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Sample records for inas nanowires controlled

  1. Quality of epitaxial InAs nanowires controlled by catalyst size in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhi; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Liao, Zhi-Ming; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Ping-Ping; Shi, Sui-Xing; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin

    2013-08-12

    In this study, the structural quality of Au-catalyzed InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy is investigated. Through detailed electron microscopy characterizations and analysis of binary Au-In phase diagram, it is found that defect-free InAs nanowires can be induced by smaller catalysts with a high In concentration, while comparatively larger catalysts containing less In induce defected InAs nanowires. This study indicates that the structural quality of InAs nanowires can be controlled by the size of Au catalysts when other growth conditions remain as constants.

  2. Quality of epitaxial InAs nanowires controlled by catalyst size in molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Ping-Ping; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Liao, Zhi-Ming; Shi, Sui-Xing; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin

    2013-08-01

    In this study, the structural quality of Au-catalyzed InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy is investigated. Through detailed electron microscopy characterizations and analysis of binary Au-In phase diagram, it is found that defect-free InAs nanowires can be induced by smaller catalysts with a high In concentration, while comparatively larger catalysts containing less In induce defected InAs nanowires. This study indicates that the structural quality of InAs nanowires can be controlled by the size of Au catalysts when other growth conditions remain as constants.

  3. Controlling the diameter distribution and density of InAs nanowires grown by Au-assisted methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, U. P.; Ercolani, D.; Zannier, V.; Beltram, F.; Sorba, L.

    2015-11-01

    III-V semiconductor nanowires have attracted intensive research interest because of their promising optical and electronic properties that can be manipulated by tailoring nanowire composition and morphology. Therefore, it is crucial to measure and control the diameter distribution of the grown nanowires. In this study, we analyze the diameter distribution of Au-catalyzed InAs nanowires. Au colloidal nanoparticles dispersed on InAs (111) B substrates and nanoparticles obtained by the thermal annealing of Au films were used as catalysts for InAs nanowire growth. The annealing time and temperature, the thickness of the Au film and the colloid sizes were systematically varied not only to understand their influence on nanowire diameter distribution, but also to find the optimal parameters for realizing samples with uniform and controlled diameter distribution. Morphological characterization was performed by scanning electron microscopy measurements and the image analysis was carried out using in-house-developed automated image analysis software to accurately determine the diameter distribution of the nanowires. A description of the image analysis software is also presented. The thermal annealing of films turned out to be the most suitable method for uniformity and density control, while the colloidal nanoparticles yielded narrow and more reproducible diameter distributions.

  4. Control of the crystal structure of InAs nanowires by tuning contributions of adatom diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hui; Ren, Xiaomin; Ye, Xian; Guo, Jingwei; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xia; Cai, Shiwei; Huang, Yongqing

    2010-11-01

    The dependence of crystal structure on contributions of adatom diffusion (ADD) and precursor direct impingement (DIM) was investigated for vapor-liquid-solid growth of InAs nanowires (NWs). The ADD contributions from the sidewalls and substrate surface can be changed by using GaAs NWs of different length as the basis for growing InAs NWs. We found that pure zinc-blende structure is favored when DIM contributions dominate. Moreover, without changing the NW diameter or growth parameters (such as temperature or V/III ratio), a transition from zinc-blende to wurtzite structure can be realized by increasing the ADD contributions. A nucleation model is proposed in which ADD and DIM contributions play different roles in determining the location and phase of the nucleus.

  5. Negative photoconductivity of InAs nanowires.

    PubMed

    Han, Yuxiang; Zheng, Xiao; Fu, Mengqi; Pan, Dong; Li, Xing; Guo, Yao; Zhao, Jianhua; Chen, Qing

    2016-01-14

    Negative photoconductivity is observed in InAs nanowires (NWs) without a surface defective layer. The negative photoconductivity is strongly dependent on the wavelength and intensity of the light, and is also sensitive to the environmental atmosphere. Two kinds of mechanisms are discerned to work together. One is related to gas adsorption, which is photodesorption of water molecules and photo-assisted chemisorption of O2 molecules. The other one can be attributed to the photogating effect introduced by the native oxide layer outside the NWs. PMID:26631367

  6. Phase coherent transport in hollow InAs nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Wenz, T.; Rosien, M.; Haas, F.; Rieger, T.; Lepsa, M. I.; Lüth, H.; Grützmacher, D.; Schäpers, Th.; Demarina, N.

    2014-09-15

    Hollow InAs nanowires are produced from GaAs/InAs core/shell nanowires by wet chemical etching of the GaAs core. At room temperature, the resistivity of several nanowires is measured before and after removal of the GaAs core. The observed change in resistivity is explained by simulating the electronic states in both structures. At cryogenic temperatures, quantum transport in hollow InAs nanowires is studied. Flux periodic conductance oscillations are observed when the magnetic field is oriented parallel to the nanowire axis.

  7. Superconducting proximity effect in InAs nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Willy

    First discovered by Holm and Meissner in 1932, the superconducting proximity effect has remained a subject of experimental and theoretical interest. In recent years, it has been proposed that proximity effect in a semiconductor with large g-factor and spin-orbit coupling could lead to exotic phases of superconductivity. This thesis focuses on proximity effect in one of the prime semiconductor candidates---InAs nanowires. The first set of experiments investigates the superconducting phase-dependent tunneling spectrum of a proximitized InAs quantum dot. We observe tunneling resonances of Andreev bound states in the Kondo regime, and induce quantum phase transitions of the quantum dot ground state with gate voltage and phase bias---the latter being the first experimental observation of its kind. An additional zero-bias peak of unknown origin is observed to coexist with the Andreev bounds states. The second set of experiments extends upon the first with sharper tunneling resonances and an increase in the device critical field. By applying an external magnetic field, we observe spin-resolved Andreev bound states in proximitized InAs quantum dots. From the linear splitting of the tunneling resonances, we extract g-factors of 5 and 10 in two different devices. The third set of experiments utilizes a novel type of epitaxial core-shell InAs-Al nanowire. We compare the induced gaps of these nanowires with control devices proximitized with evaporated Al films. Our results show that the epitaxial core-shell nanowires possess a much harder induced gap---up to two orders of magnitude in sub-gap conductance suppression as compared to a factor of five in evaporated control devices. This observation suggests that roughness in S-N interfaces plays a crucial role in the quality of the proximity effect. The fourth set of experiments investigates the gate-tunability of epitaxial half-shell nanowires. In a half-shell nanowire Josephson junction, we measure the normal state resistance

  8. Catalyst-free growth of InAs nanowires on Si (111) by CBE.

    PubMed

    Gomes, U P; Ercolani, D; Sibirev, N V; Gemmi, M; Dubrovskii, V G; Beltram, F; Sorba, L

    2015-10-16

    We investigate a growth mechanism which allows for the fabrication of catalyst-free InAs nanowires on Si (111) substrates by chemical beam epitaxy. Our growth protocol consists of successive low-temperature (LT) nucleation and high-temperature growth steps. This method produces non-tapered InAs nanowires with controllable length and diameter. We show that InAs nanowires evolve from the islands formed during the LT nucleation step and grow truly catalyst-free, without any indium droplets at the tip. The impact of different growth parameters on the nanowire morphology is presented. In particular, good control over nanowire aspect ratio is demonstrated. A better understanding of the growth process is obtained through the development of a theoretical model combining the diffusion-induced growth scenario with some specific features of the catalyst-free growth mechanism, along with the analysis of the V/III flow ratio influencing material incorporation. As a result, we perform a full mapping of the nanowire morphology versus growth parameters which provides useful general guidelines on the self-induced formation of III-V nanowires on silicon. PMID:26404459

  9. Suspended InAs nanowire Josephson junctions assembled via dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montemurro, D.; Stornaiuolo, D.; Massarotti, D.; Ercolani, D.; Sorba, L.; Beltram, F.; Tafuri, F.; Roddaro, S.

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel technique for the realization of suspended Josephson junctions based on InAs semiconductor nanowires. The devices are assembled using a technique of drop-casting guided by dielectrophoresis, which allows one to finely align the nanostructures on top of the electrodes. The proposed architecture removes the interaction between the nanowire and the substrate which is known to influence disorder and the orientation of the Rashba vector. The relevance of this approach in view of the implementation of hybrid Josephson junctions based on semiconducting nanowires coupled with high-temperature superconductors is discussed.

  10. Suspended InAs nanowire Josephson junctions assembled via dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Montemurro, D; Stornaiuolo, D; Massarotti, D; Ercolani, D; Sorba, L; Beltram, F; Tafuri, F; Roddaro, S

    2015-09-25

    We present a novel technique for the realization of suspended Josephson junctions based on InAs semiconductor nanowires. The devices are assembled using a technique of drop-casting guided by dielectrophoresis, which allows one to finely align the nanostructures on top of the electrodes. The proposed architecture removes the interaction between the nanowire and the substrate which is known to influence disorder and the orientation of the Rashba vector. The relevance of this approach in view of the implementation of hybrid Josephson junctions based on semiconducting nanowires coupled with high-temperature superconductors is discussed. PMID:26335273

  11. Selective-Area Growth of InAs Nanowires on Ge and Vertical Transistor Application.

    PubMed

    Tomioka, Katsuhiro; Izhizaka, Fumiya; Fukui, Takashi

    2015-11-11

    III-V compound semiconductor and Ge are promising channel materials for future low-power and high-performance integrated circuits. A heterogeneous integration of these materials on the same platform, however, raises serious problem owing to a huge mismatch of carrier mobility. We proposed direct integration of perfectly vertically aligned InAs nanowires on Ge as a method for new alternative integrated circuits and demonstrated a high-performance InAs nanowire-vertical surrounding-gate transistor. Virtually 100% yield of vertically aligned InAs nanowires was achieved by controlling the initial surface of Ge and high-quality InAs nanowires were obtained regardless of lattice mismatch (6.7%). The transistor performance showed significantly higher conductivity with good gate control compared to Si-based conventional field-effect transistors: the drain current was 0.65 mA/μm, and the transconductance was 2.2 mS/μm at drain-source voltage of 0.50 V. These demonstrations are a first step for building alternative integrated circuits using vertical III-V/multigate planar Ge FETs. PMID:26468962

  12. Crystal Phase- and Orientation-Dependent Electrical Transport Properties of InAs Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Fu, Mengqi; Tang, Zhiqiang; Li, Xing; Ning, Zhiyuan; Pan, Dong; Zhao, Jianhua; Wei, Xianlong; Chen, Qing

    2016-04-13

    We report a systematic study on the correlation of the electrical transport properties with the crystal phase and orientation of single-crystal InAs nanowires (NWs) grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. A new method is developed to allow the same InAs NW to be used for both the electrical measurements and transmission electron microscopy characterization. We find both the crystal phase, wurtzite (WZ) or zinc-blende (ZB), and the orientation of the InAs NWs remarkably affect the electronic properties of the field-effect transistors based on these NWs, such as the threshold voltage (VT), ON-OFF ratio, subthreshold swing (SS) and effective barrier height at the off-state (ΦOFF). The SS increases while VT, ON-OFF ratio, and ΦOFF decrease one by one in the sequence of WZ ⟨0001⟩, ZB ⟨131⟩, ZB ⟨332⟩, ZB ⟨121⟩, and ZB ⟨011⟩. The WZ InAs NWs have obvious smaller field-effect mobility, conductivities, and electron concentration at VBG = 0 V than the ZB InAs NWs, while these parameters are not sensitive to the orientation of the ZB InAs NWs. We also find the diameter ranging from 12 to 33 nm shows much less effect than the crystal phase and orientation on the electrical transport properties of the InAs NWs. The good ohmic contact between InAs NWs and metal remains regardless of the variation of the crystal phase and orientation through temperature-dependent measurements. Our work deepens the understanding of the structure-dependent electrical transport properties of InAs NWs and provides a potential way to tailor the device properties by controlling the crystal phase and orientation of the NWs. PMID:27002386

  13. In-situ mechanical characterization of wurtzite InAs nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdélyi, Róbert; Hannibal Madsen, Morten; Sáfrán, György; Hajnal, Zoltán; Endre Lukács, István; Fülöp, Gergő; Csonka, Szabolcs; Nygård, Jesper; Volk, János

    2012-10-01

    High aspect ratio vertical InAs nanowires were mechanically characterized in a scanning electron microscope equipped with two micromanipulators. One, equipped with a calibrated atomic force microscope probe, was used for in-situ static bending of single nanowires along the <11-20> crystallographic direction. The other one was equipped with a tungsten tip for dynamic resonance excitation of the same nanowires. This setup enabled a direct comparison between the two techniques. The crystal structure was analyzed using transmission electron microscopy, and for InAs nanowires with a hexagonal wutzite crystal structure, the bending modulus value was found to BM=43.5 GPa. This value is significantly lower than previously reported for both cubic zinc blende InAs bulk crystals and InAs nanowires. Besides, due to their high resonance quality factor (Q>1200), the wurtzite InAs nanowires are shown to be a promising candidate for sub-femtogram mass detectors.

  14. Modulating Electrical Properties of InAs Nanowires via Molecular Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ho-Yuen; Yip, SenPo; Han, Ning; Dong, Goufa; Fang, Ming; Yang, Zai-xing; Wang, Fengyun; Lin, Hao; Wong, Chun-Yuen; Ho, Johnny C

    2015-07-28

    In recent years, InAs nanowires have been demonstrated with the excellent electron mobility as well as highly efficient near-infrared and visible photoresponse at room temperature. However, due to the presence of a large amount of surface states that originate from the unstable native oxide, the fabricated nanowire transistors are always operated in the depletion mode with degraded electron mobility, which is not energy-efficient. In this work, instead of the conventional inorganic sulfur or alkanethiol surface passivation, we employ aromatic thiolate (ArS(-))-based molecular monolayers with controllable molecular design and electron density for the surface modification of InAs nanowires (i.e., device channels) by simple wet chemistry. More importantly, besides reliably improving the device performances by enhancing the electron mobility and the current on-off ratio through surface state passivation, the device threshold voltage (VTh) can also be modulated by varying the para-substituent of the monolayers such that the molecule bearing electron-withdrawing groups would significantly shift the VTh towards the positive region for the enhancement mode device operation, in which the effect has been quantified by density functional theory calculations. These findings reveal explicitly the efficient modulation of the InAs nanowires' electronic transport properties via ArS(-)-based molecular monolayers, which further elucidates the technological potency of this ArS(-) surface treatment for future nanoelectronic device fabrication and circuit integration. PMID:26083845

  15. Nucleation and growth mechanism of self-catalyzed InAs nanowires on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, U. P.; Ercolani, D.; Zannier, V.; David, J.; Gemmi, M.; Beltram, F.; Sorba, L.

    2016-06-01

    We report on the nucleation and growth mechanism of self-catalyzed InAs nanowires (NWs) grown on Si (111) substrates by chemical beam epitaxy. Careful choices of the growth parameters lead to In-rich conditions such that the InAs NWs nucleate from an In droplet and grow by the vapor–liquid–solid mechanism while sustaining an In droplet at the tip. As the growth progresses, new NWs continue to nucleate on the Si (111) surface causing a spread in the NW size distribution. The observed behavior in NW nucleation and growth is described within a suitable existing theoretical model allowing us to extract relevant growth parameters. We argue that these results provide useful guidelines to rationally control the growth of self-catalyzed InAs NWs for various applications.

  16. Nucleation and growth mechanism of self-catalyzed InAs nanowires on silicon.

    PubMed

    Gomes, U P; Ercolani, D; Zannier, V; David, J; Gemmi, M; Beltram, F; Sorba, L

    2016-06-24

    We report on the nucleation and growth mechanism of self-catalyzed InAs nanowires (NWs) grown on Si (111) substrates by chemical beam epitaxy. Careful choices of the growth parameters lead to In-rich conditions such that the InAs NWs nucleate from an In droplet and grow by the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism while sustaining an In droplet at the tip. As the growth progresses, new NWs continue to nucleate on the Si (111) surface causing a spread in the NW size distribution. The observed behavior in NW nucleation and growth is described within a suitable existing theoretical model allowing us to extract relevant growth parameters. We argue that these results provide useful guidelines to rationally control the growth of self-catalyzed InAs NWs for various applications. PMID:27171601

  17. Bandgap Energy of Wurtzite InAs Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Rota, Michele B; Ameruddin, Amira S; Fonseka, H Aruni; Gao, Qiang; Mura, Francesco; Polimeni, Antonio; Miriametro, Antonio; Tan, H Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Capizzi, Mario

    2016-08-10

    InAs nanowires (NWs) have been grown on semi-insulating InAs (111)B substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition catalyzed by 50, 100, and 150 nm-sized Au particles. The pure wurtzite (WZ) phase of these NWs has been attested by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area diffraction pattern measurements. Low temperature photoluminescence measurements have provided unambiguous and robust evidence of a well resolved, isolated peak at 0.477 eV, namely 59 meV higher than the band gap of ZB InAs. The WZ nature of this energy band has been demonstrated by high values of the polarization degree, measured in ensembles of NWs both as-grown and mechanically transferred onto Si and GaAs substrates, in agreement with the polarization selection rules for WZ crystals. The value of 0.477 eV found here for the bandgap energy of WZ InAs agrees well with theoretical calculations. PMID:27467011

  18. Metal free growth and characterization of InAs1-xPx nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Mandl, Bernhard; Stangl, Julian; Brehm, Moritz; Fromherz, Thomas; Bauer, Guenther; Maartensson, Thomas; Samuelson, Lars; Seifert, Werner

    2007-04-10

    InAs nanowires have been grown without the use of Au or other metal particles as catalyst by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. The nanowires growth is initiated by a thin layer of SiOx. The wires exhibit a non-tapered shape with a hexagonal cross section. In addition to InAs also InAs1-xPx wires are grown and the incorporation of P is studied by photoluminescence.

  19. Synthesis and structural characterization of vertical ferromagnetic MnAs/semiconducting InAs heterojunction nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodaira, Ryutaro; Hara, Shinjiro; Kabamoto, Kyohei; Fujimagari, Hiromu

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to synthesize vertical ferromagnetic/semiconducting heterojunction nanowires by combing the catalyst-free selective-area growth of InAs nanowires and the endotaxial nanoclustering of MnAs and to structurally and magnetically characterize them. MnAs penetrates the InAs nanowires to form nanoclusters. The surface migration length of manganese adatoms on the nanowires, which is estimated to be 600 nm at 580 °C, is a key to the successful fabrication of vertical MnAs/InAs heterojunction nanowires with atomically abrupt heterointerfaces.

  20. Single-electron transport in InAs nanowire quantum dots formed by crystal phase engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Malin; Namazi, Luna; Lehmann, Sebastian; Leijnse, Martin; Dick, Kimberly A.; Thelander, Claes

    2016-05-01

    We report electrical characterization of quantum dots formed by introducing pairs of thin wurtzite (WZ) segments in zinc blende (ZB) InAs nanowires. Regular Coulomb oscillations are observed over a wide gate voltage span, indicating that WZ segments create significant barriers for electron transport. We find a direct correlation of transport properties with quantum dot length and corresponding growth time of the enclosed ZB segment. The correlation is made possible by using a method to extract lengths of nanowire crystal phase segments directly from scanning electron microscopy images, and with support from transmission electron microscope images of typical nanowires. From experiments on controlled filling of nearly empty dots with electrons, up to the point where Coulomb oscillations can no longer be resolved, we estimate a lower bound for the ZB-WZ conduction-band offset of 95 meV.

  1. Growth of Catalyst-Free Epitaxial InAs Nanowires on Si Wafers Using Metallic Masks.

    PubMed

    Soo, M Teng; Zheng, Kun; Gao, Qiang; Tan, H Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Zou, Jin

    2016-07-13

    Development of heteroepitaxy growth of catalyst-free vertical III-V nanowires on Si wafers is highly desirable for future nanoscale Si-based electronic and optoelectronic devices. In this study, a proof-of-concept approach is developed for catalyst-free heteroepitaxy growth of InAs nanowires on Si wafers. Before the growth of InAs nanowires, a Si-compatible metallic film with a thickness of several tens of nanometers was predeposited on a Si wafer and then annealed to form nanosize openings so as to obtain a metallic mask. These nano-openings exposed the surface of the Si wafer, which allowed subsequent nucleation and growth of epitaxial InAs nanowires directly on the surface of the Si wafer. The small size of the nano-openings limits the lateral growth of the nanostructures but promotes their axial growth. Through this approach, catalyst-free InAs nanowires were grown on both Si (111) and (001) wafers successfully at different growth temperatures. In particular, ultralong defect-free InAs nanowires with the wurtzite structure were grown the Si (111) wafers at 550 °C using the Ni mask. This study offers a simple, cost-effective, and scalable method to grow catalyst-free III-V nanowires on Si wafers. The simplicity of the approach opens a new avenue for the growth and integration of catalyst-free high-quality heteroepitaxial III-V nanowires on Si wafers. PMID:27248817

  2. InAs nanowire formation on InP(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, H. J.; Ashwin, M. J.; Jones, T. S.

    2006-12-01

    The heteroepitaxial growth of InAs on InP(001) by solid source molecular beam epitaxy has been studied for a range of different growth temperatures and annealing procedures. Atomic force microscopy images show that nanowires are formed for deposition in the temperature range of 400-480 deg. C, and also following high temperature annealing (480 deg. C) after deposition at 400 deg. C. The wires show preferential orientation along <110> and often exhibit pronounced serpentine behavior due to the presence of kinks, an effect that is reduced at increasing growth temperature. The results suggest that the serpentine behavior is related to the degree of initial surface order. Kinks in the wires appear to act as nucleation centers for In adatoms migrating along the wires during annealing, leading to the coexistence of large three-dimensional islands.

  3. Ag-catalyzed InAs nanowires grown on transferable graphite flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-Holdt, Jakob; Kanne, Thomas; Sestoft, Joachim E.; Gejl, Aske; Zeng, Lunjie; Johnson, Erik; Olsson, Eva; Nygård, Jesper; Krogstrup, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Semiconducting nanowires grown by quasi-van-der-Waals epitaxy on graphite flakes are a new class of hybrid materials that hold promise for scalable nanostructured devices within opto-electronics. Here we report on high aspect ratio and stacking fault free Ag-seeded InAs nanowires grown on exfoliated graphite flakes by molecular beam epitaxy. Ag catalyzes the InAs nanowire growth selectively on the graphite flakes and not on the underlying InAs substrates. This allows for easy transfer of the flexible graphite flakes with as-grown nanowire ensembles to arbitrary substrates by a micro-needle manipulator. Besides the possibilities for fabricating novel nanostructure device designs, we show how this method is used to study the parasitic growth and bicrystal match between the graphite flake and the nanowires by transmission electron microscopy.

  4. Ag-catalyzed InAs nanowires grown on transferable graphite flakes.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Holdt, Jakob; Kanne, Thomas; Sestoft, Joachim E; Gejl, Aske; Zeng, Lunjie; Johnson, Erik; Olsson, Eva; Nygård, Jesper; Krogstrup, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Semiconducting nanowires grown by quasi-van-der-Waals epitaxy on graphite flakes are a new class of hybrid materials that hold promise for scalable nanostructured devices within opto-electronics. Here we report on high aspect ratio and stacking fault free Ag-seeded InAs nanowires grown on exfoliated graphite flakes by molecular beam epitaxy. Ag catalyzes the InAs nanowire growth selectively on the graphite flakes and not on the underlying InAs substrates. This allows for easy transfer of the flexible graphite flakes with as-grown nanowire ensembles to arbitrary substrates by a micro-needle manipulator. Besides the possibilities for fabricating novel nanostructure device designs, we show how this method is used to study the parasitic growth and bicrystal match between the graphite flake and the nanowires by transmission electron microscopy. PMID:27479073

  5. g-factor anisotropy in nanowire-based InAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    D'Hollosy, Samuel; Fábián, Gábor; Baumgartner, Andreas; Schönenberger, Christian; Nygård, Jesper

    2013-12-04

    The determination and control of the electron g-factor in semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are fundamental prerequisites in modern concepts of spintronics and spin-based quantum computation. We study the dependence of the g-factor on the orientation of an external magnetic field in quantum dots (QDs) formed between two metallic contacts on stacking fault free InAs nanowires. We extract the g-factor from the splitting of Kondo resonances and find that it varies continuously in the range between |g*| = 5 and 15.

  6. Crystal phase-dependent nanophotonic resonances in InAs nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Anttu, Nicklas; Lehmann, Sebastian; Storm, Kristian; Dick, Kimberly A; Samuelson, Lars; Wu, Phillip M; Pistol, Mats-Erik

    2014-10-01

    Nanostructures have many material, electronic, and optical properties that are not found in bulk systems and that are relevant for technological applications. For example, nanowires realized from III-V semiconductors can be grown into a wurtzite crystal structure. This crystal structure does not naturally exist in bulk where these materials form the zinc-blende counterpart. Being able to concomitantly grow these nanowires in the zinc-blende and/or wurtzite crystal structure provides an important degree of control for the design and optimization of optoelectronic applications based on these semiconductor nanostructures. However, the refractive indices of this new crystallographic phase have so far not been elucidated. This shortcoming makes it impossible to predict and utilize the full potential of these new nanostructured materials for optoelectronics applications: a careful design and optimization of optical resonances by tuning the nanostructure geometry is needed to achieve optimal performance. Here, we report and analyze striking differences in the optical response of nanophotonic resonances in wurtzite and zinc-blende InAs nanowire arrays. Specifically, through reflectance measurements we find that the resonance can be tuned down to λ ≈ 380 nm in wurtzite nanowires by decreasing the nanowire diameter. In stark contrast, a similar tuning to below λ ≈ 500 nm is not possible in the zinc-blende nanowires. Furthermore, we find that the wurtzite nanowires can absorb twice as strongly as the zinc-blende nanowires. We attribute these strikingly large differences in resonant behavior to large differences between the refractive indices of the two crystallographic phases realized in these nanostructures. We anticipate our findings to be relevant for other III-V materials as well as for all material systems that manifest polytypism. Taken together, our results demonstrate crystal phase engineering as a potentially new design dimension for optoelectronics

  7. Ballistic Transport and Exchange Interaction in InAs Nanowire Quantum Point Contacts.

    PubMed

    Heedt, S; Prost, W; Schubert, J; Grützmacher, D; Schäpers, Th

    2016-05-11

    One-dimensional ballistic transport is demonstrated for a high-mobility InAs nanowire device. Unlike conventional quantum point contacts (QPCs) created in a two-dimensional electron gas, the nanowire QPCs represent one-dimensional constrictions formed inside a quasi-one-dimensional conductor. For each QPC, the local subband occupation can be controlled individually between zero and up to six degenerate modes. At large out-of-plane magnetic fields Landau quantization and Zeeman splitting emerge and comprehensive voltage bias spectroscopy is performed. Confinement-induced quenching of the orbital motion gives rise to significantly modified subband-dependent Landé g factors. A pronounced g factor enhancement related to Coulomb exchange interaction is reported. Many-body effects of that kind also manifest in the observation of the 0.7·2e(2)/h conductance anomaly, commonly found in planar devices. PMID:27104768

  8. Defect-free thin InAs nanowires grown using molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi; Chen, Ping-Ping; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin

    2016-01-21

    In this study, we designed a simple method to achieve the growth of defect-free thin InAs nanowires with a lateral dimension well below their Bohr radius on different substrate orientations. By depositing and annealing a thin layer of Au thin film on a (100) substrate surface, we have achieved the growth of defect-free uniform-sized thin InAs nanowires. This study provides a strategy to achieve the growth of pure defect-free thin nanowires. PMID:26671780

  9. Harmonic Generation in InAs Nanowire Double Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroer, M. D.; Jung, M.; Petersson, K. D.; Petta, J. R.

    2012-02-01

    InAs nanowires provide a useful platform for investigating the physics of confined electrons subjected to strong spin-orbit coupling. Using tunable, bottom-gated double quantum dots, we demonstrate electrical driving of single spin resonance.ootnotetextS. Nadj-Perge et al., Nature 468, 1084 (2010)^,ootnotetextM.D. Schroer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 176811 (2011) We observe a standard spin response when the applied microwave frequency equals the Larmour frequency f0. However, we also observe an anomalous signal at frequencies fn= f0/ n for integer n up to n ˜5. This is equivalent to generation of harmonics of the spin resonance field. While a f0/2 signal has observed,ootnotetextE.A. Laird et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 246601 (2007) we believe this is the first observation of higher harmonics in spin resonance. Possible mechanisms will be discussed.ootnotetextE.I. Rashba, arXiv:1110.6569 (2011) Acknowledgements: Research supported by the Sloan and Packard Foundations, the NSF, and Army Research Office.

  10. Orientation Dependence of Electromechanical Characteristics of Defect-free InAs Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kun; Zhang, Zhi; Hu, Yibin; Chen, Pingping; Lu, Wei; Drennan, John; Han, Xiaodong; Zou, Jin

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the electrical properties of defect-free nanowires with different structures and their responses under deformation are essential for design and applications of nanodevices and strain engineering. In this study, defect-free zinc-blende- and wurtzite-structured InAs nanowires were grown using molecular beam epitaxy, and individual nanowires with different structures and orientations were carefully selected and their electrical properties and electromechanical responses were investigated using an electrical probing system inside a transmission electron microscope. Through our careful experimental design and detailed analyses, we uncovered several extraordinary physical phenomena, such as the electromechanical characteristics are dominated by the nanowire orientation, rather than its crystal structure. Our results provide critical insights into different responses induced by deformation of InAs with different structures, which is important for nanowire-based devices. PMID:26837494

  11. Alloying InAs and InP nanowires for optoelectronic applications: A first principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toniolo, Giuliano R.; Anversa, Jonas; dos Santos, Cláudia L.; Piquini, Paulo

    2014-08-01

    The capability of nanowires to relieve the stress introduced by lattice mismatching through radial relaxation opens the possibility to search for devices for optoelectronic applications. However, there are difficulties to fabricate, and therefore to explore the properties of nanowires with narrow diameters. Here we apply first principles calculations to study the electronic and optical properties of narrow InAs1 - xPx nanowires. Our results show that the absorption threshold can be pushed to near-ultraviolet region, and suggests that arrays of these nanowires with different diameters and compositions could be used as devices acting from the mid-infrared to the near-ultraviolet region.

  12. Length distributions of Au-catalyzed and In-catalyzed InAs nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskii, V. G.; Sibirev, N. V.; Berdnikov, Y.; Gomes, U. P.; Ercolani, D.; Zannier, V.; Sorba, L.

    2016-09-01

    We present experimental data on the length distributions of InAs nanowires grown by chemical beam epitaxy with Au catalyst nanoparticles obtained by thermal dewetting of Au film, Au colloidal nanoparticles and In droplets. Poissonian length distributions are observed in the first case. Au colloidal nanoparticles produce broader and asymmetric length distributions of InAs nanowires. However, the distributions can be strongly narrowed by removing the high temperature annealing step. The length distributions for the In-catalyzed growth are instead very broad. We develop a generic model that is capable of describing the observed behaviors by accounting for both the incubation time for nanowire growth and secondary nucleation of In droplets. These results allow us to formulate some general recipes for obtaining more uniform length distributions of III-V nanowires.

  13. Length distributions of Au-catalyzed and In-catalyzed InAs nanowires.

    PubMed

    Dubrovskii, V G; Sibirev, N V; Berdnikov, Y; Gomes, U P; Ercolani, D; Zannier, V; Sorba, L

    2016-09-16

    We present experimental data on the length distributions of InAs nanowires grown by chemical beam epitaxy with Au catalyst nanoparticles obtained by thermal dewetting of Au film, Au colloidal nanoparticles and In droplets. Poissonian length distributions are observed in the first case. Au colloidal nanoparticles produce broader and asymmetric length distributions of InAs nanowires. However, the distributions can be strongly narrowed by removing the high temperature annealing step. The length distributions for the In-catalyzed growth are instead very broad. We develop a generic model that is capable of describing the observed behaviors by accounting for both the incubation time for nanowire growth and secondary nucleation of In droplets. These results allow us to formulate some general recipes for obtaining more uniform length distributions of III-V nanowires. PMID:27501469

  14. Schottky barrier heights at the interfaces between pure-phase InAs nanowires and metal contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Boyong; Huang, Shaoyun; Wang, Jiyin; Pan, Dong; Zhao, Jianghua; Xu, H. Q.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding of the Schottky barriers formed at metal contact-InAs nanowire interfaces is of great importance for the development of high-performance InAs nanowire nanoelectronic and quantum devices. Here, we report a systematical study of InAs nanowire field-effect transistors (FETs) and the Schottky barrier heights formed at the contact-nanowire interfaces. The InAs nanowires employed are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and are high material quality single crystals, and the devices are made by directly contacting the nanowires with a series of metals of different work functions. The fabricated InAs nanowire FET devices are characterized by electrical measurements at different temperatures and the Schottky barrier heights are extracted from the measured temperature and gate-voltage dependences of the channel current. We show that although the work functions of the contact metals are widely spread, the Schottky barrier heights are determined to be distributed over 35-55 meV, showing a weak but not negligible dependence on the metals. The deduced Fermi level in the InAs nanowire channels is found to be in the band gap and very close to the conduction band. The physical origin of the results is discussed in terms of Fermi level pinning by the surface states of the InAs nanowires and a shift in pinned Fermi level induced by the metal-related interface states.

