Science.gov

Sample records for including individual residences

  1. General design, construction, and operation guidelines: Constructed wetlands wastewater treatment systems for small users including individual residences. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, G.R.; Watson, J.T.

    1993-05-01

    One of the Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA`s) major goals is cleanup and protection of the waters of the Tennessee River system. Although great strides have been made, point source and nonpoint source pollution still affect the surface water and groundwater quality in the Tennessee Valley and nationally. Causes of this pollution are poorly operating wastewater treatment systems or the lack of them. Practical solutions are needed, and there is great interest and desire to abate water pollution with effective, simple, reliable and affordable wastewater treatment processes. In recognition of this need, TVA began demonstration of the constructed wetlands technology in 1986 as an alternative to conventional, mechanical processes, especially for small communities. Constructed wetlands can be downsized from municipal systems to small systems, such as for schools, camps and even individual homes.

  2. Short residence time coal liquefaction process including catalytic hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Raymond P.; Schmalzer, David K.; Wright, Charles H.

    1982-05-18

    Normally solid dissolved coal product and a distillate liquid product are produced by continuously passing a feed slurry comprising raw feed coal and a recycle solvent oil and/or slurry together with hydrogen to a preheating-reaction zone (26, alone, or 26 together with 42), the hydrogen pressure in the preheating-reaction zone being at least 1500 psig (105 kg/cm.sup.2), reacting the slurry in the preheating-reaction zone (26, or 26 with 42) at a temperature in the range of between about 455.degree. and about 500.degree. C. to dissolve the coal to form normally liquid coal and normally solid dissolved coal. A total slurry residence time is maintained in the reaction zone ranging from a finite value from about 0 to about 0.2 hour, and reaction effluent is continuously and directly contacted with a quenching fluid (40, 68) to substantially immediately reduce the temperature of the reaction effluent to below 425.degree. C. to substantially inhibit polymerization so that the yield of insoluble organic matter comprises less than 9 weight percent of said feed coal on a moisture-free basis. The reaction is performed under conditions of temperature, hydrogen pressure and residence time such that the quantity of distillate liquid boiling within the range C.sub.5 -454.degree. C. is an amount at least equal to that obtainable by performing the process under the same condition except for a longer total slurry residence time, e.g., 0.3 hour. Solvent boiling range liquid is separated from the reaction effluent (83) and recycled as process solvent (16). The amount of solvent boiling range liquid is sufficient to provide at least 80 weight percent of that required to maintain the process in overall solvent balance.

  3. Short residence time coal liquefaction process including catalytic hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.P.; Schmalzer, D.K.; Wright, C.H.

    1982-05-18

    Normally solid dissolved coal product and a distillate liquid product are produced by continuously passing a feed slurry comprising raw feed coal and a recycle solvent oil and/or slurry together with hydrogen to a preheating-reaction zone, the hydrogen pressure in the preheating-reaction zone being at least 1,500 psig (105 kg/cm[sup 2]), reacting the slurry in the preheating-reaction zone at a temperature in the range of between about 455 and about 500 C to dissolve the coal to form normally liquid coal and normally solid dissolved coal. A total slurry residence time is maintained in the reaction zone ranging from a finite value from about 0 to about 0.2 hour, and reaction effluent is continuously and directly contacted with a quenching fluid to substantially immediately reduce the temperature of the reaction effluent to below 425 C to substantially inhibit polymerization so that the yield of insoluble organic matter comprises less than 9 weight percent of said feed coal on a moisture-free basis. The reaction is performed under conditions of temperature, hydrogen pressure and residence time such that the quantity of distillate liquid boiling within the range C[sub 5]-454 C is an amount at least equal to that obtainable by performing the process under the same condition except for a longer total slurry residence time, e.g., 0.3 hour. Solvent boiling range liquid is separated from the reaction effluent and recycled as process solvent. The amount of solvent boiling range liquid is sufficient to provide at least 80 weight percent of that required to maintain the process in overall solvent balance. 6 figs.

  4. 26 CFR 1.871-2 - Determining residence of alien individuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determining residence of alien individuals. 1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Nonresident Aliens and Foreign Corporations § 1.871-2 Determining residence of alien individuals. (a) General. The term nonresident alien individual means an individual...

  5. 26 CFR 1.871-2 - Determining residence of alien individuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Determining residence of alien individuals. 1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Nonresident Aliens and Foreign Corporations § 1.871-2 Determining residence of alien individuals. (a) General. The term nonresident alien individual means...

  6. 26 CFR 1.871-2 - Determining residence of alien individuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Determining residence of alien individuals. 1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Nonresident Aliens and Foreign Corporations § 1.871-2 Determining residence of alien individuals. (a) General. The term nonresident alien individual means...

  7. 26 CFR 1.871-2 - Determining residence of alien individuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Determining residence of alien individuals. 1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Nonresident Aliens and Foreign Corporations § 1.871-2 Determining residence of alien individuals. (a) General. The term nonresident alien individual means...

  8. 26 CFR 1.871-2 - Determining residence of alien individuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Determining residence of alien individuals. 1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Nonresident Aliens and Foreign Corporations § 1.871-2 Determining residence of alien individuals. (a) General. The term nonresident alien individual means...

  9. Improving Psychiatry Residents' Attitudes Toward Individuals Diagnosed with Substance Use Disorders.

    PubMed

    Avery, Jonathan; Zerbo, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Special attention needs to be paid to the attitudes of psychiatry residents toward individuals diagnosed with substance use disorders. The attitudes of trainees may be worse toward these individuals than toward individuals with other diagnoses, and these attitudes may worsen over time. While psychiatry residencies are increasingly teaching residents about how to diagnosis and treat individuals diagnosed with substance use disorders, more attention needs to be paid to educating residents about common attitudes toward these individuals. We recommend that psychiatry residency programs start with basic educational didactics and reflection exercises on attitudes toward individuals diagnosed with substance use disorders and that programs try to form a positive "hidden curriculum" in their institutions. PMID:26146757

  10. Does social status within a dominance hierarchy mediate individual growth, residency and relocation?

    PubMed

    Akbaripasand, Abbas; Ramezani, J; Krkosek, Martin; Lokman, P Mark; Closs, Gerard P

    2014-11-01

    The availability of food, and hence energy, is known to influence the abundance, habitat choice and growth of individuals. In contrast, there is a paucity of knowledge on how the interaction of energy supply and social status determines patterns of residency and movement. This study tests whether the presence of conspecifics and an individual's social status in relation to food supply influence the fitness and movement of a drift-feeding fish (Galaxias fasciatus). Using an information-theoretic approach (AIC), our analysis indicated that the most parsimonious model of fish movement among pools was one that included food supply, social rank and fish relative growth rate. Our results indicated that subordinate fish relocated more frequently compared to dominant fish, most likely as a consequence of intra-specific competition that limited the access of these smaller fish to resources and constrained their growth. Our results suggest that energy constraints may force individuals to explore new habitats in an effort to find more energetically profitable patches. We conclude that intra-specific competition mediated through the social hierarchy amongst closely interacting individuals plays a key role in determining individual growth, residency and relocation. PMID:25159213

  11. The Quantitative Analysis on the Individual Characteristics of Urban Residents and Their Sport Consumption Motivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xianliang, Lei; Hongying, Yu

    Using the questionnaire, mathematical statistics and entropy measurement methods, the quantitative relationship between the individual characteristics urban residents and their sports consumption motivation are studied. The results show that the most main sports consumption motivation of urban residents is fitness motivation and social motivation. Urban residents of different gender, age, education and income levels are different in regulating psychological motivation, rational consumption motivation and seeking common motivation.

  12. Can an individualized and comprehensive care strategy improve urinary incontinence (UI) among nursing home residents?

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yukiko; Nagata, Kumiko; Tanaka, Tomoe; Kuwano, Koichi; Endo, Hidetoshi; Otani, Tetsuya; Nakazawa, Minato; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is one of the most common and distressing conditions among nursing home residents. Although scheduled care is usually provided for them, incontinence care should be individualized regarding going to the toilet, changing diapers, and taking food and water. We have developed an individualized and comprehensive care strategy to address the problem. We conducted an intervention study that involved training chiefs of staffs, who in turn trained other staffs, and encouraging residents. A total of 153 elderly subjects selected from 1290 residents in 17 nursing homes were eligible to receive our individualized and comprehensive care. The goals of the care strategy were (i) to complete meal intake; (ii) to take fluids up to 1500 ml/day; (iii) to urinate in a toilet; (iv) to spend over 6h out of bed; and (v) to reduce time spent in wet diapers. We explained the aims of our strategy to the chiefs of staff of each nursing home and instructed them to encourage residents to take an active part in our individualized and comprehensive care strategy for 12 weeks. For 3 days before and after that period, we assessed the changes in fluid volume intake, time spent in wet diapers, size of diaper pads, and urination habits. The result was that fluid volume intake significantly increased (p<0.001) while time spent in wet diapers decreased (p<0.001). The number of residents wearing diapers decreased as did the size of pads during the day (p=0.0017). The proportion of residents using diapers at night was reduced and those using toilets at night increased (p=0.007). This study suggests that such an individualized and comprehensive care strategy can offer a measurable improvement in UI care. PMID:19095315

  13. Individualized behavior management program for Alzheimer's/dementia residents using behavior-based ergonomic therapies.

    PubMed

    Bharwani, Govind; Parikh, Pratik J; Lawhorne, Larry W; VanVlymen, Eric; Bharwani, Meena

    2012-05-01

    Person-centered, nonpharmacological interventions for managing Alzheimer's/dementia-related behavioral disturbances have received significant attention. However, such interventions are quite often of a single type limiting their benefits. We develop a comprehensive nonpharmacological intervention, the Behavior-Based Ergonomic Therapy (BBET), which consists of multiple therapies. This low-cost, 24/7 program uses learning, personality, and behavioral profiles and cognitive function of each resident to develop a set of individualized therapies. These therapies are made available through an accessible resource library of music and video items, games and puzzles, and memory props to provide comfort or stimulation depending on an individual resident's assessment. The quantitative and qualitative benefits of the BBET were evaluated at the dementia care unit in a not-for-profit continuing care retirement community in west central Ohio. The 6-month pilot study reduced falls by 32.5% and markedly reduced agitation through increased resident engagement. PMID:22517891

  14. 15 CFR 806.10 - Determining place of residence and country of jurisdiction of individuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determining place of residence and country of jurisdiction of individuals. 806.10 Section 806.10 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF ECONOMIC ANALYSIS, DEPARTMENT OF...

  15. 26 CFR 1.6013-6 - Election to treat nonresident alien individual as resident of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Election to treat nonresident alien individual...-6 Election to treat nonresident alien individual as resident of the United States. (a) Election for... spouse is a nonresident alien. The effect of the election is that each spouse is treated as a resident...

  16. Measurements of individual radiation doses in residents living around the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Nagataki, Shigenobu; Takamura, Noboru; Kamiya, Kenji; Akashi, Makoto

    2013-11-01

    At the outset of the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in March 2011, the radiation doses experienced by residents were calculated from the readings at monitoring posts, with several assumptions being made from the point of view of protection and safety. However, health effects should also be estimated by obtaining measurements of the individual radiation doses. The individual external radiation doses, determined by a behavior survey in the "evacuation and deliberate evacuation area" in the first 4 months, were <5 mSv in 97.4% of residents (maximum: 15 mSv). Doses in Fukushima Prefecture were <3 mSv in 99.3% of 386,572 residents analyzed. External doses in Fukushima City determined by personal dosimeters were <1 mSv/3 months (September-November, 2011) in 99.7% of residents (maximum: 2.7 mSv). Thyroid radiation doses, determined in March using a NaI (TI) scintillation survey meter in children in the evacuation and deliberate evacuation area, were <10 mSv in 95.7% of children (maximum: 35 mSv). Therefore, all doses were less than the intervention level of 50 mSv proposed by international organizations. Internal radiation doses determined by cesium-134 ((134)C) and cesium-137 ((137)C) whole-body counters (WBCs) were <1 mSv in 99% of the residents, and the maximum thyroid equivalent dose by iodine-131 WBCs was 20 mSv. The exploratory committee of the Fukushima Health Management Survey mentions on its website that radiation from the accident is unlikely to be a cause of adverse health effects in the future. In any event, sincere scientific efforts must continue to obtain individual radiation doses that are as accurate as possible. However, observation of the health effects of the radiation doses described above will require reevaluation of the protocol used for determining adverse health effects. The dose-response relationship is crucial, and the aim of the survey should be to collect sufficient data to confirm the presence or absence of radiation health

  17. Age and individual sleep characteristics affect cognitive performance in anesthesiology residents after a 24-hour shift.

    PubMed

    Tadinac, Meri; Sekulić, Ante; Hromatko, Ivana; Mazul-Sunko, Branka; Ivancić, Romina

    2014-03-01

    Previous research has shown that both shift work and sleep deprivation have an adverse influence on various aspects of human cognitive performance. The aim of this study was to explore changes in cognitive functioning and subjective sleepiness of anesthesiology residents after a 24-hour shift. Twenty-six anesthesiology residents completed a set of psychological instruments at the beginning and at the end of the shift, as well as a questionnaire regarding information about the shift, Stanford Sleepiness Scale, and Circadian Type Questionnaire. There was a significant decline in cognitive performance measured by the Auditory Verbal Learning Test after the shift. The effect was stronger in older participants and in those with high scores on rigidity of sleep scale and low scores on the ability to overcome sleepiness scale. There were no differences in the digits forward test (a measure of concentration), while digits backward test (a measure of working memory) even showed an improved performance after the shift. Although participants reported being significantly sleepier after the shift, the subjective sleepiness did not correlate with any of the objective measures of cognitive performance. In conclusion, the performance in short tasks involving concentration and working memory was not impaired, while performance in long-term and monotone tasks declined after sleep deprivation, and the magnitude of this decline depended on the specific individual characteristics of sleep and on age Surprisingly, age seemed to have an important impact on cognitive functions after shift work even in the relatively age-homogeneous population of young anesthesiology residents. PMID:24974663

  18. Homing behaviour and individual identification of the pipefish Nerophis lumbriciformis (Pisces; Syngnathidae): a true intertidal resident?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Nuno Miguel; Vieira, Maria da Natividade; Almada, Vitor

    2005-04-01

    Syngnathids have been the focus of growing interest due to their peculiar reproductive biology and vulnerability to environmental degradation and overcollecting. In this study, near the south limit of the species' geographic distribution, a description of the homing behaviour of the worm pipefish, Nerophis lumbriciformis, based on the unique facial pigmentation patterns, is presented. Even though the amount of facial pigmentation was substantially higher in larger adult females, suggesting that it can be part of the secondary sexual repertoire of this sex role reversed species, this technique allowed for the positive identification of adult individuals (males and females) during at least 19 months. Recaptures showed that this pipefish shows a strong homing behaviour, with individuals being regularly captured within less than 2 m of the original identification event. The absence of horizontal migrations to adjacent areas and the observation of adults in the subtidal, together with the overall low number of recaptures (even though some individuals were cyclically resighted) highlighted the fact that the intertidal is not N. lumbriciformis' permanent residence. This observation also demonstrates that the estimation of the population size, important for conservation purposes, based solely on intertidal data can be misleading because captured individuals are only a fraction of a larger, mainly subtidal, population.

  19. 26 CFR 1.6013-6 - Election to treat nonresident alien individual as resident of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Election to treat nonresident alien individual... Statements § 1.6013-6 Election to treat nonresident alien individual as resident of the United States. (a... the other spouse is a nonresident alien. The effect of the election is that each spouse is treated...

  20. Interannual variation and long-term trends in proportions of resident individuals in partially migratory birds.

    PubMed

    Meller, Kalle; Vähätalo, Anssi V; Hokkanen, Tatu; Rintala, Jukka; Piha, Markus; Lehikoinen, Aleksi

    2016-03-01

    Partial migration - a part of a population migrates and another part stays resident year-round on the breeding site - is probably the most common type of migration in the animal kingdom, yet it has only lately garnered more attention. Theoretical studies indicate that in partially migratory populations, the proportion of resident individuals (PoR) should increase in high latitudes in response to the warming climate, but empirical evidence exists for few species. We provide the first comprehensive overview of the environmental factors affecting PoR and the long-term trends in PoR by studying 27 common partially migratory bird species in Finland. The annual PoR values were calculated by dividing the winter bird abundance by the preceding breeding abundance. First, we analysed whether early-winter temperature, winter temperature year before or the abundance of tree seeds just before overwintering explains the interannual variation in PoR. Secondly, we analysed the trends in PoR between 1987 and 2011. Early-winter temperature explained the interannual variation in PoR in the waterbirds (waterfowl and gulls), most likely because the temperature affects the ice conditions and thereby the feeding opportunities for the waterbirds. In terrestrial species, the abundance of seeds was the best explanatory variable. Previous winter's temperature did not explain PoR in any species, and thus, we conclude that the variation in food availability caused the interannual variation in PoR. During the study period, PoR increased in waterbirds, but did not change in terrestrial birds. Partially migratory species living in physically contrasting habitats can differ in their annual and long-term population-level behavioural responses to warming climate, possibly because warm winter temperatures reduce ice cover and improve the feeding possibilities of waterbirds but do not directly regulate the food availability for terrestrial birds. PMID:26718017

  1. 34 CFR 607.11 - What must be included in individual development grant applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What must be included in individual development grant applications? 607.11 Section 607.11 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education... Does an Institution Apply for a Grant? § 607.11 What must be included in individual development...

  2. 34 CFR 607.11 - What must be included in individual development grant applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What must be included in individual development grant applications? 607.11 Section 607.11 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education... Does an Institution Apply for a Grant? § 607.11 What must be included in individual development...

  3. 34 CFR 607.11 - What must be included in individual development grant applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What must be included in individual development grant applications? 607.11 Section 607.11 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education... Does an Institution Apply for a Grant? § 607.11 What must be included in individual development...

  4. 34 CFR 607.11 - What must be included in individual development grant applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What must be included in individual development grant applications? 607.11 Section 607.11 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education... Does an Institution Apply for a Grant? § 607.11 What must be included in individual development...

  5. Organizational and Individual Conditions Associated with Depressive Symptoms among Nursing Home Residents over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassie, Kimberly M.; Cassie, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of organizational culture and climate on depressive symptoms among nursing home residents. Design and Methods: Using a pooled cross-sectional design, this study examines a sample of 23 nursing homes, 1,114 employees, and 5,497 residents. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Minimum Data Set, Depression Rating…

  6. 26 CFR 1.6013-6 - Election to treat nonresident alien individual as resident of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Election to treat nonresident alien individual as resident of the United States. 1.6013-6 Section 1.6013-6 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Tax Returns Or Statements § 1.6013-6 Election to...

  7. 20 CFR 408.212 - What happens if you are a qualified individual already residing outside the United States?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What happens if you are a qualified individual already residing outside the United States? 408.212 Section 408.212 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS SVB Qualification...

  8. 20 CFR 408.212 - What happens if you are a qualified individual already residing outside the United States?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What happens if you are a qualified individual already residing outside the United States? 408.212 Section 408.212 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS SVB Qualification...

  9. 20 CFR 408.212 - What happens if you are a qualified individual already residing outside the United States?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What happens if you are a qualified individual already residing outside the United States? 408.212 Section 408.212 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS SVB Qualification...

  10. 20 CFR 408.212 - What happens if you are a qualified individual already residing outside the United States?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What happens if you are a qualified individual already residing outside the United States? 408.212 Section 408.212 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS SVB Qualification...

  11. 20 CFR 408.212 - What happens if you are a qualified individual already residing outside the United States?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What happens if you are a qualified individual already residing outside the United States? 408.212 Section 408.212 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS SVB Qualification...

  12. 15 CFR 806.10 - Determining place of residence and country of jurisdiction of individuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF ECONOMIC ANALYSIS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... immediate families who are residing outside their country of citizenship as a result of employment by...

  13. 34 CFR 606.11 - What must be included in individual development grant applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must be included in individual development grant applications? 606.11 Section 606.11 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DEVELOPING...

  14. 34 CFR 607.11 - What must be included in individual development grant applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must be included in individual development grant applications? 607.11 Section 607.11 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STRENGTHENING INSTITUTIONS PROGRAM...

  15. 34 CFR 606.11 - What must be included in individual development grant applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... development grant applications? In addition to the information needed by the Secretary to determine whether... application for a development grant must include— (a) The institution's comprehensive development plan; (b) A... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What must be included in individual development...

  16. 34 CFR 606.11 - What must be included in individual development grant applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... development grant applications? In addition to the information needed by the Secretary to determine whether... application for a development grant must include— (a) The institution's comprehensive development plan; (b) A... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What must be included in individual development...

