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Sample records for in-tank precipitation itp

  1. Independent Technical Review of In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    An Independent Technical Review of In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) and Extended Sludge Processing (ESP) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) was carried out in March, 1993. The review focused on ITP/ESP equipment and chemical processes, integration of ITP/ESP within the High Level Waste (HLW) and Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) systems, and management and regulatory concerns. Following the ITR executive summary, this report includes: Chapter I--summary assessment; Chapter II--recommendations; and Chapter III--technical evaluations.

  2. In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) Structures Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, T.; Mertz, G.E.; Flanders, H.E.; Estochen, E.G.; Baldwin, G.R.; Rieck, P.J.; Amin, J.A.

    1994-09-20

    This report summarized the results of structural evaluations conducted for the three high-level waste storage tanks, filtration building, and four above ground transfer lines associated with the ITP facility. The evaluations are performed to assure that demands resulting from normal operating and natural phenomena hazard loads do not exceed the structural capacities when evaluated to current criteria and the revised usage classifications.

  3. Nuclear criticality safety bounding analysis for the in-tank-precipitation (ITP) process, impacted by fissile isotopic weight fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Bess, C.E.

    1994-04-22

    The In-Tank Precipitation process (ITP) receives High Level Waste (HLW) supernatant liquid containing radionuclides in waste processing tank 48H. Sodium tetraphenylborate, NaTPB, and monosodium titanate (MST), NaTi{sub 2}O{sub 5}H, are added for removal of radioactive Cs and Sr, respectively. In addition to removal of radio-strontium, MST will also remove plutonium and uranium. The majority of the feed solutions to ITP will come from the dissolution of supernate that had been concentrated by evaporation to a crystallized salt form, commonly referred to as saltcake. The concern for criticality safety arises from the adsorption of U and Pt onto MST. If sufficient mass and optimum conditions are achieved then criticality is credible. The concentration of u and Pt from solution into the smaller volume of precipitate represents a concern for criticality. This report supplements WSRC-TR-93-171, Nuclear Criticality Safety Bounding Analysis For The In-Tank-Precipitation (ITP) Process. Criticality safety in ITP can be analyzed by two bounding conditions: (1) the minimum safe ratio of MST to fissionable material and (2) the maximum fissionable material adsorption capacity of the MST. Calculations have provided the first bounding condition and experimental analysis has established the second. This report combines these conditions with canyon facility data to evaluate the potential for criticality in the ITP process due to the adsorption of the fissionable material from solution. In addition, this report analyzes the potential impact of increased U loading onto MST. Results of this analysis demonstrate a greater safety margin for ITP operations than the previous analysis. This report further demonstrates that the potential for criticality in the ITP process due to adsorption of fissionable material by MST is not credible.

  4. In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) geotechnical report, WSRC-TR-95-0057, Revision 0, Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, B.E.; Timian, D.A.

    1995-06-02

    A geotechnical study has been completed in H-Area for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and the balance of the H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. The study consisted of subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing, and engineering analyses. The purpose of these investigations is to evaluate the overall stability of the H-Area tanks under static and dynamic conditions. The objectives of the study are to define the site-specific geological conditions at ITP and HTF, obtain engineering properties for the assessment of the stability of the native soils and embankment under static and dynamic loads (i.e., slope stability, liquefaction potential, and potential settlements), and derive properties for soil-structure interaction studies. This document contains the records of cone penetrometer and dilatometer soundings for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) Geotechnical Report, Volume 3.

  5. In-tank precipitation facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) geotechnical report, WSRC-TR-95-0057, Revision 0, Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    A geotechnical study has been completed in H-Area for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and the balance of the H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. The study consisted of subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing, and engineering analyses. The purpose of these investigations is to evaluate the overall stability of the H-Area tanks under static and dynamic conditions. The objectives of the study are to define the site-specific geological conditions at ITP and HTF, obtain engineering properties for the assessment of the stability of the native soils and embankment under static and dynamic loads (i.e., slope stability, liquefaction potential, and potential settlements), and derive properties for soil-structure interaction studies. This document (Volume 5) contains the laboratory test results for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) Geotechnical Report.

  6. In-tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) geotechnical report, WSRC-TR-95-0057, Revision 0, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    A geotechnical study has been completed in H-Area for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and the balance of the H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. The study consisted of subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing, and engineering analyses. The purpose of these investigations is to evaluate the overall stability of the H-Area tanks under static and dynamic conditions. The objectives of the study are to define the site-specific geological conditions at ITP and HTF, obtain engineering properties for the assessment of the stability of the native soils and embankment under static and dynamic loads (i.e., slope stability, liquefaction potential, and potential settlements), and derive properties for soil-structure interaction studies.

  7. In-Tank Processing (ITP) Geotechnical Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cumbust, R.J.; Salomone, L.A.

    1994-07-01

    A geotechnical investigation has been completed for the In Tank Processing Facility (ITP) which consists of buildings 241-96H and 241- 32H; and Tanks 241-948H, 241-949H, 241-950H, and 241-951H. The investigation consisted of a literature search for relevant technical data, field explorations, field and laboratory testing, and analyses. This document presents a summary of the scope and results to date of the investigations and engineering analyses for these facilities. A final geotechnical report, which will include a more detailed discussion and all associated boring logs, laboratory test results, and analyses will be issued in October 1994. The purpose of the investigation is to obtain geotechnical information to evaluate the seismic performance of the foundation materials and embankments under and around the ITP. The geotechnical engineering objectives of the investigation are to: (1) define the subsurface stratigraphy, (2) obtain representative engineering properties of the subsurface materials, (3) assess the competence of the subsurface materials under static and dynamic loads, (4) derive properties for seismic soil- structure interaction analysis, (5) evaluate the areal and vertical extent of horizons that might cause dynamic settlement or instability, and (6) determine settlement at the foundation level of the tanks.

  8. In-Tank Processing (ITP) Geotechnical Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cumbest, R.J.

    1999-01-15

    A geotechnical investigation has been completed for the In Tank Processing Facility (ITP) which consists of buildings 241-96H and 241-32H; and Tanks 241-948H, 241-949H, 241-950H, and 241-951H. The investigation consisted of a literature search for relevant technical data, field explorations, field and laboratory testing, and analyses. This document presents a summary of the scope and results to date of the investigations and engineering analyses for these facilities. A final geotechnical report, which will include a more detailed discussion and all associated boring logs, laboratory test results, and analyses will be issued in October 1994.The purpose of the investigation is to obtain geotechnical information to evaluate the seismic performance of the foundation materials and embankme nts under and around the ITP. The geotechnical engineering objectives of the investigation are to: 1) define the subsurface stratigraphy, 2) obtain representative engineering properties of the subsurface materials, 3) assess the competence of the subsurface materials under static and dynamic loads, 4) derive properties for seismic soil-structure interaction analysis, 5) evaluate the areal and vertical extent of horizons that might cause dynamic settlement or instability, and 6) determine settlement at the foundation level of the tanks.

  9. Analysis of Copper in the In-Tank Precipitation Process Caustic Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Tovo, L.L.; Boyce, W.T.

    1996-12-12

    Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICPMS) procedures for measuring Cu in In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) caustic samples have been tested and implemented in the Analytical Development Section at the Savannah River Technology Center.

  10. Human Reliability Analysis for In-Tank Precipitation Alignment and Startup of Emergency Purge Ventilation Equipment. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, B.J.; Britt, T.E.

    1994-10-01

    This report documents the methodology used for calculating the human error probability for establishing air based ventilation using emergency purge ventilation equipment on In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) processing tanks 48 and 49 after failure of the nitrogen purge system following a seismic event. The analyses were performed according to THERP (Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction) as described in NUREG/CR-1278-F, ``Handbook of Human Reliability Analysis with Emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Applications.`` The calculated human error probabilities are provided as input to the Fault Tree Analysis for the ITP Nitrogen Purge System.

  11. Human reliability analysis for In-Tank Precipitation alignment and startup of emergency purge ventilation equipment. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, L.M.; Shapiro, B.J.; Britt, T.E.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the methodology used for calculating the human error probability for establishing air based ventilation using emergency purge ventilation equipment on In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) processing tanks 48 and 49 after a failure of the nitrogen purge system following a seismic event. The analyses were performed according to THERP (Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction) as described in NUREG/CR-1278-F, ``Handbook of Human Reliability Analysis with Emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Application.`` The calculated human error probabilities are provided as input to the Fault Tree Analysis for the ITP Nitrogen Purge System.

  12. Human Reliability Analysis for In-Tank Precipitation Alignment and Startup of Emergency Purge Ventilation Equipment. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, B.J.; Britt, T.E.

    1995-06-01

    This report documents the methodology used for calculating the human error probability for establishing air based ventilation using emergency purge ventilation equipment on In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) processing tanks 48 and 49 after a failure of the nitrogen purge system following a seismic event. The analyses were performed according to THERP (Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction) as describes in NUREG/CR-1278-F.

  13. Tributylphosphate in the In-Tank Precipitation Process Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.J.; Hobbs, D.T.; Swingle, R.F.

    1993-11-23

    A material balance investigation and evaluation of n- tributylphosphate (TBP) recycle throughout ITP and its carryover to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was performed. Criticality and DWPF-related issues were determined to pose no adverse consequences due to TBP addition. Effects of decomposition products were also considered. Flammability of 1-butanol, a TBP decomposition product, in Tank 22 was investigated. Calculations show that Tank 22 would be ventilated with air at a rate sufficient to maintain a 1-butanol concentration (volume percent) well below 25 percent of the lower flammability limit (LFL) for 1-butanol.

  14. Human reliability analysis for In-Tank Precipitation alignment and startup of emergency purge ventilation equipment. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, L.M.

    1993-08-01

    This report documents the methodology used for calculating the human error probability for establishing air based ventilation using emergency purge ventilation equipment on In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) processing tanks 48 and 49 after a failure of the nitrogen purge system following a seismic event. The analyses were performed according to THERP (Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction). The calculated human error probabilities are provided as input to the Fault Tree Analysis for the ITP Nitrogen Purge System. The analysis assumes a seismic event initiator leading to establishing air based ventilation on the ITP processing tanks 48 and 49. At the time of this analysis only the tanks and the emergency purge ventilation equipment are seismically qualified. Consequently, onsite and offsite power is assumed to be unavailable and all operator control actions are to be performed locally on the tank top. Assumptions regarding procedures, staffing, equipment locations, equipment tagging, equipment availability, and training were made and are documented in this report. The human error probability for establishing air based ventilation using the emergency purge ventilation equipment on In-Tank Precipitation processing tanks 48 and 49 after a failure of the nitrogen purge system following a seismic event is 4.2E-6 (median value on the lognormal scale). It is important to note that this result is predicated on the implementation of all of the assumptions listed in the ``Assumptions`` section of this report. This analysis was not based on the current conditions in ITP. The analysis is to be used as a tool to aid ITP operations personnel in achieving the training, procedural, and operational goals outlined in this document.

  15. HLW flowsheet material balance for DWPF rad operation with Tank 51 sludge and ITP Cycle 1 precipitate

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, A.S.

    1995-04-19

    This document presents the details of the Savannah River Plant Flowsheet for the Rad Operation with Tank Sludge and ITP Cycle 1 Precipitate. Topics discussed include: material balance; radiolysis chemistry of tank precipitates; algorithm for ESP washing; chemistry of hydrogen and ammonia generation in CPC; batch sizes for processing feed; and total throughput of a streams during one cycle of operation.

  16. Frequency of deflagration in the in-tank precipitation process tanks due to loss of nitrogen purge system. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, J.M.; Mason, C.L.; Olsen, L.M.; Shapiro, B.J.; Gupta, M.K.; Britt, T.E.

    1994-01-01

    High-level liquid wastes (HLLW) from the processing of nuclear material at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are stored in large tanks in the F- and H-Area tank farms. The In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process is one step in the processing and disposal of HLLW. The process hazards review for the ITP identified the need to implement provisions that minimize deflagration/explosion hazards associated with the process. The objective of this analysis is to determine the frequency of a deflagration in Tank 48 and/or 49 due to nitrogen purge system failures (including external events) and coincident ignition source. A fault tree of the nitrogen purge system coupled with ignition source probability is used to identify dominant system failures that contribute to the frequency of deflagration. These system failures are then used in the recovery analysis. Several human actions, recovery actions, and repair activities are identified that reduce total frequency. The actions are analyzed and quantified as part of a Human Reliability Analysis (HRA). The probabilities of failure of these actions are applied to the fault tree cutsets and the event trees.

  17. ITP Solids Stability Operating Window Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1998-04-01

    Tetraphenylborate solids provide a potentially large source of benzene in the slurries produced in the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process. The stability of the solids is an important consideration in the safety analysis of the process. Recent tests investigated the stability of the potassium tetraphenylborate (KTPB) solids under process conditions, during both precipitation and washing. In addition, the tests measured the relative stabilities of the sodium, potassium and cesium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB, KTPB, and CsTPB, respectively). Additional tests examined the similarity of the catalytic system in the reaction of soluble and insoluble tetraphenylborates.

  18. Precipitation and Deposition of Aluminum Containing Species in Tank Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Hobbs, David T.; Wang, L.; Dabbs, Daniel M.; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2003-06-01

    Aluminum-containing phases represent the most prevalent solids that can appear or disappear during the processing of radioactive tank wastes. Processes such as sludge washing and leaching are designed to dissolve Al-containing phases and, thereby, minimize the volume of high-level waste glass required to encapsulate radioactive sludges. Unfortunately, waste-processing steps that include evaporation can involve solutions that are supersaturated with respect to cementitious aluminosilicates that result in unwanted precipitation and scale formation. Of all the constituents of tank waste, limited solubility cementitious aluminosilicates have the greatest potential for clogging pipes and transfer lines, fouling highly radioactive components such as ion exchangers, and completely shutting down processing operations. For instance, deposit buildup and clogged drain lines experienced during the tank waste volume-reduction process at Savannah River Site (SRS) required an evaporator to b e shut down in October 1999. The Waste Processing Technology Section (WPTS) of Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) at SRS is now collaborating with team members from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to verify the thermodynamic stability of aluminosilicate compounds under waste tank conditions in an attempt to solve the deposition and clogging problems. The primary goals of this study are to understand the (1) the major factors controlling precipitation, heterogeneous nucleation and growth phenomena, of relatively insoluble aluminosilicates, (2) role of organics for inhibiting aluminosilicate formation, and (3) to develop a predictive tool to control precipitation, scale formation, and cementation under tank waste processing conditions. The results obtained from this will provide crucial information for (1) avoiding problematical sludge processing steps, and (2) identifying and developing effective technologies to process retrieved sludges and supernatants before ultimate

  19. Precipitation and Deposition of Aluminum Containing Species in Tank Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Hobbs, David T.; Wang, L.; Dabbs, Daniel M.; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2004-06-01

    Aluminum-containing phases represent the most prevalent solids that can appear or disappear during the processing of radioactive tank wastes. Processes such as sludge washing and leaching are designed to dissolve Al-containing phases and, thereby, minimize the volume of high-level waste glass required to encapsulate radioactive sludges. Unfortunately, waste-processing steps that include evaporation can involve solutions that are supersaturated with respect to cementitious aluminosilicates that result in unwanted precipitation and scale formation. Of all the constituents of tank waste, limited solubility cementitious aluminosilicates have the greatest potential for clogging pipes and transfer lines, fouling highly radioactive components such as ion exchangers, and completely shutting down processing operations. For instance, deposit buildup and clogged drain lines experienced during the tank waste volume-reduction process at Savannah River Site (SRS) required an evaporator to be shut down in October 1999. The Waste Processing Technology Section (WPTS) of Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) at SRS is now collaborating with team members from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to verify the thermodynamic stability of aluminosilicate compounds under waste tank conditions in an attempt to solve the deposition and clogging problems. The primary goals of this study are to understand the (1) the major factors controlling precipitation, heterogeneous nucleation and growth phenomena, of relatively insoluble aluminosilicates, (2) role of organics for inhibiting aluminosilicate formation, and (3) to develop a predictive tool to control precipitation, scale formation, and cementation under tank waste processing conditions. The results obtained from this will provide crucial information for (1) avoiding problematical sludge processing steps, and (2) identifying and developing effective technologies to process retrieved sludges and supernatants before ultimate

  20. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... thrombocytopenic purpura; Bleeding disorder - ITP; Autoimmune - ITP; Low platelet count - ITP ... when certain immune system cells produce antibodies against platelets. Platelets help your blood clot by clumping together ...

  1. ITP Filtrate Benzene Removal Alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Dworjanyn, L.O.

    1993-05-21

    Existing ITP filtrate hold tanks may provide sufficient capacity and residence time to strip dissolved benzene from the incoming filtrate using nitrogen sparging in the bottom of the old tanks. This is based on equilibrium supported by late Wash test data using aged washed slurry. Theoretical considerations indicate that benzene stripping will be more difficult from the ITP unwashed high salt filtrates due to reduced mass transfer. Therefore experimental sparging data is needed to quantify the theoretical effects.Foaming limits which dictate allowable sparging rate will also have to be established. Sparging in the hold tanks will require installation of sintered metal spargers, and possibly stirrers and foam monitoring/disengagement equipment. The most critical sparging needs are at the start of the precipitation/concentration cycle, when the filtrate flux rate is the highest,and at the end of wash cycle where Henry`s equilibrium constant falls off,requiring more gas to sparge the dissolved benzene. With adequate recycle (for proper distribution) or sparging in the old tanks, the 30 inch column could be used for the complete ITP process. A courser packing would reduce back pressure while enabling benzene stripping. The Late Wash Tests indicate adequate benzene stripping even at reduced gas flow. This will require experimental verification under ITP conditions. Using the 30 in. column vs 18 in. during the wash cycle will enhance stripping without need for additional sparging provided the minimum flow requirements are met.

  2. Safety evaluation of the ITP filter/stripper test runs and quiet time runs using simulant solution. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, M.K.

    1994-06-01

    The purpose is to provide the technical bases for the evaluation of Unreviewed Safety Question for the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) Filter/Stripper Test Runs (Ref. 7) and Quiet Time Runs Program (described in Section 3.6). The Filter/Stripper Test Runs and Quiet Time Runs program involves a 12,000 gallon feed tank containing an agitator, a 4,000 gallon flush tank, a variable speed pump, associated piping and controls, and equipment within both the Filter and the Stripper Building.

  3. Precipitation and Deposition of Aluminum-Containing Phases in Tank Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel M. Dabbs; Ilhan A. Aksay

    2005-01-12

    Aluminum-containing phases compose the bulk of solids precipitating during the processing of radioactive tank wastes. Processes designed to minimize the volume of high-level waste through conversion to glassy phases require transporting waste solutions near-saturated with aluminum-containing species from holding tank to processing center. The uncontrolled precipitation within transfer lines results in clogged pipes and lines and fouled ion exchangers, with the potential to shut down processing operations.

  4. Safety evaluation of the ITP filter/stripper test runs and quiet time runs using simulant solution

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, M.K.

    1993-10-01

    In-Tank Precipitation is a process for removing radioactivity from the salt stored in the Waste Management Tank Farm at Savannah River. The process involves precipitation of cesium and potassium with sodium tetraphenylborate (STPB) and adsorption of strontium and actinides on insoluble sodium titanate (ST) particles. The purpose of this report is to provide the technical bases for the evaluation of Unreviewed Safety Question for the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) Filter/Stripper Test Runs and Quiet Time Runs Program. The primary objective of the filter-stripper test runs and quiet time runs program is to ensure that the facility will fulfill its design basis function prior to the introduction of radioactive feed. Risks associated with the program are identified and include hazards, both personnel and environmental, associated with handling the chemical simulants; the presence of flammable materials; the potential for damage to the permanenet ITP and Tank Farm facilities. The risks, potential accident scenarios, and safeguards either in place or planned are discussed at length.

  5. Precipitation and Deposition of Aluminum-Containing Species in Tank Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Hobbs, David T.; Wang, Li-Qiong; Dabbs, Daniel M.; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2002-06-01

    Aluminum-containing phases represent the most prevalent solids that can appear or disappear during the processing of radioactive tank wastes. Processes such as sludge washing and leaching are designed to dissolve Al-containing phases and thereby minimize the volume of high-level waste glass required to encapsulate radioactive sludges. Unfortunately, waste-processing steps that include evaporation can involve solutions that are supersaturated with respect to cementitious aluminosilicates that result in unwanted precipitation and scale formation. Of all the constituents of tank waste, limited solubility cementitious aluminosilicates have the greatest potential for clogging pipes and transfer lines, fouling highly radioactive components such as ion exchangers, and completely shutting down processing operations. For instance, deposit buildup and clogged drain lines experienced during the tank waste volume-reduction process at the Savannah River Site (SRS) required an evaporator to be shut down in October 1999. The Waste Processing Technology Section of Westinghouse Savannah River Company at SRS now is collaborating with team members from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to verify the thermodynamic stability of aluminosilicate compounds under waste tank conditions in an attempt to solve the deposition and clogging problems. The primary objectives of this study are (1) to understand the major factors controlling precipitation, heterogeneous nucleation, and growth phenomena of relatively insoluble aluminosilicates; (2) to determine the role of organics for inhibiting aluminosilicate formation, and (3) to develop a predictive tool to control precipitation, scale formation, and cementation under tank waste processing conditions. The results of this work will provide crucial information for (1) avoiding problematical sludge processing steps and (2) identifying and developing effective technologies to process retrieved sludges and supernatants before ultimate

  6. Aluminum-Containing Phases in Tank Waste: Precipitation and Deposition of Aluminum-Containing Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas; Hobbs, D.T.; Wellman, D.M.; Aksay, I.

    2006-06-01

    Aluminosilicate deposit buildup experienced during the tank waste volume-reduction process at the Savannah River Site (SRS) required an evaporator to be shut down in October 1999. Recent investigations illustrated the accumulation 7 wt% uranium, 3% was 235U and absent of neutron poisons, within these deposits and presented a criticality concern. The Waste Processing Technology Section of Westinghouse Savannah River Company at SRS is now collaborating with a team from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in efforts to identify the phases controlling uranium solubility and understand the conditions under which they precipitate.

  7. Precipitation and Deposition of Aluminum-Containing Phases in Tank Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Dabbs, Daniel M.; Aksay, I.A.

    2005-12-01

    In the first phase of our study, we focused on the use of simple organics to raise the solubility of aluminum oxyhydroxides in high alkaline aqueous solvents. In a limited survey of common organic acids, we determined that citric acid had the highest potential to achieve our goal. However, our subsequent investigation revealed that the citric acid appeared to play two roles in the solutions: first, raising the concentration of aluminum in highly alkaline solutions by breaking up or inhibiting ''seed'' polycations and thereby delaying the nucleation and growth of particles; and second, stabilizing nanometer-sized particles in suspension when nucleation did occur. The results of this work were recently published in Langmuir: D.M. Dabbs, U. Ramachandran, S. Lu, J. Liu, L.-Q. Wang, I.A. Aksay, ''Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid'' Langmuir, 21, 11690-11695 (2005). The second phase of our work involved the solvation of silicon, again in solutions of high alkalinity. Citric acid, due to its unfavorable pKa values, was not expected to be useful with silicon-containing solutions. Here, the use of polyols was determined to be effective in maintaining silicon-containing particles under high pH conditions but at smaller size with respect to standard suspensions of silicon-containing particles. There were a number of difficulties working with highly alkaline silicon-containing solutions, particularly in solutions at or near the saturation limit. Small deviations in pH resulted in particle formation or dissolution in the absence of the organic agents. One of the more significant observations was that the polyols appeared to stabilize small particles of silicon oxyhydroxides across a wider range of pH, albeit this was difficult to quantify due to the instability of the solutions.

  8. ITP Filter Particulate Decontamination Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Dworjanyn, L.O.

    1993-05-21

    A new test method was developed which showed the installed In- Tank Precipitation Filter Unit {number_sign}3 provided at least 40, 000 x decontamination of the precipitated potassium tetraphenylborate (KTPB) during the cold chemical runs.This filter is expected to meet the needed 40,000 x hot cesium decontamination requirements, assuming that the cesium precipitate, CsTPB, behaves the same as KTPB. The new method permits cold chemicals field testing of installed filters to quantify particulate decontamination and verify filter integrity before going hot. The method involves a 1000 x concentration of fine particulate KTPB in the filtrate to allow direct analysis by counting for naturally radioactive isotope K-40 using the underground SRTC gamma spectroscopy facility. The particulate concentration was accomplished by ultra filtration at Rhone-Poulenc, NJ, using a small cross-flow bench facility, followed by collection of all suspended solids on a small filter disc for K analysis.

  9. ITP Materials Compatibility Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Skidmore, T.E.

    1998-09-01

    Based on information provided by ITP, normal operation will consist of controlled exposure to benzene and TBP concentrations of 300 and 100 ppm, respectively, in an approximate 5M NaOH solution at temperatures as high as 50 degrees C. Other compounds present in the filtrate solution were much lower in concentration and were not tested. In addition, levels as high as 1000 ppm benzene or TBP may be reached. It is assumed that the TBP will be maintained at a constant concentration to control foaming behavior.

  10. New treatment for ITP.

    PubMed

    Wood, D

    1995-12-01

    A new treatment for HIV-related idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP) has been developed. The treatment, WinRho SDTM, is a form of the intravenous immunoglobulin, IVIG. IVIG has been successful at reducing the ability of HIV antibody-fragment clusters to bind to platelets, thus preventing the body from destroying the platelets prematurely. WinRho SD was effective for HIV patients whether they were taking AZT or not. Minor side effects developed following four percent of the infusions. Anemia caused by hemolysis can also be a problem. Suggested dosing is set at 250 IU (50mg/kg bodyweight), and the infusions take about three to five minutes, as opposed to several hours for other IVIG forms. PMID:11363105

  11. In-Trail Procedure (ITP) Algorithm Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, Cesar A.; Siminiceanu, Radu I.

    2007-01-01

    The primary objective of this document is to provide a detailed description of the In-Trail Procedure (ITP) algorithm, which is part of the Airborne Traffic Situational Awareness In-Trail Procedure (ATSA-ITP) application. To this end, the document presents a high level description of the ITP Algorithm and a prototype implementation of this algorithm in the programming language C.

  12. Dissolution-precipitation processes in tank experiments for testing numerical models for reactive transport calculations: Experiments and modelling.