  15. Designed Quasi-1D Potential Structures Realized in Compositionally Graded InAs1-xPx Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Nylund, Gustav; Storm, Kristian; Lehmann, Sebastian; Capasso, Federico; Samuelson, Lars

    2016-02-10

    III-V semiconductor heterostructures are important components of many solid-state optoelectronic devices, but the ability to control and tune the electrical and optical properties of these structures in conventional device geometries is fundamentally limited by the bulk dimensionality and the inability to accommodate lattice-mismatched material combinations. Here we demonstrate how semiconductor nanowires may enable the creation of arbitrarily shaped one-dimensional potential structures for new types of designed device functionality. We describe the controlled growth of stepwise compositionally graded InAs1-xPx heterostructures defined along the axes of InAs nanowires, and we show that nanowires with sawtooth-shaped composition profiles behave as near-ideal unipolar diodes with ratchet-like rectification of the electron transport through the nanowires, in excellent agreement with simulations. This new type of designed quasi-1D potential structure represents a significant advance in band gap engineering and may enable fundamental studies of low-dimensional hot-carrier dynamics, in addition to constituting a platform for implementing novel electronic and optoelectronic device concepts. PMID:26788886

  16. InAs nanowire growth modes on Si (111) by gas source molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, M. T.; LaPierre, R. R.

    2016-02-01

    InAs nanowires (NWs) were grown on silicon substrates by gas source molecular beam epitaxy using five different growth modes: (1) Au-assisted growth, (2) positioned (patterned) Au-assisted growth, (3) Au-free growth, (4) positioned Au-assisted growth using a patterned oxide mask, and (5) Au-free selective-area epitaxy (SAE) using a patterned oxide mask. Optimal growth conditions (temperature, V/III flux ratio) were identified for each growth mode for control of NW morphology and vertical NW yield. The highest yield (72%) was achieved with the SAE method at a growth temperature of 440 °C and a V/III flux ratio of 4. Growth mechanisms are discussed for each of the growth modes.

  17. Time evolution studies of laser induced chemical changes in InAs nanowire using Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Suparna; Aggarwal, R.; Kumari Gupta, Vandna; Ingale, Alka

    2014-07-07

    We report the study of time evolution of chemical changes on the surface of an InAs nanowire (NW) on laser irradiation in different power density regime, using Raman spectroscopy for a time span of 8–16 min. Mixture of metastable oxides like InAsO{sub 4,} As{sub 2}O{sub 3} are formed upon oxidation, which are reflected as sharp Raman peaks at ∼240–254 and 180–200 cm{sup −1}. Evidence of removal of arsenic layer by layer is also observed at higher power density. Position controlled laser induced chemical modification on a nanometer scale, without changing the core of the NW, can be useful for NW based device fabrication.

  18. Strain-induced band alignment in wurtzite/zinc-blende InAs heterostructured nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Jaya Kumar; Roy, Anushree; Chakraborty, Arup; Dasgupta, Indra; Hasanu, Elena; Ercolani, Daniele; Sorba, Lucia; Gemmi, Mauro

    2015-11-01

    We study band alignment in wurtzite/zinc-blende polytype InAs heterostructured nanowires using temperature-dependent resonance Raman measurements. Nanowires having two different wurtzite fractions are investigated. Using visible excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman measurements, we probe the electronic band alignment of these semiconductor nanowires near a high-symmetry point of the Brillouin zone (E1 gap). The strain in the crystal structure, as revealed from the shift of the phonon mode, explains the observed band alignment at the wurtzite/zinc-blende interface. Our experimental results are further supported by electronic-structure calculations for such periodic heterostructured interface.

  19. A transmission line method for evaluation of vertical InAs nanowire contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, M. Svensson, J. Lind, E. Wernersson, L.-E.

    2015-12-07

    In this paper, we present a method for metal contact characterization to vertical semiconductor nanowires using the transmission line method (TLM) on a cylindrical geometry. InAs nanowire resistors are fabricated on Si substrates using a hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) spacer between the bottom and top contact. The thickness of the HSQ is defined by the dose of an electron beam lithography step, and by varying the separation thickness for a group of resistors, a TLM series is fabricated. Using this method, the resistivity and specific contact resistance are determined for InAs nanowires with different doping and annealing conditions. The contacts are shown to improve with annealing at temperatures up to 300 °C for 1 min, with specific contact resistance values reaching down to below 1 Ω µm{sup 2}.

  20. Ultrathin InAs nanowire growth by spontaneous Au nanoparticle spreading on indium-rich surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Kyooho; Mohseni, Parsian K.; Li, Xiuling

    2014-11-01

    Ultrathin InAs nanowires (NWs) can enable true one-dimensional electronics. We report a growth phenomenon where a bimodal size distribution (~α nm and ~5 nm in diameter) of InAs NWs can be achieved from gold (Au) nanoparticles of a single size, α (α = 50-250 nm). We determine that ultrathin InAs NW growth is seeded by ultra-small Au nanoparticles shed from the large Au seeds upon indium (In) introduction into the growth system and formed prior to the supersaturation of In in Au. The Au spreading phenomenon is explained by the balancing of Gibbs free energy lowering from In-Au mixing and the surface tension increase. Ultrathin InAs NWs formed in this way exhibit a perfect wurtzite structure with no stacking faults. We have observed InAs NWs with diameters down to ~2 nm using our growth method. Passivating the ultrathin InAs NWs with an AlAs shell, subsequently oxidized in air, results in physical deformation of the InAs core, demonstrating the mechanical pliability of these ultrathin NWs.Ultrathin InAs nanowires (NWs) can enable true one-dimensional electronics. We report a growth phenomenon where a bimodal size distribution (~α nm and ~5 nm in diameter) of InAs NWs can be achieved from gold (Au) nanoparticles of a single size, α (α = 50-250 nm). We determine that ultrathin InAs NW growth is seeded by ultra-small Au nanoparticles shed from the large Au seeds upon indium (In) introduction into the growth system and formed prior to the supersaturation of In in Au. The Au spreading phenomenon is explained by the balancing of Gibbs free energy lowering from In-Au mixing and the surface tension increase. Ultrathin InAs NWs formed in this way exhibit a perfect wurtzite structure with no stacking faults. We have observed InAs NWs with diameters down to ~2 nm using our growth method. Passivating the ultrathin InAs NWs with an AlAs shell, subsequently oxidized in air, results in physical deformation of the InAs core, demonstrating the mechanical pliability of these

  1. Strain-driven synthesis of <112> direction InAs nanowires in V-grooved trenches on Si using InP/GaAs buffer layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shiyan; Zhou, Xuliang; Kong, Xiangting; Li, Mengke; Mi, Junping; Wang, Mengqi; Pan, Jiaoqing

    2016-09-01

    The catalyst-free metal organic vapor phase epitaxial growth of InAs nanowires on silicon (001) substrates is investigated by using selectively grown InP/GaAs buffer layers in V-grooved trenches. A strain-driven mechanism of self-aligned <112> direction InAs nanowires growing is proposed and demonstrated by the transmission electron microscopy measurement. The morphology of InAs nanowires is tapered in diameter and exhibits a hexagonal cross-section. The defect-free InAs nanowire shows a pure zinc blende crystal structure and an epitaxial relationship with InP buffer layer.

  2. Crystal Phase Transformation in Self-Assembled InAs Nanowire Junctions on Patterned Si Substrates.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Torsten; Rosenbach, Daniel; Vakulov, Daniil; Heedt, Sebastian; Schäpers, Thomas; Grützmacher, Detlev; Lepsa, Mihail Ion

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate the growth and structural characteristics of InAs nanowire junctions evidencing a transformation of the crystalline structure. The junctions are obtained without the use of catalyst particles. Morphological investigations of the junctions reveal three structures having an L-, T-, and X-shape. The formation mechanisms of these structures have been identified. The NW junctions reveal large sections of zinc blende crystal structure free of extended defects, despite the high stacking fault density obtained in individual InAs nanowires. This segment of zinc blende crystal structure in the junction is associated with a crystal phase transformation involving sets of Shockley partial dislocations; the transformation takes place solely in the crystal phase. A model is developed to demonstrate that only the zinc blende phase with the same orientation as the substrate can result in monocrystalline junctions. The suitability of the junctions to be used in nanoelectronic devices is confirmed by room-temperature electrical experiments. PMID:26881450

  3. Anomalous photoconductive behavior of a single InAs nanowire photodetector

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Junshuai; Yan, Xin; Sun, Fukuan; Zhang, Xia Ren, Xiaomin

    2015-12-28

    We report on a bare InAs nanowire photodetector which exhibits an anomalous photoconductive behavior. Under low-power illumination, the current is smaller than the dark current, and monotonously decreases as the excitation power increases. When the excitation power is high enough, the current starts to increase normally. The phenomenon is attributed to different electron mobilities in the “core” and “shell” of a relatively thick nanowire originating from the surface effect, which result in a quickly dropped “core current” and slowly increased “shell current” under illumination.

  4. Theoretical interpretation of the electron mobility behavior in InAs nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, E. G. Ruiz, F. G. Godoy, A.; Tienda-Luna, I. M.; Martínez-Blanque, C.; Gámiz, F.

    2014-11-07

    This work studies the electron mobility in InAs nanowires (NWs), by solving the Boltzmann Transport Equation under the Momentum Relaxation Time approximation. The numerical solver takes into account the contribution of the main scattering mechanisms present in III-V compound semiconductors. It is validated against experimental field effect-mobility results, showing a very good agreement. The mobility dependence on the nanowire diameter and carrier density is analyzed. It is found that surface roughness and polar optical phonons are the scattering mechanisms that mainly limit the mobility behavior. Finally, we explain the origin of the oscillations observed in the mobility of small NWs at high electric fields.

  5. Diameter dependence of the thermal conductivity of InAs nanowires.

    PubMed

    Swinkels, M Y; van Delft, M R; Oliveira, D S; Cavalli, A; Zardo, I; van der Heijden, R W; Bakkers, E P A M

    2015-09-25

    The diameter dependence of the thermal conductivity of InAs nanowires in the range of 40-1500 nm has been measured. We demonstrate a reduction in thermal conductivity of 80% for 40 nm nanowires, opening the way for further design strategies for nanoscaled thermoelectric materials. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of thermal contact in the most common measurement method for nanoscale thermal conductivity. Our study allows for the determination of the thermal contact using existing measurement setups. The thermal contact resistance is found to be comparable to the wire thermal resistance for wires with a diameter of 90 nm and higher. PMID:26329133

  6. X-ray diffraction strain analysis of a single axial InAs 1-x Px nanowire segment.

    PubMed

    Keplinger, Mario; Mandl, Bernhard; Kriegner, Dominik; Holý, Václav; Samuelsson, Lars; Bauer, Günther; Deppert, Knut; Stangl, Julian

    2015-01-01

    The spatial strain distribution in and around a single axial InAs 1-x Px hetero-segment in an InAs nanowire was analyzed using nano-focused X-ray diffraction. In connection with finite-element-method simulations a detailed quantitative picture of the nanowire's inhomogeneous strain state was achieved. This allows for a detailed understanding of how the variation of the nanowire's and hetero-segment's dimensions affect the strain in its core region and in the region close to the nanowire's side facets. Moreover, ensemble-averaging high-resolution diffraction experiments were used to determine statistical information on the distribution of wurtzite and zinc-blende crystal polytypes in the nanowires. PMID:25537589

  7. Au-free epitaxial growth of InAs nanowires.

    PubMed

    Mandl, Bernhard; Stangl, Julian; Mårtensson, Thomas; Mikkelsen, Anders; Eriksson, Jessica; Karlsson, Lisa S; Bauer, G Uuml Nther; Samuelson, Lars; Seifert, Werner

    2006-08-01

    III-V nanowires have been fabricated by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy without using Au or other metal particles as a catalyst. Instead, prior to growth, a thin SiOx layer is deposited on the substrates. Wires form on various III-V substrates as well as on Si. They are nontapered in thickness and exhibit a hexagonal cross-section. From high-resolution X-ray diffraction, the epitaxial relation between wires and substrates is demonstrated and their crystal structure is determined. PMID:16895379

  8. Electronic properties of GaAs, InAs and InP nanowires studied by terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Hannah J.; Docherty, Callum J.; Gao, Qiang; Tan, H. Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Lloyd-Hughes, James; Herz, Laura M.; Johnston, Michael B.

    2013-05-01

    We have performed a comparative study of ultrafast charge carrier dynamics in a range of III-V nanowires using optical pump-terahertz probe spectroscopy. This versatile technique allows measurement of important parameters for device applications, including carrier lifetimes, surface recombination velocities, carrier mobilities and donor doping levels. GaAs, InAs and InP nanowires of varying diameters were measured. For all samples, the electronic response was dominated by a pronounced surface plasmon mode. Of the three nanowire materials, InAs nanowires exhibited the highest electron mobilities of 6000 cm2 V-1 s-1, which highlights their potential for high mobility applications, such as field effect transistors. InP nanowires exhibited the longest carrier lifetimes and the lowest surface recombination velocity of 170 cm s-1. This very low surface recombination velocity makes InP nanowires suitable for applications where carrier lifetime is crucial, such as in photovoltaics. In contrast, the carrier lifetimes in GaAs nanowires were extremely short, of the order of picoseconds, due to the high surface recombination velocity, which was measured as 5.4 × 105  cm s-1. These findings will assist in the choice of nanowires for different applications, and identify the challenges in producing nanowires suitable for future electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  9. Type II band alignment in InAs zinc-blende/wurtzite heterostructured nanowires.

    PubMed

    Panda, Jaya Kumar; Chakraborty, Arup; Ercolani, Daniele; Gemmi, Mauro; Sorba, Lucia; Roy, Anushree

    2016-10-14

    In this article we demonstrate type-II band alignment at the wurtzite/zinc-blende hetero-interface in InAs polytype nanowires using resonance Raman measurements. Nanowires were grown with an optimum ratio of the above mentioned phases, so that in the electronic band alignment of such NWs the effect of the difference in the crystal structure dominates over other perturbing effects (e.g. interfacial strain, confinement of charge carriers and band bending due to space charge). Experimental results are compared with the band alignment obtained from density functional theory calculations. In resonance Raman measurements, the excitation energies in the visible range probe the band alignment formed by the E 1 gap of wurtzite and zinc-blende phases. However, we expect our claim to be valid also for band alignment near the fundamental gap at the heterointerface. PMID:27586817

  10. Photocurrents in a Single InAs Nanowire/Silicon Heterojunction.

    PubMed

    Brenneis, Andreas; Overbeck, Jan; Treu, Julian; Hertenberger, Simon; Morkötter, Stefanie; Döblinger, Markus; Finley, Jonathan J; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Koblmüller, Gregor; Holleitner, Alexander W

    2015-10-27

    We investigate the optoelectronic properties of single indium arsenide nanowires, which are grown vertically on p-doped silicon substrates. We apply a scanning photocurrent microscopy to study the optoelectronic properties of the single heterojunctions. The measured photocurrent characteristics are consistent with an excess charge carrier transport through midgap trap states, which form at the Si/InAs heterojunctions. Namely, the trap states add an additional transport path across a heterojunction, and the charge of the defects changes the band bending at the junction. The bending gives rise to a photovoltaic effect at a small bias voltage. In addition, we observe a photoconductance effect within the InAs nanowires at large biases. PMID:26348461

  11. Sensing and energy harvesting of fluidic flow by InAs nanowires.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Liang, Dong; Gao, Xuan P A; Alexander, J Iwan D

    2013-08-14

    Indium arsenide (InAs) nanowire (NW) field effect transistors (FETs) were incorporated into a microfluidic channel to detect the flow rate change as well as to harvest fluid flow energy for electric power generation. Discrete changes in the electric current through InAs NW FETs were observed upon flow rate changes at steps of 1 mL/h (equivalent to ~3 mm/s change in average linear velocity). The current also showed a sign change upon reversing flow direction. By comparing the response of the device with and without a driving voltage between source-drain electrodes, we conclude that the dominant contribution in the response is the streaming potential tuned conductance of NW. In the absence of source-drain voltage, we further demonstrate that the ionic flow could enable generation of an ~mV electrical potential (or ~nA electrical current) inside the InAs NW per mL/h increase of flow rate, most likely due to the charge dragging effect. PMID:23899249

  12. The electrical and structural properties of n-type InAs nanowires grown from metal-organic precursors.

    PubMed

    Thelander, C; Dick, K A; Borgström, M T; Fröberg, L E; Caroff, P; Nilsson, H A; Samuelson, L

    2010-05-21

    The electrical and structural properties of 111B-oriented InAs nanowires grown using metal-organic precursors have been studied. On the basis of electrical measurements it was found that the trends in carbon incorporation are similar to those observed in the layer growth, where an increased As/In precursor ratio and growth temperature result in a decrease in carbon-related impurities. Our results also show that the effect of non-intentional carbon doping is weaker in InAs nanowires compared to bulk, which may be explained by lower carbon incorporation in the nanowire core. We determine that differences in crystal quality, here quantified as the stacking fault density, are not the primary cause for variations in resistivity of the material studied. The effects of some n-dopant precursors (S, Se, Si, Sn) on InAs nanowire morphology, crystal structure and resistivity were also investigated. All precursors result in n-doped nanowires, but high precursor flows of Si and Sn also lead to enhanced radial overgrowth. Use of the Se precursor increases the stacking fault density in wurtzite nanowires, ultimately at high flows leading to a zinc blende crystal structure with strong overgrowth and very low resistivity. PMID:20413840

  13. Fabrication and optical properties of multishell InAs quantum dots on GaAs nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Xin; Zhang, Xia Li, Junshuai; Cui, Jiangong; Ren, Xiaomin

    2015-02-07

    Hybrid nanostructures combining nanowires with quantum dots promote the development of nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices with integrated functionalities. In this work, we present a complex nanostructure with multishell quantum dots grown on nanowires. 1–4 shells of Stranski-Krastanov InAs quantum dots are grown on the sidewalls of GaAs nanowires by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Different dot shells are separated by 8 nm GaAs spacer shells. With increasing the number of shells, the quantum dots become sparser and tend to align in one array, which is caused by the shrinkage of facets on which dots prefer to grow as well as the strain fields produced by the lower set of dots which influences the migration of In adatoms. The size of quantum dots increases with the increase of shell number due to enhanced strain fields coupling. The spectra of multishell dots exhibit multiwavelength emission, and each peak corresponds to a dot shell. This hybrid structure may serve as a promising element in nanowire intermediate band solar cells, infrared nanolasers, and photodetectors.

  14. Phase-coherent transport and spin relaxation in InAs nanowires grown by molecule beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L. B.; Guo, J. K.; Kang, N. E-mail: hqxu@pku.edu.cn; Li, Sen; Fan, Dingxun; Pan, Dong; Zhao, Jianhua; Xu, H. Q. E-mail: hqxu@pku.edu.cn

    2015-04-27

    We report low-temperature magnetotransport studies of individual InAs nanowires grown by molecule beam epitaxy. At low magnetic fields, the magnetoconductance characteristics exhibit a crossover between weak antilocalization and weak localization by changing either the gate voltage or the temperature. The observed crossover behavior can be well described in terms of relative scales of the transport characteristic lengths extracted based on the quasi-one-dimensional theory of weak localization in the presence of spin-orbit interaction. The spin relaxation length extracted from the magnetoconductance data is found to be in the range of 80–100 nm, indicating the presence of strong spin-orbit coupling in the InAs nanowires. Moreover, the amplitude of universal conductance fluctuations in the nanowires is found to be suppressed at low temperatures due to the presence of strong spin-orbit scattering.

  15. Suspended InAs nanowire gate-all-around field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qiang; Huang, Shaoyun E-mail: hqxu@pku.edu.cn; Wang, Jingyun; Pan, Dong; Zhao, Jianhua; Xu, H. Q. E-mail: hqxu@pku.edu.cn

    2014-09-15

    Gate-all-around field-effect transistors are realized with thin, single-crystalline, pure-phase InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy. At room temperature, the transistors show a desired high on-state current I{sub on} of ∼10 μA and an on-off current ratio I{sub on}/I{sub off} of as high as 10{sup 6} at source-drain bias voltage of 50 mV and gate length of 1 μm with a gate underlap spacing of 1 μm from the source and from the drain. At low temperatures, the on-state current I{sub on} is only slightly reduced, while the ratio I{sub on}/I{sub off} is increased to 10{sup 7}. The field-effect mobility in the nanowire channels is also investigated and found to be ∼1500 cm{sup 2}/V s at room temperature and ∼2000 cm{sup 2}/V s at low temperatures. The excellent performance of the transistors is explained in terms of strong electrostatic and quantum confinements of carriers in the nanowires.

  16. Mechanical properties of individual InAs nanowires studied by tensile tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Wei, X. L.; Xu, T. T.; Ning, Z. Y.; Shu, J. P.; Wang, X. Y.; Pan, D.; Zhao, J. H.; Yang, T.; Chen, Q.

    2014-03-01

    Mechanical properties of individual InAs nanowires (NWs) synthesized by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) methods are studied by in-situ tensile tests in a scanning electron microscope and their fracture strength and Young's modulus are obtained. The two types of NWs both exhibit brittle fracture with a maximum elastic strain up to ˜10%. Their fracture strength distributes in a similar range of ˜2-5 GPa with a general trend of increasing with NW volume decrease, which is well described by Weibull statistic with a smaller Weibull modulus and a higher characteristic strength for MOCVD NWs. Young's modulus is determined to be 16-78 GPa with an average value of 45 GPa and no dependence on NW diameter for MOCVD NWs and 34-79 GPa with an average value of 58 GPa for MBE NWs.

  17. Mechanical properties of individual InAs nanowires studied by tensile tests

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Wei, X. L. E-mail: qingchen@pku.edu.cn; Xu, T. T.; Ning, Z. Y.; Shu, J. P.; Chen, Q. E-mail: qingchen@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. Y.; Pan, D.; Zhao, J. H.; Yang, T.

    2014-03-10

    Mechanical properties of individual InAs nanowires (NWs) synthesized by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) methods are studied by in-situ tensile tests in a scanning electron microscope and their fracture strength and Young's modulus are obtained. The two types of NWs both exhibit brittle fracture with a maximum elastic strain up to ∼10%. Their fracture strength distributes in a similar range of ∼2–5 GPa with a general trend of increasing with NW volume decrease, which is well described by Weibull statistic with a smaller Weibull modulus and a higher characteristic strength for MOCVD NWs. Young's modulus is determined to be 16–78 GPa with an average value of 45 GPa and no dependence on NW diameter for MOCVD NWs and 34–79 GPa with an average value of 58 GPa for MBE NWs.

  18. Unit cell structure of crystal polytypes in InAs and InSb nanowires.

    PubMed

    Kriegner, Dominik; Panse, Christian; Mandl, Bernhard; Dick, Kimberly A; Keplinger, Mario; Persson, Johan M; Caroff, Philippe; Ercolani, Daniele; Sorba, Lucia; Bechstedt, Friedhelm; Stangl, Julian; Bauer, Günther

    2011-04-13

    The atomic distances in hexagonal polytypes of III-V compound semiconductors differ from the values expected from simply a change of the stacking sequence of (111) lattice planes. While these changes were difficult to quantify so far, we accurately determine the lattice parameters of zinc blende, wurtzite, and 4H polytypes for InAs and InSb nanowires, using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The results are compared to density functional theory calculations. Experiment and theory show that the occurrence of hexagonal bilayers tends to stretch the distances of atomic layers parallel to the c axis and to reduce the in-plane distances compared to those in zinc blende. The change of the lattice parameters scales linearly with the hexagonality of the polytype, defined as the fraction of bilayers with hexagonal character within one unit cell. PMID:21434674

  19. Signature of topological transition in InAs nanowire Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strambini, Elia; Paajaste, J.; Amado, M.; Roddaro, S.; San-Jose, P.; Aguado, R.; Bergeret, S.; Ercolani, D.; Sorba, L.; Giazotto, F.

    The coupling of a conventional s-wave superconductors to semiconductors with strong spin-orbit (SO) coupling, like e. g. InAs or InSb nanowires (NWs), gives rise to unconventional p-wave superconductivity that may become a topological superconductor (TS), which is a natural host for exotic edge modes with Majorana character. Recently the enhancement of the critical supercurrent Ic in a strong SO semiconducting Josephson junction (JJ) have been proposed as a new evidence of the sought-after Majorana bound states. Here we report on the first observation of the colossal Ic enhancement induced by an external magnetic field on a mesoscopic JJ formed by InAs NWs and Ti/Al leads. This anomalous enhancement appears precisely above a threshold magnetic field Bth orthogonal to the substrate and in junctions of different lengths, suggesting that the origin of the enhancement is intrinsic, i.e. it is not related to geometrical resonances in the junction. None of the standard phenomenon known in JJ, including e. g. Fraunhofer patterns or π-junction behavior, can explain this colossal enhancement while a topological transition at Bth is qualitatively compatible with the observed phenomenology.

  20. Wet etch methods for InAs nanowire patterning and self-aligned electrical contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fülöp, G.; d’Hollosy, S.; Hofstetter, L.; Baumgartner, A.; Nygård, J.; Schönenberger, C.; Csonka, S.

    2016-05-01

    Advanced synthesis of semiconductor nanowires (NWs) enables their application in diverse fields, notably in chemical and electrical sensing, photovoltaics, or quantum electronic devices. In particular, indium arsenide (InAs) NWs are an ideal platform for quantum devices, e.g. they may host topological Majorana states. While the synthesis has been continously perfected, only a few techniques have been developed to tailor individual NWs after growth. Here we present three wet chemical etch methods for the post-growth morphological engineering of InAs NWs on the sub-100 nm scale. The first two methods allow the formation of self-aligned electrical contacts to etched NWs, while the third method results in conical shaped NW profiles ideal for creating smooth electrical potential gradients and shallow barriers. Low temperature experiments show that NWs with etched segments have stable transport characteristics and can serve as building blocks of quantum electronic devices. As an example we report the formation of a single electrically stable quantum dot between two etched NW segments.

  1. Wet etch methods for InAs nanowire patterning and self-aligned electrical contacts.

    PubMed

    Fülöp, G; d'Hollosy, S; Hofstetter, L; Baumgartner, A; Nygård, J; Schönenberger, C; Csonka, S

    2016-05-13

    Advanced synthesis of semiconductor nanowires (NWs) enables their application in diverse fields, notably in chemical and electrical sensing, photovoltaics, or quantum electronic devices. In particular, indium arsenide (InAs) NWs are an ideal platform for quantum devices, e.g. they may host topological Majorana states. While the synthesis has been continously perfected, only a few techniques have been developed to tailor individual NWs after growth. Here we present three wet chemical etch methods for the post-growth morphological engineering of InAs NWs on the sub-100 nm scale. The first two methods allow the formation of self-aligned electrical contacts to etched NWs, while the third method results in conical shaped NW profiles ideal for creating smooth electrical potential gradients and shallow barriers. Low temperature experiments show that NWs with etched segments have stable transport characteristics and can serve as building blocks of quantum electronic devices. As an example we report the formation of a single electrically stable quantum dot between two etched NW segments. PMID:27040175

  2. Self-catalyzed growth mechanism of InAs nanowires and growth of InAs/GaSb heterostructured nanowires on Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoye; Du, Wenna; Yang, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xingwang; Yang, Tao

    2015-09-01

    The growth mechanism of III-V nanowires (NWs) grown without the use of any foreign catalysts, especially the growth mechanism of InAs NWs grown on Si substrates, is still an open question and controversial. To make it clear, we in detail investigated metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth of InAs NWs on Si substrates. Based on assuming the growth of InAs NWs by self-catalyzed growth mode, we firstly realized the growth of InAs/GaSb heterostructured NWs both in the axial direction by utilizing the catalysis of In droplet and in the radial direction (core/shell structure) by consuming In droplet. In particular, we found the presence of a certain amount of In atoms in the top droplet of the InAs/GaSb axially heterostructured NWs, which is the direct evidence of self-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mode for the growth of InAs NWs on Si. All the results obtained here support that the InAs NWs are grown by self-catalyzed VLS mechanism. The reasons for the absence of In droplets in the growth of InAs NWs were also discussed in details.

  3. Structural and electrical properties of catalyst-free Si-doped InAs nanowires formed on Si(111)

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Woo; Jeon, Seong Gi; Lee, Cheul-Ro; Lee, Sang Jun; Song, Jae Yong; Kim, Jun Oh; Noh, Sam Kyu; Leem, Jae-Young; Kim, Jin Soo

    2015-01-01

    We report structural and electrical properties of catalyst-free Si-doped InAs nanowires (NWs) formed on Si(111) substrates. The average diameter of Si-doped InAs NWs was almost similar to that of undoped NWs with a slight increase in height. In the previous works, the shape and size of InAs NWs formed on metallic catalysts or patterned structures were significantly changed by introducing dopants. Even though the external shape and size of the Si-doped NWs in this work were not changed, crystal structures inside the NWs were significantly changed. For the undoped InAs NWs, both zincblende (ZB) and wurzite (WZ) structures were observed in transmission-electron microscope images, where the portion of WZ structure was estimated to be more than 30%. However, only ZB was observed with an increase in stacking fault (SF) for the Si-doped NWs. The undoped and Si-doped InAs NWs were used as channels of four-point electrical measurements with Al/Ni electrodes to investigate electrical properties. The resistivity calculated from the current-voltage curve of a Si-doped InAs NW showed 1.32 × 10−3 Ωcm, which was dramatically decreased from 10.14 × 10−3 Ωcm for the undoped InAs NW. A relatively low resistivity of catalyst-free Si-doped InAs NWs was achieved without significant change in structural dimensions. PMID:26581781

  4. Structural and electrical properties of catalyst-free Si-doped InAs nanowires formed on Si(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Dong Woo; Jeon, Seong Gi; Lee, Cheul-Ro; Lee, Sang Jun; Song, Jae Yong; Kim, Jun Oh; Noh, Sam Kyu; Leem, Jae-Young; Kim, Jin Soo

    2015-11-01

    We report structural and electrical properties of catalyst-free Si-doped InAs nanowires (NWs) formed on Si(111) substrates. The average diameter of Si-doped InAs NWs was almost similar to that of undoped NWs with a slight increase in height. In the previous works, the shape and size of InAs NWs formed on metallic catalysts or patterned structures were significantly changed by introducing dopants. Even though the external shape and size of the Si-doped NWs in this work were not changed, crystal structures inside the NWs were significantly changed. For the undoped InAs NWs, both zincblende (ZB) and wurzite (WZ) structures were observed in transmission-electron microscope images, where the portion of WZ structure was estimated to be more than 30%. However, only ZB was observed with an increase in stacking fault (SF) for the Si-doped NWs. The undoped and Si-doped InAs NWs were used as channels of four-point electrical measurements with Al/Ni electrodes to investigate electrical properties. The resistivity calculated from the current-voltage curve of a Si-doped InAs NW showed 1.32 × 10-3 Ωcm, which was dramatically decreased from 10.14 × 10-3 Ωcm for the undoped InAs NW. A relatively low resistivity of catalyst-free Si-doped InAs NWs was achieved without significant change in structural dimensions.

