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Sample records for inappropriate drug prescribing

  1. Potentially inappropriate drug prescribing in elderly hospitalized patients: an analysis and comparison of explicit criteria.

    PubMed

    Di Giorgio, Concetta; Provenzani, Alessio; Polidori, Piera

    2016-04-01

    Background The management of therapy in elderly is a critical aspect of primary care. The physio-pathological complexity of the elderly involves the prescription of multiple drugs, exposing them to a higher risk of adverse reactions. Objective Aim of this study was to assess the medication use and (potential) inappropriate medications and prescribing omissions in the elderly before and during hospitalization, according to the main tools in literature described, and their relation to the number of comorbidities. Setting The study was carried out by the Clinical Pharmacists at ISMETT, an Italian Research Institute. Methods The prescriptions of elderly, admitted in ISMETT between January and December 2012, were analyzed. The information about clinical profile of elderly and prescriptions was obtained from the electronic medical records. 2012 Beers criteria, Screening Tool of Older Person's Prescriptions/Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right Treatment criteria, and Improving Prescribing in the Elderly criteria were used to evaluate the appropriateness of prescriptions. The correlation between the number of comorbidities and the different tools was analyzed with the Spearman correlation coefficient. The frequency analysis was done with the Pearson Chi square test. Main outcome measure Percentage of potentially inappropriate medications and prescribing omissions before/during hospitalization in elderly. Results 1027 elderly were admitted between January and December 2012. At admission and during hospitalization, according to Beers criteria 24 and 49 % of elderly had at least one potentially inappropriate medication, respectively; according to the Screening Tool of Older Person's Prescriptions criteria 21 and 27 %, respectively; according to the Improving Prescribing in the Elderly criteria 28 and 25 %, respectively; and then, according to Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right Treatment criteria 28 and 33 % had at least one potentially prescribing omission

  2. Inappropriate drug prescribing in older adults: the updated 2002 Beers criteria – a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    van der Hooft, Cornelis S; Jong, Geert W 't; Dieleman, Jeanne P; Verhamme, Katia M C; van der Cammen, Tischa J M; Stricker, Bruno H CH; Sturkenboom, Miriam C J M

    2005-01-01

    Background In 1997, Beers and colleagues developed explicit criteria for potentially inappropriate drug prescribing in ambulatory older adults aged 65 years and over. Several studies have been performed to estimate the prevalence of inappropriate drug prescribing based on these criteria. In 2002, the criteria were updated. Aims To examine the extent and trend of inappropriate drug prescribing to ambulatory older adults in the Netherlands between 1997 and 2001, according to the 1997 and the updated Beers criteria. Methods Data were retrieved from the Integrated Primary Care Information (IPCI) project, a general practice research database with data from computer-based patient records of a group of 150 general practitioners in the Netherlands. All subjects aged 65 and over were included. Prescriptions were classified as inappropriate if they fulfilled the Beers criteria of prescriptions that generally should be avoided in older adults because of a high risk of adverse effects, while also considering dose and comorbidity. Results Between 1997 and 2001, the 1-year risk of receiving at least one inappropriate drug prescription for older adults ranged between 16.8% (95% CI: 16.3–17.3%) and 18.5% (18.3–18.7%) according to the 1997 criteria and between 19.1% (18.6–19.6%) and 20.0% (19.5–20.5%) according to the updated Beers criteria. According to the updated criteria, the most frequently prescribed inappropriate drugs were nitrofurantoin, long-acting benzodiazepines, amitriptyline, promethazine and cimetidine. Temazepam and zolpidem were mostly prescribed in supratherapeutic dose. Conventional NSAIDs in persons with a history of gastric/duodenal ulcer were the most frequently prescribed contra-indicated drugs. Conclusions Prescribing potentially inappropriate prescriptions to ambulatory older people in the Netherlands is substantial. Compared with other studies using the 1997 Beers criteria, inappropriate prescribing to the elderly is lower than in the USA but

  3. POPI (Pediatrics: Omission of Prescriptions and Inappropriate Prescriptions): Development of a Tool to Identify Inappropriate Prescribing

    PubMed Central

    Prot-Labarthe, Sonia; Weil, Thomas; Angoulvant, François; Boulkedid, Rym; Alberti, Corinne; Bourdon, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Rational prescribing for children is an issue for all countries and has been inadequately studied. Inappropriate prescriptions, including drug omissions, are one of the main causes of medication errors in this population. Our aim is to develop a screening tool to identify omissions and inappropriate prescriptions in pediatrics based on French and international guidelines. Methods A selection of diseases was included in the tool using data from social security and hospital statistics. A literature review was done to obtain criteria which could be included in the tool called POPI. A 2-round-Delphi consensus technique was used to establish the content validity of POPI; panelists were asked to rate their level of agreement with each proposition on a 9-point Likert scale and add suggestions if necessary. Results 108 explicit criteria (80 inappropriate prescriptions and 28 omissions) were obtained and submitted to a 16-member expert panel (8 pharmacists, 8 pediatricians hospital-based −50%- or working in community −50%-). Criteria were categorized according to the main physiological systems (gastroenterology, respiratory infections, pain, neurology, dermatology and miscellaneous). Each criterion was accompanied by a concise explanation as to why the practice is potentially inappropriate in pediatrics (including references). Two round of Delphi process were completed via an online questionnaire. 104 out of the 108 criteria submitted to experts were selected after 2 Delphi rounds (79 inappropriate prescriptions and 25 omissions). Discussion Conclusion POPI is the first screening-tool develop to detect inappropriate prescriptions and omissions in pediatrics based on explicit criteria. Inter-user reliability study is necessary before using the tool, and prospective study to assess the effectiveness of POPI is also necessary. PMID:24978045

  4. Inappropriate prescribing practices: the challenge and opportunity for patient safety.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Laurel K; Kawasumi, Yuko; Bartlett, Gillian; Tamblyn, Robyn

    2005-01-01

    Adverse clinical events related to inappropriate prescribing practices are an important threat to patient safety. Avoidance of inappropriate prescribing in community settings, where the majority of prescriptions are written, offers a major area of opportunity to improve quality of care and outcomes. Electronic medication order entry systems, with automated clinical risk screening and online alerting capabilities, appear as particularly promising enabling tools in such settings. The Medical Office of the Twenty First Century (MOXXI-III) research group is currently utilizing such a system that integrates identification of dosing errors, adverse drug interactions, drug-disease and allergy contraindications and potential toxicity or contraindications based on patient age. This paper characterizes the spectrum of alerts in an urban community of care involving 28 physicians and 32 pharmacies. Over a consecutive nine-month period, alerts were generated in 29% of 22,419 prescriptions, resulting in revised prescriptions in 14% of the alert cases. Drug-disease contraindications were the most common driver of alerts, accounting for 41% of the total and resulting in revised prescriptions in 14% of cases. In contrast, potential dosing errors generated only 8% of all alerts, but resulted in revised prescriptions 23% of the time. Overall, online evidence-based screening and alerting around prescription of medications in a community setting demands confirmation in prescribers' clinical decision making in almost one-third of prescriptions and leads to changed decisions in up to one-quarter of some prescribing categories. Its ultimate determination of clinical relevance to patient safety may, however, have to await more detailed examination of physician response to alerts and patient outcomes as a primary measure of utility. Patient safety is an increasingly recognized challenge and opportunity for stakeholders in improving health care delivery. It involves many issues, including

  5. Frequency and cost of potentially inappropriate prescribing for older adults: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Steven G.; Hunt, Jordan; Rioux, Jocelyn; Proulx, Jeffery; Weymann, Deirdre; Tannenbaum, Cara

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many medications pose greater health risks when prescribed for older adults, compared with available pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic alternatives. We sought to quantify the frequency and cost of potentially inappropriate prescribing for older women and men in Canada. Methods: Using data for 2013 from the National Prescription Drug Utilization Information System database, which contains prescription claims from publicly financed drug plans in all provinces except for Quebec, we identified the frequency of prescribing and cost of potentially inappropriate medications dispensed to provincial drug plan enrollees aged 65 years or more. Potentially inappropriate prescriptions were defined with the use of the American Geriatrics Society's 2012 version of the Beers Criteria for potentially inappropriate medication use in older adults. Results: For the 6 provinces with relatively complete data coverage (British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario and Prince Edward Island), 37% of older people filled 1 or more prescription meeting the Beers Criteria. A higher proportion of women (42%) than men (31%) filled potentially inappropriate prescriptions. The highest rates of prescribing of potentially inappropriate medications were among women aged 85 or more (47%). Benzodiazepines and other hypnotics were the leading contributors to the overall frequency of and sex differences in prescribing of potentially inappropriate drugs among older adults. We estimated that $75 per older Canadian, or $419 million in total, was spent on potentially inappropriate medications outside of hospital settings in 2013. Interpretation: Prescribing of potentially inappropriate medications for older adults is common and costly in Canada, especially for women. Multipronged and well-coordinated strategies to reduce the use and cost of potentially inappropriate drugs would likely generate significant health system savings while simultaneously generating major benefits to

  6. Association between Physician Specialty and Risk of Prescribing Inappropriate Pill Splitting

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chia-Yu; Hsu, Chia-Chen; Chiang, Shu-Chiung; Ho, Chin-Chin; Chou, Chia-Lin; Wu, Min-Shan; Chang, Yuh-Lih; Tsai, Han-Yi; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chou, Yueh-Ching

    2013-01-01

    Background Prescription errors that occur due to the process of pill splitting are a common medication problem; however, available prescription information involving inappropriate pill splitting and its associated factors is lacking. Methods We retrospectively evaluated a cohort of ambulatory prescriptions involving extended-release or enteric-coated formulations in a Taiwan medical center during a 5-month period in 2010. For this study, those pill splitting prescriptions involving special oral formulations were defined as inappropriate prescriptions. Information obtained included patient demographics, prescriber specialty and prescription details, which were assessed to identify factors associated with inappropriate pill splitting. Results There were 1,252 inappropriate prescriptions identified in this cohort study, representing a prescription frequency for inappropriate pill splitting of 1.0% among 124,300 prescriptions with special oral formulations. Among 35 drugs with special oral formulations in our study, 20 different drugs (57.1%, 20/35) had ever been prescribed to split. Anti-diabetic agents, cardiovascular agents and central nervous system agents were the most common drug classes involved in inappropriate splitting. The rate of inappropriate pill splitting was higher in older (over 65 years of age) patients (1.1%, 832/75,387). Eighty-seven percent (1089/1252) of inappropriate prescriptions were prescribed by internists. The rate of inappropriate pill splitting was highest from endocrinologists (3.4%, 429/12,477), nephrologists (1.3%, 81/6,028) and cardiologists (1.3%, 297/23,531). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the strongest factor associated with individual specific drug of inappropriate splitting was particular physician specialties. Conclusion This study provides important insights into the inappropriate prescription of special oral formulation related to pill splitting, and helps to aggregate information that can assist

  7. A Review of Potentially Inappropriate Prescribing in Over 65's in Livinghealth Clinic.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, J; Laoire, F O; Linehan, G; Herlihy, D

    2015-06-01

    Polypharmacy and potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) are areas of growing importance and concern. Optimising drug prescribing in older people is challenging and complex at,the individual GP level. At a national level it is an important public health issue for the care and management of the ageing Irish population. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of PIP in Livinghealth Clinic using the STOPP (Screening Tool for Older Persons' Prescribing) criteria and to identify areas of PIP. LHC audits demonstrated PIP levels of between 16% and 29%. Our findings were similar to other studies in that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) at maximum therapeutic dosage for >8 weeks, and long acting benzodiazepines prescribed for > 1 month, continue to be significant areas of PIP. However, not all identified PIP maybe inappropriate. The STOPP criteria are a useful screening tool for older persons' prescribing, but are best used together with clinical assessment and discretion. PMID:26182803

  8. Potentially inappropriate prescribing in an Irish elderly population in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Cristín; O'Mahony, Denis; Kennedy, Julia; Weedle, Peter; Byrne, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    AIMS Screening tools have been formulated to identify potentially inappropriate prescribing (IP) in older people. Beers' criteria are the most widely used but have disadvantages when used in Europe. New IP screening tools called Screening Tool of Older Person's Prescriptions (STOPP) and Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right Treatment (START) have been developed to identify potential IP and potential prescribing omissions (PPOs). The aim was to measure the prevalence rates of potential IP and PPOs in primary care using Beers' criteria, STOPP and START. METHODS Case records of 1329 patients ≥65 years old from three general practices in one region of southern Ireland were studied. The mean age ± SD of the patients was 74.9 ± 6.4 years, 60.9% were female. Patients' current diagnoses and prescription medicines were reviewed and the Beers' criteria, STOPP and START tools applied. RESULTS The total number of medicines prescribed was 6684; median number of medicines per patient was five (range 1–19). Overall, Beers' criteria identified 286 potentially inappropriate prescriptions in 18.3% (243) of patients, whilst the corresponding IP rate identified by STOPP was 21.4% (284), in respect of 346 potentially inappropriate prescriptions. A total of 333 PPOs were identified in 22.7% (302) of patients using the START tool. CONCLUSION Potentially inappropriate drug prescribing and errors of drug omission are highly prevalent among older people living in the community. Prevention strategies should involve primary care doctors and community pharmacists. PMID:20002089

  9. Alternatives to potentially inappropriate medications for use in e-prescribing software: triggers and treatment algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Hume, Anne L; Quilliam, Brian J; Goldman, Roberta; Eaton, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the development of evidence-based electronic prescribing (e-prescribing) triggers and treatment algorithms for potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) for older adults. Design Literature review, expert panel and focus group. Setting Primary care with access to e-prescribing systems. Participants Primary care physicians using e-prescribing systems receiving medication history. Interventions Standardised treatment algorithms for clinicians attempting to prescribe PIMs for older patients. Main outcome measure Development of 15 treatment algorithms suggesting alternative therapies. Results Evidence-based treatment algorithms were well received by primary care physicians. Providing alternatives to PIMs would make it easier for physicians to change decisions at the point of prescribing. Conclusion Prospectively identifying older persons receiving PIMs or with adherence issues and providing feasible interventions may prevent adverse drug events. PMID:21719560

  10. Potentially inappropriate prescribing in institutionalised older patients in Spain: the STOPP-START criteria compared with the Beers criteria

    PubMed Central

    Ubeda, Amalia; Ferrándiz, Luisa; Maicas, Nuria; Gomez, Cristina; Bonet, Montserrat; Peris, Jose E.

    Objective The aims of this study were to identify potentially inappropriate prescribing using the Beers and STOPP criteria. The START criteria were applied to detect prescription omission in the geriatric population. We compared the utility of these criteria in institutionalised older people. Methods Descriptive study reviewing the medication and clinical records of 81 residents (aged 65 years and more) by pharmacists in a nursing home in the Lleida region (Spain). Results The mean patients’'age was 84 (SD=8) years, with an average of 5 drugs per resident (total prescriptions: 416 medicines). The Beers criteria identified potentially inappropriate medication use in 25% of patients and 48% of patients used at least 1 inappropriate medication according to STOPP criteria. The most frequent potentially inappropriate medications for both criteria were long-acting benzodiazepines and NSAIDs. START detected 58 potential prescribing omissions in 44% of patients. Calcium-vitamin D supplementation in osteoporosis was the most frequent rule (15%), but omissions corresponding to the cardiovascular system implied 23% of patients. Conclusions The STOPP-START criteria reveal that potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) is a highly prevalent problem among Spanish nursing home residents, and a statistically significant positive correlation was found between the number of medicines prescribed and the number of PIP detected in this study. The STOPP criteria detect a larger number of PI medications in this geriatric population than the Beers criteria. The prescribing omissions detected by the START criteria are relevant and require intervention. Pharmacists’ review of medications may help identify potentially inappropriate prescribing and, through an interdisciplinary approach, working with physicians may improve prescribing practices among geriatric residents of nursing homes. PMID:24155822

  11. Prescribing of psychotropics in the elderly: why is it so often inappropriate?

    PubMed

    Mort, Jane R; Aparasu, Rajender R

    2002-01-01

    Psychotropic medications are an important treatment approach to mental health disorders; such disorders are common in the elderly population. Elderly patients are more likely to experience adverse effects from these agents than their younger counterparts due to age-related changes in pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic parameters. Because of these factors, inappropriate use of psychotropic medications in elderly patients has become a focus of concern. In general an agent is considered inappropriate if the risk associated with its use exceeds its benefit. Implicit and explicit criteria for inappropriate use of medications in the elderly have been created and include psychotropic agents. These criteria vary in their make-up but the explicit criteria tend to agree that amitriptyline, doxepin, and benzodiazepines that have long half-lives are not appropriate. Although explicit inappropriate medication criteria have been in existence since 1991, elderly patients continue to receive inappropriate psychotropic medications. A wide array of factors may be responsible for this practice. Provider-related causes include deficits in knowledge, confusion due to the lack of a consensus on the inappropriate psychotropic criteria, difficulties in addressing an inappropriate medication started by a previous provider, multiple prescribers and pharmacies involved in the care of a patient, negative perceptions regarding aging, and cost issues. Patients may contribute to the problem by demanding an inappropriate medication. Finally, the healthcare setting may inadvertently contribute to inappropriate prescribing by such policies as restrictive formularies or lack of reimbursement for pharmacists' clinical services. Successful approaches to optimising prescribing have been either educational or administrative. Educational approaches (e.g. one-on-one sessions, academic detailing) seek to influence decision making, while administrative approaches attempt to enforce policies to curtail the

  12. STOPP/START criteria for potentially inappropriate prescribing in older people: version 2

    PubMed Central

    O'Mahony, Denis; O'Sullivan, David; Byrne, Stephen; O'Connor, Marie Noelle; Ryan, Cristin; Gallagher, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: screening tool of older people's prescriptions (STOPP) and screening tool to alert to right treatment (START) criteria were first published in 2008. Due to an expanding therapeutics evidence base, updating of the criteria was required. Methods: we reviewed the 2008 STOPP/START criteria to add new evidence-based criteria and remove any obsolete criteria. A thorough literature review was performed to reassess the evidence base of the 2008 criteria and the proposed new criteria. Nineteen experts from 13 European countries reviewed a new draft of STOPP & START criteria including proposed new criteria. These experts were also asked to propose additional criteria they considered important to include in the revised STOPP & START criteria and to highlight any criteria from the 2008 list they considered less important or lacking an evidence base. The revised list of criteria was then validated using the Delphi consensus methodology. Results: the expert panel agreed a final list of 114 criteria after two Delphi validation rounds, i.e. 80 STOPP criteria and 34 START criteria. This represents an overall 31% increase in STOPP/START criteria compared with version 1. Several new STOPP categories were created in version 2, namely antiplatelet/anticoagulant drugs, drugs affecting, or affected by, renal function and drugs that increase anticholinergic burden; new START categories include urogenital system drugs, analgesics and vaccines. Conclusion: STOPP/START version 2 criteria have been expanded and updated for the purpose of minimizing inappropriate prescribing in older people. These criteria are based on an up-to-date literature review and consensus validation among a European panel of experts. PMID:25324330

  13. Social Trends in Prescribing Mood-Modifying Drugs to Women

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Jim

    1987-01-01

    The author of this article looks at the accumulating research evidence which suggests that there has been inappropriate prescribing and overprescribing of mood-altering drugs to women. This, he holds, in large part reflects problems that are best approached from within the tradition and perspective of social medicine. Socio-health considerations illuminate the need for research in this field. PMID:21263994

  14. Reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescribing in the residential care setting: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ching Jou; Kong, David CM; Stuart, Rhonda L

    2014-01-01

    Residential aged care facilities are increasingly identified as having a high burden of infection, resulting in subsequent antibiotic use, compounded by the complexity of patient demographics and medical care. Of particular concern is the recent emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms among this vulnerable population. Accordingly, antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programs have started to be introduced into the residential aged care facilities setting to promote judicious antimicrobial use. However, to successfully implement AMS programs, there are unique challenges pertaining to this resource-limited setting that need to be addressed. In this review, we summarize the epidemiology of infections in this population and review studies that explore antibiotic use and prescribing patterns. Specific attention is paid to issues relating to inappropriate or suboptimal antibiotic prescribing to guide future AMS interventions. PMID:24477218

  15. Polypharmacy, Drug-Drug Interactions, and Potentially Inappropriate Medications in Older HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Meredith; Steinman, Michael A.; McNicholl, Ian R.; Valcour, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe the frequency of medication-related problems in older HIV-infected adults Design Retrospective chart review Setting And Participants Community dwelling HIV-infected adults age 60 and older and age and sex-matched HIV-uninfected adults Measurements Total number of medications, potentially inappropriate medications as defined by the modified Beers criteria, anticholinergic drug burden as defined by the Anticholinergic Risk Scale, and drug-drug interactions using Lexi-Interact online drug interactions database. Results Of 89 HIV-infected participants, most were Caucasian (91%) and male (94%) with a median age of 64 (range 60-82). Common comorbidities included hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and depression. Participants were taking a median of 13 medications (range 2-38), of which only a median of 4 were antiretrovirals. At least one potentially inappropriate medication was prescribed in 46 participants (52%). Sixty-two (70%) participants had at least one Category D (consider therapy modification) drug-drug interaction and 10 (11%) had a Category X (avoid combination) interaction. One-third of these interactions were between two non-antiretroviral medications. We identified 15 participants (17%) with an anticholinergic risk scale score ≥3. In contrast, HIV-uninfected participants were taking a median of 6 medications, 29% had at least one potentially inappropriate medication, and 4% had an anticholinergic risk scale score ≥ 3 (p-value <0.05 for each comparison except p=0.07 for anticholinergic burden). Conclusion HIV-infected older adults have a high frequency of medication-related problems, of which a large portion is due to medications used to treat comorbid diseases. These medication issues were substantially higher than HIV-uninfected participants. Attention to the principles of geriatric prescribing is needed as this population ages in order to minimize complications from multiple medication use. PMID:24576251

  16. Medication review using a Systematic Tool to Reduce Inappropriate Prescribing (STRIP) in adults with an intellectual disability: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Zaal, Rianne J; Ebbers, Susan; Borms, Mirka; Koning, Bart de; Mombarg, Erna; Ooms, Piet; Vollaard, Hans; van den Bemt, Patricia M L A; Evenhuis, Heleen M

    2016-08-01

    A Systematic Tool to Reduce Inappropriate Prescribing (STRIP), which includes the Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right Treatment (START) and the Screening Tool of Older Peoples' Prescriptions (STOPP), has recently been developed in the Netherlands for older patients with polypharmacy in the general population. Active involvement of the patient is part of this systematic multidisciplinary medication review. Although annual review of pharmacotherapy is recommended for people with an intellectual disability (ID), a specific tool for this population is not yet available. Besides, active involvement can be compromised by ID. Therefore, the objective of this observational pilot study was to evaluate the process of medication review using STRIP in adults with an ID living in a centralized or dependent setting and the identification of drug-related problems using this tool. The study was performed in three residential care organizations for ID. In each organization nine clients with polypharmacy were selected by an investigator (a physician in training to become a specialized physician for individuals with an ID) for a review using STRIP. Clients as well as their legal representatives (usually a family member) and professional caregivers were invited to participate. Reviews were performed by an investigator together with a pharmacist. First, to evaluate the process time-investments of the investigator and the pharmacist were described. Besides, the proportion of reviews in which a client and/or his legal representative participated was calculated as well as the proportion of professional caregivers that participated. Second, to evaluate the identification of drug-related problems using STRIP, the proportion of clients with at least one drug-related problem was calculated. Mean time investment was 130minutes for the investigator and 90minutes for the pharmacist. The client and/or a legal representatives were present during 25 of 27 reviews (93%). All 27 professional

  17. Rooting out institutional corruption to manage inappropriate off-label drug use.

    PubMed

    Rodwin, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    Prescribing drugs for uses that the FDA has not approved - off-label drug use - can sometimes be justified but is typically not supported by substantial evidence of effectiveness. At the root of inappropriate off-label drug use lie perverse incentives for pharmaceutical firms and flawed oversight of prescribing physicians. Typical reform proposals such as increased sanctions for manufacturers might reduce the incidence of unjustified off-label use, but they do not remove the source of the problem. Public policy should address the cause and control the practice. To manage inappropriate off-label drug use, off-label prescriptions must be tracked in order to monitor the risks and benefits and the manufacturers' conduct. Even more important, reimbursement rules should be changed so that manufacturers cannot profit from off-label sales. When off-label sales pass a critical threshold, manufacturers should also be required to pay for independent testing of the safety and effectiveness of off-label drug uses and for the FDA to review the evidence. Manufacturers should also finance, under FDA supervision, programs designed to warn physicians and the public about the risks of off-label drug use. PMID:24088156

  18. [Should the ophthalmologist prescribe generic drugs?].

    PubMed

    Nordmann, J-P

    2003-10-01

    It seems obvious that an ophthalmologist should encourage the use of generic drugs. However, it is important to know the exact definition of a generic drug and the type of studies to be conducted before a generic drug is released on the market. A generic drug is a drug that has the same composition quantitatively as well as qualitatively of the active compound as the original drug. It also has the same pharmaceutical mode of action and the same bioavailability, as determined with bioavailability studies. Ophthalmic drops contain both an active compound and many adjuvants used to stabilize the drug. Globally speaking, the active compound corresponds to the efficacy of a topical drug and the adjuvant to its tolerance. It is likely that the efficacy of a generic drug is identical to that of the brand-name drug, even though only bioavailability studies in non-human models are required to evaluate tolerance which is less likely to be identical, as adjuvants can differ. A survey of 520 French ophthalmologists has recently been conducted. It shows that doctors rarely think of prescribing generic drugs, as they do not consider cost as a major issue in treating glaucoma. However, they see no reason not to prescribe generic drugs. This mixed perception is shared by patients who willingly accept that doctors prescribe a generic drug, but do not wish the pharmacist to take the initiative of filling a prescription with a generic drug, which sometimes gives patients the impression of being less well treated. The use of generic drugs should be encouraged, keeping in mind that good tolerance should be ensured. PMID:14646825

  19. Warfarin and Drug Interactions: Prescribing Vigilance.

    PubMed

    Hook, J; Millsopp, Lynne; Field, E Anne

    2016-01-01

    A patient taking warfarin presented to the Oral Medicine Clinic at Liverpool University Dental Hospital, having been prescribed metronidazole and miconazole by his general dental practitioner (GDP) for his oral mucosal problem. He subsequently developed bruising on his torso following mild trauma. Having read the drug information leaflet provided with his metronidazole and miconazole, he noted the potential drug interactions between these and warfarin. He therefore stopped his warfarin. The details of this case are outlined, and the potential for significant drug interactions with warfarin are highlighted. The need for dental practitioners to be vigilant concerning drug interactions is emphasized, together with the importance of CPD in relation to drug prescribing. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This case report, which is of relevance to all dental practitioners, highlights the importance of up-to-date medical and drug histories and the continuing awareness of potential drug interactions. In this case, patient intervention after checking drug information leaflets prevented serious consequences. The importance and potentially serious consequences of significant drug interactions needs to be understood. PMID:27024900

  20. Prescriber barriers and enablers to minimising potentially inappropriate medications in adults: a systematic review and thematic synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kristen; Stowasser, Danielle; Freeman, Christopher; Scott, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Objective To synthesise qualitative studies that explore prescribers’ perceived barriers and enablers to minimising potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) chronically prescribed in adults. Design A qualitative systematic review was undertaken by searching PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, PsycINFO, CINAHL and INFORMIT from inception to March 2014, combined with an extensive manual search of reference lists and related citations. A quality checklist was used to assess the transparency of the reporting of included studies and the potential for bias. Thematic synthesis identified common subthemes and descriptive themes across studies from which an analytical construct was developed. Study characteristics were examined to explain differences in findings. Setting All healthcare settings. Participants Medical and non-medical prescribers of medicines to adults. Outcomes Prescribers’ perspectives on factors which shape their behaviour towards continuing or discontinuing PIMs in adults. Results 21 studies were included; most explored primary care physicians’ perspectives on managing older, community-based adults. Barriers and enablers to minimising PIMs emerged within four analytical themes: problem awareness; inertia secondary to lower perceived value proposition for ceasing versus continuing PIMs; self-efficacy in regard to personal ability to alter prescribing; and feasibility of altering prescribing in routine care environments given external constraints. The first three themes are intrinsic to the prescriber (eg, beliefs, attitudes, knowledge, skills, behaviour) and the fourth is extrinsic (eg, patient, work setting, health system and cultural factors). The PIMs examined and practice setting influenced the themes reported. Conclusions A multitude of highly interdependent factors shape prescribers’ behaviour towards continuing or discontinuing PIMs. A full understanding of prescriber barriers and enablers to changing prescribing behaviour is critical to the

  1. Effectiveness of a Multifaceted Intervention for Potentially Inappropriate Prescribing in Older Patients in Primary Care: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial (OPTI-SCRIPT Study)

    PubMed Central

    Clyne, Barbara; Smith, Susan M.; Hughes, Carmel M.; Boland, Fiona; Bradley, Marie C.; Cooper, Janine A.; Fahey, Tom

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) is common in older people and can result in increased morbidity, adverse drug events, and hospitalizations. The OPTI-SCRIPT study (Optimizing Prescribing for Older People in Primary Care, a cluster-randomized controlled trial) tested the effectiveness of a multifaceted intervention for reducing PIP in primary care. METHODS We conducted a cluster-randomized controlled trial among 21 general practitioner practices and 196 patients with PIP. Intervention participants received a complex, multifaceted intervention incorporating academic detailing; review of medicines with web-based pharmaceutical treatment algorithms that provide recommended alternative-treatment options; and tailored patient information leaflets. Control practices delivered usual care and received simple, patient-level PIP feedback. Primary outcomes were the proportion of patients with PIP and the mean number of potentially inappropriate prescriptions. We performed intention-to-treat analysis using random-effects regression. RESULTS All 21 practices and 190 patients were followed. At intervention completion, patients in the intervention group had significantly lower odds of having PIP than patients in the control group (adjusted odds ratio = 0.32; 95% CI, 0.15–0.70; P = .02). The mean number of PIP drugs in the intervention group was 0.70, compared with 1.18 in the control group (P = .02). The intervention group was almost one-third less likely than the control group to have PIP drugs at intervention completion, but this difference was not significant (incidence rate ratio = 0.71; 95% CI, 0.50–1.02; P = .49). The intervention was effective in reducing proton pump inhibitor prescribing (adjusted odds ratio = 0.30; 95% CI, 0.14–0.68; P = .04). CONCLUSIONS The OPTI-SCRIPT intervention incorporating academic detailing with a pharmacist, and a review of medicines with web-based pharmaceutical treatment algorithms, was effective in reducing PIP

  2. Inappropriate Drug Use in People with Cognitive Impairment and Dementia: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Johnell, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to identify, assess and summarize studies about potentially inappropriate drug use (IDU) in cognitive impairment and dementia and to present findings about whether cognitive impairment and dementia are associated with IDU. The search was made in Medline/PubMed using free terms in the title or abstract. The inclusion criteria were: English language, published until 1 March 2014, original quantitative study and assessment of overall IDU with a consensus based summarized measure. Exclusion criteria were: focus on specific patient group (other than cognitive impairment or dementia), focus on specific drug class and failure to present a prevalence measure of IDU or an effect estimate (i.e. odds ratio). Of the initial 182 studies found in Medline, 22 articles fulfilled the criteria. Most studies used the Beers criteria for assessment of IDU. Prevalence of IDU among individuals with cognitive impairment or dementia ranged from 10.2% to 56.4% and was higher in nursing home settings than in community-dwelling samples. Most studies reported a lower likelihood of IDU in case of cognitive impairment or dementia. To conclude, IDU is highly prevalent among persons with cognitive impairment and dementia, although these conditions seem to be associated with a lower probability of IDU. This might reflect an awareness among clinicians of cautious prescribing to this vulnerable group of patients. More studies on large cohorts of persons with cognitive impairment and dementia are needed to draw conclusions about optimal drug prescribing to this frail group of older persons. PMID:26054404

  3. [Impact of potentially inappropriate drug usage on health insurance business results].