    PubMed

    Poonoosamy, Jenna; Kosakowski, Georg; Van Loon, Luc R; Mäder, Urs

    2015-01-01

    In the context of testing reactive transport codes and their underlying conceptual models, a simple 2D reactive transport experiment was developed. The aim was to use simple chemistry and design a reproducible and fast to conduct experiment, which is flexible enough to include several process couplings: advective-diffusive transport of solutes, effect of liquid phase density on advective transport, and kinetically controlled dissolution/precipitation reactions causing porosity changes. A small tank was filled with a reactive layer of strontium sulfate (SrSO4) of two different grain sizes, sandwiched between two layers of essentially non-reacting quartz sand (SiO2). A highly concentrated solution of barium chloride was injected to create an asymmetric flow field. Once the barium chloride reached the reactive layer, it forced the transformation of strontium sulfate into barium sulfate (BaSO4). Due to the higher molar volume of barium sulfate, its precipitation caused a decrease of porosity and lowered the permeability. Changes in the flow field were observed with help of dye tracer tests. The experiments were modelled using the reactive transport code OpenGeosys-GEM. Tests with non-reactive tracers performed prior to barium chloride injection, as well as the density-driven flow (due to the high concentration of barium chloride solution), could be well reproduced by the numerical model. To reproduce the mineral bulk transformation with time, two populations of strontium sulfate grains with different kinetic rates of dissolution were applied. However, a default porosity permeability relationship was unable to account for measured pressure changes. Post mortem analysis of the strontium sulfate reactive medium provided useful information on the chemical and structural changes occurring at the pore scale at the interface that were considered in our model to reproduce the pressure evolution with time. PMID:25805363

  13. Dissolution-precipitation processes in tank experiments for testing numerical models for reactive transport calculations: Experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonoosamy, Jenna; Kosakowski, Georg; Van Loon, Luc R.; Mäder, Urs

    2015-06-01

    In the context of testing reactive transport codes and their underlying conceptual models, a simple 2D reactive transport experiment was developed. The aim was to use simple chemistry and design a reproducible and fast to conduct experiment, which is flexible enough to include several process couplings: advective-diffusive transport of solutes, effect of liquid phase density on advective transport, and kinetically controlled dissolution/precipitation reactions causing porosity changes. A small tank was filled with a reactive layer of strontium sulfate (SrSO4) of two different grain sizes, sandwiched between two layers of essentially non-reacting quartz sand (SiO2). A highly concentrated solution of barium chloride was injected to create an asymmetric flow field. Once the barium chloride reached the reactive layer, it forced the transformation of strontium sulfate into barium sulfate (BaSO4). Due to the higher molar volume of barium sulfate, its precipitation caused a decrease of porosity and lowered the permeability. Changes in the flow field were observed with help of dye tracer tests. The experiments were modelled using the reactive transport code OpenGeosys-GEM. Tests with non-reactive tracers performed prior to barium chloride injection, as well as the density-driven flow (due to the high concentration of barium chloride solution), could be well reproduced by the numerical model. To reproduce the mineral bulk transformation with time, two populations of strontium sulfate grains with different kinetic rates of dissolution were applied. However, a default porosity permeability relationship was unable to account for measured pressure changes. Post mortem analysis of the strontium sulfate reactive medium provided useful information on the chemical and structural changes occurring at the pore scale at the interface that were considered in our model to reproduce the pressure evolution with time.

  14. Accessing ITP: Accommodating the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, R. Wayne

    The Information Technology Project (ITP) at Clayton College & State University (CCSU) (Georgia) focuses on information technology as a central part of teaching and learning, primarily through Universal Personal Information Technology Access (UPITA). UPITA equips each student and faculty member with a powerful multimedia notebook computer with…

  15. ITP of lanthanides in microfluidic PMMA chip.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yongzheng; Bottenus, Danny; Liu, Bingwen; Clark, Sue B; Ivory, Cornelius F

    2014-03-01

    An ITP separation of eight lanthanides on a serpentine PMMA microchip with a tee junction and a 230-mm-long serpentine channel is described. The cover of the PMMA chip is 175 μm thick so that a C(4) D in microchip mode can be used to detect the lanthanides as they migrate through the microchannel. Acetate and α-hydroxyisobutyric acid are used as complexing agents to increase the electrophoretic mobility difference between the lanthanides. Eight lanthanides are concentrated within ∼ 6 min by ITP in the microchip using 10 mM ammonium acetate at pH 4.5 as the leading electrolyte and 10 mM acetic acid at ∼ pH 3.0 as the terminating electrolyte. In addition, a 2D numerical simulation of the lanthanides undergoing ITP in the microchip is compared with experimental results using COMSOL Multiphysics v4.3a. PMID:24258617

  16. [Protocol for the study and treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). ITP-2010].

    PubMed

    Monteagudo, E; Fernández-Delgado, R; Sastre, A; Toll, T; Llort, A; Molina, J; Astigarraga, I; Dasí, M A; Cervera, A

    2011-06-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), formerly known as immune thrombocytopenic purpura, is a disease in which clinical and therapeutic management has always been controversial. The ITP working group of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology has updated its guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of ITP in children based on current guidelines, literature review, clinical trials and member consensus. The primary objective was to lessen clinical variability in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in order to obtain best clinical results with minimal adverse events and good quality of life. PMID:21439923

  17. Wireless Success Story - Industrial Technologies Program (ITP)

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2010-05-01

    This success story presents the results of wireless research by Sensors & Automation, a sub-program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Industrial Technologies Program (ITP). The prioritized research resulted in success with realized energy and cost savings.

  18. Occult hemorrhage in children with severe ITP.

    PubMed

    Flores, Adolfo; Buchanan, George R

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the frequency and significance of clinically unapparent or occult hemorrhage in ITP. Therefore, we prospectively explored the sites and frequency of occult bleeding in children with severe ITP at diagnosis or upon symptomatic relapse in a prospective, single-institution cohort study of patients ≤ 18 years of age and a platelet count ≤ 10,000/mm(3) . Data collected included bleeding severity assessment, urinalysis, fecal occult blood testing, and non-contrast brain MRI. Stool and urine samples were tested within 7 days of diagnosis or symptomatic relapse. Three months after diagnosis or relapse a noncontrast brain MRI evaluated hemosiderin deposits resulting from prior localized hemorrhage. Fifty-two ITP patients were enrolled with a mean platelet count of 4,000/mm(3) . A significant occurrence of occult hemorrhage was identified in the urine (27%) compared with clinically overt hematuria (0.91%, P < 0.0005). CNS microbleeding in the superficial cortex of the left frontal lobe was identified in one child with occult bleeding in the urinary tract. There was no relationship between occult hemorrhage and bleeding manifestations on physical examination. Occult hemorrhage was not a harbinger of subsequent bleeding. Our findings suggest that occult hemorrhage occurs with greater frequency than overt bleeding in children with severe ITP. CNS microbleeding is a potential risk in this patient population. Assessment of brain microbleeds and microscopic hematuria in this patient population require additional study. PMID:26661930

  19. Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP) Secondary to Subclinical Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Tahir, Hassan; Sheraz, Faizan; Sagi, Jahnavi; Daruwalla, Vistasp

    2016-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is the most common cause of isolated thrombocytopenia in healthy people. ITP may rarely coexist with autoimmune thyroid disorders, which may indicate more complex defect in immune system. Primary ITP usually responds well to steroids and intravenous immunoglobulins. However, ITP may be difficult to treat when associated with thyroid autoimmune disorders. In such cases, treating the underlying thyroid disorder may significantly improve platelet count and can either cause remission of disease or improve response to standard ITP therapy. We report a case of 47-year-old male who was diagnosed with ITP and was also found to have subclinical Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism with levothyroxine in our patient significantly improved the platelets, thus successfully bringing the disease in remission. PMID:27200380

  20. Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP) Secondary to Subclinical Hashimoto's Thyroiditis: Role of Levothyroxine in Improving the Clinical Outcome of ITP.

    PubMed

    Tahir, Hassan; Sheraz, Faizan; Sagi, Jahnavi; Daruwalla, Vistasp

    2016-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is the most common cause of isolated thrombocytopenia in healthy people. ITP may rarely coexist with autoimmune thyroid disorders, which may indicate more complex defect in immune system. Primary ITP usually responds well to steroids and intravenous immunoglobulins. However, ITP may be difficult to treat when associated with thyroid autoimmune disorders. In such cases, treating the underlying thyroid disorder may significantly improve platelet count and can either cause remission of disease or improve response to standard ITP therapy. We report a case of 47-year-old male who was diagnosed with ITP and was also found to have subclinical Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism with levothyroxine in our patient significantly improved the platelets, thus successfully bringing the disease in remission. PMID:27200380

  1. Safety and Efficacy Study of Romiplostim (AMG 531) to Treat ITP in Pediatric Subjects

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-18

    Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Thrombocytopenia in Pediatric Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP); Thrombocytopenia in Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP)

  2. Safety and Efficacy Study of Romiplostim to Treat ITP in Pediatric Subjects

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-13

    Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Thrombocytopenia; Thrombocytopenia in Pediatric Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP); Thrombocytopenia in Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP); Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Immune Thrombocytopenia

  3. On the ATW-concepts: ITP approach and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Simonenko, V. A.; Grebyonkin, K. F.

    1995-09-15

    It is discussed the interest of Russian Federal Nuclear Center-Institute of Technical Physics at Chelyabinsk-70 in the research of Accelerator Driven Technologies applications for radioactive waste transmutation, cumulated actinides burning, energy production. The ITP background and opportunities for this research are presented. It is shown the ITP possibilities for testing and experimental development of Accelerator Driven Technologies.

  4. Expression of Schistocerca gregaria ion transport peptide (ITP) and its homologue (ITP-L) in a baculovirus/insect cell system.

    PubMed

    Ring, M; Meredith, J; Wiens, C; Macins, A; Brock, H W; Phillips, J E; Theilmann, D A

    1998-01-01

    We expressed an N-terminally extended Schistocerca gregaria ion transport peptide (ScgITP) and its homologue (ion transport peptide-like; ITP-L) in insect Sf9 cells using baculovirus expression vectors. Antibodies raised against peptide fragments of ITP and ITP-L were used to detect and characterize the baculovirus expressed peptides (bacITP, bacITP-L). Biological activity of the expressed peptides was assayed using the highly specific bioassay for native ITP, namely the increase in ileal short-circuit current which is a measure of active Cl- transport. BacITP and bacITP-L expression was optimal in Sf9 cells infected at a multiplicity of infection of 1, grown in Grace's medium, and harvested 2-3 days after infection. Western blots showed that bacITP was 2 kDa larger than native or synthetic ITP. This difference was not due to glycosylation and could in part be attributed to post-translational cleavage of the ITP propeptide at a site 11 amino acids upstream of the cleavage site used by S. gregaria to produce native ITP. BacITP stimulated ileal short-circuit current but is significantly less active (270-fold) than synthetic ITP (synITP) possibly as a result of the N-terminal extension. Production of bacITP-L permitted us to show that it is not stimulatory in the bioassay but reduces the synITP response in vitro and thus may have some potential for enhancing the effectiveness of biological control agents such as baculoviruses. PMID:9612936

  5. VM version of INTERLAN's NS4240 Xerox ITP Network Software

    SciTech Connect

    Frese, H.; Cottrell, R.L.; Downey, T.

    1986-04-01

    This manual describes Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's VM adaptation of INTERLAN's NS4240 ITP Network Software. The ITP Network Software is an implementation of the Xerox Network Systems Internet Transport Protocols. The ITP Network Software runs under the VM/SP operating system. This manual assumes familiarity with the use of the VM operating system. The user is also expected to have experience in assembling, linking, and running application programs on a system. The user should be familiar with the concepts of computer networking and have an understanding of the more specific concepts of Ethernet-based networks. 10 refs.

  6. [Recurrent infections in an ITP patient treated with rituximab].

    PubMed

    Rosenberg-Bezalel, Shira; Asher, Ilan; Sthoeger, Zev

    2012-11-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia and recurrent infections. Various mechanisms have been implied in the disease pathophysiology. Patients with CVID are at increased risk of developing ITP (Immune Thrombocytopenia Purpura) and/ or AIHA (Autoimmune Haemolytic Anemia). Rituximab, a humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, is increasingly being used for autoimmune cytopenias including ITP and AIHA. This is a case history of a patient treated with Rituximab due to refractory ITP. A year after completion of therapy the patient started suffering from an increased frequency of infections. Six years after treatment with Rituximab the patient was diagnosed with CVID and IVIG replacement treatment was started. The main possibilities that this patient presents include aggravation of CVID, first presented as ITP, after Rituximab treatment versus CVID secondary to Rituximab treatment. PMID:23367730

  7. Deflagration analysis of the ITP facility utilizing the MELCOR/SR code

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, D.K.; Chow, S.

    1993-07-01

    Under certain accident conditions, waste tanks in the In-Tank Processing (ITP) facility may contain significant concentrations of benzene and hydrogen. Because these gases are flammable, a safety analysis was required to demonstrate that the risk posed by the possible combustion of these gases is acceptable. In support of this analysis, the MELCOR/SR computer code was modified to simulate the combustion of benzene-hydrogen mixtures. MELCOR/SR was developed originally to analyze severe accidents that may occur in the SRS production reactors but many of its modules can be used also for non-reactor applications such as combustion and aerosol and radionuclide transport. The MELCOR/SR combustion model (package) was originally configured for the deflagration analysis of hydrogen-carbon monoxide mixtures. With minor changes to the coding in the combustion package subroutines, and the addition of benzene thermodynamic and transport properties to the input decks, MELCOR/SR was modified to analyze deflagrations in benzene-hydrogen gas mixtures. A MELCOR/SR model was created consisting of two control volumes connected by flow paths. One volume represents a type III waste tank; the other, the environment. The flow paths represent vents that open during the deflagration. Choked flow and radiative heat transfer from the hot gas to the cooling coils and tank walls are phenomonalogical aspects accounted for in the model. Results from MELCOR/SR compared favorably with results from two other codes: COMPACT, a code similar to MELCOR/SR used in the preliminary ITP analysis and DPAC, a code developed specifically to analyze deflagrations in SRS waste tanks. Peak pressures predicted by MELCOR/SR (and by DPAC) for realistic waste tank conditions do not exceed the pressure required to fail the primary line of the tank. ({approximately}23 psig)

  8. Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP): a rare association of lymph node tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Surana, Anuj P; Shelgikar, Kishor M; Melinkeri, Sameer; Phadke, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    Although various haematologic abnormalities are known to occur with tuberculosis, association of immune thrombocytopenia with tuberculosis is uncommon. We report a case of retroperitoneal lymph node tuberculosis who presented with ITP. A 76 year old female was admitted to our hospital with oral mucosal bleed and petechial lesions over extremities and abdomen. A diagnosis of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) was established. Intravenous Anti-D immunoglobulin and Dexamethasone therapy was started, but failed to elicit any sustained platelet response. CT abdomen revealed multiple retroperitoneal lymph nodes with central necrosis. Histopathology (HPE) of these revealed caseating lymphadenitis suggestive of tuberculosis. After 2 months of anti-tuberculous therapy, the platelet counts returned to normal and patient was off all therapy for ITP thereby suggesting likely association between tuberculosis and immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:25327103

  9. Hydrolysis of ITP generates a membrane potential in submitochondrial particles.

    PubMed

    Sorgato, M C; Galiazzo, F; Valente, M; Cavallini, L; Ferguson, S J

    1982-08-20

    ITP hydrolysis catalysed by the ATPase of submitochondrial particles from both bovine heart and rat liver is shown to be linked to the generation of a membrane potential, and therefore also to proton translocation. The magnitude of the membrane potential is similar to that observed during ATP hydrolysis at equivalent concentrations of phosphate and nucleoside tri- and diphosphates. An explanation is suggested for why in other reports ITP was found to be a poor substrate for supporting energy-linked reactions that are driven by the membrane potential. PMID:6214275

  10. Thromboembolism in patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP): a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Langeberg, Wendy J; Schoonen, W Marieke; Eisen, Melissa; Gamelin, Laurence; Stryker, Scott

    2016-06-01

    This meta-analysis describes the incidence rate of arterial and venous thromboembolism (ATE and VTE) in patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), and the relative risk of ATE and VTE in patients with ITP and comparable populations without ITP. MEDLINE and EMBASE were systematically searched for observational studies reporting incidence rates of ATE and VTE in populations with and without ITP between 1996 and 2013 [follow-up completed before thrombopoietin receptor (TPOr) agonists were commercially available]. Three large, population-based studies were identified from Denmark, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The incidence of ATE per 100 patient-years among patients with ITP ranged from 1.0 to 2.8, and among populations without ITP ranged from 0.7 to 1.8; the summary relative risk adjusted for matching factors (aRR) was 1.5 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.3, 1.8]. The incidence of VTE per 100 patient-years among patients with ITP ranged from 0.4 to 0.7, and among populations without ITP ranged from 0.1 to 0.4; the summary aRR (95 % CI) was 1.9 (1.4, 2.7). The risk of ATE and VTE among patients with ITP, based on evidence from three large, population-based observational studies, should be considered when evaluating the risk of thromboembolism attributed to ITP treatments, such as TPOr agonists. PMID:27084254

  11. Sports Participation in Children and Adolescents with Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manjusha; Lambert, Michele P; Breakey, Vicky; Buchanan, George R; Neier, Michelle; Neufeld, Ellis J; Kempert, Pamela; Neunert, Cindy E; Nottage, Kerri; Klaassen, Robert J

    2015-12-01

    We surveyed 278 pediatric hematologists/oncologists regarding how children with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) are counseled for participation in sports. Results show substantial variation in physician perception of contact risk for different sports, and the advice offered about restriction of sport activities of affected children. Many physicians recommend restriction of sports when platelet counts are under 50 × 10(9) /L. Such restriction may affect the child's quality of life despite their having an overall benign disease. PMID:26174203

  12. Long-term outcome following splenectomy for chronic and persistent immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in adults and children : Splenectomy in ITP.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Rayaz; Devasia, Anup J; Viswabandya, Auro; Lakshmi, Kavitha M; Abraham, Aby; Karl, Sampath; Mathai, John; Jacob, Paul M; Abraham, Deepak; Srivastava, Alok; Mathews, Vikram; George, Biju

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the outcomes of splenectomy for chronic and persistent immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). This study is a retrospective analysis of 254 patients with chronic or persistent ITP who underwent splenectomy at CMC, Vellore, India between 1995 and 2009. Responses were assessed based on standard criteria. One hundred and sixty seven adults and 87 children with a median age of 29 years (range 2-64) with persistent (n = 103) or chronic ITP (n = 151) was studied. Response was seen in 229 (90.2 %) including CR in 74.4 % at a median time of 1 day (range 1-54). Infections following splenectomy were reported in 16 %. Deaths related to post splenectomy sepsis occurred in 1.57 % and major bleeding in 0.78 %. At median follow-up of 54.3 months (range 1-290), 178 (70.1 %) remain in remission. The 5-year and 10-year overall survival (OS) is 97.4 ± 1.2 % and 94.9 ± 2.1 %, respectively, while the 5-year and 10-year event-free survival (EFS) is 76.5 + 2.9 % and 71.0 + 3.9 %, respectively. Splenectomy is associated with long-term remission rates of >70 % in chronic or persistent ITP. PMID:27370992

  13. Analysis of an insect neuropeptide, Schistocerca gregaria ion transport peptide (ITP), expressed in insect cell systems.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, T A; Hegedus, D; Wang, Y J; Zhao, Y; Meredith, J; Brock, H W; Phillips, J E; Grigliatti, T A; Theilmann, D A

    1999-12-01

    We have produced an active form of Schistocerca gregaria ion transport peptide (ITP) in an insect cell expression system. Transformed Drosophila Kc1 cells secreted a form of ITP into the cell culture medium that was proteolytically cleaved correctly at the amino (N)-terminus. Concentrated culture supernatant from transformed Kc1 and Hi5 cells had high biological activity when tested on isolated locust ilea. Conversely, ITP expressed by baculovirus-infected Sf9 cells was larger in size and had decreased specific activity compared to ITP produced by Kc1 cells due to incorrect cleavage of the peptide at the N-terminus in the baculovirus system. This demonstrates how processing of the secreted foreign protein (ITP) expressed under the late polyhedrin promoter is compromised in a baculovirus-infected cell. Transient transformation of Kc1 cells results in supernatants containing two forms of ITP; one form (A) co-elutes with synthetic ITP and the other form (B) has reduced electrophoretic mobility. In contrast, in stably transformed Kc1 cell supernatant, ITP is expressed in a single form, which has the same electrophoretic mobility and specific biological activity as form A produced by transiently transformed Kc1 cells. Arch. PMID:10578114

  14. Monoclonal versus polyclonal anti-D in the treatment of ITP.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Alan H

    2013-10-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune bleeding disorder caused by low numbers of platelets generally due to the production of anti-platelet antibodies. One effective treatment for ITP patients who express the RhD antigen on their red blood cells has been the use of blood donor-derived pooled polyclonal anti-D. Although anti-D has served us well, it needs to be replaced with a recombinant product. While the mechanism of action of anti-D in ITP remains highly speculative, this has not thwarted attempts to replace anti-D with a monoclonal product. Although a single attempt at a monoclonal antibody was not successful in the 1990s for the treatment of ITP, more recent efforts in mouse models of ITP and ITP patients now show that monoclonal antibodies can be successful in ITP. These studies also finally help substantiate the concept that it is unlikely that contaminants in the original donor-derived preparations mediate the major ameliorative activity of anti-D in ITP. PMID:23919777

  15. Cooperative Control Technology with ITP Method for SCADA Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosakaya, Juichi; Tadokoro, Hideyuki; Inazumi, Yasuhiro

    Introducing multi-agent (MA) technology into a SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) system can improve the serviceability and enhance maintenance-free operation with the inter-terminal parameter (ITP) method. In addition, the system's distributed intelligent field terminals (IFTs) use a common algorithm that is unaffected by any changes to the system specifications. As a result of these innovations, the proposed system has much better serviceability because it is much easier to make modifications compared to that of conventional systems. This system has been implemented for practical purposes at over 60 sites.

  16. Identification of novel biomarkers in chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) by microarray-based serum protein profiling.

    PubMed

    Bal, Gürkan; Futschik, Matthias E; Hartl, Daniela; Ringel, Frauke; Kamhieh-Milz, Julian; Sterzer, Viktor; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Alhamdani, Mohamed S S; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2016-02-01

    The pathological mechanisms underlying the development of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) are unclear and its diagnosis remains a process of exclusion. Currently, there are no known specific biomarkers for ITP to support differential diagnosis and treatment decisions. Profiling of serum proteins may be valuable for identifying such biomarkers. Sera from 46 patients with primary chronic ITP and 34 healthy blood donors were analysed using a microarray of 755 antibodies. We identified 161 differentially expressed proteins. In addition to oncoproteins and tumour-suppressor proteins, including apoptosis regulator BCL2, breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein (BRCA1), Fanconi anaemia complementation group C (FANCC) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), we detected six anti-nuclear autoantibodies in a subset of ITP patients: anti-PCNA, anti-SmD, anti-Ro/SSA60, anti-Ro/SSA52, anti-La/SSB and anti-RNPC antibodies. This finding may provide a rational explanation for the association of ITP with malignancies and other autoimmune diseases. While RUNX1mRNA expression in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients was significantly downregulated, an accumulation of RUNX1 protein was observed in the platelets of ITP patients. This may indicate dysregulation of RUNX1 expression in PBMC and megakaryocytes and may lead to an imbalanced immune response and impaired thrombopoiesis. In conclusion, we provide novel insights into the pathogenic mechanisms of ITP that warrant further exploration. PMID:26628061

  17. Eltrombopag therapy in newly diagnosed steroid non-responsive ITP patients.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Anil Kumar; Shukla, Ayush; Mishra, Sanjay; Yadav, Yogendra Singh; Yadav, Deependra Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disorder characterised by isolated thrombocytopenia (peripheral blood platelet count <100 × 10(9)/L) in the absence of other causes or disorders that may be associated with thrombocytopenia. The upfront treatment in newly diagnosed ITP patients is steroids; however, about one-third patients do not respond, and require other treatment, including IVIg, anti-D, or splenectomy. Previous studies have shown decreased platelet production in some ITP patients, aside from the evidence of enhanced platelet destruction. Thrombopoietin receptor agonists (TPO-RA), such as eltrombopag have been shown to provide good response in steroid non-responsive chronic ITP patients. We have studied response to eltrombopag in 25 newly diagnosed steroid non-responsive ITP patients; 80 % patients showed response at the end of 1 month, and 76 % sustained response at the end of 3 months. The platelet count rose from a mean value of 17.5 ± 3.6-152.5 ± 107.9 × 10(9)/L at the end of 1 month. Our results suggest a possible role of eltrombopag in newly diagnosed steroid non-responsive ITP patients. However, our study is limited in that it is a single-centre study, with a small sample size, and lacks a long-term safety profile. Our findings highlight the potential value of a larger prospective study on the upfront use of TPO-RA in patients of ITP. PMID:24526570

  18. Intelligent Elements for the ISHM Testbed and Prototypes (ITP) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, William A.; Park, Han; Schwabacher, Mark; Watson, Michael; Mackey, Ryan; Fijany, Amir; Trevino, Luis; Weir, John

    2005-01-01

    Deep-space manned missions will require advanced automated health assessment capabilities. Requirements such as in-space assembly, long dormant periods and limited accessibility during flight, present significant challenges that should be addressed through Integrated System Health Management (ISHM). The ISHM approach will provide safety and reliability coverage for a complete system over its entire life cycle by determining and integrating health status and performance information from the subsystem and component levels. This paper will focus on the potential advanced diagnostic elements that will provide intelligent assessment of the subsystem health and the planned implementation of these elements in the ISHM Testbed and Prototypes (ITP) Project under the NASA Exploration Systems Research and Technology program.

  19. SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP). Volume 1: Plenary Session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Briefings from the plenary session of the conference on SSTAC/ARTS Review of the Draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) held on 24-28 Jun. 1991 are included. Viewgraphs from the presentations are included.

  20. Precipitation of Aluminum Containing Species in Tank Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Hobbs, David; Parker, Kent E.; McCready, David E.