  5. Structural and electrical properties of catalyst-free Si-doped InAs nanowires formed on Si(111).

    PubMed

    Park, Dong Woo; Jeon, Seong Gi; Lee, Cheul-Ro; Lee, Sang Jun; Song, Jae Yong; Kim, Jun Oh; Noh, Sam Kyu; Leem, Jae-Young; Kim, Jin Soo

    2015-01-01

    We report structural and electrical properties of catalyst-free Si-doped InAs nanowires (NWs) formed on Si(111) substrates. The average diameter of Si-doped InAs NWs was almost similar to that of undoped NWs with a slight increase in height. In the previous works, the shape and size of InAs NWs formed on metallic catalysts or patterned structures were significantly changed by introducing dopants. Even though the external shape and size of the Si-doped NWs in this work were not changed, crystal structures inside the NWs were significantly changed. For the undoped InAs NWs, both zincblende (ZB) and wurzite (WZ) structures were observed in transmission-electron microscope images, where the portion of WZ structure was estimated to be more than 30%. However, only ZB was observed with an increase in stacking fault (SF) for the Si-doped NWs. The undoped and Si-doped InAs NWs were used as channels of four-point electrical measurements with Al/Ni electrodes to investigate electrical properties. The resistivity calculated from the current-voltage curve of a Si-doped InAs NW showed 1.32 × 10(-3) Ωcm, which was dramatically decreased from 10.14 × 10(-3) Ωcm for the undoped InAs NW. A relatively low resistivity of catalyst-free Si-doped InAs NWs was achieved without significant change in structural dimensions. PMID:26581781

  6. Thermal conductivity of bulk and nanowire InAs, AlN, and BeO polymorphs from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wu; Mingo, Natalio

    2013-11-14

    We compute the thermal conductivity of the alternative zincblende (ZB) and wurtzite (WZ) phases of InAs, AlN, and BeO. The bulk thermal conductivity of the ZB phase of BeO is predicted to be even higher than that of its WZ phase (the highest amongst all ceramics used in electronic technology). Our calculations agree well with the available experimental measurements for bulk ZB InAs, WZ AlN, WZ BeO, and WZ and ZB InAs nanowires, and we provide predictions for the remaining cases. The predicted good thermal conductor ZB BeO might have interesting applications in improved heat sinks for high performance semiconductor electronics.

  7. Patterned p-doping of InAs nanowires by gas-phase surface diffusion of Zn.

    PubMed

    Ford, Alexandra C; Chuang, Steven; Ho, Johnny C; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Fan, Zhiyong; Javey, Ali

    2010-02-10

    Gas phase p-doping of InAs nanowires with Zn atoms is demonstrated as an effective route for enabling postgrowth dopant profiling of nanostructures. The versatility of the approach is demonstrated by the fabrication of high-performance gated diodes and p-MOSFETs. High Zn concentrations with electrically active content of approximately 1 x 10(19) cm(-3) are achieved which is essential for compensating the electron-rich surface layers of InAs to enable heavily p-doped structures. This work could have important practical implications for the fabrication of planar and nonplanar devices based on InAs and other III-V nanostructures which are not compatible with conventional ion implantation processes that often cause severe lattice damage with local stoichiometry imbalance. PMID:20044838

  8. X-ray diffraction strain analysis of a single axial InAs1–xPx nanowire segment

    PubMed Central

    Keplinger, Mario; Mandl, Bernhard; Kriegner, Dominik; Holý, Václav; Samuelsson, Lars; Bauer, Günther; Deppert, Knut; Stangl, Julian

    2015-01-01

    The spatial strain distribution in and around a single axial InAs1–xPx hetero-segment in an InAs nanowire was analyzed using nano-focused X-ray diffraction. In connection with finite-element-method simulations a detailed quantitative picture of the nanowire’s inhomogeneous strain state was achieved. This allows for a detailed understanding of how the variation of the nanowire’s and hetero-segment’s dimensions affect the strain in its core region and in the region close to the nanowire’s side facets. Moreover, ensemble-averaging high-resolution diffraction experiments were used to determine statistical information on the distribution of wurtzite and zinc-blende crystal polytypes in the nanowires. PMID:25537589

  9. Electronic structures of [1 1 1]-oriented free-standing InAs and InP nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Gaohua; Luo, Ning; Chen, Ke-Qiu; Xu, H. Q.

    2016-04-01

    We report on a theoretical study of the electronic structures of the [1 1 1]-oriented, free-standing, zincblende InAs and InP nanowires with hexagonal cross sections by means of an atomistic s{{p}3}{{s}\\ast} , spin-orbit interaction included, nearest-neighbor, tight-binding method. The band structures and the band state wave functions of these nanowires are calculated and the symmetry properties of the bands and band states are analyzed based on the C 3v double point group. It is shown that all bands of these nanowires are doubly degenerate at the Γ -point and some of these bands will split into non-degenerate bands when the wave vector k moves away from the Γ -point as a manifestation of spin-splitting due to spin-orbit interaction. It is also shown that the lower conduction bands of these nanowires all show simple parabolic dispersion relations, while the top valence bands show complex dispersion relations and band crossings. The band state wave functions are presented by the spatial probability distributions and it is found that all the band states show 2π /3 -rotation symmetric probability distributions. The effects of quantum confinement on the band structures of the [1 1 1]-oriented InAs and InP nanowires are also examined and an empirical formula for the description of quantization energies of the lowest conduction band and the highest valence band is presented. The formula can simply be used to estimate the enhancement of the band gaps of the nanowires at different sizes as a result of quantum confinement.

  10. Electronic structures of [1 1 1]-oriented free-standing InAs and InP nanowires.

    PubMed

    Liao, Gaohua; Luo, Ning; Chen, Ke-Qiu; Xu, H Q

    2016-04-01

    We report on a theoretical study of the electronic structures of the [1 1 1]-oriented, free-standing, zincblende InAs and InP nanowires with hexagonal cross sections by means of an atomistic sp(3)s*, spin-orbit interaction included, nearest-neighbor, tight-binding method. The band structures and the band state wave functions of these nanowires are calculated and the symmetry properties of the bands and band states are analyzed based on the C(3v) double point group. It is shown that all bands of these nanowires are doubly degenerate at the Γ-point and some of these bands will split into non-degenerate bands when the wave vector k moves away from the Γ-point as a manifestation of spin-splitting due to spin-orbit interaction. It is also shown that the lower conduction bands of these nanowires all show simple parabolic dispersion relations, while the top valence bands show complex dispersion relations and band crossings. The band state wave functions are presented by the spatial probability distributions and it is found that all the band states show 2π/3-rotation symmetric probability distributions. The effects of quantum confinement on the band structures of the [1 1 1]-oriented InAs and InP nanowires are also examined and an empirical formula for the description of quantization energies of the lowest conduction band and the highest valence band is presented. The formula can simply be used to estimate the enhancement of the band gaps of the nanowires at different sizes as a result of quantum confinement. PMID:26951953

  11. Sub-100 nm Si nanowire and nano-sheet array formation by MacEtch using a non-lithographic InAs nanowire mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jae Cheol; Zhang, Chen; Li, Xiuling

    2012-08-01

    We report a non-lithographical method for the fabrication of ultra-thin silicon (Si) nanowire (NW) and nano-sheet arrays through metal-assisted-chemical-etching (MacEtch) with gold (Au). The mask used for metal patterning is a vertical InAs NW array grown on a Si substrate via catalyst-free, strain-induced, one-dimensional heteroepitaxy. Depending on the Au evaporation angle, the shape and size of the InAs NWs are transferred to Si by Au-MacEtch as is (NWs) or in its projection (nano-sheets). The Si NWs formed have diameters in the range of ˜25-95 nm, and aspect ratios as high as 250 in only 5 min etch time. The formation process is entirely free of organic chemicals, ensuring pristine Au-Si interfaces, which is one of the most critical requirements for high yield and reproducible MacEtch.

  12. Sub-100 nm Si nanowire and nano-sheet array formation by MacEtch using a non-lithographic InAs nanowire mask.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae Cheol; Zhang, Chen; Li, Xiuling

    2012-08-01

    We report a non-lithographical method for the fabrication of ultra-thin silicon (Si) nanowire (NW) and nano-sheet arrays through metal-assisted-chemical-etching (MacEtch) with gold (Au). The mask used for metal patterning is a vertical InAs NW array grown on a Si substrate via catalyst-free, strain-induced, one-dimensional heteroepitaxy. Depending on the Au evaporation angle, the shape and size of the InAs NWs are transferred to Si by Au-MacEtch as is (NWs) or in its projection (nano-sheets). The Si NWs formed have diameters in the range of ∼25-95 nm, and aspect ratios as high as 250 in only 5 min etch time. The formation process is entirely free of organic chemicals, ensuring pristine Au-Si interfaces, which is one of the most critical requirements for high yield and reproducible MacEtch. PMID:22781145

  13. Conditions for high yield of selective-area epitaxy InAs nanowires on SiO x /Si(111) substrates.

    PubMed

    Robson, M T; Dubrovskii, V G; LaPierre, R R

    2015-11-20

    Experimental data and a model are presented which define the boundary values of V/III flux ratio and growth temperature for droplet-assisted nucleation of InAs semiconductor nanowires in selective-area epitaxy on SiO(x)/Si (111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Within these boundaries, the substrate receives a balanced flux of group III and V materials allowing the growth of vertically oriented nanowires as compared to the formation of droplets or crystallites. PMID:26508403

  14. Short-wavelength infrared photodetector on Si employing strain-induced growth of very tall InAs nanowire arrays

    PubMed Central

    Wook Shin, Hyun; Jun Lee, Sang; Gun Kim, Doo; Bae, Myung-Ho; Heo, Jaeyeong; Jin Choi, Kyoung; Jun Choi, Won; Choe, Jeong-woo; Cheol Shin, Jae

    2015-01-01

    One-dimensional crystal growth enables the epitaxial integration of III-V compound semiconductors onto a silicon (Si) substrate despite significant lattice mismatch. Here, we report a short-wavelength infrared (SWIR, 1.4–3 μm) photodetector that employs InAs nanowires (NWs) grown on Si. The wafer-scale epitaxial InAs NWs form on the Si substrate without a metal catalyst or pattern assistance; thus, the growth is free of metal-atom-induced contaminations, and is also cost-effective. InAs NW arrays with an average height of 50 μm provide excellent anti-reflective and light trapping properties over a wide wavelength range. The photodetector exhibits a peak detectivity of 1.9 × 108  cm·Hz1/2/W for the SWIR band at 77 K and operates at temperatures as high as 220 K. The SWIR photodetector on the Si platform demonstrated in this study is promising for future low-cost optical sensors and Si photonics. PMID:26035286

  15. In situ doping of catalyst-free InAs nanowires with Si: Growth, polytypism, and local vibrational modes of Si

    SciTech Connect

    Dimakis, Emmanouil; Ramsteiner, Manfred; Huang, Chang-Ning; Trampert, Achim; Riechert, Henning; Geelhaar, Lutz; Davydok, Anton; Biermanns, Andreas; Pietsch, Ullrich

    2013-09-30

    Growth and structural aspects of the in situ doping of InAs nanowires with Si have been investigated. The nanowires were grown catalyst-free on Si(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. The supply of Si influenced the growth kinetics, affecting the nanowire dimensions, but not the degree of structural polytypism, which was always pronounced. As determined by Raman spectroscopy, Si was incorporated as substitutional impurity exclusively on In sites, which makes it a donor. Previously unknown Si-related Raman peaks at 355 and 360 cm{sup −1} were identified, based on their symmetry properties in polarization-dependent measurements, as the two local vibrational modes of an isolated Si impurity on In site along and perpendicular, respectively, to the c-axis of the wurtzite InAs crystal.

  16. Atomic Scale Surface Structure and Morphology of InAs Nanowire Crystal Superlattices: The Effect of Epitaxial Overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    While shell growth engineering to the atomic scale is important for tailoring semiconductor nanowires with superior properties, a precise knowledge of the surface structure and morphology at different stages of this type of overgrowth has been lacking. We present a systematic scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) study of homoepitaxial shell growth of twinned superlattices in zinc blende InAs nanowires that transforms {111}A/B-type facets to the nonpolar {110}-type. STM imaging along the nanowires provides information on different stages of the shell growth revealing distinct differences in growth dynamics of the crystal facets and surface structures not found in the bulk. While growth of a new surface layer is initiated simultaneously (at the twin plane interface) on the {111}A and {111}B nanofacets, the step flow growth proceeds much faster on {111}A compared to {111}B leading to significant differences in roughness. Further, we observe that the atomic scale structures on the {111}B facet is different from its bulk counterpart and that shell growth on this facet occurs via steps perpendicular to the ⟨112⟩B-type directions. PMID:25710727

  17. Se-doping dependence of the transport properties in CBE-grown InAs nanowire field effect transistors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the transport properties of lateral gate field effect transistors (FET) that have been realized by employing, as active elements, (111) B-oriented InAs nanowires grown by chemical beam epitaxy with different Se-doping concentrations. On the basis of electrical measurements, it was found that the carrier mobility increases from 103 to 104 cm2/(V × sec) by varying the ditertiarybutyl selenide (DtBSe) precursor line pressure from 0 to 0.4 Torr, leading to an increase of the carrier density in the transistor channel of more than two orders of magnitude. By keeping the DtBSe line pressure at 0.1 Torr, the carrier density in the nanowire channel measures ≈ 5 × 1017 cm-3 ensuring the best peak transconductances (> 100 mS/m) together with very low resistivity values (70 Ω × μm) and capacitances in the attofarad range. These results are particularly relevant for further optimization of the nanowire-FET terahertz detectors recently demonstrated. PACS: 73.63.-b, 81.07.Gf, 85.35.-p PMID:22373361

  18. Spin dependent electronic structure and level crossings as a function of magnetic field in InAs nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, S. Q.; Waugh, J.; Matsuura, T.; Faniel, S.; Wu, H. Z.; Koga, Takaaki

    2010-01-01

    We point out that the electric field formed in the surface inversion layer in InAs nanowires leads to effective magnetic fields, due to the Rashba effect, that are mostly aligned along the wire axis, i.e., parallel to the external magnetic field B. While this situation leads to some similarities in spin splitting between the Zeeman and Rashba effects, extensive theoretical simulations revealed that large and small spin splittings should take place alternately at Fermi energies with increasing magnetic field B, as a result of the competition between the Rashba and Zeeman spin splittings. We suggest that an experimental detection of such characteristics should bring up quantitative insights into the relative strengths between the Rashba and Zeeman magnetic fields.

  19. Influence of the oxide layer for growth of self-assisted InAs nanowires on Si(111)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The growth of self-assisted InAs nanowires (NWs) by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on Si(111) is studied for different growth parameters and substrate preparations. The thickness of the oxide layer present on the Si(111) surface is observed to play a dominant role. Systematic use of different pre-treatment methods provides information on the influence of the oxide on the NW morphology and growth rates, which can be used for optimizing the growth conditions. We show that it is possible to obtain 100% growth of vertical NWs and no parasitic bulk structures between the NWs by optimizing the oxide thickness. For a growth temperature of 460°C and a V/III ratio of 320 an optimum oxide thickness of 9 ± 3 Å is found. PMID:21880130

  20. Magneto-transport properties of InAs nanowires laterally-grown by selective area molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs (110) masked substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Akabori, M.; Yamada, S.

    2013-12-04

    We prepared InAs nanowires (NWs) by lateral growth on GaAs (110) masked substrates in molecular beam epitaxy. We measured magneto-transport properties of the InAs NWs. In spite of parallel-NW multi-channels, we observed fluctuating magneto-conductance. From the fluctuation, we evaluated phase coherence length as a function of measurement temperature, and found decrease in the length with increase in the temperature. We also evaluate phase coherence length as a function of gate voltage.

  1. Electrical tuning of Rashba spin-orbit interaction in multigated InAs nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherübl, Zoltán; Fülöp, Gergő; Madsen, Morten H.; Nygârd, Jesper; Csonka, Szabolcs

    2016-07-01

    Indium arsenide nanowires (NWs) are a promising platform to fabricate quantum electronic devices, among other advantages they have strong spin-orbit interaction (SOI). The controlled tuning of the SOI is desired in spin-based quantum devices. In this study we investigate the possibility of tuning the SOI by electrostatic fields generated by a back gate and two side gates placed on the opposite sides of the NW. The strength of the SOI is analyzed by weak anti-localization effect. We demonstrate that the strength of the SOI can be strongly tuned up to a factor of 2 with the electric field across the NW, while the average electron density is kept constant. Furthermore, a simple electrostatic model is introduced to calculate the expected change of the SOI. Good agreement is found between the experimental results and the estimated Rashba-type SOI generated by the gate-induced electric field.

  2. Sb-induced phase control of InAsSb nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Q D; Anyebe, Ezekiel A; Chen, R; Liu, H; Sanchez, Ana M; Rajpalke, Mohana K; Veal, Tim D; Wang, Z M; Huang, Y Z; Sun, H D

    2015-02-11

    For the first time, we report a complete control of crystal structure in InAs(1-x)Sb(x) NWs by tuning the antimony (Sb) composition. This claim is substantiated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy combined with photoluminescence spectroscopy. The pure InAs nanowires generally show a mixture of wurtzite (WZ) and zinc-blende (ZB) phases, where addition of a small amount of Sb (∼2-4%) led to quasi-pure WZ InAsSb NWs, while further increase of Sb (∼10%) resulted in quasi-pure ZB InAsSb NWs. This phase transition is further evidenced by photoluminescence (PL) studies, where a dominant emission associated with the coexistence of WZ and ZB phases is present in the pure InAs NWs but absent in the PL spectrum of InAs0.96Sb0.04 NWs that instead shows a band-to-band emission. We also demonstrate that the Sb addition significantly reduces the stacking fault density in the NWs. This study provides new insights on the role of Sb addition for effective control of nanowire crystal structure. PMID:25559370

  3. Rate-limiting mechanisms in high-temperature growth of catalyst-free InAs nanowires with large thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Hertenberger, S; Rudolph, D; Becker, J; Bichler, M; Finley, J J; Abstreiter, G; Koblmüller, G

    2012-06-15

    We identify the entire growth parameter space and rate-limiting mechanisms in non-catalytic InAs nanowires (NWs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Surprisingly huge growth temperature ranges are found with maximum temperatures close to ~600°C upon dramatic increase of V/III ratio, exceeding by far the typical growth temperature range for catalyst-assisted InAs NWs. Based on quantitative in situ line-of-sight quadrupole mass spectrometry, we determine the rate-limiting factors in high-temperature InAs NW growth by directly monitoring the critical desorption and thermal decomposition processes of InAs NWs. Both under dynamic (growth) and static (no growth, ultra-high vacuum) conditions the (111)-oriented InAs NWs evidence excellent thermal stability at elevated temperatures even under negligible supersaturation. The rate-limiting factor for InAs NW growth is hence dominated by In desorption from the substrate surface. Closer investigation of the group-III and group-V flux dependences on growth rate reveals two apparent growth regimes, an As-rich and an In-rich regime defined by the effective As/In flux ratio, and maximum achievable growth rates of > 6 µm h(-1). The unique features of high-T growth and excellent thermal stability provide the opportunity for operation of InAs-based NW materials under caustic environment and further allow access to temperature regimes suitable for alloying non-catalytic InAs NWs with GaAs. PMID:22595881

  4. Rate-limiting mechanisms in high-temperature growth of catalyst-free InAs nanowires with large thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertenberger, S.; Rudolph, D.; Becker, J.; Bichler, M.; Finley, J. J.; Abstreiter, G.; Koblmüller, G.

    2012-06-01

    We identify the entire growth parameter space and rate-limiting mechanisms in non-catalytic InAs nanowires (NWs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Surprisingly huge growth temperature ranges are found with maximum temperatures close to ˜600 °C upon dramatic increase of V/III ratio, exceeding by far the typical growth temperature range for catalyst-assisted InAs NWs. Based on quantitative in situ line-of-sight quadrupole mass spectrometry, we determine the rate-limiting factors in high-temperature InAs NW growth by directly monitoring the critical desorption and thermal decomposition processes of InAs NWs. Both under dynamic (growth) and static (no growth, ultra-high vacuum) conditions the (111)-oriented InAs NWs evidence excellent thermal stability at elevated temperatures even under negligible supersaturation. The rate-limiting factor for InAs NW growth is hence dominated by In desorption from the substrate surface. Closer investigation of the group-III and group-V flux dependences on growth rate reveals two apparent growth regimes, an As-rich and an In-rich regime defined by the effective As/In flux ratio, and maximum achievable growth rates of > 6 µm h-1. The unique features of high-T growth and excellent thermal stability provide the opportunity for operation of InAs-based NW materials under caustic environment and further allow access to temperature regimes suitable for alloying non-catalytic InAs NWs with GaAs.

  5. First-principles study of quantum confinement and surface effects on the electronic properties of InAs nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, Feng; Tang, Li-Ming Zhang, Yong; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2013-12-14

    We have used first principles methods to systematically investigate the quantum confinement effect on the electronic properties of zinc-blende (ZB) and wurtzite (WZ) InAs nanowires (NWs) with different orientations and diameters, and compared their electronic properties before and after pseudo-hydrogen passivation. The results show that the calculated carrier effective masses are dependent on the NW diameter, except for [110] ZB NWs, and the hole effective masses of [111] ZB NWs are larger than the electron effective masses when the NW diameter is ≥26 Å. The band alignments of [111] ZB and [0001] WZ NWs reveal that the effect of quantum confinement on the conduction bands is greater than on the valence bands, and the position of the valence band maximum level changes little with increasing NW diameter. The pseudo-hydrogen passivated NWs have larger band gaps than the corresponding unpassivated NWs. The carrier effective masses and mobilities can be adjusted by passivating the surface dangling bonds.

  6. Low temperature transport in p-doped InAs nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, S.; Jespersen, T. S.; Madsen, M. H.; Krogstrup, P.; Nygård, J.

    2013-10-14

    We present low temperature electrical measurements of p-type Indium Arsenide nanowires grown via molecular beam epitaxy using Beryllium as a dopant. Growth of p-type wires without stacking faults is demonstrated. Devices in field-effect geometries exhibit ambipolar behavior, and the temperature dependence of electron and hole field effect mobilities are extracted. At low temperatures, we observe reproducible conductance fluctuations as a result of quantum interference, and magnetoconductance data show weak antilocalization.

  7. Shape-Controlled Deterministic Assembly of Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunlong; Yao, Jun; Xu, Lin; Mankin, Max N; Zhu, Yinbo; Wu, Hengan; Mai, Liqiang; Zhang, Qingjie; Lieber, Charles M

    2016-04-13

    Large-scale, deterministic assembly of nanowires and nanotubes with rationally controlled geometries could expand the potential applications of one-dimensional nanomaterials in bottom-up integrated nanodevice arrays and circuits. Control of the positions of straight nanowires and nanotubes has been achieved using several assembly methods, although simultaneous control of position and geometry has not been realized. Here, we demonstrate a new concept combining simultaneous assembly and guided shaping to achieve large-scale, high-precision shape controlled deterministic assembly of nanowires. We lithographically pattern U-shaped trenches and then shear transfer nanowires to the patterned substrate wafers, where the trenches serve to define the positions and shapes of transferred nanowires. Studies using semicircular trenches defined by electron-beam lithography yielded U-shaped nanowires with radii of curvature defined by inner surface of the trenches. Wafer-scale deterministic assembly produced U-shaped nanowires for >430,000 sites with a yield of ∼90%. In addition, mechanistic studies and simulations demonstrate that shaping results in primarily elastic deformation of the nanowires and show clearly the diameter-dependent limits achievable for accessible forces. Last, this approach was used to assemble U-shaped three-dimensional nanowire field-effect transistor bioprobe arrays containing 200 individually addressable nanodevices. By combining the strengths of wafer-scale top-down fabrication with diverse and tunable properties of one-dimensional building blocks in novel structural configurations, shape-controlled deterministic nanowire assembly is expected to enable new applications in many areas including nanobioelectronics and nanophotonics. PMID:26999059

  8. Hot Carrier Trapping Induced Negative Photoconductance in InAs Nanowires toward Novel Nonvolatile Memory.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yiming; Peng, Xingyue; Kim, Hong-Seok; Kim, Taeho; Jeon, Sanghun; Kang, Hang Kyu; Choi, Wonjun; Song, Jindong; Doh, Yong-Joo; Yu, Dong

    2015-09-01

    We report a novel negative photoconductivity (NPC) mechanism in n-type indium arsenide nanowires (NWs). Photoexcitation significantly suppresses the conductivity with a gain up to 10(5). The origin of NPC is attributed to the depletion of conduction channels by light assisted hot electron trapping, supported by gate voltage threshold shift and wavelength-dependent photoconductance measurements. Scanning photocurrent microscopy excludes the possibility that NPC originates from the NW/metal contacts and reveals a competing positive photoconductivity. The conductivity recovery after illumination substantially slows down at low temperature, indicating a thermally activated detrapping mechanism. At 78 K, the spontaneous recovery of the conductance is completely quenched, resulting in a reversible memory device, which can be switched by light and gate voltage pulses. The novel NPC based optoelectronics may find exciting applications in photodetection and nonvolatile memory with low power consumption. PMID:26226506

  9. Controlling plasmonic wave packets in silver nanowires.

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, L.; Nome, R.; Montgomery, J. M.; Gray, S. K.; Scherer, N. F.

    2010-09-01

    Three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations were performed to explore the excitation of surface plasmon resonances in long silver (Ag) nanowires. In particular, we show that it is possible to generate plasmonic wave packets that can propagate along the nanowire by exciting superpositions of surface plasmon resonances. By using an appropriately chirped pulse, it is possible to transiently achieve localization of the excitation at the distal end of the nanowire. Such designed coherent superpositions will allow realizing spatiotemporal control of plasmonic excitations for enhancing nonlinear responses in plasmonic 'circuits'.

  10. Raman spectroscopy and electrical properties of InAs nanowires with local oxidation enabled by substrate micro-trenches and laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanta, R.; Krogstrup, P.; Nygård, J.; Jespersen, T. S.; Madsen, M. H.; Liao, Z.; Vosch, T.

    2015-12-14

    The thermal gradients along indium arsenide nanowires were engineered by a combination of fabricated micro-trenches in the supporting substrate and focused laser irradiation. This allowed local spatial control of thermally activated oxidation reactions of the nanowire on the scale of the diffraction limit. The locality of the oxidation was detected by micro-Raman mapping, and the results were found to be consistent with numerical simulations of the temperature profile. Applying the technique to nanowires in electrical devices the locally oxidized nanowires remained conducting with a lower conductance as expected for an effectively thinner conducting core.

  11. Measurements of the spin-orbit interaction and Landé g factor in a pure-phase InAs nanowire double quantum dot in the Pauli spin-blockade regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiyin; Huang, Shaoyun; Lei, Zijin; Pan, Dong; Zhao, Jianhua; Xu, H. Q.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate direct measurements of the spin-orbit interaction and Landé g factors in a semiconductor nanowire double quantum dot. The device is made from a single-crystal pure-phase InAs nanowire on top of an array of finger gates on a Si/SiO2 substrate and the measurements are performed in the Pauli spin-blockade regime. It is found that the double quantum dot exhibits a large singlet-triplet energy splitting of ΔST ˜ 2.3 meV, a strong spin-orbit interaction of ΔSO ˜ 140 μeV, and a large and strongly level-dependent Landé g factor of ˜12.5. These results imply that single-crystal pure-phase InAs nanowires are desired semiconductor nanostructures for applications in quantum information technologies.

  12. Controlled fabrication of nanowire sensors.

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Francois

    2007-10-01

    We present a simple top down approach based on nanoimprint lithography to create dense arrays of silicon nanowires over large areas. Metallic contacts to the nanowires and a bottom gate allow the operation of the array as a field-effect transistor with very large on/off ratios. When exposed to ammonia gas or cyclohexane solutions containing nitrobenzene or phenol, the threshold voltage of the field-effect transistor is shifted, a signature of charge transfer between the analytes and the nanowires. The threshold voltage shift is proportional to the Hammett parameter and the concentration of the nitrobenzene and phenol analytes. For the liquid analytes considered, we find binding energies of 400 meV, indicating strong physisorption. Such values of the binding energies are ideal for stable and reusable sensors.

  13. Branched silver nanowires as controllable plasmon routers.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yurui; Li, Zhipeng; Huang, Yingzhou; Zhang, Shunping; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J; Xu, Hongxing

    2010-05-12

    Using polarization dependent scattering spectroscopy, we investigate plasmon propagation on branched silver nanowires. By controlling the polarization of the incident laser light, the wire plasmons can be routed into different wire branches and result in light emission from the corresponding wire ends. This routing behavior is found to be strongly dependent on the wavelength of light. Thus for certain incident polarizations, light of different wavelength will be routed into different branches. The branched nanowire can thus serve as a controllable router and multiplexer in integrated plasmonic circuits. PMID:20420411

  14. Formation of InAs/AlGaAs/GaAs Nanowire Structures by Self-Organized Rod Growth on InAs Quantum Dots and Their Transport Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Masato; Vitushinskiy, Pavel; Kojima, Tomoya; Sakaki, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    AlGaInAs nanowires or rods of 20-40 nm diameter were formed by depositing an AlGaAs/GaAs/InAs short-period superlattice onto self-organized InAs quantum dots on GaAs. The In content is found to be substantially higher in the rods than in the superlattice matrix, implying that rods serve as favorable paths for electrons. Transport properties measured at 4.2 K on a sample where 79-nm-long rods are buried between n+-GaAs electrodes show that rods are indeed far more conductive than their matrix barrier. Photoluminescence study has indicated that photogenerated carriers recombine mostly in the seed dot portion of rods.

  15. Size and density control of InAs quantum dot ensembles on self-assembled nanostructured templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Wang, Zh M.; Liang, B. L.; Sablon, K. A.; Strom, N. W.; Salamo, G. J.

    2006-12-01

    New morphologies of InAs quantum dot (QD) ensembles forming on self-assembled GaAs nano-holed island templates are demonstrated. Droplet homoepitaxy (GaAs/GaAs) is used to generate holed nanoscale-sized mounds that appear to elongate along [0\\,1\\,\\bar{1}] . Depending on the InAs monolayer (ML) coverages, subsequent InAs deposition forms different sizes and shapes of QD ensembles. While we initially observe the formation of the QDs at the hole sites when less InAs is deposited, QDs form around the edges of the mounds with greater InAs deposition. By varying the InAs depositions and growth temperatures, we demonstrate an ability to control the size and density of QDs. The observed decrease in the necessary critical thickness required for the InAs 2D 3D transition may be due to the higher density of monolayer steps on the sidewalls of the holes and on the edges of the mounds. This hybrid growth approach overcomes some limitations of typical QD growth on planar GaAs surfaces and may find applications in optoelectronics.

  16. TOPICAL REVIEW: Electron transport in indium arsenide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayeh, Shadi A.

    2010-02-01

    The vapor--liquid--solid growth of semiconductor nanowires led to the implementation of engineered electronic and optoelectronic one-dimensional nanostructures with outstanding promise for device applications. To realize this promise, detailed understanding and control over their growth, crystal structure, and transport properties and their combined impact on device performance is vital. Here, we review our work on electron transport in InAs nanowires in a variety of device schemes. First, we provide a brief introduction and historical perspective on growth and transport studies in InAs NWs. Second, we discuss and present experimental measurements of ballistic transport in InAs nanowires over ~200 nm length scale, which indicates a large electron mean free path and correlates with the high electron mobility measured on similar nanowires. Third, we devise a device model that enables accurate estimation of transport coefficients from field-effect transistor measurements by taking into account patristic device components. We utilize this model to reveal the impact of surface states, diameter, lateral and vertical fields, as well as crystal structure, on electron transport and transport coefficient calculation. We show in these studies that electron transport in InAs nanowires is dominated by surface state effects that introduce measurement artifacts in parameter extraction, reduce electron mobility for smaller diameters, and degrade the subthreshold characteristics of transistors made of Zinc Blende InAs nanowires. This device model is also used for isolating vertical and lateral field effects on electron transport in nanowire transistor channels and explaining observed negative differential conductance and mobility degradation at high injection fields, which is supported by electro-thermal simulations and microstructure failure analysis. We adopt the concept of lack of inversion symmetry in polar III-V materials and the resultant spontaneous polarization charges

  17. Optical Control of Electrons in Au Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Eric; Basnet, Gobind; Huang, Wayne; Flanders, Bret; Batelaan, Herman

    2016-05-01

    Gold nanowires, with diameters less than 100 nm, are novel sources for electron field emission. Their geometry confines the propagation of conduction electrons, giving rise to effects not seen in the bulk, such as ballistic currents and surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Dynamics within the wire are probed with laser-induced field emission from the nanowire tip. A balanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer is used to split and delay pulses up to 170 ps from a Ti:Saph oscillator (800 nm, 50 fs) in a pump-probe scheme. The output beamsplitter of the interferometer is mounted on a translation stage to control the separation of the pump and probe beams with sub-micron precision. The beams are focused to 3 μm spots on the tip and shaft of a nanowire, mounted under vacuum at 2 × 10-7 mTorr, by an off-axis parabolic mirror. Field-emitted electrons are counted by a channel electron multiplier. We discuss experimental results of our pump-probe experiments taken at different pump positions. Optical control of electron dynamics within these nanowires may lead to a truly on-demand source of single and multiple electron pulses. We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF awards 1306565 and 1430519.

  18. Morphology and composition of oxidized InAs nanowires studied by combined Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanta, Rawa; Kanne, Thomas; Amaduzzi, Francesca; Liao, Zhiyu; Madsen, Morten H.; Alarcón-Lladó, Esther; Krogstrup, Peter; Johnson, Erik; Morral, Anna Fontcuberta i.; Vosch, Tom; Nygård, Jesper; Jespersen, Thomas S.