  17. 34 CFR 606.11 - What must be included in individual development grant applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... development grant applications? In addition to the information needed by the Secretary to determine whether... application for a development grant must include— (a) The institution's comprehensive development plan; (b) A... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What must be included in individual development...

  18. 34 CFR 606.11 - What must be included in individual development grant applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... development grant applications? In addition to the information needed by the Secretary to determine whether... application for a development grant must include— (a) The institution's comprehensive development plan; (b) A... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What must be included in individual development...

  19. 29 CFR 2570.35 - Information to be included in applications for individual exemptions only.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... exemptions only. 2570.35 Section 2570.35 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE BENEFITS... be included in applications for individual exemptions only. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c... consummated or will be consummated only if the exemption is granted; (14) If the exemption transaction...

  20. Size of spawning population, residence time, and territory shifts of individuals in the spawning aggregation of a riverine catostomid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grabowski, T.B.; Isely, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the behavior of individual fish in a spawning aggregation, specifically how long an individual remains in an aggregation. We monitored Moxostoma robustum (Cope) (Robust Redhorse) in a Savannah River spawning aggregation during spring 2004 and 2005 to provide an estimate of the total number of adults and the number of males comprising the aggregation and to determine male residence time and movements within a spawning aggregation. Robust Redhorse were captured using prepostioned grid electrofishers, identified to sex, weighed, measured, and implanted with a passive integrated transponder. Spawning aggregation size was estimated using a multiple census mark-and-recapture procedure. The spawning aggregation seemed to consist of approximately the same number of individuals (82-85) and males (50-56) during both years of this study. Individual males were present for a mean of 3.6 ?? 0.24 days (?? SE) during the 12-day spawning period. The mean distance between successive recaptures of individual males was 15.9 ?? 1.29 m (?? SE). We conclude that males establish spawning territories on a daily basis and are present within the spawning aggregation for at least 3-4 days. The relatively short duration of the aggregation may be the result of an extremely small population of adults. However, the behavior of individuals has the potential to influence population estimates made while fish are aggregated for spawning.

  1. Effects of Fenfluramine on Autistic Individuals Residing in a State Developmental Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarbrough, Elsie; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Results of evaluating effects of fenfluramine on 21 maladaptive behaviors in 20 autistic individuals (from 9 to 30 years old) over a 9-month period using a double-blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled design indicated no significant reductions in maladaptive behaviors and the presence of negative side effects. (Author/DB)

  2. A Factual Look at Higher Education in Nebraska, Including Fall Headcount Enrollment, Freshman Residence, Degrees Awarded, Institutional Finance, Faculty Salaries. Fall 1996 IPEDS Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education, Lincoln.

    This report presents comparative data on postsecondary education in Nebraska in 1996. Data tables, analyses, and charts are grouped as follows: fall headcount enrollment, including freshmen residence; degrees awarded; institutional finance; faculty salaries; and private career schools. Headcount data cover full- and part-time students, race and…

  3. SEVESO WOMEN'S HEALTH STUDY: DOES ZONE OF RESIDENCE PREDICT INDIVIDUAL TCDD EXPOSURE? (R824761)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The compound, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), is produced as an unwanted by-product of various chemical reactions and combustion processes, including the manufacture of chlorinated phenols and derivatives. In animals, TCDD exposure is associated with toxic, car...

  4. Individual welfare maximization in electricity markets including consumer and full transmission system modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, James Daniel

    1999-11-01

    This dissertation presents a new algorithm that allows a market participant to maximize its individual welfare in the electricity spot market. The use of such an algorithm in determining market equilibrium points, called Nash equilibria, is also demonstrated. The start of the algorithm is a spot market model that uses the optimal power flow (OPF), with a full representation of the transmission system. The OPF is also extended to model consumer behavior, and a thorough mathematical justification for the inclusion of the consumer model in the OPF is presented. The algorithm utilizes price and dispatch sensitivities, available from the Hessian matrix of the OPF, to help determine an optimal change in an individual's bid. The algorithm is shown to be successful in determining local welfare maxima, and the prospects for scaling the algorithm up to realistically sized systems are very good. Assuming a market in which all participants maximize their individual welfare, economic equilibrium points, called Nash equilibria, are investigated. This is done by iteratively solving the individual welfare maximization algorithm for each participant until a point is reached where all individuals stop modifying their bids. It is shown that these Nash equilibria can be located in this manner. However, it is also demonstrated that equilibria do not always exist, and are not always unique when they do exist. It is also shown that individual welfare is a highly nonconcave function resulting in many local maxima. As a result, a more global optimization technique, using a genetic algorithm (GA), is investigated. The genetic algorithm is successfully demonstrated on several systems. It is also shown that a GA can be developed using special niche methods, which allow a GA to converge to several local optima at once. Finally, the last chapter of this dissertation covers the development of a new computer visualization routine for power system analysis: contouring. The contouring algorithm is

  5. Genotypic Characterization of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Derived from Antiretroviral Therapy-Naive Individuals Residing in Sorong, West Papua.

    PubMed

    Witaningrum, Adiana Mutamsari; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Khairunisa, Siti Qamariyah; Yunifiar M, Muhammad Qushai; Indriati, Dwi Wahyu; Bramanthi, Rendra; Nasronudin; Kameoka, Masanori

    2016-08-01

    Papua and West Papua provinces have the highest prevalence rate of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in Indonesia; however, data on the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 are limited. We conducted a genotypic study on HIV-1 genes derived from antiretroviral therapy-naive individuals residing in Sorong, West Papua. HIV-1 genomic fragments were amplified from 43 peripheral blood samples, and sequencing analysis of the genes was carried out. Of the 43 samples, 41 protease (PR), 31 reverse transcriptase (RT), 26 gag, and 25 env genes were sequenced. HIV-1 subtyping revealed that CRF01_AE (48.8%, 21/43) and subtype B (41.9%, 18/43) were the major subtypes prevalent in the region, whereas other recombinant forms were also detected. Major drug resistance-associated mutations for PR inhibitors were not detected; however, mutations for the RT inhibitors, A62V and E138A, appeared in a few samples, indicating the possible emergence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance in Sorong, West Papua. PMID:27009513

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid markers including trefoil factor 3 are associated with neurodegeneration in amyloid-positive individuals.

    PubMed

    Paterson, R W; Bartlett, J W; Blennow, K; Fox, N C; Shaw, L M; Trojanowski, J Q; Zetterberg, H; Schott, J M

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to identify cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers associated with neurodegeneration in individuals with and without CSF evidence of Alzheimer pathology. We investigated 287 Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) subjects (age=74.9±6.9; 22/48/30% with Alzheimer's disease/mild cognitive impairment/controls) with CSF multiplex analyte data and serial volumetric MRI. We calculated brain and hippocampal atrophy rates, ventricular expansion and Mini Mental State Examination decline. We used false discovery rate corrected regression analyses to assess associations between CSF variables and atrophy rates in individuals with and without amyloid pathology, adjusting in stages for tau, baseline volume, p-tau, age, sex, ApoE4 status and diagnosis. Analytes showing statistically significant independent relationships were entered into reverse stepwise analyses. Adjusting for tau, baseline volume, p-tau, age, sex and ApoE4, 4/83 analytes were significantly independently associated with brain atrophy rate, 1/83 with ventricular expansion and 2/83 with hippocampal atrophy. The strongest CSF predictor for the three atrophy measures was low trefoil factor 3 (TFF3). High cystatin C (CysC) was associated with higher whole brain atrophy and hippocampal atrophy rates. Lower levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and chromogranin A (CrA) were associated with higher whole brain atrophy. In exploratory reverse stepwise analyses, lower TFF3 was associated with higher rates of whole brain, hippocampal atrophy and ventricular expansion. Lower levels of CrA were associated with higher whole brain atrophy rate. The relationship between low TFF3 and increased hippocampal atrophy rate remained after adjustment for diagnosis. We identified a series of CSF markers that are independently associated with rate of neurodegeneration in amyloid-positive individuals. TFF3, a substrate for NOTCH processing may be an important biomarker of neurodegeneration across the Alzheimer

  7. 20 CFR 666.140 - Which individuals receiving services are included in the core indicators of performance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... individuals who are registered under 20 CFR 663.105 and 664.215 for the adult, dislocated worker and youth... included in the core indicators of performance? 666.140 Section 666.140 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND... WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT State Measures of Performance § 666.140 Which individuals receiving services...

  8. 20 CFR 666.140 - Which individuals receiving services are included in the core indicators of performance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... individuals who are registered under 20 CFR 663.105 and 664.215 for the adult, dislocated worker and youth... included in the core indicators of performance? 666.140 Section 666.140 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND... WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT State Measures of Performance § 666.140 Which individuals receiving services...

  9. Including Social Factors in the Analysis of Reminiscence in Elderly Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamme, Simone; Baars, Jan

    1993-01-01

    Contends that developmental, determinist, and contextualist psychologists, although all studying reminiscence in older adults, have not fully acknowledged the role the environment plays in establishing reminiscent behavior in elderly people. Suggests including sociological life course theory in the analyses and interpretation of this behavior.…

  10. An In Situ, Individual-Based Approach to Quantify Connectivity of Marine Fish: Ontogenetic Movements and Residency of Lingcod

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Mary Anne; Reynolds, Brad F.; Powers, Sean P.

    2010-01-01

    As modern fishery assessments change in an effort to be more accurate and encompass the range of potential ecosystem interactions, critical information on the ecology of species including life history, intra and inter-specific competitive interactions and habitat requirements must be added to the standard fishery-dependent and independent data sets. One species whose movements and habitat associations greatly affects exploitation patterns is lingcod, Ophiodon elongatus, which support an economically important fishery along the coastal waters of the Pacific Coast of North America. High site fidelity and limited movements within nearshore areas are hypothesized to have resulted in high catchability, a major factor that has contributed to overfished stocks. Thus, assessing the level of movement and connectivity among lingcod subpopulations inhabiting nearshore habitats is a prerequisite to determining the condition of lingcod stocks. We used the Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking (POST) Project acoustic receiver array in Alaska's Prince William Sound to monitor movements and residency of 21 acoustic-tagged lingcod for up to 16 months. Eight of sixteen lingcod (50%) initially aged at 2.5- to 3.5- years-old dispersed from their tag site. Dispersal was highly seasonal, occurring in two, five-week periods from mid-December through January and from mid-April through May. Dispersal in winter may be related to sexually immature lingcod or newly-mature male lingcod being displaced by territorial males. Spring dispersal may be indicative of the onset of migratory behavior where lingcod move out into Prince William Sound and possibly the offshore waters of the Gulf of Alaska. Our results reveal a pattern of ontogenetic dispersal as lingcod approach 4-years-old and exceed 50 cm total length. The large proportion of tagged fish migrating out of Port Gravina, their tagging site, reflects a high level of connectivity among Prince William Sound subpopulations. Our results also support the

  11. An in situ, individual-based approach to quantify connectivity of marine fish: ontogenetic movements and residency of lingcod.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Mary Anne; Reynolds, Brad F; Powers, Sean P

    2010-01-01

    As modern fishery assessments change in an effort to be more accurate and encompass the range of potential ecosystem interactions, critical information on the ecology of species including life history, intra and inter-specific competitive interactions and habitat requirements must be added to the standard fishery-dependent and independent data sets. One species whose movements and habitat associations greatly affects exploitation patterns is lingcod, Ophiodon elongatus, which support an economically important fishery along the coastal waters of the Pacific Coast of North America. High site fidelity and limited movements within nearshore areas are hypothesized to have resulted in high catchability, a major factor that has contributed to overfished stocks. Thus, assessing the level of movement and connectivity among lingcod subpopulations inhabiting nearshore habitats is a prerequisite to determining the condition of lingcod stocks. We used the Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking (POST) Project acoustic receiver array in Alaska's Prince William Sound to monitor movements and residency of 21 acoustic-tagged lingcod for up to 16 months. Eight of sixteen lingcod (50%) initially aged at 2.5- to 3.5- years-old dispersed from their tag site. Dispersal was highly seasonal, occurring in two, five-week periods from mid-December through January and from mid-April through May. Dispersal in winter may be related to sexually immature lingcod or newly-mature male lingcod being displaced by territorial males. Spring dispersal may be indicative of the onset of migratory behavior where lingcod move out into Prince William Sound and possibly the offshore waters of the Gulf of Alaska. Our results reveal a pattern of ontogenetic dispersal as lingcod approach 4-years-old and exceed 50 cm total length. The large proportion of tagged fish migrating out of Port Gravina, their tagging site, reflects a high level of connectivity among Prince William Sound subpopulations. Our results also support the

  12. 20 CFR 666.140 - Which individuals receiving services are included in the core indicators of performance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... who are registered under 20 CFR 663.105 and 664.215 for the adult, dislocated worker and youth... included in the core indicators of performance? 666.140 Section 666.140 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND... INVESTMENT ACT State Measures of Performance § 666.140 Which individuals receiving services are included...

  13. Educational Rights of Parents under Provisions of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Including the Amendments of 1997 (Special Education).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC. Office of Indian Education Programs.

    This pamphlet describes the educational rights of parents provided under provisions of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, including the amendments of 1997. It discusses rights in the following areas: (1) free appropriate public education; (2) prior notice to parents, including a list of the information required to be in a notice that…

  14. Text messaging interventions for individuals with mental health disorders including substance use: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Watson, Tyler; Simpson, Scot; Hughes, Christine

    2016-09-30

    We completed a systematic review of the literature to characterize the impact of text messaging interventions on medication adherence or mental health related outcomes in people with mental health disorders including substance use. Four electronic databases were searched from January 1999 to October 2015. Seven studies met our inclusion criteria: three studies evaluated text messaging in patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder diagnosis, two studies evaluated text messaging in patients with chronic alcohol dependence, and two studies reviewed text messaging in patients with mood disorders. Six studies were randomized controlled trials and one was a prospective pilot study with pre-post intervention design. Text messaging frequency ranged from once weekly to twelve per day. The effect of text messaging on medication adherence was measured in five studies; one study reporting significant improvements in the text messaging intervention group. The effect of text messaging on mental health related outcomes was measured in all seven studies, with five studies showing significant improvements in a variety of psychiatric and social functioning assessments. Collectively, these studies suggest text messaging is a promising tool to support management of patients with mental illness. Further research examining theory-based text messaging interventions in larger samples of patients is required. PMID:27423123

  15. A cross-sectional case control study on genetic damage in individuals residing in the vicinity of a mobile phone base station.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Gursatej; Kaur, Gurpreet; Nisar, Uzma

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phone base stations facilitate good communication, but the continuously emitting radiations from these stations have raised health concerns. Hence in this study, genetic damage using the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay was assessed in peripheral blood leukocytes of individuals residing in the vicinity of a mobile phone base station and comparing it to that in healthy controls. The power density in the area within 300 m from the base station exceeded the permissive limits and was significantly (p = 0.000) higher compared to the area from where control samples were collected. The study participants comprised 63 persons with residences near a mobile phone tower, and 28 healthy controls matched for gender, age, alcohol drinking and occupational sub-groups. Genetic damage parameters of DNA migration length, damage frequency (DF) and damage index were significantly (p = 0.000) elevated in the sample group compared to respective values in healthy controls. The female residents (n = 25) of the sample group had significantly (p = 0.004) elevated DF than the male residents (n = 38). The linear regression analysis further revealed daily mobile phone usage, location of residence and power density as significant predictors of genetic damage. The genetic damage evident in the participants of this study needs to be addressed against future disease-risk, which in addition to neurodegenerative disorders, may lead to cancer. PMID:25006864

  16. 26 CFR 1.6013-6 - Election to treat nonresident alien individual as resident of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... citizen, is married to W, a nonresident alien of the United States and a domiciliary of country X. H and W maintain their only permanent home in country X. W receives both U.S. source and country X source interest... United States—country X Income Tax Convention interest derived and beneficially owned by a resident...

  17. 45 CFR 286.135 - What information on penalties against individuals must be included in a Tribal Family Assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What information on penalties against individuals must be included in a Tribal Family Assistance Plan? 286.135 Section 286.135 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  18. Education: Guide to European Organizations and Programmes. A Guide to European Organizations Involved in Education, including Individual Programmes and Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Heledd

    This report presents a guide to European organizations involved in education, including individual programs and projects. Entries are brief as they are intended as simple outlines of the organizations or programs, but full addresses and telephone numbers are provided. Divided into four categories, the organizations listed are as follows: (1)…

  19. 20 CFR 666.140 - Which individuals receiving services are included in the core indicators of performance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Which individuals receiving services are included in the core indicators of performance? 666.140 Section 666.140 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) PERFORMANCE ACCOUNTABILITY UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT State Measures...

  20. 20 CFR 666.140 - Which individuals receiving services are included in the core indicators of performance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Which individuals receiving services are included in the core indicators of performance? 666.140 Section 666.140 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PERFORMANCE ACCOUNTABILITY UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT State Measures of...

  1. Insomnia and urban neighbourhood contexts – are associations modified by individual social characteristics and change of residence? Results from a population-based study using residential histories

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Until now, insomnia has not been much of interest in epidemiological neighbourhood studies, although literature provides evidence enough for insomnia-related mechanisms being potentially dependent on neighbourhood contexts. Besides, studies have shown differences in sleep along individual social characteristics that might render residents more vulnerable to neighbourhood contextual exposures. Given the role of exposure duration and changes in the relationship between neighbourhoods and health, we studied associations of neighbourhood unemployment and months under residential turnover with insomnia by covering ten years of residential history of nearly 3,000 urban residents in the Ruhr Area, Germany. Methods Individual data were retrieved from the Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study, a population-based study of randomly chosen participants from adjacent cities, which contains self-rated insomnia symptoms and individual social characteristics. Participants’ residential addresses were retrospectively assessed using public registries. We built individually derived exposure measures informing about mean neighbourhood unemployment rates and months under high residential turnover. These measures were major predictors in multivariate logistic regressions modelling the association between social neighbourhood characteristics and insomnia in the whole sample and subgroups defined by low income, low education, social isolation, and change of residence. Traffic-related noise, age, gender, economic activity, and education were considered as covariates. Results Nearly 12 per cent of the participants complained about insomnia. Associations of neighbourhood unemployment with insomnia were more consistent than those of residential turnover in the whole sample (adjusted OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.00-2.03 for neighbourhood unemployment and OR 1.33, 95% CI 0.78-2.25 for residential turnover in the highest exposure categories). In low-income and socially isolated participants, neighbourhood

  2. Measurement of individual doses of radiation by personal dosimeter is important for the return of residents from evacuation order areas after nuclear disaster.