    PubMed

    Kirschke, Malin; Böhme, Jacqueline

    2014-09-01

    In Germany a list was drawn up that included 83 potentially inappropriate drugs. The PRISCUS list published in 2010 was intended to highlight certain problems in the pharmakotherapy of elderly patients and serve as a support for improved medicine safety. Almost a third of the insurance portfolio of the HALLESCHE Krankenversicherung aged over 75 years takes drugs that are on the PRISCUS list. Benzodiazepine and Z-drugs are taken most frequently. The costs per insurant with potentially inappropriate medication are on average higher than for policyholders who do not take drugs on the PRISCUS list. The costs per insurant are rising, with an increase in the number of PRISCUS agents being taken as well. However, there is still no scientific proof that potentially inappropriate drugs lead to adverse drug events. PMID:25272660

  4. Inappropriate prescribing of antithrombotic therapy in Ethiopian elderly population using updated 2015 STOPP/START criteria: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Getachew, Henok; Bhagavathula, Akshaya Srikanth; Abebe, Tamrat Befekadu; Belachew, Sewunet Admasu

    2016-01-01

    Background Inappropriate use of antiplatelets and anticoagulants among elderly patients increases the risk of adverse outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of inappropriate prescribing of antithrombotic therapy in hospitalized elderly patients. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional, single-center study was conducted at the Gondar University Hospital. A total of 156 hospitalized elderly patients fulfilling the inclusion/exclusion criteria were included in the study. The Screening Tool for Older Person’s Prescription/Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right Treatment criteria version 2 were applied to patients’ data to identify the total number of inappropriate prescribing (IPs) including potentially inappropriate medications and potential prescribing omissions. Results A total of 70 IPs were identified in 156 patients who met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 36 (51.4%) were identified as potentially inappropriate medications by the Screening Tool for Older Person’s Prescription criteria. The prevalence of IP per patient indicated that 58 of the 156 (37.2%) patients were exposed to at least one IP. Of these, 32 (55.2%) had at least one potentially inappropriate medication and 33 (56.9%) had at least one potential prescribing omission. Patients hospitalized due to venous thromboembolism (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =29.87, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.26–708.6), stroke (AOR =7.74, 95% CI, 1.27–47.29), or acute coronary syndrome (AOR =13.48, 95% CI, 1.4–129.1) were less likely to be exposed to an IP. An increase in Charlson comorbidity index score was associated with increased IP exposure (AOR =0.60, 95% CI, 0.39–0.945). IPs were about six times more likely to absent in patients prescribed with antiplatelet only therapy (AOR =6.23, 95% CI, 1.90–20.37) than those receiving any other groups of antithrombotics. Conclusion IPs are less common in elderly patients primarily admitted due to venous thromboembolism, stroke, and acute

  5. Drug-induced arrhythmia: pharmacogenomic prescribing?

    PubMed Central

    Behr, Elijah R.; Roden, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced Torsades de Pointes is a rare, unpredictable, and life-threatening serious adverse event. It can be caused by both cardiac and non-cardiac drugs and has become a major issue in novel drug development and for the regulatory authorities. This review describes the problem, predisposing factors, and the underlying genetic predisposition as it is understood currently. The future potential for pharmacogenomic-guided and personalized prescription to prevent drug-induced Torsades de Pointes is discussed. Database searches utilized reports from www.qtdrugs.org up to January 2012, case reports and articles from www.pubmed.com up to January 2012, and the British National Formulary edition at www.bnf.org. PMID:23091201

  6. The effect of "group detailing" on drug prescribing in primary care.

    PubMed

    Mastura, I; Teng, C L

    2008-10-01

    The quality of physician prescribing is suboptimal. Patients are at risk of potentially adverse reaction because of inappropriate or writing error in the drug prescriptions. We assess the effect of "group academic detailing" to reduce writing drug name using brand name and short form in the drug prescriptions in a controlled study at two primary health care clinics in Negeri Sembilan. Five medical officers in Ampangan Health Clinic received an educational intervention consisting of group academic detailing from the resident Family Medicine Specialist, as well as a drug summary list using generic names. The academic detailing focused on appropriate prescribing habit and emphasized on using the full generic drug name when writing the drug prescription. Analyses were based on 3371 prescriptions that were taken from two clinics. The other health clinic was for comparison. The prescribing rates were assessed by reviewing the prescriptions (two months each for pre- and post-intervention phase). Statistically significant reduction in writing prescription using brand name and using short form were observed after the educational intervention. Writing prescription using brand name for pre- and postintervention phase were 33.9% and 19.0% (postintervention vs pre-intervention RR 0.56, 95% CI 0.48 to 0.66) in the intervention clinic. Prescription writing using any short form for pre- and post-intervention phase were 49.2% and 29.2% (post-intervention vs pre-intervention RR 0.59, 95% CI 0.53 to 0.67). This low cost educational intervention focusing on prescribing habit produced an important reduction in writing prescription using brand name and short form. Group detailing appears to be feasible in the public health care system in Malaysia and possibly can be used for other prescribing issues in primary care. PMID:19385492

  7. Application of three different sets of explicit criteria for assessing inappropriate prescribing in older patients: a nationwide prevalence study of ambulatory care visits in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chirn-Bin; Yang, Shu-Yu; Lai, Hsiu-Yun; Wu, Ru-Shu; Liu, Hsing-Cheng; Hsu, Hsiu-Ying; Hwang, Shinn-Jang; Chan, Ding-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the national prevalence of potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) prescribed in ambulatory care clinics in Taiwan according to three different sets of regional criteria and the correlates of PIM use. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting This analysis included older patients who visited ambulatory care clinics in 2009 and represented half of the older population included on the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database. Participants We identified 1 164 701 subjects who visited ambulatory care clinics and were over 65 years old in 2009. Primary and secondary outcome measures PIM prevalence according to the 2012 Beers criteria, the PIM-Taiwan criteria and the PRISCUS criteria was estimated separately, and characteristics of PIM users were explored. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine patient factors associated with the use of at least one PIM. Leading PIMs for each set of criteria were also listed. Results The prevalence of having at least one PIM at the patient level was highest with the Beers criteria (86.2%), followed by the PIM-Taiwan criteria (73.3%) and the PRISCUS criteria (66.9%). Polypharmacy and younger age were associated with PIM use for all three sets of criteria. The leading PIMs detected by the PIM-Taiwan and PRISCUS criteria were all included in the 2012 Beers criteria. Non-COX-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the Beers criteria and benzodiazepines in the PIM-Taiwan and PRISCUS criteria accounted for most leading PIMs. Conclusions The prevalence of PIMs was high among older Taiwanese patients receiving ambulatory care visits. The prevalence of PIM and its associated factors varied according to three sets of criteria at the population level. PMID:26546136

  8. Presenting Multiple Drug Alerts in an Ambulatory Electronic Prescribing System

    PubMed Central

    Weinger, M.B.; Gregg, W.M.; Johnson, K.B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective This study explores alternative approaches to the display of drug alerts, and examines whether and how human-factors based interface design can be used to improve the prescriber’s perception about drug alert presentation, signal detection from noisy alert data, and their comprehension of clinical decision support during electronic prescribing. Methods We reviewed issues with presenting multiple drug alerts in electronic prescribing systems. User-centered design, consisting of iterative usability and prototype testing was applied. After an iterative design phase, we proposed several novel drug alert presentation interfaces; expert evaluation and formal usability testing were applied to access physician prescribers’ perceptions of the tools. We mapped drug alert attributes to different interface constructs. We examined four different interfaces for presenting multiple drug alerts. Results A TreeDashboard View was better perceived than a text-based ScrollText View with respect to the ability to detect critical information, the ability to accomplish tasks, and the perceptional efficacy of finding information. Conclusion A robust model for studying multiple drug-alert presentations was developed. Several drug alert presentation interfaces were proposed. The TreeDashboard View was better perceived than the text-based ScrollText View in delivering multiple drug alerts during a simulation of electronic prescribing. PMID:25024753

  9. Best Practices for Drug Prescribing in Older Adults: A Call for Action.

    PubMed

    Marengoni, Alessandra; Nobili, Alessandro; Onder, Graziano

    2015-11-01

    Achievement of a good quality of prescribing is one of the major challenges for physicians caring for older persons, because of aging-related changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs, the large number of co-occurring chronic diseases affecting older adults and consequent polypharmacy. Several approaches are available and have been used to tackle over-prescription of drugs, such as medication review, application of appropriateness criteria and computerized prescription support systems, but, one by one, they have shown limited effectiveness with respect to patient-centred outcomes. We propose to test a multicomponent intervention with the goal of achieving the best-tailored pharmacotherapy for each patient at a specific point in time. The intervention should start with identification of patients at risk of drug-related problems and identification of their priorities, followed by medication review over time, supported by the use of inappropriateness criteria and computerized systems, and also necessarily embedded in the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment. PMID:26586379

  10. A review on prescribing patterns of antihypertensive drugs.

    PubMed

    Jarari, Noah; Rao, Narasinga; Peela, Jagannadha Rao; Ellafi, Khaled A; Shakila, Srikumar; Said, Abdul R; Nelapalli, Nagaraja Kumari; Min, Yupa; Tun, Kin Darli; Jamallulail, Syed Ibrahim; Rawal, Avinash Kousik; Ramanujam, Ranjani; Yedla, Ramesh Naidu; Kandregula, Dhilip Kumar; Argi, Anuradha; Peela, Laxmi Teja

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension continues to be an important public health concern because of its associated morbidity, mortality and economic impact on the society. It is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and renal complications. It has been estimated that by 2025, 1.56 billion individuals will have hypertension. The increasing prevalence of hypertension and the continually increasing expense of its treatment influence the prescribing patterns among physicians and compliance to the treatment by the patients. A number of national and international guidelines for the management of hypertension have been published. Since many years ago, diuretics were considered as the first-line drugs for treatment of hypertension therapy; however, the recent guidelines by the Joint National Commission (JNC8 guidelines) recommend both calcium channel blockers as well as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors as first-line drugs, in addition to diuretics. Antihypertensive drug combinations are generally used for effective long-term management and to treat comorbid conditions. This review focuses on the antihypertensive medication utilization, their cost factors, adherence to treatment by patients, and physicians' adherence to guidelines in prescribing medications in different settings including Indian scenario. The antihypertensive medication prescribing pattern studies help in monitoring, evaluation and necessary modifications to the prescribing habits to achieve rational and cost-effective treatment. Additionally, periodic updating of recommended guidelines and innovative drug formulations, and prescription monitoring studies help in rational use of antihypertensive drugs, which can be tailored to suit the patients' requirements, including those in the developing countries. PMID:27019747

  11. The involvement of prescribed drugs in road trauma.

    PubMed

    Drummer, Olaf H; Yap, Suwan

    2016-08-01

    Coroners files and toxicological records of fatally-injured drivers in Victoria from 2000 to 2006 and from 2007 to 2013 were reviewed in separate studies to establish the role of prescribed drugs on crash risk. 2638 driver fatalities were included in the study, which represented over 97% of all driver fatalities in this period. The detection limits of the drugs were at the low end of those seen with common illicit drugs or prescribed drugs. Drugs of any type were found in 34.4% of the study group, medicinal drugs 21.2%, and alcohol (≥0.05 gram/100mL) was found in 24.8%. The prevalence of the most common drugs detected that are legally available by prescription were anti-depressants (7.9%), benzodiazepines (7.0%), opiates/opioids (6.6%), and sedating anti-histamines (1.1%). Each driver was assessed for responsibility using a previously published and validated method. The crash risk of drivers taking opioids, benzodiazepines, or anti-depressants (primarily the serotonin reuptake inhibitors), were not significantly over-represented compared to the drug-free control group, although there was a suggestion of increased crash risk for benzodiazepines. Crash risk was elevated for drivers using cannabis (by presence of THC in blood at>2ng/mL) and amphetamines. These data show that drivers using medicinal drugs alone are unlikely to show significant crash risk even if drugs are potentially impairing. PMID:26826848

  12. Structured pharmaceutical analysis of the Systematic Tool to Reduce Inappropriate Prescribing is an effective method for final-year medical students to improve polypharmacy skills: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Keijsers, Carolina J P W; van Doorn, Adriaan B D; van Kalles, Anouk; de Wildt, Dick J; Brouwers, Jacobus R B J; van de Kamp, Henrieke J; Jansen, Paul A F

    2014-07-01

    Medical students may not be adequately trained to prescribe appropriately to older adults with polypharmacy. This study addressed how to teach students to minimize inappropriate polypharmacy. Final-year medical students (N = 106) from two Dutch schools of medicine participated in this randomized controlled trial with a pre/posttest design. The Systematic Tool to Reduce Inappropriate Prescribing (STRIP) was used as the intervention. This medication review tool consists of five steps and is part of the Dutch multidisciplinary guideline on polypharmacy. Step two is a structured pharmaceutical analysis of drug use, assessed using six questions regarding undertreatment, ineffective treatment, overtreatment, potential adverse effects, contraindications or interactions, and dose adjustments. It is used in combination with the Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right Treatment and the Screening Tool of Older Person's Prescriptions checklists. Students were asked to optimize the medication lists of real people, making use, or not, of the STRIP. The number of correct or potentially harmful decisions that the students made when revising the lists was determined by comparison with expert consensus. Students who used the STRIP had better scores than control students; they made more correct decisions (9.3 vs 7.0, 34%; P < .001, correlation coefficient (r) = 0.365) and fewer potentially harmful decisions (3.9 vs 5.6, -30%; P < .001, r = 0.386). E-learning did not have a different effect from that of non-E-learning methods. Students were satisfied with the method. The STRIP method is effective in helping final-year medical students improve their prescribing skills. PMID:24916615

  13. Family Physician attitudes about prescribing using a drug formulary

    PubMed Central

    Suggs, L Suzanne; Raina, Parminder; Gafni, Amiram; Grant, Susan; Skilton, Kevin; Fan, Aimei; Szala-Meneok, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Background Drug formularies have been created by third party payers to control prescription drug usage and manage costs. Physicians try to provide the best care for their patients. This research examines family physicians' attitudes regarding prescription reimbursement criteria, prescribing and advocacy for patients experiencing reimbursement barriers. Methods Focus groups were used to collect qualitative data on family physicians' prescribing decisions related to drug reimbursement guidelines. Forty-eight family physicians from four Ontario cities participated. Ethics approval for this study was received from the Hamilton Health Sciences/Faculty of Health Sciences Research Ethics Board at McMaster University. Four clinical scenarios were used to situate and initiate focus group discussions about prescribing decisions. Open-ended questions were used to probe physicians' experiences and attitudes and responses were audio recorded. NVivo software was used to assist in data analysis. Results Most physicians reported that drug reimbursement guidelines complicated their prescribing process and can require lengthy interpretation and advocacy for patients who require medication that is subject to reimbursement restrictions. Conclusion Physicians do not generally see their role as being cost-containment monitors and observed that cumbersome reimbursement guidelines influence medication choice beyond the clinical needs of the patient, and produce unequal access to medication. They observed that frustration, discouragement, fatigue, and lack of appreciation can often contribute to family physicians' failure to advocate more for patients. Physicians argue cumbersome reimbursement regulations contribute to lower quality care and misuse of physicians' time increasing overall health care costs by adding unnecessary visits to family physicians, specialists, and emergency rooms. PMID:19835601

  14. Sources of drug information and their influence on the prescribing behaviour of doctors in a teaching hospital in Ibadan, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Oshikoya, Kazeem Adeola; Oreagba, Ibrahim; Adeyemi, Olayinka

    2011-01-01

    Background Pharmaceutical drug promotion is a means of informing health professionals about new drugs. The approach is often times unethical and inappropriate and may promote irrational prescribing. Dearth of information on impact of pharmaceutical drug promotion on prescribing behaviour of doctors in developing African countries has necessitated this study. We therefore aimed to determine the sources of drug information for doctors working in a teaching hospital in Nigeria and to assess the self-reported impact of the sources on their prescribing behaviour. Methods A total of 163 doctors working at the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan in Nigeria were evaluated with a questionnaire for their demographics and sources of drug information. For doctors who relied on drug promotion, they were asked to self-report and self-rate their opinion on extent of interactions with pharmaceutical companies as well as how such interactions had impacted on their prescribing behaviour. Apart from the demographics, each question was evaluated with a typical five-level Likert item. Data analyses were with simple descriptive statistics. Results Of the 400 doctors working at UCH, only 40.8% participated in the study. Drug information was sourced from colleagues (161, 98.8%), reference books (158, 96.9%), pharmaceutical sales representatives-PSRs (152, 93.2%), promotion materials (151, 92.6%), scientific papers/journals/internet (149, 91.4%), and drug promotion forum/product launches (144, 88.3%). Each source was highly utilized but there was no wide variation in their pattern of use. According to the self-report of over a half of the respondents, PSRs was an accurate and reliable drug information resource; PSRs increased their awareness of the promoted drugs; and their prescribing behaviours were influenced by information from PSRs. Conclusion Respondents tend to rely on a broad range of drug information resources which include potentially inappropriate resources such as PSRs

  15. Drug use and the role of patients and prescribers.

    PubMed

    Sterky, G; Tomson, G; Diwan, V K; Sachs, L

    1991-01-01

    In order to move towards rational drug use in any national or local setting the methods of inquiry have to be expanded. Both the public and private sector have to be addressed. In the latter the pharmacists might be studied using a tracer, fictitious client. One important factor influencing prescribing, drug information, has rarely been assessed scientifically. Experimental studies using group randomization are, however feasible even in developing countries. The individual human being must be in the focus of drug studies and health care and health in the foreground. The combination of qualitative and quantitative methods will assist us to achieve rational drug use that is culturally acceptable, economically feasible and pharmacologically sound. PMID:2045844

  16. Assessing potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) and predicting patient outcomes in Ontario’s older population: a population-based cohort study applying subsets of the STOPP/START and Beers’ criteria in large health administrative databases

    PubMed Central

    Bjerre, Lise M; Ramsay, Timothy; Cahir, Catriona; Ryan, Cristín; Halil, Roland; Farrell, Barbara; Thavorn, Kednapa; Catley, Christina; Hawken, Steven; Gillespie, Ulrika; Manuel, Douglas G

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adverse drug events (ADEs) are common in older people and contribute significantly to emergency department (ED) visits, unplanned hospitalisations, healthcare costs, morbidity and mortality. Many ADEs are avoidable if attention is directed towards identifying and preventing inappropriate drug use and undesirable drug combinations. Tools exist to identify potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) in clinical settings, but they are underused. Applying PIP assessment tools to population-wide health administrative data could provide an opportunity to assess the impact of PIP on individual patients as well as on the healthcare system. This would open new possibilities for interventions to monitor and optimise medication management on a broader, population-level scale. Methods and analysis The aim of this study is to describe the occurrence of PIP in Ontario's older population (aged 65 years and older), and to assess the health outcomes and health system costs associated with PIP—more specifically, the association between PIP and the occurrence of ED visits, hospitalisations and death, and their related costs. This will be done within the framework of a population-based retrospective cohort study using Ontario's large health administrative and population databases. Eligible patients aged 66 years and older who were issued at least 1 prescription between 1 April 2003 and 31 March 2014 (approximately 2 million patients) will be included. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was obtained from the Ottawa Health Services Network Ethical Review Board and from the Bruyère Research Institute Ethics Review Board. Dissemination will occur via publication, presentation at national and international conferences, and ongoing exchanges with regional, provincial and national stakeholders, including the Ontario Drug Policy Research Network and the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. Trial registration number Registered with clinicaltrials

  17. Understanding the molecular properties and metabolism of top prescribed drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Haizhen A; Mashinson, Victoria; Woolman, Theodor A; Zha, Mengyi

    2013-01-01

    Molecular properties such as the molecular weight, hydrophobicity parameter logP, and the total polar surface area (TPSA) have been used extensively in modern drug discovery. We investigated these properties and ADMET scores of the top 200 therapeutic drugs by the U.S. retail sales (2010) and classified them according to the clinical indications and/or routes of administration. This list of drugs provides ample information of these molecular descriptors for successfully approved drugs. The mean logP for oral drugs is 2.5 while the logP for injectable drugs seems to be smaller. Among different types of clinical indications, drugs used for anti-HIV, and antibiotics tend to have lower logP. The molecular weights of anti-HIV drugs, antihypertensives and antibiotics appear to be larger. The ADMET scores, derived from a combination of molecular weights and logP, are consistent for oral drugs, with a mean score of 1.5 and a standard deviation of 1.0. Many clinical drugs that violate Lipinski's rule of five criteria can still exhibit ADMET scores that are very close to the mean value for oral drugs (1.5) and lie within the acceptable standard deviation. The molecular properties of MW, logP, and TPSA appear to vary according to their clinical indications. Many drugs form salts or cocrystals with acids or solvents that increase their solubility. Our data show that addition of hydrochloride is the most common method to increase solubility of drug ingredients. Cytochrome P450 isozymes 3A4, 2D6, 2C9, 2C8 and 3C5 are the top five proteins that metabolize the 200 most prescribed drugs. Drugs metabolized by 3A4 appear to have larger molecular weights and those metabolized by 2D6 have lower molecular weights. CYP2C8-metabolized drugs appear to be most hydrophilic, with the smallest logP and the largest polar surface areas. PMID:23675936

  18. Pharmacoeconomic consequences of variable patient compliance with prescribed drug regimens.

    PubMed

    Urquhart, J

    1999-03-01

    Variable compliance with prescribed drug regimens is a leading source of variability in drug response. Specifics differ by drug and disease. The role of variable compliance was clearly defined in 2 trials of lipid-lowering agents, cholestyramine and gemfibrozil, in which exceptionally careful measurements of compliance were made, which has not been done in later trials. Economic consequences of variable compliance are estimated by converting dose-dependent changes in absolute risk of incident coronary disease into the unicohort format, which designates how many patients must be treated to prevent, in a given time, a defined 'coronary event'. Two strong influences on the costs of treatment are: (i) the shape of the relation between drug intake and risk reduction; and (ii) the strength of the linkage between intake and prescription refills. The intake-effect relation for cholestyramine is linear, making compliance-neutral the cost to prevent 1 coronary event, provided that refills match intake. If refills exceed intake, treatment costs rise. The intake-effect relation for gemfibrozil is more typically nonlinear, so poorer compliers purchase and take the drug in amounts that have little benefit, increasing the cost to prevent 1 coronary event. If refills run at a higher rate than intake, costs increase still further. A key question for future study is: do policies that encourage timely refills increase compliance enough to offset their potential to waste money in the purchasing of an untaken drug? PMID:10537430

  19. Disease-drug database for pharmacogenomic-based prescribing.

    PubMed

    Hussain, S; Kenigsberg, B B; Danahey, K; Lee, Y M; Galecki, P M; Ratain, M J; O'Donnell, P H

    2016-08-01

    Providers have expressed a strong desire to have additional clinical decision-support tools to help with interpretation of pharmacogenomic results. We developed and tested a novel disease-drug association tool that enables pharmacogenomic-based prescribing to treat common diseases. First, 324 drugs were mapped to 484 distinct diseases (mean number of drugs treating each disease was 4.9; range 1-37). Then the disease-drug association tool was pharmacogenomically annotated, with an average of 1.8 pharmacogenomically annotated drugs associated/disease. Applying this tool to a prospectively enrolled >1,000 patient cohort from a tertiary medical center showed that 90% of the top ∼20 diseases in this population and ≥93% of patients could appropriately be treated with ≥1 medication with actionable pharmacogenomic information. When combined with clinical patient genotypes, this tool permits delivery of patient-specific pharmacogenomically informed disease treatment recommendations to inform the treatment of many medical conditions of the US population, a key initial step towards implementation of precision medicine. PMID:26940584

  20. Association between drug‐specific indicators of prescribing quality and quality of drug treatment: a validation study

    PubMed Central

    Belfrage, Björn; Fastbom, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose To evaluate the concurrent validity of three European sets of drug‐specific indicators of prescribing quality Methods In 200 hip fracture patients (≥65 years), consecutively recruited to a randomized controlled study in Sahlgrenska University Hospital in 2009, quality of drug treatment at study entry was assessed according to a gold standard as well as to three drug‐specific indicator sets (Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, French consensus panel list, and German PRISCUS list). As gold standard, two specialist physicians independently assessed and then agreed on the quality for each patient, after initial screening with STOPP (Screening Tool of Older Persons' potentially inappropriate Prescriptions) and START (Screening Tool to Alert to Right Treatment). Results According to the Swedish, French, and German indicator sets, 82 (41%), 54 (27%), and 43 (22%) patients had potentially inappropriate drug treatment. A total of 141 (71%) patients had suboptimal drug treatment according to the gold standard. The sensitivity for the indicator sets was 0.51 (95% confidence interval: 0.43; 0.59), 0.33 (0.26; 0.41), and 0.29 (0.22; 0.37), respectively. The specificity was 0.83 (0.72; 0.91), 0.88 (0.77; 0.94), and 0.97 (0.88; 0.99). Suboptimal drug treatment was 2.0 (0.8; 5.3), 1.9 (0.7; 5.1), and 6.1 (1.3; 28.6) times as common in patients with potentially inappropriate drug treatment according to the indicator sets, after adjustments for age, sex, cognition, residence, multi‐dose drug dispensing, and number of drugs. Conclusions In this setting, the indicator sets had high specificity and low sensitivity. This needs to be considered upon use and interpretation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26147790

  1. Development of a core drug list towards improving prescribing education and reducing errors in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Emma; Pryce Roberts, Adele; Wilde, Kirsty; Walton, Hannah; Suri, Sati; Rull, Gurvinder; Webb, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    AIM To develop a core list of 100 commonly prescribed drugs to support prescribing education. METHODS A retrospective analysis of prescribing data from primary care in England (2006 and 2008) and from two London Teaching Hospitals (2007 and 2009) was performed. A survey of prescribing by foundation year 1 (FY1) doctors in 39 NHS Trusts across London was carried out. RESULTS A core list of 100 commonly prescribed drugs comprising ≥0.1% prescriptions in primary and/or secondary care was developed in 2006/7. The core list remained stable over 2 years. FY1 doctors prescribed 65% drugs on the list at least monthly. Seventy-six% of FY1 doctors did not regularly prescribe any drugs not on the core list. There was a strong correlation between prescribing frequency (prescriptions for each drug class expressed as percentage of all prescriptions written) and error rate described in the EQUIP study (errors made when prescribing each drug class expressed as a percentage of all errors made), n= 39, r= 0.861, P= 0.000. CONCLUSIONS Our core drug list identifies drugs that are commonly used and associated with error and is stable over at least 2 years. This list can now be used to develop learning resources and training programmes to improve prescribing of drugs in regular use. Complementary skills required for prescribing less familiar drugs must be developed in parallel. Ongoing research is required to monitor the effect of new training initiatives on prescribing error and patient safety. PMID:21219399

  2. 42 CFR 440.120 - Prescribed drugs, dentures, prosthetic devices, and eyeglasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prescribed drugs, dentures, prosthetic devices, and eyeglasses. 440.120 Section 440.120 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.120 Prescribed drugs,...

  3. Psychotropic drug prescribing in child and adolescent learning disability psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Bramble, David

    2007-07-01

    This postal questionnaire study investigated the prescribing practices of a group of senior British psychiatrists who have responsibilities for children and adolescents with learning disabilities (mental retardation). The study revealed that all of the clinicians surveyed (n = 16) were prescribing psychotropic medication; psychostimulants and major tranquillizers represented the most frequently prescribed classes and, respectively, methylphenidate, risperidone, melatonin, sodium valproate and carbamazepine were the most frequently employed specific agents. Most patients were receiving monotherapy. Many (14/16) clinicians reported difficulties in shared-care prescribing arrangements with General Practitioners. The study concludes that psychopharmacology is an established part of the psychiatric management of learning disabled children but acknowledges the need for the elaboration of clinical governance standards to this area of practice. PMID:17446203

  4. An audit of prescribing practices for benzodiazepines and Z-drugs.

    PubMed

    Cadogan, C; Ryder, S

    2015-03-01

    Concerns persist over the use of benzodiazepines and Z-drugs in Ireland. A prospective prescription audit was conducted in 81 community pharmacies across Ireland over a four week period. The study sought to assess the level of prescription compliance with key components of benzodiazepine and Z-drug prescribing guidelines. 28% of audit booklets issued were returned, yielding data on 4,418 prescriptions. The findings suggest that little progress has been made in improving the prescribing of benzodiazepines and Z-drugs in Ireland in the decade since publication of the Benzodiazepine Committee's report. Fewer than one fifth of prescriptions (18.8%) were fully compliant with the assessment criteria and the majority (53.7%) had multiple discrepancies. This study highlights the importance of monitoring and auditing benzodiazepine and Z-drug prescribing practices. Interventions involving patients, prescribers and pharmacists are required to improve the prescribing and use of these medications in Ireland. PMID:25876301

  5. [Some problems due to the questionable indication for prescribing drugs].

    PubMed

    Mangeot, J P

    1997-01-01

    Once a diagnosis has been done, prescribers must take into account the indications and method of use of a product before prescribing it. The indications are given in the Product License and noted in the Summary of Product Characteristics. The "RMO" informs on what would be dangerous or useless to prescribe. From now on French prescribers will have in addition to take into account indications admitted to reimbursement by the Sécurité Sociale that might be different from the Product License indications. Various problems will follow: Necessity to establish standardised and classified indications to be used by all. Necessity that this standardisation be at a European level. The indications given in the Product License must be in strict accordance with what is in the dictionary. Necessity for the prescribers to be continuously kept up to date on this dictionary. Risk of differences between general practice and hospital where there is no such opposability. This will affect therapeutic research in France. These problems must be examined as a whole. PMID:9453174

  6. Co-Prescribing of Potentially Interacting Drugs during Warfarin Therapy - A Population-Based Register Study.

    PubMed

    Rikala, Maria; Hauta-Aho, Milka; Helin-Salmivaara, Arja; Lassila, Riitta; Korhonen, Maarit Jaana; Huupponen, Risto

    2015-08-01

    We analysed the occurrence of co-prescribing of potentially interacting drugs during warfarin therapy in the community-dwelling population of Finland. We identified drugs having interaction potential with warfarin using the Swedish Finnish INteraction X-referencing drug-drug interaction database (SFINX) and obtained data on drug purchases from the nationwide Prescription Register. We defined warfarin users as persons purchasing warfarin in 2010 (n = 148,536) and followed them from their first prescription in 2010 until the end of the calendar year. Co-prescribing was defined as at least 1-day overlap between warfarin and interacting drug episodes. In addition, we identified persons who initiated warfarin therapy between 1 January 2007 and 30 September 2010 (n = 110,299) and followed these incident users for a 3-month period since warfarin initiation. Overall, 74.4% of warfarin users were co-prescribed interacting drugs. Co-prescribing covered 46.4% of the total person-years of warfarin exposure. Interacting drugs that should be avoided with warfarin were co-prescribed for 13.4% of warfarin users. The majority of the co-prescriptions were for drugs that are not contraindicated during warfarin therapy but require special consideration. Among incident users, 57.1% purchased potentially interacting drugs during the 3-month period after initiation, while 9.0% purchased interacting drugs that should be avoided with warfarin. To conclude, the occurrence of co-prescribing of potentially interacting drugs was high during warfarin therapy. Our findings highlight the importance of close monitoring of warfarin therapy and the need for further studies on the clinical consequences of co-prescribing of interacting drugs with warfarin. PMID:25537751

  7. [Improving drug prescribing in the elderly: a new edition of STOPP/START criteria].

    PubMed

    Delgado Silveira, E; Montero Errasquín, B; Muñoz García, M; Vélez-Díaz-Pallarés, M; Lozano Montoya, I; Sánchez-Castellano, C; Cruz-Jentoft, A J

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate use of drugs in older patients may have an adverse impact on several individual health outcomes, such as increasing the prevalence of adverse drug reactions, morbidity and mortality, and geriatric syndromes, as well as on health care systems, such as increased costs and longer hospital stays. Explicit criteria of drug appropriateness are increasingly used to detect and prevent inappropriate use of drugs, either within a comprehensive geriatric assessment or as tool used by different multidisciplinary geriatric teams. STOPP-START criteria, first published in 2008 (in Spanish in 2009), are being adopted as reference criteria throughout Europe. The Spanish version of the new 2014 edition (recently published in English) of the STOPP-START criteria is presented here. A review of all the papers published in Spain using the former version of these criteria is also presented, with the intention of promoting their use and for research in different health care levels. PMID:25466971

  8. Prescribing patterns and drug cost among cardiovascular patients in Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Al-Junid, S M; Ezat, W P Sharifa; Surianti, S

    2007-03-01

    A prevalence study was conducted, measuring drug cost and prescribing patterns of clinicians treating cardiovascular patients in UKM Hospital (HUKM). One Hundred and thirty-five patients' case-notes were selected from the Case-Mix database of HUKM. The average and median number of drugs prescribed per patient was 7.56 (+/- 3.37) and 7.0 (+/- 3) respectively. Generic drug prescription rate was still low (45.2%). Significant relationship was observed between generic drug prescriptions with age of patients, types of wards and different levels of clinicians' training. Younger patients, admitted to Coronary Care Unit (CCU) and Cardiology Rehabilitation Ward (CRW) were more likely to be prescribed with branded drugs. Lower generic drugs prescription and higher cost of drugs were mostly practised by Consultants. CCU and CRW wards were the only predictor to having low generic drugs prescriptions. Ninety-nine percent of the total RM28,879.25 drug cost was used to purchase branded drugs. Mean drug cost for a patient is RM213.92 (+/- RM333.36) and median cost is RM102.46 (+/- RM240.51). Higher drug cost and its' predictors were patients with severity level II and III, length of stay of > or = 6 days, number of drugs types of > or = 7, generic drugs prescription rate < 50% and patients admitted in CCU and CRW wards. This study is important for short and long-term decision-making, controlling of providers behaviour and resources. PMID:17682574

  9. Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs Are Associated With Sustained Reductions In Opioid Prescribing By Physicians.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yuhua; Pan, Yijun; Taylor, Aryn; Radakrishnan, Sharmini; Luo, Feijun; Pincus, Harold Alan; Schackman, Bruce R

    2016-06-01

    State prescription drug monitoring programs are promising tools to rein in the epidemic of prescription opioid overdose. We used data from a national survey to assess the effects of these programs on the prescribing of opioid analgesics and other pain medications in ambulatory care settings at the point of care in twenty-four states from 2001 to 2010. We found that the implementation of a prescription drug monitoring program was associated with more than a 30 percent reduction in the rate of prescribing of Schedule II opioids. This reduction was seen immediately following the launch of the program and was maintained in the second and third years afterward. Effects on overall opioid prescribing and prescribing of non-opioid analgesics were limited. Increased use of these programs and the adoption of new policies and practices governing their use may have contributed to sustained effectiveness. Future studies are needed to evaluate the policies' comparative effectiveness. PMID:27269021

  10. Effect of Drug Sample Removal on Prescribing in a Family Practice Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Hartung, Daniel M.; Evans, David; Haxby, Dean G.; Kraemer, Dale F.; Andeen, Gabriel; Fagnan, Lyle J.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE Little is known about the impact of recent restrictions on pharmaceutical industry detailing and sampling on prescribing behavior, particularly within smaller, independent practices. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a policy prohibiting prescription drug samples and pharmaceutical industry interaction on prescribing patterns in a rural family practice clinic in central Oregon. METHODS Segmented linear regression models were used to evaluate trends in prescribing using locally obtained pharmacy claims. Oregon Medicaid pharmacy claims were used to control for secular prescribing changes. Total and class-specific monthly trends in branded, promoted, and average prescription drug costs were analyzed 18 months before and after policy implementation. RESULTS Aggregate trends of brand name drug use did not change significantly after policy implementation. In aggregate, use of promoted agents decreased by 1.43% while nonpromoted branded agents increased by 3.04%. Branded drugs prescribed for respiratory disease declined significantly by 11.34% compared with a control group of prescribers. Relative to the control group, prescriptions of promoted cholesterol-lowering drugs and antidepressants were reduced by approximately 9.98% and 11.34%, respectively. The trend in average cost per prescription for lipid-lowering drugs was significantly reduced by $0.70 per prescription per month. Overall, average prescription drug costs increased by $5.18 immediately after policy implementation. CONCLUSIONS Restriction of pharmaceutical industry representatives and samples from a rural family practice clinic produced modest reductions in branded drug use that varied by class. Although aggregate average costs increased, prescriptions for branded and promoted lipid-lowering agents and antidepressants were reduced. PMID:20843881

  11. Factors influencing prescribing of fall-risk-increasing drugs to the elderly: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Steinsbekk, Aslak; Granas, Anne Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Explore the situations in which GPs associate drug use with falls among their elderly patients, and the factors influencing the prescribing and cessation of fall-risk-increasing drugs (FRIDs). Design. A qualitative study with 13 GPs who participated in two semi-structured focus groups in Central Norway. Participants were encouraged to share overall thoughts on the use of FRIDs among elderly patients and stories related to prescribing and cessation of FRIDs in their own practice. Results. The main finding was that GPs did not immediately perceive the use of FRIDs to be a prominent factor regarding falls in elderly patients, exceptions being when the patient presented with dizziness, reported a fall, or when prescribing FRIDs for the first time. It was reported as common to renew prescriptions without performing a drug review. Factors influencing the prescribing and cessation of FRIDs were categorized into GPs’ clinical work conditions, uncertainty about outcome of changing prescriptions, patients’ prescribing demands, and lack of patient information. Conclusions. The results from this study indicate that GPs need to be reminded that there is a connection between FRID use and falls among elderly patients of enough clinical relevance to remember to assess the patient's drug list and perform regular drug reviews. PMID:25965505

  12. Weight considerations in psychotropic drug prescribing and switching.

    PubMed

    Hasnain, Mehrul; Vieweg, W Victor R

    2013-09-01

    Our review describes potential weight-altering effects of psychotropic medications (antipsychotics, antidepressants, anti-anxiety medications, mood stabilizers, sedative-hypnotics, medications for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and other psychotropic medications) and offers guidance on switching a medication if its weight-altering effect becomes problematic. For second-generation antipsychotics, the risk of weight gain is high with clozapine and olanzapine, low with amisulpride, aripiprazole, and ziprasidone, and medium with other second-generation antipsychotics. Switching from a high-risk antipsychotic to a low-risk antipsychotic usually mitigates or reverses weight gain. For second-generation antidepressants, there may be modest weight loss with bupropion and modest weight gain with mirtazapine and paroxetine. Other second-generation antidepressants are weight neutral but individual variations can occur. If significant change in weight occurs, switching to or adding a low-risk second-generation antidepressant should be considered. Mood stabilizers include lithium, valproate, carbamazepine, lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, and most second-generation antipsychotics. Risk of weight gain is high with lithium and valproate and low with carbamazepine, lamotrigine, and oxcarbazepine. Given the complexity of bipolar disorder and its management, a switch of a mood stabilizer would be best done by a psychiatrist. Benzodiazepines, non-benzodiazepine and melatonergic hypnotics, doxepin, and trazodone are weight neutral. Diphenhydramine may cause weight-gain and can be switched to a weight-neutral hypnotic if needed. Stimulants can cause varying degrees of weight loss and switching to atomoxetine or bupropion may reverse this problem. If that fails, switching to clonidine or guanfacine can be tried. Switching must be evidence-based and take into account status of the condition being treated, efficacy, side effect profile, potential drug-drug interactions, required

  13. Prescribing narcotics to drug-dependent people in prison: some preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, B; Drelfuss, R; Dobler-Mikola, A

    Switzerland began testing a program in which narcotics are prescribed under medical care for drug-dependent inmates. The goal of the program being run at the Oberschongrun penitentiary is to make drug-dependent people feel better, have the chance of becoming stable in prison, and escape the vicious cycle of committing further drug-related crimes when they are released. Participation in the trial is voluntary. Participants must be at least 20 years of age, been drug dependent for two years, and have undergone unsuccessful drug treatment. An additional selection criterion is illegal consumption of heroin while incarcerated. Issues involved with the trial are described, including the conflicts inherent in prescribing drugs that are usually considered illegal. Preliminary conclusions show that the program is feasible, although there are significant problems in instituting this type of program in an environment that is totalitarian and rigid. The program raises prison role issues of rehabilitation versus punishment. PMID:11365294

  14. Drugs for dementia: the first year. An audit of prescribing practice.

    PubMed Central

    McGirr, G.; Compton, S. A.

