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Sample records for incident mobility disability

  1. Comparison of Assessment Results of Children with Low Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dennis J.; Reilly, AmySue; Henley, Joan

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a research study that assessed young children with a low incidence disability, specifically Cri-du-Chat Syndrome (CDSC). A description of the concerns of assessing individuals with low incidence disabilities is described. Parent reports (using the Development Observation Checklist System) on the functioning of their children…

  2. Incidence of Dementia in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strydom, Andre; Chan, Trevor; King, Michael; Hassiotis, Angela; Livingston, Gill

    2013-01-01

    Dementia may be more common in older adults with intellectual disability (ID) than in the general population. The increased risk for Alzheimer's disease in people with Down syndrome (DS) is well established, but much less is known about dementia in adults with ID who do not have DS. We estimated incidence rates from a longitudinal study of…

  3. MAJOR MOBILITY DISABILITY-ASSESSMENT AND BASELINE PERFORMANCE IN LIFE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Major mobility disability has previously been defined by self-reported inability to walk ¼ mile. Observed inability to walk 400 meters provides a valid and objective disability endpoint for clinical trials that is relevant to community walking, future advanced disability and mortality. LIFE particip...

  4. Brief Report: A Growth Mixture Model of Occupational Aspirations of Individuals with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, In Heok; Rojewski, Jay W.

    2013-01-01

    A previous longitudinal study of the occupational aspirations of individuals with high-incidence disabilities revealed multiple longitudinal patterns for individuals with learning disabilities or emotional-behavioral disorders. Growth mixture modeling was used to determine whether individuals in these two high-incidence disabilities groups (N =…

  5. Mathematics Placement Decisions for High School Students with High Incidence Disabilities: A Collective Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murzyn, Amy Lee

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this multiple case study is to describe the experiences of case managers making mathematics placement decisions of high school students with high incidence disabilities. There is much information about what should be happening when making mathematics placement decisions of high school students with high incidence disabilities, but…

  6. Disability in the Oldest-old: Incidence and Risk Factors in The 90+ Study

    PubMed Central

    Berlau, Daniel J.; Corrada, Maria M.; Peltz, Carrie B.; Kawas, Claudia H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To measure the incidence of disability in individuals aged 90 and older and examine factors that may increase risk of disability. Design and Setting The 90+ Study, a longitudinal study of aging initiated in January 2003 with follow-up through May 2009. Participants 216 non-disabled, prospectively followed participants who were aged 90 or older at baseline. Measurements The incidence of disability, measured as needing help on one or more Activities of Daily Living, and calculated using person-years. Risk factors were examined using a Cox proportional hazards analysis. Results The overall incidence of disability was 16.4%per year (95% confidence interval, 13.3–20.0), and did not differ by gender. Disability incidence increased with age from 8.3%in the 90–94 age group to 25.7%in the 95 and older age group. Several factors were associated with increased risk of disability including history of congestive heart failure, history of depression poor self-rated quality of life and cognitive impairment. Conclusion Disability incidence is high and increases rapidly with age in the oldest-old, with rates essentially tripling between ages 90–94 and 95+. Some factors associated with increased risk of disability in younger elderly continue to be risk factors in the oldest-old. Because of the tremendous social and financial impact of disability and the rapid growth of the oldest-old, the development of strategies to delay disability in the elderly should be a priority for health care research. PMID:22273736

  7. Prospective Analyses of Childhood Factors and Antisocial Behavior for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chin-Chih; Symons, Frank J.; Reynolds, Arthur J.

    2011-01-01

    This prospective longitudinal study investigated the association between childhood factors (individual, family, and school characteristics) and later antisocial behavior (official juvenile delinquency and adult crime) for students identified with high-incidence disabilities (i.e., learning disabilities, emotional disturbance). The sample consisted…

  8. Intermediate Work Outcomes for Adolescents with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojewski, Jay W.; Lee, In Heok; Gregg, Noel

    2014-01-01

    A longitudinal sample from the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 was used to determine differences in work outcomes between (a) individuals with learning disabilities or emotional-behavior disorders and (b) individuals with or without disabilities. Twelve factors were arranged into individual, family, school-peer, and community categories.…

  9. Effect of structured physical activity on prevention of major mobility disability in older adults: the LIFE Study randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Pahor, Marco; Guralnik, Jack M.; Ambrosius, Walter T.; Blair, Steven; Bonds, Denise E.; Church, Timothy S.; Espeland, Mark A.; Fielding, Roger A.; Gill, Thomas M.; Groessl, Erik J.; King, Abby C.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Manini, Todd M.; McDermott, Mary M.; Miller, Michael E.; Newman, Anne B.; Rejeski, W Jack; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Importance In older adults reduced mobility is common and is an independent risk factor for morbidity, hospitalization, disability, and mortality. Limited evidence suggests that physical activity may help prevent mobility disability; however, there are no definitive clinical trials examining if physical activity prevents or delays mobility disability. Objective To test the hypothesis that a long-term structured physical activity program is more effective than a health education program (also referred to as a successful aging program) in reducing the risk of major mobility disability. Design, Setting, and Participants The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) study was a multicenter, randomized trial that enrolled participants between February 2010 and December 2011, who participated for an average of 2.6 years. Follow-up ended in December 2013. Outcome assessors were blinded to the intervention assignment. Participants were recruited from urban, suburban and rural communities at 8 field centers throughout the US. We randomized a volunteer sample of 1,635 sedentary men and women aged 70–89 years who had physical limitations, defined as a score on the Short Physical Performance Battery of 9 or below, but were able to walk 400 m. Interventions Participants were randomized to a structured moderate intensity physical activity program (n=818) done in a center and at home that included including aerobic, resistance and flexibility training activities or to a health education program (n=817) consisting of workshops on topics relevant to older adults and upper extremity stretching exercises. Main Outcomes and Measures The primary outcome was major mobility disability objectively defined by loss of ability to walk 400 m. Results Incident major mobility disability occurred in 30.1% (n=246/818) of physical activity and 35.5% (n=290/817) of health education participants (HR=0.82, 95%CI=0.69–0.98, p=0.03). Persistent mobility disability was experienced by 120/818 (14.7%) physical activity and 162/817 (19.8%) health education participants (HR=0.72; 95%CI=0.57–0.91; p=0.006). Serious adverse events were reported by 404/818 (49.4%) of the physical activity and 373/817 (45.7%) of the health education participants (Risk Ratio=1.08; 95%CI=0.98–1.20). Conclusions and Relevance A structured moderate intensity physical activity program, compared with a health education program, reduced major mobility disability over 2.6 years among older adults at risk of disability. These findings suggest mobility benefit from such a program in vulnerable older adults. Registration ClinicalsTrials.gov identifier NCT01072500. PMID:24866862

  10. Brief report: a growth mixture model of occupational aspirations of individuals with high-incidence disabilities.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Heok; Rojewski, Jay W

    2013-02-01

    A previous longitudinal study of the occupational aspirations of individuals with high-incidence disabilities revealed multiple longitudinal patterns for individuals with learning disabilities or emotional-behavioral disorders. Growth mixture modeling was used to determine whether individuals in these two high-incidence disabilities groups (N = 585) possessed heterogeneous aspirations trajectories. Two distinct classes emerged. Among selected covariates (inc., gender, SES, locus of control, self-concept, mathematics achievement), only gender and SES significantly distinguished group membership. While no covariates were significantly related to the growth factors for latent class 2 (low aspirations), math achievement and SES were significantly related to initial aspirations in latent class 1 (high aspirations). Moreover, for latent class 1, the occupational aspirations of individuals with learning disabilities became increasingly lower than adolescents with emotional-behavior disorders after high school. Possible explanations for this phenomenon are considered. PMID:23219251

  11. Correlations between joint and spinal mobility, spinal sagittal configuration, segmental mobility, segmental pain, symptoms and disabilities in female homecare personnel.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, G; Gerdle, B

    2000-09-01

    The aim of a study comprising 607 women working as homecare personnel was to investigate general spinal, joint and segmental mobility, different symptoms (pain and strain) and their relation to various aspects of disability. Joint mobility (mainly peripheral) was estimated using the "Beighton" score and spinal posture and mobility were measured by kyphometer. Passive segmental mobility and pain provocation were estimated manually. Pain intensity and strain during work and leisure were estimated using visual analogue scales for defined anatomical regions. Disability was rated using defined items and two indices. The 7-day prevalence of low back pain was 48%. Peripheral joint mobility, spinal sagittal posture and thoracic sagittal mobility showed low correlations with disability. Lumbar sagittal hypomobility was associated with higher disability. Manually estimated segmental mobility and segmental pain provocation of L4-L5 and L5-S1 correlated with disability; hypo- and hypermobility or positive pain provocation tests at these levels showed higher disability than normal mobility and negative pain provocation tests, respectively. Cluster analysis revealed that the combination of positive pain provocation tests and low lumbar sagittal mobility was associated with particularly high disability levels. In conclusion, positive pain provocation tests were clearly associated with high disability levels. PMID:11028797

  12. Making Mathematics Placement Decisions for High School Students with High Incidence Disabilities: A Collective Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murzyn, Amy; Hughes, Trudie

    2015-01-01

    This multiple case study described the experiences of case managers making mathematics placement decisions for high school students with high incidence disabilities. Participants included three parents, three students, three case managers, three mathematics teachers, and three administrators from different high schools across rural, suburban and…

  13. Development Patterns of Occupational Aspirations in Adolescents with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojewski, Jay W.; Lee, In Heok; Gregg, Noel; Gemici, Sinan

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzed the longitudinal development of occupational aspiration prestige scores over a 12-year period (Grade 8 to 8 years postsecondary) to better understand this aspect of career choice from adolescence into adulthood for people with high-incidence disabilities. A curvilinear trajectory was detected where aspirations increased during…

  14. Prevalence and Incidence of Myocardial Infarction and Cerebrovascular Accident in Ageing Persons with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, J.; Rozeboom, W.; Penning, C.; Evenhuis, H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological information on age-related cardiovascular disease in people with intellectual disability (ID) is scarce and inconclusive. We compared prevalence and incidence of cerebrovascular accident and myocardial infarction over age 50 in a residential population with ID to that in a general practice population. Method: Lifetime…

  15. Prevalence of Weight Problems among Youth with High-Incidence Disabilities in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trout, Alexandra L.; Lambert, Matthew C.; Nelson, Timothy D.; Thompson, Ronald W.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of weight problems among youth in general and youth in out-of-home care has been well documented; however, the prevalence of obesity/overweight among youth with high-incidence disabilities in more restrictive settings, such as residential care, has not been assessed. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of…

  16. On CALL: One Approach to Improving Services for Students with Low-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley-Johnson, Sharon; Johnson, C. Merle; Drevon, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    Students with low-incidence disabilities frequently receive less than optimal psychoeducational services because the specialized tests and instructional materials required to meet their idiosyncratic needs often are unavailable due to budget constraints, inadequate training of school personnel, and the difficulty school personnel have keeping…

  17. Clinical Psychopathology, Untoward Incidents and the Use of Restrictive Procedures in Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplin, Eddie; Tsakanikos, Elias; Wright, Steve; Bouras, Nick

    2009-01-01

    Background: Previous evidence has suggested that clinical characteristics may predict use of restraint in adults with intellectual disability. However, the relationship between specific types of untoward incidents, corresponding interventions (restrictive procedures) and clinical psychopathology remains unclear. Method: We examined all untoward…

  18. Proportional Reasoning Word Problem Performance for Middle School Students with High-Incidence Disabilities (HID)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brawand, Anne Eichorn

    2013-01-01

    Schema-based instruction (SBI) was used to examine the solving of proportional reasoning word problems for middle school students with high-incidence disabilities (HID). Seventh- and eighth-grade students with HID participated in the study. Students were randomly assigned to one of three groups. A multiple-baseline-across-groups design was…

  19. Relationship between Mobility Limitations and the Places where Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Live

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, Shaun; Ouellette-Kuntz, Helene; Hunter, Duncan

    2008-01-01

    As the population ages, mobility limitations are associated with increased mortality and negative health-related states both in the general population and among people with intellectual disabilities. The influence of mobility limitations upon the lives and lifestyles of people with intellectual disabilities remains poorly understood. Specifically,…

  20. Factors Related to Hysterectomy in Women with Physical and Mobility Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsieh, Molly; Chen, Si-Fan; Wu, Chia-Ling; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to identify self-report data for hysterectomy prevalence and to explore its correlated factors among women with physical and mobility disabilities in Taiwan. This paper was part of a larger study, "Survey on Preventive Health Utilizations of People with Physical and Mobility Disability in Taiwan," which is a cross-sectional survey…

  1. Traumatic Brain Injury in the Netherlands: Incidence, Costs and Disability-Adjusted Life Years

    PubMed Central

    Scholten, Annemieke C.; Haagsma, Juanita A.; Panneman, Martien J. M.; van Beeck, Ed F.; Polinder, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Objective Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability, leading to great personal suffering and huge costs to society. Integrated knowledge on epidemiology, economic consequences and disease burden of TBI is scarce but essential for optimizing healthcare policy and preventing TBI. This study aimed to estimate incidence, cost-of-illness and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) of TBI in the Netherlands. Methods This study included data on all TBI patients who were treated at an Emergency Department (ED - National Injury Surveillance System), hospitalized (National Medical Registration), or died due to their injuries in the Netherlands between 2010–2012. Direct healthcare costs and indirect costs were determined using the incidence-based Dutch Burden of Injury Model. Disease burden was assessed by calculating years of life lost (YLL) owing to premature death, years lived with disability (YLD) and DALYs. Incidence, costs and disease burden were stratified by age and gender. Results TBI incidence was 213.6 per 100,000 person years. Total costs were €314.6 (USD $433.8) million per year and disease burden resulted in 171,200 DALYs (on average 7.1 DALYs per case). Men had highest mean costs per case (€19,540 versus €14,940), driven by indirect costs. 0–24-year-olds had high incidence and disease burden but low economic costs, whereas 25–64-year-olds had relatively low incidence but high economic costs. Patients aged 65+ had highest incidence, leading to considerable direct healthcare costs. 0–24-year-olds, men aged 25–64 years, traffic injury victims (especially bicyclists) and home and leisure injury victims (especially 0–5-year-old and elderly fallers) are identified as risk groups in TBI. Conclusions The economic and health consequences of TBI are substantial. The integrated approach of assessing incidence, costs and disease burden enables detection of important risk groups in TBI, development of prevention programs that target these risk groups and assessment of the benefits of these programs. PMID:25343447

  2. The Prevalence, Incidence, and Factors Predictive of Mental Ill-Health in Adults with Profound Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Sally-Ann; Smiley, Elita; Finlayson, Janet; Jackson, Alison; Allan, Linda; Williamson, Andrew; Mantry, Dipali; Morrison, Jillian

    2007-01-01

    Background: There are no previous studies of the prevalence and incidence of mental ill-health in adults with profound intellectual disabilities. Method: In this population-based prospective cohort study, adults with profound intellectual disabilities underwent psychiatric assessment (n = 184), with further assessment after 2 years (n = 131).…

  3. The Prevalence and Severity of Physical Mobility Limitations in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, Shaun; Ouellette-Kuntz, Helene; Hunter, Duncan

    2009-01-01

    Background: The population of older adults with intellectual disabilities is growing, creating new challenges for individuals, families and service providers. Although there has been increased research into the ageing process for adults with intellectual disabilities, there is little focused research investigating physical mobility. Materials and…

  4. Disability, mortality, and incidence of cancer among Geneva painters and electricians: a historical prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Gubéran, E; Usel, M; Raymond, L; Tissot, R; Sweetnam, P M

    1989-01-01

    The 1916 painters and the 1948 electricians who resided in the Canton of Geneva at the time of the 1970 census were identified and followed up to 1984. During the study period 121 disability pensions were awarded to painters and 59 to electricians. Age standardised incidence of disability per 1000 man-years at risk was higher among painters than among electricians for all neuropsychiatric causes (1.23/1000 and 0.68/1000, respectively) and for all other causes (5.50/1000 and 3.41/1000, respectively). No case of presenile dementia was diagnosed among painters. There was inadequate evidence to indicate that the higher risk of neuropsychiatric disability for painters might have been due to their occupational exposure to organic solvents. A possible toxic effect of these substances on the central nervous system was confounded with alcoholism which was associated with disability from neuropsychiatric disease in 12 of 20 painters and in only one of 10 electricians. Mortality and incidence of cancer were assessed among both cohorts and compared with the expected figures calculated from Geneva rates. Among painters there was a significant increase in overall mortality (O = 254, E = 218.5), in mortality from all cancers (O = 96, E = 75.4), and in incidence from all cancers (O = 159, E = 132.0). For the specific cancer sites, there was a significant excess risk for lung cancer (mortality: O = 40, E = 23.0), which was possibly related to occupational exposure to asbestos and to zinc chromate, although cigarette smoking was not controlled. The significant excesses of biliary tract cancer and of bladder cancer were in accordance with previous observations among painters from other countries. There was also a significant increase in incidence from testicular cancer (O=5, E=1.6), which has not been reported before. For causes of death other than cancer the excesses for alcoholism (O=5, E=0.8). for liver cirrhosis (O=14, E=8.8), for motor vehicle accidents (O=12, E=5.9), and for cerebrovascular disease when allowing for ten years of latency (O=8, E=4.0), were consistent with a probable increased risk of alcohol abuse. Among electricians overall mortality was similar to that expected (O=137, E=139.0). No significant excess risk was found for all cancers or for any specific cancer site. Because of the small number of expected deaths the statistical power was low for the assessment of a possible risk for leukaemia or for brain tumour. PMID:2920139

  5. Physical Activity Among Persons Aging with Mobility Disabilities: Shaping a Research Agenda

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Dori E.; Bombardier, Charles H.; Hoffman, Jeanne M.; Belza, Basia

    2011-01-01

    With the aging of the baby boomer population and their accompanying burden of disease, future disability rates are expected to increase. This paper summarizes the state of the evidence regarding physical activity and aging for individuals with mobility disability and proposes a healthy aging research agenda for this population. Using a previously published framework, we present evidence in order to compile research recommendations in four areas focusing on older adults with mobility disability: (1) prevalence of physical activity, (2) health benefits of physical activity, (3) correlates of physical activity participation, and, (4) promising physical activity intervention strategies. Overall, findings show a dearth of research examining physical activity health benefits, correlates (demographic, psychological, social, and built environment), and interventions among persons aging with mobility disability. Further research is warranted. PMID:21748010

  6. Effects of Functional Mobility Skills Training for Adults with Severe Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whinnery, Stacie B.; Whinnery, Keith W.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a functional mobility program on the functional standing and walking skills of five adults with developmental disabilities. The Mobility Opportunities Via Education (MOVE) Curriculum was implemented using a multiple-baseline across subjects design. Repeated measures were taken during baseline, intervention…

  7. Team-Based Learning for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities in High School Social Studies Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Shawn; Wanzek, Jeanne; Swanson, Elizabeth A.; Vaughn, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of implementing team-based learning (TBL) practices on content acquisition for 11th grade students with high-incidence disabilities enrolled in general education social studies courses. TBL components focus on collaborative discourse within heterogeneous teams. TBL, which requires critical thinking and the application…

  8. Incidence, Types and Characteristics of Aggressive Behaviour in Treatment Facilities for Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability and Severe Challenging Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenneij, N. H.; Koot, H. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Inpatient aggression in treatment facilities for persons with intellectual disability (ID) can have aversive consequences, for co-clients and staff, but also for the aggressors themselves. To manage and eventually prevent inpatient aggressive incidents, more knowledge about their types and characteristics is necessary. Method: In four…

  9. Fix It with TAPE: Repurposing Technology to Be Assistive Technology for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouck, Emily C.; Shurr, Jordan C.; Tom, Kinsey; Jasper, Andrea D.; Bassette, Laura; Miller, Bridget; Flanagan, Sara M.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses how practitioners can repurpose technology--common and socially desirable technology in particular--to be assistive technology for students with high-incidence disabilities. The authors provide a framework for practitioners to consider technology for repurposing: TAPE (Transportable, Available, Practical, Engaging) and…

  10. Effects of an Adapted Physical Education Teaching Model on Special Educator Teaching Approaches for Students with Low Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laughlin, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a training package, which consisted of the Flex Grid Teaching Model along with adapted physical education consultation, on special education teacher instruction of functional motor skill acquisition instruction to secondary students with low incidence disabilities. Special education teachers…

  11. Related Services Research for Students with Low-Incidence Disabilities: Implications for Speech-Language Pathologists in Inclusive Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giangreco, Michael F.

    2000-01-01

    This article summarizes a team process for making related services decisions called VISTA (Vermont Interdependent Services Team Approach) and nine research studies on the use and impact of VISTA with students with low incidence disabilities. It also addresses team size, consumer perspectives, and paraprofessional supports. Five major conclusions…

  12. Factors Predictive of Type of Powered Mobility Received by Veterans with Disability

    PubMed Central

    Rabadi, Meheroz H.; Vincent, Andrea S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The goal of this observational study was to determine factors predictive of the type of powered mobility prescribed to veterans with disability. Material/Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted for all veterans (n=170) who received powered mobility from a designated power mobility clinic. Logistic regression analysis was used to determined factors predictive of the type of powered mobility provided. Results Sixty-four (38%) veterans were provided powered wheelchairs and 106 (62%) were provided powered scooters. Of the variables examined, only primary medical conditions for referral and disability severity (as measured by the 2-minute timed walk test; 2-MWT) were predictive of the types of powered mobility prescribed. Veterans who were able to walk longer distances were more likely to be prescribed powered scooters. Age, gender, race, level of education, marital and employment status, number of chronic medical conditions, and upper and lower limb muscle strength were not significant predictors. Conclusions This study suggests that the primary medical conditions for referral and 2-MWT can assist clinicians in the determination of the type of powered mobility to prescribe to veterans with disability. PMID:25955214

  13. School Mobility, Dropout, and Graduation Rates across Student Disability Categories in Utah. REL 2015-055

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrat, Vanessa X.; Berliner, BethAnn; Voight, Adam; Tran, Loan; Huang, Chun-Wei; Yu, Airong; Chen-Gaddini, Min

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the characteristics of students with disabilities in Utah public schools, and presents the single-year mobility and dropout rates for students in grades 6-12, as well as the four-year cohort dropout and graduation rates, for students who started grade 9 for the first time in 2007/08 and constituted the 2011 cohort. Results…

  14. Obstacle Course Training Can Improve Mobility and Prevent Falls in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hanegem, E.; Enkelaar, L.; Smulders, E.; Weerdesteyn, V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) constitute a special-needs population at high risk of falling. This is the first study to evaluate whether obstacle course training can improve mobility and prevent falls in this population. Methods: The intervention was implemented as part of an institution-wide health care improvement plan…

  15. Outdoor Built Environment Barriers and Facilitators to Activity among Midlife and Older Adults with Mobility Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Dori E.; Huang, Deborah L.; Simonovich, Shannon D.; Belza, Basia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To gain better understanding of how the built environment impacts neighborhood-based physical activity among midlife and older adults with mobility disabilities. Design and methods: We conducted in-depth interviews with 35 adults over age 50, which used an assistive device and lived in King County, Washington, U.S. In addition,…

  16. The Incidence and Nature of Letter Orientation Errors in Reading Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terepocki, Megan; Kruk, Richard S.; Willows, Dale M.

    2002-01-01

    A study investigated letter orientation confusions (reversals) in the reading and writing of 10 children with reading disabilities and 10 typical readers (age 10). Individuals with reading disability made more orientation confusions. Orientation errors were more frequent for reversible than for nonreversible items in tasks involving long-term…

  17. Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Prevalence, Incidence and Remission of Aggressive Behaviour and Related Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, S.-A.; Smiley, E.; Jackson, A.; Finlayson, J.; Allan, L.; Mantry, D.; Morrison, J.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Aggressive behaviours can be disabling for adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), with negative consequences for the adult, their family and paid carers. It is surprising how little research has been conducted into the epidemiology of these needs, given the impact they can have. This study investigates point prevalence, 2-year…

  18. The Impact of Placement on Reading and Mathematics Achievement of Students with High Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Jennifer Stell

    2011-01-01

    The question of where best to educate students with disabilities to maximize their academic achievement has been discussed and researched for over four decades, with inconsistent and contradictory results. This study focused on the mathematics and reading achievement of middle and high school students with mild disabilities in an urban district in…

  19. A Review of the Use of Touch-Screen Mobile Devices by People with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Jennifer; Limbrick, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a review of the research on the use of mobile touch-screen devices such as PDAs, iPod Touches, iPads and smart phones by people with developmental disabilities. Most of the research has been on very basic use of the devices as speech generating devices, as a means of providing video, pictorial and/or audio self-prompting and…

  20. The Effect of Obesity on Incidence of Disability and Mortality in Mexicans Aged 50 Years and Older

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Karmarkar, Amol M.; Tan, Alai; Graham, James E.; Arcari, Christine M.; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.; Snih, Soham Al

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of obesity on incidence of disability and mortality among non-disabled older Mexicans at baseline. Material and Methods The sample included 8,415 Mexicans aged ?50 years from the Mexican Health and Aging Study (2001-2012), who reported no limitations in activities of daily living (ADLs) at baseline and have complete data on all covariates. Socio-demographics, smoking status, comorbidities, ADL activities, and body mass index (BMI) were collected. Results The lowest hazard ratio (HR) for disability was at BMI of 25 to <30 (HR=0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.85-1.12). The lowest HR for mortality were seen among participants with BMIs 25 to <30 (HR=0.85; 95% CI, 075-0.97), 30 to <35 (HR=0.86; 95 % CI, 0.72-1.02), and ?35 (HR=0.92; 95 % CI, 0.70-1.22). Conclusion Mexican older adults with a BMI of 25 to <30 were at less risk for both disability and mortality. PMID:26172232

  1. Gender differences in cognitive impairment and mobility disability in old age: a cross-sectional study in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Onadja, Yentéma; Atchessi, Nicole; Soura, Bassiahi Abdramane; Rossier, Clémentine; Zunzunegui, Maria-Victoria

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to examine differences in cognitive impairment and mobility disability between older men and women in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, and to assess the extent to which these differences could be attributable to gender inequalities in life course social and health conditions. Data were collected on 981 men and women aged 50 and older in a 2010 cross-sectional health survey conducted in the Ouagadougou Health and Demographic Surveillance System. Cognitive impairment was assessed using the Leganés cognitive test. Mobility disability was self-reported as having any difficulty walking 400 m without assistance. We used logistic regression to assess gender differences in cognitive impairment and mobility disability. Prevalence of cognitive impairment was 27.6% in women and 7.7% in men, and mobility disability was present in 51.7% of women and 26.5% of men. The women to men odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for cognitive impairment and mobility disability was 3.52 (1.98-6.28) and 3.79 (2.47-5.85), respectively, after adjusting for the observed life course social and health conditions. The female excess was only partially explained by gender inequalities in nutritional status, marital status and, to a lesser extent, education. Among men and women, age, childhood hunger, lack of education, absence of a partner and being underweight were independent risk factors for cognitive impairment, while age, childhood poor health, food insecurity and being overweight were risk factors for mobility disability. Enhancing nutritional status and education opportunities throughout life span could prevent cognitive impairment and mobility disability and partly reduce the female excess in these disabilities. PMID:23827740

  2. Associations Between Fibrin D-Dimer, Markers of Inflammation, Incident Self-Reported Mobility Limitation, and All-Cause Mortality in Older Men

    PubMed Central

    Wannamethee, S Goya; Whincup, Peter H; Lennon, Lucy; Papacosta, Olia; Lowe, Gordon D

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the independent relationships between fibrin D-dimer, interleukin 6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), and fibrinogen and incident mobility limitation and mortality. Design Prospective. Setting General practice in 24 British towns. Participants Men aged 60 to 79 without prevalent heart failure followed up for an average of 11.5 years (N = 3,925). Measurements All-cause mortality (n = 1,286) and self-reported mobility disability obtained at examination in 1998 to 2000 and in a postal questionnaire 3 to 5 years later in 2003. Results High D-dimer (top vs lowest tertile: adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.46, 95% confidence interval = 1.02–2.05) and IL-6 (aOR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.01–2.02) levels (but not CRP or fibrinogen) were associated with greater incident mobility limitation after adjustment for confounders and prevalent disease status. IL-6, CRP, fibrinogen, and D-dimer were significantly associated with total mortality after adjustment for confounders. Only D-dimer and IL-6 predicted total mortality independent of each other and the other biomarkers. The adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) was 1.16 (95% CI = 1.10–1.22) for a standard deviation increase in log D-dimer and 1.10 (95% CI = 1.04–1.18) for a standard deviation increase in log IL-6. D-dimer was independently related to vascular and nonvascular mortality, and IL-6 was independently related to vascular mortality. Risks of mobility limitation and mortality were greatest in those with a combination of high D-dimer and IL-6 levels. Conclusion D-dimer and IL-6 are associated with risk of mobility limitation and mortality in older men without heart failure. The findings suggest that coagulation leads to functional decline and mortality s that inflammation does not explain. PMID:25516032

  3. A Mobile Robot for Remote Response to Incidents Involving Hazardous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Richard V.

    1994-01-01

    This paper will describe a teleoperated mobile robot system being developed at JPL for use by the JPL Fire Department/HAZMAT Team. The project, which began in October 1990, is focused on prototyping a robotic vehicle which can be quickly deployed and easily operated by HAZMAT Team personnel allowing remote entry and exploration of a hazardous material incident site. The close involvement of JPL Fire Department personnel has been critical in establishing system requirements as well as evaluating the system. The current robot, called HAZBOT III, has been especially designed for operation in environments that may contain combustible gases. Testing of the system with the Fire Department has shown that teleoperated robots can successfully gain access to incident sites allowing hazardous material spills to be remotely located and identified. Work is continuing to enable more complex missions through enhancement of the operator interface and by allowing tetherless operation.

  4. Incidence of and Risk Factors for Falls among Adults with an Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, C. R.; Clemson, L.; Stancliffe, R. J.; Durvasula, S.; Sherrington, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Falls among people with intellectual disability (ID) occur at a younger age than the general population and are a significant cause of injury and hospitalisation. There is very limited research investigating risk factors for falls among people with ID and none with people living outside of formal care arrangements, either independently…

  5. Mobile social network services for families with children with developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Chou, Li-Der; Lai, Nien-Hwa; Chen, Yen-Wen; Chang, Yao-Jen; Yang, Jyun-Yan; Huang, Lien-Fu; Chiang, Wen-Ling; Chiu, Hung-Yi; Shin, Haw-Yun

    2011-07-01

    As Internet technologies evolve, their applications have changed various aspects of human life. Here, we attempt to examine their potential impact on services for families with developmentally delayed children. Our research is thus designed to utilize wireless mobile communication technologies, location services, and search technology in an effort to match families of specific needs with potential care providers. Based on the investigation conducted by our counselors, this paper describes a platform for smooth communication between professional communities and families with children with developmental disabilities (CDD). This research also looks into the impact of management of mobile social network services and training on the operation of these services. Interaction opportunities, care, and support to families with CDD are introduced. PMID:21606040

  6. Outdoor Built Environment Barriers and Facilitators to Activity among Midlife and Older Adults with Mobility Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Dori E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To gain better understanding of how the built environment impacts neighborhood-based physical activity among midlife and older adults with mobility disabilities. Design and methods: We conducted in-depth interviews with 35 adults over age 50, which used an assistive device and lived in King County, Washington, U.S. In addition, participants wore Global Positioning Systems (GPS) devices for 3 days prior to the interview. The GPS maps were used as prompts during the interviews. Open coding of the 35 interviews using latent content analysis resulted in key themes and subthemes that achieved consensus between coders. Two investigators independently coded the text of each interview. Results: Participants were on average of 67 years of age (range: 50–86) and predominantly used canes (57%), walkers (57%), or wheelchairs (46%). Key themes pertained to curb ramp availability and condition, sidewalk availability and condition, hills, aesthetics, lighting, ramp availability, weather, presence and features of crosswalks, availability of resting places and shelter on streets, paved or smooth walking paths, safety, and traffic on roads. Implications: A variety of built environment barriers and facilitators to neighborhood-based activity exist for midlife and older adults with mobility disabilities. Preparing our neighborhood environments for an aging population that uses assistive devices will be important to foster independence and health. PMID:23010096

  7. The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) study, randomized trial of physical activity: Effect on the prevention of major mobility disability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In older adults reduced mobility is common and is an independent risk factor for morbidity, hospitalization, disability, and mortality. Limited evidence suggests that physical activity may help prevent mobility disability; however, there are no definitive clinical trials examining if physical activi...

  8. Motor vehicle driving in high incidence psychiatric disability: comparison of drivers with ADHD, depression, and no known psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Aduen, Paula A; Kofler, Michael J; Cox, Daniel J; Sarver, Dustin E; Lunsford, Erin

    2015-05-01

    Although not often discussed in clinical settings, motor vehicle driving is a complex multitasking endeavor during which a momentary attention lapse can have devastating consequences. Previous research suggests that drivers with high incidence psychiatric disabilities such as ADHD contribute disproportionately to collision rates, which in turn portend myriad adverse social, financial, health, mortality, and legal outcomes. However, self-referral bias and the lack of psychiatric comparison groups constrain the generalizability of these findings. The current study addressed these limitations and examined the unique associations among ADHD, Depression, and adverse driving outcomes, independent of self-selection, driving exposure, and referral bias. The Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP-2) Naturalistic Driving Study comprises U.S. drivers from six sites selected via probability-based sampling. Groups were defined by Barkley ADHD and psychiatric diagnosis questionnaires, and included ADHD (n = 275), Depression (n = 251), and Healthy Control (n = 1828). Primary outcomes included self-reported traffic collisions, moving violations, collision-related injuries, and collision fault (last 3 years). Accounting for demographic differences, ADHD but not Depression portended increased risk for multiple violations (OR = 2.3) and multiple collisions (OR = 2.2). ADHD but not Depression portended increased risk for collision fault (OR = 2.1). Depression but not ADHD predicted increased risk for self-reported injury following collisions (OR = 2.4). ADHD appears uniquely associated with multiple collisions, multiple violations, and collision fault, whereas Depression is uniquely associated with self-reported injury following a collision. Identification of the specific mechanisms underlying this risk will be critical to designing effective interventions to improve long-term functioning for drivers with high incidence psychiatric disability. PMID:25843156

  9. (abstract) A Mobile Robot for Remote Response to Incidents Involving Hazardous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Richard V.

    1994-01-01

    This paper will report the status of the Emergency Response Robotics project, a teleoperated mobile robot system being developed at JPL for use by the JPL Fire Department/HAZMAT Team. The project, which began in 1991, has been focused on developing a robotic vehicle which can be quickly deployed by HAZMAT Team personnel for first entry into an incident site. The primary goals of the system are to gain access to the site, locate and identify the hazard, and aid in its mitigation. The involvement of JPL Fire Department/HAZMAT Team personnel has been critical in guiding the design and evaluation of the system. A unique feature of the current robot, called HAZBOT III, is its special design for operation in combustible environments. This includes the use of all solid state electronics, brushless motors, and internal pressurization. Demonstration and testing of the system with HAZMAT Team personnel has shown that teleoperated robots, such as HAZBOT III, can successfully gain access to incident sites locating and identifying hazardous material spills. Work is continuing to enable more complex missions through the addition of appropriate sensor technology and enhancement of the operator interface.

  10. Designing Clinical Trials of Intervention for Mobility Disability: Results from the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) Pilot Trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clinical trials to assess interventions for mobility disability are critically needed, however data for efficiently designing such trials are lacking. Our results are described from the LIFE pilot clinical trial, in which 424 volunteers aged 70-89 years were randomly assigned to one of two intervent...

