ of the parameters which control this exchange. This proposed "single-well" method might be suitable as a preliminary test in order to evaluate the life span of a hot dry rock geothermal doublet.

  4. Weather-type stratified verification of quantitative precipitation forecasts with the feature based technique SAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, M.; Wernli, H.

    2009-09-01

    Recently, a new generation of NWP models has been developed with a horizontal grid spacing that allows the explicit simulation of deep convection. In this study, we investigate whether this new category of models produces better precipitation forecasts than the previous model generation with parameterized deep convection - and in particular, we like to investigate whether the differences are more pronounced during certain weather types. Quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPF) from 20 deterministic forecast models from the MAP D-PHASE experiment are analysed with the feature-based verification technique SAL during the DOP (Demonstration Observation Period; June till November 2007). SAL contains three independent components that consider aspects of the structure (S), amplitude (A) and location (L) of the precipitation field in a pre-defined domain, in this study the German part of the COPS area. The weather type classification is based upon an objective front analysis tool recently developed at the ETH Zurich. This tool identifies fronts as regions with intense horizontal gradients in the equivalent potential temperature field at 850 hPa. It allows to distinguish between quasi-stationary fronts and propagating warm and cold fronts. We will use the objectively identified fronts to classify precipitation events either as pre-frontal, frontal or post-frontal, and in the absence of any significant frontal structures and for warm surface conditions as air-mass convection. The observational data set used for the verification has an hourly time resolution and is based upon a disaggregation technique, which combines the high temporal resolution of radar data with the fairly high accuracy of the amount of precipitation obtained from rain gauge measurements. All precipitation data sets have been transformed onto the same grid with a horizontal grid space of 7 km. Evaluations of daily accumulated QPFs show that most of the very high resolution models (i.e. those without

  5. COMPARISON OF VERIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR THE MEMBRANE FILTER TOTAL COLIFORM TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification of membrane filter total coliform colonies from drinking water was increased 87% by testing for the presence of beta-galactosidase and cytochrome oxidase, compared with verification by determination of gas production in lauryl tryptose broth. Over 90% of the coliform...

  6. Experimental verification of a computational technique for determining ground reactions in human bipedal stance.

    PubMed

    Audu, Musa L; Kirsch, Robert F; Triolo, Ronald J

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional (3D) biomechanical model of human standing that enables us to study the mechanisms of posture and balance simultaneously in various directions in space. Since the two feet are on the ground, the system defines a kinematically closed-chain which has redundancy problems that cannot be resolved using the laws of mechanics alone. We have developed a computational (optimization) technique that avoids the problems with the closed-chain formulation thus giving users of such models the ability to make predictions of joint moments, and potentially, muscle activations using more sophisticated musculoskeletal models. This paper describes the experimental verification of the computational technique that is used to estimate the ground reaction vector acting on an unconstrained foot while the other foot is attached to the ground, thus allowing human bipedal standing to be analyzed as an open-chain system. The computational approach was verified in terms of its ability to predict lower extremity joint moments derived from inverse dynamic simulations performed on data acquired from four able-bodied volunteers standing in various postures on force platforms. Sensitivity analyses performed with model simulations indicated which ground reaction force (GRF) and center of pressure (COP) components were most critical for providing better estimates of the joint moments. Overall, the joint moments predicted by the optimization approach are strongly correlated with the joint moments computed using the experimentally measured GRF and COP (0.78 < or = r(2) < or = 0.99,median,0.96) with a best-fit that was not statistically different from a straight line with unity slope (experimental=computational results) for postures of the four subjects examined. These results indicate that this model-based technique can be relied upon to predict reasonable and consistent estimates of the joint moments using the predicted GRF and COP for most standing postures. PMID

  7. EDITORIAL: International Workshop on Monte Carlo Techniques in Radiotherapy Delivery and Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaegen, Frank; Seuntjens, Jan

    2008-03-01

    Monte Carlo particle transport techniques offer exciting tools for radiotherapy research, where they play an increasingly important role. Topics of research related to clinical applications range from treatment planning, motion and registration studies, brachytherapy, verification imaging and dosimetry. The International Workshop on Monte Carlo Techniques in Radiotherapy Delivery and Verification took place in a hotel in Montreal in French Canada, from 29 May-1 June 2007, and was the third workshop to be held on a related topic, which now seems to have become a tri-annual event. About one hundred workers from many different countries participated in the four-day meeting. Seventeen experts in the field were invited to review topics and present their latest work. About half of the audience was made up by young graduate students. In a very full program, 57 papers were presented and 10 posters were on display during most of the meeting. On the evening of the third day a boat trip around the island of Montreal allowed participants to enjoy the city views, and to sample the local cuisine. The topics covered at the workshop included the latest developments in the most popular Monte Carlo transport algorithms, fast Monte Carlo, statistical issues, source modeling, MC treatment planning, modeling of imaging devices for treatment verification, registration and deformation of images and a sizeable number of contributions on brachytherapy. In this volume you will find 27 short papers resulting from the workshop on a variety of topics, some of them on very new stuff such as graphics processing units for fast computing, PET modeling, dual-energy CT, calculations in dynamic phantoms, tomotherapy devices, . . . . We acknowledge the financial support of the National Cancer Institute of Canada, the Institute of Cancer Research of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Association Québécoise des Physicien(ne)s Médicaux Clinique, the Institute of Physics, and Medical

  8. In-situ fluorimetry: A powerful non-invasive diagnostic technique for natural dyes used in artefacts. Part II. Identification of orcein and indigo in Renaissance tapestries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementi, C.; Miliani, C.; Romani, A.; Santamaria, U.; Morresi, F.; Mlynarska, K.; Favaro, G.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, three Renaissance tapestries depicting scenes painted by Raffaello Sanzio, conserved at the Vatican Museum, were investigated using in-situ UV-Visible fluorimetric measurements. The results show that this technique is suitable for the detection of natural organic colorants used for dyeing the threads woven in these tapestries. The emission signals detected on red-purple colours were assigned to the colorant orcein and those on different nuances of blue and green colours to indigo by comparison with data from reference laboratory samples. The assignments were supported by chromatographic experiments carried out on threads taken from the back side of the tapestry in the same points analysed by spectrofluorimentry.

  9. Strategies and Techniques to Enhance the In Situ Endothelialization of Small-Diameter Biodegradable Polymeric Vascular Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Hibino, Narutoshi; Fisher, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Due to the lack of success in small-diameter (<6 mm) prosthetic vascular grafts, a variety of strategies have evolved utilizing a tissue-engineering approach. Much of this work has focused on enhancing the endothelialization of these grafts. A healthy, confluent endothelial layer provides dynamic control over homeo-stasis, influencing and preventing thrombosis and smooth muscle cell proliferation that can lead to intimal hyperplasia. Strategies to improve endothelialization of biodegradable polymeric grafts have encompassed both chemical and physical modifications to graft surfaces, many focusing on the recruitment of endothelial and endothelial progenitor cells. This review aims to provide a compilation of current and developing strategies that utilize in situ endothelialization to improve vascular graft outcomes, providing a context for the future directions of vascular tissue-engineering strategies that do not require preprocedural cell seeding. PMID:23252992

  10. Comparison of advanced offline and in situ techniques of organic aerosol composition measurement during the CalNex campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timkovsky, J.; Chan, A. W. H.; Dorst, T.; Goldstein, A. H.; Oyama, B.; Holzinger, R.

