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Sample records for incident mobility disability

  1. Sensory and Motor Peripheral Nerve Function and Incident Mobility Disability

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Rachel E.; Boudreau, Robert M.; Caserotti, Paolo; Harris, Tamara B.; Zivkovic, Sasa; Goodpaster, Bret H.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Schwartz, Ann V.; Vinik, Aaron I.; Cauley, Jane A.; Simonsick, Eleanor M.; Newman, Anne B.; Strotmeyer, Elsa S.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives Peripheral nerve impairments are highly prevalent in older adults and are associated with poor lower-extremity function. Whether sensorimotor nerve function predicts incident mobility disability has not been determined. We assessed the relationship between sensorimotor nerve function and incident mobility disability over 10 years. Design Prospective cohort study with longitudinal analysis. Setting Two U.S. clinical sites. Participants Population-based sample of community-dwelling older adults with no mobility disability at 2000/01 exam (N = 1680; mean SD: age = 76.5 2.9, BMI = 27.1 4.6; 50.2% women, 36.6% black and 10.7% with diabetes). Measurements Motor nerve conduction amplitude (poor: <1 mV) and velocity (poor: <40 m/s) were measured on the deep peroneal nerve. Sensory nerve function was measured using 10-g and 1.4-g monofilaments and vibration detection threshold at the toe. Lower-extremity symptoms included numbness or tingling and sudden stabbing, burning, pain or aches. Incident mobility disability assessed semiannually over 8.5 years (IQR: 4.59.6) was defined as two consecutive self-reports of a lot of difficulty or inability to walk mile or climb 10 steps. Results Nerve impairments were detected in 55% of participants and 30% developed mobility disability. Worse motor amplitude (HR = 1.29 per SD, 95% CI: 1.161.44), vibration detection threshold (HR = 1.13 per SD, 95% CI: 1.041.23), symptoms (HR = 1.65, 95% CI: 1.362.17), 2 motor (HR = 2.10, 95% CI: 1.433.09), 2 sensory (HR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.372.68), and ?3 nerve impairments (HR = 2.33, 95% CI: 1.543.53) predicted incident mobility disability, after adjustment. Quadriceps strength mediated relationships between certain nerve impairments and mobility disability, although most remained significant. Conclusion Poor sensorimotor nerve function independently predicted mobility disability. Future work should investigate modifiable risk factors and interventions like strength training for preventing disability and improving function in older adults with poor nerve function. PMID:25482096

  2. Can failure on adaptive locomotor tasks independently predict incident mobility disability?

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Nandini; Metter, E Jeffrey; Guralnik, Jack; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2013-08-01

    This study examined whether inability to perform adaptive locomotor tests predicts self-reported incident mobility disability. InCHIANTI study participants (N = 611; age, 50-85 yrs) who could walk 7 m at self-selected speed and who had no self-reported mobility disability at baseline were included. The ability to complete four adaptive locomotor tests was assessed: fast walking, walking on a narrow path, crossing obstacles while walking, and talking while walking. Mobility disability was recorded again at 3-yr follow-up. Failure in the fast-walking and narrow-path walking tests predicted approximately 2.5 times likelihood of reporting incident mobility disability (P = 0.009 and P = 0.011, respectively). Failure in the obstacle-crossing test predicted approximately two times likelihood of reporting incident mobility disability; however, this result did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.077). Failure in talking while walking did not predict incident mobility disability. Those who failed both the fast-walking and narrow-path walking tests were almost nine times as likely to report incident mobility disability. PMID:23291600

  3. Education Predicts Incidence of Preclinical Mobility Disability in Initially High-Functioning Older Women. The Women’s Health and Aging Study II

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Patricia C.; Xue, Qian-Li; Tian, Jing; Thorpe, Roland J.; Fried, Linda P.

    2011-01-01

    Background. To examine the impact of educational attainment on the incidence of preclinical mobility disability (PCD). Methods. The Women's Health and Aging II Study is a prospective observational cohort study of 436 initially high-functioning community-dwelling women aged 70–79 years at baseline in Baltimore, Maryland. We measured the association of highest attained education level with preclinical mobility disability (PCD) over an 11-year period. PCD is defined as self-reported modification in any of four tasks without reporting difficulty in those tasks. The tasks were walking ½ mile, climbing up steps, doing heavy housework, and getting in/out of bed or chair. Results. Participants with less than 9 years of education were more likely to acquire incident PCD (hazard ratio: 3.1, 95% confidence interval = 1.2–7.7) than their counterparts with more education after adjusting for income, marital status, number of diseases, and high self-efficacy. Conclusions. Lower education level is an independent predictor of incident preclinical mobility disability. This association has important implications for primary and secondary prevention and can be easily assessed in clinical encounters. PMID:21382883

  4. Comparison of Assessment Results of Children with Low Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dennis J.; Reilly, AmySue; Henley, Joan

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a research study that assessed young children with a low incidence disability, specifically Cri-du-Chat Syndrome (CDSC). A description of the concerns of assessing individuals with low incidence disabilities is described. Parent reports (using the Development Observation Checklist System) on the functioning of their children

  5. Incidence of Dementia in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strydom, Andre; Chan, Trevor; King, Michael; Hassiotis, Angela; Livingston, Gill

    2013-01-01

    Dementia may be more common in older adults with intellectual disability (ID) than in the general population. The increased risk for Alzheimer's disease in people with Down syndrome (DS) is well established, but much less is known about dementia in adults with ID who do not have DS. We estimated incidence rates from a longitudinal study of

  6. MAJOR MOBILITY DISABILITY-ASSESSMENT AND BASELINE PERFORMANCE IN LIFE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Major mobility disability has previously been defined by self-reported inability to walk ¼ mile. Observed inability to walk 400 meters provides a valid and objective disability endpoint for clinical trials that is relevant to community walking, future advanced disability and mortality. LIFE particip...

  7. Incidence of dementia in older adults with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Strydom, Andre; Chan, Trevor; King, Michael; Hassiotis, Angela; Livingston, Gill

    2013-06-01

    Dementia may be more common in older adults with intellectual disability (ID) than in the general population. The increased risk for Alzheimer's disease in people with Down syndrome (DS) is well established, but much less is known about dementia in adults with ID who do not have DS. We estimated incidence rates from a longitudinal study of dementia in older adults with ID without DS and compared them to general population rates. 222 participants with ID without DS aged 60 years and older were followed up an average of 2.9 years later to identify those who had declined in functional or cognitive abilities. Those who screened positive had a comprehensive assessment for dementia, diagnosed using ICD 10 and DSM IV criteria. 134 participants who did not have dementia at initial assessment were alive and interviewed at follow up; 21 (15.7%) were diagnosed with dementia. Overall incidence rate for those aged ? 60 was 54.6/1000 person years (95% CI 34.1-82.3). The highest incidence rate (97.8/1000 person years) was in the age group 70-74. Standardised incidence ratio for those aged ? 65 was 4.98 (95% CI 1.62-11.67). Incidence of dementia in older people with intellectual disabilities are up to five times higher than older adults in the general population. Screening may be useful in this population given the high incident rates, particularly as more effective treatments become available. Studies to explore the underlying aetiological factors for dementia associated with intellectual disability could help to identify novel protective and risk factors. PMID:23578903

  8. Orientation and Mobility for Students with Multiple Severe Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Duncan

    This paper addresses orientation and mobility (O&M) training for people with multiple severe disabilities including visual impairments. The historical origins of O&M training are reviewed, noting difficulties with applying the traditional curriculum with such groups as very young children, the elderly, and those with multiple disabilities. A

  9. Disability and incident coronary heart disease in older community-dwelling adults: the Three-City Study

    PubMed Central

    Plichart, Matthieu; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; Tzourio, Christophe; Amouyel, Philippe; Prs, Karine; Ritchie, Karen; Jouven, Xavier; Ducimetire, Pierre; Empana, Jean-Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Context Disability is a common condition in the elderly and has been associated with prevalent coronary heart disease (CHD) and with shorter longevity. However, whether disability predicts the occurrence of CHD has been less studied. Objective To prospectively assess the association between disability and incident fatal and non-fatal CHD among older adults free of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Design and Settings: The Three-City (3C) Study is a French multicentre prospective population-based cohort of 9294 elderly subjects (3469 men and 5645 women) aged 65 and over at baseline between 1999 to 2001 and followed-up during 6 years. Participants 7354 participants with no history of CVD and with available information on disability status. Disability was assessed at baseline with a three levels of a hierarchical scale : no disability, mild disability (mobility only), moderate or severe disability (mobility plus activities of daily living and/or instrumental activities of daily living). Main Outcome Measure Incident fatal and non-fatal coronary events (angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, revascularization procedures and CHD death). Results At baseline, the mean level of the risk factors increased gradually with the severity of disability. After a median follow-up of 5.2 years, 264 first coronary events including 55 fatal events occurred. Participants with moderate or severe disability had a 1.8-fold (95%CI: 1.12.9) increased risk of overall CHD compared to non-disabled subjects in multivariate analysis, while those with mild disability were not at increased CHD risk. The association was found for fatal CHD only, for which the risk increased gradually with the severity of disability (mild disability: HR = 1.8, 95%CI: 0.93.8; moderate/severe disability: HR = 4.5, 95%CI: 1.811.3; p for trend = 0.002). Conclusion These data suggest that the association of disability with incident CHD is mostly due to an association with fatal CHD in community-dwelling elderly subjects. PMID:20345869

  10. Brief Report: A Growth Mixture Model of Occupational Aspirations of Individuals with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, In Heok; Rojewski, Jay W.

    2013-01-01

    A previous longitudinal study of the occupational aspirations of individuals with high-incidence disabilities revealed multiple longitudinal patterns for individuals with learning disabilities or emotional-behavioral disorders. Growth mixture modeling was used to determine whether individuals in these two high-incidence disabilities groups (N =

  11. Understanding the Relationship between Transition Services and Postschool Outcomes for Students with High Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joshi, Gauri Salil

    2012-01-01

    Given the consistently poor postschool outcomes of individuals with high incidence disabilities, there is a need to examine the transition services provided to them while in school. This secondary data analysis explored the transition services received by individuals with high incidence disabilities through the National Longitudinal Transition…

  12. Mathematics Placement Decisions for High School Students with High Incidence Disabilities: A Collective Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murzyn, Amy Lee

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this multiple case study is to describe the experiences of case managers making mathematics placement decisions of high school students with high incidence disabilities. There is much information about what should be happening when making mathematics placement decisions of high school students with high incidence disabilities, but…

  13. Mathematics Placement Decisions for High School Students with High Incidence Disabilities: A Collective Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murzyn, Amy Lee

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this multiple case study is to describe the experiences of case managers making mathematics placement decisions of high school students with high incidence disabilities. There is much information about what should be happening when making mathematics placement decisions of high school students with high incidence disabilities, but

  14. Is the Use of Benzodiazepines Associated with Incident Disability?

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Shelly L.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Blough, David; Wagner, Edward H.; Koepsell, Thomas D.; Buchner, Dave

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study examined the association between benzodiazepine use and incident disability with an emphasis on elucidating whether the underlying health conditions that result in benzodiazepine use (confounding factors) or intrinsic adverse effects of benzodiazepine use were responsible for functional decline. DESIGN Cohort study with follow-up of 4 to 5 years. SETTING A health maintenance organization (HMO) in western Washington. PARTICIPANTS Individuals aged 65 and older from a random sample of HMO enrollees who participated in a health promotion intervention trial (n = 1,519). MEASUREMENTS Benzodiazepine use was ascertained from computerized pharmacy records. Self-reported functional status was assessed using a six-item physical function scale ranging from vigorous activity to self-care activities of daily living (ADLs). Two outcomes were examined: decline in overall physical function and limitations in self-care ADLs. Multivariate models were examined that included demographic characteristics, health status, and health behaviors that were likely to be confounders. Several analyses were conducted to examine whether benzodiazepine use or confounding factors were responsible for functional decline. RESULTS Benzodiazepine use was significantly associated with incident loss of physical function (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.022.24) in the fully adjusted model. Although use of benzodiazepines was associated with limitations in ADLs, it was not significant when adjusting for other factors (HR = 1.71, 95% CI = 0.873.34). Several of our findings suggest that the health conditions leading to benzodiazepine use may partly or fully explain these associations: (1) use of anxiolytic benzodiazepines (HR = 1.95, 95% CI = 1.243.07), but not hypnotic agents (HR = 1.21, 95% CI = 0.732.00), was associated with functional decline; (2) adjustment for health status variables minimized these associations; and (3) there was little evidence of dose response. CONCLUSIONS A modestly increased risk for decline in physical function was associated with benzodiazepine use, especially of anxiolytic agents. The health conditions that result in benzodiazepine use may be more important in the pathogenesis of disability than benzodiazepine use itself. Although there are many reasons for avoiding benzodiazepines in older adults, it is still unclear whether use contributes independently to functional decline. PMID:12110059

  15. Intermediate Work Outcomes for Adolescents with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojewski, Jay W.; Lee, In Heok; Gregg, Noel

    2014-01-01

    A longitudinal sample from the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 was used to determine differences in work outcomes between (a) individuals with learning disabilities or emotional-behavior disorders and (b) individuals with or without disabilities. Twelve factors were arranged into individual, family, school-peer, and community categories.…

  16. Intermediate Work Outcomes for Adolescents with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojewski, Jay W.; Lee, In Heok; Gregg, Noel

    2014-01-01

    A longitudinal sample from the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 was used to determine differences in work outcomes between (a) individuals with learning disabilities or emotional-behavior disorders and (b) individuals with or without disabilities. Twelve factors were arranged into individual, family, school-peer, and community categories.

  17. Reading Disability in an Epidemiological Context: Incidence and Environmental Correlates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badian, Nathlie A.

    1984-01-01

    Among four-year groups of children in a school system (266 girls, 284 boys), 4 percent had a reading disability and 2.7 percent were "slow learners." Reading disabled boys tended to be later born in their families. Lower reading scores were associated with hot birth month temperatures for all socioeconomic groups. (Author/CL)

  18. Disability in the Oldest-old: Incidence and Risk Factors in The 90+ Study

    PubMed Central

    Berlau, Daniel J.; Corrada, Maria M.; Peltz, Carrie B.; Kawas, Claudia H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To measure the incidence of disability in individuals aged 90 and older and examine factors that may increase risk of disability. Design and Setting The 90+ Study, a longitudinal study of aging initiated in January 2003 with follow-up through May 2009. Participants 216 non-disabled, prospectively followed participants who were aged 90 or older at baseline. Measurements The incidence of disability, measured as needing help on one or more Activities of Daily Living, and calculated using person-years. Risk factors were examined using a Cox proportional hazards analysis. Results The overall incidence of disability was 16.4%per year (95% confidence interval, 13.320.0), and did not differ by gender. Disability incidence increased with age from 8.3%in the 9094 age group to 25.7%in the 95 and older age group. Several factors were associated with increased risk of disability including history of congestive heart failure, history of depression poor self-rated quality of life and cognitive impairment. Conclusion Disability incidence is high and increases rapidly with age in the oldest-old, with rates essentially tripling between ages 9094 and 95+. Some factors associated with increased risk of disability in younger elderly continue to be risk factors in the oldest-old. Because of the tremendous social and financial impact of disability and the rapid growth of the oldest-old, the development of strategies to delay disability in the elderly should be a priority for health care research. PMID:22273736

  19. Correlations between joint and spinal mobility, spinal sagittal configuration, segmental mobility, segmental pain, symptoms and disabilities in female homecare personnel.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, G; Gerdle, B

    2000-09-01

    The aim of a study comprising 607 women working as homecare personnel was to investigate general spinal, joint and segmental mobility, different symptoms (pain and strain) and their relation to various aspects of disability. Joint mobility (mainly peripheral) was estimated using the "Beighton" score and spinal posture and mobility were measured by kyphometer. Passive segmental mobility and pain provocation were estimated manually. Pain intensity and strain during work and leisure were estimated using visual analogue scales for defined anatomical regions. Disability was rated using defined items and two indices. The 7-day prevalence of low back pain was 48%. Peripheral joint mobility, spinal sagittal posture and thoracic sagittal mobility showed low correlations with disability. Lumbar sagittal hypomobility was associated with higher disability. Manually estimated segmental mobility and segmental pain provocation of L4-L5 and L5-S1 correlated with disability; hypo- and hypermobility or positive pain provocation tests at these levels showed higher disability than normal mobility and negative pain provocation tests, respectively. Cluster analysis revealed that the combination of positive pain provocation tests and low lumbar sagittal mobility was associated with particularly high disability levels. In conclusion, positive pain provocation tests were clearly associated with high disability levels. PMID:11028797

  20. Community-Based Summer Work Experiences of Adolescents with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Erik W.; Trainor, Audrey A.; Ditchman, Nicole; Swedeen, Beth; Owens, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Although summer offers a natural context for adolescents to gain community-based work experience, little is known about the extent to which youth with disabilities are accessing these transition-related opportunities. We examined the summer employment experiences of 220 youth with high-incidence disabilities at two time points. Although more than…

  1. Prospective Analyses of Childhood Factors and Antisocial Behavior for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chin-Chih; Symons, Frank J.; Reynolds, Arthur J.

    2011-01-01

    This prospective longitudinal study investigated the association between childhood factors (individual, family, and school characteristics) and later antisocial behavior (official juvenile delinquency and adult crime) for students identified with high-incidence disabilities (i.e., learning disabilities, emotional disturbance). The sample consisted…

  2. Prospective Analyses of Childhood Factors and Antisocial Behavior for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chin-Chih; Symons, Frank J.; Reynolds, Arthur J.

    2011-01-01

    This prospective longitudinal study investigated the association between childhood factors (individual, family, and school characteristics) and later antisocial behavior (official juvenile delinquency and adult crime) for students identified with high-incidence disabilities (i.e., learning disabilities, emotional disturbance). The sample consisted

  3. Effect of structured physical activity on prevention of major mobility disability in older adults: the LIFE Study randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Pahor, Marco; Guralnik, Jack M.; Ambrosius, Walter T.; Blair, Steven; Bonds, Denise E.; Church, Timothy S.; Espeland, Mark A.; Fielding, Roger A.; Gill, Thomas M.; Groessl, Erik J.; King, Abby C.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Manini, Todd M.; McDermott, Mary M.; Miller, Michael E.; Newman, Anne B.; Rejeski, W Jack; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Importance In older adults reduced mobility is common and is an independent risk factor for morbidity, hospitalization, disability, and mortality. Limited evidence suggests that physical activity may help prevent mobility disability; however, there are no definitive clinical trials examining if physical activity prevents or delays mobility disability. Objective To test the hypothesis that a long-term structured physical activity program is more effective than a health education program (also referred to as a successful aging program) in reducing the risk of major mobility disability. Design, Setting, and Participants The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) study was a multicenter, randomized trial that enrolled participants between February 2010 and December 2011, who participated for an average of 2.6 years. Follow-up ended in December 2013. Outcome assessors were blinded to the intervention assignment. Participants were recruited from urban, suburban and rural communities at 8 field centers throughout the US. We randomized a volunteer sample of 1,635 sedentary men and women aged 70–89 years who had physical limitations, defined as a score on the Short Physical Performance Battery of 9 or below, but were able to walk 400 m. Interventions Participants were randomized to a structured moderate intensity physical activity program (n=818) done in a center and at home that included including aerobic, resistance and flexibility training activities or to a health education program (n=817) consisting of workshops on topics relevant to older adults and upper extremity stretching exercises. Main Outcomes and Measures The primary outcome was major mobility disability objectively defined by loss of ability to walk 400 m. Results Incident major mobility disability occurred in 30.1% (n=246/818) of physical activity and 35.5% (n=290/817) of health education participants (HR=0.82, 95%CI=0.69–0.98, p=0.03). Persistent mobility disability was experienced by 120/818 (14.7%) physical activity and 162/817 (19.8%) health education participants (HR=0.72; 95%CI=0.57–0.91; p=0.006). Serious adverse events were reported by 404/818 (49.4%) of the physical activity and 373/817 (45.7%) of the health education participants (Risk Ratio=1.08; 95%CI=0.98–1.20). Conclusions and Relevance A structured moderate intensity physical activity program, compared with a health education program, reduced major mobility disability over 2.6 years among older adults at risk of disability. These findings suggest mobility benefit from such a program in vulnerable older adults. Registration ClinicalsTrials.gov identifier NCT01072500. PMID:24866862

  4. 78 FR 41824 - Enhanced Mobility for Seniors and Individuals With Disabilities: Proposed Circular

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-11

    ... review DOT's complete Privacy Act Statement published in the Federal Register on April 11, 2000 (65 FR... Federal Transit Administration Enhanced Mobility for Seniors and Individuals With Disabilities: Proposed... implementing the Enhanced Mobility for Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities Program. The Moving Ahead...

  5. Factors Related to Hysterectomy in Women with Physical and Mobility Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsieh, Molly; Chen, Si-Fan; Wu, Chia-Ling; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to identify self-report data for hysterectomy prevalence and to explore its correlated factors among women with physical and mobility disabilities in Taiwan. This paper was part of a larger study, "Survey on Preventive Health Utilizations of People with Physical and Mobility Disability in Taiwan," which is a cross-sectional survey

  6. The Experiences of Students with Mobility Disabilities in Cypriot Higher Education Institutions: Listening to Their Voices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadjikakou, Kika; Polycarpou, Vaso; Hadjilia, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the experiences of students with mobility disabilities in Cypriot higher education institutions. In order to obtain relevant information, in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 Cypriot students with different forms of mobility disabilities, who attended different Cypriot higher education institutions and a

  7. Relationship between Mobility Limitations and the Places where Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Live

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, Shaun; Ouellette-Kuntz, Helene; Hunter, Duncan

    2008-01-01

    As the population ages, mobility limitations are associated with increased mortality and negative health-related states both in the general population and among people with intellectual disabilities. The influence of mobility limitations upon the lives and lifestyles of people with intellectual disabilities remains poorly understood. Specifically,

  8. Assessment of Cognitive Ability of Students with Severe and Low-Incidence Disabilities--Part 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crepeau-Hobson, Franci; Vujeva, Hana

    2012-01-01

    Students with severe and low-incidence disabilities comprise a heterogeneous population that often presents a challenge to the professionals charged with evaluating their skills and abilities. This is especially true in conducting a valid assessment of the cognitive ability of these children. Often, school psychologists are limited to the use of…

  9. Prevalence and Incidence of Myocardial Infarction and Cerebrovascular Accident in Ageing Persons with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, J.; Rozeboom, W.; Penning, C.; Evenhuis, H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological information on age-related cardiovascular disease in people with intellectual disability (ID) is scarce and inconclusive. We compared prevalence and incidence of cerebrovascular accident and myocardial infarction over age 50 in a residential population with ID to that in a general practice population. Method: Lifetime

  10. Prevalence of Weight Problems among Youth with High-Incidence Disabilities in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trout, Alexandra L.; Lambert, Matthew C.; Nelson, Timothy D.; Thompson, Ronald W.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of weight problems among youth in general and youth in out-of-home care has been well documented; however, the prevalence of obesity/overweight among youth with high-incidence disabilities in more restrictive settings, such as residential care, has not been assessed. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of

  11. On CALL: One Approach to Improving Services for Students with Low-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley-Johnson, Sharon; Johnson, C. Merle; Drevon, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    Students with low-incidence disabilities frequently receive less than optimal psychoeducational services because the specialized tests and instructional materials required to meet their idiosyncratic needs often are unavailable due to budget constraints, inadequate training of school personnel, and the difficulty school personnel have keeping…

  12. The Use of Clickers in Secondary Education Math with Students with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Jeremy Ryan

    2012-01-01

    A single-subject withdrawal design paired with content quizzes was used to examine the effect of clickers on three dependent variables (student engagement, math quiz scores, and inappropriate behavior) with students diagnosed with high-incidence disabilities in a secondary grade level resource math class and a secondary grade level inclusive math

  13. Clinical Psychopathology, Untoward Incidents and the Use of Restrictive Procedures in Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplin, Eddie; Tsakanikos, Elias; Wright, Steve; Bouras, Nick

    2009-01-01

    Background: Previous evidence has suggested that clinical characteristics may predict use of restraint in adults with intellectual disability. However, the relationship between specific types of untoward incidents, corresponding interventions (restrictive procedures) and clinical psychopathology remains unclear. Method: We examined all untoward…

  14. Assistive Technology and Students with High-Incidence Disabilities: Understanding the Relationship through the NLTS2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouck, Emily C.; Maeda, Yukiko; Flanagan, Sara M.

    2012-01-01

    Assistive technology use in secondary school and postschool has been shown to improve the educational attainment and life outcomes of students with high-incidence disabilities. This study used data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2--collected in the early to mid-2000s--to explore the relationship between receipt of assistive

  15. Perceptions of Trainers and Practitioners regarding Assessment and Intervention for Students with Low Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Christine L.; Shapiro, Edward S.

    2005-01-01

    Two national surveys of the perceptions of trainers and practitioners regarding assessment and intervention for students with low incidence disabilities (LID) were conducted. The first survey, sent to the directors of 250 school psychology training programs, was designed to determine the extent and type of training in assessment and intervention

  16. Clinical Psychopathology, Untoward Incidents and the Use of Restrictive Procedures in Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplin, Eddie; Tsakanikos, Elias; Wright, Steve; Bouras, Nick

    2009-01-01

    Background: Previous evidence has suggested that clinical characteristics may predict use of restraint in adults with intellectual disability. However, the relationship between specific types of untoward incidents, corresponding interventions (restrictive procedures) and clinical psychopathology remains unclear. Method: We examined all untoward

  17. On CALL: One Approach to Improving Services for Students with Low-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley-Johnson, Sharon; Johnson, C. Merle; Drevon, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    Students with low-incidence disabilities frequently receive less than optimal psychoeducational services because the specialized tests and instructional materials required to meet their idiosyncratic needs often are unavailable due to budget constraints, inadequate training of school personnel, and the difficulty school personnel have keeping

  18. Assistive Technology and Students with High-Incidence Disabilities: Understanding the Relationship through the NLTS2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouck, Emily C.; Maeda, Yukiko; Flanagan, Sara M.

    2012-01-01

    Assistive technology use in secondary school and postschool has been shown to improve the educational attainment and life outcomes of students with high-incidence disabilities. This study used data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2--collected in the early to mid-2000s--to explore the relationship between receipt of assistive…

  19. Proportional Reasoning Word Problem Performance for Middle School Students with High-Incidence Disabilities (HID)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brawand, Anne Eichorn

    2013-01-01

    Schema-based instruction (SBI) was used to examine the solving of proportional reasoning word problems for middle school students with high-incidence disabilities (HID). Seventh- and eighth-grade students with HID participated in the study. Students were randomly assigned to one of three groups. A multiple-baseline-across-groups design was…

  20. Incidence of Learning Disabilities in Juvenile Delinquents and Nondelinquents: Implications for Etiology and Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Allan

    Investigated was the incidence of learning disabilities in juvenile delinquents at a Rhode Island Training School. Ss and nondelinquent controls were administered the Halstead-Reitan battery of measures including the Wechsler Intelligence Scale, the Wide Range Achievement Test, and tests of sensory imperception. Results found the five predictors

  1. Prevalence and Incidence of Myocardial Infarction and Cerebrovascular Accident in Ageing Persons with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, J.; Rozeboom, W.; Penning, C.; Evenhuis, H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological information on age-related cardiovascular disease in people with intellectual disability (ID) is scarce and inconclusive. We compared prevalence and incidence of cerebrovascular accident and myocardial infarction over age 50 in a residential population with ID to that in a general practice population. Method: Lifetime…

  2. Making Mathematics Placement Decisions for High School Students with High Incidence Disabilities: A Collective Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murzyn, Amy; Hughes, Trudie

    2015-01-01

    This multiple case study described the experiences of case managers making mathematics placement decisions for high school students with high incidence disabilities. Participants included three parents, three students, three case managers, three mathematics teachers, and three administrators from different high schools across rural, suburban and

  3. Proportional Reasoning Word Problem Performance for Middle School Students with High-Incidence Disabilities (HID)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brawand, Anne Eichorn

    2013-01-01

    Schema-based instruction (SBI) was used to examine the solving of proportional reasoning word problems for middle school students with high-incidence disabilities (HID). Seventh- and eighth-grade students with HID participated in the study. Students were randomly assigned to one of three groups. A multiple-baseline-across-groups design was

  4. Making Mathematics Placement Decisions for High School Students with High Incidence Disabilities: A Collective Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murzyn, Amy; Hughes, Trudie

    2015-01-01

    This multiple case study described the experiences of case managers making mathematics placement decisions for high school students with high incidence disabilities. Participants included three parents, three students, three case managers, three mathematics teachers, and three administrators from different high schools across rural, suburban and…

  5. Project Reaching Out: Technology Training for Minorities with Low Incidence Disabilities. Part I: African-American Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RESNA: Association for the Advancement of Rehabilitation Technology, Washington, DC.

    The purpose of this curriculum, part of Project Reaching Out, is to provide African-Americans with low incidence disabilities an overview of information on assistive technology in a manner that respects differences in beliefs, interpersonal styles, and behaviors. Low incidence disabilities are defined as deafness, blindness, deaf blindness,

  6. Highly Mobile Children and Youth with Disabilities: Policies and Practices in Five States. inForum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Luzanne; Ahearn, Eileen

    2007-01-01

    This document's primary focus is on a subset of the population of mobile children--infants, preschoolers, children and youth with disabilities and their families who are highly mobile. First, a background section provides information about policies and practices developed for mobile children at the federal level under the McKinney-Vento Program.

  7. Physical Mobility Limitations in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, S.; Hunter, D.; Ouellette-Kuntz, H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Mobility limitations increase with age in the general population. Despite a growing population of older adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), mobility is rarely studied in the ID literature. The specific aim of this study was to identify and summarise primary literature investigating mobility limitations in adults with ID.

  8. SIMON: Integration of mobility and parking solutions for people with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Ferreras, Alberto; Barber, Ricard; Dur-Gil, Juan Vicente; Solaz, Jos; Muoz, Eva Mara; Serrano, Manuel; Marqus, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Mobility and parking in urban areas are often difficult for people with disabilities. Obstacles include lack of accessible information on routes, transport alternatives and parking availability, as well as fraud in the use of the specific services intended for these citizens. The SIMON project aims to improve this situation through the integration of different ICT solutions. SIMON is enhancing the European Parking Card for disable people with contactless technologies and integrates mobile solutions to support user unique identification in existing parking areas whilst preserving privacy. SIMON will also promote better mobility solutions for mobility including information, navigation and access to restricted areas. PMID:26294493

  9. Strength and Speed Training for Elders With Mobility Disability

    PubMed Central

    Protas, Elizabeth J.; Tissier, Sandrine

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to pilot test a function-focused exercise intervention consisting of strength and gait-speed training in elders with reduced walking speed, decreased walking endurance, and functional impairment. Twelve participants, 77.2 years old (± 7.34), whose usual gait speed was <0.85 m/s, with walking endurance of <305 m in 5 min, and who were functionally impaired participated in a moderate-intensity exercise intervention. The training occurred 3 times per week, 75 min per session, for 3 months and combined 4 weeks of gait-speed training, walking exercise, and functional strengthening. The participants demonstrated mean usual gait speeds (≥1.0 m/s), endurance (≥350 m), and functional ability (≥10 score on performance battery) that were within normal limits after 12 weeks of training. Fastest gait speed (≥1.5 m/s) and muscle strength also improved significantly. Improvements were maintained during follow-up testing after 3–6 months. In summary, a 12-week intervention for frail, mobility-disabled participants led to improvements in walking, function, and strength. PMID:19799099

  10. The Prevalence and Severity of Physical Mobility Limitations in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, Shaun; Ouellette-Kuntz, Helene; Hunter, Duncan

    2009-01-01

    Background: The population of older adults with intellectual disabilities is growing, creating new challenges for individuals, families and service providers. Although there has been increased research into the ageing process for adults with intellectual disabilities, there is little focused research investigating physical mobility. Materials and

  11. Associations of BMI and adipose tissue area and density with incident mobility limitation and poor performance in older adults123

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Rachel A; Reinders, Ilse; Register, Thomas C; Ayonayon, Hilsa N; Newman, Anne B; Satterfield, Suzanne; Goodpaster, Bret H; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Harris, Tamara B

    2014-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a risk factor for disability, but risk of specific adipose depots is not completely understood. Objective: We investigated associations between mobility limitation, performance, and the following adipose measures: body mass index (BMI) and areas and densities of visceral adipose tissue (VAT), subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), and intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) in older adults. Design: This was a prospective population-based study of men (n = 1459) and women (n = 1552) initially aged 7079 y and free from mobility limitation. BMI was determined from measured height and weight. Adipose tissue area and density in Hounsfield units were measured in the thigh and abdomen by using computed tomography. Mobility limitation was defined as 2 consecutive reports of difficulty walking one-quarter mile or climbing 10 steps during semiannual assessments over 13 y. Poor performance was defined as a gait speed <1 m/s after 9 y of follow-up (n = 1542). Results: In models adjusted for disability risk factors, BMI, and areas of VAT, abdominal SAT, and IMAT were positively associated with mobility limitation in men and women. In women, thigh SAT area was positively associated with mobility limitation risk, whereas VAT density was inversely associated. Associations were similar for poor performance. BMI and thigh IMAT area (independent of BMI) were particularly strong indicators of incident mobility limitation and poor performance. For example, in women, the HR (95% CI) and OR (95% CI) associated with an SD increment in BMI for mobility limitation and poor performance were 1.31 (1.21, 1.42) and 1.41 (1.13, 1.76), respectively. In men, the HR (95% CI) and OR (95% CI) associated with an SD increment in thigh IMAT for mobility limitation and poor performance were 1.37 (1.27, 1.47) and 1.54 (1.18, 2.02), respectively. Conclusions: Even into old age, higher BMI is associated with mobility limitation and poor performance. The amount of adipose tissue in abdominal and thigh depots may also convey risk beyond BMI. PMID:24522448

  12. Autonomous mobile platform for enhanced situational awareness in Mass Casualty Incidents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongyi; Schafer, James; Wang, Sili; Ganz, Aura

    2014-01-01

    To enhance the efficiency of the search and rescue process of a Mass Casualty Incident, we introduce a low cost autonomous mobile platform. The mobile platform motion is controlled by an Android Smartphone mounted on a robot. The pictures and video captured by the Smartphone camera can significantly enhance the situational awareness of the incident commander leading to a more efficient search and rescue process. Moreover, the active RFID readers mounted on the mobile platform can improve the localization accuracy of victims in the disaster site in areas where the paramedics are not present, reducing the triage and evacuation time. PMID:25570104

  13. Effects of Increased Mobility Skills on Meaningful Life Participation for an Adult with Severe Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whinnery, Stacie B.; Whinnery, Keith W.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a case study of an adult with severe, multiple disabilities and discusses issues affecting meaningful life participation. Emphasis is placed on the role of functional mobility skills to increase active engagement in age-appropriate activities and opportunities to make informed choices. MOVE for Adults (Mobility Opportunities

  14. Physical Activity Among Persons Aging with Mobility Disabilities: Shaping a Research Agenda

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Dori E.; Bombardier, Charles H.; Hoffman, Jeanne M.; Belza, Basia

    2011-01-01

    With the aging of the baby boomer population and their accompanying burden of disease, future disability rates are expected to increase. This paper summarizes the state of the evidence regarding physical activity and aging for individuals with mobility disability and proposes a healthy aging research agenda for this population. Using a previously published framework, we present evidence in order to compile research recommendations in four areas focusing on older adults with mobility disability: (1) prevalence of physical activity, (2) health benefits of physical activity, (3) correlates of physical activity participation, and, (4) promising physical activity intervention strategies. Overall, findings show a dearth of research examining physical activity health benefits, correlates (demographic, psychological, social, and built environment), and interventions among persons aging with mobility disability. Further research is warranted. PMID:21748010

  15. Traumatic Brain Injury in the Netherlands: Incidence, Costs and Disability-Adjusted Life Years

    PubMed Central

    Scholten, Annemieke C.; Haagsma, Juanita A.; Panneman, Martien J. M.; van Beeck, Ed F.; Polinder, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Objective Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability, leading to great personal suffering and huge costs to society. Integrated knowledge on epidemiology, economic consequences and disease burden of TBI is scarce but essential for optimizing healthcare policy and preventing TBI. This study aimed to estimate incidence, cost-of-illness and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) of TBI in the Netherlands. Methods This study included data on all TBI patients who were treated at an Emergency Department (ED - National Injury Surveillance System), hospitalized (National Medical Registration), or died due to their injuries in the Netherlands between 20102012. Direct healthcare costs and indirect costs were determined using the incidence-based Dutch Burden of Injury Model. Disease burden was assessed by calculating years of life lost (YLL) owing to premature death, years lived with disability (YLD) and DALYs. Incidence, costs and disease burden were stratified by age and gender. Results TBI incidence was 213.6 per 100,000 person years. Total costs were 314.6 (USD $433.8) million per year and disease burden resulted in 171,200 DALYs (on average 7.1 DALYs per case). Men had highest mean costs per case (19,540 versus 14,940), driven by indirect costs. 024-year-olds had high incidence and disease burden but low economic costs, whereas 2564-year-olds had relatively low incidence but high economic costs. Patients aged 65+ had highest incidence, leading to considerable direct healthcare costs. 024-year-olds, men aged 2564 years, traffic injury victims (especially bicyclists) and home and leisure injury victims (especially 05-year-old and elderly fallers) are identified as risk groups in TBI. Conclusions The economic and health consequences of TBI are substantial. The integrated approach of assessing incidence, costs and disease burden enables detection of important risk groups in TBI, development of prevention programs that target these risk groups and assessment of the benefits of these programs. PMID:25343447

  16. Online Reading Comprehension among Seventh Grade Students with High Incidence Disabilities in Inclusive Settings: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Katherine R.

    2010-01-01

    Because research exploring how students with disabilities read and comprehend on the Internet is scarce, a mixed methods study was implemented to determine if Internet Reciprocal Teaching (IRT) is an effective intervention for improving online reading comprehension among seventh grade students with high-incidence disabilities in inclusive

  17. Online Reading Comprehension among Seventh Grade Students with High Incidence Disabilities in Inclusive Settings: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Katherine R.