    2002-05-29

    Aluminisilicate deposit buildup experienced during the tank waste volume-reduction process at the Savannah River Site (SRS) required an evaporator to be shut down in October 1999. The Waste Processing Technology Section (WPTS) of Westinghouse Savannah River Company at SRS is now collaborating with team members from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to verify the steady-state thermodynamic stability of aluminosilicate compounds under waste tank conditions in an attempt to eliminate the deposition and clogging problems. The data obtained at 40 ?C showed that formation and persistence of crystalline phases was dependent on the initial hydroxide concentrations. The formation and persistence of zeolite A occurred only at lower hydroxide concentrations, whereas increasing hydroxide concentrations appeared to promote the formation of sodalite and cancrinite. The data also showed that although zeolite A forms initially, it is a metastable phase that converts to more stable crystalline materials such as sodalite and cancrinite. Additionally, the rate of transformation of zeolite A appeared to increase with increasing hydroxide concentration. The data from tests conducted at 80 ?C revealed relatively rapid formation of sodalite and cancrinite. Although minor amounts of zeolite A were initially detected in some cases, the higher reaction temperatures seemed to promote very rapid transformation of this phase into more stable phases. Also, the higher temperature and hydroxide concentrations appeared to initiate kinetically fast crystallization of sodalite and cancrinite. More recent testing at SRS in support of the HLW evaporator plugging issue has shown similar trends in the formation of aluminosilicate phases. These tests were carried out under conditions more similar to those that occur in HLW tanks and evaporators. Comparison of our results with those reported above show very similar trends.

  1. Benzene distribution in product streams from in-tank processing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1987-01-15

    Benzene is the major product of radiolytic decomposition of tetraphenylborate salts during in-tank salt decontamination. Its production rate has been measured at the Savannah River Laboratory (SR) and at the University of Florida under various conditions of importance to the in-tank process. Recent work has been concerned with the extent of decomposition for long storage periods, and the composition of the product streams from the process. The major results from this work are: the stored potassium tetraphenylborate precipitate will decompose at a rate of 7.3 {plus minus} 1.1% per year; the major products of the decomposition are benzene, phenol, biphenyl, and phenylboric acid; decomposition is directly proportional to the total dose and is unaffected by dose rate; the decomposition produces acidic compounds which will cause a decrease in the pH of the storage tank. 13 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Platelet function tests, independent of platelet count, are associated with bleeding severity in ITP

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Rachael F.; Gerrits, Anja J.; Berny-Lang, Michelle A.; Brown, Travis; Carmichael, Sabrina L.; Neufeld, Ellis J.; Michelson, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients with similarly low platelet counts differ in their tendency to bleed. To determine if differences in platelet function in ITP patients account for this variation in bleeding tendency, we conducted a single-center, cross-sectional study of pediatric patients with ITP. Bleeding severity (assessed by standardized bleeding score) and platelet function (assessed by whole blood flow cytometry) with and without agonist stimulation was evaluated in 57 ITP patients (median age, 9.9 years). After adjustment for platelet count, higher levels of thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP)-stimulated percent P-selectin- and activated glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa–positive platelets were significantly associated with a lower bleeding score, whereas higher levels of immature platelet fraction (IPF), TRAP-stimulated platelet surface CD42b, unstimulated platelet surface P-selectin, and platelet forward light scatter (FSC) were associated with a higher bleeding score. Thus, platelet function tests related to platelet age (IPF, FSC) and activation through the protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1) thrombin receptor (TRAP-stimulated P-selectin, activated GPIIb-IIIa, and CD42b), independent of platelet count, are associated with concurrent bleeding severity in ITP. These tests may be useful markers of future bleeding risk in ITP. PMID:26138687

  3. Review of Benzene Stripping Alternatives for the Small Tank Precipitation Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dworjanyn, L.O.

    2000-11-07

    Packed columns provide a proven technology for stripping benzene from salt solution. With continuous Small Tank Precipitation process the stripping load is reduced by a factor of four vs. former ITP cycling, and process continuity is maintained through to the Saltstone transfer tank. Lower stripping capacity allows new design options, including coarser packing and possibly reduced foaming packing.

  4. Feasibility and acceptability of insecticide-treated plastic sheeting (ITPS) for vector control in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This study assessed the feasibility and acceptability of utilizing insecticide-treated plastic sheeting (ITPS) as a malaria control intervention in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Methods ZeroVector® ITPS was installed in 40 homes across four study sites representing a cross section of malaria transmission risk and housing style. Structured questionnaires were completed at the time of ITPS installation (n=40) and at four weeks post installation (n=40) with the household head. Similarly, group interviews with the male and/or female household heads were completed at installation (n=5) and four-week follow-up (n=4). Results ZeroVector® ITPS was successfully installed in a range of homes employing traditional and/or modern building materials in PNG. The ITPS installations remained intact over the course of the four-week trial period and were highly acceptable to both male and female household heads. No dissatisfaction with the ITPS product was reported at four-week follow-up; however, the installation process was time consuming, participants reported a reduction in mosquito net use following ITPS installation and many participants expressed concern about the longevity of ITPS over the longer term. Conclusion ZeroVector® ITPS installation is feasible and highly acceptable in a diverse range of PNG contexts and is likely to be favourably received as a vector control intervention if accessible en masse. A longer-term evaluation is required before firm policy or public health decisions can be made regarding the potential application of ITPS in the national malaria control programme. The positive study findings suggest a longer-term evaluation of this promising malaria control intervention warrants consideration. PMID:23046535

  5. Twentieth international symposium on electro- and liquid-phase separation techniques (ITP2013): highlights.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Alejandro; Hernández-Borges, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The 20th edition of the International Symposium on Electro- and Liquid-Phase Separation Techniques (ITP2013) took place on October 6-9, 2013, at Puerto de la Cruz in Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain). This article reviews the highlights of this new edition of the symposia, also including the different activities that took place as well as the awards presented. PMID:24339404

  6. SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP). Volume 5: Human Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs of briefings from the Space Systems and Technology Advisory Committee (SSTAC)/ARTS review of the draft integrated technology plan (ITP) on human support are included. Topics covered include: human support program; human factors; life support technology; fire safety; medical support technology; advanced refrigeration technology; EVA suit system; advanced PLSS technology; and ARC-EVA systems research program.

  7. The beta 1 tubulin R307H single nucleotide polymorphism is associated with treatment failures in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP)

    PubMed Central

    Basciano, Paul A.; Bussel, James; Hafeez, Zeeshan; Christos, Paul J.; Giannakakou, Paraskevi

    2013-01-01

    Summary Predictive biomarkers are needed in ITP. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in beta 1 tubulin are potential candidates, as beta 1 tubulin is integral for platelet production and function, and SNPs in beta 1 tubulin have been associated with distinct phenotypes in platelets. We investigated the most prevalent beta 1 tubulin SNP (R307H) as a biomarker in patients with ITP via a retrospective chart review. Allelic frequencies between a group of 191 ITP patients and a healthy control group showed no difference, suggesting no direct etiologic role for the SNP in ITP. However, over similar periods of follow-up, both heterozygote and homozygote minor allele ITP patients were treated with significantly more treatment modalities and had significantly higher risk of failure to immune-modulatory therapies (RR=1.5, 95%CI=1.1–2.1;p=0.01); with rituximab, in particular, ITP patients with the SNP experienced a 58% failure rate (RR=1.6, 95%CI=1.03–2.5; p=0.04). Analysis of the absolute immature platelet fraction (A-IPF) as a marker of platelet production showed that SNP patients had significantly higher median A-IPFs compared to non-SNP patients when complete responses were achieved using immune modulatory therapies. The data suggest that the beta 1 tubulin R307H SNP has potential for use as a biomarker in ITP and may affect platelet turnover. PMID:23157319

  8. Structural response of the ITP failed filter transportation box to impact and internal pressure, Task 93-034-1

    SciTech Connect

    Mertz, G.E.

    1993-07-01

    The ITP failed filter containment box is used to transport the failed filter from the tank farm to the burial ground. During transportation, the ITP failed filter containment box, or ``box,`` will be subject to internal pressure loading and possibly an impact load resulting from rough handling or an accidental drop. This report contains a structural analysis of the impact limiters and the box containment boundary, subject to pressure and impact loading.

  9. FcγRIII in ITP: it ain't over 'til it's over.

    PubMed

    McCrae, Keith R

    2016-01-01

    In this issue of Blood, Yu et al describe a novel anti–Fcγ receptor III (FcγRIII)-albumin fusion protein that inhibits the development of thrombocytopenia in a murine model of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP).1 The unique aspect of this protein is that it blocks FcγRIII-mediated uptake of antibody-coated platelets without activating FcγRIII and the associated inflammatory response. PMID:26744437

  10. Is it safe to avoid bone marrow examination in suspected itp?

    PubMed

    Naithani, Rahul; Kumar, Rajat; Mahapatra, M; Agrawal, Neerja; Pati, H P; Choudhry, V P

    2007-01-01

    Two children with suspected ITP are described. One child was treated outside with corticosteroids and was diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Another child was fresh and diagnosed as acute myeloid leukemia on bone marrow aspirate examination. Both the children had no physical or peripheral smear finding suggestive of leukemia. We suggest that a bone marrow examination is required in developing countries for evaluation of thrombocytopenia before labeling it an immune thrombocytopenic purpura. PMID:17454791

  11. SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP). Volume 6: Controls and guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs of briefings from the Space Systems and Technology Advisory Committee (SSTAC)/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) on controls and guidance are included. Topics covered include: strategic avionics technology planning and bridging programs; avionics technology plan; vehicle health management; spacecraft guidance research; autonomous rendezvous and docking; autonomous landing; computational control; fiberoptic rotation sensors; precision instrument and telescope pointing; microsensors and microinstruments; micro guidance and control initiative; and earth-orbiting platforms controls-structures interaction.

  12. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) associated with vaccinations: a review of reported cases.

    PubMed

    Perricone, Carlo; Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Nesher, Gideon; Borella, Elisabetta; Odeh, Qasim; Conti, Fabrizio; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Valesini, Guido

    2014-12-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune condition characterized by low platelet count with mucocutaneous and other bleedings. Clinical manifestations may range from spontaneous formation of purpura and petechiae, especially on the extremities, to epistaxis, bleeding at the gums or menorrhagia, any of which occur usually if the platelet count is below 20,000 per μl. A very low count may result in the spontaneous formation of hematomas in the mouth or on other mucous membranes. Fatal complications, including subarachnoid or intracerebral, lower gastrointestinal or other internal bleeding can arise due to an extremely low count. Vaccines may induce ITP by several mechanisms. Vaccine-associated autoimmunity may stem not only from the antigen-mediated responses but also from other constituents of the vaccine, such as yeast proteins, adjuvants, and preservatives diluents. The most likely is through virally induced molecular mimicry. The binding of pathogenic autoantibodies to platelet and megakaryocytes may cause thrombocytopenia by different mechanisms, such as opsonization, direct activation of complement, or apoptotic pathways. The autoantibodies hypothesis is not sufficient to explain all ITP cases: In the anti-platelet antibody-negative cases, a complementary mechanism based on T cell immune-mediated mechanism has been suggested. In particular, T cell subsets seem dysregulated with an increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, as IFN-γ and TNF, and chemokines, as CXCL10. Vaccines are one of the most striking discoveries in human history that changed dramatically life expectancy. Nonetheless, the occurrence of adverse events and autoimmune phenomena has been described following vaccination, and ITP may represent one of this. PMID:25427992

  13. Real-life management of primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in adult patients and adherence to practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lozano, María Luisa; Revilla, N; Gonzalez-Lopez, T J; Novelli, S; González-Porras, J R; Sánchez-Gonzalez, B; Bermejo, N; Pérez, S; Lucas, F J; Álvarez, M T; Arilla, M J; Perera, M; do Nascimento, J; Campos, R M; Casado, L F; Vicente, V

    2016-06-01

    Very few data exist on the management of adult patients diagnosed with primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). The objectives of this study were to describe the diagnostic and treatment patterns for ITP and to compare the findings to recent ITP guidelines. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of adult ITP patients diagnosed with primary ITP between January 2011 and June 2012 and examined whether management strategies were consistent or not with eight recent guideline-recommended practices. Overall, median age at the diagnosis of the disease (n = 101) was 58 years and median platelet count 12 × 10(9)/L with 75.2 % of patients having symptoms of ITP. The study perceived two major shortcomings in the diagnostic approach: (1) failure to perform peripheral blood film examination in 22.8 % of patients, a test that is mandatory by all guidelines, and (2) ordinary bone marrow assessment in more than half of the patients at diagnosis (50.5 %), a test not routinely recommended by guidelines. Low appropriateness in therapeutic management of patients included (1) unjustified use of intravenous immunoglobulin in the absence of bleeding in 54.8 % of patients and (2) splenectomy not being deferred until 6-12 months from diagnosis (median 161 days). Data also reflect a trend towards the early use of thrombopoietin receptor agonists in the treatment of patients who are refractory to any first-line therapy. We have recognized important areas of inapropriateness in the diagnostic and therapeutic management of adult ITP patients. Compliance with established guidelines should be encouraged in order to improve patient outcomes. PMID:27098812

  14. EVALUATION OF LOW TEMPERATURE ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION IN TANK 51

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, J

    2008-09-04

    loss from a quiescent tank; and an evaluation of the aluminum dissolution rate model and actual dissolution rate. LTAD was successfully completed in Tank 51 with minimal waste tank changes. The following general conclusions may be drawn about the LTAD process: (1) Dissolution at about 60 C for 46 days dissolved 64% of the aluminum from the sludge slurry. (2) The aluminum-laden leach solution decanted to Tank 11 can be blended with a wide variety of supernates without risk of precipitating the dissolved aluminum based on thermodynamic chemical equilibrium models. (3) Uranium and plutonium leached into solution without corresponding leaching of iron or metal other than aluminum, but the total mass leached was a small fraction of the total uranium and plutonium in the sludge. (4) The concentration of uranium and plutonium in the leach solution was indistinguishable from other tank farm supernates, thus, the leach solutions can be managed relative to the risk of criticality like any other supernate. (5) A small amount of mercury leached into solution from the sludge causing the liquid phase concentration to increase 6 to 10 fold, which is consistent with the 4 to 14 fold increase observed during the 1982 aluminum dissolution demonstration. (6) Chromium did not dissolve during LTAD. (7) Chloride concentration increased in the liquid phase during LTAD due to chloride contamination in the 50% sodium hydroxide solution. (8) The rate of heat loss from Tank 51 at temperatures above 45 C appeared linear and predictable at 8E+7 cal/hr. (9) The rate of heat transfer from Tank 51 did not follow a simplified bulk heat transfer model. (10) Prediction of the aluminum dissolution rate was prone to error due to a lack of active specific surface area data of sludge particles. (11) The higher than expected dissolution rate during LTAD was likely due to smaller than expected particle sizes of most of the sludge particles. While evaluating the LTAD process, the dissolved salt solution from

  15. In-tank recirculating arsenic treatment system

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Patrick V.; Dwyer, Brian P.; Krumhansl, James L.; Chwirka, Joseph D.

    2009-04-07

    A low-cost, water treatment system and method for reducing arsenic contamination in small community water storage tanks. Arsenic is removed by using a submersible pump, sitting at the bottom of the tank, which continuously recirculates (at a low flow rate) arsenic-contaminated water through an attached and enclosed filter bed containing arsenic-sorbing media. The pump and treatment column can be either placed inside the tank (In-Tank) by manually-lowering through an access hole, or attached to the outside of the tank (Out-of-Tank), for easy replacement of the sorption media.

  16. Splenectomy for primary and recurrent immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Current criteria for patient selection and results.

    PubMed Central

    Akwari, O E; Itani, K M; Coleman, R E; Rosse, W F

    1987-01-01

    Of 565 patients with thrombocytopenia admitted to Duke University Hospital between 1975 and 1985, 100 had splenectomy. Ninety-eight patients had failed chronic immunosuppressive therapy and three patients had acute intracranial bleeding or total absence of platelets in the peripheral blood smear, and had urgent splenectomy. At primary splenectomy, accessory spleens were identified and resected in 18% of patients. There was no operative mortality. Fifty-eight patients had an excellent response to splenectomy and their steroids were tapered off within 3 weeks. Thirteen patients had a poor response to primary splenectomy of whom eight remitted spontaneously and five required accessory splenectomy resulting in complete remission in three patients. Twenty-nine patients were considered nonresponders, 25 of whom had radionuclide scanning for accessory spleens. Seven of these patients had accessory spleens identified but only four consented to accessory splenectomy. In three of the four patients, a complete remission was achieved. Neither platelet antibody titers nor measurements of platelet survival or turnover predicted platelet response to splenectomy. However, immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in older patients was significantly less likely to respond to splenectomy. These data support continuing use of splenectomy in selected patients with ITP and an aggressive search for accessory spleens in patients who relapse since they are easily localized at operation by hand-held isotope detector probe. Images Fig. 6. PMID:3662662

  17. Quantitative kinetics of In-111 autologous (In-AP) and homologous (Cr-HP) platelets in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP)

    SciTech Connect

    Lotter, M.G.; Heyns, A.D.P.; Badenhorst, P.N.; Minnaar, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    Contrary to the accepted view, the authors have found that platelet turnover is not always increased in ITP if the mean platelet survival time (PS) is measured with In-AP. The authors investigated the possible cause of the discrepancy by comparing kinetics of In-AP with those of Cr-HP in 10 patients with ITP. PS was estimated with the multiple hit model. The equilibrium and final in vivo distribution of In-AP was quantitated with the geometrical mean method. The patients could be divided into either those with splenic or diffuse RES platelet destruction. The authors conclude that in ITP platelet survival of In-AP is significantly (P < .05) longer than that of Cr-HP. Platelet turnover measured with In-AP is only normal in patients with mainly splenic platelet sequestration. Results with Cr-HP give a false impression of PS. It seems that in ITP those patients with severe disease also have a platelet production defect.

  18. Precipitation Recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.; Bras, Rafael L.

    1996-01-01

    The water cycle regulates and reflects natural variability in climate at the regional and global scales. Large-scale human activities that involve changes in land cover, such as tropical deforestation, are likely to modify climate through changes in the water cycle. In order to understand, and hopefully be able to predict, the extent of these potential global and regional changes, we need first to understand how the water cycle works. In the past, most of the research in hydrology focused on the land branch of the water cycle, with little attention given to the atmospheric branch. The study of precipitation recycling which is defined as the contribution of local evaporation to local precipitation, aims at understanding hydrologic processes in the atmospheric branch of the water cycle. Simply stated, any study on precipitation recycling is about how the atmospheric branch of the water cycle works, namely, what happens to water vapor molecules after they evaporate from the surface, and where will they precipitate?

  19. STRONTIUM PRECIPITATION

    DOEpatents

    McKenzie, T.R.

    1960-09-13

    A process is given for improving the precipitation of strontium from an aqueous phosphoric-acid-containing solution with nickel or cobalt ferrocyanide by simultaneously precipitating strontium or calcium phosphate. This is accomplished by adding to the ferrocyanide-containing solution calcium or strontium nitrate in a quantity to yield a concentration of from 0.004 to 0.03 and adjusting the pH of the solution to a value of above 8.

  20. 19 CFR 151.26 - Molasses in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Molasses in tank cars. 151.26 Section 151.26 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Sugars, Sirups, and Molasses § 151.26 Molasses in tank cars. When molasses...

  1. [A trial of integrated telepathology (iTP) in Nagano prefecture].

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Akihiko

    2013-01-01

    The shortage of pathologists is a major issue in Japan, and telepathology (TP) is considered one of the most innovative solutions to resolve this. About twenty years ago, robotic TP systems (RTS) were developed and are still used in Japan. Virtual slide (VS) systems appeared in the early 2000s and have being replacing RTS because of the ease of handling images, easy reference to previous images and synchronous discussion among pathologists. Both systems are currently used for intra-operative consultations, second opinions and consultations by specialists, and in education and research via the internet. With these systems, pathologists participating in consultations have to obtain a patient's clinical information by other methods, such as fax or e-mail, and they often make a diagnosis without this information and previous histological images. The author proposes an "integrated telepathology (iTP)" system in Nagano prefecture. This system is composed of an anatomic pathology information system (APIS) linking the VS system and is designed to connect all pathologists in community hospitals, including Shinshu University Hospital, using a virtual private network. Any registered pathologist can access APIS and view any pathological images of patients with the clinical information. Therefore, pathologists can make a diagnosis with substantial patient information at any time and from any location, and pathologists in different hospitals can consult one another in a secure network. Our iTP system will be able to streamline diagnosis duties in surgical pathology in Nagano prefecture, and may solve the shortage of pathologists by improving diagnosis efficiency. PMID:23672084

  2. Precipitation Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDuffie, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Although weather, including its role in the water cycle, is included in most elementary science programs, any further examination of raindrops and snowflakes is rare. Together rain and snow make up most of the precipitation that replenishes Earth's life-sustaining fresh water supply. When viewed individually, raindrops and snowflakes are quite…

  3. Houdini: Reconfigurable in-tank robot

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.W.; Slifko, A.D.; Thompson, B.R.

    1995-10-01

    RedZone Robotics, Inc. and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) are developing a tethered mobile robot, Houdini, to work inside waste storage tanks in support of the Department of Energy`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) Program. This project is funded by the DOE`s Environmental Management Office of Technology Development through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Our goal is to develop technology that is useful for in-tank operations throughout the DOE`s EM program. The first application of the Houdini system is to support the waste retrieval action planned for the final remediation of the Fernald site`s waste silos. RedZone and CMU have discussed potential applications for the system with personnel from several other DOE sites, and have found that the system would be widely useful in the DOE complex for tasks both inside and outside of waste storage tanks. We are tailoring the first implementation of the Houdini system to the specific needs of the Fernald silo remediation. The Fernald application-specific design constraints are primarily interface issues and should not interfere with the utility of the system at other sites.

  4. Houdini: Reconfigurable in-tank robot

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.W.; Slifko, A.D.; Thompson, B.R.; Fisher, C.G.

    1995-12-31

    RedZone Robotics, Inc. and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) are developing a tethered mobile robot, Houdini, to work inside waste storage tanks in support of the Department of Energy`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) Program. This project is funded by the DOE`s Environmental Management Office of Technology Development through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Our goal is to develop technology that is useful for in-tank operations throughout the DOE`s EM program. The first application of the Houdini system is to support the waste retrieval action planned for the final remediation of the Fernald site`s waste silos. RedZone and CMU have discussed potential applications for the system with personnel from several other DOE sites, and have found that the system would be widely useful in the DOE complex for tasks both inside and outside of waste storage tanks. We are tailoring the first implementation of the Houdini system to the specific needs of the Fernald silo remediation. The Fernald application-specific design constraints are primarily interface issues and should not interfere with the utility of the system at other sites. In addition, DOE personnel at the Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) have expressed a strong interest in the Houdini system. They have a target application scheduled for mid-1996. This program represents a unique opportunity to develop a new technology that has immediate application in two CERCLA cleanup actions; the proposed applications at Fernald and ORNL support Federal Facility compliance agreements.

  5. RhIL-11 treatment normalized Th1/Th2 and T-bet/GATA-3 imbalance in in human immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP).

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying; Zhou, Xieming; Guo, Wenjian; Li, Qianqian; Pan, Xiahui; Bao, Yunhua; He, Muqing; Zhu, Baoling; Lin, Xiaoji; Jin, Limin; Yao, Rongxin

    2016-09-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune hemorrhagic disorder characterized by reduction in platelet counts. T helper 1 (Th1) cells polarization with an increased shift of Th1/Th2 ratio has been reported in ITP. This shift is associated with transcription factor T-box expressed in T cells (T-bet) upregulation and GATA-binding protein 3 (GATA-3) downregulation, leading to an increased T-bet/GATA-3 ratio. Our previous in vitro study showed that recombinant human interleukin-11 (rhIL-11) could normalize Th1/Th2 imbalance in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from adult ITP patients, which co-occurred with T-bet/GATA-3 ratio restoration. In this report, we investigated whether rhIL-11 had therapeutic effect in clinical ITP patients and whether rhIL-11 treatment could normalize Th1/Th2 and T-bet/GATA-3 levels in vivo. We found rhIL-11 treatment had a response rate of 67.7% and significantly decreased Th1 and T-bet levels but increased Th2 and GATA-3 levels in ITP patients who showed good response, normalizing Th1/Th2 and T-bet/GATA-3 ratios similar to that in healthy controls. Thus our study suggested rhIL-11 was effective with tolerable adverse effects in ITP. The treatment strategy warrants further clinical investigation. PMID:27235596

  6. Acidic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    At the International Symposium on Acidic Precipitation, over 400 papers were presented, and nearly 200 of them are included here. They provide an overview of the present state of the art of acid rain research. The Conference focused on atmospheric science (monitoring, source-receptor relationships), aquatic effects (marine eutrophication, lake acidification, impacts on plant and fish populations), and terrestrial effects (forest decline, soil acidification, etc.).

  7. HOUDINI: RECONFIGURABLE IN-TANK ROBOT

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Thompson; Adam Slifko

    1997-02-12

    This report details the development of a reconfigurable in-tank robotic cleanup system called Houdini{trademark}. Driven by the general need to develop equipment for the removal of radioactive waste from hundreds of DOE waste storage tanks and the specific needs of DOE sites such as Oak Ridge Naitonal Laboratory and Fernald, Houdini{trademark} represents one of the possible tools that can be used to mobilize and retrieve this waste material for complete remediation. Houdini{trademark} is a hydraulically powered, track driven, mobile work vehicle with a collapsible frame designed to enter underground or above ground waste tanks through existing 24 inch riser openings. After the vehicle has entered the waste tank, it unfolds and lands on the waste surface or tank floor to become a remotely operated mini-bulldozer. Houdini{trademark} utilizes a vehicle mounted plow blade and 6-DOF manipulator to mobilize waste and carry other tooling such as sluicing pumps, excavation buckets, and hydraulic shears. The complete Houdini{trademark} system consists of the tracked vehicle and other support equipment (e.g., control console, deployment system, hydraulic power supply, and controller) necessary to deploy and remotely operate this system at any DOE site. Inside the storage tanks, the system is capable of performing heel removal, waste mobilization, waste size reduction, and other tank waste retrieval and decommissioning tasks. The first Houdini{trademark} system was delivered on September 24, 1996 to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The system acceptance test was successfully performed at a cold test facility at ORNL. After completion of the cold test program and the training of site personnel, ORNL will deploy the system for clean-up and remediation of the Gunite storage tanks.