    2000-01-01

    In March 1998 the Department of Health and Social Services issued prescribing guidelines for the use of drugs for dementia. A criterion based audit of 202 consecutive cases was undertaken over one year which showed that the prescribing guidelines in general were being followed. A small number of patients, 3, were prescribed the drugs outside the guidelines and most failures, 10, were due to poor recording of data in the clinical record. Despite the recommendation of the DHSS no agreed shared care protocols have been implemented but this does not seem to have affected access to these drugs. As a result of this audit changes have been made with regard to documentation of patient assessments and suggestions made to review Clinical Resource Efficiency Support Team (CREST) guidelines. PMID:11196723

  15. Impact of a drug bulletin on the knowledge, perception of drug utility, and prescribing behavior of physicians.

    PubMed

    Denig, P; Haaijer-Ruskamp, F M; Zijsling, D H

    1990-01-01

    The impact of a drug bulletin was tested in a randomized controlled trial that included 186 family physicians. The length of the trial was six months. It was hypothesized that printed information, such as in drug bulletins, influences physician prescribing behavior by changing their knowledge of drug efficacy and adverse effects and their perceptions of drug utility. Therefore, the impact of a drug bulletin was evaluated on these domains of influence. Interview data were used to assess changes in knowledge, perceived drug utility, and stated prescribing. Health insurance funds' records were used to collect actual prescribing data. Information in the bulletin on the treatment of renal colic changed physicians' knowledge as well as perceived utility of drugs used for renal colic (p less than 0.05). Significant changes in stated prescribing were also found. On the other hand, advice in the same bulletin on the treatment of the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) had no impact at all. It did not even improve the knowledge of the physicians about the drugs used for IBS. Apparently, the message about the treatment of IBS failed to gain the attention of the physicians. It is suggested that some messages are sufficiently transmitted through written information, and others that are seen as less relevant or too difficult to implement need more intensive strategies. PMID:2301192

  16. Introducing a drug formulary to general practice — effects on practice prescribing costs

    PubMed Central

    Beardon, P.H.G.; Brown, S.V.; Mowat, D.A.E.; Grant, J.A.; McDevitt, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    A drug formulary comprising 249 preparations of 132 drugs and drug combinations was prepared by the partners in a three-doctor general practice serving more than 5000 patients. No attempt was made to change to generic prescribing nor were repeat prescription drugs altered. Introduction of the formulary in September 1981 was followed by an increase in the proportion of prescriptions containing drugs from the formulary from about 55% to more than 60% for both repeat and non-repeat prescriptions. The proportion of formulary drugs on non-repeat prescriptions reached a maximum of 78% within the first year with the additional influence of information feedback. Over the first year the level of formulary drugs used for both repeat and nonrepeat prescribing levelled off at about 62%. Even with these modest changes, when compared with the costs of general practice prescribing in Scotland as a whole, the introduction of the formulary resulted in savings of approximately 10% within the practice for the mean ingredient costs both per patient and per prescription. PMID:3449632

  17. Should Physicians be Encouraged to use Generic Names and to Prescribe Generic Drugs?

    PubMed

    Riaz, Haris; Krasuski, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    While using the brand names seems like a trivial issue at the outset, using these names is inherently problematic. Cardiovascular drugs remain the most commonly prescribed drugs by the physicians. The junior doctors are likely to introject practices of their seniors and consequently to reciprocate from the experiences learnt from their preceptors. Using the generic names may be one way to facilitate prescription of the generic drugs who have a better cost profile and similar efficacy than the more expensive branded drugs. In this editorial, we have outlined several arguments to suggest the importance of using the generic names in academic discussions and clinical documentation. PMID:27179932

  18. Some current factors influencing the prescribing and use of psychiatric drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, R L

    1992-01-01

    A reprise of selected known factors about the influences affecting the prescribing and use of drugs, and some new developments in the drug marketplace, are the basis for this summary and observations about future expectations regarding psychotherapeutic agents. This information can be used to assist in formulating or updating, or both, conceptualizations and hypotheses for future policy and research planning in this area. PMID:1738808

  19. Prescribing Patterns of Drugs in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS): An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shobitha; Chogtu, Bharti

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by acute respiratory failure and is associated with wide range of clinical disorders. Controversy prevails over the pharmacological intervention in this disease. The aim of the study was to observe the prescribing pattern of drugs in patients with ARDS managed at a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: This observational study was conducted at tertiary care hospital in India. Data of patients admitted from January 2010 to December 2012 was collected. Patients aged more than 18 years admitted in ICU, who were diagnosed to have ARDS during the study period, were included. A total of 150 patients of ARDS were selected. Data was collected as per the pre designed proforma and it included patients’ age, gender, clinical disorders precipitating ARDS, prescribing pattern of drugs and outcome. The data of the subjects was collected till discharge from hospital or death. Results: Infection was the cause of ARDS in 81.3% (n=122) of subjects. Antibiotics were prescribed in all the subjects and beta-lactams were prescribed in 97.3% (n=146). 41.3% (n=62) were prescribed corticosteroids, 39.3% (n=59) diuretics and 89.3% (n=134) intravenous fluids. Conclusion: The outcome of patients on different pharmacological treatment did not show any statistically significant difference. PMID:25859465

  20. The Seattle evaluation of computerized drug profiles: effects on prescribing practices and resource use.

    PubMed

    Koepsell, T D; Gurtel, A L; Diehr, P H; Temkin, N R; Helfand, K H; Gleser, M A; Tompkins, R K

    1983-08-01

    Since 1979, all outpatient pharmacy transactions at the US Public Health Service Hospital in Seattle have been captured in a computer system which generates a profile of each patient's active and previously used drugs. We conducted a controlled trial in which patients were allocated to profile or no-profile groups while the computer continued to collect data on everyone. In all, 41,572 clinic visits made by 6,186 patients were studied. The incidence of preventable drug-drug interactions and redundancies was very low and was unaffected by profiles. For unclear reasons, prescription of two interacting drugs on the same visit was significantly more common for patients with profiles. The duration of drug-drug interaction episodes was significantly shorter for profile group patients, perhaps due to earlier detection of the error on subsequent visits. Profiles had no effect on prescribing volume or coordination of drug refill and visit schedules, but profile group patients made about 5 per cent fewer clinic visits than those in the no-profile group. In this setting, it appears that the prescribing of interacting or redundant drugs is more often due to inadequate provider knowledge than to inaccessible patient-specific drug data. Prevention of such errors would thus require a more active educational or monitoring program. PMID:6688154

  1. Prescribing patterns for older heavy drug users living in the community.

    PubMed

    Grymonpre, R E; Sitar, D S; Montgomery, P R; Mitenko, P A; Aoki, F Y

    1991-02-01

    We report an analysis of prescription drugs claimed under a government-sponsored, universal Pharmacare program for community-dwelling adults aged greater than or equal to 50 years in Manitoba during 1975, 1978, 1981, and 1984. We limited our analysis to claimants who reported over six drugs in a year in order to control for effects of inflation and a changing deductible. The median number of prescribed drugs and the percent of claimants over age 50 years receiving prescriptions from multiple physicians decreased during the course of our study. In this sample of heavy drug users, age and sex did not consistently correlate with overall drug use, although there was correlation for specific drug groups. The relative ranking of prescribed drugs changed over the years, although benzodiazepines, thiazide diuretics, topical steroids, and codeine-containing analgesics remained near the top. Barbiturates and topical antibiotics showed the greatest drop in prescription rates; acetaminophen and beta-blockers increased the most. Using these community data, we project the prevalence of drug-related adverse events to be highest with beta-blockers, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, thiazide diuretics, and benzodiazepines. PMID:2058191

  2. Psychotropic drug prescribing in an Australian specialist child and adolescent eating disorder service: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To describe the rates, indications, and adverse effects of psychotropic drug prescription in a specialist tertiary hospital child and adolescent eating disorder service. Methods Retrospective case note study of all active eating disorder patients (N = 115) over the period of treatment from referral to time of study (M = 2 years), covering patient demographics, clinical characteristics, drug prescriptions, indications, and adverse effects. Results Psychotropic drugs were prescribed in 45% of cases, most commonly antidepressants (41%), followed by anxiolytics (29%) and antipsychotics (22%), with 8% initiated before referral to the specialist eating disorder program. Common indications were depressed mood, agitation, anxiety, and insomnia. Patient clinical severity and complexity was associated with prescribing. Adverse effects, mostly minor, were recorded in 23% of antidepressant prescriptions, 39% of antipsychotic prescriptions, and 13% of anxiolytic prescriptions. Second generation antipsychotic prescription was associated with subsequent new onset binge eating, in this preliminary observational study. Self-harm by overdose of psychotropics occurred in 11% of patients prescribed medication. Conclusions Psychotropic medications were frequently prescribed to adolescent eating disorder patients to treat distressing symptoms. Prospective randomised controlled trials to clarify efficacy and safety are needed. Given the difficulties of conducting clinical trials in this population, services are encouraged to monitor and audit medication safety and efficacy in everyday practice, and to report their findings. PMID:24999406

  3. Identification and prevalence of adverse drug events caused by potentially inappropriate medication in homebound elderly patients: a retrospective study using a nationwide survey in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Onda, Mitsuko; Imai, Hirohisa; Takada, Yurina; Fujii, Shingo; Shono, Takako; Nanaumi, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A nationwide large-scale survey was conducted to identify the prevalence and causal medications of adverse drug events (ADEs) that are caused by potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) given to homebound elderly patients, factors associated with ADEs, and measures taken by pharmacists to manage ADEs and their effects on ADEs. Settings A questionnaire was mailed to 3321 pharmacies nationwide. It asked about the details of PIMs and ADEs of up to 5 patients for whom home visits were provided by a pharmacist. Questionnaire forms were filled in by pharmacists who visited the patients. Design and participants Between 23 January and 13 February 2013, comprehensive assessment forms were sent to 3321 pharmacies. Data collected from 1890 pharmacies including data of 4815 patients were analysed and 28 patients of unknown sex were excluded. Their average age was 82.7 years. PIMs were identified based on the 2003 Beers Criteria Japan. Results There were 600 patients who did not provide valid answers regarding the medications. In the remaining 4243 patients, one or more medications that were considered to be PIMs had been prescribed to 48.4% of patients. PIM-induced ADEs were found in 8% of these patients by pharmacists during home visits. The top ADE-inducing medications were strong anticholinergic antihistamines, benzodiazepines, sulpiride and digoxin. The most common ADEs associated with benzodiazepines were frequent lightheadedness, somnolence and sleepiness, which increase the risk of falls and subsequent fractures in elderly patients. The following factors associated with ADEs were identified: sex, pharmacist awareness of prescription issues, frequency of visits and time spent at patients’ homes, and the frequency of detailed checks for patient adverse reactions by pharmacists. Conclusions The PIM prevalence associated with home healthcare in Japan was relatively high, as reported in previous studies. The present study suggests that pharmacists could

  4. The Development and Evaluation of an Integrated Electronic Prescribing and Drug Management System for Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Tamblyn, Robyn; Huang, Allen; Kawasumi, Yuko; Bartlett, Gillian; Grad, Roland; Jacques, André; Dawes, Martin; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Perreault, Robert; Taylor, Laurel; Winslade, Nancy; Poissant, Lise; Pinsonneault, Alain

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To develop and evaluate the acceptability and use of an integrated electronic prescribing and drug management system (MOXXI) for primary care physicians. Design: A 20-month follow-up study of MOXXI (Medical Office of the XXIst Century) implementation in 28 primary care physicians and 13,515 consenting patients. Measurement: MOXXI was developed to enhance patient safety by integrating patient demographics, retrieving active drugs from pharmacy systems, generating an automated problem list, and providing electronic prescription, stop order, automated prescribing problem alerts, and compliance monitoring functions. Evaluation of technical performance, acceptability, and use was conducted using audit trails, questionnaires, standardized tasks, and information from comprehensive health insurance databases. Results: Perceived improvements in continuity of care and professional autonomy were associated with physicians' expected use of MOXXI. Physician speed in using MOXXI improved substantially in the first three months; however, only the represcribing function was faster using MOXXI than by handwritten prescription. Physicians wrote electronic prescriptions in 36.9 per 100 visits and reviewed the patient's drug profile in 12.6 per 100 visits. Physicians rated printed prescriptions, the current drug list, and the represcribing function as the most beneficial aspects of the system. Physicians were more likely to use the drug profile for patients who used more medication, made more emergency department visits, had more prescribing physicians, and lower continuity of care. Conclusion: Primary care physicians believed an integrated electronic prescribing and drug management system would improve continuity of care, and they were more likely to use the system for patients with more complex, fragmented care. PMID:16357357

  5. Methods to reduce prescribing errors in elderly patients with multimorbidity.

    PubMed

    Lavan, Amanda H; Gallagher, Paul F; O'Mahony, Denis

    2016-01-01

    The global population of multimorbid older people is growing steadily. Multimorbidity is the principal cause of complex polypharmacy, which in turn is the prime risk factor for inappropriate prescribing and adverse drug reactions and events. Those who prescribe for older frailer multimorbid people are particularly prone to committing prescribing errors of various kinds. The causes of prescribing errors in this patient population are multifaceted and complex, including prescribers' lack of knowledge of aging physiology, geriatric medicine, and geriatric pharmacotherapy, overprescribing that frequently leads to major polypharmacy, inappropriate prescribing, and inappropriate drug omission. This review examines the various ways of minimizing prescribing errors in multimorbid older people. The role of education in physician prescribers and clinical pharmacists, the use of implicit and explicit prescribing criteria designed to improve medication appropriateness in older people, and the application of information and communication-technology systems to minimize errors are discussed in detail. Although evidence to support any single intervention to prevent prescribing errors in multimorbid elderly people is inconclusive or lacking, published data support focused prescriber education in geriatric pharmacotherapy, routine application of STOPP/START (screening tool of older people's prescriptions/screening tool to alert to right treatment) criteria for potentially inappropriate prescribing, electronic prescribing, and close liaison between clinical pharmacists and physicians in relation to structured medication review and reconciliation. Carrying out a structured medication review aimed at optimizing pharmacotherapy in this vulnerable patient population presents a major challenge. Another challenge is to design, build, validate, and test by clinical trials suitably versatile and efficient software engines that can reliably and swiftly perform complex medication reviews in

  6. Did FDA Decisionmaking Affect Anti-Psychotic Drug Prescribing in Children?: A Time-Trend Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Franklin, Jessica M.; Eddings, Wesley; Landon, Joan; Kesselheim, Aaron S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Following Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval, many drugs are prescribed for non-FDA-approved (“off-label”) uses. If substantial evidence supports the efficacy and safety of off-label indications, manufacturers can pursue formal FDA approval through supplemental new drug applications (sNDAs). We evaluated the effect of FDA determinations on pediatric sNDAs for antipsychotic drugs on prescribing of these products in children. Methods Retrospective, segmented time-series analysis using new prescription claims during 2003–2012 for three atypical antipsychotics (olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone). FDA approved the sNDAs for pediatric use of olanzapine and quetiapine in December 2009, but did not approve the sNDA for pediatric use of ziprasidone. Results During the months before FDA approval of its pediatric sNDA, new prescriptions of olanzapine decreased for both children and adults. After FDA approval, the increase in prescribing trends was similar for both age groups (P = 0.47 for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder; P = 0.37 for other indications). Comparable decreases in use of quetiapine were observed between pediatrics and adults following FDA approval of its pediatric sNDA (P = 0.88; P = 0.63). Prescribing of ziprasidone decreased similarly for pediatric and adult patients after FDA non-approval of its pediatric sNDA (P = 0.61; P = 0.79). Conclusions The FDA’s sNDA determinations relating to use of antipsychotics in children did not result in changes in use that favored the approved sNDAs and disfavored the unapproved sNDA. Improved communication may help translate the agency’s expert judgments to clinical practice. PMID:27032095

  7. Impact of separating drug prescribing and dispensing on provider behaviour: Taiwan's experience.

    PubMed

    Chou, Y J; Yip, Winnie C; Lee, Cheng-Hua; Huang, Nicole; Sun, Ying-Pei; Chang, Hong-Jen

    2003-09-01

    In many Asian countries, physicians both prescribe and dispense drugs. This practice is hypothesized to have caused high drug expenditure and widespread prescription of antibiotics in Asia. Recently, Taiwan implemented the separation policy on an experimental basis. This paper's objective is to empirically evaluate the impact of Taiwan's reform to separate drug prescribing and dispensing on drug expenditure and total health expenditure. The research design consists of a pre/post comparison of the experimental with the control sites (difference-in-difference). Separation policy was implemented in Kaohsung and Taipei in March 1997, and expanded to Chia-yi and Taichung in March 1998. Changes in drug prescription behaviour before and after implementation in these two pairs of experimental cities were compared to Hsin-chu and Tainan (control), where separation policy was not implemented during the study period. To reduce resistance, providers in experimental sites were allowed to hire on-site pharmacists and dispense drugs through them if they chose to do so. Our study sample consists of all outpatient visits to clinics in the study sites between December 1996 and June 1998, with a total of 55.23 million claim records. The drug prescription rate, drug expenditure and total health expenditure per visit were the main outcome measures. We found that the probability of prescription and drug expenditure per visit were, respectively, 17-34% and 12-36% less among visits to clinics without on-site pharmacists, compared with the control sites. However, no difference in total health expenditure was found between these two types of visits. Hence, the separation policy could be effective in reducing drug expenditure and affecting prescription behaviour, but is less certain as a policy for reducing total health expenditure. We also found that the policy has practically no effect on clinics that have on-site pharmacists. PMID:12917273

  8. Best practice strategies to safeguard drug prescribing and drug administration: an anthology of expert views and opinions.

    PubMed

    Seidling, Hanna M; Stützle, Marion; Hoppe-Tichy, Torsten; Allenet, Benoît; Bedouch, Pierrick; Bonnabry, Pascal; Coleman, Jamie J; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando; Lovis, Christian; Rei, Maria Jose; Störzinger, Dominic; Taylor, Lenka A; Pontefract, Sarah K; van den Bemt, Patricia M L A; van der Sijs, Heleen; Haefeli, Walter E

    2016-04-01

    Background While evidence on implementation of medication safety strategies is increasing, reasons for selecting and relinquishing distinct strategies and details on implementation are typically not shared in published literature. Objective We aimed to collect and structure expert information resulting from implementing medication safety strategies to provide advice for decision-makers. Setting Medication safety experts with clinical expertise from thirteen hospitals throughout twelve European and North American countries shared their experience in workshop meetings, on-site-visits and remote structured interviews. Methods We performed an expert-based, in-depth assessment of implementation of best-practice strategies to improve drug prescribing and drug administration. Main outcome measures Workflow, variability and recommended medication safety strategies in drug prescribing and drug administration processes. Results According to the experts, institutions chose strategies that targeted process steps known to be particularly error-prone in the respective setting. Often, the selection was channeled by local constraints such as the e-health equipment and critically modulated by national context factors. In our study, the experts favored electronic prescribing with clinical decision support and medication reconciliation as most promising interventions. They agreed that self-assessment and introduction of medication safety boards were crucial to satisfy the setting-specific differences and foster successful implementation. Conclusion While general evidence for implementation of strategies to improve medication safety exists, successful selection and adaptation of a distinct strategy requires a thorough knowledge of the institute-specific constraints and an ongoing monitoring and adjustment of the implemented measures. PMID:26964781

  9. Meaningful use stage 2 e-prescribing threshold and adverse drug events in the Medicare Part D population with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Meghan Hufstader; Encinosa, William; Mostashari, Farzad; Bynum, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Evidence supports the potential for e-prescribing to reduce the incidence of adverse drug events (ADEs) in hospital-based studies, but studies in the ambulatory setting have not used occurrence of ADE as their outcome. Using the “prescription origin code” in 2011 Medicare Part D prescription drug events files, the authors investigate whether physicians who meet the meaningful use stage 2 threshold for e-prescribing (≥50% of prescriptions e-prescribed) have lower rates of ADEs among their diabetic patients. Risk of any patient with diabetes in the provider’s panel having an ADE from anti-diabetic medications was modeled adjusted for prescriber and patient panel characteristics. Physician e-prescribing to Medicare beneficiaries was associated with reduced risk of ADEs among their diabetes patients (Odds Ratio: 0.95; 95% CI, 0.94-0.96), as were several prescriber and panel characteristics. However, these physicians treated fewer patients from disadvantaged populations. PMID:25948698

  10. Methods to reduce prescribing errors in elderly patients with multimorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Lavan, Amanda H; Gallagher, Paul F; O’Mahony, Denis

    2016-01-01

    The global population of multimorbid older people is growing steadily. Multimorbidity is the principal cause of complex polypharmacy, which in turn is the prime risk factor for inappropriate prescribing and adverse drug reactions and events. Those who prescribe for older frailer multimorbid people are particularly prone to committing prescribing errors of various kinds. The causes of prescribing errors in this patient population are multifaceted and complex, including prescribers’ lack of knowledge of aging physiology, geriatric medicine, and geriatric pharmacotherapy, overprescribing that frequently leads to major polypharmacy, inappropriate prescribing, and inappropriate drug omission. This review examines the various ways of minimizing prescribing errors in multimorbid older people. The role of education in physician prescribers and clinical pharmacists, the use of implicit and explicit prescribing criteria designed to improve medication appropriateness in older people, and the application of information and communication-technology systems to minimize errors are discussed in detail. Although evidence to support any single intervention to prevent prescribing errors in multimorbid elderly people is inconclusive or lacking, published data support focused prescriber education in geriatric pharmacotherapy, routine application of STOPP/START (screening tool of older people’s prescriptions/screening tool to alert to right treatment) criteria for potentially inappropriate prescribing, electronic prescribing, and close liaison between clinical pharmacists and physicians in relation to structured medication review and reconciliation. Carrying out a structured medication review aimed at optimizing pharmacotherapy in this vulnerable patient population presents a major challenge. Another challenge is to design, build, validate, and test by clinical trials suitably versatile and efficient software engines that can reliably and swiftly perform complex medication reviews

  11. Gaps in Drug Dosing for Obese Children: A Systematic Review of Commonly Prescribed Acute Care Medications

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Stevie; Siegel, David; Benjamin, Daniel K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 1 out of 6 children in the United States is obese. This has important implications for drug dosing and safety, as pharmacokinetic (PK) changes are known to occur in obesity due to altered body composition and physiology. Inappropriate drug dosing can limit therapeutic efficacy and increase drug-related toxicity for obese children. Few systematic reviews examining PK and drug dosing in obese children have been performed. Methods We identified 25 acute care drugs from the Strategic National Stockpile and Acute Care Supportive Drugs List and performed a systematic review for each drug in 3 study populations: obese children (2–18 years of age), normal weight children, and obese adults. For each study population, we first reviewed a drug’s Food and Drug Administration (FDA) label, followed by a systematic literature review. From the literature, we extracted drug PK data, biochemical properties, and dosing information. We then reviewed data in 3 age subpopulations (2–7 years, 8–12 years, and 13–18 years) for obese and normal weight children and by route of drug administration (intramuscular, intravenous, by mouth, and inhaled). If sufficient PK data were not available by age/route of administration, a data gap was identified. Findings Only 2/25 acute care drugs (8%) contained dosing information on the FDA label for each obese children and adults compared with 22/25 (88%) for normal weight children. We found no sufficient PK data in the literature for any of the acute care drugs in obese children. Sufficient PK data were found for 7/25 acute care drugs (28%) in normal weight children and 3/25 (12%) in obese adults. Implications Insufficient information exists to guide dosing in obese children for any of the acute care drugs reviewed. This knowledge gap is alarming, given the known PK changes that occur in the setting of obesity. Future clinical trials examining the PK of acute care medications in obese children should be prioritized. PMID

  12. Review of Top 10 Prescribed Drugs and Their Interaction with Dental Treatment.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Robert J; Johnson, Michael P

    2016-04-01

    The proportion of people over age 60 is growing faster than any other group. Many patients take several medications to manage multiple chronic medical conditions. Poor oral health is common and dental visits by patients over the age of 65 are increasing. The dentist must recognize that these medications may interact with dental treatment. This article reviews the top 10 prescribed drugs as listed in the IMS Institute national prescription audit in January 2015 and reviews the interactions between these medications and dental treatment. The medications reviewed include levothyroxine, acetaminophen/hydrocodone, lisinopril, metoprolol, atorvastatin, amlodipine, metformin, omeprazole, simvastatin, and albuterol. PMID:27040293

  13. What Should Junior Doctors Know about the Drugs they Frequently Prescribe? A Delphi Study among Physicians in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, David; Disselhorst, Guus; Jansen, Bernard; Tichelaar, Jelle; van Agtmael, Michiel; de Vries, Theo; Richir, Milan

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the information about commonly prescribed drugs that junior doctors should know in order to prescribe rationally in daily practice, defined as essential drug knowledge (EDK). A two-round Internet Delphi study was carried out involving general practitioners from one practice cluster, and registrars and consultants from two Dutch academic and eight teaching hospitals. A preliminary list of 377 potential EDK items for three commonly prescribed drugs was assessed on a dichotomous scale; an item was considered EDK if at least 80% consensus was reached. The consensus list of EDK items was discussed by the research team to identify similarities between the three drugs, with a view to forming a list of general EDK items applicable to other commonly prescribed drugs. Sixty experts considered 93 of the 377 items (25%) as EDK. These items were then used to form a list of 10 general EDK items. The list of EDK items identified by primary and secondary care doctors could be used in medical curricula and training programmes and for assessing the prescribing competence of future junior doctors. Further research is needed to evaluate the generalizability of this list for other commonly prescribed drugs. PMID:26506082

  14. Influence of an e-mail with a drug information attachment on sales of prescribed drugs: a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Edward, Christina; Himmelmann, Anders; Wallerstedt, Susanna M

    2007-01-01

    Background To provide doctors with producer-independent information to facilitate choice of treatment is an important task. The objective of the present study was to evaluate if an e-mail with a drug information attachment has effects on sales of prescribed drugs and if the design of the attachment is of importance. Methods The Swedish pharmaceutical benefit board found rizatriptan (Maxalt®) 10 mg to be the most cost-effective triptan. All 119 heads of primary care units in western Sweden were randomized to receive information concerning this conclusion via (i) e-mail with attachment I, (ii) e-mail with attachment II or (iii) no information (control). Attachment I was a short one (heading plus three lines text), whereas attachment II was a long one (heading plus one page text and one page with tables). The change in percentage rizatriptan of total triptans sold before and after the intervention (May – July 2004 and May – July 2005, respectively) was compared between the groups. Results Totally 48,229 (2004) and 50,674 (2005) defined daily doses of triptans were prescribed and sold during May – July in primary care units in the western part of Sweden. The absolute change in percentage rizatriptan was greater in the intervention groups compared with the control group 2 (25th – 75th percentile: -3 – 7) vs 0 (-7 - 5), P = 0.031). The absolute change in percentage rizatriptan did not differ between the two attachment groups (P = 0.93). Conclusion An e-mail with a drug information attachment may influence sales of prescribed drugs. No difference between different designs of the attachment could be detected. PMID:17942000

  15. Knowledge and attitudes of the pharmacists, prescribers and patients towards generic drug use in Istanbul – Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Toklu, Hale Z.; Dülger, Gül A.; Hıdıroğlu, Seyhan; Akici, Ahmet; Yetim, Aslıhan; Gannemoğlu, H. Mustafa; Güneş, Haşim

    The use of generic drugs has increased significantly in recent years. Since generic drugs are available at a lower cost, they provide an opportunity for savings in drug expenditure. Thus, use of generic drugs is encouraged especially in developing countries. There are only a few studies concerning the perceptions and attitudes of the healthcare providers and patients towards generic drug use. Methods The present study was conducted by a face to face questionnaire in the Kadikoy district of Istanbul in April 2010. From randomly chosen respondents, 68 pharmacists, 56 prescribers and 101 patients consented to participate in the study. Results Thirty one and 32 % of the pharmacists and prescribers, respectively, expressed that they believed that the generics did not differ from the original drugs, whereas only 24% of the patients believed so. Forty percent of the pharmacists and 82% of the prescribers told that they were unsure about the bioequivalence of the generics. Ten percent of the patients claimed that they immediately accept generic substitution by the pharmacist, while 26% accepted it if it was substituted by the prescriber. Cost was the most important factor taken into consideration about generic substitution (92% for prescribers; 83% for patients and 82% for pharmacists). Conclusions Our findings demonstrated that healthcare providers as well as the drug consumers have insufficient knowledge about generic drugs. Therefore, they should be better educated with respect to generic substitution. PMID:24155838

  16. Awareness about prescribed drugs among patients attending Out-patient departments

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jaswinder; Singh, Narinder; Kumar, Rahat; Bhandari, Vikram; Kaur, Navpreet; Dureja, Sheveta

    2013-01-01

    Background: Communication skills play an important role in establishing doctor-patient relationship is widely recognized throughout the world. The information passed on to the patients affects the treatment outcomes. Objectives: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the level of awareness among OPD patients about prescribed drugs. Materials and Methods: A total of two hundred sixty four patients having a valid prescription from a doctor practicing in allopathic system, visiting 4 different chemist shops in a North Indian city were enrolled in the study. All the enrolled patients were given a preformed questionnaire to be answered on the spot. Results: It was found that though a considerable number of patients were aware about the therapeutic effects of the drugs and the manner of administration of the medicines; they lacked information regarding the side effects, warnings and the information their doctor may require at the next consultation. Conclusion: The study highlighted the fact that doctors need to spend more time with the patients to make them active participants in the drug therapy. PMID:23776839

  17. Do drug advertisements in Russian medical journals provide essential information for safe prescribing?

    PubMed Central

    Vlassov, Vasiliy; Mansfield, Peter; Lexchin, Joel; Vlassova, Anna

    2001-01-01

    Objective To examine pharmaceutical advertisements in medical journals for their adequacy of information. Methods We selected a convenience sample of 5 major Russian medical journals covering different fields of medicine and different types of publications. We evaluated all the ads in all the issues of the selected journals published during 1998. We counted the number of appearances of trade, chemical, and generic names; indication and contraindication; pharmacologic group; safety warnings; and references. Counts in all categories were aggregated for each advertiser. Results There were 397 placements of 207 distinct advertisements. Only 154 placements (40%) mentioned the generic name, 177 (45%) mentioned any indication, 42 (11%) mentioned safety warnings and contraindications, 21 (5%) warned about drug interactions, and 8 (2%) provided references. The 6 companies responsible for the most ads on average provided less information than the other companies. Conclusions Almost none of the drug ads published in Russian medical journals provide the basic information required for appropriate prescribing. This is despite the fact that in Russia, ads that omit essential information and that could lead consumers to misunderstandings about an advertised product are illegal. The arrival of drug advertising in Russia has brought little information and has been potentially damaging. PMID:11381003

  18. Latest trends in ADHD drug prescribing patterns in children in the UK: prevalence, incidence and persistence

    PubMed Central

    Beau-Lejdstrom, Raphaelle; Douglas, Ian; Evans, Stephen J W; Smeeth, Liam

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) drug prescribing in children under 16 years old in the UK between 1992 and 2013. Methods All patients under 16 registered in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) with a minimum of 1 year of observation time and who received at least one prescription of any ADHD drug between 1 January 1992 and 31 December 2013.Trends in prevalence and incidence of use of ADHD drugs in children were calculated between 1995 and 2013 and persistence in new users was estimated. Results The prevalence of ADHD drug use in children under 16 increased 34-fold overall, rising from 1.5 95% CI (1.1 to 2.0) per 10 000 children in 1995 to 50.7 95% CI (49.2 to 52.1) per 10 000 children in 2008 then stabilising to 51.1 95% CI (49.7 to 52.6) per 10 000 children in 2013. The rate of new users increased eightfold reaching 10.2 95% CI (9.5 to 10.9) per 10 000 children in 2007 then decreasing to 9.1 95% CI (8.5 to 9.7) per 10 000 children in 2013. Although prevalence and incidence increased rather steeply after 1995, this trend seems to halt from 2008 onwards. We identified that 77%, 95% CI (76% to 78%) of children were still under treatment after 1 year and 60% 95% CI (59% to 61%) after 2 years. Conclusions There was a marked increase in ADHD drug use among children in the UK from 1992 until around 2008, with stable levels of use since then. UK children show relatively long persistence of treatment with ADHD medications compared to other countries. PMID:27297009

  19. Dental prescribing in Wales and associated public health issues.

    PubMed

    Karki, A J; Holyfield, G; Thomas, D

    2011-01-01

    Dental prescribing data in Wales have not been studied in detail previously. The analysis of national data available from Health Solutions Wales showed that dental prescribing in Wales accounted for 9% of total antibacterial prescribing in primary care in 2008. Penicillin and metronidazole constituted the bulk of antibiotics prescribed by dentists. Since the publication of National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidance (March 2008) on prophylaxis against infective endocarditis, dental prescriptions for amoxicillin 3g sachets and clindamycin capsules have decreased. Dental prescriptions for fluoride preparations increased in number from 2007 to 2008. Dental prescribing of controlled drugs raises no concern. The figure for antibiotic prescribing in Wales is similar to that of England. Nevertheless, the figure seems a little high, indicating potential inappropriate prescribing behaviour among dentists. Antibiotic resistance is a major public health issue and many patients each year die from infections from bacterial strains that are resistant to one or more antibiotics. Inappropriate use of antibiotics is a major cause of antibiotic resistance and every effort should be made to reduce the number of inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions in dental practice. PMID:21164522

  20. Utilization of potentially inappropriate medications in elderly patients in a tertiary care teaching hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    Jhaveri, Binit N.; Patel, Tejas K.; Barvaliya, Manish J; Tripathi, Chandrabhanu

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the use of potentially inappropriate medicines in elderly inpatients in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis was performed for cases of elderly patients admitted between January 2010 and December 2010. Data on age, gender, diagnosis, duration of hospital stay, treatment, and outcome were collected. Prescriptions were assessed for the use of potentially inappropriate medications in geriatric patients by using American Geriatric Society Beer's criteria (2012) and PRISCUS list (2010). Results: A total of 676 geriatric patients (52.12% females) were admitted in the medicine ward. The average age of geriatric patients was 72.69 years. According to Beer's criteria, at least one inappropriate medicine was prescribed in 590 (87.3%) patients. Metoclopramide (54.3%), alprazolam (9%), diazepam (8%), digoxin > 0.125 mg/day (5%), and diclofenac (3.7%) were the commonly used inappropriate medications. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in heart and renal failure patients was the commonly identified drug–disease interaction. According to PRISCUS list, at least one inappropriate medication was prescribed in 210 (31.06%) patients. Conclusion: Use of inappropriate medicines is highly prevalent in elderly patients. PMID:25276629

  1. Inappropriateness of Medication Prescriptions to Elderly Patients in the Primary Care Setting: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Opondo, Dedan; Eslami, Saied; Visscher, Stefan; de Rooij, Sophia E.; Verheij, Robert; Korevaar, Joke C.; Abu-Hanna, Ameen

    2012-01-01

    Background Inappropriate medication prescription is a common cause of preventable adverse drug events among elderly persons in the primary care setting. Objective The aim of this systematic review is to quantify the extent of inappropriate prescription to elderly persons in the primary care setting. Methods We systematically searched Ovid-Medline and Ovid-EMBASE from 1950 and 1980 respectively to March 2012. Two independent reviewers screened and selected primary studies published in English that measured (in)appropriate medication prescription among elderly persons (>65 years) in the primary care setting. We extracted data sources, instruments for assessing medication prescription appropriateness, and the rate of inappropriate medication prescriptions. We grouped the reported individual medications according to the Anatomical Therapeutic and Chemical (ATC) classification and compared the median rate of inappropriate medication prescription and its range within each therapeutic class. Results We included 19 studies, 14 of which used the Beers criteria as the instrument for assessing appropriateness of prescriptions. The median rate of inappropriate medication prescriptions (IMP) was 20.5% [IQR 18.1 to 25.6%.]. Medications with largest median rate of inappropriate medication prescriptions were propoxyphene 4.52(0.10–23.30)%, doxazosin 3.96 (0.32 15.70)%, diphenhydramine 3.30(0.02–4.40)% and amitriptiline 3.20 (0.05–20.5)% in a decreasing order of IMP rate. Available studies described unequal sets of medications and different measurement tools to estimate the overall prevalence of inappropriate prescription. Conclusions Approximately one in five prescriptions to elderly persons in primary care is inappropropriate despite the attention that has been directed to quality of prescription. Diphenhydramine and amitriptiline are the most common inappropriately prescribed medications with high risk adverse events while propoxyphene and doxazoxin are the most commonly

  2. Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Inquiry in Psychiatric Assessment: Detection of High Rates of Opioid Prescribing to a Dual Diagnosis Population

    PubMed Central

    Hackman, Daniel T.; Greene, Marion S.; Fernandes, Taya J.; Brown, Ashley M.; Wright, Eric R.; Chambers, R. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Objective An epidemic of prescription drug abuse is disproportionately impacting the mentally ill. We examined the utility of a state prescription drug monitoring database for assessing recent controlled substance prescribing to patients presenting for dual diagnosis treatment. Method In a community mental health center that provides integrated dual diagnosis care, we queried the Indiana Scheduled Prescription Electronic Collection and Tracking (INSPECT) system for all cases that were open as of August 2, 2011, and had been practitioner-diagnosed (per DSM-IV criteria) by January 2, 2012. INSPECT provided a record of controlled substance dispensations to each patient; diagnostic evaluation was conducted blind from prescription data compilation covering the prior 12 months. Demographic data, insurance status, and DSM-IV diagnoses were compiled from the clinic's electronic medical record. Results The sample (N = 201) was 51% female, 56% white, and two-thirds uninsured. Over 80% were dually diagnosed with substance use disorders and psychotic, mood, or anxiety disorders. Nicotine and alcohol disorders were identified in most, with about a third diagnosed with cannabis, cocaine, or opioid disorders. A majority of patients (n = 115) had been prescribed opioids in the prior year, with nearly 1 in 5 prescribed an opioid and benzodiazepine simultaneously. Patients were dispensed a mean of 4 opioid prescriptions and 213 opioid pills. More opioid prescriptions correlated with opioid dependence (OR = 1.08; 95% CI, 1.016–1.145), and more prescribers correlated with personality disorder diagnoses (OR = 1.112; 95% CI, 1.001–1.235). Higher rates and riskier patterns of controlled substance prescribing were identified in patients with Medicaid/Medicare insurance compared to uninsured patients. Conclusions Prescription drug monitoring is a powerful tool for assessing addictions and high frequencies of patient exposures to prescribed opioids in a dual diagnosis clinic. Improved

  3. Clinical implications of prescribing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in oral health care--a review.