    2016-07-01

    Any device exposed to ambient conditions will be prone to oxidation. This may be of particular importance for semiconductor nanowires because of the high surface-to-volume ratio and only little is known about the consequences of oxidation for these systems. Here, we study the properties of indium arsenide nanowires which were locally oxidized using a focused laser beam. Polarization dependent micro-Raman measurements confirmed the presence of crystalline arsenic, and transmission electron microscopy diffraction showed the presence of indium oxide. The surface dependence of the oxidation was investigated in branched nanowires grown along the [0001] and [01\\bar{1}0] wurtzite crystal directions exhibiting different surface facets. The oxidation did not occur at the [01\\bar{1}0] direction. The origin of this selectivity is discussed in terms transition state kinetics of the free surfaces of the different crystal families of the facets and numerical simulations of the laser induced heating.

  19. Control of Si nanowire growth by oxygen.

    PubMed

    Kodambaka, Suneel; Hannon, James B; Tromp, Rudolf M; Ross, Frances M

    2006-06-01

    Semiconductor nanowires formed using the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism are routinely grown in many laboratories, but a comprehensive understanding of the key factors affecting wire growth is still lacking. In this paper we show that, under conditions of low disilane pressure and higher temperature, long, untapered Si wires cannot be grown, using Au catalyst, without the presence of oxygen. Exposure to oxygen, even at low levels, reduces the diffusion of Au away from the catalyst droplets. This allows the droplet volumes to remain constant for longer times and therefore permits the growth of untapered wires. This effect is observed for both gas-phase and surface-bound oxygen, so the source of oxygen is unimportant. The control of oxygen exposure during growth provides a new tool for the fabrication of long, uniform-diameter structures, as required for many applications of nanowires. PMID:16771597

  20. Electrically controlled giant piezoresistance in silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Neuzil, Pavel; Wong, Chee Chung; Reboud, Julien

    2010-04-14

    Herein we demonstrate giant piezoresistance in silicon nanowires (NWs) by the modulation of an electric field-induced with an external electrical bias. Positive bias for a p-type device (negative for an n-type) partially depleted the NWs forming a pinch-off region, which resembled a funnel through which the electrical current squeezed. This region determined the total current flowing through the NWs. In this report, we combined the electrical biasing with the application of mechanical stress, which impacts the charge carriers' concentration, to achieve an electrically controlled giant piezoresistance in nanowires. This phenomenon was used to create a stress-gated field-effect transistor, exhibiting a maximum gauge factor of 5000, 2 orders of magnitude increase over bulk value. Giant piezoresistance can be tailored to create highly sensitive mechanical sensors operating in a discrete mode such as nanoelectromechanical switches. PMID:20192246

  1. How Copper Nanowires Grow and How To Control Their Properties.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shengrong; Stewart, Ian E; Chen, Zuofeng; Li, Bo; Rathmell, Aaron R; Wiley, Benjamin J

    2016-03-15

    Scalable, solution-phase nanostructure synthesis has the promise to produce a wide variety of nanomaterials with novel properties at a cost that is low enough for these materials to be used to solve problems. For example, solution-synthesized metal nanowires are now being used to make low cost, flexible transparent electrodes in touch screens, organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), and solar cells. There has been a tremendous increase in the number of solution-phase syntheses that enable control over the assembly of atoms into nanowires in the last 15 years, but proposed mechanisms for nanowire formation are usually qualitative, and for many syntheses there is little consensus as to how nanowires form. It is often not clear what species is adding to a nanowire growing in solution or what mechanistic step limits its rate of growth. A deeper understanding of nanowire growth is important for efficiently directing the development of nanowire synthesis toward producing a wide variety of nanostructure morphologies for structure-property studies or producing precisely defined nanostructures for a specific application. This Account reviews our progress over the last five years toward understanding how copper nanowires form in solution, how to direct their growth into nanowires with dimensions ideally suited for use in transparent conducting films, and how to use copper nanowires as a template to grow core-shell nanowires. The key advance enabling a better understanding of copper nanowire growth is the first real-time visualization of nanowire growth in solution, enabling the acquisition of nanowire growth kinetics. By measuring the growth rate of individual nanowires as a function of concentration of the reactants and temperature, we show that a growing copper nanowire can be thought of as a microelectrode that is charged with electrons by hydrazine and grows through the diffusion-limited addition of Cu(OH)2(-). This deeper mechanistic understanding, coupled to an

  2. Diameter dependence of mechanical, electronic, and structural properties of InAs and InP nanowires: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dos Santos, Cláudia L.; Piquini, Paulo

    2010-02-01

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have ideal morphologies to act as active parts and connections in nanodevices since they naturally restrict the conduction channels and periodicity to one dimension. The advantages from the reduced spatial dimension can be greatly enhanced by wisely selecting the materials composing the NWs, through the knowledge of the properties of their bulk counterparts. NW’s properties can still be tailored by managing (i) internal or intrinsic characteristics as diameters, growth directions, structural phases, and the faceting or saturation of surfaces, and/or (ii) external or extrinsic influences as applied electric, magnetic, thermal, and mechanical fields. Bulk InAs has one of the lowest electron effective-masses among binary III-V semiconducting materials while bulk InP shows excellent optical properties, which make InAs and InP NWs candidates for optoelectronic materials. In this work, we use first-principles calculations to study the structural, electronic, and mechanical properties of [111] zinc-blende InAs and InP NWs as a function of diameter (ranging from 0.5 to 2.0 nm). The influence of external mechanical stress on the electronic properties is also analyzed. The axial lattice constants of the NWs are seen to decrease with decreasing diameter, as a consequence of a shorter surface lattice constant of the NWs, as compared to their bulk values. The Young’s modulus of both InAs and InP NWs is determined to decrease while the Poisson’s ratio to increase with decreasing diameters, with deviations from the bulk Young’s modulus estimated to occur for NWs with diameters lower than 15 nm. The increase in the band-gaps with decreasing diameters is seen to be slower than the expected from simple quantum-mechanical models ( 1/D2 , where D is the diameter), mainly for the smallest (<1.0nm) diameters. The electron effective-masses are seen to increase with decreasing diameters, due to a k -dependent energy shift of the conduction

  3. E{sub 1} Gap of Wurtzite InAs Single Nanowires Measured by Means of Resonant Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, M.; Lima, M. M. Jr. de; Cantarero, A.; Dacal, L. C. O.; Iikawa, F.; Chiaramonte, T.; Cotta, M. A.

    2011-12-23

    Indium arsenide nanowires were synthesized with an intermixing of wurtzite and zincblende structure by chemical beam epitaxy with the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. Resonant Raman spectroscopy of the transverse optical phonon mode at 215 cm{sup -1} reveals an E{sub 1} gap of 2.47 eV which is assigned to the electronic band gap at the A point in the indium arsenide wurtzite phase.

  4. Distortions of the coulomb blockade conductance line in scanning gate measurements of inas nanowire based quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukov, A. A.; Volk, Ch.; Winden, A.; Hardtdegen, H.; Schaepers, Th.

    2013-01-15

    We performed measurements at helium temperatures of the electronic transport in the linear regime in an InAs quantum wire in the presence of a charged tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) at low electron concentration. We show that at certain concentration of electrons, only two closely placed quantum dots, both in the Coulomb blockade regime, govern conductance of the whole wire. Under this condition, two types of peculiarities-wobbling and splitting-arise in the behavior of the lines of the conductance peaks of Coulomb blockade. These peculiarities are measured in quantum-wire-based structures for the first time. We explain both peculiarities as an interplay of the conductance of two quantum dots present in the wire. Detailed modeling of wobbling behavior made in the framework of the orthodox theory of Coulomb blockade demonstrates good agreement with the obtained experimental data.

  5. The influence of the droplet composition on the vapor-liquid-solid growth of InAs nanowires on GaAs (111)B by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Jens; Gottschalch, Volker; Wagner, Gerald

    2008-12-01

    The heteroepitaxial growth of InAs nanowires (NWs) on GaAs (1¯1¯1¯)B substrate was investigated by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. The vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism was applied with gold as seed material. InAs NW with two types of morphology were observed. The first morphology type exhibited a tapered NW shape. In a distinct region below the alloy particle the shape was influenced by the precursor surface diffusion. The NW growth was attributed to Au-rich liquid alloy particles containing gallium as a result of the initial Au-GaAs interaction. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements revealed the lowest eutectic temperature of the Au-Ga-In liquid alloy for different compositions. For a considerable amount of gallium inside the ternary alloy, the eutectic temperature was found to be below the InAs NW growth temperature window. A second type of morphology with a more columnlike shape was related to a very high indium fraction inside the liquid alloy particle during VLS growth. These NW exhibited a change in the side facet orientation from {2¯11} to {1¯10} below the droplet. Additionally, the sample structure was studied by transmission electron microscopy. A change in the InAs NW crystal structure from sphalerite-type to mainly wurtzite-type was observed with an increase in the growth temperature.

  6. Coherent Control to Prepare an InAs Quantum Dot for Spin-Photon Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, L. A.; Truex, K.; Duan, L.-M.; Steel, D. G.; Bracker, A. S.; Gammon, D.; Sham, L. J.

    2014-03-01

    We optically generated an electronic state in a single InAs /GaAs self-assembled quantum dot that is a precursor to the deterministic entanglement of the spin of the electron with an emitted photon in the proposal of W. Yao, R.-B. Liu, and L. J. Sham [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 030504 (2005).]. A superposition state is prepared by optical pumping to a pure state followed by an initial pulse. By modulating the subsequent pulse arrival times and precisely controlling them using interferometric measurement of path length differences, we are able to implement a coherent control technique to selectively drive exactly one of the two components of the superposition to the ground state. This optical transition contingent on spin was driven with the same broadband pulses that created the superposition through the use of a two pulse coherent control sequence. A final pulse affords measurement of the coherence of this "preentangled" state.

  7. Performance Comparison of InAs, InSb, and GaSb n-Channel Nanowire Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors in the Ballistic Transport Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoida, Kenta; Tsuchiya, Hideaki; Kamakura, Yoshinari; Mori, Nobuya; Ogawa, Matsuto

    2013-03-01

    Ballistic performances of InAs, InSb, and GaSb nanowire field-effect transistors (NWFETs) were theoretically investigated. We found that InAs and InSb NWFETs exhibit similar device performances due to 1D band structure effects. Furthermore, although these In-based NWFETs suffer from the density-of-states (DOS) bottleneck, a lower power switching is expected. On the other hand, GaSb NWs have multiple energy subbands at conduction band minima, as a result of the projection of L-valleys which thus improves the DOS. In particular, a <110>-oriented GaSb NW has an improved DOS and a high electron velocity simultaneously, and thus, it could be a strong competitor to In-based NWFETs.

  8. Intrinsic polarization control in rectangular GaN nanowire lasers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Changyi; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S.; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Brener, Igal; Brueck, S. R. J.; Wang, George T.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we demonstrate intrinsic, linearly polarized lasing from single GaN nanowires using cross-sectional shape control. A two-step top-down fabrication approach was employed to create straight nanowires with controllable rectangular cross-sections. A clear lasing threshold of 444kW/cm2 and a narrow spectral line width of 0.16 nm were observed under optical pumping at room temperature, indicating the onset of lasing. The polarization was along the short dimension (y-direction) of the nanowire due to the higher transverse confinement factors for y-polarized transverse modes resulting from the rectangular nanowire cross-section. The results show that cross-sectioned shape control can enable inherent control overmore » the polarization of nanowire lasers without additional environment requirements, such as placement onto lossy substrates.« less

  9. Intrinsic polarization control in rectangular GaN nanowire lasers.

    PubMed

    Li, Changyi; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S; Figiel, Jeffrey J; Brener, Igal; Brueck, S R J; Wang, George T

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate intrinsic, linearly polarized lasing from single GaN nanowires using cross-sectional shape control. A two-step top-down fabrication approach was employed to create straight nanowires with controllable rectangular cross-sections. A clear lasing threshold of 444 kW cm(-2) and a narrow spectral line width of 0.16 nm were observed under optical pumping at room temperature, indicating the onset of lasing. The polarization was along the short dimension (y-direction) of the nanowire due to the higher transverse confinement factors for y-polarized transverse modes resulting from the rectangular nanowire cross-section. The results show that cross-sectioned shape control can enable inherent control over the polarization of nanowire lasers without additional environment requirements, such as placement onto lossy substrates. PMID:26899502

  10. Intrinsic polarization control in rectangular GaN nanowire lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changyi; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting. S.; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Brener, Igal; Brueck, S. R. J.; Wang, George T.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate intrinsic, linearly polarized lasing from single GaN nanowires using cross-sectional shape control. A two-step top-down fabrication approach was employed to create straight nanowires with controllable rectangular cross-sections. A clear lasing threshold of 444 kW cm-2 and a narrow spectral line width of 0.16 nm were observed under optical pumping at room temperature, indicating the onset of lasing. The polarization was along the short dimension (y-direction) of the nanowire due to the higher transverse confinement factors for y-polarized transverse modes resulting from the rectangular nanowire cross-section. The results show that cross-sectioned shape control can enable inherent control over the polarization of nanowire lasers without additional environment requirements, such as placement onto lossy substrates.

  11. Controlled synthesis of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Luping; Chen, Shikai; Kim, Jung; Xu, Cheng; Zhao, Yang; Ziegler, Kirk J.

    2015-03-01

    Because of their high optical transparency and high electrical conductivity, ITO nanowires have been used in solar cells, diodes, and sensors. Synthesizing ITO nanowires reliably with controllable and reproducible structures and morphologies is desirable for many applications. However, the dependence of ITO nanowire structure and morphology on growth conditions has yet to be investigated systematically. In this work, experimental conditions including catalyst diameter, growth time, temperature, and oxygen partial pressure are varied to determine their impact on the diameter, length, and microstructure of synthesized nanowires. The diameters of the nanowires depend on the diameter of Au catalysts, however, not as directly as other studies have observed. Nanowire diameters of 99 nm were obtained when using 14 nm Au nanoclusters compared to 366 nm when using 321 nm Au nanoclusters. Nanowire length and diameters are independent of O2 partial pressure. However, the O2 partial pressure had to remain below 3.23 mTorr for successful nanowire growth. The optimal temperature for nanowire growth was 750 °C.

  12. Controlled growth of Si nanowire arrays for device integration.

    PubMed

    Hochbaum, Allon I; Fan, Rong; He, Rongrui; Yang, Peidong

    2005-03-01

    Silicon nanowires were synthesized, in a controlled manner, for their practical integration into devices. Gold colloids were used for nanowire synthesis by the vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism. Using SiCl4 as the precursor gas in a chemical vapor deposition system, nanowire arrays were grown vertically aligned with respect to the substrate. By manipulating the colloid deposition on the substrate, highly controlled growth of aligned silicon nanowires was achieved. Nanowire arrays were synthesized with narrow size distributions dictated by the seeding colloids and with average diameters down to 39 nm. The density of wire growth was successfully varied from approximately 0.1-1.8 wires/microm2. Patterned deposition of the colloids led to confinement of the vertical nanowire growth to selected regions. In addition, Si nanowires were grown directly into microchannels to demonstrate the flexibility of the deposition technique. By controlling various aspects of nanowire growth, these methods will enable their efficient and economical incorporation into devices. PMID:15755094

  13. Segmented nanowires displaying locally controllable properties

    DOEpatents

    Sutter, Eli Anguelova; Sutter, Peter Werner

    2013-03-05

    Vapor-liquid-solid growth of nanowires is tailored to achieve complex one-dimensional material geometries using phase diagrams determined for nanoscale materials. Segmented one-dimensional nanowires having constant composition display locally variable electronic band structures that are determined by the diameter of the nanowires. The unique electrical and optical properties of the segmented nanowires are exploited to form electronic and optoelectronic devices. Using gold-germanium as a model system, in situ transmission electron microscopy establishes, for nanometer-sized Au--Ge alloy drops at the tips of Ge nanowires (NWs), the parts of the phase diagram that determine their temperature-dependent equilibrium composition. The nanoscale phase diagram is then used to determine the exchange of material between the NW and the drop. The phase diagram for the nanoscale drop deviates significantly from that of the bulk alloy.

  14. Controllable deformation of silicon nanowires with strain up to 24%

    SciTech Connect

    Walavalkar, Sameer S.; Homyk, Andrew P.; Henry, M. David; Scherer, Axel

    2010-06-15

    Fabricated silicon nanostructures demonstrate mechanical properties unlike their macroscopic counterparts. Here we use a force mediating polymer to controllably and reversibly deform silicon nanowires. This technique is demonstrated on multiple nanowire configurations, which undergo deformation without noticeable macroscopic damage after the polymer is removed. Calculations estimate a maximum of nearly 24% strain induced in 30 nm diameter pillars. The use of an electron activated polymer allows retention of the strained configuration without any external input. As a further illustration of this technique, we demonstrate nanoscale tweezing by capturing 300 nm alumina beads using circular arrays of these silicon nanowires.

  15. Uninterrupted and reusable source for the controlled growth of nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Sugavaneshwar, R. P.; Nanda, Karuna Kar

    2013-01-01

    Generally, the length of the oxide nanowires grown by vapor phase transport is limited by the degradation of the source materials. Furthermore, the source material is used once for the nanowires growth. By exploiting the Si-Zn phase diagram, we have developed a simple methodology for the non-catalytic growth of ultralong ZnO nanowires in large area with controllable aspect ratio and branched structures. The insolubility of Zn in Si and the use of a Si cap on the Zn source to prevent local source oxidation of Zn (i. e. prevents the degradation of the source) are the keys to grow longer nanowires without limitations. It has been shown that the aspect ratio can be controlled by thermodynamically (temperature) and more importantly by kinetically (vapor flux). One of the interesting findings is that the same source material can be used for several depositions of oxide nanostructured materials. PMID:23412010

  16. Controllable Hydrocarbon Formation from the Electrochemical Reduction of CO2 over Cu Nanowire Arrays.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming; Djanashvili, Kristina; Smith, Wilson A

    2016-06-01

    In this work, the effect of Cu nanowire morphology on the selective electrocatalytic reduction of CO2 is presented. Cu nanowire arrays were prepared through a two-step synthesis of Cu(OH)2 and CuO nanowire arrays on Cu foil substrates and a subsequent electrochemical reduction of the CuO nanowire arrays to Cu nanowire arrays. By this simple synthesis method, Cu nanowire array electrodes with different length and density were able to be controllably synthesized. We show that the selectivity for hydrocarbons (ethylene, n-propanol, ethane, and ethanol) on Cu nanowire array electrodes at a fixed potential can be tuned by systematically altering the Cu nanowire length and density. The nanowire morphology effect is linked to the increased local pH in the Cu nanowire arrays and a reaction scheme detailing the local pH-induced formation of C2  products is also presented by a preferred CO dimerization pathway. PMID:27098996

  17. Synthesis and characterization of nanowire coils of organometallic coordination polymers for controlled cargo release.

    PubMed

    Liang, Guodong; Ni, Huan; Bao, Suping; Zhu, Fangming; Gao, Haiyang; Wu, Qing

    2014-06-12

    Nanowire coils of organometallic coordination polymers have been synthesized for the first time by using the emulsion periphery polymerization technique. An amphiphilic triblock copolymer terminated with inclusion complex of β-cyclodextrin and 4,4'-bipyridine self-assembles into oil-in-water emulsion in a toluene/water mixture. Subsequent coordination of bipyridine with Ni(II) in periphery of emulsions results in the formation of coordination polymer nanowire coils. The nanowire coils are composed of nanowires with diameter of 2 nm. Nanowire coils exhibit enhanced thermal stability in contrast to their parent triblock copolymer. Interestingly, nanowire coils are capable of encapsulating organic cargoes. Encapsulated cargoes can be selectively extracted from nanowire coils without damaging nanowire coils. Nanowire coils are potential candidates for encapsulating and controlled release of organic cargoes. PMID:24842771

  18. Optical Sensing with Simultaneous Electrochemical Control in Metal Nanowire Arrays

    PubMed Central

    MacKenzie, Robert; Fraschina, Corrado; Sannomiya, Takumi; Auzelyte, Vaida; Vörös, Janos

    2010-01-01

    This work explores the alternative use of noble metal nanowire systems in large-scale array configurations to exploit both the nanowires’ conductive nature and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The first known nanowire-based system has been constructed, with which optical signals are influenced by the simultaneous application of electrochemical potentials. Optical characterization of nanowire arrays was performed by measuring the bulk refractive index sensitivity and the limit of detection. The formation of an electrical double layer was controlled in NaCl solutions to study the effect of local refractive index changes on the spectral response. Resonance peak shifts of over 4 nm, a bulk refractive index sensitivity up to 115 nm/RIU and a limit of detection as low as 4.5 × 10−4 RIU were obtained for gold nanowire arrays. Simulations with the Multiple Multipole Program (MMP) confirm such bulk refractive index sensitivities. Initial experiments demonstrated successful optical biosensing using a novel form of particle-based nanowire arrays. In addition, the formation of an ionic layer (Stern-layer) upon applying an electrochemical potential was also monitored by the shift of the plasmon resonance. PMID:22163441

  19. Synthesis of gold nanowires with controlled crystallographic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, S.; Toimil-Molares, M. E.; Maurer, F.; Miehe, G.; Ensinger, W.; Liu, J.; Cornelius, T. W.; Neumann, R.

    2006-09-01

    The controlled fabrication of poly- and single-crystalline Au nanowires is reported. In polycarbonate templates, prepared by heavy-ion irradiation and subsequent etching, Au nanowires with diameters down to 25 nm are electrochemically synthesized. Four-circle X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy measurements demonstrate that wires deposited potentiostatically at a voltage of -1.2 V at 65 °C are single-crystalline and oriented along the [110] direction. By reverse-pulse electrodeposition, wires oriented along the [100] direction are grown. The wires are cylindrical over their whole length. The morphology of the caps growing on top of poly- and single-crystalline wires is a strong indication of the particular crystalline structure of the nanowires.

  20. Control of photon transport properties in nanocomposite nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffa, M.; Fasano, V.; Camposeo, A.; Persano, L.; Pisignano, D.

    2016-02-01

    Active nanowires and nanofibers can be realized by the electric-field induced stretching of polymer solutions with sufficient molecular entanglements. The resulting nanomaterials are attracting an increasing attention in view of their application in a wide variety of fields, including optoelectronics, photonics, energy harvesting, nanoelectronics, and microelectromechanical systems. Realizing nanocomposite nanofibers is especially interesting in this respect. In particular, methods suitable for embedding inorganic nanocrystals in electrified jets and then in active fiber systems allow for controlling light-scattering and refractive index properties in the realized fibrous materials. We here report on the design, realization, and morphological and spectroscopic characterization of new species of active, composite nanowires and nanofibers for nanophotonics. We focus on the properties of light-confinement and photon transport along the nanowire longitudinal axis, and on how these depend on nanoparticle incorporation. Optical losses mechanisms and their influence on device design and performances are also presented and discussed.

  1. Controllable orientation of single silver nanowire using two fiber probes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaohao; Cheng, Chang; Xin, Hongbao; Lei, Hongxiang; Li, Baojun

    2014-01-01

    We report a strategy for realizing precise orientation of single silver nanowire using two fiber probes. By launching a laser of 980 nm wavelength into the two fibers, single silver nanowire with a diameter of 600 nm and a length of 6.5 μm suspended in water was trapped and rotated by optical torque resulting from its interaction with optical fields outputted from the fiber probes. Angular orientation of the nanowire was controlled by varying the relative distance between the two fiber probes. The angular stiffness, which refers to the stability of orientation, was estimated to be on the order of 10−19 J/rad2·mW. The experiments were interpreted by theoretical analysis. PMID:24496474

  2. Synthesis of Au nanowires with controlled morphological and structural characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurvinder; van Helvoort, Antonius T. J.; Bandyopadhyay, Sulalit; Volden, Sondre; Andreassen, Jens-Petter; Glomm, Wilhelm R.

    2014-08-01

    A growth of one-dimensional noble metal nanostructure with controlled structural characteristic has been under intense investigation as the physical properties, for example, mechanical and electrical properties highly depend on the crystallinity of the nanostructure. Herein, we report a seed-mediated growth of gold nanowires with controlled structural and morphological characteristics, which can easily be varied by selecting appropriate seed nanoparticles, either spherical or rod type in aqueous solution at room temperature. The growth of nanowires was monitored by characterizing the samples at different time period during the reaction, and our observations suggest that growth occurs from seeds rapidly growing along one-dimension followed by surfactant induced fusion or welding and surface diffusion. The aspect ratio and morphology of these NWs can be tuned by CTAB concentration, pH and temperature of the growth solution. We show that the aspect ratio and morphology of these NWs can be tuned by the surfactant concentration, pH and temperature of the growth solution. Electron microscopy and X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopic techniques were employed for investigating structural and surface characteristics of nanowires. This approach can possibly help to synthesize nanowires of other metals with controlled crystalline behaviour which is highly essential for understanding their properties and practical applications in nanoelectronics, optical devices, catalysis, and sensors.

  3. ``Hot spots'' growth on single nanowire controlled by electric charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Shaobo; Liu, Xuehua; He, Ting; Tian, Lei; Wang, Wenhui; Sun, Rui; He, Weina; Zhang, Xuetong; Zhang, Jinping; Ni, Weihai; Zhou, Xiaochun

    2016-06-01

    ``Hot spots'' - a kind of highly active site, which are usually composed of some unique units, such as defects, interfaces, catalyst particles or special structures - can determine the performance of nanomaterials. In this paper, we study a model system, i.e. ``hot spots'' on a single Ag nanowire in the galvanic replacement reaction (GRR), by dark-field microscopy. The research reveals that electric charge can be released by the formation reaction of AgCl, and consequently the electrochemical potential on Ag nanowire drops. The electric charge could induce the reduction of Ag+ to form the ``hot spots'' on the nanowire during the GRR. The appearance probability of ``hot spots'' is almost even along the Ag nanowire, while it is slightly lower near the two ends. The spatial distance between adjacent ``hot spots'' is also controlled by the charge, and obeys a model based on Boltzmann distribution. In addition, the distance distribution here has an advantage in electron transfer and energy saving. Therefore, it's necessary to consider the functions of electric charge during the synthesis or application of nanomaterials.``Hot spots'' - a kind of highly active site, which are usually composed of some unique units, such as defects, interfaces, catalyst particles or special structures - can determine the performance of nanomaterials. In this paper, we study a model system, i.e. ``hot spots'' on a single Ag nanowire in the galvanic replacement reaction (GRR), by dark-field microscopy. The research reveals that electric charge can be released by the formation reaction of AgCl, and consequently the electrochemical potential on Ag nanowire drops. The electric charge could induce the reduction of Ag+ to form the ``hot spots'' on the nanowire during the GRR. The appearance probability of ``hot spots'' is almost even along the Ag nanowire, while it is slightly lower near the two ends. The spatial distance between adjacent ``hot spots'' is also controlled by the charge, and obeys a

  4. Role of re-growth interface preparation process for spectral line-width reduction of single InAs site-controlled quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Herranz, Jesús; Wewior, Lukasz; Alén, Benito; Fuster, David; González, Luisa; González, Yolanda

    2015-05-15

    We present growth and optical characterization measurements of single InAs site-controlled quantum dots (SCQDs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs (001) patterned substrates by atomic force microscopy oxidation lithography. InAs SCQDs directly grown on the patterned surface were used as a seed layer and strain template for the nucleation of optically active single InAs SCQDs. The preservation of the initial geometry of the engraved pattern motifs after the re-growth interface preparation process, the lack of buffer layer growth prior to InAs seed layer deposition and the development of suitable growth conditions provide us an improvement of the SCQDs' active layer optical properties while retaining a high ratio of single occupation (89%). In this work a fivefold reduction of the average optical line-width from 870 μeV to 156 μeV for InAs SCQDs located 15 nm from the re-growth interface is obtained by increasing the temperature of the initial thermal treatment step of the re-growth interface from 490 °C to 530 °C. PMID:25895541

  5. Superconducting qubits with semiconductor nanowire Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersson, K. D.; Larsen, T. W.; Kuemmeth, F.; Jespersen, T. S.; Krogstrup, P.; Nygård, J.; Marcus, C. M.

    2015-03-01

    Superconducting transmon qubits are a promising basis for a scalable quantum information processor. The recent development of semiconducting InAs nanowires with in situ molecular beam epitaxy-grown Al contacts presents new possibilities for building hybrid superconductor/semiconductor devices using precise bottom up fabrication techniques. Here, we take advantage of these high quality materials to develop superconducting qubits with superconductor-normal-superconductor Josephson junctions (JJs) where the normal element is an InAs semiconductor nanowire. We have fabricated transmon qubits in which the conventional Al-Al2O3-Al JJs are replaced by a single gate-tunable nanowire JJ. Using spectroscopy to probe the qubit we observe fluctuations in its level splitting with gate voltage that are consistent with universal conductance fluctuations in the nanowire's normal state conductance. Our gate-tunable nanowire transmons may enable new means of control for large scale qubit architectures and hybrid topological quantum computing schemes. Research supported by Microsoft Station Q, Danish National Research Foundation, Villum Foundation, Lundbeck Foundation and the European Commission.

  6. "Hot spots" growth on single nanowire controlled by electric charge.

    PubMed

    Xi, Shaobo; Liu, Xuehua; He, Ting; Tian, Lei; Wang, Wenhui; Sun, Rui; He, Weina; Zhang, Xuetong; Zhang, Jinping; Ni, Weihai; Zhou, Xiaochun

    2016-06-01

    "Hot spots" - a kind of highly active site, which are usually composed of some unique units, such as defects, interfaces, catalyst particles or special structures - can determine the performance of nanomaterials. In this paper, we study a model system, i.e. "hot spots" on a single Ag nanowire in the galvanic replacement reaction (GRR), by dark-field microscopy. The research reveals that electric charge can be released by the formation reaction of AgCl, and consequently the electrochemical potential on Ag nanowire drops. The electric charge could induce the reduction of Ag(+) to form the "hot spots" on the nanowire during the GRR. The appearance probability of "hot spots" is almost even along the Ag nanowire, while it is slightly lower near the two ends. The spatial distance between adjacent "hot spots" is also controlled by the charge, and obeys a model based on Boltzmann distribution. In addition, the distance distribution here has an advantage in electron transfer and energy saving. Therefore, it's necessary to consider the functions of electric charge during the synthesis or application of nanomaterials. PMID:27240743

  7. EDITORIAL: Nanowires Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadish, Chennupati

    2010-02-01

    Nanowires are considered as building blocks for the next generation of electronics, photonics, sensors and energy applications. One-dimensional nanostructures offer unique opportunities to control the density of states of semiconductors, and in turn their electronic and optical properties. Nanowires allow the growth of axial heterostructures without the constraints of lattice mismatch. This provides flexibility to create heterostructures of a broad range of materials and allows integration of compound semiconductor based optoelectronic devices with silicon based microelectronics. Nanowires are widely studied and the number of papers published in the field is growing exponentially with time. Already nanowire lasers, nanowire transistors, nanowire light emitting diodes, nanowire sensors and nanowire solar cells have been demonstrated. This special issue on semiconductor nanowires features 17 invited papers from leading experts in the field. In this special issue, the synthesis and growth of semiconductor nanowires of a broad range of materials have been addressed. Both axial and radial heterostructures and their structural properties have been discussed. Electrical transport properties of nanowires have been presented, as well as optical properties and carrier dynamics in a range of nanowires and nanowire heterostructures. Devices such as nanowire lasers and nanowire sensors have also been discussed. I would like to thank the Editorial Board of the journal for suggesting this special issue and inviting me to serve as the Guest Editor. Sincere thanks are due to all the authors for their contributions to this special issue. I am grateful to the reviewers and editorial staff at Semiconductor Science and Technology and the Institute of Physics Publishing for their excellent efforts. Special thanks are due to Dr Claire Bedrock for coordinating this special issue.

  8. Metal Catalyst for Low-Temperature Growth of Controlled Zinc Oxide Nanowires on Arbitrary Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Baek Hyun; Kwon, Jae W.