  11. A Review of the Use of Touch-Screen Mobile Devices by People with Developmental Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Jennifer; Limbrick, Lisa

    2015-12-01

    This article presents a review of the research on the use of mobile touch-screen devices such as PDAs, iPod Touches, iPads and smart phones by people with developmental disabilities. Most of the research has been on very basic use of the devices as speech generating devices, as a means of providing video, pictorial and/or audio self-prompting and for leisure activities such as listening to music and watching videos. Most research studies were small-n designs that provided a preponderant level of research evidence. There is a clear need for more research with younger participants and with a much wider range of apps, including educational apps. PMID:23888356

  12. The effects of inquiry-based science on the social and communicative skills of students with low-incidence disabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Heather Hopkins

    This research utilized inquiry based science as a vehicle to implement and maintain social skills training for secondary students, ages 14 to 20, with low-incidence disabilities in a self-contained classroom. This three year action research study examined the effects of an inquiry based science curriculum on the level and quantity of social skills used by students with one or more of the following challenges: significant learning disability (functioning more than two grade levels below grade level), emotional/social disability, mental retardation, Autism, and/or varying degrees of brain damage. Through the use of video recording, the students in the study were analyzed based on the level of social interaction and the amount of socialization that took place during inquiry based science. The skills sought were based on the social and communication skills earmarked in the students' weekly social skills training class and their Individualized Education Plans (IEP). Based on previous research in social skills training it has been determined that where social skills training is lacking are in the areas of transfer and maintenance of skills. Due to the natural social behavior that must take place in inquiry based science this group of students were found to exhibit gains in (1) quantity of social interactions on topic; (2) developing higher levels of social interactions (sharing, taking other's suggestions, listening and responding appropriately, etc.); and (3) maintenance of social skills taught outside of formal social skills training. These gains were seen overall in the amount of student involvement during inquiry based science verses teacher involvement. Such increases are depicted through students' verbal exchanges, excerpts from field notes, and student reflections. The findings of this research is expected to guide special educators, administrators and directors of curriculum as to how to better create curriculum for this specific population where social skills training is utilized and maintained in all aspects of the academic day, thus helping this population of student achieve more independence and appropriate interactions in their live as citizens of society.

  13. Childhood brain tumours and use of mobile phones: comparison of a case-control study with incidence data.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Denis; Feychting, Maria; Schüz, Joachim; Röösli, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The first case-control study on mobile phone use and brain tumour risk among children and adolescents (CEFALO study) has recently been published. In a commentary published in Environmental Health, Söderqvist and colleagues argued that CEFALO suggests an increased brain tumour risk in relation to wireless phone use. In this article, we respond and show why consistency checks of case-control study results with observed time trends of incidence rates are essential, given the well described limitations of case-control studies and the steep increase of mobile phone use among children and adolescents during the last decade. There is no plausible explanation of how a notably increased risk from use of wireless phones would correspond to the relatively stable incidence time trends for brain tumours among children and adolescents observed in the Nordic countries. Nevertheless, an increased risk restricted to heavy mobile phone use, to very early life exposure, or to rare subtypes of brain tumours may be compatible with stable incidence trends at this time and thus further monitoring of childhood brain tumour incidence rate time trends is warranted. PMID:22607537

  14. An Empirical Assessment of a Home-Based Exercise Treatment Package for People with Severe Mobility-Related Disabilities Using a Changing Criterion Design: Two Studies

    E-print Network

    Nary, Dorothy E.

    2010-12-13

    A single-subject changing criterion design was used in two studies to empirically assess a home-based exercise treatment package for sedentary participants with severe mobility-related disabilities. The independent variable ...

  15. Environmental barriers to and availability of healthy foods for people with mobility disabilities living in urban and suburban neighborhoods. — Measures of the Food Environment

    Cancer.gov

    Mojtahedi MC, Boblick P, Rimmer JH, Rowland JL, Jones RA, Braunschweig CL. Environmental barriers to and availability of healthy foods for people with mobility disabilities living in urban and suburban neighborhoods.

  16. Using Ecological Momentary Assessment to Monitor Community Participation of People with Mobility-Related Disabilities

    E-print Network

    Gonda, Chiaki

    2011-06-27

    Increased community participation of people with disabilities is a goal of many community-based disability organizations. Researchers used an ecological momentary assessment (EMA) approach to investigate factors that might ...

  17. Muscle strength and BMI as predictors of major mobility disability in the lifestyle interventions and independence for elders pilot (LIFE-P)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Muscle weakness and obesity are two significant threats to mobility facing the increasing number of older adults. To date, there are no studies that have examined the association of strength and body mass index (BMI) on event rates on a widely used performance measure of major mobility disability. T...

  18. Implementing Applied Behavior Analysis for Effective Orientation and Mobility Instruction of Students with Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Mea, Melanie L.

    2013-01-01

    Working with children who have multiple disabilities that include visual impairments can be especially challenging. Many disabling conditions manifest into behavioral difficulties that may take away from learning. Acting out may be a student's way of expressing a lack of healthy coping mechanisms in relation to his or her environment. Implementing…

  19. Mobile phone use while cycling: incidence and effects on behaviour and safety.

    PubMed

    de Waard, Dick; Schepers, Paul; Ormel, Wieke; Brookhuis, Karel

    2010-01-01

    The effects of mobile phone use on cycling behaviour were studied. In study 1, the prevalence of mobile phone use while cycling was assessed. In Groningen 2.2% of cyclists were observed talking on their phone and 0.6% were text messaging or entering a phone number. In study 2, accident-involved cyclists responded to a questionnaire. Only 0.5% stated that they were using their phone at the time of the accident. In study 3, participants used a phone while cycling. The content of the conversation was manipulated and participants also had to enter a text message. Data were compared with just cycling and cycling while listening to music. Telephoning coincided with reduced speed, reduced peripheral vision performance and increased risk and mental effort ratings. Text messaging had the largest negative impact on cycling performance. Higher mental workload and lower speed may account for the relatively low number of people calling involved in accidents. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Although perhaps mainly restricted to flat countries with a large proportion of cyclists, mobile phone use while cycling has increased and may be a threat to traffic safety, similar to phone use while driving a car. In this study, the extent of the problem was assessed by observing the proportion of cyclists using mobile phones, sending questionnaires to accident-involved cyclists and an experimental study was conducted on the effects of mobile phone use while cycling. PMID:20069479

  20. An Investigation into the Incidence of Obesity and Underweight among Adults with an Intellectual Disability in an Australian Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Kathleen; McGillivray, Jane; Illingworth, Kaye; Brookhouse, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Reports suggest that 7% to 18% of Australian adults are obese and a further 16% to 55% are overweight. Studies from other countries have indicated that obesity among people with an intellectual disability may be at least, or even more, prevalent. Prevalence rates range from 28% to 59%. The aim of the current study was to investigate the weight…

  1. Increasing Dengue Incidence in Singapore over the Past 40 Years: Population Growth, Climate and Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Struchiner, Claudio Jose; Rocklöv, Joacim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Massad, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In Singapore, the frequency and magnitude of dengue epidemics have increased significantly over the past 40 years. It is important to understand the main drivers for the rapid increase in dengue incidence. We studied the relative contributions of putative drivers for the rise of dengue in Singapore: population growth, climate parameters and international air passenger arrivals from dengue endemic countries, for the time period of 1974 until 2011. We used multivariable Poisson regression models with the following predictors: Annual Population Size; Aedes Premises Index; Mean Annual Temperature; Minimum and Maximum Temperature Recorded in each year; Annual Precipitation and Annual Number of Air Passengers arriving from dengue-endemic South-East Asia to Singapore. The relative risk (RR) of the increase in dengue incidence due to population growth over the study period was 42.7, while the climate variables (mean and minimum temperature) together explained an RR of 7.1 (RR defined as risk at the end of the time period relative to the beginning and goodness of fit associated with the model leading to these estimates assessed by pseudo-R2 equal to 0.83). Estimating the extent of the contribution of these individual factors on the increasing dengue incidence, we found that population growth contributed to 86% while the residual 14% was explained by increase in temperature. We found no correlation with incoming air passenger arrivals into Singapore from dengue endemic countries. Our findings have significant implications for predicting future trends of the dengue epidemics given the rapid urbanization with population growth in many dengue endemic countries. It is time for policy-makers and the scientific community alike to pay more attention to the negative impact of urbanization and urban climate on diseases such as dengue. PMID:26322517

  2. Increasing Dengue Incidence in Singapore over the Past 40 Years: Population Growth, Climate and Mobility.

    PubMed

    Struchiner, Claudio Jose; Rocklöv, Joacim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Massad, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In Singapore, the frequency and magnitude of dengue epidemics have increased significantly over the past 40 years. It is important to understand the main drivers for the rapid increase in dengue incidence. We studied the relative contributions of putative drivers for the rise of dengue in Singapore: population growth, climate parameters and international air passenger arrivals from dengue endemic countries, for the time period of 1974 until 2011. We used multivariable Poisson regression models with the following predictors: Annual Population Size; Aedes Premises Index; Mean Annual Temperature; Minimum and Maximum Temperature Recorded in each year; Annual Precipitation and Annual Number of Air Passengers arriving from dengue-endemic South-East Asia to Singapore. The relative risk (RR) of the increase in dengue incidence due to population growth over the study period was 42.7, while the climate variables (mean and minimum temperature) together explained an RR of 7.1 (RR defined as risk at the end of the time period relative to the beginning and goodness of fit associated with the model leading to these estimates assessed by pseudo-R2 equal to 0.83). Estimating the extent of the contribution of these individual factors on the increasing dengue incidence, we found that population growth contributed to 86% while the residual 14% was explained by increase in temperature. We found no correlation with incoming air passenger arrivals into Singapore from dengue endemic countries. Our findings have significant implications for predicting future trends of the dengue epidemics given the rapid urbanization with population growth in many dengue endemic countries. It is time for policy-makers and the scientific community alike to pay more attention to the negative impact of urbanization and urban climate on diseases such as dengue. PMID:26322517

  3. Students with Disabilities Experience in Higher Education Online Courses: An Exploratory Study of Self-Efficacy, Use of Assistive Technologies and Mobile Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Chandinie Devi Parasram

    2012-01-01

    The overarching aim of this mixed methods study was to explore the online experiences of students with disabilities, with particular focus on students' use of assistive technologies, mobile media and self-efficacy. Using a multifaceted an integrative approach, this study considered a framework of universal design, Scherer's Matching…

  4. Dynamic biosignal management and transmission during telemedicine incidents handled by Mobile Units over diverse network types.

    PubMed

    Mandellos, George J; Koutelakis, George V; Panagiotakopoulos, Theodor C; Koukias, Andreas M; Koukias, Mixalis N; Lymberopoulos, Dimitrios K

    2008-01-01

    Early and specialized pre-hospital patient treatment improves outcome in terms of mortality and morbidity, in emergency cases. This paper focuses on the design and implementation of a telemedicine system that supports diverse types of endpoints including moving transports (MT) (ambulances, ships, planes, etc.), handheld devices and fixed units, using diverse communication networks. Target of the above telemedicine system is the pre-hospital patient treatment. While vital sign transmission is prior to other services provided by the telemedicine system (videoconference, remote management, voice calls etc.), a predefined algorithm controls provision and quality of the other services. A distributed database system controlled by a central server, aims to manage patient attributes, exams and incidents handled by different Telemedicine Coordination Centers (TCC). PMID:19163300

  5. Longitudinal associations between incident lumbar spine MRI findings and chronic low back pain or radicular symptoms: retrospective analysis of data from the longitudinal assessment of imaging and disability of the back (LAIDBACK)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are few longitudinal cohort studies examining associations between incident MRI findings and incident spine-related symptom outcomes. Prior studies do not discriminate between the two distinct outcomes of low back pain (LBP) and radicular symptoms. To address this gap in the literature, we conducted a secondary analysis of existing data from the Longitudinal Assessment of Imaging and Disability of the Back (LAIDBACK). The purpose of this study was to examine the association of incident lumbar MRI findings with two specific spine-related symptom outcomes: 1) incident chronic bothersome LBP, and 2) incident radicular symptoms such as pain, weakness, or sensation alterations in the lower extremity. Methods The original LAIDBACK study followed 123 participants without current LBP or sciatica, administering standardized MRI assessments of the lumbar spine at baseline and at 3-year follow-up, and collecting information on participant-reported spine-related symptoms and signs every 4 months for 3 years. These analyses examined bivariable and multivariable associations between incident MRI findings and symptom outcomes (LBP and radicular symptoms) using logistic regression. Results Three-year cumulative incidence of new MRI findings ranged between 2 and 8%, depending on the finding. Incident annular fissures were associated with incident chronic LBP, after adjustment for prior back pain and depression (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 6.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-36.9). All participants with incident disc extrusions (OR 5.4) and nerve root impingement (OR 4.1) reported incident radicular symptoms, although associations were not statistically significant. No other incident MRI findings showed large magnitude associations with symptoms. Conclusions Even when applying more specific definitions for spine-related symptom outcomes, few MRI findings showed large magnitude associations with symptom outcomes. Although incident annular fissures, disc extrusions, and nerve root impingement were associated with incident symptom outcomes, the 3-year incidence of these MRI findings was extremely low, and did not explain the vast majority of incident symptom cases. PMID:24886265

  6. Overlapping Chat's Accessibility Requirements between Students with and without Disabilities Due to the Mobile Limitations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvo, Rocío; Iglesias, Ana; Moreno, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    The use of Chats has been extended to mobile-learning (m-learning) environments in the last decade. Students and teachers can communicate in real time and they do not need waiting till their next tutoring date to solve their problems and doubts. However, Chats have many accessibility barriers and many students cannot use this collaborative tool.…

  7. Disability in instrumental activities of daily living among older adults: gender differences

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre, Tiago da Silva; Corona, Ligiana Pires; Nunes, Daniella Pires; Santos, Jair Lício Ferreira; Duarte, Yeda Aparecida de Oliveira; Lebrão, Maria Lúcia

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze gender differences in the incidence and determinants of disability regarding instrumental activities of daily living among older adults. METHODS The data were extracted from the Saúde, Bem-Estar e Envelhecimento (SABE – Health, Wellbeing and Ageing) study. In 2000, 1,034 older adults without difficulty in regarding instrumental activities of daily living were selected. The following characteristics were evaluated at the baseline: sociodemographic and behavioral variables, health status, falls, fractures, hospitalizations, depressive symptoms, cognition, strength, mobility, balance and perception of vision and hearing. Instrumental activities of daily living such as shopping and managing own money and medication, using transportation and using the telephone were reassessed in 2006, with incident cases of disability considered as the outcome. RESULTS The incidence density of disability in instrumental activities of daily living was 44.7/1,000 person/years for women and 25.2/1,000 person/years for men. The incidence rate ratio between women and men was 1.77 (95%CI 1.75;1.80). After controlling for socioeconomic status and clinical conditions, the incidence rate ratio was 1.81 (95%CI 1.77;1.84), demonstrating that women with chronic disease and greater social vulnerability have a greater incidence density of disability in instrumental activities of daily living. The following were determinants of the incidence of disability: age ? 80 and worse perception of hearing in both genders; stroke in men; and being aged 70 to 79 in women. Better cognitive performance was a protective factor in both genders and better balance was a protective factor in women. CONCLUSIONS The higher incidence density of disability in older women remained even after controlling for adverse social and clinical conditions. In addition to age, poorer cognitive performance and conditions that adversely affect communication disable both genders. Acute events, such as a stroke, disables elderly men more, whereas early deficits regarding balance disable women more. PMID:25119933

  8. Disability in instrumental activities of daily living among older adults: gender differences.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Tiago da Silva; Corona, Ligiana Pires; Nunes, Daniella Pires; Santos, Jair Lício Ferreira; Duarte, Yeda Aparecida de Oliveira; Lebrão, Maria Lúcia

    2014-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze gender differences in the incidence and determinants of disability regarding instrumental activities of daily living among older adults. METHODS The data were extracted from the Saúde, Bem-Estar e Envelhecimento (SABE - Health, Wellbeing and Ageing) study. In 2000, 1,034 older adults without difficulty in regarding instrumental activities of daily living were selected. The following characteristics were evaluated at the baseline: sociodemographic and behavioral variables, health status, falls, fractures, hospitalizations, depressive symptoms, cognition, strength, mobility, balance and perception of vision and hearing. Instrumental activities of daily living such as shopping and managing own money and medication, using transportation and using the telephone were reassessed in 2006, with incident cases of disability considered as the outcome. RESULTS The incidence density of disability in instrumental activities of daily living was 44.7/1,000 person/years for women and 25.2/1,000 person/years for men. The incidence rate ratio between women and men was 1.77 (95%CI 1.75;1.80). After controlling for socioeconomic status and clinical conditions, the incidence rate ratio was 1.81 (95%CI 1.77;1.84), demonstrating that women with chronic disease and greater social vulnerability have a greater incidence density of disability in instrumental activities of daily living. The following were determinants of the incidence of disability: age ? 80 and worse perception of hearing in both genders; stroke in men; and being aged 70 to 79 in women. Better cognitive performance was a protective factor in both genders and better balance was a protective factor in women. CONCLUSIONS The higher incidence density of disability in older women remained even after controlling for adverse social and clinical conditions. In addition to age, poorer cognitive performance and conditions that adversely affect communication disable both genders. Acute events, such as a stroke, disables elderly men more, whereas early deficits regarding balance disable women more. PMID:25119933

  9. Circulatory Diseases in the U.S. Elderly in the Linked National Long-Term Care Survey-Medicare Database: Population-Based Analysis of Incidence, Comorbidity, and Disability

    PubMed Central

    Akushevich, Igor; Kravchenko, Julia; Ukraintseva, Svetlana; Arbeev, Konstantin; Yashin, Anatoli I.

    2014-01-01

    Incidence rates of acute coronary heart disease (ACHD; including myocardial infarction and angina pectoris), stroke, and heart failure (HF) were studied for their age, disability, and comorbidity patterns in the U.S. elderly population using the National Long Term Care Survey (NLTCS) data linked to Medicare records for 1991–2005. Incidence rates increased with age with a decrease in the oldest old (stroke and HF) or were stable at all ages (ACHD). For all diseases, incidence rates were lower among institutionalized individuals and higher in individuals with higher comorbidity indices. The results could be used for understanding currently debated effects of biomedical research, screening, and therapeutic innovations on changes in disease incidence with advancing age as well as for projecting future Medicare costs.

  10. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2012-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers... Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may...

  11. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2014-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers... Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may...

  12. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2013-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers... Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may...

  13. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2011-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers... Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may...

  14. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers... Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may...

  15. 28 CFR 36.311 - Mobility devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...individuals with mobility disabilities to use wheelchairs and manually-powered mobility aids, such as walkers, crutches, canes, braces, or other similar devices designed for use by individuals with mobility disabilities in any areas open to pedestrian...

  16. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  17. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  18. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  19. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  20. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  1. Mobile applications for participation at the shopping mall: content analysis and usability for persons with physical disabilities and communication or cognitive limitations.

    PubMed

    Auger, Claudine; Leduc, Emilie; Labbé, Delphine; Guay, Cassioppée; Fillion, Brigitte; Bottari, Carolina; Swaine, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to determine the important features in content and usability of existing mobile applications evaluating environmental barriers and facilitators (EBF) to participation for persons with physical disabilities presenting mild communication or cognitive limitations. A rigorous process based on a user-centered design approach led to the identification of two relevant mobile applications to evaluate the EBF. An accessibility expert, the research team as well as five users then tested the mobile applications in a shopping mall. A thematic content analysis of the research team's and users' comments established 10 categories of key features that adequately respond to the needs of the clientele targeted in this study. In terms of content, granularity and contextualization of the information provided were considered important. With respect to usability, relevant features were place finding, rating system, presentation of results, compatibility, user-friendliness, aesthetics, credibility of the information as well as connectivity/interactiveness. The research team and the users agreed on some aspects such as aesthetics, but had different perspectives on features such as the rating system or the connectivity/interactiveness of the application. The users proposed new features suggesting that the existing mobile applications did not correspond to all their needs. PMID:25513999

  2. Mobile Applications for Participation at the Shopping Mall: Content Analysis and Usability for Persons with Physical Disabilities and Communication or Cognitive Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Auger, Claudine; Leduc, Emilie; Labbé, Delphine; Guay, Cassioppée; Fillion, Brigitte; Bottari, Carolina; Swaine, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to determine the important features in content and usability of existing mobile applications evaluating environmental barriers and facilitators (EBF) to participation for persons with physical disabilities presenting mild communication or cognitive limitations. A rigorous process based on a user-centered design approach led to the identification of two relevant mobile applications to evaluate the EBF. An accessibility expert, the research team as well as five users then tested the mobile applications in a shopping mall. A thematic content analysis of the research team’s and users’ comments established 10 categories of key features that adequately respond to the needs of the clientele targeted in this study. In terms of content, granularity and contextualization of the information provided were considered important. With respect to usability, relevant features were place finding, rating system, presentation of results, compatibility, user-friendliness, aesthetics, credibility of the information as well as connectivity/interactiveness. The research team and the users agreed on some aspects such as aesthetics, but had different perspectives on features such as the rating system or the connectivity/interactiveness of the application. The users proposed new features suggesting that the existing mobile applications did not correspond to all their needs. PMID:25513999

  3. Students requesting accommodations on the basis of mobility, systemic or other health-related disabilities must provide documentation assessed and signed by a licensed physician within the past six months.

    E-print Network

    1 Students requesting accommodations on the basis of mobility, systemic or other health-related disabilities must provide documentation assessed and signed by a licensed physician within the past six months. The documentation must include, but is not restricted to, the following: o An identification of the person

  4. Effects of physical exercise therapy on mobility, physical functioning, physical activity and quality of life in community-dwelling older adults with impaired mobility, physical disability and/or multi-morbidity: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    de Vries, N M; van Ravensberg, C D; Hobbelen, J S M; Olde Rikkert, M G M; Staal, J B; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, M W G

    2012-01-01

    This is the first meta-analysis focusing on elderly patients with mobility problems, physical disability and/or multi-morbidity. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of physical exercise therapy on mobility, physical functioning, physical activity and quality of life. A broad systematic literature search was performed in the databases PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, PEDro and The Cochrane Library. Relevant study characteristics were reviewed and meta-analyses using standardized mean differences (SMDs) were performed. The results show that physical exercise therapy has a positive effect on mobility (SMD final value: 0.18; 95% CI: 0.05, 0.30; SMD change value: 0.82; 95% CI: 0.54, 1.10) and physical functioning (SMD final value: 0.27; 95% CI: 0.08, 0.46; SMD change value: 2.93; 95% CI: 2.50, 3.36). High-intensity exercise interventions seem to be somewhat more effective in improving physical functioning than low-intensity exercise interventions (SMD final value: 0.22; 95% CI: -0.17, 0.62; SMD change value: 0.38; 95% CI: -0.48, 1.25). These positive effects are of great value for older adults who are already physically impaired. The effect on physical activity and quality of life was not evident and no definite conclusions on the most effective type of physical exercise therapy intervention can be drawn. PMID:22101330

  5. Accommodating Students with Disabilities on State English Language Proficiency Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albus, Debra; Thurlow, Martha L.

    2008-01-01

    All English language learners (ELLs) are to participate in an annual assessment of English language proficiency (ELP) under Title III of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. This includes ELLs with disabilities, regardless of whether they are high-incidence disabilities (e.g., learning disability) or low-incidence disabilities (e.g., deaf or hard…

  6. Orientation and Mobility with Persons Who Are Deaf-Blind: An Initial Examination of Single-Subject Design Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Amy T.

    2009-01-01

    Persons who are deaf-blind represent a heterogeneous, low-incidence population of children and adults who, at some point in life, regardless of the presence of additional disabilities, may benefit from formal orientation and mobility (O&M) instruction. Current national policies, such as the No Child Left Behind Act, which emphasize that…

  7. Superheroes Social Skills: A Study Examining the Effects of Using an Evidence-Based Approach to Teach Social Skills to Children with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, Julia Ann Kelly

    2011-01-01

    The current study evaluated the use of a manualized social skills program, Superheroes Social Skills, to increase the use of prosocial behaviors and decrease the use of aggressive behaviors for children with externalizing behaviors. The training was implemented by a school psychologist in a pullout group with four children with high-incidence

  8. Freedom to Roam: A Study of Mobile Device Adoption and Accessibility for People with Visual and Motor Disabilities

    E-print Network

    Wobbrock, Jacob O.

    in the world. However, these empowering devices have their own accessibility challenges. We present a formative provide guidelines for more accessible and empowering mobile device design. Categories and Subject a visually impaired participant carries with her frequently: (a) signature stamp, (b) water-level sensor, (c

  9. Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 301 acute and chronic diseases and injuries in 188 countries, 1990–2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Up-to-date evidence about levels and trends in disease and injury incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability (YLDs) is an essential input into global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013), we estimated these quantities for acute and chronic diseases and injuries for 188 countries between 1990 and 2013. Methods Estimates were calculated for disease and injury incidence, prevalence, and YLDs using GBD 2010 methods with some important refinements. Results for incidence of acute disorders and prevalence of chronic disorders are new additions to the analysis. Key improvements include expansion to the cause and sequelae list, updated systematic reviews, use of detailed injury codes, improvements to the Bayesian meta-regression method (DisMod-MR), and use of severity splits for various causes. An index of data representativeness, showing data availability, was calculated for each cause and impairment during three periods globally and at the country level for 2013. In total, 35 620 distinct sources of data were used and documented to calculated estimates for 301 diseases and injuries and 2337 sequelae. The comorbidity simulation provides estimates for the number of sequelae, concurrently, by individuals by country, year, age, and sex. Disability weights were updated with the addition of new population-based survey data from four countries. Findings Disease and injury were highly prevalent; only a small fraction of individuals had no sequelae. Comorbidity rose substantially with age and in absolute terms from 1990 to 2013. Incidence of acute sequelae were predominantly infectious diseases and short-term injuries, with over 2 billion cases of upper respiratory infections and diarrhoeal disease episodes in 2013, with the notable exception of tooth pain due to permanent caries with more than 200 million incident cases in 2013. Conversely, leading chronic sequelae were largely attributable to non-communicable diseases, with prevalence estimates for asymptomatic permanent caries and tension-type headache of 2·4 billion and 1·6 billion, respectively. The distribution of the number of sequelae in populations varied widely across regions, with an expected relation between age and disease prevalence. YLDs for both sexes increased from 537·6 million in 1990 to 764·8 million in 2013 due to population growth and ageing, whereas the age-standardised rate decreased little from 114·87 per 1000 people to 110·31 per 1000 people between 1990 and 2013. Leading causes of YLDs included low back pain and major depressive disorder among the top ten causes of YLDs in every country. YLD rates per person, by major cause groups, indicated the main drivers of increases were due to musculoskeletal, mental, and substance use disorders, neurological disorders, and chronic respiratory diseases; however HIV/AIDS was a notable driver of increasing YLDs in sub-Saharan Africa. Also, the proportion of disability-adjusted life years due to YLDs increased globally from 21·1% in 1990 to 31·2% in 2013. Interpretation Ageing of the world’s population is leading to a substantial increase in the numbers of individuals with sequelae of diseases and injuries. Rates of YLDs are declining much more slowly than mortality rates. The non-fatal dimensions of disease and injury will require more and more attention from health systems. The transition to non-fatal outcomes as the dominant source of burden of disease is occurring rapidly outside of sub-Saharan Africa. Our results can guide future health initiatives through examination of epidemiological trends and a better understanding of variation across countries. PMID:26063472

  10. Identifying mobility heterogeneity in very frail older adults. Are frail people all the same?

    PubMed

    Montero-Odasso, Manuel; Bergman, Howard; Béland, François; Sourial, Nadia; Fletcher, John D; Dallaire, Luc

    2009-01-01

    Frail older adults sustain mobility limitations; however, clinical experience suggests that their mobility characteristics are far from being homogeneous. We conducted a prospective analysis to identify mobility heterogeneity in 1160 very frail older adults and we investigated the associations between mobility limitation profiles and further institutionalization and death. A cluster analysis using 11 self-reported mobility indicators was used to identify mobility profiles (MPs). At baseline, MPs varies from having mild limitations (n=370), moderate limitations (n=470), to severe limitations (n=320). Mild MP did not have mobility disability. Moderate MP had upper limb task limitations and mild lower limb task difficulties. Severe MP portrayed more deficits in lower limbs tasks functions with important mobility disability. After 2 years of follow up, the Severe MP group had a higher risk of mortality and nursing home placement when compared with Mild MP. Higher incidences of hip fracture and hospitalization were associated with the severity of MP. Even among very frail elderly, we identified different levels of mobility, cautioning against to treat them as a homogeneous group. Mobility heterogeneity predicted mortality and nursing home placement in a dose response manner. None of the mobility indicators individually predicted the outcomes as strongly as the profiles. Identification of this mobility heterogeneity may assist on planning of health programs in very frail elderly. PMID:18986718

  11. 49 CFR 39.93 - What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring onto a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...individuals with mobility disabilities to use wheelchairs and manually powered mobility aids, such as walkers, crutches, canes, braces, or other similar devices designed for use by individuals with mobility disabilities in any areas open to pedestrian...

  12. Learning Disabilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Weight Safely Learning Disabilities KidsHealth > Teens > Diseases & Conditions > Learning Disorders > Learning Disabilities Print A A A Text Size ... common and best-known verbal learning disability is dyslexia , which causes people to have trouble recognizing or ...

  13. Prevalence of Disability and Disability Type Among Adults--United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Courtney-Long, Elizabeth A; Carroll, Dianna D; Zhang, Qing C; Stevens, Alissa C; Griffin-Blake, Shannon; Armour, Brian S; Campbell, Vincent A

    2015-07-31

    Understanding the prevalence of disability is important for public health programs to be able to address the needs of persons with disabilities. Beginning in 2013, to measure disability prevalence by functional type, the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), added five questions to identify disability in vision, cognition, mobility, self-care, and independent living. CDC analyzed data from the 2013 BRFSS to assess overall prevalence of any disability, as well as specific types of disability among noninstitutionalized U.S. adults. Across all states, disabilities in mobility and cognition were the most frequently reported types. State-level prevalence of each disability type ranged from 2.7% to 8.1% (vision); 6.9% to 16.8% (cognition); 8.5% to 20.7% (mobility); 1.9% to 6.2% (self-care) and 4.2% to 10.8% (independent living). A higher prevalence of any disability was generally seen among adults living in states in the South and among women (24.4%) compared with men (19.8%). Prevalences of any disability and disability in mobility were higher among older age groups. These are the first data on functional disability types available in a state-based health survey. This information can help public health programs identify the prevalence of and demographic characteristics associated with different disability types among U.S. adults and better target appropriate interventions to reduce health disparities. PMID:26225475

  14. Incidence of Lateral Phoria Among SLD Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, James R.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Compared was the incidence of lateral phoria, a tendency for the eyes to turn in or out, in 45 elementary grade learning disabled children and 364 children in regular elementary education classes. (DB)

  15. Is There Really a Difference? Distinguishing Mild Intellectual Disability from "Similar" Disability Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouck, Emily C.; Satsangi, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Students with mild intellectual disability generally garner less individual attention in research, as they are often aggregated with students with moderate and severe intellectual disability or students with other high incidence disabilities. This study used the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2) to look at the personal…

  16. Disabling Myths About Disability. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Beatrice A.

    Five myths regarding physical disability are examined. First, the myth that people with physical disabilities tend to be more maladjusted than the ordinary person is analyzed, and it is concluded that the common association between maladjustment and physical disability is grossly oversimplified. Second, the myth portraying people with disabilities

  17. Students with Disabilities in Post-secondary Education Introduction

    E-print Network

    Chen, Deming

    deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and health impairment (Ameri- can Association of Community Colleges, n. d are learning disabilities, emotional or psychiatric condition, orthopedic or mobility impairment, attention

  18. Incidence Rates

    Cancer.gov

    Close Window State Cancer Profiles Quick Reference Guides ? Quick Reference Guides Index Incidence Rates Send to Printer Text description of this image. Site Home Policies Accessibility Viewing Files FOIA Contact Us U.S. Department of Health and Human

  19. Staffing Patterns for Counselors of Disabled Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Diego Community Coll. District, CA. Research Office.

    Nine California community colleges were surveyed in 1979-1980 to determine the ratios of certified disability counselors to students with hearing, speech, visual, or mobility impairments; students with learning disabilities (average or limited); students with other health problems; and students in convalescent and nursing homes. Survey findings…

  20. Learning Disabilities and Employment before and in the Americans with Disabilities Act Era: Progress or a Bridge Too Far?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerber, Paul J.; Batalo, Cecilia G.; Achola, Edwin O.

    2011-01-01

    The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and its amendments have been in existence for a little more than twenty years. Title One, which pertains to employment, has had a bearing on employment for persons with disabilities, particularly the high incidence category of learning disabilities, who for the most part work in competitive…

  1. The physically disabled medical student.

    PubMed

    Stiens, S

    1987-01-01

    Previous literature on physically disabled medical students is reviewed, and its implications are examined. Although they encounter significant obstacles to their acceptance into medical school due to stereotyped attitudes, environmental barriers, and recent legal decisions, these students are nevertheless applying to and successfully completing medical school. Common coping strategies for students with mobility, visual, and hearing impairments are briefly outlined. PMID:2962981

  2. Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sittiprapaporn, Wichian, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Learning disability is a classification that includes several disorders in which a person has difficulty learning in a typical manner. Depending on the type and severity of the disability, interventions may be used to help the individual learn strategies that will foster future success. Some interventions can be quite simplistic, while others are…

  3. Learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Lyon, G R

    1996-01-01

    Approximately 5% of all public school students are identified as having a learning disability (LD). LD is not a single disorder, but includes disabilities in any of seven areas related to reading, language, and mathematics. These separate types of learning disabilities frequently co-occur with one another and with social skill deficits and emotional or behavioral disorders. Most of the available information concerning learning disabilities relates to reading disabilities, and the majority of children with learning disabilities have their primary deficits in basic reading skills. An important part of the definition of LD is its exclusions: learning disabilities cannot be attributed primarily to mental retardation, emotional disturbance, cultural difference, or disadvantage. Thus, the concept of LD focuses on the notion of a discrepancy between a child's academic achievement and his or her apparent capacity to learn. Recent research indicates, however, that disability in basic reading skills is primarily caused by deficits in phonological awareness, which is independent of any achievement-capacity discrepancy. Deficits in phonological awareness can be identified in late kindergarten and first grade using inexpensive, straightforward testing protocol. Interventions have varying effectiveness, depending largely on the severity of the individual child's disability. The prevalence of learning disability identification has increased dramatically in the past 20 years. The "real" prevalence of LD is subject to much dispute because of the lack of an agreed-upon definition of LD with objective identification criteria. Some researchers have argued that the currently recognized 5% prevalence rate is inflated; others argue that LD is still underidentified. In fact, it appears that there are both sound and unsound reasons for the increase in identification rates. Sound reasons for the increase include better research, a broader definition of disability in reading, focusing on phonological awareness, and greater identification of girls with learning disabilities. Unsound reasons for the increase include broad and vague definitions of learning disability, financial incentives to identify students for special education, and inadequate preparation of teachers by colleges of education, leading to overreferral of students with any type of special need. There is no clear demarcation between students with normal reading abilities and those with mild reading disability. The majority of children with reading disabilities have relatively mild reading disabilities, with a smaller number having extreme reading disabilities. The longer children with disability in basic reading skills, at any level of severity, go without identification and intervention, the more difficult the task of remediation and the lower the rate of success. Children with extreme deficits in basic reading skills are much more difficult to remediate than children with mild or moderate deficits. It is unclear whether children in the most severe range can achieve age- and grade-approximate reading skills, even with normal intelligence and with intense, informed intervention provided over a protracted period of time. Children with severe learning disabilities are likely to manifest an increased number of and increased severity of social and behavioral deficits. When children with disabilities in reading also manifest attention deficit disorder, their reading deficits are typically exacerbated, more severe, and more resistant to intervention. While severe reading disorders are clearly a major concern, even mild deficits in reading skills are likely to portend significant difficulties in academic learning. These deficits, too, are worthy of early identification and intervention. Even children with relatively subtle linguistic and reading deficits require the expertise of a teacher who is well trained and informed about the relationships between language development and reading development. PMID:8689262

  4. Cancer Incidence

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator presents cancer incidence rates for the U.S. population from 1973 to 2008. Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the U.S., and many factors, including exposure to some environmental contaminants, are known or suspected of contributing to increased ca...