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of formation processes, physical properties, and climate/health effects of organic aerosols is still limited in part due to limited knowledge of organic aerosol composition. We present speciated measurements of organic aerosol composition by two methods: in situ thermal-desorption proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (TD-PTR-MS) and offline two-dimensional gas chromatography with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (GC × GC/TOF-MS). Using the GC × GC/TOF-MS 153 compounds were identified, 123 of which were matched with 64 ions observed by the TD-PTR-MS. A reasonable overall correlation of 0.67 (r2) was found between the total matched TD-PTR-MS signal (sum of 64 ions) and the total matched GC × GC/TOF-MS signal (sum of 123 compounds) for the Los Angeles area. A reasonable quantitative agreement between the two methods was observed for most individual compounds with concentrations which were detected at levels above 2 ng m-3 using the GC × GC/TOF-MS. The analysis of monocarboxylic acids standards with TD-PTR-MS showed that alkanoic acids with molecular masses below 290 amu are detected well (recovery fractions above 60 %). However, the concentrations of these acids were consistently higher on quartz filters (quantified offline by GC × GC/TOF-MS) than those suggested by in situ TD-PTR-MS measurements, which is consistent with the semivolatile nature of the acids and corresponding positive filter sampling artifacts.

  11. Fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques (FISH) to detect changes in CYP19a gene expression of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    SciTech Connect

    Park, June-Woo; Tompsett, Amber; Zhang, Xiaowei; Newsted, John L.; Jones, Paul D.; Au, Doris; Kong, Richard; Wu, Rudolf S.S.; Giesy, John P. Hecker, Markus

    2008-10-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a sensitive in situ hybridization methodology using fluorescence-labeled riboprobes (FISH) that allows for the evaluation of gene expression profiles simultaneously in multiple target tissues of whole fish sections of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). To date FISH methods have been limited in their application due to autofluorescence of tissues, fixatives or other components of the hybridization procedure. An optimized FISH method, based on confocal fluorescence microscopy was developed to reduce the autofluorescence signal. Because of its tissue- and gender-specific expression and relevance in studies of endocrine disruption, gonadal aromatase (CYP19a) was used as a model gene. The in situ hybridization (ISH) system was validated in a test exposure with the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole. The optimized FISH method revealed tissue-specific expression of the CYP19a gene. Furthermore, the assay could differentiate the abundance of CYP19a mRNA among cell types. Expression of CYP19a was primarily associated with early stage oocytes, and expression gradually decreased with increasing maturation. No expression of CYP19a mRNA was observed in other tissues such as brain, liver, or testes. Fadrozole (100 {mu}g/L) caused up-regulation of CYP19a expression, a trend that was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis on excised tissues. In a combination approach with gonad histology, it could be shown that the increase in CYP19a expression as measured by RT-PCR on a whole tissue basis was due to a combination of both increases in numbers of CYP19a-containing cells and an increase in the amount of CYP19a mRNA present in the cells.

  12. Desorption mass spectrometry: Revisiting the in-situ calibration technique for mixed group-V alloy MBE growth of ~3.3 μm diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Ron; Lu, Chunte; Yang, Chi; Newell, Timothy C.; Luong, Sanh

    2015-09-01

    We apply the desorption mass spectrometry (DMS) technique and analyze the desorbed Sb species in-situ during MBE growth of mixed As/Sb heterostructures. We demonstrate how DMS is useful in pre-growth calibration of the V/III ratio, the group-III ratio, as well as the Sb-content in quaternary or quinary mixed As/Sb alloys. We also apply DMS to the digital alloy growth method. For demonstration purposes, we start with an un-calibrated MBE system, use the DMS technique to calibrate all of the previously undetermined MBE parameters and grow a ~3.3 μm diode laser heterostructure in only one attempt. The results demonstrate that the DMS technique will allow the MBE to quickly converge toward a set of acceptable growth parameters without the need for ex-situ calibration of alloy composition.

  13. Theoretical detection threshold of the proton-acoustic range verification technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Moiz; Yousefi, Siavash; Xing, Lei; Xiang, Liangzhong

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Range verification in proton therapy using the proton-acoustic signal induced in the Bragg peak was investigated for typical clinical scenarios. The signal generation and detection processes were simulated in order to determine the signal-to-noise limits. Methods: An analytical model was used to calculate the dose distribution and local pressure rise (per proton) for beams of different energy (100 and 160 MeV) and spot widths (1, 5, and 10 mm) in a water phantom. In this method, the acoustic waves propagating from the Bragg peak were generated by the general 3D pressure wave equation implemented using a finite element method. Various beam pulse widths (0.1–10 μs) were simulated by convolving the acoustic waves with Gaussian kernels. A realistic PZT ultrasound transducer (5 cm diameter) was simulated with a Butterworth bandpass filter with consideration of random noise based on a model of thermal noise in the transducer. The signal-to-noise ratio on a per-proton basis was calculated, determining the minimum number of protons required to generate a detectable pulse. The maximum spatial resolution of the proton-acoustic imaging modality was also estimated from the signal spectrum. Results: The calculated noise in the transducer was 12–28 mPa, depending on the transducer central frequency (70–380 kHz). The minimum number of protons detectable by the technique was on the order of 3–30 × 10{sup 6} per pulse, with 30–800 mGy dose per pulse at the Bragg peak. Wider pulses produced signal with lower acoustic frequencies, with 10 μs pulses producing signals with frequency less than 100 kHz. Conclusions: The proton-acoustic process was simulated using a realistic model and the minimal detection limit was established for proton-acoustic range validation. These limits correspond to a best case scenario with a single large detector with no losses and detector thermal noise as the sensitivity limiting factor. Our study indicated practical proton

  14. Investigation of Advanced Dose Verification Techniques for External Beam Radiation Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asuni, Ganiyu Adeniyi

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) have been introduced in radiation therapy to achieve highly conformal dose distributions around the tumour while minimizing dose to surrounding normal tissues. These techniques have increased the need for comprehensive quality assurance tests, to verify that customized patient treatment plans are accurately delivered during treatment. in vivo dose verification, performed during treatment delivery, confirms that the actual dose delivered is the same as the prescribed dose, helping to reduce treatment delivery errors. in vivo measurements may be accomplished using entrance or exit detectors. The objective of this project is to investigate a novel entrance detector designed for in vivo dose verification. This thesis is separated into three main investigations, focusing on a prototype entrance transmission detector (TRD) developed by IBA Dosimetry, Germany. First contaminant electrons generated by the TRD in a 6 MV photon beam were investigated using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. This study demonstrates that modification of the contaminant electron model in the treatment planning system is required for accurate patient dose calculation in buildup regions when using the device. Second, the ability of the TRD to accurately measure dose from IMRT and VMAT was investigated by characterising the spatial resolution of the device. This was accomplished by measuring the point spread function with further validation provided by MC simulation. Comparisons of measured and calculated doses show that the spatial resolution of the TRD allows for measurement of clinical IMRT fields within acceptable tolerance. Finally, a new general research tool was developed to perform MC simulations for VMAT and IMRT treatments, simultaneously tracking dose deposition in both the patient CT geometry and an arbitrary planar detector system, generalized to handle either entrance or exit orientations. It was

  15. Development of experimental verification techniques for non-linear deformation and fracture on the nanometer scale.

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, Neville Reid; Bahr, David F.