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanowires generated by hydrothermal method present superior physical and chemical characteristics. Quality control of the growth has been very challenging and controlled growth is only achievable under very limited conditions using homogeneous seed layers with high temperature processes. Here we show the controlled ZnO nanowire growth on various organic and inorganic materials without the requirement of a homogeneous seed layer and a high temperature process. We also report the discovery of an important role of the electronegativity in the nanowire growth on arbitrary substrates. Using heterogeneous metal oxide interlayers with low-temperature hydrothermal methods, we demonstrate well-controlled ZnO nanowire arrays and single nanowires on flat or curved surfaces. A metal catalyst and heterogeneous metal oxide interlayers are found to determine lattice-match with ZnO and to largely influence the controlled alignment. These findings will contribute to the development of novel nanodevices using controlled nanowires. PMID:24625584

  9. Reduction of nanowire diameter beyond lithography limits by controlled catalyst dewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calahorra, Yonatan; Kerlich, Alexander; Amram, Dor; Gavrilov, Arkady; Cohen, Shimon; Ritter, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Catalyst assisted vapour-liquid-solid is the most common method to realize bottom-up nanowire growth; establishing a parallel process for obtaining nanoscale catalysts at pre-defined locations is paramount for further advancement towards commercial nanowire applications. Herein, the effect of a selective area mask on the dewetting of metallic nanowire catalysts, deposited within lithography-defined mask pinholes, is reported. It was found that thin disc-like catalysts, with diameters of 120-450 nm, were transformed through dewetting into hemisphere-like catalysts, having diameters 2-3 fold smaller; the process was optimized to about 95% yield in preventing catalyst splitting, as would otherwise be expected due to their thickness-to-diameter ratio, which was as low as 1/60. The catalysts subsequently facilitated InP and InAs nanowire growth. We suggest that the mask edges prevent surface migration mediated spreading of the dewetted metal, and therefore induce its agglomeration into a single particle. This result presents a general strategy to diminish lithography-set dimensions for NW growth, and may answer a fundamental challenge faced by bottom-up nanowire technology.

  10. Simultaneous integration of different nanowires on single textured Si (100) substrates.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Torsten; Rosenbach, Daniel; Mussler, Gregor; Schäpers, Thomas; Grützmacher, Detlev; Lepsa, Mihail Ion

    2015-03-11

    By applying a texturing process to silicon substrates, we demonstrate the possibility to integrate III-V nanowires on (100) oriented silicon substrates. Nanowires are found to grow perpendicular to the {111}-oriented facets of pyramids formed by KOH etching. Having control of the substrate orientation relative to the incoming fluxes enables not only the growth of nanowires on selected facets of the pyramids but also studying the influence of the fluxes on the nanowire nucleation and growth. Making use of these findings, we show that nanowires with different dimensions can be grown on the same sample and, additionally, it is even possible to integrate nanowires of different semiconductor materials, for example, GaAs and InAs, on the very same sample. PMID:25650521

  11. Increased Photoconductivity Lifetime in GaAs Nanowires by Controlled n-Type and p-Type Doping.

    PubMed

    Boland, Jessica L; Casadei, Alberto; Tütüncüoglu, Gözde; Matteini, Federico; Davies, Christopher L; Jabeen, Fauzia; Joyce, Hannah J; Herz, Laura M; Fontcuberta I Morral, Anna; Johnston, Michael B

    2016-04-26

    Controlled doping of GaAs nanowires is crucial for the development of nanowire-based electronic and optoelectronic devices. Here, we present a noncontact method based on time-resolved terahertz photoconductivity for assessing n- and p-type doping efficiency in nanowires. Using this technique, we measure extrinsic electron and hole concentrations in excess of 10(18) cm(-3) for GaAs nanowires with n-type and p-type doped shells. Furthermore, we show that controlled doping can significantly increase the photoconductivity lifetime of GaAs nanowires by over an order of magnitude: from 0.13 ns in undoped nanowires to 3.8 and 2.5 ns in n-doped and p-doped nanowires, respectively. Thus, controlled doping can be used to reduce the effects of parasitic surface recombination in optoelectronic nanowire devices, which is promising for nanowire devices, such as solar cells and nanowire lasers. PMID:26959350

  12. Controlled growth of single nanowires within a supported alumina template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlad, A.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Faniel, S.; Bayot, V.; Melinte, S.; Piraux, L.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, S.

    2006-10-01

    A simple technique for fabricating single nanowires with well-defined position is presented. The process implies the use of a silicon nitride mask for selective electrochemical growth of the nanowires in a porous alumina template. We show that this method allows the realization of complex nanowire patterns as well as arrays of single nanowires with a precise position and spacing.

  13. Controlled Growth of Rubrene Nanowires by Eutectic Melt Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jeyon; Hyon, Jinho; Park, Kyung-Sun; Cho, Boram; Baek, Jangmi; Kim, Jueun; Lee, Sang Uck; Sung, Myung Mo; Kang, Youngjong

    2016-01-01

    Organic semiconductors including rubrene, Alq3, copper phthalocyanine and pentacene are crystallized by the eutectic melt crystallization. Those organic semiconductors form good eutectic systems with the various volatile crystallizable additives such as benzoic acid, salicylic acid, naphthalene and 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene. Due to the formation of the eutectic system, organic semiconductors having originally high melting point (Tm > 300 °C) are melted and crystallized at low temperature (Te = 40.8–133 °C). The volatile crystallizable additives are easily removed by sublimation. For a model system using rubrene, single crystalline rubrene nanowires are prepared by the eutectic melt crystallization and the eutectic-melt-assisted nanoimpinting (EMAN) technique. It is demonstrated that crystal structure and the growth direction of rubrene can be controlled by using different volatile crystallizable additives. The field effect mobility of rubrene nanowires prepared using several different crystallizable additives are measured and compared. PMID:26976527

  14. Controlled Growth of Rubrene Nanowires by Eutectic Melt Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jeyon; Hyon, Jinho; Park, Kyung-Sun; Cho, Boram; Baek, Jangmi; Kim, Jueun; Lee, Sang Uck; Sung, Myung Mo; Kang, Youngjong

    2016-01-01

    Organic semiconductors including rubrene, Alq3, copper phthalocyanine and pentacene are crystallized by the eutectic melt crystallization. Those organic semiconductors form good eutectic systems with the various volatile crystallizable additives such as benzoic acid, salicylic acid, naphthalene and 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene. Due to the formation of the eutectic system, organic semiconductors having originally high melting point (Tm > 300 °C) are melted and crystallized at low temperature (Te = 40.8-133 °C). The volatile crystallizable additives are easily removed by sublimation. For a model system using rubrene, single crystalline rubrene nanowires are prepared by the eutectic melt crystallization and the eutectic-melt-assisted nanoimpinting (EMAN) technique. It is demonstrated that crystal structure and the growth direction of rubrene can be controlled by using different volatile crystallizable additives. The field effect mobility of rubrene nanowires prepared using several different crystallizable additives are measured and compared. PMID:26976527

  15. Controlled Growth of Rubrene Nanowires by Eutectic Melt Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jeyon; Hyon, Jinho; Park, Kyung-Sun; Cho, Boram; Baek, Jangmi; Kim, Jueun; Lee, Sang Uck; Sung, Myung Mo; Kang, Youngjong

    2016-03-01

    Organic semiconductors including rubrene, Alq3, copper phthalocyanine and pentacene are crystallized by the eutectic melt crystallization. Those organic semiconductors form good eutectic systems with the various volatile crystallizable additives such as benzoic acid, salicylic acid, naphthalene and 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene. Due to the formation of the eutectic system, organic semiconductors having originally high melting point (Tm > 300 °C) are melted and crystallized at low temperature (Te = 40.8–133 °C). The volatile crystallizable additives are easily removed by sublimation. For a model system using rubrene, single crystalline rubrene nanowires are prepared by the eutectic melt crystallization and the eutectic-melt-assisted nanoimpinting (EMAN) technique. It is demonstrated that crystal structure and the growth direction of rubrene can be controlled by using different volatile crystallizable additives. The field effect mobility of rubrene nanowires prepared using several different crystallizable additives are measured and compared.

  16. Glucose biosensor based on multisegment nanowires exhibiting reversible magnetic control.

    PubMed

    Gerola, Gislaine P; Takahashi, Giovanna S; Perez, Geraldo G; Recco, Lucas C; Pedrosa, Valber A

    2014-11-01

    We describe the amperometric detection of glucose using oriented nanowires with magnetic switching of the bioelectrochemical process. The fabrication process of the nanowires was prepared through controlled nucleation and growth during a stepwise electrochemical deposition, and it was characterized using scanning electron microscopy. Cyclic voltammetry and amperometry were used to study the magnetoswitchable property; this control was accomplished by changing the surface orientation of nanowires. Under the optimal condition, the amperometric response was also linear up to a glucose concentration of 0.1-16.0 mmol L(-1) with a sensitivity of 81 μA mM(-1). The detection limit was estimated for 4.8×10(-8) mol L(-1), defined from a signal/noise ratio of 3. It also exhibits good reproducibility and high selectivity with insignificant interference from ascorbic acid, acetoaminophen, and uric acid. The resulting biosensor was applied to detect the blood sugar in human serum samples without any pretreatment, and the results were comparatively in agreement with the clinical assay. PMID:25127595

  17. Morphology control of layer-structured gallium selenide nanowires.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hailin; Meister, Stefan; Chan, Candace K; Zhang, Xiao Feng; Cui, Yi

    2007-01-01

    Layer-structured group III chalcogenides have highly anisotropic properties and are attractive materials for stable photocathodes and battery electrodes. We report the controlled synthesis and characterization of layer-structured GaSe nanowires via a catalyst-assisted vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism during GaSe powder evaporation. GaSe nanowires consist of Se-Ga-Ga-Se layers stacked together via van der Waals interactions to form belt-shaped nanowires with a growth direction along the [11-20], width along the [1-100], and height along the [0001] direction. Nanobelts exhibit a variety of morphologies including straight, zigzag, and saw-tooth shapes. These morphologies are realized by controlling the growth temperature and time so that the actual catalysts have a chemical composition of Au, Au-Ga alloy, or Ga. The participation of Ga in the VLS catalyst is important for achieving different morphologies of GaSe. In addition, GaSe nanotubes are also prepared by a slow growth process. PMID:17212464

  18. Routing of surface plasmons in silver nanowire networks controlled by polarization and coating.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hong; Pan, Deng; Xu, Hongxing

    2015-12-01

    Controllable propagation of electromagnetic energy in plasmonic nanowaveguides is of great importance for building nanophotonic circuits. Here, we studied the routing of surface plasmons in silver nanowire structures by combining experiments and electromagnetic simulations. The superposition of different plasmon modes results in the tunable near field patterns of surface plasmons on the nanowire. Using the quantum dot fluorescence imaging technique, we experimentally demonstrate that the near field distribution on the nanowire controls the surface plasmon transmission in the nanowire networks. By controlling the polarization of the input light or by controlling the dielectric coating on the nanowire to modulate the plasmon field distribution and guarantee the strong local field intensity at the connecting junction, the surface plasmons can be efficiently routed to the connected nanowires. Depositing a thin layer of Al2O3 film onto the nanowires can reverse the polarization dependence of the output intensity at the nanowire terminals. These results are instructive for designing functional plasmonic nanowire networks and metal-nanowire-based nanophotonic devices. PMID:26514593

  19. Routing of surface plasmons in silver nanowire networks controlled by polarization and coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hong; Pan, Deng; Xu, Hongxing

    2015-11-01

    Controllable propagation of electromagnetic energy in plasmonic nanowaveguides is of great importance for building nanophotonic circuits. Here, we studied the routing of surface plasmons in silver nanowire structures by combining experiments and electromagnetic simulations. The superposition of different plasmon modes results in the tunable near field patterns of surface plasmons on the nanowire. Using the quantum dot fluorescence imaging technique, we experimentally demonstrate that the near field distribution on the nanowire controls the surface plasmon transmission in the nanowire networks. By controlling the polarization of the input light or by controlling the dielectric coating on the nanowire to modulate the plasmon field distribution and guarantee the strong local field intensity at the connecting junction, the surface plasmons can be efficiently routed to the connected nanowires. Depositing a thin layer of Al2O3 film onto the nanowires can reverse the polarization dependence of the output intensity at the nanowire terminals. These results are instructive for designing functional plasmonic nanowire networks and metal-nanowire-based nanophotonic devices.

  20. Controlling nanowire growth through electric field-induced deformation of the catalyst droplet

    PubMed Central

    Panciera, Federico; Norton, Michael M.; Alam, Sardar B.; Hofmann, Stephan; Mølhave, Kristian; Ross, Frances M.

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires with precisely controlled structure, and hence well-defined electronic and optical properties, can be grown by self-assembly using the vapour–liquid–solid process. The structure and chemical composition of the growing nanowire is typically determined by global parameters such as source gas pressure, gas composition and growth temperature. Here we describe a more local approach to the control of nanowire structure. We apply an electric field during growth to control nanowire diameter and growth direction. Growth experiments carried out while imaging within an in situ transmission electron microscope show that the electric field modifies growth by changing the shape, position and contact angle of the catalytic droplet. This droplet engineering can be used to modify nanowires into three dimensional structures, relevant to a range of applications, and also to measure the droplet surface tension, important for quantitative development of strategies to control nanowire growth. PMID:27470536

  1. Controlling nanowire growth through electric field-induced deformation of the catalyst droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panciera, Federico; Norton, Michael M.; Alam, Sardar B.; Hofmann, Stephan; Mølhave, Kristian; Ross, Frances M.

    2016-07-01

    Semiconductor nanowires with precisely controlled structure, and hence well-defined electronic and optical properties, can be grown by self-assembly using the vapour-liquid-solid process. The structure and chemical composition of the growing nanowire is typically determined by global parameters such as source gas pressure, gas composition and growth temperature. Here we describe a more local approach to the control of nanowire structure. We apply an electric field during growth to control nanowire diameter and growth direction. Growth experiments carried out while imaging within an in situ transmission electron microscope show that the electric field modifies growth by changing the shape, position and contact angle of the catalytic droplet. This droplet engineering can be used to modify nanowires into three dimensional structures, relevant to a range of applications, and also to measure the droplet surface tension, important for quantitative development of strategies to control nanowire growth.

  2. Controlling nanowire growth through electric field-induced deformation of the catalyst droplet.

    PubMed

    Panciera, Federico; Norton, Michael M; Alam, Sardar B; Hofmann, Stephan; Mølhave, Kristian; Ross, Frances M

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires with precisely controlled structure, and hence well-defined electronic and optical properties, can be grown by self-assembly using the vapour-liquid-solid process. The structure and chemical composition of the growing nanowire is typically determined by global parameters such as source gas pressure, gas composition and growth temperature. Here we describe a more local approach to the control of nanowire structure. We apply an electric field during growth to control nanowire diameter and growth direction. Growth experiments carried out while imaging within an in situ transmission electron microscope show that the electric field modifies growth by changing the shape, position and contact angle of the catalytic droplet. This droplet engineering can be used to modify nanowires into three dimensional structures, relevant to a range of applications, and also to measure the droplet surface tension, important for quantitative development of strategies to control nanowire growth. PMID:27470536

  3. Chemical beam epitaxy growth of III–V semiconductor nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Mohummed Noori, Farah T.

    2013-12-16

    Indium- Arsenide (InAs) nanowires were grown in a high vacuum chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) unit on InAs(111) wafers substrates at 425–454°C. Two types of nanogold were used as orientation catalyst, 40nm and 80nm. The measurements were performed using scanning electron microscopy showed that uniform nanowires. The nanowires orient vertically in the InAs nanowire scanning electron microscopy of an array 80nm diameter InAs nanowire with length is in the range 0.5–1 μm and of an array 40nm diameter with length is in the range 0.3–0.7μm. The nanowire length with growth time shows that the linear increase of nanowires start to grow as soon as TMIn is available. The growth rate with temperature was studied.

  4. Direct Conversion of Perovskite Thin Films into Nanowires with Kinetic Control for Flexible Optoelectronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pengchen; Gu, Shuai; Shen, Xinpeng; Xu, Ning; Tan, Yingling; Zhuang, Shendong; Deng, Yu; Lu, Zhenda; Wang, Zhenlin; Zhu, Jia

    2016-02-10

    With significant progress in the past decade, semiconductor nanowires have demonstrated unique features compared to their thin film counterparts, such as enhanced light absorption, mechanical integrity and reduced therma conductivity, etc. However, technologies of semiconductor thin film still serve as foundations of several major industries, such as electronics, displays, energy, etc. A direct path to convert thin film to nanowires can build a bridge between these two and therefore facilitate the large-scale applications of nanowires. Here, we demonstrate that methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) nanowires can be synthesized directly from perovskite film by a scalable conversion process. In addition, with fine kinetic control, morphologies, and diameters of these nanowires can be well-controlled. Based on these perovskite nanowires with excellent optical trapping and mechanical properties, flexible photodetectors with good sensitivity are demonstrated. PMID:26797488

  5. Surface-controlled contact printing for nanowire device fabrication on a large scale.

    PubMed

    Roßkopf, D; Strehle, S

    2016-05-01

    Assembly strategies for functional nanowire devices that merge bottom-up and top-down technologies have been debated for over a decade. Although several breakthroughs have been reported, nanowire device fabrication techniques remain generally incompatible with large-scale and high-yield top-down microelectronics manufacturing. Strategies enabling the controlled transfer of nanowires from the growth substrate to pre-defined locations on a target surface would help to address this challenge. Based on the promising concept of mechanical nanowire transfer, we developed the technique of surface-controlled contact printing, which is based purely on dry friction between a nanowire and a target surface. Surface features, so-called catchers, alter the local frictional force or deposition probability and allow the positioning of single nanowires. Surface-controlled contact printing extends the current scope of nanowire alignment strategies with the intention to facilitate efficient nanowire device fabrication. This is demonstrated by the simultaneous assembly of 36 nanowire resistors within a chip area of greater than 2 cm(2) aided only by mask-assisted photolithography. PMID:27007944

  6. Control of zinc oxide nanowire array properties with electron-beam lithography templating for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicaise, Samuel M.; Cheng, Jayce J.; Kiani, Amirreza; Gradečak, Silvija; Berggren, Karl K.

    2015-02-01

    Hydrothermally synthesized zinc oxide nanowire arrays have been used as nanostructured acceptors in emerging photovoltaic (PV) devices. The nanoscale dimensions of such arrays allow for enhanced charge extraction from PV active layers, but the device performance critically depends on the nanowire array pitch and alignment. In this study, we templated hydrothermally-grown ZnO nanowire arrays via high-resolution electron-beam-lithography defined masks, achieving the dual requirements of high-resolution patterning at a pitch of several hundred nanometers, while maintaining hole sizes small enough to control nanowire array morphology. We investigated several process conditions, including the effect of annealing sputtered and spincoated ZnO seed layers on nanowire growth, to optimize array property metrics—branching from individual template holes and off-normal alignment. We found that decreasing template hole size decreased branching prevalence but also reduced alignment. Annealing seed layers typically improved alignment, and sputtered seed layers yielded nanowire arrays superior to spincoated seed layers. We show that these effects arose from variation in the size of the template holes relative to the ZnO grain size in the seed layer. The quantitative control of branching and alignment of the nanowire array that is achieved in this study will open new paths toward engineering more efficient electrodes to increase photocurrent in nanostructured PVs. This control is also applicable to inorganic nanowire growth in general, nanomechanical generators, nanowire transistors, and surface-energy engineering.

  7. Surface-controlled contact printing for nanowire device fabrication on a large scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roßkopf, D.; Strehle, S.

    2016-05-01

    Assembly strategies for functional nanowire devices that merge bottom-up and top-down technologies have been debated for over a decade. Although several breakthroughs have been reported, nanowire device fabrication techniques remain generally incompatible with large-scale and high-yield top-down microelectronics manufacturing. Strategies enabling the controlled transfer of nanowires from the growth substrate to pre-defined locations on a target surface would help to address this challenge. Based on the promising concept of mechanical nanowire transfer, we developed the technique of surface-controlled contact printing, which is based purely on dry friction between a nanowire and a target surface. Surface features, so-called catchers, alter the local frictional force or deposition probability and allow the positioning of single nanowires. Surface-controlled contact printing extends the current scope of nanowire alignment strategies with the intention to facilitate efficient nanowire device fabrication. This is demonstrated by the simultaneous assembly of 36 nanowire resistors within a chip area of greater than 2 cm2 aided only by mask-assisted photolithography.

  8. Control of zinc oxide nanowire array properties with electron-beam lithography templating for photovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Nicaise, Samuel M; Cheng, Jayce J; Kiani, Amirreza; Gradečak, Silvija; Berggren, Karl K

    2015-02-20

    Hydrothermally synthesized zinc oxide nanowire arrays have been used as nanostructured acceptors in emerging photovoltaic (PV) devices. The nanoscale dimensions of such arrays allow for enhanced charge extraction from PV active layers, but the device performance critically depends on the nanowire array pitch and alignment. In this study, we templated hydrothermally-grown ZnO nanowire arrays via high-resolution electron-beam-lithography defined masks, achieving the dual requirements of high-resolution patterning at a pitch of several hundred nanometers, while maintaining hole sizes small enough to control nanowire array morphology. We investigated several process conditions, including the effect of annealing sputtered and spincoated ZnO seed layers on nanowire growth, to optimize array property metrics-branching from individual template holes and off-normal alignment. We found that decreasing template hole size decreased branching prevalence but also reduced alignment. Annealing seed layers typically improved alignment, and sputtered seed layers yielded nanowire arrays superior to spincoated seed layers. We show that these effects arose from variation in the size of the template holes relative to the ZnO grain size in the seed layer. The quantitative control of branching and alignment of the nanowire array that is achieved in this study will open new paths toward engineering more efficient electrodes to increase photocurrent in nanostructured PVs. This control is also applicable to inorganic nanowire growth in general, nanomechanical generators, nanowire transistors, and surface-energy engineering. PMID:25642895

  9. Controllable electron interactions in quantum dots coupled to nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacla, Alexandre; Cheng, Guanglei; Tomczyk, Michelle; Levy, Jeremy; Daley, Andrew; Pekker, David

    We theoretically study transport properties in quantum dot devices proximity coupled to superconducting nanowires. In particular, we investigate the controllable transition from resonant pair tunneling to Andreev bound states, which has been recently observed in nanodevices fabricated at the interface of the oxide heterostructure LaAlO3/SrTiO3. We show that such a transition in transport features can signify a Lifshitz transition, at which electron interactions change from attractive to repulsive. We also discuss an alternate description in terms of magnetic impurities.

  10. Controllable growth and optical properties of InP and InP/InAs nanostructures on the sidewalls of GaAs nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Xin; Zhang, Xia Li, Junshuai; Cui, Jiangong; Ren, Xiaomin

    2014-12-07

    The growth and optical properties of InP and InP/InAs nanostructures on GaAs nanowires are investigated. InP quantum well and quantum dots (QDs) are formed on the sidewalls of GaAs nanowires successively with increasing the deposition time of InP. The GaAs/InP nanowire heterostructure exhibits a type-II band alignment. The wavelength of the InP quantum well is in the range of 857–892 nm at 77 K, which means that the quantum well is nearly fully strained. The InP quantum dot, which has a bow-shaped cross section, exhibits dislocation-free pure zinc blende structure. Stranski-Krastanow InAs quantum dots are subsequently formed on the GaAs/InP nanowire core-shell structure. The InAs quantum dots are distributed over the middle part of the nanowire, indicating that the In atoms contributing to the quantum dots mainly come from the vapor rather than the substrate. The longest emission wavelength obtained from the InAs QDs is 1039 nm at 77 K. The linewidth is as narrow as 46.3 meV, which is much narrower than those on planar InP substrates and wurtzite InP nanowires, suggesting high-crystal-quality, phase-purity, and size-uniformity of quantum dots.

  11. Controlling the exciton energy of a nanowire quantum dot by strain fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan; Zadeh, Iman Esmaeil; Jöns, Klaus D.; Fognini, Andreas; Reimer, Michael E.; Zhang, Jiaxiang; Dalacu, Dan; Poole, Philip J.; Ding, Fei; Zwiller, Val; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2016-05-01

    We present an experimental route to engineer the exciton energies of single quantum dots in nanowires. By integrating the nanowires onto a piezoelectric crystal, we controllably apply strain fields to the nanowire quantum dots. Consequently, the exciton energy of a single quantum dot in the nanowire is shifted by several meVs without degrading its optical intensity and single-photon purity. Second-order autocorrelation measurements are performed at different strain fields on the same nanowire quantum dot. The suppressed multi-photon events at zero time delay clearly verify that the quantum nature of single-photon emission is well preserved under external strain fields. The work presented here could facilitate on-chip optical quantum information processing with the nanowire based single photon emitters.

  12. Voltage-controlled domain wall traps in ferromagnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Uwe; Emori, Satoru; Beach, Geoffrey S D

    2013-06-01

    Electrical control of magnetism has the potential to bring about revolutionary new spintronic devices, many of which rely on efficient manipulation of magnetic domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires. Recently, it has been shown that voltage-induced charge accumulation at a metal-oxide interface can influence domain wall motion in ultrathin metallic ferromagnets, but the effects have been relatively modest and limited to the slow, thermally activated regime. Here we show that a voltage can generate non-volatile switching of magnetic properties at the nanoscale by modulating interfacial chemistry rather than charge density. Using a solid-state ionic conductor as a gate dielectric, we generate unprecedentedly strong voltage-controlled domain wall traps that function as non-volatile, electrically programmable and switchable pinning sites. Pinning strengths of at least 650 Oe can be readily achieved, enough to bring to a standstill domain walls travelling at speeds of at least ~20 m s(-1). We exploit this new magneto-ionic effect to demonstrate a prototype non-volatile memory device in which voltage-controlled domain wall traps facilitate electrical bit selection in a magnetic nanowire register. PMID:23708429

  13. Surface dislocation nucleation controlled deformation of Au nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, B.; Kapelle, B.; Volkert, C. A.; Richter, G.

    2014-11-17

    We investigate deformation in high quality Au nanowires under both tension and bending using in-situ transmission electron microscopy. Defect evolution is investigated during: (1) tensile deformation of 〈110〉 oriented, initially defect-free, single crystal nanowires with cross-sectional widths between 30 and 300 nm, (2) bending deformation of the same wires, and (3) tensile deformation of wires containing coherent twin boundaries along their lengths. We observe the formation of twins and stacking faults in the single crystal wires under tension, and storage of full dislocations after bending of single crystal wires and after tension of twinned wires. The stress state dependence of the deformation morphology and the formation of stacking faults and twins are not features of bulk Au, where deformation is controlled by dislocation interactions. Instead, we attribute the deformation morphologies to the surface nucleation of either leading or trailing partial dislocations, depending on the Schmid factors, which move through and exit the wires producing stacking faults or full dislocation slip. The presence of obstacles such as neutral planes or twin boundaries hinder the egress of the freshly nucleated dislocations and allow trailing and leading partial dislocations to combine and to be stored as full dislocations in the wires. We infer that the twins and stacking faults often observed in nanoscale Au specimens are not a direct size effect but the result of a size and obstacle dependent transition from dislocation interaction controlled to dislocation nucleation controlled deformation.

  14. Positioned growth of InP nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, P. J.; Dalacu, D.; Lapointe, J.; Kam, A.; Mnaymneh, K.

    2011-02-01

    We describe two different approaches to growing precisely positioned InP nanowires on InP wafers. Both of these approaches utilize the selective area growth capabilities of Chemical Beam Epitaxy, one using the Au catalysed Vapour-Liquid-Solid (VLS) growth mode, the other being catalyst-free. Growth is performed on InP wafers which are first coated with 20 nm of SiO2. These are then patterned using e-beam lithography to create nanometer scale holes in the SiO2 layer to expose the InP surface. For the VLS growth Au is then deposited into the holes in the SiO2 mask layer using a self-aligned lift-off process. For the catalyst-free growth no Au is deposited. In both cases the deposition of InP results in the formation of InP nanowires. In VLS growth the nanowire diameter is controlled by the size of the Au particle, whereas when catalyst-free the diameter is that of the opening in the SiO2 mask. The orientation of the nanowires is also different, <111>B when using Au particles and <111>A when catalyst-free. For the catalysed growth the effect of the Au particle can be turned off by modifying growth conditions allowing the nanowire to be clad, dramatically enhancing the optical emission from InAs quantum dots grown inside the nanowire.

  15. Optically controlled local nanosoldering of metal nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Liu, Guoping; Yang, Hangbo; Wang, Wei; Luo, Si; Dai, Shuowei; Qiu, Min

    2016-05-01

    Nanojoining (including nanowelding, nanosoldering, etc.) of metal nanomaterials offers the opportunity of constructing complex structures and advanced functional devices at the nanoscale. In comparison with nanowelding, nanosoldering does not involve the melting of base metal and shows considerable mechanical strength and good thermal and electrical conductivity. Here, an optically controlled local nanosoldering technique, which ensures the nanostructures to be bonded while their original structural integrity is retained, is proposed and demonstrated. Typical elemental devices (V-shaped, T-shaped, and X-shaped nanostructures) are formed with this nanosoldering technique. The conductivity of one V-shaped junction is enhanced by 500 times after nanosoldering. This facile nanosoldering technique provides an avenue to locally manipulate light, charge, heat, and mass transport at the nanoscale and is thereby expected to benefit the development of nanophotonics and nanoelectronics.

  16. Controlled assembly of multi-segment nanowires by histidine-tagged peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Aijun A.; Lee, Joun; Jenikova, Gabriela; Mulchandani, Ashok; Myung, Nosang V.; Chen, Wilfred

    2006-07-01

    A facile technique was demonstrated for the controlled assembly and alignment of multi-segment nanowires using bioengineered polypeptides. An elastin-like-polypeptide (ELP)-based biopolymer consisting of a hexahistine cluster at each end (His6-ELP-His6) was generated and purified by taking advantage of the reversible phase transition property of ELP. The affinity between the His6 domain of biopolymers and the nickel segment of multi-segment nickel/gold/nickel nanowires was exploited for the directed assembly of nanowires onto peptide-functionalized electrode surfaces. The presence of the ferromagnetic nickel segments on the nanowires allowed the control of directionality by an external magnetic field. Using this method, the directed assembly and positioning of multi-segment nanowires across two microfabricated nickel electrodes in a controlled manner was accomplished with the expected ohmic contact.

  17. Controlled Living Nanowire Growth: Precise Control over the Morphology and Optical Properties of AgAuAg Bimetallic Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Martin; Scarabelli, Leonardo; March, Katia; Altantzis, Thomas; Tebbe, Moritz; Kociak, Mathieu; Bals, Sara; García de Abajo, F Javier; Fery, Andreas; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2015-08-12

    Inspired by the concept of living polymerization reaction, we are able to produce silver-gold-silver nanowires with a precise control over their total length and plasmonic properties by establishing a constant silver deposition rate on the tips of penta-twinned gold nanorods used as seed cores. Consequently, the length of the wires increases linearly in time. Starting with ∼210 nm × 32 nm gold cores, we produce nanowire lengths up to several microns in a highly controlled manner, with a small self-limited increase in thickness of ∼4 nm, corresponding to aspect ratios above 100, whereas the low polydispersity of the product allows us to detect up to nine distinguishable plasmonic resonances in a single colloidal solution. We analyze the spatial distribution and the nature of the plasmons by electron energy loss spectroscopy and obtain excellent agreement between measurements and electromagnetic simulations, clearly demonstrating that the presence of the gold core plays a marginal role, except for relatively short wires or high-energy modes. PMID:26134470

  18. Controlled Living Nanowire Growth: Precise Control over the Morphology and Optical Properties of AgAuAg Bimetallic Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by the concept of living polymerization reaction, we are able to produce silver–gold–silver nanowires with a precise control over their total length and plasmonic properties by establishing a constant silver deposition rate on the tips of penta-twinned gold nanorods used as seed cores. Consequently, the length of the wires increases linearly in time. Starting with ∼210 nm × 32 nm gold cores, we produce nanowire lengths up to several microns in a highly controlled manner, with a small self-limited increase in thickness of ∼4 nm, corresponding to aspect ratios above 100, whereas the low polydispersity of the product allows us to detect up to nine distinguishable plasmonic resonances in a single colloidal solution. We analyze the spatial distribution and the nature of the plasmons by electron energy loss spectroscopy and obtain excellent agreement between measurements and electromagnetic simulations, clearly demonstrating that the presence of the gold core plays a marginal role, except for relatively short wires or high-energy modes. PMID:26134470

  19. Size-controllable Ni5TiO7 nanowires as promising catalysts for CO oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanan; Liu, Baodan; Yang, Lini; Yang, Bing; Liu, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Lusheng; Weimer, Christian; jiang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Ni5TiO7 nanowires with controllable sizes are synthesized using PEO method combined with impregnation and annealing at 1050oC in air, with adjustment of different concentrations of impregnating solution to control the dimension of nanowires. The resulting nanowires are characterized in details using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. In addition, the CO catalytic oxidation performance of the Ni5TiO7 nanowires is investigated using a fixed-bed quartz tubular reactor and an on-line gas chromatography system, indicating that the activity of this catalytic system for CO oxidation is a strong dependency upon the nanocrystal size.When the size of the Ni5TiO7 nanowires is induced from 4 μm to 50 nm, the corresponding maximum conversion temperature is lowered by ~100 oC. PMID:26395314

  20. Fabrication of enzyme-degradable and size-controlled protein nanowires using single particle nano-fabrication technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omichi, Masaaki; Asano, Atsushi; Tsukuda, Satoshi; Takano, Katsuyoshi; Sugimoto, Masaki; Saeki, Akinori; Sakamaki, Daisuke; Onoda, Akira; Hayashi, Takashi; Seki, Shu

    2014-04-01

    Protein nanowires exhibiting specific biological activities hold promise for interacting with living cells and controlling and predicting biological responses such as apoptosis, endocytosis and cell adhesion. Here we report the result of the interaction of a single high-energy charged particle with protein molecules, giving size-controlled protein nanowires with an ultra-high aspect ratio of over 1,000. Degradation of the human serum albumin nanowires was examined using trypsin. The biotinylated human serum albumin nanowires bound avidin, demonstrating the high affinity of the nanowires. Human serum albumin-avidin hybrid nanowires were also fabricated from a solid state mixture and exhibited good mechanical strength in phosphate-buffered saline. The biotinylated human serum albumin nanowires can be transformed into nanowires exhibiting a biological function such as avidin-biotinyl interactions and peroxidase activity. The present technique is a versatile platform for functionalizing the surface of any protein molecule with an extremely large surface area.