  5. Course Completion and Attainment in Disabled Students Taking Courses with the Open University UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, John T. E.

    2010-01-01

    This investigation compared outcomes in disabled and non-disabled students taking courses by distance learning with the Open University UK in 2003. Students with mental health difficulties showed poorer course completion than non-disabled students. Students with restricted mobility and students with other disabilities showed lower pass rates than…

  6. Intellectual disability

    MedlinePLUS

    ... below average Development way below that of peers Intelligence quotient (IQ) score below 70 on a standardized ... understand risks and make plans and decisions. Social: Nutrition programs can reduce disability associated with malnutrition. Early ...

  7. Evolutionary genomics of human intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Crespi, Bernard; Summers, Kyle; Dorus, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have postulated that X-linked and autosomal genes underlying human intellectual disability may have also mediated the evolution of human cognition. We have conducted the first comprehensive assessment of the extent and patterns of positive Darwinian selection on intellectual disability genes in humans. We report three main findings. First, as noted in some previous reports, intellectual disability genes with primary functions in the central nervous system exhibit a significant concentration to the X chromosome. Second, there was no evidence for a higher incidence of recent positive selection on X-linked than autosomal intellectual disability genes, nor was there a higher incidence of selection on such genes overall, compared to sets of control genes. However, the X-linked intellectual disability genes inferred to be subject to recent positive selection were concentrated in the Rho GTP-ase pathway, a key signaling pathway in neural development and function. Third, among all intellectual disability genes, there was evidence for a higher incidence of recent positive selection on genes involved in DNA repair, but not for genes involved in other functions. These results provide evidence that alterations to genes in the Rho GTP-ase and DNA-repair pathways may play especially-important roles in the evolution of human cognition and vulnerability to genetically-based intellectual disability. PMID:25567903

  8. Learning Disabilities and ADHD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disabilities Learning disabilities and ADHD Learning disabilities and ADHD Learning disabilities affect how you understand, remember, and ... learning skills, including memory tips from LD Online. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) top ADHD is a medical condition that ...

  9. with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, Debra L.; Jones, Vita L.; Sparks, Shannon L.; Aldridge, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Parents from culturally diverse backgrounds need to feel that they play a vital role in the future success of their sons or daughters with disabilities. Differences in culture and ethnicity can affect families' involvement in transition planning and the goals that they emphasize for their children. Families of diverse backgrounds were…

  10. Common Pediatric Disabilities: Medical Aspects and Educational Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Janet Siantz; Colson, Steven

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents definitions of common pediatric disabilities and information about incidence, causes, diagnosis, common characteristics, complications with educational implications, and multidisciplinary intervention approaches. It covers the following conditions: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, fragile…

  11. Speech and Language Disorders in Children with Intellectual Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgieva, Dobrinka; Cholakova, Maya

    This study of 148 Bulgarian children with mild intellectual disabilities investigated the incidence of various types of speech and language disorders in children with intellectual disabilities. A questionnaire was given to the parents and relatives of the children requiring information about the pupils' pre-, peri-, and early postnatal…

  12. Sleep and Developmental Disabilities: Assessment, Treatment, and Outcome Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doran, Scott M.; Harvey, Mark T.; Horner, Robert H.

    2006-01-01

    People with developmental disabilities sleep less and experience higher incidence of clinical sleep disorders than the general population. Exploring the neurophysiology linking sleep with daytime performance in patients with developmental disabilities is now possible using minimally sufficient sleep and sleep-sensitive behavioral assays. Although…

  13. Learning Disabilities: Introduction and Strategies for College Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seitz, Sandy; Scheerer, Jan

    Designed for community college educators, this paper provides an overview of the characteristics and problems of the learning disabled adult and offers strategies for both teaching and learning. Following introductory remarks, the paper provides definitions of learning disability and discusses the symptoms, psychological effects, and incidence of…

  14. Risk Behaviors for Varying Categories of Disability in NELS:88

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollar, David

    2005-01-01

    A large body of research shows that youth with disabilities, who comprise about 13% of the country's school-aged population, report comparable to higher incidence rates of alcohol, tobacco, and other drug (ATOD) use than their peers. Furthermore, youth with disabilities who reported ATOD use or who engaged in binge drinking had significantly more…

  15. Chronic Disability Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gamborg, Brian L.; Elliott, William S.; Curtis, Kenneth W.

    1991-01-01

    Prolonged disability is best understood as an illness that exists independently of the initiating disease. The disabled individual goes through predictable stages of disability before resolution occurs. The failure to diagnose disability can jeopardize successful rehabilitation. If correctly identified and treated either prior to or concurrently with the initiating problem, successful recovery of the disabled individual is substantially increased. PMID:21229113

  16. Linking C-Reactive Protein to Late-Life Disability in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999–2002

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Hsu-Ko; Bean, Jonathan F.; Yen, Chung-Jen; Leveille, Suzanne G.

    2008-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation, measured by interleukin-6, predicts incident disability among elderly people. However, little is known about the relation of C-reactive protein (CRP) to disability. Method Participants (>60 years old, N = 1680) were from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2002. Disability in activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), leisure and social activities (LSA), lower extremity mobility (LEM), and general physical activities (GPA) was obtained by self-report. Peak muscle power was the product of isokinetic peak leg torque and peak force velocity. Functional limitations were evaluated via habitual walking speed, which was obtained from a 20-foot timed walk. CRP levels were quantified by using latex-enhanced nephelometry. Results Elevated CRP levels were associated with disability in IADL, LSA, LEM, and GPA, independent of basic demographics, chronic medical diseases, health behaviors, as well as nutritional markers. The corresponding odds ratios of disability for each standard-deviation increase in natural-log-transformed CRP were 1.18 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02–1.35), 1.18 (95% CI, 1.00–1.39), 1.17 (95% CI, 1.03–1.33), and 1.17 (95% CI, 1.05–1.31), respectively. The relationship diminished after additional adjustment of leg power and/or walking speed, meaning that impairment in leg power and limitations in gait speed likely mediate the association between CRP and disability. CRP had an inverse relationship to leg power and walking speed. Likewise, additional adjustment for leg power substantially diminished the association between CRP and walking speed, suggesting a mediating effect of power between CRP and gait speed. Conclusions Independent of chronic diseases, elevated CRP is associated with multiple domains of disability through mediation of muscle power, habitual gait speed, or both. Future research is needed to understand CRP as a risk factor for disability in older populations. PMID:16611705

  17. Career Interests and Self-Estimated Abilities of Young Adults with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Sherri; Unkefer, Lesley Craig; Cichy, Bryan Ervin; Peper, Christine; Juang, Ju-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain vocational interests and self-estimated work-relevant abilities of young adults with disabilities. Results showed that young adults with both low incidence and high incidence disabilities have a wide range of interests and self-estimated work-relevant abilities that are comparable to those in the general…

  18. Facts about Developmental Disabilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Children with kernicterus are more likely to have cerebral palsy, hearing and vision problems, and problems with their ... developmental disabilities, such as: ADHD , autism spectrum disorder , cerebral palsy , hearing loss , intellectual disability , learning disability, vision impairment , ...

  19. Population Impact of Arthritis on Disability in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jing; Chang, Rowland W.; Dunlop, Dorothy D.

    2007-01-01

    Objective Disability threatens the independence of older adults and has large economic and societal costs. This article examines the population impact of arthritis on disability incidence among older Americans. Methods The present study used longitudinal data (1998–2000) from the Health and Retirement Study, a national probability sample of elderly Americans. Disability was defined by the inability to perform basic activities of daily living (ADL). A total of 7,758 participants ages ?65 years with no ADL disability at baseline were included in the analyses. Multiple logistic regression was used to measure the impact of baseline arthritis (self reported) on incidence of subsequent ADL disability after controlling for baseline differences in demographics, health factors, health behaviors, and medical access. Results Older adults who had baseline arthritis had a substantially higher incidence of ADL disability compared with those without arthritis (9.3% versus 4.5%). The strong relationship of arthritis and ADL disability was partially explained by demographic, health, behavioral, and medical access factors. However, even after adjusting for all other risk factors, arthritis remained as an independent and significant predictor for developing ADL disability (adjusted odds ratio 1.5, 95% confidence interval 1.2–1.8). Almost 1 in every 4 new cases of ADL disability was due to arthritis (adjusted population attributable fraction: 23.7%). Conclusion The high frequency of incident ADL disability attributable to arthritis points to the importance of intervention programs that address the entire spectrum of health and functional problems in persons with arthritis to prevent disability. PMID:16583415

  20. Disability Information & Awareness: Afghanistan. Version 2.2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, M.

    This report focuses on a project in Afghanistan that coordinates the efforts of several agencies to develop community-directed disability, rehabilitation, and education services. The program stresses community mobilization aided by skills transfer from expatriate specialists, and includes physical therapy, prosthetics, living skills and mobility

  1. Disabilities research in India

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekar, H.; Naveen Kumar, C.; Prashanth, N. R.; Kasthuri, P.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review all articles related to psychiatric disability that have been published in the Indian Journal of Psychiatry since its inception till date. We have also added up some more relevant literature in the area of mental disability of Indian psychiatric patients. Finally the article ends up with discussion related to challenges associated with mental disability, persons with Disability Act and future directions in the area of psychiatric disability. PMID:21836695

  2. Predicting disabilities in daily functioning in older people with intellectual disabilities using a frailty index.

    PubMed

    Schoufour, Josje D; Mitnitski, Arnold; Rockwood, Kenneth; Hilgenkamp, Thessa I M; Evenhuis, Heleen M; Echteld, Michael A

    2014-10-01

    Frailty is a state of increased vulnerability to adverse health outcomes compared to others of the same age. People with intellectual disabilities (ID) are more frequently and earlier frail compared to the general population. Frailty challenges much of health care, which will likely further increase due to the aging of the population. Before effective interventions can start, more information is necessary about the consequences of frailty in this, already disabled, population. Here we report whether frailty predicts disabilities in daily functioning. Frailty was measured with a frailty index (FI). At baseline and follow-up activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and mobility were collected by informant report. For 703 older people with ID (?50 yr) baseline and follow-up measures were known. Multivariate linear regression models were used to predict ADL, IADL and mobility at follow-up. The FI was significantly associated with disabilities in daily functioning independent of baseline characteristics (age, gender, level of ID, Down syndrome) and baseline ADL, IADL or mobility. The FI showed to be most predictive for those with relative high independence at baseline. These results stress the importance for interventions that limit the progression of frailty and, thereby, help to limit further disability. PMID:24950014

  3. MOBILE SENSING 1 MOBILE SENSING

    E-print Network

    Prodiæ, Aleksandar

    ;MOBILE SENSING 40 #12;MOBILE SENSING 41 #12;MOBILE SENSING 42 Each patient was rated by our app, junior Drs., and senior Drs. on a 0-7 scale. #12;MOBILE SENSING 43 Error for our app: 1.2/7 ! ErrorMOBILE SENSING 1 MOBILE SENSING ! ! Parham Aarabi #12;MOBILE SENSING 2 20 years of sensing research

  4. Progression of leprosy disability after discharge: is multidrug therapy enough?

    PubMed Central

    Sales, Anna Maria; Campos, Dayse Pereira; Hacker, Mariana Andrea; da Costa Nery, José Augusto; Düppre, Nádia Cristina; Rangel, Emanuel; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Penna, Maria Lucia Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the risk factors related to worsening of physical disabilities after treatment discharge among patients with leprosy administered 12 consecutive monthly doses of multidrug therapy (MDT/WHO). Methods Cohort study was carried out at the Leprosy Laboratory in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We evaluated patients with multibacillary leprosy treated (MDT/WHO) between 1997 and 2007. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the relationship between the onset of physical disabilities after release from treatment and epidemiological and clinical characteristics. Results The total observation time period for the 368 patients was 1 570 person-years (PY), averaging 4.3 years per patient. The overall incidence rate of worsening of disability was 6.5/100 PY. Among those who began treatment with no disability, the incidence rate of physical disability was 4.5/100 PY. Among those who started treatment with Grade 1 or 2 disabilities, the incidence rate of deterioration was 10.5/100 PY. The survival analysis evidenced that when disability grade was 1, the risk was 1.61 (95% CI: 1.02–2.56), when disability was 2, the risk was 2.37 (95% CI 1.35–4.16), and when the number of skin lesions was 15 or more, an HR = 1.97 (95% CI: 1.07–3.63). Patients with neuritis showed a 65% increased risk of worsening of disability (HR = 1.65 [95% CI: 1.08–2.52]). Conclusion Impairment at diagnosis was the main risk factor for neurological worsening after treatment/MDT. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment of reactional episodes remain the main means of preventing physical disabilities. PMID:23937704

  5. Incidents of Security Concern

    SciTech Connect

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-01

    This presentation addresses incidents of security concern and an incident program for addressing them. It addresses the phases of an inquiry, and it divides incidents into categories based on severity and interest types based on whether security, management, or procedural interests are involved. A few scenarios are then analyzed according to these breakdowns.

  6. GRADUATE LIBERAL STUDIES -DISABILITIES SERVICES

    E-print Network

    Royer, Dana

    for Students (in the case of learning or psychological disabilities) or Health Services (in the case disabilities services: ___________________________________________________________ PERSONAL INFORMATIOGRADUATE LIBERAL STUDIES - DISABILITIES SERVICES DISABILITIES SERVICES REQUEST FORM GRADUATE

  7. 47 CFR 14.61 - Obligations with respect to internet browsers built into mobile phones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... false Obligations with respect to internet browsers built into mobile phones...EQUIPMENT BY PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES Internet Browsers Built Into Telephones Used With...14.61 Obligations with respect to internet browsers built into mobile phones....

  8. 47 CFR 14.61 - Obligations with respect to internet browsers built into mobile phones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... false Obligations with respect to internet browsers built into mobile phones...EQUIPMENT BY PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES Internet Browsers Built Into Telephones Used With...14.61 Obligations with respect to internet browsers built into mobile phones....

  9. Disability and Obesity

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for People with Disabilities Evidence shows that regular physical activity provides important health benefits for people with disabilities. Benefits include improved cardiovascular and muscle fitness, mental health, balance, and a better ability to ...

  10. 30 CFR 250.188 - What incidents must I report to MMS and when must I report them?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... calendar days after the incident: (1) All fatalities. (2) All injuries that require the evacuation of the.../material handling operations. (9) All incidents that damage or disable safety systems or equipment... District Manager within 15 calendar days after the incident: (1) Any injuries that result in one or...

  11. Disability Accommodation Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flick-Hruska, Connie, Comp.; Blythe, Gretchen, Comp.

    Designed as a resource for two-year college faculty and staff working with students with disabilities, this handbook contains facts about various disabilities, practical suggestions for improving services, and resource points for further information. Following a brief introduction, legal implications regarding disabled students are discussed for…

  12. Teaching Disability Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Laura F.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the history of teaching disability law and traces the development of disability law courses, tracking the emergence of disability discrimination law as a more comprehensive set of legal requirements. The extent to which schools are offering these courses and the approaches being used are examined; additional approaches are also suggested.…

  13. Social Psychoanalytic Disability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodley, Dan

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores connections and tensions between psychoanalysis and disability studies. The first part of the paper considers contemporaneous engagements with the psyche by a number of disability studies writers. These scholars have remained accountable to a politicised disability studies but have pushed for critical encounters with the…

  14. Work Disability in Appalachia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Judith

    This paper begins by examining the history of disability payments to disabled workers, specifically disability payments to coal workers. Efforts by the United Mine Workers of America made mine health and safety an issue in the 1960s, and continuing liberalization of the law continued through the 1970s. The identification of coal miners with…

  15. Normalizing Disability in Families.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Mary

    2015-01-01

    This comment shifts Ouellette's frame of reference in linking prenatal selection against disability, laws prohibiting prenatal sex selection, and fertility specialists' discrimination against disabled adults. Viewing decisions about who can reproduce and what children will be born as fundamentally decisions about family suggests ways to promote acceptance of people with disabilities as valued family members — without limiting reproductive liberties. PMID:26242942

  16. Information For Disabled

    E-print Network

    Information For Disabled And Dyslexic Students.Please contact our service if you require this guide;1. What is the Disability and Dyslexia Support Service? 2. How to contact us 3. Applying to the University an offer d. Providing evidence of your disability e. Setting up support after you have arrived

  17. Science and Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanovich, Keith E.

    1988-01-01

    Reactions to H. Lee Swanson's paper "Toward a Metatheory of Learning Disabilities" are outlined, and his arguments are applied to reading disabilities, focusing on the importance of the scientific attitude, the misuse of ecological validity, interpretation of Thomas Kuhn's work, modularity and reading disability, and scientific progress toward a…

  18. Nickel allergy presenting as mobile phone contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Hugh; Tate, Bruce

    2010-02-01

    A 39-year-old man presented with a 6-month history of a treatment-resistant facial dermatitis. The patient regularly used his mobile phone, predominantly on the left cheek. Patch testing confirmed the clinical suspicion of mobile phone contact dermatitis from nickel contained in the phone casing. Although infrequently reported, with the trend towards metallic mobile phone casings and the high incidence of nickel sensitization in the community, the incidence of mobile phone contact dermatitis is likely to increase. PMID:20148836

  19. Filicide-suicide involving children with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Coorg, Rohini; Tournay, Anne

    2013-06-01

    Filicide-suicide, or murder of a child by a parent followed by suicide, has an unknown incidence in both the general and disabled population. As there is no national database, the authors examined known associated factors and newspaper reports to characterize filicide-suicide victims and perpetrators involving children with disabilities. A newspaper search was conducted using LexisNexis and NewsBank: Access World News databases through the University of California, Irvine Library's Web site. Age, gender of child and parent, method used, and diagnoses of parent and child were recorded. Twenty-two news articles were found describing a total of 26 disabled children as victims of filicide-suicide between 1982 and 2010. Eighty-one percent of children killed were male, and 54% were autistic. Thirty percent of perpetrators had a reported mental illness. Male children or children with autism may be at risk for filicide-suicide, but accurate record keeping is needed to determine the incidence and risk factors and aid in its prevention in the disabled population. PMID:22826515

  20. Mobility and Mobility Aids for Visually Handicapped Individuals. Bibliography, No. 84-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC. National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped.

    The bibliography lists approximately 150 references (1973-1983) on orientation and mobility for visually impaired individuals. Citations are organized alphabetically by author's name within five major topic areas: general works, manuals and curriculum guides, research literature, mobility for special populations (multiple disabilities, children…

  1. 78 FR 9926 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control...Prevalence and Incidence of Inflammatory Bowel Disease, FOA DP 13-001, initial review. In...

  2. 77 FR 4047 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control...Animal-Human Interface of Influenza and Other Zoonotic Diseases in Vietnam, IP12-002, The Incidence of...

  3. Incident Case Study Friday, December Incident description

    E-print Network

    Kroll, Kristen L.

    that directly lead to the incident. The first was mixing organics with nitric acid. Nitric acid reacts violently experimental technique requiring the use of nitric acid. This was the labs first time working with nitric acid was made for the nitric acid. The experiment called for soaking material in nitric acid to remove a polymer

  4. Differences in Self-Reported Trauma Symptomatology between Individuals with and without Disability: An Exploratory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauser, David R.; Lustig, Daniel C.; Uruk, Ayse C.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined whether individuals with disabilities report higher levels of trauma symptoms than their nondisabled counterparts. Based on trauma theory and prior research regarding the incidence rate of posttraumatic stress disorder, the authors hypothesized that individuals with disabilities would report higher levels of…

  5. The Evolution of Learning Disabilities in Children with Tourette Syndrome: Educational Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Deborah M.

    The paper examines implications of the high incidence of learning disabilities in children with Tourette Syndrome. Tourette Syndrome is a neurological disorder that causes involuntary muscle jerks and vocalizations. Approximately 60% of children with Tourette Syndrome are classified as learning disabled. It is possible that this high correlation…

  6. Work and Home: Data from the National Health Interview Survey on Disability. Research/Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, Dana Scott; Butterworth, John

    This issue brief provides a national profile of individuals with developmental disabilities based on the National Health Interview Survey on Disability, Phase 1. This in-depth survey of 107,400 individuals uses a complex sampling strategy which is designed to provide national incidence estimates for each survey item. Data are reported which were…

  7. RADIUS: Research Archive on Disability in the United States. [CD-ROMs].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sociometrics Corp., Los Altos, CA.

    This Research Archive on Disability in the United States (RADIUS), a database on CD-ROM, contains 19 data sets on the prevalence, incidence, correlates, and consequences of disability in the United States. The 19 data sets are: (1) 1991 National Maternal and Infant Health Follow-Up Survey; (2) National Pediatric Trauma Registry, 1988-1994; (3)…

  8. Identifying Expressions of Pleasure and Displeasure by Persons with Profound and Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, Katja; Maes, Bea

    2006-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to explore a procedure for drafting individualised profiles of how people with profound multiple disabilities express pleasure and displeasure. Method: There were 6 participants with profound multiple disabilities. The procedure involved an observational analysis of videotaped critical incidents by a…

  9. Enterprise Incidents Issue 12 

    E-print Network

    Heaton, Rosemarie

    1995-01-01

    stream_source_info Star Trek Enterprise_Incidents_12_-_The_Legacy.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 89 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Star Trek Enterprise_Incidents_12_-_The_Legacy.pdf.txt Content...

  10. Incident analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg, D.W.; Buerer, A.; Leeds, S.

    1996-02-20

    This document presents information about a fire that occurred in January 1996 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This fire was caused by the spontaneous combustion of 100% fuming nitric acid. Topics discussed include: Summary of the incident; technical background; procedural background; supervision; previous incidents with 100% fuming nitric acid; and judgment of potential hazards.

  11. Evaluation of an Application for Making Palmtop Computers Accessible to Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, Steven E.; Davies, Daniel K.; Davies, Katelyn R.; Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Palmtop computers provide a promising mobile platform to address barriers to computer-based supports for people with intellectual disabilities. This study evaluated a specially designed interface to make navigation and features of palmtop computers more accessible to users with intellectual disabilities. Method: The specialised…

  12. A Wheelchair User with Visual and Intellectual Disabilities Managing Simple Orientation Technology for Indoor Travel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Campodonico, Francesca; Oliva, Doretta

    2009-01-01

    Persons with profound visual impairments and other disabilities, such as neuromotor and intellectual disabilities, may encounter serious orientation and mobility problems even in familiar indoor environments, such as their homes. Teaching these persons to develop maps of their daily environment, using miniature replicas of the areas or some…

  13. Disability and Democracy in Cambodia: An Integrative Approach to Community Building and Civic Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zook, Darren C.

    2010-01-01

    The political framework through which the various communities of disabled persons in Cambodia advocate for and claim their rights is complex and confusing. Both governmental and non-governmental actors engage this political framework through the mobilization of persons from the various disabled communities, competing in the civic sphere through…

  14. Care of Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Developmental Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Weedon, Dean; Wilson, Benjamin; Jones, Kyle Bradford; Bilder, Deborah

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 4.8% of individuals in the United States are affected by developmental disabilities (DDs). These individuals have a spectrum of abilities in terms of communication, mobility, and activities of daily living (ADLs). Because there typically is no specific treatment for the underlying disability, the focus of care should be on diagnosing and managing co-occurring medical and mental or behavioral health conditions and improving function and quality of life. Care of patients with DDs is similar to care of patients without DDs, although adjustments may be needed in the physician's interactive approach, engagement of caregivers, and sensitivity to symptoms. Health care can be enhanced by obtaining information about caregivers and guardians, living and work situations, support services received, and functional and instrumental ADL levels. In managing acute conditions, physicians should assess change from baseline and identify and manage maladaptive behaviors that interfere with care. An individualized preventive care plan should be created that may include additional or adapted screening. Needs for consent/medical decision-making support should be identified and addressed, and consent obtained as appropriate. Providing caregiver support and becoming familiar with community resources are other aspects of caring for this population. PMID:26669210

  15. Disability and dignity-enabling home environments.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Barbara E; Secker, Barbara; Rolfe, Debbie; Wagner, Frank; Parke, Bob; Mistry, Bhavnita

    2012-01-01

    In Canada where long-term care is primarily oriented to elderly persons and affordable accessible housing is limited, younger disabled adults may be living in circumstances that do not meet their health needs and contribute to their social exclusion. The purpose of this study was to undertake an ethical analysis of what constitute an 'adequate' home environment for adults with significant mobility disabilities. An integrated design was used that combined qualitative interviews with normative ethical analysis in an iterative process. Twenty interviews with 19 participants were conducted in Ontario, Canada with two groups: younger adults (ages 18-55) with mobility disabilities and 'decision-makers' who consisted of policy makers, program administrators and discharge planners. Data were analyzed using a critical disability ethics approach and processes of reflective equilibrium. Drawing on Nora Jacobson's (Jacobson, 2009) taxonomy of dignity and pluralistic approaches to social justice, the concept of 'social dignity' provides a lens for exploring the adequacy of home environments for disabled people. Analyses suggested seven threshold conditions necessary for a dignity-enabling home: the ability to form and sustain meaningful relationships; access to community and civic life; access to control and flexibility of daily activities; access to opportunities for self-expression and identity affirmation; access to respectful relationships with attendants; access to opportunities to participate in school, work or leisure; access to physical, psychological and ontological security. The results have implications for housing, health and social care policies, and political reform. Social dignity provides a normative ethical grounding for assessing the adequacy of home environments. The threshold elements outline specific dignity-enabling conditions that are open to further specification or elaboration in different contexts. PMID:22142787

  16. Early Stage Breast Cancer Treatments for Younger Medicare Beneficiaries with Different Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Iezzoni, Lisa I; Ngo, Long H; Li, Donglin; Roetzheim, Richard G; Drews, Reed E; McCarthy, Ellen P

    2008-01-01

    Objective To explore how underlying disability affects treatments and outcomes of disabled women with breast cancer. Data Sources Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program data, linked with Medicare files and Social Security Administration disability group. Study Design Ninety thousand two hundred and forty-three incident cases of early-stage breast cancer under age 65; adjusted relative risks and hazards ratios examined treatments and survival, respectively, for women in four disability groups compared with nondisabled women. Principal Findings Demographic characteristics, treatments, and survival varied among four disability groups. Compared with nondisabled women, those with mental disorders and neurological conditions had significantly lower adjusted rates of breast conserving surgery and radiation therapy. Survival outcomes also varied by disability type. Conclusions Compared with nondisabled women, certain subgroups of women with disabilities are especially likely to experience disparities in care for breast cancer. PMID:18479411

  17. Impact of physical frailty on disability in community-dwelling older adults: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Makizako, Hyuma; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Doi, Takehiko; Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Suzuki, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between physical frailty and risk of disability, and to identify the component(s) of frailty with the most impact on disability in community-dwelling older adults. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting A Japanese community. Participants 4341 older adults aged ?65 living in the community participated in a baseline assessment from 2011 to 2012 and were followed for 2?years. Main outcome measures Care-needs certification in the national long-term care insurance (LTCI) system of Japan, type of physical frailty (robust, prefrail, frail) and subitems (slowness, weakness, exhaustion, low activity, weight loss), adjusted for several potential confounders such as demographic characteristics, analysed with Kaplan-Meier survival curves for incidence of disability by frailty phenotype. Results During the 2-year follow-up period, 168 participants (3.9%) began using the LTCI system for incidence of disability. Participants classified as frail (HR 4.65, 95% CI 2.63 to 8.22) or prefrail (2.52, 1.56 to 4.07) at the baseline assessment had an increased risk of disability incidence compared with robust participants. Analyses for subitems of frailty showed that slowness (2.32, 1.62 to 3.33), weakness (1.90, 1.35 to 2.68) and weight loss (1.61, 1.13 to 2.31) were related to increased risk of disability incidence. In stratified analyses, participants who were classified as frail and who had lower cognitive function had the highest percentage (30.3%) of disability incidence during the 2?years after baseline assessment. Conclusions Physical frailty, even being prefrail, had a strong impact on the risk of future disability. Some components of frailty, such as slowness, weakness and weight loss, are strongly associated with incident disability in community-dwelling older adults. PMID:26338685

  18. Disability and Health: Healthy Living

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the Health and Wellness of Persons with Disabilities Health Care Reform Health care reform for Americans with disabilities: Learn more about the Affordable Care Act . Getting the Best Possible Health Care People with disabilities must get the care ...

  19. An Exploration of Community Learning Disability Nurses' Therapeutic Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsham, Marian

    2012-01-01

    This literature review and primary qualitative research explores therapeutic role from the perspective of Community Learning Disability Nurses. Semi-structured interviews, based on Critical Incident Technique ("Psychol Bull", 51, 1954, 327), and descriptive phenomenological methodology were adopted to elicit data amenable to systematic content…

  20. Vitamin D and Fractures in People with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanlint, S.; Nugent, M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disability (ID) are thought to be at an increased risk of fractures. The extent of this increase in risk has been incompletely documented in the literature, and the underlying reasons remain to be elucidated. Methods: The aims of our study were to document the vitamin D status and fracture incidence in an…

  1. Learning Disabilities and Conductive Hearing Loss Involving Otitis Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichman, Julie; Healey, William C.

    1983-01-01

    A review of research on the relationship of otitis media (ear infection) and learning/language/hearing disorders revealed that incidence of otitis media was twice as common in learning disabled as nonLD students; and that, in general, otitis-prone children scored below controls with frequent evidence of performance deficits. (CL)

  2. Adults with Learning Disabilities. ERIC Digest No. 189.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerka, Sandra

    Thanks to increased advocacy and research, several major federal laws, and heightened awareness of the changing demands of the workplace, more attention is being focused on adults with learning disabilities (LD). There is still no consensus on definitions of LD. Estimates of the incidence of LD range from 5% to 20% of the population. Adults with…

  3. Critical incidents in psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Plutchik, R; Conte, H R; Karasu, T B

    1994-01-01

    The critical-incident technique was used to obtain a list of patient behaviors that create special difficulties for the psychotherapist. The list was prepared by a group of seven clinicians during a series of meetings. Included in the list were such items as: insulting the therapist; coming late to the session; threatening suicide; and offering gifts. The list was given to 21 experienced psychiatrists who were asked to rate both the importance and the frequency of occurrence of each incident in their experience. The critical incidents could be divided into five major categories: threat of harm from the patient; criticism of the therapist or the therapy; occurrence of a major life crisis; attempts by the patient to seek friendship or seduction, and miscellaneous incidents, such as being consistently late. When ratings by the experienced psychiatrists were compared with those of 10 third-year psychiatric residents, it was found that the inexperienced psychiatrists in almost every case rated the incident as less important and more frequent than did the experienced clinicians. In terms of implications, knowledge of critical incidents in psychotherapy may provide a source of material for training purposes, may enable the development of modeling procedures for training in communication skills, and may encourage supervisors to focus attention on important therapeutic issues. PMID:8179030

  4. Educational and Sex Differentials in Life Expectancies and Disability-Free Life Expectancies in São Paulo, Brazil, and Urban Areas in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Flávia Cristina Drumond

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To estimate transition probabilities between disability states, total life expectancy, and the latter’s decomposition into years spent disabled and disability-free by age, sex and education among older adults in São Paulo, Brazil, and urban areas in Mexico. Methods Applied a micro-simulation method (Interpolative Markov Chains) using longitudinal data. Results We found large between-country educational differences in incidence of and recovery from disability with higher rates in Mexico than in São Paulo, but no differences in mortality. Older adults in Mexico spent longer time being disability-free than in São Paulo for both levels of education. Males and females in São Paulo spent a larger fraction of their remaining life disabled at every age than their counterparts in urban areas in Mexico. Discussion There were educational differences in the prevalence of disability in São Paulo and urban areas in Mexico, and significant educational differences in disability incidence and recovery across sites. PMID:23781016

  5. Research into Telecommunications Options for People with Physical Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Toan; Garrett, Rob; Downing, Andrew; Walker, Lloyd; Hobbs, David

    2007-01-01

    People with a disability do not have equitable access to the modern telecommunication medium. Many experience difficulty typing, handling the phone, dialing, or answering calls. For those who are unable to speak, the only option is to type messages using whatever functional control site exists on their body. The provision of accessible mobile

  6. Fall Graduation Access Information Accessibility, Wheelchairs, and Disability

    E-print Network

    Resler, Lynn M.

    This is a comprehensive website designed to address access and accommodation topics for individuals with disabilities and in designated handicap parking spaces. For individuals with impaired mobility (without a DMV tag) additional. Ushers are available to direct you to these areas. Wheelchairs, walkers, and baby strollers must

  7. Ubiquitous Yet Unique: Perspectives of People With Disabilities on Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwasaki, Yoshitaka; Mactavish, Jennifer B.

    2005-01-01

    This exploratory study was grounded in a qualitative framework and used a focus group method to examine the meanings that individuals with disabilities (e.g., permanent mobility impairments, sensory impairments) attach to their experiences of stress, as well as major sources or causes of stress in these individuals' lives. Overall, the data showed…

  8. Individual Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frostig, Marianne; And Others

    The following workshop presentations consider learning disabilities: "Educational Goals of the Perceptually Handicapped" by Marianne Frostig, "Remediation of Reading Problems" by Gilbert Schiffman, "Early Identification of Learning Disabilities" by Katrina de Hirsch, and "What Are Some Speech and Hearing Considerations? by John Irwin. (JD)

  9. Note on Narrating Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clandinin, D. Jean; Raymond, Heather

    2006-01-01

    We outline a theoretical view of narrative inquiry as both phenomenon and method, and we explore the growth and development of narrative inquiry in the field of education. Drawing on research with participants labeled as developmentally disabled, we show how narrative inquiry can illuminate how disability is understood and lived out in social,…

  10. Working with the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetherington, Cheryl; Sandmeyer, Louise

    1979-01-01

    In a period of declining college enrollments, it is important to serve all qualified students, especially disabled students who may not be attracted to a college unless the college is responding to their needs. The role of the counselor is to translate awareness of needs into positive action for the disabled student. (Author)

  11. Disabilities and disaster 

    E-print Network

    Stough, Laura

    2010-01-01

    stream_source_info Disabilities and disaster.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 3 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Disabilities and disaster.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  12. Montessori and Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Sylvia O.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the characteristics of learning disabilities in the areas of coordination, language, attention, and perception, and explains how the Montessori method can be used to educate young children with these disabilities. The method relies on a developmental approach that ensures the child a wholesome environment in which to thrive. (MDM)

  13. Learning Disabilities: Lifelong Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Shirley C., Ed.; Ellis, William, Ed.

    This book contains papers on learning disabilities based on presentations made at the "Summit on Learning Disabilities: A National Responsibility," held in September 1994. The first section provides an overview and includes "The State of Research" (G. Reid Lyon). The second section focuses on education and includes: "Preventing Early Reading…

  14. Ghana: Disability and Spirituality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botts, Betsy H.; Evans, William H.