    2005-11-01

    This work covers three distinct aspects of deformation and fracture during indentations. In particular, we develop an approach to verification of nanoindentation induced film fracture in hard film/soft substrate systems; we examine the ability to perform these experiments in harsh environments; we investigate the methods by which the resulting deformation from indentation can be quantified and correlated to computational simulations, and we examine the onset of plasticity during indentation testing. First, nanoindentation was utilized to induce fracture of brittle thin oxide films on compliant substrates. During the indentation, a load is applied and the penetration depth is continuously measured. A sudden discontinuity, indicative of film fracture, was observed upon the loading portion of the load-depth curve. The mechanical properties of thermally grown oxide films on various substrates were calculated using two different numerical methods. The first method utilized a plate bending approach by modeling the thin film as an axisymmetric circular plate on a compliant foundation. The second method measured the applied energy for fracture. The crack extension force and applied stress intensity at fracture was then determined from the energy measurements. Secondly, slip steps form on the free surface around indentations in most crystalline materials when dislocations reach the free surface. Analysis of these slip steps provides information about the deformation taking place in the material. Techniques have now been developed to allow for accurate and consistent measurement of slip steps and the effects of crystal orientation and tip geometry are characterized. These techniques will be described and compared to results from dislocation dynamics simulations.

  16. Application of in situ hybridization, cytochemical and immunocytochemical techniques for the investigation of peroxisomes. A review including novel data. Robert Feulgen Prize Lecture 1997.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, E

    1997-09-01

    In situ hybridization, cytochemical and immunocytochemical techniques have contributed significantly to the understanding of the biology of peroxisomes, since they permit in situ demonstration of the sites of synthesis and distribution of peroxisomal proteins without the necessity of homogenization and subcellular fractionation of tissues or cultured cells. This article reviews the results of research on mammalian peroxisomal metabolism, biogenesis and proliferation in which morphological techniques have played a significant role in the elucidation of the biological problem. Some new data on peroxisomal heterogeneity and morphogenesis are included. The morphological methods applied have made it possible to characterize the differences in distribution of mRNAs encoding peroxisomal proteins in different tissues, as well as to monitor the marked heterogeneity in the protein composition and in the activity of specific enzymes in the peroxisomal population of single cells, or in tissues with complex organization (e.g. liver and kidney). In addition, the dynamic alterations and high plasticity of the peroxisomal compartment--partly dependent on contact of the peroxisomes to the microtubular network-are presented. PMID:9342614

  17. Single-Tube Reaction Using Perfluorocarbons: A Prerequisite Step Leading to the Whole-Slide In Situ Technique on Histopathological Slides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chang; Teng, Tsung-Han; Tsai, Jane S-C; Huang, Hsien-Da; Chang, Yih-Leong; Liang, Cher-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Developing a robust, novel method for performing multiple reactions in a single tube is not only time- and cost-saving but also critical for future high-throughput whole-slide in situ techniques on diseased tissues. In this study, we introduce the use of perfluorocarbons and compound-coated magnetic particles to create pseudochambers in a single tube, allowing different reactions to be performed in different phases. Perfluorocarbons also serve as cell lysis buffer and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) buffer owing to their highly penetrating, repellent and emulsifiable properties. Using this method, nucleic acids can be isolated and purified from various sample types and sizes, followed by PCR, real-time PCR, or multiplex PCR in the same tube. No incubation or enzyme digesting time is needed and the risk of cross-contamination is reduced. Tests can be performed in microemulsions (water-in-oil droplets) containing sequence-specific captures and probes for further high-throughput detection. We present a simple, quick, and robust procedure as a prerequisite step to future high-throughput in situ techniques. PMID:27336363

  18. Single-Tube Reaction Using Perfluorocarbons: A Prerequisite Step Leading to the Whole-Slide In Situ Technique on Histopathological Slides

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Chang; Teng, Tsung-Han; Tsai, Jane S.-C.; Huang, Hsien-Da; Chang, Yih-Leong

    2016-01-01

    Developing a robust, novel method for performing multiple reactions in a single tube is not only time- and cost-saving but also critical for future high-throughput whole-slide in situ techniques on diseased tissues. In this study, we introduce the use of perfluorocarbons and compound-coated magnetic particles to create pseudochambers in a single tube, allowing different reactions to be performed in different phases. Perfluorocarbons also serve as cell lysis buffer and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) buffer owing to their highly penetrating, repellent and emulsifiable properties. Using this method, nucleic acids can be isolated and purified from various sample types and sizes, followed by PCR, real-time PCR, or multiplex PCR in the same tube. No incubation or enzyme digesting time is needed and the risk of cross-contamination is reduced. Tests can be performed in microemulsions (water-in-oil droplets) containing sequence-specific captures and probes for further high-throughput detection. We present a simple, quick, and robust procedure as a prerequisite step to future high-throughput in situ techniques. PMID:27336363

  19. Survey of Verification and Validation Techniques for Small Satellite Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacklin, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the current trends and practices in small-satellite software verification and validation. This document is not intended to promote a specific software assurance method. Rather, it seeks to present an unbiased survey of software assurance methods used to verify and validate small satellite software and to make mention of the benefits and value of each approach. These methods include simulation and testing, verification and validation with model-based design, formal methods, and fault-tolerant software design with run-time monitoring. Although the literature reveals that simulation and testing has by far the longest legacy, model-based design methods are proving to be useful for software verification and validation. Some work in formal methods, though not widely used for any satellites, may offer new ways to improve small satellite software verification and validation. These methods need to be further advanced to deal with the state explosion problem and to make them more usable by small-satellite software engineers to be regularly applied to software verification. Last, it is explained how run-time monitoring, combined with fault-tolerant software design methods, provides an important means to detect and correct software errors that escape the verification process or those errors that are produced after launch through the effects of ionizing radiation.

  20. Laser Ablation in situ (U-Th-Sm)/He and U-Pb Double-Dating of Apatite and Zircon: Techniques and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInnes, B.; Danišík, M.; Evans, N.; McDonald, B.; Becker, T.; Vermeesch, P.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new laser-based technique for rapid, quantitative and automated in situ microanalysis of U, Th, Sm, Pb and He for applications in geochronology, thermochronometry and geochemistry (Evans et al., 2015). This novel capability permits a detailed interrogation of the time-temperature history of rocks containing apatite, zircon and other accessory phases by providing both (U-Th-Sm)/He and U-Pb ages (+trace element analysis) on single crystals. In situ laser microanalysis offers several advantages over conventional bulk crystal methods in terms of safety, cost, productivity and spatial resolution. We developed and integrated a suite of analytical instruments including a 193 nm ArF excimer laser system (RESOlution M-50A-LR), a quadrupole ICP-MS (Agilent 7700s), an Alphachron helium mass spectrometry system and swappable flow-through and ultra-high vacuum analytical chambers. The analytical protocols include the following steps: mounting/polishing in PFA Teflon using methods similar to those adopted for fission track etching; laser He extraction and analysis using a 2 s ablation at 5 Hz and 2-3 J/cm2fluence; He pit volume measurement using atomic force microscopy, and U-Th-Sm-Pb (plus optional trace element) analysis using traditional laser ablation methods. The major analytical challenges for apatite include the low U, Th and He contents relative to zircon and the elevated common Pb content. On the other hand, apatite typically has less extreme and less complex zoning of parent isotopes (primarily U and Th). A freeware application has been developed for determining (U-Th-Sm)/He ages from the raw analytical data and Iolite software was used for U-Pb age and trace element determination. In situ double-dating has successfully replicated conventional U-Pb and (U-Th)/He age variations in xenocrystic zircon from the diamondiferous Ellendale lamproite pipe, Western Australia and increased zircon analytical throughput by a factor of 50 over conventional methods