  1. Extensive duplication events account for multiple control regions and pseudo-genes in the mitochondrial genome of the velvet worm Metaperipatus inae (Onychophora, Peripatopsidae).

    PubMed

    Braband, Anke; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Cameron, Stephen L; Daniels, Savel; Mayer, Georg

    2010-10-01

    The phylogeny of Onychophora (velvet worms) is unresolved and even the monophyly of the two major onychophoran subgroups, Peripatidae and Peripatopsidae, is uncertain. Previous studies of complete mitochondrial genomes from two onychophoran species revealed two strikingly different gene arrangement patterns from highly conserved in a representative of Peripatopsidae to highly derived in a species of Peripatidae, suggesting that these data might be informative for clarifying the onychophoran phylogeny. In order to assess the diversity of mitochondrial genomes among onychophorans, we analyzed the complete mitochondrial genome of Metaperipatus inae, a second representative of Peripatopsidae from Chile. Compared to the proposed ancestral gene order in Onychophora, the mitochondrial genome of M. inae shows dramatic rearrangements, although all protein-coding and ribosomal RNA genes are encoded on the same strands as in the ancestral peripatopsid genome. The retained strand affiliation of all protein-coding and ribosomal RNA genes and the occurrence of three control regions and several pseudo-genes suggest that the derived mitochondrial gene arrangement pattern in M. inae evolved by partial genome duplications, followed by a subsequent loss of redundant genes. Our findings, thus, confirm the diversity of the mitochondrial gene arrangement patterns among onychophorans and support their utility for clarifying the phylogeography of Onychophora, in particular of the Peripatopsidae species from South Africa and Chile. PMID:20510379

  2. The role of surface passivation in controlling Ge nanowire faceting

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gamalski, A. D.; Tersoff, J.; Kodambaka, S.; Zakharov, D. N.; Ross, F. M.; Stach, E. A.

    2015-11-05

    In situ transmission electron microscopy observations of nanowire morphologies indicate that during Au-catalyzed Ge nanowire growth, Ge facets can rapidly form along the nanowire sidewalls when the source gas (here, digermane) flux is decreased or the temperature is increased. This sidewall faceting is accompanied by continuous catalyst loss as Au diffuses from the droplet to the wire surface. We suggest that high digermane flux and low temperatures promote effective surface passivation of Ge nanowires with H or other digermane fragments inhibiting diffusion and attachment of Au and Ge on the sidewalls. Furthermore, these results illustrate the essential roles of themore » precursor gas and substrate temperature in maintaining nanowire sidewall passivation, necessary to ensure the growth of straight, untapered, <111>-oriented nanowires.« less

  3. The role of surface passivation in controlling Ge nanowire faceting

    SciTech Connect

    Gamalski, A. D.; Tersoff, J.; Kodambaka, S.; Zakharov, D. N.; Ross, F. M.; Stach, E. A.

    2015-11-05

    In situ transmission electron microscopy observations of nanowire morphologies indicate that during Au-catalyzed Ge nanowire growth, Ge facets can rapidly form along the nanowire sidewalls when the source gas (here, digermane) flux is decreased or the temperature is increased. This sidewall faceting is accompanied by continuous catalyst loss as Au diffuses from the droplet to the wire surface. We suggest that high digermane flux and low temperatures promote effective surface passivation of Ge nanowires with H or other digermane fragments inhibiting diffusion and attachment of Au and Ge on the sidewalls. Furthermore, these results illustrate the essential roles of the precursor gas and substrate temperature in maintaining nanowire sidewall passivation, necessary to ensure the growth of straight, untapered, <111>-oriented nanowires.

  4. From Twinning to Pure Zincblende Catalyst-Free InAs(Sb) Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Potts, Heidi; Friedl, Martin; Amaduzzi, Francesca; Tang, Kechao; Tütüncüoglu, Gözde; Matteini, Federico; Alarcon Lladó, Esther; McIntyre, Paul C; Fontcuberta i Morral, Anna

    2016-01-13

    III-V nanowires are candidate building blocks for next generation electronic and optoelectronic platforms. Low bandgap semiconductors such as InAs and InSb are interesting because of their high electron mobility. Fine control of the structure, morphology, and composition are key to the control of their physical properties. In this work, we present how to grow catalyst-free InAs1-xSbx nanowires, which are stacking fault and twin defect-free over several hundreds of nanometers. We evaluate the impact of their crystal phase purity by probing their electrical properties in a transistor-like configuration and by measuring the phonon-plasmon interaction by Raman spectroscopy. We also highlight the importance of high-quality dielectric coating for the reduction of hysteresis in the electrical characteristics of the nanowire transistors. High channel carrier mobilities and reduced hysteresis open the path for high-frequency devices fabricated using InAs1-xSbx nanowires. PMID:26686394

  5. Control of the micrometric scale morphology of silicon nanowires through ion irradiation-induced metal dewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Savio, R.; Repetto, L.; Guida, P.; Angeli, E.; Firpo, G.; Volpe, A.; Ierardi, V.; Valbusa, U.

    2016-08-01

    We propose ion-induced dewetting of Au thin films as a mechanism to modify and control the morphology of Si nanowires formed through metal-assisted chemical etching. We show that the patterns formed upon irradiation resemble those typical of dewetting phenomena, with a characteristic length in the nanometer range. Irradiated Au films are then used as a template for the fabrication of Si nanowires, and we show that a long-range order exists also in etched substrates, although at much longer length scales in the micrometer range. Investigation of the optical properties reveals that the Si nanowires emit broadband photoluminescence peaked at 700 nm. The proposed synthesis method allows tuning the morphological features of the nanowire bundles at the nanoscale without affecting the optical properties. This approach can be exploited for the engineering of nanowires-based devices where the morphological features become important.

  6. Controllable template synthesis of superconducting Zn nanowires with different microstructures by electrochemical deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Guo; Tian, Ming-Liang; Kumar, Nitesh; Mallouk, Thomas E

    2005-07-01

    A systematic study was conducted on the fabrication, structural characterization, and transport properties of Zn nanowires with diameters between 40 and 100 nm. Zinc nanowires were fabricated by electrodepositing Zn into commercially available polycarbonate (PC) or anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes. By controlling the electrodeposition process, we found that the nanowires can be single-crystal, polycrystalline Zn, crystalline Zn/nanocrystalline ZnO composites, or entirely ZnO. The microstructure and chemistry was characterized by using transmission electron microscopy. Transport studies on single-crystal or polycrystalline Zn nanowire arrays embedded inside the membrane showed that the superconducting transition temperature, Tc, is insensitive to the nanowire diameter and morphology. The superconductivity shows a clear crossover from bulklike to quasi-1D behavior, as evidenced by residual low-temperature resistance, when the diameter of the wires is reduced to 70 nm (20 times smaller than the bulk coherence length). PMID:16178219

  7. Piezotronic Effect in Polarity-Controlled GaN Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenfu; Pu, Xiong; Han, Changbao; Du, Chunhua; Li, Linxuan; Jiang, Chunyan; Hu, Weiguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-08-25

    Using high-quality and polarity-controlled GaN nanowires (NWs), we studied the piezotronic effect in crystal orientation defined wurtzite structures. By applying a normal compressive force on c-plane GaN NWs with an atomic force microscopy tip, the Schottky barrier between the Pt tip and GaN can be effectively tuned by the piezotronic effect. In contrast, the normal compressive force cannot change the electron transport characteristics in m-plane GaN NWs whose piezoelectric polarization axis is turned in the transverse direction. This observation provided solid evidence for clarifying the difference between the piezotronic effect and the piezoresistive effect. We further demonstrated a high sensitivity of the m-plane GaN piezotronic transistor to collect the transverse force. The integration of c-plane GaN and m-plane GaN indicates an overall response to an external force in any direction. PMID:26256533

  8. Control of gold surface diffusion on si nanowires.

    PubMed

    den Hertog, Martien I; Rouviere, Jean-Luc; Dhalluin, Florian; Desré, Pierre J; Gentile, Pascal; Ferret, Pierre; Oehler, Fabrice; Baron, Thiery

    2008-05-01

    Silicon nanowires (NW) were grown by the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism using gold as the catalyst and silane as the precursor. Gold from the catalyst particle can diffuse over the wire sidewalls, resulting in gold clusters decorating the wire sidewalls. The presence or absence of gold clusters was observed either by high angle annular darkfield scanning transmission electron microscopy images or by scanning electron microscopy. We find that the gold surface diffusion can be controlled by two growth parameters, the silane partial pressure and the growth temperature, and that the wire diameter also affects gold diffusion. Gold clusters are not present on the NW side walls for high silane partial pressure, low temperature, and small NW diameters. The absence or presence of gold on the NW sidewall has an effect on the sidewall morphology. Different models are qualitatively discussed. The main physical effect governing gold diffusion seems to be the adsorption of silane on the NW sidewalls. PMID:18422363

  9. Controlled surface diffusion in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of GaN nanowires.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wen Chi; Hong, Franklin Chau-Nan

    2009-02-01

    This study investigates the growth of GaN nanowires by controlling the surface diffusion of Ga species on sapphire in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. Under nitrogen-rich growth conditions, Ga has a tendency to adsorb on the substrate surface diffusing to nanowires to contribute to their growth. The significance of surface diffusion on the growth of nanowires is dependent on the environment of the nanowire on the substrate surface as well as the gas phase species and compositions. Under nitrogen-rich growth conditions, the growth rate is strongly dependent on the surface diffusion of gallium, but the addition of 5% hydrogen in nitrogen plasma instantly diminishes the surface diffusion effect. Gallium desorbs easily from the surface by reaction with hydrogen. On the other hand, under gallium-rich growth conditions, nanowire growth is shown to be dominated by the gas phase deposition, with negligible contribution from surface diffusion. This is the first study reporting the inhibition of surface diffusion effects by hydrogen addition, which can be useful in tailoring the growth and characteristics of nanowires. Without any evidence of direct deposition on the nanowire surface, gallium and nitrogen are shown to dissolve into the catalyst for growing the nanowires at 900 degrees C. PMID:19417353

  10. Controlling the Interface Areas of Organic/Inorganic Semiconductor Heterojunction Nanowires for High-Performance Diodes.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zheng; Yang, Hui; Gao, Juan; Li, Jiaofu; Chen, Yanhuan; Jia, Zhiyu; Li, Yongjun; Liu, Huibiao; Yang, Wensheng; Li, Yuliang; Li, Dan

    2016-08-24

    A new method of in situ electrically induced self-assembly technology combined with electrochemical deposition has been developed for the controllable preparation of organic/inorganic core/shell semiconductor heterojunction nanowire arrays. The size of the interface of the heterojunction nanowire can be tuned by the growing parameter. The heterojunction nanowires of graphdiyne/CuS with core/shell structure showed the strong dependence of rectification ratio and perfect diode performance on the size of the interface. It will be a new way for controlling the structures and properties of one-dimensional heterojunction nanomaterials. PMID:27472226

  11. The fabrication of polycrystalline silver nanowires via self-assembled nanotubes at controlled temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jui-Hsiang; Tsai, Ching-Yi; Chiu, Yi-Hong; Hsieh, Feng-Ming

    2009-01-01

    We report a novel method for the fabrication of silver nanowires under controlled conditions. Silver nanoparticles were synthesized using a surfactant of octanoic acid via a reverse micelle technique. Hollow nanotubes were prepared under various controlled conditions through self-assembly of surfactant clusters of reversed micelles containing silver nanoparticles. These organized nanotubes were used as a structure-directing template for the preparation of silver nanowires. This is a bottom-up technique for the fabrication of silver nanowires. Self-assembled nanotube construction and the cross section of the nanotubes were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. From the results, reasonable schematic representations of the formation of self-assembled nanoparticles and nanowires were proposed. Further sintering treatment at 500 °C burned away the organic compounds and left silver nanowires. The construction of the nanowires was confirmed using SEM, x-ray diffraction (XRD), and energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDXA). This paper demonstrates that silver nanowires can be fabricated via self-assembled nanoparticles at a controlled low temperature.

  12. The fabrication of polycrystalline silver nanowires via self-assembled nanotubes at controlled temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jui-Hsiang; Tsai, Ching-Yi; Chiu, Yi-Hong; Hsieh, Feng-Ming

    2009-01-21

    We report a novel method for the fabrication of silver nanowires under controlled conditions. Silver nanoparticles were synthesized using a surfactant of octanoic acid via a reverse micelle technique. Hollow nanotubes were prepared under various controlled conditions through self-assembly of surfactant clusters of reversed micelles containing silver nanoparticles. These organized nanotubes were used as a structure-directing template for the preparation of silver nanowires. This is a bottom-up technique for the fabrication of silver nanowires. Self-assembled nanotube construction and the cross section of the nanotubes were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. From the results, reasonable schematic representations of the formation of self-assembled nanoparticles and nanowires were proposed. Further sintering treatment at 500 degrees C burned away the organic compounds and left silver nanowires. The construction of the nanowires was confirmed using SEM, x-ray diffraction (XRD), and energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDXA). This paper demonstrates that silver nanowires can be fabricated via self-assembled nanoparticles at a controlled low temperature. PMID:19417290

  13. Speedy fabrication of diameter-controlled Ag nanowires using glycerolunder microwave irradiation conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diameter-controlled Ag nanowires were rapidly fabricated (1 min) using inexpensive, abundant, and environmentally-friendly glycerol as both reductant and solvent under non-stirred microwave irradiation conditions; no Ag particles were formed using conventional heating methods. Th...

  14. Correction: β-Sialon nanowires, nanobelts and hierarchical nanostructures: morphology control, growth mechanism and cathodoluminescence properties.

    PubMed

    Huang, Juntong; Huang, Zhaohui; Liu, Yangai; Fang, Minghao; Chen, Kai; Huang, Yaoting; Huang, Saifang; Ji, Haipeng; Yang, Jingzhou; Wu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shaowei

    2016-08-01

    Correction for 'β-Sialon nanowires, nanobelts and hierarchical nanostructures: morphology control, growth mechanism and cathodoluminescence properties' by Juntong Huang, et al., Nanoscale, 2014, 6, 424-432. PMID:27401042

  15. Stable and metastable nanowires displaying locally controllable properties

    DOEpatents

    Sutter, Eli Anguelova; Sutter, Peter Werner

    2014-11-18

    Vapor-liquid-solid growth of nanowires is tailored to achieve complex one-dimensional material geometries using phase diagrams determined for nanoscale materials. Segmented one-dimensional nanowires having constant composition display locally variable electronic band structures that are determined by the diameter of the nanowires. The unique electrical and optical properties of the segmented nanowires are exploited to form electronic and optoelectronic devices. Using gold-germanium as a model system, in situ transmission electron microscopy establishes, for nanometer-sized Au--Ge alloy drops at the tips of Ge nanowires (NWs), the parts of the phase diagram that determine their temperature-dependent equilibrium composition. The nanoscale phase diagram is then used to determine the exchange of material between the NW and the drop. The phase diagram for the nanoscale drop deviates significantly from that of the bulk alloy.

  16. Novel Nanowire-Based Flip-Flop Circuit Utilizing Gate-Controlled GaAs Three-Branch Nanowire Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Hiromu; Shiratori, Yuta; Kasai, Seiya

    2011-06-01

    A novel set-reset flip-flop (SR-FF) circuit integrating gate-controlled GaAs three-branch nanowire junctions (TBJs) is designed, fabricated, and characterized. Fundamental logic gates including AND, NOT, and NAND are constructed using Schottky wrap gate (WPG)-controlled TBJs together with inverter circuits that have the same configuration. The present SR-FF circuit is simply designed using a pair of cross-coupled TBJ-based NAND gates. The circuit is successfully fabricated on a GaAs-based hexagonal nanowire network. Its correct operation with a voltage transfer gain larger than unity is demonstrated. Reduction of circuit area and possible operation speed are also discussed.

  17. Coherent control to prepare an InAs quantum dot for spin-photon entanglement.

    PubMed

    Webster, L A; Truex, K; Duan, L-M; Steel, D G; Bracker, A S; Gammon, D; Sham, L J

    2014-03-28

    We optically generated an electronic state in a single InAs/GaAs self-assembled quantum dot that is a precursor to the deterministic entanglement of the spin of the electron with an emitted photon in the proposal of W. Yao, R.-B. Liu, and L. J. Sham [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 030504 (2005). A superposition state is prepared by optical pumping to a pure state followed by an initial pulse. By modulating the subsequent pulse arrival times and precisely controlling them using interferometric measurement of path length differences, we are able to implement a coherent control technique to selectively drive exactly one of the two components of the superposition to the ground state. This optical transition contingent on spin was driven with the same broadband pulses that created the superposition through the use of a two pulse coherent control sequence. A final pulse affords measurement of the coherence of this "preentangled" state. PMID:24724666

  18. Diameter-controlled and surface-modified Sb₂Se₃ nanowires and their photodetector performance.

    PubMed

    Choi, Donghyeuk; Jang, Yamujin; Lee, JeeHee; Jeong, Gyoung Hwa; Whang, Dongmok; Hwang, Sung Woo; Cho, Kyung-Sang; Kim, Sang-Wook

    2014-01-01

    Due to its direct and narrow band gap, high chemical stability, and high Seebeck coefficient (1800 μVK(-1)), antimony selenide (Sb2Se3) has many potential applications, such as in photovoltaic devices, thermoelectric devices, and solar cells. However, research on the Sb2Se3 materials has been limited by its low electrical conductivity in bulk state. To overcome this challenge, we suggest two kinds of nano-structured materials, namely, the diameter-controlled Sb2Se3 nanowires and Ag2Se-decorated Sb2Se3 nanowires. The photocurrent response of diameter-controlled Sb2Se3, which depends on electrical conductivity of the material, increases non-linearly with the diameter of the nanowire. The photosensitivity factor (K = I(light)/I(dark)) of the intrinsic Sb2Se3 nanowire with diameter of 80-100 nm is highly improved (K = 75). Additionally, the measurement was conducted using a single nanowire under low source-drain voltage. The dark- and photocurrent of the Ag2Se-decorated Sb2Se3 nanowire further increased, as compared to that of the intrinsic Sb2Se3 nanowire, to approximately 50 and 7 times, respectively. PMID:25336056

  19. Diameter-Controlled and Surface-Modified Sb2Se3 Nanowires and Their Photodetector Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Donghyeuk; Jang, Yamujin; Lee, Jeehee; Jeong, Gyoung Hwa; Whang, Dongmok; Hwang, Sung Woo; Cho, Kyung-Sang; Kim, Sang-Wook

    2014-10-01

    Due to its direct and narrow band gap, high chemical stability, and high Seebeck coefficient (1800 μVK-1), antimony selenide (Sb2Se3) has many potential applications, such as in photovoltaic devices, thermoelectric devices, and solar cells. However, research on the Sb2Se3 materials has been limited by its low electrical conductivity in bulk state. To overcome this challenge, we suggest two kinds of nano-structured materials, namely, the diameter-controlled Sb2Se3 nanowires and Ag2Se-decorated Sb2Se3 nanowires. The photocurrent response of diameter-controlled Sb2Se3, which depends on electrical conductivity of the material, increases non-linearly with the diameter of the nanowire. The photosensitivity factor (K = Ilight/Idark) of the intrinsic Sb2Se3 nanowire with diameter of 80-100 nm is highly improved (K = 75). Additionally, the measurement was conducted using a single nanowire under low source-drain voltage. The dark- and photocurrent of the Ag2Se-decorated Sb2Se3 nanowire further increased, as compared to that of the intrinsic Sb2Se3 nanowire, to approximately 50 and 7 times, respectively.

  20. Diameter-Controlled and Surface-Modified Sb2Se3 Nanowires and Their Photodetector Performance

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Donghyeuk; Jang, Yamujin; Lee, JeeHee; Jeong, Gyoung Hwa; Whang, Dongmok; Hwang, Sung Woo; Cho, Kyung-Sang; Kim, Sang-Wook

    2014-01-01

    Due to its direct and narrow band gap, high chemical stability, and high Seebeck coefficient (1800 μVK−1), antimony selenide (Sb2Se3) has many potential applications, such as in photovoltaic devices, thermoelectric devices, and solar cells. However, research on the Sb2Se3 materials has been limited by its low electrical conductivity in bulk state. To overcome this challenge, we suggest two kinds of nano-structured materials, namely, the diameter-controlled Sb2Se3 nanowires and Ag2Se-decorated Sb2Se3 nanowires. The photocurrent response of diameter-controlled Sb2Se3, which depends on electrical conductivity of the material, increases non-linearly with the diameter of the nanowire. The photosensitivity factor (K = Ilight/Idark) of the intrinsic Sb2Se3 nanowire with diameter of 80–100 nm is highly improved (K = 75). Additionally, the measurement was conducted using a single nanowire under low source-drain voltage. The dark- and photocurrent of the Ag2Se-decorated Sb2Se3 nanowire further increased, as compared to that of the intrinsic Sb2Se3 nanowire, to approximately 50 and 7 times, respectively. PMID:25336056

  1. Morphological control of heterostructured nanowires synthesized by sol-flame method

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Heterostructured nanowires, such as core/shell nanowires and nanoparticle-decorated nanowires, are versatile building blocks for a wide range of applications because they integrate dissimilar materials at the nanometer scale to achieve unique functionalities. The sol-flame method is a new, rapid, low-cost, versatile, and scalable method for the synthesis of heterostructured nanowires, in which arrays of nanowires are decorated with other materials in the form of shells or chains of nanoparticles. In a typical sol-flame synthesis, nanowires are dip-coated with a solution containing precursors of the materials to be decorated, then dried in air, and subsequently heated in the post-flame region of a flame at high temperature (over 900°C) for only a few seconds. Here, we report the effects of the precursor solution on the final morphology of the heterostructured nanowire using Co3O4 decorated CuO nanowires as a model system. When a volatile cobalt salt precursor is used with sufficient residual solvent, both solvent and cobalt precursor evaporate during the flame annealing step, leading to the formation of Co3O4 nanoparticle chains by a gas-solid transition. The length of the nanoparticle chains is mainly controlled by the temperature of combustion of the solvent. On the other hand, when a non-volatile cobalt salt precursor is used, only the solvent evaporates and the cobalt salt is converted to nanoparticles by a liquid–solid transition, forming a conformal Co3O4 shell. This study facilitates the use of the sol-flame method for synthesizing heterostructured nanowires with controlled morphologies to satisfy the needs of diverse applications. PMID:23924299

  2. Magnetic control of Rashba splittings in symmetric InAs quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Toru; Faniel, Sébastien; Monta, Nozomu; Koga, Takaaki

    2010-09-01

    We propose a mechanism to control the Rashba-induced subband splitting by a magnetic field using a symmetric double quantum well (QW) system, where the lowest two subbands are coupled by a position-dependent Rashba parameter α(z). In such a system, all subbands are spin degenerate due to the time reversal symmetry and the spatial inversion symmetry at zero magnetic field, despite the presence of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction. Applying an external magnetic field parallel to the QW plane ( B∥y^) lifts this spin degeneracy breaking the time reversal symmetry, where the spin splitting energies are controllable in the range between zero and 2.9 meV, the latter being on the same order of magnitude as a typical Rashba splitting in a narrow asymmetric QW. We find that the first and second subband energy levels for a selected spin state with k∥=(kF,0,0) anticross each other, and that the energy of the subband splitting Δ0, equivalent to the Rashba splitting for the case of single QWs, can be determined from the value of the anticrossing magnetic field Bac. These results suggest that the investigation in the symmetric double QWs would provide useful approaches for quantitative understanding of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction.

  3. Germanium nanowire growth controlled by surface diffusion effects

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidtbauer, Jan; Bansen, Roman; Heimburger, Robert; Teubner, Thomas; Boeck, Torsten; Fornari, Roberto

    2012-07-23

    Germanium nanowires (NWs) were grown onto Ge(111) substrates by the vapor-liquid-solid process using gold droplets. The growth was carried out in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber at substrate temperatures between 370 Degree-Sign C and 510 Degree-Sign C. The resulting nanowire growth rate turns out to be highly dependent on the substrate temperature exhibiting the maximum at T = 430 Degree-Sign C. The temperature dependence of growth rate can be attributed to surface diffusion both along the substrate and nanowire sidewalls. Analyzing the diffusive material transport yields a diffusion length of 126 nm at a substrate temperature of 430 Degree-Sign C.

  4. Gate-controlled terahertz single electron photovoltaic effect in self-assembled InAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. Nagai, N.; Shibata, K.; Hirakawa, K.; Ndebeka-Bandou, C.; Bastard, G.

    2015-09-07

    We have observed a terahertz (THz) induced single electron photovoltaic effect in self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs). We used a single electron transistor (SET) geometry that consists of a single InAs QD and nanogap electrodes coupled with a bowtie antenna. Under a weak, broadband THz radiation, a photocurrent induced by THz intersublevel transitions in the QD is generated even when no bias voltage is applied to the SET. The observed single electron photovoltaic effect is due to an energy-dependent tunneling asymmetry in the QD-SET. Moreover, the tunneling asymmetry changes not only with the shell but also with the electron number in the QD, suggesting the manybody nature of the electron wavefunctions. The THz photovoltaic effect observed in the present QD-SET system may have potential applications to nanoscale energy harvesting.

  5. Gate-controlled terahertz single electron photovoltaic effect in self-assembled InAs quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Shibata, K.; Nagai, N.; Ndebeka-Bandou, C.; Bastard, G.; Hirakawa, K.

    2015-09-01

    We have observed a terahertz (THz) induced single electron photovoltaic effect in self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs). We used a single electron transistor (SET) geometry that consists of a single InAs QD and nanogap electrodes coupled with a bowtie antenna. Under a weak, broadband THz radiation, a photocurrent induced by THz intersublevel transitions in the QD is generated even when no bias voltage is applied to the SET. The observed single electron photovoltaic effect is due to an energy-dependent tunneling asymmetry in the QD-SET. Moreover, the tunneling asymmetry changes not only with the shell but also with the electron number in the QD, suggesting the manybody nature of the electron wavefunctions. The THz photovoltaic effect observed in the present QD-SET system may have potential applications to nanoscale energy harvesting.

  6. Exploring the Potential of Turbulent Flow Control Using Vertically Aligned Nanowire Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Sean; Calhoun, John; Guskey, Christopher; Seigler, Michael; Koka, Aneesh; Sodano, Henry

    2012-11-01

    We present evidence that turbulent flow can be influenced by oscillating nanowires. A substrate coated with vertically aligned nanowires was installed in the boundary wall of fully-developed turbulent channel flow, and the substrate was excited by a piezoceramic actuator to oscillate the nanowires. Because the nanowires are immersed in the viscous sublayer, it was previously unclear whether the small scale flow oscillations imparted into the bulk flow by the nanowires would influence the turbulent flow or be dissipated by the effects of viscosity. Our experiments demonstrated that the nanowires produced perturbations in the flow and contributed energy throughout the depth of the turbulent layer. A parallel investigation using a dynamically scaled surface of vertically aligned wires in laminar flow found that, even at low Reynolds numbers, significant momentum transport can be produced in the flow by the introduction of a travelling wave motion into the surface. These findings reflect the potential for using oscillating nanowires as a novel method of near-wall turbulent flow control. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under FA9550-11-1-0140.

  7. Fabrication of nickel and gold nanowires by controlled electrodeposition on deoxyribonucleic acid molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Qun; Jin, Helena; Dai, Kun

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic and electrical nanowires are two important materials in the development of futuristic nanoelectronics, data storage media and nanosensors. Ni and Au nanowires with a diameter of a few tens of nanometres have been fabricated using deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules as a template through nanoparticle-controlled electroless deposition (ELD). Nanowire precursors, 1-3 nm Pt(0)-DNA and 1.4 nm Au(0)-DNA, were assembled using two different methods. Chemical reduction was used to deposit Pt(0) particles on DNA which catalyzed Ni nanowire growth. Positively charged Au nanoparticles were directly assembled on phosphate groups of DNA which were stretched and anchored between micrometre-spaced electrodes. Electrical measurement has shown that Au nanowires, catalyzed by Au(0)-DNA in a subsequent ELD, are highly conductive and show linear I-V characteristics. The major factors for the resistivity of nanowires were discussed in detail. This work involves important aspects in the field of DNA-based self-assembly, such as DNA and surface interaction, DNA nanoparticle assembly and electrical property of fabricated nanowires.

  8. Controlling the Lithiation-Induced Strain and Charging Rate in Nanowire Electrodes by Coating

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Li Q.; Liu, Xiao H.; Liu, Yang; Huang, Shan; Zhu, Ting; Gui, Liangjin; Mao, Scott X.; Ye, Zhi Zhen; Wang, Chong M.; Sullivan, J. P.; Huang, Jian Yu

    2011-05-04

    Lithiation-induced-strain (LIS) in electrode materials plagues the performance and lifetime of lithium ion batteries (LIBs). Controlling the LIS is one of the ultimate goals for making better LIBs. Here we report that by carbon or aluminum coating, the charging rate and LIS of individual SnO2 nanowire electrodes can be altered dramatically: namely the carbon or aluminum coated nanowires can be charged about 10 times faster than the non-coated nanowires, and the radial expansion of the coated nanowires was completely suppressed, resulting little or no mismatch strain at the reaction front, as evidenced by the lack of dislocations near the reaction front. The improved charging rate and the suppression of the radial expansion were attributed to the mechanical confinement of the coatings. These studies demonstrate an effective route to control the charging rate and LIS, enabling the design of better LIBs.

  9. Generic technique to grow III-V semiconductor nanowires in a closed glass vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kan; Xing, Yingjie; Xu, H. Q.

    2016-06-01

    Crystalline III-V semiconductor nanowires have great potential in fabrication of nanodevices for applications in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics, and for studies of novel physical phenomena. Sophisticated epitaxy techniques with precisely controlled growth conditions are often used to prepare high quality III-V nanowires. The growth process and cost of these experiments are therefore dedicated and very high. Here, we report a simple but generic method to synthesize III-V nanowires with high crystal quality. The technique employs a closed evacuated tube vessel with a small tube carrier containing a solid source of materials and another small tube carrier containing a growth substrate inside. The growth of nanowires is achieved after heating the closed vessel in a furnace to a preset high temperature and then cooling it down naturally to room temperature. The technique has been employed to grow InAs, GaAs, and GaSb nanowires on Si/SiO2 substrates. The as-grown nanowires are analyzed by SEM, TEM and Raman spectroscopy and the results show that the nanowires are high quality zincblende single crystals. No particular condition needs to be adjusted and controlled in the experiments. This technique provides a convenient way of synthesis of III-V semiconductor nanowires with high material quality for a wide range of applications.