    2010-01-01

    Because research exploring how students with disabilities read and comprehend on the Internet is scarce, a mixed methods study was implemented to determine if Internet Reciprocal Teaching (IRT) is an effective intervention for improving online reading comprehension among seventh grade students with high-incidence disabilities in inclusive…

  18. Mobility disability and the pattern of accelerometer-derived sedentary and physical activity behaviors in people with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ezeugwu, Victor; Klaren, Rachel E.; A. Hubbard, Elizabeth; Manns, Patricia (Trish); Motl, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Low physical activity and high sedentary behavior levels are major concerns in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) and these differ depending on the level of mobility disability. However, the manner in which daily activity is accumulated is currently unknown in this population. Methods A secondary analysis was performed on a combined data set of persons with MS from two previous investigations of physical activity and symptomatic or quality of life outcomes in the United States over a two year period (20072009). Mobility disability status was determined using the Patient Determined Disease Steps (PDDS) while activity behavior was objectively monitored using an ActiGraph accelerometer for 7days. Results Persons with MS who have mobility disability were involved in sedentary behavior, light and moderate intensity activity for 65%, 34% and 1% of the day, respectively compared to 60%, 37%, and 3%, respectively in those without mobility disability (p<0.05). Breaks in sedentary time did not differ by mobility disability status. Compared to those without mobility disability, the average number of sedentary bouts longer than 30min was greater in those with mobility disability (p=0.016). Conclusion Persons with MS with mobility disability are less active, engage in more sedentary behavior and accumulate prolonged sedentary bouts.

  19. Factors Predictive of Type of Powered Mobility Received by Veterans with Disability

    PubMed Central

    Rabadi, Meheroz H.; Vincent, Andrea S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The goal of this observational study was to determine factors predictive of the type of powered mobility prescribed to veterans with disability. Material/Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted for all veterans (n=170) who received powered mobility from a designated power mobility clinic. Logistic regression analysis was used to determined factors predictive of the type of powered mobility provided. Results Sixty-four (38%) veterans were provided powered wheelchairs and 106 (62%) were provided powered scooters. Of the variables examined, only primary medical conditions for referral and disability severity (as measured by the 2-minute timed walk test; 2-MWT) were predictive of the types of powered mobility prescribed. Veterans who were able to walk longer distances were more likely to be prescribed powered scooters. Age, gender, race, level of education, marital and employment status, number of chronic medical conditions, and upper and lower limb muscle strength were not significant predictors. Conclusions This study suggests that the primary medical conditions for referral and 2-MWT can assist clinicians in the determination of the type of powered mobility to prescribe to veterans with disability. PMID:25955214

  20. Outdoor Built Environment Barriers and Facilitators to Activity among Midlife and Older Adults with Mobility Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Dori E.; Huang, Deborah L.; Simonovich, Shannon D.; Belza, Basia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To gain better understanding of how the built environment impacts neighborhood-based physical activity among midlife and older adults with mobility disabilities. Design and methods: We conducted in-depth interviews with 35 adults over age 50, which used an assistive device and lived in King County, Washington, U.S. In addition,

  1. School Mobility, Dropout, and Graduation Rates across Student Disability Categories in Utah. REL 2015-055

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrat, Vanessa X.; Berliner, BethAnn; Voight, Adam; Tran, Loan; Huang, Chun-Wei; Yu, Airong; Chen-Gaddini, Min

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the characteristics of students with disabilities in Utah public schools, and presents the single-year mobility and dropout rates for students in grades 6-12, as well as the four-year cohort dropout and graduation rates, for students who started grade 9 for the first time in 2007/08 and constituted the 2011 cohort. Results…

  2. Outdoor Built Environment Barriers and Facilitators to Activity among Midlife and Older Adults with Mobility Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Dori E.; Huang, Deborah L.; Simonovich, Shannon D.; Belza, Basia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To gain better understanding of how the built environment impacts neighborhood-based physical activity among midlife and older adults with mobility disabilities. Design and methods: We conducted in-depth interviews with 35 adults over age 50, which used an assistive device and lived in King County, Washington, U.S. In addition,…

  3. Obstacle Course Training Can Improve Mobility and Prevent Falls in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hanegem, E.; Enkelaar, L.; Smulders, E.; Weerdesteyn, V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) constitute a special-needs population at high risk of falling. This is the first study to evaluate whether obstacle course training can improve mobility and prevent falls in this population. Methods: The intervention was implemented as part of an institution-wide health care improvement plan

  4. Mobility Device Use in the United States. Disability Statistics Report 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaye, H. Stephen; Kang, Taewoon; LaPlante, Michell P.

    This report provides data on the use of mobility devices in the United States by providing a detailed profile of the population using these devices. It covers their demographic characteristics; health and disability status, including diagnoses and impairments, physical functioning, and activities of daily living; and health insurance status. The

  5. Effects of Disability on Pregnancy Experiences Among Women with Impaired Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Iezzoni, Lisa I.; Wint, Amy J.; Smeltzer, Suzanne C.; Ecker, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Little is known about how functional impairments might affect the pregnancies of women with mobility disability. We aimed to explore complications that arise during pregnancy specifically related to physical functional impairments of women with significant mobility disabilities. Design Qualitative descriptive analysis Setting Telephone interviews with women from 17 USA states Sample 22 women with significant mobility difficulties who had delivered babies within the prior 10 years; most participants were recruited through social networks. Methods We conducted 2-hour, in-depth telephone interviews using a semi-structured, open-ended interview protocol. We used NVivo software to sort interview transcript texts for conventional content analyses. Main outcome measures Functional impairment-related complications during pregnancy. Results The women’s mean (standard deviation) age was 34.8 (5.3) years. Most were white, well-educated, and higher income; 8 women had spinal cord injuries, 4 cerebral palsy, and 10 had other conditions; 18 used wheeled mobility aids; and 14 had cesarean deliveries (8 elective). Impairment-related complications during pregnancy included: falls; urinary tract and bladder problems; wheelchair fit and stability problems that reduced mobility and compromised safety; significant shortness of breath, sometimes requiring respiratory support; increased spasticity; bowel management difficulties; and skin integrity problems (this was rare, but multiple women greatly increased skin monitoring during pregnancy to prevent pressure ulcers). Conclusions In addition to other pregnancy-associated health risks, women with mobility disabilities appear to experience problems relating to their functional impairments. Pre-conception planning and in-depth discussions during early pregnancy could potentially assist women with mobility disabilities to anticipate and address these difficulties. PMID:25417861

  6. Food Access Patterns and Barriers among Midlife and Older Adults with Mobility Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Deborah L.; Rosenberg, Dori E.; Simonovich, Shannon D.; Belza, Basia

    2012-01-01

    We examined where midlife and older adults with a mobility disability accessed food outside the home in King County, Washington, USA, how they travelled to these food destinations, and facilitators and barriers to food access using qualitative interviews. Thirty-five adults aged ?50 years with a mobility disability (defined as use of an assistive device for mobility) were interviewed. Supplemental objective information was obtained from a Global Positioning System device worn by participants for 3 days. Participants primarily accessed food at grocery stores, restaurants, and coffee shops/cafs. The most common transportation modes were walking, obtaining a ride from friends, motorized chair/scooter, and public transit. Location and proximity of food destinations were factors affecting participants' ability to access these destinations. Adequate space, ease of entry, available amenities such as restrooms, and helpful people were facilitators for participants to access food outside the home. PMID:23056944

  7. Environmental and state-level regulatory factors affect the incidence of autism and intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Rzhetsky, Andrey; Bagley, Steven C; Wang, Kanix; Lyttle, Christopher S; Cook, Edwin H; Altman, Russ B; Gibbons, Robert D

    2014-03-01

    Many factors affect the risks for neurodevelopmental maladies such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and intellectual disability (ID). To compare environmental, phenotypic, socioeconomic and state-policy factors in a unified geospatial framework, we analyzed the spatial incidence patterns of ASD and ID using an insurance claims dataset covering nearly one third of the US population. Following epidemiologic evidence, we used the rate of congenital malformations of the reproductive system as a surrogate for environmental exposure of parents to unmeasured developmental risk factors, including toxins. Adjusted for gender, ethnic, socioeconomic, and geopolitical factors, the ASD incidence rates were strongly linked to population-normalized rates of congenital malformations of the reproductive system in males (an increase in ASD incidence by 283% for every percent increase in incidence of malformations, 95% CI: [91%, 576%], p<6×10(-5)). Such congenital malformations were barely significant for ID (94% increase, 95% CI: [1%, 250%], p = 0.0384). Other congenital malformations in males (excluding those affecting the reproductive system) appeared to significantly affect both phenotypes: 31.8% ASD rate increase (CI: [12%, 52%], p<6×10(-5)), and 43% ID rate increase (CI: [23%, 67%], p<6×10(-5)). Furthermore, the state-mandated rigor of diagnosis of ASD by a pediatrician or clinician for consideration in the special education system was predictive of a considerable decrease in ASD and ID incidence rates (98.6%, CI: [28%, 99.99%], p = 0.02475 and 99% CI: [68%, 99.99%], p = 0.00637 respectively). Thus, the observed spatial variability of both ID and ASD rates is associated with environmental and state-level regulatory factors; the magnitude of influence of compound environmental predictors was approximately three times greater than that of state-level incentives. The estimated county-level random effects exhibited marked spatial clustering, strongly indicating existence of as yet unidentified localized factors driving apparent disease incidence. Finally, we found that the rates of ASD and ID at the county level were weakly but significantly correlated (Pearson product-moment correlation 0.0589, p = 0.00101), while for females the correlation was much stronger (0.197, p<2.26×10(-16)). PMID:24625521

  8. Environmental and State-Level Regulatory Factors Affect the Incidence of Autism and Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Rzhetsky, Andrey; Bagley, Steven C.; Wang, Kanix; Lyttle, Christopher S.; Cook, Edwin H.; Altman, Russ B.; Gibbons, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Many factors affect the risks for neurodevelopmental maladies such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and intellectual disability (ID). To compare environmental, phenotypic, socioeconomic and state-policy factors in a unified geospatial framework, we analyzed the spatial incidence patterns of ASD and ID using an insurance claims dataset covering nearly one third of the US population. Following epidemiologic evidence, we used the rate of congenital malformations of the reproductive system as a surrogate for environmental exposure of parents to unmeasured developmental risk factors, including toxins. Adjusted for gender, ethnic, socioeconomic, and geopolitical factors, the ASD incidence rates were strongly linked to population-normalized rates of congenital malformations of the reproductive system in males (an increase in ASD incidence by 283% for every percent increase in incidence of malformations, 95% CI: [91%, 576%], p<6×10−5). Such congenital malformations were barely significant for ID (94% increase, 95% CI: [1%, 250%], p = 0.0384). Other congenital malformations in males (excluding those affecting the reproductive system) appeared to significantly affect both phenotypes: 31.8% ASD rate increase (CI: [12%, 52%], p<6×10−5), and 43% ID rate increase (CI: [23%, 67%], p<6×10−5). Furthermore, the state-mandated rigor of diagnosis of ASD by a pediatrician or clinician for consideration in the special education system was predictive of a considerable decrease in ASD and ID incidence rates (98.6%, CI: [28%, 99.99%], p = 0.02475 and 99% CI: [68%, 99.99%], p = 0.00637 respectively). Thus, the observed spatial variability of both ID and ASD rates is associated with environmental and state-level regulatory factors; the magnitude of influence of compound environmental predictors was approximately three times greater than that of state-level incentives. The estimated county-level random effects exhibited marked spatial clustering, strongly indicating existence of as yet unidentified localized factors driving apparent disease incidence. Finally, we found that the rates of ASD and ID at the county level were weakly but significantly correlated (Pearson product-moment correlation 0.0589, p = 0.00101), while for females the correlation was much stronger (0.197, p<2.26×10−16). PMID:24625521

  9. Related Services Research for Students with Low-Incidence Disabilities: Implications for Speech-Language Pathologists in Inclusive Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giangreco, Michael F.

    2000-01-01

    This article summarizes a team process for making related services decisions called VISTA (Vermont Interdependent Services Team Approach) and nine research studies on the use and impact of VISTA with students with low incidence disabilities. It also addresses team size, consumer perspectives, and paraprofessional supports. Five major conclusions

  10. Effects of an Adapted Physical Education Teaching Model on Special Educator Teaching Approaches for Students with Low Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laughlin, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a training package, which consisted of the Flex Grid Teaching Model along with adapted physical education consultation, on special education teacher instruction of functional motor skill acquisition instruction to secondary students with low incidence disabilities. Special education teachers

  11. Team-Based Learning for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities in High School Social Studies Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Shawn; Wanzek, Jeanne; Swanson, Elizabeth A.; Vaughn, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of implementing team-based learning (TBL) practices on content acquisition for 11th grade students with high-incidence disabilities enrolled in general education social studies courses. TBL components focus on collaborative discourse within heterogeneous teams. TBL, which requires critical thinking and the application

  12. Fix It with TAPE: Repurposing Technology to Be Assistive Technology for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouck, Emily C.; Shurr, Jordan C.; Tom, Kinsey; Jasper, Andrea D.; Bassette, Laura; Miller, Bridget; Flanagan, Sara M.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses how practitioners can repurpose technology--common and socially desirable technology in particular--to be assistive technology for students with high-incidence disabilities. The authors provide a framework for practitioners to consider technology for repurposing: TAPE (Transportable, Available, Practical, Engaging) and

  13. Incidence, Types and Characteristics of Aggressive Behaviour in Treatment Facilities for Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability and Severe Challenging Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenneij, N. H.; Koot, H. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Inpatient aggression in treatment facilities for persons with intellectual disability (ID) can have aversive consequences, for co-clients and staff, but also for the aggressors themselves. To manage and eventually prevent inpatient aggressive incidents, more knowledge about their types and characteristics is necessary. Method: In four

  14. Incidence, Types and Characteristics of Aggressive Behaviour in Treatment Facilities for Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability and Severe Challenging Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenneij, N. H.; Koot, H. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Inpatient aggression in treatment facilities for persons with intellectual disability (ID) can have aversive consequences, for co-clients and staff, but also for the aggressors themselves. To manage and eventually prevent inpatient aggressive incidents, more knowledge about their types and characteristics is necessary. Method: In four…

  15. "Bring Your Textbook!" Using Secondary Texts to Assess Reading Demands and Skills Required for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King-Sears, Margaret E.; Duke, Jodi M.

    2010-01-01

    It is important for special educators to have a strong repertoire of diagnostic methods to determine how well students with high-incidence disabilities are accessing, reading, and remembering content from textbooks used in their middle and high school classes. Suggestions for using the diagnostic information to guide specialized instruction

  16. Health beliefs, low mood, and somatizing tendency: contribution to incidence and persistence of musculoskeletal pain with and without reported disability

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Martnez, Jos Miguel; Coggon, David; Delclos, George; Benavides, Fernando G; Serra, Consol

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study aims to investigate whether associations of psychological risk factors with the incidence and persistence of disabling musculoskeletal pain differ from those for non-disabling musculoskeletal pain. Methods As part of the international Cultural and Psychosocial Influences in Disability (CUPID) study, 1105 Spanish nurses and office workers were asked at baseline about health beliefs concerning pain, mental health, and somatizing tendency. Musculoskeletal pain in the past months at ten anatomical sites (back, neck, and left and right shoulder, elbow, wrist/hand, and knee) was ascertained at baseline and one year later. Pain was classed as disabling if it made one or more specified everyday activities difficult or impossible. Multilevel multinomial logistic regression modeling was used to explore associations of baseline risk factors with pain outcomes at follow-up, conditioned on pain status at baseline. Results A total of 971 participants (87.9%) completed follow-up. Among anatomical sites that were pain-free at baseline, the development of disabling musculoskeletal pain was predicted by pessimistic beliefs about pain prognosis [odds ratio (OR) 1.5, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.02.1], poor mental health (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.33.0), and somatizing tendency (OR 4.0, 95% CI 2.56.4). Adverse beliefs about prognosis were also associated with the transition from non-disabling to disabling musculoskeletal pain (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.112.5) and the persistence of disabling musculoskeletal pain (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.25.5), which was already present at baseline. Associations with non-disabling musculoskeletal pain were weaker and less consistent. Conclusion Our findings suggest that established psychological risk factors relate principally to the disability that arises from musculoskeletal pain. PMID:23955508

  17. Disability levels and correlates among older mobile home dwellers, an NHATS analysis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rousan, Tala M.; Rubenstein, Linda M.; Wallace, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although remarkably understudied, manufactured or mobile homes are the housing choice for nearly 20 million Americans and little is known about the health of older persons living in mobile homes. Objective We sought to investigate disability levels and other health correlates among older adults living in mobile or manufactured homes compared to their counterparts living in other types of homes. Methods We sampled non-institutional adults aged 65 years or older (n = 7609), of whom 344 lived in mobile homes, from the 2011 National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS). Results Respondents living in mobile homes (average age = 75.1 years; SD = 0.5) had lower education and income and medical insurance than older adults living in other types of community residence (average age = 77.5 years; SD = 0.2). They were more likely to smoke, have lung and heart disease, and report fair or poor general health status. Mobile home dwellers reported more difficulty or inability in performing the following activities of daily living when compared to their counterparts: stooping and kneeling (64.9% vs 60.8%, p = 0.007), walking 6 blocks (46.5% vs 41.5%, p = 0.001), walking 3 blocks (37.7% vs 33.5%, p = 0.002), and climbing up to 20 stairs (39.2% vs 34.8%, p = 0.02). Among those reporting disability, mobile home dwellers had fewer bathroom safety modifications. Conclusion There is higher prevalence of chronic conditions, functional and cognitive impairment in older mobile home dwellers compared to older adults living in other types of housing. PMID:25766655

  18. Universal accessibility of "accessible" fitness and recreational facilities for persons with mobility disabilities.

    PubMed

    Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Kelly P; Ginis, Kathleen A Martin

    2011-01-01

    This study descriptively measured the universal accessibility of "accessible" fitness and recreational facilities for Ontarians living with mobility disabilities. The physical and social environments of 44 fitness and recreational facilities that identified as "accessible" were assessed using a modified version of the AIMFREE. None of the 44 facilities were completely accessible. Mean accessibility ratings ranged between 31 and 63 out of a possible 100. Overall, recreational facilities had higher accessibility scores than fitness centers, with significant differences found on professional support and training, entrance areas, and parking lot. A modest correlation was found between the availability of fitness programming and the overall accessibility of fitness-center specific facility areas. Overall, the physical and social environments of the 44 fitness and recreational facilities assessed were limited in their accessibility for persons with mobility disabilities. Future efforts should be directed at establishing and meeting universal accessibility guidelines for Canadian physical activity facilities. PMID:21282844

  19. A Review of the Use of Touch-Screen Mobile Devices by People with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Jennifer; Limbrick, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a review of the research on the use of mobile touch-screen devices such as PDAs, iPod Touches, iPads and smart phones by people with developmental disabilities. Most of the research has been on very basic use of the devices as speech generating devices, as a means of providing video, pictorial and/or audio self-prompting and

  20. A Review of the Use of Touch-Screen Mobile Devices by People with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Jennifer; Limbrick, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a review of the research on the use of mobile touch-screen devices such as PDAs, iPod Touches, iPads and smart phones by people with developmental disabilities. Most of the research has been on very basic use of the devices as speech generating devices, as a means of providing video, pictorial and/or audio self-prompting and…

  1. Association between Coffee Consumption and Incident Risk of Disabling Dementia inElderly Japanese: The Ohsaki Cohort 2006Study.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Kemmyo; Tomata, Yasutake; Kaiho, Yu; Honkura, Kenji; Sugawara, Yumi; Tsuji, Ichiro

    2015-12-01

    Epidemiological studies of the association between coffee consumption and dementia have yielded inconsistent results. Therefore, we investigated the association between coffee consumption and incident risk of dementia in an elderly Japanese population. 23,091 subjects aged ?65 y living in Ohsaki City, northeastern Japan, responded to the baseline survey in 2006. Of these, we analyzed 13,137 subjects who gave informed consent and were not disabled at baseline. The outcome was the incidence of disabling dementia defined by usage of the Long-term Care Insurance database. We used the Cox proportional hazards regression model for multivariate analysis. During 5.7 y of follow-up period, we identified 1,107 cases of incident dementia. Overall, coffee consumption was significantly associated with a lower risk of incident dementia. The multivariate-adjusted HRs for the incidence of dementia according to coffee consumption categories (never, occasionally, 1-2 cups/d, and ?3 cups/d) were 1.00, 0.73 (95% CI, 0.62-0.86), 0.72 (95% CI, 0.61-0.84), and 0.82 (95% CI, 0.65-1.02; p for trend?=?0.009), respectively. In addition, this significant inverse association was more remarkable among women, non-smokers, and non-drinkers. Coffee consumption is significantly associated with a lower risk of incident dementia. PMID:26682686

  2. Gender differences in cognitive impairment and mobility disability in old age: a cross-sectional study in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Onadja, Yentma; Atchessi, Nicole; Soura, Bassiahi Abdramane; Rossier, Clmentine; Zunzunegui, Maria-Victoria

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to examine differences in cognitive impairment and mobility disability between older men and women in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, and to assess the extent to which these differences could be attributable to gender inequalities in life course social and health conditions. Data were collected on 981 men and women aged 50 and older in a 2010 cross-sectional health survey conducted in the Ouagadougou Health and Demographic Surveillance System. Cognitive impairment was assessed using the Legans cognitive test. Mobility disability was self-reported as having any difficulty walking 400 m without assistance. We used logistic regression to assess gender differences in cognitive impairment and mobility disability. Prevalence of cognitive impairment was 27.6% in women and 7.7% in men, and mobility disability was present in 51.7% of women and 26.5% of men. The women to men odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for cognitive impairment and mobility disability was 3.52 (1.98-6.28) and 3.79 (2.47-5.85), respectively, after adjusting for the observed life course social and health conditions. The female excess was only partially explained by gender inequalities in nutritional status, marital status and, to a lesser extent, education. Among men and women, age, childhood hunger, lack of education, absence of a partner and being underweight were independent risk factors for cognitive impairment, while age, childhood poor health, food insecurity and being overweight were risk factors for mobility disability. Enhancing nutritional status and education opportunities throughout life span could prevent cognitive impairment and mobility disability and partly reduce the female excess in these disabilities. PMID:23827740

  3. Superior effect of forceful compared with standard traction mobilizations in hip disability?

    PubMed

    Vaarbakken, Kjartan; Ljunggren, Anne Elisabeth

    2007-09-01

    THE OBJECTIVE OF THIS STUDY WAS TO COMPARE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TWO COMPILED PHYSIOTHERAPY PROGRAMS: one including forceful traction mobilizations, the other including traction with unknown force, in patients with hip disability according to ICF (the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, 2001; WHO), using a block randomized, controlled trial with two parallel treatment groups in a regular private outpatient physiotherapy practice. In the experimental group (E; n = 10) and control group (C; n = 9), the mean (+/-SD) age for all participants was 59 +/- 12 years. They were recruited from outpatient physiotherapy clinics, had persistent pain located at the hip joint for >8 weeks and hip hypomobility. Both groups received exercise, information and manual traction mobilization. In E, the traction force was progressed to 800 N, whereas in C it was unknown. Major outcome measure was the median total change score >/=20 points or >/=50% of the disease- and joint-specific Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), compiled of Pain, Stiffness, Function and Hip-related quality of life (ranging 0-100). The mean (range) treatments received were 13 (7-16) over 5-12 weeks and 20 (18-24) over 12 weeks for E and C, respectively. The experimental group showed superior clinical post-treatment effect on HOOS (>/=20 points), in six of 10 participants compared with none of nine in the control group (p = 0.011). The effect size was 1.1. The results suggest that a compiled physiotherapy program including forceful traction mobilizations are short-term effective in reducing self-rated hip disability in primary healthcare. The long-term effect is to be documented. PMID:18833335

  4. Delaying Mobility Disability in People With Parkinson Disease Using a Sensorimotor Agility Exercise Program

    PubMed Central

    King, Laurie A; Horak, Fay B

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces a new framework for therapists to develop an exercise program to delay mobility disability in people with Parkinson disease (PD). Mobility, or the ability to efficiently navigate and function in a variety of environments, requires balance, agility, and flexibility, all of which are affected by PD. This article summarizes recent research identifying how constraints on mobility specific to PD, such as rigidity, bradykinesia, freezing, poor sensory integration, inflexible program selection, and impaired cognitive processing, limit mobility in people with PD. Based on these constraints, a conceptual framework for exercises to maintain and improve mobility is presented. An example of a constraint-focused agility exercise program, incorporating movement principles from tai chi, kayaking, boxing, lunges, agility training, and Pilates exercises, is presented. This new constraint-focused agility exercise program is based on a strong scientific framework and includes progressive levels of sensorimotor, resistance, and coordination challenges that can be customized for each patient while maintaining fidelity. Principles for improving mobility presented here can be incorporated into an ongoing or long-term exercise program for people with PD. PMID:19228832

  5. Decreased incidence of neurologic disability among neonates at high risk born between 1975 and 1984 in Alberta.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, C M; Etches, P C

    1988-01-01

    We report the outcome at 2 or 3.5 years of 1463 neonates at high risk born between 1975 and 1984 and cared for in a regional perinatal program in Alberta. Although the number of surviving infants of very low birth weight (1250 g or less) increased over the study period, the incidence rate of neurologic impairment fell significantly, from 19% to 13% (p less than 0.01), so that there was no significant increase in the absolute number of disabled children. This finding remained valid when two other groups of infants at high risk (those weighing more than 1250 g at birth and having a positive neurologic history and those born at term with asphyxial encephalopathy) were included in the analysis, so that over the decade there was a significant decrease in the incidence of disability among the total group of neonates (p less than 0.01) and no increase in the absolute number of disabled children (23 in 1975 and 19 in 1984). We conclude that neonatal intensive care has contributed to improved survival of neonates at high risk without increasing the burden of major neurologic disability. PMID:2969278

  6. Incidence of disability pensions among slaughterhouse workers in Denmark. With special regard to diagnosis of the musculo-skeletal system.

    PubMed

    Hansen, N S; Jeune, B

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether slaughterhouse workers (SW) in Denmark have a higher incidence of disability than expected in comparison with the general population and the sub-group of the population that is gainfully employed, especially with regard to pensions awarded for incapacity related to the musculo-skeletal system. There were 122 male SW who were awarded disability pensions (medium or high level of compensation) in the 3-year period 1977-79 as compared with the expected figure, 152.3 (p less than 0.05) and 40 disability pensions awarded to female SW as compared with 30.7 (0.05 less than p less than 0.10). In men the Standardized Disability Ratio (SDR) increases with age. High SDRs are observed for diagnosis in the musculo-skeletal system for both sexes. The difference between observed and expected values does not change appreciably when the expected values are calculated on the basis of age-specific incidence rates among all actively employed people. Problems of the study design and selection bias are discussed to facilitate the interpretation of results. A possible deleterious effect of meatpacking on the musculo-skeletal system calls for further investigation. PMID:7156917

  7. The incidence of cognitive disabilities in the siblings of autistic children.

    PubMed

    August, G J; Stewart, M A; Tsai, L

    1981-05-01

    Individual components of cognitive disability were assessed in the siblings of 41 autistic probands and compared with similar measures from a control group of siblings of Down's syndrome individuals. The results showed a significant familial clustering of cognitive disabilities in the siblings of autistic probands. These cognitive impairments included disturbances in expressive and receptive language, specific learning disabilities, and varying degrees of mental subnormality. PMID:6456787

  8. Exploring Mobility Options for Children with Physical Disabilities: A Focus on Powered Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiart, Lesley

    2011-01-01

    The study by Tefft et al. (2011, in this issue) is one of the few studies that have explored the impact of pediatric powered mobility on families. The parents who participated in their study reported increased satisfaction with their children's social and play skills, ability to move independently, sleeping patterns, and public perception of their

  9. Exploring Mobility Options for Children with Physical Disabilities: A Focus on Powered Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiart, Lesley

    2011-01-01

    The study by Tefft et al. (2011, in this issue) is one of the few studies that have explored the impact of pediatric powered mobility on families. The parents who participated in their study reported increased satisfaction with their children's social and play skills, ability to move independently, sleeping patterns, and public perception of their…

  10. Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Prevalence, Incidence and Remission of Aggressive Behaviour and Related Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, S.-A.; Smiley, E.; Jackson, A.; Finlayson, J.; Allan, L.; Mantry, D.; Morrison, J.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Aggressive behaviours can be disabling for adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), with negative consequences for the adult, their family and paid carers. It is surprising how little research has been conducted into the epidemiology of these needs, given the impact they can have. This study investigates point prevalence, 2-year

  11. The Incidence and Nature of Letter Orientation Errors in Reading Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terepocki, Megan; Kruk, Richard S.; Willows, Dale M.

    2002-01-01

    A study investigated letter orientation confusions (reversals) in the reading and writing of 10 children with reading disabilities and 10 typical readers (age 10). Individuals with reading disability made more orientation confusions. Orientation errors were more frequent for reversible than for nonreversible items in tasks involving long-term

  12. Self-Determination Prospects of Youth with High-Incidence Disabilities: Divergent Perspectives and Related Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Erik W.; Trainor, Audrey; Owens, Laura; Sweden, Beth; Sun, Ye

    2010-01-01

    Promoting student self-determination has emerged as a key component of recommended practices in the field of secondary transition. This article examined the self-determination prospects of 196 youth with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD), learning disabilities (LD), and mild/moderate cognitive disabilities (CD) using the "AIR…

  13. Social Capital during the Postsecondary Transition for Young Adults with High Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trainor, Audrey A.; Morningstar, Mary; Murray, Angela; Kim, Hyejung

    2013-01-01

    Social capital, relationships, and networks among people who share resources with one another, is essential to the successful transition into adulthood for all individuals--with or without disabilities. Social capital is particularly valuable for youth with disabilities because it has the potential to create access to other forms of capital as

  14. The Effects of Obesity and Mobility Disability in Access to Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening in France: Results from the National Health and Disability Survey

    PubMed Central

    Bussière, Clémence; Sicsic, Jonathan; Pelletier-Fleury, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to disentangle the effects of obesity and mobility limitation on cervical and breast cancer screening among community dwelling women. Methods The data source was the French national Health and Disability Survey - Household Section, 2008. The Body Mass Index (BMI) was used to categorize obesity status. We constructed a continuous score of mobility limitations to assess the severity of disability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.84). Logistic regressions were performed to examine the association between obesity, mobility limitations and the use of Pap test (n = 8 133) and the use of mammography (n = 7 561). Adjusted odds ratios were calculated (AOR). Interaction terms between obesity and the disability score were included in models testing for effect modifications. Results Compared with non-obese women, the odds of having a Pap test in the past 3 years was 24% lower in obese women (AOR = 0.76; 95% CI: 0.65 to 0.89), the odds of having a mammogram in the past 2 years was 23% lower (AOR = 0.77; 95% CI: 0.66 to 0.91). Each time the disability score was 5 points higher, the odds of having a Pap test decreases by 20% (AOR = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.94 to 0.98), the odds of having a mammogram decreases by 25% (AOR = 0.95; 95% CI: 0.94 to 0.97). There was no significant interaction between obesity and disability score. Conclusion Obesity and mobility limitation are independently associated with a lower likelihood of cervical and breast cancer screening. Protective outreach and follow-up are necessary to reduce inequalities and thus to reduce health disparities in these vulnerable and high-risk populations of obese women with disabilities. PMID:25133662

  15. The Effect of Obesity on Incidence of Disability and Mortality in Mexicans Aged 50 Years and Older

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Karmarkar, Amol M.; Tan, Alai; Graham, James E.; Arcari, Christine M.; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.; Snih, Soham Al

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of obesity on incidence of disability and mortality among non-disabled older Mexicans at baseline. Material and Methods The sample included 8,415 Mexicans aged ?50 years from the Mexican Health and Aging Study (2001-2012), who reported no limitations in activities of daily living (ADLs) at baseline and have complete data on all covariates. Socio-demographics, smoking status, comorbidities, ADL activities, and body mass index (BMI) were collected. Results The lowest hazard ratio (HR) for disability was at BMI of 25 to <30 (HR=0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.85-1.12). The lowest HR for mortality were seen among participants with BMIs 25 to <30 (HR=0.85; 95% CI, 075-0.97), 30 to <35 (HR=0.86; 95 % CI, 0.72-1.02), and ?35 (HR=0.92; 95 % CI, 0.70-1.22). Conclusion Mexican older adults with a BMI of 25 to <30 were at less risk for both disability and mortality. PMID:26172232

  16. Outdoor Built Environment Barriers and Facilitators to Activity among Midlife and Older Adults with Mobility Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Dori E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To gain better understanding of how the built environment impacts neighborhood-based physical activity among midlife and older adults with mobility disabilities. Design and methods: We conducted in-depth interviews with 35 adults over age 50, which used an assistive device and lived in King County, Washington, U.S. In addition, participants wore Global Positioning Systems (GPS) devices for 3 days prior to the interview. The GPS maps were used as prompts during the interviews. Open coding of the 35 interviews using latent content analysis resulted in key themes and subthemes that achieved consensus between coders. Two investigators independently coded the text of each interview. Results: Participants were on average of 67 years of age (range: 5086) and predominantly used canes (57%), walkers (57%), or wheelchairs (46%). Key themes pertained to curb ramp availability and condition, sidewalk availability and condition, hills, aesthetics, lighting, ramp availability, weather, presence and features of crosswalks, availability of resting places and shelter on streets, paved or smooth walking paths, safety, and traffic on roads. Implications: A variety of built environment barriers and facilitators to neighborhood-based activity exist for midlife and older adults with mobility disabilities. Preparing our neighborhood environments for an aging population that uses assistive devices will be important to foster independence and health. PMID:23010096

  17. (abstract) A Mobile Robot for Remote Response to Incidents Involving Hazardous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Richard V.

    1994-01-01

    This paper will report the status of the Emergency Response Robotics project, a teleoperated mobile robot system being developed at JPL for use by the JPL Fire Department/HAZMAT Team. The project, which began in 1991, has been focused on developing a robotic vehicle which can be quickly deployed by HAZMAT Team personnel for first entry into an incident site. The primary goals of the system are to gain access to the site, locate and identify the hazard, and aid in its mitigation. The involvement of JPL Fire Department/HAZMAT Team personnel has been critical in guiding the design and evaluation of the system. A unique feature of the current robot, called HAZBOT III, is its special design for operation in combustible environments. This includes the use of all solid state electronics, brushless motors, and internal pressurization. Demonstration and testing of the system with HAZMAT Team personnel has shown that teleoperated robots, such as HAZBOT III, can successfully gain access to incident sites locating and identifying hazardous material spills. Work is continuing to enable more complex missions through the addition of appropriate sensor technology and enhancement of the operator interface.

  18. Using Mobile Technology in an Urban High School to Decrease Adult Prompting during in School Transitions for Students Identified with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christman, Jennifer T.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the application of video modeling on mobile technology to increase efficiency in the classroom for students identified with intellectual disabilities. Specially, this study sought to identify if video modeling on mobile technology could decrease adult prompting for students with intellectual disabilities during

  19. The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) study, randomized trial of physical activity: Effect on the prevention of major mobility disability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In older adults reduced mobility is common and is an independent risk factor for morbidity, hospitalization, disability, and mortality. Limited evidence suggests that physical activity may help prevent mobility disability; however, there are no definitive clinical trials examining if physical activi...

  20. Interpreting Outcomes of Social Skills Training for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gresham, Frank M.; Sugai, George; Horner, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses probable explanations for the weak effects in some meta-analyses that have investigated the effectiveness of social skills training (SST) for students with disabilities and offers specific recommendations for designing and producing more effective SST interventions. Treatment integrity issues, assessment issues, and

  1. The Effects of Mindfulness Meditation on Adolescents with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solar, Ernest L., II

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown evidence that mindfulness-based meditation practices may be effective treatment interventions for mental, emotional, and medical disabilities in the adult population. There has been a limited number of research studies showing the effectiveness of meditation practices with secondary students who receive special education…

  2. Injury Incidence and Patterns in Workers with Intellectual Disability: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lysaght, Rosemary; Sparring, Cynthia; Ouellette-Kuntz, Helene; Marshall, Carrie Anne

    2011-01-01

    Background: Workplace safety is a concern in the employment of persons with intellectual disability, due to both real concerns for employee well-being, and the effect that negative perceptions of safety risk can have on hiring. Method: This study involved a retrospective analysis of workplace insurance claim records for workers with and without

  3. Research on Computer-Mediated Instruction for Students with High Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Gail; Koury, Kevin; Mitchem, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    In this literature review, the effects of computer-mediated instruction on the learning of students with mild and moderate disabilities are synthesized from 1996 onward that extends our previously published synthesis for the period 1987-1995. Empirically based findings are reviewed and discussed in the basic skills areas of reading, writing, and

  4. Incidence of and Risk Factors for Falls among Adults with an Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, C. R.; Clemson, L.; Stancliffe, R. J.; Durvasula, S.; Sherrington, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Falls among people with intellectual disability (ID) occur at a younger age than the general population and are a significant cause of injury and hospitalisation. There is very limited research investigating risk factors for falls among people with ID and none with people living outside of formal care arrangements, either independently

  5. Incidence of and Risk Factors for Falls among Adults with an Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, C. R.; Clemson, L.; Stancliffe, R. J.; Durvasula, S.; Sherrington, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Falls among people with intellectual disability (ID) occur at a younger age than the general population and are a significant cause of injury and hospitalisation. There is very limited research investigating risk factors for falls among people with ID and none with people living outside of formal care arrangements, either independently…

  6. Designing Clinical Trials of Intervention for Mobility Disability: Results from the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) Pilot Trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clinical trials to assess interventions for mobility disability are critically needed, however data for efficiently designing such trials are lacking. Our results are described from the LIFE pilot clinical trial, in which 424 volunteers aged 70-89 years were randomly assigned to one of two intervent...