    PubMed

    Orita, Makiko; Hayashida, Naomi; Taira, Yasuyuki; Fukushima, Yoshiko; Ide, Juichi; Endo, Yuuko; Kudo, Takashi; Yamashita, Shunichi; Takamura, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    To confirm the availability of individual dose evaluation for the return of residents after the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP), we evaluated individual doses of radiation as measured by personal dosimeters in residents who temporarily stayed in Evacuation Order Areas in Kawauchi village, which is partially located within a 20 km radius of the FNPP. We also compared individual doses with the external radiation doses estimated from the ambient dose rates and with doses estimated from the concentrations of radionuclides in the soil around each individual's house. Individual doses were significantly correlated with the ambient doses in front of the entrances to the houses (r = 0.90, p<0.01), in the backyards (r = 0.41, p<0.01) and in the nearby fields (r = 0.80, p<0.01). The maximum cumulative ambient doses in the backyards and fields around the houses were 6.38 and 9.27 mSv/y, respectively. The maximum cumulative individual dose was 3.28 mSv/y, and the median and minimum doses were 1.35 and 0.71 mSv/y. The estimated external effective doses from concentrations of artificial radionuclides in soil samples ranged from 0.03 to 23.42 mSv/y. The individual doses were moderately correlated with external effective doses in the backyards (r = 0.38, p<0.01) and in the fields (r = 0.36, p<0.01); however, the individual doses were not significantly correlated with the external effective doses in front of the entrances (r = 0.01, p = 0.92). Our study confirmed that individual doses are low levels even in the evacuation order area in Kawauchi village, and external effective dose levels are certainly decreasing due to the decay of artificial radionuclides and the decontamination of contaminated soil. Long-term follow-up of individual doses as well as internal-exposure doses, environmental monitoring and reconstruction of infrastructure are needed so that residents may return to their hometowns after a nuclear disaster. PMID:25806523

  3. Measurement of Individual Doses of Radiation by Personal Dosimeter Is Important for the Return of Residents from Evacuation Order Areas after Nuclear Disaster

    PubMed Central

    Orita, Makiko; Hayashida, Naomi; Taira, Yasuyuki; Fukushima, Yoshiko; Ide, Juichi; Endo, Yuuko; Kudo, Takashi; Yamashita, Shunichi; Takamura, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    To confirm the availability of individual dose evaluation for the return of residents after the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP), we evaluated individual doses of radiation as measured by personal dosimeters in residents who temporarily stayed in Evacuation Order Areas in Kawauchi village, which is partially located within a 20 km radius of the FNPP. We also compared individual doses with the external radiation doses estimated from the ambient dose rates and with doses estimated from the concentrations of radionuclides in the soil around each individual’s house. Individual doses were significantly correlated with the ambient doses in front of the entrances to the houses (r = 0.90, p<0.01), in the backyards (r = 0.41, p<0.01) and in the nearby fields (r = 0.80, p<0.01). The maximum cumulative ambient doses in the backyards and fields around the houses were 6.38 and 9.27 mSv/y, respectively. The maximum cumulative individual dose was 3.28 mSv/y, and the median and minimum doses were 1.35 and 0.71 mSv/y. The estimated external effective doses from concentrations of artificial radionuclides in soil samples ranged from 0.03 to 23.42 mSv/y. The individual doses were moderately correlated with external effective doses in the backyards (r = 0.38, p<0.01) and in the fields (r = 0.36, p<0.01); however, the individual doses were not significantly correlated with the external effective doses in front of the entrances (r = 0.01, p = 0.92). Our study confirmed that individual doses are low levels even in the evacuation order area in Kawauchi village, and external effective dose levels are certainly decreasing due to the decay of artificial radionuclides and the decontamination of contaminated soil. Long-term follow-up of individual doses as well as internal-exposure doses, environmental monitoring and reconstruction of infrastructure are needed so that residents may return to their hometowns after a nuclear disaster. PMID:25806523

  4. Risk Factors for Low Bone Mineral Density in Individuals Residing in a Facility for the People with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, J. S.; Timell, A. M.; Elolia, R.; Thatcher, S. S.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) are known to have a high prevalence of both low bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures with significant attendant morbidity. Effective strategies aimed at reducing fractures will be facilitated by the identification of predisposing risk factors. Methods: Bone mineral density was measured…

  5. Federal Government Health, Education, and Welfare Programs of Assistance to American Indians Residing on Federal Reservations (Including Table of Contents and Index).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langone, Stephen A.

    Federal health, education, and welfare programs for 1970 benefiting American Indians residing on Federal reservations are listed. The report is divided into 3 sections: (1) Federal Indian programs aimed at improving or providing Indian health services, tribal management services, housing, higher education, and conservation; (2) Federal programs…

  6. Individual and contextual determinants of resident-on-resident abuse in nursing homes: a random sample telephone survey of adults with an older family member in a nursing home.

    PubMed

    Schiamberg, Lawrence B; von Heydrich, Levente; Chee, Grace; Post, Lori A

    2015-01-01

    Few empirical investigations of elder abuse in nursing homes address the frequency and determinants of resident-on-resident abuse (RRA). A random sample of 452 adults with an older adult relative, ≥65 years of age, in a nursing home completed a telephone survey regarding elder abuse experienced by that elder family member. Using a Linear Structural Relations (LISREL) modeling design, the study examined the association of nursing home resident demographic characteristics (e.g., age, gender), health and behavioral characteristics (e.g., diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease, Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs), types of staff abuse (e.g., physical, emotional), and factors beyond the immediate nursing home setting (e.g., emotional closeness of resident with family members) with RRA. Mplus statistical software was used for structural equation modeling. Main findings indicated that resident-on-resident mistreatment of elderly nursing home residents is associated with the age of the nursing home resident, all forms of staff abuse, all ADLs and IADLs, and emotional closeness of the older adult to the family. PMID:26026215

  7. The Role of Economic Factors, Including the Level of Tuition, in Individual University Participation Decisions in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, David R.; Rahman, Fiona T.

    2005-01-01

    The study uses individual data from the Canadian Labour Force Survey to consider economic factors in university participation decisions by persons aged 17-24 from 1976 to 2003. The level of real tuition is one economic factor that may affect the university participation decision. There is also regional variation in the opportunity cost of…

  8. Modeling the rate of turnover of DOC and particulate organic carbon in a UK, peat-hosted stream: Including diurnal cycling in short-residence time systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, F.; Moody, C. S.

    2014-10-01

    This study proposes a multicomponent, multiprocess scheme to explain the turnover of organic matter (particulate and dissolved organic matter) in streams. The scheme allows for production and degradation of organic matter by both photic and aphotic processes with transformation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to increasingly refractory forms. The proposed scheme was compared to 10 months of experimental observations of the turnover and fate of particulate and dissolved organic matter in stream water from a peat-covered catchment. The scheme was able to explain average decline in DOC concentration of 65% over 70 h with a 13% mean average percentage error based on turnover in three types of organic matter (particulate, labile dissolved, and refractory dissolved) although the order and rate of reactions did change between sets of experimental observations. The modeling suggests that activation energies are low for all except the most refractory forms of DOC in turn, suggesting that processes are not sensitive to temperature change. Application of the modeling scheme to organic matter turnover in the River Tees, northern England, showed that annual removal of total organic carbon was equivalent to between 13 and 33 t C/km2/yr from an at source export of between 22 and 56 t C/km2/yr giving a total in-stream loss rate of between 53 and 62% over a median in-stream residence time of 35 h.

  9. Rewarding the Resident Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Jennifer M.; Drake, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Residents routinely make significant contributions to the education of medical students. However, little attention has been paid to rewarding these individuals for their involvement in these academic activities. This report describes a program that rewards resident teachers with an academic appointment as a Clinical Instructor. The residents…

  10. Individual Radiological Protection Monitoring of Utrok Atoll Residents Based on Whole Body Counting of Cesium-137 (137Cs) and Plutonium Bioassay

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, T; Kehl, S; Brown, T; Martinelli, R; Hickman, D; Jue, T; Tumey, S; Langston, R

    2007-06-08

    This report contains individual radiological protection surveillance data developed during 2006 for adult members of a select group of families living on Utrok Atoll. These Group I volunteers all underwent a whole-body count to determine levels of internally deposited cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) and supplied a bioassay sample for analysis of plutonium isotopes. Measurement data were obtained and the results compared with an equivalent set of measurement data for {sup 137}Cs and plutonium isotopes from a second group of adult volunteers (Group II) who were long-term residents of Utrok Atoll. For the purposes of this comparison, Group II volunteers were considered representative of the general population on Utrok Atoll. The general aim of the study was to determine residual systemic burdens of fallout radionuclides in each volunteer group, develop data in response to addressing some specific concerns about the preferential uptake and potential health consequences of residual fallout radionuclides in Group I volunteers, and generally provide some perspective on the significance of radiation doses delivered to volunteers (and the general Utrok Atoll resident population) in terms of radiological protection standards and health risks. Based on dose estimates from measurements of internally deposited {sup 137}Cs and plutonium isotopes, the data and information developed in this report clearly show that neither volunteer group has acquired levels of internally deposited fallout radionuclides specific to nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands that are likely to have any consequence on human health. Moreover, the dose estimates are well below radiological protection standards as prescribed by U.S. regulators and international agencies, and are very small when compared to doses from natural sources of radiation in the Marshall Islands and the threshold where radiation health effects could be either medically diagnosed in an individual or epidemiologically discerned in a

  11. Summary of Changes Related to the Individualized Education Program (IEP): Current Law and 1997 IDEA Amendments, Including Congressional Committee Comments. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrag, Judy; Ahearn, Eileen M.

    This report summarizes provisions and highlights changes for the Individualized Education Program (IEP) within the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Amendments of 1997. Also included are references from the two Congressional Committee Reports--those of the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee and the House Committee on…

  12. Training Personnel for the Education of Individuals with Disabilities Program. Component 2: Preparation of Related Services Personnel (Pediatric Residents). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruder, Mary Beth

    This final report describes the activities and outcomes of a project designed to develop, implement, and evaluate a new three-year longitudinal competency based curriculum for pediatric residents on their role in early intervention and special education. The curriculum consisted of four half-days per month for every resident in an ambulatory…

  13. Predictors, Including Blood, Urine, Anthropometry, and Nutritional Indices, of All-Cause Mortality among Institutionalized Individuals with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohwada, Hiroko; Nakayama, Takeo; Tomono, Yuji; Yamanaka, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    As the life expectancy of people with intellectual disability (ID) increases, it is becoming necessary to understand factors affecting survival. However, predictors that are typically assessed among healthy people have not been examined. Predictors of all-cause mortality, including blood, urine, anthropometry, and nutritional indices, were…

  14. Resident recruitment.

    PubMed

    Longmaid, H Esterbrook

    2003-02-01

    This article has introduced the reader to the critical components of successful recruitment of radiology residents. With particular attention to the ACGME institutional and program requirements regarding resident recruitment, and an explanation of the support systems (ERAS and NRMP) currently available to those involved in applicant review and selection, the article has sought to delineate a sensible approach to recruitment. Successful recruiters have mastered the essentials of these programs and have learned to adapt the programs to their needs. As new program directors work with their departments' resident selection committees, they will identify the factors that faculty and current residents cite as most important in the successful selection of new residents. By structuring the application review process, exploiting the power of the ERAS, and crafting a purposeful and friendly interview process, radiology residency directors can find and recruit the residents who best match their programs. PMID:12585436

  15. Delinking resident duty hours from patient safety.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Roisin; Parshuram, Christopher S

    2014-01-01

    Patient safety is a powerful motivating force for change in modern medicine, and is often cited as a rationale for reducing resident duty hours. However, current data suggest that resident duty hours are not significantly linked to important patient outcomes. We performed a narrative review and identified four potential explanations for these findings. First, we question the relevance of resident fatigue in the creation of harmful errors. Second, we discuss factors, including workload, experience, and individual characteristics, that may be more important determinants of resident fatigue than are duty hours. Third, we describe potential adverse effects that may arise from--and, therefore, counterbalance any potential benefits of--duty hour reductions. Fourth, we explore factors that may mitigate any risks to patient safety associated with using the services of resident trainees. In summary, it may be inappropriate to justify a reduction in working hours on the grounds of a presumed linkage between patient safety and resident duty hours. Better understanding of resident-related factors associated with patient safety will be essential if improvements in important patient safety outcomes are to be realized through resident-focused strategies. PMID:25561349

  16. Delinking resident duty hours from patient safety

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Patient safety is a powerful motivating force for change in modern medicine, and is often cited as a rationale for reducing resident duty hours. However, current data suggest that resident duty hours are not significantly linked to important patient outcomes. We performed a narrative review and identified four potential explanations for these findings. First, we question the relevance of resident fatigue in the creation of harmful errors. Second, we discuss factors, including workload, experience, and individual characteristics, that may be more important determinants of resident fatigue than are duty hours. Third, we describe potential adverse effects that may arise from – and, therefore, counterbalance any potential benefits of – duty hour reductions. Fourth, we explore factors that may mitigate any risks to patient safety associated with using the services of resident trainees. In summary, it may be inappropriate to justify a reduction in working hours on the grounds of a presumed linkage between patient safety and resident duty hours. Better understanding of resident-related factors associated with patient safety will be essential if improvements in important patient safety outcomes are to be realized through resident-focused strategies. PMID:25561349

  17. Residency Decisions: Another Look.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Barry S.

    The process of determining student's residency status for fee payment at the University of Nevada-Reno is described and supplemental information forms that are used at the university are included. At the University of Nevada-Reno, residency decisions are the responsibility of admissions office professional staff. The university has a formal…

  18. Implementation of an Integrative Medicine Curriculum for Preventive Medicine Residents.

    PubMed

    Chiaramonte, Delia R; D'Adamo, Christopher; Amr, Sania

    2015-11-01

    The University of Maryland Department of Epidemiology and Public Health collaborated with the Center for Integrative Medicine at the same institution to develop and implement a unique integrative medicine curriculum within a preventive medicine residency program. Between October 2012 and July 2014, Center for Integrative Medicine faculty provided preventive medicine residents and faculty, and occasionally other Department of Epidemiology and Public Health faculty, with comprehensive exposure to the field of integrative medicine, including topics such as mind-body medicine, nutrition and nutritional supplements, Traditional Chinese Medicine, massage, biofield therapies, manual medicine, stress management, creative arts, and the use of integrative medicine in the inpatient setting. Preventive medicine residents, under the supervision of Department of Epidemiology and Public Health faculty, led integrative medicine-themed journal clubs. Resident assessments included a case-based knowledge evaluation, the Integrative Medicine Attitudes Questionnaire, and a qualitative evaluation of the program. Residents received more than 60 hours of integrative medicine instruction, including didactic sessions, experiential workshops, and wellness retreats in addition to clinical experiences and individual wellness mentoring. Residents rated the program positively and recommended that integrative medicine be included in preventive medicine residency curricula. The inclusion of a wellness-focused didactic, experiential, and skill-based integrative medicine program within a preventive medicine residency was feasible and well received by all six preventive medicine residents. PMID:26477900

  19. Human organ/tissue growth algorithms that include obese individuals and black/white population organ weight similarities from autopsy data.

    PubMed

    Young, John F; Luecke, Richard H; Pearce, Bruce A; Lee, Taewon; Ahn, Hongshik; Baek, Songjoon; Moon, Hojin; Dye, Daniel W; Davis, Thomas M; Taylor, Susan J

    2009-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models need the correct organ/tissue weights to match various total body weights in order to be applied to children and the obese individual. Baseline data from Reference Man for the growth of human organs (adrenals, brain, heart, kidneys, liver, lungs, pancreas, spleen, thymus, and thyroid) were augmented with autopsy data to extend the describing polynomials to include the morbidly obese individual (up to 250 kg). Additional literature data similarly extends the growth curves for blood volume, muscle, skin, and adipose tissue. Collectively these polynomials were used to calculate blood/organ/tissue weights for males and females from birth to 250 kg, which can be directly used to help parameterize PBPK models. In contrast to other black/white anthropomorphic measurements, the data demonstrated no observable or statistical difference in weights for any organ/tissue between individuals identified as black or white in the autopsy reports. PMID:19267313

  20. 26 CFR 1.884-5 - Qualified resident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of which the foreign corporation is a resident or a citizen or resident of the United States; (B) The... an individual who is not a U.S. citizen or resident, also obtains a certificate of residency... foreign country of which the foreign corporation is a resident and who are not citizens or residents...

  1. 26 CFR 1.884-5 - Qualified resident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... an individual who is not a U.S. citizen or resident, also obtains a certificate of residency... a certificate of residency shall not be required in the case of an individual who is a shareholder...) Certificate of residency. A certificate of residency must be signed by the relevant authorities (as...

  2. 26 CFR 1.884-5 - Qualified resident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... an individual who is not a U.S. citizen or resident, also obtains a certificate of residency... a certificate of residency shall not be required in the case of an individual who is a shareholder...) Certificate of residency. A certificate of residency must be signed by the relevant authorities (as...

  3. 26 CFR 1.884-5 - Qualified resident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... an individual who is not a U.S. citizen or resident, also obtains a certificate of residency... a certificate of residency shall not be required in the case of an individual who is a shareholder...) Certificate of residency. A certificate of residency must be signed by the relevant authorities (as...

  4. Individuals with Primary Osteoarthritis Have Different Phenotypes Depending on the Affected Joint - A Case Control Study from Southern Sweden Including 514 Participants

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Magnus K; Karlsson, Caroline; Magnusson, Håkan; Cöster, Maria; von Schewelov, Tord; Nilsson, Jan Åke; Brudin, Lars; Rosengren, Björn E

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether primary osteoarthritis (OA), independent of affected joint, is associated with a phenotype that is different from the phenotype in a normative cohort. Material and Methods: We included 274 patients with primary OA, 30 women and 32 men (mean age 66 years, range 42-84) with primary hip OA, 38 women and 74 men (mean age 61 years; range 34-85) with primary knee OA, 42 women and 19 men (men age 64 years, range 42-87) with primary ankle or foot OA and 20 women and 19 men (mean age 66 years, range 47-88) with primary hand or finger OA. Of all patients included with OA, 23% had hip OA, 41% knee OA, 22% ankle or foot OA and 14% hand or finger OA. Serving as references were 122 women and 118 men of the same ages who were population-based, included as a control cohort. We measured total body BMD (g/cm2) and proportion of fat and lean mass (%) with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Height, weight and BMI (kg/m2) were also assessed. We then calculated Z-scores (number of standard deviations difference from the mean value of the control cohort) in the OA patients and compared these between the groups. Results: Individuals with hand OA and controls had similar phenotype. Individuals with lower extremity OA, irrespective of the affected joint, had similar weight, BMI and BMD, but higher than in individuals with hand OA and controls (all p<0.05). Individuals with lower extremity OA had higher fat and lower lean mass than individuals with hand OA and controls (all p<0.001). Conclusion: Individuals with primary OA in the lower extremity have a phenotype with higher BMD, higher BMI, proportionally higher fat content and lower lean body mass content. The different skeletal phenotypes in our patients with OA in the lower extremity and patients with hand OA indicate that separate pathophysiologic pathways may be responsible for primary OA in different joints PMID:25614774

  5. Permanent resident

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, John F.

    2016-01-01

    The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff. PMID:27193992

  6. Sex-stratified genome-wide association studies including 270,000 individuals show sexual dimorphism in genetic loci for anthropometric traits.

    PubMed

    Randall, Joshua C; Winkler, Thomas W; Kutalik, Zoltán; Berndt, Sonja I; Jackson, Anne U; Monda, Keri L; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Esko, Tõnu; Mägi, Reedik; Li, Shengxu; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Feitosa, Mary F; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Day, Felix R; Fall, Tove; Ferreira, Teresa; Gustafsson, Stefan; Locke, Adam E; Mathieson, Iain; Scherag, Andre; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wood, Andrew R; Liang, Liming; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Dimas, Antigone S; Karpe, Fredrik; Min, Josine L; Nicholson, George; Clegg, Deborah J; Person, Thomas; Krohn, Jon P; Bauer, Sabrina; Buechler, Christa; Eisinger, Kristina; Bonnefond, Amélie; Froguel, Philippe; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Prokopenko, Inga; Waite, Lindsay L; Harris, Tamara B; Smith, Albert Vernon; Shuldiner, Alan R; McArdle, Wendy L; Caulfield, Mark J; Munroe, Patricia B; Grönberg, Henrik; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Li, Guo; Beckmann, Jacques S; Johnson, Toby; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Teder-Laving, Maris; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Zhao, Jing Hua; Amin, Najaf; Oostra, Ben A; Kraja, Aldi T; Province, Michael A; Cupples, L Adrienne; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Kaprio, Jaakko; Ripatti, Samuli; Surakka, Ida; Collins, Francis S; Saramies, Jouko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Jula, Antti; Salomaa, Veikko; Erdmann, Jeanette; Hengstenberg, Christian; Loley, Christina; Schunkert, Heribert; Lamina, Claudia; Wichmann, H Erich; Albrecht, Eva; Gieger, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Johansson, Asa; Pramstaller, Peter P; Kathiresan, Sekar; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Penninx, Brenda; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Gyllensten, Ulf; Boomsma, Dorret I; Campbell, Harry; Wilson, James F; Chanock, Stephen J; Farrall, Martin; Goel, Anuj; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Estrada, Karol; Uitterlinden, André G; Hofman, Albert; Zillikens, M Carola; den Heijer, Martin; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Maschio, Andrea; Hall, Per; Tyrer, Jonathan; Teumer, Alexander; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Tönjes, Anke; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Hall, Alistair S; Samani, Nilesh J; Attwood, Antony Paul; Sambrook, Jennifer G; Hung, Joseph; Palmer, Lyle J; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Sinisalo, Juha; Boucher, Gabrielle; Huikuri, Heikki; Lorentzon, Mattias; Ohlsson, Claes; Eklund, Niina; Eriksson, Johan G; Barlassina, Cristina; Rivolta, Carlo; Nolte, Ilja M; Snieder, Harold; Van der Klauw, Melanie M; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Gejman, Pablo V; Shi, Jianxin; Jacobs, Kevin B; Wang, Zhaoming; Bakker, Stephan J L; Mateo Leach, Irene; Navis, Gerjan; van der Harst, Pim; Martin, Nicholas G; Medland, Sarah E; Montgomery, Grant W; Yang, Jian; Chasman, Daniel I; Ridker, Paul M; Rose, Lynda M; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli; Absher, Devin; Iribarren, Carlos; Basart, Hanneke; Hovingh, Kees G; Hyppönen, Elina; Power, Chris; Anderson, Denise; Beilby, John P; Hui, Jennie; Jolley, Jennifer; Sager, Hendrik; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Kristiansson, Kati; Perola, Markus; Lindström, Jaana; Swift, Amy J; Uusitupa, Matti; Atalay, Mustafa; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerry; Fraser, Ross M; Price, Jackie F; Fischer, Krista; Krjutå Kov, Kaarel; Metspalu, Andres; Mihailov, Evelin; Langenberg, Claudia; Luan, Jian'an; Ong, Ken K; Chines, Peter S; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Edkins, Sarah; Franks, Paul W; Hallmans, Göran; Shungin, Dmitry; Morris, Andrew David; Palmer, Colin N A; Erbel, Raimund; Moebus, Susanne; Nöthen, Markus M; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Hveem, Kristian; Narisu, Narisu; Hamsten, Anders; Humphries, Steve E; Strawbridge, Rona J; Tremoli, Elena; Grallert, Harald; Thorand, Barbara; Illig, Thomas; Koenig, Wolfgang; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Peters, Annette; Boehm, Bernhard O; Kleber, Marcus E; März, Winfried; Winkelmann, Bernhard R; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Arveiler, Dominique; Cesana, Giancarlo; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Virtamo, Jarmo; Yarnell, John W G; Kuh, Diana; Wong, Andrew; Lind, Lars; de Faire, Ulf; Gigante, Bruna; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Pedersen, Nancy L; Dedoussis, George; Dimitriou, Maria; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kanoni, Stavroula; Stirrups, Kathleen; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Njølstad, Inger; Wilsgaard, Tom; Ganna, Andrea; Rehnberg, Emil; Hingorani, Aroon; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Assimes, Themistocles L; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S; Frayling, Timothy; Groop, Leif C; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David; Ingelsson, Erik; Kaplan, Robert; Mohlke, Karen L; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P; Stefansson, Kari; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; McCarthy, Mark I; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Qi, Lu; Loos, Ruth J F; Lindgren, Cecilia M; North, Kari E; Heid, Iris M