  10. Revealing controllable nanowire transformation through cationic exchange for RRAM application.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Wei; Chen, Jui-Yuan; Chiu, Chung-Hua; Wu, Wen-Wei

    2014-05-14

    One dimensional metal oxide nanostructures have attracted much attention owing to their fascinating functional properties. Among them, piezoelectricity and photocatalysts along with their related materials have stirred significant interests and widespread studies in recent years. In this work, we successfully transformed piezoelectric ZnO into photocatalytic TiO2 and formed TiO2/ZnO axial heterostructure nanowires with flat interfaces by solid to solid cationic exchange reactions in high vacuum (approximately 10(-8) Torr) transmission electron microscope (TEM). Kinetic behavior of the single crystalline TiO2 was systematically analyzed. The nanoscale growth rate of TiO2 has been measured using in situ TEM videos. On the basis of the rate, we can control the dimensions of the axial-nanoheterostructure. In addition, the unique Pt/ ZnO / TiO2/ ZnO /Pt heterostructures with complementary resistive switching (CRS) characteristics were designed to solve the important issue of sneak-peak current. The resistive switching behavior was attributed to the migration of oxygen and TiO2 layer served as reservoir, which was confirmed by energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) analysis. This study not only supplied a distinct method to explore the transformation mechanisms but also exhibited the potential application of ZnO/TiO2 heterostructure in nanoscale crossbar array resistive random-access memory (RRAM). PMID:24742102

  11. Measuring the electrical properties of semiconductor nanowires using terahertz conductivity spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Hannah J.; Docherty, Callum J.; Yong, Chaw-Keong; Wong-Leung, Jennifer; Gao, Qiang; Paiman, Suriati; Tan, H. Hoe; Jagadish, C.; Lloyd-Hughes, James; Herz, Laura M.; Johnston, Michael B.

    2013-12-01

    Accurately measuring the electronic properties of nanowires is a crucial step in the development of novel semiconductor nanowire-based devices. With this in mind, optical pump-terahertz probe (OPTP) spectroscopy is ideally suited to studies of nanowires: it provides non-contact measurement of carrier transport and dynamics at room temperature. OPTP spectroscopy has been used to assess key electrical properties, including carrier lifetime and carrier mobility, of GaAs, InAs and InP nanowires. The measurements revealed that InAs nanowires exhibited the highest mobilities and InP nanowires exhibited the lowest surface recombination velocity.

  12. Enhancement of thermoelectric performance in InAs nanotubes by tuning quantum confinement effect

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Wu-Xing; Tan, Shihua; Chen, Ke-Qiu; Hu, Wenping

    2014-03-28

    By using the nonequilibrium Green's function method, we study the thermoelectric properties of InAs nanotubes. The results show that InAs nanotube with a certain internal diameter has much higher ZT value than nanowire due to the enhancement of quantum confinement effect leading to the increase of the power factor S{sup 2}G. The ZT value of InAs nanotube can reach 1.74, which is about three times greater than that of nanowires. Moreover, it is found that the ZT values of InAs nanotubes decrease rapidly with the increase of internal diameter, which results from the rapid increase of phonons thermal conductance due to the “red shift” of low-frequency optical phonon modes.

  13. Controlled fabrication of ion track nanowires and channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spohr, Reimar; Zet, Cristian; Eberhard Fischer, Bernd; Kiesewetter, Helge; Apel, Pavel; Gunko, Igor; Ohgai, Takeshi; Westerberg, Lars

    2010-03-01

    We describe a system for fabricating prescribed numbers of ion track nanochannels and nanowires from a few hundred down to one. It consists of two parts: first, a mobile tape transport system, which, in connection with an ion beam from a heavy-ion accelerator (nuclear charge Z above 18 and specific energy between 1 and 10 MeV/nucleon) tuned down to low flux density by means of defocusing and a set of sensitive fluorescence screens, can fabricate a series of equidistant irradiation spots on a tape, whereby each spot corresponds to a preset number of ion tracks. The tape transport system uses films of 36 mm width and thicknesses between 5 and 100 μm. The aiming precision of the system depends on the diameter of the installed beam-defining aperture, which is between 50 and 500 μm. The distance between neighboring irradiation spots on the tape is variable and typically set to 25 mm. After reaching the preset number of ion counts the irradiation is terminated, the tape is marked and moved to the next position. The irradiated frames are punched out to circular membranes with the irradiation spot in the center. The second part of the setup is a compact conductometric system with 10 picoampere resolution consisting of a computer controlled conductometric cell, sealing the membrane hermetically between two chemically inert half-chambers containing electrodes and filling/flushing openings, and is encased by an electrical shield and a thermal insulation. The ion tracks can be etched to a preset diameter and the system can be programmed to electroreplicate nanochannels in a prescribed sequence of magnetic/nonmagnetic metals, alloys or semiconductors. The goal of our article is to make the scientific community aware of the special features of single-ion fabrication and to demonstrate convincingly the significance of controlled etching and electro-replication.

  14. Templated Control of Au nanospheres in Silica Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, J W; Vanamu, G; Zaidi, S H

    2007-03-15

    The formation of regularly-spaced metal nanostructures in selectively-placed insulating nanowires is an important step toward realization of a wide range of nano-scale electronic and opto-electronic devices. Here we report templated synthesis of Au nanospheres embedded in silica nanowires, with nanospheres consistently spaced with a period equal to three times their diameter. Under appropriate conditions, nanowires form exclusively on Si nanostructures because of enhanced local oxidation and reduced melting temperatures relative to templates with larger dimensions. We explain the spacing of the nanospheres with a general model based on a vapor-liquid-solid mechanism, in which an Au/Si alloy dendrite remains liquid in the nanotube until a critical Si concentration is achieved locally by silicon oxide-generated nanowire growth. Additional Si oxidation then locally reduces the surface energy of the Au-rich alloy by creating a new surface with minimum area inside of the nanotube. The isolated liquid domain subsequently evolves to become an Au nanosphere, and the process is repeated.

  15. Nanowire Photovoltaic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, David

    2015-01-01

    Firefly Technologies, in collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, developed synthesis methods for highly strained nanowires. Two synthesis routes resulted in successful nanowire epitaxy: direct nucleation and growth on the substrate and a novel selective-epitaxy route based on nanolithography using diblock copolymers. The indium-arsenide (InAs) nanowires are implemented in situ within the epitaxy environment-a significant innovation relative to conventional semiconductor nanowire generation using ex situ gold nanoparticles. The introduction of these nanoscale features may enable an intermediate band solar cell while simultaneously increasing the effective absorption volume that can otherwise limit short-circuit current generated by thin quantized layers. The use of nanowires for photovoltaics decouples the absorption process from the current extraction process by virtue of the high aspect ratio. While no functional solar cells resulted from this effort, considerable fundamental understanding of the nanowire epitaxy kinetics and nanopatterning process was developed. This approach could, in principle, be an enabling technology for heterointegration of dissimilar materials. The technology also is applicable to virtual substrates. Incorporating nanowires onto a recrystallized germanium/metal foil substrate would potentially solve the problem of grain boundary shunting of generated carriers by restricting the cross-sectional area of the nanowire (tens of nanometers in diameter) to sizes smaller than the recrystallized grains (0.5 to 1 micron(exp 2).

  16. Transparently wrap-gated semiconductor nanowire arrays for studies of gate-controlled photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Nylund, Gustav; Storm, Kristian; Torstensson, Henrik; Wallentin, Jesper; Borgström, Magnus T.; Hessman, Dan; Samuelson, Lars

    2013-12-04

    We present a technique to measure gate-controlled photoluminescence (PL) on arrays of semiconductor nanowire (NW) capacitors using a transparent film of Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) wrapping around the nanowires as the gate electrode. By tuning the wrap-gate voltage, it is possible to increase the PL peak intensity of an array of undoped InP NWs by more than an order of magnitude. The fine structure of the PL spectrum reveals three subpeaks whose relative peak intensities change with gate voltage. We interpret this as gate-controlled state-filling of luminescing quantum dot segments formed by zincblende stacking faults in the mainly wurtzite NW crystal structure.

  17. A versatile synthesis method of dendrites-free segmented nanowires with a precise size control

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report an innovative strategy to obtain cylindrical nanowires combining well established and low-cost bottom-up methods such as template-assisted nanowires synthesis and electrodeposition process. This approach allows the growth of single-layer or multi-segmented nanowires with precise control over their length (from few nanometers to several micrometers). The employed techniques give rise to branched pores at the bottom of the templates and consequently dendrites at the end of the nanowires. With our method, these undesired features are easily removed from the nanowires by a selective chemical etching. This is crucial for magnetic characterizations where such non-homogeneous branches may introduce undesired features into the final magnetic response. The obtained structures show extremely narrow distributions in diameter and length, improved robustness and high-yield, making this versatile approach strongly compatible with large scale production at an industrial level. Finally, we show the possibility to tune accurately the size of the nanostructures and consequently provide an easy control over the magnetic properties of these nanostructures. PMID:22390637

  18. Tuning the local temperature during feedback controlled electromigration in gold nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, An; Hou, Shimin Liao, Jianhui

    2014-06-02

    Feedback controlled electromigration (FCE) in metallic nanowires has been widely used for various purposes. However, the control of the local temperature during FCE remains a challenge. Here, we report that the environment temperature can be used as a knob to tune the local temperature during FCE in gold nanowires. FCE was performed in gold nanowires at various environment temperatures ranging from 4.2 K to 300 K. We find that the dissipated power normalized by the cross section area of the nano constriction is linearly proportional to the environment temperature. Interestingly, the estimated local maximum temperature parabolically depends on the environment temperature. A minimum in the local temperature can be reached if an appropriate environment temperature is chosen. Our findings are well supported by the finite element simulation. Moreover, the data indicates the coupling between FCE triggering current density and local temperature.

  19. Ledge-flow-controlled catalyst interface dynamics during Si nanowire growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Stephan; Sharma, Renu; Wirth, Christoph T.; Cervantes-Sodi, Felipe; Ducati, Caterina; Kasama, Takeshi; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Drucker, Jeff; Bennett, Peter; Robertson, John

    2008-05-01

    Self-assembled nanowires offer the prospect of accurate and scalable device engineering at an atomistic scale for applications in electronics, photonics and biology. However, deterministic nanowire growth and the control of dopant profiles and heterostructures are limited by an incomplete understanding of the role of commonly used catalysts and specifically of their interface dynamics. Although catalytic chemical vapour deposition of nanowires below the eutectic temperature has been demonstrated in many semiconductor-catalyst systems, growth from solid catalysts is still disputed and the overall mechanism is largely unresolved. Here, we present a video-rate environmental transmission electron microscopy study of Si nanowire formation from Pd silicide crystals under disilane exposure. A Si crystal nucleus forms by phase separation, as observed for the liquid Au-Si system, which we use as a comparative benchmark. The dominant coherent Pd silicide/Si growth interface subsequently advances by lateral propagation of ledges, driven by catalytic dissociation of disilane and coupled Pd and Si diffusion. Our results establish an atomistic framework for nanowire assembly from solid catalysts, relevant also to their contact formation.

  20. Ledge-flow-controlled catalyst interface dynamics during Si nanowire growth.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Stephan; Sharma, Renu; Wirth, Christoph T; Cervantes-Sodi, Felipe; Ducati, Caterina; Kasama, Takeshi; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Drucker, Jeff; Bennett, Peter; Robertson, John

    2008-05-01

    Self-assembled nanowires offer the prospect of accurate and scalable device engineering at an atomistic scale for applications in electronics, photonics and biology. However, deterministic nanowire growth and the control of dopant profiles and heterostructures are limited by an incomplete understanding of the role of commonly used catalysts and specifically of their interface dynamics. Although catalytic chemical vapour deposition of nanowires below the eutectic temperature has been demonstrated in many semiconductor-catalyst systems, growth from solid catalysts is still disputed and the overall mechanism is largely unresolved. Here, we present a video-rate environmental transmission electron microscopy study of Si nanowire formation from Pd silicide crystals under disilane exposure. A Si crystal nucleus forms by phase separation, as observed for the liquid Au-Si system, which we use as a comparative benchmark. The dominant coherent Pd silicide/Si growth interface subsequently advances by lateral propagation of ledges, driven by catalytic dissociation of disilane and coupled Pd and Si diffusion. Our results establish an atomistic framework for nanowire assembly from solid catalysts, relevant also to their contact formation. PMID:18327262

  1. Real-time visualization of diffusion-controlled nanowire growth in solution.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shengrong; Chen, Zuofeng; Ha, Yoon-Cheol; Wiley, Benjamin J

    2014-08-13

    This Letter shows that copper nanowires grow through the diffusion-controlled reduction of dihydroxycopper(I), Cu(OH)2(-). A combination of potentiostatic coulometry, UV-visible spectroscopy, and thermodynamic calculations was used to determine the species adding to growing Cu nanowires is Cu(OH)2(-). Cyclic voltammetry was then used to measure the diffusion coefficient of Cu(OH)2(-) in the reaction solution. Given the diameter of a Cu nanowire and the diffusion coefficient of Cu(OH)2(-), we calculated the dependence of the diffusion-limited growth rate on the concentration of copper ions to be 26 nm s(-1) mM(-1). Independent measurements of the nanowire growth rate with dark-field optical microscopy yielded 24 nm s(-1) mM(-1) for the growth rate dependence on the concentration of copper. Dependence of the nanowire growth rate on temperature yielded a low activation energy of 11.5 kJ mol(-1), consistent with diffusion-limited growth. PMID:25054865

  2. Controlled Structure of Electrochemically Deposited Pd Nanowires in Ion-Track Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jinglai; Lyu, Shuangbao; Yao, Huijun; Mo, Dan; Chen, Yonghui; Sun, Youmei; Maaz, K.; Maqbool, M.; Liu, Jie

    2015-12-01

    Understanding and controlling structural properties of the materials are crucial in materials research. In this paper, we report that crystallinity and crystallographic orientation of Pd nanowires can be tailored by varying the fabrication conditions during electrochemical deposition in polycarbonate ion-track templates. By changing the deposition temperature during the fabrication process, the nanowires with both single- and poly-crystallinities were obtained. The wires with preferred crystallographic orientations along [111], [100], and [110] directions were achieved via adjusting the applied voltage and temperature during electrochemical deposition.

  3. Predicting the optoelectronic properties of nanowire films based on control of length polydispersity

    PubMed Central

    Large, Matthew J.; Burn, Jake; King, Alice A.; Ogilvie, Sean P.; Jurewicz, Izabela; Dalton, Alan B.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the optoelectronic properties of percolating thin films of silver nanowires (AgNWs) are predominantly dependent upon the length distribution of the constituent AgNWs. A generalized expression is derived to describe the dependence of both sheet resistance and optical transmission on this distribution. We experimentally validate the relationship using ultrasonication to controllably vary the length distribution. These results have major implications where nanowire-based films are a desirable material for transparent conductor applications; in particular when application-specific performance criteria must be met. It is of particular interest to have a simple method to generalize the properties of bulk films from an understanding of the base material, as this will speed up the optimisation process. It is anticipated that these results may aid in the adoption of nanowire films in industry, for applications such as touch sensors or photovoltaic electrode structures. PMID:27158132

  4. Predicting the optoelectronic properties of nanowire films based on control of length polydispersity.

    PubMed

    Large, Matthew J; Burn, Jake; King, Alice A; Ogilvie, Sean P; Jurewicz, Izabela; Dalton, Alan B

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the optoelectronic properties of percolating thin films of silver nanowires (AgNWs) are predominantly dependent upon the length distribution of the constituent AgNWs. A generalized expression is derived to describe the dependence of both sheet resistance and optical transmission on this distribution. We experimentally validate the relationship using ultrasonication to controllably vary the length distribution. These results have major implications where nanowire-based films are a desirable material for transparent conductor applications; in particular when application-specific performance criteria must be met. It is of particular interest to have a simple method to generalize the properties of bulk films from an understanding of the base material, as this will speed up the optimisation process. It is anticipated that these results may aid in the adoption of nanowire films in industry, for applications such as touch sensors or photovoltaic electrode structures. PMID:27158132

  5. Predicting the optoelectronic properties of nanowire films based on control of length polydispersity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Large, Matthew J.; Burn, Jake; King, Alice A.; Ogilvie, Sean P.; Jurewicz, Izabela; Dalton, Alan B.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate that the optoelectronic properties of percolating thin films of silver nanowires (AgNWs) are predominantly dependent upon the length distribution of the constituent AgNWs. A generalized expression is derived to describe the dependence of both sheet resistance and optical transmission on this distribution. We experimentally validate the relationship using ultrasonication to controllably vary the length distribution. These results have major implications where nanowire-based films are a desirable material for transparent conductor applications; in particular when application-specific performance criteria must be met. It is of particular interest to have a simple method to generalize the properties of bulk films from an understanding of the base material, as this will speed up the optimisation process. It is anticipated that these results may aid in the adoption of nanowire films in industry, for applications such as touch sensors or photovoltaic electrode structures.

  6. Modulated Magnetic Nanowires for Controlling Domain Wall Motion: Toward 3D Magnetic Memories.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yurii P; Chuvilin, Andrey; Lopatin, Sergei; Kosel, Jurgen

    2016-05-24

    Cylindrical magnetic nanowires are attractive materials for next generation data storage devices owing to the theoretically achievable high domain wall velocity and their efficient fabrication in highly dense arrays. In order to obtain control over domain wall motion, reliable and well-defined pinning sites are required. Here, we show that modulated nanowires consisting of alternating nickel and cobalt sections facilitate efficient domain wall pinning at the interfaces of those sections. By combining electron holography with micromagnetic simulations, the pinning effect can be explained by the interaction of the stray fields generated at the interface and the domain wall. Utilizing a modified differential phase contrast imaging, we visualized the pinned domain wall with a high resolution, revealing its three-dimensional vortex structure with the previously predicted Bloch point at its center. These findings suggest the potential of modulated nanowires for the development of high-density, three-dimensional data storage devices. PMID:27138460

  7. Controllable synthesis of Cu-Ni core-shell nanoparticles and nanowires with tunable magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huizhang; Jin, Jiarui; Chen, Yuanzhi; Liu, Xiang; Zeng, Deqian; Wang, Laisen; Peng, Dong-Liang

    2016-05-25

    Cu seeds were used to direct the epitaxial growth of Ni shell to form Cu-Ni core-shell cubes, tetrahexahedrons and nanowires. The controllable epitaxial growth of Ni shells on Cu cores provided selectively exposed surfaces and morphologies as well as tunable magnetic properties. PMID:27147395

  8. Rapid and controllable flame reduction of TiO2 nanowires for enhanced solar water-splitting.

    PubMed

    Cho, In Sun; Logar, Manca; Lee, Chi Hwan; Cai, Lili; Prinz, Fritz B; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    We report a new flame reduction method to generate controllable amount of oxygen vacancies in TiO2 nanowires that leads to nearly three times improvement in the photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting performance. The flame reduction method has unique advantages of a high temperature (>1000 °C), ultrafast heating rate, tunable reduction environment, and open-atmosphere operation, so it enables rapid formation of oxygen vacancies (less than one minute) without damaging the nanowire morphology and crystallinity and is even applicable to various metal oxides. Significantly, we show that flame reduction greatly improves the saturation photocurrent densities of TiO2 nanowires (2.7 times higher), α-Fe2O3 nanowires (9.4 times higher), ZnO nanowires (2.0 times higher), and BiVO4 thin film (4.3 times higher) in comparison to untreated control samples for PEC water-splitting applications. PMID:24295287

  9. Plasmon-controlled excitonic emission from vertically-tapered organic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikkaraddy, Rohit; Patra, Partha Pratim; Tripathi, Ravi P. N.; Dasgupta, Arindam; Kumar, G. V. Pavan

    2016-08-01

    Organic molecular nanophotonics has emerged as an important avenue to harness molecular aggregation and crystallization on various functional platforms to obtain nano-optical devices. To this end, there is growing interest to combine organic molecular nanostructures with plasmonic surfaces and interfaces. Motivated by this, herein we introduce a unique geometry: vertically-tapered organic nanowires grown on a plasmonic thin film. A polarization-sensitive plasmon-polariton on a gold thin-film was harnessed to control the exciton-polariton propagation and subsequent photoluminescence from an organic nanowire made of diaminoanthraquinone (DAAQ) molecules. We show that the exciton-polariton emission from individual DAAQ nanowires can be modulated up to a factor of 6 by varying the excitation polarization state of surface plasmons. Our observations were corroborated with full-wave three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain calculations performed on vertically-tapered nanowire geometry. Our work introduces a new optical platform to study coupling between propagating plasmons and propagating excitons, and may have implications in emerging fields such as hybrid-polariton based light emitting devices and vertical-cavity nano-optomechanics.Organic molecular nanophotonics has emerged as an important avenue to harness molecular aggregation and crystallization on various functional platforms to obtain nano-optical devices. To this end, there is growing interest to combine organic molecular nanostructures with plasmonic surfaces and interfaces. Motivated by this, herein we introduce a unique geometry: vertically-tapered organic nanowires grown on a plasmonic thin film. A polarization-sensitive plasmon-polariton on a gold thin-film was harnessed to control the exciton-polariton propagation and subsequent photoluminescence from an organic nanowire made of diaminoanthraquinone (DAAQ) molecules. We show that the exciton-polariton emission from individual DAAQ nanowires can be

  10. Controlled Growth of Copper Oxide Nano-Wires through Direct Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilman, Joann; Neupane, Ravi; Yost, Andrew J.; Chien, Teyu

    Copper oxides, both Cu2O and CuO, have many applications in solar cells, sensors, and nano-electronics. The properties of the copper oxides are further influenced by the dimension of the materials, especially when made in nanoscale. In particular, the properties of the copper oxide nanowires could be tuned by their structures, lengths, and widths. While several methods have been reported to grow nanowires, direct oxidation is arguably the most economical one. This research examines the effects of oxidization duration and temperature in dry air environment on the development of copper oxide nanowires in order to achieve cost effective controllable growth. Using the direct oxidation method in dry air we have demonstrated growth of CuO nano-wires at temperatures as low as 300 °C and as short as 1hr. Furthermore we have observed that the lengths and diameters of the CuO NWs can be controlled by the duration and temperature of the oxidation process. WY NASA Space Grant Consortium.

  11. Initialization of a spin qubit in a site-controlled nanowire quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagoudakis, Konstantinos G.; McMahon, Peter L.; Fischer, Kevin A.; Puri, Shruti; Müller, Kai; Dalacu, Dan; Poole, Philip J.; Reimer, Michael E.; Zwiller, Val; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa; Vučković, Jelena

    2016-05-01

    A fault-tolerant quantum repeater or quantum computer using solid-state spin-based quantum bits will likely require a physical implementation with many spins arranged in a grid. Self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) have been established as attractive candidates for building spin-based quantum information processing devices, but such QDs are randomly positioned, which makes them unsuitable for constructing large-scale processors. Recent efforts have shown that QDs embedded in nanowires can be deterministically positioned in regular arrays, can store single charges, and have excellent optical properties, but so far there have been no demonstrations of spin qubit operations using nanowire QDs. Here we demonstrate optical pumping of individual spins trapped in site-controlled nanowire QDs, resulting in high-fidelity spin-qubit initialization. This represents the next step towards establishing spins in nanowire QDs as quantum memories suitable for use in a large-scale, fault-tolerant quantum computer or repeater based on all-optical control of the spin qubits.

  12. Controlled Synthesis of Pt Nanowires with Ordered Large Mesopores for Methanol Oxidation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengwei; Xu, Lianbin; Yan, Yushan; Chen, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Catalysts for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) are at the heart of key green-energy fuel cell technology. Nanostructured Pt materials are the most popular and effective catalysts for MOR. Controlling the morphology and structure of Pt nanomaterials can provide opportunities to greatly increase their activity and stability. Ordered nanoporous Pt nanowires with controlled large mesopores (15, 30 and 45 nm) are facilely fabricated by chemical reduction deposition from dual templates using porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes with silica nanospheres self-assembled in the channels. The prepared mesoporous Pt nanowires are highly active and stable electrocatalysts for MOR. The mesoporous Pt nanowires with 15 nm mesopores exhibit a large electrochemically active surface area (ECSA, 40.5 m(2) g(-1)), a high mass activity (398 mA mg(-1)) and specific activity (0.98 mA cm(-2)), and a good If/Ib ratio (1.15), better than the other mesoporous Pt nanowires and the commercial Pt black catalyst. PMID:27550737

  13. Controlled Synthesis of Pt Nanowires with Ordered Large Mesopores for Methanol Oxidation Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chengwei; Xu, Lianbin; Yan, Yushan; Chen, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Catalysts for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) are at the heart of key green-energy fuel cell technology. Nanostructured Pt materials are the most popular and effective catalysts for MOR. Controlling the morphology and structure of Pt nanomaterials can provide opportunities to greatly increase their activity and stability. Ordered nanoporous Pt nanowires with controlled large mesopores (15, 30 and 45 nm) are facilely fabricated by chemical reduction deposition from dual templates using porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes with silica nanospheres self-assembled in the channels. The prepared mesoporous Pt nanowires are highly active and stable electrocatalysts for MOR. The mesoporous Pt nanowires with 15 nm mesopores exhibit a large electrochemically active surface area (ECSA, 40.5 m2 g−1), a high mass activity (398 mA mg−1) and specific activity (0.98 mA cm−2), and a good If/Ib ratio (1.15), better than the other mesoporous Pt nanowires and the commercial Pt black catalyst. PMID:27550737

  14. Conductance through a proximitized nanowire in the Coulomb blockade regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heck, Bernard; Lutchyn, Roman; Glazman, Leonid

    Motivated by recent experiments of the Copenhagen group on InAs nanowires with epitaxial Al, we investigate the two-terminal conductance of a strongly proximitized nanowire in the Coulomb blockade regime. We identify the leading electron transport processes at zero applied magnetic field B as well as at finite fields, suppressing the induced gap Δind (B) . In the conventional superconducting phase, the conductance is controlled by the sequential Cooper pair tunneling if Δind (B) exceeds the charging energy Ec, and by the elastic single-electron processes if Δind (B)

  15. Morphology controlling method for amorphous silica nanoparticles and jellyfish-like nanowires and their luminescence properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haitao; Huang, Zhaohui; Huang, Juntong; Xu, Song; Fang, Minghao; Liu, Yan-Gai; Wu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shaowei

    2016-03-01

    Uniform silica nanoparticles and jellyfish-like nanowires were synthesized by a chemical vapour deposition method on Si substrates treated without and with Ni(NO3)2, using silicon powder as the source material. Composition and structural characterization using field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the as-prepared products were silica nanoparticles and nanowires which have amorphous structures. The form of nanoparticles should be related to gas-phase nucleation procedure. The growth of the nanowires was in accordance with vapour-liquid-solid mechanism, followed by Ostwald ripening to form the jellyfish-like morphology. Photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence measurements showed that the silica products excited by different light sources show different luminescence properties. The emission spectra of both silica nanoparticles and nanowires are due to the neutral oxygen vacancies (≡Si-Si≡). The as-synthesized silica with controlled morphology can find potential applications in future nanodevices with tailorable photoelectric properties.

  16. Plasmon-controlled excitonic emission from vertically-tapered organic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Chikkaraddy, Rohit; Patra, Partha Pratim; Tripathi, Ravi P N; Dasgupta, Arindam; Kumar, G V Pavan

    2016-08-21

    Organic molecular nanophotonics has emerged as an important avenue to harness molecular aggregation and crystallization on various functional platforms to obtain nano-optical devices. To this end, there is growing interest to combine organic molecular nanostructures with plasmonic surfaces and interfaces. Motivated by this, herein we introduce a unique geometry: vertically-tapered organic nanowires grown on a plasmonic thin film. A polarization-sensitive plasmon-polariton on a gold thin-film was harnessed to control the exciton-polariton propagation and subsequent photoluminescence from an organic nanowire made of diaminoanthraquinone (DAAQ) molecules. We show that the exciton-polariton emission from individual DAAQ nanowires can be modulated up to a factor of 6 by varying the excitation polarization state of surface plasmons. Our observations were corroborated with full-wave three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain calculations performed on vertically-tapered nanowire geometry. Our work introduces a new optical platform to study coupling between propagating plasmons and propagating excitons, and may have implications in emerging fields such as hybrid-polariton based light emitting devices and vertical-cavity nano-optomechanics. PMID:27444822

  17. Morphology controlling method for amorphous silica nanoparticles and jellyfish-like nanowires and their luminescence properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haitao; Huang, Zhaohui; Huang, Juntong; Xu, Song; Fang, Minghao; Liu, Yan-Gai; Wu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shaowei

    2016-01-01

    Uniform silica nanoparticles and jellyfish-like nanowires were synthesized by a chemical vapour deposition method on Si substrates treated without and with Ni(NO3)2, using silicon powder as the source material. Composition and structural characterization using field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the as-prepared products were silica nanoparticles and nanowires which have amorphous structures. The form of nanoparticles should be related to gas-phase nucleation procedure. The growth of the nanowires was in accordance with vapour-liquid-solid mechanism, followed by Ostwald ripening to form the jellyfish-like morphology. Photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence measurements showed that the silica products excited by different light sources show different luminescence properties. The emission spectra of both silica nanoparticles and nanowires are due to the neutral oxygen vacancies (≡Si-Si≡). The as-synthesized silica with controlled morphology can find potential applications in future nanodevices with tailorable photoelectric properties. PMID:26940294

  18. Morphology controlling method for amorphous silica nanoparticles and jellyfish-like nanowires and their luminescence properties

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haitao; Huang, Zhaohui; Huang, Juntong; Xu, Song; Fang, Minghao; Liu, Yan-gai; Wu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shaowei

    2016-01-01

    Uniform silica nanoparticles and jellyfish-like nanowires were synthesized by a chemical vapour deposition method on Si substrates treated without and with Ni(NO3)2, using silicon powder as the source material. Composition and structural characterization using field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the as-prepared products were silica nanoparticles and nanowires which have amorphous structures. The form of nanoparticles should be related to gas-phase nucleation procedure. The growth of the nanowires was in accordance with vapour-liquid-solid mechanism, followed by Ostwald ripening to form the jellyfish-like morphology. Photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence measurements showed that the silica products excited by different light sources show different luminescence properties. The emission spectra of both silica nanoparticles and nanowires are due to the neutral oxygen vacancies (≡Si-Si≡). The as-synthesized silica with controlled morphology can find potential applications in future nanodevices with tailorable photoelectric properties. PMID:26940294

  19. Growth strategies to control tapering in Ge nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Periwal, P.; Baron, T. Salem, B.; Bassani, F.; Gentile, P.

    2014-04-01

    We report the effect of PH{sub 3} on the morphology of Au catalyzed Ge nanowires (NWs). Ge NWs were grown on Si (111) substrate at 400 °C in the presence of PH{sub 3}, using vapor-liquid-solid method by chemical vapor deposition. We show that high PH{sub 3}/GeH{sub 4} ratio causes passivation at NW surface. At high PH{sub 3} concentration phosphorous atoms attach itself on NW surface and form a self-protection coating that prevents conformal growth and leads to taper free nanostructures. However, in case of low PH{sub 3} flux the combination of axial and radial growth mechanism occurs resulting in conical structure. We have also investigated axial PH{sub 3}-intrinsic junctions in Ge NWs. The unusual NW shape is attributed to a combination of catalyzed, uncatalyzed and diffusion induced growth.

  20. Controllable electrical and physical breakdown of poly-crystalline silicon nanowires by thermally assisted electromigration.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun-Young; Moon, Dong-Il; Seol, Myeong-Lok; Jeon, Chang-Hoon; Jeon, Gwang-Jae; Han, Jin-Woo; Kim, Choong-Ki; Park, Sang-Jae; Lee, Hee Chul; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    The importance of poly-crystalline silicon (poly-Si) in semiconductor manufacturing is rapidly increasing due to its highly controllable conductivity and excellent, uniform deposition quality. With the continuing miniaturization of electronic components, low dimensional structures such as 1-dimensional nanowires (NWs) have attracted a great deal of attention. But such components have a much higher current density than 2- or 3-dimensional films, and high current can degrade device lifetime and lead to breakdown problems. Here, we report on the electrical and thermal characteristics of poly-Si NWs, which can also be used to control electrical and physical breakdown under high current density. This work reports a controllable catastrophic change of poly-Si NWs by thermally-assisted electromigration and underlying mechanisms. It also reports the direct and real time observation of these catastrophic changes of poly-Si nanowires for the first time, using scanning electron microscopy. PMID:26782708

  1. Controllable electrical and physical breakdown of poly-crystalline silicon nanowires by thermally assisted electromigration

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun-Young; Moon, Dong-Il; Seol, Myeong-Lok; Jeon, Chang-Hoon; Jeon, Gwang-Jae; Han, Jin-Woo; Kim, Choong-Ki; Park, Sang-Jae; Lee, Hee Chul; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    The importance of poly-crystalline silicon (poly-Si) in semiconductor manufacturing is rapidly increasing due to its highly controllable conductivity and excellent, uniform deposition quality. With the continuing miniaturization of electronic components, low dimensional structures such as 1-dimensional nanowires (NWs) have attracted a great deal of attention. But such components have a much higher current density than 2- or 3- dimensional films, and high current can degrade device lifetime and lead to breakdown problems. Here, we report on the electrical and thermal characteristics of poly-Si NWs, which can also be used to control electrical and physical breakdown under high current density. This work reports a controllable catastrophic change of poly-Si NWs by thermally-assisted electromigration and underlying mechanisms. It also reports the direct and real time observation of these catastrophic changes of poly-Si nanowires for the first time, using scanning electron microscopy. PMID:26782708

  2. Controllable electrical and physical breakdown of poly-crystalline silicon nanowires by thermally assisted electromigration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun-Young; Moon, Dong-Il; Seol, Myeong-Lok; Jeon, Chang-Hoon; Jeon, Gwang-Jae; Han, Jin-Woo; Kim, Choong-Ki; Park, Sang-Jae; Lee, Hee Chul; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    The importance of poly-crystalline silicon (poly-Si) in semiconductor manufacturing is rapidly increasing due to its highly controllable conductivity and excellent, uniform deposition quality. With the continuing miniaturization of electronic components, low dimensional structures such as 1-dimensional nanowires (NWs) have attracted a great deal of attention. But such components have a much higher current density than 2- or 3- dimensional films, and high current can degrade device lifetime and lead to breakdown problems. Here, we report on the electrical and thermal characteristics of poly-Si NWs, which can also be used to control electrical and physical breakdown under high current density. This work reports a controllable catastrophic change of poly-Si NWs by thermally-assisted electromigration and underlying mechanisms. It also reports the direct and real time observation of these catastrophic changes of poly-Si nanowires for the first time, using scanning electron microscopy.