  7. A Review of the Use of Touch-Screen Mobile Devices by People with Developmental Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Jennifer; Limbrick, Lisa

    2015-12-01

    This article presents a review of the research on the use of mobile touch-screen devices such as PDAs, iPod Touches, iPads and smart phones by people with developmental disabilities. Most of the research has been on very basic use of the devices as speech generating devices, as a means of providing video, pictorial and/or audio self-prompting and for leisure activities such as listening to music and watching videos. Most research studies were small-n designs that provided a preponderant level of research evidence. There is a clear need for more research with younger participants and with a much wider range of apps, including educational apps. PMID:23888356

  8. Relation of physical activity time to incident disability in community dwelling adults with or at risk of knee arthritis: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether objectively measured time spent in light intensity physical activity is related to incident disability and to disability progression. Design Prospective multisite cohort study from September 2008 to December 2012. Setting Baltimore, Maryland; Columbus, Ohio; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Pawtucket, Rhode Island, USA. Participants Disability onset cohort of 1680 community dwelling adults aged 49 years or older with knee osteoarthritis or risk factors for knee osteoarthritis; the disability progression cohort included 1814 adults. Main outcome measures Physical activity was measured by accelerometer monitoring. Disability was ascertained from limitations in instrumental and basic activities of daily living at baseline and two years. The primary outcome was incident disability. The secondary outcome was progression of disability defined by a more severe level (no limitations, limitations to instrumental activities only, 1-2 basic activities, or ?3 basic activities) at two years compared with baseline. Results Greater time spent in light intensity activities had a significant inverse association with incident disability. Less incident disability and less disability progression were each significantly related to increasing quartile categories of daily time spent in light intensity physical activities (hazard ratios for disability onset 1.00, 0.62, 0.47, and 0.58, P for trend=0.007; hazard ratios for progression 1.00, 0.59, 0.50, and 0.53, P for trend=0.003) with control for socioeconomic factors (age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, income) and health factors (comorbidities, depressive symptoms, obesity, smoking, lower extremity pain and function, and knee assessments: osteoarthritis severity, pain, symptoms, prior injury). This finding was independent of time spent in moderate-vigorous activities. Conclusion These prospective data showed an association between greater daily time spent in light intensity physical activities and reduced risk of onset and progression of disability in adults with osteoarthritis of the knee or risk factors for knee osteoarthritis. An increase in daily physical activity time may reduce the risk of disability, even if the intensity of that additional activity is not increased. PMID:24782514

  9. The Incidence and Short Term Functional Effect of Partial PCL Release in Fixed and Mobile Bearing PCL Retaining TKA.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Ran; Woolwine, Spencer; Josephs, Lee; Scott, Richard D

    2015-12-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) release may be required to balance the flexion gap in PCL retaining TKA. This study examines the incidence and functional consequences of PCL release in both fixed and mobile bearing TKA. A consecutive series of 1388 TKAs with 1014 fixed bearing, and 374 mobile bearing implants were reviewed for prevalence of partial PCL release, restoration of potential flexion and objective knee stability at minimum one-year follow-up. Patients receiving mobile bearing inserts were more likely to need partial PCL release (42% versus 17.5%). The occurrence of partial PCL release did not have a significant impact on knee range of motion and subjective knee stability. The need for a partial PCL release appears to be greater in mobile than in fixed bearing. Knees that required a release in both groups demonstrated no difference in restoration of flexion compared with unreleased knees and no adverse effects on flexion stability. PMID:26145191

  10. Childhood brain tumours and use of mobile phones: comparison of a case-control study with incidence data.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Denis; Feychting, Maria; Schz, Joachim; Rsli, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The first case-control study on mobile phone use and brain tumour risk among children and adolescents (CEFALO study) has recently been published. In a commentary published in Environmental Health, Sderqvist and colleagues argued that CEFALO suggests an increased brain tumour risk in relation to wireless phone use. In this article, we respond and show why consistency checks of case-control study results with observed time trends of incidence rates are essential, given the well described limitations of case-control studies and the steep increase of mobile phone use among children and adolescents during the last decade. There is no plausible explanation of how a notably increased risk from use of wireless phones would correspond to the relatively stable incidence time trends for brain tumours among children and adolescents observed in the Nordic countries. Nevertheless, an increased risk restricted to heavy mobile phone use, to very early life exposure, or to rare subtypes of brain tumours may be compatible with stable incidence trends at this time and thus further monitoring of childhood brain tumour incidence rate time trends is warranted. PMID:22607537

  11. [Work-related disability among postal employees: incidence, duration, and social security costs in 2008].

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Flávia Alves Neves; Barbosa-Branco, Anadergh

    2014-06-01

    This study analyzed the characteristics of Brazilian postal workers that received sick leave benefits in 2008. The databases were from the Unified Benefits System (SUB) and the National Registry of Social Information (CNIS). The incidence rate was 556.5 benefits per 10,000 employees, and the leading causes of work-related sick leave were injuries, musculoskeletal disorders, and mental disorders. Areas most frequently reported in injuries were knees and legs, wrists and hands, ankles and feet, and shoulders and arms, with higher incidence rates in men. Women were more affected by musculoskeletal disorders and mental disorders. Average sick leave lasted longer in men, and the incidence of benefits increased with age. The States with the highest incidence rates were Mato Grosso do Sul, Goiás, and Santa Catarina, and security benefits averaged BRL 1,847.00. Postal work may involve additional risk of injuries to the limbs, due to the long distances carrying heavy weight, assault, and dog bites. PMID:25099054

  12. Motor vehicle driving in high incidence psychiatric disability: comparison of drivers with ADHD, depression, and no known psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Aduen, Paula A; Kofler, Michael J; Cox, Daniel J; Sarver, Dustin E; Lunsford, Erin

    2015-05-01

    Although not often discussed in clinical settings, motor vehicle driving is a complex multitasking endeavor during which a momentary attention lapse can have devastating consequences. Previous research suggests that drivers with high incidence psychiatric disabilities such as ADHD contribute disproportionately to collision rates, which in turn portend myriad adverse social, financial, health, mortality, and legal outcomes. However, self-referral bias and the lack of psychiatric comparison groups constrain the generalizability of these findings. The current study addressed these limitations and examined the unique associations among ADHD, Depression, and adverse driving outcomes, independent of self-selection, driving exposure, and referral bias. The Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP-2) Naturalistic Driving Study comprises U.S. drivers from six sites selected via probability-based sampling. Groups were defined by Barkley ADHD and psychiatric diagnosis questionnaires, and included ADHD (n=275), Depression (n=251), and Healthy Control (n=1828). Primary outcomes included self-reported traffic collisions, moving violations, collision-related injuries, and collision fault (last 3 years). Accounting for demographic differences, ADHD but not Depression portended increased risk for multiple violations (OR=2.3) and multiple collisions (OR=2.2). ADHD but not Depression portended increased risk for collision fault (OR=2.1). Depression but not ADHD predicted increased risk for self-reported injury following collisions (OR=2.4). ADHD appears uniquely associated with multiple collisions, multiple violations, and collision fault, whereas Depression is uniquely associated with self-reported injury following a collision. Identification of the specific mechanisms underlying this risk will be critical to designing effective interventions to improve long-term functioning for drivers with high incidence psychiatric disability. PMID:25843156

  13. “How did that happen?” Public responses to women with mobility disability during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Iezzoni, Lisa I.; Wint, Amy J.; Smeltzer, Suzanne C.; Ecker, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about current societal attitudes toward women with significant mobility disability who are visibly pregnant. Objective To use qualitative descriptive analysis methods to examine perceptions of women with significant mobility disability about how strangers reacted to their visible pregnancies. Methods In late 2013, we conducted 2-h telephone interviews with 22 women with significant mobility difficulties who had delivered babies within the prior 10 years. The semi-structured, open-ended interview protocol addressed wide-ranging pregnancy-related topics, including statements from strangers. Most participants were recruited through social networks, coming from 17 states nationwide. We used NVivo to sort the texts for content analysis. Results The women’s mean (standard deviation) age was 34.8 (5.3) years; most were white, well-educated, and higher income, although half had Medicaid during their pregnancies; and 18 used wheeled mobility aids. Eighteen women described memorable interactions with strangers relating to their pregnancies or newborn babies. Strangers’ statements fell into six categories: (1) curious; (2) intrusively and persistently curious; (3) hostile, including concerns that taxpayers would end up supporting the mother and child; (4) questioning woman’s competence as a potential parent; (5) oblivious, not recognizing visible pregnancy or motherhood; and (6) positive. Many women reported strangers asking how their pregnancy had happened. The women doubted that visibly pregnant women without disabilities evoke the same reactions from strangers. Conclusions Women with mobility disability who are visibly pregnant may perceive reactions from strangers that appear intrusive. Planning ahead for handling such encounters could reduce the stresses of these interactions. PMID:25944504

  14. Interdisciplinary Graduate Program: Rural Early Intervention Specialists for Low Incidence Disabilities (REIS/LID). Final Grant Performance Report [and] REIS/LID Student Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine Univ., Orono. Center for Community Inclusion.

    This final report describes accomplishments and activities of a 3-year federally funded project of the University of Maine to develop and deliver a graduate Master's degree program in early intervention for infants and young children with low incidence disabilities. A curriculum was designed to prepare professionals to provide culturally relevant,

  15. A Qualitative Study of Individual and Peer Factors Related to Effective Nonviolent versus Aggressive Responses to Problem Situations among Adolescents with High Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Terri N.; Helms, Sarah W.; Bettencourt, Amie F.; Sutherland, Kevin; Lotze, Geri M.; Mays, Sally; Wright, Stephen; Farrell, Albert D.

    2012-01-01

    To enhance the positive adjustment of youths with high incidence disabilities, a better understanding of the factors that influence their use of effective responses in challenging situations is needed. In this qualitative study, adolescents described individual and peer factors that would influence their use of effective nonviolent or aggressive…

  16. A Qualitative Study of Individual and Peer Factors Related to Effective Nonviolent versus Aggressive Responses to Problem Situations among Adolescents with High Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Terri N.; Helms, Sarah W.; Bettencourt, Amie F.; Sutherland, Kevin; Lotze, Geri M.; Mays, Sally; Wright, Stephen; Farrell, Albert D.

    2012-01-01

    To enhance the positive adjustment of youths with high incidence disabilities, a better understanding of the factors that influence their use of effective responses in challenging situations is needed. In this qualitative study, adolescents described individual and peer factors that would influence their use of effective nonviolent or aggressive

  17. Environmental barriers to and availability of healthy foods for people with mobility disabilities living in urban and suburban neighborhoods. Measures of the Food Environment

    Cancer.gov

    Mojtahedi MC, Boblick P, Rimmer JH, Rowland JL, Jones RA, Braunschweig CL. Environmental barriers to and availability of healthy foods for people with mobility disabilities living in urban and suburban neighborhoods.

  18. Addressing the nonexercise part of the activity continuum: a more realistic and achievable approach to activity programming for adults with mobility disability?

    PubMed

    Manns, Patricia J; Dunstan, David W; Owen, Neville; Healy, Genevieve N

    2012-04-01

    Participation in physical activity is fundamental for the maintenance of metabolic health and the prevention of major chronic diseases, particularly type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A whole-of-day approach to physical activity promotion is increasingly advocated and includes not only increasing moderate-intensity physical activity but also reducing sedentary time and increasing light-intensity activity (the "nonexercise" part of the activity continuum). This whole-of-day approach to tackling the challenge of inactivity may be particularly relevant for adults with mobility disabilities, who are among the most inactive segment of the population. Focusing on nonexercise activity by striving to reduce sedentary time and increase light-intensity activity may be a more successful place to begin to change behavior in someone with mobility disability. This article discusses what is known about the metabolic health consequences of sedentary behavior and light-intensity activity in adults with and without mobility disability. The concept of inactivity physiology is presented, along with possible applications or evidence from studies with adults with mobility disability. Mobility disability discussions and examples focus on stroke and spinal cord injury. Finally, clinical implications and future research directions related to sedentary behavior in adults with mobility disability are discussed. PMID:22156025

  19. The effects of inquiry-based science on the social and communicative skills of students with low-incidence disabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Heather Hopkins

    This research utilized inquiry based science as a vehicle to implement and maintain social skills training for secondary students, ages 14 to 20, with low-incidence disabilities in a self-contained classroom. This three year action research study examined the effects of an inquiry based science curriculum on the level and quantity of social skills used by students with one or more of the following challenges: significant learning disability (functioning more than two grade levels below grade level), emotional/social disability, mental retardation, Autism, and/or varying degrees of brain damage. Through the use of video recording, the students in the study were analyzed based on the level of social interaction and the amount of socialization that took place during inquiry based science. The skills sought were based on the social and communication skills earmarked in the students' weekly social skills training class and their Individualized Education Plans (IEP). Based on previous research in social skills training it has been determined that where social skills training is lacking are in the areas of transfer and maintenance of skills. Due to the natural social behavior that must take place in inquiry based science this group of students were found to exhibit gains in (1) quantity of social interactions on topic; (2) developing higher levels of social interactions (sharing, taking other's suggestions, listening and responding appropriately, etc.); and (3) maintenance of social skills taught outside of formal social skills training. These gains were seen overall in the amount of student involvement during inquiry based science verses teacher involvement. Such increases are depicted through students' verbal exchanges, excerpts from field notes, and student reflections. The findings of this research is expected to guide special educators, administrators and directors of curriculum as to how to better create curriculum for this specific population where social skills training is utilized and maintained in all aspects of the academic day, thus helping this population of student achieve more independence and appropriate interactions in their live as citizens of society.

  20. Empowered to Play: A Case Study Describing the Impact of Powered Mobility on the Exploratory Play of Disabled Children.

    PubMed

    Sonday, Amshuda; Gretschel, Pam

    2016-03-01

    Exploratory play is one of the most vital ways in which children learn about their environment and develop. It is well documented that limited mobility restricts a child's ability to engage in their environment through exploratory play. In this study, a qualitative, collective case study design explored the impact of powered mobility on the exploratory play of two children with physical disabilities. Data were collected from the children, their parents and their siblings through participant observation and in-depth, informal interviews. This paper focuses on two themes: Opportunity to Play revealed how powered mobility increased opportunities for the children to become more actively engaged in exploratory play with others across a wider array of contexts, and My Child was Transformed highlighted significant changes in the affect and motivation of each child, which seemed to be linked to their increased internal control over their play choices. The findings suggest that the provision of powered mobility is a key contributor promoting the participation of physically disabled children in exploratory play. Because of undergraduate curricular constraints, a limitation of this study was that data were only confined to 2 months; affecting the depth of data gained that prolonged engagement would have offered. The study recommends for occupational therapy practice that occupational therapists advocate for easier access to powered mobility through governmental and policy means. The study also recommends further research be conducted on the experiences of the caregivers on how these powered mobility devices have influenced their day-to-day occupations. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26153363

  1. Muscle strength and BMI as predictors of major mobility disability in the lifestyle interventions and independence for elders pilot (LIFE-P)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Muscle weakness and obesity are two significant threats to mobility facing the increasing number of older adults. To date, there are no studies that have examined the association of strength and body mass index (BMI) on event rates on a widely used performance measure of major mobility disability. T...

  2. Mobilizing Disability Experience to Inform Architectural Practice: Lessons Learned from a Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeersch, Peter-Willem; Heylighen, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Through their bodily interaction with the designed environment, disabled people can detect obstacles and appreciate spatial qualities architects may not be attuned to. While designers in several disciplines acknowledge disabled people as lead or critical users, in architectural practice their embodied experience is hardly recognized as a valuable…

  3. Implementing Applied Behavior Analysis for Effective Orientation and Mobility Instruction of Students with Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Mea, Melanie L.

    2013-01-01

    Working with children who have multiple disabilities that include visual impairments can be especially challenging. Many disabling conditions manifest into behavioral difficulties that may take away from learning. Acting out may be a student's way of expressing a lack of healthy coping mechanisms in relation to his or her environment. Implementing

  4. Trial Development of a Mobile Feeding Assistive Robotic Arm for People with Physical Disabilities of the Extremities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Hideyuki; Higa, Hiroki; Soken, Takashi; Namihira, Yoshinori

    A mobile feeding assistive robotic arm for people with physical disabilities of the extremities has been developed in this paper. This system is composed of a robotic arm, microcontroller, and its interface. The main unit of the robotic arm can be contained in a laptop computer's briefcase. Its weight is 5kg, including two 12-V lead acid rechargeable batteries. This robotic arm can be also mounted on a wheelchair. To verify performance of the mobile robotic arm system, drinking tea task was experimentally performed by two able-bodied subjects as well as three persons suffering from muscular dystrophy. From the experimental results, it was clear that they could smoothly carry out the drinking task, and that the robotic arm could firmly grasp a commercially available 500-ml plastic bottle. The eating task was also performed by the two able-bodied subjects. The experimental results showed that they could eat porridge by using a spoon without any difficulty.

  5. Free Computer-Based Assistive Technology to Support Students with High-Incidence Disabilities in the Writing Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouck, Emily C.; Meyer, Nancy K.; Satsangi, Rajiv; Savage, Melissa N.; Hunley, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Written expression is a neglected but critical component of education; yet, the writing process--from prewriting, to writing, and postwriting--is often an area of struggle for students with disabilities. One strategy to assist students with disabilities struggling with the writing process is the use of computer-based technology. This article

  6. Increasing Dengue Incidence in Singapore over the Past 40 Years: Population Growth, Climate and Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Struchiner, Claudio Jose; Rocklöv, Joacim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Massad, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In Singapore, the frequency and magnitude of dengue epidemics have increased significantly over the past 40 years. It is important to understand the main drivers for the rapid increase in dengue incidence. We studied the relative contributions of putative drivers for the rise of dengue in Singapore: population growth, climate parameters and international air passenger arrivals from dengue endemic countries, for the time period of 1974 until 2011. We used multivariable Poisson regression models with the following predictors: Annual Population Size; Aedes Premises Index; Mean Annual Temperature; Minimum and Maximum Temperature Recorded in each year; Annual Precipitation and Annual Number of Air Passengers arriving from dengue-endemic South-East Asia to Singapore. The relative risk (RR) of the increase in dengue incidence due to population growth over the study period was 42.7, while the climate variables (mean and minimum temperature) together explained an RR of 7.1 (RR defined as risk at the end of the time period relative to the beginning and goodness of fit associated with the model leading to these estimates assessed by pseudo-R2 equal to 0.83). Estimating the extent of the contribution of these individual factors on the increasing dengue incidence, we found that population growth contributed to 86% while the residual 14% was explained by increase in temperature. We found no correlation with incoming air passenger arrivals into Singapore from dengue endemic countries. Our findings have significant implications for predicting future trends of the dengue epidemics given the rapid urbanization with population growth in many dengue endemic countries. It is time for policy-makers and the scientific community alike to pay more attention to the negative impact of urbanization and urban climate on diseases such as dengue. PMID:26322517

  7. Increasing Dengue Incidence in Singapore over the Past 40 Years: Population Growth, Climate and Mobility.

    PubMed

    Struchiner, Claudio Jose; Rocklv, Joacim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Massad, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In Singapore, the frequency and magnitude of dengue epidemics have increased significantly over the past 40 years. It is important to understand the main drivers for the rapid increase in dengue incidence. We studied the relative contributions of putative drivers for the rise of dengue in Singapore: population growth, climate parameters and international air passenger arrivals from dengue endemic countries, for the time period of 1974 until 2011. We used multivariable Poisson regression models with the following predictors: Annual Population Size; Aedes Premises Index; Mean Annual Temperature; Minimum and Maximum Temperature Recorded in each year; Annual Precipitation and Annual Number of Air Passengers arriving from dengue-endemic South-East Asia to Singapore. The relative risk (RR) of the increase in dengue incidence due to population growth over the study period was 42.7, while the climate variables (mean and minimum temperature) together explained an RR of 7.1 (RR defined as risk at the end of the time period relative to the beginning and goodness of fit associated with the model leading to these estimates assessed by pseudo-R2 equal to 0.83). Estimating the extent of the contribution of these individual factors on the increasing dengue incidence, we found that population growth contributed to 86% while the residual 14% was explained by increase in temperature. We found no correlation with incoming air passenger arrivals into Singapore from dengue endemic countries. Our findings have significant implications for predicting future trends of the dengue epidemics given the rapid urbanization with population growth in many dengue endemic countries. It is time for policy-makers and the scientific community alike to pay more attention to the negative impact of urbanization and urban climate on diseases such as dengue. PMID:26322517

  8. Dynamic biosignal management and transmission during telemedicine incidents handled by Mobile Units over diverse network types.

    PubMed

    Mandellos, George J; Koutelakis, George V; Panagiotakopoulos, Theodor C; Koukias, Andreas M; Koukias, Mixalis N; Lymberopoulos, Dimitrios K

    2008-01-01

    Early and specialized pre-hospital patient treatment improves outcome in terms of mortality and morbidity, in emergency cases. This paper focuses on the design and implementation of a telemedicine system that supports diverse types of endpoints including moving transports (MT) (ambulances, ships, planes, etc.), handheld devices and fixed units, using diverse communication networks. Target of the above telemedicine system is the pre-hospital patient treatment. While vital sign transmission is prior to other services provided by the telemedicine system (videoconference, remote management, voice calls etc.), a predefined algorithm controls provision and quality of the other services. A distributed database system controlled by a central server, aims to manage patient attributes, exams and incidents handled by different Telemedicine Coordination Centers (TCC). PMID:19163300

  9. Follow that Bear! Encouraging Mobility in a Young Child with Visual Impairment and Multiple Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolla, Joan

    2000-01-01

    This article shows that unexpected gains can happen when teachers develop aggressive, innovative, and adaptive orientation and mobility (O&M) programming for children who are low-functioning. A case study illustrates strategies for using an adaptive mobility device, squaring-up, stepping out, and charting progress. Challenges to a successful O&M

  10. A Self-Reported Screening Tool for Detecting Community-Dwelling Older Persons with Frailty Syndrome in the Absence of Mobility Disability: The FiND Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Cesari, Matteo; Demougeot, Laurent; Boccalon, Henri; Guyonnet, Sophie; Abellan Van Kan, Gabor; Vellas, Bruno; Andrieu, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Background The frailty syndrome (a geriatric multidimensional condition characterized by decreased reserve and diminished resistance to stressors) represents a promising target of preventive interventions against disability in elders. Available screening tools for the identification of frailty in the absence of disability present major limitations. In particular, they have to be administered by a trained assessor, require special equipment, and/or do not discriminate between frail and disabled individuals. Aim of this study is to verify the agreement of a novel self-reported questionnaire (the Frail Non-Disabled [FiND] instrument) designed for detecting non-mobility disabled frail older persons with results from reference tools. Methodology/Principal Findings Data are from 45 community-dwelling individuals aged ?60 years. Participants were asked to complete the FiND questionnaire separately exploring the frailty and disability domains. Then, a blinded assessor objectively measured the frailty status (using the phenotype proposed by Fried and colleagues) and mobility disability (using the 400-meter walk test). Cohen's kappa coefficients were calculated to determine the agreement between the FiND questionnaire with the reference instruments. Mean age of participants (women 62.2%) was 72.5 (standard deviation 8.2) years. Seven (15.6%) participants presented mobility disability as being unable to complete the 400-meter walk test. According to the frailty phenotype criteria, 25 (55.6%) participants were pre-frail or frail, and 13 (28.9%) were robust. Overall, a substantial agreement of the instrument with the reference tools (kappa?=?0.748, quadratic weighted kappa?=?0.836, both p values<0.001) was reported with only 7 (15.6%) participants incorrectly categorized. The agreement between results of the FiND disability domain and the 400-meter walk test was excellent (kappa?=?0.920, p<0.001). Conclusions/Significance The FiND questionnaire presents a very good capacity to correctly identify frail older persons without mobility disability living in the community. This screening tool may represent an opportunity for diffusing awareness about frailty and disability and supporting specific preventive campaigns. PMID:24999805

  11. Students with Disabilities Experience in Higher Education Online Courses: An Exploratory Study of Self-Efficacy, Use of Assistive Technologies and Mobile Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Chandinie Devi Parasram

    2012-01-01

    The overarching aim of this mixed methods study was to explore the online experiences of students with disabilities, with particular focus on students' use of assistive technologies, mobile media and self-efficacy. Using a multifaceted an integrative approach, this study considered a framework of universal design, Scherer's Matching…

  12. Overlapping Chat's Accessibility Requirements between Students with and without Disabilities Due to the Mobile Limitations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvo, Rocío; Iglesias, Ana; Moreno, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    The use of Chats has been extended to mobile-learning (m-learning) environments in the last decade. Students and teachers can communicate in real time and they do not need waiting till their next tutoring date to solve their problems and doubts. However, Chats have many accessibility barriers and many students cannot use this collaborative tool.…

  13. Incidence and pattern of unintentional injuries and resulting disability among children under 5 years of age: results of the National Health Survey of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Fatmi, Zafar; Kazi, Ambreen; Hadden, Wilbur C; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Razzak, Junaid A; Pappas, Gregory

    2009-05-01

    National estimates of injuries for children under 5 years based on population representative surveys are not readily available globally and have not been reported for developing countries. This study estimated the annual incidence, pattern and distribution of unintentional injuries according to age, gender, socio-economic status, urban/rural residence and disability caused among children aged under 5 years in Pakistan. The National Health Survey of Pakistan (NHSP 1990-94) is a nationally representative survey of households to assess the health profile of the country. A two-stage stratified design was used to select 3223 children under 5 years of age for interview and examination. Data were used for boys and girls in urban and rural areas over the preceding year. A community development index was developed to assess the relationship between socio-economic status and injuries. Weighted estimates were computed adjusting for complex survey design using surveyfreq and surveylogistic option of SAS 9.1 software. Post hoc power calculations were made for each variable keeping the design effect at 3.0. The overall annual incidence of unintentional injuries was 47.8 [95% CI 36.6, 59.0] per 1000 per year; 50.2 [95% CI 37.0, 63.4] and 45.2 [95% CI 29.4, 61.0] per 1000 per year among boys and girls under 5 years of age respectively. An estimated 1.1 million unintentional injuries occur in Pakistan annually among these children. Injury rates increase with age among the under-5s. Urban and rural injuries were 56.1 [95% CI 33.5, 78.7] and 44.1 [95% CI 31.1, 57.1] per 1000 per year respectively. The children living in least developed communities had almost 3 times higher risks of injuries than most developed communities. The annual incidence of types of injuries were: falls 28.7 [95% CI 19.5, 37.9], cuts/bruises 9.7 [95% CI 5.3, 14.1] and burns 6.6 [95% CI 3.0, 10.2] per 1000 per year. Falls were the most common type of injury (60%) followed by cuts/bruises (21%) and burns (14%). The majority of injuries occur at home (85%), with just 10% due to road traffic. Road traffic injuries and injuries to the female child were more likely to result in disability. There is a high burden of unintentional injuries and disability among children under 5 in Pakistan. These results are useful for planning further research and for prioritising prevention programmes nationally and in other developing countries with similar situation. PMID:19775384

  14. Incidence of ADL Disability in Older Persons, Physical Activities as a Protective Factor and the Need for Informal and Formal Care – Results from the SNAC-N Project

    PubMed Central

    Sjölund, Britt-Marie; Wimo, Anders; Engström, Maria; von Strauss, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to examine 1) the incidence of disability in Activities of Daily Living (ADL), in persons 78 years and older 2) explore whether being physical active earlier is a significant predictor of being disability free at follow-up and 3) describe the amount of informal and formal care in relation to ADL-disability. Methods Data were used from a longitudinal community-based study in Nordanstig (SNAC-N), a part of the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care (SNAC). To study objectives 1) and 2) all ADL-independent participants at baseline (N = 307) were included; for objective 3) all participants 78 years and older were included (N = 316). Data were collected at baseline and at 3- and 6-year follow-ups. ADL-disability was defined as a need for assistance in one or more activities. Informal and formal care were measured using the Resource utilization in Dementia (RUD)-instrument. Results The incidence rates for men were similar in the age groups 78-81and 84 years and older, 42.3 vs. 42.5/1000 person-years. For women the incidence rate for ADL-disability increased significantly from the age group 78–81 to the age group 84 years and older, 20.8 vs.118.3/1000 person-years. In the age group 78–81 years, being physically active earlier (aOR 6.2) and during the past 12 month (aOR 2.9) were both significant preventive factors for ADL-disability. Both informal and formal care increased with ADL-disability and the amount of informal care was greater than formal care. The incidence rate for ADL-disability increases with age for women and being physically active is a protective factor for ADL-disability. Conclusion The incidence rate for ADL-disability increases with age for women, and being physical active is a protective factor for ADL-disability. PMID:26407207

  15. Psychological and culturally-influenced risk factors for the incidence and persistence of low back pain and associated disability in Spanish workers: findings from the CUPID study

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Serra, Consol; Martnez, Jos Miguel; Ntani, Georgia; Delclos, George; Palmer, Keith T.; Coggon, David; Benavides, Fernando G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the importance of psychological and culturally-influenced factors as predictors of incidence and persistence of LBP in a Spanish working population. Methods As part of the international CUPID study, 1105 Spanish nurses and office workers, aged 20-59 years, answered questions at baseline about LBP in the past month and past year, associated disability, occupational lifting, smoking habits, health beliefs, mental health, and distress from common somatic symptoms. At follow-up 12 months later, they were asked again about LBP and associated disability in the past month. Associations with the incidence and persistence of LBP were assessed by log binomial regression, and characterised by prevalence rate ratios (PRRs) with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results 971 participants (87.9%) completed follow-up. Among 579 with no LBP at baseline, 22.8% reported LBP at follow-up. After adjustment for sex, age and occupation, development of new LBP was predicted by poor mental health (PRR 1.5, 95%CI 1.0-2.2), somatising tendency (PRR 1.8, 95%CI 1.2-2.7), and presence of LBP for >1 month in the year before baseline (PRR 4.7, 95%CI 3.1-6.9). Among 392 subjects who had LBP at baseline, 59.4% reported persistence at follow-up. Persistence of LBP was associated with presence of symptoms for >1 month in the 12 months before baseline (PRR 1.4, 95%CI 1.2-1.7), and more weakly with somatising tendency, and with adverse beliefs about the work-relatedness and prognosis of LBP Conclusion In Spain, as in northern European countries, psychological and culturally-influenced factors have an important role in the development and persistence of LBP. PMID:22864247

  16. Longitudinal associations between incident lumbar spine MRI findings and chronic low back pain or radicular symptoms: retrospective analysis of data from the longitudinal assessment of imaging and disability of the back (LAIDBACK)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are few longitudinal cohort studies examining associations between incident MRI findings and incident spine-related symptom outcomes. Prior studies do not discriminate between the two distinct outcomes of low back pain (LBP) and radicular symptoms. To address this gap in the literature, we conducted a secondary analysis of existing data from the Longitudinal Assessment of Imaging and Disability of the Back (LAIDBACK). The purpose of this study was to examine the association of incident lumbar MRI findings with two specific spine-related symptom outcomes: 1) incident chronic bothersome LBP, and 2) incident radicular symptoms such as pain, weakness, or sensation alterations in the lower extremity. Methods The original LAIDBACK study followed 123 participants without current LBP or sciatica, administering standardized MRI assessments of the lumbar spine at baseline and at 3-year follow-up, and collecting information on participant-reported spine-related symptoms and signs every 4 months for 3 years. These analyses examined bivariable and multivariable associations between incident MRI findings and symptom outcomes (LBP and radicular symptoms) using logistic regression. Results Three-year cumulative incidence of new MRI findings ranged between 2 and 8%, depending on the finding. Incident annular fissures were associated with incident chronic LBP, after adjustment for prior back pain and depression (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 6.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-36.9). All participants with incident disc extrusions (OR 5.4) and nerve root impingement (OR 4.1) reported incident radicular symptoms, although associations were not statistically significant. No other incident MRI findings showed large magnitude associations with symptoms. Conclusions Even when applying more specific definitions for spine-related symptom outcomes, few MRI findings showed large magnitude associations with symptom outcomes. Although incident annular fissures, disc extrusions, and nerve root impingement were associated with incident symptom outcomes, the 3-year incidence of these MRI findings was extremely low, and did not explain the vast majority of incident symptom cases. PMID:24886265

  17. Obesity and Survival to Age 85 Years without Major Disease or Disability in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Rillamas-Sun, Eileen; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Waring, Molly E.; Kroenke, Candyce H.; LaMonte, Michael J.; Vitolins, Mara Z.; Seguin, Rebecca; Bell, Christina L.; Gass, Margery; Manini, Todd M.; Masaki, Kamal H.; Wallace, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    Context The impact of obesity on late-age survival without disease or disability in women is unknown. Objective To investigate if higher baseline body mass index and waist circumference affects womens survival to age 85 years without major chronic disease (coronary disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, or hip fracture) and mobility disability. Design, Setting, Participants Examination of 36,611 women from the Womens Health Initiative who could have reached age 85 years or older if they survived to the last outcomes evaluation on September 17, 2012. Recruitment was from 40 US Clinical Centers from October 1993December 1998. Multinomial logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association of baseline body mass index and waist circumference with the outcomes, adjusting for demographic, behavioral, and health characteristics. Main Outcome Measures Mutually-exclusive classifications: 1) survived without major chronic disease and without mobility disability (healthy); 2) survived with ?1 major chronic disease at baseline, but without new disease or disability (prevalent diseased); 3) survived and developed ?1 major chronic disease but not disability during study follow-up (incident diseased); 4) survived and developed mobility disability with or without disease (disabled); and 5) did not survive (died). Results Mean (SD) baseline age was 72.4 (3.0) years (range: 6681). The distribution of women classified as healthy, prevalent diseased, incident diseased, disabled, and died was 19%, 15%, 23%, 18%, and 25%, respectively. Compared to normal-weight women, underweight and obese women were more likely to die before age 85 years. Overweight and obese women had higher risks of incident disease and mobility disability. Disability risks were striking. Relative to normal-weight women, adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of mobility disability was 1.6 (1.51.8) for overweight women and 3.2 (2.93.6), 6.6 (5.48.1), and 6.7 (4.89.2), for class I, II, and III obesity, respectively. Waist circumference >88 centimeters was also associated with higher risk of earlier death, incident disease, and mobility disability. Conclusions Overall and abdominal obesity were important and potentially modifiable factors associated with dying or developing mobility disability and major chronic disease before age 85 years in older women. PMID:24217806

  18. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  19. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  20. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  1. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  2. Disability in instrumental activities of daily living among older adults: gender differences

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre, Tiago da Silva; Corona, Ligiana Pires; Nunes, Daniella Pires; Santos, Jair Lcio Ferreira; Duarte, Yeda Aparecida de Oliveira; Lebro, Maria Lcia

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze gender differences in the incidence and determinants of disability regarding instrumental activities of daily living among older adults. METHODS The data were extracted from the Sade, Bem-Estar e Envelhecimento (SABE Health, Wellbeing and Ageing) study. In 2000, 1,034 older adults without difficulty in regarding instrumental activities of daily living were selected. The following characteristics were evaluated at the baseline: sociodemographic and behavioral variables, health status, falls, fractures, hospitalizations, depressive symptoms, cognition, strength, mobility, balance and perception of vision and hearing. Instrumental activities of daily living such as shopping and managing own money and medication, using transportation and using the telephone were reassessed in 2006, with incident cases of disability considered as the outcome. RESULTS The incidence density of disability in instrumental activities of daily living was 44.7/1,000 person/years for women and 25.2/1,000 person/years for men. The incidence rate ratio between women and men was 1.77 (95%CI 1.75;1.80). After controlling for socioeconomic status and clinical conditions, the incidence rate ratio was 1.81 (95%CI 1.77;1.84), demonstrating that women with chronic disease and greater social vulnerability have a greater incidence density of disability in instrumental activities of daily living. The following were determinants of the incidence of disability: age ? 80 and worse perception of hearing in both genders; stroke in men; and being aged 70 to 79 in women. Better cognitive performance was a protective factor in both genders and better balance was a protective factor in women. CONCLUSIONS The higher incidence density of disability in older women remained even after controlling for adverse social and clinical conditions. In addition to age, poorer cognitive performance and conditions that adversely affect communication disable both genders. Acute events, such as a stroke, disables elderly men more, whereas early deficits regarding balance disable women more. PMID:25119933

  3. Mobile Applications for Participation at the Shopping Mall: Content Analysis and Usability for Persons with Physical Disabilities and Communication or Cognitive Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Auger, Claudine; Leduc, Emilie; Labbé, Delphine; Guay, Cassioppée; Fillion, Brigitte; Bottari, Carolina; Swaine, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to determine the important features in content and usability of existing mobile applications evaluating environmental barriers and facilitators (EBF) to participation for persons with physical disabilities presenting mild communication or cognitive limitations. A rigorous process based on a user-centered design approach led to the identification of two relevant mobile applications to evaluate the EBF. An accessibility expert, the research team as well as five users then tested the mobile applications in a shopping mall. A thematic content analysis of the research team’s and users’ comments established 10 categories of key features that adequately respond to the needs of the clientele targeted in this study. In terms of content, granularity and contextualization of the information provided were considered important. With respect to usability, relevant features were place finding, rating system, presentation of results, compatibility, user-friendliness, aesthetics, credibility of the information as well as connectivity/interactiveness. The research team and the users agreed on some aspects such as aesthetics, but had different perspectives on features such as the rating system or the connectivity/interactiveness of the application. The users proposed new features suggesting that the existing mobile applications did not correspond to all their needs. PMID:25513999

  4. Mobile applications for participation at the shopping mall: content analysis and usability for persons with physical disabilities and communication or cognitive limitations.

    PubMed

    Auger, Claudine; Leduc, Emilie; Labb, Delphine; Guay, Cassioppe; Fillion, Brigitte; Bottari, Carolina; Swaine, Bonnie

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to determine the important features in content and usability of existing mobile applications evaluating environmental barriers and facilitators (EBF) to participation for persons with physical disabilities presenting mild communication or cognitive limitations. A rigorous process based on a user-centered design approach led to the identification of two relevant mobile applications to evaluate the EBF. An accessibility expert, the research team as well as five users then tested the mobile applications in a shopping mall. A thematic content analysis of the research team's and users' comments established 10 categories of key features that adequately respond to the needs of the clientele targeted in this study. In terms of content, granularity and contextualization of the information provided were considered important. With respect to usability, relevant features were place finding, rating system, presentation of results,compatibility, user-friendliness, aesthetics, credibility of the information as well as connectivity/interactiveness. The research team and the users agreed on some aspects such as aesthetics, but had different perspectives on features such as the rating system or the connectivity/interactiveness of the application. The users proposed new features suggesting that the existing mobile applications did not correspond to all their needs. PMID:25587605

  5. Mobile applications for participation at the shopping mall: content analysis and usability for persons with physical disabilities and communication or cognitive limitations.