    2013-06-01

    Given the anthropometric differences between men and women and previous evidence of sex-difference in genetic effects, we conducted a genome-wide search for sexually dimorphic associations with height, weight, body mass index, waist circumference, hip circumference, and waist-to-hip-ratio (133,723 individuals) and took forward 348 SNPs into follow-up (additional 137,052 individuals) in a total of 94 studies. Seven loci displayed significant sex-difference (FDR<5%), including four previously established (near GRB14/COBLL1, LYPLAL1/SLC30A10, VEGFA, ADAMTS9) and three novel anthropometric trait loci (near MAP3K1, HSD17B4, PPARG), all of which were genome-wide significant in women (P<5×10(-8)), but not in men. Sex-differences were apparent only for waist phenotypes, not for height, weight, BMI, or hip circumference. Moreover, we found no evidence for genetic effects with opposite directions in men versus women. The PPARG locus is of specific interest due to its role in diabetes genetics and therapy. Our results demonstrate the value of sex-specific GWAS to unravel the sexually dimorphic genetic underpinning of complex traits. PMID:23754948

  7. Sex-stratified Genome-wide Association Studies Including 270,000 Individuals Show Sexual Dimorphism in Genetic Loci for Anthropometric Traits

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Anne U.; Monda, Keri L.; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Esko, Tõnu; Mägi, Reedik; Li, Shengxu; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Feitosa, Mary F.; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Day, Felix R.; Fall, Tove; Ferreira, Teresa; Gustafsson, Stefan; Locke, Adam E.; Mathieson, Iain; Scherag, Andre; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wood, Andrew R.; Liang, Liming; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Dimas, Antigone S.; Karpe, Fredrik; Min, Josine L.; Nicholson, George; Clegg, Deborah J.; Person, Thomas; Krohn, Jon P.; Bauer, Sabrina; Buechler, Christa; Eisinger, Kristina; Bonnefond, Amélie; Froguel, Philippe; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Prokopenko, Inga; Waite, Lindsay L.; Harris, Tamara B.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Shuldiner, Alan R.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Grönberg, Henrik; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Li, Guo; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Johnson, Toby; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Teder-Laving, Maris; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Amin, Najaf; Oostra, Ben A.; Kraja, Aldi T.; Province, Michael A.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Ripatti, Samuli; Surakka, Ida; Collins, Francis S.; Saramies, Jouko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Jula, Antti; Salomaa, Veikko; Erdmann, Jeanette; Hengstenberg, Christian; Loley, Christina; Schunkert, Heribert; Lamina, Claudia; Wichmann, H. Erich; Albrecht, Eva; Gieger, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Johansson, Åsa; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Penninx, Brenda; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Gyllensten, Ulf; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Campbell, Harry; Wilson, James F.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Farrall, Martin; Goel, Anuj; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Estrada, Karol; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hofman, Albert; Zillikens, M. Carola; den Heijer, Martin; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Maschio, Andrea; Hall, Per; Tyrer, Jonathan; Teumer, Alexander; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Tönjes, Anke; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D.; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Hall, Alistair S.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Attwood, Antony Paul; Sambrook, Jennifer G.; Hung, Joseph; Palmer, Lyle J.; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Sinisalo, Juha; Boucher, Gabrielle; Huikuri, Heikki; Lorentzon, Mattias; Ohlsson, Claes; Eklund, Niina; Eriksson, Johan G.; Barlassina, Cristina; Rivolta, Carlo; Nolte, Ilja M.; Snieder, Harold; Van der Klauw, Melanie M.; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Gejman, Pablo V.; Shi, Jianxin; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Wang, Zhaoming; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Mateo Leach, Irene; Navis, Gerjan; van der Harst, Pim; Martin, Nicholas G.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Yang, Jian; Chasman, Daniel I.; Ridker, Paul M.; Rose, Lynda M.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli; Absher, Devin; Iribarren, Carlos; Basart, Hanneke; Hovingh, Kees G.; Hyppönen, Elina; Power, Chris; Anderson, Denise; Beilby, John P.; Hui, Jennie; Jolley, Jennifer; Sager, Hendrik; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Kristiansson, Kati; Perola, Markus; Lindström, Jaana; Swift, Amy J.; Uusitupa, Matti; Atalay, Mustafa; Lakka, Timo A.; Rauramaa, Rainer; Bolton, Jennifer L.; Fowkes, Gerry; Fraser, Ross M.; Price, Jackie F.; Fischer, Krista; KrjutÅ¡kov, Kaarel; Metspalu, Andres; Mihailov, Evelin; Langenberg, Claudia; Luan, Jian'an; Ong, Ken K.; Chines, Peter S.; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.; Saaristo, Timo E.; Edkins, Sarah; Franks, Paul W.; Hallmans, Göran; Shungin, Dmitry; Morris, Andrew David; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Erbel, Raimund; Moebus, Susanne; Nöthen, Markus M.; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Hveem, Kristian; Narisu, Narisu; Hamsten, Anders; Humphries, Steve E.; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Tremoli, Elena; Grallert, Harald; Thorand, Barbara; Illig, Thomas; Koenig, Wolfgang; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Peters, Annette; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Kleber, Marcus E.; März, Winfried; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Arveiler, Dominique; Cesana, Giancarlo; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Virtamo, Jarmo; Yarnell, John W. G.; Kuh, Diana; Wong, Andrew; Lind, Lars; de Faire, Ulf; Gigante, Bruna; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Dedoussis, George; Dimitriou, Maria; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kanoni, Stavroula; Stirrups, Kathleen; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Njølstad, Inger; Wilsgaard, Tom; Ganna, Andrea; Rehnberg, Emil; Hingorani, Aroon; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S.; Frayling, Timothy; Groop, Leif C.; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David; Ingelsson, Erik; Kaplan, Robert; Mohlke, Karen L.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P.; Stefansson, Kari; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Qi, Lu; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; North, Kari E.; Heid, Iris M.

    2013-01-01

    Given the anthropometric differences between men and women and previous evidence of sex-difference in genetic effects, we conducted a genome-wide search for sexually dimorphic associations with height, weight, body mass index, waist circumference, hip circumference, and waist-to-hip-ratio (133,723 individuals) and took forward 348 SNPs into follow-up (additional 137,052 individuals) in a total of 94 studies. Seven loci displayed significant sex-difference (FDR<5%), including four previously established (near GRB14/COBLL1, LYPLAL1/SLC30A10, VEGFA, ADAMTS9) and three novel anthropometric trait loci (near MAP3K1, HSD17B4, PPARG), all of which were genome-wide significant in women (P<5×10−8), but not in men. Sex-differences were apparent only for waist phenotypes, not for height, weight, BMI, or hip circumference. Moreover, we found no evidence for genetic effects with opposite directions in men versus women. The PPARG locus is of specific interest due to its role in diabetes genetics and therapy. Our results demonstrate the value of sex-specific GWAS to unravel the sexually dimorphic genetic underpinning of complex traits. PMID:23754948

  8. Measurement and calculation of individual head-related transfer functions using a boundary element model including the measurement and effect of skin and hair impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Brian Fredrick Gray

    1998-12-01

    This research investigates various aspects of the Head- Related Transfer Function (HRTF), which is a description of the acoustic frequency filtering performed by the geometry of the head as a function of incident angle. The effects of this filtering are used in the brain to determine the location of sound sources in space. Initially, various methods for measuring the HRTF are examined, as well as several means of normalizing or equalizing the data. One method is chosen which best represents the informational content of the measured data for comparisons between experimental methods. The question as to whether the acoustic properties of skin and hair contribute to the HRTF is also examined. Measurements are made of the acoustic absorption and impedance of various skin and hair samples using a plane wave tube and two microphones. The limitations of this technique and published standards are also included. Finally, an individual HRTF is calculated using an optically generated surface mesh and a numerical boundary element (BEM) solution. The results of the impedance measurements are included in the calculations. Final analysis consists of comparing the various calculated HRTFs and measured HRTFs. Geometric variations in the head mesh such as removal of the pinna are also included. Good agreement is found given the assumptions made in the generation of the computational model (i.e. lack of torso) throughout the frequency range of the model, which extends from 1-6 kHz. Computational speed and size of the numerical problem limit the work to this region.

  9. Organizing a Nursing Home Library for Residents. A Do-It-Yourself Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Ruth V.

    These guidelines for developing and maintaining a library in a resident nursing home, for use by either staff members or volunteers, recommend an individual survey of each resident as a way of determining reading preferences and deciding what materials should be ordered. Other areas examined are the location of the library, including space and…

  10. Effects of Lifestyle Interventions That Include a Physical Activity Component in Class II and III Obese Individuals: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Baillot, Aurélie; Romain, Ahmed J.; Boisvert-Vigneault, Katherine; Audet, Mélisa; Baillargeon, Jean Patrice; Dionne, Isabelle J.; Valiquette, Louis; Chakra, Claire Nour Abou; Avignon, Antoine; Langlois, Marie-France

    2015-01-01

    Background In class II and III obese individuals, lifestyle intervention is the first step to achieve weight loss and treat obesity-related comorbidities before considering bariatric surgery. A systematic review, meta-analysis, and meta-regression were performed to assess the impact of lifestyle interventions incorporating a physical activity (PA) component on health outcomes of class II and III obese individuals. Methods An electronic search was conducted in 4 databases (Medline, Scopus, CINAHL and Sportdiscus). Two independent investigators selected original studies assessing the impact of lifestyle interventions with PA components on anthropometric parameters, cardiometabolic risk factors (fat mass, blood pressure, lipid and glucose metabolism), behaviour modification (PA and nutritional changes), and quality of life in adults with body mass index (BMI) ≥ 35 kg/m2. Estimates were pooled using a random-effect model (DerSimonian and Laird method). Heterogeneity between studies was assessed by the Cochran’s chi-square test and quantified through an estimation of the I². Results Of the 3,170 identified articles, 56 met our eligibility criteria, with a large majority of uncontrolled studies (80%). The meta-analysis based on uncontrolled studies showed significant heterogeneity among all included studies. The pooled mean difference in weight loss was 8.9 kg (95% CI, 10.2–7.7; p < 0.01) and 2.8 kg/m² in BMI loss (95% CI, 3.4–2.2; p < 0.01). Long-term interventions produced superior weight loss (11.3 kg) compared to short-term (7.2 kg) and intermediate-term (8.0 kg) interventions. A significant global effect of lifestyle intervention on fat mass, waist circumference, blood pressure, total cholesterol, LDL-C, triglycerides and fasting insulin was found (p<0.01), without significant effect on HDL-C and fasting blood glucose. Conclusions Lifestyle interventions incorporating a PA component can improve weight and various cardiometabolic risk factors in class II

  11. Stress in Family Practice Residents

    PubMed Central

    Rudner, Howard L.

    1986-01-01

    Sources and levels of stress, as well as coping mechanisms, perceived by residents in both years of a two-year family practice residency program in Toronto are described. In addition, differences between first- and second-year residents, and between women and men residents, regardless of year, are examined. Results of the survey indicate that the levels of stress are relatively high throughout the two years of residency training. The three most stressful aspects of being a resident are time pressures, fatigue, and lack of self-confidence. Female residents appear to report a higher level of stress than males, especially in trying to combine a personal and a professional life. Specific coping mechanisms include talking to others, adjusting attitudes and feelings, or strategic use of time. Recommendations aimed at helping family medicine residency programs deal with the problem of stress in residents are suggested. A current major province-wide research study including all interns and residents in Ontario is described. PMID:21267263

  12. Burnout During Residency Training: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    IsHak, Waguih William; Lederer, Sara; Mandili, Carla; Nikravesh, Rose; Seligman, Laurie; Vasa, Monisha; Ogunyemi, Dotun; Bernstein, Carol A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Burnout is a state of mental and physical exhaustion related to work or care giving activities. Burnout during residency training has gained significant attention secondary to concerns regarding job performance and patient care. This article reviews the relevant literature on burnout in order to provide information to educators about its prevalence, features, impact, and potential interventions. Methods Studies were identified through a Medline and PsychInfo search from 1974 to 2009. Fifty-one studies were identified. Definition and description of burnout and measurement methods are presented followed by a thorough review of the studies. Results An examination of the burnout literature reveals that it is prevalent in medical students (28%–45%), residents (27%–75%, depending on specialty), as well as practicing physicians. Psychological distress and physical symptoms can impact work performance and patient safety. Distress during medical school can lead to burnout, which in turn can result in negative consequences as a working physician. Burnout also poses significant challenges during early training years in residency. Time demands, lack of control, work planning, work organization, inherently difficult job situations, and interpersonal relationships, are considered factors contributing to residents' burnout. Potential interventions include workplace-driven and individual-driven measures. Workplace interventions include education about burnout, workload modifications, increasing the diversity of work duties, stress management training, mentoring, emotional intelligence training, and wellness workshops. Individual-driven behavioral, social, and physical activities include promoting interpersonal professional relations, meditation, counseling, and exercise. Conclusions Educators need to develop an active awareness of burnout and ought to consider incorporating relevant instruction and interventions during the process of training resident physicians

  13. Determinants of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, Including Hookah Smoking and Opium Use– A Cross-Sectional Analysis of 50,000 Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Islami, Farhad; Nasseri-Moghaddam, Siavosh; Pourshams, Akram; Poustchi, Hossein; Semnani, Shahryar; Kamangar, Farin; Etemadi, Arash; Merat, Shahin; Khoshnia, Masoud; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Pharoah, Paul D.; Brennan, Paul; Abnet, Christian C.; Boffetta, Paolo; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common cause of discomfort and morbidity worldwide. However, information on determinants of GERD from large-scale studies in low- to medium-income countries is limited. We investigated the factors associated with different measures of GERD symptoms, including frequency, patient-perceived severity, and onset time. Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of the baseline data from a population-based cohort study of ∼50,000 individuals in in Golestan Province, Iran. GERD symptoms in this study included regurgitation and/or heartburn. Results Approximately 20% of participants reported at least weekly symptoms. Daily symptoms were less commonly reported by men, those of Turkmen ethnicity, and nass chewers. On the other hand, age, body mass index, alcohol drinking, cigarette smoking, opium use, lower socioeconomic status, and lower physical activity were associated with daily symptoms. Most of these factors showed similar associations with severe symptoms. Women with higher BMI and waist to hip ratio were more likely to report frequent and severe GERD symptoms. Hookah smoking (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.02–1.75) and opium use (OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.55–1.87) were associated with severe symptoms, whereas nass chewing had an inverse association (OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.76–0.99). After exclusion of cigarette smokers, hookah smoking was still positively associated and nass chewing was inversely associated with GERD symptoms (all frequencies combined). Conclusion GERD is common in this population. The associations of hookah and opium use and inverse association of nass use with GERD symptoms are reported for the first time. Further studies are required to investigate the nature of these associations. Other determinants of GERD were mostly comparable to those reported elsewhere. PMID:24586635

  14. Conversations with Holocaust survivor residents.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Sandra P; LeNavenec, Carole Lynne; Aldiabat, Khaldoun

    2011-03-01

    Traumatic events in one's younger years can have an impact on how an individual copes with later life. One traumatic experience for Jewish individuals was the Holocaust. Some of these people are moving into long-term care facilities. It was within this context that the research question emerged: What are Holocaust survivor residents' perceptions of a life lived as they move into a long-term care facility? For this qualitative study, Holocaust survivors were individually interviewed. Findings emphasize that nursing care needs to ensure that Holocaust survivor residents participate in activities, receive timely health care, and receive recognition of their life experiences. PMID:20795597

  15. Menarche, menopause, and breast cancer risk: individual participant meta-analysis, including 118 964 women with breast cancer from 117 epidemiological studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Menarche and menopause mark the onset and cessation, respectively, of ovarian activity associated with reproduction, and affect breast cancer risk. Our aim was to assess the strengths of their effects and determine whether they depend on characteristics of the tumours or the affected women. Methods Individual data from 117 epidemiological studies, including 118 964 women with invasive breast cancer and 306 091 without the disease, none of whom had used menopausal hormone therapy, were included in the analyses. We calculated adjusted relative risks (RRs) associated with menarche and menopause for breast cancer overall, and by tumour histology and by oestrogen receptor expression. Findings Breast cancer risk increased by a factor of 1·050 (95% CI 1·044–1·057; p<0·0001) for every year younger at menarche, and independently by a smaller amount (1·029, 1·025–1·032; p<0·0001), for every year older at menopause. Premenopausal women had a greater risk of breast cancer than postmenopausal women of an identical age (RR at age 45–54 years 1·43, 1·33–1·52, p<0·001). All three of these associations were attenuated by increasing adiposity among postmenopausal women, but did not vary materially by women's year of birth, ethnic origin, childbearing history, smoking, alcohol consumption, or hormonal contraceptive use. All three associations were stronger for lobular than for ductal tumours (p<0·006 for each comparison). The effect of menopause in women of an identical age and trends by age at menopause were stronger for oestrogen receptor-positive disease than for oestrogen receptor-negative disease (p<0·01 for both comparisons). Interpretation The effects of menarche and menopause on breast cancer risk might not be acting merely by lengthening women's total number of reproductive years. Endogenous ovarian hormones are more relevant for oestrogen receptor-positive disease than for oestrogen receptor-negative disease and for lobular than

  16. A phenomenologic investigation of pediatric residents' experiences being parented and giving parenting advice.

    PubMed

    Bax, A C; Shawler, P M; Blackmon, D L; DeGrace, E W; Wolraich, M L

    2016-09-01

    Factors surrounding pediatricians' parenting advice and training on parenting during residency have not been well studied. The primary purpose of this study was to examine pediatric residents' self-reported experiences giving parenting advice and explore the relationship between parenting advice given and types of parenting residents received as children. Thirteen OUHSC pediatric residents were individually interviewed to examine experiences being parented and giving parenting advice. Phenomenological methods were used to explicate themes and secondary analyses explored relationships of findings based upon Baumrind's parenting styles (authoritative, authoritarian, permissive). While childhood experiences were not specifically correlated to the parenting advice style of pediatric residents interviewed, virtually all reported relying upon childhood experiences to generate their advice. Those describing authoritative parents reported giving more authoritative advice while others reported more variable advice. Core interview themes related to residents' parenting advice included anxiety about not being a parent, varying advice based on families' needs, and emphasis of positive interactions and consistency. Themes related to how residents were parented included discipline being a learning process for their parents and recalling that their parents always had expectations, yet always loved them. Pediatric residents interviewed reported giving family centered parenting advice with elements of positive interactions and consistency, but interviews highlighted many areas of apprehension residents have around giving parenting advice. Our study suggests that pediatric residents may benefit from more general educational opportunities to develop the content of their parenting advice, including reflecting on any impact from their own upbringing. PMID:27367930

  17. Otolaryngology residency and fellowship training. The resident's perspective.

    PubMed

    Miller, R H

    1994-10-01

    Based on the success rate of US otolaryngology graduates on the American Board of Otolaryngology Certification Examination, it would appear that otolaryngology training is quite good. However, it is not clear that all aspects of training are equal in quality, not only between programs but also within a single program. One indication that there may be areas of weakness is the fact that despite the perceived national shortages of primary care physicians in the United States and the overabundance of specialists, 25% of the approximately 260 graduating otolaryngology residents extend their training beyond specialty training to subspecialty levels (Manpower Committee of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, unpublished data obtained from chief resident questionnaires, 1990-1992). The most popular area of fellowship training is facial plastic surgery, followed by neurotology and head and neck oncology. Pediatric otolaryngology fellowships make up most of the balance. Most of the fellowships are well structured and are 1 year in duration. Others are more like apprenticeships and may be of shorter duration. A few are 2 years long and include a significant research commitment reserved for individuals entering academic practice. PMID:7917188

  18. Ovarian cancer and smoking: individual participant meta-analysis including 28 114 women with ovarian cancer from 51 epidemiological studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Smoking has been linked to mucinous ovarian cancer, but its effects on other ovarian cancer subtypes and on overall ovarian cancer risk are unclear, and the findings from most studies with relevant data are unpublished. To assess these associations, we review the published and unpublished evidence. Methods Eligible epidemiological studies were identified by electronic searches, review articles, and discussions with colleagues. Individual participant data for 28 114 women with and 94 942 without ovarian cancer from 51 epidemiological studies were analysed centrally, yielding adjusted relative risks (RRs) of ovarian cancer in smokers compared with never smokers. Findings After exclusion of studies with hospital controls, in which smoking could have affected recruitment, overall ovarian cancer incidence was only slightly increased in current smokers compared with women who had never smoked (RR 1·06, 95% CI 1·01–1·11, p=0·01). Of 17 641 epithelial cancers with specified histology, 2314 (13%) were mucinous, 2360 (13%) endometrioid, 969 (5%) clear-cell, and 9086 (52%) serous. Smoking-related risks varied substantially across these subtypes (pheterogeneity<0·0001). For mucinous cancers, incidence was increased in current versus never smokers (1·79, 95% CI 1·60–2·00, p<0·0001), but the increase was mainly in borderline malignant rather than in fully malignant tumours (2·25, 95% CI 1·91–2·65 vs 1·49, 1·28–1·73; pheterogeneity=0·01; almost half the mucinous tumours were only borderline malignant). Both endometrioid (0·81, 95% CI 0·72–0·92, p=0·001) and clear-cell ovarian cancer risks (0·80, 95% CI 0·65–0·97, p=0·03) were reduced in current smokers, and there was no significant association for serous ovarian cancers (0·99, 95% CI 0·93–1·06, p=0·8). These associations did not vary significantly by 13 sociodemographic and personal characteristics of women including their body-mass index, parity, and use of

  19. 42 CFR 436.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... State of residence is the State in which the individual is living. (3) For any other non... “foster care homes”, licensed as set forth in 45 CFR 1355.20, and providing food, shelter and supportive... of indicating intent, the State of residence is the State where the individual is living with...