    2010-01-01

    This descriptive study explores the educational system and attitudes toward disability in the Volta Region of Ghana. Traditional, Christian, and Islamic beliefs toward disability are explored. Educators from Accra and three families from the Volta Region with children with special needs are interviewed in an effort to explore the connection…

  15. Dads and Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Cindy, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on the relationship of fathers and their children with disabilities. It reports a study of 86 Kansas fathers of children (ages 5 to 8) with and without disabilities. The study was conducted in order to identify more options for fathers wishing to increase their involvement with their children. The study sent surveys of…

  16. Disaster and disabilities 

    E-print Network

    Stough, Laura

    2014-01-01

    . W. (2006). Academic and behavioral reactions of children with disabilities to the loss of a firefighter father. Review of Disability Studies, 2(3), 68–77. Christensen, K. M., Collins, S. D., Holt, J. M., & Phillips, C. N. (2006). The relationship...

  17. The demographics of disability.

    PubMed

    LaPlante, M P

    1991-01-01

    In this article, I have attempted to clarify some of the disparate estimates and ways of measuring disability that have been used in different surveys. The definitional issue has implications for the size of the population that will be covered by the ADA. I have reviewed several perspectives, including that of researchers, disability advocates, and individual self-perceptions, which need to be considered in understanding the meaning of disability. Disability involves limitations in actions and activities because of mental and physical impairments. Comparison of these different perspectives reveals that the differences lie in the range of activities that are considered. At least 36 million persons, over 14 percent of the U.S. population, are limited in selected activities. Depending on what are considered to be major life activities, the population covered by the ADA could vastly exceed that figure. Little information is available about the extent to which persons with disabilities, however defined, are affected by discrimination and unequal treatment. Limited data are available from one survey conducted by the International Center for the Disabled, which indicate that as many as 66 percent of persons with activity limitations who are not working would like a job. On the other hand, many persons with activity limitations indicate that their limitations are an important cause of their unemployment. About a quarter of persons with activity limitations due to impairments have experienced discrimination in some form. The impact of the ADA will likely vary by impairment. Because the prevalence of chronic diseases is far greater than the prevalence of physical and sensory impairments, chronic diseases are more frequently the cause of disability. The risk of disability is highest for impairments with low prevalence. Because states and local areas differ in the prevalence of disability, the impact of the ADA will also be likely to vary by geographic area. For some states, the rate of work disability is more than twice the rate of other states. Yet, research indicates that much of the variation is due to socioeconomic characteristics of areas. This reflects, at the macroeconomic level, that persons with disabilities are more likely to be poor and less educated than persons without disabilities. Because of differences in understanding what disability is and insufficient knowledge about the extent of the problem of discrimination toward persons with disabilities, assessment of the potential impact of the ADA is challenging.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1837839

  18. Workers with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Blanck, P D; Pransky, G

    1999-01-01

    Individuals with disabilities constitute a sizable portion of the workforce and represent the majority of working-age persons who are unable to work. Historically, barriers to employment have included attitudinal discrimination by employers, lack of workplace accommodations, and inadequate job training. The disability rights movement has achieved considerable success in promoting legislation to remove these barriers and uphold equal employment. Research suggests that many employers actively attempt to incorporate persons with disabilities into the workforce and gain substantial economic benefit from their participation, without incurring burdensome expenses. Occupational health providers are asked by employers and others to provide input on feasibility and safety, a difficult task given the lack of scientific study on the occupational abilities and risks associated with specific disabilities. Providers have an important role in promoting the equal employment of disabled persons, by providing objective opinions on their ability and risks on the job and suggesting workplace accommodations and treatments that enhance the ability to work. PMID:10378977

  19. 77 FR 40601 - Final Priority: Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program; Disability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ...Priority: Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program; Disability Rehabilitation Research Project; Employment of Individuals With...Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR)--Disability and...

  20. Appendicular Fractures: A Significant Problem among Institutionalized Adults with Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, K. M.; Williams, J.; Womack, C.; Nayak, N. G.; Nasef, S.; Bush, A.; Tylavsky, F. A.; Carbone, L.

    2003-01-01

    This study found a high incidence of nontraumatic fractures in adults with developmental disabilities living in a state-run facility, a 7.3% incidence among 391 adults. Factors associated with fractures included use of antiepileptic medication. Although bone mineral density (BMD) by heel ultrasound did not predict fracture, values were much lower…

  1. Using iPads with Students with Disabilities: Lessons Learned from Students, Teachers, and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper Rodríguez, Cathi; Strnadová, Iva; Cumming, Therese

    2014-01-01

    The use of mobile technology has increased greatly in recent years. Although the research in this area is still in its infancy, preliminary studies are showing a positive impact on the skills and academic engagement of students with disabilities. This column provides an overview of a selection of research studies involving mobile devices such as…

  2. A Review of Balance and Gait Capacities in Relation to Falls in Persons with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enkelaar, Lotte; Smulders, Ellen; van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Henny; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Weerdesteyn, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    Limitations in mobility are common in persons with intellectual disabilities (ID). As balance and gait capacities are key aspects of mobility, the prevalence of balance and gait problems is also expected to be high in this population. The objective of this study was to critically review the available literature on balance and gait characteristics…

  3. The Excessive Appearance of Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalko, Rod

    2009-01-01

    This paper engages the appearance of disability in contemporary Western culture. Rather than taking disability for granted as a biomedical condition, I interrogate how disability is made to appear in our culture, including its appearance as a biomedical condition. Fundamentally, disability appears to us as a trouble and, as such, cultural…

  4. Disability Etiquette Guide The Basics

    E-print Network

    Sibille, Etienne

    The handicapped or the disabled People with disabilities The mentally retarded or he's retarded PeopleDisability Etiquette Guide The Basics ASK BEFORE YOU HELP Interact with the person as a person first! Just because someone has a disability, don't assume he or she needs help. Offer assistance

  5. Dickens and disability.

    PubMed

    Wainapel, S F

    1996-12-01

    The novels of Charles Dickens include many vivid portraits of individuals with physical disabilities or deformities, and these conditions are often used symbolically to highlight some of the author's recurring themes. Disabled children are depicted as innocent victims, while their older counterparts are most often viewed as corrupt victimizers whose physical deformities are outward manifestations of their inner depravity. Punishment for moral failings in non-disabled characters frequently takes the form of paralysis and/or aphasia resulting from a cerebrovascular accident. In this context the wheelchair becomes a potent metaphor of imprisonment as a form of retributive justice. PMID:9007422

  6. Training reduces stuck pipe costs and incidents

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, B. ); Smith, R. )

    1994-09-19

    Properly administered initial and refresher stuck pipe training courses have dramatically reduced the cost and number of stuck pipe incidents for many companies worldwide. These training programs have improved operator and contractor crew awareness of stuck pipe risks and fostered a team commitment in averting such incidents. The success is evident in the achievements of the companies sponsoring such training. Preventing and minimizing stuck pipe is the most significant benefit of stuck pipe training, but crews also benefit from becoming more knowledgeable about the drilling program and equipment operation. The paper discusses stuck pipe costs, stuck pipe training, prevention of stuck pipes, well bore stability, geopressured formation, reactive formation, reactive formations, unconsolidated formations, mobile formations, fractured and faulted formations, differential sticking, 8 other causes of stuck pipe, and freeing stuck pipe.

  7. Incident Type Drug Violation

    E-print Network

    Stowell, Michael

    Incident Type Theft Drug Violation Drug Violation Alcohol Violation Drug Violation Alcohol/07/2015 01:08 1855 ATHENS ST Boulder CO 80302 UNLAWFUL POSSESSION OR SALE OF MJ BY Referred Date/Time Occured:25 2015-00002429 11/06/2015 23:41 2250 WILLARD LOOP DR Boulder CO 80309 UNLAWFUL POSSESSION OR SALE OF MJ

  8. Incident Type Drug Violation

    E-print Network

    Stowell, Michael

    Incident Type Theft Drug Violation Drug Violation Drug Violation Criminal Trespass Criminal-00002237 10/22/2015 00:38 600 30TH ST Boulder CO 80310 UNLAWFUL POSSESSION OR SALE OF MJ BY Cleared - Summons:38 - 10/22/2015 01:13 2015-00002237 10/22/2015 00:38 600 30TH ST Boulder CO 80310 ILLEGAL POSSESSION

  9. Incident Type Criminal Trespass

    E-print Network

    Stowell, Michael

    Incident Type Criminal Trespass Traffic Offense Burglary Burglary Theft Drug Violation Drug:49 2015-00002422 11/05/2015 17:40 2200 WILLARD LOOP DR Boulder CO 80309 UNLAWFUL POSSESSION OR SALE OF MJ:40 2200 WILLARD LOOP DR Boulder CO 80309 ILLEGAL POSSESSION OF MARIJUANA Cleared - Summons Date

  10. Incident Type Alcohol Violation

    E-print Network

    Stowell, Michael

    Incident Type Alcohol Violation Alcohol Violation Warrant Burglary Burglary Drug Violation Drug Violation Drug Violation Other Offense Other Offense Other Offense Other Offense Theft Theft Date/11/2015 23:19 2200 BAKER DR Boulder CO 80309 UNLAWFUL POSSESSION OR SALE OF MJ BY Cleared - Summons Date

  11. Incident Type Alcohol Violation

    E-print Network

    Stowell, Michael

    Incident Type Alcohol Violation Burglary Burglary Burglary Burglary Burglary Sex Offense Drug Violation Drug Violation Drug Violation Alcohol Violation Alcohol Violation Theft Theft Date/Time Occured 10:30 2015-00002301 10/28/2015 23:20 500 30TH ST Boulder CO 80303 POSSESSION OF DRUG PARAPHERNALIA (PETTY

  12. Incident Type Drug Violation

    E-print Network

    Stowell, Michael

    Incident Type Drug Violation Drug Violation Criminal Mischief Criminal Mischief Criminal Mischief KITTREDGE LOOP DR Boulder CO 80309 UNLAWFUL POSSESSION OR SALE OF MJ BY Referred Date/Time Occured 10 ILLEGAL POSSESSION OF MARIJUANA Referred Case Number Date/Time Reported Location of Occurence Criminal

  13. Incident Type Drug Violation

    E-print Network

    Stowell, Michael

    Incident Type Drug Violation Drug Violation Drug Violation Disturbance Fraud/Forgery Criminal 80303 UNLAWFUL POSSESSION OR SALE OF MJ BY Cleared - Summons Date/Time Occured 11/10/2015 00:19 - 11/10/2015 00:19 3300 BASELINE RD Boulder CO 80303 ILLEGAL POSSESSION OF MARIJUANA Cleared - Summons Case Number

  14. Incident Type Traffic Offense

    E-print Network

    Stowell, Michael

    Login ID: Incident Type Burglary Burglary Traffic Offense Drug Violation Drug Violation Drug Violation Criminal Trespass Criminal Trespass Criminal Mischief Traffic Offense Traffic Offense Drug Violation Drug Violation Alcohol Violation Theft Date/Time Occured 2015-00008314 11/12/2015 20:37 1995

  15. Childhood Cancer Incidence

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator presents childhood cancer incidence rates for the U.S. population from 1973 to 2008. While their causes are largely unknown, there are reasons to believe that childhood cancers might be more prevalent in groups that are exposed to higher levels of environmental ...

  16. Incident Type Alcohol Violation

    E-print Network

    Stowell, Michael

    Incident Type Alcohol Violation Alcohol Violation Alcohol Violation Alcohol Violation Other Offense Traffic Offense Traffic Offense Criminal Trespass Criminal Trespass Other Offense Theft Theft Alcohol Violation Alcohol Violation Alcohol Violation Date/Time Occured 2015-00002337 10/30/2015 22:05 1955 COLORADO

  17. Incident Type Alcohol Violation

    E-print Network

    Stowell, Michael

    Incident Type Alcohol Violation Alcohol Violation Alcohol Violation DUI/DWAI DUI/DWAI DUI/DWAI DUI/DWAI Alcohol Violation Alcohol Violation Alcohol Violation Harassment Alcohol Violation Alcohol Violation-00002374 10/31/2015 04:05 3300 BASELINE RD Boulder CO 80303 POSSESSING/SELLING OF ALCOHOL BY MINORS Cleared

  18. RAPID INCIDENT RESPONSE FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Will discuss WERF Contract (RFP# 03-HHE-5PP), Protocols for the Timely Investigation of Potential Health Incidents Associated with Biosolids Land Application, as a member of the project advisory committee. The contractor, University of North Carolina, started work in early June, ...

  19. Transportation Experiences for Suburban Older Adults: Implications for the Loss of the Driver's License for Psychological Well-being, Health and Mobility

    E-print Network

    Sandeen, Beverly A

    1997-01-01

    disabled and elderly persons. Third International Conference on Mobility and T ranspon of Elderly and Handicappeddisabled and elderly people. Third International Conference on Mobility and Transport of Elderly and Handicapped

  20. An Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Daniel B; Payne, Patricia W

    2012-01-01

    Although the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) by centrally-located operations staff is well established in the area of emergency response, utilization by first responders in the field is uneven. Cost, complexity, and connectivity are often the deciding factors preventing wider adoption. For the past several years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing a mobile GIS solution using free and open-source software targeting the needs of front-line personnel. Termed IMPACT, for Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit, this ORNL application can complement existing GIS infrastructure and extend its power and capabilities to responders first on the scene of a natural or man-made disaster.

  1. What Are Learning Disabilities?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the most common learning disabilities include the following: Dyslexia. This condition causes problems with language skills, particularly reading. People with dyslexia may have difficulty spelling, understanding sentences, and recognizing ...

  2. Types of Disabilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... situations. A woman in early midlife can develop multiple sclerosis, which may make it difficult to move around. ... Disorders (FASD) Fragile X Syndrome Hearing Loss Hemochromatosis (Iron Overload) Hemophilia Intellectual Disability Kernicterus Sickle Cell Disease ...

  3. Ethics in neurodevelopmental disability.

    PubMed

    Racine, Eric; Bell, Emily; Shevell, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental disabilities, like autism spectrum disorders and cerebral palsy are a common health problem in children. Given the impact of these conditions on children, families, and healthcare and social systems, the care of developmentally challenged children raises questions related to values and ethical principles. We review the common features of neurodevelopmental disorders that help understand the associated ethical questions. We focus on three major areas where ethical questions arise for clinicians and those involved in making decisions for or caring for these children: (1) the principles of decision-making and autonomy as they relate to developmental disability; (2) the issues related to quality of life that have long intersected with developmental disability; and (3) the use of unproven therapies and diagnostics that are particularly controversial given the extent that neurodevelopmental disabilities impact children and their families, yet active treatments options are limited. PMID:24182383

  4. Sexuality and Intellectual Disability

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or developmental disabilities have been thought to be asexual, having no need for loving and fulfilling relationships ... decision-making, including education about such issues as reproduction, marriage and family life, abstinence, safe sexual practices, ...

  5. FacingDisability.com

    MedlinePLUS

    A Spinal Cord Injury Affects the Entire Family FacingDisability was specifically created to connect families who suddenly have to deal ... and insights on spinal cord injury issues Interactive Spinal Cord Injury Map Shows what areas are affected by ...

  6. Advocating in schools for children with disabilities: what's new with IDEA?

    PubMed

    Altshuler, Sandra J; Kopels, Sandra

    2003-07-01

    All social workers who work with children and families, regardless of their practice setting, should be aware of the important educational rights to which children with disabilities and their families are entitled. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (P.L. 101-476), one of the most sweeping laws protecting children with disabilities, was substantially amended in 1997, and its regulatory provisions became legally effective in October 1999. This article provides information about the requirements of the law and the impact of those changes on children's educational rights. The changes discussed and their practice implications include expansion of categories of children with disabilities; new requirements for mobile, homeless, or culturally diverse populations and participants in the individualized education program process; payment for private school placements for children with disabilities; discipline of children with disabilities; and provision of social work services in the schools. PMID:12899279

  7. Issues Using the Life History Calendar in Disability Research

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Tiffany N.; Harrison, Tracie

    2011-01-01

    Background Overall, there is a dearth of research reporting mixed-method data collection procedures using the LHC within disability research. Objective This report provides practical knowledge on use of the life history calendar (LHC) from the perspective of a mixed-method life history study of mobility impairment situated within a qualitative paradigm. Methods In this paper the method related literature referring to the LHC was reviewed along with its epistemological underpinnings. Further, the uses of the LHC in disability research were illustrated using preliminary data from reports of disablement in Mexican American and Non-Hispanic White women with permanent mobility impairment. Results From our perspective, the LHC was most useful when approached from an interpretive paradigm when gathering data from women of varied ethnic and socioeconomic strata. While we found the LHC the most useful tool currently available for studying disablement over the life course, there were challenges associated with its use. The LHC required extensive interviewer training. In addition, large segments of time were needed for completion depending on the type of participant responses. Conclusions Researchers planning to conduct a disability study may find our experience using the LHC valuable for anticipating issues that may arise when the LHC is used in mixed-method research. PMID:22014674

  8. Accuracy and Precision of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory Computer-Adaptive Tests (PEDI-CAT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Stephen M.; Coster, Wendy J.; Dumas, Helene M.; Fragala-Pinkham, Maria A.; Kramer, Jessica; Ni, Pengsheng; Tian, Feng; Kao, Ying-Chia; Moed, Rich; Ludlow, Larry H.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aims of the study were to: (1) build new item banks for a revised version of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) with four content domains: daily activities, mobility, social/cognitive, and responsibility; and (2) use post-hoc simulations based on the combined normative and disability calibration samples to assess the…

  9. Reaching the unreached: Mobile surgical camps in a remote village of Himachal Pradesh

    PubMed Central

    Bathla, Sonal; Verghese, George; Kalla, Vinod; Sharma, T. C.; Dam, Subrat; Agarwal, Nirmala; Balani, Sweta; Dhamija, Priti Arora; Agarwal, Deepa; Kumar, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The aim was to study the epidemiological factors responsible for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) in poor women of the remote village Shillai, do their POP quantification staging, to study the variety of surgeries conducted in mobile surgical camps in this area. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of surgeries conducted in five mobile surgical camps in Shillai, Himachal Pradesh from 2009 to 2013, under “Project Prolapse”. Results: A total number of surgeries conducted in five camps from 2009 to 2013 were 490 including 192 gynecological surgeries. Eighty-two percent of gynecological surgery was conducted for POP. Poor nutritional status (mean weight 41.1 kg), multiparty (mean 3.5), early marriage (mean age 18.2 years), unassisted home deliveries (100%), premature bearing down (23.8%), early postpartum resumption of strenuous activity (54.7%) and smoking (33%) contribute to the high incidence of POP. Anterior compartment prolapse was seen in 99% of patients undergoing surgery while posterior compartment prolapse was seen in 4% of patients. Vaginal hysterectomy with anterior repair with culdoplasty was the most common procedure performed (73.4%), and vault suspension was done in 3.6% subjects. The complication rate was negligible. Conclusion: Uterovaginal prolapse is not only socially embarrassing and disabling; its surgical treatment is complex and costly too. The free mobile surgical camps under Project Prolapse in Shillai, Himachal Pradesh has provided relief to old neglected, disabled women suffering from prolapse in this remote village. Parallel counseling of women and dais for safe hospital delivery and training subordinates in prolapse surgery may help in addressing the problem of POP in this area in the long run. PMID:25317000

  10. Teaching Medical Students About Disability in Family Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Catherine Leigh; Brown, Rachel S.; Zhen, Huiling; McDermott, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether a unique didactic focusing on delivering health care to patients with disabilities (PWDs) impacts medical students’ knowledge of specific disabilities and related concerns, attitudes about barriers to this populations’ health care, and behavior during typical primary care visits with PWDs. A 90-minute session for students during their third-year family medicine clerkship addressed clinical considerations for patients with mobility and cognitive impairments. Questionnaires were administered to students at the beginning and completion of the clerkship. Analyses of 71 matched questionnaires reveal that knowledge and attitudes were positively impacted. PMID:19724936

  11. Trajectory of Cognitive Decline after Incident Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Deborah A.; Galecki, Andrzej T.; Langa, Kenneth M.; Unverzagt, Frederick W.; Kabeto, Mohammed U.; Giordani, Bruno; Wadley, Virginia G.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Cognitive decline is a major cause of disability in stroke survivors. The magnitude of survivors’ cognitive changes after stroke is uncertain. Objective To measure changes in cognitive function among survivors of incident stroke, controlling for their prestroke cognitive trajectories. Design, Setting, and Participants Prospective study of 23,572 participants aged ?45 years without baseline cognitive impairment from the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort, residing in the continental United States, enrolled 2003–2007 and followed through March 31, 2013. Over a median follow-up of 6.1 years (25th–75th percentile: 5.0–7.1 years), 515 participants survived expert-adjudicated incident stroke and 23,057 remained stroke-free. Exposure Time-dependent incident stroke. Outcome Measures The primary outcome was change in global cognition (Six-Item Screener, SIS; range 0–6). Secondary outcomes were change in new learning (Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer’s Disease Word List Learning; range 0–30), verbal memory (Word List Delayed Recall; range 0–10), and executive function (Animal Fluency Test; range ?0), and cognitive impairment (SIS<5/impaired vs. ?5/unimpaired). For all tests, higher scores indicate better performance. Results Stroke was associated with acute decline in global cognition (0.10 points; 95% CI, 0.04–0.17), new learning (1.80 points; 95% CI, 0.73–2.86), and verbal memory (0.60 points; 95% CI, 0.13–1.07). Participants with stroke, compared to those without stroke, demonstrated faster declines in global cognition (0.06 points per year faster; 95% CI, 0.03–0.08) and executive function (0.63 points per year faster; 95% CI, 0.12–1.15), but not in new learning and verbal memory, compared to prestroke slopes. Among survivors, the difference in risk of cognitive impairment acutely after stroke was not statistically significant (odds ratio, 1.32; 95% CI, 0.95–1.83; P=0.097); however, there was a significantly faster poststroke rate of incident cognitive impairment compared to the prestroke rate (odds ratio, 1.23 per year; 95% CI, 1.10–1.38; P<0.001). For a 70 year-old black woman, stroke at year 3 was associated with greater incident cognitive impairment: absolute difference (95% CI) of 4.0% (?1.2%–9.2%) at year 3 and 12.4% (7.7%–17.1% at year 6). Conclusion Incident stroke was associated with an acute decline in cognition and also accelerated and persistent cognitive decline over 6 years. PMID:26151265

  12. Mortality Risk Associated With Disability: A Population-Based Record Linkage Study

    PubMed Central

    Nusselder, Wilma J.; Mackenbach, Johan P.; Klijs, Bart; van Baal, Pieter H. M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the association between mortality and disability and quantified the effect of disability-associated risk factors. Methods. We linked data from cross-sectional health surveys in the Netherlands to the population registry to create a large data set comprising baseline covariates and an indicator of death. We used Cox regression models to estimate the hazard ratio of disability on mortality. Results. Among men, the unadjusted hazard ratio for activities of daily living, mobility, or mild disability defined by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development at age 55 years was 7.85 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.36, 14.13), 5.21 (95% CI = 3.19, 8.51), and 1.87 (95% CI = 1.58, 2.22), respectively. People with disability in activities of daily living and mobility had a 10-year shorter life expectancy than nondisabled people had, of which 6 years could be explained by differences in lifestyle, sociodemographics, and major chronic diseases. Conclusions. Disabled people face a higher mortality risk than nondisabled people do. Although the difference can be explained by diseases and other risk factors for those with mild disability, we cannot rule out that more severe disabilities have an independent effect on mortality. PMID:22021307

  13. Mobile versus fixed site lithotripsy.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, C.; Burgess, N. A.; Feneley, R. C.; Matthews, P. N.

    1991-01-01

    The efficacy of a mobile Dornier HM4 lithotriptor, was compared with that of a fixed site Siemens Lithostar. A total of 115 calculi in 98 patients were treated, 55 on the mobile Dornier and 60 on the Lithostar. The groups were similar except for stone size, the mean of the Lithostar group being 11 mm compared with 7.7 mm in the Dornier group. Fragmentation rates were not significantly different, 88% and 75% on the mobile and fixed site machines, respectively and, at 3 months follow-up 66% and 46% were stone free or with fragments of less than 2 mm. There were no serious complications, and the incidence of mild complications was similar in the two groups. We conclude that the mobile Dornier HM4 is an effective lithotriptor and can offer several advantages over fixed site machines. PMID:1929134

  14. Bridging the Gap between Disability Studies and Disability Services in Higher Education: A Model Center on Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Alan L.; Sales, Amos

    2010-01-01

    The professional field of Disability Services in Higher Education and the academic discipline of Disability Studies share a perspective on disability that considers disability as a socially constructed phenomenon. Despite this common underpinning, there has been little effort or inquiry into the ways that disability services and Disability Studies…

  15. A Secure Operational Model for Mobile Payments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Instead of paying by cash, check, or credit cards, customers can now also use their mobile devices to pay for a wide range of services and both digital and physical goods. However, customers' security concerns are a major barrier to the broad adoption and use of mobile payments. In this paper we present the design of a secure operational model for mobile payments in which access control is based on a service-oriented architecture. A customer uses his/her mobile device to get authorization from a remote server and generate a two-dimensional barcode as the payment certificate. This payment certificate has a time limit and can be used once only. The system also provides the ability to remotely lock and disable the mobile payment service. PMID:25386607

  16. Disability Studies, Disabled People and the Struggle for Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Mike; Barnes, Colin

    2010-01-01

    This paper traces the relationship between the emergence of disability studies and the struggle for meaningful inclusion for disabled people with particular reference to the work of a pivotal figure in these developments: Len Barton. It is argued that the links between disability activism and the academy were responsible for the emergence of…

  17. Thrice Disabling Disability: Enabling Inclusive, Socially Just Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, S. Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this inquiry was to create a social justice-oriented inclusive and enabling pedagogy by situating traditional individualised views of disability alongside three alternative understandings: a disability studies in education perspective, a First Nations view of disability and one based upon the autism pride/autism-as-culture movement.…

  18. Disability Services Offices for Students with Disabilities: A Campus Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cory, Rebecca C.

    2011-01-01

    Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) are often the starting places for conversations about students with disabilities in higher education. Section 504 and the ADA provide mandates for protection from discrimination and provision of reasonable disability accommodations (e.g., sign language…

  19. Disability, Disorder, and Identity

    PubMed Central

    Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organizations International Classification of Diseases is the most important diagnostic tool, worldwide, to ensure that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities receive the supports they need to live richer, fuller lives. And yet, the ICD has naming conventions that create a conundrum for the field, requiring that all “conditions” in the ICD be named as a “disorder.” This article discusses the effect of naming on how people with intellectual disability are perceived by others and how they perceive themselves. The importance of continuing to move the field toward the adoption of functional/person-environment fit models of disability is discussed. “What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.”William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet (II, ii, 1–2) PMID:23537360

  20. Disability and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for patients with CFS. Disability Evaluation Under Social Security (Blue Book - September 2008) The SSA has prepared the Disability Evaluation Under Social Security (known as the Blue Book) to help physicians ...

  1. The case for conserving disability.

    PubMed

    Garland-Thomson, Rosemarie

    2012-09-01

    It is commonly believed that disability disqualifies people from full participation in or recognition by society. This view is rooted in eugenic logic, which tells us that our world would be a better place if disability could be eliminated. In opposition to this position, I argue that that disability is inherent in the human condition and consider the bioethical question of why we might want to conserve rather than eliminate disability from our shared world. To do so, I draw together an eclectic, rather than systematic, configuration of counter-eugenic arguments for conserving disability. The idea of preserving intact, keeping alive, and even encouraging to flourish denoted by conserve suggests that disabilities would be better understood as benefits rather than deficits. I present, then, a reading of disability as a potentially generative resource rather than unequivocally restrictive liability. In other words, what I consider here is the cultural and material contributions disability offers to the world. PMID:23180334

  2. Learning Disabilities Association of America

    MedlinePLUS

    ... More STRESS!! The Missing Piece of the LD/ADHD Puzzle. Clinical Neuropsychologist and Harvard Medical School faculty ... behavior in students with learning disabilities and associated ADHD. More Info Learning Disabilities: A Multidisciplinary Journal Committed ...

  3. Incident Management: Process into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaac, Gayle; Moore, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Tornados, shootings, fires--these are emergencies that require fast action by school district personnel, but they are not the only incidents that require risk management. The authors have introduced the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the Incident Command System (ICS) and assured that these systems can help educators plan for and…

  4. Formerly `Critical Incidents' University Policy

    E-print Network

    Bearhop, Stuart

    3 NAME ROLE DATE Professor Ken Evans Dean, College of Engineering, Maths and Physical Sciences 7th May 2014 Rachel Bird Interim Manager, College of Engineering, Maths and Physical Sciences 7th May 2014 Welfare Incident Policy 5 1.1 Need for a Welfare Incident Policy 5 1.2 Definition of a Welfare Incident 5

  5. Changes in Disability Levels Among Older Adults Experiencing Adverse Events in Postacute Rehabilitation Care

    PubMed Central

    Gacto-Sánchez, Mariano; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc; Navarro-Pujalte, Esther; Escolar-Reina, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to assess the relationship between adverse events (AEs) and changes in the levels of disability from admission to discharge during inpatient rehabilitation programs. A prospective cohort study was conducted among a cohort of inpatients (216 older adults) admitted to a rehabilitation unit. The occurrences of any AE were reported. The level of disability regarding mobility activities was estimated using the disability qualifiers from the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. Changes in the levels of disability between admission and discharge were assessed. Baseline-measured covariates were also selected. Regarding all 4 disability levels (“no limitation,” “mild,” “moderate,” “severe,” and “complete disability”), a total of 159 participants experienced an improvement at discharge (126 participants progressed 1 level, whereas 33 improved 2 disability levels), 56 made no change, and no participants experienced a decline. The occurrence of fall-related events and the diagnostic group (musculoskeletal system) are specific predictive factors of change in the level of disability. The odds of undergoing a change in any disability level between admission and discharge decreases by 68% (1–0.32) when patients experience fall-related events (odds ratio [OR]?=?0.32, 95% confidence interval [CI]?=?0.11–0.97, P?=?0.041) and increases for individuals with musculoskeletal conditions (OR?=?3.91, 95% CI?=?1.34–11.38, P?=?0.012). Our findings suggest that increased efforts to prevent the occurrence of these AEs, together with early interventions suited to the diagnosis of the affected system, may have a positive influence on the improvement of disability. Further studies should evaluate disability over time after discharge to obtain a better sense of how transient or permanent the associated disability may be. PMID:25715255

  6. Familial Patterns of Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sandra

    1992-01-01

    Pedigree analysis of 12 young adults (9 of whom had learning disabilities) indicated that learning disability (LD) was strongly familial but that the type of disability (reading or math) was not directly inherited. Autoimmune disorders were significantly correlated with LD. In seven of the LD families, adults failed to overcome earlier reading and…

  7. Disability Discrimination in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Mark C.

    1999-01-01

    Reviewed 1998 and early 1999 court decisions related to disability discrimination in higher education. This period witnessed major developments in the law of disability discrimination as it relates to higher education. A major focus was on whether persons whose impairments are ameliorated by treatment are individuals with disabilities covered by…

  8. Literary Characters Who Are Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Keith; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Determines which specific disability categories appear most often in literature, when they appear, and which authors have contributed most to their appearance. Physical disabilities have been portrayed most often, followed by alcoholism and sensory disorders. Most portrayals of disabilities appeared between 1900 and 1949 and Charles Dickens wrote…

  9. The Gifted Learning Disabled Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1994

    This collection of articles on gifted learning disabled students begins with an explanation of the philosophy of the Center for Talented Youth at Johns Hopkins University (Maryland), a list of characteristics of gifted disabled students, and three definitions of learning disabilities. The following papers are then provided: "Gifted but Learning…

  10. Computers, Technology, and Disability. [Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC. HEATH Resource Center.

    This paper describes programs and resources that focus on access of postsecondary students with disabilities to computers and other forms of technology. Increased access to technological devices and services is provided to students with disabilities under the Technology-Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act (Tech Act). Section…

  11. Accommodating Workers with Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satcher, Jamie

    Someone who has a learning disability has difficulty in perceiving, understanding, and using information from the environment. This disability can cause problems in reading, listening, speaking, writing, spelling, or performing mathematics. Furthermore, learning disabilities may affect motor functioning, memory, and attention. Because a growing…

  12. Disability Discrimination in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Mark C.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews court cases in 1999 related to disability discrimination in higher education focusing on the Americans with Disabilities Act and section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The "Garrett" case regarding Eleventh Amendment immunity is the case most likely to be significant in the development of the law of disability discrimination. (SLD)

  13. Disabled People in Japanese Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kojima, Yoko, Ed.; And Others

    The volume is intended to give readers a glimpse of the day-to-day life of disabled people in Japan. Eight brief papers present life experiences of a mentally retarded preschooler, severely disabled children, a child with muscular dystrophy, a young girl with polio living in the community, visually disabled and recovering mentally ill people…

  14. DISABILITIES AND ACCOMMODATIONS Effective Date

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    federal and state laws and regulations prohibiting discrimination on the basis of disability or handicapSUBJECT: DISABILITIES AND ACCOMMODATIONS Effective Date: 9-18-12 Policy Number: 1.13 Supersedes of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and other

  15. Counseling Center Disability Support Service

    E-print Network

    Hill, Wendell T.

    /or Department Chair of the person involved. Any individual to whom the student takes a disability-8111 301.314.7682 TEL 301.405.0813 FAX GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES The purpose by students with disabilities. A student who believes that he or she has not received appropriate

  16. Sexual and Nonsexual Offenders With Intellectual and Learning Disabilities: A Comparison of Characteristics, Referral Patterns, and Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, William R.; Smith, Anne H. W.; Law, Jacqueline; Quinn, Kathleen; Anderson, Andrew; Smith, Astrid; Allan, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    This article reports an evaluation of a community intellectual disability offender service over the period from 1990 to 2001. Men who committed sex offenses or sexually abusive incidents (n = 106) and men who committed other types of offenses and serious incidents (n = 78) are compared on personal characteristics, referral sources, forensic…

  17. Programming Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valett, Robert E.

    Written primarily for use by persons concerned with the establishment and operation of learning disability programs the text presents a rationale for programing, definitions, examples, and educational rationales for basic learning abilities, and a model school district policy statement. Preliminary screening, psychological evaluation, a…

  18. Disability and Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ageing in their 40s and 50s. Engaging in health risk behaviours Some studies have indicated that people with disabilities have higher rates of risky behaviours such as smoking, poor diet and ... depending on the health condition. However an investigation in the United Kingdom ...

  19. Disability, Disorder, and Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization's "International Classification of Diseases" ("ICD") is the most important diagnostic tool, worldwide, to ensure that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities receive the supports they need to live richer, fuller lives. And yet, the "ICD" has naming conventions that create a conundrum for the field,…

  20. Medication and Reading Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, Laurie L.

    1981-01-01

    The clinical syndrome which relates most frequently to the reading-disabled child is the attention deficity disorder. The child psychiatrist will generally resort to medication only when behavioral management techniques have failed. The two most frequently used medications are Ritalin and Dexedrine, central nervous system stimulants. (JN)

  1. Intellectual Disability and Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercier, C.; Picard, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The association between poverty and intellectual disability (ID) has been well documented. However, little is known about persons with ID who face circumstances of extreme poverty, such as homelessness. This paper describes the situation of persons with ID who were or are homeless in Montreal and are currently receiving services from a…

  2. Multiculturalism and Severe Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Luanna H.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses the need for educators to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to help students with severe disabilities from mainstream groups to develop cross-cultural knowledge, values, and competencies. It outlines goals for multicultural understanding for educational researches, for teacher educators, and for school leaders and…

  3. Disability: The College's Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hourihan, John P., Ed.

    Fifteen author-contributed papers are presented to help campus personnel understand the difficulties encountered by disabled college students. Initial sections address issues and strategies involved, while a third section presents six case studies describing successful programs. A final chapter lists annotated resource guides on aspects of higher…

  4. Designing for the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, Selwyn

    Implications of the merits of normality and independence for the disabled, and their relevance to architectural design criteria are discussed. The introduction reflects the philosophical approach to the design and construction of public buildings and housing. Nine principle sections provide data and recommendations on the following topics:…

  5. Iowans with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruth, Amy, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    "The Goldfinch" is a magazine aimed at introducing young people to Iowa history. Each issue has a different topic which is discussed in detail throughout that issue. There are articles which describe different aspects of the topic. The topic for this particular issue is "Iowans with Disabilities." Featured articles from this issue include:…

  6. The Able Disabled

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sears, James H.