    PubMed

    Auger, Claudine; Leduc, Emilie; Labb, Delphine; Guay, Cassioppe; Fillion, Brigitte; Bottari, Carolina; Swaine, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to determine the important features in content and usability of existing mobile applications evaluating environmental barriers and facilitators (EBF) to participation for persons with physical disabilities presenting mild communication or cognitive limitations. A rigorous process based on a user-centered design approach led to the identification of two relevant mobile applications to evaluate the EBF. An accessibility expert, the research team as well as five users then tested the mobile applications in a shopping mall. A thematic content analysis of the research team's and users' comments established 10 categories of key features that adequately respond to the needs of the clientele targeted in this study. In terms of content, granularity and contextualization of the information provided were considered important. With respect to usability, relevant features were place finding, rating system, presentation of results, compatibility, user-friendliness, aesthetics, credibility of the information as well as connectivity/interactiveness. The research team and the users agreed on some aspects such as aesthetics, but had different perspectives on features such as the rating system or the connectivity/interactiveness of the application. The users proposed new features suggesting that the existing mobile applications did not correspond to all their needs. PMID:25513999

  6. The global burden of injury: incidence, mortality, disability-adjusted life years and time trends from the Global Burden of Disease study 2013

    PubMed Central

    Haagsma, Juanita A; Graetz, Nicholas; Bolliger, Ian; Naghavi, Mohsen; Higashi, Hideki; Mullany, Erin C; Abera, Semaw Ferede; Abraham, Jerry Puthenpurakal; Adofo, Koranteng; Alsharif, Ubai; Ameh, Emmanuel A; Ammar, Walid; Antonio, Carl Abelardo T; Barrero, Lope H; Bekele, Tolesa; Bose, Dipan; Brazinova, Alexandra; Catalá-López, Ferrán; Dandona, Lalit; Dandona, Rakhi; Dargan, Paul I; De Leo, Diego; Degenhardt, Louisa; Derrett, Sarah; Dharmaratne, Samath D; Driscoll, Tim R; Duan, Leilei; Petrovich Ermakov, Sergey; Farzadfar, Farshad; Feigin, Valery L; Gabbe, Belinda; Gosselin, Richard A; Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Hamadeh, Randah Ribhi; Hijar, Martha; Hu, Guoqing; Jayaraman, Sudha P; Jiang, Guohong; Khader, Yousef Saleh; Khan, Ejaz Ahmad; Krishnaswami, Sanjay; Kulkarni, Chanda; Lecky, Fiona E; Leung, Ricky; Lunevicius, Raimundas; Lyons, Ronan Anthony; Majdan, Marek; Mason-Jones, Amanda J; Matzopoulos, Richard; Meaney, Peter A; Mekonnen, Wubegzier; Miller, Ted R; Mock, Charles N; Norman, Rosana E; Polinder, Suzanne; Pourmalek, Farshad; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa; Refaat, Amany; Rojas-Rueda, David; Roy, Nobhojit; Schwebel, David C; Shaheen, Amira; Shahraz, Saeid; Skirbekk, Vegard; Søreide, Kjetil; Soshnikov, Sergey; Stein, Dan J; Sykes, Bryan L; Tabb, Karen M; Temesgen, Awoke Misganaw; Tenkorang, Eric Yeboah; Theadom, Alice M; Tran, Bach Xuan; Vasankari, Tommi J; Vavilala, Monica S; Vlassov, Vasiliy Victorovich; Woldeyohannes, Solomon Meseret; Yip, Paul; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Younis, Mustafa Z; Yu, Chuanhua; Murray, Christopher J L; Vos, Theo

    2016-01-01

    Background The Global Burden of Diseases (GBD), Injuries, and Risk Factors study used the disability-adjusted life year (DALY) to quantify the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors. This paper provides an overview of injury estimates from the 2013 update of GBD, with detailed information on incidence, mortality, DALYs and rates of change from 1990 to 2013 for 26 causes of injury, globally, by region and by country. Methods Injury mortality was estimated using the extensive GBD mortality database, corrections for ill-defined cause of death and the cause of death ensemble modelling tool. Morbidity estimation was based on inpatient and outpatient data sets, 26 cause-of-injury and 47 nature-of-injury categories, and seven follow-up studies with patient-reported long-term outcome measures. Results In 2013, 973 million (uncertainty interval (UI) 942 to 993) people sustained injuries that warranted some type of healthcare and 4.8 million (UI 4.5 to 5.1) people died from injuries. Between 1990 and 2013 the global age-standardised injury DALY rate decreased by 31% (UI 26% to 35%). The rate of decline in DALY rates was significant for 22 cause-of-injury categories, including all the major injuries. Conclusions Injuries continue to be an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed and developing world. The decline in rates for almost all injuries is so prominent that it warrants a general statement that the world is becoming a safer place to live in. However, the patterns vary widely by cause, age, sex, region and time and there are still large improvements that need to be made. PMID:26635210

  7. Relationships between spinal mobility, physical performance tests, pain intensity and disability assessments in chronic low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Grönblad, M; Hurri, H; Kouri, J P

    1997-03-01

    Correlations between the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (ODQ), the Pain Disability Index (PDI), PDI subscales PDI factor 1 (PDI 1), PDI factor 2 (PDI 2) and visual analogue scale (VAS) pain intensity on the one hand and spine range of motion measures and static and dynamic functional performance tests on the other, were studied in 52 chronic low back pain patients. Comparable groups of male and female patients were studied. A moderately significant (p < 0.01) inverse correlation was observed between the ODQ and rotation to the left even after correction for age, but not when men and women were studied separately. A significant (r = -0.480, p < 0.001) inverse correlation was observed between the repeated squatting test and pain intensity and in men both pain intensity and disability correlated (r = -0.607, p < 0.001) with this particular test. Only for the women were there moderately significant (p < 0.01) inverse correlations between disability assessments and all the physical performance tests with the exception of the static back muscle test. In the women only the isometric lifting test showed a moderately significant inverse correlation (r = -0.504, p < 0.01) with pain intensity. Such apparent gender differences in the overlap between physical performance tests and self-report disability assessments and pain intensity may be clinically relevant. The results will, however, require confirmation on larger groups of chronic low back pain patients. PMID:9084101

  8. Laying the Foundation for Connect to Protect®: A Multi-Site Community Mobilization Intervention to Reduce HIV/AIDS Incidence and Prevalence among Urban Youth

    PubMed Central

    Ziff, Mauri A.; Harper, Gary W.; Chutuape, Kate S.; Deeds, Bethany Griffin; Futterman, Donna; Francisco, Vincent T.; Muenz, Larry R.

    2006-01-01

    Despite the considerable resources that have been dedicated to HIV prevention interventions and services over the past decade, HIV incidence among young people in the United States remains alarmingly high. One reason is that the majority of prevention efforts continue to focus solely on modifying individual behavior, even though public health research strongly suggests that changes to a community's structural elements, such as their programs, practices, and laws or policies, may result in more effective and sustainable outcomes. Connect to Protect is a multi-city community mobilization intervention that focuses on altering or creating community structural elements in ways that will ultimately reduce youth HIV incidence and prevalence. The project, which spans 6 years, is sponsored by the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions at multiple urban clinical research sites. This paper provides an overview of the study's three phases and describes key factors in setting a firm foundation for the initiation and execution of this type of undertaking. Connect to Protect's community mobilization approach to achieving structural change represents a relatively new and broad direction in HIV prevention research. To optimize opportunities for its success, time and resources must be initially placed into laying the groundwork. This includes activities such as building a strong overarching study infrastructure to ensure protocol tasks can be met across sites; tapping into local site and community expertise and knowledge; forming collaborative relationships between sites and community organizations and members; and fostering community input on and support for changes at a structural level. Failing to take steps such as these may lead to insurmountable implementation problems for an intervention of this kind. PMID:16739051

  9. Rural People with Disabilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in Our Nation) promotes cooperation between the transportation industry and the disability community to increase mobility for people with disabilities under the ADA and beyond. They offer numerous resources, as well as training and technical assistance, in an effort to make the ADA ...

  10. Orientation and Mobility with Persons Who Are Deaf-Blind: An Initial Examination of Single-Subject Design Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Amy T.

    2009-01-01

    Persons who are deaf-blind represent a heterogeneous, low-incidence population of children and adults who, at some point in life, regardless of the presence of additional disabilities, may benefit from formal orientation and mobility (O&M) instruction. Current national policies, such as the No Child Left Behind Act, which emphasize that…

  11. Orientation and Mobility with Persons Who Are Deaf-Blind: An Initial Examination of Single-Subject Design Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Amy T.

    2009-01-01

    Persons who are deaf-blind represent a heterogeneous, low-incidence population of children and adults who, at some point in life, regardless of the presence of additional disabilities, may benefit from formal orientation and mobility (O&M) instruction. Current national policies, such as the No Child Left Behind Act, which emphasize that

  12. Accommodating Students with Disabilities on State English Language Proficiency Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albus, Debra; Thurlow, Martha L.

    2008-01-01

    All English language learners (ELLs) are to participate in an annual assessment of English language proficiency (ELP) under Title III of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. This includes ELLs with disabilities, regardless of whether they are high-incidence disabilities (e.g., learning disability) or low-incidence disabilities (e.g., deaf or hard

  13. Superheroes Social Skills: A Study Examining the Effects of Using an Evidence-Based Approach to Teach Social Skills to Children with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, Julia Ann Kelly

    2011-01-01

    The current study evaluated the use of a manualized social skills program, Superheroes Social Skills, to increase the use of prosocial behaviors and decrease the use of aggressive behaviors for children with externalizing behaviors. The training was implemented by a school psychologist in a pullout group with four children with high-incidence

  14. Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 301 acute and chronic diseases and injuries in 188 countries, 1990–2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Up-to-date evidence about levels and trends in disease and injury incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability (YLDs) is an essential input into global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013), we estimated these quantities for acute and chronic diseases and injuries for 188 countries between 1990 and 2013. Methods Estimates were calculated for disease and injury incidence, prevalence, and YLDs using GBD 2010 methods with some important refinements. Results for incidence of acute disorders and prevalence of chronic disorders are new additions to the analysis. Key improvements include expansion to the cause and sequelae list, updated systematic reviews, use of detailed injury codes, improvements to the Bayesian meta-regression method (DisMod-MR), and use of severity splits for various causes. An index of data representativeness, showing data availability, was calculated for each cause and impairment during three periods globally and at the country level for 2013. In total, 35 620 distinct sources of data were used and documented to calculated estimates for 301 diseases and injuries and 2337 sequelae. The comorbidity simulation provides estimates for the number of sequelae, concurrently, by individuals by country, year, age, and sex. Disability weights were updated with the addition of new population-based survey data from four countries. Findings Disease and injury were highly prevalent; only a small fraction of individuals had no sequelae. Comorbidity rose substantially with age and in absolute terms from 1990 to 2013. Incidence of acute sequelae were predominantly infectious diseases and short-term injuries, with over 2 billion cases of upper respiratory infections and diarrhoeal disease episodes in 2013, with the notable exception of tooth pain due to permanent caries with more than 200 million incident cases in 2013. Conversely, leading chronic sequelae were largely attributable to non-communicable diseases, with prevalence estimates for asymptomatic permanent caries and tension-type headache of 2·4 billion and 1·6 billion, respectively. The distribution of the number of sequelae in populations varied widely across regions, with an expected relation between age and disease prevalence. YLDs for both sexes increased from 537·6 million in 1990 to 764·8 million in 2013 due to population growth and ageing, whereas the age-standardised rate decreased little from 114·87 per 1000 people to 110·31 per 1000 people between 1990 and 2013. Leading causes of YLDs included low back pain and major depressive disorder among the top ten causes of YLDs in every country. YLD rates per person, by major cause groups, indicated the main drivers of increases were due to musculoskeletal, mental, and substance use disorders, neurological disorders, and chronic respiratory diseases; however HIV/AIDS was a notable driver of increasing YLDs in sub-Saharan Africa. Also, the proportion of disability-adjusted life years due to YLDs increased globally from 21·1% in 1990 to 31·2% in 2013. Interpretation Ageing of the world’s population is leading to a substantial increase in the numbers of individuals with sequelae of diseases and injuries. Rates of YLDs are declining much more slowly than mortality rates. The non-fatal dimensions of disease and injury will require more and more attention from health systems. The transition to non-fatal outcomes as the dominant source of burden of disease is occurring rapidly outside of sub-Saharan Africa. Our results can guide future health initiatives through examination of epidemiological trends and a better understanding of variation across countries. PMID:26063472

  15. Learning Disabilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Learning Disabilities KidsHealth > For Teens > Learning Disabilities Print A ... study engineering as he'd hoped? What Are Learning Disabilities? For someone diagnosed with a learning disability, ...

  16. Association among measures of mobility-related disability and self-perceived fatigue among older people: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Wuber J. S.; Lima, Camila A.; Bilton, Tereza L.; Ferrioli, Eduardo; Dias, Rosângela C.; Perracini, Monica R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between self-perceived fatigue with different physical functioning tests and functional performance scales used for evaluating mobility-related disability among community-dwelling older persons. Method: This is a cross-sectional, population-based study. The sample was composed of older persons with 65 years of age or more living in Cuiabá, MT, and Barueri, SP, Brazil. The data for this study is from the FIBRA Network Study. The presence of self-perceived fatigue was assessed using self-reports based on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale. The Lawton instrumental activities of daily living scale (IADL) and the advanced activities of daily living scale (AADL) were used to assess performance and participation restriction. The following physical functioning tests were used: five-step test (FST), the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), and usual gait speed (UGS). Three models of logistic regression analysis were conducted, and a significance level of α<0.05 was adopted. Results: The sample was composed of 776 older adults with a mean age (SD) of 71.9 (5.9) years, of whom the majority were women (74%). The prevalence of self-perceived fatigue within the participants was 20%. After adjusting for covariates, SPPB, UGS, IADL, and AADL remained associated with self-perceived fatigue in the final multivariate regression model. Conclusion: Our results suggest that there is an association between self-perceived fatigue and lower extremity function, usual gait speed and activity limitation and participation restriction in older adults. Further cohort studies are needed to investigate which physical performance measure may be able to predict the negative impact of fatigue in older adults. PMID:26039035

  17. Disability Identity--Disability Pride

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses a way of thinking about disability which has emerged out of the UK Disabled People's Movement over the last three decades in opposition to the preceding medical model of disability which viewed disability as synonymous with problem. Disabled people are increasingly challenging the notion that their embodiment is inherently…

  18. Intellectual disability

    MedlinePLUS

    Intellectual disability is a condition diagnosed before age 18 that includes below-average intellectual function and a lack of ... Intellectual disability affects about 1 to 3% of the population. There are many causes of intellectual disability, but doctors ...

  19. Learning Disabilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Learning Disabilities Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What are Learning Disabilities? Learning disabilities are disorders that affect the ...

  20. Learning Disability Subtypes in Children with Neurofibromatosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Vickie R.; Moore, Bartlett D., III; Hiscock, Merrill

    1997-01-01

    This study investigated the incidence of learning disabilities in 105 children (ages 6-18) with neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF-1). Results found that nearly 70% of the subjects were academically deficient and 42% met the criteria for learning disabilities. A low incidence of visuospatial-constructional deficits was also found. (Author/CR)

  1. Prevalence of Disability and Disability Type Among Adults--United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Courtney-Long, Elizabeth A; Carroll, Dianna D; Zhang, Qing C; Stevens, Alissa C; Griffin-Blake, Shannon; Armour, Brian S; Campbell, Vincent A

    2015-07-31

    Understanding the prevalence of disability is important for public health programs to be able to address the needs of persons with disabilities. Beginning in 2013, to measure disability prevalence by functional type, the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), added five questions to identify disability in vision, cognition, mobility, self-care, and independent living. CDC analyzed data from the 2013 BRFSS to assess overall prevalence of any disability, as well as specific types of disability among noninstitutionalized U.S. adults. Across all states, disabilities in mobility and cognition were the most frequently reported types. State-level prevalence of each disability type ranged from 2.7% to 8.1% (vision); 6.9% to 16.8% (cognition); 8.5% to 20.7% (mobility); 1.9% to 6.2% (self-care) and 4.2% to 10.8% (independent living). A higher prevalence of any disability was generally seen among adults living in states in the South and among women (24.4%) compared with men (19.8%). Prevalences of any disability and disability in mobility were higher among older age groups. These are the first data on functional disability types available in a state-based health survey. This information can help public health programs identify the prevalence of and demographic characteristics associated with different disability types among U.S. adults and better target appropriate interventions to reduce health disparities. PMID:26225475

  2. Disabling Myths About Disability. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Beatrice A.

    Five myths regarding physical disability are examined. First, the myth that people with physical disabilities tend to be more maladjusted than the ordinary person is analyzed, and it is concluded that the common association between maladjustment and physical disability is grossly oversimplified. Second, the myth portraying people with disabilities

  3. Is There Really a Difference? Distinguishing Mild Intellectual Disability from "Similar" Disability Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouck, Emily C.; Satsangi, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Students with mild intellectual disability generally garner less individual attention in research, as they are often aggregated with students with moderate and severe intellectual disability or students with other high incidence disabilities. This study used the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2) to look at the personal

  4. Is There Really a Difference? Distinguishing Mild Intellectual Disability from "Similar" Disability Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouck, Emily C.; Satsangi, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Students with mild intellectual disability generally garner less individual attention in research, as they are often aggregated with students with moderate and severe intellectual disability or students with other high incidence disabilities. This study used the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2) to look at the personal…

  5. Learning Disabilities Due to Minimal Brain Dysfunction: Hope Through Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    The pamphlet provides basic information on learning disabilities due to minimal brain dysfunction (MBD). Topics considered include terminology, incidence, symptoms, causes and prevention, diagnosis, family role for MBD children, and research in learning disabilities due to MBD. (CL)

  6. Disability retirement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Eligibility for disability retirement is discussed. General guidelines and a few standards are given. Usually the same basic medical principles apply to the evaluation of claims for disability retirement as apply to determining medical suitability for initial employment.

  7. Learning Disabilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... be able to go to college and study engineering as he'd hoped? What Are Learning Disabilities? ... some theories as to why they develop, including: Genetic influences. Experts have noticed that learning disabilities tend ...

  8. Staffing Patterns for Counselors of Disabled Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Diego Community Coll. District, CA. Research Office.

    Nine California community colleges were surveyed in 1979-1980 to determine the ratios of certified disability counselors to students with hearing, speech, visual, or mobility impairments; students with learning disabilities (average or limited); students with other health problems; and students in convalescent and nursing homes. Survey findings

  9. Cancer Incidence

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator presents cancer incidence rates for the U.S. population from 1973 to 2008. Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the U.S., and many factors, including exposure to some environmental contaminants, are known or suspected of contributing to increased ca...

  10. Library Services to Disabled Students: Outreach and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenn, Katy

    1996-01-01

    Discusses some approaches to meeting the needs of disabled students in academic libraries in keeping with the Americans with Disabilities Act. Highlights include types of disabilities, including visual, mobility, and hearing impairments; obstacles found in libraries, including poor communication; and possible remedies. (LRW)

  11. Abuse and Neglect of Children with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baladerian, Nora J.

    1994-01-01

    Estimates of the incidence of abuse of children with disabilities range from 2 to 10 times the rate of children without disabilities All forms of abuse, including multiple types of abuse with the same child, multiple perpetrators of abuse, and multiple victims within a grouping of children, exist within the population of children with

  12. Learning Disabilities and Employment before and in the Americans with Disabilities Act Era: Progress or a Bridge Too Far?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerber, Paul J.; Batalo, Cecilia G.; Achola, Edwin O.

    2011-01-01

    The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and its amendments have been in existence for a little more than twenty years. Title One, which pertains to employment, has had a bearing on employment for persons with disabilities, particularly the high incidence category of learning disabilities, who for the most part work in competitive…

  13. Learning Disabilities and Employment before and in the Americans with Disabilities Act Era: Progress or a Bridge Too Far?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerber, Paul J.; Batalo, Cecilia G.; Achola, Edwin O.

    2011-01-01

    The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and its amendments have been in existence for a little more than twenty years. Title One, which pertains to employment, has had a bearing on employment for persons with disabilities, particularly the high incidence category of learning disabilities, who for the most part work in competitive

  14. Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sittiprapaporn, Wichian, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Learning disability is a classification that includes several disorders in which a person has difficulty learning in a typical manner. Depending on the type and severity of the disability, interventions may be used to help the individual learn strategies that will foster future success. Some interventions can be quite simplistic, while others are…

  15. Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, James J.; McCarthy, Joan F.

    An attempt to collate basic knowledge concerning learning disabilities, the text discusses the background and definition of learning disabilities, and its identification, etiology, and epidemiology. Guidelines for diagnostic evaluation are presented as are approaches from perceptual motor, developmental, visual, neurophysiological, linguistic, and

  16. Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sittiprapaporn, Wichian, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Learning disability is a classification that includes several disorders in which a person has difficulty learning in a typical manner. Depending on the type and severity of the disability, interventions may be used to help the individual learn strategies that will foster future success. Some interventions can be quite simplistic, while others are

  17. Medium-/Long-Term Effects of a Specific Exercise Protocol Combined with Patient Education on Spine Mobility, Chronic Fatigue, Pain, Aerobic Fitness and Level of Disability in Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Giannotti, Erika; Koutsikos, Konstantinos; Pigatto, Maurizia; Rampudda, Maria Elisa; Doria, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To propose a rehabilitation protocol able to produce immediate and long-term beneficial effects on level of disability and overall performance in ADLs. Materials and Methods. Forty-one FM patients were randomized to an exercise and educational-behavioral programme group (experimental group, EG = 21) or to a control group (CG = 20). Each subject was evaluated before, at the end (T1), and after 6 months (T6) from the conclusion of the rehabilitation treatment using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), the visual analogue scale (VAS), the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), the fatigue severity scale (FSS), the 6-minute walking test (6MWT), tender points count (TPC), and spinal active range of motion. The exercise protocol included 20 sessions consisting in self-awareness, stretching, strengthening, spine flexibility, and aerobic exercises, which patients were subsequently educated to perform at home. Results. The two groups were comparable at baseline. At T1, the EG showed a positive trend in FIQ, VAS, HAQ, and FSS scales and significant improvement in 6MWT and in most spinal active range of motion measurements (P between 0.001 and 0.04). The positive results were maintained at the follow-up. Conclusion. The proposed programme was well tolerated and produced immediate and medium-term beneficial effects improving function and strain endurance. This trial is registered with DRKS00005071 on DRKS. PMID:24616894

  18. Depression, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, and Functional Disability in Survivors of Critical Illness: results from the BRAIN ICU (Bringing to light the Risk Factors And Incidence of Neuropsychological dysfunction in ICU survivors) Investigation: A Longitudinal Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, James C; Pandharipande, Pratik P; Girard, Timothy D; Brummel, Nathan E; Thompson, Jennifer L; Hughes, Christopher G; Pun, Brenda T; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Morandi, Alessandro; Shintani, Ayumi K; Hopkins, Ramona O; Bernard, Gordon R; Dittus, Robert S; Ely, E. Wesley

    2014-01-01

    Background Critical illness is associated with cognitive impairment, but mental health and functional disabilities in general intensive care unit (ICU) survivors are inadequately characterized and there are a paucity of data regarding the relationship between age and delirium and these outcomes. Methods In this prospective, multisite cohort study, we enrolled medical/surgical ICU patients with respiratory failure or shock, collected detailed demographics and in-hospital variables, and assessed survivors at 3 and 12 months with measures of depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and functional disability. We used linear and proportional odds logistic regression to examine the independent associations between age and delirium duration versus mental health and functional disabilities. Findings We enrolled 821 patients with a median (interquartile range) age of 61 (51, 71), assessing 448 patients and 382 patients 3 and 12 months after discharge. At 3- and 12-month follow-up, 37% (149/407) and 33% (116/347) of subjects reported at least mild depression, driven primarily by somatic rather than cognitive symptoms. Depressive symptoms were common even among those with no proxy reported history of depression, reported at 3- and 12-month follow-up by 30% (76/255) and 29% (62/217) of these individuals. At either follow-up assessment, only 7% (27/415, 24/361) of subjects had symptoms consistent with PTSD. Disabilities in basic activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) were present in 32% (139/428) and 26% (108/422) of individuals at 3 months and in 27% (102/374) and 23%(87/372) at 12 months. Mental health and functional difficulties were prevalent in young and old patients. Although older age was frequently associated with mental health and functional disabilities, no consistent association was observed between delirium and these outcomes. Interpretation In contrast with early single-center reports, data from this large, multicenter investigation reveal depression is much more common than PTSD after critical illness and is driven by somatic symptoms indicative of physical disabilities rather than by cognitive symptoms. Poor mental health and functional disability were common, and persistent in up to a quarter of patients. PMID:24815803

  19. Learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Lyon, G R

    1996-01-01

    Approximately 5% of all public school students are identified as having a learning disability (LD). LD is not a single disorder, but includes disabilities in any of seven areas related to reading, language, and mathematics. These separate types of learning disabilities frequently co-occur with one another and with social skill deficits and emotional or behavioral disorders. Most of the available information concerning learning disabilities relates to reading disabilities, and the majority of children with learning disabilities have their primary deficits in basic reading skills. An important part of the definition of LD is its exclusions: learning disabilities cannot be attributed primarily to mental retardation, emotional disturbance, cultural difference, or disadvantage. Thus, the concept of LD focuses on the notion of a discrepancy between a child's academic achievement and his or her apparent capacity to learn. Recent research indicates, however, that disability in basic reading skills is primarily caused by deficits in phonological awareness, which is independent of any achievement-capacity discrepancy. Deficits in phonological awareness can be identified in late kindergarten and first grade using inexpensive, straightforward testing protocol. Interventions have varying effectiveness, depending largely on the severity of the individual child's disability. The prevalence of learning disability identification has increased dramatically in the past 20 years. The "real" prevalence of LD is subject to much dispute because of the lack of an agreed-upon definition of LD with objective identification criteria. Some researchers have argued that the currently recognized 5% prevalence rate is inflated; others argue that LD is still underidentified. In fact, it appears that there are both sound and unsound reasons for the increase in identification rates. Sound reasons for the increase include better research, a broader definition of disability in reading, focusing on phonological awareness, and greater identification of girls with learning disabilities. Unsound reasons for the increase include broad and vague definitions of learning disability, financial incentives to identify students for special education, and inadequate preparation of teachers by colleges of education, leading to overreferral of students with any type of special need. There is no clear demarcation between students with normal reading abilities and those with mild reading disability. The majority of children with reading disabilities have relatively mild reading disabilities, with a smaller number having extreme reading disabilities. The longer children with disability in basic reading skills, at any level of severity, go without identification and intervention, the more difficult the task of remediation and the lower the rate of success. Children with extreme deficits in basic reading skills are much more difficult to remediate than children with mild or moderate deficits. It is unclear whether children in the most severe range can achieve age- and grade-approximate reading skills, even with normal intelligence and with intense, informed intervention provided over a protracted period of time. Children with severe learning disabilities are likely to manifest an increased number of and increased severity of social and behavioral deficits. When children with disabilities in reading also manifest attention deficit disorder, their reading deficits are typically exacerbated, more severe, and more resistant to intervention. While severe reading disorders are clearly a major concern, even mild deficits in reading skills are likely to portend significant difficulties in academic learning. These deficits, too, are worthy of early identification and intervention. Even children with relatively subtle linguistic and reading deficits require the expertise of a teacher who is well trained and informed about the relationships between language development and reading development. PMID:8689262

  20. 28 CFR 35.137 - Mobility devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mobility devices. 35.137 Section 35.137... LOCAL GOVERNMENT SERVICES General Requirements 35.137 Mobility devices. (a) Use of wheelchairs and... devices designed for use by individuals with mobility disabilities, in any areas open to pedestrian...

  1. 28 CFR 36.311 - Mobility devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mobility devices. 36.311 Section 36.311... ACCOMMODATIONS AND IN COMMERCIAL FACILITIES Specific Requirements 36.311 Mobility devices. (a) Use of..., or other similar devices designed for use by individuals with mobility disabilities in any areas...

  2. Academic Library Services for Students with Disabilities: A Survey at the University of South Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loope, Charlene H.

    A pilot survey of 16 students at the University of South Carolina from across four disability categories evaluated the range of services and adaptive equipment necessary to meet disabled students' needs in an academic library setting. Disability categories represented were: (1) learning disabilities and attention deficit disorders, (2) mobility

  3. Shakespeare on old age and disability.

    PubMed

    Covey, H

    2000-01-01

    The plays of William Shakespeare were reviewed for references to disabilities, aging and disability, and older characters with disabilities. Shakespeare's references draw from traditional cultural notions about older people with disabilities. These traditional notions include people with physical disabilities being evil, the entertainment value of disabilty, and those who were mentally ill being wild and animal-like. He viewed the aging process as disabling and old age as a time when individuals lost some abilities to function, particularly when it came to mental capacity and physical mobility. His writings show that he used disability as a literary tool to add dimension to characters and set them apart. Contemporary literature continues to share some of Shakespeare's view on aging and disability but also departs from them in important ways. For example, contemporary treatment of disabilities and aging places more emphasis on the human side of the affects of aging and disabilities. Disabilities and aging are not cast in the same negative terms as Shakespeare used. PMID:10987340

  4. Sexual Force at Sexual Debut. Swedish Adolescents with Disabilities at Higher Risk than Adolescents without Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunnberg, Elinor; Bostrom, Margareta Linden; Berglund, Mats

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study are first to compare the incidence of force on the first occasion of sexual intercourse reported by participants with disabilities to that of students without disabilities; second to determine whether there are significant differences in mental health, substance abuse, and school performance as reported by participants

  5. Sexual Force at Sexual Debut. Swedish Adolescents with Disabilities at Higher Risk than Adolescents without Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunnberg, Elinor; Bostrom, Margareta Linden; Berglund, Mats

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study are first to compare the incidence of force on the first occasion of sexual intercourse reported by participants with disabilities to that of students without disabilities; second to determine whether there are significant differences in mental health, substance abuse, and school performance as reported by participants…

  6. Quantifying disability: data, methods and results.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, C. J.; Lopez, A. D.

    1994-01-01

    Conventional methods for collecting, analysing and disseminating data and information on disability in populations have relied on cross-sectional censuses and surveys which measure prevalence in a given period. While this may be relevant for defining the extent and demographic pattern of disabilities in a population, and thus indicating the need for rehabilitative services, prevention requires detailed information on the underlying diseases and injuries that cause disabilities. The Global Burden of Disease methodology described in this paper provides a mechanism for quantifying the health consequences of the years of life lived with disabilities by first estimating the age-sex-specific incidence rates of underlying conditions, and then mapping these to a single disability index which collectively reflects the probability of progressing to a disability, the duration of life lived with the disability, and the approximate severity of the disability in terms of activity restriction. Detailed estimates of the number of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) lived are provided in this paper, for eight geographical regions. The results should be useful to those concerned with planning health services for the disabled and, more particularly, with determining policies to prevent the underlying conditions which give rise to serious disabling sequelae. PMID:8062403

  7. Evolutionary genomics of human intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Crespi, Bernard; Summers, Kyle; Dorus, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have postulated that X-linked and autosomal genes underlying human intellectual disability may have also mediated the evolution of human cognition. We have conducted the first comprehensive assessment of the extent and patterns of positive Darwinian selection on intellectual disability genes in humans. We report three main findings. First, as noted in some previous reports, intellectual disability genes with primary functions in the central nervous system exhibit a significant concentration to the X chromosome. Second, there was no evidence for a higher incidence of recent positive selection on X-linked than autosomal intellectual disability genes, nor was there a higher incidence of selection on such genes overall, compared to sets of control genes. However, the X-linked intellectual disability genes inferred to be subject to recent positive selection were concentrated in the Rho GTP-ase pathway, a key signaling pathway in neural development and function. Third, among all intellectual disability genes, there was evidence for a higher incidence of recent positive selection on genes involved in DNA repair, but not for genes involved in other functions. These results provide evidence that alterations to genes in the Rho GTP-ase and DNA-repair pathways may play especially-important roles in the evolution of human cognition and vulnerability to genetically-based intellectual disability. PMID:25567903

  8. Regional patterns of disability-free life expectancy and disability-adjusted life expectancy: global Burden of Disease Study.

    PubMed

    Murray, C J; Lopez, A D

    1997-05-10

    Published and unpublished data were reviewed to estimate the incidence, prevalence, and duration of 483 disabling sequelae of 107 diseases and injuries in an attempt to quantify disability for inclusion in health policy debates. The DisMod computer program was applied many times until consistent parameters were identified. The severity of disability was measured by the person-trade-off method, disability weights were measured across groups, and the prevalence of seven classes of disability was back-calculated from the distribution of each disabling sequelae across disabilities. The prevalence for each class of disability for different age-sex groups was used to calculate seven forms of disability-free life expectancy (DFLE) and disability-adjusted life expectancy (DALE). The prevalence of most disability classes is highest in sub-Saharan Africa and lowest in established market economies, with low-severity disabilities being the most common. DFLE varies significantly among regions. In high-income regions, almost 90% of expected disability is due to non-communicable diseases and most of the rest to injuries. However, in poorer regions, almost half of expected disability is due to communicable diseases and injuries. The higher proportion of life span spent disabled in high-mortality populations is consistent with the compression of morbidity hypothesis. PMID:9149696

  9. with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, Debra L.; Jones, Vita L.; Sparks, Shannon L.; Aldridge, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Parents from culturally diverse backgrounds need to feel that they play a vital role in the future success of their sons or daughters with disabilities. Differences in culture and ethnicity can affect families' involvement in transition planning and the goals that they emphasize for their children. Families of diverse backgrounds were

  10. Disablement, Disability and the Nigerian Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abang, Theresa B.

    1988-01-01

    The condition of the disabled in developing nations, particularly Nigeria, is considered. Discussed are prevention of disability by control of infectious diseases, effects of myth and superstition on attitudes toward the disabled, the lack of medical facilities, and the rights of the disabled to an education and building access. (Author/DB)

  11. Office of Disability Employment Policy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Order Disability Statistics February 2016 Disability Employment Statistics Ages 16 years and over Labor Force Participation People with disabilities: 19.5% People without disabilities: ... Constitution Ave. NW ...

  12. Osteoarthritis: increasing mobility and reducing disability.

    PubMed

    Quinet, R J

    1986-02-01

    Older patients taking NSAIDs or high-dose aspirin should have complete laboratory evaluations of blood count, urinalysis, BUN/creatine, potassium, and serum transaminases several times yearly; more often if the clinical picture warrants. The use of aspirin, NSAIDs, and other medications should be reviewed in detail with the patient, particularly the rationale. The physician should stress the need to take the medications regularly, not "as needed." Physicians should also take time to warn patients against unorthodox medications and "treatments." PMID:3943721

  13. Common Pediatric Disabilities: Medical Aspects and Educational Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Janet Siantz; Colson, Steven

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents definitions of common pediatric disabilities and information about incidence, causes, diagnosis, common characteristics, complications with educational implications, and multidisciplinary intervention approaches. It covers the following conditions: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, fragile

  14. Common Pediatric Disabilities: Medical Aspects and Educational Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Janet Siantz; Colson, Steven

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents definitions of common pediatric disabilities and information about incidence, causes, diagnosis, common characteristics, complications with educational implications, and multidisciplinary intervention approaches. It covers the following conditions: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, fragile…

  15. [People with learning disabilities: an overview of the facts].

    PubMed

    Schipper, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This article gives a short overview of some basic facts about people with learning disabilities. The prevalence (1-3% worldwide) and stability of the incidence are described, as well as the causes and possible medical comorbidities.- People with learning disabilities are at significantly greater risk of developing cognitive and medical problems compared with the average population. Lastly, an overview of actual chronic care costs is given, as well as actual participation possibilities for people with learning disabilities. PMID:25534270

  16. Learning Disabilities: Introduction and Strategies for College Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seitz, Sandy; Scheerer, Jan

    Designed for community college educators, this paper provides an overview of the characteristics and problems of the learning disabled adult and offers strategies for both teaching and learning. Following introductory remarks, the paper provides definitions of learning disability and discusses the symptoms, psychological effects, and incidence of

  17. Wake Up Call: Pregnant and Parenting Teens with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Karen H.; Woolcock-Henry, Constance O.; Domenico, Desirae M.

    2005-01-01

    Pregnancy among all teenagers is a major challenge facing the United States. A literature review indicated little research on the incidences of pregnancy and parenting among teenagers with disabilities, similarities and differences in their educational needs when compared to their non-disabled peers, and how programs address their specific

  18. Sleep and Developmental Disabilities: Assessment, Treatment, and Outcome Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doran, Scott M.; Harvey, Mark T.; Horner, Robert H.

    2006-01-01

    People with developmental disabilities sleep less and experience higher incidence of clinical sleep disorders than the general population. Exploring the neurophysiology linking sleep with daytime performance in patients with developmental disabilities is now possible using minimally sufficient sleep and sleep-sensitive behavioral assays. Although…

  19. Risk Behaviors for Varying Categories of Disability in NELS:88

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollar, David

    2005-01-01

    A large body of research shows that youth with disabilities, who comprise about 13% of the country's school-aged population, report comparable to higher incidence rates of alcohol, tobacco, and other drug (ATOD) use than their peers. Furthermore, youth with disabilities who reported ATOD use or who engaged in binge drinking had significantly more

  20. Sleep and Developmental Disabilities: Assessment, Treatment, and Outcome Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doran, Scott M.; Harvey, Mark T.; Horner, Robert H.

    2006-01-01

    People with developmental disabilities sleep less and experience higher incidence of clinical sleep disorders than the general population. Exploring the neurophysiology linking sleep with daytime performance in patients with developmental disabilities is now possible using minimally sufficient sleep and sleep-sensitive behavioral assays. Although

  1. Risk Behaviors for Varying Categories of Disability in NELS:88

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollar, David

    2005-01-01

    A large body of research shows that youth with disabilities, who comprise about 13% of the country's school-aged population, report comparable to higher incidence rates of alcohol, tobacco, and other drug (ATOD) use than their peers. Furthermore, youth with disabilities who reported ATOD use or who engaged in binge drinking had significantly more…

  2. Learning Disability Prevalence and Adult Education Program Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Margaret Becker

    2008-01-01

    This study identifies adult education program characteristics associated with learning disability (LD) prevalence through statistical analyses of data from a single U.S. state (Kansas). Data indicate that several variables at the adult education (AE) program level are linked to LD prevalence, including disability incidence, educational background…

  3. The Multidomain Intervention to preveNt disability in ElDers (MINDED) project: rationale and study design of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cesari, Matteo; Demougeot, Laurent; Boccalon, Henri; Guyonnet, Sophie; Vellas, Bruno; Andrieu, Sandrine

    2014-05-01

    Disability is hardly reversible at old age, negatively impacts on the elders' quality of life, and significantly threatens the sustainability of public health services. Therefore, preventive interventions become necessary for successfully avoiding its onset. The translation of the successful clinical approach represented by the geriatric comprehensive assessment at the community-level and the specific targeting of frailty (a well-established geriatric syndrome) might represent a promising possibility. This approach may allow the implementation of preventive interventions before the irreversible features of disability onset. Unfortunately, there is a lack of evidence on the effectiveness of primary prevention programs against disability in community-dwelling elders. Moreover, the novelty of the topic makes it difficult for the immediate design and conduction of a full-scale trial. For these reasons, a pilot project aimed at obtaining the preliminary information for the design of a subsequent definitive trial is required. In the present article, we describe the objectives, design, and methods of the Multidomain Intervention to preveNt Disability in ElDers (MINDED) project. MINDED is articulated into three sequential phases. First, a screening tool for indentifying non-disabled frail older persons in the community (ideal target population for preventive interventions against disability) will be validated. Then, the organization of a multidisciplinary team in the development and design of a multidomain preventive plan against disability will be verified/optimized. Finally, a randomized controlled trial measuring the effect size of a multicomponent intervention (based on physical exercise, nutrition, and cognitive training) against incident mobility disability versus usual care in community-dwelling frail elders will be conducted. PMID:24768939

  4. Facts about Developmental Disabilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Children with kernicterus are more likely to have cerebral palsy, hearing and vision problems, and problems with their ... developmental disabilities, such as: ADHD , autism spectrum disorder , cerebral palsy , hearing loss , intellectual disability , learning disability, vision impairment , ...