  1. A Localized In-Situ Hydrogel-Mediated Protein Digestion and Extraction Technique For On-Tissue Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Glenn A.; Nicklay, Joshua J.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    A simultaneous on-tissue proteolytic digestion and extraction method is described for the in-situ analysis of proteins from spatially distinct areas of a tissue section. The digestion occurs on-tissue within a hydrogel network, and peptides extracted from this gel are identified with liquid chromatography tandem MS (LC-MS/MS). The hydrogels are compatible with solubility agents (e.g. chaotropes and detergents) known to improve enzymatic digestion of proteins. Additionally, digestions and extractions are compatible with Imaging Mass Spectrometry (IMS) experiments. As an example application, an initial IMS experiment was conducted to profile lipid species using a traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometer. On-tissue MS/MS was also performed on the same tissue section to identify lipid ions that showed spatial differences. Subsequently, the section underwent an on-tissue hydrogel digestion to reveal 96 proteins that co-localized to the rat brain cerebellum. Hematoxylin and Eosin (H & E) staining was then performed to provide additional histological information about the tissue structure. This technology provides a versatile workflow that can be used to correlate multiple complementary analytical approaches in the analysis of a single tissue section. PMID:23402265

  2. The use of a neutron backscatter technique for in-situ water measurement in paper-recycling industry.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Norpaiza Mohamad; Zain, Rasif Mohd; Abdul Rahman, Mohd Fitri; Mustapha, Ismail

    2009-01-01

    A bulk of used paper supplied to recycling industry may contain water in their internal voids. This is because the price of the used paper is currently based on their weight and it has a huge potential of suppliers to add with water in order to increase the price. Currently used methods for detecting moisture content in a paper are restricted to a sheet of paper only. This paper presents a non-intrusive method for quick and in-situ measurement of water content in a bulk of used paper. The proposed method extends the capability of common paper moisture gauge, by using a neutron device. A fast neutron source (Am-Be 241) and a portable backscattering neutron detector are used for water measurement. It theoretically indicates that the slow neutron counts can be correlated to the hydrogen or water level in a paper. The method has the potential of being used by the paper-recycling industry for rapid and non-destructive measurement of water in a bulk of used paper. PMID:19303310

  3. Innovative Protocols for in SITU MTBE Degradation by Using Molecular Probes-An Enhanced Chemical-Bio Oxidation Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Fallgren

    2009-02-20

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is a common technology to cleanup petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and groundwater. Sodium percarbonate (SPC) is an oxidant which is activated by iron (Fe) to produce Fenton-like reactions. Western Research Institute, in conjunction with Regenesis and the U.S. Department of Energy, conducted a study that investigated the performance of a 'safe' oxidant, SPC, to cleanup groundwater and soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons and associated contaminants (e.g., MTBE). Results from a field pilot test in Frenchglen, Oregon showed VOC concentrations in groundwater decreased substantially within 2 weeks after injecting activated SPC (RegenOx). A protocol was established for determining RegenOx TOD in soils and groundwater. Total oxidant demand tests were necessary to determine the correct dosage of RegenOx to apply in the field and sufficiently degrade the contaminants of concern. Bench studies with RegenOx showed this technology was effective in degrading diesel fuel and 1,4-dioxane. The Fe-silica activator (RegenOx Part B) was tested with another oxidant, sodium persulfate. Bench tests results showed the combination of sodium persulfate and RegenOx Part B was effective in reducing PCE, MTBE, benzene, and n-heptane concentrations in water. Overall, the results of this project indicated that most petroleum contaminants in soil and groundwater can be sufficiently degraded using the RegenOx technology.

  4. Development and verification of global/local analysis techniques for laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Danniella Muheim; Griffin, O. Hayden, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A two-dimensional to three-dimensional global/local finite element approach was developed, verified, and applied to a laminated composite plate of finite width and length containing a central circular hole. The resulting stress fields for axial compression loads were examined for several symmetric stacking sequences and hole sizes. Verification was based on comparison of the displacements and the stress fields with those accepted trends from previous free edge investigations and a complete three-dimensional finite element solution of the plate. The laminates in the compression study included symmetric cross-ply, angle-ply and quasi-isotropic stacking sequences. The entire plate was selected as the global model and analyzed with two-dimensional finite elements. Displacements along a region identified as the global/local interface were applied in a kinematically consistent fashion to independent three-dimensional local models. Local areas of interest in the plate included a portion of the straight free edge near the hole, and the immediate area around the hole. Interlaminar stress results obtained from the global/local analyses compares well with previously reported trends, and some new conclusions about interlaminar stress fields in plates with different laminate orientations and hole sizes are presented for compressive loading. The effectiveness of the global/local procedure in reducing the computational effort required to solve these problems is clearly demonstrated through examination of the computer time required to formulate and solve the linear, static system of equations which result for the global and local analyses to those required for a complete three-dimensional formulation for a cross-ply laminate. Specific processors used during the analyses are described in general terms. The application of this global/local technique is not limited software system, and was developed and described in as general a manner as possible.

  5. In situ observation of 2212 intergrowths in the early stages of (Bi, Pb)2223 phase formation using the synchrotron XRD technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, Fumitake; Osamura, Kozo

    2005-04-01

    2212 intergrowths in the (Bi, Pb)2223 phase have been investigated using in situ high temperature synchrotron XRD technique. With a high energy synchrotron x-ray and high resolution diffractometer, we could obtain high resolution powder XRD patterns of (Bi, Pb)2223 and (Bi, Pb)2212 from the whole bulk inside the Ag-sheath. This gave us more detailed information on 2212 intergrowths in the (Bi, Pb)2223 phase than ever before. During in situ observation, the Ag-tubed precursor was kept at 1095 K with flowing Ar-7.8% O2 mixed gas. The profiles of the diffraction peaks were analysed by Rietveld analysis to evaluate the isotropic and anisotropic lattice strain of (Bi, Pb)2223 and (Bi, Pb)2212. Considering the evolution of anisotropic lattice strain during the heat treatment, it was concluded that 2212 intergrowths in the (Bi, Pb)2223 phase are not in the untransformed region of (Bi, Pb)2212 after incommensurate intercalation, but a stacking fault-like defect contained in the (Bi, Pb)2223 phase during its nucleation and growth. A new model of 2212 intergrowth formation in the (Bi, Pb)2223 phase was suggested and discussed.

  6. Renal glomerular proteoglycans. An investigation of their synthesis in vivo using a technique for fixation in situ.

    PubMed Central

    Beavan, L A; Davies, M; Mason, R M

    1988-01-01

    Newly synthesized rat glomerular [35S]proteoglycans were labelled in vivo after injecting Na2[35S]SO4 intraperitoneally. At the end of the labelling period (7 h) the kidneys were perfused in situ with 0.01% (w/v) cetylpyridinium chloride. This fixed proteoglycans in the tissue and increased their recovery 2-3-fold during subsequent isolation of glomeruli from the renal cortex. The glomeruli were fractionated by a modified osmotic lysis and detergent extraction procedure [Meezan, Brendel, Hjelle & Carlson (1978) in The Biology and Chemistry of Basement Membranes (Kefalides, N.A., ed.), Academic Press, New York; Kanwar & Farquhar (1979) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 76, 4493-4497] to obtain a basement membrane preparation. The proteoglycans released at each stage of the procedure were characterized using DEAE-Sephacel ion-exchange chromatography, chondroitinase ABC and HNO2 digestion and Sepharose CL-4B gel-permeation chromatography. About 85% of the [35S]proteoglycans synthesized were of the heparan sulphate variety, the remainder being chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans. Three sizes of heparan sulphate proteoglycans were identified. The largest (HS1, Kav. 0.47) accounts for 44% of the total extractable heparan sulphates. About one third of HS1 were extracted from the glomerular basement-membrane fraction with 8 M-urea and 4 M-guanidine hydrochloride but the remainder were released from the glomerulus during preparation of the fraction. The two smaller molecules (HS2, Kav. 0.56 and HS3, Kav. 0.68) accounted for 27% and 28% of the extractable heparan sulphate respectively and were not associated with the basement membrane fraction. HS1, HS2 and HS3 were also isolated from non-fixed glomeruli labelled in vivo but with much lower recovery. In glomeruli labelled in vitro, heparan sulphate accounted for only 35% of the proteoglycans, the remainder being of the chondroitin sulphate type. Proteoglycans similar to HS1, HS2 and HS3 were present in glomeruli labelled in vitro

  7. Ground vibration tests of a high fidelity truss for verification of on orbit damage location techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashangaki, Thomas A. L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a series of modal tests that were performed on a cantilevered truss structure. The goal of the tests was to assemble a large database of high quality modal test data for use in verification of proposed methods for on orbit model verification and damage detection in flexible truss structures. A description of the hardware is provided along with details of the experimental setup and procedures for 16 damage cases. Results from selected cases are presented and discussed. Differences between ground vibration testing and on orbit modal testing are also described.