    1975-01-01

    The author dispels employer myths pertaining to employment of the physically handicapped and urges rehabilitation and retraining of present employees and additional employment of qualified handicapped individuals. Surveys in 1958 and 1973 of physically handicapped employees, including disabled veterans, found them to be very loyal, dependable, and…

  7. Parenting with a Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Holly

    1993-01-01

    This guide discusses how adjusting to parenthood for some persons with physical disabilities requires additional accommodations. Changes in lifestyle, environmental adaptations and assistive technology may be necessary to make independent child care possible. Project Innovative Parenting (PIP) was developed with the purpose to empower…

  8. Health Professionals with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Cinotti, Debra A.

    2009-01-01

    When it comes to education from K-12 and into the college years, the literature is replete with stories of the accomplishments of youngsters and adults with any number of disabilities who surpassed the expectations of their families and teachers. Similarly, there are an increasing number of examples of young men and women with a range of…

  9. Handbook of Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, Samuel L., Ed.; Horner, Robert H., Ed.; Snell, Martha E., Ed.; Blacher, Jan, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This authoritative handbook reviews the breadth of current knowledge about developmental disabilities: neuroscientific and genetic foundations; the impact on health, learning, and behavior; and effective educational and clinical practices. Leading authorities analyze what works in intervening with diverse children and families, from infancy…

  10. Non-Disabled Children's Ideas about Disability and Disabled People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckett, Angharad E.

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses findings from an Economic and Social Research Council-funded study exploring non-disabled children's ideas about disability. This represents the first in-depth sociological investigation of children's ideas about disabled people as members of wider society. Data are presented from focus group discussions with…

  11. High Tech Tots: Technology for Mobility, Manipulation, Communication, and Learning in Early Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Charlene

    1988-01-01

    Increasingly, very young children with disabilities are using microcomputers, powered mobility, myoelectric prostheses, and augmentative communication devices. This article examines research, clinical experience, and issues in the field of advanced technology applied to disabled children, aged birth to three, and suggests future applications of…

  12. Grazing incidence beam expander

    SciTech Connect

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  13. Foster care children with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jacqueline Marie

    2002-01-01

    Each year the number of children who enter the foster care system grows because the number of children who are vulnerable to abuse, neglect and/or poverty grows. Children with disabilities are a particularly vulnerable subset of this already vulnerable population. What are the implications of conceptual and methodological issues in theories of disability for estimates of children with disabilities in foster care? To what extent do children in the foster care system have disabilities? What are implications of existing health care coverage strategies (Medicaid, managed care, etc.) for the health and well-being of foster care children with disabilities? Conceptual and operational definitions of disability are reviewed. Descriptive statistics based on a secondary analysis of 1998 administrative AFCARS data are used to summarize the extent of disabilities. In addition, existing empirical studies and public policies on national and state health care insurance strategies are analyzed. PMID:12809380

  14. Processing of speech signals for physical and sensory disabilities.

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, H

    1995-01-01

    Assistive technology involving voice communication is used primarily by people who are deaf, hard of hearing, or who have speech and/or language disabilities. It is also used to a lesser extent by people with visual or motor disabilities. A very wide range of devices has been developed for people with hearing loss. These devices can be categorized not only by the modality of stimulation [i.e., auditory, visual, tactile, or direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve (auditory-neural)] but also in terms of the degree of speech processing that is used. At least four such categories can be distinguished: assistive devices (a) that are not designed specifically for speech, (b) that take the average characteristics of speech into account, (c) that process articulatory or phonetic characteristics of speech, and (d) that embody some degree of automatic speech recognition. Assistive devices for people with speech and/or language disabilities typically involve some form of speech synthesis or symbol generation for severe forms of language disability. Speech synthesis is also used in text-to-speech systems for sightless persons. Other applications of assistive technology involving voice communication include voice control of wheelchairs and other devices for people with mobility disabilities. Images Fig. 4 PMID:7479816

  15. The Modification of Educational Equipment and Curriculum for Maximum Utilization by Physically Disabled Persons; Design of a School for Physically Disabled Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuker, Harold E.; And Others

    Elements of modified school design for the physically disabled are considered, including mobility, classrooms, science laboratories, applied skill areas, the library, the swimming pool, and sanitary facilities. Also discussed are the cafeteria (food service, seating, and other considerations), recreational areas (play grounds,…

  16. Disability Prevalence and Demographic Association among Race/Ethnic Minority Populations in the United States: Implications for the 21st Century. Monograph Series Number Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asbury, Charles A.; And Others

    This research report examined the distribution and incidence of disabilities among minority communities. A review of literature is provided including relevant statistics on the prevalence of disabilities in African Americans and Hispanic Americans. The study used data from the National Health Interview Survey (n=122,859) to determine the…

  17. Factors Mediating the Relationship between Social Skills and Academic Grades in a Sample of Students Diagnosed with Learning Disabilities or Emotional Disturbance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milsom, Amy; Glanville, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    Research has found students with high incidence disabilities to be at risk for academic difficulties and school dropout. Using data from the NLTS-2 database, relationships between social skills and grades were examined for students who were diagnosed with learning disabilities or emotional disturbance. Results revealed significant direct and…

  18. This Is My Story: I've Got Cancer. "The Veronica Project": An Ethnographic Study of the Experiences of People with Learning Disabilities Who Have Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuffrey-Wijne, Irene; Davies, John

    2007-01-01

    As people with learning disabilities live longer, and the incidence of cancer is rising, it is of increasing importance to understand the lived cancer experience of this group. Consideration of the viewpoints of people with learning disabilities themselves will facilitate the development of cancer support services that are appropriate and…

  19. Summit on the National Effort To Prevent Mental Retardation and Related Disabilities. Summit Proceedings (Washington, D.C., February 6-7, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Committee on Mental Retardation, Washington, DC.

    This document reports the proceedings of a summit to assess the adequacy of the U.S. effort to prevent mental retardation and related disabilities and to chart the course for future strategies to reduce the incidence and ameliorate the effects of these disabilities, particularly when caused by socioeconomic conditions. The document contains…

  20. Delay Adjusted Incidence Infographic

    Cancer.gov

    This Infographic shows the National Cancer Institute SEER Incidence Trends. The graphs show the Average Annual Percent Change (AAPC) 2002-2011. For Men, Thyroid: 5.3*,Liver & IBD: 3.6*, Melanoma: 2.3*, Kidney: 2.0*, Myeloma: 1.9*, Pancreas: 1.2*, Leukemia: 0.9*, Oral Cavity: 0.5, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: 0.3*, Esophagus: -0.1, Brain & ONS: -0.2*, Bladder: -0.6*, All Sites: -1.1*, Stomach: -1.7*, Larynx: -1.9*, Prostate: -2.1*, Lung & Bronchus: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -3/0*. For Women, Thyroid: 5.8*, Liver & IBD: 2.9*, Myeloma: 1.8*, Kidney: 1.6*, Melanoma: 1.5, Corpus & Uterus: 1.3*, Pancreas: 1.1*, Leukemia: 0.6*, Brain & ONS: 0, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: -0.1, All Sites: -0.1, Breast: -0.3, Stomach: -0.7*, Oral Cavity: -0.7*, Bladder: -0.9*, Ovary: -0.9*, Lung & Bronchus: -1.0*, Cervix: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -2.7*. * AAPC is significantly different from zero (p<.05). Rates were adjusted for reporting delay in the registry. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  1. [Disability, autism and neurodiversity].

    PubMed

    Ortega, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    This article analyzes the emergence of the neurodiversity movement in the context of studies about disabilities and the political organization of disabled people. The neurodiversity movement is organized by the so-called high functioning autists, who believe that autism is not a disease to be treated and, if possible, cured. It is instead a human difference that has to be respected just like other differences (sexual, racial, among others). The activists of the neurodiversity movement oppose the groups of parents of autistic children and professionals seeking for a cure for autism. This article presents the arguments of the pro- and anti-cure groups and analyzes both positions as well as their impact upon the field of health and the development of public policies for autists. PMID:19142310

  2. Prostitution, disability and prohibition.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Frej Klem

    2015-06-01

    Criminalisation of prostitution, and minority rights for disabled persons, are important contemporary political issues. The article examines their intersection by analysing the conditions and arguments for making a legal exception for disabled persons to a general prohibition against purchasing sexual services. It explores the badness of prostitution, focusing on and discussing the argument that prostitution harms prostitutes, considers forms of regulation and the arguments for and against with emphasis on a liberty-based objection to prohibition, and finally presents and analyses three arguments for a legal exception, based on sexual rights, beneficence, and luck egalitarianism, respectively. It concludes that although the general case for and against criminalisation is complicated there is a good case for a legal exception. PMID:25079067

  3. Predictable mobility

    E-print Network

    Iagnemma, Karl

    In this article, a statistical mobility prediction for planetary surface exploration rovers has been described. This method explicitly considers uncertainty of the terrain physical parameters via SRSM and employs models ...

  4. Staying Mobile

    MedlinePLUS

    ... needs and recommend adaptations and tools (.pdf), and vehicle or van modifications to help keep you driving ... great options for some, a custom-built mobility vehicle can achieve more comprehensive or specific conversions. Consult ...

  5. Mobile cinema

    E-print Network

    Pan, Pengkai, 1972-

    2004-01-01

    This thesis develops techniques and methods that extend the art and craft of storytelling, and in particular enable the creation of mobile cinema. Stories are always constrained by the medium in which they are told and the ...

  6. Population segments with disabilities 

    E-print Network

    Stough, Laura

    2013-01-01

    . Mayhorn North Carolina State University Email: lstough@tamu.edu As a whole, scholars suggest that individuals with disabilities are disproportionately affected by disaster (Fox, White, Rooney, and Rowland, 2007; Hemingway and Priestley, 2006; Mc... aging and disease combine with other social factors to make older adults particularly vulnerable to disaster (Flanagan, Gregory, Hallisey, Heitgerd, and Lewis, 2011; Mayhorn, 2005; McGuire, Ford, and Okoro, 2007). Demographics and Prevalence...

  7. Nonverbal learning disability.

    PubMed

    Volden, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Nonverbal learning disability (NLD) is described as a subtype of specific learning disability where the source of the disability is a difficulty in processing nonverbal information. The child with NLD presents with problems in visual, spatial, and tactile perception but with strengths in rote verbal skills. Traditionally, these children were recognized by their difficulties in arithmetic which presented a stark contrast with their strengths in spelling and decoding text. They also exhibited a split between their verbal IQ (VIQ) and performance IQ (PIQ) scores with the VIQ being significantly higher than PIQ. Over time, however, diagnostic criteria have evolved and the broadened definition of the NLD syndrome has led many to question the utility and uniqueness of the NLD diagnosis. In addition, shifting diagnostic standards have made research results difficult to replicate. In short, the research to date leaves many unanswered questions about (1) the definition of the NLD syndrome, (2) the pervasiveness of the academic, social and psychopathological difficulties, (3) the source of the NLD syndrome, and (4) the degree to which it overlaps with other conditions. This chapter outlines a brief history of the NLD syndrome, how it is currently conceptualized, and some of the current debate about the unanswered questions above. PMID:23622171

  8. Unpacking intoxication, racialising disability.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mel Y

    2015-06-01

    This article examines concepts whose strictly medical applications have only partly informed their widespread use and suggests that demonstrably shared logics motivate our thinking across domains in the interest of a politically just engagement. It considers exchanges between the culturally complex concepts of 'toxicity' and 'intoxication', assessing the racialised conditions of their animation in several geopolitically--and quite radically--distinct scenarios. First, the article sets the framework through considering the racial implications of impairment and disability language of 'non-toxic' finance capital in the contemporary US financial crisis. Shifting material foci from 'illiquid financial bodies' to opiates while insisting that neither is 'more' metaphorically toxic than the other, the article turns to address the role of opium and temporality in the interanimations of race and disability in two sites of 19th-century British empire: Langdon Down's clinic for idiocy, and China's retort on opium to Queen Victoria. The article concludes with a provocation that suggests yet another crossing of borders, that between researcher and researched: 'intoxicated method' is a hypothetical mode of approach that refuses idealised research positions by 'critically disabling' the idealised cognitive and conceptual lens of analysis. PMID:26052116

  9. `Disabled' students in higher education Elisabet Weedon,

    E-print Network

    Millar, Andrew J.

    `Disabled' students in higher education Elisabet Weedon, Centre for Research in Education Inclusion statistical analysis compares disabled with non-disabled Recent Scottish legislation on access to higher disability 57.5 17.1 - Dyslexia (Specific learning difficulty) 16.2 54.2 53.3 Other disability (or medical

  10. 20 CFR 220.110 - Medically disabled.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... sufficient for a finding of medical disability, unless the diagnosis is supported by medical findings that... DISABILITY Medical Considerations § 220.110 Medically disabled. (a) “Medically disabled.” The term “medically... about whether the claimant's impairment(s) is medically disabling on medical evidence only,...

  11. Smith normal form Incidence of Subspaces

    E-print Network

    Arnold, Elizabeth A.

    Smith normal form Incidence of Subspaces Incidence maps and SNF bases The Smith Normal Form SNF of Skew Lines in PG(3, q) #12;Smith normal form Incidence of Subspaces Incidence maps and SNF bases Outline 1 Smith normal form 2 Incidence of Subspaces 3 Incidence maps and SNF bases Brouwer, Ducey

  12. Estimation of Physical Functional Disabilities and Long-term Care Needs for Patients Under Maintenance Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Mei-Chuan; Sung, Junne-Ming; Chang, Yu-Tzu; Hwang, Jing-Shiang

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Physical functional disabilities in hemodialysis (HD) patients may increase their mortality and long-term care needs. The aim of this study was to estimate the changes of proportion for different physical functional disabilities along time after beginning HD and the lifelong care needs. Methods: We used a population-based cohort consisting of 84,657 incident HD patients in Taiwan between 1998 and 2009 to estimate the survival function and extrapolate to lifetime through a semiparametric method. The Barthel Index (BI) was used to measure the functional disability levels cross-sectionally in 1334 HD patients recruited from 9 HD centers. A BI score <50 was considered as severe disability. Lifetime care needs were obtained by extrapolating the age-stratified survival functions to lifetime and then multiplying them with proportions of different kinds of functional disabilities over time. Results: On average, HD patients had at least 6.4, 2.0, and 1.3 years without disability, with moderate disability, and severe disability, respectively. The most common care needs were stair-climbing and bathing, which were 3.0 and 1.7 years, respectively. HD patients were expected to have about 3 years living with disabilities for those beginning HD at an age above 35 years; however, the older the patient, the higher the proportion of functional disabilities and care needs. Conclusions: HD patients are in need of long-term care and require early intervention and resource planning. The method developed in this study can also be applied to other chronic illnesses with various functional disabilities. PMID:24300025

  13. [Restructuring of the specialized job market for people with disabilities through legislative reform of the Rehabilitation Act--consequences for the workshops for the disabled].

    PubMed

    Wendt, S

    2001-04-01

    The legal basis for employment of people with disabilities in sheltered Workshops for the Disabled (Werkstätten für Behinderte, WfB) had hitherto been shaped by the 1961 Federal Social Assistance Act, the 1969 Employment Promotion Act, the 1974 Severely Disabled Persons Act with the related Workshop Ordinances of 1980 and 1996. The Act on Combating Unemployment of Severely Disabled Persons, effective as of Oct. 1, 2000 has now created a new legal foundation, which also is aimed at enhancing Workshop employees' horizontal mobility into the general job market, inter alia providing for access to Supported Employment arrangements and for availability of selective placement and support services (Integrationsfachdienste, IFD) throughout Germany. These Services also are intended as points of contact in the counselling of severely disabled school leavers in relation to placement opportunities in competitive jobs and/or integration projects or firms. Discussed from a legal perspective are the differences in sociolegal respects between such projects for severely disabled persons and employment in Workshops for the Disabled, as well as implications for the Workshops' own economic activity, also making reference to the forthcoming Book 9 of the Social Code. PMID:11370467

  14. Chernobyl fallout and cancer incidence in Finland.

    PubMed

    Auvinen, Anssi; Seppä, Karri; Pasanen, Kari; Kurttio, Päivi; Patama, Toni; Pukkala, Eero; Heinävaara, Sirpa; Arvela, Hannu; Verkasalo, Pia; Hakulinen, Timo

    2014-05-01

    Twenty-five years have passed since the Chernobyl accident, but its health consequences remain to be well established. Finland was one of the most heavily affected countries by the radioactive fallout outside the former Soviet Union. We analyzed the relation of the estimated external radiation exposure from the fallout to cancer incidence in Finland in 1988-2007. The study cohort comprised all ? 3.8 million Finns who had lived in the same dwelling for 12 months following the accident (May 1986-April 1987). Radiation exposure was estimated using data from an extensive mobile dose rate survey. Cancer incidence data were obtained for the cohort divided into four exposure categories (the lowest with the first-year committed dose <0.1 mSv and the highest ? 0.5 mSv) allowing for a latency of 5 years for leukemia and thyroid cancer, and 10 years for other cancers. Of the eight predefined cancer sites regarded as radiation-related from earlier studies, only colon cancer among women showed an association with exposure from fallout [excess rate ratio per increment in exposure category 0.06, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.02-0.11]. No such effect was observed for men, or other cancer sites. Our analysis of a large cohort over two decades did not reveal an increase in cancer incidence following the Chernobyl accident, with the possible exception of colon cancer among women. The largely null findings are consistent with extrapolation from previous studies suggesting that the effect is likely to remain too small to be empirically detectable and of little public health impact. PMID:24135935

  15. Quality of Life among Persons with Physical Disability in Udupi Taluk: A Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kuvalekar, Kunal; Kamath, Ramachandra; Ashok, Lena; Shetty, Bhartesh; Mayya, Shreemathi; Chandrasekaran, Varalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Disability is not just a health problem or attribute of individuals, but it reflects the problems individuals experience in their interaction with society and physical movements. Disabled persons remain neglected part of society and they also experience various barriers due to restriction of participation. Objectives: The aim was to assess the quality of life (QOL) of physically disabled persons, the impact of physical disability on activities of daily living (ADL) and to study the awareness about laws and facilities available for disabled persons. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional community based study was conducted among 130 physical disabled persons who were selected using convenience sampling technique. The WHO BREF scale was used to assess QOL, while assessment of ADL was done using Barthel Index. Socio-demographic assessment was done using Udai Pareek scale. SPSS version 15.0 was used to analyze data. Categorical variables were expressed as frequencies and percentages. As per guidelines physical, psychological, social, and environmental domain scores for WHO BREF scale were calculated. Results: Among the study participants, 36.2% had a disability from birth that is, congenital. The second common cause of disability was found to be postpolio residual paralysis as it was found among 26.2% respondents. Other causes found were stroke/paralysis and accidents, in 19.2% and 18.5% respondents, respectively. Activities such as transfer, mobility, and stair climbing showed greater impact of physical disability. It was found that 11.5% respondents required help in one of the ADL. QOL score was found to be low under the psychological domain reflecting on negative feelings, bodily image, appearance, spirituality, and self-esteem of respondents. Conclusion: Physical disability had affected social participation as well as marriage of the respondents. However, it was found that very few of them are aware about facilities provided under persons with disability act. PMID:25810992

  16. Altitude Modulates Concussion Incidence

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David W.; Myer, Gregory D.; Currie, Dustin W.; Comstock, R. Dawn; Clark, Joseph F.; Bailes, Julian E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Recent research indicates that the volume and/or pressure of intracranial fluid, a physiology affected by one’s altitude (ie, elevation above sea level), may be associated with the likelihood and/or severity of a concussion. The objective was to employ an epidemiological field investigation to evaluate the relationship between altitude and concussion rate in high school sports. Hypothesis: Because of the physiologies that occur during acclimatization, including a decline in intracranial compliance (a “tighter fit”), increased altitude may be related to a reduction in concussion rates in high school athletes. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Data on concussions and athlete exposures (AEs) between 2005-2006 and 2011-2012 were obtained from a large national sample of high schools (National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance System [High School RIO]) and were used to calculate total, competition, and practice concussion rates for aggregated sports and for football only. Results: Altitude of participating schools ranged from 7 to 6903 ft (median, 600 ft), and a total of 5936 concussions occurred in 20,618,915 exposures (2.88 per 10,000 AEs). When concussion rates were dichotomized by altitude using the median, elevated altitude was associated with a reduction in concussion rates overall (rate ratio [RR], 1.31; P < .001), in competition (RR, 1.31; P < .001), and in practice (RR, 1.29; P < .001). Specifically, high school sports played at higher altitude demonstrated a 31% reduction (95% confidence interval [CI], 25%-38%) in the incidence of total reported concussions. Likewise, concussion rates at increased altitude were reduced 30% for overall exposures, 27% for competition exposures, and 28% for practice exposures in football players (P < .001). Conclusion: The results of this epidemiological investigation indicate increased physiological responses to altitude may be associated with a reduction in sports-related concussion rates, especially in collision sports. Future research that focuses on the potential prophylactic effect of optimizing outflow impedance and thus reduction of intracranial compliance (a “tighter fit”) in humans is warranted to determine the most effective approaches to mitigate sport-related concussion, especially in football players. PMID:26535254

  17. THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities -Disability

    E-print Network

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities - Disability INTRODUCTION This document provides response to that legislation. CURRENT LEGAL POSITION Discrimination on the grounds of disability. In addition, it is illegal to discriminate for a disability-related reason. Discrimination by association

  18. THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities -Disability

    E-print Network

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE Equal Opportunities - Disability INTRODUCTION This document provides response to that legislation. CURRENT LEGAL POSITION Discrimination on the grounds of disability to discriminate for a disability-related reason. Discrimination by association is also prohibited, and therefore

  19. Disabled people’s healthcare encounters 

    E-print Network

    Bailey, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is about impairment, disability and health. Placed in the context of Disability Studies, it engages with the theoretical debates about how disability and impairment should be conceived. In doing so it pays ...

  20. Prevalence and features of ICF-disability in Spain as captured by the 2008 National Disability Survey

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Since 1986, the study of disability in Spain has been mainly addressed by National Disability Surveys (NDSs). While international attempts to frame NDS designs within the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) have progressed, in general, the ICF has hardly been used in either the NDS or epidemiological studies. This study sought to identify ICF Activity- and Participation-related content in the most recent Spanish NDS, the 2008 Survey on Disabilities, Independence and Dependency Situations (Encuesta sobre discapacidades, autonomía personal y situaciones de Dependencia - EDAD 2008), and estimate the prevalence of such ICF-framed disability. Methods EDAD 2008 methods and questions were perused. Of the 51 EDAD items analysed, 29 were backcoded to specific d2-d7 domains of the ICF Checklist and, by rating the recorded difficulty to perform specific tasks with or without help, these were then taken as performance and capacity respectively. A global ICF score was also derived, albeit lacking data for d1, "Learning and applying knowledge", d8, "Major Life Areas" and d9, "Community, Social and Civic Life". Data were grouped by sex, age, residence and initial positive screening, and prevalence figures were calculated by disability level both for the general population, using the originally designed weights, and for the population that had screened positive to disability. Data for institutionalised persons were processed separately. Results Crude prevalence of ICF severe/complete and moderate disability among the community-dwelling population aged ?6 years was 0.9%-2.2% respectively, and that of severe/complete disability among persons living in sheltered accommodation was 0.3%. Prevalence of severe/complete disability was: higher in women than in men, 0.8% vs. 0.4%; increased with age; and was particularly high in domains such as "Domestic Life", 3.4%, "Mobility", 1.8%, and "Self-care", 1.9%, in which prevalence decreased when measured by reference to performance. Moreover, global scores indicated that severe/complete disability in these same domains was frequent among the moderately disabled group. Conclusions The EDAD 2008 affords an insufficient data set to be ICF-framed when it comes to the Activity and Participation domains. Notwithstanding their unknown validity, ratings for available ICF domains may, however, be suitable for consideration under the ADL model of functional dependency, suggesting that there are approximately 500,000 persons suffering from severe/complete disability and 1,000,000 suffering from moderate disability, with half the latter being severely disabled in domains capable of benefiting from technical or personal aid. Application of EDAD data to the planning of services for regions and other subpopulations means that need for personal help must be assessed, unmet needs ascertained, and knowledge of social participation and support, particularly for the mentally ill, improved. International, WHO-supported co-operation in ICF planning and use of NDSs in Spain and other countries is needed. PMID:22122806

  1. The Impact of Early Powered Mobility on Parental Stress, Negative Emotions, and Family Social Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tefft, Donita; Guerette, Paula; Furumasu, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Powered mobility has been found to have positive effects on young children with severe physical disabilities, but the impact on the family has been less well documented. We evaluated the impact of early powered mobility on parental stress, negative emotions, perceived social interactions, and parental satisfaction with wheelchair characteristics…

  2. The World Report on Disability and People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Officer, Alana; Shakespeare, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The "World Report on Disability" was requested by the World Health Assembly, the governing body of the World Health Organization (WHO). Because disability is broader than health, WHO partnered with the World Bank. The "World Report" was published in 2011 and provides a comprehensive scientific analysis on the global situation…

  3. The Law's Understanding of Intellectual Disability as a Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is differently yet validly described by different professions. Legal professionals find it most useful to consider ID as a disability rather than a disorder. Because the law regulates the actions of individuals in a society and the actions of society on an individual, the law's concern in dealing with a person with ID…

  4. Disabilities Information Flow: A Disabilities Information Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ling, Bin; Allison, Colin; Nicholl, J. Ross; Moodley, Luke; Roberts, Dave

    2006-01-01

    The Disabilities Information Flow (DIF) project at the University of St Andrews has sought to provide a means of efficiently managing all student disabilities information within the institution and provide appropriate role-based service interfaces for all staff who need to routinely interact with this information. This paper describes the software…

  5. Responding to computer security incidents: Guidelines for incident handling

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, E.E. Jr.; Brown, D.S.; Longstaff, T.A.

    1990-07-23

    These guidelines do not comprise an exhaustive set of incident handling procedures. A lengthy set of guidelines would be too intimidating to read and to incorporate into site contingency response plans. The discipline of responding to incidents is also very much in its infancy. Because so much is yet to be learned about handling incidents, this version of these guidelines will necessarily lack some degree of sophistication and detail. In addition, it is impossible to specify specific technical procedures for responding to the many types and versions of computer systems within DOE. This guidelines document contains basic information about responding to incidents which can be used, regardless of hardware platform or operating system. For specific technical details necessary to implement many of the recommendations in these guidelines, consult your system administrator or vendor.

  6. Markers for Aggression in Inpatient Treatment Facilities for Adults with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenneij, Nienke H.; Didden, Robert; Stolker, Joost Jan; Koot, Hans M.

    2009-01-01

    In high care settings for persons with intellectual disability (ID) aggressive incidents often occur. Still little is known about factors that are associated with an increased risk for aggressive behavior in clients who are admitted to an inpatient treatment facility. In four inpatient facilities, 108 adults with mild and borderline ID and…

  7. Prevalence of Psychopathology across a Service Population of Parents with Intellectual Disabilities and Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGaw, Sue; Shaw, Tom; Beckley, Kerry

    2007-01-01

    This study identified and investigated the incidence of childhood trauma and psychopathology across a population of parents with intellectual disabilities (IDs) known to a parenting service in the United Kingdom over a 5-year period and examined the emotional and physical welfare of their children. Data were gathered from 49 parents with ID and 58…

  8. Learning Disabilities in New Zealand: Where Kiwis and Kids with LD Can't Fly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, James W.

    1992-01-01

    This article discusses reasons for rejection of the learning disability category in New Zealand and describes the general education and special education systems in New Zealand. It is suggested that the needs of such students may potentially be met by new policies for "high incidence" special needs. Teacher training needs are also addressed. (DB)

  9. Cancer and Intellectual Disability: A Review of Some Key Contextual Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogg, James; Tuffrey-Wijne, Irene

    2008-01-01

    Research into the health of people with intellectual disabilities has increasingly focused on the occurrence of cancer in this population. Information on the incidence and prevalence of cancer is reviewed in both institutional and community settings. Examples of environmental causation are considered including "Helicobacter pylori."…

  10. Hepatitis C Seroprevalence in an Institution for Residents with a Developmental Disability. Brief Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Eric

    1996-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in Australia of 156 individuals with developmental disabilities who were long-term clients of a residential institution, to determine the incidence of hepatitis C antibodies. Results indicated that none of the residents was seropositive and that hepatitis C is less prevalent than hepatitis B in residential…

  11. Factors Related to Post-School Outcomes of Minority Youth with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garate, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    The levels of post-school life success were examined for a group of 273 minority youth, with high incidence disabilities (HID) one to four years out of high school. In this cross-sectional study, school leavers completed a phone survey regarding their actions beyond high school related to employment, continued post-secondary education, independent…

  12. Papanicolaou Smear Screening of Women with Intellectual Disabilities: A Cross-Sectional Survey in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Lin, Jin-Ding; Sung, Chang-Lin; Liu, Ta-Wen; Liu, Yi-Lian; Chen, Li-Mei; Chu, Cordia M.

    2010-01-01

    Although little is known about the incidence of cervical cancer in women with intellectual disabilities (ID), Pap smear screening is an effective public health program to prevent cervical cancer to this group of people. The purposes of this study were to identify and evaluate the factors regarding the utilization of the Pap smears in women with ID…

  13. Hematopoietic mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Mattoscio, Miriam; Nicholas, Richard; Sormani, Maria P.; Malik, Omar; Lee, Jean S.; Waldman, Adam D.; Dazzi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the mobilization from the bone marrow and the functional relevance of the increased number of circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) induced by the anti-?-4 integrin antibody natalizumab in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: We evaluated CD45lowCD34+ HSPC frequency by flow cytometry in blood from 45 natalizumab-treated patients (12 of whom were prospectively followed during the first year of treatment as part of a pilot cohort and 16 prospectively followed for validation), 10 untreated patients with MS, and 24 healthy donors. In the natalizumab-treated group, we also assessed sorted HSPC cell cycle status, T- and B-lymphocyte subpopulation frequencies (n = 29), and HSPC differentiation potential (n = 10). Results: Natalizumab-induced circulating HSPC were predominantly quiescent, suggesting recent mobilization from the bone marrow, and were capable of differentiating ex vivo. Circulating HSPC numbers were significantly increased during natalizumab, but heterogeneously, allowing the stratification of mobilizer and nonmobilizer subgroups. Nonmobilizer status was associated with persistence of disease activity during treatment. The frequency of B cells and CD103+CD8+ regulatory T cells persistently increased, more significantly in mobilizer patients, who also showed a specific naive/memory B-cell profile. Conclusions: The data suggest that natalizumab-induced circulating HSPC increase is the result of true mobilization from the bone marrow and has clinical and immunologic relevance. HSPC mobilization, associated with clinical remission and increased proportion of circulating B and regulatory T cells, may contribute to the treatment's mode of action; thus, HSPC blood counts could represent an early biomarker of responsiveness to natalizumab. PMID:25762712

  14. Long-term Disability Associated With War-related Experience Among Vietnam Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Robert; Salomon, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent combat operations have involved large numbers of personnel. Long-term health effects of military deployment remain largely unknown. Objectives: To examine patterns and trends in long-term disability among combat veterans and to relate disability to aspects of wartime experience. Participants: A total of 60,228 Australian military personnel deployed between 1962 and 1975 during the Vietnam War, and 82,877 military personnel who were not deployed overseas. Outcome Measures: Accepted physician-assessed disability claims were evaluated over follow-up periods up to 50 years after deployment, and compared with age-matched controls. Multivariable analysis was used to examine differences by service branch, rank, age, and deployment duration. Results: The steepest rise in disability incidence was observed among Vietnam veterans starting in the 1990s, around 20–30 years after deployment for most veterans. After 1994, when Statements of Principles were introduced to guide evaluation of disability claims, the hazard ratio for disability incidence was 1.53 (95% confidence interval, 1.32–1.77) compared with the prior period. By January 2011, after an average follow-up of 42.5 years, 69.7% (95% confidence interval, 69.4%–70.1%) of veterans had at least 1 war-related disability. Many veterans had multiple disabilities, with leading causes being eye and ear disorders (48.0%), mental health conditions (47.9%), and musculoskeletal disorders (18.4%). For specific categories of disability, relative risks for accepted claims among veterans compared with controls were highest for mental health disorders, at 22.9 (21.9–24.0) and lowest for injuries, at 1.5 (1.4–1.6) with a relative risk for any disability of 3.7 (3.7–3.8). Veterans with service of >1 year were 2.5 (2.2–2.7) times more likely to have a mental health disability than those who served <100 days, and 2.3 (2.1–2.5) times more likely to have other disabilities. Conclusions: Long-term effects of deployment into military conflicts are substantial, and likelihood of war-related disability is associated with service history. If similar patterns follow from more recent conflicts, significant additional resources will be needed to prevent and treat long-term health conditions among veterans. PMID:25768060

  15. Long-Term Morbidity and Management Strategies of Tracheal Aspiration in Adults with Severe Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, B.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The feeding skills of 73 adults with severe developmental disabilities who aspirated were examined. Mobility, level of mental retardation, or feeding skill did not discriminate those who aspirated. Mealtime respiratory distress (65%) or chronic lung disease (55%), however, were significantly associated with aspiration. (Author/DB)

  16. Effectiveness of Cognitive Skills-Based Computer-Assisted Instruction for Students with Disabilities: A Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weng, Pei-Lin; Maeda, Yukiko; Bouck, Emily C.

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) for students with disabilities can be categorized into the following categories: visual, auditory, mobile, and cognitive skills-based CAI. Cognitive-skills based CAI differs from other types of CAI largely in terms of an emphasis on instructional design features. We conducted both systematic review of…

  17. Increasing Accessibility: Using Universal Design Principles to Address Disability Impairments in the Online Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Candice N.; Heiselt, April K.

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing number of students enrolling in distance education, there is a need to consider the accessibility of course materials in online learning environments. Four major groups of disabilities: mobility, auditory, visual, and cognitive are explored as they relate to their implementation into instructional design and their impact on…

  18. Feasibility of Quantitative Ultrasound Measurement of the Heel Bone in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mergler, S.; Lobker, B.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Penning, C.

    2010-01-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures are common in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Reduced mobility in case of motor impairment and the use of anti-epileptic drugs contribute to the development of low BMD. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurement of the heel bone is a non-invasive and radiation-free method for measuring bone…

  19. Therapeutic Riding for a Student with Multiple Disabilities and Visual Impairment: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrman, Jennifer; Ross, David B.

    2001-01-01

    A 9-year-old with multiple disabilities and visual impairments was the focus of a 10-week developmental therapeutic riding program incorporating hippotherapy. The program has led to increased mobility, an increase in visual attention span and fixation time, signs of greater verbal communication, and the acquisition of new functional signs.…

  20. 20 CFR 404.1511 - Definition of a disabling impairment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Definition of Disability § 404.1511 Definition of a disabling impairment. (a) Disabled workers, persons...

  1. 20 CFR 404.1505 - Basic definition of disability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Definition of Disability § 404.1505 Basic definition of disability. (a) The law defines disability...