  3. Chemical composition and thermal stability of GaAs oxides grown by AFM anodic oxidation for site-controlled growth of InAs quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, K. M.; Shibata, K.; Horiuchi, I.; Kamiko, M.; Yamamoto, R.; Hirakawa, K.

    2011-12-01

    We have fabricated GaAs oxides by using atomic force microscope (AFM)-assisted anodic oxidation at various bias voltages, Vox, and studied their chemical compositions and thermal stabilities. The oxides grown at bias voltages less than 30 V desorbed after standard thermal cleaning in molecular beam epitaxy, while the oxide patterns fabricated at Vox≥40 V survived on the surface. We have further investigated the chemical composition of the oxides by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. It has been found that the AFM oxides grown at Vox˜10 V predominantly consist of Ga2O and GaO, whereas those grown at Vox˜50 V contain a Ga2O3-component. This result indicates that the better thermal stability of AFM oxides grown at Vox≥40 V can be attributed to the formation of Ga2O3. We grew a GaAs buffer layer on the oxide nanomasks and obtained nanoholes. After supplying InAs, selective dot nucleation took place in the nanoholes, resulting in successful formation of site-controlled QDs.

  4. Growth control, structure, chemical state, and photoresponse of CuO-CdS core-shell heterostructure nanowires.

    PubMed

    El Mel, A A; Buffière, M; Bouts, N; Gautron, E; Tessier, P Y; Henzler, K; Guttmann, P; Konstantinidis, S; Bittencourt, C; Snyders, R

    2013-07-01

    The growth of single-crystal CuO nanowires by thermal annealing of copper thin films in air is studied. We show that the density, length, and diameter of the nanowires can be controlled by tuning the morphology and structure of the copper thin films deposited by DC magnetron sputtering. After identifying the optimal conditions for the growth of CuO nanowires, chemical bath deposition is employed to coat the CuO nanowires with CdS in order to form p-n nanojunction arrays. As revealed by high-resolution TEM analysis, the thickness of the polycrystalline CdS shell increases when decreasing the diameter of the CuO core for a given time of CdS deposition. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy combined with transmission x-ray microscopy allows the chemical analysis of isolated nanowires. The absence of modification in the spectra at the Cu L and O K edges after the deposition of CdS on the CuO nanowires indicates that neither Cd nor S diffuse into the CuO phase. We further demonstrate that the core-shell nanowires exhibit the I-V characteristic of a resistor instead of a diode. The electrical behavior of the device was found to be photosensitive, since increasing the incident light intensity induces an increase in the collected electrical current. PMID:23732175

  5. Diameter and location control of ZnO nanowires using electrodeposition and sodium citrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifson, Max L.; Levey, Christopher G.; Gibson, Ursula J.

    2013-10-01

    We report single-step growth of spatially localized ZnO nanowires of controlled diameter to enable improved performance of piezoelectric devices such as nanogenerators. This study is the first to demonstrate the combination of electrodeposition with zinc nitrate and sodium citrate in the growth solution. Electrodeposition through a thermally-grown silicon oxide mask results in localization, while the growth voltage and solution chemistry are tuned to control the nanowire geometry. We observe a competition between lateral (relative to the (0001) axis) citrate-related morphology and voltage-driven vertical growth which enables this control. High aspect ratios result with either pure nitrate or nitrate-citrate mixtures if large voltages are used, but low growth voltages permit the growth of large diameter nanowires in solution with citrate. Measurements of the current density suggest a two-step growth process. An oxide mask blocks the electrodeposition, and suppresses nucleation of thermally driven growth, permitting single-step lithography on low cost p-type silicon substrates.

  6. Controlled growth of semiconducting nanowire, nanowall, and hybrid nanostructures on graphene for piezoelectric nanogenerators.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Brijesh; Lee, Keun Young; Park, Hyun-Kyu; Chae, Seung Jin; Lee, Young Hee; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2011-05-24

    Precise control of morphologies of one- or two-dimensional nanostructures during growth has not been easy, usually degrading device performance and therefore limiting applications to various advanced nanoscale electronics and optoelectronics. Graphene could be a platform to serve as a substrate for both morphology control and direct use of electrodes due to its ideal monolayer flatness with π electrons. Here, we report that, by using graphene directly as a substrate, vertically well-aligned zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires and nanowalls were obtained systematically by controlling gold (Au) catalyst thickness and growth time without inflicting significant thermal damage on the graphene layer during thermal chemical vapor deposition of ZnO at high temperature of about 900 °C. We clarify Au nanoparticle positions at graphene-ZnO heterojunctions that are very important in realizing advanced nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic applications of such nanostructures. Further, we demonstrate a piezoelectric nanogenerator that was fabricated from the vertically aligned nanowire-nanowall ZnO hybrid/graphene structure generates a new type of direct current through the specific electron dynamics in the nanowire-nanowall hybrid. PMID:21495657

  7. Spin current control of damping in YIG/Pt nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safranski, Christopher; Barsukov, Igor; Lee, Han Kyu; Schneider, Tobias; Jara, Alejandro; Smith, Andrew; Chang, Houchen; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Wu, Mingzhong; Krivorotov, Ilya

    Understanding of spin transport at ferromagnet/normal metal interfaces is of great importance for spintronics applications. We report the effect of pure spin currents in YIG(30 nm)/Pt(6 nm) nanowires. The samples show magneto-resistance from two distinct mechanisms: (i) spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) and (ii) inverse spin Hall effect (iSHE) along with spin Seebeck current (SSC) induced by Ohmic heating of the Pt layer. Using the SMR and iSHE effects, we measure the spin wave eigenmodes by spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance (ST-FMR). Direct current applied to the Pt layer results in injection of spin Hall current into YIG that acts as damping or anti-damping spin torque depending on the polarity. In addition, Ohmic heating gives rise to a SSC acting as anti-damping regardless of current polarity. ST-FMR reveals current-induced variation of the spin wave mode linewidth that is asymmetric in the bias current and decreases to zero for anti-damping spin Hall current. Near this current, we observe complex interaction among the spin wave eigenmodes that we asses using micromagnetic simulations. Our results advance understanding of magnetization dynamics driven by pure spin currents.

  8. Ultra-low density InAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrovskii, V. G. Cirlin, G. E.; Brunkov, P. A.; Perimetti, U.; Akopyan, N.

    2013-10-15

    We show that InAs quantum dots (QDs) can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with an ultralow density of sin 10{sup 7} cm{sup -2} without any preliminary or post-growth surface treatment. The strain-induced QD formation proceeds via the standard Stranski-Krastanow mechanism, where the InAs coverage is decreased to 1.3-1.5 monolayers (MLs). By using off-cut GaAs (100) substrates, we facilitate the island nucleation in this subcritical coverage range without any growth interruption. The QD density dependences on the InAs coverage are studied by photoluminescence, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and are well reproduced by the universal double exponential shapes. This method enables the fabrication of InAs QDs with controllable density in the range 10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} cm{sup -2}, exhibiting bright photoluminescence.

  9. Time scales for Majorana manipulation using Coulomb blockade in gate-controlled superconducting nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hell, Michael; Danon, Jeroen; Flensberg, Karsten; Leijnse, Martin

    2016-07-01

    We numerically compute the low-energy spectrum of a gate-controlled superconducting topological nanowire segmented into two islands, each Josephson coupled to a bulk superconductor. This device may host two pairs of Majorana bound states and could provide a platform for testing Majorana fusion rules. We analyze the crossover between (i) a charge-dominated regime utilizable for initialization and readout of Majorana bound states, (ii) a single-island regime for dominating interisland Majorana coupling, (iii) a Josephson-plasmon regime for large coupling to the bulk superconductors, and (iv) a regime of four Majorana bound states allowing for topologically protected Majorana manipulations. From the energy spectrum, we derive conservative estimates for the time scales of a fusion-rule testing protocol proposed recently (D. Aasen et al., arXiv:1511.05153). We also analyze the steps needed for basic Majorana braiding operations in branched nanowire structures.

  10. Controlling the stability of both the structure and velocity of domain walls in magnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, J.; Atkinson, D.

    2016-08-01

    For magnetic nanowire devices, the precise control of both domain wall (DW) motion and pinning behaviour is essential for reliable functional performance. The domain wall velocity and wall structure are typically sensitive to the driving field or spin-polarized current, and the pinning behaviour depends on the walls' structure and chirality, leading to variability in behaviour. Here, a systematic study combining experimental measurements and micromagnetic simulations of planar nanowires with small fixed-angle structural modulations on both edges was undertaken to study the domain wall reversal regime. A phase diagram for the reversal field as a function of modulation amplitude was obtained that shows that three DW reversal regime. A range of field and modulation amplitudes were identified in which stable DW reversal occurs, where the wall velocity is constant as a function of field and the wall structure is stable, which is well suited to applications.

  11. Controlled Growth of Platinum Nanowire Arrays on Sulfur Doped Graphene as High Performance Electrocatalyst

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rongyue; Higgins, Drew C.; Hoque, Md Ariful; Lee, DongUn; Hassan, Fathy; Chen, Zhongwei

    2013-01-01

    Graphene supported Pt nanostructures have great potential to be used as catalysts in electrochemical energy conversion and storage technologies; however the simultaneous control of Pt morphology and dispersion, along with ideally tailoring the physical properties of the catalyst support properties has proven very challenging. Using sulfur doped graphene (SG) as a support material, the heterogeneous dopant atoms could serve as nucleation sites allowing for the preparation of SG supported Pt nanowire arrays with ultra-thin diameters (2–5 nm) and dense surface coverage. Detailed investigation of the preparation technique reveals that the structure of the resulting composite could be readily controlled by fine tuning the Pt nanowire nucleation and growth reaction kinetics and the Pt-support interactions, whereby a mechanistic platinum nanowire array growth model is proposed. Electrochemical characterization demonstrates that the composite materials have 2–3 times higher catalytic activities toward the oxygen reduction and methanol oxidation reaction compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst. PMID:23942256

  12. Controlled growth of platinum nanowire arrays on sulfur doped graphene as high performance electrocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rongyue; Higgins, Drew C; Hoque, Md Ariful; Lee, Dongun; Hassan, Fathy; Chen, Zhongwei

    2013-01-01

    Graphene supported Pt nanostructures have great potential to be used as catalysts in electrochemical energy conversion and storage technologies; however the simultaneous control of Pt morphology and dispersion, along with ideally tailoring the physical properties of the catalyst support properties has proven very challenging. Using sulfur doped graphene (SG) as a support material, the heterogeneous dopant atoms could serve as nucleation sites allowing for the preparation of SG supported Pt nanowire arrays with ultra-thin diameters (2-5 nm) and dense surface coverage. Detailed investigation of the preparation technique reveals that the structure of the resulting composite could be readily controlled by fine tuning the Pt nanowire nucleation and growth reaction kinetics and the Pt-support interactions, whereby a mechanistic platinum nanowire array growth model is proposed. Electrochemical characterization demonstrates that the composite materials have 2-3 times higher catalytic activities toward the oxygen reduction and methanol oxidation reaction compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst. PMID:23942256

  13. Vertically aligned crystalline silicon nanowires with controlled diameters for energy conversion applications: Experimental and theoretical insights

    SciTech Connect

    Razek, Sara Abdel; Swillam, Mohamed A.; Allam, Nageh K.

    2014-05-21

    Vertically orientated single crystalline silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays with controlled diameters are fabricated via a metal-assisted chemical etching method. The diameter of the fabricated nanowires is controlled by simply varying the etching time in HF/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} electrolytes. The fabricated SiNWs have diameters ranging from 117 to 650 nm and lengths from 8 to 18 μm. The optical measurements showed a significant difference in the reflectance/absorption of the SiNWs with different diameters, where the reflectance increases with increasing the diameter of the SiNWs. The SiNWs showed significant photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra with peaks lying between 380 and 670 nm. The PL intensity increases as the diameter increases and shows red shift for peaks at ∼670 nm. The increase or decrease of reflectivity is coincident with PL intensity at wavelength ∼660 nm. The x-ray diffraction patterns confirm the high crystallinity of the fabricated SiNWs. In addition, the Raman spectra showed a shift in the first order transverse band toward lower frequencies compared to that usually seen for c-Si. Finite difference time domain simulations have been performed to confirm the effect of change of diameter on the optical properties of the nanowires. The simulation results showed good agreement with the experimental results for the SiNWs of different diameters.

  14. Controlling the growth and field emission properties of silicide nanowire arrays by direct silicification of Ni foil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihong; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Lei; Yang, Deren

    2008-09-17

    Nickel silicide nanowire arrays have been achieved by the decomposition of SiH(4) on Ni foil at 650 °C. It is indicated that the nickel silicide nanowires consist of roots with diameter of about 100-200 nm and tips with diameter of about 10-50 nm. A Ni diffusion controlled mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of the nickel silicide nanowires. Field emission measurement shows that the turn-on field of the nickel silicide nanowire arrays is low, at about 3.7 V µm(-1), and the field enhancement factor is as high as 4280, so the arrays have promising applications as emitters. PMID:21832554

  15. Controlling the lithiation-induced strain and charging rate in nanowire electrodes by coating.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li Qiang; Liu, Xiao Hua; Liu, Yang; Huang, Shan; Zhu, Ting; Gui, Liangjin; Mao, Scott X; Ye, Zhi Zhen; Wang, Chong Min; Sullivan, John P; Huang, Jian Yu

    2011-06-28

    The advanced battery system is critically important for a wide range of applications, from portable electronics to electric vehicles. Lithium ion batteries (LIBs) are presently the best performing ones, but they cannot meet requirements for more demanding applications due to limitations in capacity, charging rate, and cyclability. One leading cause of those limitations is the lithiation-induced strain (LIS) in electrodes that can result in high stress, fracture, and capacity loss. Here we report that, by utilizing the coating strategy, both the charging rate and LIS of SnO(2) nanowire electrodes can be altered dramatically. The SnO(2) nanowires coated with carbon, aluminum, or copper can be charged about 10 times faster than the noncoated ones. Intriguingly, the radial expansion of the coated nanowires was completely suppressed, resulting in enormously reduced tensile stress at the reaction front, as evidenced by the lack of formation of dislocations. These improvements are attributed to the effective electronic conduction and mechanical confinement of the coatings. Our work demonstrates that nanoengineering the coating enables the simultaneous control of electrical and mechanical behaviors of electrodes, pointing to a promising route for building better LIBs. PMID:21542642

  16. Control of Domain Wall Structure and Pinning In Spin-Valve Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampaio, J.; Thevenard, L.; Lewis, E.; O'Brien, L.; Zeng, H. T.; Petit, D.; Read, D.; Cowburn, R. P.

    2009-03-01

    Domain walls (DWs) in magnetic nanowires are the basis for several proposed data storage devices [D Allwood et al. Science 309, 1688 (2005), SS Parkin, US Patent 6,834,005 (2004)]. Most schemes use artificial defects (ADs) to modify the potential landscape seen by the DW, and thereby control its propagation. This potential modification depends on the DW structure. Integrating the nanowire in a Spin-Valve (SV) stack allows the electrical probing of the magnetization as well as electronic integration in future devices. However, using SV systems introduces strong stray fields from the reference layer, especially on the ADs. These can significantly alter the internal structure and propagation of DWs. The study of their influence has been hindered so far by the difficulty of creating DWs of known internal structure and to propagate them at low fields. Here we demonstrate low field (20Oe) propagation of DWs and their pinning by ADs in L-shaped SV nanowires with dimensions for which only transverse DWs are stable (200nm width, free layer 8nm Ni19Fe81, pinned layer 2nm CoFe).This was verified with micromagnetic simulations. Moreover we show DW depinning at protrusions along the wire with fields lower than that required to nucleation (80/140Oe). These results contribute to furthering the electrical integration of DW based data storage devices.

  17. Color control of nanowire InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes by post-growth treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hezhi; Jacopin, Gwénolé; Neplokh, Vladimir; Largeau, Ludovic; Julien, François H.; Kryliouk, Olga; Tchernycheva, Maria

    2015-11-01

    Core/shell InGaN/GaN nanowire light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on vertically standing single nanowires and nanowire arrays were fabricated and extensively characterized. The emission of single wire LEDs with the same conformal contact geometry as the array device exhibits the same broadening as the array LED electroluminescence, which proves an excellent wire-to-wire homogeneity. The electroluminescence spectra present two peaks corresponding to the m-plane InGaN quantum well (blue emission) and to an In-rich region at the m-plane-semipolar plane junction (green emission), in agreement with structural characterizations. Modification of the contact layout and a post-growth plasma treatment enable strongly suppressing the unwanted green electroluminescence while increasing the intensity in the blue spectral range for the same injected electrical power. Electron beam induced current mapping proves the inhibition of the electrical activity of the top part of the nanowire after plasma treatment. Inductively coupled plasma etching of the In-rich region permits one to completely remove the green emission for all injection currents, but loss of intensity in the blue spectral range is observed. Selectively contacting the m-plane and plasma treatment of the top part of the nanowire appear as a viable solution for controlling the color of core/shell nanowire LEDs with an inhomogeneous indium composition.

  18. Color control of nanowire InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes by post-growth treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hezhi; Jacopin, Gwénolé; Neplokh, Vladimir; Largeau, Ludovic; Julien, François H; Kryliouk, Olga; Tchernycheva, Maria

    2015-11-20

    Core/shell InGaN/GaN nanowire light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on vertically standing single nanowires and nanowire arrays were fabricated and extensively characterized. The emission of single wire LEDs with the same conformal contact geometry as the array device exhibits the same broadening as the array LED electroluminescence, which proves an excellent wire-to-wire homogeneity. The electroluminescence spectra present two peaks corresponding to the m-plane InGaN quantum well (blue emission) and to an In-rich region at the m-plane-semipolar plane junction (green emission), in agreement with structural characterizations. Modification of the contact layout and a post-growth plasma treatment enable strongly suppressing the unwanted green electroluminescence while increasing the intensity in the blue spectral range for the same injected electrical power. Electron beam induced current mapping proves the inhibition of the electrical activity of the top part of the nanowire after plasma treatment. Inductively coupled plasma etching of the In-rich region permits one to completely remove the green emission for all injection currents, but loss of intensity in the blue spectral range is observed. Selectively contacting the m-plane and plasma treatment of the top part of the nanowire appear as a viable solution for controlling the color of core/shell nanowire LEDs with an inhomogeneous indium composition. PMID:26508299

  19. Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Menke, E J; Thompson, M A; Xiang, C; Yang, L C; Penner, R M

    2006-11-01

    Nanowire fabrication methods can be classified either as 'top down', involving photo- or electron-beam lithography, or 'bottom up', involving the synthesis of nanowires from molecular precursors. Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition (LPNE) combines attributes of photolithography with the versatility of bottom-up electrochemical synthesis. Photolithography defines the position of a sacrificial nickel nanoband electrode, which is recessed into a horizontal trench. This trench acts as a 'nanoform' to define the thickness of an incipient nanowire during its electrodeposition. The electrodeposition duration determines the width of the nanowire. Removal of the photoresist and nickel exposes a polycrystalline nanowire--composed of gold, platinum or palladium--characterized by thickness and width that can be independently controlled down to 18 and 40 nm, respectively. Metal nanowires prepared by LPNE may have applications in chemical sensing and optical signal processing, and as interconnects in nanoelectronic devices. PMID:17057701

  20. Transfer Printing of Semiconductor Nanowires with Lasing Emission for Controllable Nanophotonic Device Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Guilhabert, Benoit; Hurtado, Antonio; Jevtics, Dimitars; Gao, Qian; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Dawson, Martin D

    2016-04-26

    Accurate positioning and organization of indium phosphide (InP) nanowires (NWs) with lasing emission at room temperature is achieved using a nanoscale transfer printing (TP) technique. The NWs retained their lasing emission after their transfer to targeted locations on different receiving substrates (e.g., polymers, silica, and metal surfaces). The NWs were also organized into complex spatial patterns, including 1D and 2D arrays, with a controlled number of elements and dimensions. The developed TP technique enables the fabrication of bespoke nanophotonic systems using NW lasers and other NW devices as building blocks. PMID:26974392

  1. The controllable assembly of nanorods, nanowires and microwires of a perylenediimide molecule with photoswitching property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ying; An, Boxing; Wang, Meng; Shi, Fangxiao; Wang, Qing; Gu, Yaxin; Niu, Wanyang; Fan, Zhaorong; Shang, Yanli; Wang, Dan; Zhao, Cong

    2015-07-01

    By using an electron donor-acceptor molecule that consists of a perylenediimide (PDI) core bonded with two ferrocene (Fc) units, well-defined nanorods, nanowires and microwires of PDI-Fc were formed through simply adjusting the initial concentration of PDI-Fc in dichloromethane or CH2Cl2. Moreover, the two-ended devices based on individual microwire were fabricated. Highly reproducible and sensitive photo response characteristics were demonstrated in the microwire through controlling the white light on and off with different light intensities. The assembly strategy via complementary donors and acceptors is of significance for constructing photoconductive systems and developing novel functional devices.

  2. Silicon Nanowire Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamins, Theodore

    2006-03-01

    Metal-catalyzed, self-assembled, one-dimensional semiconductor nanowires are being considered as possible device elements to augment and supplant conventional electronics and to extend the use of CMOS beyond the physical and economic limits of conventional technology. Such nanowires can create nanostructures without the complexity and cost of extremely fine scale lithography. The well-known and controllable properties of silicon make silicon nanowires especially attractive. Easy integration with conventional electronics will aid their acceptance and incorporation. For example, connections can be formed to both ends of a nanowire by growing it laterally from a vertical surface formed by etching the top silicon layer of a silicon-on-insulator structure into isolated electrodes. Field-effect structures are one class of devices that can be readily built in silicon nanowires. Because the ratio of surface to volume in a thin nanowire is high, conduction through the nanowire is very sensitive to surface conditions, making it effective as the channel of a field-effect transistor or as the transducing element of a gas or chemical sensor. As the nanowire diameter decreases, a greater fraction of the mobile charge can be modulated by a given external charge, increasing the sensitivity. Having the gate of a nanowire transistor completely surround the nanowire also enhances the sensitivity. For a field-effect sensor to be effective, the charge must be physically close to the nanowire so that the majority of the compensating charge is induced in the nanowire and so that ions in solution do not screen the charge. Because only induced charge is being sensed, a coating that selectively binds the target species should be added to the nanowire surface to distinguish between different species in the analyte. The nanowire work at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories was supported in part by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

  3. Electrical detection of dengue virus (DENV) DNA oligomer using silicon nanowire biosensor with novel molecular gate control.

    PubMed

    Nuzaihan M N, M; Hashim, U; Md Arshad, M K; Kasjoo, S R; Rahman, S F A; Ruslinda, A R; Fathil, M F M; Adzhri, R; Shahimin, M M

    2016-09-15

    In this paper, a silicon nanowire biosensor with novel molecular gate control has been demonstrated for Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) detection related to dengue virus (DENV). The silicon nanowire was fabricated using the top-down nanolithography approach, through nanostructuring of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) layers achieved by combination of the electron-beam lithography (EBL), plasma dry etching and size reduction processes. The surface of the fabricated silicon nanowire was functionalized by means of a three-step procedure involving surface modification, DNA immobilization and hybridization. This procedure acts as a molecular gate control to establish the electrical detection for 27-mers base targets DENV DNA oligomer. The electrical detection is based on the changes in current, resistance and conductance of the sensor due to accumulation of negative charges added by the immobilized probe DNA and hybridized target DNA. The sensitivity of the silicon nanowire biosensors attained was 45.0µAM(-1), which shows a wide-range detection capability of the sensor with respect to DNA. The limit of detection (LOD) achieved was approximately 2.0fM. The demonstrated results show that the silicon nanowire has excellent properties for detection of DENV with outstanding repeatability and reproducibility performances. PMID:27107147

  4. Controllable fabrication of oriented micro/nanowire arrays of dibenzo-tetrathiafulvalene by a multiple drop-casting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Zhao, Xiaoli; Cai, Bin; Pei, Tengfei; Tong, Yanhong; Tang, Qingxin; Liu, Yichun

    2014-01-01

    A multiple drop-casting method of growing the ultralong dibenzo-tetrathiafulvalene (DB-TTF) micro/nanowire arrays has been developed which has the success ratio as high as 94%. This method enables the arrays with a length over a few hundreds of micrometers to locate between droplets with the definite orientation. The width of the micro/nanowires is controlled via tuning the concentration of DB-TTF solution in dichloromethane. The large-scale arrays can be grown onto Si, SiO2, glass, and the flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates. These results show the promising potential of this facile solution-based process for the growth of the high-quality organic micro/nanowires, the fabrication of high-performance and flexible devices, and the fabrication of controlled assemblies of nanoscale circuits for fundamental studies and future applications.

  5. The controllable assembly of nanorods, nanowires and microwires of a perylenediimide molecule with photoswitching property

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Ying; An, Boxing; Wang, Meng; Shi, Fangxiao; Wang, Qing; Gu, Yaxin; Niu, Wanyang; Fan, Zhaorong; Shang, Yanli; Wang, Dan; Zhao, Cong

    2015-07-15

    By using an electron donor–acceptor molecule that consists of a perylenediimide (PDI) core bonded with two ferrocene (Fc) units, well-defined nanorods, nanowires and microwires of PDI-Fc were formed through simply adjusting the initial concentration of PDI-Fc in dichloromethane or CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}. Moreover, the two-ended devices based on individual microwire were fabricated. Highly reproducible and sensitive photo response characteristics were demonstrated in the microwire through controlling the white light on and off with different light intensities. The assembly strategy via complementary donors and acceptors is of significance for constructing photoconductive systems and developing novel functional devices. - Graphical abstract: The two-ended devices based on individual microwire were fabricated. Highly reproducible and sensitive photo response characteristics were observed by controlling the white light on and off with different light intensities. - Highlights: • An electron donor–acceptor molecule (PDI-Fc) was synthesized. • Well-defined nanorods, nanowires and microwires of PDI-Fc were formed. • The two-ended devices based on individual microwire were fabricated. • Highly reproducible and sensitive photo response characteristics were observed.

  6. Adiabatic Edge Channel Transport in a Nanowire Quantum Point Contact Register.

    PubMed

    Heedt, S; Manolescu, A; Nemnes, G A; Prost, W; Schubert, J; Grützmacher, D; Schäpers, Th

    2016-07-13

    We report on a prototype device geometry where a number of quantum point contacts are connected in series in a single quasi-ballistic InAs nanowire. At finite magnetic field the backscattering length is increased up to the micron-scale and the quantum point contacts are connected adiabatically. Hence, several input gates can control the outcome of a ballistic logic operation. The absence of backscattering is explained in terms of selective population of spatially separated edge channels. Evidence is provided by regular Aharonov-Bohm-type conductance oscillations in transverse magnetic fields, in agreement with magnetoconductance calculations. The observation of the Shubnikov-de Haas effect at large magnetic fields corroborates the existence of spatially separated edge channels and provides a new means for nanowire characterization. PMID:27347816

  7. Magnetic and structural properties of fcc/hcp bi-crystalline multilayer Co nanowire arrays prepared by controlled electroplating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirota, K. R.; Béron, F.; Zanchet, D.; Rocha, T. C. R.; Navas, D.; Torrejón, J.; Vazquez, M.; Knobel, M.

    2011-04-01

    We report on the structural and magnetic properties of crystalline bi-phase Co nanowires, electrodeposited into the pores of anodized alumina membranes, as a function of their length. Co nanowires present two different coexistent crystalline structures (fcc and hcp) that can be controlled by the time of pulsed electrodeposition. The fcc crystalline phase grows at the early stage and is present at the bottom of all the nanowires, strongly influencing their magnetic behavior. Both structural and magnetic characterizations indicate that the length of the fcc phase is constant at around 260-270 nm. X-ray diffraction measurements revealed a strong preferential orientation (texture) in the (1 0-1 0) direction for the hcp phase, which increases the nanowire length as well as crystalline grain size, degree of orientation, and volume fraction of oriented material. The first-order reversal curve (FORC) method was used to infer both qualitatively and quantitatively the complex magnetization reversal of the nanowires. Under the application of a magnetic field parallel to the wires, the magnetization reversal of each region is clearly distinguishable; the fcc phase creates a high coercive contribution without an interaction field, while the hcp phase presents a smaller coercivity and undergoes a strong antiparallel interaction field from neighboring wires.

  8. Controlled growth of CH3NH3PbI3 nanowires in arrays of open nanofluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, Massimo; Bonvin, Eric; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Forró, László; Horváth, Endre

    2016-01-01

    Spatial positioning of nanocrystal building blocks on a solid surface is a prerequisite for assembling individual nanoparticles into functional devices. Here, we report on the graphoepitaxial liquid-solid growth of nanowires of the photovoltaic compound CH3NH3PbI3 in open nanofluidic channels. The guided growth, visualized in real-time with a simple optical microscope, undergoes through a metastable solvatomorph formation in polar aprotic solvents. The presently discovered crystallization leads to the fabrication of mm2-sized surfaces composed of perovskite nanowires having controlled sizes, cross-sectional shapes, aspect ratios and orientation which have not been achieved thus far by other deposition methods. The automation of this general strategy paves the way towards fabrication of wafer-scale perovskite nanowire thin films well-suited for various optoelectronic devices, e.g. solar cells, lasers, light-emitting diodes and photodetectors.

  9. Controlled growth of CH3NH3PbI3 nanowires in arrays of open nanofluidic channels

    PubMed Central

    Spina, Massimo; Bonvin, Eric; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Forró, László; Horváth, Endre

    2016-01-01

    Spatial positioning of nanocrystal building blocks on a solid surface is a prerequisite for assembling individual nanoparticles into functional devices. Here, we report on the graphoepitaxial liquid-solid growth of nanowires of the photovoltaic compound CH3NH3PbI3 in open nanofluidic channels. The guided growth, visualized in real-time with a simple optical microscope, undergoes through a metastable solvatomorph formation in polar aprotic solvents. The presently discovered crystallization leads to the fabrication of mm2-sized surfaces composed of perovskite nanowires having controlled sizes, cross-sectional shapes, aspect ratios and orientation which have not been achieved thus far by other deposition methods. The automation of this general strategy paves the way towards fabrication of wafer-scale perovskite nanowire thin films well-suited for various optoelectronic devices, e.g. solar cells, lasers, light-emitting diodes and photodetectors. PMID:26806213

  10. Controlled growth of CH3NH3PbI3 nanowires in arrays of open nanofluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Spina, Massimo; Bonvin, Eric; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Náfrádi, Bálint; Forró, László; Horváth, Endre

    2016-01-01

    Spatial positioning of nanocrystal building blocks on a solid surface is a prerequisite for assembling individual nanoparticles into functional devices. Here, we report on the graphoepitaxial liquid-solid growth of nanowires of the photovoltaic compound CH3NH3PbI3 in open nanofluidic channels. The guided growth, visualized in real-time with a simple optical microscope, undergoes through a metastable solvatomorph formation in polar aprotic solvents. The presently discovered crystallization leads to the fabrication of mm(2)-sized surfaces composed of perovskite nanowires having controlled sizes, cross-sectional shapes, aspect ratios and orientation which have not been achieved thus far by other deposition methods. The automation of this general strategy paves the way towards fabrication of wafer-scale perovskite nanowire thin films well-suited for various optoelectronic devices, e.g. solar cells, lasers, light-emitting diodes and photodetectors. PMID:26806213