  5. Social and Communicative Interventions and Transition Outcomes for Youth with Disabilities: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alwell, Morgen; Cobb, Brian

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between social and communicative interventions and transition-related outcomes for secondary-aged youth with disabilities is explored in this systematic review. In all, 30 studies intervening with 316 youth with a broad range of disability labels (both high- and low-incidence disabilities) were reviewed. Subgroup analyses were

  6. Using Virtual Reality To Teach Disability Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pivik, Jayne; McComas, Joan; Macfarlane, Ian; Laflamme, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design and evaluation of a desktop virtual reality program that was developed to teach children about the accessibility and attitudinal barriers encountered by their peers with mobility impairments. Investigated attitudes, grade levels, familiarity with individuals with a disability, and gender. (Author/LRW)

  7. Cognitive Apprenticeship into the Discipline: Helping Students with Disabilities Think and Act Like Historians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouck, Emily C.; Okolo, Cynthia M.; Englert, Carol Sue; Heutsche, Anne

    2008-01-01

    This study explored the apprenticeship of students with high-incidence disabilities into the discipline of history through mediation of a web-based instructional environment, the Virtual History Museum (VHM). Thirteen students with high-incidence disabilities spread across two co-taught classrooms participated. They engaged in two units of

  8. Career Interests and Self-Estimated Abilities of Young Adults with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Sherri; Unkefer, Lesley Craig; Cichy, Bryan Ervin; Peper, Christine; Juang, Ju-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain vocational interests and self-estimated work-relevant abilities of young adults with disabilities. Results showed that young adults with both low incidence and high incidence disabilities have a wide range of interests and self-estimated work-relevant abilities that are comparable to those in the general…

  9. Career Interests and Self-Estimated Abilities of Young Adults with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Sherri; Unkefer, Lesley Craig; Cichy, Bryan Ervin; Peper, Christine; Juang, Ju-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain vocational interests and self-estimated work-relevant abilities of young adults with disabilities. Results showed that young adults with both low incidence and high incidence disabilities have a wide range of interests and self-estimated work-relevant abilities that are comparable to those in the general

  10. Mobility and Mobility Aids for Visually Handicapped Individuals. Bibliography, No. 84-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC. National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped.

    The bibliography lists approximately 150 references (1973-1983) on orientation and mobility for visually impaired individuals. Citations are organized alphabetically by author's name within five major topic areas: general works, manuals and curriculum guides, research literature, mobility for special populations (multiple disabilities, children

  11. Creating a Disability Mythology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Steven E.

    1992-01-01

    The concept of a "disability culture" is related to the development of a "disability mythology," in which stories about people who have done heroic activities (almost all people with disabilities) are passed on within the community of people with disabilities as examples of positive change through individual heroism. (DB)

  12. Effect of thoracic manipulation and deep craniocervical flexor training on pain, mobility, strength, and disability of the neck of patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwan-Woo; Kim, Won-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of thoracic manipulation and deep craniocervical flexor training on the muscle strength and endurance, range of motion, and the disability index of the neck of patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-six patients with chronic neck pain participated. They received an intervention for 35 minutes a day, three times a week for 10 weeks. Subjects were randomly assigned to one control and two experimental groups: group A (thoracic manipulation combined with deep craniocervical flexor training, n=16), group B (deep craniocervical flexor training, n=15), and group C (active self-exercise as a control group, n=15). Muscle strength and endurance, pain, neck disability index, and range of motion of the cervical and thoracic spine were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] Group A showed significant increases in muscle strength, endurance, and cervical and thoracic range of motion, and significant decreases in the pain and neck disability index, compared with groups B and C. [Conclusion] Although deep craniocervical flexor training is effective at improving neck function, thoracic manipulation combined with deep craniocervical flexor training was a more effective intervention for pain relief and improving the range of motion, muscle function, and neck disability of patients with nonspecific chronic neck pain. PMID:26957752

  13. Disabilities research in India

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekar, H.; Naveen Kumar, C.; Prashanth, N. R.; Kasthuri, P.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review all articles related to psychiatric disability that have been published in the Indian Journal of Psychiatry since its inception till date. We have also added up some more relevant literature in the area of mental disability of Indian psychiatric patients. Finally the article ends up with discussion related to challenges associated with mental disability, persons with Disability Act and future directions in the area of psychiatric disability. PMID:21836695

  14. Predicting disabilities in daily functioning in older people with intellectual disabilities using a frailty index.

    PubMed

    Schoufour, Josje D; Mitnitski, Arnold; Rockwood, Kenneth; Hilgenkamp, Thessa I M; Evenhuis, Heleen M; Echteld, Michael A

    2014-10-01

    Frailty is a state of increased vulnerability to adverse health outcomes compared to others of the same age. People with intellectual disabilities (ID) are more frequently and earlier frail compared to the general population. Frailty challenges much of health care, which will likely further increase due to the aging of the population. Before effective interventions can start, more information is necessary about the consequences of frailty in this, already disabled, population. Here we report whether frailty predicts disabilities in daily functioning. Frailty was measured with a frailty index (FI). At baseline and follow-up activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and mobility were collected by informant report. For 703 older people with ID (?50 yr) baseline and follow-up measures were known. Multivariate linear regression models were used to predict ADL, IADL and mobility at follow-up. The FI was significantly associated with disabilities in daily functioning independent of baseline characteristics (age, gender, level of ID, Down syndrome) and baseline ADL, IADL or mobility. The FI showed to be most predictive for those with relative high independence at baseline. These results stress the importance for interventions that limit the progression of frailty and, thereby, help to limit further disability. PMID:24950014

  15. Mobile robots

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, W.J.; Marquina, N.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents papers given at a conference on mobile robots. Topics the conference included are the following: mobility systems for robotic vehicles; detection and control of mobile robot motion by real-time computer vision, obstacle avoidance algorithms for an autonomous land vehicle; hierarchical processor and matched filters for range image processing; asynchronous distributed control system for a mobile robot, and, planning in a hierarchical nested autonomous control system.

  16. Incidents of Security Concern

    SciTech Connect

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-01

    This presentation addresses incidents of security concern and an incident program for addressing them. It addresses the phases of an inquiry, and it divides incidents into categories based on severity and interest types based on whether security, management, or procedural interests are involved. A few scenarios are then analyzed according to these breakdowns.

  17. 78 FR 22780 - Final Priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research-Disability and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-17

    ... published in the Federal Register on April 4, 2013 (78 FR 20299), can be accessed on the Internet at the... with low incidence and severe disability. This notice announces a priority that NIDRR intends to use... Register on January 17, 2013 (78 FR 3864). That notice contained background information and our reasons...

  18. Pregnancy in women with physical disabilities.

    PubMed

    Signore, Caroline; Spong, Catherine Y; Krotoski, Danuta; Shinowara, Nancy L; Blackwell, Sean C

    2011-04-01

    The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development sponsored a 2-day workshop to assess the body of evidence on pregnancy in women with physical disabilities, identify gaps in knowledge, and formulate recommendations for further research. A multidisciplinary group of experts discussed available data on pregnancy outcomes among women with varying physically disabling conditions, medical and psychosocial risks for mothers and children, and barriers to prenatal care and parenting for women with physical disabilities. Existing evidence is limited by a preponderance of retrospective single-site studies of small sample sizes. For most women, pregnancy outcomes are favorable. However, increased rates of certain adverse outcomes, such as low birth weight (related to preterm birth or growth restriction) and cesarean delivery, have been reported in women with spinal cord injuries, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, or other conditions. Common morbidities across conditions may include urinary tract infections, decreased mobility and independence, skin ulceration, respiratory compromise, interpersonal abuse, stress, and mood disorders. Socioeconomic, physical, and attitudinal barriers to antenatal care and independent parenting can be problematic. Current evidence, although limited, indicates that most women with physical disabilities will have good pregnancy outcomes; however, some data suggest that rates of a range of complications may be more common among women with physical disabilities, depending on the nature and severity of the underlying condition. Many questions remain unanswered. Establishment of a systematic and comprehensive registry of pregnancy course and outcomes among women with physical disabilities is of high priority for addressing persistent gaps in knowledge. PMID:21422868

  19. General Information about Learning Disabilities (Fact Sheet Number 7) = Informacion General sobre Impedimentos en el Aprendizaje (Fact Sheet Number 19).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Interstate Research Associates, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet providing general information about learning disabilities is presented in both English and Spanish versions. It begins with the federal definition of learning disabilities and a discussion of its implications followed by estimates of incidence. Typical characteristics of students with learning disabilities are then summarized as

  20. What is an Intellectual Disability?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Crushes What's a Booger? What Is an Intellectual Disability? KidsHealth > For Kids > What Is an Intellectual Disability? ... becoming an independent person. continue What Causes Intellectual Disabilities? Intellectual disabilities happen because the brain gets injured ...

  1. The violence of disablism.

    PubMed

    Goodley, Dan; Runswick-Cole, Katherine

    2011-05-01

    This article addresses the multi-faceted nature of violence in the lives of disabled people, with a specific focus on the accounts of disabled children and their families. Traditionally, when violence and disability have been considered together, this has emphasised the disabled subject whom inevitably exhibits violent challenging behaviour. Recently, however, more attention has been paid to violence experienced by disabled people, most notably in relation to hate crime. This article embraces theories that do not put the problems of disablism or violence back onto disabled people but magnify and expose processes of disablism that are produced in the relationships between people, which sometimes involve violence. This, we argue, means taking seriously the role of social relationships, institutions and culture in the constitution of violence. Disabled children, we argue, are enculturated by the violence of disablism. We follow iek's advice to step back from the obvious signals of violence to 'perceive the contours of the background which generates such outbursts', and identify four elements of the violence of disablism which we define as real, psychoemotional, systemic and cultural. We come to the conclusion that violence experienced by disabled children and their families says more about the dominant culture of disablism than it does of the acts of a few seemingly irrational, unreasonable, mean or violent individuals. We conclude that there is a need for extensive cultural deconstruction and reformation. PMID:21226732

  2. Progression of leprosy disability after discharge: is multidrug therapy enough?

    PubMed Central

    Sales, Anna Maria; Campos, Dayse Pereira; Hacker, Mariana Andrea; da Costa Nery, Jos Augusto; Dppre, Ndia Cristina; Rangel, Emanuel; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Penna, Maria Lucia Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the risk factors related to worsening of physical disabilities after treatment discharge among patients with leprosy administered 12 consecutive monthly doses of multidrug therapy (MDT/WHO). Methods Cohort study was carried out at the Leprosy Laboratory in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We evaluated patients with multibacillary leprosy treated (MDT/WHO) between 1997 and 2007. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the relationship between the onset of physical disabilities after release from treatment and epidemiological and clinical characteristics. Results The total observation time period for the 368 patients was 1570 person-years (PY), averaging 4.3years per patient. The overall incidence rate of worsening of disability was 6.5/100PY. Among those who began treatment with no disability, the incidence rate of physical disability was 4.5/100PY. Among those who started treatment with Grade 1 or 2 disabilities, the incidence rate of deterioration was 10.5/100PY. The survival analysis evidenced that when disability grade was 1, the risk was 1.61 (95% CI: 1.022.56), when disability was 2, the risk was 2.37 (95% CI 1.354.16), and when the number of skin lesions was 15 or more, an HR=1.97 (95% CI: 1.073.63). Patients with neuritis showed a 65% increased risk of worsening of disability (HR=1.65 [95% CI: 1.082.52]). Conclusion Impairment at diagnosis was the main risk factor for neurological worsening after treatment/MDT. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment of reactional episodes remain the main means of preventing physical disabilities. PMID:23937704

  3. Disability and Obesity

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CDC Employees and Reasonable Accommodations (RA) Disability and Obesity Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... and Disability at http://www.ncpad.org/ The Obesity Epidemic Obesity affects different people in different ways ...

  4. Disability Accommodation Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flick-Hruska, Connie, Comp.; Blythe, Gretchen, Comp.

    Designed as a resource for two-year college faculty and staff working with students with disabilities, this handbook contains facts about various disabilities, practical suggestions for improving services, and resource points for further information. Following a brief introduction, legal implications regarding disabled students are discussed for…

  5. Work Disability in Appalachia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Judith

    This paper begins by examining the history of disability payments to disabled workers, specifically disability payments to coal workers. Efforts by the United Mine Workers of America made mine health and safety an issue in the 1960s, and continuing liberalization of the law continued through the 1970s. The identification of coal miners with…

  6. Rural Economies and Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Dennis

    Both the rural economy and the disability community in rural areas can benefit from a recognition that they are mutually dependent. With the decline of rural America, the economic base underpinning all aspects of disability support systems is weakening. In addition, rural disability services often are compartmentalized along functional lines with

  7. Teaching Disability Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Laura F.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the history of teaching disability law and traces the development of disability law courses, tracking the emergence of disability discrimination law as a more comprehensive set of legal requirements. The extent to which schools are offering these courses and the approaches being used are examined; additional approaches are also suggested.

  8. DISABILITY STATISTICS CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the Disability Statistics Center is to produce and disseminate statistical information on disability and the status of people with disabilities in American society and to establish and monitor indicators of how conditions are changing over time to meet their health...

  9. Normalizing Disability in Families.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Mary

    2015-01-01

    This comment shifts Ouellette's frame of reference in linking prenatal selection against disability, laws prohibiting prenatal sex selection, and fertility specialists' discrimination against disabled adults. Viewing decisions about who can reproduce and what children will be born as fundamentally decisions about family suggests ways to promote acceptance of people with disabilities as valued family members — without limiting reproductive liberties. PMID:26242942

  10. Social Psychoanalytic Disability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodley, Dan

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores connections and tensions between psychoanalysis and disability studies. The first part of the paper considers contemporaneous engagements with the psyche by a number of disability studies writers. These scholars have remained accountable to a politicised disability studies but have pushed for critical encounters with the

  11. Social Psychoanalytic Disability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodley, Dan

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores connections and tensions between psychoanalysis and disability studies. The first part of the paper considers contemporaneous engagements with the psyche by a number of disability studies writers. These scholars have remained accountable to a politicised disability studies but have pushed for critical encounters with the…

  12. 30 CFR 250.188 - What incidents must I report to MMS and when must I report them?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... calendar days after the incident: (1) All fatalities. (2) All injuries that require the evacuation of the.../material handling operations. (9) All incidents that damage or disable safety systems or equipment... District Manager within 15 calendar days after the incident: (1) Any injuries that result in one or...

  13. Disability and marginal utility of income: evidence from hypothetical choices.

    PubMed

    Tengstam, Sven

    2014-03-01

    It is often assumed that disability reduces the marginal utility of income. In this article, individuals' marginal utility of income in two states-(i) paralyzed in both legs from birth and (ii) not mobility impaired at all-is measured through hypothetical choices between imagined lotteries behind a so-called veil of ignorance. The outcomes of the lotteries include both income and disability status. It is found that most people have higher marginal utility when paralyzed than when not mobility impaired at all. The two marginal utilities are evaluated at the same levels of income. Having personal experience of mobility impairment and supporting the Left Party, the Social Democratic Party, the Green Party, or the Liberal Party are associated with having a higher marginal utility when paralyzed. The results suggest that more than full insurance of income losses connected to being disabled is optimal. The results further suggest that, given a utilitarian social welfare function, resources should be transferred to rather than from disabled people. Finally, if the transfers are not large enough to smooth out the marginal utilities of the disabled and the nondisabled, distributional weights based on disability status should be used in cost-benefit analysis. PMID:23532796

  14. 49 CFR 38.95 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 38.95 Section 38.95 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Commuter Rail Cars and Systems § 38.95 Mobility aid accessibility. (a)(1) General. All new...

  15. 49 CFR 38.159 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 38.159 Section 38.159 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Over-the-Road Buses and Systems § 38.159 Mobility aid accessibility. (a)(1) General. All...

  16. 49 CFR 38.23 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 38.23 Section 38.23 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Buses, Vans and Systems § 38.23 Mobility aid accessibility. (a) General. All vehicles covered...

  17. Beyond (Models of) Disability?

    PubMed

    Beaudry, Jonas-Sébastien

    2016-04-01

    The strategy of developing an ontology or models of disability as a prior step to settling ethical issues regarding disabilities is highly problematic for two reasons. First, key definitional aspects of disability are normative and cannot helpfully be made value-neutral. Second, if we accept that the contested concept of disability is value-laden, it is far from obvious that there are definitive reasons for choosing one interpretation of the concept over another. I conclude that the concept of disability is better left ethically open-ended or broad enough to encompass the examination of various ethical issues (such as oppression, minority rights, or physical discomfort). Alternatively, the concept of disability could be altogether abandoned in order to focus on specific issues without being hindered by debates about the nature of disability. Only political costs, rather than conceptual considerations internal to the models, could be weighed against such a conclusion. PMID:26892249

  18. Adaptive computing for people with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Merrow, S L; Corbett, C D

    1994-01-01

    Adaptive computing is a relatively new area, and little has been written in the nursing literature on the topic. "Adaptive computing" refers to the professional services and the technology (both hardware and software) that make computing technology accessible for persons with disabilities. Nurses in many settings such as schools, industry, rehabilitation facilities, and the community, can use knowledge of adaptive computing as they counsel, advise, and advocate for people with disabilities. Nurses with an awareness and knowledge of adaptive computing will be better able to promote high-level wellness for individuals with disabilities, thus maximizing their potential for an active fulfilling life. People with different types of disabilities, including visual, mobility, hearing, learning, communication disorders and acquired brain injuries may benefit from computer adaptations. Disabled people encounter barriers to computing in six major areas: 1) the environment, 2) data entry, 3) information output, 4) technical documentation, 5) support, and 6) training. After a discussion of these barriers, the criteria for selecting appropriate adaptations and selected examples of adaptations are presented. Several cases studies illustrate the evaluation process and the development of adaptive computer solutions. PMID:8082064

  19. Disability on Irish farms--a real concern.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Shane; Ruane, Dermot J; McNamara, John; Kinsella, Anne; McNamara, Angela

    2009-01-01

    Farmers operate within hazardous environments while conducting their day-to-day tasks, potentially resulting in injury or disability. Disability can serve as a major life-changing event for the farmer, the farm family, and the farm business. In Ireland, the agricultural sector reported the highest incidence of disability, yet there is relatively little known on the impact of agricultural-based disability. In 2007, a questionnaire was appended to the Teagasc (Irish Agricultural and Food Development Authority) National Farm Survey to obtain some metric of the prevalence and impact of disability on Irish farms, in addition to quantifying service/support requirements of farm operators experiencing disability. Almost 5.9% (approximately 6611) of Irish farm operators reported disability, primarily caused through illness/disease. Arthritis (31.4%), back problems (17%), and heart circulatory problems (12.5%) were most frequently reported. The lowest prevalence of disability was found among tillage (1.4%) and dairy (4.1%) farms, with the highest prevalence among cattle farms (7.1%). Family farm income was lower on disability-experiencing farms relative to nondisability farms (123 euros per hectare), with a lower participation in off-farm employment also identified. Many farm operators (approximately 20%) ceased off-farm employment following disability. Discontinuation of off-farm employment can further precipitate family farm income decline, but also place additional pressures on the farm business if quality services/supports are not available. The current provision of services/supports to farm operators experiencing disability is perceived largely insufficient across the entire service/support spectrum from when disability was first experienced through to retirement. Awareness and issues surrounding eligibility were the primary reasons for failing to avail of currently available service/supports. PMID:19437272

  20. Repositioning Mothers: Mothers, Disabled Children and Disability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Sara; Runswick-Cole, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    In this article we set out to review the ways in which mothers of disabled children have been portrayed within disability studies and the more broader academic literature. We argue that within disability studies mothers of disabled children occupy a liminal position because they are often not disabled and yet they can experience forms of

  1. Reasonable Accommodations: A Faculty Guide to Teaching College Students with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Professional Staff Congress of the City Univ. of New York, NY.

    This handbook is designed to provide City University of New York faculty with practical information and suggestions to help them meet the needs of disabled students in their classrooms. An overview on teaching students with disabilities is provided, followed by discussions of specific topics including coping with mobility and hand-function…

  2. 76 FR 47078 - Make Inoperative Exemptions; Vehicle Modifications To Accommodate People With Disabilities, Head...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ...This final rule updates and expands an existing exemption from certain requirements of our head restraints standard that is available in the context of vehicle modifications to accommodate people with disabilities. The rule facilitates the mobility of drivers and passengers with disabilities by updating the exemption to include the corresponding portions of a new, upgraded version of the......

  3. "So Much Potential in Reading!" Developing Meaningful Literacy Routines for Students with Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenlon, Amanda G.; McNabb, Jessica; Pidlypchak, Harmony

    2010-01-01

    Children with multiple disabilities, often experience challenges in communication, mobility, and learning. Despite these challenges, substantial research exists that documents successful educational methods and strategies for these students. Specifically, students with multiple disabilities have successfully been taught to use a voice output

  4. Advocating in Schools for Children with Disabilities: What's New with IDEA?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altshuler, Sandra J.; Kopels, Sandra

    2003-01-01

    Article provides information regarding amended Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and the impact of those changes on children's education rights. Some changes and practice implications discussed include expansion of categories of children with disabilities; new requirements for mobile, homeless, or culturally diverse populations and…

  5. A Wheelchair User with Visual and Intellectual Disabilities Managing Simple Orientation Technology for Indoor Travel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Campodonico, Francesca; Oliva, Doretta

    2009-01-01

    Persons with profound visual impairments and other disabilities, such as neuromotor and intellectual disabilities, may encounter serious orientation and mobility problems even in familiar indoor environments, such as their homes. Teaching these persons to develop maps of their daily environment, using miniature replicas of the areas or some…

  6. Evaluation of an Application for Making Palmtop Computers Accessible to Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, Steven E.; Davies, Daniel K.; Davies, Katelyn R.; Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Palmtop computers provide a promising mobile platform to address barriers to computer-based supports for people with intellectual disabilities. This study evaluated a specially designed interface to make navigation and features of palmtop computers more accessible to users with intellectual disabilities. Method: The specialised

  7. Disability and Democracy in Cambodia: An Integrative Approach to Community Building and Civic Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zook, Darren C.

    2010-01-01

    The political framework through which the various communities of disabled persons in Cambodia advocate for and claim their rights is complex and confusing. Both governmental and non-governmental actors engage this political framework through the mobilization of persons from the various disabled communities, competing in the civic sphere through

  8. A Wheelchair User with Visual and Intellectual Disabilities Managing Simple Orientation Technology for Indoor Travel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Campodonico, Francesca; Oliva, Doretta

    2009-01-01

    Persons with profound visual impairments and other disabilities, such as neuromotor and intellectual disabilities, may encounter serious orientation and mobility problems even in familiar indoor environments, such as their homes. Teaching these persons to develop maps of their daily environment, using miniature replicas of the areas or some

  9. Critical incidents in psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Plutchik, R; Conte, H R; Karasu, T B

    1994-01-01

    The critical-incident technique was used to obtain a list of patient behaviors that create special difficulties for the psychotherapist. The list was prepared by a group of seven clinicians during a series of meetings. Included in the list were such items as: insulting the therapist; coming late to the session; threatening suicide; and offering gifts. The list was given to 21 experienced psychiatrists who were asked to rate both the importance and the frequency of occurrence of each incident in their experience. The critical incidents could be divided into five major categories: threat of harm from the patient; criticism of the therapist or the therapy; occurrence of a major life crisis; attempts by the patient to seek friendship or seduction, and miscellaneous incidents, such as being consistently late. When ratings by the experienced psychiatrists were compared with those of 10 third-year psychiatric residents, it was found that the inexperienced psychiatrists in almost every case rated the incident as less important and more frequent than did the experienced clinicians. In terms of implications, knowledge of critical incidents in psychotherapy may provide a source of material for training purposes, may enable the development of modeling procedures for training in communication skills, and may encourage supervisors to focus attention on important therapeutic issues. PMID:8179030

  10. Incidence of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kariuki, S.M.; Bottomley, C.; Kleinschmidt, I.; Sander, J.W.; Newton, C.R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the pooled incidence of epilepsy from published studies and investigate sources of heterogeneity in the estimates. Methods: We searched online databases for incidence studies and used meta-analytic methods to analyze the data. Results: Thirty-three articles met the entry criteria. The median incidence of epilepsy was 50.4/100,000/year (interquartile range [IQR] 33.675.6), while it was 45.0 (IQR 30.366.7) for high-income countries and 81.7 (IQR 28.0239.5) for low- and middle-income countries. Population-based studies had higher incidence estimates than hospital-based studies (p = 0.02) while retrospective study design was associated with lower estimates than prospective studies (p = 0.04). Conclusion: We provide data that could potentially be used to assess the burden and analyze the trends in incidence of epilepsy. Our results support the need for large population-based incidence studies of epilepsy. Neurology 2011;77:10051012 PMID:21893672

  11. Injuries and Individuals with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Chaudhry, Ramiz A.

    2009-01-01

    Children and adults with disabilities are at an increased risk of injury. Falls are the leading mechanism of injury regardless of the disability status and are even more common in those with moderate or severe disabilities. The setting for the injury differs with the disability status. Compared to individuals with moderate or no disabilities,

  12. Injuries and Individuals with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Chaudhry, Ramiz A.

    2009-01-01

    Children and adults with disabilities are at an increased risk of injury. Falls are the leading mechanism of injury regardless of the disability status and are even more common in those with moderate or severe disabilities. The setting for the injury differs with the disability status. Compared to individuals with moderate or no disabilities,…

  13. Care of Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Developmental Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Weedon, Dean; Wilson, Benjamin; Jones, Kyle Bradford; Bilder, Deborah

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 4.8% of individuals in the United States are affected by developmental disabilities (DDs). These individuals have a spectrum of abilities in terms of communication, mobility, and activities of daily living (ADLs). Because there typically is no specific treatment for the underlying disability, the focus of care should be on diagnosing and managing co-occurring medical and mental or behavioral health conditions and improving function and quality of life. Care of patients with DDs is similar to care of patients without DDs, although adjustments may be needed in the physician's interactive approach, engagement of caregivers, and sensitivity to symptoms. Health care can be enhanced by obtaining information about caregivers and guardians, living and work situations, support services received, and functional and instrumental ADL levels. In managing acute conditions, physicians should assess change from baseline and identify and manage maladaptive behaviors that interfere with care. An individualized preventive care plan should be created that may include additional or adapted screening. Needs for consent/medical decision-making support should be identified and addressed, and consent obtained as appropriate. Providing caregiver support and becoming familiar with community resources are other aspects of caring for this population. PMID:26669210

  14. Meeting the Needs of Students with Severe Disabilities: Issues and Practices in Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryndak, Diane L.; Kennedy, Craig H.

    2000-01-01

    This introductory article highlights concerns faced by teacher education programs that prepare teachers to support students with severe disabilities in today's schools. Teacher shortages and the challenge of maintaining a teacher education program in a low incidence disabilities area are discussed. (Contains references.) (CR)

  15. Identifying Expressions of Pleasure and Displeasure by Persons with Profound and Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, Katja; Maes, Bea

    2006-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to explore a procedure for drafting individualised profiles of how people with profound multiple disabilities express pleasure and displeasure. Method: There were 6 participants with profound multiple disabilities. The procedure involved an observational analysis of videotaped critical incidents by a

  16. Problems and Programs in the Education of Multiply Disabled Deaf Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Desmond J.; Quigley, Stephen P.

    The multiple disabilities, both remediable and adjustable, which may be associated with deafness are defined and comments are offered on the trend away from the "medical model." Incidence figures for the various disabilities are given, and the problems of diagnosis and ascertainment of the educational needs of each individual are considered.

  17. Sexual Abuse of Individuals with Disabilities: Prevention Strategies for Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEachern, Adriana G.

    2012-01-01

    Sexual abuse of individuals with disabilities occurs in alarming proportions, although the prevalence and incidence of such abuse is difficult to determine. Although all states maintain statistics on child sexual abuse, the rate of victimization for individuals with disabilities is not specific. This paper reviews several studies conducted on

  18. RADIUS: Research Archive on Disability in the United States. [CD-ROMs].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sociometrics Corp., Los Altos, CA.

    This Research Archive on Disability in the United States (RADIUS), a database on CD-ROM, contains 19 data sets on the prevalence, incidence, correlates, and consequences of disability in the United States. The 19 data sets are: (1) 1991 National Maternal and Infant Health Follow-Up Survey; (2) National Pediatric Trauma Registry, 1988-1994; (3)

  19. Sexual Abuse of Individuals with Disabilities: Prevention Strategies for Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEachern, Adriana G.

    2012-01-01

    Sexual abuse of individuals with disabilities occurs in alarming proportions, although the prevalence and incidence of such abuse is difficult to determine. Although all states maintain statistics on child sexual abuse, the rate of victimization for individuals with disabilities is not specific. This paper reviews several studies conducted on…

  20. Complexities in Identifying and Defining Mathematics Learning Disability in the Primary School-Age Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzocco, Michele M. M.; Myers, Gwen F.

    2003-01-01

    Findings from a prospective longitudinal study of math disability (MD) addressed its incidence during primary school, the utility of different MD definitions, and evidence of MD subtypes. Findings indicated only 22 of 209 participants demonstrated "persistent MD"; reading disability was more frequent in this group; and reading related skills and

  1. The Evolution of Learning Disabilities in Children with Tourette Syndrome: Educational Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Deborah M.

    The paper examines implications of the high incidence of learning disabilities in children with Tourette Syndrome. Tourette Syndrome is a neurological disorder that causes involuntary muscle jerks and vocalizations. Approximately 60% of children with Tourette Syndrome are classified as learning disabled. It is possible that this high correlation

  2. Mild Intellectual Disabilities: Legacies and Trends in Concepts and Educational Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polloway, Edward A.; Lubin, Jacqueline; Smith, J. David; Patton, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Intellectual disability has been considered a high incidence disability in special education since the inception of the field in the United States. The purpose of this article is to evaluate current educational programs and practices for students who historically and commonly have been referred to as having mild mental retardation. The article

  3. A secure operational model for mobile payments.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tao-Ku

    2014-01-01

    Instead of paying by cash, check, or credit cards, customers can now also use their mobile devices to pay for a wide range of services and both digital and physical goods. However, customers' security concerns are a major barrier to the broad adoption and use of mobile payments. In this paper we present the design of a secure operational model for mobile payments in which access control is based on a service-oriented architecture. A customer uses his/her mobile device to get authorization from a remote server and generate a two-dimensional barcode as the payment certificate. This payment certificate has a time limit and can be used once only. The system also provides the ability to remotely lock and disable the mobile payment service. PMID:25386607

  4. A Secure Operational Model for Mobile Payments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Instead of paying by cash, check, or credit cards, customers can now also use their mobile devices to pay for a wide range of services and both digital and physical goods. However, customers' security concerns are a major barrier to the broad adoption and use of mobile payments. In this paper we present the design of a secure operational model for mobile payments in which access control is based on a service-oriented architecture. A customer uses his/her mobile device to get authorization from a remote server and generate a two-dimensional barcode as the payment certificate. This payment certificate has a time limit and can be used once only. The system also provides the ability to remotely lock and disable the mobile payment service. PMID:25386607

  5. Disability and dignity-enabling home environments.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Barbara E; Secker, Barbara; Rolfe, Debbie; Wagner, Frank; Parke, Bob; Mistry, Bhavnita

    2012-01-01

    In Canada where long-term care is primarily oriented to elderly persons and affordable accessible housing is limited, younger disabled adults may be living in circumstances that do not meet their health needs and contribute to their social exclusion. The purpose of this study was to undertake an ethical analysis of what constitute an 'adequate' home environment for adults with significant mobility disabilities. An integrated design was used that combined qualitative interviews with normative ethical analysis in an iterative process. Twenty interviews with 19 participants were conducted in Ontario, Canada with two groups: younger adults (ages 18-55) with mobility disabilities and 'decision-makers' who consisted of policy makers, program administrators and discharge planners. Data were analyzed using a critical disability ethics approach and processes of reflective equilibrium. Drawing on Nora Jacobson's (Jacobson, 2009) taxonomy of dignity and pluralistic approaches to social justice, the concept of 'social dignity' provides a lens for exploring the adequacy of home environments for disabled people. Analyses suggested seven threshold conditions necessary for a dignity-enabling home: the ability to form and sustain meaningful relationships; access to community and civic life; access to control and flexibility of daily activities; access to opportunities for self-expression and identity affirmation; access to respectful relationships with attendants; access to opportunities to participate in school, work or leisure; access to physical, psychological and ontological security. The results have implications for housing, health and social care policies, and political reform. Social dignity provides a normative ethical grounding for assessing the adequacy of home environments. The threshold elements outline specific dignity-enabling conditions that are open to further specification or elaboration in different contexts. PMID:22142787

  6. Culture and Disability Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Carroll M.

    1983-01-01

    A substantial amount of literature suggests that illness behavior in the United States is a product of a patient's core culture; equally credible findings do not support this contention. Most students and graduates in the health care professions believe that illness and disability behavior are affected by a patient's culture, but they are hard put to find convincing examples of that relationship. In experience with medical students studying the social and cultural bases of illness behavior, with patients who are disabled and with persons who claim disability in the absence of physical disease or disabling psychopathology, I observed no deviant disability behavior that was typical for the members of any cultural group, and no behavior was displayed by the members of one cultural group that was not seen in members of other cultural groups. No cultural stereotypes were upheld. I did find evidence that disability behavior is influenced by personality factors, social situations and the gains derived from the disability status. Evolving concepts of “entitlement,” which are closely related to socioeconomic status, also have a significant influence. The impact of feedback from others in a person's many social and medical subcultures is a more crucial determinant of illness and disability behavior, except in those for whom illness and disability behavior is determined by the limitations imposed by the disease or by a personality structure resistant to cultural expectations and social feedback. PMID:6666106

  7. Disability and global development.

    PubMed

    Durocher, Joan; Lord, Janet; Defranco, Allison

    2012-07-01

    The United States invests billions of taxpayer dollars each year into foreign assistance programs that foster international diplomacy and development directed toward improving the quality of life for people around the world. These programs develop economies and combat poverty, promote democracy and governance, build new infrastructure, advance and protect human rights, among other development goals. The United States cannot effectively accomplish the goals of foreign assistance programs unless it undertakes measures to ensure that the programs are accessible to and inclusive of people with disabilities. The United States has been a leader in advancing the rights of people with disabilities and must continue to promote disability rights through its international development work. Overseas economic development will not be successful unless people with disabilities are included. Because of the significant number of people with disabilities in developing countries, if they are not included, the very economic growth the United States is trying to foster will be hindered. The goals of democracy and governance programs cannot be achieved without the inclusion of people with disabilities. In many countries, domestic law contains blatant discriminatory provisions for people with disabilities that undermine access to justice and full participation in society. The provisions that discriminate against people with disabilities include arbitrary exclusions in electoral codes, sweeping plenary guardianship laws with no due-process protections, discriminatory banking practices, and inaccessible court proceedings. National disability legal frameworks remain underdeveloped throughout the world. PMID:22726852

  8. Disability: a welfarist approach

    PubMed Central

    Savulescu, Julian; Kahane, Guy

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we offer a new account of disability. According to our account, some state of a person's biology or psychology is a disability if that state makes it more likely that a person's life will get worse, in terms of his or her own wellbeing, in a given set of social and environmental circumstances. Unlike the medical model of disability, our welfarist approach does not tie disability to deviation from normal species functioning, nor does it understand disability in essentialist terms. Like the social model of disability, the welfarist approach sees disability as a harmful state that results from the interaction between a person's biology and psychology and his or her surrounding environment. However, unlike the social model, it denies that the harm associated with disability is entirely due to social prejudice or injustice. In this paper, we outline and clarify the welfarist approach, answer common objections and illustrate its usefulness in addressing a range of difficult ethical questions involving disability. PMID:22140353

  9. Work place issues surrounding healthcare professionals with disabilities in the current labor market.

    PubMed

    Kontosh, Larry G; Fletcher, Ina; Frain, Michael; Winland-Brown, Jill

    2007-01-01

    Healthcare professionals, nurses with and without disabilities, administrators and personnel directors were surveyed to explore hiring practices and attitudes towards working with nurses with disabilities employed in clinical settings. Specifically the purpose of the study was to gather and analyze data regarding the perceptions of two groups towards nurses with disabilities: 1) employers and 2) other nurses (with and without a disability). The study defined a nurse with a disability as an RN who has an activity limitation, specifically an altered activity capability which limits mobility, ambulation, strength, coordination, or equilibrium. Findings suggest that nurses are more likely to be willing to work with an RN with a disability if they had worked with one in the past. However, overall acceptance of RNs with disabilities was not broad. PMID:18057569

  10. Disability and Health: Healthy Living

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the Health and Wellness of Persons with Disabilities Health Care Reform Health care reform for Americans with disabilities: Learn more about the Affordable Care Act . Getting the Best Possible Health Care People with disabilities must get the care ...

  11. Disability Information & Awareness: Afghanistan. Version 2.2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, M.

    This report focuses on a project in Afghanistan that coordinates the efforts of several agencies to develop community-directed disability, rehabilitation, and education services. The program stresses community mobilization aided by skills transfer from expatriate specialists, and includes physical therapy, prosthetics, living skills and mobility…

  12. Ubiquitous Yet Unique: Perspectives of People With Disabilities on Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwasaki, Yoshitaka; Mactavish, Jennifer B.

    2005-01-01

    This exploratory study was grounded in a qualitative framework and used a focus group method to examine the meanings that individuals with disabilities (e.g., permanent mobility impairments, sensory impairments) attach to their experiences of stress, as well as major sources or causes of stress in these individuals' lives. Overall, the data showed

  13. Research into Telecommunications Options for People with Physical Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Toan; Garrett, Rob; Downing, Andrew; Walker, Lloyd; Hobbs, David

    2007-01-01

    People with a disability do not have equitable access to the modern telecommunication medium. Many experience difficulty typing, handling the phone, dialing, or answering calls. For those who are unable to speak, the only option is to type messages using whatever functional control site exists on their body. The provision of accessible mobile

  14. Impact of physical frailty on disability in community-dwelling older adults: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Makizako, Hyuma; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Doi, Takehiko; Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Suzuki, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between physical frailty and risk of disability, and to identify the component(s) of frailty with the most impact on disability in community-dwelling older adults. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting A Japanese community. Participants 4341 older adults aged ≥65 living in the community participated in a baseline assessment from 2011 to 2012 and were followed for 2 years. Main outcome measures Care-needs certification in the national long-term care insurance (LTCI) system of Japan, type of physical frailty (robust, prefrail, frail) and subitems (slowness, weakness, exhaustion, low activity, weight loss), adjusted for several potential confounders such as demographic characteristics, analysed with Kaplan-Meier survival curves for incidence of disability by frailty phenotype. Results During the 2-year follow-up period, 168 participants (3.9%) began using the LTCI system for incidence of disability. Participants classified as frail (HR 4.65, 95% CI 2.63 to 8.22) or prefrail (2.52, 1.56 to 4.07) at the baseline assessment had an increased risk of disability incidence compared with robust participants. Analyses for subitems of frailty showed that slowness (2.32, 1.62 to 3.33), weakness (1.90, 1.35 to 2.68) and weight loss (1.61, 1.13 to 2.31) were related to increased risk of disability incidence. In stratified analyses, participants who were classified as frail and who had lower cognitive function had the highest percentage (30.3%) of disability incidence during the 2 years after baseline assessment. Conclusions Physical frailty, even being prefrail, had a strong impact on the risk of future disability. Some components of frailty, such as slowness, weakness and weight loss, are strongly associated with incident disability in community-dwelling older adults. PMID:26338685

  15. Physical fitness is predictive for a decline in daily functioning in older adults with intellectual disabilities: results of the HA-ID study.