  2. Dyslexia: Problems of Reading Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Herman K.; Schiffman, Gilbert B.

    The purpose of this book is to provide an understanding of both the educational and medical aspects of reading and to show how they are interrelated in reading disabilities. The various aspects of reading disabilities are presented in the following chapters: Introduction to the Reading Problem; Early Predictive Studies; Psychological Evaluation;…

  3. Dynamic Assessment of Language Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    The paper reports a study of a narrative-based Dynamic Assessment (DA) procedure developed in the USA that is used in the UK with children with developmental language disabilities. Three monolingual English children with language disabilities are assessed by a speech/language pathologist/therapist who is learning to work with DA in collaboration…

  4. Assessment of Developmentally Disabled Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Joan B.

    1985-01-01

    Although formal assessment of children with severe disabilities raises many problems of measurement, evaluation by "standard rulers" is still essential. This article examines the role of the school psychologist in the measurement process and identifies issues related to the assessment of developmentally disabled children. (Author/EGS)

  5. Hypermedia Interaction for the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Philip

    1992-01-01

    Special types of prosthetic devices have been designed to support the specific needs of disabled and handicapped computer users in retrieving information. Of particular importance are interfaces based on the use of sound, tactile operations, and gestures. Such interfaces may be used to provide disabled people with access to hypermedia information.…

  6. Voices of Disability in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Liz

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her story of being a nurse with a disability who serves people with disabilities and older adults. She recounts her experience of what it is like to be stigmatized, marginalized, and to have lowered expectations because of her difference. The author had no right arm save about six inches from the shoulder down.…

  7. Students, Colleges, and Disability Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Stephen B.

    As recently as the 1960s and 1970s, comparatively few persons with disabilities were able to attend college, either due to limited financial resources or to the inaccessibility of the campus and college programs. Today, colleges have substantially increased their efforts to recruit, admit, and accommodate qualified students with disabilities and…

  8. Children with disabilities in disaster 

    E-print Network

    Stough, Laura

    2012-01-01

    stream_source_info Children with disabilities in disaster.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 2 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Children with disabilities in disaster.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset...

  9. Stability of Arithmetic Disability Subtypes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Cheryl H.; Pennett, H. Deborah-Lynne; Black, Jeffrey L.; Fair, George W.; Balise, Raymond R.

    1999-01-01

    A study examined the stability over 19 months of academic subtyping classification of 80 children (ages 9 to 13) representing four subtypes of arithmetic disabilities (AD). Approximately half of the sample retained AD regardless of identification method. Children with deficits in arithmetic, reading, and spelling disabilities exhibited the…

  10. The World Report on Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickenbach, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    The World Report on Disability, a joint endeavor of the World Health Organization and the World Bank, launched in June 2011, is an astonishing achievement that will set the standard for disability studies research for evidence-informed policy for years to come. The product of collaborative and participatory work between organizations of persons…

  11. Epistemological Relativity in Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavale, Kenneth A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper affirms H. Lee Swanson's views in "Toward a Metatheroy of Learning Disabilities" and elaborates upon the role of basic research in learning disabilities. An alternative perspective on the nature of applied research is described that views applied research as theoretically driven research aimed at practical matters. (JDD)

  12. Supervising Adults with Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Dale

    Intended for employers, supervisors, and coworkers, the booklet presents guidelines for accommodating learning disabled (LD) employees. An introductory section explains the condition, describing its nature and the range of impairments it includes. Five types of learning disabilities are identified: visual, auditory, motor, tactile, and academic.…

  13. Understanding Intellectual Disability through Rasopathies

    PubMed Central

    Alvaro, San Martín; Rafael, Pagani Mario

    2014-01-01

    Intellectual disability, commonly known as mental retardation in the International Classification of Disease from World Health Organization, is the term that describes an intellectual and adaptive cognitive disability that begins in early life during the developmental period. Currently the term intellectual disability is the preferred one. Although our understanding of the physiological basis of learning and learning disability is poor, a general idea is that such condition is quite permanent. However, investigations in animal models suggest that learning disability can be functional in nature and as such reversible through pharmacology or appropriate learning paradigms. A fraction of the cases of intellectual disability is caused by point mutations or deletions in genes that encode for proteins of the RAS/MAP Kinase signaling pathway known as RASopathies. Here we examined the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in this group of genetic disorders focusing in studies which provide evidence that intellectual disability is potentially treatable and curable. The evidence presented supports the idea that with the appropriate understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved, intellectual disability could be treated pharmacologically and perhaps through specific mechanistic-based teaching strategies. PMID:24859216

  14. Ischemic stroke incidence in Santa Coloma de Gramenet (ISISCOG), Spain. A community-based study

    PubMed Central

    Alzamora, María Teresa; Sorribes, Marta; Heras, Antonio; Vila, Nicolás; Vicheto, Marisa; Forés, Rosa; Sánchez-Ojanguren, José; Sancho, Amparo; Pera, Guillem

    2008-01-01

    Background In Spain, stroke is one of the major causes of death and the main cause of severe disability in people over 65 years. We analyzed the incidence of ischemic stroke, stroke subtypes, case fatality and disability at 90 days after the event in a Spanish population. Methods A prospective community-based register of ischemic strokes was established in Santa Coloma de Gramenet (Barcelona) [116,220 inhabitants of all ages, according to the municipal census of December 31,2001], from January 1 to December 31, 2003. Standard definitions and case finding methods were used to identify all cases in all age groups. Every patient underwent a complete clinical evaluation and systematic tests including neuroimaging (CT/MRI) and vascular studies (carotid duplex ultrasound intra and extracranial and MR angiography). Results Over a one year period, 196 ischemic strokes were registered [107 men; median age = 76 years (range 39–98)], being the first event in 159 patients (81.1%) and a recurrent stroke in 37 (18.9%). After age-adjustment to the European population, the incidence of ischemic stroke per 100,000 inhabitants was 172 (95% CI, 148–196); 219 (176–261) in men and 133 (105–160) in women, with an annual incidence for first ischemic stroke of 139 (118–161); 165 (128–201) in men and 115 (89–140) in women. The incidence of stroke increased with age. Stroke subtypes (TOAST classification criteria) were lacunar in 28.8%, atherothrombotic in 18.6%, cardioembolic in 26.6% and undetermined in 26.0% of patients. At 90 days, the case-fatality was 12%, and among survivors, moderate-to-severe disability was present in 45 % at 3 months. Conclusion This prospective community-based study shows one of the lowest incidences of stroke in Europe, as well as one of the lowest case fatality and disability rates at 90 days after stroke. PMID:18371212

  15. 36 CFR 1192.95 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.95 Section 1192.95 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY GUIDELINES FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Commuter Rail Cars and Systems §...

  16. 36 CFR 1192.125 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.125 Section 1192.125 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY GUIDELINES FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Intercity Rail Cars and Systems...

  17. 36 CFR 1192.23 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.23 Section 1192.23 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY GUIDELINES FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Buses, Vans and Systems §...

  18. 36 CFR 1192.159 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.159 Section 1192.159 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY GUIDELINES FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Over-the-Road Buses and Systems...

  19. Overcoming Challenges: "Going Mobile with Your Own Video Models"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnahan, Christina R.; Basham, James D.; Christman, Jennifer; Hollingshead, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Video modeling has been shown to be an effective intervention for students with a variety of disabilities. Traditional video models present problems in terms of application across meaningful settings, such as in the community or even across the school environment. However, with advances in mobile technology, portable devices with video capability…

  20. Working Together: Computers and People with Mobility Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    This brief paper describes several computing tools that have been effectively used by individuals with mobility impairments. Emphasis is on tasks to be completed and how the individuals abilities (not disabilities), with possible assistance from technology, can be used to accomplish them. Preliminary information addresses the importance of…

  1. Mobile Customer Relationship Management and Mobile Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanayei, Ali; Mirzaei, Abas

    The purpose of this study is twofold. First, in order to guarantee a coherent discussion about mobile customer relationship management (mCRM), this paper presents a conceptualization of mCRM delineating its unique characteristics because of Among the variety of mobile services, considerable attention has been devoted to mobile marketing and in particular to mobile customer relationship management services. Second, the authors discusses the security risks in mobile computing in different level(user, mobile device, wireless network,...) and finally we focus on enterprise mobile security and it's subgroups with a series of suggestion and solution for improve mobile computing security.

  2. Defining disability: metaphysical not political.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Christopher A

    2013-08-01

    Recent discussions surrounding the conceptualising of disability has resulted in a stalemate between British sociologists and philosophers. The stagnation of theorizing that has occurred threatens not only academic pursuits and the advancement of theoretical interpretations within the Disability Studies community, but also how we educate and advocate politically, legally, and socially. More pointedly, many activists and theorists in the UK appear to believe the British social model is the only effective means of understanding and advocating on behalf of people with disabilities. This model, largely reliant upon materialist research traditions, contends that disability is a form of social oppression and hence, is a phenomenon that should be conceptualised in social terms. Individual properties such as impairments are disregarded as they are viewed to be unimportant in the analysis of the social causes of disability. Concurrently, many bioethicists and philosophers have embraced what Tom Shakespeare has classified as an 'Interactional Approach' to disability--that "the experience of a disabled person results from the relationship between factors intrinsic to the individual, and the extrinsic factors arising from the wider context in which she finds herself". I intend to demonstrate that the benefits of the British social model are now outweighed by its burdens. I suggest, as Jerome Bickenbach has, that while it may be somewhat churlish to critique the social model in light of its political success, taken literally, it implies that people with disabilities require no additional health resources by virtue of their impairments. Despite the eloquent arguments that have preceded me by interactional theorists, none have been accepted as evidence of fallacious reasoning by British social model theorists. This article is an attempt to clarify why it is that the types of arguments British social model theorists have been offering are misguided. I suggest that the British social model, unlike an interactional approach, is unable to provide a realistic account of the experience of disability, and subsequently, unable to be properly utilized to ensure justice for people with disabilities. PMID:22481609

  3. Prevalence of disabled people involved in Spanish Civil Guard's police activity.

    PubMed

    González, José L; Cendra, Jacobo; Manzanero, Antonio L

    2013-11-01

    Improving interventions with victims and offenders with disabilities requires analysis of the degree of prevalence of crimes in which these people are involved. For this purpose, data regarding interventions made by the Spanish Civil Guard between 2008 and 2010, in which 2099 people had some kind of disability, have been collected and analyzed, with particular regard to criminal offenses (felonies and/or misdemeanors). In this study, the relationship between the types of disability a person has and other variables like their connection to the incident, their gender, age, the relationship between victim and perpetrator, and the time and place of the events were all taken into consideration. The results show that most of the victims with disabilities served by the Spanish Civil Guard were male. The interventions were mainly aid and rescues. Criminal offenses were only 20% of the events. PMID:24029801

  4. Comprehension of Humor in Children with Nonverbal Learning Disabilities, Reading Disabilities, and without Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret; Glass, Kimberly

    2008-01-01

    The normal development of humor in children has been well documented with a predictable course that is tied to social, cognitive, and linguistic development in children. This study explored humor comprehension in children with nonverbal learning disabilities (NVLD). Children with NVLD were compared with children with reading disabilities and a…

  5. Center Director Bridges visits Disability Awareness and Action working Group Technology Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges (standing, center) poses with members of the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG), which is holding the 1999 Technology Fair Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 'Opening Doors to Ability.' Some of the vendors participating are Canine Companions for Independence, Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services.

  6. Center Director Bridges visits Disability Awareness and Action working Group Technology Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges stops to talk to one of the vendors at the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG) Technology Fair being held Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. With him at the far left is Sterling Walker, director of Engineering Development at KSC and chairman of DAAWG, and Nancie Strott, a multi-media specialist with Dynacs and chairperson of the Fair; at the right is Carol Cavanaugh, with KSC Public Services. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 'Opening Doors to Ability.' Some of the vendors participating are Canine Companions for Independence, Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services.

  7. Cyber Incidents Involving Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Turk

    2005-10-01

    The Analysis Function of the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has prepared this report to document cyber security incidents for use by the CSSC. The description and analysis of incidents reported herein support three CSSC tasks: establishing a business case; increasing security awareness and private and corporate participation related to enhanced cyber security of control systems; and providing informational material to support model development and prioritize activities for CSSC. The stated mission of CSSC is to reduce vulnerability of critical infrastructure to cyber attack on control systems. As stated in the Incident Management Tool Requirements (August 2005) ''Vulnerability reduction is promoted by risk analysis that tracks actual risk, emphasizes high risk, determines risk reduction as a function of countermeasures, tracks increase of risk due to external influence, and measures success of the vulnerability reduction program''. Process control and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, with their reliance on proprietary networks and hardware, have long been considered immune to the network attacks that have wreaked so much havoc on corporate information systems. New research indicates this confidence is misplaced--the move to open standards such as Ethernet, Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol, and Web technologies is allowing hackers to take advantage of the control industry's unawareness. Much of the available information about cyber incidents represents a characterization as opposed to an analysis of events. The lack of good analyses reflects an overall weakness in reporting requirements as well as the fact that to date there have been very few serious cyber attacks on control systems. Most companies prefer not to share cyber attack incident data because of potential financial repercussions. Uniform reporting requirements will do much to make this information available to Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and others who require it. This report summarizes the rise in frequency of cyber attacks, describes the perpetrators, and identifies the means of attack. This type of analysis, when used in conjunction with vulnerability analyses, can be used to support a proactive approach to prevent cyber attacks. CSSC will use this document to evolve a standardized approach to incident reporting and analysis. This document will be updated as needed to record additional event analyses and insights regarding incident reporting. This report represents 120 cyber security incidents documented in a number of sources, including: the British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) Industrial Security Incident Database, the 2003 CSI/FBI Computer Crime and Security Survey, the KEMA, Inc., Database, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Energy Incident Database, the INL Cyber Incident Database, and other open-source data. The National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism (MIPT) database was also interrogated but, interestingly, failed to yield any cyber attack incidents. The results of this evaluation indicate that historical evidence provides insight into control system related incidents or failures; however, that the limited available information provides little support to future risk estimates. The documented case history shows that activity has increased significantly since 1988. The majority of incidents come from the Internet by way of opportunistic viruses, Trojans, and worms, but a surprisingly large number are directed acts of sabotage. A substantial number of confirmed, unconfirmed, and potential events that directly or potentially impact control systems worldwide are also identified. Twelve selected cyber incidents are presented at the end of this report as examples of the documented case studies (see Appendix B).

  8. PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOSOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN AND ASSOCIATED DISABILITY

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Coggon, David

    2015-01-01

    Although much attention has been given to the physical determinants of common musculoskeletal complaints such as back and arm pain, research points to a stronger influence of psychological factors. Multiple studies have implicated poor mental health and somatisation (a tendency to worry about common somatic symptoms) in the incidence and chronicity of musculoskeletal pain and associated disability. Also important are adverse beliefs about the prognosis of such disorders, and about the role of physical activity in their development and persistence. Differences in societal beliefs may have contributed to major variation in the prevalence of disabling musculoskeletal pain that has been observed between countries and in the same countries over time. Psychosocial aspects of work have also been linked with musculoskeletal pain, although relative risks have generally been smaller. There is a need to take account of psychological factors in the clinical management of patients with back, neck and arm pain. PMID:26612236

  9. Romantic relationships and interpersonal violence among adults with developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Ward, Karen M; Bosek, Rebecca L; Trimble, Erin L

    2010-04-01

    Romantic relationships are important in the lives of adults with developmental disabilities. The purpose of this study was to explore dating and romantic relationships among these adults and to identify the nature and extent of interpersonal violence in their relationships. A random sample of 47 women and men participated in semistructured interviews. The authors found that relationships sounded very typical of people without disabilities, but their time together was more limited than they wanted. A high percentage of participants had experienced interpersonal violence, primarily in the form of name calling, yelling, screaming, and physical assault. Although the police and family or friends were the first sources of assistance following an abusive incident, more than one third of the participants said they did not seek any help. PMID:20597743

  10. MIDAS : minor incident decision analysis software

    E-print Network

    Horng, Tze-Chieh, 1964-

    2004-01-01

    MIDAS is the minor incident decision analysis software that acts as an advisory tool for plant decision makers and operators to analyze the available decision alternatives for resolving minor incidents. The minor incidents ...

  11. 42 CFR 405.2452 - Services and supplies incident to clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Services and supplies incident to clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services. 405.2452 Section 405.2452 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... THE AGED AND DISABLED Rural Health Clinic and Federally Qualified Health Center Services...

  12. THE SOLUBLE EPOXIDE HYDROLASE GENE HARBORS SEQUENCE VARIATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH SUSCEPTIBILITY TO AND PROTECTION FROM INCIDENT ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stroke is the leading cause of severe disability and the third leading cause of death, accounting for one of every 15 deaths in the USA. We investigated the association of polymorphisms in the soluble epoxide hydrolase gene (EPHX2) with incident ischemic stroke in African-Americans and Whites. Twelv...

  13. Recent trends in assistive technology for mobility

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Loss of physical mobility makes maximal participation in desired activities more difficult and in the worst case fully prevents participation. This paper surveys recent work in assistive technology to improve mobility for persons with a disability, drawing on examples observed during a tour of academic and industrial research sites in Europe. The underlying theme of this recent work is a more seamless integration of the capabilities of the user and the assistive technology. This improved integration spans diverse technologies, including powered wheelchairs, prosthetic limbs, functional electrical stimulation, and wearable exoskeletons. Improved integration is being accomplished in three ways: 1) improving the assistive technology mechanics; 2) improving the user-technology physical interface; and 3) sharing of control between the user and the technology. We provide an overview of these improvements in user-technology integration and discuss whether such improvements have the potential to be transformative for people with mobility impairments. PMID:22520500

  14. Fluid blade disablement tool

    DOEpatents

    Jakaboski, Juan-Carlos (Albuquerque, NM); Hughs, Chance G. (Albuquerque, NM); Todd, Steven N. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2012-01-10

    A fluid blade disablement (FBD) tool that forms both a focused fluid projectile that resembles a blade, which can provide precision penetration of a barrier wall, and a broad fluid projectile that functions substantially like a hammer, which can produce general disruption of structures behind the barrier wall. Embodiments of the FBD tool comprise a container capable of holding fluid, an explosive assembly which is positioned within the container and which comprises an explosive holder and explosive, and a means for detonating. The container has a concavity on the side adjacent to the exposed surface of the explosive. The position of the concavity relative to the explosive and its construction of materials with thicknesses that facilitate inversion and/or rupture of the concavity wall enable the formation of a sharp and coherent blade of fluid advancing ahead of the detonation gases.

  15. Self-report computer-based survey of technology use by people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Tanis, Emily Shea; Palmer, Susan; Wehmeyer, Michael; Davies, Daniel K; Stock, Steven E; Lobb, Kathy; Bishop, Barbara

    2012-02-01

    Advancements of technologies in the areas of mobility, hearing and vision, communication, and daily living for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities has the potential to greatly enhance independence and self-determination. Previous research, however, suggests that there is a technological divide with regard to the use of such technologies by people with intellectual and developmental disabilities when compared with the use reported by the general public. To provide current information with regard to technology use by people with intellectual and developmental disabilities by examining the technology needs, use, and barriers to such use experienced by 180 adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities, we used QuestNet, a self-directed computer survey program. Results suggest that although there has been progress in technology acquisition and use by people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, an underutilization of technologies across the population remains. PMID:22316226

  16. Bad Bedfellows: Disability Sex Rights and Viagra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentzell, Emily

    2006-01-01

    The disability rights movement grounds material critiques of the treatment of people with disabilities in a social constructionist perspective, locating disability in the social rather than physical realm, and demedicalizing the concept of disability. However, this conceptualization is threatened by the medicalization of non-normative erections as…

  17. Causal Relationships between Poverty and Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lustig, Daniel C.; Strauser, David R.

    2007-01-01

    Although research suggests why disability may cause poverty, it is not well understood why poverty may cause disability. This article presents the Poverty Disability Model, which includes four groups of factors that increase the risk that poverty will cause disability and chronic health problems. Rehabilitation interventions and counselor…

  18. Voices of Disability on the Radio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Malley, Mary Pat

    2008-01-01

    Background: While much commentary exists in relation to the portrayal of disabled people in the media, very little research examines the talk itself in any detail. This paper examines the how people with communication disabilities and disabled people are dealt with in the talk of a radio programme about disability. Aims: To show how the voices of…

  19. 2008 Disability Status Report: The United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, W. Lee C.; von Schrader, S.

    2010-01-01

    The Annual Disability Status Reports provide policy makers, disability advocates, reporters, and the public with a summary of the most recent demographic and economic statistics on the non-institutionalized population with disabilities. They contain information on the population size and disability prevalence for various demographic…

  20. 2009 Disability Status Report: United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, W. Lee C.; von Schrader, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Annual Disability Status Reports provide policy makers, disability advocates, reporters, and the public with a summary of the most recent demographic and economic statistics on the non-institutionalized population with disabilities. They contain information on the population size and disability prevalence for various demographic…

  1. Student Handbook Services for Students with Disabilities

    E-print Network

    Awtar, Shorya

    .............................................................................................................13 III. Students with Learning Disabilities (LD), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD

  2. Disability Services Center University of California, Irvine

    E-print Network

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    COGNITIVE DISABILITIES Learning Disabilities 55 20 - - 62 AD/HD 80 17 - - 87 Acquired / Traumatic Brain 2013-2014 1065 #12;Disability Demographics 4 Psychological 35.2% Other Funtional/Medical 26.3% AD/HD 10 Demographics Psychological 47.8% Other Funtional/Medical 21.0% AD/HD 10.2% Learning Disabilities 12.1% Autism

  3. Northern Illinois University Disability and Accessibility Tutorial

    E-print Network

    Ammar, Greg

    successful in working with students who have disabilities? 19 Disability etiquette 19 Person-first language on Disabilities (Co-Chairs, Greg Long & Bill Nicklas)* Endorsed by NIU Presidential Commission on Persons/21/13) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Table of Contents Disability benefits students and the larger university community 3 Challenges

  4. Handbook for Students Disabilities / Medical Conditions

    E-print Network

    Pavlov, Ronnie

    and personal growth in students with disabilities. We partner with our community members to embrace disabilityHandbook for Students with Disabilities / Medical Conditions 2015-2016 Handbook also available Students with Disabilities 4 Confidentiality of Student Records & Documentation 4 Academic Accommodations

  5. College of Liberal Arts Campus Disability Resources

    E-print Network

    Pillow, Jonathan

    College of Liberal Arts Campus Disability Resources for Graduate Students The University of Texas services that facilitate students' academic and life goals and enhance their personal growth and well-being. Campus Resources for students with psychological disabilities: ddce.utexas.edu/disability/ psychological-disabilities

  6. College Students with Disabilities' Motivation to Utilize Disability Support Services: A Qualitative Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Rachel Heather

    2012-01-01

    The current study investigated the motivation of college students with disabilities to disclose their disability(s) to the university and to utilize disability support services. Eleven college students with a diversity of invisible disabilities from a large university were interviewed using a narrative approach. Analysis involved a combination of…

  7. 75 FR 9821 - Disability Determinations by State Agency Disability Examiners

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ...SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION 20 CFR Parts 404...State Agency Disability Examiners AGENCY: Social Security Administration. ACTION: Notice...benefits under titles II and XVI of the Social Security Act (Act) without the...

  8. 75 FR 62676 - Disability Determinations by State Agency Disability Examiners

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ...SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION 20 CFR Parts 404...State Agency Disability Examiners AGENCY: Social Security Administration. ACTION: Final...benefits under titles II and XVI of the Social Security Act (Act) without the...

  9. Barriers and Facilitators to Community Mobility for Assistive Technology Users

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Natasha

    2012-01-01

    Mobility is frequently described in terms of individual body function and structures however contemporary views of disability also recognise the role of environment in creating disability. Aim. To identify consumer perspectives regarding barriers and facilitators to optimal mobility for a heterogeneous population of impaired Victorians who use assistive technology in their daily lives. Method. An accessible survey investigated the impact of supports or facilitators upon actual and desired life outcomes and health-related quality of life, from 100?AT users in Victoria, Australia. This paper reports upon data pertaining to community mobility. Results. A range of barriers and enablers to community mobility were identified including access to AT devices, environmental interventions, public transport, and inclusive community environs. Substantial levels of unmet need result in limited personal mobility and community participation. Outcomes fall short of many principles enshrined in current policy and human rights frameworks. Conclusion. AT devices as well as accessible and inclusive home and community environs are essential to maximizing mobility for many. Given the impact of the environment upon the capacity of individuals to realise community mobility, this raises the question as to whether rehabilitation practitioners, as well as prescribing AT devices, should work to build accessible communities via systemic advocacy. PMID:23029617

  10. Going mobile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brus, Eric

    1987-12-01

    By 1990, all metropolitan areas in the U.S. and rural areas close to major cities or towns are expected to have cellular telephone service; 22 Canadian cities also feature cellular service. To supply mobile telecommunication services to sparsely-populated rural areas, a mobile satellite service (MSS) is now being developed. In this paper the projected possibilities of the MSS system are discussed, including a possibility that a piggyback-MSS payload be added to the GSTAR-4 satellite which is scheduled for a launch in 1988 or 1989; one in which some of the hardware from aborted direct-broadcast satellites would be used; and the possibility of building a new MSS satellite with large servicing capacity. Canada is planning to launch its own mobile satellite, MSAT, in the early 1990s. The MSS is expected to be 'generic', serving not only people on land but maritime and aeronautical users as well. It will also offer major benefits to truck and automobile drivers, making it possible for them to conduct business or to call for assistance from locations beyond the range of cellular systems.

  11. The incidence of the dumping syndrome following gastrojejunostomy with Roux-en-y anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Cade, Richard J.; Kilby, John O.

    1982-01-01

    A clinical study was undertaken to determine the incidence of the dumping syndrome following partial gastrectomy and Roux-en-y gastrojejunostomy. Twenty-three patients were scored according to a clinical diagnostic index. There were no dumpers identified. A theoretical explanation for these findings is offered. A Roux-en-y conversion should be considered for patients with disabling dumping symptoms following gastric surgery. PMID:7170285

  12. Benefits for Children with Disabilities

    MedlinePLUS

    Benefits For Children With Disabilities 2015 Contacting Social Security Visit our website At our website, www. socialsecurity. gov , you can: • Create a my Social Security account to review your Social Security Statement , verify ...

  13. Children with an Intellectual Disability

    MedlinePLUS

    ... skills to talk about their feelings, and their depression may be shown by new problems, for instance in their behavior, eating and sleeping. Early diagnosis of psychiatric disorders in children with intellectual disabilities leads to early ...

  14. Benefits for People with Disabilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... free TTY number, 1-800-325-0778. Report fraud, waste and abuse More Information Disability Determination Process ... Important Information: FOIA Open Government Glossary Privacy Report Fraud, Waste or Abuse Site Map Website Policies Other ...

  15. Lateral Dominance and Reading Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Albert J.

    1979-01-01

    Theory and research on the relation of lateral dominance to the causation of reading disability are reviewed. Both direct and indirect measures of cerebral hemisphere functioning are considered. (SBH)

  16. Theme: Serving Individuals with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Marty; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes "Reviewing Commitment to Individuals with Disabilities" (Frick); "Modifying Laboratory Equipment" (Silletto); "Equine Facilitated Therapy" (Hoover et al.); "Horticultural Therapy" (Rees, Iverson); "How Accessible Is Your Agriculture Program? (Delks, Sillery); "Agricultural Education for the Mentally Handicapped" (Phillips, Dormody);…

  17. Office of Disability Employment Policy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Workforce Recruitment Program (WRP) Youth Publications ODEP Newsletter Business Sense Newsletter Publications for Order Newsroom FAQs Highlight ... ODEP Launches Online Tool for Small Businesses and Business Associations November 20, 2015 "Small Business & Disability Employment: ...

  18. Language-Based Learning Disabilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... based learning disability diagnosed? A speech-language pathologist (SLP) is part of a team consisting of the ... professionals (i.e., teacher(s), special educators, psychologist). The SLP will evaluate spoken (speaking and listening) and written ( ...

  19. Summer activities: incidents and accidents.

    PubMed

    Krau, Stephen D

    2013-06-01

    Summer invites activities and sports that are unique to this time of year. Although safety is a priority, there are commonly accidents and incidents that occur while individuals are participating in these activities. The prevalence and incidence of several types of injuries and trauma related to water activities, camping, caving, backpacking, and hiking are discussed. Treatment of nonfatal drowning is discussed, along with the pathophysiologic process that must be corrected for optimal outcomes. Summer is a time for outdoor cooking, campfires, and the traditional Fourth of July firework pastimes, which can result in admissions to critical care areas. PMID:23692945

  20. 33 CFR 165.835 - Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. 165.835 Section...Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. (a) Definition. As used in this section— Cruise ship means a passenger vessel...

  1. 33 CFR 165.835 - Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. 165.835 Section...Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. (a) Definition. As used in this section— Cruise ship means a passenger vessel...

  2. 33 CFR 165.835 - Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. 165.835 Section...Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. (a) Definition. As used in this section— Cruise ship means a passenger vessel...

  3. 33 CFR 165.835 - Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. 165.835 Section...Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. (a) Definition. As used in this section— Cruise ship means a passenger vessel...

  4. 33 CFR 165.835 - Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. 165.835 Section...Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. (a) Definition. As used in this section— Cruise ship means a passenger vessel...

  5. 77 FR 24934 - Proposed Priority-National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research-Disability and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ...Priority--National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Project (DRRP)--Employment of Individuals With...

  6. 77 FR 8234 - National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research-Disability and Rehabilitation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ...Rehabilitation Research Project--Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability and Rehabilitation...announces a priority for a center on knowledge translation for disability and rehabilitation...developmental disabilities--in their knowledge translation work. Given the wide...

  7. Astronomical activities with disabled people

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Gil, Amelia; Blay, Pere; Gallego Calvente, A. Teresa; Gómez, Miquel; Guirado, José Carlos; Lanzara, Mariana; Martínez Núñez, Silvia

    2011-06-01

    As we celebrate the International Year of Astronomy, we have been working on four different projects with the goal of making astronomy more accessible to people with special needs. These projects are 1) an astronomy book and web site for blind people, 2) an open source software for people with motor disabilities, 3) a planetarium program for the visually impaired and 4) educational material for intellectually disabled people.

  8. Mobility and Aging: New Directions for Public Health Action

    PubMed Central

    Guralnik, Jack M.; Jackson, Richard J.; Marottoli, Richard A.; Phelan, Elizabeth A.; Prohaska, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Optimal mobility, defined as relative ease and freedom of movement in all of its forms, is central to healthy aging. Mobility is a significant consideration for research, practice, and policy in aging and public health. We examined the public health burdens of mobility disability, with a particular focus on leading public health interventions to enhance walking and driving, and the challenges and opportunities for public health action. We propose an integrated mobility agenda, which draws on the lived experience of older adults. New strategies for research, practice, and policy are needed to move beyond categorical promotion programs in walking and driving to establish a comprehensive program to enhance safe mobility in all its forms. PMID:22698013

  9. Inequality in Disability in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Tareque, Md. Ismail; Begum, Sharifa; Saito, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate inequality in disability in Bangladesh. Methods The study used both household level and individual level data from a large nationally representative data set, Bangladesh’s Household Income and Expenditure Survey - 2010. Principal component analysis was used to construct a wealth index based on household assets from household level data. Then, using data from 49,809 individuals aged 5 years and over, chi-square tests and logistic regression were performed to test the association between wealth level and disability. Findings Women and older people are significantly more likely to report having disabilities than men and younger people. For middle and rich families, respectively, there is a 14 percent lower likelihood of reporting disabilities than for poor families. Changes in the probability of having disabilities are linear with increasing wealth. In addition, the study identifies some significant factors affecting disability, namely, age, sex, education, marital status, and place of residence including divisional differences. Conclusion In Bangladesh, worse health among the poor argues for policies prioritizing this group while at the same time giving special attention to women and the elderly. PMID:25075513

  10. Public Transport for Everyone: A Summary of the Results of Research and Development Projects Concerning Disabled People and Transport Facilities Supported by the Swedish Transport Research Board. TFB-Report 1989:1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borjesson, Mats

    This report summarizes the results of research and development concerning disabled individuals in Sweden and their use of transport facilities. The first section, "People with Impaired Mobility and Their Travel Needs," outlines Sweden's transport policy goal to adapt transport to the needs of disabled people, addresses the difficulty in…

  11. Fifteen-year trends of long-term disability and sick leaves in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Remus, Cesar; Hernandez-Rios, Guillermo; Duran-Barragan, Sergio; Sanchez-Ortiz, Adriana; Aceves-Avila, Francisco Javier; Castillo-Ortiz, Jose Dionisio; Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the trends in work disability and sick leave in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). In 1993 and 2007, patients diagnosed with AS that attended to a secondary- or a tertiary-care outpatient rheumatology clinics were evaluated for demographics, disease characteristics, axial mobility, working status, and work days missed due to sick leave or permanent disability. Factors that impacted labor status were identified by multiple regression analysis. In 1993, 91 study individuals (mean age 35 years, mean disease duration 10?±?8 years) included 28 (31%) on permanent disability and 63 currently working; of these 63, 42 (67%) had missed at least 1 work day in the previous 12 months (mean 69?±?63 days). In the next 5 years, the annual permanent disability was 3%. In 2007, 185 study individuals (mean age 42, mean disease duration 12?±?10 years) included 53 (39%) on permanent disability and 132 active workers; 35 (66%) out of the 53 began permanent disability between 1999 and 2007 (2.1% annual disability rate), and 53 (40%) out of 132 active workers missed at least 1 work day in the previous 12 months (mean 52?±?63 days). Only age predicted disability, with 10% and 11% increases in risk per year in 1993 and 2007, respectively (hazard ratios 1.09 and 1.11, respectively; p?=?0.03 for both). Although the impact of AS on work seems to decrease slightly during the last 15 years, the actual impact is still substantial. An important proportion of patients went on permanent disability in the three decades before retirement. Extrapolating these results to official data for the year 2005, we may infer that between 1.3 million and nearly 15 million working days were missed that year due to AS. PMID:21210289

  12. Serious Incident Management in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Ike; Thorley-Smith, Sara

    2007-01-01

    As part of its efforts to ensure school safety, the government of New South Wales, Australia, has developed simulation exercises to better prepare principals to manage serious incidents, in collaboration with police. This article describes two initiatives implemented across NSW. The exercises provide principals in both secondary and primary…

  13. Incidence | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer incidence is usually measured as the number of new cases each year for every 100,000 people (for gender-specific cancers, people of the same gender serve as the denominator) and age-adjusted to a standard population to allow comparisons over time.

  14. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... respect to transportation to which 14 CFR Part 254 applies, the limits to liability for loss, damage, or... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other...

  15. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... respect to transportation to which 14 CFR part 254 applies, the limits to liability for loss, damage, or... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other...

  16. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... respect to transportation to which 14 CFR part 254 applies, the limits to liability for loss, damage, or... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other...

  17. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... respect to transportation to which 14 CFR Part 254 applies, the limits to liability for loss, damage, or... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other...

  18. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... respect to transportation to which 14 CFR part 254 applies, the limits to liability for loss, damage, or... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other...

  19. Aberrations for Grazing Incidence Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.

    2008-01-01

    Large number of grazing incidence telescope configurations have been designed and studied. Wolte1 telescopes are commonly used in astronomical applications. Wolter telescopes consist of a paraboloidal primary mirror and a hyperboloidal or an ellipsoidal secondary mirror. There are 8 possible combinations of Wolter telescopes. Out of these possible designs only type 1 and type 2 telescopes are widely used. Type 1 telescope is typically used for x-ray applications and type 2 telescopes are used for EUV applications. Wolter-Schwarzshild (WS) telescopes offer improved image quality over a small field of view. The WS designs are stigmatic and free of third order coma and, therefore, the PSF is significantly better over a small field of view. Typically the image is more symmetric about its centroid. As for the Wolter telescopes there are 8 possible combinations of WS telescopes. These designs have not been widely used because the surface equations are complex parametric equations complicating the analysis and typically the resolution requirements are too low to take full advantage of the WS designs. There are several other design options. Most notable are wide field x-ray telescope designs. Polynomial designs were originally suggested by Burrows4 and hyperboloid-hyperboloid designs for solar physics applications were designed by Harvey5. No general aberration theory exists for grazing incidence telescopes that would cover all the design options. Several authors have studied the aberrations of grazing incidence telescopes. A comprehensive theory of Wolter type 1 and 2 telescopes has been developed. Later this theory was expanded to include all possible combinations of grazing incidence and also normal incidence paraboloid-hyperboloid and paraboloid-ellipsoid telescopes. In this article the aberration theory of Wolter type telescopes is briefly reviewed.