  8. HOUDINI: RECONFIGURABEL IN-TANK ROBOT

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Thompson; Adam Slifko

    1997-02-12

    This report details the development of a reconfigurable in-tank robotic cleanup systems called Houdini{trademark}. Driven by the general need to develop equipment for the removal of radioactive waste from hundreds of DOE waste storage tanks and the specific needs of DOE sites such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Fernald, Houdini{trademark} represents one of the possible tools that can be used to mobilize and retrieve this waste material for complete remediation. Houdini{trademark} is a hydraulically powered, track driven, mobile work vehicle with a collapsible frame designed to enter underground or above ground waste tanks through existing 24 inch riser openings. After the vehicle has entered the waste tank, it unfolds and lands on the waste surface or tank floor to become a remotely operated mini-bulldozer. Houdini{trademark} utilizes a vehicle mounted plow blade and 6-DOF manipulator to mobile waste and carry other tooling such as sluicing pumps, excavation buckets, and hydraulic shears. The complete Houdini{trademark} system consists of the tracked vehicle and other support equipment (e.g., control console, deployment system, hydraulic power supply, and controller) necessary to deploy and remotely operate this system at any DOE site. Inside the storage tanks, the system is capable of performing heel removal, waste mobilization, waste size reduction, and other tank waste retrieval and decommissioning tasks. The first Houdini{trademark} system was delivered on September 24, 1996 to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The system acceptance test was successfully performed at a cold test facility at ORNL. After completion of the cold test program and the training of site personnel, ORNL will deploy the system for clean-up and remediation of the Gunite storage tanks.

  9. Comparative of three methods (ELIZA, MAIPA and flow cytometry) to determine anti-platelet antibody in children with ITP.

    PubMed

    Hamidpour, Mohsen; Khalili, Ghader; Tajic, Nader; Shamsian, Bi Bi Shahin; Hamidpour, Rafie

    2014-01-01

    Immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpurea (ITP) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the increased anti-platelet antibodies in the patient's sera and decreased platelets in the blood circulation. This study has determined and characterized the antiplatelet glycoproteins in children with ITP. Thirty eight children, who were hospitalized with clinical signs of ITP in Mofid Children Hospital (Tehran, Iran) during 18 months, went under our clinical studies in a research project. ELISA, Flow cytometry and MAIPA (Monoclonal Antibody Immobilization of Platelet Antigens) methods were employed to determine serum anti-platelet antibodies level. The anti-platelet antibodies level above mean + 3SD of control group was assumed as positive. The platelet counts ranged between 2 × 10(9)/L and 100 × 10(9)/L. Among the patients 63.5% of them were anti-platelet antibodies positive with ELISA method. Results of platelet lysate method showed that 51.7% of patients had antibodies against platelet antigens. Antibody against platelet GPIIb/IIIa, GPIb/IX and GPIa/IIa using MAIPA method were 48%, 54% and 25% respectively. In flow cytometry 62% of patients showed anti-platelet antibodies. The comparison of three methods shows that since MAIPA is the specific method for the detection of very small amount of antibody against glycoprotein antigens, it has the advantage of differentiating between immune and non-immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:25755908

  10. Comparative of three methods (ELIZA, MAIPA and flow cytometry) to determine anti-platelet antibody in children with ITP

    PubMed Central

    Hamidpour, Mohsen; Khalili, Ghader; Tajic, Nader; Shamsian, Bi Bi Shahin; Hamidpour, Rafie

    2014-01-01

    Immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpurea (ITP) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the increased anti-platelet antibodies in the patient’s sera and decreased platelets in the blood circulation. This study has determined and characterized the antiplatelet glycoproteins in children with ITP. Thirty eight children, who were hospitalized with clinical signs of ITP in Mofid Children Hospital (Tehran, Iran) during 18 months, went under our clinical studies in a research project. ELISA, Flow cytometry and MAIPA (Monoclonal Antibody Immobilization of Platelet Antigens) methods were employed to determine serum anti-platelet antibodies level. The anti-platelet antibodies level above mean + 3SD of control group was assumed as positive. The platelet counts ranged between 2 × 109/L and 100 × 109/L. Among the patients 63.5% of them were anti-platelet antibodies positive with ELISA method. Results of platelet lysate method showed that 51.7% of patients had antibodies against platelet antigens. Antibody against platelet GPIIb/IIIa, GPIb/IX and GPIa/IIa using MAIPA method were 48%, 54% and 25% respectively. In flow cytometry 62% of patients showed anti-platelet antibodies. The comparison of three methods shows that since MAIPA is the specific method for the detection of very small amount of antibody against glycoprotein antigens, it has the advantage of differentiating between immune and non-immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:25755908

  11. A commercial application of survivable network design: ITP/INPLANS CCS Network Topology Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Mihail, M.; Shallcross, D.; Dean, N.; Mostrel, M.

    1996-12-31

    The ITP/INPLANS CCS Network Topology Analyzer is a Bellcore product which performs automated design of cost effective survivable CCS (Common Channel Signaling) networks, with survivability meaning that certain path-connectivity is preserved under limited failures of network elements. The algorithmic core of this product consists of suitable extensions of primal-dual approximation schemes for Steiner network problems. Even though most of the survivability problems arising in CCS networks are not strictly of the form for which the approximation algorithms with proven performance guarantees apply, we implemented modifications of these algorithms with success: In addition to duality-based performance guarantees that indicate, mathematically, discrepancy of no more than 20% from optimality for generic Steiner problems and no more than 40% for survivable CCS networks, our software passed all commercial benchmark tests, and our code was deployed with the August 94 release of the product. CCS networks fall in the general category of low bit-rate backbone networks. The main characteristic of survivability problems for these networks is that each edge, once present, can be assumed to carry arbitrarily many paths. For high bit-rate backbone networks, such as the widely used ATM and SONET, this is no longer the case. We discuss versions of network survivability with capacitated edges that appear to model survivability considerations in such networks.

  12. ANNUAL REPORT. PRECIPITATION AND DEPOSITION OF ALUMINUM-CONTAINING SPECIES IN TANK WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aluminum-containing phases represent the most prevalent solids that can appear or disappear during the processing of radioactive tank wastes. Processes such as sludge washing and leaching are designed to dissolve Al-containing phases and thereby minimize the volume of high-level ...

  13. PRECIPITATION AND DEPOSITION OF ALUMINUM-CONTAINING PHASES IN TANK WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aluminum-containing phases represent the most prevalent solids that can appear or disappear during the processing of radioactive tank wastes. Processes such as sludge washing and leaching are designed to dissolve Al-containing phases and, thereby, minimize the volume of high-lev...

  14. Historical trends in tank 241-SY-101 waste temperatures and levels

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1993-09-01

    The gas release and fluctuating level of the waste in tank 241-SY-101 have prompted more detailed interest in its historical behavior, in hopes of achieving a better understanding of its current status. To examine the historical behavior, essentially all of the tank waste temperature and level data record has been retrieved, examined, and plotted in various ways. To aid in interpreting the data, the depth of the non-convective waste layer was estimated by using a least-squares Chebyshev approximation to the temperatures. This report documents the retrieval critical examination, and graphic presentation of 241-SY-101 temperature and waste level histories. The graphic presentations clearly indicate a tank cooling trend that has become precipitous since late 1991. The plots also clearly show the decreasing frequency of waste gas release events, increasing height of the non-convective layer, and larger level drops per event.

  15. Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP): a community hospital experience and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Jubelirer, Steven J; Mousa, Luay; Reddy, Usha; Mir, Mohsin; Welch, Christine A

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed the records of 51 patients with Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP) who underwent Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG) at Charleston Area Medical Center between June 1992 and September 2005. There were 41 males and 10 females with a median age of 68 years (range 49-87). Four patients had a previous splenectomy, one of whom had it performed concomitantly with the CABG. Three patients were on chronic corticosteroids on admission. The median pump time was 114 minutes (range: 42-244 minutes). The median cross-clamp time was 62 minutes (range 22-192 minutes). The median total chest tube drainage postoperatively was 1,346 cc (range: 265-9875cc). The mean preoperative and 24 hour postoperative platelet count was 126,000 (range 58,000-323,000) and 99,000/mm3 (range: 27,000-194,000), respectively. Twenty-one (40%) patients received platelet transfusions. Platelets were given intraoperatively or postoperatively in all but two of those patients. The median number of units of platelets given was 10 (range: 6-52). Twenty-seven (53%) received packed red cells intraoperatively or postoperatively. The median number of red cells given was 2 (range: 1-34). Other hemostatic agents given intraoperatively/ postoperatively included aprotinin (8 patients), aminocaproic acid (10 patients), DDAVP (5 patients), and intravenous gammaglobulin (IgG) in 3 patients. Thirteen patients were given corticosteroids preoperatively with little improvement in platelet count. CABG may be successfully performed in ITP patients with moderate thrombocytopenia (> or = 50,000/mm3) using conventional therapies (e.g., transfusions, IV IgG, hematinics) without the need for preoperative splenectomy or prolongation of hospital stay. However, a prospective study on the ideal management of ITP patients undergoing CABG would be beneficial. PMID:22235705

  16. Production of sunshine bass fingerlings in tanks without using rotifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously reported protocol for culture of sunshine bass larvae to fingerling size in tanks involved an initial feeding of rotifers for several days before the larvae are weaned to feed on Artemia nauplii. Maintaining rotifer cultures requires space, time, equipment, supplies, trained culturists a...

  17. 19 CFR 151.26 - Molasses in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Molasses in tank cars. 151.26 Section 151.26 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Sugars, Sirups, and Molasses §...

  18. 19 CFR 151.26 - Molasses in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Molasses in tank cars. 151.26 Section 151.26 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Sugars, Sirups, and Molasses §...

  19. 19 CFR 151.26 - Molasses in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Molasses in tank cars. 151.26 Section 151.26 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Sugars, Sirups, and Molasses §...

  20. 19 CFR 151.26 - Molasses in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Molasses in tank cars. 151.26 Section 151.26 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Sugars, Sirups, and Molasses §...

  1. 41. VIEW LOOKING IN TANK, SHOWING TRAINING DURING ASCENT (WEARING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. VIEW LOOKING IN TANK, SHOWING TRAINING DURING ASCENT (WEARING STEINKE HOOD) AT RIGHT, DIVING INSTRUCTOR AT LEFT MAINTAINING HIS POSITION ON THE WIRE No date - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  2. 40. VIEW LOOKING IN TANK JUST OUTSIDE DOOR TO AIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. VIEW LOOKING IN TANK JUST OUTSIDE DOOR TO AIR LOCK. HIGH HOOKS IS POSITIONING THE STEINKE HOOD ON THE TRAINEE, WHILE LOW HOOKS HOLDS HIM IN PLACE No date - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  3. A novel triple therapy for ITP using high-dose dexamethasone, low-dose rituximab, and cyclosporine (TT4)

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Philip Young-Ill; Roncolato, Fernando; Badoux, Xavier; Ramanathan, Sundra; Ho, Shir-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Promising reports of combination immunosuppression with high-dose dexamethasone and rituximab for the treatment of primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) have recently emerged. They suggest a potential to further optimize the efficacy of therapy. We investigate the use of a novel combination of conventional therapies in ITP given over 4 weeks. From 2011 to 2014, 20 patients were prospectively enrolled onto a single-arm phase 2b study to describe the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of oral dexamethasone 40 mg for days 1 to 4, oral cyclosporine 2.5 to 3 mg/kg daily for day 1 to 28, and intravenous low-dose rituximab 100 mg for days 7, 14, 21, and 28. There were no therapy-related serious adverse side effects, 6-month response rate was 60%, and treatment was well tolerated. Responders enjoyed relapse-free survivals of 92% and 76%, respectively, at 12 and 24 months. This study highlights the possibility of achieving an enduring remission from 4 weeks of therapy. This study is registered at www.anzctr.org.au (#ANZCTRN12611000015943). PMID:25972158

  4. PRECIPITATION OF PLUTONOUS PEROXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Barrick, J.G.; Manion, J.P.

    1961-08-15

    A precipitation process for recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution is described. In the process for precipitating plutonium as plutonous peroxide, hydroxylamine or hydrazine is added to the plutoniumcontaining solution prior to the addition of peroxide to precipitate plutonium. The addition of hydroxylamine or hydrazine increases the amount of plutonium precipitated as plutonous peroxide. (AEC)

  5. 49 CFR 173.319 - Cryogenic liquids in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... subchapter for a DOT-113C120W tank car apply to a DOT-113D120W tank car. (49 U.S.C. 1803, 1804, 1808; 49 CFR... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cryogenic liquids in tank cars. 173.319 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.319 Cryogenic liquids in...

  6. Benzene Evolution Rates from Saltstone Prepared with 2X ITP Flowsheet Concentrations of Phenylborates and Heated to 85 Degrees C

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.R.

    2000-08-23

    The Saltstone Facility provides the final treatment and disposal of low level liquid wastes streams. At the Saltstone Facility, the waste is mixed with cement, flyash, and slag to form a grout, which is pumped into large concrete vaults where it cures. The facility started radioactive operations in June 1990. High Level Waste Engineering requested Savannah River Technology Center to determine the effect of TPB and its decomposition products (i.e., 3PB, 2PB, and 1PB) on the saltstone process. Previous testing performed by SRTC determined saltstone benzene evolution rates a function of ITP filtrate composition. Testing by the Thermal Fluids Laboratory has shown at design operation, the temperature in the Z-area vaults could reach 85 degrees Celsius. Saltstone asked SRTC to perform additional testing to determine whether curing at 85 degrees Celsius could change saltstone benzene evolution rates. This document describes the test performed to determine the effect of curing temperature on the benzene evolution rates.

  7. Precipitation Climate Data Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, B. R.; Prat, O.; Vasquez, L.

    2015-12-01

    Five precipitation CDRs are now or soon will be transitioned to NOAA's CDR program. These include the PERSIANN data set, which is a 30-year record of daily adjusted global precipitation based on retrievals from satellite microwave data using artificial neural networks. The AMSU-A/B/Hydrobundle is an 11-year record of precipitable water, cloud water, ice water, and other variables. CMORPH (the NOAA Climate Prediction Center Morphing Technique) is a 17-year record of daily and sub-daily adjusted global precipitation measured from passive microwave and infrared data at high spatial and temporal resolution. GPCP (the Global Precipitation Climatology Project) is an approximately 30-year record of monthly and pentad adjusted global precipitation and a 17-year record of daily adjusted global precipitation. The NEXRAD Reanalysis is a 10-year record of high resolution NEXRAD radar based adjusted CONUS-wide hourly and daily precipitation. This study provides an assessment of the existing and transitioned long term precipitation CDRs and includes the verification of the five precipitation CDRs using various methods including comparison with in-situ data sets and trend analysis. As all of the precipitation related CDRs are transitioned, long term analyses can be performed. Comparisons at varying scales (hourly, daily and longer) of the precipitation CDRs with in-situ data sets are provided as well as a first look at what could be an ensemble long term precipitation data record.

  8. Locating levels in tanks and silos using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snell, John R., Jr.; Schwoegler, Matt

    2004-04-01

    Thermography is a powerful tool for locating or verifying levels in tanks and silos. But one could ask "Why bother?" All too often existing level indication instruments are simply not reliable or positive verification of instrumentation readings is required. When properly used, thermography can reveal not only the liquid/gas interface, but also sludge buildup and floating materials such as waxes and foams. Similar techniques can be used to locate levels and bridging problems in silos containing fluidized solids. This paper discusses the parameters and limitations that must be addressed, shows techniques that can be employed, and illustrates the discussions with numerous thermal images.

  9. SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP). Volume 8: Aerothermodynamics Automation and Robotics (A/R) systems sensors, high-temperature superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs of briefings presented at the SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) on aerothermodynamics, automation and robotics systems, sensors, and high-temperature superconductivity are included. Topics covered include: aerothermodynamics; aerobraking; aeroassist flight experiment; entry technology for probes and penetrators; automation and robotics; artificial intelligence; NASA telerobotics program; planetary rover program; science sensor technology; direct detector; submillimeter sensors; laser sensors; passive microwave sensing; active microwave sensing; sensor electronics; sensor optics; coolers and cryogenics; and high temperature superconductivity.

  10. Development of Chemical Treatment Alternatives for Tetraphenylborate Destruction in Tank 48H

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.P.

    2003-03-11

    This study assessed chemical treatment options for decomposing the tetraphenylborate in High Level Waste (HLW) Tank 48H. Tank 48H, located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC, contains approximately one million liters of HLW. The tetraphenylborate slurry represents legacy material from commissioning of an In Tank Precipitation process to separate radioactive cesium and actinides from the nonradioactive chemicals. During early operations, the process encountered an unplanned chemical reaction that catalytically decomposed the excess tetraphenylborate producing benzene. Subsequent research indicated that personnel could not control the operations within the existing equipment to both meet the desired treatment rate for the waste and maintain the benzene concentration within allowable concentrations. Since then, the Department of Energy selected an alternate treatment process for handling high-level waste at the site. However, the site must destroy the tetraphenylborate before returning the tank to HLW service. The research focuses on identifying treatments to decompose tetraphenylborate to the maximum extent feasible, with a preference for decomposition methods that produce carbon dioxide rather than benzene. A number of experiments examined whether the use of oxidants, catalysts or acids proved effective in decomposing the tetraphenylborate. Additional experiments developed an understanding of the solid, liquid and gas decomposition products.

  11. Dropping of mixing pump in Tank 102-AP

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, R.F.

    1995-06-02

    The purpose of this study is to examine dropping of the mixing pump in Tank 102-AP during its removal poses the risk of causing a leak in the tank bottom with attendant potential for public exposure from the leak. The purpose of this investigation is to examine the potential for causing such a leak (i.e., estimated frequency of leak occurrence); to qualitatively estimate leak magnitude if its is a credible event; and, finally to compare the worker hazard, in the installation of an impact limiter (should it be required), to that which the public might incur if a leak is manifest in the tank bottom. The ultimate goal of the study is, of course, to assess the need for installation of an impact limiter.

  12. Assessment of performing an MST strike in Tank 21H

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, Michael R.

    2014-09-29

    Previous Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) tank mixing studies performed for the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) project have shown that 3 Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs) installed in Tank 41 are sufficient to support actinide removal by MST sorption as well as subsequent resuspension and removal of settled solids. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is pursuing MST addition into Tank 21 as part of the Large Tank Strike (LTS) project. The preliminary scope for LTS involves the use of three standard slurry pumps (installed in N, SE, and SW risers) in a Type IV tank. Due to the differences in tank size, internal interferences, and pump design, a separate mixing evaluation is required to determine if the proposed configuration will allow for MST suspension and strontium and actinide sorption. The author performed the analysis by reviewing drawings for Tank 21 [W231023] and determining the required cleaning radius or zone of influence for the pumps. This requirement was compared with previous pilot-scale MST suspension data collected for SCIX that determined the cleaning radius, or zone of influence, as a function of pump operating parameters. The author also reviewed a previous Tank 50 mixing analysis that examined the ability of standard slurry pumps to suspend sludge particles. Based on a review of the pilot-scale SCIX mixing tests and Tank 50 pump operating experience, three standard slurry pumps should be able to suspend sludge and MST to effectively sorb strontium and actinides onto the MST. Using the SCIX data requires an assumption about the impact of cooling coils on slurry pump mixing. The basis for this assumption is described in this report. Using the Tank 50 operating experience shows three standard slurry pumps should be able to suspend solids if the shear strength of the settled solids is less than 160 Pa. Because Tank 21 does not contain cooling coils, the shear strength could be larger.

  13. Global Precipitation Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Kummerow, Christian D.; Shepherd, James Marshall

    2008-01-01

    This chapter begins with a brief history and background of microwave precipitation sensors, with a discussion of the sensitivity of both passive and active instruments, to trace the evolution of satellite-based rainfall techniques from an era of inference to an era of physical measurement. Next, the highly successful Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission will be described, followed by the goals and plans for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission and the status of precipitation retrieval algorithm development. The chapter concludes with a summary of the need for space-based precipitation measurement, current technological capabilities, near-term algorithm advancements and anticipated new sciences and societal benefits in the GPM era.

  14. Selective Precipitation of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Matulis, Daumantas

    2016-01-01

    Selective precipitation of proteins can be used as a bulk method to recover the majority of proteins from a crude lysate, as a selective method to fractionate a subset of proteins from a protein solution, or as a very specific method to recover a single protein of interest from a purification step. This unit describes a number of methods suitable for selective precipitation. In each of the protocols that are outlined, the physical or chemical basis of the precipitation process, the parameters that can be varied for optimization, and the basic steps for developing an optimized precipitation are described. PMID:26836410

  15. Mixing Effects on the Precipitation and Cross Flows Filtration of a Hanford Simulated Precipitated Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect

    DUIGNAN, MARK

    2004-03-31

    As part of the River Protection Project at Hanford, Washington, Bechtel National, Inc. has been contracted by the United States Department of Energy to design a Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant to stabilize liquid radioactive waste. Because of its experience with radioactive waste stabilization, the Savannah River Technology Center of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company is working with Bechtel National and Washington Group International, to help design and test certain parts of the Waste Treatment Plant. One part of the process is the separation of radioactive isotopes from the liquid waste by a precipitation reaction and cross-flow ultrafiltration. To better understand those combined processes an experiment was performed using a simulated radioactive waste, made to prototypically represent the chemical and physical characteristics of a Hanford waste in tank 241-AN-102 and precipitated under prototypic conditions. The resultant slurry was then filtered using a cross-flow filter prototypic in porosity, length, and diameter to the plant design. An important aspect of filtration for waste treatment is the rate at which permeate is produced. There are many factors that affect filtration rate and one of the most difficult to obtain is the effect of particles in the waste streams. The Waste Treatment Plant will filter many waste streams, with varying concentrations and types of dissolved and undissolved solids. An added complication is the need to precipitate organic complexants so they can be efficiently separated from the supernatant. Depending on how precipitation is performed, the newly created solids will add to the complicating factors that determine permeate flux rate. To investigate the effect of precipitated solids on filter flux a pilot-scale test was performed and two different mixing mechanisms were used for the precipitation reaction. A standard impeller type mixer, which created a homogeneous mixture, and a pulse jet mixer, which created a

  16. 49 CFR 174.304 - Class 3 (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class 3 (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars... (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars. A tank car containing a Class 3 (flammable liquid) material, other... the liquid from the tank car to permanent storage tanks of sufficient capacity to receive the...

  17. 49 CFR 174.304 - Class 3 (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class 3 (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars... (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars. A tank car containing a Class 3 (flammable liquid) material, other... the liquid from the tank car to permanent storage tanks of sufficient capacity to receive the...

  18. 49 CFR 174.304 - Class 3 (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Class 3 (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars... (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars. A tank car containing a Class 3 (flammable liquid) material, other... the liquid from the tank car to permanent storage tanks of sufficient capacity to receive the...

  19. 46 CFR 153.981 - Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion. 153.981 Section 153.981 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Transfer Procedures § 153.981 Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion. The person in charge of...

  20. 46 CFR 153.981 - Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion. 153.981 Section 153.981 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Transfer Procedures § 153.981 Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion. The person in charge of...

  1. 46 CFR 153.981 - Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion. 153.981 Section 153.981 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Transfer Procedures § 153.981 Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion. The person in charge of...

  2. 46 CFR 153.981 - Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion. 153.981 Section 153.981 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Transfer Procedures § 153.981 Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion. The person in charge of...

  3. 46 CFR 153.981 - Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion. 153.981 Section 153.981 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Transfer Procedures § 153.981 Leaving room in tank for cargo expansion. The person in charge of...

  4. PRECIPITATION OF PROTACTINIUM

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.L.

    1958-07-15

    An lmprovement in the separation of protactinium from aqueous nitric acid solutions is described. 1t covers the use of lead dioxide and tin dioxide as carrier precipitates for the protactinium. In carrying out the process, divalent lead or divalent tin is addcd to the solution and oxidized, causing formation of a carrier precipitate of lead dioxide or stannic oxide, respectively.

  5. Global Precipitation Measurement Poster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azarbarzin, Art

    2010-01-01

    This poster presents an overview of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) constellation of satellites which are designed to measure the Earth's precipitation. It includes the schedule of launches for the various satellites in the constellation, and the coverage of the constellation, It also reviews the mission capabilities, and the mission science objectives.

  6. The Thorbex precipitation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nína Petersen, Guðrún; Ágústsson, Hálfdán; Ólafsson, Haraldur; Arason, Þórður

    2016-04-01

    During the autumn of 2014, precipitation was observed by a dense network of automatic raingauges covering a 243 m high and steep mountain, Þorbjörn, in the Reykjanes peninsula in SW-Iceland. The experiment is backed by continuous radar observations of winds and precipitation, radiosondes every 12 hours at the nearby Keflavik airport and a number of automatic weather stations. Some of the key results are: -The observations indicate that the average maximum rain over or close to the mountain maybe ~1.7 times the background rain. -Although the precipitation is only liquid, there seems to be great observation errors, likely due to strong winds. This calls for revision of the climatology of precipitation in Iceland and in other windy places. -The maximum wind loss and the spatial variability are of a similar magnitude. This complicates mapping of true precipitation.

  7. Precipitation and floodiness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, E.; Day, J. J.; Pappenberger, F.; Cloke, H.

    2015-12-01

    There are a number of factors that lead to nonlinearity between precipitation anomalies and flood hazard; this nonlinearity is a pertinent issue for applications that use a precipitation forecast as a proxy for imminent flood hazard. We assessed the degree of this nonlinearity for the first time using a recently developed global-scale hydrological model driven by the ERA-Interim/Land precipitation reanalysis (1980-2010). We introduced new indices to assess large-scale flood hazard, or floodiness, and quantified the link between monthly precipitation, river discharge, and floodiness anomalies at the global and regional scales. The results show that monthly floodiness is not well correlated with precipitation, therefore demonstrating the value of hydrometeorological systems for providing floodiness forecasts for decision-makers. A method is described for forecasting floodiness using the Global Flood Awareness System, building a climatology of regional floodiness from which to forecast floodiness anomalies out to 2 weeks.

  8. In-tank processes for destruction of organic complexants and removal of selected radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, W.W.; Kupfer, M.J.; McKeon, M.M.