  8. Development of Non Destructive Evaluation Techniques for the In-Situ Inspection of the Orbiter's Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Jose M.

    2004-01-01

    One of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board's (CAB) recommendation is to develop and implement an inspection plan to determine the structural integrity of all Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) system components that make part of the Space Shuttle's thermal protection system. This presentation focuses on the efforts to leverage non-destructive evaluation (NDE) expertise from academia, private industry, and government agencies resulting in the design of a comprehensive health monitoring program for RCC components. The different NDE techniques that were considered are presented along with the chosen techniques and preliminary inspection results of RCC materials.

  9. In-situ fluorimetry: a powerful non-invasive diagnostic technique for natural dyes used in artefacts. Part II. Identification of orcein and indigo in Renaissance tapestries.

    PubMed

    Clementi, C; Miliani, C; Romani, A; Santamaria, U; Morresi, F; Mlynarska, K; Favaro, G

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, three Renaissance tapestries depicting scenes painted by Raffaello Sanzio, conserved at the Vatican Museum, were investigated using in-situ UV-Visible fluorimetric measurements. The results show that this technique is suitable for the detection of natural organic colorants used for dyeing the threads woven in these tapestries. The emission signals detected on red-purple colours were assigned to the colorant orcein and those on different nuances of blue and green colours to indigo by comparison with data from reference laboratory samples. The assignments were supported by chromatographic experiments carried out on threads taken from the back side of the tapestry in the same points analysed by spectrofluorimentry. PMID:19004665

  10. Formation of 2D colloidal crystals by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique monitored in situ by Brewster angle microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gil, Alvaro; Guitián, Francisco

    2007-03-01

    We report a method that combines Brewster angle microscopy and Langmuir-Blodgett films technique to obtain highly ordered 2D colloidal crystals of nanospheres. The deposition of Langmuir-Blodgett films of silica spheres monitored by Brewster angle microscopy allows to determine with accuracy the best physical conditions to transfer highly ordered monolayers of nanoparticles. PMID:17184789

  11. FINAL REPORT. DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED IN-SITU TECHNIQUES FOR CHEMISTRY MONITORING AND CORROSION MITIGATION IN SCWO ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The principal objective of this work was to develop sensing technologies and corrosion monitoring techniques for use in Super Critical Water Oxidation (SCWO) systems. SCWO is currently being considered as a volume reduction technology for the pretreatment of Mixed Low Level Nucle...

  12. A technique coupling the analyte electrodeposition followed by in-situ stripping with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for analysis of samples with high NaCl contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čánský, Zdeněk; Rychlovský, Petr; Petrová, Zuzana; Matousek, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    A technique coupling the analyte electrodeposition followed by in-situ stripping with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry has been developed for determination of lead and cadmium in samples with high salt contents. To separate the analyte from the sample matrix, the analyte was in-situ quantitatively electrodeposited on a platinum sampling capillary serving as the cathode (sample volume, 20 μL). The spent electrolyte containing the sample matrix was then withdrawn, the capillary with the analyte deposited was washed with deionized water and the analyte was stripped into a chemically simple electrolyte (5 g/L NH 4H 2PO 4) by reversing the polarity of the electrodeposition circuit. Electrothermal atomization using a suitable optimized temperature program followed. A fully automated manifold was designed for this coupled technique and the appropriate control software was developed. The operating conditions for determination of Pb and Cd in samples with high contents of inorganic salts were optimized, the determination was characterized by principal analytical parameters and its applicability was verified on analyses of urine reference samples. The absolute limits of detection for lead and cadmium (3 σ criterion) in a sample containing 30 g/L NaCl were 8.5 pg and 2.3 pg, respectively (peak absorbance) and the RSD values amounted to 1.6% and 1.9% for lead (at the 40 ng mL - 1 level) and cadmium (at the 4.0 ng mL - 1 level), respectively. These values (and also the measuring sensitivity) are superior to the results attained in conventional electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of Pb and Cd in pure solutions (5 g/L NH 4H 2PO 4). The sensitivity of the Pb and Cd determination is not affected by the NaCl concentration up to a value of 100 g/L, demonstrating an efficient matrix removal during the electrodeposition step.

  13. Application of object-oriented verification techniques to ensemble precipitation forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallus, W.

    2009-04-01

    Both the Method for Diagnostic Evaluation (MODE) and Contiguous Rain Area (CRA) object-oriented verification techniques have been used to analyze precipitation forecasts from two sets of ensembles to determine if spread-skill behavior observed using traditional measures can be seen in the object parameters, and to examine several methods of obtaining forecast guidance from the object parameters. One set of ensembles consisted of two 8 member Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model ensembles, one having mixed physics and dynamics with common initial and lateral boundary conditions (Phys) and another using common physics and dynamic core but with perturbed initial and lateral boundary conditions (IC/LBC). Traditional measures had found that spread grows much faster in IC/LBC than in Phys such that although skill and spread initially are as large or larger in Phys than in IC/LBC, after roughly 24 hours, better skill and spread are found in IC/LBC. These measures also reflected the strong diurnal signal of precipitation dominating the central United States during the warm season. The other set of ensembles included 5 members of a 4 km grid spacing WRF ensemble (ENS4) and 5 members of a 20 km WRF ensemble (ENS20). Traditional measures applied to these ensembles suggested that the diurnal signal was better in ENS4 and spread increased more rapidly than in ENS20. Standard deviations (SDs) of four object parameters computed for the first set of ensembles showed the trend of enhanced spread growth in IC/LBC compared to Phys that had been observed in traditional measures, with areal coverage of precipitation exhibiting the greatest growth in spread with time. The two techniques did not produce identical results, although they did show the same general trends. CRA better showed differences between Phys and IC/LBC for SDs of rain rate, while MODE showed more of a difference for SDs of rain volume. A diurnal cycle had some influence on the SDs of all parameters, especially

  14. Raman spectrosopic characterization of human malignant tissues: implications for a percutaneous optical biopsy technique for in-situ tissue diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redd, Douglas C. B.; Frank, Christopher J.; Feng, Zhe Chuan; Gansler, Ted S.; McCreery, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    Recent advancements in the technique of Raman spectroscopy now make it possible to achieve rapid, minimally invasive and non-destructive characterization of tissues. In order to evaluate the efficacy of this technique for diagnosis, the Raman spectra of normal and neoplastic human tissues (e.g., breast, kidney, liver and colon) were obtained utilizing visible and near-IR excitation. Normal breast tissue and colon adenocarcinoma showed major Raman features due to the presence of carotenoids and lipids. In breast carcinoma, the features due to lipids were attenuated and as fibrosis (desmoplasia) increased, new spectral features attributable to collagen were observed. Samples of normal and neoplastic liver and kidney show unique spectral differences sufficient to permit tissue differentiation.