  20. Factors Associated With Vulvodynia Incidence

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Barbara D.; Legocki, Laurie J.; Plegue, Melissa A.; Sen, Ananda; Haefner, Hope K.; Harlow, Sioban D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess incidence rates of and risk factors for vulvodynia. Methods We conducted a longitudinal population-based study of women in southeast Michigan (Woman to Woman Health Study) using a validated survey-based screening test for vulvodynia that was repeated at 6-month intervals over 30 months. Unadjusted incidence rates were determined using Poisson models. Demographic and symptom-related risk factors for incidence were assessed using discrete time survival analysis. Results Women who screened negative for vulvodynia at baseline and were followed through at least one additional survey (n=1786), were assessed for onset of vulvodynia. The incidence rate was 4.2 cases per 100 person-years, and rates per 100 person-years were greater in women who were younger (7.6 cases per 100 person-years at age 20, compared with 3.3 cases per 100 person-years at age 60), Hispanic (9.5), married or living as married (4.9); had reported symptoms of vulvar pain but did not meet vulvodynia criteria on the initial survey (11.5); or had reported past symptoms suggesting a history of vulvodynia (7.5). Increased risk of new onset vulvodynia also included baseline sleep disturbance, chronic pain in general, specific comorbid pain disorders, and specific comorbid psychological disorders. Conclusions The incidence rates of vulvodynia differ by age, ethnicity and marital status. Onset is more likely among women with previous symptoms of vulvodynia or those with intermediate symptoms not meeting criteria for vulvodynia, and among those with preexisting sleep, psychological, and comorbid pain disorders. This suggests vulvodynia is an episodic condition with a potentially identifiable prodromal phase. PMID:24402591

  1. INCIDENT REPORTING: LEARNING FROM EXPERIENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, Steven C.; Kinzey, Bruce R.; Dean, Jesse D.; Davis, Patrick B.; Ruiz, Antonio

    2007-09-12

    Experience makes a superior teacher. Sharing the details surrounding safety events is one of the best ways to help prevent their recurrence elsewhere. This approach requires an open, non-punitive environment to achieve broad benefits. The Hydrogen Incident Reporting Tool (www.h2incidents.org) is intended to facilitate the sharing of lessons learned and other relevant information gained from actual experiences using and working with hydrogen and hydrogen systems. Its intended audience includes those involved in virtually any aspect of hydrogen technology, systems and use, with an emphasis towards energy and transportation applications. The database contains records of safety events both publicly available and/or voluntarily submitted. Typical records contain a general description of the occurrence, contributing factors, equipment involved, and some detailing of consequences and changes that have been subsequently implemented to prevent recurrence of similar events in the future. The voluntary and confidential nature and other characteristics surrounding the database mean that any analysis of apparent trends in its contents cannot be considered statistically valid for a universal population. A large portion of reported incidents have occurred in a laboratory setting due to the typical background of the reporting projects, for example. Yet some interesting trends are becoming apparent even at this early stage of the database’s existence and general lessons can already be taken away from these experiences. This paper discusses the database and a few trends that have already become apparent for the reported incidents. Anticipated future uses of this information are also described. This paper is intended to encourage wider participation and usage of the incidents reporting database and to promote the safety benefits offered by its contents.

  2. Do subclinical vascular abnormalities precede impaired physical ability and ADL disability?

    PubMed

    den Ouden, Marjolein E M; Schuurmans, Marieke J; Mueller-Schotte, Sigrid; Bots, Michiel L; van der Schouw, YvonneT

    2014-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease is an important cause of disability in activities of daily living (ADL) through its effect on physical functioning. However, it is unclear whether subclinical vascular abnormalities and rate of change in subclinical vascular abnormalities is also associated with an impaired physical ability and with ADL disability. In a longitudinal study, 490 middle-aged and older persons were included. Physical ability was measured using the Short Physical Performance Battery and ADL disability using a questionnaire on self-reported basic and instrumental ADL. Subclinical vascular abnormalities were measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV) and carotid intima media thickness (CIMT, in men only). Longitudinal associations between baseline markers of subclinical vascular abnormalities, their rate of change, and change in physical ability or ADL disability were assessed using generalized estimation equation models. After adjustment for confounders, higher baseline PWV, change in PWV, baseline CIMT (in men) and change in CIMT (in men) were associated with a higher rate of change in physical ability (regression coefficients 0.035, 95% CI [0.018; 0.052]; 0.047, 95% CI [0.024; 0.069]; 0.214, 95% CI [0.070; 0.358] and 0.148, 95% CI [0.019; 0.277], respectively). No relations were found for change in ADL disability. In subjects with incident cardiovascular disease, higher change in PWV was associated with a higher rate of change in ADL disability (regression coefficient 0.054, 95% CI [0.001; 0.106]). The present study showed that subclinical vascular abnormalities and rate of change were associated with higher rate of change in physical ability. The association between (change in) subclinical vascular abnormalities and ADL disability tended to be stronger in persons with incident and prevalent cardiovascular disease. These data may suggest that ADL decline is more a direct effect of experienced clinically manifest vascular events rather than the effect of progression of subclinical vascular abnormalities. PMID:24909353

  3. Music reduces pain and increases functional mobility in fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A.; Wilson, Andrew D.; Vase, Lene; Brattico, Elvira; Barrios, Fernando A.; Jensen, Troels S.; Romero-Romo, Juan I.; Vuust, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The pain in Fibromyalgia (FM) is difficult to treat and functional mobility seems to be an important comorbidity in these patients that could evolve into a disability. In this study we wanted to investigate the analgesic effects of music in FM pain. Twenty-two FM patients were passively exposed to (1) self-chosen, relaxing, pleasant music, and to (2) a control auditory condition (pink noise). They rated pain and performed the “timed-up & go task (TUG)” to measure functional mobility after each auditory condition. Listening to relaxing, pleasant, self-chosen music reduced pain and increased functional mobility significantly in our FM patients. The music-induced analgesia was significantly correlated with the TUG scores; thereby suggesting that the reduction in pain unpleasantness increased functional mobility. Notably, this mobility improvement was obtained with music played prior to the motor task (not during), therefore the effect cannot be explained merely by motor entrainment to a fast rhythm. Cognitive and emotional mechanisms seem to be central to music-induced analgesia. Our findings encourage the use of music as a treatment adjuvant to reduce chronic pain in FM and increase functional mobility thereby reducing the risk of disability. PMID:24575066

  4. Music reduces pain and increases functional mobility in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A; Wilson, Andrew D; Vase, Lene; Brattico, Elvira; Barrios, Fernando A; Jensen, Troels S; Romero-Romo, Juan I; Vuust, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The pain in Fibromyalgia (FM) is difficult to treat and functional mobility seems to be an important comorbidity in these patients that could evolve into a disability. In this study we wanted to investigate the analgesic effects of music in FM pain. Twenty-two FM patients were passively exposed to (1) self-chosen, relaxing, pleasant music, and to (2) a control auditory condition (pink noise). They rated pain and performed the "timed-up & go task (TUG)" to measure functional mobility after each auditory condition. Listening to relaxing, pleasant, self-chosen music reduced pain and increased functional mobility significantly in our FM patients. The music-induced analgesia was significantly correlated with the TUG scores; thereby suggesting that the reduction in pain unpleasantness increased functional mobility. Notably, this mobility improvement was obtained with music played prior to the motor task (not during), therefore the effect cannot be explained merely by motor entrainment to a fast rhythm. Cognitive and emotional mechanisms seem to be central to music-induced analgesia. Our findings encourage the use of music as a treatment adjuvant to reduce chronic pain in FM and increase functional mobility thereby reducing the risk of disability. PMID:24575066

  5. Cooperating mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Harrington, John J.; Eskridge, Steven E.; Hurtado, John E.; Byrne, Raymond H.

    2004-02-03

    A miniature mobile robot provides a relatively inexpensive mobile robot. A mobile robot for searching an area provides a way for multiple mobile robots in cooperating teams. A robotic system with a team of mobile robots communicating information among each other provides a way to locate a source in cooperation. A mobile robot with a sensor, a communication system, and a processor, provides a way to execute a strategy for searching an area.

  6. Epidemiology of fractures in people with severe and profound developmental disabilities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glick, N.R.; Fischer, M.H.; Heisey, D.M.; Leverson, G.E.; Mann, D.C.

    2005-01-01

    Fractures are more prevalent among people with severe and profound developmental disabilities than in the general population. In order to characterize the tendency of these people to fracture, and to identify features that may guide the development of preventive strategies, we analyzed fracture epidemiology in people with severe and profound developmental disabilities who lived in a stable environment. Data from a 23-year longitudinal cohort registry of 1434 people with severe and profound developmental disabilities were analyzed to determine the effects of age, gender, mobility, bone fractured, month of fracture, and fracture history upon fracture rates. Eighty-five percent of all fractures involved the extremities. The overall fracture rate increased as mobility increased. In contrast, femoral shaft fracture risk was substantially higher in the least mobile [relative risk (RR), 10.36; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.29-32.66] compared with the most mobile group. Although the overall fracture rate was not associated with age, the femoral shaft fractures decreased but hand/foot fractures increased with age. Overall fracture risk declined in August and September (RR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.55-0.89), being especially prominent for tibial/fibular fractures (RR, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.13-0.70). Gender was not a factor in fracture risk. Two primary fracture mechanisms are apparent: one, largely associated with lack of weight-bearing in people with the least mobility, is exemplified by femoral fractures during non-traumatic events as simple as diapering or transfers; the other, probably due to movement- or fall-related trauma, is exemplified by hand/foot fractures in people who ambulate. The fracture experience of people with severe and profound developmental disabilities is unique and, because it differs qualitatively from postmenopausal osteoporosis, may require population-specific methods for assessing risk, for improving bone integrity, and for reduction of falls and accidents. ?? International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2004.

  7. Comparison of legislation concerning people with disability and heritage environment in Malaysia and developed countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsin, J. M.; Ariffin, S. I.; Shahminan, R. N. R.

    2014-02-01

    Heritage towns and buildings are invaluable cultural assets of a nation, and are extremely useful in manifesting place identity, and crucial in promoting tourism. These places of cultural significance should be made accessible to everyone including people with mobility or sensory impairments, the elderly, parents with small children and those who are temporarily disabled due to injury or illness. By creating a accessible heritage environment not only can you cater towards the increasing population of disabled people, but you could increase the number of cultural properties as resources of a nation through 'accessible tourism'. However the differences in implementation of barrier-free tourism for historic buildings and places are rather large between developed and developing countries such as Malaysia. This paper serves as preliminary study on accessibility of heritage environment in Malaysia. First, review of some related definitions, perception toward disability, and background studies in disability movement will be discussed to achieve better understanding of the increasing population of disabled people and how it would affect the development of infrastructure in the built environment. Second, it will look into existing legislation concerning heritage conservation and legislation on provision of access for the disabled in Malaysia and other developing countries. Finally, this paper seeks to find gaps between these legislations and conclude with some recommendations.

  8. Reaching everyone: Promoting the inclusion of youth with disabilities in evaluating foster care outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Blakeslee, Jennifer E.; Quest, A. Del; Powers, Jennifer; Powers, Laurie E.; Geenen, Sarah; Nelson, May; Dalton, Lawrence D.; McHugh, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to evaluate foster care outcomes must avoid systematic exclusion of particular groups. Although often unrecognized as such, youth with disabilities are highly overrepresented in the U.S. foster care system, and yet youth with some disabilities, including those with intellectual, serious emotional, and physical impairments may be underrepresented in research and evaluation studies evaluating foster care outcomes. The recruitment and retention of youth with various disabilities in such studies can be impeded by under-identification of disability and relatively high placement and school mobility. Furthermore, youth with various disabilities may experience more disappointing outcomes than foster youth overall, underscoring the importance of including these youth in outcome tracking efforts. This is especially relevant given the recent implementation of the National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD), which requires that state child welfare agencies gather baseline information about youth in foster care at age 17, and then survey outcomes at 19 and 21. To promote the full participation of foster youth with disabilities in such outcome evaluation, this paper describes successful strategies for identifying and retaining participants that were used in three separate longitudinal intervention studies. These strategies include the systematic recruitment of foster youth by special education status, and creative use of validated tracking and retention strategies incorporating minor accommodations as needed. PMID:24273364

  9. 20 CFR 416.911 - Definition of disabling impairment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determining Disability and Blindness Definition of Disability § 416.911 Definition of disabling impairment. (a) If you are an adult:...

  10. 8.13 Support for Disabled People Introduction

    E-print Network

    Swain, Peter

    8.13 Support for Disabled People Introduction This category provides information about the institution's policies, procedures, and support for disabled people, including information about accessibility Disability policies Policies, procedures and guidelines relating to support for disabled people

  11. Mobile Routing Basic Notions of Mobility

    E-print Network

    Das, Samir R.

    as TCP) will break. Also, not easy to find IP address for a mobile host that moves frequently. Mobile IP are in the same network. Otherwise, a route change in the IP layer may be needed. This is called network layer handoff. Mobile IP is a standard protocol for handling network layer handoff. #12;Illustrating Link Layer

  12. Mobile Schools for a Mobile World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Overwhelmingly, independent schools are embracing mobile devices--laptops, iPads or other tablets, and smartphones--to enhance teaching and learning. This article describes the results of the "NAIS 2012 Mobile Learning Survey." Among its findings were that 75 percent of NAIS-member schools currently use mobile learning devices in at…

  13. Health Gain through Screening--Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke: Developing Primary Health Care Services for People with Intellectual Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, M. B.; Turner, S.; Martin, D. M.; Roy, A.

    1997-01-01

    A study of 120 British adults with intellectual disability found they had higher risk factors of developing coronary heart disease and stroke than the general population. There was a greater incidence of obesity and considerably lower physical activity levels than the general population. Several also had abnormal cholesterol readings. (CR)

  14. The Effects of Self-Monitoring on the Procedural Integrity of a Behavioral Intervention for Young Children with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plavnick, Joshua B.; Ferreri, Summer J.; Maupin, Angela N.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of self-monitoring on procedural integrity of token economy implementation by 3 staff in a special education classroom were evaluated. The subsequent changes in academic readiness behaviors of 2 students with low-incidence disabilities were measured. Multiple baselines across staff and students showed that procedural integrity…

  15. Sleep Disturbances as a Predictor of Cause-Specific Work Disability and Delayed Return to Work

    PubMed Central

    Salo, Paula; Oksanen, Tuula; Sivertsen, Børge; Hall, Martica; Pentti, Jaana; Virtanen, Marianna; Vahtera, Jussi; Mika, Kivimäki

    2010-01-01

    Study Objective: To examine sleep disturbances as a predictor of cause-specific work disability and delayed return to work. Design: Prospective observational cohort study linking survey data on sleep disturbances with records of work disability (? 90 days sickness absence, disability pension, or death) obtained from national registers. Setting: Public sector employees in Finland. Participants: 56,732 participants (mean age 44.4 years, 80% female), who were at work and free of work disability at the study inception. Measurements and Results: During a mean follow-up of 3.3 years, incident diagnosis-specific work disability was observed in 4,028 (7%) employees. Of those, 2,347 (60%) returned to work. Sleep disturbances 5-7 nights per week predicted work disability due to mental disorders (hazard ratio [HR] 1.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-1.9) and diseases of the circulatory system (HR = 1.6, 95% CI 1.2-2.1), musculoskeletal system (HR = 1.6, 95% CI 1.4-1.8) and nervous system (HR = 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.2), and injuries and poisonings (HR = 1.6, 95% CI 1.2-2.1) after controlling for baseline age, sex, socioeconomic status, night/shift work, health behaviors (e.g., smoking, exercise), diagnosed somatic diseases, use of pain killers, depression, and anxiety. In addition, sleep disturbances prior to disability were associated with higher likelihood of not returning to work after work disability from musculoskeletal diseases (HR = 1.2, 95% CI 1.1-1.7) and, in men, after work disability due to mental disorders (HR = 4.4, 95% CI 1.7-11.1). Conclusions: Sleep disturbances are associated with increased risk for subsequent disabling mental disorders and various physical illnesses. They also predict the outcome of work disability due to musculoskeletal disorders. Citation: Salo P; Oksanen T; Sivertsen B; Hall M; Pentti J; Virtanen M; Vahtera J; Kivimäki M. Sleep disturbances as a predictor of cause-specific work disability and delayed return to work. SLEEP 2010;33(10):1323-1331. PMID:21061854

  16. A New Classification of Function and Disability in China: Subtypes Based on Performance-Based and Self-Reported Measures

    PubMed Central

    Purser, Jama L.; Feng, Qiushi; Yi, Zeng; Hoenig, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To develop a new classification method to describe incidence and prevalence of function and disability and their predictors in Chinese older adults. Methods Data were obtained from 16,020 older adults in the 2002 wave of Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS). The subtypes of function and disability were defined by combining physical performance (PP) tests and self-reported assessments of activities of daily living (ADL). Results The most prevalent subtype involved PP limitations without ADL dependency. Rural living made it more likely that an individual with physical performance limitations would be independent in ADL, whereas city residence made dependence in ADL more likely, regardless of whether performance limitations were present. Discussion Self-reported and performance-based tools can be used in combination to estimate conceptually different subtypes of function and disability, with different epidemiological rates of incidence and different social, medical, and environmental predictors. PMID:22556391

  17. Glare disability in nephropathic cystinosis.

    PubMed

    Katz, B; Melles, R B; Schneider, J A

    1987-12-01

    Cystinosis is a rare metabolic disorder in which nonprotein cystine accumulates within lysosomes due to a defect in lysosomal cystine transport. Although cystine accumulates within most ocular tissues, patients with cystinosis generally complain only of photophobia and glare. We measured glare sensitivity in 12 patients with infantile cystinosis and compared their results with an age-matched control population. Ten of the 12 patients with cystinosis had demonstrable glare disability when compared with the control group. Glare disability scores in the patients with cystinosis ranged from 5% to 50%. Dazzle glare resulting from the accumulation of cystine crystals in ocular tissue may account for glare disability seen in these patients and contribute to their complaints of photophobia. PMID:3689190

  18. Astronomical Activities with Disabled People

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Amelia Ortiz

    With this contribution we would like to share our experiences in organizing astronomical activities addressed to people with disabilities. The goal is twofold: we would like to invite all those with similar experiences to contribute to the compilation of a document to guide other astronomers who might be interested in carrying out these kind of activities aimed at groups of people with special needs. We also want to persuade public outreach officers that working with disabled people is not as difficult as it may seem at first, as long as they are provided with adequate educational material and guidelines about how to do it. The final goal is to build a repository that can be used by educators and public outreach officers as a guide when working with disabled people, specially during the International Year of Astronomy.

  19. National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Opportunity Act , the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR), now the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR), has been transferred to the Administration ...

  20. People with Disabilities Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to your state see RHIhub’s State Guides . What transportation services can rural communities provide for people with disabilities? Access to transportation is a major issue for people with disabilities ...

  1. Communicating with and about People with Disabilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... realistic portrayals of persons with disabilities in television programming and motion pictures. Where progress is still needed ... disability, it is appropriate to offer to shake hands. People with limited hand use or who wear ...

  2. Rehabilitation Research on Disability: New Horizons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Richard T.

    1977-01-01

    Presents an overview of research on disability and integrates rehabilitation research with the mainstream of scientific activity. Examples of disability research are given covering spinal cord injury, facial disfigurement, cancer of the larynx, and cystic fibrosis. (Author/TA)

  3. Death and Disability from Injuries Down Worldwide

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_156065.html Death and Disability From Injuries Down Worldwide: Study Rate ... 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The worldwide rate of death and disability caused by injuries has fallen by ...

  4. METROPOLITAN ATLANTA DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES PROGRAM (MADDSP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    To address the problem of developmental disabilities among children, CDC, the former Division of Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, which was funded by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and the Georgia Department of Human Resources, initiate...

  5. Emergency Evacuation of People with Disabilities Introduction

    E-print Network

    Emergency Evacuation of People with Disabilities Introduction This policy was developed to provide guidance on developing individual emergency evacuation plans. There are many types of disabilities, some emergency evacuation plan. We believe individual emergency planning will identify the resources

  6. A Navigation Aid for Blind People with Walking Disabilities Andreas Wachaja Pratik Agarwal Miguel Reyes Adame Knut Moller Wolfram Burgard

    E-print Network

    Teschner, Matthias

    A Navigation Aid for Blind People with Walking Disabilities Andreas Wachaja Pratik Agarwal Miguel Reyes Adame Knut M¨oller Wolfram Burgard Abstract--Many blind people require travel aids to navigate assistance but also enables blind users with mobility impairment to avoid obstacles. By leveraging existing

  7. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY TO PREVENT DISABILITY IN FUNCTIONALLY LIMITED OLDER ADULTS: THE ART AND SCIENCE OF TAILORING TREATMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of the physical activity (PA) intervention in the LIFE trial is to improve impairments associated with "mobility disability" and to teach long-term maintenance of independent PA (150 minutes of aerobic activity per week). The PA program is of moderate intensity and includes aerobic, str...

  8. Self-Report Computer-Based Survey of Technology Use by People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanis, Emily Shea; Palmer, Susan; Wehmeyer, Michael; Davies, Daniel K.; Stock, Steven E.; Lobb, Kathy; Bishop, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Advancements of technologies in the areas of mobility, hearing and vision, communication, and daily living for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities has the potential to greatly enhance independence and self-determination. Previous research, however, suggests that there is a technological divide with regard to the use of such…

  9. Exploring Undergraduate Student Attitudes toward Persons with Disabilities: Application of the Disability Social Relationship Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hergenrather, Kenneth; Rhodes, Scott

    2007-01-01

    The Disability Social Relations Generalized Disability (DSRGD) Scale was used to explore the influence of the social context on attitudes toward persons with disabilities. The DSRGD Scale was based on the Disability Social Relationship (DSR) Scale (Grand, Bernier, & Strohmer, 1982; Strohmer, Grand, & Purcell, 1984). A sample of 1,013 undergraduate…

  10. Theorising the Lives of Disabled Children: How Can Disability Theory Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Nick

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of both disability studies and the new social studies of childhood has seen a new approach in the study of disability in childhood. The focus has shifted from an exploration of impairment to one that prioritises the social with disabled children themselves placed at the centre of the research. This article concentrates on disability

  11. Children's Experiences of Disability: Pointers to a Social Model of Childhood Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Clare; Stalker, Kirsten

    2007-01-01

    The social model of disability has paid little attention to disabled children, with few attempts to explore how far it provides an adequate explanatory framework for their experiences. This paper reports findings from a two-year study exploring the lived experiences of 26 disabled children aged 7-15. They experienced disability in four ways--in…

  12. Where We Are: Disability and Accessibility--Moving beyond Disability 2.0 in Composition Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Tara; Dolmage, Jay; Price, Margaret; Lewiecki-Wilson, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    The authors' perception, as specialists at the intersection of disability studies and composition studies, is that disability has arrived--in the sense that it is now on most peoples' radar. Most have come to think of it as "Disability 2.0": the state where acceptance of disabled students and teachers as belonging in our…

  13. Investigation of Raising Burden of Children with Autism, Physical Disability and Mental Disability in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiong, Nina; Yang, Li; Yu, Yang; Hou, Jiaxun; Li, Jia; Li, Yuanyuan; Liu, Hairong; Zhang, Ying; Jiao, Zhengang

    2011-01-01

    The family economic burden of raising autistic children, physical disabled children and mental disabled children were evaluated in China. 227 parents of children with autism, children with physical disability, children with mental disability and normal children were interviewed for children's costs, family income and economic assistance, etc. The…

  14. What is a Disability? As defined by the AODA, a disability is

    E-print Network

    Sokolowski, Marla

    to a disability: Students can contact the Accessibility services on their campus. Faculty or Staff or MembersOntario Ontario Human Rights Code (OHRC) www.ohrc.on.ca Disclosing a disability Persons with disabilities choose) and their comfort level. Students who have a disability do not necessarily request service or accommodation

  15. 78 FR 38949 - Computer Security Incident Coordination (CSIC): Providing Timely Cyber Incident Response

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Computer Security Incident Coordination (CSIC): Providing... Technology (NIST) is seeking information relating to Computer Security Incident Coordination (CSIC). NIST is... Computer Security Incident Response Teams (CSIRTs) to coordinate effectively when responding to...

  16. The utility of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health checklist for evaluating disability in a community-dwelling geriatric population sample.

    PubMed

    Dernek, Bahar; Esmaeilzadeh, Sina; Oral, Aydan

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate disability in community-dwelling individuals aged 65 years and over using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) checklist and the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHODAS-II) and to compare how these two ICF-based instruments measured disability in an attempt to show the utility of the ICF checklist in a field setting to describe disability. In this population-based, cross-sectional and descriptive study, data on the ICF checklist and the WHODAS-II were collected from 200 selected participants who lived in a small town. Both the ICF checklist and the WHODAS-II identified a considerable proportion of the elderly with a disability in life areas relevant to cognition and domestic life in a similar manner, the proportions ranging from 52.5 to 68.5%. However, the proportions of those with a disability showed a statistically significant difference in the domains of the two instruments relevant to mobility, self-care, and participation in society. Although the absolute intrarater agreement for matching items of the instruments ranged from 40.5 to 87.5%, kappa statistics showed slight to moderate agreement for the original ICF qualifier and mostly moderate agreement with reduced response options. ICF qualifiers were found to discriminate between the WHODAS-II domain scores in those with no, mild-moderate and severe-complete difficulty. The disparity between the data obtained from the ICF checklist and the WHODAS-II in some domains may have resulted from differing interpretations of the items of the ICF checklist, lower reliability of some of the items, and the current feature of the qualifiers used without any adaptations. The ICF checklist has the potential to be used in a field setting, provided that some modifications are made. PMID:25514467

  17. Disability discrimination in healthcare services and employment.

    PubMed

    Barber, Christopher

    2015-09-30

    This article discusses the meaning and philosophical basis of disability discrimination in health care. It focuses on aspects of language that influence discourse about disability and affect the experiences of people with disabilities. Reference is made to the experiences of those who have an autism spectrum condition, with a specific focus on three NHS employees with Asperger syndrome, in relation to disability discrimination. The implications for nurses and nursing are discussed. Recommendations are made for awareness raising and training. PMID:26419169

  18. Detection of Cyberbullying Incidents on the Instagram Social Network Homa Hosseinmardi, Sabrina Arredondo Mattson, Rahat Ibn Rafiq, Richard Han, Qin Lv, Shivakant Mishra

    E-print Network

    Han, Richard Y.

    Detection of Cyberbullying Incidents on the Instagram Social Network Homa Hosseinmardi, Sabrina approaches to un- derstand and automatically detect incidents of cyberbul- lying over images in Instagram, a media-based mobile social network. To this end, we have collected a sam- ple Instagram data set

  19. Traumatic and non-traumatic spinal cord impairment in New Zealand: incidence and characteristics of people admitted to spinal units.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Derrett S; Beaver C; Sullivan MJ; Herbison GP; Acland R; Paul C

    2012-10-01

    This paper estimates the incidence (all ages) of spinal cord neurological impairment (SCI; traumatic and non-traumatic) in New Zealand and describes pre-SCI characteristics and early post-SCI outcomes for participants (16-64 years) in this longitudinal study. Demographic and clinical data on all people admitted to New Zealand's two spinal units (mid-2007 to mid-2009) were included for the estimate of incidence. Participants in this longitudinal study were asked at first interview about pre-SCI socio-demographic, health and behavioural characteristics, and about post-SCI symptoms, general health status (EQ-5D) and disability (WHODAS 12-item). Age-adjusted incidence rates (95% CI) for European, M?ori, Pacific and 'Other' ethnicities were 29 (24-34), 46 (30-64), 70 (40-100) and 16 (9-22) per million, respectively. Interviews with 118 (73%) participants (16-64 years), occurred 6.5 months post-SCI. Most reported bother with symptoms, and problems with health status and disability. Compared with Europeans, the incidence of SCI is high among M?ori and particularly high among Pacific people. Six months after SCI, proximate to discharge from the spinal units, considerable symptomatic, general health and disability burden was borne by people with SCI.

  20. Traumatic and non-traumatic spinal cord impairment in New Zealand: incidence and characteristics of people admitted to spinal units

    PubMed Central

    Derrett, Sarah; Beaver, Carolyn; Sullivan, Martin J; Herbison, G Peter; Acland, Rick; Paul, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    This paper estimates the incidence (all ages) of spinal cord neurological impairment (SCI; traumatic and non-traumatic) in New Zealand and describes pre-SCI characteristics and early post-SCI outcomes for participants (16–64?years) in this longitudinal study. Demographic and clinical data on all people admitted to New Zealand's two spinal units (mid-2007 to mid-2009) were included for the estimate of incidence. Participants in this longitudinal study were asked at first interview about pre-SCI socio-demographic, health and behavioural characteristics, and about post-SCI symptoms, general health status (EQ-5D) and disability (WHODAS 12-item). Age-adjusted incidence rates (95% CI) for European, M?ori, Pacific and ‘Other’ ethnicities were 29 (24–34), 46 (30–64), 70 (40–100) and 16 (9–22) per million, respectively. Interviews with 118 (73%) participants (16–64?years), occurred 6.5?months post-SCI. Most reported bother with symptoms, and problems with health status and disability. Compared with Europeans, the incidence of SCI is high among M?ori and particularly high among Pacific people. Six months after SCI, proximate to discharge from the spinal units, considerable symptomatic, general health and disability burden was borne by people with SCI. PMID:22544829

  1. Teaching Disability Employment Discrimination Law: Accommodating Physical and Mental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulow, Marianne DelPo

    2012-01-01

    Disability employment discrimination is often treated summarily in legal environment courses. This is actually a topic with significant practical application in the workplace since managers are often those who are confronted with accommodation requests. It is therefore desirable to include a class with hands-on exercises for students to begin to…

  2. Disability and the Digital Divide. Disability Statistics Abstract Number 22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaye, H. Stephen

    This report discusses findings from the Current Population Survey of 1998 that found Americans with disabilities are less than half as likely as their counterparts to own a computer, and they are about one-quarter as likely to use the Internet. Others findings indicate: (1) among persons 65 years of age or older, only one-tenth of those with…

  3. Identification of Learning Disabled Bilingual Hispanic Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zavala, Jesus; Mims, Joan

    1983-01-01

    The study compared 10 learning disabled and 10 non-learning disabled limited English proficient Mexican American elementary grade children. Six tests were identified as predicting learning disabilities including the Prueba de Lectura y Lenguaje Escrito and the Test of Nonverbal Intelligence. (Author/DB)

  4. Learning Disabilities: Historical Perspectives. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallahan, Daniel P.; Mercer, Cecil D.

    Although the federal government's involvement in learning disabilities through task forces, legislation, and funding has been evident only since the 1960s and 1970s, the roots of learning disabilities can be traced back to the early 1800s. Learning disabilities are one of the newest categories officially recognized by the U.S. Department of…

  5. Veterans with Disabilities in Postsecondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madaus, Joseph W.; Miller, Wayne K., II; Vance, Mary Lee

    2009-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, veterans with disabilities have been a catalyst in the development of services for students with disabilities in higher education. Current converging factors, including anticipated large numbers of veterans with disabilities enrolling in postsecondary education, Office for Civil Rights directives, and the passage of the…

  6. Compensatory Services and Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Allan G., Jr.; Russo, Charles J.

    2009-01-01

    Students with disabilities are entitled to a free appropriate public education (FAPE) under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). If school officials fail to provide students with a FAPE, the courts may grant appropriate relief. Courts often direct educators to provide students with disabilities with a FAPE and to compensate…

  7. Disabilities Legislation Implementation in American Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Barry

    1996-01-01

    To help assess Australian universities' compliance with the Disability Discrimination Act, a study examined implementation in the United States of the Americans with Disabilities Act in five state universities seen as leaders in innovation for students and staff with disabilities. Implications of the American experience for the Australian context…

  8. Students with Disabilities: Doing What's Right

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Anne; Myers, Karen A.

    2006-01-01

    Providing equal educational access to students with disabilities is both a legal and a moral obligation. It is also an important component of the educational experience of all students. On college and university campuses, the needs of students with disabilities are typically considered the responsibility of the disability services office. Although…

  9. Effects of Counselor Disability on Counselor Attraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risica, Virginia J.; Nevid, Jeffrey S.

    1990-01-01

    Examined effects of counselor disability on counselor attraction to college students (N=60) using mock counseling interview with counselor-confederate enacting one of three disability conditions: wheelchair-user, blind person, or nondisabled person. Results failed to show either clearly stigmatizing or enhancing effects of counselor disability on…

  10. Romanian Approach to Media Portrayals of Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciot, Melania-Gabriela; Van Hove, Geert

    2010-01-01

    There is a wide range of media representations of disability, but not just because of the societal stigma. They are a function of norms of journalism as well as biases among people with disabilities themselves. This article is a contribution to the issue of social representation of persons with disabilities from a Romanian perspective, which will…

  11. Postsecondary Education for Individuals with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1991-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue contains several articles on postsecondary education for individuals with disabilities. "Supported Education for People with Psychiatric Disabilities...Issues and Implications" (Karen V. Unger) describes three prototypes for postsecondary education of individuals with psychiatric disabilities--the self-contained…

  12. Depression, Disability, and Rehabilitation Services for Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Judith A.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review scientific evidence for the co-occurrence of major depressive illness and disability, and to examine this phenomenon specifically for women in the United States today. Following a discussion of different ways of operationalizing the concept of disability, the analysis addresses gender biases in disability

  13. Forensic Learning Disability Nursing Role Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Tom; Phipps, Dianne; Melling, Kat

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a study carried out on the role constructs of forensic and nonforensic Learning Disability Nursing in relation to six binary themes. The aims were to identify if there were differences in perceptions of forensic learning disability nurses and nonforensic learning disability nurses in relation to the six binary themes of the…

  14. Paddling with Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Teri; Medina, Jacquie

    2013-01-01

    Although there is a variety of literature that offers adaptations and teaching suggestions for paddling with individuals who have physical disabilities, only a few address the needs of individuals with developmental disabilities (Gullion, 2009; Zeller, 2009). Developmental disabilities refer to a diverse group of severe chronic conditions that are…

  15. Violence Exposure among Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Patricia M.

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this paper is children with disabilities exposed to a broad range of violence types including child maltreatment, domestic violence, community violence, and war and terrorism. Because disability research must be interpreted on the basis of the definitional paradigm employed, definitions of disability status and current prevalence…

  16. Workplace Discrimination and the Perception of Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, William R.; Reid, Christine A.; McMahon, Brian T.