  20. Expansion of the North Carolina Unemployment Insurance Individual Wage Report to Include Occupational Detail: A Study of a Consolidated Approach to Occupational Data Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurado, Eugene A.; Wolff, Warren W.

    A study examined the feasibility of adding employer-generated job titles to the North Carolina Unemployment Insurance Individual Wage Record as a means to providing a more comprehensive source of occupational data than has been possible with currently operating federal and state systems. During the study, researchers conducted structured…

  1. Factors associated with burnout among residents in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Zubairi, Akbar Jaleel; Noordin, Shahryar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Recent literature has focused on burnout as a specific job related distress syndrome among physicians and residents having adverse effects on patient care. Local data on burnout is lacking. Materials & methods An online self-administered questionnaire was sent via email to all residents (325) at our institute with and a response rate of 110 (34%) was achieved. Out of these 82 residents consented and completely filled the questionnaires and were included in the analysis. The questionnaire comprised of demographic variables, the Maslach burnout inventory and occupational risk factors. Results High levels of burnout on at least one subscale were reported by 61(74.4%) residents, in 2 components by 34(41.5%) whereas an alarming 10(12.2%) residents scored high on all three subscales. Among the individual subscales emotional exhaustion was most frequent in 49(59.8%). Among the departments Radiology reported the highest levels (100%) of burnout and low levels were reported by Pediatrics (45%). There was no difference between burnout levels among junior and senior residents. Dissatisfaction with workload, length of work hours, relationship with co-workers and lack of autonomy were significantly associated with high level of burnout. Conclusion High levels of burnout are prevalent among trainee doctors in our part of the world which are comparable with international literature. Efforts to improve the work environment of residents may significantly reduce levels of burnout. PMID:26955475

  2. 2009 Canadian Radiation Oncology Resident Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Debenham, Brock; Banerjee, Robyn; Fairchild, Alysa; Dundas, George; Trotter, Theresa; Yee, Don

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Statistics from the Canadian post-MD education registry show that numbers of Canadian radiation oncology (RO) trainees have risen from 62 in 1999 to approximately 150 per year between 2003 and 2009, contributing to the current perceived downturn in employment opportunities for radiation oncologists in Canada. When last surveyed in 2003, Canadian RO residents identified job availability as their main concern. Our objective was to survey current Canadian RO residents on their training and career plans. Methods and Materials: Trainees from the 13 Canadian residency programs using the national matching service were sought. Potential respondents were identified through individual program directors or chief resident and were e-mailed a secure link to an online survey. Descriptive statistics were used to report responses. Results: The eligible response rate was 53% (83/156). Similar to the 2003 survey, respondents generally expressed high satisfaction with their programs and specialty. The most frequently expressed perceived weakness in their training differed from 2003, with 46.5% of current respondents feeling unprepared to enter the job market. 72% plan on pursuing a postresidency fellowship. Most respondents intend to practice in Canada. Fewer than 20% of respondents believe that there is a strong demand for radiation oncologists in Canada. Conclusions: Respondents to the current survey expressed significant satisfaction with their career choice and training program. However, differences exist compared with the 2003 survey, including the current perceived lack of demand for radiation oncologists in Canada.

  3. Day-to-day care: the interplay of CNAs' views of residents & nursing home environments.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Lucy Takesue; Wallhagen, Margaret I

    2008-11-01

    This qualitative study identified certified nursing assistants' (CNAs') perspectives of nursing home residents and how these perspectives translate into care practices. Data included observations of and interviews with 27 CNAs in three dissimilar nursing homes. All participants were people of color, and all but 3 were immigrants. CNAs constructed three views of residents: as fictive kin, as a commodity, and as an autonomous person. Although individual CNAs held one primary view of residents in general, select residents were viewed from an alternative perspective, resulting in variations in care practices. These findings suggest that such distinctions, in tandem with structural, organizational, and cultural differences in nursing homes, present opportunities for nursing leadership to affect the visible, everyday practice of nursing CNAs. To target interventions, further research is needed on how CNAs come to differentially view residents and how these differences influence CNAs' care relationships with residents. PMID:19024427

  4. Effects of Green House® Nursing Homes on Residents' Families

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Terry Y.; Kane, Rosalie A.; Cutler, Lois J.; Yu, Tzy-Chyi

    2008-01-01

    A longitudinal quasi-experimental study with two comparison groups was conducted to test the effects of a Green House (GH®) nursing home program on residents' family members. The GH®s are individual residences, each serving 10 elders, where certified nursing assistant (CNA)-level resident assistants form primary relationships with residents and family, family is encouraged to visits, and professionals adapted their roles to support the model. GH® family were somewhat less involved in providing assistance to their residents although family contact did not differ among the settings at any time period. GH® family were more satisfied with their resident's care and with their own experience as family members, and had no greater family burden. Issues in studying family outcomes are discussed as well as implications for roles of various personnel, including social service and activities staff in a GH® model. PMID:19361115

  5. 42 CFR 483.114 - Annual review of NF residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... residents. (a) Individuals with mental illness. For each resident of a NF who has mental illness, the State mental health authority must determine in accordance with § 483.130 whether, because of the resident's physical and mental condition, the resident requires— (1) The level of services provided by— (i) A NF;...

  6. Toolbox for Evaluating Residents as Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coverdale, John H.; Ismail, Nadia; Mian, Ayesha; Dewey, Charlene

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors review existing assessment tools related to evaluating residents' teaching skills and teaching effectiveness. Methods: PubMed and PsycInfo databases were searched using combinations of keywords including "residents," "residents as teachers," "teaching skills," and "assessments" or "rating scales." Results: Eleven evaluation…

  7. Minerva: using a software program to improve resident performance during independent call

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itri, Jason N.; Redfern, Regina O.; Cook, Tessa; Scanlon, Mary H.

    2010-03-01

    We have developed an application called Minerva that allows tracking of resident discrepancy rates and missed cases. Minerva mines the radiology information system (RIS) for preliminary interpretations provided by residents during independent call and copies both the preliminary and final interpretations to a database. Both versions are displayed for direct comparison by Minerva and classified as 'in agreement', 'minor discrepancy' or 'major discrepancy' by the resident program director. Minerva compiles statistics comparing minor, major and total discrepancy rates for individual residents relative to the overall group. Discrepant cases are categorized according to date, modality and body part and reviewed for trends in missed cases. The rate of minor, major and total discrepancies for residents on-call at our institution was similar to rates previously published, including a 2.4% major discrepancy rate for second year radiology residents in the DePICTORS study and a 2.6% major discrepancy rate for resident at a community hospital. Trend analysis of missed cases was used to generate a topic-specific resident missed case conference on acromioclavicular (AC) joint separation injuries, which resulted in a 75% decrease in the number of missed cases related to AC separation subsequent to the conference. Using a software program to track of minor and major discrepancy rates for residents taking independent call using modified RadPeer scoring guidelines provides a competency-based metric to determine resident performance. Topic-specific conferences using the cases identified by Minerva can result in a decrease in missed cases.

  8. Perspectives on Healthy Eating Among Appalachian Residents

    PubMed Central

    Schoenberg, Nancy E.; Howell, Britteny M.; Swanson, Mark; Grosh, Christopher; Bardach, Shoshana

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Extensive attention has been focused on improving the dietary intake of Americans. Such focus is warranted due to increasing rates of overweight, obesity, and other dietary-related disease. To address suboptimal dietary intake requires an improved, contextualized understanding of the multiple and intersecting influences on healthy eating, particularly among those populations at greatest risk of and from poor diet, including rural residents. Methods During 8 focus groups (N=99) and 6 group key informant interviews (N=20), diverse Appalachian rural residents were queried about their perceptions of healthy eating, determinants of healthy food intake, and recommendations for improving the dietary intake of people in their communities. Participants included church members and other laypeople, public health officials, social service providers, health care professionals, and others. Findings Participants offered insights on healthy eating consistent with the categories of individual, interpersonal, community, physical, environmental and society-level influences described in the socioecological model. Although many participants identified gaps in dietary knowledge as a persistent problem, informants also identified extra-individual factors, including the influence of family, fellow church members, and schools, policy, advertising and media, and general societal trends, as challenges to healthy dietary intake. We highlight Appalachian residents’ recommendations for promoting healthier diets, including support groups, educational workshops, cooking classes, and community gardening. Conclusions We discuss the implications of these findings for programmatic development in the Appalachian context. PMID:23944277

  9. [Education reform with the support of the faculty--introduction of a supplementary education program including teacher support and individual guidance].

    PubMed

    Wada, Keiji; Yoshimura, Teruki

    2015-01-01

      To deal with declining levels of academic ability and motivation among students (a situation attributable to fewer high school graduates, a greater number of universities, and the diversification of entrance examination methods), one must comprehend the conditions of faculties collectively, and take appropriate measures. Using the results of examinations carried out in each grade as indices, we examined levels of academic ability and established various support programs based on the results. Basic chemistry, biology, and physics courses were designed to help first-year students acquire essential academic skills. For second, third, and fourth-year students, two types of support programs were implemented: supplementary instruction to help students improve their understanding of basic topics in pharmaceutical sciences, and an e-learning system to promote self-study, requiring minimal assistance from teachers. Although educational benefits were observed in many students, the number of learners whose understanding failed to improve as a result of the support programs continued to increase. Consequently, The Support Section for Pharmaceutical Education opened in October 2011 to address these concerns. The support section functions mainly to provide individual assistance to students who lack strong academic abilities, and provides teachers with information useful for educational reform. Here, we describe the educational support provided by our faculty and its effectiveness. PMID:25743904

  10. Internal Medicine Residents' Perceptions of Cross-Cultural Training

    PubMed Central

    Park, Elyse R; Betancourt, Joseph R; Miller, Elizabeth; Nathan, Michael; MacDonald, Ellie; Ananeh-Firempong, Owusu; Stone, Valerie E

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Physicians increasingly face the challenge of managing clinical encounters with patients from a range of cultural backgrounds. Despite widespread interest in cross-cultural care, little is known about resident physicians' perceptions of what will best enable them to provide quality care to diverse patient populations. OBJECTIVES To assess medicine residents' (1) perceptions of cross-cultural care, (2) barriers to care, and (3) training experiences and recommendations. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS Qualitative individual interviews were conducted with 26 third-year medicine residents at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston (response rate = 87%). Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. RESULTS Despite significant interest in cross-cultural care, almost all of the residents reported very little training during residency. Most had gained cross-cultural skills through informal learning. A few were skeptical about formal training, and some expressed concern that it is impossible to understand every culture. Challenges to the delivery of cross-cultural care included managing patients with limited English proficiency, who involve family in critical decision making, and who have beliefs about disease that vary from the biomedical model. Residents cited many implications to these barriers, ranging from negatively impacting the patient-physician relationship to compromised care. Training recommendations included making changes to the educational climate and informal and formal training mechanisms. CONCLUSIONS If cross-cultural education is to be successful, it must take into account residents' perspectives and be focused on overcoming residents' cited barriers. It is important to convey that cross-cultural education is a set of skills that can be taught and applied, in a time-efficient manner, rather than requiring an insurmountable knowledge base. PMID:16704391

  11. Ovarian Cancer and Body Size: Individual Participant Meta-Analysis Including 25,157 Women with Ovarian Cancer from 47 Epidemiological Studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Only about half the studies that have collected information on the relevance of women's height and body mass index to their risk of developing ovarian cancer have published their results, and findings are inconsistent. Here, we bring together the worldwide evidence, published and unpublished, and describe these relationships. Methods and Findings Individual data on 25,157 women with ovarian cancer and 81,311 women without ovarian cancer from 47 epidemiological studies were collected, checked, and analysed centrally. Adjusted relative risks of ovarian cancer were calculated, by height and by body mass index. Ovarian cancer risk increased significantly with height and with body mass index, except in studies using hospital controls. For other study designs, the relative risk of ovarian cancer per 5 cm increase in height was 1.07 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–1.09; p<0.001); this relationship did not vary significantly by women's age, year of birth, education, age at menarche, parity, menopausal status, smoking, alcohol consumption, having had a hysterectomy, having first degree relatives with ovarian or breast cancer, use of oral contraceptives, or use of menopausal hormone therapy. For body mass index, there was significant heterogeneity (p<0.001) in the findings between ever-users and never-users of menopausal hormone therapy, but not by the 11 other factors listed above. The relative risk for ovarian cancer per 5 kg/m2 increase in body mass index was 1.10 (95% CI, 1.07–1.13; p<0.001) in never-users and 0.95 (95% CI, 0.92–0.99; p = 0.02) in ever-users of hormone therapy. Conclusions Ovarian cancer is associated with height and, among never-users of hormone therapy, with body mass index. In high-income countries, both height and body mass index have been increasing in birth cohorts now developing the disease. If all other relevant factors had remained constant, then these increases in height and weight would be associated with a 3% increase

  12. Prediction of individual milk proteins including free amino acids in bovine milk using mid-infrared spectroscopy and their correlations with milk processing characteristics.

    PubMed

    McDermott, A; Visentin, G; De Marchi, M; Berry, D P; Fenelon, M A; O'Connor, P M; Kenny, O A; McParland, S

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of mid-infrared spectroscopy in predicting milk protein and free amino acid (FAA) composition in bovine milk. Milk samples were collected from 7 Irish research herds and represented cows from a range of breeds, parities, and stages of lactation. Mid-infrared spectral data in the range of 900 to 5,000 cm(-1) were available for 730 milk samples; gold standard methods were used to quantify individual protein fractions and FAA of these samples with a view to predicting these gold standard protein fractions and FAA levels with available mid-infrared spectroscopy data. Separate prediction equations were developed for each trait using partial least squares regression; accuracy of prediction was assessed using both cross validation on a calibration data set (n=400 to 591 samples) and external validation on an independent data set (n=143 to 294 samples). The accuracy of prediction in external validation was the same irrespective of whether undertaken on the entire external validation data set or just within the Holstein-Friesian breed. The strongest coefficient of correlation obtained for protein fractions in external validation was 0.74, 0.69, and 0.67 for total casein, total β-lactoglobulin, and β-casein, respectively. Total proteins (i.e., total casein, total whey, and total lactoglobulin) were predicted with greater accuracy then their respective component traits; prediction accuracy using the infrared spectrum was superior to prediction using just milk protein concentration. Weak to moderate prediction accuracies were observed for FAA. The greatest coefficient of correlation in both cross validation and external validation was for Gly (0.75), indicating a moderate accuracy of prediction. Overall, the FAA prediction models overpredicted the gold standard values. Near-unity correlations existed between total casein and β-casein irrespective of whether the traits were based on the gold standard (0.92) or mid

  13. 42 CFR 483.356 - Protection of residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.356 Protection of residents. (a) Restraint... behavior, and the resident's chronological and developmental age; size; gender; physical, medical,...

  14. 42 CFR 483.356 - Protection of residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.356 Protection of residents. (a) Restraint... behavior, and the resident's chronological and developmental age; size; gender; physical, medical,...

  15. 42 CFR 483.356 - Protection of residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.356 Protection of residents. (a) Restraint... behavior, and the resident's chronological and developmental age; size; gender; physical, medical,...

  16. 42 CFR 483.356 - Protection of residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.356 Protection of residents. (a) Restraint... behavior, and the resident's chronological and developmental age; size; gender; physical, medical,...

  17. Psychiatry Residency Training around the World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zisook, Sidney; Balon, Richard; Bjorksten, Karin S.; Everall, Ian; Dunn, Laura; Ganadjian, Krauz; Jin, Hua; Parikh, Sagar; Sciolla, Andres; Sidhartha, Tanuj; Yoo, Tai

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors compare and contrast psychiatry residency training in the United States to that in Canada and selected countries in South America, Europe, and Asia. Method: Nine individuals who are intimately familiar with psychiatry residency training in the United States (primarily chairs, training directors, associate training directors,…

  18. Accumulation and Clearance of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) in Current and Former Residents of an Exposed Community

    PubMed Central

    Seals, Ryan; Bartell, Scott M.; Steenland, Kyle

    2011-01-01

    Background Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a perfluoroalkyl acid found in > 99% of Americans. Its health effects are unknown. Prior estimates of serum half-life range from 2.3 to 3.8 years. Objectives We assessed the impact of years of residence and years since residing in the study area on serum PFOA concentration in a sample of current and former residents who were exposed to PFOA emissions from an industrial facility in six water districts in West Virginia and Ohio. Methods Serum samples and questionnaires, including residential history, were collected in 2005–2006. We modeled log serum PFOA (nanograms per milliliter) for current residents as a function of years of residence in a water district, adjusted for a variety of factors. We modeled the half-life in former residents who lived in two water districts with high exposure levels using a two-segment log-linear spline. Results We modeled serum PFOA concentration in 17,516 current residents as a function of years of residence (R2 = 0.68). Years of residence was significantly associated with PFOA concentration (1% increase in serum PFOA/year of residence), with significant heterogeneity by water district. Half-life was estimated in two water districts comprising a total of 1,573 individuals. For the participants included in our analyses, we found that years since residing in a water district was significantly associated with serum PFOA, which yielded half-lives of 2.9 and 8.5 years for water districts with higher and lower exposure levels, respectively. Conclusion Years of residence in an exposed water district is positively associated with observed serum PFOA in 2005–2006. Differences in serum clearance rate between low- and high-exposure water districts suggest a possible concentration-dependent or time-dependent clearance process or inadequate adjustment for background exposures. PMID:20870569

  19. [Pregnancy during residency].