  15. Comparison of the resulting error in data fusion techniques when used with remote sensing, earth observation, and in-situ data sets for water quality applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, Alexander; El Serafy, Ghada

    2016-04-01

    Ecological modeling and water quality investigations are complex processes which can require a high level of parameterization and a multitude of varying data sets in order to properly execute the model in question. Since models are generally complex, their calibration and validation can benefit from the application of data and information fusion techniques. The data applied to ecological models comes from a wide range of sources such as remote sensing, earth observation, and in-situ measurements, resulting in a high variability in the temporal and spatial resolution of the various data sets available to water quality investigators. It is proposed that effective fusion into a comprehensive singular set will provide a more complete and robust data resource with which models can be calibrated, validated, and driven by. Each individual product contains a unique valuation of error resulting from the method of measurement and application of pre-processing techniques. The uncertainty and error is further compounded when the data being fused is of varying temporal and spatial resolution. In order to have a reliable fusion based model and data set, the uncertainty of the results and confidence interval of the data being reported must be effectively communicated to those who would utilize the data product or model outputs in a decision making process[2]. Here we review an array of data fusion techniques applied to various remote sensing, earth observation, and in-situ data sets whose domains' are varied in spatial and temporal resolution. The data sets examined are combined in a manner so that the various classifications, complementary, redundant, and cooperative, of data are all assessed to determine classification's impact on the propagation and compounding of error. In order to assess the error of the fused data products, a comparison is conducted with data sets containing a known confidence interval and quality rating. We conclude with a quantification of the performance

  16. Fabrication of mullite-bonded porous SiC ceramics from multilayer-coated SiC particles through sol-gel and in-situ polymerization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimpour, Omid

    In this work, mullite-bonded porous silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics were prepared via a reaction bonding technique with the assistance of a sol-gel technique or in-situ polymerization as well as a combination of these techniques. In a typical procedure, SiC particles were first coated by alumina using calcined powder and alumina sol via a sol-gel technique followed by drying and passing through a screen. Subsequently, they were coated with the desired amount of polyethylene via an in-situ polymerization technique in a slurry phase reactor using a Ziegler-Natta catalyst. Afterward, the coated powders were dried again and passed through a screen before being pressed into a rectangular mold to make a green body. During the heating process, the polyethylene was burnt out to form pores at a temperature of about 500°C. Increasing the temperature above 800°C led to the partial oxidation of SiC particles to silica. At higher temperatures (above 1400°C) derived silica reacted with alumina to form mullite, which bonds SiC particles together. The porous SiC specimens were characterized with various techniques. The first part of the project was devoted to investigating the oxidation of SiC particles using a Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) apparatus. The effects of particle size (micro and nano) and oxidation temperature (910°C--1010°C) as well as the initial mass of SiC particles in TGA on the oxidation behaviour of SiC powders were evaluated. To illustrate the oxidation rate of SiC in the packed bed state, a new kinetic model, which takes into account all of the diffusion steps (bulk, inter and intra particle diffusion) and surface oxidation rate, was proposed. Furthermore, the oxidation of SiC particles was analyzed by the X-ray Diffraction (XRD) technique. The effect of different alumina sources (calcined Al2O 3, alumina sol or a combination of the two) on the mechanical, physical, and crystalline structure of mullite-bonded porous SiC ceramics was studied in the

  17. Fabrication of mullite-bonded porous SiC ceramics from multilayer-coated SiC particles through sol-gel and in-situ polymerization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimpour, Omid

    In this work, mullite-bonded porous silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics were prepared via a reaction bonding technique with the assistance of a sol-gel technique or in-situ polymerization as well as a combination of these techniques. In a typical procedure, SiC particles were first coated by alumina using calcined powder and alumina sol via a sol-gel technique followed by drying and passing through a screen. Subsequently, they were coated with the desired amount of polyethylene via an in-situ polymerization technique in a slurry phase reactor using a Ziegler-Natta catalyst. Afterward, the coated powders were dried again and passed through a screen before being pressed into a rectangular mold to make a green body. During the heating process, the polyethylene was burnt out to form pores at a temperature of about 500°C. Increasing the temperature above 800°C led to the partial oxidation of SiC particles to silica. At higher temperatures (above 1400°C) derived silica reacted with alumina to form mullite, which bonds SiC particles together. The porous SiC specimens were characterized with various techniques. The first part of the project was devoted to investigating the oxidation of SiC particles using a Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) apparatus. The effects of particle size (micro and nano) and oxidation temperature (910°C--1010°C) as well as the initial mass of SiC particles in TGA on the oxidation behaviour of SiC powders were evaluated. To illustrate the oxidation rate of SiC in the packed bed state, a new kinetic model, which takes into account all of the diffusion steps (bulk, inter and intra particle diffusion) and surface oxidation rate, was proposed. Furthermore, the oxidation of SiC particles was analyzed by the X-ray Diffraction (XRD) technique. The effect of different alumina sources (calcined Al2O 3, alumina sol or a combination of the two) on the mechanical, physical, and crystalline structure of mullite-bonded porous SiC ceramics was studied in the

  18. Sublimation extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: A new technique for future in situ analyses of purines and pyrimidines on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Cleaves, H. J.; Buch, A.; Schubert, M.; Aubrey, A.; Bada, J. L.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2006-12-01

    We have developed a sublimation technique coupled with chemical derivatization and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to detect nucleobases and other volatile organic compounds derived from bacteria in Mars analog materials. To demonstrate this technique, a sample of serpentine inoculated with Escherichia coli ( E. coli) cells was heated to 500 °C for several seconds under Martian ambient pressure. The sublimate was collected on a cold finger, then derivatized and analyzed by GC-MS. We found that adenine, cytosine, thymine and uracil were the most abundant molecules detected in the sublimed E. coli extract by GC-MS. In addition, nucleobases were also detected in sublimed extracts of a deep-sea sediment sample, seawater, and soil collected from the Atacama Desert in Chile after heating the samples under the same conditions. Our results indicate that nucleobases can be easily isolated directly from natural samples using sublimation and then detected by GC-MS after chemical derivatization. The sublimation-based extraction technique is one approach that should be considered for use by future in situ instruments designed to detect organic compounds relevant to life in the Martian regolith.

  19. Structural and optical studies of Zn1-xCdxS quantum dots synthesized by in situ technique in PVA matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vineeshkumar, T. V.; Rithesh Raj, D.; Prasanth, S.; Unnikrishnan, N. V.; Philip, Reji; Sudarsanakumar, C.

    2014-11-01

    Zn1-xCdxS (x = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 … 0.9) quantum dots were synthesized successfully using novel in situ technique in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) matrix. The PVA acted as a capping agent as well as a reducing agent. The structural and optical properties of the samples were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), TEM analysis, UV-Visible absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). X-ray diffraction patterns revealed cubic zinc blende phase of the samples with lattice parameter in the range 5.47-5.75 Å. Optical band gap values were calculated from the absorption spectra and observed a decreasing band gap with increasing Cd:Zn ratio. The Raman spectra were recorded using conventional Micro Raman technique. Photoluminescence spectra showed asymmetric broad emission with multiple maxima. The concentration dependent quenching of PL intensity with increasing Cd:Zn ratio was observed along with a red shift. The nonlinear optical (NLO) and limiting properties were studied using Z-scan technique.