    2011-01-01

    This article documents the employment discrimination experienced by Americans "regarded as" disabled (but not medically verified as such), using the Integrated Mission System of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). Claimants who were perceived as disabled, as contrasted with those with documented disabilities, were more likely…

  17. Serving Learning Disabled Students in Postsecondary Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Belinda D.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses legislation addressing institutional responsibilities concerning the educational needs of the handicapped. Explains the nature of learning disabilities. Distinguishes between accommodations for the physically handicapped and learning disabled. Describes ways of assuring equal access to education for learning disabled students, through…

  18. Homework Practices That Support Students with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Connections in Special Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This issue discusses homework issues related to students with disabilities and how to ensure that students with disabilities benefit from homework. It addresses communication problems teachers face in assigning homework to students with disabilities and recommendations for overcoming these communication barriers. Strategies are provided for…

  19. Behavioral Inhibition in Children with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Weerdt, Frauke; Desoete, Annemie; Roeyers, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Children with reading disabilities (RD, n = 17), mathematical disabilities (MD, n = 22), combined reading and mathematical disabilities (RD + MD, n = 28) and control peers (n = 45) were tested on behavioral inhibition with a Go/no-go task in a picture, letter and digit-modality. In contrast to children without RD, children with RD made…

  20. Emerging Technologies and Their Impact on Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    Technological innovation is transforming the prevalence and functional impact of child disability, the scale of social disparities in child disability, and perhaps the essential meaning of disability in an increasingly technology-dominated world. In this article, Paul Wise investigates several specific facets of this transformation. He begins by…

  1. Improving Educational Outcomes for Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frieden, Lex

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores how attitudes and expectations for students with disabilities are changing as a result of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) and the impact of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Overall, there is strong support for increasing expectations for students with disabilities and helping them to improve their…

  2. UNIVERSITY OF CAPE TOWN DISABILITY SERVICE

    E-print Network

    Tadross, Mark

    UNIVERSITY OF CAPE TOWN DISABILITY SERVICE Promoting Access and Developing Solutions Students other comments? Would you like access to the Dayhouse for students with disabilities? Would you like Person to call in case of emergency while at the Disability Service Name Home Phone Work Phone E

  3. Disability Support Services 121 East Annex

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Andrew

    staff promotes self-determination and personal responsibility for students with disabilities is confidential and not part of the permanent student record. How do I get services? Disclosure of disability when. Students must contact DSS, provide documentation of disability, and schedule an appointment to meet

  4. Accessibility Center for Students with Disabilities

    E-print Network

    Chandy, John A.

    Accessibility Map Center for Students with Disabilities Wilbur Cross Building, 201 233 Glenbrook with Disabilities is committed to achieving equal educational opportunity and full participation for persons with disabilities. It is the policy that no qualified person be excluded from participating in any University

  5. Predictors of disability worsening in clinically isolated syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jokubaitis, Vilija G; Spelman, Tim; Kalincik, Tomas; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Grand'Maison, François; Duquette, Pierre; Girard, Marc; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Grammond, Pierre; Hupperts, Raymond; Cabrera-Gomez, José; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Boz, Cavit; Giuliani, Giorgio; Fernández-Bolaños, Ricardo; Iuliano, Gerardo; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Verheul, Freek; van Pesch, Vincent; Petkovska-Boskova, Tatjana; Fiol, Marcela; Moore, Fraser; Cristiano, Edgardo; Alroughani, Raed; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Barnett, Michael; Slee, Mark; Vella, Norbert; Herbert, Joseph; Shaw, Cameron; Saladino, Maria Laura; Amato, Maria Pia; Liew, Danny; Paolicelli, Damiano; Butzkueven, Helmut; Trojano, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess demographic, clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, and treatment exposure predictors of time to 3 or 12-month confirmed disability worsening in clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and early multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods We utilized the MSBase Incident Study (MSBasis), a prospective cohort study of outcome after CIS. Predictors of time to first 3 and 12-month confirmed expanded disability status scale worsening were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results About 1989 patients were analyzed, the largest seen-from-onset cohort reported to-date. A total of 391 patients had a first 3-month confirmed disability worsening event, of which 307 were sustained for 12 months. Older age at CIS onset (adjusted hazard ratio: aHR 1.17, 95% 1.06, 1.30), pyramidal (aHR 1.45, 95% CI 1.13, 1.89) and ambulation (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.09, 2.34) system dysfunction, annualized relapse rate (aHR 1.20, 95% CI 1.18, 1.22), and lower proportion of observation time on treatment were associated with 3-month confirmed worsening. Predictors of time to 12-month sustained worsening included pyramidal system dysfunction (Hazard ratio: aHR 1.38, 95% CI 1.05, 1.83), and older age at CIS onset (aHR 1.17, 95% CI 1.04, 1.31). Greater proportion of follow-up time exposed to treatment was associated with greater reductions in the rate of worsening. Interpretation This study provides class IV evidence for a strong protective effect of disease-modifying treatment to reduce disability worsening events in patients with CIS and early MS, and confirms age and pyramidal dysfunction at onset as risk factors. PMID:26000321

  6. Physical Disability After Injury-Related Inpatient Rehabilitation in Children

    PubMed Central

    Durbin, Dennis R.; Winston, Flaura K.; Zhao, Huaqing; Stineman, Margaret G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the residual physical disability after inpatient rehabilitation for children 7 to 18 years old with traumatic injuries. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of patients aged 7 to 18 years who underwent inpatient rehabilitation for traumatic injuries from 2002 to 2011. Patients were identified from the Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation. Injuries were captured by using standardized Medicare Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility Patient Assessment Instrument codes. Functional outcome was measured with the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) instrument. A validated, categorical grading system of the FIM motor items was used, consisting of clinically relevant levels of physical achievement from grade 1 (need for total assistance) to grade 7 (completely independent for self-care and mobility). RESULTS: A total of 13?798 injured children underwent inpatient rehabilitation across 523 facilities during the 10-year period. After a mean 3-week length of stay, functional limitations were reduced, but children still tended to have residual physical disabilities (median admission grade: 1; median discharge grade: 4). Children with spinal cord injuries, either alone or in combination with other injuries, had lower functional grade at discharge, longer lengths of stay, and more comorbidities at discharge than those with traumatic brain injuries, burns, and multiple injuries (P < .0001 for all comparisons). CONCLUSIONS: Children had very severe physical disability on admission to inpatient rehabilitation for traumatic injuries, and those with spinal cord injuries had persistent disability at discharge. These traumatic events during critical stages of development may result in a substantial care burden over the child’s lifespan. PMID:23248228

  7. Mobility, Emotion, and Universality in Future Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chignell, Mark; Hosono, Naotsune; Fels, Deborah; Lottridge, Danielle; Waterworth, John

    The Graphical user interface has traditionally supported personal productivity, efficiency, and usability. With computer supported cooperative work, the focus has been on typical people, doing typical work in a highly rational model of interaction. Recent trends towards mobility, and emotional and universal design are extending the user interface paradigm beyond the routine. As computing moves into the hand and away from the desktop, there is a greater need for dealing with emotions and distractions. Busy and distracted people represent a new kind of disability, but one that will be increasingly prevalent. In this panel we examine the current state of the art, and prospects for future collaboration in non-normative computing requirements. This panel draws together researchers who are studying the problems of mobility, emotion and universality. The goal of the panel is to discuss how progress in these areas will change the nature of future collaboration.

  8. Aberrations for grazing incidence telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.

    1988-01-01

    The wavefront aberration polynomial and transverse ray aberration expansions will be derived for grazing incidence two-mirror Wolter telescopes including all paraboloid-hyperboloid and paraboloid-ellipsoid combinations. The reference sphere is determined with the help of the principal surface of the telescope, and the aberration polynomials will be given as functions of the coordinates of the ray intersection with the reference sphere. Third -and some of the fifth-order and seventh-order aberration terms will be analyzed. Also, the well-known relationship between wavefront aberration polynomials and transverse ray aberration polynomials will be verified.

  9. Measuring Disability: Comparing the Impact of Two Data Collection Approaches on Disability Rates.

    PubMed

    Sabariego, Carla; Oberhauser, Cornelia; Posarac, Aleksandra; Bickenbach, Jerome; Kostanjsek, Nenad; Chatterji, Somnath; Officer, Alana; Coenen, Michaela; Chhan, Lay; Cieza, Alarcos

    2015-09-01

    The usual approach in disability surveys is to screen persons with disability upfront and then ask questions about everyday problems. The objectives of this paper are to demonstrate the impact of screeners on disability rates, to challenge the usual exclusion of persons with mild and moderate disability from disability surveys and to demonstrate the advantage of using an a posteriori cut-off. Using data of a pilot study of the WHO Model Disability Survey (MDS) in Cambodia and the polytomous Rasch model, metric scales of disability were built. The conventional screener approach based on the short disability module of the Washington City Group and the a posteriori cut-off method described in the World Disability Report were compared regarding disability rates. The screener led to imprecise rates and classified persons with mild to moderate disability as non-disabled, although these respondents already experienced important problems in daily life. The a posteriori cut-off applied to the general population sample led to a more precise disability rate and allowed for a differentiation of the performance and needs of persons with mild, moderate and severe disability. This approach can be therefore considered as an inclusive approach suitable to monitor the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. PMID:26308039

  10. Measuring Disability: Comparing the Impact of Two Data Collection Approaches on Disability Rates

    PubMed Central

    Sabariego, Carla; Oberhauser, Cornelia; Posarac, Aleksandra; Bickenbach, Jerome; Kostanjsek, Nenad; Chatterji, Somnath; Officer, Alana; Coenen, Michaela; Chhan, Lay; Cieza, Alarcos

    2015-01-01

    The usual approach in disability surveys is to screen persons with disability upfront and then ask questions about everyday problems. The objectives of this paper are to demonstrate the impact of screeners on disability rates, to challenge the usual exclusion of persons with mild and moderate disability from disability surveys and to demonstrate the advantage of using an a posteriori cut-off. Using data of a pilot study of the WHO Model Disability Survey (MDS) in Cambodia and the polytomous Rasch model, metric scales of disability were built. The conventional screener approach based on the short disability module of the Washington City Group and the a posteriori cut-off method described in the World Disability Report were compared regarding disability rates. The screener led to imprecise rates and classified persons with mild to moderate disability as non-disabled, although these respondents already experienced important problems in daily life. The a posteriori cut-off applied to the general population sample led to a more precise disability rate and allowed for a differentiation of the performance and needs of persons with mild, moderate and severe disability. This approach can be therefore considered as an inclusive approach suitable to monitor the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. PMID:26308039

  11. Information Technology and Disabilities, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNulty, Tom, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Four issues of this newsletter on information technology and disabilities (ITD) contain the following articles: "Building an Accessible CD-ROM Reference Station" (Rochelle Wyatt and Charles Hamilton); "Development of an Accessible User Interface for People Who Are Blind or Vision Impaired as Part of the Re-Computerisation of Royal Blind Society…

  12. Learning Disabilities: The Decade Ahead.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krasnoff, Margaret J., Ed.

    Presented are ten papers given at a 1974 conference focusing on realistic goals for serving learning disabled children in the decade ahead. Papers have the following titles and authors: "Introduction and Overview of the Problem of the Conference" (W. Cruickshank); "Concepts of Vision in Relation to Perception" (G. Getman); "Motor Activities and…

  13. The Language of Language Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conant, Susan

    1986-01-01

    Language researchers should avoid using such terms as "language-defective", "linguistically deviant", "normal", or "healthy" when describing children with or without language problems, because these terms suggest that the children are nothing but their disability. The use of "children with" (or without) plus description of the condition is more…

  14. Information Technology and Disabilities, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNulty, Tom, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This document consists of all issues/pages of the electronic journal "Information Technology and Disabilities" published during 1996, i.e., a total of 13 ITD articles: (1) "New CSUF (California State University at Fullerton) Braille Transcription Center Promotes Access to Postsecondary Instructional Materials for the California State University…

  15. Hyperactivity, Learning Disabilities, and Alcohol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Sandra; Sherry, Lee

    1984-01-01

    A review of research on the effects of alcohol consumption by pregnant women supports the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's warning about the possible negative effects (learning disabilities, hyperactivity, short attention span, and emotional liability) of children. (Author/CL)

  16. Accreditation of Developmental Disabilities Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemp, Richard; Braddock, David

    1988-01-01

    Data gathered from 296 agency accreditation surveys, conducted by the Accreditation Council on Services for People with Developmental Disabilities, were analyzed, focusing on ownership, services provided, size of residential units, critical standards, characteristics of individuals served, and accreditation outcome. Redundancies between private…

  17. Educating Students with Mild Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyen, Edward L., Ed.; And Others

    The book contains 19 papers from the journal, "Focus on Exceptional Children," that discuss new perspectives and practices in educating students with mild disabilities. The first half of the book is titled "New Perspectives" and includes the following articles: "Beyond the Regular Education Initiative/Inclusion and the Resource Room Controversy"…

  18. Developmental Disabilities and Child Welfare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rycus, Judith S.; Hughes, Ronald C.

    This monograph addresses common misconceptions about developmental disabilities, describes the conditions that child welfare workers are most likely to see, provides examples of effective interventions, and stresses the importance of early intervention to promote healthy development. Specific chapters include: (1) "Understanding Developmental…

  19. Disability within the African Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eskay, M.; Onu, V. C.; Igbo, J. N.; Obiyo, N.; Ugwuanyi, L.

    2012-01-01

    For a long time, children with special needs were educated along with other regular children in schools. The notion of special education was a Western phenomenon and concept in Nigeria. How were children with special needs educated without special education programs? This article will provide cultural perspectives on issues of disability and care…

  20. Disabled Readers: Insight, Assessment, Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Diane J., Ed.

    Focusing on helping teachers to understand and help children who have reading disabilities, the 13 papers in this volume were prepared by practitioners at various levels from public school, community, and university settings. The papers included in part one offer insights into the concomitant aspects of reading difficulties. Specific topics…

  1. Disability Discrimination in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Mark C.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews developments in 2000 in the law of disability discrimination as it relates to higher education, which falls into five categories: (1) definition of a qualified individual; (2) accommodations, access, undue burden, and fundamental alteration of programs; (3) intentional discrimination, harassment, and retaliation; (4) Eleventh Amendment…

  2. Accommodating Workers with Mental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mank, David; And Others

    1992-01-01

    NEC America prepares its employees to train severely disabled co-workers. Three characteristics of the training are (1) the right type and amount of assistance; (2) measurement of degrees of learning; and (3) reinforcement of what has been learned. (SK)

  3. Disability access to Library services

    E-print Network

    Kent, University of

    Page 1 Disability access to Library services Ask us and we'll try and help www to resources and services 3 LibrarySearch 3 Access to the building 3 Opening hours 3 Getting to know the Library 3 Getting into the Templeman Library 4 Parking 4 Entrances and lifts 4 Medical conditions 4

  4. Disability, Work and Cash Benefits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mashaw, Jerry L., Ed.; And Others

    This book contains 13 papers from a workshop convened to explore the causes of work disability and the types of interventions that might enable individuals to remain at work, return to work, or enter the work force for the first time, despite having chronic health conditions or impairments. Following an overview of the papers by editors Jerry L.…

  5. Designing for the Physically Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Dept. of Education, Toronto.

    This publication provides instructions and visual diagrams both for adapting existing structures and for building new facilities to meet the special needs of the disabled. Each of the two main sections is divided into two parts: "The Site" and "The Building." The first section, "Modification of Existing Schools," covers topics of grading, walks,…

  6. Group Disability National Account Name

    E-print Network

    physician. Sun Life will fax this form to your physician. Additionally, you will need to complete required, click Get a Form, then Employee Benefits Forms.* Once completed, you or your physician can fax it to Sun with Disability benefits from Sun Life Financial. Claim Submission Checklist When you call , you should

  7. Visual Disability and Horse Riding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brickell, Diana

    2005-01-01

    It is now commonplace for horse riding to be included in the extra-curricular activities of students with physical disabilities. In this article an account is given of how visually impaired people can derive physical, mental, and emotional benefits from this supervised activity. It is argued that the rider, in learning to exercise self-control and…

  8. Disability and the Black Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Sheila D., Ed.

    This book addresses physical, mental, and learning disabilities experienced across age, gender, and ethnic groups by the black race in the United States. After an introduction by Sheila D. Miller, the papers are: "A Study to Assess Patient Satisfaction of Transitioning from Medicaid to Managed Care by Sickle Cell Patients in Hampton Roads,…

  9. Child Abuse and Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Joann, Ed.; Bartlette, Don

    1992-01-01

    Literature indicating high rates of abuse in this population is reviewed, as is literature indicating high rates of developmental disabilities in child victims of abuse. Problems in data collecting practices are noted. Reasons for these children's greater risk for abuse are identified, including child attributes, stress, parent vulnerabilities,…

  10. Developmental Disabilities Program. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-07-27

    This rule implements the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act of 2000. The previous regulations were completed in 1997 before the current law was passed. The rule will align the regulations and current statute and will provide guidance to AIDD grantees. PMID:26214859

  11. Individual Learning Disabilities: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rocky Mountain Educational Lab., Inc., Greeley, CO.

    The bibliography contains a variety of subject matter focusing on, but not necessarily limited to, the topic of learning disabilities. Included are 351 articles dating from 1959 to 1968, 148 books ranging from 1926 to 1968, 60 booklets from 1956 to 1968, 37 testing materials dating from 1955 to 1967, 42 catalogs from 1967 to 1968, 36 video tapes,…

  12. Reading Disabilities: An International Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarnopol, Lester, Ed.; Tarnopol, Muriel, Ed.

    This volume includes essays on reading disabilities in such places as Argentina, Austria, Belgium, China, Canada, Denmark, Czechoslovakia, Finland, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, Ireland, Norway, The Netherlands, Rhodesia, Republic of South Africa, and the United States. Most of the 20 essays include the background of special education in the…

  13. Cognitive Processing in Mild Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Hilawani, Yasser A.; Poteet, James A.

    Research regarding the cognitive processing of students with learning disabilities, mild mental handicap, and emotional handicap is reviewed. In considering cognitive processing for students with mild mental handicap, research attention has been directed to the issues of memory and learning, acquisition and retrieval deficits, inefficient…

  14. Speech of Mentally Disabled Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Bruce

    The study summarized in this paper deals with the grammatical analysis of the spontaneous speech of approximately 150 children who are classified as mentally disabled; educable (I.Q. range 50-80). The performance of these mentally disadvantaged children is compared with the performance of 200 normally developing children by using a clinical…

  15. Bullying and Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynt, Samuel W.; Morton, Rhonda Collins

    2004-01-01

    According to a 2001 study by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development about 3 in 10 children are affected as bully, victim, or both. However, the knowledge base pertaining to the relationship between bullying and students with disabilities is relatively new and somewhat sparse. This paper defines the terms bully and bullying…

  16. Intellectual Disabilities and Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herer, Gilbert R.

    2012-01-01

    Undetected/untreated hearing loss imposes significant limitations upon individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID). It can interfere with cognitive development, impede communicative and social interactions, and limit vocational aspirations. Over the past decade, the hearing of 9961 people with ID was evaluated at Special Olympics sports…

  17. College Students with Psychiatric Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Delar K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on college students with psychiatric disabilities. It defines and discusses various psychiatric conditions such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, and personality disorders. It concludes with accommodations that a college professor can make to help these students succeed in higher education. (Contains 1…

  18. Information Technology and Disabilities, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNulty, Tom, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Four issues of this newsletter on information technology and disabilities (ITD) contain the following articles: "Developing an Accessible Online Public Access Catalog at the Washington Talking Book and Braille Library" (Charles Hamilton); "Assistive Technology in the Science Laboratory: A Talking Laboratory Work Station for Visually Impaired…

  19. Pediatric Disability and Caregiver Separation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoyd, Judith L. M.; Akincigil, Ayse; Paek, Eun Kwang

    2010-01-01

    The evidence that the birth of a child with a disability leads to divorce or separation is equivocal, with the majority of recent research suggesting that such a birth and childrearing may be stressful, but not necessarily toxic, to the caregiver relationship. Such research has been limited by small sample sizes and nonrepresentative samples and…

  20. Special Educational Needs and Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keil, Sue; Miller, Olga; Cobb, Rory

    2006-01-01

    Issues relating to the categorisation and labelling of pupils, and, the use of the terms "special educational needs" and "disability" in particular, have been the topic of debate in "BJSE" before. In this article, Sue Keil, a research officer at the Royal National Institute for the Blind (RNIB), Olga Miller, of the Institute of Education,…

  1. The Feasibility of Measuring Frailty to Predict Disability and Mortality in Older Medical-ICU Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Matthew R.; Reid, M. Cary; Westlake, Amanda A.; Rowe, John W.; Granieri, Evelyn C.; Wunsch, Hannah; Dam, Tien; Rabinowitz, Daniel; Goldstein, Nathan E.; Maurer, Mathew S.; Lederer, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether frailty can be measured within 4 days prior to hospital discharge in older ICU survivors of respiratory failure, and whether it is associated with post-discharge disability and mortality. Materials and Methods We performed a single center prospective cohort study of 22 medical-ICU survivors age ? 65 years old who had received non-invasive or invasive mechanical ventilation for at least 24 hours. Frailty was defined as a score of ? 3 using Fried’s 5-point scale. We measured disability with the Katz Activities of Daily Living. We estimated unadjusted associations between Fried’s frailty score and incident disability at 1-month and 6-month mortality using Cox proportional hazard models. Results The mean (standard deviation) age was 77 (9) years, mean APACHE II score was 27 (9.7), mean frailty score was 3.4 (1.3), and 18 (82%) were frail. Nine subjects (41%) died within 6 months, and all were frail. Each 1-point increase in frailty score was associated with a 90% increased rate of incident disability at 1-month (rate ratio: 1.9, 95% CI 0.7-4.9) and a threefold increase in 6-month mortality (rate ratio: 3.0, 95% CI 1.4-6.3). Conclusions:Frailty can be measured in older ICU survivors near hospital discharge and is associated with 6-month mortality in unadjusted analysis. Larger studies to determine if frailty independently predicts outcomes are warranted. PMID:24559575

  2. Engendering student empathy for disabled clients with urinary incontinence through experiential learning.

    PubMed

    Karlowicz, Karen A; Palmer, Kay L

    2006-10-01

    As part of a rehabilitation clinical course for senior baccalaureate nursing students, a disability-incontinence experiential learning activity is required. The assignment is intended to familiarize students with some of the challenges encountered by a client with mobility problems, including continence management issues using disposable undergarments. Wearing the undergarments dry and wet while being confined to a wheelchair provides insight and promotes empathy for patients with bladder control problems. PMID:17078325

  3. Violence exposure among children with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Patricia M

    2009-06-01

    The focus of this paper is children with disabilities exposed to a broad range of violence types including child maltreatment, domestic violence, community violence, and war and terrorism. Because disability research must be interpreted on the basis of the definitional paradigm employed, definitions of disability status and current prevalence estimates as a function of a given paradigm are initially considered. These disability paradigms include those used in federal, education, juvenile justice, and health care arenas. Current prevalence estimates of childhood disability in the U.S. are presented within the frameworks of these varying definitions of disability status in childhood. Summaries of research from 2000 to 2008 on the four types of violence victimization addressed among children with disabilities are presented and directions for future research suggested. PMID:19517229

  4. The Impact of Placement on Reading and Mathematics Achievement of Students with High Incidence Disabilities

    E-print Network

    Harrington, Jennifer S.

    2011-07-29

    opportunities has inspired me to v be a life-long learner. I love you very much and miss you daily—I am forever indebted to you for your years of love, support, guidance, and understanding. vi TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter 1: Introduction...

  5. Paraprofessional Involvement in Self-Determination Instruction for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Carter, Erik W.; Sisco, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Although enhancing students' self-determination is advocated as a central element of high-quality special education and transition services, little is known about the ways in which paraprofessionals are involved in promoting self-determination or the extent to which they share teachers' views regarding its importance. The authors surveyed 223…

  6. 20 CFR 416.993 - Medical evidence in continuing disability review cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determining Disability and Blindness Continuing Or Stopping Disability Or Blindness § 416.993 Medical evidence in continuing disability review cases....

  7. 20 CFR 416.993 - Medical evidence in continuing disability review cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determining Disability and Blindness Continuing Or Stopping Disability Or Blindness § 416.993 Medical evidence in continuing disability review cases....

  8. 20 CFR 416.993 - Medical evidence in continuing disability review cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determining Disability and Blindness Continuing Or Stopping Disability Or Blindness § 416.993 Medical evidence in continuing disability review cases....

  9. 20 CFR 416.993 - Medical evidence in continuing disability review cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determining Disability and Blindness Continuing Or Stopping Disability Or Blindness § 416.993 Medical evidence in continuing disability review cases....

  10. 20 CFR 416.993 - Medical evidence in continuing disability review cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determining Disability and Blindness Continuing Or Stopping Disability Or Blindness § 416.993 Medical evidence in continuing disability review cases....

  11. Assessing and improving cross-border chemical incident preparedness and response across Europe.

    PubMed

    Stewart-Evans, James; Hall, Lisbeth; Czerczak, Slawomir; Manley, Kevin; Dobney, Alec; Hoffer, Sally; Pa?aszewska-Tkacz, Anna; Jankowska, Agnieszka

    2014-11-01

    Good practices in emergency preparedness and response for chemical incidents include practices specific to the different functions of exposure assessment (e.g., within the monitoring function, the use of mobile monitoring equipment; within the modelling function, the use of rapid dispersion models with integrated mapping software) and generic practices to engage incident response stakeholders to maximise exposure assessment capabilities (e.g., sharing protocols and pre-prepared information and multi-agency training and exercising). Such practices can optimise cross-border collaboration. A wide range of practices have been implemented across MSs during chemical incident response, particularly during incidents that have cross-border and trans-boundary impacts. This paper proposes a self-assessment methodology to enable MSs, or organisations within MSs, to examine exposure assessment capabilities and communication pathways between exposure assessors and public health risk assessors. Where gaps exist, this methodology provides links to good practices that could improve response, communication and collaboration across local, regional and national borders. A fragmented approach to emergency preparedness for chemical incidents is a major obstacle to improving cross-border exposure assessment. There is no one existing body or structure responsible for all aspects of chemical incident preparedness and response in the European Union. Due to the range of different organisations and networks involved in chemical incident response, emergency preparedness needs to be drawn together. A number of recommendations are proposed, including the use of networks of experts which link public health risk assessors with experts in exposure assessment, in order to coordinate and improve chemical incident emergency preparedness. The EU's recent Decision on serious cross-border threats to health aims to facilitate MSs' compliance with the International Health Regulations, which require reporting and communication regarding significant chemical incidents. This provides a potential route to build on in order to improve chemical incident preparedness and response across Europe. PMID:24768281

  12. Mobility and Reading Habits of the Blind; An Inquiry Made for the Ministry of Health, Covering the Registered Blind of England and Wales in 1965. Government Social Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, P.G.; Todd, Jean E.

    A random sample of registered blind people in England and Wales (5% of those aged 16 to 65 and 1.7% of those aged 65 to 79) was interviewed in 1965 regarding mobility, orientation, and reading. Data included age, age when blindness occurred, sex, residual sight for mobility, residual sight for reading, other disabilities, and ability to walk…

  13. Mobile Router Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.; Shell, Dan; Leung, Kent

    2002-01-01

    Cisco Systems and NASA have been performing joint research on mobile routing technology under a NASA Space Act Agreement. Cisco developed mobile router technology and provided that technology to NASA for applications to aeronautic and space-based missions. NASA has performed stringent performance testing of the mobile router, including the interaction of routing and transport-level protocols. This paper describes mobile routing, the mobile router, and some key configuration parameters. In addition, the paper describes the mobile routing test network and test results documenting the performance of transport protocols in dynamic routing environments.

  14. Using assistive technology outcomes research to inform policy related to the employment of individuals with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Steven; Edyburn, Dave L; Rust, Kathy L; Schwanke, Todd D; Smith, Roger O

    2008-01-01

    We know that work is recognized as a central component of life for individuals with and without disabilities. It yields many physical and psychological benefits to the individual while simultaneously contributing numerous benefits to society. Lawmakers have enacted a plethora of laws designed to prevent discrimination, provide incentives for employers to hire individuals with disabilities, and facilitate job training/career preparation. Assistive technology figures prominently in disability employment law as a critical strategy for gaining access and supporting employment and upward mobility in the workplace. However, little systematic effort has been devoted to examining assistive technology use and outcomes as they relate to the employment of individuals with disabilities. The purpose of this article is to articulate a series of issues that permeate assistive technology outcome measurement in employment settings and subsequently affect the use of research knowledge for federal and state policy makers. For each issue, the authors pose three questions for critical analysis: Does the law compel the provision of assistive technology? Does outcome data play any part in the operation of the law? When it does, what kind of data would be useful to collect and where could it be found? Finally, the authors provide a brief glimpse of the current and future research efforts concerning the RSA-911 database. The recent database summaries exemplify the importance of such a national data collection system for informing federal policy, particularly concerning the contributions of assistive technology device use and services on improving the employment of individuals with disabilities. PMID:18939654

  15. The Impact of Digital Mobile Devices in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevillano-García, M.ª Luisa; Vázquez-Cano, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    This research examined the acceptance, incidence, and use of digital mobile devices (tablets and smartphones) among university students in the European Higher Education Area (EHEA). The research was contextualized in a sample of 419 students from three Spanish public universities. Through a quantitative methodology, we identified the factors and…

  16. Association between vestibular schwannomas and mobile phone use.

    PubMed

    Moon, In Seok; Kim, Bo Gyung; Kim, Jinna; Lee, Jong Dae; Lee, Won-Sang

    2014-01-01

    Vestibular schwannomas (VSs) grow in the region where the energy from mobile phone use is absorbed. We examined the associations of VSs with mobile phone use. This study included 119 patients who had undergone surgical tumor removal. We used two approaches in this investigation. First, a case-control study for the association of mobile phone use and incidence of VSs was conducted. Both cases and controls were investigated with questions based on INTERPHONE guidelines. Amount of mobile phone use according to duration, daily amount, and cumulative hours were compared between two groups. We also conducted a case-case study. The location and volume of the tumors were investigated by MRI. Associations between the estimated amount of mobile phone use and tumor volume and between the laterality of phone use and tumor location were analyzed. In a case-control study, the odds ratio (OR) of tumor incidence according to mobile phone use was 0.956. In the case-case study, tumor volume and estimated cumulative hours showed a strong correlation (r(2)?=?0.144, p?=?0.002), and regular mobile phone users showed tumors of a markedly larger volume than those of non-regular users (p?mobile phones and tumor volume that showed strong correlation with amount of mobile phone use, thus there is a possibility that mobile phone use may affect tumor growth. PMID:23975478

  17. The Role of Age in Moderating the Association Between Disability and Light-Intensity Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Prizer, Lindsay P; Gay, Jennifer L; Gerst-Emerson, Kerstin; Froehlich-Grobe, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There's a lack of evidence on the association between light-intensity physical activity and disability. This study examines the relationships in activity by self-reported physical function in five domains (i.e., activities of daily living [ADL], instrumental ADL, leisure activities, lower extremity, and general activities), and whether this association varies by age. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2004 and 2005-2006 waves. Subjects Participants included 5700 men and women ages 20 to 85 years. Measures Difficulty with various activities was measured with the Physical Functioning Questionnaire, accelerometer-measured physical activity, demographics, and self-rated health. Analysis Ordinary least squares regression models were run to examine the relationship between physical function in each domain, light-intensity activity, and the moderating effect of age. Analyses controlled for body mass index, moderate-to-vigorous-intensity activity, self-reported health, accelerometer wear time, and gender. Results Little variation was seen in light-intensity physical activity among younger adults regardless of disability status. Older adults reporting difficulty with activities engaged in significantly less light-intensity physical activity compared to those with no disability (271.8 vs. 316.5 minutes). Age significantly moderated the association between light-intensity physical activity and leisure activities (p = .048), and lower extremity mobility (p = .039). Age did not moderate other domains of disability. Conclusion Younger age may be protective regarding the influence of disability on light-intensity activity. In addition, disability may be more debilitating for some older individuals. Interventions to increase light-intensity activity should aim to address disability at all ages, with increased attention for older adults. PMID:25973969

  18. Improving incident reporting among junior doctors

    PubMed Central

    Hotton, Emily; Jordan, Lesley; Peden, Carol

    2014-01-01

    To ensure systems in hospitals improve to make patient care safer, learning must occur when things go wrong. Incident reporting is one of the commonest mechanisms used to learn from harm events and near misses. Only a relatively small number of incidents that occur are actually reported and different groups of staff have different rates of reporting. Nationally, junior doctors are low reporters of incidents, a finding supported by our local data. We set out to explore the culture and awareness around incident reporting among our junior doctors, and to improve the incident reporting rate within this important staff group. In order to achieve this we undertook a number of work programmes focused on junior doctors, including: assessment of their knowledge, confidence and understanding of incident reporting, education on how and why to report incidents with a focus on reporting on clinical themes during a specific time period, and evaluation of the experience of those doctors who reported incidents. Junior doctors were asked to focus on incident reporting during a one week period. Before and after this focussed week, they were invited to complete a questionnaire exploring their confidence about what an incident was and how to report. Prior to “Incident Reporting Week”, on average only two reports were submitted a month by junior doctors compared with an average of 15 per month following the education and awareness week. This project highlights the fact that using a focussed reporting period and/or specific clinical themes as an education tool can benefit a hospital by promoting awareness of incidents and by increasing incident reporting rates. This can only assist in improving hospital systems, and ultimately increase patient safety.

  19. The incidence of cognitive dysfunction in an encopretic population in children.

    PubMed

    Stern, H P; Lowitz, G H; Prince, M T; Altshuler, L; Stroh, S E

    1988-01-01

    Cognitive testing was conducted in a clinical population of encopretic patients. Testing included the Weschler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R), the Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT) and the Bender Visual-Motor Gestalt Test (BVMGT). Although Full Scale, Verbal and Performance Intelligence Quotients on the WISC-R were not statistically different from general population means, subtests in Arithmetic (p less than 0.001), Digit Span (p less than 0.001) and Coding (p less than 0.05) were. There was also a high incidence of Verbal/Performance discrepancies and statistically significant differences on the WRAT in Spelling (p less than 0.01) and Arithmetic (p less than 0.01). Visual-motor integration was delayed two or more years in 43% of the patients on the BVMGT. These findings are consistent with the diagnosis of specific learning disabilities. An increased frequency of learning disabilities in an encopretic population may represent a subset of patients with a distinct syndrome in this disorder. These findings may point to the central nervous system (CNS) as the common point of pathology for the encopresis and learning disabilities, or reflect a common insult to both the CNS and gastrointestinal tract. Since histories in these patients did not reveal significant pregnancy or neonatal risk factors, this association could be related to genetic or environmental issues. Health professionals should be alert to the possibility of an increased incidence of learning disabilities in their encopretic patients. Further controlled studies are needed to determine if this finding is present in other settings, and if so, to determine the etiology. PMID:3200504

  20. Incidence and outcome of injury in Ghana: a community-based survey.

    PubMed Central

    Mock, C. N.; Abantanga, F.; Cummings, P.; Koepsell, T. D.

    1999-01-01

    Injury is an increasingly significant health problem in most low-income countries. However, strategies for preventing injury have not been well addressed. The present study was carried out to measure the incidence and outcome of various mechanisms of injury in Ghana in order to provide data for use in developing priorities for injury prevention efforts. For this purpose, using two-stage cluster sampling and household interviews, we surveyed 21,105 persons living in 431 urban and rural sites. During the preceding year, 1609 injuries resulting in one or more days of loss of normal activity were reported. Injury-related mortality was slightly higher in the urban (83 per 100,000) than in the rural area (53 per 100,000). However, the burden of disability from nonfatal injuries, as assessed by disability days, was higher in the rural (4697 disability days per 1000 person-years) than in the urban area (2671 days per 1000 person-years). Based on incidence rates and disability times, the major types of injury in the urban area were transport-related injury and falls. In the rural area, agricultural injuries predominated, followed by falls and transport-related injury. In rural and urban areas combined, 73% of motor vehicle-related injuries involved commercial vehicles. In this and other similar developing-country settings, injury prevention efforts should focus on falls and on transport safety in both urban and rural areas, with special attention being paid to commercial vehicles. In rural areas, agricultural injuries contributed the largest burden of morbidity, and should be a priority for prevention efforts. PMID:10680242