    PubMed

    Oppewal, Alyt; Hilgenkamp, Thessa I M; van Wijck, Ruud; Schoufour, Josje D; Evenhuis, Heleen M

    2014-10-01

    A high incidence of limitations in daily functioning is seen in older adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), along with poor physical fitness levels. The aim of this study was to assess the predictive value of physical fitness for daily functioning after 3 years, in 602 older adults with borderline to profound ID (? 50 years). At baseline, physical fitness levels and daily functioning (operationalized as basic activities of daily living [ADL] and mobility) were assessed. After 3 years, the measurements of daily functioning were repeated. At follow-up, 12.6% of the participants were completely independent in ADL and 48.5% had no mobility limitations. More than half of the participants (54.8%) declined in their ability to perform ADL and 37.5% declined in their mobility. Manual dexterity, visual reaction time, balance, comfortable and fast gait speed, muscular endurance, and cardiorespiratory fitness were significant predictors for a decline in ADL. For a decline in mobility, manual dexterity, balance, comfortable and fast walking speed, grip strength, muscular endurance, and cardiorespiratory fitness were all significant predictors. This proves the predictive validity of these physical fitness tests for daily functioning and stresses the importance of using physical fitness tests and implementing physical fitness enhancing programs in the care for older adults with ID. PMID:24950015

  16. Negotiating hearing disability and hearing disabled identities.

    PubMed

    Hindhede, Anette Lykke

    2012-03-01

    Using disability theory as a framework and social science theories of identity to strengthen the arguments, this article explores empirically how working-age adults confront the medical diagnosis of hearing impairment. For most participants hearing impairment threatens the stability of social interaction and the construction of hearing disabled identities is seen as shaped in the interaction with the hearing impaired person's surroundings. In order to overcome the potential stigmatization the 'passing' as normal becomes predominant. For many the diagnosis provokes radical redefinitions of the self. The discursively produced categorization and subjectivity of senescence mean that rehabilitation technologies such as hearing aids identify a particular life-style (disabled) which determines their social significance. Thus wearing a hearing aid works against the contemporary attempt to create socially ideal bodily presentations of the self, as the hearing aid is a symbolic extension of the body's lack of function. PMID:21540252

  17. Disciplining Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Janieth

    2012-01-01

    Discipline in schools can be difficult, especially when dealing with students with disabilities. In fact, Clash (2006) reported that working with students with disabilities under stringent legal demands has become a source of stress for many principals. The typical principal has not received extensive preservice or inservice training in this area.

  18. Disability Employment 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Business is about productivity and maintaining a competitive advantage. To do this, business needs qualified workers. Hiring people with disabilities adds value to a business and will attract new customers. Disability is not inability. Employers can make sound business decisions and gain a competitive advantage by using this guide to increase the

  19. Disability Employment 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Business is about productivity and maintaining a competitive advantage. To do this, business needs qualified workers. Hiring people with disabilities adds value to a business and will attract new customers. Disability is not inability. President Bush's position is that he "will not be satisfied until every American who wants to work can find a

  20. Disability Employment 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Business is about productivity and maintaining a competitive advantage. To do this, business needs qualified workers. Hiring people with disabilities adds value to a business and will attract new customers. Disability is not inability. President Bush's position is that he "will not be satisfied until every American who wants a job can find a job,

  1. FacingDisability.com

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About Blog Facing Disability Jeff Shannon Donate A Spinal Cord Injury Affects the Entire Family FacingDisability was specifically created ... more videos of Sean BLOG – Bowel Programs for Spinal Cord Injury A new Factsheet that summarizes the latest medical ...

  2. Working with the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetherington, Cheryl; Sandmeyer, Louise

    1979-01-01

    In a period of declining college enrollments, it is important to serve all qualified students, especially disabled students who may not be attracted to a college unless the college is responding to their needs. The role of the counselor is to translate awareness of needs into positive action for the disabled student. (Author)

  3. Disabilities in Written Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Teresa J.

    2011-01-01

    Regular education teachers may have received inadequate preparation to work with the variety of student disabilities encountered in the classroom, or they may have received limited training regarding the full range of learning disabilities and their effects on classroom performance. Along with problems in the area of math, students may also have…

  4. Learning about Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popp, Rita Ann

    1983-01-01

    The author describes lessons provided for regular class elementary students to help them understand disabilities and disabled persons. Objectives, materials needed, and activities are outlined for six lessons focusing on the following topics: individual differences, wheelchairs; devices that help people walk; amputation, artificial limbs, and

  5. Learning Disabilities: Lifelong Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Shirley C., Ed.; Ellis, William, Ed.

    This book contains papers on learning disabilities based on presentations made at the "Summit on Learning Disabilities: A National Responsibility," held in September 1994. The first section provides an overview and includes "The State of Research" (G. Reid Lyon). The second section focuses on education and includes: "Preventing Early Reading

  6. Disability: Our Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hourihan, John P., Ed.

    Ten papers from a 1978 lecture series on employment, civil rights, education, social aspects, and recreation and leisure for disabled persons are presented. It is explained that as disabled persons, the lecturers presented role models to the students at the Regional Education Program for Handicapped College Students at Teachers College, Columbia.

  7. Disciplining Students with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, Kevin P.

    This report discusses disciplining children with disabilities in schools, in the context of the legal requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Practical concepts are explained in terms of the school's responsibility to: (1) maintain a safe environment; (2) teach a code of discipline to all students; (3) use the

  8. Beauty and Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David W.

    2015-01-01

    People often hold stereotypical notions about disability, assuming people with significant disabilities offer little in terms of friendship or contribution. Some are even repulsed by that person's physical appearance. Such responses, evident within the Christian community as well, fail to acknowledge the inherent worth of the person as created in

  9. The Disabled: Media's Monster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogdan, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    From the early nineteenth century to the present, horror, gangster, and adventure films, television, the comics, and newspapers have shown physical and mental disabilities to connote murder, violence, and danger. Such false portrayals have promoted negative public attitudes toward people with disabilities. (Author/MJL)

  10. Learning Disabilities: Lifelong Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Shirley C., Ed.; Ellis, William, Ed.

    This book contains papers on learning disabilities based on presentations made at the "Summit on Learning Disabilities: A National Responsibility," held in September 1994. The first section provides an overview and includes "The State of Research" (G. Reid Lyon). The second section focuses on education and includes: "Preventing Early Reading…

  11. Disability: A Pacific Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Donna

    2008-01-01

    This paper is a personal perspective about the disability issues within the Cook Islands. It looks at how the needs of children and adults with disabilities have been addressed over the years and the vision of many people who have worked towards building an inclusive society, starting with mainstreaming in the schools to full inclusion. It

  12. Workers with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Blanck, P D; Pransky, G

    1999-01-01

    Individuals with disabilities constitute a sizable portion of the workforce and represent the majority of working-age persons who are unable to work. Historically, barriers to employment have included attitudinal discrimination by employers, lack of workplace accommodations, and inadequate job training. The disability rights movement has achieved considerable success in promoting legislation to remove these barriers and uphold equal employment. Research suggests that many employers actively attempt to incorporate persons with disabilities into the workforce and gain substantial economic benefit from their participation, without incurring burdensome expenses. Occupational health providers are asked by employers and others to provide input on feasibility and safety, a difficult task given the lack of scientific study on the occupational abilities and risks associated with specific disabilities. Providers have an important role in promoting the equal employment of disabled persons, by providing objective opinions on their ability and risks on the job and suggesting workplace accommodations and treatments that enhance the ability to work. PMID:10378977

  13. Estimating national disability risk.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan

    2004-06-01

    In this article, I provide a method to rebuild the active and disabled life expectancy (ALE and DLE) on the basis of 'current' death and disability risks, and to measure disability risk. This method uses national-level data, and is based on two main assumptions. The first is the Gompertz assumption that death rate rises with age exponentially, and the second is the Cox assumption that death rates of active status are proportional to those of disabled status across age. Applying this method to the US data, I find that the disability risk has increased between 1970 and 1990 for both men and women aged 40 and older. Situations in which above assumptions could be removed are also discussed. PMID:15136013

  14. Workplace Factors Associated with Preventing and Managing Work Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habeck, Rochelle V.; Hunt, H. Allan; VanTol, Brett

    1998-01-01

    Provides empirical evidence about the relationship between policies and practices and the incidence and outcomes of work disability, controlling for organizational factors. Describes the employer self-assessment survey instrument designed for the study and the eight independent variables explored within Michigan establishments (N=220) in seven…

  15. An Exploration of Community Learning Disability Nurses' Therapeutic Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsham, Marian

    2012-01-01

    This literature review and primary qualitative research explores therapeutic role from the perspective of Community Learning Disability Nurses. Semi-structured interviews, based on Critical Incident Technique ("Psychol Bull", 51, 1954, 327), and descriptive phenomenological methodology were adopted to elicit data amenable to systematic content

  16. Injury and Disability in Matched Men's and Women's Intercollegiate Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanese, Richard R.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Studied eight matched men's and women's intercollegiate teams for one year to determine the incidence of athletic injury and disability. Found no gender differences except in gymnastics, in which certain events may account for the greater rate of injuries and longer recovery time among female subjects. (DM)

  17. Dental Disease: A Continuing Education Problem for the Disabled Individual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, William P.

    1983-01-01

    The author cites the incidence and types of dental diseases among disabled persons; discusses such contributing factors as low income and absence of comprehensive dental services; and describes a low-cost model interdisciplinary dental hygiene program involving special education, rehabilitation, and dentistry. (MC)

  18. Vitamin D and Fractures in People with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanlint, S.; Nugent, M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disability (ID) are thought to be at an increased risk of fractures. The extent of this increase in risk has been incompletely documented in the literature, and the underlying reasons remain to be elucidated. Methods: The aims of our study were to document the vitamin D status and fracture incidence in an…

  19. Adults with Learning Disabilities. ERIC Digest No. 189.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerka, Sandra

    Thanks to increased advocacy and research, several major federal laws, and heightened awareness of the changing demands of the workplace, more attention is being focused on adults with learning disabilities (LD). There is still no consensus on definitions of LD. Estimates of the incidence of LD range from 5% to 20% of the population. Adults with

  20. Vitamin D and Fractures in People with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanlint, S.; Nugent, M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disability (ID) are thought to be at an increased risk of fractures. The extent of this increase in risk has been incompletely documented in the literature, and the underlying reasons remain to be elucidated. Methods: The aims of our study were to document the vitamin D status and fracture incidence in an

  1. Using iPads with Students with Disabilities: Lessons Learned from Students, Teachers, and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper Rodríguez, Cathi; Strnadová, Iva; Cumming, Therese

    2014-01-01

    The use of mobile technology has increased greatly in recent years. Although the research in this area is still in its infancy, preliminary studies are showing a positive impact on the skills and academic engagement of students with disabilities. This column provides an overview of a selection of research studies involving mobile devices such as…

  2. Using iPads with Students with Disabilities: Lessons Learned from Students, Teachers, and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper Rodrguez, Cathi; Strnadov, Iva; Cumming, Therese

    2014-01-01

    The use of mobile technology has increased greatly in recent years. Although the research in this area is still in its infancy, preliminary studies are showing a positive impact on the skills and academic engagement of students with disabilities. This column provides an overview of a selection of research studies involving mobile devices such as

  3. A Review of Balance and Gait Capacities in Relation to Falls in Persons with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enkelaar, Lotte; Smulders, Ellen; van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Henny; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Weerdesteyn, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    Limitations in mobility are common in persons with intellectual disabilities (ID). As balance and gait capacities are key aspects of mobility, the prevalence of balance and gait problems is also expected to be high in this population. The objective of this study was to critically review the available literature on balance and gait characteristics

  4. A Review of Balance and Gait Capacities in Relation to Falls in Persons with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enkelaar, Lotte; Smulders, Ellen; van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Henny; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Weerdesteyn, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    Limitations in mobility are common in persons with intellectual disabilities (ID). As balance and gait capacities are key aspects of mobility, the prevalence of balance and gait problems is also expected to be high in this population. The objective of this study was to critically review the available literature on balance and gait characteristics…

  5. Childhood Cancer Incidence

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator presents childhood cancer incidence rates for the U.S. population from 1973 to 2008. While their causes are largely unknown, there are reasons to believe that childhood cancers might be more prevalent in groups that are exposed to higher levels of environmental ...

  6. RAPID INCIDENT RESPONSE FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Will discuss WERF Contract (RFP# 03-HHE-5PP), Protocols for the Timely Investigation of Potential Health Incidents Associated with Biosolids Land Application, as a member of the project advisory committee. The contractor, University of North Carolina, started work in early June, ...

  7. Incident meteoroid flux density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badadjanov, P. B.; Bibarsov, R. SH.; Getman, V. S.; Kolmakov, V. M.

    1987-01-01

    Complex photographic and radar meteor observations were carried out. Using the available observational data, the density of incident flux of meteoroids was estimated over a wide mass range of 0.001 to 100 g. To avoid the influence of apparatus selectivity a special technique was applied. The main characteristics of this technique are given and discussed.

  8. Disability and Health: Exploring the Disablement Experience of Young Adult African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Tracie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to examine disablement as experienced by young adult African American men and women with permanent mobility impairment. Methods This study included a sample of 5 male and 5 female participants ranging in age from 22 to 39. An exploratory descriptive design and qualitative methods, including interviews and fieldnotes, were used. Interview data was analyzed using the process of inductive qualitative content analysis. Results Basic desires for independence, shared intimacy, and psychological and physical health were not diminished by physical limitations. The disablement experience of this group is reflected in the themes of “Cumulative Losses” and “Sustained Desires.” The findings of this study describe the high level of motivation that young adult African American men and women with disabilities have to improve levels of health and well-being within the context of their impairments. Conclusion This study provides a better understanding of the contextual factors and experiences that may contribute to the development of further disability and subsequent health-related problems over time. Increased knowledge of the disablement experience of these young men and women may assist health care entities and social service providers in improving health care and rehabilitation efforts targeting this group. PMID:23745770

  9. Exploring Postsecondary Education Disability Service's Standards: Alignment with Disability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzman, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    A study analyzing the perspectives held by higher education's disability service providers in regards to disability and/or students with disabilities in the implementation of program standards was carried out using a sequential mixed-methods design. Using the knowledge gather by Disability Studies scholars, the study used the constructs of

  10. Exploring Postsecondary Education Disability Service's Standards: Alignment with Disability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzman, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    A study analyzing the perspectives held by higher education's disability service providers in regards to disability and/or students with disabilities in the implementation of program standards was carried out using a sequential mixed-methods design. Using the knowledge gather by Disability Studies scholars, the study used the constructs of…

  11. Training reduces stuck pipe costs and incidents

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, B. ); Smith, R. )

    1994-09-19

    Properly administered initial and refresher stuck pipe training courses have dramatically reduced the cost and number of stuck pipe incidents for many companies worldwide. These training programs have improved operator and contractor crew awareness of stuck pipe risks and fostered a team commitment in averting such incidents. The success is evident in the achievements of the companies sponsoring such training. Preventing and minimizing stuck pipe is the most significant benefit of stuck pipe training, but crews also benefit from becoming more knowledgeable about the drilling program and equipment operation. The paper discusses stuck pipe costs, stuck pipe training, prevention of stuck pipes, well bore stability, geopressured formation, reactive formation, reactive formations, unconsolidated formations, mobile formations, fractured and faulted formations, differential sticking, 8 other causes of stuck pipe, and freeing stuck pipe.

  12. An Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Daniel B; Payne, Patricia W

    2012-01-01

    Although the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) by centrally-located operations staff is well established in the area of emergency response, utilization by first responders in the field is uneven. Cost, complexity, and connectivity are often the deciding factors preventing wider adoption. For the past several years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing a mobile GIS solution using free and open-source software targeting the needs of front-line personnel. Termed IMPACT, for Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit, this ORNL application can complement existing GIS infrastructure and extend its power and capabilities to responders first on the scene of a natural or man-made disaster.

  13. The Excessive Appearance of Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalko, Rod

    2009-01-01

    This paper engages the appearance of disability in contemporary Western culture. Rather than taking disability for granted as a biomedical condition, I interrogate how disability is made to appear in our culture, including its appearance as a biomedical condition. Fundamentally, disability appears to us as a trouble and, as such, cultural

  14. Adaptive Technology for the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filipczak, Bob

    1993-01-01

    The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 has made it illegal to discriminate against a disabled job applicant who is capable of doing the job. Adaptive devices allow even severely disabled people to perform jobs. Employers can use technology to help disabled employees be as productive as others. (JOW)

  15. Paralympic Athletes and "Knowing Disability"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Hayley

    2012-01-01

    This article explores non-disabled young people's understandings of Paralympic athletes and the disability sports they play. The article examines how society has come to know disability by discussing medical and social model views of disability. The conceptual tools offered by Pierre Bourdieu are utilised as a means of understanding the nature and

  16. Appendicular Fractures: A Significant Problem among Institutionalized Adults with Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, K. M.; Williams, J.; Womack, C.; Nayak, N. G.; Nasef, S.; Bush, A.; Tylavsky, F. A.; Carbone, L.

    2003-01-01

    This study found a high incidence of nontraumatic fractures in adults with developmental disabilities living in a state-run facility, a 7.3% incidence among 391 adults. Factors associated with fractures included use of antiepileptic medication. Although bone mineral density (BMD) by heel ultrasound did not predict fracture, values were much lower

  17. Appendicular Fractures: A Significant Problem among Institutionalized Adults with Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, K. M.; Williams, J.; Womack, C.; Nayak, N. G.; Nasef, S.; Bush, A.; Tylavsky, F. A.; Carbone, L.

    2003-01-01

    This study found a high incidence of nontraumatic fractures in adults with developmental disabilities living in a state-run facility, a 7.3% incidence among 391 adults. Factors associated with fractures included use of antiepileptic medication. Although bone mineral density (BMD) by heel ultrasound did not predict fracture, values were much lower…

  18. Dickens and disability.

    PubMed

    Wainapel, S F

    1996-12-01

    The novels of Charles Dickens include many vivid portraits of individuals with physical disabilities or deformities, and these conditions are often used symbolically to highlight some of the author's recurring themes. Disabled children are depicted as innocent victims, while their older counterparts are most often viewed as corrupt victimizers whose physical deformities are outward manifestations of their inner depravity. Punishment for moral failings in non-disabled characters frequently takes the form of paralysis and/or aphasia resulting from a cerebrovascular accident. In this context the wheelchair becomes a potent metaphor of imprisonment as a form of retributive justice. PMID:9007422

  19. Mobile Customer Relationship Management and Mobile Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanayei, Ali; Mirzaei, Abas

    The purpose of this study is twofold. First, in order to guarantee a coherent discussion about mobile customer relationship management (mCRM), this paper presents a conceptualization of mCRM delineating its unique characteristics because of Among the variety of mobile services, considerable attention has been devoted to mobile marketing and in particular to mobile customer relationship management services. Second, the authors discusses the security risks in mobile computing in different level(user, mobile device, wireless network,...) and finally we focus on enterprise mobile security and it's subgroups with a series of suggestion and solution for improve mobile computing security.

  20. What Are Learning Disabilities?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... have trouble generalizing and following multistep directions. 12 Visual perceptual/visual motor deficit. People with this condition mix up ... top] Learning Disabilities Association of America. (n.d.). Visual perceptual/visual motor deficit . Retrieved June 15, 2012, ...

  1. National Council on Disability

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 16, 2016 National Council on Disability Commends Senate Commerce Committee for Hearings on Self-Driving Cars March ... Written Submission of Chair Clyde Terry to Senate Commerce Committee on Autonomous Vehicles March 7, 2016 Medicaid ...

  2. Ethics in neurodevelopmental disability.

    PubMed

    Racine, Eric; Bell, Emily; Shevell, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental disabilities, like autism spectrum disorders and cerebral palsy are a common health problem in children. Given the impact of these conditions on children, families, and healthcare and social systems, the care of developmentally challenged children raises questions related to values and ethical principles. We review the common features of neurodevelopmental disorders that help understand the associated ethical questions. We focus on three major areas where ethical questions arise for clinicians and those involved in making decisions for or caring for these children: (1) the principles of decision-making and autonomy as they relate to developmental disability; (2) the issues related to quality of life that have long intersected with developmental disability; and (3) the use of unproven therapies and diagnostics that are particularly controversial given the extent that neurodevelopmental disabilities impact children and their families, yet active treatments options are limited. PMID:24182383

  3. Sexuality and Intellectual Disability

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or developmental disabilities have been thought to be asexual, having no need for loving and fulfilling relationships ... decision-making, including education about such issues as reproduction, marriage and family life, abstinence, safe sexual practices, ...

  4. Advocating in schools for children with disabilities: what's new with IDEA?

    PubMed

    Altshuler, Sandra J; Kopels, Sandra

    2003-07-01

    All social workers who work with children and families, regardless of their practice setting, should be aware of the important educational rights to which children with disabilities and their families are entitled. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (P.L. 101-476), one of the most sweeping laws protecting children with disabilities, was substantially amended in 1997, and its regulatory provisions became legally effective in October 1999. This article provides information about the requirements of the law and the impact of those changes on children's educational rights. The changes discussed and their practice implications include expansion of categories of children with disabilities; new requirements for mobile, homeless, or culturally diverse populations and participants in the individualized education program process; payment for private school placements for children with disabilities; discipline of children with disabilities; and provision of social work services in the schools. PMID:12899279

  5. Drugs, discrimination and disability.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Frances

    2009-12-01

    Whether addiction to prohibited drugs should be classified as a disability for the purposes of disability discrimination is a controversial question in Australia. The leading Australian case of Marsden v Human Rights Equal Opportunity Commission & Coffs Harbour & District Ex-Servicemen & Women's Memorial Club Ltd (HREOC, No H98/51, 30 August 1999); [2000] FCA 1619 concerned a disability discrimination complaint brought by Mr Marsden as a result of his treatment by the club. The case was brought as a public interest test case by the New South Wales Legal Aid Commission. Mr Marsden was on a methadone program at the time. The reasoning of the decision at the Federal Court opened the way for a finding that dependence on illegal drugs constituted a disability under disability discrimination legislation. The media reaction to the court's decision led to State and federal governments proposing legislation limiting legal protection from discrimination for people addicted to illegal drugs on the basis of their drug use. While the proposed federal legislation lapsed after objections from a coalition of medical, legal and other advocacy groups, the New South Wales legislation still provides that, in employment matters, it is not unlawful to discriminate against a person on the ground of disability if the disability relates to the person's addiction to a prohibited drug and the person is actually addicted to a prohibited drug at the time of the discrimination. The article details the sequence of events in the Marsden case, reflects on the role of public interest litigation in achieving social justice outcomes and suggests that Australia's recent ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities on 17 July 2008 should encourage legislators to review legislation which may have a discriminatory effect on people suffering from addictions. PMID:20169800

  6. Accuracy and Precision of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory Computer-Adaptive Tests (PEDI-CAT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Stephen M.; Coster, Wendy J.; Dumas, Helene M.; Fragala-Pinkham, Maria A.; Kramer, Jessica; Ni, Pengsheng; Tian, Feng; Kao, Ying-Chia; Moed, Rich; Ludlow, Larry H.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aims of the study were to: (1) build new item banks for a revised version of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) with four content domains: daily activities, mobility, social/cognitive, and responsibility; and (2) use post-hoc simulations based on the combined normative and disability calibration samples to assess the

  7. How to Find Good Apps: An Evaluation Rubric for Instructional Apps for Teaching Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ok, Min Wook; Kim, Min Kyung; Kang, Eun Young; Bryant, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Computers can be an effective teaching method for students with learning disabilities (LD). The use of mobile devices as education tools for students with disabilities has received considerable attention in special education recently. Parents, teachers, and professionals look for effective applications (i.e., apps) that meet the needs of their…

  8. Accuracy and Precision of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory Computer-Adaptive Tests (PEDI-CAT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Stephen M.; Coster, Wendy J.; Dumas, Helene M.; Fragala-Pinkham, Maria A.; Kramer, Jessica; Ni, Pengsheng; Tian, Feng; Kao, Ying-Chia; Moed, Rich; Ludlow, Larry H.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aims of the study were to: (1) build new item banks for a revised version of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) with four content domains: daily activities, mobility, social/cognitive, and responsibility; and (2) use post-hoc simulations based on the combined normative and disability calibration samples to assess the…

  9. Trajectory of Cognitive Decline after Incident Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Deborah A.; Galecki, Andrzej T.; Langa, Kenneth M.; Unverzagt, Frederick W.; Kabeto, Mohammed U.; Giordani, Bruno; Wadley, Virginia G.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Cognitive decline is a major cause of disability in stroke survivors. The magnitude of survivors cognitive changes after stroke is uncertain. Objective To measure changes in cognitive function among survivors of incident stroke, controlling for their prestroke cognitive trajectories. Design, Setting, and Participants Prospective study of 23,572 participants aged ?45 years without baseline cognitive impairment from the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort, residing in the continental United States, enrolled 20032007 and followed through March 31, 2013. Over a median follow-up of 6.1 years (25th75th percentile: 5.07.1 years), 515 participants survived expert-adjudicated incident stroke and 23,057 remained stroke-free. Exposure Time-dependent incident stroke. Outcome Measures The primary outcome was change in global cognition (Six-Item Screener, SIS; range 06). Secondary outcomes were change in new learning (Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimers Disease Word List Learning; range 030), verbal memory (Word List Delayed Recall; range 010), and executive function (Animal Fluency Test; range ?0), and cognitive impairment (SIS<5/impaired vs. ?5/unimpaired). For all tests, higher scores indicate better performance. Results Stroke was associated with acute decline in global cognition (0.10 points; 95% CI, 0.040.17), new learning (1.80 points; 95% CI, 0.732.86), and verbal memory (0.60 points; 95% CI, 0.131.07). Participants with stroke, compared to those without stroke, demonstrated faster declines in global cognition (0.06 points per year faster; 95% CI, 0.030.08) and executive function (0.63 points per year faster; 95% CI, 0.121.15), but not in new learning and verbal memory, compared to prestroke slopes. Among survivors, the difference in risk of cognitive impairment acutely after stroke was not statistically significant (odds ratio, 1.32; 95% CI, 0.951.83; P=0.097); however, there was a significantly faster poststroke rate of incident cognitive impairment compared to the prestroke rate (odds ratio, 1.23 per year; 95% CI, 1.101.38; P<0.001). For a 70 year-old black woman, stroke at year 3 was associated with greater incident cognitive impairment: absolute difference (95% CI) of 4.0% (?1.2%9.2%) at year 3 and 12.4% (7.7%17.1% at year 6). Conclusion Incident stroke was associated with an acute decline in cognition and also accelerated and persistent cognitive decline over 6 years. PMID:26151265

  10. Geriatric Impairments and Disability: The Cardiovascular Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Sarwat I.; McAvay, Gail; Ning, Yuming; Allore, Heather G.; Newman, Anne B.; Gill, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Our objective was to determine the relative importance of geriatric impairments (including those in muscle strength, physical capacity, cognition, vision, hearing and psychological status) and chronic diseases in predicting subsequent functional disability in longitudinal analyses. Design We analyzed longitudinal data from the Cardiovascular Health Study. Multivariable Cox hazards regression modeling was used to analyze associations between time-dependent predictors and onset of disability in Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and mobility. Setting/Participants 5888 community-dwelling elderly persons were followed for up to seven years. Intervention N/A Measurements Data were collected annually through in-person examinations. Results ADL disability developed in 15% of participants and mobility disability in 30%. A single multivariable model was developed that included demographics, marital status, body mass index, and number of impairments and diseases. The hazard ratios of having 1, 2, and ≥ 3 geriatric impairments (compared with none) for the outcome of ADL disability were 2.12 (95% CI 1.63–2.75), 4.25 (3.30–5.48), and 7.87 6.10–10.17), respectively, and for having 1, 2, and ≥ 3 chronic diseases were 1.75 (1.41–2.19), 2.45 (1.95–3.07), and 3.26 (2.53–4.19), respectively. Similarly, the hazard ratios of having 1, 2, and ≥ 3 impairments for the outcome of mobility disability were 1.48 (1.27–1.73), 2.08 (1.77–2.45), and 3.70 (3.09–4.42), and for having 1, 2, and ≥ 3 diseases were 2.06 (1.76–2.40), 2.80 (2.36–3.31), and 4.20 (3.44–5.14). Conclusion As compared with number of chronic diseases, the number of geriatric impairments was more strongly associated with subsequent ADL disability, and nearly as strongly associated with the subsequent mobility disability. PMID:20863328

  11. Classical mobility of highly mobile crystal defects.

    PubMed

    Swinburne, T D; Dudarev, S L; Sutton, A P

    2014-11-21

    Highly mobile crystal defects such as crowdions and prismatic dislocation loops exhibit an anomalous temperature independent mobility unexplained by phonon scattering analysis. Using a projection operator, without recourse to elasticity, we derive analytic expressions for the mobility of highly mobile defects and dislocations which may be efficiently evaluated in molecular dynamics simulation. The theory explains how a temperature-independent mobility arises because defect motion is not an eigenmode of the Hessian, an implicit assumption in all previous treatments. PMID:25479502

  12. Incident Management: Process into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaac, Gayle; Moore, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Tornados, shootings, fires--these are emergencies that require fast action by school district personnel, but they are not the only incidents that require risk management. The authors have introduced the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the Incident Command System (ICS) and assured that these systems can help educators plan for and

  13. [Evaluation of functional status and disability of narcolepsy patients].

    PubMed

    Hublin, Christer; Kirjavainen, Turkka; Partinen, Markku; Ojala, Mikael; Saarenpää-Heikkilä, Outi

    2011-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a sleep-wake disorder with a multiple symptom picture of varying degree of severity. It has been rare in Finland, but its incidence among persons of less than 17 years of age increased in an unprecedented manner after the swine flu epidemic and vaccination. The evaluation of narcolepsy patients requires a broad insight and consideration of other than mere medical aspects. The extent of disability in distinct age periods may turn out to be different from what was previously expected, necessitating updating of the evaluation of the degree of disability. PMID:21995115

  14. Mortality Risk Associated With Disability: A Population-Based Record Linkage Study

    PubMed Central

    Nusselder, Wilma J.; Mackenbach, Johan P.; Klijs, Bart; van Baal, Pieter H. M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the association between mortality and disability and quantified the effect of disability-associated risk factors. Methods. We linked data from cross-sectional health surveys in the Netherlands to the population registry to create a large data set comprising baseline covariates and an indicator of death. We used Cox regression models to estimate the hazard ratio of disability on mortality. Results. Among men, the unadjusted hazard ratio for activities of daily living, mobility, or mild disability defined by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development at age 55 years was 7.85 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.36, 14.13), 5.21 (95% CI = 3.19, 8.51), and 1.87 (95% CI = 1.58, 2.22), respectively. People with disability in activities of daily living and mobility had a 10-year shorter life expectancy than nondisabled people had, of which 6 years could be explained by differences in lifestyle, sociodemographics, and major chronic diseases. Conclusions. Disabled people face a higher mortality risk than nondisabled people do. Although the difference can be explained by diseases and other risk factors for those with mild disability, we cannot rule out that more severe disabilities have an independent effect on mortality. PMID:22021307

  15. Encouraging the Development of Disability Allies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Nancy J.; Assadi, Jennifer L.; Herriott, Todd K.

    2005-01-01

    The authors advocate for a constructionist interpretation of disability, grounded in a social justice perspective, by discussing disability paradigms, factors that influence attitudes and attitude change regarding disability, and disability ally development and behaviors.

  16. Grazing incidence beam expander

    SciTech Connect

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  17. Disability associated with mental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Pranit K.; Deka, Kamala; Chetia, Dhrubajyoti

    2006-01-01

    Background: Disability associated with mental illness is a major contributor to the global burden of disease. The present study looks at some aspects of disability associated with 7 psychiatric disorders: schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder, anxiety disorders, depression, obsessivecompulsive disorder, dementia, and mental and behavioural disorders due to the use of alcohol. Aims: (i) To evaluate the nature and quantity of disabilities in the study groups; (ii) to compare the degree of disability with the severity of the disorder; (iii) to compare disability among various disorders; and (iv) to study the longitudinal stability of disability in the disease groups. Methods: A total of 228 patients attending the OPD, Department of Psychiatry, Assam Medical College, Dibrugarh, between July 2003 and June 2004, who were diagnosed as per ICD-10 guidelines and SCAN, were included in the study. Severity was assessed by the application of some commonly used rating scales for each specific disorder. The level of disability was assessed by using the Indian Disability Evaluation and Assessment Scale (IDEAS). Patients were followed up at 6 and 12 months. Statistical analysis was done on SPSS version 10. Results: All the 7 disorders under study are associated with significant disability; schizophrenia being maximally disabling. Disability associated with alcohol use disorder and anxiety is comparable to disability on account of OCD. Over a period of 12 months, disability due to depression, alcohol use disorder and anxiety tend to remain significant. PMID:20703393

  18. Bridging the Gap between Disability Studies and Disability Services in Higher Education: A Model Center on Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Alan L.; Sales, Amos

    2010-01-01

    The professional field of Disability Services in Higher Education and the academic discipline of Disability Studies share a perspective on disability that considers disability as a socially constructed phenomenon. Despite this common underpinning, there has been little effort or inquiry into the ways that disability services and Disability Studies

  19. 20 CFR 718.204 - Total disability and disability causation defined; criteria for determining total disability and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Total disability and disability causation defined; criteria for determining total disability and total disability due to pneumoconiosis. 718.204... DISABILITY OR DEATH DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Determining Entitlement to Benefits § 718.204 Total disability...

  20. 20 CFR 718.204 - Total disability and disability causation defined; criteria for determining total disability and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Total disability and disability causation defined; criteria for determining total disability and total disability due to pneumoconiosis. 718.204... DISABILITY OR DEATH DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Determining Entitlement to Benefits § 718.204 Total disability...

  1. Sports-related injuries in athletes with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Fagher, K; Lexell, J

    2014-10-01

    The number of athletes with disabilities participating in organized sports and the popularity of the Paralympic Games is steadily increasing around the world. Despite this growing interest and the fact that participation in sports places the athlete at risk for injury, there are few studies concerning injury patterns, risk factors, and prevention strategies of injuries in disabled athletes. In this systematic literature search and critical review, we summarize current knowledge of the epidemiology of sports-related injuries in disabled athletes and describe their characteristics, incidence, prevalence, and prevention strategies. The outcomes of interest were any injury, either an acute trauma or an overuse event. PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Google Scholar were systematically searched and 25 of 605 identified studies met the inclusion criteria. Lower extremity injuries were more common in walking athletes, whereas upper extremity injuries were more prevalent in wheelchair athletes. The methodologies and populations varied widely between the studies. Few studies were sports or disability specific, which makes it difficult to determine specific risk factors, and few studies reported injury severity and prevention of injuries. Further longitudinal, systematic sports and disability specific studies are needed in order to identify and prevent injuries in athletes with disabilities. PMID:24422719

  2. Disability and Employment. Disability Statistics Abstract Number 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaPlante, Mitchell P.; Kennedy, Jae; Kaye, H. Stephen; Wenger, Barbara L.

    This statistical abstract summarizes recent data on the relationship between disability and employment. The statistics come from the Current Population Survey, the Census Bureau's Survey of Income and Program Participation, a poll of 1,000 Americans with disabilities, and administrative data on recipients of Social Security Disability Insurance…

  3. Thrice Disabling Disability: Enabling Inclusive, Socially Just Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, S. Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this inquiry was to create a social justice-oriented inclusive and enabling pedagogy by situating traditional individualised views of disability alongside three alternative understandings: a disability studies in education perspective, a First Nations view of disability and one based upon the autism pride/autism-as-culture movement.

  4. Disability Services Offices for Students with Disabilities: A Campus Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cory, Rebecca C.

    2011-01-01

    Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) are often the starting places for conversations about students with disabilities in higher education. Section 504 and the ADA provide mandates for protection from discrimination and provision of reasonable disability accommodations (e.g., sign language…

  5. Disability Services Offices for Students with Disabilities: A Campus Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cory, Rebecca C.

    2011-01-01

    Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) are often the starting places for conversations about students with disabilities in higher education. Section 504 and the ADA provide mandates for protection from discrimination and provision of reasonable disability accommodations (e.g., sign language

  6. Disability Studies, Disabled People and the Struggle for Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Mike; Barnes, Colin

    2010-01-01

    This paper traces the relationship between the emergence of disability studies and the struggle for meaningful inclusion for disabled people with particular reference to the work of a pivotal figure in these developments: Len Barton. It is argued that the links between disability activism and the academy were responsible for the emergence of

  7. Growing Up Physically Disabled: Factors in the Evaluation of Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Nancy

    1982-01-01

    Investigated how people with congenital orthopedic disabilities intially learn that they are different and how they learn the evaluative meaning associated with being disabled. Analyzed the content of 29 autobiographies. Results indicated that people born with orthopedic disabilities discover between ages 3 and 5 that they are different. (Author)

  8. Math Disabilities and Reading Disabilities: Can They Be Separated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, H. Lee; Jerman, Olga; Zheng, Xinhua

    2009-01-01

    This article synthesizes some of the published literature that selectively compares the cognitive functioning of children with math disabilities (MDs) with average-achieving children and poor readers (children with reading disabilities [RDs] or comorbid disabilities [RDs + MDs]). All studies in the synthesis report reading, IQ, and math scores for

  9. Disability, Disorder, and Identity

    PubMed Central

    Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organizations International Classification of Diseases is the most important diagnostic tool, worldwide, to ensure that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities receive the supports they need to live richer, fuller lives. And yet, the ICD has naming conventions that create a conundrum for the field, requiring that all “conditions” in the ICD be named as a “disorder.” This article discusses the effect of naming on how people with intellectual disability are perceived by others and how they perceive themselves. The importance of continuing to move the field toward the adoption of functional/person-environment fit models of disability is discussed. “What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.”William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet (II, ii, 1–2) PMID:23537360

  10. Commentary on measuring disability.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Howard H

    2013-09-01

    This is a commentary on 5 articles in this issue of Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation that report on several related studies of new approaches to measuring disability. The project was grounded in theory, beginning with the development of a conceptual framework enhanced by a literature review and expert consultation within and outside of the Social Security Administration. The investigators then used item response theory to develop test items, which they organized into computer adaptive testing instruments and tested them for their psychometric properties. All in all, it is a groundbreaking set of studies and an enormously valuable contribution to the field. Hopefully it will also be tested as an alternative approach to assessing disability in the Social Security Administration disability benefits programs. PMID:23770279

  11. Madness as disability.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Sander L

    2014-12-01

    How does society imagine mental illness? Does this shift radically over time and with different social attitudes as well as scientific discoveries about the origins and meanings of mental illness? What happens when we begin to think about mental illness as madness, as a malleable concept constantly shifting its meaning? We thus look at the meanings associated with 'general paralysis of the insane' in the nineteenth century and autism today in regard to disability. In this case study we examine the claims by scholars such as the anthropologist Emily Martin and the psychiatrist Kay Jamison as to the relationship between mental illness, disability and creativity. Today, the health sciences have become concerned with mental illness as a form of disability. How does this change the meaning of madness for practitioners and patients? PMID:25395442

  12. School problems and solutions for students with disabilities: a qualitative examination.

    PubMed

    Sorani-Villanueva, Sandra; McMahon, Susan D; Crouch, Ronald; Keys, Christopher B

    2014-01-01

    The inclusion of students with disabilities is a process that requires collaboration among multiple individuals, with teachers, aides, parents, students, and school systems playing important roles in resolving student problems. In the current study, we examined data from 75 teachers concerning 126 students about problems that students with disabilities had following a transition from a school primarily serving students with disabilities to more inclusive schools. Reported problems were reviewed and five major themes emerged: academic, behavioral, mobility/accessibility, social, and transportation issues. Teachers typically resolved academic problems by working directly with the student or collaborating with school staff. Social problems were resolved through student and teacher initiatives. Behavioral, transportation, and mobility/accessibility problems were resolved through collaboration among many key school figures and family members. Implications for theory, research, and inclusive school practices related to academic curricula, resources, services, and architectural accommodations for students with disabilities are discussed. PMID:24447159

  13. Successful Aging as a Continuum of Functional Independence: Lessons from Physical Disability Models of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, Kristin A.; Vallejo, Abbe N.; Studenski, Stephanie A.