    PubMed

    Maas, S M; van 't Hoff, B W; Rings, E H; van der Waals, F W; Büller, H A

    1992-12-19

    The number of female residents in the Netherlands has steadily increased in recent years. Due to the increased time on waiting lists to enter residency programmes and to the increased duration of training, female residents will be older during their residencies. This will probably result in an increased number of pregnancies during residencies. A questionnaire regarding pregnancy during residency was sent to 191 residents in two university hospitals in the Netherlands. The response rate was 74.3%. Fifty percent of the male and only 19% of the female residents had children. No negative effects of a pregnancy on their training were experienced or anticipated by the residents. However, a negative effect on the functioning of the department was expected. No formal provisions, like replacements were available and many solutions to replace pregnant colleagues depended on the flexibility of the colleagues. The wish to have children was high and equally distributed among male and female residents, 92% and 96%, resp. Given the difficulty to seek a permanent position and to have children after residency, the choice of many female residents will be to have their children during residency. This increase in number of pregnancies requires anticipation of the residency programme directors. They should take the lead in proposing adequate regulations. PMID:1470257

  20. The Individual Pupil Profile (Including Manual).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Anne; Berman, Steven

    Because of the diversity, range, and combination of disabilities at the Center for Multiple-Handicapped Children, operated under the auspices of the New York City Board of Education, a unique instrument was needed for assessing functional levels, setting goals, and charting progress of handicapped children in special education facilities, regular…

  1. Characteristics of Optometric Residencies in the Veterans Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Daniel J.; Newcomb, Robert D.

    1986-01-01

    Results of a study of the characteristics of 10 Veterans Administration optometric residency programs are presented and compared with results of an earlier survey. Factors analyzed include resident characteristics, specializations, program design, residents' salaries and health insurance, and post-residency employment options. (MSE)

  2. 26 CFR 1.82-1 - Payments for or reimbursements of expenses of moving from one residence to another residence...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... moving from one residence to another residence attributable to employment or self-employment. 1.82-1... employment or self-employment. (a) Reimbursements in gross income—(1) In general. Any amount received or... from one residence to another residence attributable to employment or self-employment is includible...

  3. Overwork Among Residents in India: A Medical Resident's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Azhar, Gulrez S.; Azhar, Abdullah Z.; Azhar, Ahmad S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper argues that medical residents who do most of the hard work in big hospitals and medical colleges are overworked. A hierarchical organizational structure, staffing patterns, and fear of failure in examinations leads to overwork among residents going unreported. This can lead to poor academic performance and research work. Gaps in communication have serious implications on patient health. Undesirable practices like LAMA (leave against medical advice) also result from overwork. Issues of pay and contracts including mandatory service need to be looked into carefully. National and international recommendations on work hours have consistently been ignored. The solutions suggested are simple and easy to implement. PMID:24479024

  4. The role of the resid solvent in coprocessing with finely divided catalysts. Quarterly report, January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.

    1994-07-01

    The research reported in this progress report describes the continuation of coal-resid coprocessing reactions which were begun last quarter (October to December 1993). During, last quarter, Maya and FHC-623 resid were evaluated as whole resids and as the hexane soluble fraction in noncatalytic and catalytic reactions at 400{degree}C. During this current quarter, reactions were performed using Pittsburgh No. 8 bituminous coal and several different solvents including Maya and FHC-623 resids. In order to evaluate the role of the different components in resids, the resids were separated into hexane soluble materials and hexane insoluble materials. The hexane solubles, which should contain the naphthene present in the resid, and the untreated whole resids were reacted with coal at the same liquefaction conditions as when the resids were reacted individually. In the catalytic reactions, a Mo naphthenate precursor was used in the presence of sulfur. The catalyst generated in situ was MoS{sub 2} . The effect of different reaction conditions on the resid was monitored by gas chromatography in which the retention times of the eluting peaks were determined. The amount of eluent present at different retention times was determined and compared. The effect of the reaction system on coal behavior during liquefaction was determined by coal conversion to THF solubles and solvent fractionation of the reaction products.

  5. Perceptions of pediatric chief residents on minority house staff recruitment and retention in large pediatric residency programs.

    PubMed

    Giardino, A P; Cooper, M C

    1999-08-01

    This study examined methods of recruiting and retaining minority house staff at US residency training programs. A 28-item questionnaire was mailed to pediatric chief residents at 78 US training programs with more than 35 residents. The response rate was 74%. Programs were characterized by patient populations served, number of ethnic/racial minority house staff and faculty, and the presence of minority house staff support systems within the institution. In this largely urban sample, minority recruitment and retention was reported as an explicit priority by 40% of pediatric chief residents. The majority (71%) reported that their house staff recruitment committees had no explicitly defined recruitment goals regarding minority house staff. Seventy-seven percent reported that within their departments, recruitment efforts toward minorities were no different than for nonminorities. Overall, few minority house staff and minority faculty were identified in the responding institutions. The most frequently reported intra-institutional support systems for minority house staff included individual pairing with faculty advisors from the same minority group (29%), an affirmative-action office located at the institution (8%), and the existence of a minority faculty support group (4%). These results indicate that pediatric chief residents may not be fully aware of the specific challenges related to the recruitment and retention of minority physicians, and most house staff recruitment committees do not have explicit goals in this regard. PMID:12656435

  6. Ethics education for dermatology residents.

    PubMed

    Bercovitch, Lionel; Long, Thomas P

    2009-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada both require the teaching and demonstration of general competencies, which include professionalism and ethics as a condition of training program accreditation and specialty certification, respectively. Residents in dermatology and other specialties perceive their training in ethics is inadequate in numerous areas. Residents and specialists in dermatology encounter numerous ethical and professional issues throughout their workday. A dermatoethics curriculum was developed at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University in 2001 to address the need for training in bioethics and professionalism. The subject matter of the curriculum and didactic methods are reviewed. Guidelines for effective teaching of ethics and professionalism to dermatology residents are presented. It is important to make the teaching sessions relevant to the residents' day-to-day work experiences and personal needs. Honesty and openness on the part of faculty and trainees is important. Although informality fosters such exchanges, the sessions should be a learning experience. Resources outside the residency program should be used as necessary. Evaluation of ethics and professionalism in trainees is addressed. PMID:19539170

  7. Encouraging energy conservation in multifamily housing: RUBS and other methods of allocating energy costs to residents

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, L

    1980-10-01

    Methods of encouraging energy conservation in multifamily housing by allocating energy costs to residents are discussed; specifically, methods appropriate for use in master metered buildings without equipment to monitor energy consumption in individual apartments are examined. Several devices available for monitoring individual energy consumption are also discussed plus methods of comparing the energy savings and cost effectiveness of monitoring devices with those of other means of promoting conservation. Specific information in Volume I includes a comparison study on energy use in master and individually metered buildings; types of appropriate conservation programs for master metered buildings; a description of the Resident Utility Billing System (RUBS); energy savings associated with RUBS; Resident reactions to RUBS; cost effectiveness of RUBS for property owners; potential abuses, factors limiting widespread use, and legal status of RUBS. Part I of Volume II contains a cost allocation decision guide and Part II in Volume II presents the RUBS Operations Manual. Pertinent appendices to some chapters are attached. (MCW)

  8. Teaching Psychiatric Administration to Senior Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbott, John A.; Sacks, Michael

    1982-01-01

    Describes a course in psychiatric administration which is part of a "standard" psychiatric residency training program. The course combined both didactic and experiential learning for senior residents performing administrative duties for the first time. Includes details of each week's seminar. Discusses course evaluation by both teachers and…

  9. Residence Hall Furnishings Top 20 List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tampke, Dale

    1999-01-01

    Provides advice on how to best meet the furniture needs of student residents now and in the future to ensure their privacy and value from the residence hall experience. Twenty tips are highlighted that include considering fire safety, upholstering, lifecycle costs, input from stakeholders, the Americans with Disabilities Act, comfort, lighting,…

  10. 42 CFR 435.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... State placement, the term also includes foster care homes, licensed as set forth in 45 CFR 1355.20, and... accordance with 45 CFR 233.40, the rules governing residence under the AFDC program. (4) For any..., AND AMERICAN SAMOA General Eligibility Requirements § 435.403 State residence. (a) Requirement....

  11. 36 CFR 59.4 - Residency requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... a project sponsor, are covered in 43 CFR part 17 which implements the provisions of Title VI of the... discrimination on the basis of residence, including preferential reservation or membership systems, except to the... assisted programs and services on the basis of residence, except in reasonable fee differentials....

  12. Tuition fees for residents: one physician's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, B

    1999-01-01

    Although the education, expertise and guidance of Canada's academic physicians cannot be overlooked, individual universities appear to see tuition fees for residents as an easy source of much needed revenue. If tuition should "rise to market levels," perhaps residents' wages should similarly rise to reflect the amount of training received, skills required, responsibilities discharged and time expended. Unfortunately, tuition fees will be an area of contention for some time. Support of provincial resident associations and medical societies may lend both moral and, possibly, financial support to future members of the profession. PMID:10530300

  13. Life After Residency.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-04-01

    Many residents don't receive any formal business training. The University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School created a crash course to teach residents some of the business and job-hunting basics they'll need. PMID:27049910

  14. Resident Research and Scholarly Activity in Internal Medicine Residency Training Programs

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Rachel B; Hebert, Randy S; Wright, Scott M

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES 1) To describe how internal medicine residency programs fulfill the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) scholarly activity training requirement including the current context of resident scholarly work, and 2) to compare findings between university and nonuniversity programs. DESIGN Cross-sectional mailed survey. SETTING ACGME-accredited internal medicine residency programs. PARTICIPANTS Internal medicine residency program directors. MEASUREMENTS Data were collected on 1) interpretation of the scholarly activity requirement, 2) support for resident scholarship, 3) scholarly activities of residents, 4) attitudes toward resident research, and 5) program characteristics. University and nonuniversity programs were compared. MAIN RESULTS The response rate was 78%. Most residents completed a topic review with presentation (median, 100%) to fulfill the requirement. Residents at nonuniversity programs were more likely to complete case reports (median, 40% vs 25%; P =.04) and present at local or regional meetings (median, 25% vs 20%; P =.01), and were just as likely to conduct hypothesis-driven research (median, 20% vs 20%; P =.75) and present nationally (median, 10% vs 5%; P =.10) as residents at university programs. Nonuniversity programs were more likely to report lack of faculty mentors (61% vs 31%; P <.001) and resident interest (55% vs 40%; P =.01) as major barriers to resident scholarship. Programs support resident scholarship through research curricula (47%), funding (46%), and protected time (32%). CONCLUSIONS Internal medicine residents complete a variety of projects to fulfill the scholarly activity requirement. Nonuniversity programs are doing as much as university programs in meeting the requirement and supporting resident scholarship despite reporting significant barriers. PMID:15836549

  15. 24 CFR 964.15 - HUD policy on resident management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... corporation. Potential benefits of resident-managed entities include improved quality of life, experiencing the dignity of meaningful work, enabling residents to choose where they want to live, and...

  16. 24 CFR 964.15 - HUD policy on resident management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... corporation. Potential benefits of resident-managed entities include improved quality of life, experiencing the dignity of meaningful work, enabling residents to choose where they want to live, and...

  17. First national in-service examination for pathology residents.

    PubMed

    Lockard, W T; Beeler, M F; Stembridge, V A; Troy, L A

    1985-01-01

    To fulfill an identified need in pathology residency program training, in 1983 the American Society of Clinical Pathologists introduced the first national in-service examination for pathology residents. This 175-item objective examination structured with seven subtest categories for various clinical rotations was administered to 1,200 residents-in-training representing 145 training programs, 40 states, and the District of Columbia. Individual norm-referenced results reports returned to each examinee, and program reports to each residency program director, indicated rank of individual examinee performance in each category and in all categories as well as with defined peer groups. Anonymity of individual results was optional to program directors. The data indicate that although performance improves with each subsequent year of residency training, the improvement is not so great as expected and that the level of performance of residents entering training was higher than anticipated. Postexamination evaluation indicated the need for this effort to continue. PMID:3966428

  18. Documentation of quality improvement exposure by internal medicine residency applicants

    PubMed Central

    Kolade, Victor O.; Sethi, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Background Quality improvement (QI) has become an essential component of medical care in the United States. In residency programs, QI is a focus area of the Clinical Learning Environment Review visits conducted by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. The readiness of applicants to internal medicine residency to engage in QI on day one is unknown. Purpose To document the reporting of QI training or experience in residency applications. Methods Electronic Residency Application Service applications to a single internal medicine program were reviewed individually looking for reported QI involvement or actual projects in the curriculum vitae (CVs), personal statements (PSs), and letters of recommendation (LORs). CVs were also reviewed for evidence of education in QI such as completion of Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) modules. Results Of 204 candidates shortlisted for interview, seven had QI items on their CVs, including one basic IHI certificate. Three discussed their QI work in their PSs, and four had recommendation letters describing their involvement in QI. One applicant had both CV and LOR evidence, so that 13 (6%) documented QI engagement. Conclusion Practice of or instruction in QI is rarely mentioned in application documents of prospective internal medicine interns. PMID:26908376

  19. Enhancement of resident education in sonography using high-speed PACS/ATM image transmission: work in progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerinckx, Andre J.; Grant, Edward G.; Melany, Michelle; Narin, Sherelle L.; Hayrapetian, Alek S.; Valentino, Daniel J.

    1996-05-01

    Transmission of high quality images between hospitals would be of value by exposing residents at individual institutions to a greater mix of disease processes. This problem is particularly serious in ultrasound where individual hospitals may not perform the entire range of examinations. We undertook this study to assess the effectiveness of image transmission via a PACS/ATM global network in improving ultrasound education among residents at affiliated hospitals. Image management was performed by AGFA PACS; global network was Asynchronous Transfer Mode. Selected cases from the two hospitals (OB/GYN cases at one, vascular at the other) were transmitted. Readout/teaching sessions included cases performed at base hospital and those received via network. Evaluation forms were collected from participants at both institutions. No image degradation occurred with transmission. Residents' exposure to ultrasound cases increased at the two hospitals. The system was considered an excellent teaching tool by all faculty and residents surveyed.

  20. Facilty Focus: Residence Halls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunnewell, James F., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Western Ridge Residence at Colorado College and Beard Hall at Wheaton College. The buildings feature multiple levels that take advantage of views and also help create a "homey" feeling. (EV)

  1. Technology in Residence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Jordan

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the necessity for incorporating current technology in today's college residence halls to meet the more diverse and continued activities of its students. Technology addressed covers data networking and telecommunications, heating and cooling systems, and fire-safety systems. (GR)

  2. Surgical residency training and international volunteerism: a national survey of residents from 2 surgical specialties

    PubMed Central

    Matar, Wadih Y.; Trottier, Daniel C.; Balaa, Fady; Fairful-Smith, Robin; Moroz, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Background Many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) lack basic surgical resources, resulting in avoidable disability and mortality. Recently, residents in surgical training programs have shown increasing interest in overseas elective experiences to assist surgical programs in LMICs. The purpose of this study was to survey Canadian surgical residents about their interest in international volunteerism. Methods We sent a web-based survey to all general and orthopedic surgery residents enrolled in surgical training programs in Canada. The survey assessed residents’ interests, attitudes and motivations, and perceived barriers and aids with respect to international volunteerism. Results In all, 361 residents completed the survey for a response rate of 38.0%. Half of the respondents indicated that the availability of an international surgery elective would have positively influenced their selection of a residency program. Excluding the 18 residents who had volunteered during residency, 63.8% of the remaining residents confirmed an interest in international volunteering with “contributing to an important cause,” “teaching” and “tourism/cultural enhancement” as the leading reasons for their interest. Perceived barriers included “lack of financial support” and “lack of available organized opportunities.” All (100%) respondents who had done an international elective during residency confirmed that they would pursue such work in the future. Conclusion Administrators of Canadian surgical programs should be aware of strong resident interest in global health care and accordingly develop opportunities by encouraging faculty mentorships and resources for global health teaching. PMID:22854155

  3. Residents as Educators: A Modern Model.

    PubMed

    Kensinger, Clark D; McMaster, William G; Vella, Michael A; Sexton, Kevin W; Snyder, Rebecca A; Terhune, Kyla P

    2015-01-01

    Education during surgical residency has changed significantly. As part of the shifting landscape, the importance of an organized and structured curriculum has increased. However, establishing this is often difficult secondary to clinical demands and pressure both on faculty and residents. We present a peer-assisted learning model for academic institutions without professional non-clinical educations. The "resident as educator" (RAE) model empowers residents to be the organizers of the education curriculum. RAE is built on a culture of commitment to education, skill development and team building, allowing the upper level residents to develop and execute the curriculum. Several modules designed to address junior level residents and medical students' educational needs have been implemented, including (1) intern boot camp, (2) summer school, (3) technical skill sessions, (4) trauma orientation, (5) weekly teaching conferences, and (4) a fourth year medical student surgical preparation course. Promoting residents as educators leads to an overall benefit for the program by being cost-effective and time-efficient, while simultaneously promoting professional development of residents and a culture of education. PMID:26143515

  4. Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors' selection criteria.

    PubMed

    Orr, Justin D; Hoffmann, Jeffrey D; Arrington, Edward D; Gerlinger, Tad L; Devine, John G; Belmont, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Factors associated with successful selection in U.S. Army orthopaedic surgical programs are unreported. The current analysis includes survey data from all Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors (PDs) to determine these factors. PDs at all Army orthopaedic surgery residency programs were provided 17 factors historically considered critical to successful selection and asked to rank order the factors as well as assign a level of importance to each. Results were collated and overall mean rankings are provided. PDs unanimously expressed that performance during the on-site orthopaedic surgery rotation at the individual program director's institution was most important. Respondents overwhelmingly reported that Steps 1 and 2 licensing exam scores were next most important, respectively. Survey data demonstrated that little importance was placed on letters of recommendation and personal statements. PDs made no discriminations based on allopathic or osteopathic degrees. The most important factors for Army orthopaedic surgery residency selection were clerkship performance at the individual PD's institution and licensing examination score performance. Army PDs consider both USMLE and COMLEX results, because Army programs have a higher percentage of successful osteopathic applicants. PMID:25988694

  5. Assimilating Traditional Healing Into Preventive Medicine Residency Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Kesler, Denece O; Hopkins, L Olivia; Torres, Eliseo; Prasad, Arti

    2015-11-01

    Comprehensive cultural competency includes knowledge and awareness of culturally based healing and wellness practices. Healthcare providers should be aware of the individual patient's beliefs, culture, and use of culturally based health practices because patients may adopt such practices for general wellness or as adjunct therapies without the benefit of discussion with their healthcare provider. This article describes the culturally based traditional healing curriculum that has been implemented in the University of New Mexico Public Health and General Preventive Medicine Residency Program in order to fulfill this knowledge necessity. Curricular elements were added in a stepwise manner starting in 2011, with the full content as described implemented starting in 2013. Data were collected annually with evaluation of the full curriculum occurring in 2015. New Mexico has a diverse population base that includes predominantly Hispanic and Native American cultures, making the inclusion of curriculum regarding traditional healing practices very pertinent. Residents at the University of New Mexico were educated through several curricular components about topics such as Curanderismo, the art of Mexican Folk Healing. An innovative approach was used, with a compendium of training methods that included learning directly from traditional healers and participation in healing practices. The incorporation of this residency curriculum resulted in a means to produce physicians well trained in approaching patient care and population health with knowledge of culturally based health practices in order to facilitate healthy patients and communities. PMID:26477902

  6. Redesigning journal club in residency.

    PubMed

    Al Achkar, Morhaf

    2016-01-01

    The gap between production and implementation of knowledge is the main reason for the suboptimal quality of health care. To eliminate this gap and improve the quality of patient care, journal club (JC) in graduate medical education provides an opportunity for learning the skills of evidence-based medicine. JC, however, continues to face many challenges mainly due to poorly defined goals, inadequate preparation, and lack of interest. This article presents an innovative model to prepare and present JC based on three pillars: dialogical learning through group discussion, mentored residents as peer teachers, and including JC as part of a structured curriculum to learn evidence-based medicine. This engaging model has the potential to transform JC from a moribund session that is daunting for residents into a lively discussion to redefine clinical practice using the most current evidence. PMID:27313486

  7. Redesigning journal club in residency

    PubMed Central

    Al Achkar, Morhaf

    2016-01-01

    The gap between production and implementation of knowledge is the main reason for the suboptimal quality of health care. To eliminate this gap and improve the quality of patient care, journal club (JC) in graduate medical education provides an opportunity for learning the skills of evidence-based medicine. JC, however, continues to face many challenges mainly due to poorly defined goals, inadequate preparation, and lack of interest. This article presents an innovative model to prepare and present JC based on three pillars: dialogical learning through group discussion, mentored residents as peer teachers, and including JC as part of a structured curriculum to learn evidence-based medicine. This engaging model has the potential to transform JC from a moribund session that is daunting for residents into a lively discussion to redefine clinical practice using the most current evidence. PMID:27313486

  8. Factors Influencing Residents' Satisfaction in Residential Aged Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Shu-Chiung; Boldy, Duncan P.; Lee, Andy H.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify the important factors influencing residents' satisfaction in residential aged care and to provide a better understanding of their interrelationships. Design and Methods: A cross-sectional survey design was used to collect the required information, including resident satisfaction, resident dependency…

  9. Resident Transitions to Assisted Living: A Role for Social Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Noelle LeCrone; Koenig, Terry; Dabelko-Schoeny, Holly

    2012-01-01

    This study explored key aspects of resident transitions to assisted living (AL), including the frequency and importance of preadmission resident education and the potential role of social workers in this setting. To examine the factors that may help or hinder resident transitions to AL, a written survey was administered to a statewide,…

  10. Value Dimensions Versus Social Indicators as Predictors of Individual Modernity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korsching, Peter F.; Burdge, Rabel J.