    1995-02-01

    This report establishes the need and technical feasibility for using in-tank pretreatment processes for destruction of organic complexants and removal of {sup 90}Sr, transuranic (TRU) elements, and {sup 99}Tc from double-shell tank (DST) liquid wastes. Neither {sup 90}Sr nor {sup 99}{Tc} have to be removed from any DST solution to obtain vitrified product containing less than the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) criteria for Class C commercial low-level waste (LLW). To meet the NRC criterion for Class C LLW, TRU elements must be removed from liquid wastes in three (possibly five) DSTs. No {sup 90}Sr will have to be removed from any solution for the total vitrified waste from both DSTs and single-shell tanks to meet a goal of <7 MCi of radionuclides and a NRC ruling for Hanford Site Incidental Waste. Guidance from ALARA principles and the TWRS Environmental Impact Statement may dictate additional removal of radionuclides from DST supernatant liquids. Scavenging processes involving precipitation of strontium phosphate and/or hydrated iron oxide effectively remove {sup 90}Sr and/or TRU elements from actual DST wastes including complexant concentrate (CC) wastes. Destruction of organic complexants is not required for these scavenging processes to reduce the {sup 90}Sr and/or TRU element concentrations of DST waste solutions to or below the NRC criteria for Class C commercial LLW. However, substantially smaller amounts of scavenging agents would be required for removal of {sup 90}Sr and TRU elements from CC waste if organic complexants were destroyed. Low concentrations of added Sr(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} are desirable to minimize the volume of HLW glass.

  9. Cloud and Precipitation Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Martin; Höller, Hartmut; Schmidt, Kersten

    Precipitation or weather radar is an essential tool for research, diagnosis, and nowcasting of precipitation events like fronts or thunderstorms. Only with weather radar is it possible to gain insights into the three-dimensional structure of thunderstorms and to investigate processes like hail formation or tornado genesis. A number of different radar products are available to analyze the structure, dynamics and microphysics of precipitation systems. Cloud radars use short wavelengths to enable detection of small ice particles or cloud droplets. Their applications differ from weather radar as they are mostly orientated vertically, where different retrieval techniques can be applied.

  10. In-tank hydrogen-ferric ion recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selverston, S.; Savinell, R. F.; Wainright, J. S.

    2016-08-01

    An H2sbnd Fe3+ recombination method is being developed for all-iron flow batteries. Working principles are described and a proof-of-concept in-tank reactor is demonstrated. A membrane-less galvanic reactor is characterized using potential, polarization and impedance measurements at hydrogen partial pressures ranging from 0.3 to 11.3 psig. Through a vertical reactor geometry, hydrogen recombination rates of up to 60 mA cm-2 were measured at PH2 = 4.5 psig for a reactor with a platinum loading of 3.2 mg cm-2, based on the geometric catalyzed area. This is equivalent to over 375 mA cm-2 with respect to the cross sectional area of the reactor at the waterline. This rate is sufficient that the reactor will readily fit inside the positive reservoir of a flow battery. The reactor was found to be resistant to degradation by flooding or catalyst loss.

  11. Light Duty Utility Arm deployment in Tank WM-188

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, M.W.

    1999-12-01

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) was successfully deployed in Tank WM-188 during February and March of 1999 at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) tank farm at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Some equipment problems were identified, but most were indicative of any first time activity. Deployment during cold weather imposed additional equipment risks, but in general, equipment response to the winter conditions was better than expected. Three end effectors were demonstrated during the deployment. All performed as expected, although the limited resolution of the Alternating Current Field Measurement end effector cannot absolutely confirm tank integrity, which is necessary for future tank inspections. Four heel samples were taken with the sampler end effector and a broad spectrum of analyses were performed. A detailed inspection of the tank interior was performed with the High Resolution Stereo Video System end effector. The sample information is proving invaluable to the development of new treatment flowsheets and waste forms. It is expected that the LDUA will be deployed for tank inspections through the next several years to support other Notice of Non-Compliance (NON) Consent Order requirements and several other ongoing initiatives.

  12. In-Tank Elutriation Test Report And Independent Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, H. H.; Adamson, D. J.; Qureshi, Z. H.; Steeper, T. J.

    2011-04-13

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) funded Technology Development and Deployment (TDD) to solve technical problems associated with waste tank closure for sites such as Hanford Site and Savannah River Site (SRS). One of the tasks supported by this funding at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNNL) was In-Tank Elutriation. Elutriation is the process whereby physical separation occurs based on particle size and density. This report satisfies the first phase of Task WP_1.3.1.1 In-Tank Elutriation, which is to assess the feasibility of this method of separation in waste tanks at Hanford Site and SRS. This report includes an analysis of scoping tests performed in the Engineering Development Laboratory of SRNL, analysis of Hanford's inadvertent elutriation, the viability of separation methods such as elutriation and hydrocyclones and recommendations for a path forward. This report will demonstrate that the retrieval of Hanford salt waste tank S-112 very successfully decreased the tank's inventories of radionuclides. Analyses of samples collected from the tank showed that concentrations of the major radionuclides Cs-136 and Sr-90 were decreased by factors of 250 and 6 and their total curie tank inventories decreased by factors of 60,000 and 2000. The total tank curie loading decreased from 300,000 Ci to 55 Ci. The remaining heel was nearly all innocuous gibbsite, Al(OH){sub 3}. However, in the process of tank retrieval approximately 85% of the tank gibbsite was also removed. Significant amounts of money and processing time could be saved if more gibbsite could be left in tanks while still removing nearly all of the radionuclides. There were factors which helped to make the elutriation of Tank S-112 successful which would not necessarily be present in all salt tanks. 1. The gibbsite particles in the tank were surprisingly large, as much as 200 {micro}m. The gibbsite crystals had probably grown in

  13. Chemisorption And Precipitation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transport and bioavailability of chemical components within soils is, in part, controlled by partitioning between solids and solution. General terms used to describe these partitioning reactions include chemisorption and precipitation. Chemisorption is inclusive of the suit...

  14. Precipitation Estimates for Hydroelectricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapiador, Francisco J.; Hou, Arthur Y.; de Castro, Manuel; Checa, Ramiro; Cuartero, Fernando; Barros, Ana P.

    2011-01-01

    Hydroelectric plants require precise and timely estimates of rain, snow and other hydrometeors for operations. However, it is far from being a trivial task to measure and predict precipitation. This paper presents the linkages between precipitation science and hydroelectricity, and in doing so it provides insight into current research directions that are relevant for this renewable energy. Methods described include radars, disdrometers, satellites and numerical models. Two recent advances that have the potential of being highly beneficial for hydropower operations are featured: the Global Precipitation Measuring (GPM) mission, which represents an important leap forward in precipitation observations from space, and high performance computing (HPC) and grid technology, that allows building ensembles of numerical weather and climate models.

  15. My NASA Data Precipitation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This lesson has two activities that help students develop a basic understanding of the relationship between cloud type and the form of precipitation and the relationship between the amount of water...

  16. IMERG Global Precipitation Rates

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission has produced its first global map of rainfall and snowfall. The GPM Core Observatory launched one year ago on Feb. 27, 2014 as a collaboration betwee...

  17. Hydride precipitation in titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Numakura, H.; Kowia, M.

    1984-10-01

    The crystal structure and morphology of hydride (deuteride) precipitates are investigated on ..cap alpha..-titanium specimens containing 1-3 at.% H or D by transmission electron microscopy. The hydride is found to have a face-centered tetragonal structure (c/a = 1.09) with an ordered arrangement of hydrogen, being isomorphous to ..gamma..-zirconium hydride. Two types of precipitation mode are observed with the habit planes (0110) and near (0225).

  18. 49 CFR 174.304 - Class 3 (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars. A tank car containing a Class 3 (flammable liquid) material, other... the liquid from the tank car to permanent storage tanks of sufficient capacity to receive the entire contents of the car....

  19. 27 CFR 19.329 - Mingled spirits or wines held in tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Storage of Distilled Spirits Rules for Mingling Or Blending Spirits § 19.329 Mingled spirits or wines held in tanks. When wines...

  20. 27 CFR 19.329 - Mingled spirits or wines held in tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Storage of Distilled Spirits Rules for Mingling Or Blending Spirits § 19.329 Mingled spirits or wines held in tanks. When wines...

  1. 27 CFR 19.329 - Mingled spirits or wines held in tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Storage of Distilled Spirits Rules for Mingling Or Blending Spirits § 19.329 Mingled spirits or wines held in tanks. When wines...

  2. Highly sensitive tITP-CZE determination of l-histidine and creatinine in human blood plasma using field-amplified sample injection with mobility-boost effect.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Takanari; Fukushi, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    2D computer simulation revealed that amino acids and weak electrolytes were cationized because of the migration of counter-ion from a BGE zone to a sample zone, which encouraged electrokinetic injection (EKI) of these analytes (by the mobility-boost (MB) effect). To investigate the effects of kinds and concentrations of counter-ions on the MB effect and the analyte amount injected into the capillary, experiments, and 1D computer simulations were performed. When acetate was used as the counter-ion, the LODs (S/N = 3) of l-histidine and creatinine, respectively, reached 0.10 and 0.25 nM because of the concentration effect by transient ITP (tITP). The concentrations of l-histidine and creatinine in human blood plasma obtained using the proposed method were agreed with those obtained using the conventional methods. The proposed method can be applied to the analysis of amino acids and weak bases that have similar pI and pKa to l-histidine and creatinine. PMID:26454141

  3. A multicenter randomized open-label study of rituximab plus rhTPO vs rituximab in corticosteroid-resistant or relapsed ITP

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hai; Xu, Miao; Qin, Ping; Zhang, Hai-yan; Yuan, Cheng-lu; Zhao, Hong-guo; Cui, Zhong-guang; Meng, Yue-sheng; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Fang; Wang, Xin; Li, Da-qi; Bi, Ke-hong; Zhu, Chuan-sheng; Guo, Cheng-shan; Chu, Xiao-xia; Wu, Qing-chao; Liu, Xin-guang; Dong, Xiao-yuan; Li, Jie; Peng, Jun

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of rituximab (RTX) plus recombinant human thrombopoietin (rhTPO) with RTX alone in patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) who had failed to respond to corticosteroids or relapsed. Recruited patients were randomized at a ratio of 2:1 into 2 groups: the combination group (RTX + rhTPO, n = 77) and the monotherapy group (RTX, n = 38). Overall response was achieved in 79.2% of patients in the combination group vs 71.1% in the monotherapy group (P = .36), and the complete response (CR) rate was 45.4% in the combination group compared with 23.7% in the monotherapy group (P = .026). The combination group had significantly shorter time to response (TTR; median and range, 7 and 4-28 days) compared with the monotherapy group (28 and 4-90 days) (P < .01). There was no difference between these 2 groups in terms of the long-term response (P = .12). Our findings demonstrated that the combination of RTX and rhTPO significantly increased the CR rate and shortened TTR compared with RTX monotherapy in the treatment of corticosteroid-resistant or relapsed ITP but failed to show a beneficial effect on the long-lasting response. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01525836. PMID:25575541

  4. Precipitating factors of insomnia.

    PubMed

    Bastien, Célyne H; Vallières, Annie; Morin, Charles M

    2004-01-01

    Insomnia is a prevalent health complaint whose onset is precipitated by a variety of factors. There is an important need to identify and describe these factors to improve our understanding of risk factors and the natural history of insomnia. This article is aimed at identifying and describing the types of precipitating factors related to the onset of insomnia. A total of 345 patients evaluated for insomnia at a sleep-disorders clinic completed a sleep survey and underwent a semistructured clinical interview. As part of the evaluation, the specific precipitating events related to the onset of insomnia were identified. Subsequently, these factors were categorized (work-school, family, physical or psychological health, or indeterminate), and their affective valence (negative, positive, or indeterminate) was coded. The most common precipitating factors of insomnia were related to family, health, and work-school events. Sixty-five percent of precipitating events had a negative valence. These events differed with the age of onset of insomnia but not with the gender of participants. These findings are useful to identify potential risk factors for insomnia and improve our understanding of the natural history of insomnia. PMID:15600224

  5. URANIUM PRECIPITATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Thunaes, A.; Brown, E.A.; Smith, H.W.; Simard, R.

    1957-12-01

    A method for the recovery of uranium from sulfuric acid solutions is described. In the present process, sulfuric acid is added to the uranium bearing solution to bring the pH to between 1 and 1.8, preferably to about 1.4, and aluminum metal is then used as a reducing agent to convert hexavalent uranium to the tetravalent state. As the reaction proceeds, the pH rises amd a selective precipitation of uranium occurs resulting in a high grade precipitate. This process is an improvement over the process using metallic iron, in that metallic aluminum reacts less readily than metallic iron with sulfuric acid, thus avoiding consumption of the reducing agent and a raising of the pH without accomplishing the desired reduction of the hexavalent uranium in the solution. Another disadvantage to the use of iron is that positive ferric ions will precipitate with negative phosphate and arsenate ions at the pH range employed.

  6. FORMATION OF URANIUM PRECIPITATES

    DOEpatents

    Googin, J.M. Jr.

    1959-03-17

    A method is described for precipitation of uranium peroxide from uranium- containing solutions so as to obtain larger aggregates which facilitates washings decantations filtrations centrifugations and the like. The desired larger aggregate form is obtained by maintaining the pH of the solution in the approximate range of 1 to 3 and the temperature at about 25 deg C or below while carrytng out the precipitation. Then prior to removal of the precipitate a surface active sulfonated bicarboxyacids such as di-octyl sodium sulfo-succinates is incorporated in an anount of the order of 0.01 to 0.05 percent by weights and the slurry is allowed to ripen for about one-half hour at a temperatare below 10 deg C.

  7. Precipitation-Regulated Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voit, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Star formation in the central galaxies of galaxy clusters appears to be fueled by precipitation of cold clouds out of hot circumgalactic gas via thermal instability. I will present both observational and theoretical support for the precipitation mode in large galaxies and discuss how it can be implemented in cosmological simulations of galaxy evolution. Galaxy cluster cores are unique laboratories for studying the astrophysics of thermal instability and may be teaching us valuable lessons about how feedback works in galaxies spanning the entire mass spectrum.

  8. The Types and Nature of Questions vis-à-vis Students' Test-Taking Skills as Significant Indicators of Second Language Examinees? Performance on the TOEFL-ITP Reading Comprehension Sub-Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Amurao, Analiza

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the reading performance of selected students at the Pre-College program of the Mahidol University International College (PC-MUIC) as they are required to attain a score of 520 in the TOEFL-ITP (or equivalent performance in IELTS) to enter MUIC. Specifically, this research aims to evaluate whether the reading skills that…

  9. Global precipitation measurement (GPM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeck, Steven P.; Flaming, Gilbert M.; Adams, W. James; Smith, Eric A.

    2001-12-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is studying options for future space-based missions for the EOS Follow-on Era (post 2003), building upon the measurements made by Pre-EOS and EOS First Series Missions. One mission under consideration is the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM), a cooperative venture of NASA, Japan, and other international partners. GPM will capitalize on the experience of the highly successful Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM). Its goal is to extend the measurement of rainfall to high latitudes with high temporal frequency, providing a global data set every three hours. A reference concept has been developed consisting of an improved TRMM-like primary satellite with precipitation radar and microwave radiometer to make detailed and accurate estimates of the precipitation structure and a constellation of small satellites flying compact microwave radiometers to provide the required temporal sampling of highly variable precipitation systems. Considering that DMSP spacecraft equipped with SSMIS microwave radiometers, successor NPOESS spacecraft equipped with CMIS microwave radiometers, and other relevant international systems are expected to be in operation during the timeframe of the reference concept, the total number of small satellites required to complete the constellation will be reduced. A nominal plan is to begin implementation in FY'03 with launches in 2007. NASA is presently engaged in advanced mission studies and advanced instrument technology development related to the mission.

  10. Total Precipitable Water

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    The simulation was performed on 64K cores of Intrepid, running at 0.25 simulated-years-per-day and taking 25 million core-hours. This is the first simulation using both the CAM5 physics and the highly scalable spectral element dynamical core. The animation of Total Precipitable Water clearly shows hurricanes developing in the Atlantic and Pacific.

  11. EFFECTS OF ACID PRECIPITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent reviews of available data indicate that precipitation in a large region of North America is highly acidic when its pH is compared with the expected pH value of 5.65 for pure rain water in equilibrium with CO2. A growing body of evidence suggests that acid rain is responsib...

  12. The Global Precipitation Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Scott; Kummerow, Christian

    2000-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Mission (GPM), expected to begin around 2006, is a follow-up to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Unlike TRMM, which primarily samples the tropics, GPM will sample both the tropics and mid-latitudes. The primary, or core, satellite will be a single, enhanced TRMM satellite that can quantify the 3-D spatial distributions of precipitation and its associated latent heat release. The core satellite will be complemented by a constellation of very small and inexpensive drones with passive microwave instruments that will sample the rainfall with sufficient frequency to be not only of climate interest, but also have local, short-term impacts by providing global rainfall coverage at approx. 3 h intervals. The data is expected to have substantial impact upon quantitative precipitation estimation/forecasting and data assimilation into global and mesoscale numerical models. Based upon previous studies of rainfall data assimilation, GPM is expected to lead to significant improvements in forecasts of extratropical and tropical cyclones. For example, GPM rainfall data can provide improved initialization of frontal systems over the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. The purpose of this talk is to provide information about GPM to the USWRP (U.S. Weather Research Program) community and to discuss impacts on quantitative precipitation estimation/forecasting and data assimilation.

  13. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... any of the following: Abnormally heavy periods in women Bleeding into the skin , often around the shins, causing a skin rash that looks like pinpoint red spots (petechial rash) Easy bruising Nosebleed or bleeding in the mouth

  14. Effects of cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) positive Helicobacter pylori infection on anti-platelet glycoprotein antibody producing B cells in patients with primary idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP)

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuan-Shan; Kuang, Li-Ping; Zhuang, Chun-Lan; Jiang, Jia-Dian; Shi, Man

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) positive Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori or HP) infection on circulating B cells producing specific platelet glycoprotein antibodies and the association between therapeutic outcomes in primary idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) patients. Methods: A total of 76 newly diagnosed primary ITP patients were included in the study which was conducted at the first affiliated hospital of Shantou University Medical college, in Shantou city China, between January 2013 and January 2014. These patients were tested for H. pylori infection by 13C urea breath test and for anti-CagA antibody in H. pylori positive cases by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Anti-GPIb and anti-GPIIb/IIIa antibody-producing B cells were measured using an enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay in all ITP patients and 30 controls. Anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) was also detected in ITP patients. Results: The numbers of anti-GPIIb/IIIa antibody-producing B cells in HP+CagA+ patients were higher than in HP+CagA- or HP- patients. However, anti-GPIb antibody-producing B cells were found higher in HP- patients. Analysis of treatment outcomes showed that a therapeutic response was more likely in patients presenting anti-GPIIb/IIIa B cells, but the poor response was found to be associated with anti-GPIb B cells and ANA presences. Conclusion: CagA antigen of H. pylori may induce anti-GPIIb/IIIa antibodies production by a molecular mimicry mechanism. Anti-GPIIb/IIIa and anti-GPIb antibody producing B Cells detection is useful for predicting treatment effects of primary ITP. PMID:25878627

  15. Development of Chemical Treatment Alternatives for Tetraphenylborate Destruction in Tank 48H

    SciTech Connect

    LAMBERT, DANIELP.

    2004-05-04

    This study assessed chemical treatment options for decomposing the tetraphenylborate in High Level Waste (HLW) Tank 48H. Tank 48H, located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC, contains approximately one million liters of HLW. The tetraphenylborate slurry represents legacy material from commissioning of an In Tank Precipitation process to separate radioactive cesium and actinides from the non radioactive chemicals. During early operations, the process encountered an unplanned chemical reaction that catalytically decomposed the excess tetraphenylborate producing benzene. Subsequent research indicated that personnel could not control the operations within the existing equipment to both meet the desired treatment rate for the waste and maintain the benzene concentration within allowable concentrations. Since then, the Department of Energy selected an alternate treatment process for handling high-level waste at the site. However, the site must destroy the tetraphenylborate before returning the tank to HLW service. The research focuses on identifying treatments to decompose tetraphenylborate to the maximum extent feasible, with a preference for decomposition methods that produce carbon dioxide rather than benzene. A number of experiments examined whether the use of oxidants, catalysts or acids proved effective in decomposing the tetraphenylborate. Additional experiments developed an understanding of the solid, liquid and gas decomposition products. The testing identified several successful treatment options including: an iron catalyst combined with hydrogen peroxide (Fenton's reagent) with added acid; sodium permanganate with added acid; and copper catalyst with added acid. A mistake occurred in the selection and make-up of the Tank 48H simulant recipe which led to an under representation of the amount of monosodium titanate and insoluble sludge solids compared to the simulant target. The amount of added MST and sludge proved about a factor of 40 low relative to the

  16. Precipitation Indices Low Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Engelen, A. F. V.; Ynsen, F.; Buisman, J.; van der Schrier, G.

    2009-09-01

    Since 1995, KNMI published a series of books(1), presenting an annual reconstruction of weather and climate in the Low Countries, covering the period AD 763-present, or roughly, the last millennium. The reconstructions are based on the interpretation of documentary sources predominantly and comparison with other proxies and instrumental observations. The series also comprises a number of classifications. Amongst them annual classifications for winter and summer temperature and for winter and summer dryness-wetness. The classification of temperature have been reworked into peer reviewed (2) series (AD 1000-present) of seasonal temperatures and temperature indices, the so called LCT (Low Countries Temperature) series, now incorporated in the Millennium databases. Recently we started a study to convert the dryness-wetness classifications into a series of precipitation; the so called LCP (Low Countries Precipitation) series. A brief outline is given here of the applied methodology and preliminary results. The WMO definition for meteorological drought has been followed being that a period is called wet respectively dry when the amount of precipitation is considerable more respectively less than usual (normal). To gain a more quantitative insight for four locations, geographically spread over the Low Countries area (De Bilt, Vlissingen, Maastricht and Uccle), we analysed the statistics of daily precipitation series, covering the period 1900-present. This brought us to the following definition, valid for the Low Countries: A period is considered as (very) dry respectively (very) wet if over a continuous period of at least 60 days (~two months) cq 90 days (~three months) on at least two out of the four locations 50% less resp. 50% more than the normal amount for the location (based on the 1961-1990 normal period) has been measured. This results into the following classification into five drought classes hat could be applied to non instrumental observations: Very wet period

  17. Precipitation hardening austenitic superalloys

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1985-01-01

    Precipitation hardening, austenitic type superalloys are described. These alloys contain 0.5 to 1.5 weight percent silicon in combination with about 0.05 to 0.5 weight percent of a post irradiation ductility enhancing agent selected from the group of hafnium, yttrium, lanthanum and scandium, alone or in combination with each other. In addition, when hafnium or yttrium are selected, reductions in irradiation induced swelling have been noted.

  18. Have splenectomy rate and main outcomes of ITP changed after the introduction of new treatments? A monocentric study in the outpatient setting during 35 years.

    PubMed

    Palandri, Francesca; Polverelli, Nicola; Sollazzo, Daria; Romano, Marco; Catani, Lucia; Cavo, Michele; Vianelli, Nicola

    2016-06-01

    In the last years, rituximab (RTX) and agonists of the thrombopoietin receptor (TPO-R) eltrombopag and romiplostim have provided new treatment options in persistent and chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Here, we analyzed the changes in therapeutic choices over time and their impact on clinical outcomes in a cohort of 557 ITP outpatients followed at the "L. and A. Seràgnoli" Institute of Hematology, Bologna, Italy, from 1980 to 2015. Overall 397 patients (71%) required front-line corticosteroids, mainly prednisone. Over the decades, splenectomy was delayed from second to third-line, but was steadily used in around 15-25% of patients refractory or relapsing after first-line treatment. Consensually, RTX and TPO-R agonists emerged as second and third-line therapy of choice, respectively. Splenectomy was associated with the best response rates and the lower incidences of relapse, while the relapse rate after RTX was comparable to that observed with corticosteroids and other immunosuppressive agents. The introduction of TPO-R agonists gave an alternative to the administration of immunosuppressive drugs and probably contributed to moderate the incidence of infectious complications that remained stable over the decades, despite an increasing use of RTX from the 2000s onwards. Overall responses were similar over time, with over 97% achieving a response in all time-periods. However, the cumulative risk of bleeding significantly decreased [14.3% (1980-89) vs. 7% (1990-99) vs. 5.6% (2000-09) vs. 0.2% (2010-15)] (P < 0.001), mainly thanks to the optimization of front-line corticosteroids therapy and to the wider availability of second and third-line therapies. PMID:26799593

  19. OXALATE MASS BALANCE DURING CHEMICAL CLEANING IN TANK 6F

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-07-22

    The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is preparing Tank 6F for closure. The first step in preparing the tank for closure is mechanical sludge removal. Following mechanical sludge removal, SRS performed chemical cleaning with oxalic acid to remove the sludge heel. Personnel are currently assessing the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning to determine whether the tank is ready for closure. SRR personnel collected liquid samples during chemical cleaning and submitted them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. Following chemical cleaning, they collected a solid sample (also known as 'process sample') and submitted it to SRNL for analysis. The authors analyzed these samples to assess the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning process. Analysis of the anions showed the measured oxalate removed from Tank 6F to be approximately 50% of the amount added in the oxalic acid. To close the oxalate mass balance, the author collected solid samples, leached them with nitric acid, and measured the concentration of cations and anions in the leachate. Some conclusions from this work are: (1) Approximately 65% of the oxalate added as oxalic acid was removed with the decanted liquid. (2) Approximately 1% of the oxalate (added to the tank as oxalic acid) formed precipitates with compounds such as nickel, manganese, sodium, and iron (II), and was dissolved with nitric acid. (3) As much as 30% of the oxalate may have decomposed forming carbon dioxide. The balance does not fully account for all the oxalate added. The offset represents the combined uncertainty in the analyses and sampling.

  20. Precipitation Indices Low Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Engelen, A. F. V.; Ynsen, F.; Buisman, J.; van der Schrier, G.

    2009-09-01

    Since 1995, KNMI published a series of books(1), presenting an annual reconstruction of weather and climate in the Low Countries, covering the period AD 763-present, or roughly, the last millennium. The reconstructions are based on the interpretation of documentary sources predominantly and comparison with other proxies and instrumental observations. The series also comprises a number of classifications. Amongst them annual classifications for winter and summer temperature and for winter and summer dryness-wetness. The classification of temperature have been reworked into peer reviewed (2) series (AD 1000-present) of seasonal temperatures and temperature indices, the so called LCT (Low Countries Temperature) series, now incorporated in the Millennium databases. Recently we started a study to convert the dryness-wetness classifications into a series of precipitation; the so called LCP (Low Countries Precipitation) series. A brief outline is given here of the applied methodology and preliminary results. The WMO definition for meteorological drought has been followed being that a period is called wet respectively dry when the amount of precipitation is considerable more respectively less than usual (normal). To gain a more quantitative insight for four locations, geographically spread over the Low Countries area (De Bilt, Vlissingen, Maastricht and Uccle), we analysed the statistics of daily precipitation series, covering the period 1900-present. This brought us to the following definition, valid for the Low Countries: A period is considered as (very) dry respectively (very) wet if over a continuous period of at least 60 days (~two months) cq 90 days (~three months) on at least two out of the four locations 50% less resp. 50% more than the normal amount for the location (based on the 1961-1990 normal period) has been measured. This results into the following classification into five drought classes hat could be applied to non instrumental observations: Very wet period

  1. DISSOLUTION OF LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATES

    DOEpatents

    Fries, B.A.