    PubMed

    Nagi, Ravleen; Yashoda Devi, B K; Rakesh, N; Reddy, Sujatha S; Patil, Deepa Jatti

    2015-03-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including both the traditional nonselective NSAIDs and the selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors, are widely used for their anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. They are routinely prescribed in dental practice for the management of pain and swelling. Their use in treating acute dental pain and chronic orofacial pain, as adjuncts to the treatment of periodontal disease, and to minimize edema following surgical procedures is well documented. However, long-term utilization of nonselective NSAIDs could increase the risk of gastrointestinal symptoms, ranging from mild (e.g., dyspepsia, nausea, or vomiting) to serious gastric problems (e.g., gastric bleeding or perforation). Therefore, selective COX-2 inhibitors have been developed with fewer GI side effects but the recently identified cardiovascular adverse reactions limit their routine use in dental practice. Another major concern for oral physicians is NSAID-induced mucosal lesions and prolongation of bleeding time during invasive dental procedures. This article reviews therapeutic and analgesic uses of NSAIDs in dentistry. The various issues surrounding NSAID-induced adverse reactions and their implications in dentistry are also discussed. PMID:25617120

  4. Antisecretory effect of prescribed appetite stimulator drug cyproheptadine in rat intestine.

    PubMed

    Meddah, Bouchra; Limas-Nzouzi, Nicolas; Mamadou, Godefroy; Miantezila, Joe; Soudy, Imar Djibrine; Eto, Bruno

    2014-06-01

    Cyproheptadine (Cph) is an antiserotoninergic and antihistaminergic agent with alpha-blocking activity and central sedative effect. Cph has been found to be effective in stimulating appetite, but to our knowledge, its direct effects on the intestine have not been documented. We aimed to assess the antisecretory effects of Cph in rat proximal colon using Ussing chambers' technique. In basal and serotonin (5-HT)-stimulated conditions, Cph induced a dose-dependent reduction in short-circuit current (Isc). This effect was different in fed vs. fasted rats (EC50 = 1.9 × 10(-5 ) m and 4.9 × 10(-5 ) m, respectively). As expected, Cph induced a marked dose-dependent rightward shift of the concentration-response curve to 5-HT (pA2 = 5.4). The effect of Cph was found to be close to that of antisecretory agents in the following sequence: peptide YY > somatostatin > clonidine > Cph > C7-sorbin. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that Cph has a direct effect on the inhibition of electrogenic ionic secretion in intestinal epithelium in vitro. Our results indicate that Cph can modulate the intestinal transport of electrolytes and provide a new insight into the peripheral effects of this drug, which is frequently prescribed as appetite stimulator in developing countries. PMID:23565811

  5. Sex differences in the risk of receiving potentially inappropriate prescriptions among older adults

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Steven G.; Weymann, Deirdre; Pratt, Brandy; Smolina, Kate; Gladstone, Emilie J.; Raymond, Colette; Mintzes, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: to measure sex differences in the risk of receiving potentially inappropriate prescription drugs and to examine what are the factors that contribute to these differences. Design: a retrospective cohort study. Setting: community setting of British Columbia, Canada. Participants: residents of British Columbia aged 65 and older (n = 660,679). Measurements: we measured 2013 period prevalence of prescription dispensations satisfying the American Geriatrics Society's 2012 version of the Beers Criteria for potentially inappropriate medication use in older adults. We used logistic regressions to test for associations between this outcome and a number of clinical and socioeconomic factors. Results: a larger share of women (31%) than of men (26%) filled one or more potentially inappropriate prescription in the community. The odds of receiving potentially inappropriate prescriptions are associated with several clinical and socioeconomic factors. After controlling for those factors, community-dwelling women were at 16% higher odds of receiving a potentially inappropriate prescription than men (adjusted odds ratio = 1.16, 95% confidence interval = 1.12–1.21). Much of this sex difference stemmed from women's increased odds of receiving potentially inappropriate prescriptions for benzodiazepines and other hypnotics, for tertiary tricyclic antidepressants and for non-selective NSAIDs. Conclusion: there are significant sex differences in older adults' risk of receiving a potentially inappropriate prescription as a result of complex intersections between gender and other social constructs. Appropriate responses will therefore require changes in the information, norms and expectations of both prescribers and patients. PMID:27151390

  6. Optimizing antimicrobial prescribing.

    PubMed

    Isturiz, Raul E

    2010-11-01

    Antibiotics are universally prescribed drugs. Because they exert selective pressure and because of the innate bacterial ability for adaptation, even the appropriate clinical use of these potentially life-preserving agents inevitably fosters the development and spread of resistance by a variety of microorganisms. Inappropriate use has accelerated and increased the magnitude of a problem that is now considered a public health crisis. For Gram-positive pathogens some compounds offer limited hope, but for Gram-negative organisms no new drugs with radically increased spectra are available for clinical trials. Patients with serious infections due to multiresistant organisms are experiencing adverse, sometimes fatal, clinical outcomes. Use of multiple drugs increases side effects and exposes additional susceptible bacteria to selective pressure. There is evidence that the appropriate use of currently available antibiotics can be associated with a reduction of the spread of resistance. Antibiotic stewardship programmes and the antibiotic 'care bundle' approach can be effective measures to lengthen the useful life of antibiotics and can be implemented in most clinical situations. PMID:21129628

  7. Use of potentially inappropriate medications in hospitalized elderly at a teaching hospital: A comparison between Beers 2003 and 2012 criteria

    PubMed Central

    Momin, Taufik G.; Pandya, Rushi N.; Rana, Devang A.; Patel, Varsha J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To detect the prevalence and pattern of use of Potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) in hospitalized elderly patients of a tertiary care teaching hospital using Beers 2012 criteria and to compare the same with Beers 2003 criteria. Materials and Methods: Prescriptions of the elderly patients aged 65 years and above were collected from the medicine ward and analyzed. PIMs were identified with help of Beers 2003 and Beers 2012 criteria and comparison was made between the two criteria. Predictors associated with use of PIM were identified using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: A total of 210 patients received 2,267 drugs. According to Beers 2003 criteria, 60 (28.57%) elderly patients received at least one PIM and 2.9% drugs were prescribed inappropriately. According to Beers 2012 criteria, 84 (40%) elderly received at least one PIM while 22 (10.47%) received multiple PIMs and about 5% drugs were prescribed inappropriately. The most commonly prescribed PIM was mineral oil-liquid paraffin (30, 14.3%) followed by spironolactone (25, 11.9%), digoxin (19, 9%), and benzodiazepines (14, 6.7%). There was a significant association between the number of patients receiving more than six drugs and the use of PIMs (P < 0.01). Use of more than 10 drugs was a significant predictor for use of PIMs in the elderly. Conclusion: The study shows high prevalence of prescribing PIMs in hospitalized elderly patients. Beers 2012 criteria are more effective in identifying PIMs than Beers 2003 criteria. PMID:24347769

  8. 42 CFR 440.120 - Prescribed drugs, dentures, prosthetic devices, and eyeglasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... records. (b) “Dentures” are artificial structures made by or under the direction of a dentist to replace a... body. (d) “Eyeglasses” means lenses, including frames, and other aids to vision prescribed by...

  9. 42 CFR 440.120 - Prescribed drugs, dentures, prosthetic devices, and eyeglasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... records. (b) “Dentures” are artificial structures made by or under the direction of a dentist to replace a... body. (d) “Eyeglasses” means lenses, including frames, and other aids to vision prescribed by...

  10. 42 CFR 440.120 - Prescribed drugs, dentures, prosthetic devices, and eyeglasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... records. (b) “Dentures” are artificial structures made by or under the direction of a dentist to replace a... body. (d) “Eyeglasses” means lenses, including frames, and other aids to vision prescribed by...

  11. Benzodiazepine prescribing patterns and deaths from drug overdose among US veterans receiving opioid analgesics: case-cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Saitz, Richard; Ganoczy, Dara; Ilgen, Mark A; Bohnert, Amy S B

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the association between benzodiazepine prescribing patterns including dose, type, and dosing schedule and the risk of death from drug overdose among US veterans receiving opioid analgesics. Design Case-cohort study. Setting Veterans Health Administration (VHA), 2004-09. Participants US veterans, primarily male, who received opioid analgesics in 2004-09. All veterans who died from a drug overdose (n=2400) while receiving opioid analgesics and a random sample of veterans (n=420 386) who received VHA medical services and opioid analgesics. Main outcome measure Death from drug overdose, defined as any intentional, unintentional, or indeterminate death from poisoning caused by any drug, determined by information on cause of death from the National Death Index. Results During the study period 27% (n=112 069) of veterans who received opioid analgesics also received benzodiazepines. About half of the deaths from drug overdose (n=1185) occurred when veterans were concurrently prescribed benzodiazepines and opioids. Risk of death from drug overdose increased with history of benzodiazepine prescription: adjusted hazard ratios were 2.33 (95% confidence interval 2.05 to 2.64) for former prescriptions versus no prescription and 3.86 (3.49 to 4.26) for current prescriptions versus no prescription. Risk of death from drug overdose increased as daily benzodiazepine dose increased. Compared with clonazepam, temazepam was associated with a decreased risk of death from drug overdose (0.63, 0.48 to 0.82). Benzodiazepine dosing schedule was not associated with risk of death from drug overdose. Conclusions Among veterans receiving opioid analgesics, receipt of benzodiazepines was associated with an increased risk of death from drug overdose in a dose-response fashion. PMID:26063215

  12. Effect of mailed feedback on drug prescribing profiles in general practice: a seven-year longitudinal study in Storstrøm County, Denmark

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Whether written feedback on drug prescribing in general practice affects prescribing habits is controversial. Most short-term studies showed no effect. However, the issue has not been tested in long-term studies involving the local general practitioner community. Aims of the study To assess whether prescribing levels in general practice are affected by long-term, unsolicited, systematically repeated, mailed feedback. Methods Each of the 94 general practices in Storstrøm County, Denmark, received semi-annual, mailed feedback about their prescribing volumes and costs within 13 major drug groups, in relation to the levels for all the other 93 practices over a 7-year period in a project initiated by the local general practitioner association. Data on the number of defined daily doses (DDDs) prescribed per 1000 listed patients in each practice per 6-months, and practice characteristics, were obtained from the Pharmaceutical Database at the County Health Department. Results There was a large variation in drug prescribing volume between practices, but little within-practice variation over time. After adjustments for the influence of practice size and other potential outcome-affecting variables, there was no evidence of a general change of prescribing volume over time, no change among practices with a high or a low prescribing level, and no significant change within the various drug groups. Conclusions We found no significant effects on prescribing levels of mailed feedback, even when repeated semi-annually during 7 years and initiated by the local general practitioner community. PMID:20929310

  13. New Study Shows Clinicians Under-Prescribing Flu Antiviral Drugs and Possibly Overprescribing Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Should Know About Flu Antiviral Drugs Antiviral Drug Supply Mixing Tamiflu Capsules Drug Resistance Information for Health ... The Flu Season Seasonal Influenza, More Information Vaccine Supply for 2015-2016 Season Seasonal Influenza-Associated Hospitalizations ...

  14. Prescriber preference for a particular tumour necrosis factor antagonist drug and treatment discontinuation: population-based cohort

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Anat; Bassett, Ken; Wright, James M; Brookhart, M Alan; Freeman, Hugh J; Dormuth, Colin R

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of physician preference for a particular tumour necrosis factor α (TNF) antagonist on the risk of treatment discontinuation in rheumatoid arthritis. Design Population-based cohort study. Setting British Columbia administrative health data (inpatients, outpatients and pharmacy). Participants 2742 British Columbia residents who initiated a first course of a TNF antagonist between 2001 and December 2008, had been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, and were treated by 1 of 58 medium-volume to high-volume prescribers. Independent variable A level of physician preference for the drug (higher or lower) was assigned based on preceding prescribing records of the care-providing physician. Higher preference was defined as at least 60% of TNF antagonist courses initiated in the preceding year. Sensitivity analysis was conducted with different thresholds for higher preference. Main outcome measure Drug discontinuation was defined as a drug-free interval of 180 days or switching to another TNF antagonist, anakinra, rituximab or abatacept. The risk of discontinuation was compared between different levels of physician preference using survival analysis. Results Higher preference for the prescribed TNF antagonist was associated with improved persistence with the drug (4.28 years (95% CI 3.70 to 4.90) vs 3.27 (2.84 to 3.84), with log rank test p value of 0.017). The adjusted HR for discontinuation was significantly lower in courses of drugs with higher preference (0.85 (0.76 to 0.96)). The results were robust in a sensitivity analysis. Conclusions Higher physician preference was associated with decreased risk of discontinuing TNF antagonists in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This finding suggests that physicians who strongly prefer a specific treatment help their patients to stay on treatment for a longer duration. Similar research on other treatments is warranted. PMID:25270855

  15. Clinically significant interactions between antiretroviral and co-prescribed drugs for HIV-infected children: profiling and comparison of two drug databases

    PubMed Central

    Oshikoya, Kazeem A; Oreagba, Ibrahim A; Ogunleye, Olayinka O; Lawal, Saheed; Senbanjo, Idowu O

    2013-01-01

    Background Drug–drug interactions are an important therapeutic challenge among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. Early recognition of drug–drug interactions is important, but conflicts do exist among drug compendia on drug interaction information. We aimed to evaluate the consistencies of two drug information resources with regards to the severity rating and categorization of the potential interactions between antiretroviral and co-prescribed drugs. Methods We reviewed the case files of human immunodeficiency virus-infected children who were receiving treatment at the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi Araba, between January 2005 and December 2010. All of the co-prescribed and antiretroviral drug pairs were screened for potential interactions using the Medscape Drug Interaction Checker and the Monthly Index of Medical Specialties Interaction Checker. Drug–drug interaction (DDI) severity and categorization were rated on a scale of A (no known interaction); B (minor/no action needed); C (moderate/monitor therapy); D (major/therapy modification); and X (contraindicated/avoid combination). Results A total of 280 patients were at risk of 596 potential DDIs. The databases showed discrepancies, with Medscape database identifying 504 (84.6%) and USA MIMS database identifying 302 (50.7%) potential DDIs. Simultaneous identification of DDIs by both databases occurred for only 275 (46.1%) listed interactions. Both databases have a weak correlation on the severity rating (rs = 0.45; P < 0.001). The most common DDIs identified by the databases were nevirapine and artemisinin-based combination therapy (170; 28.5%), nevirapine and fluconazole (58; 9.7%), and zidovudine and fluconazole (55; 9.2%). There were 272 (45.6%) interaction severity agreements between the databases. Conclusion Discrepancies occurred in DDI listings between Medscape and USA MIMS databases. Health care professionals may need to consult

  16. 42 CFR 440.120 - Prescribed drugs, dentures, prosthetic devices, and eyeglasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS... his practice as defined by State law to— (1) Artificially replace a missing portion of the body; (2... body. (d) “Eyeglasses” means lenses, including frames, and other aids to vision prescribed by...

  17. 49 CFR 219.103 - Prescribed and over-the-counter drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... on the basis of the available medical history, that use of the substance by the employee at the... Schedules II through V of the controlled substance list) prescribed or authorized by a medical practitioner, or possession incident to such use, if— (1) The treating medical practitioner or a...

  18. New Framework To Diagnose the Direct Disposal of Prescribed Drugs in Wastewater - A Case Study of the Antidepressant Fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Bruce; Youdan, Jane; Barden, Ruth; Kasprzyk-Hordern, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Intentional or accidental release (direct disposal) of high loads of unused pharmaceuticals into wastewater can go unnoticed. Here, direct disposal of a pharmaceutical drug via the sewer network was identified for the first time using wastewater analysis. An irregularly high load of the antidepressant fluoxetine in raw wastewater (10.5 ± 2.4 g d(-1)) was up to 11 times greater than any other day. National prescription data revealed a predicted daily fluoxetine load for the studied treatment works to be 0.4-1.6 g d(-1). Enantio-selective analysis showed the high load of fluoxetine was present as a racemic mixture, which is typical for fluoxetine in dispensed formulations. As fluoxetine undergoes stereoselective metabolism within the body, a racemic mixture in wastewater suggests a nonconsumed drug was the major contributor of the high load. This was confirmed by its major metabolite norfluoxetine whose load did not increase on this day. Considering the most commonly prescribed formulation of fluoxetine, this increased load accounts for the disposal of ∼915 capsules. Furthermore, as fluoxetine is prescribed as one capsule per day, disposal is unlikely to be at the patient level. It is postulated that direct disposal was from a facility which handles larger quantities of the drug (e.g., a pharmacy). PMID:26974167

  19. The effects of North Carolina's prescription drug monitoring program on the prescribing behaviors of the state's providers.

    PubMed

    Ringwalt, Chris; Garrettson, Mariana; Alexandridis, Apostolos

    2015-04-01

    State-level prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) show promise as a key strategy to respond to the epidemic of the misuse and abuse of controlled substances (CS), particularly opioid analgesics, in the United States. Undocumented concerns have been expressed that these PDMPs may have a "chilling effect" on providers' willingness to prescribe these substances to their patients. Using data from North Carolina's PDMP for the 3-year period from 2009 through 2011, we examined whether rapid increases in (1) the number of providers who queried the system, and (2) the number of days on which they queried it, would be related to their prescribing practices in regards to CS. We hypothesized that neither marker of PDMP utilization would be associated with a decrease in either patients receiving CS prescriptions or CS prescriptions filled. We found no association between either of these variables and the number of patients who filled prescriptions for CS or the number of prescriptions for CS filled. However, we did find a slight positive relationship between the growth in the utilization of the PDMP and the number of prescriptions filled for opioid analgesics. Concerns that PDMPs may constrain prescribing behavior with regards to CS are not supported. PMID:25466768

  20. Antimicrobial drug prescribing patterns for community-acquired pneumonia in hospitalized patients: A retrospective pilot study from New Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Kotwani, Anita; Kumar, Santosh; Swain, Prafulla Kumar; Suri, J. C.; Gaur, S. N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine patterns and frequency of antimicrobial drug use among hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Methodology: A retrospective 5 years (April 2007–March 2012) detailed medical record review of patients diagnosed with CAP and discharged to home from Non-Intensive Care Unit respiratory medicine wards of two public hospitals in Delhi. Results: A total of 261 medical records were analyzed. Over the 5 years, 82.0% (2007–08), 78.6% (2008–09), 59.5% (2009–10), 64.7% (2010–11), and 67.8% (2011–12) patients were prescribed two antimicrobials. In the last two study years, the proportion of patients receiving three antimicrobials increased (from 2.0% to 26.5% and 28.8%), while the proportion receiving monotherapy decreased (from 16.0% to 8.8% and 3.4%). In accordance with guidelines, beta-lactams and macrolides were the two most frequently prescribed antimicrobials (34.1%). However, newer generation beta-lactams were prescribed. A total of 37 patients were prescribed beta-lactam-tazobactam combination preparations. Overall, beta-lactams constituted more than 40% of prescriptions while macrolides were the second most prescribed class. Cephalosporin prescriptions significantly increased (P < 0.01) and penicillin prescriptions significantly decreased over study periods. The prescription of fluoroquinolones also decreased (21.5–6.0%, P < 0.01) and aminoglycoside prescription ranged from 9.7% to 16.4%, over 5 years. Reasons for prescribing three antimicrobials, use of aminoglycosides, or higher-end/reserve antibiotics were not mentioned in the medical records. There were no hospital-specific guidelines for doctors to follow in the treatment of CAP. Conclusions: These findings suggest the need for implementing antimicrobial treatment guidelines. Adequate documentation and monitoring of antibiotic use for feedback are also lacking. An antimicrobial stewardship program may offer the most

  1. Development and validation of a survey instrument for assessing prescribers' perception of computerized drug–drug interaction alerts

    PubMed Central

    Fear, Kathleen; Chaffee, Bruce W; Zimmerman, Christopher R; Karls, Edward M; Gatwood, Justin D; Stevenson, James G; Pearlman, Mark D

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop a theoretically informed and empirically validated survey instrument for assessing prescribers' perception of computerized drug–drug interaction (DDI) alerts. Materials and methods The survey is grounded in the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology and an adapted accident causation model. Development of the instrument was also informed by a review of the extant literature on prescribers' attitude toward computerized medication safety alerts and common prescriber-provided reasons for overriding. To refine and validate the survey, we conducted a two-stage empirical validation study consisting of a pretest with a panel of domain experts followed by a field test among all eligible prescribers at our institution. Results The resulting survey instrument contains 28 questionnaire items assessing six theoretical dimensions: performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions, perceived fatigue, and perceived use behavior. Satisfactory results were obtained from the field validation; however, a few potential issues were also identified. We analyzed these issues accordingly and the results led to the final survey instrument as well as usage recommendations. Discussion High override rates of computerized medication safety alerts have been a prevalent problem. They are usually caused by, or manifested in, issues of poor end user acceptance. However, standardized research tools for assessing and understanding end users' perception are currently lacking, which inhibits knowledge accumulation and consequently forgoes improvement opportunities. The survey instrument presented in this paper may help fill this methodological gap. Conclusion We developed and empirically validated a survey instrument that may be useful for future research on DDI alerts and other types of computerized medication safety alerts more generally. PMID:21486876

  2. Less is more: a project to reduce the number of PIMs (potentially inappropriate medications) on an elderly care ward

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Tin Htun; Judith Beck, Adèle; Siese, Thomas; Berrisford, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Potentially inappropriate prescribing in healthcare of the elderly (HCE) is associated with avoidable adverse drug events (ADEs).1,2 A recent set of prescribing criteria has been designed and validated, called “Screening Tool of Older Persons' Prescriptions” (STOPP), to rationalise prescribing in hospitalised patients on HCE wards.1,3 The aim of this quality improvement project was to identify how many potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) were prescribed on these wards, and remove them. This was executed by implementing a ward round checklist, which incorporated STOPP criteria, for the twice weekly, consultant led ward rounds. This quality improvement project was carried out over four months. In a pilot study, we identified eight inappropriate medical prescriptions among 148 medications (5.4% ) prescribed on one ward. After applying a checklist for a structured ward round, we reviewed the medications prescribed on that ward, and found 10 PIMs out of 192 (5.2% ). Utilising the increasingly recognised “plan, do, study, act” (PDSA) cycle,4 we implemented departmental teaching and meetings with other members of the multidisciplinary team, which raised awareness of PIMs among junior doctors, as well as involving our pharmacists in drug chart screening. During this process we continued with a further six cycles on a bi-weekly basis, and saw a gradual decrease in PIM to 1.5%. In conclusion, a structured ward round, facilitated by a checklist that included review of drug charts based on STOPP criteria, demonstrated a considerable reduction of PIMs. It would be interesting to apply this quality improvement project to non-HCE wards, including general surgical wards or adult psychiatry wards, as a means of not only reducing the effects of ADEs, but also the expenditure associated with unnecessary drug prescriptions, and the costs associated with additional care arising from associated ADEs. PMID:27096089

  3. Medicare program; e-prescribing and the prescription drug program. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2005-11-01

    This final rule adopts standards for an electronic prescription drug program under Title I of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA). These standards will be the foundation standards or the first set of final uniform standards for an electronic prescription drug program under the MMA, and represent the first step in our incremental approach to adopting final foundation standards that are consistent with the MMA objectives of patient safety, quality of care, and efficiencies and cost savings in the delivery of care. PMID:16273748

  4. Psychopharmacoteratophobia: Excessive fear of malformation associated with prescribing psychotropic drugs during pregnancy: An Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Dushad; Gowdappa, Basavnna; Ashoka, H. G.; Eiman, Najla

    2015-01-01

    “Psychopharmacoteratophobia is the fear or avoidance of prescribing psychotropic medicine to a pregnant woman on a given indication in anticipation of fetal malformation.” It is rooted in the tragedy associated with thalidomide use and is increasing due to the inability to predict accurately, strict legal provision of consumer protection, ethical and legal issues involved, and pitfalls in the available evidence of teratogenicity. In the Indian setting, the physicians face more challenges as the majority of the patients may ask them to decide, what is the best for their health. Most guidelines emphasize more on what not to do than what to do, and the locus of decision is left to the doctor and the patient. In this review, we have focused on relevant issues related to psychopharmacoteraophobia that may be helpful to understand this phenomenon and help to address the deprivation of a mentally ill woman from the required treatment. PMID:26600635

  5. Potential to Enhance the Prescribing of Generic Drugs in Patients with Mental Health Problems in Austria; Implications for the Future

    PubMed Central

    Godman, Brian; Bucsics, Anna; Burkhardt, Thomas; Piessnegger, Jutta; Schmitzer, Manuela; Barbui, Corrado; Raschi, Emanuel; Bennie, Marion; Gustafsson, Lars L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Scrutiny over pharmaceutical expenditure is increasing leading to multiple reforms. This includes Austria with measures to lower generic prices and enhance their utilization. However the situation for newer antidepressants and atypical antipsychotic medicines (AAPs) is different to PPIs, statins, and renin-angiotensin inhibitor drugs with greater tailoring of therapy and no wish to switch products in stable patients. Authorities welcome generics though given the high costs particularly of single-sourced AAPs. Objective: Assess (a) changes in utilization of venlafaxine versus other newer antidepressants before and after availability of generics, (b) utilization of generic versus originator venlafaxine, (c) price reductions of venlafaxine over time and their influence on total expenditure, (d) utilization of risperidone versus other AAPs, (e) suggest potential additional reforms that could be introduced if pertinent to further enhance the use of generics. Methodology: A quasi-experimental study design with a segmented time series and an observational study. Utilization measured in defined daily doses (DDDs) and total expenditure per DDD and over time. Results: No appreciable changes in the utilization of venlafaxine and risperidone after generics. The reduction in expenditure/DDD for venlafaxine decreased overall expenditure on newer antidepressants by 5% by the end of the study versus just before generics despite a 37% increase in utilization. Expenditure will further decrease if reduced prescribing of duloxetine. Conclusion: Depression, schizophrenia, and bipolar diseases are complex diseases. As a result, specific measures are needed to encourage the prescribing of generic risperidone and venlafaxine when multiple choices are appropriate. Authorities cannot rely on a “Hawthorne” effect between classes to enhance the use of generics. Measures may include prescribing restrictions for duloxetine. No specific measures planned for AAPs with more

  6. An evaluation of prescribing practices for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in Mongolia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in all age groups worldwide. It may be classified as mild/moderate or severe, the latter usually requiring hospitalisation. Although, there are many studies reported in relation to CAP, there is relatively little known about the treatment of CAP and its antibiotic use in Mongolia. The study aim was to evaluate prescribing practices for the treatment of mild/moderate CAP in Mongolia with respect to national prescribing guidelines. Methods Written prescriptions with a written diagnosis of CAP included were collected prospectively and sequentially for ten weeks from a purposefully selected sample of community pharmacies in rural and urban areas of Mongolia. The data collected included the patient’s age, gender, medication details, frequency and number of doses prescribed. Evaluation was with respect to the Mongolian Standard Treatment Guidelines (2005, 2008). Statistical differences between groups were tested using the Chi-squared and Fisher’s exact tests. Results Prescriptions were collected from 22 pharmacies and represented the prescribing practices of 118 doctors. The study enrolled 394 (193 adults and 201 children) patients, with a median age for children of 2.0 years (range: 0.03-12) and adults of 33.0 years (range: 13–92). The most commonly prescribed drugs were aminopenicillins, vitamins, and mucolytics, with the median number of drugs being three per prescription. Inappropriate drug selection was similar for adults (57.7%) and children (56.6%), and the major reason for an overall frequency of inappropriate prescribing for adults was 89.0% and for children 78.0%. Doctors in urban areas prescribed more inappropriate drugs than those in rural areas for both children and adults, p = .0014. The proportion of prescribed injections was 28.4% for adults and 9.0% for children, and for adults was significantly higher in urban areas. The prescribing standard for non

  7. Relationship of Prescribed Drugs with the Risk of Fall in Inpatients.

    PubMed

    Kozono, Aki; Isami, Keisuke; Shiota, Kimiko; Tsumagari, Kyouichi; Nagano, Masahisa; Inoue, Daisuke; Adachi, Rui; Hiraki, Yoichi; Nakagawa, Yoshihiro; Kamimura, Hidetoshi; Yamamichi, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Falls are common in elderly patients and are often serious. Several drugs have been associated with an increased risk of fall. Older adults often take multiple drugs for chronic diseases, and thus may be at increased risk from drugs associated with fall. We investigated the association between drug use and falling in hospitalized older people, with the goal of identifying medications that may increase the risk of a fall. A retrospective case control study was performed at the National Hospital Organization Kumamoto Saishunso Hospital in Japan. Medications taken by patients who fell (n=57) were compared with those taken by patients who did not fall (n=63). The median age (interquartile range; IQR) of the fall and non-fall groups were 75.0 (67.0-83.0) and 80.0 (70.3-84.5) years, respectively. The characteristics of the two groups were similar, with no significant differences in age, sex, or body weight. The probability of falling increased when the patients used zolpidem [odds ratio (OR)=2.47; 95%CI: 1.09-5.63; p<0.05] and calcium channel antagonists (OR=0.299; 95%CI: 0.13-0.68; p<0.01), and was also related to physical factors (OR=2.27; 95%CI: 1.01-5.09; p<0.05). Elderly patients taking zolpidem may fall due to sleepiness, and blood pressure control may be important to prevent orthostatic high blood pressure. In the treatment of elderly people, medical staff should try to choose drugs that prevent fall or are not associated with falling. PMID:27150933

  8. Variation in Prescribing Patterns and Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Intravenous Busulfan in Pediatric Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    McCune, Jeannine S.; Baker, K. Scott; Blough, David K.; Gamis, Alan; Bemer, Meagan J.; Kelton-Rehkopf, Megan C.; Winter, Laura; Barrett, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Personalizing intravenous (IV) busulfan doses in children using therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is an integral component of hematopoietic cell transplant. The authors sought to characterize initial dosing and TDM of IV busulfan, along with factors associated with busulfan clearance, in 729 children who underwent busulfan TDM from December 2005 to December 2008. The initial IV busulfan dose in children weighing ≤12 kg ranged 4.8-fold, with only 19% prescribed the package insert dose of 1.1 mg/kg. In those children weighing >12 kg, the initial dose ranged 5.4-fold, and 79% were prescribed the package insert dose. The initial busulfan dose achieved the target exposure in only 24.3% of children. A wide range of busulfan exposures were targeted for children with the same disease (eg, 39 target busulfan exposures for the 264 children diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia). Considerable heterogeneity exists regarding when TDM is conducted and the number of pharmacokinetic samples obtained. Busulfan clearance varied by age and dosing frequency but not by underlying disease. The authors’ group is currently evaluating how using population pharmacokinetics to optimize initial busulfan dose and TDM (eg, limited sampling schedule in conjunction with maximum a posteriori Bayesian estimation) may affect clinical outcomes in children. PMID:23444282

  9. Variation in prescribing patterns and therapeutic drug monitoring of intravenous busulfan in pediatric hematopoietic cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    McCune, Jeannine S; Baker, K Scott; Blough, David K; Gamis, Alan; Bemer, Meagan J; Kelton-Rehkopf, Megan C; Winter, Laura; Barrett, Jeffrey S

    2013-03-01

    Personalizing intravenous (IV) busulfan doses in children using therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is an integral component of hematopoietic cell transplant. The authors sought to characterize initial dosing and TDM of IV busulfan, along with factors associated with busulfan clearance, in 729 children who underwent busulfan TDM from December 2005 to December 2008. The initial IV busulfan dose in children weighing ≤12 kg ranged 4.8-fold, with only 19% prescribed the package insert dose of 1.1 mg/kg. In those children weighing >12 kg, the initial dose ranged 5.4-fold, and 79% were prescribed the package insert dose. The initial busulfan dose achieved the target exposure in only 24.3% of children. A wide range of busulfan exposures were targeted for children with the same disease (eg, 39 target busulfan exposures for the 264 children diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia). Considerable heterogeneity exists regarding when TDM is conducted and the number of pharmacokinetic samples obtained. Busulfan clearance varied by age and dosing frequency but not by underlying disease. The authors- group is currently evaluating how using population pharmacokinetics to optimize initial busulfan dose and TDM (eg, limited sampling schedule in conjunction with maximum a posteriori Bayesian estimation) may affect clinical outcomes in children. PMID:23444282

  10. Aspirin Often Wrongly Prescribed for Atrial Fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hsu. He is an assistant professor of medicine, cardiology and cardiac electrophysiology at the University of California, ... clots. This study -- based on patients from 123 cardiology practices in the United States -- highlights inappropriate prescribing ...

  11. When inappropriate becomes beneficial.

    PubMed

    Arroja, José David; Zimmermann, Marc

    2015-03-01

    We report the case of a young man who accidentally received a prolonged electric discharge from electrical wires and released the electric source with the help of an inappropriate shock from his implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), after misinterpretation of the electrical signal by the device as a ventricular tachycardia. This case illustrates the "electrical noise" phenomenon, and underscores the need for precautions for patients with an ICD and their physicians. PMID:25707735

  12. Potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) in long-term care (LTC) patients: validation of the 2014 STOPP-START and 2012 Beers criteria in a LTC population—a protocol for a cross-sectional comparison of clinical and health administrative data

    PubMed Central

    Bjerre, Lise M; Halil, Roland; Catley, Christina; Farrell, Barbara; Hogel, Matthew; Black, Cody D; Williams, Margo; Ryan, Cristín; Manuel, Douglas G

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) is frequent and problematic in older patients. Identifying PIP is necessary to improve prescribing quality; ideally, this should be performed at the population level. Screening Tool of Older Persons’ potentially inappropriate Prescriptions/Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right Treatment (STOPP/START) and Beers criteria were developed to identify PIP in clinical settings and are useful at the individual patient level; however, they are time-consuming and costly to apply. Only a subset of these criteria is applicable to routinely collected population-level health administrative data (HAD) because the clinical information necessary to implement these tools is often missing from databases. The performance of subsets of STOPP/START and Beers criteria in HAD compared with clinical data from the same patients is unknown; furthermore, the performance of the updated 2014 STOPP-START and 2012 Beers criteria compared with one another is also unknown. Methods and analysis A cross-sectional study of linked HAD and clinical data will be conducted to validate the subsets of STOPP/START and Beers criteria applicable to HAD by comparing their performance when applied to clinical and HAD for the same patients. Eligible patients will be 66 years and over and recently admitted to 1 of 6 long-term care facilities in Ottawa, Ontario. The target sample size is 275, but may be less if statistical significance can be achieved sooner. Medication, diagnostic and clinical data will be collected by a consultant pharmacist. The main outcome measure is the proportion of PIP missed by the subset of STOPP/START and Beers criteria applied to HAD when compared with clinical data. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the Ottawa Health Services Network Research Ethics Board, the Bruyère Continuing Care Research Ethics Board and the ethics board of the City of Ottawa Long Term Care Homes. Dissemination will occur via

  13. Prescribing patterns and the use of therapeutic drug monitoring of psychotropic medication in a psychiatric high-security unit.