    This investigation is an empirical attempt to locate variables which best predict individual modernity and to explicate causal relationships. The dimensions chosen for analysis are defined by several relevant models in past research. The independent variables include two personal characteristics (age and sex); five structural variables (residence,…

  11. Resident Wellness Matters: Optimizing Resident Education and Wellness Through the Learning Environment.

    PubMed

    Jennings, M L; Slavin, Stuart J

    2015-09-01

    The problem of poor mental health in residency is well established. Burnout, depression, and suicidal ideation are prevalent among resident physicians, and these problems appear to persist into practice. Leaders in graduate medical education such as policy makers at the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and directors of individual programs and institutions should acknowledge these important issues and take steps to address them. The ACGME's Clinical Learning Environment Review (CLER) Program currently outlines an expectation that institutions both educate residents about burnout and measure burnout annually. The CLER Program could go further by expecting institutions to create quality initiatives to enhance resident wellness and increase resident engagement. The ACGME should also call for and support research in this area. Leaders or directors of individual programs and institutions should consider wellness initiatives that both (1) identify and address suboptimal aspects of the learning environment and (2) train residents in resilience skills. Efforts to improve the residency learning environment could be guided by the work of Maslach and Leiter, who describe six categories of work stress that can contribute to burnout: (1) workload, (2) control, (3) balance between effort and reward, (4) community, (5) fairness, and (6) values. PMID:26177527

  12. A cross-cultural pediatric residency program merger.

    PubMed

    Cora-Bramble, Denice; Joseph, Jill; Jain, Swati; Huang, Zhihuan Jennifer; Gaughan-Chaplain, Maura; Batshaw, Mark

    2006-12-01

    Academic health centers, health systems, and, to a lesser degree, medical schools and residency programs have merged, consolidated, or formed strategic alliances. There are few published reports of residency program mergers, and only one involving a merger between a historically black college and university (HBCU) and a predominantly white institution.This case study describes a merger between two dissimilar urban pediatric residency programs. The Howard University Hospital (HUH) pediatric residency program is affiliated with a HBCU, and the Children's National Medical Center (CNMC) pediatric residency program, is affiliated with a leading children's hospital which had relatively few underrepresented minority physicians or residents. The pediatric residency program merger between HUH and CNMC occurred in 2003 and presented organizational, cultural, and programmatic challenges and opportunities for both institutions. However, there was a sharp contrast between the opinions of the HUH and CNMC residents with respect to the perceived effect of the merger on residency training, patient care, and the individual institutions. Increasing the size and diversity of CNMC's resident pool and the granting of accreditation for the community health track were positive outcomes, but the magnitude of the institutional change process and the disruption to residents' routines and schedules were significant challenges. The merger served as an impetus to embed cultural competency guiding principles and expectations into the organizational fabric of the combined residency program. PMID:17122482

  13. Teaching pediatric residents about child maltreatment.

    PubMed

    Dubowitz, H; Black, M

    1991-10-01

    Child maltreatment is a growing problem faced by pediatricians; however, there are many deficiencies in pediatricians' relevant knowledge and skills. Residency programs typically have included limited teaching in the area of child maltreatment. Fifty pediatric residents participated in an evaluation of a model educational course in child maltreatment developed by an interdisciplinary faculty. The course resulted in significant short-term improvements in knowledge and skills as well as a greater sense of competence in managing cases of child maltreatment. The importance of teaching pediatric residents about the "new morbidity" is discussed. PMID:1939686

  14. Can We Scientifically Select Residence Hall Staff?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wotruba, Richard T.

    In order to insure that only those individuals who are capable of facilitating positive growth within others are chosen as Resident Assistants (R.A.'s), it is vitally important to use a method of selection that is as objective as possible. In an effort to meet this challenge, Holy Cross College initiated a three year study to develop such a…

  15. 42 CFR 436.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... “foster care homes”, licensed as set forth in 45 CFR 1355.20, and providing food, shelter and supportive... determined in accordance with 45 CFR 233.40, the rules governing residence under the AFDC program. (4) For...); or (ii) Living and which the individual entered with a job commitment or seeking employment...

  16. Teaching professionalism to residents.

    PubMed

    Klein, Eileen J; Jackson, J Craig; Kratz, Lyn; Marcuse, Edgar K; McPhillips, Heather A; Shugerman, Richard P; Watkins, Sandra; Stapleton, F Bruder

    2003-01-01

    The need to teach professionalism during residency has been affirmed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, which will require documentation of education and evaluation of professionalism by 2007. Recently the American Academy of Pediatrics has proposed the following components of professionalism be taught and measured: honesty/integrity, reliability/responsibility, respect for others, compassion/empathy, self-improvement, self-awareness/knowledge of limits, communication/collaboration, and altruism/advocacy. The authors describe a curriculum for introducing the above principles of professionalism into a pediatrics residency that could serve as a model for other programs. The curriculum is taught at an annual five-day retreat for interns, with 11 mandatory sessions devoted to addressing key professionalism issues. The authors also explain how the retreat is evaluated and how the retreat's topics are revisited during the residency, and discuss general issues of teaching and evaluating professionalism. PMID:12525406

  17. Financing Residency Training Redesign

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Patricia A.; Waller, Elaine; Green, Larry A.; Crane, Steven; Garvin, Roger D.; Pugno, Perry A.; Kozakowski, Stanley M.; Douglass, Alan B.; Jones, Samuel; Eiff, M. Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Background Redesign in the health care delivery system creates a need to reorganize resident education. How residency programs fund these redesign efforts is not known. Methods Family medicine residency program directors participating in the Preparing Personal Physicians for Practice (P4) project were surveyed between 2006 and 2011 on revenues and expenses associated with training redesign. Results A total of 6 university-based programs in the study collectively received $5,240,516 over the entire study period, compared with $4,718,943 received by 8 community-based programs. Most of the funding for both settings came from grants, which accounted for 57.8% and 86.9% of funding for each setting, respectively. Department revenue represented 3.4% of university-based support and 13.1% of community-based support. The total average revenue (all years combined) per program for university-based programs was just under $875,000, and the average was nearly $590,000 for community programs. The vast majority of funds were dedicated to salary support (64.8% in university settings versus 79.3% in community-based settings). Based on the estimated ratio of new funding relative to the annual costs of training using national data for a 3-year program with 7 residents per year, training redesign added 3% to budgets for university-based programs and about 2% to budgets for community-based programs. Conclusions Residencies undergoing training redesign used a variety of approaches to fund these changes. The costs of innovations marginally increased the estimated costs of training. Federal and local funding sources were most common, and costs were primarily salary related. More research is needed on the costs of transforming residency training. PMID:26140119

  18. 26 CFR 1.6049-8 - Interest and original issue discount paid to residents of Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... residents of Canada. 1.6049-8 Section 1.6049-8 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... original issue discount paid to residents of Canada. (a) Interest subject to reporting requirement. For... nonresident alien individual is an individual who resides in Canada and is not a United States citizen....

  19. 26 CFR 1.6049-8 - Interest and original issue discount paid to residents of Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... residents of Canada. 1.6049-8 Section 1.6049-8 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Interest and original issue discount paid to residents of Canada. (a) Interest subject to reporting... Canadian nonresident alien individual is an individual who resides in Canada and is not a United...

  20. An Assigned Teaching Resident Rotation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels-Brady, Catherine; Rieder, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors' adult psychiatry residency training program identified several educational needs for residents at their institution. Junior residents needed enhanced learning of clinical interviewing skills and learning connected to the inpatient psychiatry ward rotations, and senior residents needed opportunities to prepare for the…

  1. Impact of pharmaceutical company representatives on internal medicine residency programs. A survey of residency program directors.

    PubMed

    Lichstein, P R; Turner, R C; O'Brien, K

    1992-05-01

    To survey internal medicine residency program directors regarding interactions between their residents and pharmaceutical company (PC) representatives (PCRs) a questionnaire was sent to the directors of all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved internal medicine residency programs. The survey included 444 program directors, of whom 272 (61.16%) responded. The majority of program directors, 228 (83.8%), allowed PCRs to meet with residents during working hours and 241 (88.6%) permitted PC sponsorship of conferences. About half of the program directors were "moderately" or "very" concerned about the potential adverse effects of PC marketing on resident attitudes and prescribing practices. Seventy percent "agreed" or "strongly agreed" that the benefits of PC sponsorship outweigh the adverse effects and 41.5% believed that refusal to allow PCRs to meet with residents would jeopardize PC funding of other departmental activities. Most program directors reported that alternate funds for conferences were available if PC support was withdrawn. "Unethical" marketing activities were observed by 14.3% of program directors and 37.5% reported that residents had participated in PC-sponsored trips during the 3 years prior to the survey. At the time of this survey, only 35.3% of programs had developed formal policies regulating PCR activities and 25.7% provided residents with formal instruction on marketing issues. Knowledge of the current extent of PCR interactions with residents may be helpful to program directors in developing policies regulating PC-marketing activities. PMID:1580704

  2. 42 CFR 436.114 - Individuals deemed to be receiving AFDC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... child or relative of the individual (or other individual living in the same household) to be receiving... ineligibility, to each dependent child and each relative with whom such a child is living (including the... State plan to provide Medicaid to non-residents, the State may continue to provide the 4-month...

  3. 42 CFR 435.115 - Individuals deemed to be receiving AFDC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... relative of the individual (or other individual living in the same household) to be receiving AFDC, if the... ineligibility, to each dependent child and each relative with whom such a child is living (including the... chosen in its State plan to provide Medicaid to non-residents, the State may continue to provide the...

  4. Induction process of trainees in pathology residency

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Imran; Ali, Natasha

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of the induction process of pathology residency at The Aga Khan University hospital. The Department of Postgraduate Medical Education was established in 1985. The induction process is an exhaustive exercise that includes an admission test held simultaneously in Karachi, Hyderabad, Lahore, and Rawalpindi, followed by an interview of the shortlisted candidates. The pathology residency program was started 25 years ago and since then the induction process has undergone major changes with the course of time. PMID:27313487

  5. Mind the Gap: Promoting Careers in Academic Research to Psychiatry Residents

    PubMed Central

    Posporelis, Sotirios; Sawa, Akira; Smith, Gwenn S.; Stitzer, Maxine L.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Chisolm, Margaret S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective With the shift of interest in psychiatry towards patient-oriented research with clinically relevant outcomes, there is a critical need for well-trained psychiatrist-scientists. The authors report on two developmentally-tailored, longitudinal research training curricula designed to use peer mentoring to bridge the gap between physicians and scientists, and to promote careers in academic research. Methods The authors instituted two independent research training curricula, one for first-year and one for second-to-fourth year psychiatry residents, spanning two campuses of one institutional residency training program. Each curriculum’s participants included psychiatry residents and peer scientific investigators, and both were attended by senior scientists and departmental leaders. The authors developed and administered an anonymous survey at the end of the first cycle of the first-year resident curriculum to assess participant attitudes. Results The first-year and second-to-fourth-year resident curricula have been implemented for 3and 2 years respectively. The authors observed overall participant satisfaction with the first-year curricula, independent of trainee status. Furthermore, first-year psychiatry residents reported increased interest in academic research careers after exposure to the curricula. Conclusions Results suggest it is possible to encourage academic research careers using peer mentoring, an innovative approach that requires minimal funding, little disruption to the residents’ schedule, and engages the gamut of individuals involved in psychiatry care and research: psychiatrists-in-training and young non-clinician scientists-in-training. PMID:24497181

  6. The future of residency education: implementing a competency-based educational model.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Frederick D; Frey, Keith A

    2007-02-01

    Graduate medical programs are faced with increasing calls for competency-based education. All accredited residencies and fellowships must now demonstrate that graduates are competent in six key areas, and outcomes data must be used to improve each program. The transition to competency-based education has challenged programs in all specialties. We describe the design, implementation, and outcomes measurement of a comprehensive, competency-based family medicine curriculum that uses multiple educational components and assessment tools in various settings and relies on both formative and summative feedback. Components include inpatient and outpatient core competencies, a longitudinal didactic curriculum, a competency-based procedures curriculum, and use of medical evidence to improve individual patient care in ambulatory practice. In addition to multiple evaluation tools (eg, video monitoring, rotation-specific evaluations, adviser-advisee meetings, faculty meetings, and checklist evaluations of procedures and physical examinations), residents receive feedback from patients, faculty, nurses, transcriptionists, and referring physicians. The curriculum demonstrates resident competence in six core areas and resident confidence in skills acquired by the completion of training. The evaluation system promotes greater objectivity in information provided to future employers and hospitals about residents. This model provides a curricular template for other accredited residency programs. PMID:17273954

  7. Impact of cadaveric surgical anatomy training on urology residents knowledge: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Serkan; Huri, Emre; Tatar, İlkan; Sargon, Mustafa; Karakan, Tolga; Yağlı, Ömer Faruk; Bağcıoğlu, Murat; Larre, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Cadaveric dissection is used as a major tool for anatomy education at the medical school. In this study we aimed to determine how a uro-anatomy cadaveric dissection course would impact urology residents knowledge. Materials and methods: A three days course was given to 50 urology residents by experienced trainers in 1–3 June 2012 at Ege University Medical School’s Anatomy Department, İzmir, Turkey. Efficacy of the course was assessed using a multiple choice questionnaire of 20 questions given before and after the course. Results: Completed questionnaires before and after the course were available for 25 residents (50%) that were included. Residents answered correctly to 11.7 out of 20 questions (59%) before the course and 13.0 out of 20 (65%) after (p<0.05). In individuals analysis, 16 residents (64%) increased their scores, 4 (16%) had similar scores and 5 (20%) had lower scores. The number of correct answers for 6 out of the 20 questions was lower following the course. Conclusion: This cadaveric surgical anatomy course was effective in improving surgical anatomy knowledge for most urology residents but not all and helped to identify ways to improve the course in the future. PMID:26328207

  8. Neurosurgery resident leadership development: an innovative approach.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Jeffrey E; Dahdaleh, Nader S; Albert, Gregory W; Greenlee, Jeremy D

    2011-02-01

    A great deal of time and resources go into the development and training of neurosurgeons. One area that has minimal literature and assessment is leadership development. Under the core competency of interpersonal and communication skills, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has indicated that residents are expected to work effectively as a member or leader of a healthcare team. This article reveals how a structured leadership program was developed so that residents are better prepared for the role of chief resident and future leadership roles. Beginning in October 2006, residents attended a series of 1-hour workshops conducted monthly. Topics included leadership style, conflict management, effective feedback, team building, team leadership, motivation, and moving from peer to leader. A retrospective pretest was conducted at the end of the program. Residents reported a significant knowledge gain for the majority of topics. Resident comments indicated a greater awareness of the impact of leading and ways to improve their personal leadership. Quantitatively and qualitatively, residents and faculty reported that the leadership program made a significant impact on the development of future neurosurgical leaders. PMID:21135732

  9. The Fukushima Health Management Survey: estimation of external doses to residents in Fukushima Prefecture

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Yasumura, Seiji; Ozasa, Kotaro; Kobashi, Gen; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Makoto; Akahane, Keiichi; Yonai, Shunsuke; Ohtsuru, Akira; Sakai, Akira; Sakata, Ritsu; Kamiya, Kenji; Abe, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    The Fukushima Health Management Survey (including the Basic Survey for external dose estimation and four detailed surveys) was launched after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The Basic Survey consists of a questionnaire that asks Fukushima Prefecture residents about their behavior in the first four months after the accident; and responses to the questionnaire have been returned from many residents. The individual external doses are estimated by using digitized behavior data and a computer program that included daily gamma ray dose rate maps drawn after the accident. The individual external doses of 421,394 residents for the first four months (excluding radiation workers) had a distribution as follows: 62.0%, <1 mSv; 94.0%, <2 mSv; 99.4%, <3 mSv. The arithmetic mean and maximum for the individual external doses were 0.8 and 25 mSv, respectively. While most dose estimation studies were based on typical scenarios of evacuation and time spent inside/outside, the Basic Survey estimated doses considering individually different personal behaviors. Thus, doses for some individuals who did not follow typical scenarios could be revealed. Even considering such extreme cases, the estimated external doses were generally low and no discernible increased incidence of radiation-related health effects is expected. PMID:26239643

  10. The Fukushima Health Management Survey: estimation of external doses to residents in Fukushima Prefecture.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Yasumura, Seiji; Ozasa, Kotaro; Kobashi, Gen; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Makoto; Akahane, Keiichi; Yonai, Shunsuke; Ohtsuru, Akira; Sakai, Akira; Sakata, Ritsu; Kamiya, Kenji; Abe, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    The Fukushima Health Management Survey (including the Basic Survey for external dose estimation and four detailed surveys) was launched after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The Basic Survey consists of a questionnaire that asks Fukushima Prefecture residents about their behavior in the first four months after the accident; and responses to the questionnaire have been returned from many residents. The individual external doses are estimated by using digitized behavior data and a computer program that included daily gamma ray dose rate maps drawn after the accident. The individual external doses of 421,394 residents for the first four months (excluding radiation workers) had a distribution as follows: 62.0%, <1 mSv; 94.0%, <2 mSv; 99.4%, <3 mSv. The arithmetic mean and maximum for the individual external doses were 0.8 and 25 mSv, respectively. While most dose estimation studies were based on typical scenarios of evacuation and time spent inside/outside, the Basic Survey estimated doses considering individually different personal behaviors. Thus, doses for some individuals who did not follow typical scenarios could be revealed. Even considering such extreme cases, the estimated external doses were generally low and no discernible increased incidence of radiation-related health effects is expected. PMID:26239643

  11. The Fukushima Health Management Survey: estimation of external doses to residents in Fukushima Prefecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Yasumura, Seiji; Ozasa, Kotaro; Kobashi, Gen; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Makoto; Akahane, Keiichi; Yonai, Shunsuke; Ohtsuru, Akira; Sakai, Akira; Sakata, Ritsu; Kamiya, Kenji; Abe, Masafumi

    2015-08-01

    The Fukushima Health Management Survey (including the Basic Survey for external dose estimation and four detailed surveys) was launched after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The Basic Survey consists of a questionnaire that asks Fukushima Prefecture residents about their behavior in the first four months after the accident; and responses to the questionnaire have been returned from many residents. The individual external doses are estimated by using digitized behavior data and a computer program that included daily gamma ray dose rate maps drawn after the accident. The individual external doses of 421,394 residents for the first four months (excluding radiation workers) had a distribution as follows: 62.0%, <1 mSv 94.0%, <2 mSv 99.4%, <3 mSv. The arithmetic mean and maximum for the individual external doses were 0.8 and 25 mSv, respectively. While most dose estimation studies were based on typical scenarios of evacuation and time spent inside/outside, the Basic Survey estimated doses considering individually different personal behaviors. Thus, doses for some individuals who did not follow typical scenarios could be revealed. Even considering such extreme cases, the estimated external doses were generally low and no discernible increased incidence of radiation-related health effects is expected.