    1959-11-10

    A plutonium separatory ore concentration procedure involving the use of a fluoride type of carrier is presented. An improvement is given in the derivation step in the process for plutonium recovery by carrier precipitation of plutonium values from solution with a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate and subsequent derivation from the resulting plutonium bearing carrier precipitate of an aqueous acidic plutonium-containing solution. The carrier precipitate is contacted with a concentrated aqueous solution of potassium carbonate to effect dissolution therein of at least a part of the precipitate, including the plutonium values. Any remaining precipitate is separated from the resulting solution and dissolves in an aqueous solution containing at least 20% by weight of potassium carbonate. The reacting solutions are combined, and an alkali metal hydroxide added to a concentration of at least 2N to precipitate lanthanum hydroxide concomitantly carrying plutonium values.

  2. 49 CFR 174.304 - Class 3 (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class 3 (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars. 174.304 Section 174.304 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY RAIL Detailed Requirements for...

  3. 27 CFR 19.329 - Mingled spirits or wines held in tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mingled spirits or wines... Rules for Mingling Or Blending Spirits § 19.329 Mingled spirits or wines held in tanks. When wines or spirits of less than 190° of proof are mingled in a tank, the proprietor must gauge the spirits or...

  4. AN EXAMINATION OF DIFFERENT STOCKING DENSITIES OF SUNSHINE BASS LARVAE REARED IN TANKS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to be cost effective, conditions for tank culture must be optimized. This experiment attempted to determine the relationship among stocking density of sunshine bass larvae in tanks and growth and survival. Sunshine bass larvae, 4 days post hatch (dph), were stocked into blue, polyethylen...

  5. Analysis of solids remaining following chemical cleaning in tank 6F

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, Michael R.; Fondeur, Fernando F.; Missimer, David M.; Summer, Michael E.; Fink, Samuel D.

    2010-02-05

    Following chemical cleaning, a solid sample was collected and submitted to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. SRNL analyzed this sample by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine the composition of the solids remaining in Tank 6F and to assess the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning process.

  6. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION COEFFICIENTS AND RADIOLOGICAL AND TOXICOLOGICAL EXPOSURE METHODOLOGY FOR USE IN TANK FARMS

    SciTech Connect

    GRIGSBY KM

    2011-04-07

    This report presents the atmospheric dispersion coefficients used in Tank Farms safety analysis. The basis equations for calculating radiological and toxicological exposures are also included. In this revision, the time averaging for toxicological consequence evaluations is clarified based on a review of DOE complex guidance and a review of tank farm chemicals.

  7. Growth and survival in tank culture: Stocking density effects on phase one sunshine bass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to be cost effective, conditions of tank culture must be optimized. This experiment attempted to determine the relationship among stocking densities of sunshine bass larvae in tanks and growth and survival. Sunshine bass larvae, 4 days post hatch (dph), were stocked into blue, polyethylen...

  8. Structural evaluation of mixer pump installed in Tank 241-AN-107 for caustic addition project

    SciTech Connect

    Leshikar, G.A.

    1995-06-16

    This report documents the structural analysis and evaluation of a mixer pump and caustic addition system to be used in Tank 107-AN. This pump will be installed in the central pump pit of this double- shell tank for the purpose of bringing the hydroxide ion concentration into compliance with Tank Farm operating specifications.

  9. Assessment of Tank 241-S-112 Liquid Waste Mixing in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Yasuo; Trent, Donald S.; Wells, Beric E.; Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2003-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate mixing of liquid waste from Tank 241-S-112 with waste in Tank 241-SY-101 and to determine the properties of the resulting waste for the cross-site transfer to avoid potential double-shell tank corrosion and pipeline plugging. We applied the time-varying, three-dimensional computer code TEMPEST to Tank SY-101 as it received the S-112 liquid waste. The model predicts that temperature variations in Tank SY-101 generate a natural convection flow that is very slow, varying from about 7 x 10{sup -5} to 1 x 10{sup -3} ft/sec (0.3 to about 4 ft/hr) in most areas. Thus, natural convection would eventually mix the liquid waste in SY-101 but would be very slow to achieve nearly complete mixing. These simulations indicate that the mixing of S-112 and SY-101 wastes in Tank SY-101 is a very slow process, and the density difference between the two wastes would further limit mixing. It is expected to take days or weeks to achieve relatively complete mixing in Tank SY-101.

  10. 49 CFR 173.314 - Compressed gases in tank cars and multi-unit tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compressed gases in tank cars and multi-unit tank cars. 173.314 Section 173.314 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR...

  11. 49 CFR 173.314 - Compressed gases in tank cars and multi-unit tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compressed gases in tank cars and multi-unit tank cars. 173.314 Section 173.314 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR...

  12. ATR/OTR-SY Tank Camera Purge System and in Tank Color Video Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    Werry, S.M.

    1995-06-06

    This procedure will document the satisfactory operation of the 101-SY tank Camera Purge System (CPS) and 101-SY in tank Color Camera Video Imaging System (CCVIS). Included in the CPRS is the nitrogen purging system safety interlock which shuts down all the color video imaging system electronics within the 101-SY tank vapor space during loss of nitrogen purge pressure.

  13. 27 CFR 19.349 - Mingled spirits or wines held in tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mingled spirits or wines held in tanks. 19.349 Section 19.349 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Storage Mingling Or Blending of Spirits § 19.349 Mingled spirits or...

  14. GROWTH AND SURVIVAL OF SUNSHINE BASS LARVAE STOCKED IN TANKS AT DIFFERENT DENSITIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to be cost effective, conditions for tank culture must be optimized. This experiment attempted to determine the relationship among stocking density of sunshine bass larvae in tanks and growth and survival. Sunshine bass larvae, 4 days post hatch (dph), were stocked into blue, polyethylen...

  15. The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) Combined Precipitation Dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Arkin, Philip; Chang, Alfred; Ferraro, Ralph; Gruber, Arnold; Janowiak, John; McNab, Alan; Rudolf, Bruno; Schneider, Udo

    1997-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) has released the GPCP Version 1 Combined Precipitation Data Set, a global, monthly precipitation dataset covering the period July 1987 through December 1995. The primary product in the dataset is a merged analysis incorporating precipitation estimates from low-orbit-satellite microwave data, geosynchronous-orbit -satellite infrared data, and rain gauge observations. The dataset also contains the individual input fields, a combination of the microwave and infrared satellite estimates, and error estimates for each field. The data are provided on 2.5 deg x 2.5 deg latitude-longitude global grids. Preliminary analyses show general agreement with prior studies of global precipitation and extends prior studies of El Nino-Southern Oscillation precipitation patterns. At the regional scale there are systematic differences with standard climatologies.

  16. A multi-centre, single-arm, open-label study evaluating the safety and efficacy of fixed dose rituximab in patients with refractory, relapsed or chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (R-ITP1000 study).

    PubMed

    Tran, Huyen; Brighton, Tim; Grigg, Andrew; McRae, Simon; Dixon, Joanna; Thurley, Daniel; Gandhi, Maher K; Truman, Matt; Marlton, Paula; Catalano, John

    2014-10-01

    The efficacy of a fixed-dose rituximab schedule was prospectively explored in primary/acute refractory, relapsed or chronic (platelet count >10 × 10(9) /l and ≤50 × 10(9) /l) idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Patients received two doses of rituximab (1000 mg) on days 1 and 15 and were followed-up on weeks 1-8, 12, 26, 39 and 52. A total of 122 patients were included in the safety population; efficacy was analysed in 108 patients. Overall response rate (ORR) at week 8, defined as the proportion of patients achieving complete response (CR; platelet count >150 × 10(9) /l) or partial response (PR; platelet count >50 × 10(9) /l) was 44%. Therapeutic response, defined as achieving a response at week 8, with at least a minor response (MR; platelet count >30 × 10(9) /l), sustained up to weeks 26 and 52 and accompanied by a reduction in ITP medications, was achieved in 44% (week 26) and 35% (week 52) of patients, respectively. Treatment was well tolerated with no safety concerns. While this study failed to meet its primary endpoint of an ORR of 50%, the efficacy of two fixed doses of rituximab appear to provide similar efficacy to the standard 375 mg/m(2) four-dose schedule in relapsed/chronic ITP. PMID:25041261

  17. PROCESSING ALTERNATIVES FOR DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D; Thomas Peters, T; Samuel Fink, S

    2007-02-27

    Two processes were chosen in the 1980's at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to decontaminate the soluble High Level Waste (HLW). The In Tank Precipitation (ITP) process (1,2) was developed at SRS for the removal of radioactive cesium and actinides from the soluble HLW. Sodium tetraphenylborate was added to the waste to precipitate cesium and monosodium titanate (MST) was added to adsorb actinides, primarily uranium and plutonium. Two products of this process were a low activity waste stream and a concentrated organic stream containing cesium tetraphenylborate and actinides adsorbed on monosodium titanate (MST). A copper catalyzed acid hydrolysis process was built to process (3, 4) the Tank 48H cesium tetraphenylborate waste in the SRS's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Operation of the DWPF would have resulted in the production of benzene for incineration in SRS's Consolidated Incineration Facility. This process was abandoned together with the ITP process in 1998 due to high benzene in ITP caused by decomposition of excess sodium tetraphenylborate. Processing in ITP resulted in the production of approximately 1.0 million liters of HLW. SRS has chosen a solvent extraction process combined with adsorption of the actinides to decontaminate the soluble HLW stream (5). However, the waste in Tank 48H is incompatible with existing waste processing facilities. As a result, a processing facility is needed to disposition the HLW in Tank 48H. This paper will describe the process for searching for processing options by SRS task teams for the disposition of the waste in Tank 48H. In addition, attempts to develop a caustic hydrolysis process for in tank destruction of tetraphenylborate will be presented. Lastly, the development of both a caustic and acidic copper catalyzed peroxide oxidation process will be discussed.

  18. Improved ethanol precipitation of DNA.

    PubMed

    Fregel, Rosa; González, Ana; Cabrera, Vicente M

    2010-04-01

    In this Short Communication, a shorter version of the standard DNA ethanol precipitation and purification protocol is described. It uses a mixture of 70% ethanol, 75 mM ammonium acetate and different concentrations of different carriers to perform DNA precipitation and washing in only one step. PMID:20336673

  19. Precipitation Process and Apparatus Therefor

    DOEpatents

    Stang, Jr, L C

    1950-12-05

    This invention concerns an apparatus for remotely-controlled precipitation and filtration operations. Liquid within a precipitation chamber is maintained above a porous member by introducing air beneath the member; pressure beneath the porous member is reduced to suck the liquid through the member and effect filtration.

  20. Acid precipitation in historical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Cowling, E.B.

    1982-02-01

    The history of acid precipitation is traced from the first awareness of the problem in the mid-17th century to the present. An outline of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment program is also given, and the author makes recommendations for future research. (JMT)

  1. Resistivity Problems in Electrostatic Precipitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Harry J.

    1974-01-01

    The process of electrostatic precipitation has ever-increasing application in more efficient collection of fine particles from industrial air emissions. This article details a large number of new developments in the field. The emphasis is on high resistivity particles which are a common cause of poor precipitator performance. (LS)

  2. BOTANICAL ASPECTS OF ACIDIC PRECIPITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acidic precipitation can be characterized as wet or frozen atmospheric deposition with a hydrogen ion concentration greater than 2.5 microequivalents liter-1. Acidic precipitation is perceived as a significant air pollution problem derived chiefly from combustion of fossil fuels,...

  3. Precipitation in the Solar System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    As an astronomy instructor, I am always looking for commonly observed Earthly experiences to help my students and me understand and appreciate similar occurrences elsewhere in the solar system. Recently I wrote a short TPT article on frost. This paper is on the related phenomena of precipitation. Precipitation, so common on most of the Earth's…

  4. Do the acute platelet responses of patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) to IV anti-D and to IV gammaglobulin predict response to subsequent splenectomy?

    PubMed

    Bussel, J B; Kaufmann, C P; Ware, R E; Woloski, B M

    2001-05-01

    The acute platelet response to Intravenous Gammaglobulin (IVIG) has been reported to predict response to subsequent splenectomy of patients with ITP. The current study was undertaken to determine if the platelet response to IV anti-D (Winrho-SDF) predicts response to subsequent splenectomy. The 61 HIV-uninfected children and adults in this study had taken part in the pre-licensing studies of IV anti-D and were all those who not only had evaluable platelet responses to IV anti-D but also had undergone splenectomy and had information available describing its 1-year outcome. Results of treatment with IVIG were available in 38 of these 61 patients. Neither response to the initial infusion of IV anti-D, nor response to the initial or last IVIG, predicted the response in either children or adults to subsequent splenectomy. However, response to the last anti-D infusion in adults was strongly correlated (P = 0.003) to response to subsequent splenectomy as was hemolysis >/=2.0 gm/dl after IV anti-D (P = 0.03). There was no overall relationship between response to IV anti-D or IVIG, and response to subsequent splenectomy. However, a good platelet response in adults to the last IV anti-D and a hemoglobin decrease >/=2.0 gm/dl both appeared to predict response to subsequent splenectomy. PMID:11279654

  5. Acceptance test report for the Tank 241-C-106 in-tank imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, L.T.

    1998-05-22

    This document presents the results of Acceptance Testing of the 241-C-106 in-tank video camera imaging system. The purpose of this imaging system is to monitor the Project W-320 sluicing of Tank 241-C-106. The objective of acceptance testing of the 241-C-106 video camera system was to verify that all equipment and components function in accordance with procurement specification requirements and original equipment manufacturer`s (OEM) specifications. This document reports the results of the testing.

  6. Estimation of continental precipitation recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brubaker, Kaye L.; Entekhabi, Dara; Eagleson, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    The total amount of water that precipitates on large continental regions is supplied by two mechanisms: 1) advection from the surrounding areas external to the region and 2) evaporation and transpiration from the land surface within the region. The latter supply mechanism is tantamount to the recycling of precipitation over the continental area. The degree to which regional precipitation is supplied by recycled moisture is a potentially significant climate feedback mechanism and land surface-atmosphere interaction, which may contribute to the persistence and intensification of droughts. Gridded data on observed wind and humidity in the global atmosphere are used to determine the convergence of atmospheric water vapor over continental regions. A simplified model of the atmospheric moisture over continents and simultaneous estimates of regional precipitation are employed to estimate, for several large continental regions, the fraction of precipitation that is locally derived. The results indicate that the contribution of regional evaporation to regional precipitation varies substantially with location and season. For the regions studied, the ratio of locally contributed to total monthly precipitation generally lies between 0. 10 and 0.30 but is as high as 0.40 in several cases.

  7. Precipitation Measurements from Space: The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.

    2007-01-01

    Water is fundamental to the life on Earth and its phase transition between the gaseous, liquid, and solid states dominates the behavior of the weather/climate/ecological system. Precipitation, which converts atmospheric water vapor into rain and snow, is central to the global water cycle. It regulates the global energy balance through interactions with clouds and water vapor (the primary greenhouse gas), and also shapes global winds and dynamic transport through latent heat release. Surface precipitation affects soil moisture, ocean salinity, and land hydrology, thus linking fast atmospheric processes to the slower components of the climate system. Precipitation is also the primary source of freshwater in the world, which is facing an emerging freshwater crisis in many regions. Accurate and timely knowledge of global precipitation is essential for understanding the behavior of the global water cycle, improving freshwater management, and advancing predictive capabilities of high-impact weather events such as hurricanes, floods, droughts, and landslides. With limited rainfall networks on land and the impracticality of making extensive rainfall measurements over oceans, a comprehensive description of the space and time variability of global precipitation can only be achieved from the vantage point of space. This presentation will examine current capabilities in space-borne rainfall measurements, highlight scientific and practical benefits derived from these observations to date, and provide an overview of the multi-national Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission scheduled to bc launched in the early next decade.

  8. Electrical precipitation apparatus and method

    SciTech Connect

    Furlong, D.A.

    1984-11-06

    An electrostatic precipitator having improved collection efficiency for suspended particles having either high or low electrical resistivities is provided. The precipitator utilizes porous collecting surfaces which permit passage of gas while retaining suspended particles and means are provided to create an electrostatic field causing the particles to migrate toward the collecting surfaces. According to the invention, only a portion of the inlet gas flow to the precipitator, sufficient to provide aerodynamic forces to facilitate adherence of the particles to the collecting surface, is drawn through the porous collecting surfaces with the remainder of the gas flow being essentially parallel to such surfaces. The two gas streams are separately withdrawn and may be combined to provide a clean gas effluent. The invention also provides an improved method for removing suspended particles from gases by electrical precipitation.

  9. Evaluation of Coupled Precipitator Two

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M.E.

    1999-11-08

    The offline testing of the Coupled Precipitator Two (CP-2) has been completed. The tests were conducted and are documented. The tests were conducted at an offline test rack near the Drain Tube Test Stand facility in 672-T.

  10. Identifying Anomality in Precipitation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, P.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Safety, risk and economic analyses of engineering constructions such as storm sewer, street and urban drainage, and channel design are sensitive to precipitation storm properties. Whether the precipitation storm properties exhibit normal or anomalous characteristics remains obscure. In this study, we will decompose a precipitation time series as sequences of average storm intensity, storm duration and interstorm period to examine whether these sequences could be treated as a realization of a continuous time random walk with both "waiting times" (interstorm period) and "jump sizes" (average storm intensity and storm duration). Starting from this viewpoint, we will analyze the statistics of storm duration, interstorm period, and average storm intensity in four regions in southwestern United States. We will examine whether the probability distribution is temporal and spatial dependent. Finally, we will use fractional engine to capture the randomness in precipitation storms.

  11. Silica Precipitation and Lithium Sorption

    SciTech Connect

    Jay Renew

    2015-09-20

    This file contains silica precipitation and lithium sorption data from the project. The silica removal data is corrected from the previous submission. The previous submission did not take into account the limit of detection of the ICP-MS procedure.

  12. Environmental Radioactivity, Temperature, and Precipitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riland, Carson A.

    1996-01-01

    Reports that environmental radioactivity levels vary with temperature and precipitation and these effects are due to radon. Discusses the measurement of this environmental radioactivity and the theory behind it. (JRH)

  13. Some Statistics of Instantaneous Precipitation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Douglas M. A.; Wendland, Wayne M.

    1984-09-01

    Known sources of data from arrays of instantaneous precipitation intensity recorders in southern Germany, east-central Illinois, northeastern Illinois, central Florida, and Hilo, Hawaii are obtained. These data are analyzed for line averages of the percent frequency of occurrence of the exceedance of selected threshold precipitation intensities. The correlation coefficients of the precipitation intensity at sites at varying distances from a reference site are determined. The decay in correlation is found to be a function of climatic region and the type of precipitation: showery or continuous. Showery rains are found to be essentially uncorrelated about 12 km from the reference site while continuous rain exhibits no correlation beyond about 50 km.Single-station intensity data collected at Urbana, Illinois; Paris, France; Inyanga, Zimbabwe; Bogor, Indonesia; Reading, United Kingdom; Island Beach, New Jersey; Miami, Florida; Franklin, North Carolina; and Majuro, Marshall Islands, are compared.

  14. Heavy Precipitation Events in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukantis, A.; Rimkus, E.; Kažys, J.

    2010-09-01

    Analysis of heavy precipitation events in Lithuania is presented in this work. Research was divided into two parts. Spatial distribution and dynamic of heavy precipitation events in Lithuania during observation period (1961-2008) is presented in the first part and climate predictions for XXI century according to outputs of CCLM model are in the second. Daily data from 17 meteorological stations were used for the analysis of heavy precipitation events in Lithuania. Research covers period from 1961 to 2008. Annual and seasonal heavy precipitation values and the recurrence of extreme daily and 3-day precipitation events were analyzed. Spatial distribution of heavy precipitation events in Lithuania was determined; the trends of such precipitation recurrence were identified. Also, daily and 3-day annual maxima probabilities were calculated using the Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution. 10, 30 and 100 years return period was analyzed. Finally, atmospheric circulation processes during heavy precipitation events were described using the adapted Hess & Brezowski macrocirculation form classification Predictions of changes of heavy precipitation recurrence in Lithuania are also presented in this study. Output data of the regional climate model CCLM (COSMO - Climate Limited-area Model) for the period 1971-2100 were used. Predictions were based on A1B and B1 emission scenarios. Despite of relatively small area and quite negligible differences in altitude there are significant unevenness in spatial distribution of heavy precipitation events in Lithuania. The mean annual number of cases when daily precipitation amount exceeded 10 mm fluctuates from 12.4 to 21.9 and from 5.3 to 10.5 when 3-day precipitation exceeded 20 mm. The probability of maximum precipitation amount for 10 year return period appears very familiar to spatial distribution of heavy precipitation recurrence: the highest values can be expected in the western part (55-60 mm daily and 75-85 mm in 3-days

  15. The 2014 Silba Precipitation Extreme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasol, Dubravka; Ólafsson, Haraldur

    2015-04-01

    On 30 July 2014 a 24 h precipitation record of 218 mm was set at the island of Silba in the N-Adriatic Sea. The precipitation was of convective nature and significantly less precipitation was recorded only small distances away, at the coast of mainland Croatia. The event is reproduced numerically and discussed in terms of dynamics and predictability. On a large scale, the precipitation extreme was associated with a slow-moving upper tropospheric low that formed over the N-Atlantic several days earlier. At lower levels, there were humid mediterranean airmasses. On a smaller scale, there are indications that the extreme convection may have been triggered by an orographic disturbance.

  16. Oceanic Precipitation Measurement - Surface Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepp, Christian

    2013-04-01

    State-of-the-art satellite derived and reanalysis based precipitation climatologies still show remarkably large differences in frequency, amount, intensity, variability and temporal behavior of precipitation over the oceans. Additionally so far appropriate in-situ validation instruments were not available for shipboard use. The uncertainties are largest for light precipitation within the ITCZ and subtropics and for cold season high-latitude precipitation including mix-phase and snowfall. Hence, a long-term issue on which IPWG and GPM-GV is urging more attention is the provision of high quality surface validation data in oceanic areas using innovative ship-based instruments. Precipitation studies would greatly benefit from systematic dataset collection and analysis as such data could also be used to constrain precipitation retrievals. To achieve this goal, the KlimaCampus and Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg, Germany funded this project that uses automated shipboard optical disdrometers, called Eigenbrodt ODM470, that are capable of measuring liquid and solid precipitation using drop size distributions in minute intervals on moving ships with high accuracy even under high wind speeds and rough sea states. Since the project start in 2009 the statistical basis for a conclusive validation has significantly improved with comprehensive data collection of more than 3 million minutes of precipitation measurements onboard six ships. Currently, six ODM470 instrument systems are available of which three are long-term mounted onboard the German research icebreaker R/V Polarstern (Alfred Wegner Institut) since June 2010, on R/V Akademik Ioffe (P.P.Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia) since September 2010 and on R/V Maria S. Merian (Brise Research, University of Hamburg) since December 2011. Three instruments are used for additional short-term shipboard campaigns and intercomparison projects. The core regions for these

  17. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeck, Steven P.; Kakar, Ramesh K.; Azarbarzin, Ardeshir A.; Hou, Arthur Y.

    2010-10-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission will provide enhanced space-based precipitation measurements with sufficient coverage, spatial resolution, temporal sampling, retrieval accuracy, and microphysical information to advance the understanding of Earth's water and energy cycle and to improve predictions of its climate, weather, and hydrometeorological processes. Such improvements will in turn improve decision support systems in broad societal applications (e.g. water resource management, agriculture, transportation, etc). GPM is a partnership between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), building upon their highly successful partnership on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). The GPM architecture consists of NASA satellites operating in partnership with other earth-observing satellites and instruments to produce global precipitation science data. The current generation of multi-satellite global precipitation products based on microwave/infrared sensors from uncoordinated satellite missions has for its anchor the TRMM precipitation radar and the TRMM Microwave Imager measurements over the tropics and subtropics (+/- 35 degrees latitude), with a mean sampling time of approximately 17 hours. The GPM mission will deploy a spaceborne Core Observatory as a reference standard to unify a space constellation of research and operational microwave sensors aimed at providing uniformly calibrated precipitation measurements globally every 2-4 hours. The Core Observatory measurements will provide, for the first time, quantitative information on precipitation particle size distribution needed for improving the accuracy of precipitation estimates by microwave radiometers and radars. In addition, the GPM will also include a second microwave radiometer and a Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) communications subsystem for near real time data relay for a future partner-provided constellation satellite. This second GPM Microwave Imager (GMI

  18. NASA Dual Precipitation Radar Arrives at Goddard

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) built by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core Observatory arrived on Friday, Marc...

  19. Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) for remote observation of precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galliano, J. A.; Platt, R. H.

    1990-01-01

    The design, development, and tests of the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) operating in the 10 to 85 GHz range specifically for precipitation retrieval and mesoscale storm system studies from a high altitude aircraft platform (i.e., ER-2) are described. The primary goals of AMPR are the exploitation of the scattering signal of precipitation at frequencies near 10, 19, 37, and 85 GHz together to unambiguously retrieve precipitation and storm structure and intensity information in support of proposed and planned space sensors in geostationary and low earth orbit, as well as storm-related field experiments. The development of AMPR will have an important impact on the interpretation of microwave radiances for rain retrievals over both land and ocean for the following reasons: (1) A scanning instrument, such as AMPR, will allow the unambiguous detection and analysis of features in two dimensional space, allowing an improved interpretation of signals in terms of cloud features, and microphysical and radiative processes; (2) AMPR will offer more accurate comparisons with ground-based radar data by feature matching since the navigation of the ER-2 platform can be expected to drift 3 to 4 km per hour of flight time; and (3) AMPR will allow underflights of the SSM/I satellite instrument with enough spatial coverage at the same frequencies to make meaningful comparisons of the data for precipitation studies.