    PubMed

    Castberg, Ingrid; Spigset, Olav

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of psychotropic medication and therapeutic drug monitoring in a high-security psychiatric unit and to compare the doses and serum concentrations both with the recommended intervals and with the doses and serum concentrations in a control group. One hundred thirty-two patients were admitted in the period from January 2000 to December 2005. All available samples were used when comparing serum concentrations and doses with the recommended ranges. For the comparison of doses and serum concentration-to-dose (C:D) ratios with the control group only 1 sample from each patient was used. A total of 459 analyses of 27 different drugs in samples from 8 women and 73 men were included. The median number of therapeutic drug monitoring analyses per patient was 4 (range 1-29). Thirty-seven of the 81 patients (46%) used 2 or more antipsychotics at the same time. Clozapine, lamotrigine, olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone, and zuclopenthixol were often given in doses above the recommended. The serum levels were frequently above those recommended for clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone, and zuclopenthixol. The serum levels were significantly higher in the study group than in the control group for clozapine, lamotrigine, quetiapine, and zuclopenthixol. The given dose was significantly higher in the study group than in the control group for clozapine, lamotrigine and zuclopenthixol. The C:D ratio was significantly lower in the study group than in the control group for olanzapine but higher for quetiapine. The non-evidence based practice of high-dose polypharmacy with several antipsychotics is widely used in this unit. The use of higher doses in the study group than in the control group was not due to differences in metabolism or adherence to treatment between the 2 groups. The frequent use of therapeutic drug monitoring did not seem to have a great impact on the prescribed doses. PMID:18708990

  14. In Silico Analysis to Compare the Effectiveness of Assorted Drugs Prescribed for Swine flu in Diverse Medicine Systems

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Kalpana; Prabahar, Archana; Selvakumar, Suganya; Raja, T. K.

    2014-01-01

    The genome of the virus H1N1 2009 consists of eight segments but maximum number of mutations occurs at segments 1 and 4, coding for PB2 subunit of hemagglutinin. Comparatively less number of mutations occur at segment 6, coding for neuraminidase. Two antiviral drugs, oseltamivir and zanamivir are commonly prescribed for treating H1N1 infection. Alternate medical systems do compete equally; andrographolide in Siddha and gelsemine in Homeopathy. Recent studies confirm the efficacy of eugenol from Tulsi and vitamins C and E against H1N1. As the protein structures are unavailable, we modeled them using Modeller by identifying suitable templates, 1RUY and 3BEQ, for hemagglutinin and neuraminidase, respectively. Prior to docking simulations using AutoDock, the drug likeness properties of the ligands were screened using in silico techniques. Docking results showed interaction between the proteins individually into selected ligands, except for gelsemine and vitamin E no interactions were shown. The best docking simulation was reported by vitamin C interacting through six hydrogen bonds into proteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase with binding energies -4.28 and -4.56 kcal/mol, respectively. Furthermore, vitamin C showed hydrophobic interactions with both proteins, two bonds with Arg119, Glu120 of HA, and one bond with Arg74 of NA. In silico docking studies thus recommend vitamin C to be more effective against H1N1. PMID:24799734

  15. In Silico Analysis to Compare the Effectiveness of Assorted Drugs Prescribed for Swine flu in Diverse Medicine Systems.

    PubMed

    Raja, Kalpana; Prabahar, Archana; Selvakumar, Suganya; Raja, T K

    2014-01-01

    The genome of the virus H1N1 2009 consists of eight segments but maximum number of mutations occurs at segments 1 and 4, coding for PB2 subunit of hemagglutinin. Comparatively less number of mutations occur at segment 6, coding for neuraminidase. Two antiviral drugs, oseltamivir and zanamivir are commonly prescribed for treating H1N1 infection. Alternate medical systems do compete equally; andrographolide in Siddha and gelsemine in Homeopathy. Recent studies confirm the efficacy of eugenol from Tulsi and vitamins C and E against H1N1. As the protein structures are unavailable, we modeled them using Modeller by identifying suitable templates, 1RUY and 3BEQ, for hemagglutinin and neuraminidase, respectively. Prior to docking simulations using AutoDock, the drug likeness properties of the ligands were screened using in silico techniques. Docking results showed interaction between the proteins individually into selected ligands, except for gelsemine and vitamin E no interactions were shown. The best docking simulation was reported by vitamin C interacting through six hydrogen bonds into proteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase with binding energies -4.28 and -4.56 kcal/mol, respectively. Furthermore, vitamin C showed hydrophobic interactions with both proteins, two bonds with Arg119, Glu120 of HA, and one bond with Arg74 of NA. In silico docking studies thus recommend vitamin C to be more effective against H1N1. PMID:24799734

  16. American parents’ willingness to prescribe psychoactive drugs to children: a test of cultural mediators

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Frank R.; Gladwin, Hugh; Rosa, Mario De La

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In the USA, white children receive psychoactive drugs more often than black or Hispanic children. This study investigates whether cultural attitudes statistically mediate differences between American parents’ self-identified racial–ethnic group membership and their willingness to medicate children for behavioral problems. Methods Using data from telephone interviews with 1,145 parents in two Florida counties, structural models tested associations between each group compared with the other, in willingness to medicate children exhibiting different problematic behaviors and hypothesized cultural (familism, fatalism, attitude toward corporal punishment, religiosity, concern about treatment stigma, birth abroad, language of interview) and other mediators (views about medications and causes of children’s problems). Respondent gender, age, socioeconomic status, parent-type household, taking psychoactive medication, and having a child with behavioral problems were used as covariates. Results Race–ethnicity was strongly associated with specific cultural attitudes and views about medications and problems, but only Hispanics distinguished themselves significantly from whites in willingness to medicate children. Across groups, parents who viewed medication favorably and endorsed biomedical causes for problems were more willing to medicate. In Hispanic–white and Hispanic–black comparisons, being interviewed in Spanish was the sole but modest cultural mediator of willingness, and in black–white comparisons, only concern about treatment stigma weakly mediated differences in willingness. Conclusions These findings provide faint support for a parent-centered cultural explanation of reported prescription differences among youths of different racial–ethnic groups in the USA. However, structural and professional components of a broader cultural hypothesis for such differences, within the USA and between different countries, still require evaluation. PMID

  17. A review of the factors influencing antimicrobial prescribing.

    PubMed

    Calbo, Esther; Alvarez-Rocha, Luis; Gudiol, Francisco; Pasquau, Juan

    2013-09-01

    There are multiple benefits of appropriate antimicrobial prescribing: it has a direct impact on clinical outcomes, avoids adverse effects, is cost effective and, perhaps most importantly, it helps to prevent the emergence of resistance. However, any physician can prescribe antibiotics, which is not the case with other clinically relevant drugs. There is great variability in the prescribing physician's (PP) training, motivation, workload and setting, including accessibility to infectious diseases consultants and/or diagnostic techniques, and therefore there is a high risk of inappropriate prescription. Many antibiotic prescribing errors occur around the selection and duration of treatment. This includes a low threshold for the indication of antibiotics, delayed initiation of treatment when indicated, limited knowledge of local antimicrobial resistance patterns by the PPs, errors in the final choice of dose, route or drug and a lack of de-escalation. Similarly, the prescription of prophylactic antibiotics to prevent surgical site infections, despite being commonly accepted, is suboptimal. Factors that may explain suboptimal use are related to the absence of well-defined protocols, poor knowledge of prophylactic protocols, miscommunication or disagreement between physicians, logistical problems, and a lack of audits. A proper understanding of the prescribing process can guide interventions to improve the PP's practices. Some of the potential interventions included in a stewardship program are education in antimicrobial prescribing, information on the local resistance patterns and accessibility to a qualified infectious diseases consultant. PMID:24129284

  18. Impact of prescribed medications on patient safety in older people

    PubMed Central

    Anathhanam, Sujo; Powis, Rachel A.; Robson, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Appropriate prescribing for older adults presents unique challenges to the prescriber. An understanding of the scale of the problems and contributing factors is essential when designing interventions to improve patient safety. The altered pharmacology of ageing, the existence of multiple medical conditions and the exclusion of elderly patients from many trials render this subgroup of the population particularly vulnerable to underprescribing and overprescribing. Adverse drug events are common, causing significant morbidity and mortality as well as having economic implications. ‘High-risk’ medications such as opioids, anticoagulants and antipsychotics can have benefits in this group of patients but strategies to optimize their safety are required. Tools exist that help to identify those at risk of adverse drug reactions and to screen for inappropriate prescribing. Developments in information technology are ongoing, and it is hoped that these may enhance the process of medication reconciliation across healthcare transitions and alert the prescriber to potential adverse drug events. This review addresses commonly encountered issues when prescribing for older people, considers strategies to improve medication safety and offers a list of ‘top tips’ to aid the clinician. PMID:25083234

  19. Potentially inappropriate prescriptions in patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Soerensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Poulsen, Birgitte Klindt; Lisby, Marianne; Mainz, Jan

    2016-07-01

    Background Very little is known about the general appropriateness of prescribing for psychiatric patients. Aims To identify prevalence and types of potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) of psychotropic and somatic medications, to assess the severity of potential clinical consequences and to identify possible predictive factors of PIP in a sample of adult psychiatric in-patients. Methods A descriptive, cross-sectional design using medication reviews by clinical pharmacologists to identify PIP during a 3-month period. The setting was in-patient units in a psychiatric department of a Danish university hospital during a 3-month period (September 2013-November 2013). Patients medication lists (n = 207) were reviewed at the time of admission and all identified PIPs were assessed for potential consequences by clinical pharmacologists. Results There were 349 PIP identified in 1291 prescriptions. The proportion of patients found to have at least one PIP was 123/207 (59%) and the proportions of patients with at least one PIP assessed to be potentially serious or fatal was 69/207 (33%) and 24/207 (12%), respectively. Interactions between drugs 125/207 (36%) and too high doses of drugs 56/207 (16%) were the most frequent PIP. Predictive factors for PIP were polypharmacy (>5 prescriptions) and having one or more somatic diagnoses. Conclusion PIP is common in psychiatric patients and potentially fatal. Particularly polypharmacy (>5 prescriptions) and concomitant somatic illness were associated with the probability of PIP. Improving the quality of prescribing might benefit from an interprofessional approach and thus better training of physicians and nurses is needed in order to minimize PIP. PMID:26824679

  20. Using an Electronic Decision Support Tool to Reduce Inappropriate Polypharmacy and Optimize Medicines: Rationale and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Tordoff, June; Dovey, Susan; Reith, David; Lloyd, Hywel; Tilyard, Murray; Smith, Alesha

    2016-01-01

    Background Polypharmacy and inappropriate continuation of medicines can lead to a significant risk of adverse drug events and drug interactions with patient harm and escalating health care costs as a result. Thorough review of patients’ medications focusing on the need for each drug can reduce the potential for harm. Limitations in performing effective medicine reviews in practice include consultation time constraints and funding for pharmacy services. We will aim to overcome these problems by designing an automatic electronic decision support tool (the medicines optimization/review and evaluation (MORE) module) that is embedded in general practice electronic records systems. The tool will focus on medicines optimization and reducing polypharmacy to aid prescribers in reviewing medicines and improve patient outcomes. Objective The objectives of this study are: (1) to develop an electronic decision support tool to assist prescribers in performing clinical medication reviews with a particular focus on patients experiencing multimorbidity and polypharmacy, and (2) evaluate and assess the use of the electronic decision support tool, providing pilot data on its usefulness in supporting prescribers during consultations with patients. Methods The first three study phases involve development of clinical rules outlining clinical interventions and the creation and validation of the MORE decision support tool. Phase four is a community-based, single-blind, prospective, 6-month controlled trial involving two interventions and two control general practices, matched for practice demographics. We will be measuring the number of times prescribers engage with the tool, total number of interventions suggested by the tool, and total number of times prescribers change medicines in response to recommendations. There will also be prospective follow-up of patients in the intervention group to examine whether changes to medications are upheld, and to determine the number of

  1. The Norwegian General Practice (NORGEP) criteria for assessing potentially inappropriate prescriptions to elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Rognstad, Sture; Brekke, Mette; Fetveit, Arne; Spigset, Olav; Wyller, Torgeir Bruun; Straand, Jørund

    2009-01-01

    Objective To establish a clinically relevant list with explicit criteria for pharmacologically inappropriate prescriptions in general practice for elderly people ≥70 years. Design A three-round Delphi process for validating the clinical relevance of suggested criteria (n = 37) for inappropriate prescriptions to elderly patients. Setting A postal consensus process undertaken by a panel of specialists in general practice, clinical pharmacology, and geriatrics. Main outcome measures The Norwegian General Practice (NORGEP) criteria, a relevance-validated list of drugs, drug dosages, and drug combinations to be avoided in the elderly (≤70 years) patients. Results Of the 140 invited panellists, 57 accepted to participate and 47 completed all three rounds of the Delphi process. The panellists reached consensus that 36 of the 37 suggested criteria were clinically relevant for general practice. Relevance of three of the criteria was rated significantly higher in Round 3 than in Round 1. At the end of the Delphi process, a significant difference between the different specialist groups’ scores was seen for only one of the 36 criteria. Conclusion The NORGEP criteria may serve as rules of thumb for general practitioners (GPs) related to their prescribing practice for elderly patients, and as a tool for evaluating the quality of GPs’ prescribing in settings where access to clinical information for individual patients is limited, e.g. in prescription databases and quality improvement interventions. PMID:19462339

  2. Generic prescribing of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Bruck, P; Antao, C A; Henry, J A

    1992-11-01

    Analysis of National Health Service prescription data for the antidepressants from 1980 to 1989 shows a consistent secular trend towards the increased use of generic names on prescriptions for this group of drugs. This apparently reflects national trends for all drugs, and was similar for most antidepressants. However, generic prescribing had by 1989 increased significantly more rapidly with fluvoxamine, which was introduced in 1987. The two drugs introduced in 1989, fluoxetine and amoxapine, also had a high generic prescribing rate in their year of introduction. Increased generic prescribing may become a feature with further new drugs. However, the use of the generic name on the prescription has relatively little influence on what is dispensed to the patient. Pharmacists may dispense a brand name when given a generic prescription. Moreover, pressures on doctors to write generic names on prescriptions may have limited relevance for some drugs; generic alternatives were available for only four out of 22 antidepressants. PMID:1474553

  3. The Impact of WHO Essential Medicines Policies on Inappropriate Use of Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Kathleen Anne; Rosella, Laura; Henry, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Inappropriate overuse of antibiotics contributes to antimicrobial resistance (AMR), yet policy implementation to reduce inappropriate antibiotic use is poor in low and middle-income countries. Aims To determine whether public sector inappropriate antibiotic use is lower in countries reporting implementation of selected essential medicines policies. Materials and Methods Results from independently conducted antibiotic use surveys in countries that did, and did not report implementation of policies to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing, were compared. Survey data on four validated indicators of inappropriate antibiotic use and 16 self-reported policy implementation variables from WHO databases were extracted. The average difference for indicators between countries reporting versus not reporting implementation of specific policies was calculated. For 16 selected policies we regressed the four antibiotic use variables on the numbers of policies the countries reported implementing. Results Data were available for 55 countries. Of 16 policies studied, four (having a national Ministry of Health unit on promoting rational use of medicines, a national drug information centre and provincial and hospital drugs and therapeutics committees) were associated with statistically significant reductions in antibiotic use of ≥20% in upper respiratory infection (URTI). A national strategy to contain antibiotic resistance was associated with a 30% reduction in use of antibiotics in acute diarrheal illness. Policies seemed to be associated with greater effects in antibiotic use for URTI and diarrhea compared with antibiotic use in all patients. There were negative correlations between the numbers of policies reported implemented and the percentage of acute diarrhoea cases treated with antibiotics (r = -0.484, p = 0.007) and the percentage of URTI cases treated with antibiotics (r = -0.472, p = 0.005). Major study limitations were the reliance on self-reported policy

  4. Inappropriate overuse of inhaled corticosteroids for COPD patients: impact on health costs and health status.

    PubMed

    de Miguel-Díez, Javier; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar; Rejas-Gutierrez, Javier; Martín-Centeno, Antonio; Gobartt-Vázquez, Elena; Hernandez-Barrera, Valentín; Gil de, Miguel Angel; Jimenez-Garcia, Rodrigo

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between inappropriate overuse of inhaled corticosteroids and self-reported health status and the annual cost of patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) recruited in the primary-care setting. An observational, crossover, descriptive study was conducted. Patients with stable COPD and aged ≥40 years, evaluated in primary care, were included. Data collected were demographic variables, clinical characteristics, self-reported health status (SF-12), the severity of the illness, treatment, and health-care resource utilization in the past year. The patients were recruited during a period of 3 months (from January 1 to March 31, 2003). Use was considered inappropriate when corticosteroids were prescribed by physicians for patients not meeting criteria for its use as recommended in guidelines. A total of 10,711 patients [75.6% males; mean age = 67.1 (SD = 9.66) years] were evaluated. Disease severity was mild in 35.5% of the cases, moderate in 53.4%, and severe in 11.2%. Among them, 3,697 (34.5%) subjects were prescribed inhaled corticosteroids or drug combinations containing such therapies, with a rate of inappropriate use of 18.2%. Physical health status was significantly lower among patients showing inappropriate corticosteroids use: 37.35 (SD = 9.53) vs. 40.7 (SD = 9.80) (p < 0.05). The annual cost per patient of COPD management was significantly higher in the group with inappropriate inhaled corticosteroids use: 1,590 (SD = 1,834) vs. 1,157 (SD = 1,536) (p < 0.05). Factors statistically associated with inappropriate use of corticosteroids were educational attainment [OR: 2.77 (95% CI: 1.36-5.63) for nonuniversity training], a history of heart disease [OR: 1.42 (95% CI: 1.02-1.97)], depression [OR: 1.47 (95% CI: 1.05-2.05)], any allergy [OR 1.69 (95% CI: 1.13-2.54)], and physical health status [OR 0.97 (95% CI: 0.96-0.98)]. Lack of adherence to the

  5. Effects of MHRA drug safety advice on time trends in prescribing volume and indices of clinical toxicity for quinine

    PubMed Central

    Acheampong, Paul; Cooper, Gill; Khazaeli, Behshad; Lupton, David J; White, Sue; May, Margaret T; Thomas, Simon H L

    2013-01-01

    Aims To ascertain the effects of the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency's (MHRA) safety update in June 2010 on the volume of prescribing of quinine and on indices of quinine toxicity. Methods We analysed quarterly primary care total and quinine prescribing data for England and quinine prescribing volume for individual Primary Care Trusts in the North East of England from 2007/8 to 2011/12 obtained from the ePACT.net database. We also analysed quinine toxicity enquiries to the National Poisons Information Service (NPIS) via Toxbase® and by telephone between 2004/5 and 2011/12. Joinpoint regression and Pearson's correlation tests were used to ascertain changes in trends in prescribing and indices of toxicity and associations between prescribing and indices of toxicity, respectively. Results Total prescribing continued to increase, but annual growth in quinine prescribing in England declined from 6.0 to −0.6% following the MHRA update [difference −0.04 (95% confidence interval −0.07 to −0.01) quinine prescriptions per 100 patients per quarter, P = 0.0111]. Much larger reductions were observed in Primary Care Trusts that introduced comprehensive prescribing reviews. The previously increasing trend in Toxbase® quinine searches was reversed [difference −19.76 (95% confidence interval −39.28 to −9.20) user sessions per quarter, P = 0.0575]. Telephone enquiries to NPIS for quinine have declined, with stabilization of the proportion of moderate to severe cases of quinine poisoning since the update. Conclusions The MHRA advice was followed by limited reductions in the growth in quinine prescribing and in indicators of quinine overdose and toxicity. Quinine prescribing, however, remains common, and further efforts are needed to reduce availability and use. PMID:23594200

  6. Opioid prescribing pitfalls: medicolegal and regulatory issues

    PubMed Central

    Jammal, Walid; Gown, Grace

    2015-01-01

    Summary Inappropriate opioid prescribing can lead to patient harm as well as a medicolegal risk to prescribers. Prescribers need to be familiar with the indications, contraindications and harms associated with opioids. When prescribing opioids, doctors must be aware of their clinical, ethical and legal responsibilities, particularly the legislative requirements in their state. Failure to comply with these can result in disciplinary action. To avoid potential conflict with differing state regulations on opioid prescribing, doctors should advise patients to get their prescription dispensed in the same state in which it was written. PMID:26843712

  7. Prescribing Pattern of Oral Antihyperglycaemic Drugs, Rationality and Adherence to American Diabetes Association (ADA) Treatment Guidelines among Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sudhaa; Tandon, Vishal R.; Roshi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oral antihyperglycaemic prescription trends keep on changing and thus the drug prescription trend study may prove to be powerful exploratory tool for health care providers. Aim To investigate trends in prescriptions of oral antihyperglycaemic drugs (OHDs) among postmenopausal women suffering from T2DM in India and evaluate the rationality and adherence to ADA treatment guidelines. Materials and Methods An observational, cross-sectional descriptive prescription audit (n=500) was carried. Postmenopausal women were interviewed in their local language using pre-tested pre validated questionnaire after verbal informed consent at a teaching tertiary care hospital of north India. Oral antihyperglycaemic drugs (OHDs) drugs were categorized as per the pharmacological classification. Adherence to available clinical practice guidelines/recommendations issued under American Diabetes Association (ADA) 2015 Guidelines as well as rationality of these prescriptions were assessed using WHO Guide to Good Prescribing. Results Mean age of the study population was 58.14±12.86. Mean duration since menopause was 5.3 years and of T2DM was 9.5 years. A 93.4% of the prescriptions had only OHDs whereas 6.6% of the prescriptions had various insulin preprations + OHDs (p<0.0001). Biguanides followed by sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, DPP-inhibitors and alpha-glucosidases inhibitor were prescribed in 85.6%, 59.8%, 26.6%, 26% and 12.2% respectively as monotherapy or in combination. Among biguanides, metformin was the most frequently prescribed OHDs. In spite of black box warning on pioglitazone, it was prescribed in 26.6% as FDC. However, clear increase use of vidagliptine was noticed upto 26%. Among combinations most frequent was metformin plus glimipride followed by voglibose plus metformin, whereas, among FDC, metformin plus glimipride followed by metformin plus vidagliptine were most frequently prescribed. Conclusion Metformin was the most common OHDs to be prescribed

  8. Electronic Prescribing

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1-877-486-2048 . I went to the pharmacy, and my prescription was ready. Electronic eRx Prescribing ... write and send your prescriptions directly to your pharmacy. This means no more prescriptions on paper and ...

  9. Prescribing patterns of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in chronic kidney disease patients in the South African private sector.

    PubMed

    Meuwesen, Willem P; du Plessis, Jesslee M; Burger, Johanita R; Lubbe, Martie S; Cockeran, Marike

    2016-08-01

    Background Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most commonly used pharmaceutical agents worldwide. NSAIDs are considered nephrotoxic and should therefore be used with caution or be avoided completely in high risk patients, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Objective This study aimed to investigate the prescribing of NSAIDs in CKD patients in order to generate awareness and improve the outcome of these patients. Setting The study was conducted using medicine claims data in the private health sector of South Africa. Method A descriptive, quantitative study was performed, using retrospective data obtained from a Pharmaceutical Benefit Management company. Data from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2013 were analysed. The study population consisted of all patients with an ICD-10 code for a CKD (N18), in association with a paid claim for an NSAID. Main outcome measure The stratification of NSAID prescribing volume among the CKD population in terms of gender, age, NSAID type, dosage and prescriber type. Results The prescribing of NSAIDs in CKD patients varied between 26 and 40 % over the 5 year study period. No association between gender and CKD patients who received NSAIDs versus those who did not was found, with p > 0.05 and Cramer's V < 0.1 for each year of the study. The association between age groups and CKD patients who received NSAIDs versus those who did not was statistically significant, but practically weak (p < 0.05; Cramer's V ≥ 0.1). Most NSAID prescriptions (52-63 %) were for patients aged 35-64 years. Diclofenac (34.25 %) was the single most frequently prescribed NSAID, but the COX-2-inhibitors (celecoxib, meloxicam and etoricoxib) were the preferred NSAID class to be prescribed. The majority (61.6 %) of the NSAIDs were prescribed by general medical practitioners in dosages meeting and even exceeding the recommended daily dosage of patients with normal kidney function. Conclusions Even though NSAIDs are

  10. Prescribing and borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chanen, Andrew M; Thompson, Katherine N

    2016-01-01

    Summary Accurate diagnosis is fundamental to effective management of borderline personality disorder, but many patients remain undetected. The first-line management for borderline personality disorder is psychosocial treatment, not drugs. There are major prescribing hazards including polypharmacy, overdose and misuse. Drug treatment might be warranted for patients who have a co-occurring mental disorder such as major depression. If a drug is prescribed for borderline personality disorder, it should only be as an adjunct to psychosocial treatment. There should be clear and collaborative goals that are regularly reviewed with the patient. Use single drugs prescribed in limited quantities for a limited time. Stop drugs that are ineffective. PMID:27340322

  11. Prescribing procrastination

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, George H.

    1979-01-01

    In his everyday work the family physician sees many patients whose problems have been diagnosed but for whom postponement of an active treatment plan is indicated. The physician must therefore prescribe procrastination in a carefully planned way. I describe some ideas and practical methods for doing this. PMID:529244

  12. Off-label or out of bounds? Prescriber and marketer liability for unapproved uses of FDA-approved drugs.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, James; Dalal, Amy

    2003-01-01

    Professor O'Reilly's study of recent drug review legislation applies a historical and holistic view of promotion practices for unapproved uses of prescription drugs. He faults Congress for moving public health protections away from a strictly protective mode and toward assistance to drug marketers. He argues that the adverse health consequences of "off-label" promotion of drugs are not well understood, and that the 1997 amendments deserved the public health interest while expanding pharmaceutical company profits. PMID:12856461

  13. Development and model testing of anti-mortem screening methodology to predict prescribed drug withholds in heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple, cow-side test for the presence of drug residues in live animal fluids would provide useful information for tissue drug residue avoidance programs. This work describes adaptation and evaluation of rapid screening tests to detect drug residues in serum and urine. Medicated herd animals had...

  14. Development and model testing of anti-mortem screening methodology to predict prescribed drug withholds in heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: A simple, cow-side test for the presence of drug residues in live animal fluids would provide useful information for tissue drug residue avoidance programs. Live animal tests have the potential to allow verification that an individual animal is free of drug residues before sale for h...

  15. Results of anti-mortem screening methodology to predict prescribed drug withholding periods for flunixin and ceftiofur in heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: A simple, cow-side test for the presence of drug residues in live animals would be useful for drug residue avoidance programs. Simple inhibition tests used at slaughter do not detect some drug tolerance concentrations such as those for flunixin and ceftiofur-metabolites. This experim...

  16. Patients Aged 80 Years or Older are Encountered More Potentially Inappropriate Medication Use

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Li; Ding, Ding; Pu, Shi-Yun; Liu, Qin-Hui; Li, Hong; Dong, Bi-Rong; Yang, Xiao-Yan; He, Jin-Han

    2016-01-01

    Background: Polypharmacy and potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) are prominent prescribing issues in elderly patients. This study was to investigate the different prevalence of PIM use in elderly inpatients between 65–79 years of age and 80 years or older, who were discharged from Geriatric Department in West China Hospital. Methods: A large-scale cohort of 1796 inpatients aged 65 years or over was recruited. Respectively, 618 patients were 65–79 years and 1178 patients were 80 years or older. Updated 2012 Beers Criteria by the American Geriatric Society was applied to assess the use of PIM among the investigated samples. Results: A review of the prescribed medications identified 686 patients aged 80 years or older consumed at least one PIM giving a rate of 58.2%. Conversely, 268 (43.4%) patients aged 65–79 years consumed at least one PIM (χ2 = 40.18, P < 0.001). Patients aged 80 years or older had higher hospitalization expenses, length of stay, co-morbidities, medical prescription, and mortality than patients aged 65–79 years (all with P < 0.001). Patients aged 80 years or older were prescribed with more benzodiazepines, drugs with strong anticholinergic properties, megestrol, antipsychotics, theophylline, and aspirin. In multiple regression analysis, PIM use was significantly associated with female gender, age, number of diagnostic disease, and number of prescribed medication. Conclusions: The finding from this study revealed that inpatients aged 80 years or older encountered more PIM use than those aged 65–79 years. Anticholinergic properties, megestrol, antipsychotics, theophylline, and aspirin are medications that often prescribed to inpatients aged 80 years or older. Doctors should carefully choose drugs for the elderly, especially the elderly aged 80 years or older. PMID:26712428

  17. Alteplase Treatment in Acute Stroke: Incorporating Food and Drug Administration Prescribing Information into Existing Acute Stroke Management Guide.

    PubMed

    Demaerschalk, Bart M

    2016-08-01

    Despite strong evidence that intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) improves outcomes in acute ischemic stroke patients, its use in clinical practice remains modest. Complex eligibility criteria have been postulated as barriers to greater utilization. Further complicating this has been multiple guidelines and prescribing labels that have been published since first being approved for use in 1996. In this review, several warning and exclusion criteria for tPA in acute ischemic stroke are reviewed with the goal of providing readers a nuanced understanding of historical context and available evidence to make informed decision. PMID:27363696

  18. AB013. Inappropriate asthma therapy: a tale of two countries

    PubMed Central

    Nibber, Anjan; Belhassen, Manon; Van Ganse, Eric; Ryan, Dermot; Langlois, Carole; Appiagyei, Francis; Skinner, Derek; Laforest, Laurent; Soriano, Joan B.; Price, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Inappropriate prescribing and misuse of asthma medication, have been identified as potentially preventable factors linked to asthma exacerbations and deaths. A recent report by the National Review of Asthma Deaths drew attention to the excessive prescribing of reliever medication, and under-prescribing of controlled medication in the United-Kingdom (UK). The inappropriate prescribing of long-acting beta agonist (LABA) bronchodilator inhalers, as either a monotherapy or without inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) has been highlighted as a major preventable factor of asthma exacerbations and deaths. To determine whether the prevalence of inappropriate LABA therapy use in asthma in the UK and in France has changed over time. Methods Two interval, parallel, population-based cohorts (2007 and 2013), were developed in each country, utilising the UK Optimum Patient Care Research Database and the French Permanent Beneficiaries Sample database. Following inclusion, patients aged 6–40 years were studied over a 12-month period. The use of LABAs without ICS, and ≥2-fold higher use of LABA compared with ICS were investigated. Analyses were stratified by age groups: children (6–13 years) and adults (14–40 years). Results Overall, 39,743 UK and 4,910 French patients were included in 2007 and 14,036 and 5,657 in 2013. In 2013, LABA use without ICS occurred in 0.1% and 1.5% of UK and French adults respectively. This was a marked reduction from 2007 UK and French figures of 0.4% and 2.6% respectively (P<0.05 for both). Excessive use of LABA relative to ICS occurred in 0.2% of UK adults and in 0.7% of French adults in 2013. These percentages represented a decrease from the 2007 figures of 0.6% and 1.4% for UK (P=0.29) and France (P=0.003), respectively. In 2007, LABA inappropriate use was more frequent in French than UK asthmatic children (P<0.0001), but showed a downward trend by time in both countries (0.1% in 2013 in both countries). Conclusions Our study suggests

  19. Nudging Guideline-Concordant Antibiotic Prescribing

    PubMed Central

    Meeker, Daniella; Knight, Tara K.; Friedberg, Mark W.; Linder, Jeffrey A.; Goldstein, Noah J.; Fox, Craig R.; Rothfeld, Alan; Diaz, Guillermo; Doctor, Jason N.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE “Nudges” that influence decision making through subtle cognitive mechanisms have been shown to be highly effective in a wide range of applications, but there have been few experiments to improve clinical practice. OBJECTIVE To investigate the use of a behavioral “nudge” based on the principle of public commitment in encouraging the judicious use of antibiotics for acute respiratory infections (ARIs). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Randomized clinical trial in 5 outpatient primary care clinics. A total of 954 adults had ARI visits during the study timeframe: 449 patients were treated by clinicians randomized to the posted commitment letter (335 in the baseline period, 114 in the intervention period); 505 patients were treated by clinicians randomized to standard practice control (384 baseline, 121 intervention). INTERVENTIONS The intervention consisted of displaying poster-sized commitment letters in examination rooms for 12 weeks. These letters, featuring clinician photographs and signatures, stated their commitment to avoid inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for ARIs. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Antibiotic prescribing rates for antibiotic-inappropriate ARI diagnoses in baseline and intervention periods, adjusted for patient age, sex, and insurance status. RESULTS Baseline rates were 43.5% and 42.8% for control and poster, respectively. During the intervention period, inappropriate prescribing rates increased to 52.7% for controls but decreased to 33.7% in the posted commitment letter condition. Controlling for baseline prescribing rates, we found that the posted commitment letter resulted in a 19.7 absolute percentage reduction in inappropriate antibiotic prescribing rate relative to control (P = .02). There was no evidence of diagnostic coding shift, and rates of appropriate antibiotic prescriptions did not diminish over time. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Displaying poster-sized commitment letters in examination rooms decreased inappropriate

  20. Prescribers' expectations and barriers to electronic prescribing of controlled substances

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Meelee; McDonald, Ann; Kreiner, Peter; Kelleher, Stephen J; Blackman, Michael B; Kaufman, Peter N; Carrow, Grant M

    2011-01-01

    Objective To better understand barriers associated with the adoption and use of electronic prescribing of controlled substances (EPCS), a practice recently established by US Drug Enforcement Administration regulation. Materials and methods Prescribers of controlled substances affiliated with a regional health system were surveyed regarding current electronic prescribing (e-prescribing) activities, current prescribing of controlled substances, and expectations and barriers to the adoption of EPCS. Results 246 prescribers (response rate of 64%) represented a range of medical specialties, with 43.1% of these prescribers current users of e-prescribing for non-controlled substances. Reported issues with controlled substances included errors, pharmacy call-backs, and diversion; most prescribers expected EPCS to address many of these problems, specifically reduce medical errors, improve work flow and efficiency of practice, help identify prescription diversion or misuse, and improve patient treatment management. Prescribers expected, however, that it would be disruptive to practice, and over one-third of respondents reported that carrying a security authentication token at all times would be so burdensome as to discourage adoption. Discussion Although adoption of e-prescribing has been shown to dramatically reduce medication errors, challenges to efficient processes and errors still persist from the perspective of the prescriber, that may interfere with the adoption of EPCS. Most prescribers regarded EPCS security measures as a small or moderate inconvenience (other than carrying a security token), with advantages outweighing the burden. Conclusion Prescribers are optimistic about the potential for EPCS to improve practice, but view certain security measures as a burden and potential barrier. PMID:21946239

  1. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis in doxylamine overdose.