  20. Advanced Techniques for In-Situ Monitoring of Phase Transformations During Welding Using Synchrotron-Based X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J W; Palmer, T A; Zhang, W; DebRoy, T

    2005-06-05

    Understanding the evolution of microstructure in welds is an important goal of welding research because of the strong correlation between weld microstructure and weld properties. To achieve this goal it is important to develop a quantitative measure of phase transformations encountered during welding in order to ultimately develop methods for predicting weld microstructures from the characteristics of the welding process. To aid in this effort, synchrotron radiation methods have been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for direct observation of microstructure evolution during welding. Using intense, highly collimated synchrotron radiation, the atomic structure of the weld heat affected and fusion zones can be probed in real time. Two synchrotron-based techniques, known as spatially resolved (SRXRD) and time resolved (TRXRD) x-ray diffraction, have been developed for these investigations. These techniques have now been used to investigate welding induced phase transformations in titanium alloys, low alloy steels, and stainless steel alloys. This paper will provide a brief overview of these methods and will discuss microstructural evolution during the welding of low carbon (AISI 1005) and medium carbon (AISI 1045) steels where the different levels of carbon influence the evolution of microstructures during welding.

  1. Development of In-Situ Erosion Measurement Techniques for Application to Real-Time Determination of Plasma Thruster Component Lifetimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This research has resulted in advancing the laser-based diagnostic capability and the ion optics development in the ion propulsion program at NASA GRC. Laser-based plasma diagnostics have been demonstrated in tabletop experiments and, in the case of LDI, on laboratory hollow cathodes. Assessment by GRC of its resources and priorities two years into the grant lead to a refocusing of the research effort away from the development of a real-time erosion rate measurement technique. The extension of the diagnostic techniques to diagnostic tools has been transferred to graduate students under the technical direction of the PI. These diagnostics may facilitate the development of ion thruster with significantly improved throughput capability for lower-power (10 kW) missions High-Isp, Long-lived ion optics development has proceeded from simple extensions of state-of-the-art geometries to radically different geometries and materials. Full-scale testing of these ion optics has demonstrated a significant advance in the throughput capability of ion thrusters enabling significantly more demanding missions. The capability to predict the throughput was developed and will continue to be upgraded. The performance models have been validated via full-scale testing. Partial validation of the throughput prediction will be completed via an upcoming wear test of the ion optics.

  2. Technical Note: A novel rocket-based in situ collection technique for mesospheric and stratospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, W.; Achtert, P.; Ivchenko, N.; Magnusson, P.; Kuremyr, T.; Shepenkov, V.; Tibert, G.

    2013-03-01

    A technique for collecting aerosol particles between altitudes of 17 and 85 km is described. Spin-stabilized collection probes are ejected from a sounding rocket allowing for multi-point measurements. Each probe is equipped with 110 collection samples that are 3 mm in diameter. The collection samples are one of three types: standard transmission electron microscopy carbon grids, glass fibre filter paper or silicone gel. Collection samples are exposed over a 50 m to 5 km height range with a total of 45 separate ranges. Post-flight electron microscopy will give size-resolved information on particle number, shape and elemental composition. Each collection probe is equipped with a suite of sensors to capture the probe's status during the fall. Parachute recovery systems along with GPS-based localization will ensure that each probe can be located and recovered for post-flight analysis.

  3. Simulation verification techniques study. Task report 4: Simulation module performance parameters and performance standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Shuttle simulation software modules in the environment, crew station, vehicle configuration and vehicle dynamics categories are discussed. For each software module covered, a description of the module functions and operational modes, its interfaces with other modules, its stored data, inputs, performance parameters and critical performance parameters is given. Reference data sources which provide standards of performance are identified for each module. Performance verification methods are also discussed briefly.

  4. A simplified technique for in situ excision of cornea and evisceration of retinal tissue from human ocular globe.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Mohit; Ferrari, Stefano; Di Iorio, Enzo; Barbaro, Vanessa; Camposampiero, Davide; Karali, Marianthi; Ponzin, Diego; Salvalaio, Gianni

    2012-01-01

    Enucleation is the process of retrieving the ocular globe from a cadaveric donor leaving the rest of the globe undisturbed. Excision refers to the retrieval of ocular tissues, especially cornea, by cutting it separate from the ocular globe. Evisceration is the process of removing the internal organs referred here as retina. The ocular globe consists of the cornea, the sclera, the vitreous body, the lens, the iris, the retina, the choroid, muscles etc (Suppl. Figure 1). When a patient is suffering from corneal damage, the cornea needs to be removed and a healthy one must be transplanted by keratoplastic surgeries. Genetic disorders or defects in retinal function can compromise vision. Human ocular globes can be used for various surgical procedures such as eye banking, transplantation of human cornea or sclera and research on ocular tissues. However, there is little information available on human corneal and retinal excision, probably due to the limited accessibility to human tissues. Most of the studies describing similar procedures are performed on animal models. Research scientists rely on the availability of properly dissected and well-conserved ocular tissues in order to extend the knowledge on human eye development, homeostasis and function. As we receive high amount of ocular globes out of which approximately 40% (Table 1) of them are used for research purposes, we are able to perform huge amount of experiments on these tissues, defining techniques to excise and preserve them regularly. The cornea is an avascular tissue which enables the transmission of light onto the retina and for this purpose should always maintain a good degree of transparency. Within the cornea, the limbus region, which is a reservoir of the stem cells, helps the reconstruction of epithelial cells and restricts the overgrowth of the conjunctiva maintaining corneal transparency and clarity. The size and thickness of the cornea are critical for clear vision, as changes in either of them

  5. In-situ measurement of epithelial tissue optical properties: Development and implementation of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Quanzeng

    Cancer is a severe threat to human health. Early detection is considered the best way to increase the chance for survival. While the traditional cancer detection method, biopsy, is invasive, noninvasive optical diagnostic techniques are revolutionizing the way that cancer is diagnosed. Reflectance spectroscopy is one of these optical spectroscopy techniques showing promise as a diagnostic tool for pre-cancer detection. When a neoplasia occurs in tissue, morphologic and biochemical changes happen in the tissue, which in turn results in the change of optical properties and reflectance spectroscopy. Therefore, a pre-cancer can be detected by extracting optical properties from reflectance spectroscopy. This dissertation described the construction of a fiberoptic based reflectance system and the development of a series of modeling studies. This research is aimed at establishing an improved understanding of the optical properties of mucosal tissues by analyzing reflectance signals at different wavelengths. The ultimate goal is to reveal the potential of reflectance-based optical diagnosis of pre-cancer. The research is detailed in Chapter 3 through Chapter 5. Although related with each other, each chapter was designed to become a journal paper ultimately. In Chapter 3, a multi-wavelength, fiberoptic system was constructed, evaluated and implemented to determine internal tissue optical properties at ultraviolet A and visible wavelengths. A condensed Monte Carlo model was deployed to simulate light-tissue interaction and generate spatially distributed reflectance data. These data were used to train an inverse neural network model to extract tissue optical properties from reflectance. Optical properties of porcine mucosal and liver tissues were finally measured. In Chapter 4, the condensed Monte Carlo method was extended so that it can rapidly simulate reflectance from a single illumination-detection fiber thus enabling the calculation of large data sets. The model was

  6. Novel techniques and devices for in-situ film coatings of long, small diameter tubes or elliptical and other surface contours

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brennan, Joseph Michael; Fischer, Wolfram; Liaw, Chong -Jer; Meng, Wuzhang; Todd, Robert; Custer, Art; Dingus, Aaron; Erikson, Mark; et al