  20. Precipitation in topographically diverse regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarboton, David

    A 1991 AGU Fall Meeting session, Precipitation in Topographically Diverse Regions, focused on the understanding and modeling of precipitation in regions with significant topography, concentrating on the effect of topography on precipitation. Contributions ranged from detailed mesoscale atmospheric models to statistical approaches.Two papers presented detailed physical modeling. A. P. Barros and D. P. Lettenmaier described their work, consisting of a threedimensional finite element model based on the measurement of moist static energy. Application of the model in the Olympic and Cascades mountains demonstrated its potential to model monthly precipitation totals to within 15%. F. Giorgi described some of the work being done at NCAR that is focusing on the regional impacts of global climate change. This work uses a mesoscale meteorological model (Penn State/NCAR MM4) embedded within a general circulation model. There were three papers from the USGS/Colorado State group that described work involving the RHEA-CSU orographic precipitation model that has been coupled with the USGS/s distributed parameter Precipitation Runoff Modeling System (PRMS). The orographic precipitation model has been integrated into a geographic information system to facilitate the use of digital elevation data. The PRMS is based on the concept of hydrologic response units, and the results presented illustrated the scale's sensitivity to these. When rectangular boxes were used instead of the usual response units defined by streams and drainage divides, there was no appreciable degradation in the quality of the simulation. The size and number of response units appears to be more crucial than whether they are demarcated by drainage divides and streams or simply arbitrary.

  1. Chemical Data for Precipitate Samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Andrea L.; Koski, Randolph A.

    2008-01-01

    During studies of sulfide oxidation in coastal areas of Prince William Sound in 2005, precipitate samples were collected from onshore and intertidal locations near the Ellamar, Threeman, and Beatson mine sites (chapter A, fig. 1; table 7). The precipitates include jarosite and amorphous Fe oxyhydroxide from Ellamar, amorphous Fe oxyhydroxide from Threeman, and amorphous Fe oxyhydroxide, ferrihydrite, and schwertmannite from Beatson. Precipitates occurring in the form of loose, flocculant coatings were harvested using a syringe and concentrated in the field by repetitive decanting. Thicker accumulations were either scraped gently from rocks using a stainless steel spatula or were scooped directly into receptacles (polyethylene jars or plastic heavy-duty zippered bags). Most precipitate samples contain small amounts of sedimentary detritus. With three jarosite-bearing samples from Ellamar, an attempt was made to separate the precipitate from the heavy-mineral fraction of the sediment. In this procedure, the sample was stirred in a graduated cylinder containing deionized water. The jarosite-rich suspension was decanted onto analytical filter paper and air dried before analysis. Eleven precipitate samples from the three mine sites were analyzed in laboratories of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Denver, Colorado (table 8). Major and trace elements were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry following multiacid (HCl-HNO3-HClO4-HF) digestion (Briggs and Meier, 2002), except for mercury, which was analyzed by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (Brown and others, 2002a). X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed on powdered samples (<200 mesh) by S. Sutley of the USGS. Additional details regarding sample preparation and detection limits are found in Taggert (2002). Discussions of the precipitate chemistry and associated microbial communities are presented in Koski and others (2008) and Foster and others (2008), respectively.

  2. Contingency plan for deployment of the void fraction instrument in Tank 241-AY-102

    SciTech Connect

    CONNER, J.M.

    1999-02-24

    High-heat producing sludge from tank 241-C-106 will be sluiced and transferred to tank 241-AY-102 beginning in October 1998. Safety analyses have postulated that after retrieval, the waste in 241-AY-102 may generate and retain unsafe levels of flammable gases (Noorani 1998, Pasamebmetoglu etal. 1997). Unsafe levels of retained gas are not expected, but cannot be ruled out because of the large uncertainty in the gas generation and retention rates. The Tank Waste Remediation System Basis for Interim Operation (Noorani 1998) identifies the need for a contingency plan to add void fraction monitoring to tank 241-AY-102 within 2 weeks of the identification of flammable gas buildup that would warrant monitoring. The Tank 241-C-106 Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Process Control Plan (Carothers et al. 1998) committed to providing a contingency plan for deployment of the void fraction instrument (VFI) in tank 241-AY-102. The VFI determines the local void fraction of the waste by compressing a waste sample captured in a gas-tight test chamber. The sample chamber is mounted on the end of a 76-cm (2.5-ft) arm that can be rotated from vertical to horizontal when the instrument is deployed. Once in the waste, the arm can be positioned horizontally and rotated to sample in different areas below the riser. The VFI is deployed using a crane. The VFI has been deployed previously in 241-AW, 241-AN, and 241-SY tank farms, most recently in tank 241-SY-101 in June and July 1998. An additional test in tank 241-SY-101 is planned in September 1998. Operating instructions for the VFI are included in the Void Fraction Instrument Operation and Maintenance Manual (Pearce 1994).

  3. Characterization of Core Samples from a Hardened Crust Layer in Tank 4F

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M. L.

    2005-09-28

    Waste removal operations in Tank 4F are scheduled to begin in late 2005 to provide material for Sludge Batch 5. Mining/probing operations to support installation of submersible mixer pumps encountered a hard layer of material at {approx}45'' to 50'' from the bottom of the tank. Attempts at penetrating the hard layer using a manual mining tool in several different risers were not successful. A core-sampling tool was used to obtain samples of the hard crust layer in Tank 4F for characterization. Three 12'' core samples and a dip sample of the supernate near the surface of the hard layer were sent to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) results for the crystalline solids from both sample FTF-434 and FTF-435 identifies the major component of both samples as Burkeite (Na{sub 6}(CO{sub 3})(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}). All of the other data collected on the crystalline solids from the Tank 4F core samples support this conclusion. The conditions in Tank 4F for the last twenty years have been ideal for Burkeite formation. The tank has been largely undisturbed with a tank temperature consistently above 30 C, a carbonate to sulfate molar ratio in the supernate conducive to Burkeite formation, and slow evaporation of the supernate phase. Thermodynamic modeling and the results of a Burkeite solubility test confirm that a ratio of 1:1:12 for the volumes of Burkeite solids, supernate, and inhibited water will dissolve all of the Burkeite. These ratios could be used to remove the 6'' layer of Burkeite from Tank 4F with no mixing. However, the thermodynamic modeling and the solubility test neglect the sludge layer beneath the Burkeite crust in Tank 4F. Settled sludge in Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste tanks usually contains greater than 75% interstitial supernate by volume. If the supernate in the sludge layer should mix into the solution used to dissolve the Burkeite, significantly more inhibited water would be needed to

  4. Dust particles precipitation in AC/DC electrostatic precipitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworek, A.; Marchewicz, A.; Krupa, A.; Sobczyk, A. T.; Czech, T.; Antes, T.; Śliwiński, Ł.; Kurz, M.; Szudyga, M.; Rożnowski, W.

    2015-10-01

    Submicron and nanoparticles removal from flue or exhaust gases remain still a challenge for engineers. The most effective device used for gas cleaning in power plants or industry is electrostatic precipitator, but its collection efficiency steeply decreases for particles smaller than 1 micron. In this paper, fractional collection efficiency of two-stage electrostatic precipitator comprising of alternating electric field charger and DC supplied parallel-plate collection stage has been investigated. The total number collection efficiency for PM2.5 particles was higher than 95% and mass collection efficiency >99%. Fractional collection efficiency for particles between 300 nm and 1 μm was >95%.

  5. Are hourly precipitation extremes increasing faster than daily precipitation extremes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, Renaud; Fowler, Hayley; Blenkinsop, Stephen; Lenderink, Geert

    2016-04-01

    Extreme precipitation events appear to be increasing with climate change in many regions of the world, including the United States. These extreme events have large societal impacts, as seen during the recent Texas-Oklahoma flooding in May 2015 which caused several billion in damages and left 47 deaths in its path. Better understanding of past changes in the characteristics of extreme rainfall events is thus critical for reliable projections of future changes. Although it has been documented in several studies that daily precipitation extremes are increasing across parts of the contiguous United States, very few studies have looked at hourly extremes. However, this is of primary importance as recent studies on the temperature scaling of extreme precipitation have shown that increases above the Clausius-Clapeyron (~ 7% °C‑1) are possible for hourly precipitation. In this study, we used hourly precipitation data (HPD) from the National Climatic Data Center and extracted more than 1,000 stations across the US with more than 40 years of data spanning the period 1950-2010. As hourly measurements are often associated with a range of issues, the data underwent multiple quality control processes to exclude erroneous data. While no significant changes were found in annual maximum precipitation using both hourly and daily resolution datasets, significant increasing trends in terms of frequency of episodes exceeding present-day 95th percentiles of wet hourly/daily precipitation were observed across a significant portion of the US. The fraction of stations with significant increasing trends falls outside the confidence interval range during all seasons but the summer. While less than 12% of stations exhibit significant trends at the daily scale in the wintertime, more than 45% of stations, mostly clustered in central and Northern United States, show significant increasing trends at the hourly scale. This suggests that short-duration storms have increased faster than daily

  6. The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Gail

    2014-05-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core satellite, scheduled for launch at the end of February 2014, is well designed estimate precipitation from 0.2 to 110 mm/hr and to detect falling snow. Knowing where and how much rain and snow falls globally is vital to understanding how weather and climate impact both our environment and Earth's water and energy cycles, including effects on agriculture, fresh water availability, and responses to natural disasters. The design of the GPM Core Observatory is an advancement of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)'s highly successful rain-sensing package [3]. The cornerstone of the GPM mission is the deployment of a Core Observatory in a unique 65o non-Sun-synchronous orbit to serve as a physics observatory and a calibration reference to improve precipitation measurements by a constellation of 8 or more dedicated and operational, U.S. and international passive microwave sensors. The Core Observatory will carry a Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Radiometer (GMI). The DPR will provide measurements of 3-D precipitation structures and microphysical properties, which are key to achieving a better understanding of precipitation processes and improving retrieval algorithms for passive microwave radiometers. The combined use of DPR and GMI measurements will place greater constraints on possible solutions to radiometer retrievals to improve the accuracy and consistency of precipitation retrievals from all constellation radiometers. Furthermore, since light rain and falling snow account for a significant fraction of precipitation occurrence in middle and high latitudes, the GPM instruments extend the capabilities of the TRMM sensors to detect falling snow, measure light rain, and provide, for the first time, quantitative estimates of microphysical properties of precipitation particles. The GPM Core Observatory was developed and tested at NASA

  7. Eocene precipitation: a global monsoon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, D. R.; Huber, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Eocene was the warmest part of the Cenozoic, with warm climates extending across all continents including Antarctica, and extending into the Arctic. Substantive paleobotanical evidence (leaf floras and palynofloras) has demonstrated the existence of broadleaf and coniferous polar forests - a circumpolar rain forest - at both poles. North and South America, Australia, and China in the Eocene were well-forested and humid continents, in contrast to today where 2/3 of these continental areas are arid or semi-arid and lack forests. Each of these regions reflect past climate states - mesothermal moist climates with low thermal seasonality at high latitudes - that have no analog in the modern world. Recent modelling and paleontological proxy data, however, is revealing a high degree of seasonality to precipitation for these continental areas, indicating a monsoon-type precipitation regime may have characterized Eocene 'greenhouse climates'. Paleobotanical proxies offer 2 methods for estimated paleo-precipitation; leaf physiognomy (including both CLAMP and leaf area analysis), and quantitative analysis of nearest living relatives ('NLRs') of macrofloras. Presented here are 1) an updated leaf area analysis calibration with smaller errors of the estimate than previously provided, and 2) analyses of fossil floras from North America, Canada, the Arctic, and Australia. Analysis of the Canadian floras indicate moist climates (MAP >100cm/a) in the early and middle Eocene at middle and high paleolatitudes. Precipitation for western North America at mid-latitudes is also estimated as high, but a seasonally dry interior and south-east is indicated. For Australia, precipitation in the south-east is estimated >120 cm/a, but the macrofloras indicate a drier interior (MAP ~60 cm/a) and seasonal drought, contradicting estimates of ~120 cm/a based on NLR analysis of pollen floras. Recently published data show that north-eastern China in the Eocene had a monsoonal-type seasonality for

  8. Statistical study of precipitating electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontheim, E. G.; Stasiewicz, K.; Chandler, M. O.; Ong, R. S. B.; Hoffman, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Energy spectra of precipitating electrons are fitted to the sum of three distributions: a power law, a Maxwellian and a Gaussian. This fitting procedure determines seven parameters which characterize the essential features of each spectrum. These characteristic parameters are used to carry out various studies involving precipitating electrons. It is shown that the absence of the power-law population from a particular spectrum is related to the softness of the precipitating primary flux, that the Maxwellian temperature and the Gaussian peak energy have a positive correlation the strength of which varies with local time, that the upward moving Gaussian population has a loss cone distribution, and that the one dimensional velocity distribution parallel to the magnetic field occasionally displays a plateau or a hump on the tail.

  9. Portable liquid collection electrostatic precipitator

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Duane C.; DeGange, John J.; Halverson, Justin E.

    2005-10-18

    A portable liquid collection electrostatic collection precipitator for analyzing air is provided which is a relatively small, self-contained device. The device has a tubular collection electrode, a reservoir for a liquid, and a pump. The pump pumps the liquid into the collection electrode such that the liquid flows down the exterior of the collection electrode and is recirculated to the reservoir. An air intake is provided such that air to be analyzed flows through an ionization section to ionize analytes in the air, and then flows near the collection electrode where ionized analytes are collected. A portable power source is connected to the air intake and the collection electrode. Ionizable constituents in the air are ionized, attracted to the collection electrode, and precipitated in the liquid. The precipitator may also have an analyzer for the liquid and may have a transceiver allowing remote operation and data collection.

  10. Measurement of precipitation using lysimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fank, Johann; Klammler, Gernot

    2013-04-01

    Austria's alpine foothill aquifers contain important drinking water resources, but are also used intensively for agricultural production. These groundwater bodies are generally recharged by infiltrating precipitation. A sustainable water resources management of these aquifers requires quantifying real evapotranspiration (ET), groundwater recharge (GR), precipitation (P) and soil water storage change (ΔS). While GR and ΔS can be directly measured by weighable lysimeters and P by separate precipitation gauges, ET is determined by solving the climatic water balance ET = P GR ± ΔS. According to WMO (2008) measurement of rainfall is strongly influenced by precipitation gauge errors. Most significant errors result from wind loss, wetting loss, evaporation loss, and due to in- and out-splashing of water. Measuring errors can be reduced by a larger area of the measuring gaugés surface and positioning the collecting vessel at ground level. Modern weighable lysimeters commonly have a surface of 1 m², are integrated into their typical surroundings of vegetation cover (to avoid oasis effects) and allow scaling the mass change of monolithic soil columns in high measuring accuracy (0.01 mm water equivalent) and high temporal resolution. Thus, also precipitation can be quantified by measuring the positive mass changes of the lysimeter. According to Meissner et al. (2007) also dew, fog and rime can be determined by means of highly precise weighable lysimeters. Furthermore, measuring precipitation using lysimeters avoid common measuring errors (WMO 2008) at point scale. Though, this method implicates external effects (background noise, influence of vegetation and wind) which affect the mass time series. While the background noise of the weighing is rather well known and can be filtered out of the mass time series, the influence of wind, which blows through the vegetation and affects measured lysimeter mass, cannot be corrected easily since there is no clear relation between

  11. Controlling and engineering precipitation patterns.

    PubMed

    Lagzi, István

    2012-02-21

    Controlling and engineering chemical structures are the most important scientific challenges in material science. Precipitation patterns from ions or nanoparticles are promising candidates for designing bulk structure for catalysis, energy production, storage, and electronics. There are only a few procedures and techniques to control precipitation (Liesegang) patterns in gel media (e.g., using an electric field, varying the initial concentration of the electrolytes). However, those methods provide just a limited degree of freedom. Here, we provide a robust and transparent way to control and engineer Liesegang patterns by varying gel concentration and inducing impurity by addition of gelatin to agarose gel. Using this experimental method, different precipitation structures can be obtained with different width and spatial distribution of the formed bands. A new variant of a sol-coagulation model was developed to describe and understand the effect of the gel concentration and impurities on Liesegang pattern formation. PMID:22283626

  12. Timber Mountain Precipitation Monitoring Station

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, Brad; McCurdy, Greg; Chapman, Jenny; Miller, Julianne

    2012-01-01

    A precipitation monitoring station was placed on the west flank of Timber Mountain during the year 2010. It is located in an isolated highland area near the western border of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), south of Pahute Mesa. The cost of the equipment, permitting, and installation was provided by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) project. Data collection, analysis, and maintenance of the station during fiscal year 2011 was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration, Soils Activity. The station is located near the western headwaters of Forty Mile Wash on the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). Overland flows from precipitation events that occur in the Timber Mountain high elevation area cross several of the contaminated Soils project CAU (Corrective Action Unit) sites located in the Forty Mile Wash watershed. Rain-on-snow events in the early winter and spring around Timber Mountain have contributed to several significant flow events in Forty Mile Wash. The data from the new precipitation gauge at Timber Mountain will provide important information for determining runoff response to precipitation events in this area of the NNSS. Timber Mountain is also a groundwater recharge area, and estimation of recharge from precipitation was important for the EMSI project in determining groundwater flowpaths and designing effective groundwater monitoring for Yucca Mountain. Recharge estimation additionally provides benefit to the Underground Test Area Sub-project analysis of groundwater flow direction and velocity from nuclear test areas on Pahute Mesa. Additionally, this site provides data that has been used during wild fire events and provided a singular monitoring location of the extreme precipitation events during December 2010 (see data section for more details). This letter report provides a summary of the site location, equipment, and data collected in

  13. Electron precipitation pattern and substorm morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, R. A.; Burch, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Patterns of the precipitation of low energy electrons observed by polar satellites were examined as functions of substorm phase. Precipitation boundaries are generally identifiable at the low latitude edge of polar cusp electron precipitation and at the poleward edge of precipitation in the premidnight sector. Both of these boundaries move equatorward when the interplanetary magnetic field turns southward.

  14. Measurement and modeling of asphaltene precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, N.E.; Hobbs, R.E.; Kashou, S.F. )

    1990-11-01

    This paper reports on experimental asphaltene precipitation data on several live-oil/solvent mixtures at reservoir conditions measured to study the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition on precipitate formation and the relationships between critical properties, PVT phase behavior, and precipitate formation. Data generated by the model can be used to identify operating conditions conducive to precipitate formation.

  15. Stabilization of in-tank residual wastes and external-tank soil contamination for the tank focus area, Hanford tank initiative: Applications to the AX Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Balsley, S.D.; Krumhansl, J.L.; Borns, D.J.; McKeen, R.G.

    1998-07-01

    A combined engineering and geochemistry approach is recommended for the stabilization of waste in decommissioned tanks and contaminated soils at the AX Tank Farm, Hanford, WA. A two-part strategy of desiccation and gettering is proposed for treatment of the in-tank residual wastes. Dry portland cement and/or fly ash are suggested as an effective and low-cost desiccant for wicking excess moisture from the upper waste layer. Getters work by either ion exchange or phase precipitation to reduce radionuclide concentrations in solution. The authors recommend the use of specific natural and man-made compounds, appropriately proportioned to the unique inventory of each tank. A filler design consisting of multilayered cementitous grout with interlayered sealant horizons should serve to maintain tank integrity and minimize fluid transport to the residual waste form. External tank soil contamination is best mitigated by placement of grouted skirts under and around each tank, together with installation of a cone-shaped permeable reactive barrier beneath the entire tank farm. Actinide release rates are calculated from four tank closure scenarios ranging from no action to a comprehensive stabilization treatment plan (desiccant/getters/grouting/RCRA cap). Although preliminary, these calculations indicate significant reductions in the potential for actinide transport as compared to the no-treatment option.

  16. Conceptual study of in-tank cesium removal using an inorganic ion exchange material

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, R.S.; Kurath, D.E.

    1996-04-01

    Presently, the Hanford Site contains approximately 230,000 m{sup 3} of mixed waste stored in 177 underground tanks. Approximately 55,000 m{sup 3} of this waste is sludge, 90,000 m{sup 3} is salt cake, and 80,000 m{sup 3} is supernate. Although the pretreatment and final disposal requirements for the waste have not been entirely defined, it is likely that some supernatant pretreatment will be required to remove {sup 137}Cs and possibly {sup 90}Sr and the transuranic components. The objective of this study was to estimate the number of HLW glass canisters resulting from the use of inorganic ion exchanger materials as in-tank pretreatment technology. The variables in the study were: number of contacts between waste and ion exchange material; ion exchange material; and decontamination requirement. This conceptual study investigates a generic in-tank Cs removal flowsheet using crystalline silico-titanates and IE-96 zeolites, and the impact of each ion exchanger on the number of glass canisters produced. In determining glass formulation, data based on current reference technology was used. Sample calculations from the worksheets and summaries of final calculated results are included at the end of this report.

  17. In-tank pretreatment of high-level tank wastes: The SIPS system

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, M.; Powell, J.; Barletta, R.

    1996-03-01

    A new approach, termed SIPS (Small In-Tank Processing System), that enables the in-tank processing and separation of high-level tank wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW) streams that are suitable for vitrification, is described. Presently proposed pretreatment systems, such as enhanced sludge washing (ESW) and TRUEX, require that the high-level tank wastes be retrieved and pumped to a large, centralized processing facility, where the various waste components are separated into a relatively small, radioactively concentrated stream (HLW), and a relatively large, predominantly non-radioactive stream (LLW). In SIPS, a small process module, typically on the order of 1 meter in diameter and 4 meters in length, is inserted into a tank. During a period of approximately six months, it processes the solid/liquid materials in the tank, separating them into liquid HLW and liquid LLW output streams that are pumped away in two small diameter (typically 3 cm o.d.) pipes. The SIPS concept appears attractive for pretreating high level wastes, since it would: (1) process waste in-situ in the tanks, (2) be cheaper and more reliable than a larger centralized facility, (3) be quickly demonstrable at full scale, (4) have less technical risk, (5) avoid having to transfer unstable slurries for long distances, and (6) be simple to decommission and dispose of. Further investigation of the SIPS concept appears desirable, including experimental testing and development of subscale demonstration units.

  18. SULFIDE PRECIPITATION OF HEAVY METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research program was initiated with the objective of evaluating a new process, the sulfide precipitation of heavy metals from industrial wastewaters. The process was expected to effect a more complete removal of heavy metals than conventional lime processing because of the mu...

  19. Electrostatic Precipitator (ESP) TRAINING MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual assists engineers in using a computer program, the ESPVI 4.0W, that models all elements of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The program is a product of the Electric Power Research Institute and runs in the Windows environment. Once an ESP is accurately modeled, the...

  20. Acid Precipitation: Causes and Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babich, Harvey; And Others

    1980-01-01

    This article is the first of three articles in a series on the acid rain problem in recent years. Discussed are the causes of acid precipitation and its consequences for the abiotic and biotic components of the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, and for man-made materials. (Author/SA)

  1. Extreme precipitation: Increases all round

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, William

    2016-05-01

    Globally, extreme rainfall is expected to increase with warming, but regional changes over land have been less certain. Now research shows that this intense precipitation has increased across both the wetter and the drier parts of the continents, and will continue to do so as global warming continues.

  2. Waste and Simulant Precipitation Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, W.V.

    2000-11-29

    As Savannah River Site (SRS) personnel have studied methods of preparing high-level waste for vitrification in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), questions have arisen with regard to the formation of insoluble waste precipitates at inopportune times. One option for decontamination of the SRS waste streams employs the use of an engineered form of crystalline silicotitanate (CST). Testing of the process during FY 1999 identified problems associated with the formation of precipitates during cesium sorption tests using CST. These precipitates may, under some circumstances, obstruct the pores of the CST particles and, hence, interfere with the sorption process. In addition, earlier results from the DWPF recycle stream compatibility testing have shown that leaching occurs from the CST when it is stored at 80 C in a high-pH environment. Evidence was established that some level of components of the CST, such as silica, was leached from the CST. This report describes the results of equilibrium modeling and precipitation studies associated with the overall stability of the waste streams, CST component leaching, and the presence of minor components in the waste streams.

  3. Classroom Exercises Utilizing Precipitation Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohler, Fred

    Precipitation data for Macomb (Illinois) for the period 1912-1981 were the bases for developing classroom exercises that offered college students experience in collecting such data. After students collected the data, they reduced them to manageable proportions, and then examined average long-term relations which may have emerged among yearly,…

  4. Conditional Generation of Monthly Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, U.; Kaluarachchi, J. J.

    2006-12-01

    Monthly precipitation models can be used in basin-wide modeling to develop long-term strategies for water resources planning and management and to estimate the change of water yield due to climate change. Such precipitation models are especially important for effective management of river basins in developing countries such as the upper Blue Nile River basin of Ethiopia where the water resource utilization is limited. Many studies have been previously performed to preserve historical temporal and spatial structures when generating precipitation series. The main focus of those studies was to preserve the historical statistics. Other important factors to be considered are transition and spatial correlations. A few recent studies attempted to preserve transition as well as the statistics of historical record. These studies provided satisfactory results while showing the difficulty and complexity of computations in their methods. The conditional generation method (CGM) that can preserve both historical temporal and spatial structures is presented in this study. Because the CGM is driven from the historical conditional probabilities occurring given amounts of precipitation between two successive months or two stations, it is computationally simple and reliable, i.e., parameterization, inverse matrix, or optimum band width is not required. The CGM was applied to reproducing the precipitation pattern of the upper Blue Nile River basin in Ethiopia using monthly precipitation data of 10 stations to demonstrate its applicability. Comparing to the method of inverse transformation of cumulative distribution functions of the gamma distribution and nonparametric kernel estimator with variable band width selected from the goodness-of-fit tests, the CGM showed improved performance, especially in representing the transition characteristics. The CGM also generated the historical spatial correlations between the stations with acceptable accuracy. The results suggested that the CGM

  5. Identification of single-shell tank in-tank hardware obstructions to retrieval at Hanford Site Tank Farms

    SciTech Connect

    Ballou, R.A.

    1994-10-01

    Two retrieval technologies, one of which uses robot-deployed end effectors, will be demonstrated on the first single-shell tank (SST) waste to be retrieved at the Hanford Site. A significant impediment to the success of this technology in completing the Hanford retrieval mission is the presence of unique tank contents called in-tank hardware (ITH). In-tank hardware includes installed and discarded equipment and various other materials introduced into the tank. This paper identifies those items of ITH that will most influence retrieval operations in the arm-based demonstration project and in follow-on tank operations within the SST farms.

  6. Downstream Impacts of Tank 48H In-tank and Out-of-tank Processing Alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.P.