    2011-01-01

    Successful aging is a multidimensional construct that could be viewed as a continuum of achievement. Based on the disability model proposed by the WHO International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, successful aging includes not only the presence or absence of disease, but also aspects of mobility and social participation. Here we review definitions of successful aging and discuss relevance of the disability model in the evaluation of successful aging and frailty. In particular, we summarize evidences that highlight the importance of measures of mobility (ability to walk and perform activities of daily living), and social participation in identifying and locating older adults across the range of the successful aging continuum. Lastly, we discuss the role of inflammation in age-related decline and in frailty. Future research directions are proposed, including identifying causal pathways among inflammatory markers, disability, and frailty. A better understanding of immunological functioning in late life may help unlock novel ways to promote successful aging. PMID:22500268

  14. Disability and Monstrosity: Further Comments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livneh, Hanoch

    1980-01-01

    The author discusses possible explanations for stereotypical and negative reactions toward physically disabled persons in literature and society. Cited are examples of physical deformity, animalism, and monstrosity. The reminder of mortality and fallibility produced by disability is considered. (CL)

  15. Medical education and disability studies.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Fiona Kumari

    2009-12-01

    The biomedicalist conceptualization of disablement as a personal medical tragedy has been criticized by disability studies scholars for discounting the difference between disability and impairment and the ways disability is produced by socio-environmental factors. This paper discusses prospects for partnerships between disability studies teaching/research and medical education; addresses some of the themes around the necessity of critical disability studies training for medical students; and examines a selection of issues and themes that have arisen from disability education courses within medical schools globally. The paper concludes that providing there is a commitment from senior management, universities are well positioned to apply both vertical and horizontal approaches to teaching disability studies to medical students. PMID:19756985

  16. Disability and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for patients with CFS. Disability Evaluation Under Social Security (Blue Book - September 2008) The SSA has prepared the Disability Evaluation Under Social Security (known as the Blue Book) to help physicians ...

  17. The Impact of Early Powered Mobility on Parental Stress, Negative Emotions, and Family Social Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tefft, Donita; Guerette, Paula; Furumasu, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Powered mobility has been found to have positive effects on young children with severe physical disabilities, but the impact on the family has been less well documented. We evaluated the impact of early powered mobility on parental stress, negative emotions, perceived social interactions, and parental satisfaction with wheelchair characteristics…

  18. The Positive Effects of Early Powered Mobility on Children's Psychosocial and Play Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerette, Paula; Furumasu, Jan; Tefft, Donita

    2013-01-01

    Powered mobility can have an important cognitive and psychosocial impact on young children who are unable to move independently. Twenty-three children with physical disabilities between the ages of 18 months and 6 years participated in this study. Data evaluating social skills, frequency of mobility play activities, frequency of interaction with

  19. The Impact of Early Powered Mobility on Parental Stress, Negative Emotions, and Family Social Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tefft, Donita; Guerette, Paula; Furumasu, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Powered mobility has been found to have positive effects on young children with severe physical disabilities, but the impact on the family has been less well documented. We evaluated the impact of early powered mobility on parental stress, negative emotions, perceived social interactions, and parental satisfaction with wheelchair characteristics

  20. Screening for Developmental Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Carol; Duran-Flores, Deborah; Dumars, Kenneth W.; Stills, Stanley

    1985-01-01

    Developmental disabilities are responsible for a combination of severe physical, mental, psychological and social deficits. They develop before age 22 years and involve a little more than 1% of the population. Screening for developmental disabilities is the first step in their prevention. Various screening instruments are available for use throughout the developmental years that are designed to detect the wide variety of developmental problems that interfere with a developing person's optimal adaptation to his or her environment. The screening instruments must be inexpensive, reproducible, widely available and cost effective to the child, family and society. PMID:2413633

  1. Working Together: Computers and People with Mobility Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    This brief paper describes several computing tools that have been effectively used by individuals with mobility impairments. Emphasis is on tasks to be completed and how the individuals abilities (not disabilities), with possible assistance from technology, can be used to accomplish them. Preliminary information addresses the importance of

  2. Teaching Mobility to a Bilaterally Hand-Amputated Blind Person.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poss, D.

    1991-01-01

    This article describes the methods used to teach mobility skills to a young man severely disabled (blind and bilaterally hand amputated) by an explosion. Stressed are the assistive devices developed and the therapist's and student's feelings during the training course. (DB)

  3. Overcoming Challenges: "Going Mobile with Your Own Video Models"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnahan, Christina R.; Basham, James D.; Christman, Jennifer; Hollingshead, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Video modeling has been shown to be an effective intervention for students with a variety of disabilities. Traditional video models present problems in terms of application across meaningful settings, such as in the community or even across the school environment. However, with advances in mobile technology, portable devices with video capability

  4. Mothers' Perceptions of Their Children's Use of Powered Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiart, Lesley; Darrah, Johanna; Hollis, Vivien; Cook, Al; May, Laura

    2004-01-01

    Physical therapists and occupational therapists frequently assist parents with the exploration and use of powered wheelchairs for their children with physical disabilities. The purpose of this study was to explore parents' experiences and perceptions of their children's experiences with the receipt and use of powered mobility. Qualitative methods

  5. 36 CFR 1192.83 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.83 Section 1192.83 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY GUIDELINES FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Light Rail Vehicles and Systems §...

  6. Overcoming Challenges: "Going Mobile with Your Own Video Models"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnahan, Christina R.; Basham, James D.; Christman, Jennifer; Hollingshead, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Video modeling has been shown to be an effective intervention for students with a variety of disabilities. Traditional video models present problems in terms of application across meaningful settings, such as in the community or even across the school environment. However, with advances in mobile technology, portable devices with video capability…

  7. Recent trends in assistive technology for mobility

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Loss of physical mobility makes maximal participation in desired activities more difficult and in the worst case fully prevents participation. This paper surveys recent work in assistive technology to improve mobility for persons with a disability, drawing on examples observed during a tour of academic and industrial research sites in Europe. The underlying theme of this recent work is a more seamless integration of the capabilities of the user and the assistive technology. This improved integration spans diverse technologies, including powered wheelchairs, prosthetic limbs, functional electrical stimulation, and wearable exoskeletons. Improved integration is being accomplished in three ways: 1) improving the assistive technology mechanics; 2) improving the user-technology physical interface; and 3) sharing of control between the user and the technology. We provide an overview of these improvements in user-technology integration and discuss whether such improvements have the potential to be transformative for people with mobility impairments. PMID:22520500

  8. Drama, Disability, and Your Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGookey, Kathleen

    1992-01-01

    Suggestions for using drama to help students learn about disabilities are given by a professional theatrical group in which actors portray disabled people and answer questions in character. Steps for developing a class skit about a person with a disability and for starting a similar acting troupe are given. (DB)

  9. Disability Discrimination in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Mark C.

    1999-01-01

    Reviewed 1998 and early 1999 court decisions related to disability discrimination in higher education. This period witnessed major developments in the law of disability discrimination as it relates to higher education. A major focus was on whether persons whose impairments are ameliorated by treatment are individuals with disabilities covered by

  10. Disabled People in Japanese Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kojima, Yoko, Ed.; And Others

    The volume is intended to give readers a glimpse of the day-to-day life of disabled people in Japan. Eight brief papers present life experiences of a mentally retarded preschooler, severely disabled children, a child with muscular dystrophy, a young girl with polio living in the community, visually disabled and recovering mentally ill people…

  11. Diagnosis in Severe Reading Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Delwyn G.

    The relationship between neurological impairment or brain damage and severe reading disability is investigated. Symptoms and causes of neurological impairment are listed, and reading disability theories are discussed. Smith and Carrigan offer a neurochemical explanation of reading disability based on synaptic transmission problems. Orton,

  12. Disability Studies: Information and Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Steven, Ed.; Shoultz, Bonnie, Ed.; Walker, Pamela, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This document reflects the diversity of the field of Disability Studies, including contributions representing different disability groups, perspectives, and disciplines. Resource information is presented in nine sections: (1) Books, Chapters, and Articles; (2) Films and Documentaries; (3) Academic Programs in Disability Studies in North America;

  13. The Gifted Learning Disabled Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1994

    This collection of articles on gifted learning disabled students begins with an explanation of the philosophy of the Center for Talented Youth at Johns Hopkins University (Maryland), a list of characteristics of gifted disabled students, and three definitions of learning disabilities. The following papers are then provided: "Gifted but Learning

  14. Literary Characters Who Are Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Keith; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Determines which specific disability categories appear most often in literature, when they appear, and which authors have contributed most to their appearance. Physical disabilities have been portrayed most often, followed by alcoholism and sensory disorders. Most portrayals of disabilities appeared between 1900 and 1949 and Charles Dickens wrote…

  15. Disability Studies and Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derby, John

    2011-01-01

    This article promotes the field of disability studies as a valuable resource for expanding art education's concept of disability and as a promising venue for interdisciplinary dialogue. While art education has persistently supported special education since its inception, disability advocacy has advanced in the past two decades toward…

  16. Familial Patterns of Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sandra

    1992-01-01

    Pedigree analysis of 12 young adults (9 of whom had learning disabilities) indicated that learning disability (LD) was strongly familial but that the type of disability (reading or math) was not directly inherited. Autoimmune disorders were significantly correlated with LD. In seven of the LD families, adults failed to overcome earlier reading and

  17. Disabled People in Japanese Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kojima, Yoko, Ed.; And Others

    The volume is intended to give readers a glimpse of the day-to-day life of disabled people in Japan. Eight brief papers present life experiences of a mentally retarded preschooler, severely disabled children, a child with muscular dystrophy, a young girl with polio living in the community, visually disabled and recovering mentally ill people

  18. Employment and People with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This newsletter issue offers six articles on employment of people with disabilities. "Employment and People with Disabilities: Challenges for the Nineties" (Frank Bowe) discusses the Americans with Disabilities Act, issues in unemployment and under-education, earnings, and implications for the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative

  19. Emerging Technologies and Cognitive Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braddock, David; Rizzolo, Mary C.; Thompson, Micah; Bell, Rodney

    2004-01-01

    Cognitive disability entails a substantial limitation in one's capacity to think, including conceptualizing, planning, and sequencing thoughts and actions, remembering, interpreting subtle social cues, and understanding numbers and symbols. Cognitive disabilities include intellectual disabilities and can also stem from brain injury, Alzheimer's

  20. Computers, Technology, and Disability. [Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC. HEATH Resource Center.

    This paper describes programs and resources that focus on access of postsecondary students with disabilities to computers and other forms of technology. Increased access to technological devices and services is provided to students with disabilities under the Technology-Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act (Tech Act). Section…

  1. Entrepreneurship among People with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holub, Tamara

    This brief paper reviews the literature on entrepreneurship among people with disabilities. It notes that entrepreneurship by individuals with disabilities is often a consequence of disability discrimination in the workforce and provides both benefits and disadvantages such as independence and freedom from access-related obstacles (benefits) and

  2. Challenging the Myth of Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brightman, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Discussion of the rhetoric of disability, including physical, hearing, and visual impairments, highlights possible benefits that computer technology can provide. Designing for disabled individuals is discussed, and product development efforts by Apple Computer to increase microcomputer access to disabled children and adults are described. (LRW)

  3. Disability Studies and Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derby, John

    2011-01-01

    This article promotes the field of disability studies as a valuable resource for expanding art education's concept of disability and as a promising venue for interdisciplinary dialogue. While art education has persistently supported special education since its inception, disability advocacy has advanced in the past two decades toward

  4. The Gifted Learning Disabled Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1994

    This collection of articles on gifted learning disabled students begins with an explanation of the philosophy of the Center for Talented Youth at Johns Hopkins University (Maryland), a list of characteristics of gifted disabled students, and three definitions of learning disabilities. The following papers are then provided: "Gifted but Learning…

  5. Disability Discrimination in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Mark C.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews court cases in 1999 related to disability discrimination in higher education focusing on the Americans with Disabilities Act and section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The "Garrett" case regarding Eleventh Amendment immunity is the case most likely to be significant in the development of the law of disability discrimination. (SLD)

  6. The Tip of the Iceberg: A Red Flag Carry-in Incident.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Nicholas J.; Dorf, Ruth

    1994-01-01

    Describes Red Flag Carry-in Crisis in which 15-year-old girl with learning disabilities fought with another student and was actively resistant to help. Presents background information, incident itself, drainoff stage, timeline, and transcript of Red Flag intervention interview. Discusses outcome goals, describes student's return to class, offers

  7. Technology with Low Incidence Populations: Promoting Access to Education and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahm, Elizabeth A., Ed.

    This report is the product of a symposium which examined the current knowledge base of technology use in special education and identified aspects ready to be transferred into the practical setting. Presentations revolve around students with low-incidence disabilities: severe physical and severe cognitive impairments, and those impairments in

  8. Delay Adjusted Incidence Infographic

    Cancer.gov

    This Infographic shows the National Cancer Institute SEER Incidence Trends. The graphs show the Average Annual Percent Change (AAPC) 2002-2011. For Men, Thyroid: 5.3*,Liver & IBD: 3.6*, Melanoma: 2.3*, Kidney: 2.0*, Myeloma: 1.9*, Pancreas: 1.2*, Leukemia: 0.9*, Oral Cavity: 0.5, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: 0.3*, Esophagus: -0.1, Brain & ONS: -0.2*, Bladder: -0.6*, All Sites: -1.1*, Stomach: -1.7*, Larynx: -1.9*, Prostate: -2.1*, Lung & Bronchus: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -3/0*. For Women, Thyroid: 5.8*, Liver & IBD: 2.9*, Myeloma: 1.8*, Kidney: 1.6*, Melanoma: 1.5, Corpus & Uterus: 1.3*, Pancreas: 1.1*, Leukemia: 0.6*, Brain & ONS: 0, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: -0.1, All Sites: -0.1, Breast: -0.3, Stomach: -0.7*, Oral Cavity: -0.7*, Bladder: -0.9*, Ovary: -0.9*, Lung & Bronchus: -1.0*, Cervix: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -2.7*. * AAPC is significantly different from zero (p<.05). Rates were adjusted for reporting delay in the registry. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  9. Cooperating mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Harrington, John J.; Eskridge, Steven E.; Hurtado, John E.; Byrne, Raymond H.

    2004-02-03

    A miniature mobile robot provides a relatively inexpensive mobile robot. A mobile robot for searching an area provides a way for multiple mobile robots in cooperating teams. A robotic system with a team of mobile robots communicating information among each other provides a way to locate a source in cooperation. A mobile robot with a sensor, a communication system, and a processor, provides a way to execute a strategy for searching an area.

  10. Disability Employment 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to acquaint business and industry with the programs and resources available to help diversify the workforce by hiring people with disabilities. It also provides information to businesses on how to access resources to better meet the growing need of business for a skilled workforce. This guide is the product of a joint

  11. Iowans with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruth, Amy, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    "The Goldfinch" is a magazine aimed at introducing young people to Iowa history. Each issue has a different topic which is discussed in detail throughout that issue. There are articles which describe different aspects of the topic. The topic for this particular issue is "Iowans with Disabilities." Featured articles from this issue include:

  12. Disability and Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ageing in their 40s and 50s. Engaging in health risk behaviours Some studies have indicated that people with disabilities have higher rates of risky behaviours such as smoking, poor diet and ... depending on the health condition. However an investigation in the United Kingdom ...

  13. Parenting with a Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Holly

    1993-01-01

    This guide discusses how adjusting to parenthood for some persons with physical disabilities requires additional accommodations. Changes in lifestyle, environmental adaptations and assistive technology may be necessary to make independent child care possible. Project Innovative Parenting (PIP) was developed with the purpose to empower

  14. Handbook of Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, Samuel L., Ed.; Horner, Robert H., Ed.; Snell, Martha E., Ed.; Blacher, Jan, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This authoritative handbook reviews the breadth of current knowledge about developmental disabilities: neuroscientific and genetic foundations; the impact on health, learning, and behavior; and effective educational and clinical practices. Leading authorities analyze what works in intervening with diverse children and families, from infancy…

  15. Intellectual Disability and Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercier, C.; Picard, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The association between poverty and intellectual disability (ID) has been well documented. However, little is known about persons with ID who face circumstances of extreme poverty, such as homelessness. This paper describes the situation of persons with ID who were or are homeless in Montreal and are currently receiving services from a

  16. Health Professionals with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Cinotti, Debra A.

    2009-01-01

    When it comes to education from K-12 and into the college years, the literature is replete with stories of the accomplishments of youngsters and adults with any number of disabilities who surpassed the expectations of their families and teachers. Similarly, there are an increasing number of examples of young men and women with a range of

  17. Disability, Disorder, and Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization's "International Classification of Diseases" ("ICD") is the most important diagnostic tool, worldwide, to ensure that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities receive the supports they need to live richer, fuller lives. And yet, the "ICD" has naming conventions that create a conundrum for the field,…

  18. Feminist Disability Studies Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoll, Kristina R.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to raise awareness about systems of oppression and privilege, as related to ability and disability in the classroom, and to provide tools to create instructional and institutional transformation. Feminist analyses of privilege, oppression, and intersectionality provide a framework for looking at the diverse experiences of…

  19. Health Professionals with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Cinotti, Debra A.

    2009-01-01

    When it comes to education from K-12 and into the college years, the literature is replete with stories of the accomplishments of youngsters and adults with any number of disabilities who surpassed the expectations of their families and teachers. Similarly, there are an increasing number of examples of young men and women with a range of…

  20. Designing for the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, Selwyn

    Implications of the merits of normality and independence for the disabled, and their relevance to architectural design criteria are discussed. The introduction reflects the philosophical approach to the design and construction of public buildings and housing. Nine principle sections provide data and recommendations on the following topics:…

  1. Multiculturalism and Severe Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Luanna H.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses the need for educators to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to help students with severe disabilities from mainstream groups to develop cross-cultural knowledge, values, and competencies. It outlines goals for multicultural understanding for educational researches, for teacher educators, and for school leaders and

  2. Disability, Disorder, and Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization's "International Classification of Diseases" ("ICD") is the most important diagnostic tool, worldwide, to ensure that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities receive the supports they need to live richer, fuller lives. And yet, the "ICD" has naming conventions that create a conundrum for the field,

  3. Handbook of Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, Samuel L., Ed.; Horner, Robert H., Ed.; Snell, Martha E., Ed.; Blacher, Jan, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This authoritative handbook reviews the breadth of current knowledge about developmental disabilities: neuroscientific and genetic foundations; the impact on health, learning, and behavior; and effective educational and clinical practices. Leading authorities analyze what works in intervening with diverse children and families, from infancy

  4. Medication and Reading Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, Laurie L.

    1981-01-01

    The clinical syndrome which relates most frequently to the reading-disabled child is the attention deficity disorder. The child psychiatrist will generally resort to medication only when behavioral management techniques have failed. The two most frequently used medications are Ritalin and Dexedrine, central nervous system stimulants. (JN)

  5. Computers for the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzaro, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    Describes adaptive technology for personal computers that accommodate disabled users and may require special equipment including hardware, memory, expansion slots, and ports. Highlights include vision aids, including speech synthesizers, magnification, braille, and optical character recognition (OCR); hearing adaptations; motor-impaired

  6. Intellectual Disability and Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercier, C.; Picard, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The association between poverty and intellectual disability (ID) has been well documented. However, little is known about persons with ID who face circumstances of extreme poverty, such as homelessness. This paper describes the situation of persons with ID who were or are homeless in Montreal and are currently receiving services from a…

  7. Designing for the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, Selwyn

    Implications of the merits of normality and independence for the disabled, and their relevance to architectural design criteria are discussed. The introduction reflects the philosophical approach to the design and construction of public buildings and housing. Nine principle sections provide data and recommendations on the following topics:

  8. Obesity and Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimmer, James H.; Yamaki, Kiyoshi

    2006-01-01

    While much of the industrialized world struggles for clues to the growing rise in obesity in their respective countries, researchers and service providers involved in understanding the health characteristics and health behaviors of persons with intellectual disability (ID) struggle with their own issues regarding the increased prevalence of

  9. Societal Factors in Disablement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonak, Richard F.

    1985-01-01

    Examined data from a questionnaire concerning people with chronic health, emotional, mental, physical, and sensory impairments, and four respondent demographic and experiential characteristics to determine if 150 human service providers endorsed the premise that components of society disable people who are impaired. Results confirmed that

  10. Mobile Schools for a Mobile World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Overwhelmingly, independent schools are embracing mobile devices--laptops, iPads or other tablets, and smartphones--to enhance teaching and learning. This article describes the results of the "NAIS 2012 Mobile Learning Survey." Among its findings were that 75 percent of NAIS-member schools currently use mobile learning devices in at

  11. Mobile Schools for a Mobile World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Overwhelmingly, independent schools are embracing mobile devices--laptops, iPads or other tablets, and smartphones--to enhance teaching and learning. This article describes the results of the "NAIS 2012 Mobile Learning Survey." Among its findings were that 75 percent of NAIS-member schools currently use mobile learning devices in at…

  12. Preparation for mass casualty incidents.

    PubMed

    VandenBerg, Sheri L; Davidson, Scott B

    2015-06-01

    Mass casualty incidents are events where the number of injured patients exceeds the resources of the health care institution to the degree that care may not be available or may be limited for a portion of the casualties. Mass casualty incidents are increasing in frequency throughout the United States. Managing mass casualty incidents has not traditionally been part of the nursing curriculum; however, our changing world requires us to become educated and prepared to respond to these scenarios. This article focuses on intentional explosive disasters and the nursing and institutional response to these incidents. This information is of value to nursing professionals and other health care providers. PMID:25981720

  13. Unidentified undescended testes in teenage boys with severe learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Haire, A R; Flavill, Jenny; Groom, W D; Dhandapani, B

    2015-05-01

    Nine boys of secondary school age were referred with undescended testes (UDT) to paediatric surgeons over a period of 8 years. All were referred from the same community paediatric clinic for children with severe learning disabilities. UDT cause concern because of a threefold increase in the incidence of cancer. Cosmesis and reduced fertility were seen as less relevant issues for these boys. The late identification and incidence of UDT are discussed. It is suggested that awareness of this issue should be raised and screening introduced. Advice is needed on the appropriate management of UDT in this group of boys. PMID:25643706

  14. Assistance System for Disabled People: A Robot Controlled by Blinking and Wireless Link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Val, Lara; Jimnez, Mara I.; Alonso, Alonso; de La Rosa, Ramn; Izquierdo, Alberto; Carrera, Albano

    Disabled people already profit from a lot of technical assistance that improves their quality of life. This article presents a system which will allow interaction between a physically disabled person and his environment. This system is controlled by voluntary muscular movements, particularly those of face muscles. These movements will be translated into machine-understandable instructions, and they will be sent by means of a wireless link to a mobile robot that will execute them. Robot includes a video camera, in order to show the user the environment of the route that the robot follows. This system gives a greater personal autonomy to people with reduced mobility.

  15. Genetic basis of cognitive disability.

    PubMed

    Flint, J

    2001-03-01

    The importance of genetic influences on cognitive disability has been recognized for a long time, but molecular analysis has only recently begun to yield insights into the pathogenesis of this common and disabling condition. The availability of genome sequences has enabled the characterization of the chromosomal deletions and trisomies that result in cognitive disability, and mutations in rare single-gene conditions are being discovered. The molecular pathology of cognitive disability is turning out to be as heterogeneous as the condition itself, with unexpected complexities even in apparently simple gene-deletion syndromes. One remarkable finding from studies on X-linked mental retardation is that mutations in different small guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding proteins result in cognitive disability without other somatic features. Advances are also being made in cognitive disability with polygenic origins, such as dyslexia and autism. However, the genetic basis of mild intellectual disability has yet to be satisfactorily explained. PMID:22034445

  16. Barriers and Facilitators to Community Mobility for Assistive Technology Users

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Natasha

    2012-01-01

    Mobility is frequently described in terms of individual body function and structures however contemporary views of disability also recognise the role of environment in creating disability. Aim. To identify consumer perspectives regarding barriers and facilitators to optimal mobility for a heterogeneous population of impaired Victorians who use assistive technology in their daily lives. Method. An accessible survey investigated the impact of supports or facilitators upon actual and desired life outcomes and health-related quality of life, from 100 AT users in Victoria, Australia. This paper reports upon data pertaining to community mobility. Results. A range of barriers and enablers to community mobility were identified including access to AT devices, environmental interventions, public transport, and inclusive community environs. Substantial levels of unmet need result in limited personal mobility and community participation. Outcomes fall short of many principles enshrined in current policy and human rights frameworks. Conclusion. AT devices as well as accessible and inclusive home and community environs are essential to maximizing mobility for many. Given the impact of the environment upon the capacity of individuals to realise community mobility, this raises the question as to whether rehabilitation practitioners, as well as prescribing AT devices, should work to build accessible communities via systemic advocacy. PMID:23029617

  17. Sexual and Nonsexual Offenders With Intellectual and Learning Disabilities: A Comparison of Characteristics, Referral Patterns, and Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, William R.; Smith, Anne H. W.; Law, Jacqueline; Quinn, Kathleen; Anderson, Andrew; Smith, Astrid; Allan, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    This article reports an evaluation of a community intellectual disability offender service over the period from 1990 to 2001. Men who committed sex offenses or sexually abusive incidents (n = 106) and men who committed other types of offenses and serious incidents (n = 78) are compared on personal characteristics, referral sources, forensic…

  18. Scalable patients tracking framework for mass casualty incidents.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xunyi; Ganz, Aura

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a system that tracks patients in a Mass Casualty Incident (MCI) using active RFID triage tags and mobile anchor points (DM-tracks) carried by the paramedics. The system does not involve any fixed deployment of the localization devices while maintaining a low cost triage tag. The localization accuracy is comparable to GPS systems without incurring the cost of providing a GPS based device to every patient in the disaster scene. PMID:22254446

  19. Changes in Disability Levels Among Older Adults Experiencing Adverse Events in Postacute Rehabilitation Care

    PubMed Central

    Gacto-Sánchez, Mariano; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc; Navarro-Pujalte, Esther; Escolar-Reina, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to assess the relationship between adverse events (AEs) and changes in the levels of disability from admission to discharge during inpatient rehabilitation programs. A prospective cohort study was conducted among a cohort of inpatients (216 older adults) admitted to a rehabilitation unit. The occurrences of any AE were reported. The level of disability regarding mobility activities was estimated using the disability qualifiers from the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. Changes in the levels of disability between admission and discharge were assessed. Baseline-measured covariates were also selected. Regarding all 4 disability levels (“no limitation,” “mild,” “moderate,” “severe,” and “complete disability”), a total of 159 participants experienced an improvement at discharge (126 participants progressed 1 level, whereas 33 improved 2 disability levels), 56 made no change, and no participants experienced a decline. The occurrence of fall-related events and the diagnostic group (musculoskeletal system) are specific predictive factors of change in the level of disability. The odds of undergoing a change in any disability level between admission and discharge decreases by 68% (1–0.32) when patients experience fall-related events (odds ratio [OR] = 0.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.11–0.97, P = 0.041) and increases for individuals with musculoskeletal conditions (OR = 3.91, 95% CI = 1.34–11.38, P = 0.012). Our findings suggest that increased efforts to prevent the occurrence of these AEs, together with early interventions suited to the diagnosis of the affected system, may have a positive influence on the improvement of disability. Further studies should evaluate disability over time after discharge to obtain a better sense of how transient or permanent the associated disability may be. PMID:25715255

  20. Altitude Modulates Concussion Incidence

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David W.; Myer, Gregory D.; Currie, Dustin W.; Comstock, R. Dawn; Clark, Joseph F.; Bailes, Julian E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Recent research indicates that the volume and/or pressure of intracranial fluid, a physiology affected by ones altitude (ie, elevation above sea level), may be associated with the likelihood and/or severity of a concussion. The objective was to employ an epidemiological field investigation to evaluate the relationship between altitude and concussion rate in high school sports. Hypothesis: Because of the physiologies that occur during acclimatization, including a decline in intracranial compliance (a tighter fit), increased altitude may be related to a reduction in concussion rates in high school athletes. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Data on concussions and athlete exposures (AEs) between 2005-2006 and 2011-2012 were obtained from a large national sample of high schools (National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance System [High School RIO]) and were used to calculate total, competition, and practice concussion rates for aggregated sports and for football only. Results: Altitude of participating schools ranged from 7 to 6903 ft (median, 600 ft), and a total of 5936 concussions occurred in 20,618,915 exposures (2.88 per 10,000 AEs). When concussion rates were dichotomized by altitude using the median, elevated altitude was associated with a reduction in concussion rates overall (rate ratio [RR], 1.31; P < .001), in competition (RR, 1.31; P < .001), and in practice (RR, 1.29; P < .001). Specifically, high school sports played at higher altitude demonstrated a 31% reduction (95% confidence interval [CI], 25%-38%) in the incidence of total reported concussions. Likewise, concussion rates at increased altitude were reduced 30% for overall exposures, 27% for competition exposures, and 28% for practice exposures in football players (P < .001). Conclusion: The results of this epidemiological investigation indicate increased physiological responses to altitude may be associated with a reduction in sports-related concussion rates, especially in collision sports. Future research that focuses on the potential prophylactic effect of optimizing outflow impedance and thus reduction of intracranial compliance (a tighter fit) in humans is warranted to determine the most effective approaches to mitigate sport-related concussion, especially in football players. PMID:26535254

  1. The Modification of Educational Equipment and Curriculum for Maximum Utilization by Physically Disabled Persons; Design of a School for Physically Disabled Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuker, Harold E.; And Others

    Elements of modified school design for the physically disabled are considered, including mobility, classrooms, science laboratories, applied skill areas, the library, the swimming pool, and sanitary facilities. Also discussed are the cafeteria (food service, seating, and other considerations), recreational areas (play grounds,

  2. Processing of speech signals for physical and sensory disabilities.

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, H

    1995-01-01

    Assistive technology involving voice communication is used primarily by people who are deaf, hard of hearing, or who have speech and/or language disabilities. It is also used to a lesser extent by people with visual or motor disabilities. A very wide range of devices has been developed for people with hearing loss. These devices can be categorized not only by the modality of stimulation [i.e., auditory, visual, tactile, or direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve (auditory-neural)] but also in terms of the degree of speech processing that is used. At least four such categories can be distinguished: assistive devices (a) that are not designed specifically for speech, (b) that take the average characteristics of speech into account, (c) that process articulatory or phonetic characteristics of speech, and (d) that embody some degree of automatic speech recognition. Assistive devices for people with speech and/or language disabilities typically involve some form of speech synthesis or symbol generation for severe forms of language disability. Speech synthesis is also used in text-to-speech systems for sightless persons. Other applications of assistive technology involving voice communication include voice control of wheelchairs and other devices for people with mobility disabilities. Images Fig. 4 PMID:7479816

  3. Mobility and Aging: New Directions for Public Health Action

    PubMed Central

    Guralnik, Jack M.; Jackson, Richard J.; Marottoli, Richard A.; Phelan, Elizabeth A.; Prohaska, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Optimal mobility, defined as relative ease and freedom of movement in all of its forms, is central to healthy aging. Mobility is a significant consideration for research, practice, and policy in aging and public health. We examined the public health burdens of mobility disability, with a particular focus on leading public health interventions to enhance walking and driving, and the challenges and opportunities for public health action. We propose an integrated mobility agenda, which draws on the lived experience of older adults. New strategies for research, practice, and policy are needed to move beyond categorical promotion programs in walking and driving to establish a comprehensive program to enhance safe mobility in all its forms. PMID:22698013

  4. Attending to America: Personal Assistance for Independent Living. A Survey of Attendant Service Programs in the United States for People of All Ages with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litvak, Simi; And Others

    Data were gathered from 154 U.S. programs providing personal assistance services for the disabled. The survey identified approximately 850,000 people receiving community-based, publicly-funded personal maintenance, hygiene, mobility, or household assistance services, with physically disabled individuals being the most often served. The report

  5. People with learning disabilities who have cancer: an ethnographic study

    PubMed Central

    Tuffrey-Wijne, Irene; Bernal, Jane; Hubert, Jane; Butler, Gary; Hollins, Sheila

    2009-01-01

    Background Cancer incidence among people with learning disabilities is rising. There have been no published studies of the needs and experiences of people with learning disabilities and cancer, from their own perspective. Aim To provide insight into the experiences and needs of people with learning disabilities who have cancer. Design of study Prospective qualitative study, using ethnographic methods. Setting Participants' homes, hospitals, nursing homes, and hospices in London and surrounding areas. Method The participants were 13 people with learning disabilities ranging from mild to severe, who had a cancer diagnosis. The main method of data collection was participant observation (over 250 hours). The median length of participation was 7 months. Results Participants' cancer experiences were shaped by their previous experience of life, which included deprivation, loneliness, and a lack of autonomy and power. They depended on others to negotiate contact with the outside world, including the healthcare system. This could lead to delayed cancer diagnosis and a lack of treatment options being offered. Most participants were not helped to understand their illness and its implications. Doctors did not make an assessment of capacity, but relied on carers' opinions. Conclusion Urgent action is warranted by findings of late diagnosis, possible discrimination around treatment options, and lack of patient involvement and assessment of capacity in decision making. There are significant gaps in knowledge and training among most health professionals, leading to disengaged services that are unaware of the physical, emotional, and practical needs of people with learning disabilities, and their carers. PMID:19566998

  6. Prostitution, disability and prohibition.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Frej Klem

    2015-06-01

    Criminalisation of prostitution, and minority rights for disabled persons, are important contemporary political issues. The article examines their intersection by analysing the conditions and arguments for making a legal exception for disabled persons to a general prohibition against purchasing sexual services. It explores the badness of prostitution, focusing on and discussing the argument that prostitution harms prostitutes, considers forms of regulation and the arguments for and against with emphasis on a liberty-based objection to prohibition, and finally presents and analyses three arguments for a legal exception, based on sexual rights, beneficence, and luck egalitarianism, respectively. It concludes that although the general case for and against criminalisation is complicated there is a good case for a legal exception. PMID:25079067

  7. Chernobyl fallout and cancer incidence in Finland.

    PubMed

    Auvinen, Anssi; Sepp, Karri; Pasanen, Kari; Kurttio, Pivi; Patama, Toni; Pukkala, Eero; Heinvaara, Sirpa; Arvela, Hannu; Verkasalo, Pia; Hakulinen, Timo

    2014-05-01

    Twenty-five years have passed since the Chernobyl accident, but its health consequences remain to be well established. Finland was one of the most heavily affected countries by the radioactive fallout outside the former Soviet Union. We analyzed the relation of the estimated external radiation exposure from the fallout to cancer incidence in Finland in 1988-2007. The study cohort comprised all ? 3.8 million Finns who had lived in the same dwelling for 12 months following the accident (May 1986-April 1987). Radiation exposure was estimated using data from an extensive mobile dose rate survey. Cancer incidence data were obtained for the cohort divided into four exposure categories (the lowest with the first-year committed dose <0.1 mSv and the highest ? 0.5 mSv) allowing for a latency of 5 years for leukemia and thyroid cancer, and 10 years for other cancers. Of the eight predefined cancer sites regarded as radiation-related from earlier studies, only colon cancer among women showed an association with exposure from fallout [excess rate ratio per increment in exposure category 0.06, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.02-0.11]. No such effect was observed for men, or other cancer sites. Our analysis of a large cohort over two decades did not reveal an increase in cancer incidence following the Chernobyl accident, with the possible exception of colon cancer among women. The largely null findings are consistent with extrapolation from previous studies suggesting that the effect is likely to remain too small to be empirically detectable and of little public health impact. PMID:24135935

  8. Disability Does Not Discriminate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Amy Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the "it can't happen to me" mentality, which makes humans think they are physically invincible and have been guilty of thinking so. The author learned the danger of the "it can't happen to me" syndrome when she was disabled in a car accident in February 1994. The accident happened when she was 21 years old,

  9. Disabling Radiological Dispersal Terror

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M

    2002-11-08

    Terror resulting from the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) relies upon an individual's lack of knowledge and understanding regarding its significance. Disabling this terror will depend upon realistic reviews of the current conservative radiation protection regulatory standards. It will also depend upon individuals being able to make their own informed decisions merging perceived risks with reality. Preparation in these areas will reduce the effectiveness of the RDD and may even reduce the possibility of its use.

  10. Adaptive mobility for rescue robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blitch, John G.

    2003-09-01

    It has often been observed that the most daunting aspect of any crisis response is managing the "unknown unknowns" that inevitably plague incident commanders and emergency personnel at all levels responsible for life and death decisions on a minute by minute basis. In structural collapse situations, for example, rescue crews rarely have even a coarse picture of the number or disposition of people or material scattered amongst the twisted beams and piles of concrete that typically entomb would-be survivors. How can the incident commander decide which beam to lift or even which section of the building to search first in the absence of information of what lies beneath. Even the slightest tug on a concrete slab can collapse potential life harboring void spaces below killing potential survivors in the process. In deploying mobile robots to assist in rescue operations we combined the traditional advantages of machine immunity to fatigue, hazardous materials and environmental controls, with the mechanical design freedom that allowed small platforms to penetrate deep into rubble to expand both situational awareness and operational influence of rescue services at the World Trade Center and mountainous snow-bound caves in Afghanistan. We learned a great deal from these experiences with regard to robot emloyment and design. This paper endeavors to share a few of our more prominent lessons learned regarding portable robot mobility as a means to manage user expectations and stimulate more innovative and adaptive design.