    PubMed

    Carrascosa, Miguel F; Caviedes, José-Ramón Salcines; Lucena, M Isabel; Cuadrado-Lavín, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Doxylamine succinate, an H(1)-antihistamine drug, is commonly used as sleep-inducing agent as well as therapy for nausea and vomiting in pregnancy. At usual doses, it may cause impairment of cognitive and psychomotor performance, anticholinergic effects, agitation and postural hypotension. Besides, since this drug is frequently involved in either accidental or intentional overdoses, it seems relevant to bear in mind other possible toxic effects. We report a case of acute severe hyponatremia in the setting of a syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (SIAD), an apparent new adverse effect linked to doxylamine overdose. The Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicated a probable relationship between doxylamine intake and SIAD development. SIAD may be considered as a potential, serious adverse reaction of doxylamine overdose. Clinicians should consider this aetiological possibility when attending patients suffering from hyponatremia. PMID:23166178

  2. Rationalising prescribing: Evidence, marketing and practice-relevant knowledge.

    PubMed

    Wadmann, Sarah; Bang, Lia E

    2015-06-01

    Initiatives in the name of 'rational pharmacotherapy' have been launched to alter what is seen as 'inappropriate' prescribing practices of physicians. Based on observations and interviews with 20 general practitioners (GPs) in 2009-2011, we explored how attempts to rationalise prescribing interact with chronic care management in Denmark. We demonstrate how attempts to rationalise prescribing by informing GPs about drug effects, adverse effects and price do not satisfy GPs' knowledge needs. We argue that, for GPs, 'rational' prescribing cannot be understood in separation from the processes that enable patients to use medication. Therefore, GPs do much more to obtain knowledge about medications than seek advice on 'rational pharmacotherapy'. For instance, GPs also seek opportunities to acquaint themselves with the material objects of medication and medical devices. We conceptualise the knowledge needs of GPs as a need for practice-relevant knowledge and argue that industry sales representatives are granted opportunity to access general practice because they understand this need of GPs. PMID:25965891

  3. The economics of direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription-only drugs: prescribed to improve consumer welfare?

    PubMed

    Morgan, Steven; Mintzes, Barbara; Barer, Morris

    2003-10-01

    According to economic theory, one might expect that the informational content of direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription-only drugs would improve consumers' welfare. However, contrasting the models of consumer and market behaviour underlying this theory with the realities of the prescription-only drug market reveals that this market is distinct in ways that render it unlikely that advertising will serve an unbiased and strictly informative function. A review of qualitative evidence regarding the informational content of drug advertising supports this conclusion. Direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising concentrates on particular products, and features of those products, to the exclusion of others, and the information provided has frequently been found to be biased or misleading in regulatory and academic evaluations. Governments that have so far resisted direct-to-consumer advertising should invest in independent sources of evidence that could help consumers and professionals to better understand the risks and benefits of treating disease with alternative drug and non-drug therapies, rather than permitting direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising. PMID:14596759

  4. Antimicrobial stewardship: Improving antibiotic prescribing practice in a respiratory ward.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Jing Ming

    2016-01-01

    International efforts have mandated guidelines on antibiotic use and prescribing, therefore the focus is now on encouraging positive behavioral changes in antibiotic prescribing practice. Documentation of indication and intended duration of antibiotic use in drug charts is an evidence-based method of reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescribing. It is also a standard detailed in our local antimicrobial guidelines. We collected baseline data on compliance with documentation of indication and duration in drug charts in a respiratory ward which revealed compliance rates of 24% and 39% respectively. We introduced interventions to improve accessibility to the guideline and to increase awareness by distributing antibiotic guardian pocket cards with a three-point checklist and strategically-placed mini-posters. We also aim to increase team motivation by obtaining their feedback in multidisciplinary team meetings and by introducing certificates for their involvement in the quality improvement process. The results of the second cycle post-intervention showed an increase in compliance rates for documentation of indication and duration of 97% and 69% respectively. After a further awareness and discussion session at the multidisciplinary team meeting with the local antimicrobial management team audit nurses, a third cycle showed compliance rates of 94% and 71% for indication and duration respectively. This project has highlighted the importance of improving accessibility and of encouraging interventions that would bring about a change in personal value and subsequently in behavior and individual practice. PMID:26893898

  5. [Specificities of prescribing medicines for children].

    PubMed

    Mercier, Jean-Christophe; Droz, Nina; Bourgade, Clara; Vizeneux, Audrey; Cotillon, Marie; de Groc, Thibault

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of medicines have been developed for adults. Consequently, the prescribing of medicines for children must take into account their pharmacodynamic characteristics and must be calculated individually according to the degree of prematurity, the age, the weight or body area and the clinical condition. Medication errors are the most common type of medical errors, notably in children, due to dosage errors or prescribtion of inappropriate medicines. The best way to avoid them lies in the use of prescribing software, the involvement of pharmacists in care units, and proper communication between prescribing doctors, caregivers, pharmacists and families. PMID:27177480

  6. The Rasch Model for Achievement Tests--Inappropriate in the Past, Inappropriate Today, Inappropriate Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Leslie D.; Ragsdale, Ronald G.

    1983-01-01

    Robitaille and O'Shea used the Rasch model in developing a set of 40-item mathematics achievement tests. The Rasch model is inappropriate for such a purpose; their article presents the model in a too favorable light and continued application of the model encourages less desirable educational practice and misdirects scarce resources. (BRR)

  7. Clinical impact of potentially inappropriate medications during hospitalization of acutely ill older patients with multimorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Kersten, Hege; Hvidsten, Lara T; Gløersen, Gløer; Wyller, Torgeir Bruun; Wang-Hansen, Marte Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs), to compare drug changes between geriatric and other medical wards, and to investigate the clinical impact of PIMs in acutely hospitalized older adults. Setting and subjects: Retrospective study of 232 home-dwelling, multimorbid older adults (aged ≥75 years) acutely admitted to Vestfold Hospital Trust, Norway. Main outcome measures. PIMs were identified by Norwegian general practice (NORGEP) criteria and Beers’ 2012 criteria. Clinical correlates were laboratory measures, functional and mental status, physical frailty, and length of stay. Results: Mean (SD) age was 86 (5.7) years, and length of stay was 6.5 (4.8) days. During the stay, the mean number of drugs used regularly changed from 7.8 (3.6) to 7.9 (3.6) (p = 0.22), and drugs used pro re nata (prn) changed from 1.4 (1.6) to 2.0 (1.7) (p < 0.001). The prevalence of any PIM changed from 39.2% to 37.9% (p = 0.076), while anticholinergics and benzodiazepines were reduced significantly (p ≤ 0.02). The geriatric ward reduced drug dosages (p < 0.001) and discontinued PIMs (p < 0.001) significantly more often than other medical wards. No relations between number of PIMS and clinical outcomes were identified, but the concomitant use of ≥3 psychotropic/opioid drugs was associated with reduced hand-grip strength (p ≤ 0.012). Conclusion: Hospitalization did not change polypharmacy or PIMs. Drug treatment was more appropriate on the geriatric than other medical wards. No clinical impact of PIMs was observed, but prescribers should be vigilant about concomitant prescription of ≥3 psychotropics/opioids.KEY POINTSAcute hospitalization of older patients with multimorbidity did not increase polypharmacy or potentially inappropriate medications.Prescription of anticholinergics and benzodiazepines was significantly reduced.The geriatric ward reduced drug dosages and discontinued potentially inappropriate medications more

  8. Bioavailability and generic prescribing.

    PubMed

    Mindel, J S

    1976-01-01

    Although oral drug bioinequivalence has been attributed to a number of causes (excipients, dosage form, variation in dissolution time, and aging) less is known about bioavailability problems of topical medications in ophthalmology. Factors that can alter drug absorption from solutions (pH, partition coefficient, container impurities, contact time, etc.) are noted, and cases in which bioavailability problems should be considered as causes of therapeutic failure are discussed. Various attitudes representing pharmaceutical companies, the federal government, pharmacists, consumers and physicians toward the related problems of bioinequivalence and generic prescribing are examined. Techniques for in vivo and in vitro drug testing and for establishing uniform conditions of drug manufacture and storage can contribute to identification and minimization of bioavailability problems. A rational program based on a combination of such techniques could, ultimately, lead to establishment of the terms "generic equivalency" and "therapeutic equivalency" as synonymous. PMID:13505

  9. Prescribing patterns for Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Hillmer, Melinda; Krahn, Murray; Hillmer, Michael; Pariser, Pauline; Naglie, Gary

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe Canadian family physicians’ prescribing practices with regard to Alzheimer disease (AD). DESIGN Cross-sectional survey administered by facsimile. SETTING Four regions in Canada (British Columbia, the Prairie Provinces, Ontario, and the Atlantic Provinces). PARTICIPANTS A stratified random sample of 1000 Canadian family physicians (250 per region) chosen from the Canadian Medical Directory; 81 of whom were excluded as ineligible. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Prescribing practices regarding cholinesterase inhibitors (ChIs) for patients with AD. RESULTS Response rate was 36.3%. About 27% of respondents reported that ChIs were prescribed for less than 10% of their AD patients, while 12.5% reported that ChIs were prescribed for more than 90% of their AD patients. More physicians prescribed ChIs in the two regions with provincial formulary coverage (Prairie Provinces and Ontario) than in the two regions without coverage (British Columbia and Atlantic Provinces). Factors that significantly predicted lower prescribing rates included female sex, perception of ChIs’ effectiveness, and self-reported knowledge of ChIs. CONCLUSION Canadian physicians’ prescribing patterns for ChIs vary; the optimal prescribing rate is unclear. Provincial coverage of these drugs along with physicians’ sex, knowledge of ChIs, and perception of the effectiveness of ChIs appear to influence prescribing rates. PMID:16926965

  10. Toxic risks of inappropriate therapy.

    PubMed

    Stewart, M J

    1990-02-01

    Drug therapy may produce toxicity. Patient individuality or drug interactions account for many cases of poisoning, but other factors such as genetic predisposition, drug contamination or human error are also known causes. Examples of various types of drug poisoning are given, illustrating the role of the clinical chemist in minimizing or studying drug toxicity. PMID:2184960

  11. Conventional management of inappropriate sinus tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Olshansky, Brian; Sullivan, Renee M

    2016-06-01

    Inappropriate sinus tachycardia is a challenging problem to manage. There are limited data on the best method to evaluate and treat the problem. Here, we consider a conventional approach to inappropriate sinus tachycardia. PMID:26164138

  12. Prosecution of physicians for prescribing opioids to patients.

    PubMed

    Reidenberg, M M; Willis, O

    2007-06-01

    Many patients in pain receive inadequate doses of opioids. Fear of government action against prescribing doctors is one cause of this inadequate treatment. The purpose of the study was to assess criminal prosecutions by reviewing press reports of indictments or trials of doctors for opioid offenses during 2 years. Forty-seven cases were reported involving 53 doctors. Fifteen cases were for offenses unrelated to medical practice. In 32 cases, the charge was based on determining the prescriptions for opioids were outside the bounds of proper medical practice. Only two of these cases were evaluated by a state medical board before indictment. Five doctors were indicted for murder related to drug overdose deaths. None were found guilty of murder. Prosecutorial excesses and hyperbole were common. The state medical board's review of appropriateness of prescribing opioids when a doctor-patient relationship is presumed to exist could decrease inappropriate criminal indictments and reduce this component of fear of prescribing adequate opioid therapy for patients in pain. PMID:17329989

  13. Prescribing for patients on dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Brendan; Jones, Ceridwen; Saunders, John

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The pharmacokinetics of a drug may be altered in patients with renal impairment who require dialysis. Some drugs are contraindicated. The drug’s clearance and therapeutic index determine if a dose adjustment is needed. A lower dose or less frequent dosing may be required. Consult a reference source or the patient’s nephrologist before prescribing. Start at a low dose and increase gradually. If possible give once-daily drugs after dialysis. PMID:27041803

  14. An Observational Study to Evaluate the Prevalence of Erectile Dysfunction (ED) and Prescribing Pattern of Drugs in Patients with ED Visiting an Andrology Specialty Clinic, Mumbai: 2012-14

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Vijay R.; Bhagat, Sagar B.; Beldar, Amit S.; Patel, Sadiq B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common occurrence and its incidence is expected to increase significantly along with the increase in various lifestyle diseases. The drug utilization for ED is very low. Also, studies describing the prescription pattern in ED are lacking. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional observational study, including a drug utilization analysis, of 606 prescriptions as per the standard guidelines (WHO and STROBE). Results: Out of 606, 249 (41%) were from the age group of 30-39 years. Addictions were present in 388 (64%). Out of 606, 186 had urological, 154 had cardiovascular and 102 had psychological co-morbid disorders. Out of 348, 201 were prescribed Tadalafil (low dose) on a once daily basis. Out of 172, 121 were prescribed Sildenafil (high dose) on an ‘as and when required’ basis. Nutritional/ herbal supplements were prescribed in 126/606. The ratio of ‘Prescribed Daily Dose’ to ‘Defined Daily Dose’ of Tadalafil, Sildenafil, and Dapoxetine were 1.1, 1.3 and 1.5 respectively. Conclusion: Measures for de-addiction play an important role in the overall management of ED. The most common co-morbid disorders were urological, like BPH, LUTS, etc, followed by cardiovascular, psychological and diabetes. Overall, rational pharmacotherapy was observed. Tadalafil was the most commonly prescribed drug for ED. The main factor in the selection of a particular PDE5 inhibitor was its pharmacokinetics and cost. Udenafil, being the costliest, was the least prescribed. Dapoxetine was used in a significant number of individuals primarily for PE with ED. The combination of Papaverine, Chlorpromazine ± Alprostadil was used as intracavernosal injection in patients not responding to oral drugs. PMID:26393163

  15. Improving antibiotic prescribing for children in the resource-poor setting

    PubMed Central

    Le Doare, Kirsty; Barker, Charlotte I S; Irwin, Adam; Sharland, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics are a critically important part of paediatric medical care in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where infectious diseases are the leading cause of child mortality. The World Health Organization estimates that >50% of all medicines are prescribed, dispensed or sold inappropriately and that half of all patients do not take their medicines correctly. Given the rising prevalence of antimicrobial resistance globally, inappropriate antibiotic use is of international concern, and countries struggle to implement basic policies promoting rational antibiotic use. Many barriers to rational paediatric prescribing in LMICs persist. The World Health Organization initiatives, such as ‘Make medicines child size’, the Model List of Essential Medicines for Children and the Model Formulary for Children, have been significant steps forward. Continued strategies to improve access to appropriate drugs and formulations, in conjunction with improved evidence-based clinical guidelines and dosing recommendations, are essential to the success of such initiatives on both a national and an international level. This paper provides an overview of these issues and considers future developments that may improve LMIC antibiotic prescribing. PMID:24433393

  16. Predicting risk of adverse drug reactions in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Lavan, Amanda Hanora; Gallagher, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are common in older adults, with falls, orthostatic hypotension, delirium, renal failure, gastrointestinal and intracranial bleeding being amongst the most common clinical manifestations. ADR risk increases with age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, increasing burden of comorbidity, polypharmacy, inappropriate prescribing and suboptimal monitoring of drugs. ADRs are a preventable cause of harm to patients and an unnecessary waste of healthcare resources. Several ADR risk tools exist but none has sufficient predictive value for clinical practice. Good clinical practice for detecting and predicting ADRs in vulnerable patients includes detailed documentation and regular review of prescribed and over-the-counter medications through standardized medication reconciliation. New medications should be prescribed cautiously with clear therapeutic goals and recognition of the impact a drug can have on multiple organ systems. Prescribers should regularly review medication efficacy and be vigilant for ADRs and their contributory risk factors. Deprescribing should occur at an individual level when drugs are no longer efficacious or beneficial or when safer alternatives exist. Inappropriate prescribing and unnecessary polypharmacy should be minimized. Comprehensive geriatric assessment and the use of explicit prescribing criteria can be useful in this regard. PMID:26834959

  17. Predicting risk of adverse drug reactions in older adults.

    PubMed

    Lavan, Amanda Hanora; Gallagher, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are common in older adults, with falls, orthostatic hypotension, delirium, renal failure, gastrointestinal and intracranial bleeding being amongst the most common clinical manifestations. ADR risk increases with age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, increasing burden of comorbidity, polypharmacy, inappropriate prescribing and suboptimal monitoring of drugs. ADRs are a preventable cause of harm to patients and an unnecessary waste of healthcare resources. Several ADR risk tools exist but none has sufficient predictive value for clinical practice. Good clinical practice for detecting and predicting ADRs in vulnerable patients includes detailed documentation and regular review of prescribed and over-the-counter medications through standardized medication reconciliation. New medications should be prescribed cautiously with clear therapeutic goals and recognition of the impact a drug can have on multiple organ systems. Prescribers should regularly review medication efficacy and be vigilant for ADRs and their contributory risk factors. Deprescribing should occur at an individual level when drugs are no longer efficacious or beneficial or when safer alternatives exist. Inappropriate prescribing and unnecessary polypharmacy should be minimized. Comprehensive geriatric assessment and the use of explicit prescribing criteria can be useful in this regard. PMID:26834959

  18. Does computerized provider order entry reduce prescribing errors for hospital inpatients? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Reckmann, Margaret H; Westbrook, Johanna I; Koh, Yvonne; Lo, Connie; Day, Richard O

    2009-01-01

    Previous reviews have examined evidence of the impact of CPOE on medication errors, but have used highly variable definitions of "error". We attempted to answer a very focused question, namely, what evidence exists that CPOE systems reduce prescribing errors among hospital inpatients? We identified 13 papers (reporting 12 studies) published between 1998 and 2007. Nine demonstrated a significant reduction in prescribing error rates for all or some drug types. Few studies examined changes in error severity, but minor errors were most often reported as decreasing. Several studies reported increases in the rate of duplicate orders and failures to discontinue drugs, often attributed to inappropriate selection from a dropdown menu or to an inability to view all active medication orders concurrently. The evidence-base reporting the effectiveness of CPOE to reduce prescribing errors is not compelling and is limited by modest study sample sizes and designs. Future studies should include larger samples including multiple sites, controlled study designs, and standardized error and severity reporting. The role of decision support in minimizing severe prescribing error rates also requires investigation. PMID:19567798

  19. Prescription of potentially inappropriate medication in older persons in Switzerland: does the dispensing channel make a difference?

    PubMed Central

    Blozik, Eva; Rapold, Roland; Reich, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Background Drugs can be supplied either directly from the prescribing physician (physician dispensing [PD]) or via a pharmacy. It is unclear whether the dispensing channel is associated with quality problems. Potentially inappropriate medication (PIM) is associated with adverse outcomes in older persons and can be considered a marker for quality deficits in prescribing. We investigated whether prevalence of PIM differs across dispensing channels. Patients and methods We analyzed basic health insurance claims of 50,747 person quarter years with PIM use of residents of the Swiss cantons Aargau and Lucerne of the years 2012 and 2013. PIM was identified using the Beers 2012 criteria and the PRISCUS list. We calculated PIM prevalence stratified by supply channel. Adjusted mixed effects logistic regression analysis was done to estimate the effect of obtaining medications through the dispensing physician as compared to the pharmacy channel on receipt of PIM. The most frequent PIMs were identified. Results There is a small but detectable difference in total PIM prevalence: 30.7% of the population supplied by a dispensing physician as opposed to 29.3% individuals who received medication in a pharmacy. According to adjusted logistic regression individuals who obtained the majority of their medications from their prescribing physician had a 15% higher chance to receive a PIM (odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.08–1.22; P<0.001). Conclusion Physician dispensing seems to affect quality and safety of drug prescriptions. Quality issues should not be neglected in the political discussion about the regulations on PD. Future studies should explore whether PD is related to other indicators of inefficiency or quality flaws. The present study also underlines the need for interventions to reduce the high rates of PIM prescribing in Switzerland. PMID:25977609

  20. Safe prescribing: a titanic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Routledge, Philip A

    2012-01-01

    The challenge to achieve safe prescribing merits the adjective ‘titanic’. The organisational and human errors leading to poor prescribing (e.g. underprescribing, overprescribing, misprescribing or medication errors) have parallels in the organisational and human errors that led to the loss of the Titanic 100 years ago this year. Prescribing can be adversely affected by communication failures, critical conditions, complacency, corner cutting, callowness and a lack of courage of conviction, all of which were also factors leading to the Titanic tragedy. These issues need to be addressed by a commitment to excellence, the final component of the ‘Seven C's’. Optimal prescribing is dependent upon close communication and collaborative working between highly trained health professionals, whose role is to ensure maximum clinical effectiveness, whilst also protecting their patients from avoidable harm. Since humans are prone to error, and the environments in which they work are imperfect, it is not surprising that medication errors are common, occurring more often during the prescribing stage than during dispensing or administration. A commitment to excellence in prescribing includes a continued focus on lifelong learning (including interprofessional learning) in pharmacology and therapeutics. This should be accompanied by improvements in the clinical working environment of prescribers, and the encouragement of a strong safety culture (including reporting of adverse incidents as well as suspected adverse drug reactions whenever appropriate). Finally, members of the clinical team must be prepared to challenge each other, when necessary, to ensure that prescribing combines the highest likelihood of benefit with the lowest potential for harm. PMID:22738396

  1. Attitudes and Behaviours to Antimicrobial Prescribing following Introduction of a Smartphone App

    PubMed Central

    Panesar, Preet; Jones, Alisdair; Aldous, Alicia; Kranzer, Katharina; Halpin, Eamus; Fifer, Helen; Macrae, Bruce; Curtis, Carmel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our hospital replaced the format for delivering portable antimicrobial prescribing guidance from a paper-based pocket guide to a smartphone application (app). We used this opportunity to assess the relationship between its use and the attitudes and behaviours of antimicrobial prescribers. Methods We used 2 structured cross-sectional questionnaires issued just prior to and 3 months following the launch of the smartphone app. Ordinal Likert scale responses to both frequencies of use and agreement statements permitted quantitative assessment of the relationship between variables. Results The smartphone app was used more frequently than the pocket guide it replaced (p < 0.01), and its increased use was associated with sentiments that the app was useful, easy to navigate and its content relevant. Users who used the app more frequently were more likely to agree that the app encouraged them to challenge inappropriate prescribing by their colleagues (p = 0.001) and were more aware of the importance of antimicrobial stewardship (p = 0.005). Reduced use of the app was associated with agreement that senior physicians’ preferences for antimicrobial prescribing would irrespectively overrule guideline recommendations (p = 0.0002). Conclusions Smartphone apps are an effective and acceptable format to deliver guidance on antimicrobial prescribing. Our findings suggest that they may empower users to challenge incorrect prescribing, breaking well-established behaviours, and thus supporting vital stewardship efforts in an era of increased antimicrobial resistance. Future work will need to focus on the direct impact on drug prescriptions as well as identifying barriers to implementing smartphone apps in other clinical settings. PMID:27111775

  2. Prescribing for unlabeled conditions: patient benefit or therapeutic roulette?

    PubMed

    Serradell, J; Rucker, T D

    1990-01-01

    There is ample evidence that prescribed medications are employed for uses far broader than the approved label indications in the U.S. An enormous research agenda thus exists that should be addressed in the not-too-distant future. In fact, it seems essential that operation of the Medicare Catastrophic Drug Benefit program be designed with the best available knowledge in this area. Perhaps it might be appropriate for several universities, the U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention, and/or the FDA to establish a center to study this question. This model has been applied with clinical/surgical registries, with adverse reaction reporting, and with device failures. We need a rational, science-compatible, and uniform policy free of political and emotional arguments to address the issue of handling, monitoring, and regulating the use of drugs for unlabeled conditions. Comprehensive data should be provided for policy makers, regulators, payers, and clinicians in their evaluating the use of different drug products. Even a brief glance at any page from the National Disease and Therapeutic Index shows intended use that would cause most experts to react in disbelief. Further, there seem to be relatively few instances in which the use of a given pharmaceutical for an unlabeled indication would qualify as a drug of choice in the first place. The therapeutic and economic consequences of the use of legend drugs for unlabeled indications are difficult to document. We do know that a significant proportion of hospital admissions and days can be traced to the inappropriate use of pharmaceutical products but the net impact of our subject on institution cost has not been established.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:10106657

  3. Promoting rational prescribing: an international perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Hogerzeil, H V

    1995-01-01

    Irrational prescribing is a global problem. Rational prescribing cannot be defined without a method of measurement and a reference standard. The former is now available but the latter needs further development. Proven effective interventions to promote rational prescribing in developed countries are treatment protocols based on wide consultation and consensus, properly introduced and with a possibility of feedback; face-to-face education focussed on a particular prescribing problem in selected individuals; structured order forms; and focussed educational campaigns. Essential drugs lists are probably effective when based on consensus and used within a comprehensive educational programme. Printed materials alone are not effective. In most cases the usefulness of such strategies in developing countries has not been proven and should be studied. Medical education in clinical pharmacology and pharmacotherapy should be based on the practical needs of future prescribes, should include the principles of rational therapeutics and problem solving, and should immunize the students against the influences they are likely to encounter in their professional life, such as patient pressure, drug promotion and irrational prescribing by peers. Within the scope of a national formulary, specialist departments in teaching hospitals should define prescribing policies as the basis for prescribing, teaching, examinations and medical audit. PMID:7756093

  4. Safe disposal of prescribed medicines.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Phillip J; Hussainy, Safeera Y; George, Johnson; Kong, David Cm; Kirkpatrick, Carl Mj

    2015-06-01

    The National Return and Disposal of Unwanted Medicines Program provides a free and safe method for the disposal of unwanted and expired medicines. This stops drugs being dumped in landfill and waterways. An audit showed that over 600 tonnes of medicines are returned through the program. A substantial proportion of these medicines were still within their expiry dates. Salbutamol, insulin and frusemide are the most commonly discarded medicines. More than $2 million of public money is wasted each year. Hoarding and non-adherence to treatment contribute to waste. Health professionals may be able to help minimise waste by informing patients about the importance of completing prescribed courses of treatment, and discouraging them from hoarding medicines after reaching the safety net threshold on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. Prescribe no more than the required quantity of medicines. When starting a new therapy, prescribe a minimal quantity in case the drug is unsuitable for the patient. Advise patients to return all unwanted medicines to a pharmacy for disposal. PMID:26648628

  5. Safe disposal of prescribed medicines

    PubMed Central

    Bergen, Phillip J; Hussainy, Safeera Y; George, Johnson; Kong, David CM; Kirkpatrick, Carl MJ

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The National Return and Disposal of Unwanted Medicines Program provides a free and safe method for the disposal of unwanted and expired medicines. This stops drugs being dumped in landfill and waterways. An audit showed that over 600 tonnes of medicines are returned through the program. A substantial proportion of these medicines were still within their expiry dates. Salbutamol, insulin and frusemide are the most commonly discarded medicines. More than $2 million of public money is wasted each year. Hoarding and non-adherence to treatment contribute to waste. Health professionals may be able to help minimise waste by informing patients about the importance of completing prescribed courses of treatment, and discouraging them from hoarding medicines after reaching the safety net threshold on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. Prescribe no more than the required quantity of medicines. When starting a new therapy, prescribe a minimal quantity in case the drug is unsuitable for the patient. Advise patients to return all unwanted medicines to a pharmacy for disposal. PMID:26648628

  6. Prescribing for periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Blair, Fiona M; Chapple, Iain L C

    2014-11-01

    With concerns about the ever-increasing development of antimicrobial resistance, it is imperative that antimicrobials are prescribed responsibly and used appropriately. This article provides an overview and simple guidelines for antimicrobial prescribing in the management of periodontal diseases. PMID:25668374

  7. Quetiapine-Induced Syndrome of Inappropriate Secretion of Antidiuretic Hormone

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) can be induced by various conditions, including malignant neoplasms, infections, central nervous system disorders, and numerous drugs. We here report a case of a 65-year-old female patient, treated with quetiapine for schizophrenia, who presented with generalized tonic-clonic seizures and was finally diagnosed with quetiapine-induced SIADH. Quetiapine-associated hyponatremia is extremely uncommon and only a few, relevant reports can be found in the literature. This case underlines the fact that patients on antipsychotic medication and more specifically on quetiapine should be closely monitored and routinely tested for electrolyte disorders. PMID:27034875

  8. Multidrug resistance after inappropriate tuberculosis treatment: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    van der Werf, Marieke J.; Langendam, Miranda W.; Huitric, Emma; Manissero, Davide

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the evidence for the postulation that inappropriate tuberculosis (TB) regimens are a risk for development of multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB. MEDLINE, EMBASE and other databases were searched for relevant articles in January 2011. Cohort studies including TB patients who received treatment were selected and data on treatment regimen, drug susceptibility testing results and genotyping results before treatment and at failure or relapse were abstracted from the articles. Four studies were included in the systematic review and two were included in the meta-analysis. In these two studies the risk of developing MDR-TB in patients who failed treatment and used an inappropriate treatment regimen was increased 27-fold (RR 26.7, 95% CI 5.0–141.7) when compared with individuals who received an appropriate treatment regimen. This review provides evidence that supports the general opinion that the development of MDR-TB can be caused by inadequate treatment, given the drug susceptibility pattern of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli. It should be noted that only two studies provided data for the meta-analysis. The information can be used to advocate for adequate treatment for patients based on drug resistance profiles. PMID:22005918

  9. The moral choice in prescribing barbiturates.

    PubMed Central

    Wells, F.

    1976-01-01

    Dr Wells, a general practitioner, looks at the problem of barbiturate dependence from the point of view of the prescribing doctor who has to choose for his patients - of all ages - the drug, usually a hypnotic, which is sought for insomnia or states of anxiety and stress. He argues that it is wise to prescribe non-barbiturates, but that even in elderly people it is possible and the right course of action is to wean these patients from their dependence on sleep-inducing drugs. Young people often acquire the drug habit by taking hypnotics from a bedside table or a bathroom cabinet in their own homes. PMID:940140

  10. Blueprint for prescriber continuing education program.

    PubMed

    2012-06-01

    On October 25, 2011, the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) posted online this Blueprint for Prescriber Continuing Education, labeled "final," relating to extended-release and long-acting opioids. The pending FDA Risk Evaluation Management Strategy (REMS) requires prescriber education. This document provides guidance to sponsors of these dosage forms in developing the prescvriber education component of their REMS. This report was posted online by the federal agency on October 25, 2011 at: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/drugs/drugsafety/informationbydrugclass/ucm277916.pdf. It is in the public domain. PMID:22764849

  11. Children's Context Inappropriate Anger and Salivary Cortisol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, Robin L.; Davidson, Richard J.; Kalin, Ned H.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2009-01-01

    Some children show emotion that is not consistent with normative appraisal of the context and can therefore be defined as context inappropriate (CI). The authors used individual growth curve modeling and hierarchical multiple regression analyses to examine whether CI anger predicts differences in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity, as…

  12. Teachers' Beliefs about Inappropriate Behaviour: Challenging Attitudes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grieve, Ann M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on taking a first step in the process of influencing teachers' attitudes by building a description of beliefs about inappropriate behaviour that can be used in staff development work to provoke dissonance-led change. It describes a study, undertaken in two parts, exploring teachers' attitudes to inclusion, and ascertaining their…

  13. Functional analysis of inappropriate mealtime behaviors.

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Cathleen C; Fisher, Wayne W; Brown, Kimberly A; Shore, Bridget A; Patel, Meeta R; Katz, Richard M; Sevin, Bart M; Gulotta, Charles S; Blakely-Smith, Audrey

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the current investigation was to apply the functional analysis described by Iwata, Dorsey, Slifer, Bauman, and Richman (1982/1994) to the inappropriate mealtime behaviors of 15 children who had been referred to an intensive program for the assessment and treatment of severe feeding disorders. During Study 1, we conducted descriptive assessments of children and parents during meals. The results of Study 1 showed that parents used the following consequences for inappropriate mealtime behaviors: coaxing and reprimanding, allowing the child to periodically take a break from or avoid eating, and giving the child preferred food or toys following inappropriate behavior. The effects of these consequences were tested systematically in Study 2 when we conducted analogue functional analyses with the children. During alternating meals, one of the consequences typically used by parents consistently followed inappropriate child behavior. Results indicated that these consequences actually worsened behavior for 10 of the 15 children (67%). These results suggested that the analogue functional analysis described by Iwata et al. may be useful in identifying the environmental events that play a role in feeding disorders. PMID:12858984

  14. Capitation combined with pay-for-performance improves antibiotic prescribing practices in rural China.

    PubMed

    Yip, Winnie; Powell-Jackson, Timothy; Chen, Wen; Hu, Min; Fe, Eduardo; Hu, Mu; Jian, Weiyan; Lu, Ming; Han, Wei; Hsiao, William C

    2014-03-01

    Pay-for-performance in health care holds promise as a policy lever to improve the quality and efficiency of care. Although the approach has become increasingly popular in developing countries in recent years, most policy designs do not permit the rigorous evaluation of its impact. Thus, evidence of its effect is limited. In collaboration with the government of Ningxia Province, a predominantly rural area in northwest China, we conducted a matched-pair cluster-randomized experiment between 2009 and 2012 to evaluate the effects of capitation with pay-for-performance on primary care providers' antibiotic prescribing practices, health spending, outpatient visit volume, and patient satisfaction. We found that the intervention led to a reduction of approximately 15 percent in antibiotic prescriptions and a small reduction in total spending per visit to village posts-essentially, community health clinics. We found no effect on other outcomes. Our results suggest that capitation with pay-for-performance can improve drug prescribing practices by reducing overprescribing and inappropriate prescribing. Our study also shows that rigorous evaluations of health system interventions are feasible when conducted in close collaboration with the government. PMID:24572187

  15. Chemotherapy prescribing errors: an observational study on the role of information technology and computerized physician order entry systems

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy administration is a high-risk process. Aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency, type, preventability, as well as potential and actual severity of outpatient chemotherapy prescribing errors in an Oncology Department where electronic prescribing is used. Methods Up to three electronic prescriptions per patient record were selected from the clinical records of consecutive patients who received cytotoxic chemotherapy between January 2007 and December 2008. Wrong prescriptions were classified as incomplete, incorrect or inappropriate. Error preventability was classified using a four-point scale. Severity was defined according to the Healthcare Failure Mode and Effect Analysis Severity Scale. Results Eight hundred and thirty-five prescriptions were eligible. The overall error rate was 20%. Excluding systematic errors (i.e. errors due to an initially faulty implementation of chemotherapy protocols into computerized dictionaries) from the analysis, the error rate decreased to 8%. Incomplete prescriptions were the majority. Most errors were deemed definitely preventable. According to error presumptive potential for damage, 72% were classified as minor; only 3% had the potential to produce major or catastrophic injury. Sixty-eight percent were classified as near misses; adverse drug events had no or little effect on clinical outcome. Conclusions Chemotherapy prescribing errors may arise even using electronic prescribing. Although periodic audits may be useful to detect common errors and guide corrective actions, it is crucial to get the computerized physician order entry system and set-ups correct before implementation. PMID:24344973

  16. E-prescribing: clinical implications for patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Marie; Dang, Devra; Lee, Jennifer

    2009-09-01

    With the recent Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services and stimulus package incentives for health information technology, many clinicians are expected to adopt or enhance their use of e-prescribing systems. E-prescribing has nearly eradicated medication errors resulting from prescriber handwriting interpretations, yet several other patient-care and workflow benefits still remain a promise. As prescribers select or update their e-prescribing systems (whether stand-alone or integrated with electronic health records), close attention is needed to the e-prescribing application features and level of clinical decision support to avoid clinical blind spots, including incomplete or inaccurate patient medication lists, poor drop-down menu or screen design, and lack of clinically relevant and actionable drug interaction and drug allergy alerts. This article presents three case studies that highlight common e-prescribing problems involving diabetes patients. PMID:20144439

  17. Use of FMEA analysis to reduce risk of errors in prescribing and administering drugs in paediatric wards: a quality improvement report

    PubMed Central

    Lago, Paola; Bizzarri, Giancarlo; Scalzotto, Francesca; Parpaiola, Antonella; Amigoni, Angela; Putoto, Giovanni; Perilongo, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    Objective Administering medication to hospitalised infants and children is a complex process at high risk of error. Failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) is a proactive tool used to analyse risks, identify failures before they happen and prioritise remedial measures. To examine the hazards associated with the process of drug delivery to children, we performed a proactive risk-assessment analysis. Design and setting Five multidisciplinary teams, representing different divisions of the paediatric department at Padua University Hospital, were trained to analyse the drug-delivery process, to identify possible causes of failures and their potential effects, to calculate a risk priority number (RPN) for each failure and plan changes in practices. Primary outcome To identify higher-priority potential failure modes as defined by RPNs and planning changes in clinical practice to reduce the risk of patients harm and improve safety in the process of medication use in children. Results In all, 37 higher-priority potential failure modes and 71 associated causes and effects were identified. The highest RPNs related (>48) mainly to errors in calculating drug doses and concentrations. Many of these failure modes were found in all the five units, suggesting the presence of common targets for improvement, particularly in enhancing the safety of prescription and preparation of endovenous drugs. The introductions of new activities in the revised process of administering drugs allowed reducing the high-risk failure modes of 60%. Conclusions FMEA is an effective proactive risk-assessment tool useful to aid multidisciplinary groups in understanding a process care and identifying errors that may occur, prioritising remedial interventions and possibly enhancing the safety of drug delivery in children. PMID:23253870

  18. Synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug prescribing variability in rheumatoid arthritis: a multilevel analysis of a cross-sectional national study.