    2003-12-22

    This document discusses a number of possible impacts that an in-tank or out-of-tank process may have on downstream processing facilities. The analysis is part of a task to develop processes to destroy tetraphenylborate using Fenton Chemistry (metal catalyst plus hydrogen peroxide). Two processes being evaluated are funded by a grant from DOE's National Energy Technology Center. The first is an in-tank process, where the tetraphenylborate is destroyed by decreasing the pH, increasing the temperature and adding a catalyst and hydrogen peroxide as required. After the TPB is destroyed, sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrite are added to the tank to return the tank to conditions that minimize corrosion. The resulting slurry is stored in a HLW tank, likely concentrated in the HLW evaporators, and later will be fed to the Salt Waste Processing Facility. The second process is an out-of-tank Fenton process. This process produces two streams, a high cesium stream that feeds to DWPF and a low cesium feed that returns to a HLW tank with the DWPF recycle. The recycle stream may be evaporated in the HLW evaporators, and will later be fed to the Saltstone Facility or the Actinide Removal Process. An additional two processes being evaluated are in-tank processes. In the first, thermal hydrolysis, the TPB is destroyed by decreasing the pH and increasing the temperature. In the second process, thermal hydrolysis, the TPB is destroyed in by decreasing the pH, adding a catalyst, and increasing the temperature. After the TPB is destroyed, sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrite are added to the tank to return the tank to conditions that minimize corrosion. The resulting slurry is stored in a HLW tank, will likely be concentrated in the HLW evaporators and later will be fed to the Salt Waste Processing Facility. This evaluation is designed to identify possible downstream impacts that may limit the productivity or quality of existing and proposed processing facilities, including the Salt Waste

  7. CONCENTRATION OF Pu USING AN IODATE PRECIPITATE

    DOEpatents

    Fries, B.A.

    1960-02-23

    A method is given for separating plutonium from lanthanum in a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitation process for the recovery of plutonium values from an aqueous solution. The carrier precipitation process includes the steps of forming a lanthanum fluoride precipi- . tate, thereby carrying plutonium out of solution, metathesizing the fluoride precipitate to a hydroxide precipitate, and then dissolving the hydroxide precipitate in nitric acid. In accordance with the invention, the nitric acid solution, which contains plutonium and lanthanum, is made 0.05 to 0.15 molar in potassium iodate. thereby precipitating plutonium as plutonous iodate and the plutonous iodate is separated from the lanthanum- containing supernatant solution.

  8. Numerical studies on the performance of a flow distributor in tank

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Soo Jai Kim, Young In; Ryu, Seungyeob; Bae, Youngmin; Kim, Keung Koo

    2015-03-10

    Flow distributors are generally observed in several nuclear power plants. During core make-up tank (CMT) injection into the reactor, the condensation and thermal stratification are observed in the CMT, and rapid condensation disturbs the injection operation. To reduce the condensation phenomena in the tank, CMT was equipped with a flow distributor. The optimal design of the flow distributor is very important to ensure the structural integrity the CMT and its safe operation during certain transient or accident conditions. In the present study, we numerically investigated the performance of a flow distributor in tank with different shape factors such as the total number of holes, pitch-to-hole diameter ratios, diameter of the hole, and the area ratios. These data will contribute to a design of the flow distributor.

  9. An assessment of the viability of storing FFTF sodium in tank cars

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.W.; Burke, T.M.

    1995-01-27

    Current FFTF Transition Project plans call for construction of a Sodium Storage Facility to store the plant sodium until it is processed either as product or waste. This report evaluates an alternative concept which would store the sodium in rail tank cars. It is concluded that utilizing a simple facility for offloading the FFTF sodium to standard industrial tank cars is not technically viable. Mitigation of potential radioactive sodium spills requires that the offload facility incorporate many of the features of the sodium storage facility. With these mitigation features incorporated, there is no significant cost or schedule advantage for the option of storing the FFTF sodium in tank cars when compared to the currently planned SSF. In addition, it is believed that the tank car option results in higher risk to project success because of unknowns associated with technical, regulatory, and public perception issues. It is therefore recommended that the project proceed with definitive design of the SSF.

  10. A MODERN INTERPRETATION OF THE BARNEY DIAGRAM FOR ALUMINUM SOLUBILITY IN TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    REYNOLDS JG; REYNOLDS DA

    2009-12-16

    Experimental and modeling studies of aluminum solubility in Hanford tank waste have been developed and refined for many years in efforts to resolve new issues or develop waste treatment flowsheets. The earliest of these studies was conducted by G. Scott Barney, who performed solubility studies in highly concentrated electrolyte solutions to support evaporator campaign flowsheets in the 1970's. The 'Barney Diagram', a term still widely used at Hanford today, suggested gibbsite ({gamma}-Al(OH){sub 3}) was much more soluble in tank waste than in simple sodium hydroxide solutions. These results, which were highly surprising at the time, continue to be applied to new situations where aluminum solubility in tank waste is of interest. Here, we review the history and provide a modern explanation for the large gibbsite solubility observed by Barney, an explanation based on basic research that has been performed and published in the last 30 years. This explanation has both thermodynamic and kinetic aspects. Thermodynamically, saturated salt solutions stabilize soluble aluminate species that are minor components in simple sodium hydroxide solutions. These species are the aluminate dimer and the sodium-aluminate ion-pair. Ion-pairs must be present in the Barney simulants because calculations showed that there was insufficient space between the highly concentrated ions for a water molecule. Thus, most of the ions in the simulants have to be ion-paired. Kinetics likely played a role as well. The simulants were incubated for four to seven days, and more recent data indicate that this was unlikely sufficient time to achieve equilibrium from supersaturation. These results allow us to evaluate applications of the Barney results to current and future tank waste issues or flowsheets.

  11. Protein recovery from surfactant precipitation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shu Ian; Stuckey, David C

    2011-01-01

    The recovery of lysozyme from an aqueous solution containing precipitated lysozyme-AOT complexes formed by the direct addition of sodium bis-(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) to a lysozyme solution was studied using both solvents, and a counterionic surfactant. Ethanol,methanol and solvent mixtures dissolved the surfactant precipitate and recovered lysozyme as a solid. Recovery efficiency and protein stability varied with the type of solvent used. An entirely different method of recovery was also evaluated using a counterionic surfactant: tri-octylmethylammonium chloride (TOMAC) which bound to AOT releasing lysozyme into solution.Complete recovery (100%) of lysozyme was achieved at a molar ratio of 2:1(TOMAC:AOT), and the original protein activity was maintained in the final aqueous phase.The recovered lysozyme retained its secondary structure as observed in circular dichroism(CD) spectra. Specific activity studies show that counterionic surfactant extraction does not alter the biological activity of the enzyme. PMID:22235487

  12. Acid precipitation; an annotated bibliography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiltshire, Denise A.; Evans, Margaret L.

    1984-01-01

    This collection of 1660 bibliographies references on the causes and environmental effects of acidic atmospheric deposition was compiled from computerized literature searches of earth-science and chemistry data bases. Categories of information are (1) atmospheric chemistry (gases and aerosols), (2) precipitation chemistry, (3) transport and deposition (wet and dry), (4) aquatic environments (biological and hydrological), (5) terrestrial environments, (6) effects on materials and structures, (7) air and precipitation monitoring and data collection, and (8) modeling studies. References date from the late 1800 's through December 1981. The bibliography includes short summaries of most documents. Omitted are unpublished manuscripts, publications in press, master 's theses and doctoral dissertations, newspaper articles, and book reviews. Coauthors and subject indexes are included. (USGS)

  13. Precipitation patterns during channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamtveit, B.; Hawkins, C.; Benning, L. G.; Meier, D.; Hammer, O.; Angheluta, L.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral precipitation during channelized fluid flow is widespread in a wide variety of geological systems. It is also a common and costly phenomenon in many industrial processes that involve fluid flow in pipelines. It is often referred to as scale formation and encountered in a large number of industries, including paper production, chemical manufacturing, cement operations, food processing, as well as non-renewable (i.e. oil and gas) and renewable (i.e. geothermal) energy production. We have studied the incipient stages of growth of amorphous silica on steel plates emplaced into the central areas of the ca. 1 meter in diameter sized pipelines used at the hydrothermal power plant at Hellisheidi, Iceland (with a capacity of ca 300 MW electricity and 100 MW hot water). Silica precipitation takes place over a period of ca. 2 months at approximately 120°C and a flow rate around 1 m/s. The growth produces asymmetric ca. 1mm high dendritic structures ';leaning' towards the incoming fluid flow. A novel phase-field model combined with the lattice Boltzmann method is introduced to study how the growth morphologies vary under different hydrodynamic conditions, including non-laminar systems with turbulent mixing. The model accurately predicts the observed morphologies and is directly relevant for understanding the more general problem of precipitation influenced by turbulent mixing during flow in channels with rough walls and even for porous flow. Reference: Hawkins, C., Angheluta, L., Hammer, Ø., and Jamtveit, B., Precipitation dendrites in channel flow. Europhysics Letters, 102, 54001

  14. Global Precipitation Mission Visualization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwaller, Mathew

    2011-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) software provides graphic visualization tools that enable easy comparison of ground- and space-based radar observations. It was initially designed to compare ground radar reflectivity from operational, ground-based, S- and C-band meteorological radars with comparable measurements from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite's precipitation radar instrument. This design is also applicable to other groundbased and space-based radars, and allows both ground- and space-based radar data to be compared for validation purposes. The tool creates an operational system that routinely performs several steps. It ingests satellite radar data (precipitation radar data from TRMM) and groundbased meteorological radar data from a number of sources. Principally, the ground radar data comes from national networks of weather radars (see figure). The data ingested by the visualization tool must conform to the data formats used in GPM Validation Network Geometry-matched data product generation. The software also performs match-ups of the radar volume data for the ground- and space-based data, as well as statistical and graphical analysis (including two-dimensional graphical displays) on the match-up data. The visualization tool software is written in IDL, and can be operated either in the IDL development environment or as a stand-alone executable function.

  15. Predictibility in Nowcasting of Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, I.; Sourcel, M.; Berenguer, M.

    2009-05-01

    Present short term precipitation forecasting is based on two methods: Lagrangian persistence (nowcasting) and numerical weather prediction (NWP). An improvement over these methods is obtained by the combination of the two. The obvious shortcoming of nowcasting is its severe limitation in capturing new development or dissipation of precipitation. NWP has the ability to predict both but very imprecisely. An attempt to correct model errors by post-processing leads to some improvement in the skill of NWP, but the improvement, although significative, is not very impressive. The goal of our effort is to take a step back and to describe, in a quantitative manner, a) the nature of the uncertainties affecting Lagrangian persistence and NWP forecasts, as well as to determineb) the physical causes of the uncertainties. We quantify the uncertainties in short term forecasting due to limitation of nowcasting algorithms and NWP to capture correctly some of the physical phenomena that determine the predictability of precipitation. The first factor considered is the diurnal cycle that appears as the one physically determined factors that limit the precision of short term prediction. We study the cycle in radar mosaics over US and compare this to nowcasts and model outputs. The seasonal and geographical dependence of the diurnal cycle is quantitatively evaluated.

  16. Comparing the effectiveness of two applications of copper sulfate and potassium permanganate against Ichthyobodosis (Costiosis) on sunshine bass in tanks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biflagellated single-cell parasite Ichthyobodo nectator, more commonly known as Costia, can cause significant fish losses among fish populations, particularly those cultured in tanks. It is often associated with young fish that have been crowded, underfed, and held in waters with low flow, but ...

  17. Calculation notes that support accident scenario and consequence of the in-tank fuel fire/deflageration

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, R.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-09

    The purpose of this calculation note is to provide the basis for In-Tank Fuel fire/Deflageration consequence for the Tank Farm Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). Tank Fuel Fire/Deflageration scenario is developed and details and description of the analysis methods are provided.

  18. Calculation notes that support accident scenario and consequence of the in-tank fuel fire/deflagration

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, R.D.

    1996-09-27

    The purpose of this calculation note is to provide the basis for In-Tank Fuel Fire/Deflageration consequence for the Tank Farm Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). Tank Fuel Fire/Deflageration scenario is developed and details and description of the analysis methods are provided.

  19. Electron precipitation patterns and substorm morphology.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, R. A.; Burch, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Statistical analysis of data from the auroral particles experiment aboard OGO 4, performed in a statistical framework interpretable in terms of magnetospheric substorm morphology, both spatial and temporal. Patterns of low-energy electron precipitation observed by polar satellites are examined as functions of substorm phase. The implications of the precipitation boundaries identifiable at the low-latitude edge of polar cusp electron precipitation and at the poleward edge of precipitation in the premidnight sector are discussed.

  20. ASSESSMENT OF THE ABILITY OF STANDARD SLURRY PUMPS TO MIX SOLIDS WITH LIQUIDS IN TANK 50H

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.

    2011-11-11

    Tank 50H is the feed tank for the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). In the summer of 2011, Tank 50H contained two standard slurry pumps and two quad volute slurry pumps. Current requirements for mixing operation is to run three pumps for one hour prior to initiating a feed transfer to SPF. Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste moved both of the Quad Volute pumps from Tank 50H to Tank 51H to replace pumps in Tank 51H that were failing. In addition, one of the standard pumps in Tank 50H exhibits high seal leakage and vibration. SRS Liquid Waste requested Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct a study to evaluate the feasibility of mixing the contents of Tank 50H with one to three standard slurry pumps. To determine the pump requirements to mix solids with liquids in Tank 50H, the author reviewed the pilot-scale blending work performed for the Small Column Ion Exchange Process (SCIX), SRNL computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, Tank 50H operating experience, and the technical literature, and applied the results to Tank 50H to determine the number, size, and operating parameters of pumps needed to mix the solid particles with the liquid in Tank 50H. The analysis determined pump requirements to suspend the solids with no 'dead zones', but did not determine the pump requirements to produce a homogeneous suspension. In addition, the analysis determined the pump requirements to prevent the accumulation of a large amount of solid particles under the telescoping transfer pump. The conclusions from this analysis follow: (1) The analysis shows that three Quad Volute pumps should be able to suspend the solid particles expected ({approx}0.6 g/L insoluble solids, {approx}5 micron) in Tank 50H. (2) Three standard slurry pumps may not be able to suspend the solid particles in Tank 50H; (3) The ability of two Quad Volute pumps to fully suspend all of the solid particles in Tank 50H is marginal; and (4) One standard slurry pump should be able to achieve a

  1. ASSESSMENT OF THE ABILITY OF STANDARD SLURRY PUMPS TO MIX MISCIBLE AND IMMISCIBLE LIQUIDS IN TANK 50H

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.

    2011-06-15

    Tank 50H is the feed tank for the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). At present, Tank 50H contains two standard slurry pumps and two Quad Volute slurry pumps. Current requirements and mixing operation is to run three pumps for one hour prior to initiating a feed transfer to SPF. Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste would like to move one or both of the Quad Volute pumps from Tank 50H to Tank 51H to replace pumps in Tank 51H that are failing. In addition, one of the standard pumps in Tank 50H exhibits high seal leakage and vibration. SRS Liquid Waste requested Savannah River National (SRNL) to conduct a study to evaluate the feasibility of mixing the contents of Tank 50H with one to three standard slurry pumps. To determine the pump requirements to blend miscible and immiscible liquids in Tank 50H, the author reviewed the pilot-scale blending work performed for the Salt Disposition Integration Project (SDIP) and the technical literature, and applied the results to Tank 50H to determine the number, size, and operating parameters needed to blend the tank contents. The conclusions from this analysis are: (1) A single rotating standard slurry pump (with a 13.6 ft{sup 2}/s U{sub 0}D) will be able to blend miscible liquids (i.e., salt solution) in Tank 50H within 4.4 hours. (2) Two rotating standard slurry pumps will be able to blend miscible liquids in Tank 50H within 3.1 hours. (3) Three rotating standard slurry pumps will be able to blend miscible liquids in Tank 50H within 2.5 hours. (4) A single rotating standard slurry pump (with a 13.6 ft{sup 2}/s U{sub 0}D) will disperse Isopar L{reg_sign} droplets that are less than or equal to 15 micron in diameter. If the droplets are less than 15 micron, they will be dispersed within 4.4 hours. Isopar L{reg_sign} provides a lower bound on the maximum size of droplets that will be dispersed by the slurry pumps in Tank 50H. (5) Two rotating standard slurry pumps will disperse Isopar L{reg_sign} droplets less than 15 micron

  2. Batch Tests with IONSIV IE-911 and a Simulant of the Savannah River Site ''Average'' Supernatant: Distribution Ratios vs Time

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.K.; Collins, J.L.; Hunt, R.D.; Lee, D.D.

    1999-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by law to treat and safely dispose of the radioactive wastes from its nuclear weapon production activities. The primary radionuclide in the DOE liquid wastes or supernatants is {sup 137}Cs. At the Savannah River Site (SRS), the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process was selected as the baseline technology to remove {sup 137}Cs from the supernatants, which are stored in underground storage tanks. In the ITP process, tetraphenylborate reacts with the water-soluble cesium to form a precipitant. The treated supernatant can then be immobilized in grout or saltstone and stored in vaults at the SRS. However, problems were encountered during the full-scale ITP processing. These difficulties have led to the evaluation of alternative technologies and/or concepts to the currently configured ITP process. The High-Level Waste Salt Disposition Team at the SRS is currently performing this assessment. After an initial screening of all potential alternatives, the Salt Disposition Team selected four primary options to evaluate further before the final down-selection. Crystalline silicotitanate (CST), an inorganic ion exchanger, was chosen as one of the leading alternatives. Since nearly all of the CST tests have been performed on supernatants from Hanford and Oak Ridge, the Salt Disposition Team has requested that personnel at the SRS and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) determine the performance of the engineered form of CST, IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-911, with actual and simulated SRS supernatants.

  3. Photoinduced tellurium precipitation in CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, Shunji

    1991-06-01

    Tellurium precipitation in CdTe is found to be induced by photoirradiation with energy higher than the energy gap at 240 W/sq cm. It is suggested that this photoinduced precipitation is related with the strong electron-phonon interactions, possibly self-trapped excitons. This irreducible tellurium precipitation may cause a serious problem for the life of semiconductor devices.

  4. Climate change projections for precipitation in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, C.; Santos, J. A.

    2013-10-01

    The strong irregularity of precipitation in Portugal, which may e.g. trigger severe/extreme droughts and floods, results in a high vulnerability of the country to precipitation inter-annual variability and to its extremes. Furthermore, dryer future climates are projected for Portugal, though there has also been some growing evidence for a strengthening of precipitation extremes. Due to the central role played byprecipitation on many socio-economic sectors and environmental systems, regional climate change assessments for precipitation in Portugal are necessary. This study is focused on analyzing climate change projections for seasonal (3-month) precipitation totals and their corresponding extremes over mainland Portugal. Taking into account the strong seasonality of the precipitation regimes in Portugal, winter (DJF) and summer (JJA) are considered separately. Precipitation datasets generated by a 16-member ensemble of regional climate model experiments from the ENSEMBLES project are used. Percentile-based indices of precipitation are computed and analyzed for a recent past period (1961-2000) and for a near future period (2041-2070). Results for the R5p, R50p and R95p indices highlight significant projected changes in precipitation, with a clear distinction between northwestern Portugal and the rest of the country in both seasons. Overall, precipitation is projected to decrease in both seasons, particularly over northwestern Portugal in winter, despite some significant regional differences. Although precipitation is projected to decrease in most cases, extremely high seasonal precipitations (above the 95th percentile)areexpected to increase in winter.

  5. Acid Precipitation and the Forest Ecosystem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dochinger, Leon S.; Seliga, Thomas A.

    1975-01-01

    The First International Symposium on Acid Precipitation and the Forest Ecosystem dealt with the potential magnitude of the global effects of acid precipitation on aquatic ecosystems, forest soils, and forest vegetation. The problem is discussed in the light of atmospheric chemistry, transport, and precipitation. (Author/BT)

  6. [Acute heart failure: precipitating factors and prevention].

    PubMed

    Aramburu Bodas, Oscar; Conde Martel, Alicia; Salamanca Bautista, Prado

    2014-03-01

    Acute heart failure episodes, whether onset or decompensation of a chronic form, are most often precipitated by a concurrent process or disease, described as precipitating factors of heart failure. In this article, we review these precipitating factors, their proportions and clinical relevance in general and in subgroups of patients, their relationship with prognosis, and their possible prevention. PMID:24930077

  7. Testing of stripping columns for the removal of benzene from aqueous radioactive salt solution

    SciTech Connect

    Georgeton, G.K.; Taylor, G.A.; Gaughan, T.P.

    1995-06-27

    Radioactive high level wastes (HLW) generated from production of special nuclear materials at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are held in interim storage in 51 underground, million gallon tanks. Radioactive cesium ({sup 137}Cs) is segregated by evaporation of aqueous waste solution for interim storage in a salt matrix comprised of Na and K salts or in concentrated salt solution. The saltcake will be dissolved and {sup 137}Cs will be separated from the nonradioactive salts in solution in the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) Process. The cesium will be combined with other radioactive species and glass formers to be melted and poured into stainless steel canisters in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The salt solution remaining after decontamination in the ITP process will be incorporated into grout for disposal at the site`s Saltstone facility. In the ITP facility, sodium tetraphenylborate (STPB) will be added to precipitate the cesium. Potassium in the waste solution also reacts with STPB and precipitates. Due to radiolytic and chemical degradation of the tetraphenylborate (TPB) precipitate, benzene is generated. The benzene dissolves into the decontaminated salt solution (DSS) and into water (WW) used to {open_quotes}wash{close_quotes} the precipitate to lower the soluble salt content of the slurry. Safety and processing requirements for disposal of the DSS and for temporary storage of the WW dictate that the benzene concentration be reduced.

  8. Skill assessment of precipitation nowcasting in Mediterranean Heavy Precipitation Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Joan; Berenguer, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Very short-term precipitation forecasting (i.e nowcasting) systems may provide valuable support in the weather surveillance process as they allow to issue automated early warnings for heavy precipitation events (HPE) as reviewed recently by Pierce et al. (2012). The need for warnings is essential in densely populated regions of small catchments, such as those typically found in Mediterranean coastal areas, prone to flash-floods. Several HPEs that occurred in NE Spain are analyzed using a nowcasting system based on the extrapolation of rainfall fields observed with weather radar following a Lagrangian approach developed and tested successfully in previous studies (Berenguer et al. 2005, 2011). Radar-based nowcasts, with lead times up to 3 h, are verified here against quality-controlled weather radar quantitative precipitation estimates and also against a dense network of raingauges. The basic questions studied are the dependence of forecast quality with lead time and rainfall amounts in several high-impact HPEs such as the 7 September 2005 Llobregat Delta river tornado outbreak (Bech et al. 2007) or the 2 November 2008 supercell tornadic thunderstorms (Bech et al. 2011) - both cases had intense rainfall rates (30' amounts exceeding 38.2 and 12.3 mm respectively) and daily values above 100 mm. Verification scores indicated that forecasts of 30' precipitation amounts provided useful guidance for lead times up to 60' for moderate intensities (up to 1 mm in 30') and up to 2.5h for lower rates (above 0.1 mm). On the other hand correlations of radar estimates and forecasts exceeded Eulerian persistence of precipitation estimates for lead times of 1.5 h for moderate intensities (up to 0.8 mm/h). We complete the analysis with a discussion on the reliability of threshold to lead time dependence based on the event-to-event variability found. This work has been done in the framework of the ProFEWS project (CGL2010-15892). References Bech J, N Pineda, T Rigo, M Aran, J Amaro, M

  9. Precipitation interpolation in mountainous areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolberg, Sjur

    2015-04-01

    Different precipitation interpolation techniques as well as external drift covariates are tested and compared in a 26000 km2 mountainous area in Norway, using daily data from 60 stations. The main method of assessment is cross-validation. Annual precipitation in the area varies from below 500 mm to more than 2000 mm. The data were corrected for wind-driven undercatch according to operational standards. While temporal evaluation produce seemingly acceptable at-station correlation values (on average around 0.6), the average daily spatial correlation is less than 0.1. Penalising also bias, Nash-Sutcliffe R2 values are negative for spatial correspondence, and around 0.15 for temporal. Despite largely violated assumptions, plain Kriging produces better results than simple inverse distance weighting. More surprisingly, the presumably 'worst-case' benchmark of no interpolation at all, simply averaging all 60 stations for each day, actually outperformed the standard interpolation techniques. For logistic reasons, high altitudes are under-represented in the gauge network. The possible effect of this was investigated by a) fitting a precipitation lapse rate as an external drift, and b) applying a linear model of orographic enhancement (Smith and Barstad, 2004). These techniques improved the results only marginally. The gauge density in the region is one for each 433 km2; higher than the overall density of the Norwegian national network. Admittedly the cross-validation technique reduces the gauge density, still the results suggest that we are far from able to provide hydrological models with adequate data for the main driving force.

  10. Isotopic characteristics of Indian precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Bhishm; Rai, S. P.; Kumar, U. Saravana; Verma, S. K.; Garg, Pankaj; Kumar, S. V. Vijaya; Jaiswal, Rahul; Purendra, B. K.; Kumar, S. R.; Pande, N. G.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrogen (2H/1H) and oxygen (18O/16O) isotopic ratios were measured in precipitation (900 samples) collected from several locations in India during the period 2003-2006 (12 locations in 2003 and 18 locations in 2004-2006). The amount of rainfall along with air temperature and humidity were also measured. The meteoric water line developed for India using isotopic data of precipitation samples, namely, δ2H = 7.93(±0.06) × δ18O + 9.94(±0.51) (n = 272, r2 = 0.98), differs slightly from the global meteoric water line. Regional meteoric water lines were developed for several Indian regions (i.e., northern and southern regions of India, western Himalayas) and found to be different from each other (southern Indian meteoric water line, slope is 7.82, intercept or D excess is 10.23; northern Indian meteoric water line, slope is 8.15, intercept is 9.55) which is attributed to differences in their geographic and meteorological conditions and their associated atmospheric processes (i.e., ambient temperature, humidity, organ, and source of vapor masses). The local meteoric water lines developed for a number of locations show wide variations in the slope and intercept. These variations are due to different vapor sources such as the northeast (NE) monsoon that originates in the Bay of Bengal; the southwest monsoon (SW) that originates in the Arabian Sea; a mixture of NE and SW monsoons; retreat of NE and SW monsoons and western disturbances that originate in the Mediterranean Sea. The altitude effect in the isotopic composition of precipitation estimated for western Himalayan region also varies from month to month.