  11. Unpacking intoxication, racialising disability.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mel Y

    2015-06-01

    This article examines concepts whose strictly medical applications have only partly informed their widespread use and suggests that demonstrably shared logics motivate our thinking across domains in the interest of a politically just engagement. It considers exchanges between the culturally complex concepts of 'toxicity' and 'intoxication', assessing the racialised conditions of their animation in several geopolitically--and quite radically--distinct scenarios. First, the article sets the framework through considering the racial implications of impairment and disability language of 'non-toxic' finance capital in the contemporary US financial crisis. Shifting material foci from 'illiquid financial bodies' to opiates while insisting that neither is 'more' metaphorically toxic than the other, the article turns to address the role of opium and temporality in the interanimations of race and disability in two sites of 19th-century British empire: Langdon Down's clinic for idiocy, and China's retort on opium to Queen Victoria. The article concludes with a provocation that suggests yet another crossing of borders, that between researcher and researched: 'intoxicated method' is a hypothetical mode of approach that refuses idealised research positions by 'critically disabling' the idealised cognitive and conceptual lens of analysis. PMID:26052116

  12. Main Idea Identification with Students with Mild Intellectual Disabilities and Specific Learning Disabilities: A Comparison of Explicit and Basal Instructional Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, C. Alan; Darch, Craig B.; Flores, Margaret M.; Shippen, Margaret E.; Hinton, Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    Students with high-incidence disabilities struggle with reading comprehension due to difficulties in background knowledge and metacognitive skills, including use of self-monitoring and other strategies. In the United States, these students typically receive the majority of their instruction in general education settings. However, there is little

  13. Understanding Learning Disabilities and Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Star, Nonnie; Shadoff, Sander

    This guide is designed to assist people with learning disabilities to recognize their disabilities and the connection between learning disabilities and substance abuse. It begins by defining learning disabilities and providing a self-test checklist for common signs and symptoms of learning disabilities. Difficulties with organization, memory,…

  14. Understanding Learning Disabilities and Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Star, Nonnie; Shadoff, Sander

    This guide is designed to assist people with learning disabilities to recognize their disabilities and the connection between learning disabilities and substance abuse. It begins by defining learning disabilities and providing a self-test checklist for common signs and symptoms of learning disabilities. Difficulties with organization, memory,

  15. Responding to computer security incidents: Guidelines for incident handling

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, E.E. Jr.; Brown, D.S.; Longstaff, T.A.

    1990-07-23

    These guidelines do not comprise an exhaustive set of incident handling procedures. A lengthy set of guidelines would be too intimidating to read and to incorporate into site contingency response plans. The discipline of responding to incidents is also very much in its infancy. Because so much is yet to be learned about handling incidents, this version of these guidelines will necessarily lack some degree of sophistication and detail. In addition, it is impossible to specify specific technical procedures for responding to the many types and versions of computer systems within DOE. This guidelines document contains basic information about responding to incidents which can be used, regardless of hardware platform or operating system. For specific technical details necessary to implement many of the recommendations in these guidelines, consult your system administrator or vendor.

  16. Pharmacological treatment of disabling tremor.

    PubMed

    Schadt, Courtney R; Duffis, Ennis I; Charles, P David

    2005-03-01

    Tremor is often a disabling primary condition or secondary to another disorder. No universally effective pharmacological agent exists for the treatment of essential tremor, and patients differ greatly in their response to therapies, thus requiring individualised regimens. Deep brain stimulation is the best option for patients with disabling, drug-resistant essential tremor. Resting tremor in Parkinson's disease is usually not the primary disabling feature, and in most cases, levodopa/carbidopa is satisfactory for many years. Young Parkinson's patients with dominant, disabling tremor benefit from anticholinergics in addition to dopaminergic therapies. However, older Parkinson's patients with more disabling tremor may suffer from dose-dependent side effects, and deep brain stimulation should be considered. This article outlines the available pharmacological agents and treatment considerations for various disabling tremors, including essential tremor and Parkinson's disease. PMID:15794733

  17. Disability Prevalence and Demographic Association among Race/Ethnic Minority Populations in the United States: Implications for the 21st Century. Monograph Series Number Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asbury, Charles A.; And Others

    This research report examined the distribution and incidence of disabilities among minority communities. A review of literature is provided including relevant statistics on the prevalence of disabilities in African Americans and Hispanic Americans. The study used data from the National Health Interview Survey (n=122,859) to determine the

  18. Summit on the National Effort To Prevent Mental Retardation and Related Disabilities. Summit Proceedings (Washington, D.C., February 6-7, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Committee on Mental Retardation, Washington, DC.

    This document reports the proceedings of a summit to assess the adequacy of the U.S. effort to prevent mental retardation and related disabilities and to chart the course for future strategies to reduce the incidence and ameliorate the effects of these disabilities, particularly when caused by socioeconomic conditions. The document contains…

  19. 20 CFR 416.1415 - Disability hearing-disability hearing officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Disability hearing-disability hearing... Reopening of Determinations and Decisions Reconsideration § 416.1415 Disability hearing—disability hearing officers. (a) General. Your disability hearing will be conducted by a disability hearing officer who...

  20. 20 CFR 416.1415 - Disability hearing-disability hearing officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Disability hearing-disability hearing... Reopening of Determinations and Decisions Reconsideration § 416.1415 Disability hearing—disability hearing officers. (a) General. Your disability hearing will be conducted by a disability hearing officer who...

  1. 20 CFR 416.1415 - Disability hearing-disability hearing officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Disability hearing-disability hearing... Reopening of Determinations and Decisions Reconsideration § 416.1415 Disability hearing—disability hearing officers. (a) General. Your disability hearing will be conducted by a disability hearing officer who...

  2. 20 CFR 416.1415 - Disability hearing-disability hearing officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Disability hearing-disability hearing... Reopening of Determinations and Decisions Reconsideration § 416.1415 Disability hearing—disability hearing officers. (a) General. Your disability hearing will be conducted by a disability hearing officer who...

  3. 20 CFR 416.1415 - Disability hearing-disability hearing officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disability hearing-disability hearing... Reopening of Determinations and Decisions Reconsideration § 416.1415 Disability hearing—disability hearing officers. (a) General. Your disability hearing will be conducted by a disability hearing officer who...

  4. The Health Mobility Is All True Mobility?

    PubMed Central

    Olivadoti, Simona; Cislaghi, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    In their study, Brenna and Spandonaro analyzed the mobility into Italian regions. In particular, it analyzes the situation of 5 regions, with very different backgrounds. With this paper, we try to better define the meaning of health mobility and to find its underlying causes. Furthermore, we propose a strategy that could help in controlling mobility flows that currently are the source of health inequalities. PMID:26673342

  5. Music reduces pain and increases functional mobility in fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A.; Wilson, Andrew D.; Vase, Lene; Brattico, Elvira; Barrios, Fernando A.; Jensen, Troels S.; Romero-Romo, Juan I.; Vuust, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The pain in Fibromyalgia (FM) is difficult to treat and functional mobility seems to be an important comorbidity in these patients that could evolve into a disability. In this study we wanted to investigate the analgesic effects of music in FM pain. Twenty-two FM patients were passively exposed to (1) self-chosen, relaxing, pleasant music, and to (2) a control auditory condition (pink noise). They rated pain and performed the timed-up & go task (TUG) to measure functional mobility after each auditory condition. Listening to relaxing, pleasant, self-chosen music reduced pain and increased functional mobility significantly in our FM patients. The music-induced analgesia was significantly correlated with the TUG scores; thereby suggesting that the reduction in pain unpleasantness increased functional mobility. Notably, this mobility improvement was obtained with music played prior to the motor task (not during), therefore the effect cannot be explained merely by motor entrainment to a fast rhythm. Cognitive and emotional mechanisms seem to be central to music-induced analgesia. Our findings encourage the use of music as a treatment adjuvant to reduce chronic pain in FM and increase functional mobility thereby reducing the risk of disability. PMID:24575066

  6. [Restructuring of the specialized job market for people with disabilities through legislative reform of the Rehabilitation Act--consequences for the workshops for the disabled].

    PubMed

    Wendt, S

    2001-04-01

    The legal basis for employment of people with disabilities in sheltered Workshops for the Disabled (Werksttten fr Behinderte, WfB) had hitherto been shaped by the 1961 Federal Social Assistance Act, the 1969 Employment Promotion Act, the 1974 Severely Disabled Persons Act with the related Workshop Ordinances of 1980 and 1996. The Act on Combating Unemployment of Severely Disabled Persons, effective as of Oct. 1, 2000 has now created a new legal foundation, which also is aimed at enhancing Workshop employees' horizontal mobility into the general job market, inter alia providing for access to Supported Employment arrangements and for availability of selective placement and support services (Integrationsfachdienste, IFD) throughout Germany. These Services also are intended as points of contact in the counselling of severely disabled school leavers in relation to placement opportunities in competitive jobs and/or integration projects or firms. Discussed from a legal perspective are the differences in sociolegal respects between such projects for severely disabled persons and employment in Workshops for the Disabled, as well as implications for the Workshops' own economic activity, also making reference to the forthcoming Book 9 of the Social Code. PMID:11370467

  7. Quality of Life among Persons with Physical Disability in Udupi Taluk: A Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kuvalekar, Kunal; Kamath, Ramachandra; Ashok, Lena; Shetty, Bhartesh; Mayya, Shreemathi; Chandrasekaran, Varalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Disability is not just a health problem or attribute of individuals, but it reflects the problems individuals experience in their interaction with society and physical movements. Disabled persons remain neglected part of society and they also experience various barriers due to restriction of participation. Objectives: The aim was to assess the quality of life (QOL) of physically disabled persons, the impact of physical disability on activities of daily living (ADL) and to study the awareness about laws and facilities available for disabled persons. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional community based study was conducted among 130 physical disabled persons who were selected using convenience sampling technique. The WHO BREF scale was used to assess QOL, while assessment of ADL was done using Barthel Index. Socio-demographic assessment was done using Udai Pareek scale. SPSS version 15.0 was used to analyze data. Categorical variables were expressed as frequencies and percentages. As per guidelines physical, psychological, social, and environmental domain scores for WHO BREF scale were calculated. Results: Among the study participants, 36.2% had a disability from birth that is, congenital. The second common cause of disability was found to be postpolio residual paralysis as it was found among 26.2% respondents. Other causes found were stroke/paralysis and accidents, in 19.2% and 18.5% respondents, respectively. Activities such as transfer, mobility, and stair climbing showed greater impact of physical disability. It was found that 11.5% respondents required help in one of the ADL. QOL score was found to be low under the psychological domain reflecting on negative feelings, bodily image, appearance, spirituality, and self-esteem of respondents. Conclusion: Physical disability had affected social participation as well as marriage of the respondents. However, it was found that very few of them are aware about facilities provided under persons with disability act. PMID:25810992

  8. [Incident of the backache in secondary education professors].

    PubMed

    Ferrera Picado, Jess Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The backache is one of the problems associate sanitary more pressing in the current world, which for years has centred the researcher's attention of the sanitary area, sociologists, statesmen... The educational community is not sufficiently studied from the perspective of the impact of the vertebral pains. Probably for the already rejected belief that they are pathologies that only concern population groups with a great physical wear It has been decided to approach the research from a qualitative methodology being the type of used method the descriptive study. The study realizes on 66 subjects that they are educational in an Institute of Secondary Education. A questionnaire is delivered them by three differentiated well parts: demographic information, medical record and Index of Oswestry's disability. In the results there is obtained a high index of participation (71%), emphasizing that 68% of the subjects demonstrates to have or to have had backache. The attributed mainsprings are wrong positions and not physical activity. And the treatment was principally medical therapy. As for the most affected regions they are cervical and dorsal, and 64% of the sample has 10% in the Index of Oswestry's disability. One concludes that, to weighing the high incident of the backache between the professors, it is not a habitual motive of labour fall. There is demonstrated that though it is not a disease that proves very disability for the professors, that is very frequent that concerns some tasks recovered in day after day. PMID:21428010

  9. Prevalence and features of ICF-disability in Spain as captured by the 2008 National Disability Survey

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Since 1986, the study of disability in Spain has been mainly addressed by National Disability Surveys (NDSs). While international attempts to frame NDS designs within the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) have progressed, in general, the ICF has hardly been used in either the NDS or epidemiological studies. This study sought to identify ICF Activity- and Participation-related content in the most recent Spanish NDS, the 2008 Survey on Disabilities, Independence and Dependency Situations (Encuesta sobre discapacidades, autonomía personal y situaciones de Dependencia - EDAD 2008), and estimate the prevalence of such ICF-framed disability. Methods EDAD 2008 methods and questions were perused. Of the 51 EDAD items analysed, 29 were backcoded to specific d2-d7 domains of the ICF Checklist and, by rating the recorded difficulty to perform specific tasks with or without help, these were then taken as performance and capacity respectively. A global ICF score was also derived, albeit lacking data for d1, "Learning and applying knowledge", d8, "Major Life Areas" and d9, "Community, Social and Civic Life". Data were grouped by sex, age, residence and initial positive screening, and prevalence figures were calculated by disability level both for the general population, using the originally designed weights, and for the population that had screened positive to disability. Data for institutionalised persons were processed separately. Results Crude prevalence of ICF severe/complete and moderate disability among the community-dwelling population aged ≥6 years was 0.9%-2.2% respectively, and that of severe/complete disability among persons living in sheltered accommodation was 0.3%. Prevalence of severe/complete disability was: higher in women than in men, 0.8% vs. 0.4%; increased with age; and was particularly high in domains such as "Domestic Life", 3.4%, "Mobility", 1.8%, and "Self-care", 1.9%, in which prevalence decreased when measured by reference to performance. Moreover, global scores indicated that severe/complete disability in these same domains was frequent among the moderately disabled group. Conclusions The EDAD 2008 affords an insufficient data set to be ICF-framed when it comes to the Activity and Participation domains. Notwithstanding their unknown validity, ratings for available ICF domains may, however, be suitable for consideration under the ADL model of functional dependency, suggesting that there are approximately 500,000 persons suffering from severe/complete disability and 1,000,000 suffering from moderate disability, with half the latter being severely disabled in domains capable of benefiting from technical or personal aid. Application of EDAD data to the planning of services for regions and other subpopulations means that need for personal help must be assessed, unmet needs ascertained, and knowledge of social participation and support, particularly for the mentally ill, improved. International, WHO-supported co-operation in ICF planning and use of NDSs in Spain and other countries is needed. PMID:22122806

  10. Constructing Disability in Online Worlds: Conceptualising Disability in Online Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Diane

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the online construction of disability is investigated and the implications for educators working in virtual worlds are considered. Based on the analysis of data collected through interviews with deaf residents of "Second Life", it is argued that research into online identity, disability and education needs to allow room for…

  11. The World Report on Disability and People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Officer, Alana; Shakespeare, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The "World Report on Disability" was requested by the World Health Assembly, the governing body of the World Health Organization (WHO). Because disability is broader than health, WHO partnered with the World Bank. The "World Report" was published in 2011 and provides a comprehensive scientific analysis on the global situation…

  12. Attitudes Toward the Psychologically Disabled, Physically Disabled, and Nondisabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Carol A.; and Others

    The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes on nondisabled persons toward physically disabled, psychologically disabled and nondisabled persons. The type of impairment, physical, psychological or normal, degree of impairment, mild, severe, sex of stimulus person male, female and the sex of the subjects were the independent variables.

  13. Disabilities Information Flow: A Disabilities Information Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ling, Bin; Allison, Colin; Nicholl, J. Ross; Moodley, Luke; Roberts, Dave

    2006-01-01

    The Disabilities Information Flow (DIF) project at the University of St Andrews has sought to provide a means of efficiently managing all student disabilities information within the institution and provide appropriate role-based service interfaces for all staff who need to routinely interact with this information. This paper describes the software…

  14. The Law's Understanding of Intellectual Disability as a Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is differently yet validly described by different professions. Legal professionals find it most useful to consider ID as a disability rather than a disorder. Because the law regulates the actions of individuals in a society and the actions of society on an individual, the law's concern in dealing with a person with ID…

  15. The World Report on Disability and People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Officer, Alana; Shakespeare, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The "World Report on Disability" was requested by the World Health Assembly, the governing body of the World Health Organization (WHO). Because disability is broader than health, WHO partnered with the World Bank. The "World Report" was published in 2011 and provides a comprehensive scientific analysis on the global situation

  16. The Law's Understanding of Intellectual Disability as a Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is differently yet validly described by different professions. Legal professionals find it most useful to consider ID as a disability rather than a disorder. Because the law regulates the actions of individuals in a society and the actions of society on an individual, the law's concern in dealing with a person with ID

  17. Mobile Router Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.; Shell, Dan; Leung, Kent

    2002-01-01

    Cisco Systems and NASA have been performing joint research on mobile routing technology under a NASA Space Act Agreement. Cisco developed mobile router technology and provided that technology to NASA for applications to aeronautic and space-based missions. NASA has performed stringent performance testing of the mobile router, including the interaction of routing and transport-level protocols. This paper describes mobile routing, the mobile router, and some key configuration parameters. In addition, the paper describes the mobile routing test network and test results documenting the performance of transport protocols in dynamic routing environments.

  18. Cyber Incidents Involving Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Turk

    2005-10-01

    The Analysis Function of the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has prepared this report to document cyber security incidents for use by the CSSC. The description and analysis of incidents reported herein support three CSSC tasks: establishing a business case; increasing security awareness and private and corporate participation related to enhanced cyber security of control systems; and providing informational material to support model development and prioritize activities for CSSC. The stated mission of CSSC is to reduce vulnerability of critical infrastructure to cyber attack on control systems. As stated in the Incident Management Tool Requirements (August 2005) ''Vulnerability reduction is promoted by risk analysis that tracks actual risk, emphasizes high risk, determines risk reduction as a function of countermeasures, tracks increase of risk due to external influence, and measures success of the vulnerability reduction program''. Process control and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, with their reliance on proprietary networks and hardware, have long been considered immune to the network attacks that have wreaked so much havoc on corporate information systems. New research indicates this confidence is misplaced--the move to open standards such as Ethernet, Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol, and Web technologies is allowing hackers to take advantage of the control industry's unawareness. Much of the available information about cyber incidents represents a characterization as opposed to an analysis of events. The lack of good analyses reflects an overall weakness in reporting requirements as well as the fact that to date there have been very few serious cyber attacks on control systems. Most companies prefer not to share cyber attack incident data because of potential financial repercussions. Uniform reporting requirements will do much to make this information available to Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and others who require it. This report summarizes the rise in frequency of cyber attacks, describes the perpetrators, and identifies the means of attack. This type of analysis, when used in conjunction with vulnerability analyses, can be used to support a proactive approach to prevent cyber attacks. CSSC will use this document to evolve a standardized approach to incident reporting and analysis. This document will be updated as needed to record additional event analyses and insights regarding incident reporting. This report represents 120 cyber security incidents documented in a number of sources, including: the British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) Industrial Security Incident Database, the 2003 CSI/FBI Computer Crime and Security Survey, the KEMA, Inc., Database, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Energy Incident Database, the INL Cyber Incident Database, and other open-source data. The National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism (MIPT) database was also interrogated but, interestingly, failed to yield any cyber attack incidents. The results of this evaluation indicate that historical evidence provides insight into control system related incidents or failures; however, that the limited available information provides little support to future risk estimates. The documented case history shows that activity has increased significantly since 1988. The majority of incidents come from the Internet by way of opportunistic viruses, Trojans, and worms, but a surprisingly large number are directed acts of sabotage. A substantial number of confirmed, unconfirmed, and potential events that directly or potentially impact control systems worldwide are also identified. Twelve selected cyber incidents are presented at the end of this report as examples of the documented case studies (see Appendix B).

  19. 77 FR 6022 - Excepted Service-Appointment of Persons With Intellectual Disabilities, Severe Physical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ... Intellectual Disabilities, Severe Physical Disabilities, and Psychiatric Disabilities AGENCY: U.S. Office of..., severe physical disabilities, and psychiatric disabilities. Paragraph (u) of section 213.3102 implements... disabilities, severe physical disabilities, and psychiatric disabilities. This Schedule A authority is...

  20. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... respect to transportation to which 14 CFR Part 254 applies, the limits to liability for loss, damage, or... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other...

  1. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... respect to transportation to which 14 CFR part 254 applies, the limits to liability for loss, damage, or... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other...

  2. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... respect to transportation to which 14 CFR part 254 applies, the limits to liability for loss, damage, or... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other...

  3. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... respect to transportation to which 14 CFR part 254 applies, the limits to liability for loss, damage, or... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other...

  4. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... respect to transportation to which 14 CFR Part 254 applies, the limits to liability for loss, damage, or... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other...

  5. Long-Term Morbidity and Management Strategies of Tracheal Aspiration in Adults with Severe Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, B.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The feeding skills of 73 adults with severe developmental disabilities who aspirated were examined. Mobility, level of mental retardation, or feeding skill did not discriminate those who aspirated. Mealtime respiratory distress (65%) or chronic lung disease (55%), however, were significantly associated with aspiration. (Author/DB)

  6. Effectiveness of Cognitive Skills-Based Computer-Assisted Instruction for Students with Disabilities: A Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weng, Pei-Lin; Maeda, Yukiko; Bouck, Emily C.

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) for students with disabilities can be categorized into the following categories: visual, auditory, mobile, and cognitive skills-based CAI. Cognitive-skills based CAI differs from other types of CAI largely in terms of an emphasis on instructional design features. We conducted both systematic review of…

  7. Guidelines for Organizing a Horseback Riding Program for Individuals with Disabilities. Bulletin 518A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Ginger A.; And Others

    This manual outlines a horseback riding program, conducted by the Larimer (Colorado) County Extension Service, for persons with disabilities. The program offers such benefits as the opportunity to learn horsemanship; strengthen and relax muscles; improve balance, coordination, and posture; and increase joint mobility. Designed to provide a

  8. Effectiveness of Cognitive Skills-Based Computer-Assisted Instruction for Students with Disabilities: A Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weng, Pei-Lin; Maeda, Yukiko; Bouck, Emily C.

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) for students with disabilities can be categorized into the following categories: visual, auditory, mobile, and cognitive skills-based CAI. Cognitive-skills based CAI differs from other types of CAI largely in terms of an emphasis on instructional design features. We conducted both systematic review of

  9. Feasibility of Quantitative Ultrasound Measurement of the Heel Bone in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mergler, S.; Lobker, B.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Penning, C.

    2010-01-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures are common in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Reduced mobility in case of motor impairment and the use of anti-epileptic drugs contribute to the development of low BMD. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurement of the heel bone is a non-invasive and radiation-free method for measuring bone

  10. Increasing Accessibility: Using Universal Design Principles to Address Disability Impairments in the Online Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Candice N.; Heiselt, April K.

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing number of students enrolling in distance education, there is a need to consider the accessibility of course materials in online learning environments. Four major groups of disabilities: mobility, auditory, visual, and cognitive are explored as they relate to their implementation into instructional design and their impact on

  11. Feasibility of Quantitative Ultrasound Measurement of the Heel Bone in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mergler, S.; Lobker, B.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Penning, C.

    2010-01-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures are common in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Reduced mobility in case of motor impairment and the use of anti-epileptic drugs contribute to the development of low BMD. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurement of the heel bone is a non-invasive and radiation-free method for measuring bone…

  12. (Instrumental) Activities of Daily Living in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgenkamp, Thessa I. M.; van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Daily living skills are important to ageing adults with intellectual disabilities (ID). The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of these skills in older adults with ID and to investigate the influence of gender, age, level of ID and mobility on these skills. Daily living skills were measured with the Barthel Index (for Activities of

  13. Providing O&M Services to Children and Youth with Severe Multiple Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Brent R.; Head, Daniel N.

    1993-01-01

    This article argues that orientation and mobility (O&M) training should be part of functional and meaningful activities for children and youth with severe multiple disabilities including a visual impairment. Evidence is provided that out-of-context instruction has not been effective, and the role of the O&M instructor is discussed. (DB)

  14. Increasing Accessibility: Using Universal Design Principles to Address Disability Impairments in the Online Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Candice N.; Heiselt, April K.

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing number of students enrolling in distance education, there is a need to consider the accessibility of course materials in online learning environments. Four major groups of disabilities: mobility, auditory, visual, and cognitive are explored as they relate to their implementation into instructional design and their impact on…

  15. Disability Mediates the Impact of Common Conditions on Perceived Health

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Jordi; Vilagut, Gemma; Adroher, Núria D.; Chatterji, Somnath; He, Yanling; Andrade, Laura Helena; Bromet, Evelyn; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Fayyad, John; Florescu, Silvia; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Gureje, Oye; Haro, Josep Maria; Hinkov, Hristo; Hu, Chiyi; Iwata, Noboru; Lee, Sing; Levinson, Daphna; Lépine, Jean Pierre; Matschinger, Herbert; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; O'Neill, Siobhan; Hormel, J.; Posada-Villa, Jose A.; Ismet Taib, Nezar; Xavier, Miguel; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Background We examined the extent to which disability mediates the observed associations of common mental and physical conditions with perceived health. Methods and Findings WHO World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys carried out in 22 countries worldwide (n = 51,344 respondents, 72.0% response rate). We assessed nine common mental conditions with the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), and ten chronic physical with a checklist. A visual analog scale (VAS) score (0, worst to 100, best) measured perceived health in the previous 30 days. Disability was assessed using a modified WHO Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS), including: cognition, mobility, self-care, getting along, role functioning (life activities), family burden, stigma, and discrimination. Path analysis was used to estimate total effects of conditions on perceived health VAS and their separate direct and indirect (through the WHODAS dimensions) effects. Twelve-month prevalence was 14.4% for any mental and 51.4% for any physical condition. 31.7% of respondents reported difficulties in role functioning, 11.4% in mobility, 8.3% in stigma, 8.1% in family burden and 6.9% in cognition. Other difficulties were much less common. Mean VAS score was 81.0 (SD = 0.1). Decrements in VAS scores were highest for neurological conditions (9.8), depression (8.2) and bipolar disorder (8.1). Across conditions, 36.8% (IQR: 31.2–51.5%) of the total decrement in perceived health associated with the condition were mediated by WHODAS disabilities (significant for 17 of 19 conditions). Role functioning was the dominant mediator for both mental and physical conditions. Stigma and family burden were also important mediators for mental conditions, and mobility for physical conditions. Conclusions More than a third of the decrement in perceived health associated with common conditions is mediated by disability. Although the decrement is similar for physical and mental conditions, the pattern of mediation is different. Research is needed on the benefits for perceived health of targeted interventions aimed at particular disability dimensions. PMID:23762442

  16. Critical incident reporting and learning.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, R P

    2010-07-01

    The success of incident reporting in improving safety, although obvious in aviation and other high-risk industries, is yet to be seen in health-care systems. An incident reporting system which would improve patient safety would allow front-end clinicians to have easy access for reporting an incident with an understanding that their report will be handled in a non-punitive manner, and that it will lead to enhanced learning regarding the causation of the incident and systemic changes which will prevent it from recurring. At present, significant problems remain with local and national incident reporting systems. These include fear of punitive action, poor safety culture in an organization, lack of understanding among clinicians about what should be reported, lack of awareness of how the reported incidents will be analysed, and how will the reports ultimately lead to changes which will improve patient safety. In particular, lack of systematic analysis of the reports and feedback directly to the clinicians are seen as major barriers to clinical engagement. In this review, robust systematic methodology of analysing incidents is discussed. This methodology is based on human factors model, and the learning paradigm which emphasizes significant shift from traditional judicial approach to understanding how 'latent errors' may play a role in a chain of events which can set up an 'active error' to occur. Feedback directly to the clinicians is extremely important for keeping them 'in the loop' for their continued engagement, and it should target different levels of analyses. In addition to high-level information on the types of incidents, the feedback should incorporate results of the analyses of active and latent factors. Finally, it should inform what actions, and at what level/stage, have been taken in response to the reported incidents. For this, local and national systems will be required to work in close cooperation, so that the lessons can be learnt and actions taken within an organization, and across organizations. In the UK, a recently introduced speciality-specific incident reporting system for anaesthesia aims to incorporate the elements of successful reporting system, as presented in this review, to achieve enhanced clinical engagement and improved patient safety. PMID:20551028

  17. Gone Mobile? (Mobile Libraries Survey 2010)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2010-01-01

    Librarians, like patrons and researchers, are caught between traditional library service models and the promise of evolving information technologies. In recent years, professional conferences have strategically featured programs and presentations geared toward building a mobile agenda and adapting or adopting services to meet new demands of mobile

  18. Ischemic stroke incidence in Santa Coloma de Gramenet (ISISCOG), Spain. A community-based study

    PubMed Central

    Alzamora, María Teresa; Sorribes, Marta; Heras, Antonio; Vila, Nicolás; Vicheto, Marisa; Forés, Rosa; Sánchez-Ojanguren, José; Sancho, Amparo; Pera, Guillem

    2008-01-01

    Background In Spain, stroke is one of the major causes of death and the main cause of severe disability in people over 65 years. We analyzed the incidence of ischemic stroke, stroke subtypes, case fatality and disability at 90 days after the event in a Spanish population. Methods A prospective community-based register of ischemic strokes was established in Santa Coloma de Gramenet (Barcelona) [116,220 inhabitants of all ages, according to the municipal census of December 31,2001], from January 1 to December 31, 2003. Standard definitions and case finding methods were used to identify all cases in all age groups. Every patient underwent a complete clinical evaluation and systematic tests including neuroimaging (CT/MRI) and vascular studies (carotid duplex ultrasound intra and extracranial and MR angiography). Results Over a one year period, 196 ischemic strokes were registered [107 men; median age = 76 years (range 39–98)], being the first event in 159 patients (81.1%) and a recurrent stroke in 37 (18.9%). After age-adjustment to the European population, the incidence of ischemic stroke per 100,000 inhabitants was 172 (95% CI, 148–196); 219 (176–261) in men and 133 (105–160) in women, with an annual incidence for first ischemic stroke of 139 (118–161); 165 (128–201) in men and 115 (89–140) in women. The incidence of stroke increased with age. Stroke subtypes (TOAST classification criteria) were lacunar in 28.8%, atherothrombotic in 18.6%, cardioembolic in 26.6% and undetermined in 26.0% of patients. At 90 days, the case-fatality was 12%, and among survivors, moderate-to-severe disability was present in 45 % at 3 months. Conclusion This prospective community-based study shows one of the lowest incidences of stroke in Europe, as well as one of the lowest case fatality and disability rates at 90 days after stroke. PMID:18371212

  19. Mobility, Emotion, and Universality in Future Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chignell, Mark; Hosono, Naotsune; Fels, Deborah; Lottridge, Danielle; Waterworth, John

    The Graphical user interface has traditionally supported personal productivity, efficiency, and usability. With computer supported cooperative work, the focus has been on typical people, doing typical work in a highly rational model of interaction. Recent trends towards mobility, and emotional and universal design are extending the user interface paradigm beyond the routine. As computing moves into the hand and away from the desktop, there is a greater need for dealing with emotions and distractions. Busy and distracted people represent a new kind of disability, but one that will be increasingly prevalent. In this panel we examine the current state of the art, and prospects for future collaboration in non-normative computing requirements. This panel draws together researchers who are studying the problems of mobility, emotion and universality. The goal of the panel is to discuss how progress in these areas will change the nature of future collaboration.

  20. Foster Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Lederman, Cindy S.

    2007-01-01

    Children and youth in foster care are a vulnerable population. They are at risk for abuse, neglect, and permanent separation from birth parents and have a greater incidence of emotional and behavioral difficulties. This is not surprising because these children are abused, neglected, or abandoned by the very people who are supposed to love and care

  1. Disability disparities: a beginning model.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Allen

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a model of disability disparities. Though the concept of health disparities is discussed in the health care literature, there is no such model that explicitly addresses disparities in the disability literature. Therefore, this model begins to fill a void in the disability literature. Part of the value of such a model is that it represents an attempt to address the question of why cultural competency is important in the disability arena at this point in the 21st century. The urgency in addressing cultural competency at this time in history is supported by understanding the multiple accountability demands on rehabilitation and disability providers these days, e.g., increasing diversification of the United States population, that render providing effective services to everyone a clear mandate. The author provides a working definition of disability disparity. The disability disparity model is described in terms of its five-domain continuum as well as its macro- and micro-level aspects that are designed to both promote clarity of the concept for researchers and offer practitioners ideas on how to explore the existence of disability disparities in working with specific service recipients. Limitations and strengths of the model are discussed along with suggested next steps in model validation. PMID:19802930

  2. The Source for Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, Paula S.; Wadlington, Elizabeth M.

    This book is designed to help clinicians and teachers work more effectively with people with learning disabilities and their families. Chapter 1 provides an overview of learning disabilities. It presents commonly accepted medical and educational definitions, prevalence figures, and possible etiological explanations for various disorders. Chapter 2…

  3. Visualising Disability in the Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlieger, Patrick; Grosvenor, Ian; Simon, Frank; Van Hove, Geert; Vanobbergen, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growth in interdisciplinary work which has argued that disability is not an isolated, individual medical pathology but instead a key defining social category like "race", class and gender. Seen in this way disability provides researchers with another analytic tool for exploring the nature of power. Running almost…

  4. The World Report on Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickenbach, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    The World Report on Disability, a joint endeavor of the World Health Organization and the World Bank, launched in June 2011, is an astonishing achievement that will set the standard for disability studies research for evidence-informed policy for years to come. The product of collaborative and participatory work between organizations of persons

  5. Voices of Disability in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Liz

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her story of being a nurse with a disability who serves people with disabilities and older adults. She recounts her experience of what it is like to be stigmatized, marginalized, and to have lowered expectations because of her difference. The author had no right arm save about six inches from the shoulder down.

  6. Supervising Adults with Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Dale

    Intended for employers, supervisors, and coworkers, the booklet presents guidelines for accommodating learning disabled (LD) employees. An introductory section explains the condition, describing its nature and the range of impairments it includes. Five types of learning disabilities are identified: visual, auditory, motor, tactile, and academic.

  7. Students, Colleges, and Disability Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Stephen B.

    As recently as the 1960s and 1970s, comparatively few persons with disabilities were able to attend college, either due to limited financial resources or to the inaccessibility of the campus and college programs. Today, colleges have substantially increased their efforts to recruit, admit, and accommodate qualified students with disabilities and

  8. Benefits for Children with Disabilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or her parents: • Must be receiving Social Security retirement or disability benefits; or • Must have died and have worked enough to qualify for Social Security. These benefits also are payable to an adult if he or she is disabled at age 18, and if they received dependents benefits on ...

  9. Voices of Disability in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Liz

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her story of being a nurse with a disability who serves people with disabilities and older adults. She recounts her experience of what it is like to be stigmatized, marginalized, and to have lowered expectations because of her difference. The author had no right arm save about six inches from the shoulder down.…

  10. Library Service to the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bookmark, 1981

    1981-01-01

    In recognition of 1981 as the Year of Disabled Persons, 10 out of the 13 essays in this issue deal specifically with library service to the disabled; the remaining three discuss the Public Library Association (PLA) Planning Process, the New York State Research Library Resources Access Project, and New York State public library construction needs.

  11. Dyslexia: Problems of Reading Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Herman K.; Schiffman, Gilbert B.

    The purpose of this book is to provide an understanding of both the educational and medical aspects of reading and to show how they are interrelated in reading disabilities. The various aspects of reading disabilities are presented in the following chapters: Introduction to the Reading Problem; Early Predictive Studies; Psychological Evaluation;

  12. Understanding Young Women with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramley, Jenny; And Others

    The report describes an Australian project to investigate ways in which gender issues affect adolescent girls with disabilities and associated educational implications. Interviews were conducted with 180 girls and women (ages 12-29) with mild or moderate disabilities. Additional information came from questionnaire responses and discussions with 48

  13. The Learning Disabled Preschool Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Samuel A.

    1987-01-01

    Two case studies involving preschool children with developmental learning disabilities (one with nystagmus and one with a hearing impairment) point to the need for appropriate ability as well as disability identification and assessment procedures (both had been diagnosed as mentally retarded) the potential of early diagnosis and intervention for

  14. Disability Studies in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    As a topic of study, disability is not new at institutions of higher education. Psychological and intellectual disabilities have been of interest in psychiatry and psychology at least since the late 1800s and early 1900s. The post-World War II era, in particular, witnessed the rapid expansion of academic programs in special education, vocational

  15. Cognitive Development and Adolescent Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkind, David

    1985-01-01

    The author offers clinical examples of ways in which the attainment of formal operations in adolescents both exacerbates chronic disabilities and contributes to the etiology of new disabilities (such as in teenage obesity, anorexia nervosa, and depression). He suggests treatment guidelines. (CL)

  16. Generalist Genes and Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plomin, Robert; Kovas, Yulia

    2005-01-01

    The authors reviewed recent quantitative genetic research on learning disabilities that led to the conclusion that genetic diagnoses differ from traditional diagnoses in that the effects of relevant genes are largely general rather than specific. This research suggests that most genes associated with common learning disabilities--language

  17. Visualising Disability in the Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlieger, Patrick; Grosvenor, Ian; Simon, Frank; Van Hove, Geert; Vanobbergen, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growth in interdisciplinary work which has argued that disability is not an isolated, individual medical pathology but instead a key defining social category like "race", class and gender. Seen in this way disability provides researchers with another analytic tool for exploring the nature of power. Running almost

  18. Attitudes Toward the Physically Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Carol A.; And Others

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of non-disabled persons toward physically disabled persons. The degree of impairment, sex of stimulus persons, and sex of subjects were the independent variables. The subjects consisted of 120 psychology students from Kent State University, Ashtabula Regional Campus. Each subject

  19. Assessment of Developmentally Disabled Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Joan B.

    1985-01-01

    Although formal assessment of children with severe disabilities raises many problems of measurement, evaluation by "standard rulers" is still essential. This article examines the role of the school psychologist in the measurement process and identifies issues related to the assessment of developmentally disabled children. (Author/EGS)

  20. Stability of Arithmetic Disability Subtypes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Cheryl H.; Pennett, H. Deborah-Lynne; Black, Jeffrey L.; Fair, George W.; Balise, Raymond R.

    1999-01-01

    A study examined the stability over 19 months of academic subtyping classification of 80 children (ages 9 to 13) representing four subtypes of arithmetic disabilities (AD). Approximately half of the sample retained AD regardless of identification method. Children with deficits in arithmetic, reading, and spelling disabilities exhibited the