    PubMed

    Ferraz-Amaro, Iván; Seoane-Mato, Daniel; Sánchez-Alonso, Fernando; Martín-Martínez, María A

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the variability in the prescription of csDMARDs for the treatment of RA between centers in Spain and to explore how this variability relates to demographic, disease, physician, and institutional characteristics. A cross-sectional nationwide study was carried out to examine data from 1352 patients. Multilevel logistic regression with two levels was performed to assess the relationships between individual and disease-related factors, as well as physician and hospital characteristics, vis-à-vis csDMARD prescription. Having three or more comorbidities (OR 0.353 [0.173-0.721]), disease duration (OR 0.321 [0.174-0.595]), and the existence of an early-arthritis unit (OR 0.552 [0.335-0.910]) were negatively associated with the prescription of one csDMARD versus nonprescription; contrary, the presence of rheumatoid factor (OR 1.909, 95 % CI [1.181-3.086]) was positively associated. On the other hand, while corticoid intake (OR 1.561 [1.088-2.240]), the maximum number of painful joints, and the presence of nursing consultation (OR 1.626 [1.078-2.452]) were positively associated with the prescription of multiple csDMARDs versus one csDMARD, patient's age (OR 0.984 [0.974-0.995]) and disease duration (OR 0.669 [0.462-0.968]) were negatively associated. Despite all these, variability in the prescription of csDMARDs between hospitals remained statistically significant after adjusting for these individual and hospital characteristics. Within the emAR II study, there was a marked variation in the number of csDMARDs prescribed between hospitals. The reasons for these variations remain unclear and cannot be solely related to disease or center characteristics. PMID:26403284

  19. Adverse Effects of Common Drugs: Adults.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Peter R; Karpa, Kelly Dowhower; Felix, Todd Matthew

    2015-09-01

    Although drugs can be an essential and lifesaving component of the care of adult patients, their use frequently is accompanied by adverse effects and life-threatening adverse drug reactions that can result in significant disability and mortality. The potential for drug-related severe morbidity and mortality is compounded during periods of hospitalization, when high-risk drugs such as anticoagulants or insulin are used, and when care in an intensive care unit is required. Patient factors in adults that can increase the risk of drug harms include immunosuppression, cognitive impairment, depression, alcoholism and other substance abuse disorders, chronic kidney disease, hepatic dysfunction, coagulopathies, limited English proficiency, institutional/nursing home care, and underinsurance or lack of insurance. Physician factors that can increase the risk of drug harms include inappropriate prescribing of drugs (including to pregnant and breastfeeding women), failure to appropriately discontinue/deprescribe drugs, insufficient drug reconciliation, failure to coordinate care among multiple prescribing clinicians, and failure to elicit and incorporate into health histories and clinical decision-making the widespread use of nonprescription drugs, herbal products, and dietary supplements. PMID:26375995

  20. Reducing inappropriate accident and emergency department attendances:

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Sharif A; Gibbons, Daniel C; Gnani, Shamini

    2013-01-01

    Background Inappropriate attendances may account for up to 40% of presentations at accident and emergency (A&E) departments. There is considerable interest from health practitioners and policymakers in interventions to reduce this burden. Aim To review the evidence on primary care service interventions to reduce inappropriate A&E attendances. Design and setting Systematic review of UK and international primary care interventions. Method Studies published in English between 1 January 1986 and 23 August 2011 were identified from PubMed, the NHS Economic Evaluation Database, the Cochrane Collaboration, and Health Technology Assessment databases. The outcome measures were A&E attendances, patient satisfaction, clinical outcome, and intervention cost. Two authors reviewed titles and abstracts of retrieved results, with adjudication of disagreements conducted by the third. Studies were quality assessed using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network checklist system where applicable. Results In total, 9916 manuscripts were identified, of which 34 were reviewed. Telephone triage was the single best-evaluated intervention. This resulted in negligible impact on A&E attendance, but exhibited acceptable patient satisfaction and clinical safety; cost effectiveness was uncertain. The limited available evidence suggests that emergency nurse practitioners in community settings and community health centres may reduce A&E attendance. For all other interventions considered in this review (walk-in centres, minor injuries units, and out-of-hours general practice), the effects on A&E attendance, patient outcomes, and cost were inconclusive. Conclusion Studies showed a negligible effect on A&E attendance for all interventions; data on patient outcomes and cost-effectiveness are limited. There is an urgent need to examine all aspects of primary care service interventions that aim to reduce inappropriate A&E attendance. PMID:24351497

  1. Matrix with Prescribed Eigenvectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Faiz

    2011-01-01

    It is a routine matter for undergraduates to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a given matrix. But the converse problem of finding a matrix with prescribed eigenvalues and eigenvectors is rarely discussed in elementary texts on linear algebra. This problem is related to the "spectral" decomposition of a matrix and has important technical…

  2. Epidemiology and definition of inappropriate sinus tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Cara N; Scheinman, Melvin M

    2016-06-01

    Inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) is a clinical syndrome lacking formal diagnostic criteria. It is generally defined as an elevated resting heart rate (HR; >90-100 bpm) with an exaggerated response to physical or emotional stress and a clearly sinus mechanism. Clinical manifestations are broad from a complete lack of symptoms to incapacitating incessant tachycardia. Now understood to be relatively prevalent, it is observed to have a generally benign prognosis, though symptoms may persist for years. Whether IST is a single discrete entity or a heterogeneous condition with overlap to other syndromes such as postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome remains a matter of debate. PMID:26310298

  3. Catheter ablation of inappropriate sinus tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Gianni, Carola; Di Biase, Luigi; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Gökoğlan, Yalçın; Güneş, Mahmut F; Horton, Rodney; Hranitzky, Patrick M; Burkhardt, J David; Natale, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Catheter ablation for inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) is recommended for patients symptomatic for palpitations and refractory to other treatments. The current approach consists in sinus node modification (SNM), achieved by ablation of the cranial part of the sinus node to eliminate faster sinus rates while trying to preserve chronotropic competence. This approach has a limited efficacy, with a very modest long-term clinical success. To overcome this, proper patient selection is crucial and an epicardial approach should always be considered. This brief review will discuss the current role and limitations of catheter ablation in the management of patients with IST. PMID:26310299

  4. Functional analysis and treatment of inappropriate verbal behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, M R; Benedict, H; Larson, T

    2001-01-01

    The present study examined the possible function of inappropriate verbal behavior of an adult man who had been diagnosed with both mental retardation and psychosis. Results of a functional analysis indicated that inappropriate verbal utterances were maintained by attention. An intervention consisting of the differential reinforcement of appropriate verbal behavior effectively reduced the inappropriate behavior. PMID:11678535

  5. Update on drug interactions with phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors prescribed as first-line therapy for patients with erectile dysfunction or pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gur, Serap; Kadowitz, Philip J; Gokce, Ahmet; Sikka, Suresh C; Lokman, Utku; Hellstrom, Wayne J G

    2013-02-01

    Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (PDE5i, sildenafil, vardenafil, tadalafil and avanafil) are a first-line medical therapy for erectile dysfunction (ED). In all likelihood, PDE5i usage will increase because sildenafil (Viagra® and Revatio®) and tadalafil (Cialis® and Adcirca®) have recently been recommended as first-line therapy for patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH). PDE5i exhibit higher plasma concentrations when co-administered with cytochrome P (CYP) 3A inhibitors, which influences their side-effect profile. The higher PDE5i plasma concentrations, caused by CYP3A inhibitors, influence the severity and timing of PDE5i drug interactions and require dose adjustment. PDE5i are safe when used with most antihypertensive agents, but co-administration with nitrates or α-blockers can cause severe hypotension and syncope. Dose adjustment is also necessary when PDE5i are co-administered with CYP3A inducers. The combination of oral tadalafil and bosentan (endothelin receptor antagonist) reduces tadalafil levels and requires dose adjustment. Current literature reports a number of interactions between PDE5i and other agents and further studies are needed to expand our knowledge base of these interactions. This review discusses relevant PDE5i drug interactions, including those with CYP 450 inhibitors and inducers which are frequently used during the treatment of ED and PH. PMID:23140258

  6. A Survey of Off-Label Prescribing for Inpatients with Mild Intellectual Disability and Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haw, C.; Stubbs, J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The term "off-label prescribing" refers to the use of a drug outside the terms of its Marketing Authorisation, including prescribing for an unlicensed indication. There have been few reports about off-label prescribing in psychiatry. The aims of the study were to determine the frequency of off-label prescribing of psychotropics for…

  7. The use of potentially inappropriate medications and changes in quality of life among older nursing home residents

    PubMed Central

    Aqqad, Sana’ MH Al; Chen, Li Li; Shafie, Asrul Akmal; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Tangiisuran, Balamurugan

    2014-01-01

    Background Nursing home residents are mainly older people with multiple diseases and taking multiple medications. The quality use of medication and its association with health related quality of life (HRQoL) have not been reported in Malaysia. This study aims to investigate the association between the use of potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) and the changes observed in the HRQoL among older nursing home residents. Methods A prospective follow up study was conducted at four nongovernmental organization nursing homes in Penang, Malaysia. Older residents (≥65 years old) taking at least one prescribed medication were included. Residents with PIMs were identified by using Screening Tool of Older Person’s potentially inappropriate Prescriptions (STOPP) criteria. HRQoL was assessed using EuroQol-5 dimension (EQ-5D) and EuroQol-visual analog scale (EQ-VAS) at baseline and after a 3-month follow up. The association of PIMs with HRQoL was analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test. Results The median age of the 211 participants was 77 years (interquartile range 72–82 years) and the median number of prescription medicines was four (interquartile range three to six). The prevalence of PIMs was 23.7% and 18.6% at baseline and 3 months later, respectively. The most commonly prescribed PIMs in decreasing order were first generation antihistamine, prescriptions of duplicate drug class, glibenclamide with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and anticholinergic to treat extrapyramidal side effects of neuroleptic medications. At baseline, there was no significant difference among residents with or without PIMs in each bracket of EQ-5D, EQ-5D index, or EQ-VAS scores. Comparison of the differences in the mean score index of EQ-5D between baseline and after 3 months also showed no statistically significant differences. Conclusion PIMs were found to be relatively common among older nursing home residents. However, no significant changes were observed in HRQoL among these residents

  8. The epidemiology of prescribing in an urban general practice

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The total prescribing in an urban general practice was recorded over a six-month period and classified according to the length of time that drugs were continued. The number of patients receiving any prescription rose with age, as did the total number of items per patient prescribed for; while the continued items rose with age, the number of items prescribed once only per patient remained constant in all age groups. The bulk of the total prescribing was for the elderly and this was mainly for continued items. The classification also shows that certain drug groups are liable to be continued whereas others are virtually always prescribed once only. The implications of these findings for self-audit of prescribing and the care of the elderly in general practice are discussed. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6. PMID:7452600

  9. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion and Ibuprofen, a rare association to be considered: role of tolvaptan.

    PubMed

    Artom, Nathan; Oddo, Silvia; Pende, Aldo; Ottonello, Luciano; Giusti, Massimo; Dallegri, Franco

    2013-01-01

    The association between the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is rare and has never been treated with an arginine vasopressin receptor antagonist. We report a unique case of SIADH associated with ibuprofen use and successfully treated with tolvaptan. A 76-year-old man came to our observation because of lumbar pain and epigastric discomfort. He was taking ibuprofen orally 400 mg bid as an analgesic treatment. Laboratory tests showed low levels of sodium (116 mmol/L) and chloride; a diagnosis of SIADH was formulated and ibuprofen was stopped immediately. Imaging tests allowed to rule out the presence of malignancies or cerebral and lung diseases. Slightly hypertonic saline infusion was administered for 3 days without significant sodium improvement; therefore, tolvaptan was started at the initial dose of 7.5 mg daily, doubled after 5 days. After 8 days of treatment the patient showed progressive increase of sodium levels up to normal values. In the following weeks tolvaptan was prescribed at progressively titrated dosage to full suspension; afterwards the sodium levels remained normal without any type of treatment. PMID:23819075

  10. Awareness of the Food and Drug Administration's Bad Ad Program and Education Regarding Pharmaceutical Advertising: A National Survey of Prescribers in Ambulatory Care Settings.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, Amie C; Boudewyns, Vanessa; Aikin, Kathryn J; Geisen, Emily; Betts, Kevin R; Southwell, Brian G

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bad Ad program educates health care professionals about false or misleading advertising and marketing and provides a pathway to report suspect materials. To assess familiarity with this program and the extent of training about pharmaceutical marketing, a sample of 2,008 health care professionals, weighted to be nationally representative, responded to an online survey. Approximately equal numbers of primary care physicians, specialists, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners answered questions concerning Bad Ad program awareness and its usefulness, as well as their likelihood of reporting false or misleading advertising, confidence in identifying such advertising, and training about pharmaceutical marketing. Results showed that fewer than a quarter reported any awareness of the Bad Ad program. Nonetheless, a substantial percentage (43%) thought it seemed useful and 50% reported being at least somewhat likely to report false or misleading advertising in the future. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants expressed more openness to the program and reported receiving more training about pharmaceutical marketing. Bad Ad program awareness is low, but opportunity exists to solicit assistance from health care professionals and to help health care professionals recognize false and misleading advertising. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants are perhaps the most likely contributors to the program. PMID:26176326

  11. Cefdinir-Induced Hepatotoxicity: Potential Hazards of Inappropriate Antibiotic Use

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Joy

    2008-01-01

    Drug-induced hepatotoxicity is well recognized but can cause some diagnostic problems, particularly if not previously reported. The present case involves a 22-year-old male who presented with jaundice and elevated liver enzymes after a course of cefdinir (Omnicef®) for streptococcal pharyngitis. A diagnosis of drug-induced liver injury was suspected but a liver biopsy was required after his jaundice worsened despite cessation of the presumed offending agent. A short course of steroids was initiated and eventually the jaundice resolved. This case highlights the need to suspect medication-induced liver injury in cases of jaundice, even if not previously reported. In addition, it illustrates the potential for adverse outcomes in situations where antibiotics are used inappropriately or where first line antibiotics are not used for routine infections. We report a case of a young male who developed jaundice associated with cefdinir use with pathological confirmation of moderate cholestasis with portal and lobular mixed inflammation and focal bile duct injury consistent with drug-induced liver injury. PMID:18752027

  12. Palifermin: new drug. Prevention of oral mucositis: inappropriate evaluation.

    PubMed

    2007-08-01

    (1) Patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy combined with total body irradiation (myeloablative therapy) often develop oral mucositis. Prevention is based mainly on sucking ice during chemotherapy. (2) Palifermin is a growth factor marketed for the prevention of severe oral mucositis in adults with malignant haemopathies who are receiving myeloablative therapy followed by peripheral stem cell autografting. (3) Palifermin has not been compared with sucking ice, despite the efficacy of this simple treatment. (4) In a randomised placebo-controlled double-blind trial involving 212 adult patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy and total body irradiation, palifermin reduced the incidence of severe oral mucositis (63% versus 98%) and its duration (about 3 days versus 9 days). The myeloablative regimen used in this trial is not that commonly used in Europe. The efficacy of palifermin during less aggressive regimens, which cause less severe oral mucositis, is not known. (5) The main adverse events noted in clinical trials were erythema and cutaneous oedema. It is not known whether palifermin increases the long-term risk of cancer. (6) Treatment with palifermin is expensive, 4800.00 euros in France); the optimal dosing schedule is not known and the unit dose chosen by the manufacturer is wastefully large. (7) In practice, it remains to be demonstrated that palifermin is more effective than simply sucking ice. PMID:17724832

  13. An ethnographic exploration of influences on prescribing in general practice: why is there variation in prescribing practices?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prescribing is a core activity for general practitioners, yet significant variation in the quality of prescribing has been reported. This suggests there may be room for improvement in the application of the current best research evidence. There has been substantial investment in technologies and interventions to address this issue, but effect sizes so far have been small to moderate. This suggests that prescribing is a decision-making process that is not sufficiently understood. By understanding more about prescribing processes and the implementation of research evidence, variation may more easily be understood and more effective interventions proposed. Methods An ethnographic study in three Scottish general practices with diverse organizational characteristics. Practices were ranked by their performance against Audit Scotland prescribing quality indicators, incorporating established best research evidence. Two practices of high prescribing quality and one practice of low prescribing quality were recruited. Participant observation, formal and informal interviews, and a review of practice documentation were employed. Results Practices ranked as high prescribing quality consistently made and applied macro and micro prescribing decisions, whereas the low-ranking practice only made micro prescribing decisions. Macro prescribing decisions were collective, policy decisions made considering research evidence in light of the average patient, one disease, condition, or drug. Micro prescribing decisions were made in consultation with the patient considering their views, preferences, circumstances and other conditions (if necessary). Although micro prescribing can operate independently, the implementation of evidence-based, quality prescribing was attributable to an interdependent relationship. Macro prescribing policy enabled prescribing decisions to be based on scientific evidence and applied consistently where possible. Ultimately, this influenced prescribing

  14. More than a prescriber: gerontological nurse practitioners' perspectives on prescribing and pharmaceutical marketing.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Diane Feeney; Ladd, Elissa

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain understanding about nurse practitioners' (NPs') prescriptive decision making for geriatric patients with attention to pharmaceutical marketing influences. Prior research has focused on physician prescribers and identified suboptimal practices. Because the majority of medications are prescribed to older adults, NPs in geriatric practice were targeted as an information-rich group to interview about prescribing issues. Given the exploratory nature of this research, qualitative focus group methods were employed using content analysis. Fifteen NPs were recruited at an annual national geriatric NP conference. They worked in all regions of the United States, had an average of 9 years prescribing experience, and participated in 1 of the 2 focus groups. The key theme that emerged was that they were more than a prescriber. Findings revealed overwhelming consistency among the NP participants that their nursing background instilled a holistic approach that encompassed both nondrug and therapeutic drug options and skepticism about drug marketing, as well as offered a positive difference by tailoring to their patients' biophysical, psychological, and economic needs with an involvement in the interplay of geriatric care issues not typically addressed by physicians. The participants' reported approaches were in alignment with geriatric prescribing recommendations. PMID:20159350

  15. Pharmaceutical marketing research and the prescribing physician.

    PubMed

    Greene, Jeremy A

    2007-05-15

    Surveillance of physicians' prescribing patterns and the accumulation and sale of these data for pharmaceutical marketing are currently the subjects of legislation in several states and action by state and national medical associations. Contrary to common perception, the growth of the health care information organization industry has not been limited to the past decade but has been building slowly over the past 50 years, beginning in the 1940s when growth in the prescription drug market fueled industry interest in understanding and influencing prescribing patterns. The development of this surveillance system was not simply imposed on the medical profession by the pharmaceutical industry but was developed through the interactions of pharmaceutical salesmen, pharmaceutical marketers, academic researchers, individual physicians, and physician organizations. Examination of the role of physicians and physician organizations in the development of prescriber profiling is directly relevant to the contemporary policy debate surrounding this issue. PMID:17502635

  16. Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Centers For Disease Control And Prevention Public Health Service U S Department Of Health And Human Services

    2016-06-01

    Improving the way opioids are prescribed through clinical practice guidelines can ensure patients have access to safer, more effective chronic pain treatment while reducing the number of people who misuse, abuse, or overdose from these drugs. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) developed and published the Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain to provide recommendations for the prescribing of opioid pain medication for patients 18 and older in primary care settings. Recommendations focus on the use of opioids in treating chronic pain (pain lasting longer than 3 months or past the time of normal tissue healing) outside of active cancer treatment, palliative care, and end-of-life care. PMID:27301691

  17. Pharmacogenetics in drug regulation: promise, potential and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rashmi R

    2005-01-01

    result in complex prescribing information. Genotype-specific dosing regimens will have to be more precise and marketing strategies more prudent. However, not all variations in drug responses are related to pharmacogenetic polymorphisms. Drug response can be modulated by a number of non-genetic factors, especially co-medications and presence of concurrent diseases. Inappropriate prescribing frequently compounds the complexity introduced by these two important non-genetic factors. Unless prescribers adhere to the prescribing information, much of the benefits of pharmacogenetics will be squandered. Discovering highly predictive genotype–phenotype associations during drug development and demonstrating their clinical validity and utility in well-designed prospective clinical trials will no doubt better define the role of pharmacogenetics in future clinical practice. In the meantime, prescribing should comply with the information provided while pharmacogenetic research is deservedly supported by all concerned but without unrealistic expectations. PMID:16096112

  18. A Study on Polypharmacy and Potential Drug-Drug Interactions among Elderly Patients Admitted in Department of Medicine of a Tertiary Care Hospital in Puducherry

    PubMed Central

    Kalyansundaram, Dharani; Bahurupi, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The proportion of elderly population has been constantly increasing over last few years. Polypharmacy is unavoidable in the elderly as they often suffer from multiple co-morbidities. Potential drug-drug interaction due to polypharmacy and potential inappropriate medication among the elderly must be carefully assessed. Aim To find out polypharmacy and potential drug-drug interactions among elderly patients admitted and discharged in Department of Medicine. Materials and Methods This study was carried out on 100 patients above 65 years of age both males and females. Data was collected through review of case sheets. Polypharmacy was observed based on admission and discharge prescriptions. Frequently occurring drug-drug interactions were assessed using online checks. Results Mean number of drugs prescribed to patients on admission (7.61 ± 3.37) was more than that on discharge (5.48±2.46). More than half of these patients received 5 to 9 number of drugs. On admission 52.69% potential drug-drug interactions were observed and on discharge 52.91%. Most common drug interactions observed in both the groups were of moderate grade. Conclusion From the present study we can conclude that polypharmacy leads to more potential drug-drug interactions. To improve drug safety in this high-risk population, appropriate prescribing is very important. PMID:27042480

  19. 78 FR 42455 - Medications Prescribed by Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... Administrative practice and procedure, Alcohol abuse, Alcoholism, Claims, Day care, Dental health, Drug abuse... section to read as follows: Sec. 17.96 Medication prescribed by non-VA physicians. * * * * * (a) * * *...

  20. Off-label prescribing in older patients.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Stephen H D; Jansen, Paul A F; Mangoni, Arduino A

    2012-06-01

    The practice of off-label prescribing, i.e. prescribing drugs either for unregistered/unapproved therapeutic indications and age groups or using unregistered/unapproved doses or methods of administration, is common in older patients. This may be due to the poor representation of this group in pre-marketing clinical trials assessing therapeutic efficacy and safety of novel therapies or merely to the fact that trials in a particular indication have not been undertaken. Off-label prescribing should not be viewed as scientifically or ethically unsound when there are good clinical data to support a particular therapeutic indication. However, a number of steps should be followed in order to ensure therapeutic efficacy, reducing, at the same time, the risk of adverse drug reactions and/or medical litigation. This article discusses the current epidemiology and trends in off-label prescribing in older patients, the scientific and ethical justification of this practice, medico-legal implications, and proposed strategies for risk mitigation. PMID:22642777

  1. The impact of prescribed psychotropics on youth

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Many psychotropics prescribed to children are unlicensed or off-label. This article uses the two most prescribed psychotropics (MPH and SSRIs) to illustrate various concerns about their impact on youth. Many mental illnesses begin in childhood or early adulthood, warranting a treatment of some kind. However, commentators have argued that prescribing is influenced by five myths: (1) children are little adults; (2) children have no reason to develop depression or anxiety; (3) psychiatric disorders are the same across adults and children; (3) children can be prescribed lower doses of the same drug; (5) drugs are preferable to alternative treatments and are more successful. Several lines of evidence suggest that these are incorrect assumptions. We update readers with recent research in relation to these myths, concluding that researchers should clarify child/adult differences for psychotropics, attend to the growth of "cosmetic" use of psychotropics in children and adolescents, and address concerns about the diagnostic validity of mental illness in the current DSM classification system. PMID:17949504

  2. The Risks of Inappropriateness in Cardiac Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Picano, Eugenio

    2009-01-01

    The immense clinical and scientific benefits of cardiovascular imaging are well-established, but are also true that 30 to 50% of all examinations are partially or totally inappropriate. Marketing messages, high patient demand and defensive medicine, lead to the vicious circle of the so-called Ulysses syndrome. Mr. Ulysses, a typical middle-aged “worried-well” asymptomatic subject with an A-type coronary personality, a heavy (opium) smoker, leading a stressful life, would be advised to have a cardiological check-up after 10 years of war. After a long journey across imaging laboratories, he will have stress echo, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, PET-CT, 64-slice CT, and adenosine-MRI performed, with a cumulative cost of >100 times a simple exercise-electrocardiography test and a cumulative radiation dose of >4,000 chest x-rays, with a cancer risk of 1 in 100. Ulysses is tired of useless examinations, exorbitant costs. unaffordable even by the richest society, and unacceptable risks. PMID:19543412

  3. What to do about Inappropriate Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Bernice

    2011-01-01

    If you believe you are a victim of harassment, bias, or prejudice, your first need is to know what person you should confide in who would be qualified to help you understand and go through the process of resolving your difficult situation. You will be best off if you have an accessible, trustworthy institutional infrastructure in place for dealing with inappropriate behavior. The exact nature of the infrastructure varies among institutions; but it starts with leadership from the top person in every unit, for example the university president, the dean, the department chair, and the research group leader. A good "safety net” structure also includes a reliable system for reporting and addressing problems before they escalate; an institutional "enforcer” who is widely known to mean business; and trainings and frequent publicity about the consequences of such behavior. The components of a good structure, as well as some alternative routes to take if you don't have such a system, will be described in the contexts of different types of institutions; and you will learn the criteria for prohibited behaviors. There will be time for analysis and discussion of scenarios taken from real incidents, altered to protect privacy.

  4. The risks of inappropriateness in cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Picano, Eugenio

    2009-05-01

    The immense clinical and scientific benefits of cardiovascular imaging are well-established, but are also true that 30 to 50% of all examinations are partially or totally inappropriate. Marketing messages, high patient demand and defensive medicine, lead to the vicious circle of the so-called Ulysses syndrome. Mr. Ulysses, a typical middle-aged "worried-well" asymptomatic subject with an A-type coronary personality, a heavy (opium) smoker, leading a stressful life, would be advised to have a cardiological check-up after 10 years of war. After a long journey across imaging laboratories, he will have stress echo, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, PET-CT, 64-slice CT, and adenosine-MRI performed, with a cumulative cost of >100 times a simple exercise-electrocardiography test and a cumulative radiation dose of >4,000 chest x-rays, with a cancer risk of 1 in 100. Ulysses is tired of useless examinations, exorbitant costs. unaffordable even by the richest society, and unacceptable risks. PMID:19543412

  5. [Porphyria and inappropriate antidiuretic hormone syndrome].

    PubMed

    López Montes, A; Lorenzo, I; Pérez Martínez, J

    2004-01-01

    We report the case of a 37-years-old woman with inappropriate antidiuretic hormone syndrome due to an attack of acute porphyria. The patient was admitted to our hospital for abdominal pain, sleepiness and pink urine. Family and personal history were normal. Seven days before the admission the patient had a laparoscopy operation for endometriosis in her left ovary. The patient had had two normal pregnancies. The physical examination was normal, the skin turgor was good and no edema was present, the blood pressure was 140/90 mmHg. Her serum sodium was 114 mEq/L, serum osmolality 243 mOsm/kg, urine sodium 146 mEq/L and urine osmolality 457 mOsm/kg. Values from laboratory examination revealed a normal peripheral haematogram, a normal kidney function, normal liver, adrenal and thyroid function. The urine tested for amino-levulinic acid, coproporphyrin and uroporphyrin was strongly positive. These findings are compatible with Porphyria Variegata or Coproporphyria Hereditary. A diagnosis of Porphyria acute with SIADH was made, and water fluid restriction, i.v. hypertonic saline infusion and furosemide to correct the hyponatremia was begun. In 1966, lesions of the median eminence of the hypothalamus and both hypothalamic -hypophyseal tracts were described in a patient with Porphyria acute intermittent and SIADH. It was suggested that SIADH occurred because of damage to these areas of the brain from excessive exposure to porphyrins. PMID:15219077

  6. Intended and unintended consequences of China's zero markup drug policy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hongmei; Miller, Grant; Zhang, Linxiu; Li, Shaoping; Rozelle, Scott

    2015-08-01

    Since economic liberalization in the late 1970s, China's health care providers have grown heavily reliant on revenue from drugs, which they both prescribe and sell. To curb abuse and to promote the availability, safety, and appropriate use of essential drugs, China introduced its national essential drug list in 2009 and implemented a zero markup policy designed to decouple provider compensation from drug prescription and sales. We collected and analyzed representative data from China's township health centers and their catchment-area populations both before and after the reform. We found large reductions in drug revenue, as intended by policy makers. However, we also found a doubling of inpatient care that appeared to be driven by supply, instead of demand. Thus, the reform had an important unintended consequence: China's health care providers have sought new, potentially inappropriate, forms of revenue. PMID:26240254

  7. Drug utilisation and off-label use of medications in anaesthesia in surgical wards of a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Amol E; Shetty, Yashashri C; Gajbhiye, Snehalata V; Salgaonkar, Sweta V

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: When a drug is used in a way that is different from that described in regulatory body approved drug label, it is said to be ‘off label use’. Perioperative phase is sensitive from the point of view of patient safety and off-label drug use in this setup can prove to be hazardous to patient. Hence, it was planned to assess the pattern of drug utilisation and off-label use of perioperative medication during anaesthesia. Methods: Preoperatively, demographic details and adverse events check list were filled from a total of 400 patients from general surgery, paediatric surgery and orthopaedics departments scheduled to undergo surgery. The perioperative assessment form was assessed to record all prescriptions followed by refilling of adverse events checklist in case record form. World Health Organization (WHO) prescribing indicators were used for analysis of drug utilisation data. National Formulary of India 2011 was used as reference material to decide off-label drug use in majority instances along with package insert. Results: A total of 3705 drugs were prescribed to the 400 participants and average number of drugs per patient was 9.26 ± 3.33. Prescriptions by generic name were 68.07% whereas 85.3% drugs were prescribed from hospital schedule. Off-label drugs overall formed 20.19% of the drugs prescribed. At least one off-label drug was prescribed to 82.5% of patients. Inappropriate dose was the most common form of off-label use. There was 1.6 times greater risk of occurrence of adverse events associated with the use of off-label drugs. Conclusion: Prescription indicators were WHO compliant. Off-label drug use was practiced in anaesthesia department with questionable clinical justification in some instances. PMID:26755837

  8. Reconsidering "The inappropriateness of conventional cephalometrics".

    PubMed

    Bookstein, Fred L

    2016-06-01

    Of all the articles on cephalometrics this journal has published over the last half-century, the one most cited across the scientific literature is the 1979 lecture "The inappropriateness of conventional cephalometrics" by Robert Moyers and me. But the durable salience of this article is perplexing, as its critique was misdirected (it should have been aimed at the craniometrics of the early twentieth century, not merely the roentgenographic extension used in the orthodontic clinic) and its proposed remedies have all failed to establish themselves as methods of any broad utility. When problems highlighted by Moyers and me have been resolved at all, the innovations that resolved them owe to tools very different from those suggested in our article and imported from fields quite a bit farther from biometrics than we expected back in 1979. One of these tools was the creation de novo of a new abstract mathematical construction, statistical shape space, in the 1980s and 1990s; another was a flexible and intuitive new graphic, the thin-plate spline, for meaningfully and suggestively visualizing a wide variety of biological findings in these spaces. On the other hand, many of the complaints Moyers and I enunciated back in 1979, especially those stemming from the disarticulation of morphometrics from the explanatory styles and purposes of clinical medicine, remain unanswered even today. The present essay, a retrospective historical meditation, reviews the context of the 1979 publication, its major themes, and its relevance today. This essay is dedicated to the memory of Robert E. Moyers on the 100th anniversary of the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics. PMID:27241987

  9. Social determinants of prescribed and non-prescribed medicine use

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to describe the use of prescribed and non prescribed medicines in a non-institutionalised population older than 15 years of an urban area during the year 2000, in terms of age and gender, social class, employment status and type of Primary Health Care. Methods Cross-sectional study. Information came from the 2000 Barcelona Health Interview Survey. The indicators used were the prevalence of use of prescribed and non-prescribed medicines in the two weeks prior to the interview. Descriptive analyses, bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out. Results More women than men took medicines (75.8% vs. 60% respectively). The prevalence of use of prescribed medicines increased with age while the prevalence of non-prescribed use decreased. These age differences are smaller among those with poor perceived health. In terms of social class, a higher percentage of men with good health in the more advantaged classes took non-prescribed medicines compared with disadvantaged classes (38.7% vs 31.8%). In contrast, among the group with poor health, more people from the more advantaged classes took prescribed medicines, compared with disadvantaged classes (51.4% vs 33.3%). A higher proportion of people who were either retired, unemployed or students, with good health, used prescribed medicines. Conclusion This study shows that beside health needs, there are social determinants affecting medicine consumption in the city of Barcelona. PMID:20441578

  10. e-Learning initiatives to support prescribing.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Simon; Mucklow, John

    2012-10-01

    Preparing medical students to prescribe is a major challenge of undergraduate education. They must develop an understanding of clinical pharmacology and acquire knowledge about drugs and therapeutics, as well as the skills to prescribe for individual patients in the face of multiple variables. The task of delivering the learning required to achieve these attributes relies upon limited numbers of teachers, who have increasingly busy clinical commitments. There is evidence that training is currently insufficient to meet the demands of the workplace. e-Learning provides an opportunity to improve the learning experience. The advantages for teachers are improved distribution of learning content, ease of update, standardization and tracking of learner activities. The advantages for learners are ease of access, greater interactivity and individual choice concerning the pace and mix of learning. Important disadvantages are the considerable resource required to develop e-Learning projects and difficulties in simulating some aspects of the real world prescribing experience. Pre-requisites for developing an e-Learning programme to support prescribing include academic expertise, institutional support, learning technology services and an effective virtual learning environment. e-Learning content might range from complex interactive learning sessions through to static web pages with links. It is now possible to simulate and provide feedback on prescribing decisions and this will improve with advances in virtual reality. Other content might include a student formulary, self-assessment exercises (e.g. calculations), a glossary and an on-line library. There is some evidence for the effectiveness of e-Learning but better research is required into its potential impact on prescribing. PMID:22509885

  11. e-Learning initiatives to support prescribing

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Simon; Mucklow, John

    2012-01-01

    Preparing medical students to prescribe is a major challenge of undergraduate education. They must develop an understanding of clinical pharmacology and acquire knowledge about drugs and therapeutics, as well as the skills to prescribe for individual patients in the face of multiple variables. The task of delivering the learning required to achieve these attributes relies upon limited numbers of teachers, who have increasingly busy clinical commitments. There is evidence that training is currently insufficient to meet the demands of the workplace. e-Learning provides an opportunity to improve the learning experience. The advantages for teachers are improved distribution of learning content, ease of update, standardization and tracking of learner activities. The advantages for learners are ease of access, greater interactivity and individual choice concerning the pace and mix of learning. Important disadvantages are the considerable resource required to develop e-Learning projects and difficulties in simulating some aspects of the real world prescribing experience. Pre-requisites for developing an e-Learning programme to support prescribing include academic expertise, institutional support, learning technology services and an effective virtual learning environment. e-Learning content might range from complex interactive learning sessions through to static web pages with links. It is now possible to simulate and provide feedback on prescribing decisions and this will improve with advances in virtual reality. Other content might include a student formulary, self-assessment exercises (e.g. calculations), a glossary and an on-line library. There is some evidence for the effectiveness of e-Learning but better research is required into its potential impact on prescribing. PMID:22509885

  12. Functional Analysis and Treatment of Multiply Controlled Inappropriate Mealtime Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachmeyer, Melanie H.; Piazza, Cathleen C.; Fredrick, Laura D.; Reed, Gregory K.; Rivas, Kristi D.; Kadey, Heather J.