    2015-07-30

    In this study, devices and techniques that can, via physical vapor deposition,coat various surface contours or very long small aperture pipes, are described. Recently, a magnetron mole was developed in order to in-situ coat accelerator tube sections of the Brookhaven National Lab relativistic heavy ion collider that have 7.1 cm diameter with access points that are 500 m apart, for copper coat the accelerator vacuum tube in order to alleviate the problems of unacceptable ohmic heating and of electron clouds. A magnetron with a 50 cm long cathode was designed fabricated and successfully operated to copper coat a whole assemblymore » containing a full-size, stainless steel, cold bore, of the accelerator magnet tubing connected to two types bellows, to which two additional pipes made of accelerator tubing were connected. The magnetron is mounted on a carriage with spring loaded wheels that successfully crossed bellows and adjusted for variations in vacuum tube diameter, while keeping the magnetron centered. Electrical power and cooling water were fed through a cable bundle. The umbilical cabling system, which is enclosed in a flexible braided metal sleeve, is driven by a motorized spool. To increase cathode lifetime, movable magnet package was developed, and thickest possible cathode was made, with a rather challenging target to substrate distance of less than 1.5 cm. Optimized process to ensure excellent adhesion was developed. Coating thickness of 10 μm Cu passed all industrial tests and even exceeded maximum capability of a 12 kg pull test fixture. Room temperature radio frequency (RF) resistivity measurement indicated that 10 μm Cu coated stainless steel accelerator tube has conductivity close to copper tubing. Work is in progress to repeat the RF resistivity measurement at cryogenic temperatures. Over 20 years ago, a device using multi axis robotic manipulators controlling separate robotic assemblies resulted in nine-axes of motion combined with conformal

  7. Novel techniques and devices for in-situ film coatings of long, small diameter tubes or elliptical and other surface contours

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brennan, Joseph Michael; Fischer, Wolfram; Liaw, Chong -Jer; Meng, Wuzhang; Todd, Robert; Custer, Art; Dingus, Aaron; Erikson, Mark; Jamshidi, Nader; Poole, Henry Joe

    2015-07-30

    In this study, devices and techniques that can, via physical vapor deposition,coat various surface contours or very long small aperture pipes, are described. Recently, a magnetron mole was developed in order to in-situ coat accelerator tube sections of the Brookhaven National Lab relativistic heavy ion collider that have 7.1 cm diameter with access points that are 500 m apart, for copper coat the accelerator vacuum tube in order to alleviate the problems of unacceptable ohmic heating and of electron clouds. A magnetron with a 50 cm long cathode was designed fabricated and successfully operated to copper coat a whole assembly containing a full-size, stainless steel, cold bore, of the accelerator magnet tubing connected to two types bellows, to which two additional pipes made of accelerator tubing were connected. The magnetron is mounted on a carriage with spring loaded wheels that successfully crossed bellows and adjusted for variations in vacuum tube diameter, while keeping the magnetron centered. Electrical power and cooling water were fed through a cable bundle. The umbilical cabling system, which is enclosed in a flexible braided metal sleeve, is driven by a motorized spool. To increase cathode lifetime, movable magnet package was developed, and thickest possible cathode was made, with a rather challenging target to substrate distance of less than 1.5 cm. Optimized process to ensure excellent adhesion was developed. Coating thickness of 10 μm Cu passed all industrial tests and even exceeded maximum capability of a 12 kg pull test fixture. Room temperature radio frequency (RF) resistivity measurement indicated that 10 μm Cu coated stainless steel accelerator tube has conductivity close to copper tubing. Work is in progress to repeat the RF resistivity measurement at cryogenic temperatures. Over 20 years ago, a device using multi axis robotic manipulators controlling separate robotic assemblies resulted in nine-axes of motion combined with conformal shape of the

  8. Sensitivity analysis of standard toxicity tests, rapid bioassays and in-situ techniques to indicate effluent toxicity in Gulf of Mexico estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.; Weber, D.

    1995-12-31

    The toxicities of eight industrial and municipal effluents discharged into the Pensacola Bay System (Florida) were evaluated for two years. Standard chronic toxicity tests with algae, invertebrates and fish were determined, as were effects monitored by Mutatox{reg_sign} and Microtox{reg_sign}. Sediment toxicity in the receiving water to four test species, in-situ effects on colonized periphyton and oyster tissue analysis were determined to assess environmental relevance of single-species toxicity tests. Overall, chronic toxicity to fish and Microtox effects were rarely observed; whereas, Mutatox effects and chronic toxicity to invertebrates were more common. Phytotoxicity (inhibition) of the effluents and sediment in the receiving water was not usually observed; however, significant stimulation of plant growth was common. Biomass and chlorophyll content of periphyton in the receiving water were greater than those in control areas, reflecting the stimulatory effect on growth observed in the laboratory phytotoxicity tests. Overall, toxicity was observed for all effluents by at least one diagnostic technique. There was no most sensitive test since effects were effluent-specific. Consequently, since there was no single effective test, the scientific and regulatory communities need to decide the significance of the various effluent assessment techniques and the ramifications of this issue on the NPDES permitting process.

  9. A crossover adjustment for improving sea surface height mapping from in-situ high rate ship-borne GNSS data using PPP technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jinyun; Dong, Zhenghua; Tan, Zhengguang; Liu, Xin; Chen, Chuanfa; Hwang, Cheinway

    2016-08-01

    Ship-borne global navigation satellite system (GNSS) technique can overcome the weakness of satellite altimetry and tide gauge in measuring sea surface heights (SSHs) over coastal seas. Ship-borne GNSS technique can be used to calibrate SSHs determined by the satellite altimetry and tide gauge. The ship-borne GNSS data are processed with the single-epoch precise point positioning (PPP) method to estimate SSHs which are filtered by the Gaussian filter to weaken and/or remove effects of sea wind and wave field. Tidal corrections are also taken into consideration to improve SSHs. One crossover adjustment method is put forward to calculate the bias and drift along the ship route and assess the accuracy of SSHs. We processed the in-situ ship-borne GPS data over the offshore sea around Keelung to compute precisely SSHs with the single-epoch PPP. Statistical results of SSH differences of crossover points indicate that the root mean squares error of SSHs determined by the ship-borne GPS is up to level of 12.9 cm over the offshore sea ~30 km far away to land.

  10. Investigation of the Surface Stress in SiC and Diamond Nanocrystals by In-situ High Pressure Powder Diffraction Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, B.; Stelmakh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Zhao, Y.; Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    The real atomic structure of nanocrystals determines key properties of the materials. For such materials the serious experimental problem lies in obtaining sufficiently accurate measurements of the structural parameters of the crystals, since very small crystals constitute rather a two-phase than a uniform crystallographic phase system. As a result, elastic properties of nanograins may be expected to reflect a dual nature of their structure, with a corresponding set of different elastic property parameters. We studied those properties by in-situ high-pressure powder diffraction technique. For nanocrystalline, even one-phase materials such measurements are particularly difficult to make since determination of the lattice parameters of very small crystals presents a challenge due to inherent limitations of standard elaboration of powder diffractograms. In this investigation we used our methodology of the structural analysis, the 'apparent lattice parameter' (alp) concept. The methodology allowed us to avoid the traps (if applied to nanocrystals) of standard powder diffraction evaluation techniques. The experiments were performed for nanocrystalline Sic and GaN powders using synchrotron sources. We applied both hydrostatic and isostatic pressures in the range of up to 40 GPa. Elastic properties of the samples were examined based on the measurements of a change of the lattice parameters with pressure. The results show a dual nature of the mechanical properties (compressibilities) of the materials, indicating a complex, core-shell structure of the grains.