    2009-01-01

    Functional analyses identified children whose inappropriate mealtime behavior was maintained by escape and adult attention. Function-based extinction procedures were tested individually and in combination. Attention extinction alone did not result in decreases in inappropriate mealtime behavior or a significant increase in acceptance. By contrast,…

  13. 20 CFR 369.4 - Inappropriate use of the seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Inappropriate use of the seal. 369.4 Section... OF THE SEAL OF THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD § 369.4 Inappropriate use of the seal. The Railroad Retirement Board shall not grant permission for use of the seal in those instances where use of the seal...

  14. 20 CFR 369.4 - Inappropriate use of the seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Inappropriate use of the seal. 369.4 Section... OF THE SEAL OF THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD § 369.4 Inappropriate use of the seal. The Railroad Retirement Board shall not grant permission for use of the seal in those instances where use of the seal...

  15. 20 CFR 369.4 - Inappropriate use of the seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Inappropriate use of the seal. 369.4 Section... OF THE SEAL OF THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD § 369.4 Inappropriate use of the seal. The Railroad Retirement Board shall not grant permission for use of the seal in those instances where use of the seal...

  16. 20 CFR 369.4 - Inappropriate use of the seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Inappropriate use of the seal. 369.4 Section... OF THE SEAL OF THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD § 369.4 Inappropriate use of the seal. The Railroad Retirement Board shall not grant permission for use of the seal in those instances where use of the seal...

  17. Setting Limits: The Child Who Uses Inappropriate Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Polly

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses how to work with a child who uses inappropriate language. The words inappropriately used by young children are grouped into five categories: (1) names of body parts considered as private, and their nicknames; (2) bathroom words and body products; (3) religion-related words; (4) sexually charged words overheard when adults…

  18. Assessing Student Perceptions of Inappropriate and Appropriate Teacher Humor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frymier, Ann Bainbridge; Wanzer, Melissa Bekelja; Wojtaszczyk, Ann M.

    2007-01-01

    This study replicated and extended Wanzer, Frymier, Wojtaszczyk, and Smith's (2006) preliminary typology of appropriate and inappropriate teacher humor and advanced three explanations for differences in interpretations of teacher humor. Students were more likely to view teacher humor as inappropriate when it was perceived as offensive and when it…

  19. Side effects of commonly prescribed analgesic medications.

    PubMed

    Carter, Gregory T; Duong, Vicky; Ho, Stanley; Ngo, Kathryn C; Greer, Christopher L; Weeks, Douglas L

    2014-05-01

    Analgesics, including opioids, steroidal and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, aspirin, acetaminophen, antiepileptics, and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, are medications commonly used to treat many forms of pain. However, all of these agents may have significant adverse side effects. Adverse effects may occasionally be inseparable from desired effects. Side effects are often dose dependent and time dependent. It is critical that the prescribing practitioner and the dispensing pharmacist provide a thorough, understandable review of the potential side effects to all patients before these drugs are administered. Proper monitoring and follow-up during therapy are crucial. PMID:24787343

  20. Scope and nature of prescribing decisions made by general practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Denig, P; Witteman, C; Schouten, H

    2002-01-01

    Background: This study describes cognitive processes of doctors who are deciding on the treatment for a patient. This helps to uncover how prescribing decisions could benefit from (computerised) support. Methods: While thinking aloud, 61 general practitioners made prescribing decisions for five patients with urinary tract infections or stomach complaints. The resulting 305 transcripts were analysed to determine the scope and nature of the decision processes. Differences in the process were related to case or doctor characteristics, and to differences in the quality of prescribing behaviour. Results: The decision processes were not extensive, particularly for patients with a urinary tract infection. The doctors did not actively consider all possible relevant information. Considerations referring to core aspects of the treatment were made in 159 cases (52%) and to contextual aspects in 111 cases (36%). Habitual behaviour, defined as making a treatment decision without any specific contemplation, was observed in 118 cases (40%) and resulted in prescribing first choice as well as second choice drugs. For stomach complaints, second choice drugs were often prescribed after considering other treatments or in view of specific circumstances. Experience of the doctor was not related to the type of decision process. Conclusions: The processes observed deviate from the decision theoretic norm of thoroughly evaluating all possible options, but these deviations do not always result in suboptimal prescribing. Decision support is useful for bringing pertinent information and first choice treatments to the prescriber's attention. In particular, information about relevant contraindications, interactions, and costs could improve the quality of prescribing. PMID:12448805

  1. Constipation in people prescribed opioids

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Constipation is reported in 52% of people with advanced malignancy. This figure rises to 87% in people who are terminally ill and taking opioids. Constipation may be the most common adverse effect of opioids. There is no reason to believe that people with chronic non-malignant disease who take opioids will be any less troubled by this adverse effect. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of: oral laxatives, rectally applied medications, and opioid antagonists for constipation in people prescribed opioids? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2009 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 23 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: arachis oil enemas, bisacodyl, co-danthrusate/co-danthramer, docusate, glycerol suppositories, ispaghula husk, lactulose, liquid paraffin, macrogols plus electrolyte solutions, magnesium salts, methylcellulose, opioid antagonists, phosphate enemas, senna, sodium citrate micro-enema, and sodium picosulfate. PMID:21718572

  2. Clinical presentation of inappropriate sinus tachycardia and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Peyrol, Michael; Lévy, Samuel

    2016-06-01

    Inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) is a syndrome characterized by a sinus tachycardia not related to a medical condition, to a physiological response, or to medication or drugs and associated with symptoms, often invalidating and altering the quality of life of affected patients. It occurs predominantly in adolescents and young adults, and in the female sex. The diagnosis requires a complete work-up in order to exclude other causes of sinus tachycardia and one or several additional tests: 24-h ECG ambulatory recordings, echocardiogram, exercise testing, and autonomous nervous system assessment. It should be differentiated from the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, with which it shares a number of symptoms, and other supraventricular tachycardias originating in the high right atrium. An electrophysiological study should be considered in selected cases in order to differentiate IST from other supraventricular tachycardias. The mechanism is still unclear, and possible etiologies may include intrinsic abnormality of the sinus node, autonomic dysfunction, hypersensitivity of the sinus node to catecholamines, blunted vagal system, or a combination of the above. The authors emphasize the wide spectrum of clinical presentations and the need to better define the IST and the criteria required to ascertain its diagnosis. PMID:26329720

  3. Identifying outcome-based indicators and developing a curriculum for a continuing medical education programme on rational prescribing using a modified Delphi process

    PubMed Central

    Esmaily, Hamideh M; Savage, Carl; Vahidi, Rezagoli; Amini, Abolghasem; Zarrintan, Mohammad Hossein; Wahlstrom, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    Background Continuing medical education (CME) is compulsory for physicians in Iran. Recent studies in Iran show that modifications of CME elements are necessary to improve the effectiveness of the educational programmes. Other studies point to an inappropriate, even irrational drug prescribing. Based on a needs assessment study regarding CME for general physicians in the East Azerbaijan province in Iran, rational prescribing practice was recognized as a high priority issue. Considering different educational methods, outcome-based education has been proposed as a suitable approach for CME. The purpose of the study was to obtain experts' consensus about appropriate educational outcomes of rational prescribing for general physicians in CME and developing curricular contents for this education. Methods The study consisted of two phases: The first phase was conducted using a two-round Delphi consensus process to identify the outcome-based educational indicators regarding rational prescribing for general physicians in primary care (GPs). In the second phase the agreed indicators were submitted to panels of experts for assessment and determination of content for a CME program in the field. Results Twenty one learning outcomes were identified through a modified Delphi process. The indicators were used by the panels of experts and six educational topics were determined for the CME programme and the curricular content of each was defined. The topics were 1) Principles of prescription writing, 2) Adverse drug reactions, 3) Drug interactions, 4) Injections, 5) Antibiotic therapy, and 6) Anti-inflammatory agents therapy. One of the topics was not directly related to any outcome, raising a question about the need for a discussion on constructive alignment. Conclusions Consensus on learning outcomes was achieved and an educational guideline was designed. Before suggesting widespread use in the country the educational package should be tested in the CME context. PMID:18510774

  4. EMPADE Study: Evaluation of Medical Prescriptions and Adverse Drug Events in COPD Patients Admitted to Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. Amer; Khan, M. Nematullah; Sultan, Ihtisham; Khan, M. Aamer; Ali, S. Amir; Farooqui, Afroze

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inappropriate drug usage may preclude ideal benefit due to increased medical cost, antimicrobial resistance, adverse effects and mortality. Therefore drug utilization studies have become a plausible means in evaluating the healthcare systems. COPD management usually involves more than one drug which may escalate the risk of ADEs (adverse drug events). Aim The present study was aimed at assessing the current drug practice and ADEs in COPD management in ICU. Materials and Methods A total of 1,044 patients admitted for the treatment of COPD were included in the study. Their prescriptions were recorded for evaluation of drug utilization and patients were counseled for assessing ADEs. Results were evaluated by Chi-square test and percentages. Result All-embracing 15,360 drugs were prescribed at an average of 14.71 drugs per patient, wherein β2-agonists were extensively prescribed agents followed by inhaled-corticosteroids and anti-cholinergics. 372 ADEs were reported in 252 patients, wherein restlessness was the most frequent ADE and theophylline was found to be associated with highest cases of ADEs. Conclusion Practitioners should prescribe least number of drugs to mitigate the likelihood of adverse outcomes in patients due to numerous drugs usage, which may be achieved by following GOLD guidelines. The present work may help in improving the current management of COPD by rectifying the flaws delineated in this article. PMID:26675667

  5. Impact of drug-drug and drug-disease interactions on gait speed in community-dwelling older adults

    PubMed Central

    Naples, Jennifer G.; Marcum, Zachary A.; Perera, Subashan; Newman, Anne B.; Greenspan, Susan L.; Gray, Shelly L.; Bauer, Douglas C.; Simonsick, Eleanor M.; Shorr, Ronald I.; Hanlon, Joseph T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Gait speed decline, an early marker of functional impairment, is a sensitive predictor of adverse health outcomes in older adults. The effect of potentially inappropriate prescribing on gait speed decline is not well known. Objective To determine if potentially inappropriate drug interactions impair functional status as measured by gait speed. Methods The sample included 2,402 older adults with medication and gait speed data from the Health, Aging and Body Composition study. The independent variable was the frequency of drug-disease and/or drug-drug interactions at baseline and three additional years. The main outcome was a clinically meaningful gait speed decline ≥ 0.1 m/s the year following drug interaction assessment. Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using multivariate generalized estimating equations for both the overall sample and a sample stratified by gait speed at time of drug interaction assessment. Results The prevalence of drug-disease and drug-drug interactions ranged from 7.6–9.3% and 10.5–12.3%, respectively, with few participants (3.8–5.7%) having multiple drug interactions. At least 22% of participants had a gait speed decline of ≥ 0.1 m/s annually. Drug interactions were not significantly associated with gait speed decline overall or in the stratified sample of fast walkers. There was some evidence, however, that drug interactions increased the risk of gait speed decline among those participants with slower gait speeds, though p values did not reach statistical significance (adjusted odds ratio 1.22, 95% confidence intervals 0.96–1.56, p=0.11). Moreover, a marginally significant dose-response relationship was seen with multiple drug interactions and gait speed decline (adjusted odds ratio 1.40; 95% confidence intervals 0.95–2.04, p=0.08). Conclusions Drug interactions may increase the likelihood of gait speed decline among older adults with evidence of preexisting debility. Future studies

  6. Potential effects of rational prescribing on national health care spending

    PubMed Central

    Littman, Jordan; Halil, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To estimate the cost savings that could result from implementation of a rational prescribing model for drug classes that are equivalent in terms of efficacy, toxicity, and convenience. Design The top 10 drug classes based on annual spending were gathered from the Canadian Institute for Health Information. They were reviewed for potential inclusion in the study based on the ability to compare intraclass medications. When equivalence in efficacy, toxicity, and convenience was determined from a literature review, annual prescribing data were gathered from the National Prescription Drug Utilization Information Systems Database. The potential cost savings were then calculated by comparing current market shares with potential future market shares. Setting Canada. Main outcome measures Estimated differences in spending produced by a rational prescribing model. Results Statins, proton pump inhibitors, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were determined to have class equivalence for efficacy, toxicity, and convenience. Total current annual spending on these classes is $856 million through public drug programs, and an estimated $1.97 billion nationally. Through rational prescribing, annual savings could reach $222 million for public drug programs, and $521 million nationally. Conclusion Most of the potential savings are derived from deprescribing the newest patent-protected medications in each class. Avoiding prescribing the newest intraclass drug, particularly in the absence of research to support its superiority in relevant clinical outcomes, could lead to considerable savings in health care expenditures and might push the pharmaceutical industry to innovate rather than imitate. PMID:26975917

  7. Drug diversion

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Prescription drug diversion has significant health, legal and social implications. Deaths from misuse of prescription drugs account for a significant proportion of overdose deaths. The drugs most commonly involved are analgesics, particularly opioids, and psychoactive drugs, particularly benzodiazepines. Diverted drugs are most often sourced from a family member or friend, but are also sourced from overseas pharmacies or laboratories, or bought from drug dealers. Drug diversion can be mitigated by good prescribing practices. Systems for monitoring the prescribing and dispensing of medicines are being instituted across Australia. PMID:26648654

  8. Initiatives to improve appropriate antibiotic prescribing in primary care.

    PubMed

    Harris, Diane J

    2013-11-01

    Influencing clinicians' prescribing behaviour is important because inappropriate use and overuse of antibiotics are major drivers of antibiotic resistance. A systematic review of interventions for promoting prudent prescribing of antibiotics by general practitioners suggests that multifaceted interventions will maximize acceptability. This article reports how this type of approach has been used successfully in Derbyshire, UK over the last 4 years. The range of interventions that have been used includes educational meetings (both open group events and others targeted at higher prescribers in the surgery) using a supportive and guiding ethos; the provision of support materials aimed at empowering avoidance or delayed antibiotic prescribing, where appropriate, and improving patients' knowledge and confidence in self-management; and the production of different treatment guidelines incorporating key messages with evidence, indicating where antibiotics are unlikely to be of benefit. Education on antibiotics in schools was a novel approach, which was developed in North Derbyshire to increase public awareness of the appropriate treatment for common illnesses without using antibiotics. PMID:24030546

  9. Prescribing patterns of antibiotics and sensitivity patterns of common microorganisms in the Internal Medicine ward of a teaching hospital in Western Nepal: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Ravi Pathiyil; Partha, Praveen; Shenoy, Nagesh Kumar; Easow, Joshy Maducolil; Brahmadathan, Kottallur Narayanan

    2003-01-01

    Background Information about antibiotic use and resistance patterns of common microorganisms are lacking in hospitals in Western Nepal. Excessive and inappropriate use of antibiotics contributes to the development of bacterial resistance. The parameter: Defined daily dose/100 bed-days, provides an estimate of consumption of drugs among hospital in-patients. This study was carried out to collect relevant demographic information, antibiotic prescribing patterns and the common organisms isolated including their antibiotic sensitivity patterns. Methods The study was carried out over a 3-month period (01.04.2002 to 30.06.2002) at the Manipal Teaching Hospital, Western Nepal. The median number of days of hospitalization and mean ± SD cost of antibiotics prescribed during hospital stay were calculated. The use of antibiotics was classified for prophylaxis, bacteriologically proven infection or non-bacteriologically proven infection. Sensitivity patterns of the common organisms were determined. Defined daily dose/100 bed-days of the ten most commonly prescribed antibiotics were calculated. Results 203 patients were prescribed antibiotics; 112 were male. Median duration of hospitalization was 5 days. 347 antibiotics were prescribed. The most common were ampicillin, amoxicillin, metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and benzylpenicillin. Mean ± SD cost of antibiotics was 16.5 ± 13.4 US$. Culture and sensitivity testing was carried out in 141 patients. The common organisms isolated were H. influenzae, E. coli, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus. Conclusions Antibiotic resistance is becoming a problem in the Internal Medicine ward. Formulation of a policy for hospital antibiotic use and an educational programme especially for junior doctors is required. PMID:12904265

  10. Controlled drugs.

    PubMed

    2016-05-18

    Essential facts Controlled drugs are defined and governed by the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 and associated regulations. Examples of controlled drugs include morphine, pethidine and methadone. Since 2012, appropriately qualified nurses and midwives can prescribe controlled drugs for medical conditions within their competence. There are some exceptions when treating addiction. PMID:27191427

  11. When not to trust therapeutic drug monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Westergreen-Thorne, Mathew; Lee, Sook Yan; Shah, Nilesh; Dodd, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is the measurement of serum or plasma drug concentration to allow the individualization of dosing. We describe the case of a patient who was prescribed inappropriately large doses of vancomycin due to inaccurate TDM. Specifically, our laboratory reported progressively lower vancomycin concentrations despite dose increases. Eventually, when duplicate samples were sent to a different laboratory vancomycin concentrations were found to be in the toxic range. We hypothesize this was due to the patient generating immunoglobulin antibodies against her infection that interfered with the original TDM immunoassay. Immunogenic TDM interference has been known to rarely occur in patients with immune related comorbidities; however, if we are correct, this is a unique case as this patient did not have such a background. This case illustrates the importance of using clinical judgement when interpreting TDM as, in this case, substantial harm to the patient was likely only narrowly avoided. PMID:27606069

  12. When not to trust therapeutic drug monitoring.

    PubMed

    Westergreen-Thorne, Mathew; Lee, Sook Yan; Shah, Nilesh; Dodd, Alan

    2016-09-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is the measurement of serum or plasma drug concentration to allow the individualization of dosing. We describe the case of a patient who was prescribed inappropriately large doses of vancomycin due to inaccurate TDM. Specifically, our laboratory reported progressively lower vancomycin concentrations despite dose increases. Eventually, when duplicate samples were sent to a different laboratory vancomycin concentrations were found to be in the toxic range. We hypothesize this was due to the patient generating immunoglobulin antibodies against her infection that interfered with the original TDM immunoassay. Immunogenic TDM interference has been known to rarely occur in patients with immune related comorbidities; however, if we are correct, this is a unique case as this patient did not have such a background. This case illustrates the importance of using clinical judgement when interpreting TDM as, in this case, substantial harm to the patient was likely only narrowly avoided. PMID:27606069

  13. Antibiotic prescribing and expenditures in outpatient adults in Greece, 2010 to 2013: evidence from real-world practice.

    PubMed

    Kourlaba, Georgia; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Kourkouni, Eleni; Mavrogeorgos, Georgios; Zaoutis, Theoklis E

    2016-06-30

    We provide a representative analysis of antibiotic prescribing, identify factors associated with broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing and assess the costs associated with antibiotic use in adult outpatients in Greece. Outpatient antibiotic prescriptions for patients older than 19 years between 2010 and 2013 in Greece were extracted from the IMS Health Xponent database. Prescribing rate and total cost for prescribed antibiotics were calculated. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors related to broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing. More than 20 million antibiotics were prescribed during the study period, an annual rate of 768 prescribed antibiotics per 1,000 adults. Overall, 33.5% of antibiotics were prescribed for acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) for which antibiotics are often not indicated. Macrolides (29.9%), cephalosporins (26.9%) and fluoroquinolones (21.0%) were the most commonly prescribed antibiotic classes. The majority (89.0%) of antibiotics were broad-spectrum. Antibiotic expenditures were approximately EUR 185 million during the study period. Factors associated with broad-spectrum prescribing included older patient age, specialty pulmonologists or otorhinolaryngologists, training in eastern Europe, diagnosis of ARTI, acute diagnosis, and first episode of disease. Broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing for ARTIs is common in adult Greek outpatients and frequently inappropriate. These data indicate the need for initiatives aiming to control antibiotic prescribing. PMID:27390126

  14. Salbutamol in paediatrics: pharmacology, prescribing and controversies.

    PubMed

    Andrzejowski, Paul; Carroll, Will

    2016-08-01

    Salbutamol has become a key drug in respiratory medicine since it was first developed by Sir David Jack et al in 1968, 5000 years after the β agonist ephedrine was first used in its raw form, as the Ma Huang herb in Chinese medicine to treat asthma. It is one of the most commonly encountered medicines in paediatric practice and the authors have found that an understanding of its pharmacology in clinical practice is incredibly helpful. In this article, we discuss its pharmacology and pharmacodynamics, practical prescribing points and some unresolved issues surrounding its use, which should serve to provide an essential working knowledge for the busy paediatrician. PMID:27059284

  15. Leveraging hospital formularies for improved prescribing.

    PubMed

    Karas, Albert; Kuehl, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    Hospital formularies, guided by the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee, exist to optimize medication use by identifying and designating drugs of choice to guide rational prescribing, ultimately reducing patient risk and costs and improving patient outcomes. Guidelines and a framework exist to guide critical evaluations of medications for formulary listing; however, there may be opportunities to improve and standardize how a formulary change could be instituted in Canadian hospitals. A formulary change at an Ontario hospital revealed that there are some key challenges to the formulary change process including the importance of a robust project plan, appropriate resources, healthcare staff education, and acceptance. PMID:25046967

  16. Prescribing Strategies for the Frail Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, John P.

    1992-01-01

    Current recommendations for prescribing for the frail elderly can be supplemented by others of value to family physicians. Minimization or simplification of medication regimens, proof of medication efficacy, vigilance for adverse drug reactions, and knowledge of aging and medications are important. Compliance is critical for the community-dwelling frail elderly but is rarely a problem in long-term care facilities. High-yield, high-risk conditions with presentations different from the “geriatric giants” must be recognized. Less medication is not necessarily the best treatment. Routine surveillance and frequent follow up are essential to adequate pharmacotherapy of frail elderly people. PMID:21221302

  17. Perspectives on electronic prescribing and terminologies.

    PubMed

    Liebovitz, David

    2013-01-01

    Electronic medical records provide potential benefits and also drawbacks. Potential benefits include increased patient safety and efficiency. Potential drawbacks include newly introduced errors and diminished workflow efficiency. In the patient safety context, medication errors account for significant patient harm. Electronic prescribing (e-prescribing) offers the promise of automated drug interaction and dosage verification. In addition, the process of enabling e-prescriptions also provides access to an often unrecognized benefit, that of viewing the dispensed medication history. This information is often critical to understanding patient symptoms. Obtaining significant value from electronic medical records requires use of standardized terminology for both targeted decision support and population-based management. Further, generating documentation for a billable encounter requires usage of proper codes. The emergence of International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10 holds promise in facilitating identification of a more precise patient code while also presenting drawbacks given its complexity. This article will focus on elements of e-prescribing and use of structured chart content, including diagnosis codes as they relate to physician office practices. PMID:23714550

  18. Variations in primary care prescribing: lessons to be learnt for GP commissioners.

    PubMed

    Houten, Rachel; Wailoo, Allan; Jonsson, Pall; McLeod, Claire

    2014-01-01

    The quality and quantity of primary care prescribing represents a fundamental determinant of the clinical and cost-effectiveness of the UK NHS. The aim of this study was to determine the 'supply' factors that affect primary care prescribing, controlling for 'demand' factors and consider the implications for clinical commissioning groups (CCGs). A detailed regression analysis was undertaken of prescribing in six therapeutic areas to determine differences in prescribing across primary care trusts (PCTs) in England. Results indicate that there are large unexplained variations in primary care prescribing. With the disbanding of the PCTs, and budgets moving to general practitioners (GPs), the role of efficiently and effectively managing prescribing will fall to GP commissioners. Therefore, mechanisms need to be put in place now to ensure that GPs are able to monitor their prescribing and reduce unnecessary drug usage, and further research into the reasons for variations in prescribing needs to be conducted at the CCG level. PMID:23714273

  19. Chinese regulation of off-label use of drugs.

    PubMed

    Ma, Feng; Lou, Nan

    2013-01-01

    China has significant gaps and weaknesses in its regulatory oversight of the off-label use of drugs. As in the United States, the off-label prescribing of drugs is not prohibited in China if there is a sound scientific basis. Physicians are allowed to prescribe off-label drugs based on their medical judgment if they follow certain requirements. There is some constraint on the right to prescribe by the imposition of malpractice liability if patients are harmed from improper off-label prescribing. However, damages awarded to successful plaintiffs are usually insignificant compared to malpractice damage awards in the U.S. Advertisement of off-label use is prohibited in China. All drug advertisements in China are subject to pre-approval, and must be based on information included in the approved package insert. However, the term "advertisement" is poorly defined. As a result, non-advertisement promotion of drugs for on-label or off-label use exist in a unregulated gray area. To better address the problem of inappropriate off-label promotion and use, China should (i) regulate both drug advertisements and non-advertisement promotion under a standard requiring off-label use to have a sound scientific basis, (ii) introduce harsher regulatory penalties, and (iii) increase compensation available for victims of medical malpractice. Such reform would not only discourage improper off-label use by introducing penalties (or increasing existing penalties) for improper promotion, but would also provide reasonable compensation for victims harmed by off-label use. PMID:24640468

  20. Codeine in paediatrics: pharmacology, prescribing and controversies.

    PubMed

    Andrzejowski, Paul; Carroll, Will

    2016-06-01

    Codeine is a drug that until recently was widely used in children. It was endorsed by the WHO as the second step on the analgesic ladder for cancer pain and has been used routinely for postoperative and breakthrough pain. Recently, its safety and efficacy have been called into question, following deaths after adenotonsillectomy was associated with its use. This has led to regulation by the US Food and Drug Administration, European Medicines Agency and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency to place significant restrictions on its use, and some centres have stopped using it altogether.In this article, we discuss the developmental pharmacology underpinning its action, reviewing what is known about the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and pharmacogenetics in children, how this relates to prescribing, as well as the practical issues and the recent regulatory framework surrounding its use. PMID:26984558

  1. E-Prescribing: History, Issues, and Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, J. Warren; Jiang, Ruixuan

    2012-01-01

    Electronic-Prescribing, Computerized Prescribing, or E-RX has increased dramatically of late in the American health care system, a long overdue alternative to the written form for the almost five billion drug treatments annually. This paper examines the history and selected issues in the rise of E-RX by a review of salient literature, interviews, and field observations in Pharmacy. Pharmacies were early adopters of computerization for a variety of factors. The profession in its new corporate forms of chain drug stores and pharmacy benefits firms has sought efficiencies, profit enhancements, and clinical improvements through managed care strategies that rely upon data automation. E-RX seems to be a leading factor in overall physician acceptance of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs), although the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) incentives seem to be the propelling force in acceptance. We conclude that greater research should be conducted by public health professionals to focus on resolutions to pharmaceutical use, safety, and cost escalation, which persist and remain dire following health reform. PMID:23569654

  2. E-prescribing: history, issues, and potentials.

    PubMed

    Salmon, J Warren; Jiang, Ruixuan

    2012-01-01

    Electronic-Prescribing, Computerized Prescribing, or E-RX has increased dramatically of late in the American health care system, a long overdue alternative to the written form for the almost five billion drug treatments annually. This paper examines the history and selected issues in the rise of E-RX by a review of salient literature, interviews, and field observations in Pharmacy. Pharmacies were early adopters of computerization for a variety of factors. The profession in its new corporate forms of chain drug stores and pharmacy benefits firms has sought efficiencies, profit enhancements, and clinical improvements through managed care strategies that rely upon data automation. E-RX seems to be a leading factor in overall physician acceptance of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs), although the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) incentives seem to be the propelling force in acceptance. We conclude that greater research should be conducted by public health professionals to focus on resolutions to pharmaceutical use, safety, and cost escalation, which persist and remain dire following health reform. PMID:23569654

  3. Effectiveness of a vancomycin restriction policy in changing the prescribing patterns of house staff.

    PubMed

    Richardson, L P; Wiseman, S W; Malani, P N; Lyons, M J; Kauffman, C A

    2000-01-01

    After noting a rise in vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) infections, we initiated a program to decrease inappropriate vancomycin use that focused on improvement of house staff prescribing practices. The initial intervention in June, 1995, encouraging house staff to follow hospital guidelines for vancomycin use and eliciting support from service chiefs in this effort, had little impact. A more intensive educational intervention, beginning in January, 1996, involved concurrent review of all vancomycin orders and one-on-one discussion with the house staff regarding the rationale for the order by an infectious diseases clinical pharmacist. When usage was deemed inappropriate, the pharmacist asked that vancomycin be discontinued, but no automatic stop orders were issued. During the next two and one-half years, this second intervention proved effective at decreasing inappropriate use from 39% to 16.8% +/- 2.4% (p = 0.005). This change was primarily due to a decrease in appropriate vancomycin prophylaxis by cardiothoracic surgery. VRE infections decreased from 0.29/100 patients discharged prior to initiating the program to 0.13/100 patients discharged after the second intervention (p = 0.01). This educational program, although labor-intensive, preserved house staff decision-making skills related to antibiotic prescribing at the same time that it decreased inappropriate vancomycin use. PMID:11272262

  4. Prescribing behaviour in general practice: the impact of promoting therapeutically equivalent cheaper medicines.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, S J; Bateman, D N; Smith, J M

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The volume and cost of prescribing varies considerably between practices. This variation is at least in part due to the prescribing behaviour of individual doctors, who are often faced with a range of therapeutically equivalent generic and brand-name drugs. AIM: To assess the impact on general practitioners' prescribing behaviour of promoting therapeutically equivalent lower cost prescribing in conjunction with an incentive scheme. METHOD: Annual prescribing data from before (1992-93) and after (1993-94) implementation of the incentive scheme were compared retrospectively for general practices in the former Northern Regional Health Authority. Main outcome measures were the practices' 1993-94 rates of prescribing relative to those in 1992-93 for 18 drugs prescribed by brand name, of which 10 were targeted in the promotion, and for 14 drugs or classes of drugs either with equivalent cheaper alternatives or of limited clinical value (10 targeted and four not). RESULTS: For 17 of the 18 drugs, brand name prescribing rates were significantly lower in 1993-94. Reductions in rates were greater for the 10 drugs appearing in the scheme's promotional literature. For other cost-saving measures, total prescribing rates were lower for seven classes of drugs, unchanged for one, but higher for the other six, all of which had been targeted. According to the growth in their overall per capita prescribing costs between the two study years, the 499 practices were categorized as low, average or high. Overall costs and individual prescribing rates for the majority of drugs studied were similar for these three practice groups in 1992-93. In 1993-94, practices' changes in prescribing volume differed between the groups, with the lowest increases in the low cost-growth group for all but one of the 32 classes of drugs. CONCLUSION: Generic substitution was more easily implemented than more complex hints regarding cost-saving substitutions. Practices with smaller overall cost

  5. Effect of polypharmacy, potentially inappropriate medications and anticholinergic burden on clinical outcomes: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wan-Hsuan; Wen, Yu-Wen; Chen, Liang-Kung; Hsiao, Fei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Polypharmacy, potentially inappropriate medications and anticholinergic burden (as assessed by the anticholinergic risk scale) are commonly used as quality indicators of pharmacotherapy in older adults. However, their role in clinical practice is undefined. We sought to investigate longitudinal changes in these indicators and their effects on clinical outcomes. Methods: We used Taiwan’s Longitudinal Health Insurance Database to retrieve quarterly information about drug use for people aged 65 years and older over a 10-year period. We analyzed the association between indicators and all-cause admission to hospital, fracture-specific admission to hospital and death using generalized estimating equations. Results: The study cohort comprised 59 042 older adults (65–74 yr: 39 358 [66.7%], 75–84 yr: 16 903 [28.6%], and ≥ 85 yr: 2781 [4.7%]). The mean changes in polypharmacy over the course of the study were greatest among patients aged 65–74 years (absolute difference +2.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.10–2.19), then among those aged 75–84 yr (+1.79, 95% CI 1.70–1.88), and finally those aged 85 years and older (+0.71, 95% CI 0.36–1.05). The number of potentially inappropriate medications increased among patients aged 65–74 years (+0.16 [0.15–0.18]) and 75–84 years (+0.09 [0.06–0.08]), but decreased in those aged 85 years and older (−0.15 [−0.26 to −0.04]). Polypharmacy, potentially inappropriate medications and anticholinergic risk scale were each associated with an increased risk of admission to hospital, but not with death. In addition, both polypharmacy (5–9 drugs: odds ratio [OR] 1.18, 95% CI 1.12–1.24; ≥ 10 drugs: OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.42–1.66) and anticholinergic burden (score 1–2: 1.39, 95% CI 1.31–1.48; ≥ 3: 1.53, 95% CI 1.41–1.66) showed dose–response relations with fracture-specific admission to hospital. Interpretation: The total number of drugs taken (polypharmacy), number of potentially inappropriate

  6. To prescribe codeine or not to prescribe codeine?

    PubMed

    Fleming, Marc L; Wanat, Matthew A

    2014-09-01

    A recently published study in Pediatrics by Kaiser et al. (2014; Epub April 21, DOI: 10.1542/peds.2013-3171) reported that on average, over the past decade, children aged 3 to 17 were prescribed approximately 700,000 prescriptions for codeine-containing products each year in association with emergency department (ED) visits. Although, guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics issued warnings in 1997 and reaffirmed their concerns regarding the safety and effectiveness of codeine in 2006, it is still often prescribed for pain and cough associated with upper respiratory infection. With the impending rescheduling of hydrocodone combination products to Schedule II, physicians and mid-level prescribers may be compelled to prescribe codeine-containing products (e.g., with acetaminophen) due to reduced administrative burden and limits on Schedule II prescriptive authority for nurse practitioners and physician assistants in some states. This commentary expounds on the safety and effectiveness concerns of codeine, with a primary focus on patients in the ED setting. PMID:25102040

  7. Conducting a Prescribed Burn and Prescribed Burning Checklist

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grasslands of the central Great Plains developed with periodic fire. Prescribed burning is an important tool for managing grasslands to maintain desirable species composition, increase grazing livestock performance, maintain productivity, and control invasive weeds. The safe and effective use of pre...

  8. Specialist Pediatric Palliative Care Prescribing Practices: A Large 5-year Retrospective Audit

    PubMed Central

    Damani, Anuja; Salins, Naveen; Ghoshal, Arunangshu; Muckaden, MaryAnn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: There is a gradual increasing trend in childhood cancers in India and pediatric palliative care in India is an emerging specialty. Prescribing pain and symptom control drugs in children with cancer requires knowledge of palliative care formulary, dosing schedules, and prescription guidelines. This study is a retrospective audit of prescribing practices of a specialist palliative care service situated in a tertiary cancer center. Methods: A total of 1135 medication records of children receiving specialist pediatric palliative care services were audited for 5 years (2010–2014) to evaluate prescribing practices in children with advanced cancer. Results: A total of 51 types of drugs were prescribed with an average of 4.2 drugs per prescription. 66.9% of the prescriptions had paracetamol, and 33.9% of the prescriptions had morphine. Most common nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs prescribed was ibuprofen (23.9%), and more than 50% of the prescriptions had aperients. The most commonly prescribed aperient was a combination of liquid paraffin and sodium-picosulfate. Dexamethasone was prescribed in 51.9% of patients and in most cases this was part of oral chemotherapy regimen. Generic names in prescription were used only in 33% of cases, and adverse effects of the drugs were documented in only 9% of cases. In 25% of cases, noncompliance to the WHO prescription guidelines was seen, and patient compliance to prescription was seen in 40% of cases. Conclusions: Audit of the prescribing practices in specialist pediatric palliative care service shows that knowledge of pediatric palliative care formulary, rational drug use, dosing, and prescribing guidelines is essential for symptom control in children with advanced life-limiting illness. Noncompliance to WHO prescribing guidelines in one fourth of cases and using nongeneric names in two-thirds of prescription indicates poor prescribing practices and warrants prescriber education. Prescription noncompliance by

  9. PGN Prescribed Burn Research Summary

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 1997, we have been studying the effects of prescribed burns conducted during late winter on shortgrass steppe on the Pawnee National Grassland. During 1997 – 2002, we studied burns on the western (Crow Valley) portion of the Pawnee by comparing plant growth on burns conducted by the Forest Ser...

  10. Experimental Analysis of Response Covariation among Compliant and Inappropriate Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrish, John M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The study investigated the relationship between topographically different child behaviors (compliance and inappropriate activities) in four mentally retarded subjects (aged 3-5) by using a methodology that tests for response covariation. Regardless of the intervention used, the behavior targeted, or the direction manipulated, the nontargeted…