  12. The Residence Life Cinema.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dungan, Jane Fidler; Elion, Audrey; Gusmano, Phil

    1997-01-01

    Explores the implementation, results, and the limitations of the Residence Life Cinema program at the University of Memphis. Claims that such programs offer an innovative method for fostering student development by utilizing movies to stimulate affective and cognitive processes in students--processes that may not occur without a catalyst. (RJM)

  13. Selection of Anesthesiology Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, J. David, III; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Selection data for all Medical University of South Carolina anesthesiology residency applicants (about 200 per year) and the 8 selected per year were compared for 4 years. Results showed standardized test scores, grades, and class ranks of those selected were not higher than of others, but interview and recommendation scores were higher.…

  14. An Evidence-Based Medicine Curriculum Improves General Surgery Residents' Standardized Test Scores in Research and Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Trickey, Amber W.; Crosby, Moira E.; Singh, Monika; Dort, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The application of evidence-based medicine to patient care requires unique skills of the physician. Advancing residents' abilities to accurately evaluate the quality of evidence is built on understanding of fundamental research concepts. The American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE) provides a relevant measure of surgical residents' knowledge of research design and statistics. Objective We implemented a research education curriculum in an independent academic medical center general residency program, and assessed the effect on ABSITE scores. Methods The curriculum consisted of five 1-hour monthly research and statistics lectures. The lectures were presented before the 2012 and 2013 examinations. Forty residents completing ABSITE examinations from 2007 to 2013 were included in the study. Two investigators independently identified research-related item topics from examination summary reports. Correct and incorrect responses were compared precurriculum and postcurriculum. Regression models were calculated to estimate improvement in postcurriculum scores, adjusted for individuals' scores over time and postgraduate year level. Results Residents demonstrated significant improvement in postcurriculum examination scores for research and statistics items. Correct responses increased 27% (P < .001). Residents were 5 times more likely to achieve a perfect score on research and statistics items postcurriculum (P < .001). Conclusions Residents at all levels demonstrated improved research and statistics scores after receiving the curriculum. Because the ABSITE includes a wide spectrum of research topics, sustained improvements suggest a genuine level of understanding that will promote lifelong evaluation and clinical application of the surgical literature. PMID:26140115

  15. 26 CFR 1.6050H-1 - Information reporting of mortgage interest received in a trade or business from an individual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... later time. Real property includes a manufactured home as defined in section 25(e)(10). An obligation... a physician, lends money to individual D to enable D to purchase C's home, and D gives a mortgage to... residence that is not the payor of record's principal residence, such as a second home, vacation...

  16. 26 CFR 1.6050H-1 - Information reporting of mortgage interest received in a trade or business from an individual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... later time. Real property includes a manufactured home as defined in section 25(e)(10). An obligation... a physician, lends money to individual D to enable D to purchase C's home, and D gives a mortgage to... residence that is not the payor of record's principal residence, such as a second home, vacation...

  17. Perceived resident-facility fit and sense of control in assisted living.

    PubMed

    Pirhonen, Jari; Pietilä, Ilkka

    2016-08-01

    The concept of resident-facility fit has largely been used to illustrate whether a residential care facility and a resident are together able to meet requirements set by only the hampering functional abilities of the latter. The purpose of this paper is to study how assisted living residents perceive resident-facility fit. The data were gathered ethnographically from both observations and resident interviews in a sheltered home in Finland during 2013-2014. Perceived resident-facility fit is based on several relational factors that connect to both the residents as individuals and their surroundings. This fit seems also to be partly conditional and indeed depends on residents' trust in having their own potential to act. Good resident-facility fit results in feeling at home in a facility, whereas poor fit can even result in residents' feeling imprisoned. Care providers can thus utilize our results to affirm residents' quality of life in residential facilities. PMID:27531452

  18. Violence against surgical residents.

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, C B; Rizzo, A G

    1997-01-01

    Violence against hospital personnel is underreported (less than one in five assaults), and accurate statistics as to the rate of violence against hospital personnel are thus difficult to establish. In the psychiatric discipline, an abundance of information has been published regarding violence in the health care setting, but few studies have examined violence outside psychiatric hospitals or by patients not diagnosed with psychiatric ailments. Using a survey that elicits information about workplace violence, we sought to gauge the prevalence of violent acts affecting general hospital workers who treat victims of violence on a daily basis. The survey was completed by a cohort of surgical staff nationwide (475 responses from 57 residency programs). Two hundred and eighty residents reported having witnessed one or more physical attacks, and 179 reported having been attacked. Violent acts were more likely to be committed in a public hospital than a private institution (P = 0.05). As shown in previous research, most attacks occurred in the emergency room (P = 0.01); the wards and parking lot were next in frequency. Women residents were more likely than men to call hospital security to intervene in a potentially violent situation (P = 0.04), and junior residents (postgraduate years 1-4) were more likely to be attacked than senior residents (> or = 5 years) (P = 0.04). The attacker was most likely to be a young black male between ages 19 and 30 (P = 0.01). We found no statistical relationship between the attacker and the victim regarding sex or race. Of the 475 respondents, 470 reported that they carry a gun themselves or know someone in the hospital environment who carries a gun. Images Figure 1. PMID:9291743

  19. 42 CFR 483.114 - Annual review of NF residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Annual review of NF residents. 483.114 Section 483... Screening and Annual Review of Mentally Ill and Mentally Retarded Individuals § 483.114 Annual review of NF... physical and mental condition, the resident requires— (1) The level of services provided by— (i) A NF;...

  20. 42 CFR 483.114 - Annual review of NF residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Annual review of NF residents. 483.114 Section 483... Screening and Annual Review of Mentally Ill and Mentally Retarded Individuals § 483.114 Annual review of NF... physical and mental condition, the resident requires— (1) The level of services provided by— (i) A NF;...

  1. 42 CFR 483.114 - Annual review of NF residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Annual review of NF residents. 483.114 Section 483... Screening and Annual Review of Mentally Ill and Mentally Retarded Individuals § 483.114 Annual review of NF... physical and mental condition, the resident requires— (1) The level of services provided by— (i) A NF;...

  2. 42 CFR 51.42 - Access to facilities and residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Access to facilities and residents. 51.42 Section 51.42 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS... Records, Facilities and Individuals § 51.42 Access to facilities and residents. (a) Access to...

  3. Internet Training to Respond to Aggressive Resident Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvine, A. Blair; Billow, Molly B.; Gates, Donna M.; Fitzwater, Evelyn L.; Seeley, John R.; Bourgeois, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This research evaluated an individualized Internet training designed to teach nurse aides (NAs) strategies to prevent or, if necessary, react to resident aggression in ways that are safe for the resident as well as the caregiver. Design and Methods: A randomized treatment and control design was implemented, with baseline, 1-, and 2-month…

  4. A new type of rural nurse residency.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Deana L; Monserud, Maria; Hudzinski, Dionetta

    2008-01-01

    The Rural Nurse Internship program is a distance education-based nurse residency designed to meet the needs of rural hospitals across the country. Nurses learn to perform the generalist role by practicing crisis assessment and management in six subnursing specialties. The collaborative yearlong residency provides preceptors, mentors, monthly seminars, and just-in-time information to novice nurses in their own hospitals using instructional technologies. Expert rural nurses teach novice employees using a standardized curriculum. Hospitals individualize the program to meet employee and hospital needs. PMID:18286930

  5. The Residency Application Abyss: Insights and Advice

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Douglas P.; Oatts, Julius T.; Fields, Barry G.; Huot, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Most medical students apply for residency training upon completion of medical school. The choice of specialty is one of a student’s first major career decisions, and the application process often results in considerable anxiety, as it is competitive, unpredictable, and requires a significant investment of time and money. This article, which addresses several important facets of the residency application using both experiential and evidence-based data, is organized chronologically into sections that describe a logical approach to applying for residency: choice of a specialty, the personal statement, the interview day, and developing a rank list. A list of relevant websites is also included. This paper is a resource that provides timely and tangible guidance to medical students applying for residency training. PMID:21966036

  6. Global Health Simulation During Residency.

    PubMed

    Rosenman, Jane R; Fischer, Philip R; Arteaga, Grace M; Hulyalkar, Manasi; Butteris, Sabrina M; Pitt, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    Resident participation in international health electives (IHEs) has been shown to be beneficial, yet not all residents have the opportunity to participate. We sought to determine whether participating in simulated global health cases, via the standardized Simulation Use for Global Away Rotations (SUGAR) curriculum, was useful for all pediatric residents, not merely those planning to go on an IHE. Pediatric residents in our program took part in 2 SUGAR cases and provided feedback via an online survey. Thirty-six of 40 residents participated (90%); 72% responded to the survey. Three of 10 residents not previously planning to work in resource-limited settings indicated participation in SUGAR made them more likely to do so. Nearly all residents (88%) felt SUGAR should be part of the residency curriculum. All felt better prepared for working cross-culturally. While designed to prepare trainees for work in resource-limited settings, SUGAR may be beneficial for all residents. PMID:27583300

  7. Global Health Simulation During Residency

    PubMed Central

    Rosenman, Jane R.; Fischer, Philip R.; Arteaga, Grace M.; Hulyalkar, Manasi; Butteris, Sabrina M.; Pitt, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Resident participation in international health electives (IHEs) has been shown to be beneficial, yet not all residents have the opportunity to participate. We sought to determine whether participating in simulated global health cases, via the standardized Simulation Use for Global Away Rotations (SUGAR) curriculum, was useful for all pediatric residents, not merely those planning to go on an IHE. Pediatric residents in our program took part in 2 SUGAR cases and provided feedback via an online survey. Thirty-six of 40 residents participated (90%); 72% responded to the survey. Three of 10 residents not previously planning to work in resource-limited settings indicated participation in SUGAR made them more likely to do so. Nearly all residents (88%) felt SUGAR should be part of the residency curriculum. All felt better prepared for working cross-culturally. While designed to prepare trainees for work in resource-limited settings, SUGAR may be beneficial for all residents. PMID:27583300

  8. Quality of Life of Nursing Home Residents with Dementia: A Comparison of Perspectives of Residents, Family, and Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crespo, Maria; Bernaldo de Quiros, Monica; Gomez, M. Mar; Hornillos, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Quality of Life (QoL) has become increasingly valued as a key outcome in dementia both in clinical practice and in research. This study compares the QoL of long-term residents with dementia as assessed by the individuals, their relatives, and their care staff. Design and Methods: Data on residents with dementia were collected in 11…

  9. Automated medical resident rotation and shift scheduling to ensure quality resident education and patient care.

    PubMed

    Smalley, Hannah K; Keskinocak, Pinar

    2016-03-01

    At academic teaching hospitals around the country, the majority of clinical care is provided by resident physicians. During their training, medical residents often rotate through various hospitals and/or medical services to maximize their education. Depending on the size of the training program, manually constructing such a rotation schedule can be cumbersome and time consuming. Further, rules governing allowable duty hours for residents have grown more restrictive in recent years (ACGME 2011), making day-to-day shift scheduling of residents more difficult (Connors et al., J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 137:710-713, 2009; McCoy et al., May Clin Proc 86(3):192, 2011; Willis et al., J Surg Edu 66(4):216-221, 2009). These rules limit lengths of duty periods, allowable duty hours in a week, and rest periods, to name a few. In this paper, we present two integer programming models (IPs) with the goals of (1) creating feasible assignments of residents to rotations over a one-year period, and (2) constructing night and weekend call-shift schedules for the individual rotations. These models capture various duty-hour rules and constraints, provide the ability to test multiple what-if scenarios, and largely automate the process of schedule generation, solving these scheduling problems more effectively and efficiently compared to manual methods. Applying our models on data from a surgical residency program, we highlight the infeasibilities created by increased duty-hour restrictions placed on residents in conjunction with current scheduling paradigms. PMID:25171938

  10. Publishing history does not correlate with clinical performance among internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Rodrigo B; Detsky, Allan S

    2010-05-01

    OBJECTIVES Selection criteria for applicants to the internal medicine programme at the University of Toronto have included the number and quality of scholarly items published. We sought to determine whether previous publishing record correlated with resident performance as measured by in-training evaluation reports (ITERs) and global impressions of clinical competency by site programme directors and senior educators (global impression). METHODS Data on the total number, quality and type of items published, as well as the timing of publishing with regard to pre-MD training, were abstracted from the curricula vitae of individuals who applied for residency during 2001-2005. These were correlated with overall, Expert and Scholar role ITER scores, and with global impression, using Spearman rank correlation scores. RESULTS We gathered publishing history data on 181 residents, for 162 of whom ITER data were available. Overall, 68.5% of residents had published, but only 14.9% had published during medical school. There was a weak correlation of borderline significance (rho = 0.15, P = 0.055) between overall ITER score and number of items published. No such correlation was found with CanMEDS Medical Expert and Scholar role scores. Global impression classified 33.9% of residents as top-rated. More top-rated residents had published (76.7% versus 65.1%; P = 0.07), but the number of items published during medical school were similar between top-rated and non-top-rated residents (16.1% versus 12.3%; P = 0.46). CONCLUSIONS Our results do not support publishing record as a predictor of residents' clinical performance. Surprisingly, the correlation between publishing record and Scholar role scores was also weak, possibly indicating an inability of the ITER to capture this competency. Further research is needed to identify predictors and measures of performance in scholarly activities. PMID:20345694

  11. Optimizing global health experiences in emergency medicine residency programs: a consensus statement from the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors 2011 Academic Assembly global health specialty track

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An increasing number of emergency medicine (EM) residency training programs have residents interested in participating in clinical rotations in other countries. However, the policies that each individual training program applies to this process are different. To our knowledge, little has been done in the standardization of these experiences to help EM residency programs with the evaluation, administration and implementation of a successful global health clinical elective experience. The objective of this project was to assess the current status of EM global health electives at residency training programs and to establish recommendations from educators in EM on the best methodology to implement successful global health electives. Methods During the 2011 Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD) Academic Assembly, participants met to address this issue in a mediated discussion session and working group. Session participants examined data previously obtained via the CORD online listserve, discussed best practices in global health applications, evaluations and partnerships, and explored possible solutions to some of the challenges. In addition a survey was sent to CORD members prior to the 2011 Academic Assembly to evaluate the resources and processes for EM residents’ global experiences. Results Recommendations included creating a global health working group within the organization, optimizing a clearinghouse of elective opportunities for residents and standardizing elective application materials, site evaluations and resident assessment/feedback methods. The survey showed that 71.4% of respondents have global health partnerships and electives. However, only 36.7% of programs require pre-departure training, and only 20% have formal competency requirements for these global health electives. Conclusions A large number of EM training programs have global health experiences available, but these electives and the trainees may benefit from

  12. A survey of resident perspectives on surgical case minimums and the impact on milestones, graduation, credentialing, and preparation for practice: AOA critical issues.

    PubMed

    Jeray, Kyle J; Frick, Steven L

    2014-12-01

    Residency education continues to evolve. Several major changes have occurred in the past several years, including emphasis on core competencies, duty-hour restrictions, and call. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Next Accreditation System (NAS) implemented educational milestones in orthopaedic surgery in July 2013. Additionally, the Residency Review Committee for orthopaedic surgery published suggested surgical case minimums in 2012, which overlap with several of the milestones.We conducted a survey to assess the opinions of orthopaedic residents regarding the ACGME-suggested surgical case minimums and the effects that these may have on resident education and potential future privileges in hospitals. The survey was sent via e-mail to all of the residents participating in the American Orthopaedic Association (AOA) Resident Leadership Forum for both 2011 and 2012. Participants in the Resident Leadership Forum are in either postgraduate year 4 or postgraduate year 5, are selected by the program directors as resident leaders, and represent 80% of the orthopaedic residency programs in the United States. The survey was completed by 157 of the 314 participants. Sixty-nine percent of the participants believed that case logs with minimum numbers of surgical procedures were an effective way to monitor the work but were not necessarily the only way to monitor the educational progress of the residents. Thirty-two percent believed that the minimums should not be required. Overwhelmingly, there was agreement that important cases were missing from the currently proposed sixteen core surgical minimums. Specifically, the residents believed that a minimum number of cases are necessary for distal radial fracture fixation and proximal humeral fracture fixation and possibly have a milestone to reflect the progress of the residents for each fixation.Most residents thought that surgical case minimums are an effective tool in monitoring the progress of

  13. The influence of aquariums on weight in individuals with dementia.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Nancy E; Beck, Alan M

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed whether individuals with dementia who observe aquariums increase the amount of food they consume and maintain body weight. The sample included 70 residents in dementia units within 3 extended care facilities in 2 states. The intervention included the introduction of an aquarium into each common dining area. A total increase of 196.9 g of daily food intake (25.0%) was noted from baseline to the end of the 10-week study. Resident body weight increased an average of 2.2 pounds during the study. Eight of 70 residents experienced a weight loss ((Equation is included in full-text article.)=1.89 lbs). People with advanced dementia responded to aquariums in their environment documenting that attraction to the natural environment is so innate that it survives dementia. PMID:23138175

  14. Hair mercury concentrations in residents of Sundarban and Calcutta, India.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Herman; O'Leary, Keri Grace; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar; Wang, Jing; Liguori, Lisa; Rainis, Holly; Smith, Katy A; Chatterjee, Mousumi

    2016-10-01

    Few studies on hair mercury have been conducted in India despite the fact that India is the world's third largest producer of coal and coal is India's primary energy source. No studies have been conducted in the Indian state of West Bengal which has a coastline with the Bay of Bengal. This study examined the concentration of mercury in hair in two diverse populations in West Bengal, India: Sundarban, a mangrove wetland where fishing is a common occupation, and Calcutta, a megacity and India's oldest functioning port. Individuals from whom scalp hair was collected (N=100) were asked a series of questions on occupation, education, age, smoking and alcohol consumption, and fish consumption. SAS was utilized to generate descriptive statistics including frequency and univariate analyses and to perform regression analyses to determine significant predictors of hair mercury in this population. The mean hair mercury increased across the first three age categories (<21, 21-30, 31-45) and decreased in the fourth category (>45). Hair mercury concentration was significantly higher among residents of Sundarban compared to Calcutta (p=0.0005). In multivariable analysis, location (Sundarban vs. Calcutta) and age were significant predictors of hair mercury concentration (p=0.0120 and p=0.0161, respectively). Average hair mercury concentrations in this study were not particularly elevated. Smoking and alcohol consumption were predictors of hair mercury concentration. The hair mercury in Sundarban residents compared to Calcutta residents may be elevated due to greater consumption of fish and type of fish consumed. PMID:27085851

  15. Systematic survey of opinion regarding the thoracic surgery residency.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, B R; Stritter, F T; Anderson, R P; Gay, W A; Kaiser, G C; Orringer, M B; Rainer, W G; Replogle, R L

    1993-05-01

    To summarize this rather wide-ranging study, let us review the high points. The future practice of thoracic surgery will be increasingly affected by governmental factors and will have even greater technological dimensions. To do this work, we must continue to attract high-caliber individuals, and this is best accomplished by the early and continuing involvement in the educational process of strong role models from our field. These future surgeons must be motivated to do good work and should have high ethical standards as well as maturity and high intelligence. Experienced, involved faculty leading the residents through a broad program that offers graduated assumption of clinical and leadership responsibilities will facilitate the development of mature clinical judgment. Residents must be taught the clinical skills necessary to do all thoracic operations, leaving subspecialization to postresidency fellowships. The educational program should be humane in its demands and collegial in its application. It should incorporate experiences beyond the operating room, including the opportunity to read, think, and interact with local mentors and colleagues from around the country. The requirements of certification should not be so rigid as to preclude the development of different pathways to the same end. Likewise, although the accreditation process must protect the resident from exploitation, it must not be so restrictive that it does not allow for educational innovation and justifiable differences among programs. These are the thoughtful opinions of our colleagues. They deserve serious consideration. PMID:8494460

  16. Emergency preparedness: addressing a residency training gap.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Sayeedha Ghori; Barnett, Daniel J; Parker, Cindy L; Links, Jonathan M; Alexander, Miriam

    2008-03-01

    As the importance of physician involvement and leadership in crisis preparedness is recognized, the literature suggests that few physicians are adequately trained to practice effectively in a large-scale crisis situation. A logical method for addressing the emergency preparedness training deficiency identified across several medical specialties is to include disaster and emergency preparedness training in residency curricula. In this article, the authors outline the development and implementation of an emergency preparedness curriculum for the Johns Hopkins General Preventive Medicine Residency (JHGPMR) from 2004 to 2006. The curriculum consists of two components. The first was developed for the academic year in the JHGPMR and includes didactic lectures, practical exercises to apply new knowledge, and an opportunity to integrate the knowledge and skills in a real-world exercise. The second, developed for the practicum year of the residency, includes Web-based lectures and online content and culminates in a tabletop preparedness exercise. Topics for both components include weapons of mass destruction, risk communication and personal preparedness, aspects of local emergency response planning, and mental health and psychological aspects of terrorism. On the basis of the emergency preparedness training gap that has been identified in the literature, and the success of the three-year experience in implementing a preparedness training curriculum in the JHGPMR, the authors recommend incorporation of competency-based emergency preparedness training for residencies of all specialties, and offer insights into how the described curriculum could be adapted for use in other residency settings. PMID:18316882

  17. Characteristics of Walking, Activity, Fear of Falling and Falls in Community Dwelling Older Adults by Residence

    PubMed Central

    Wert, David M.; Talkowski, Jaime B.; Brach, Jennifer; VanSwearingen, Jessie

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Research focusing on community dwelling older adults includes adults living in senior living residences (SLR) and independent community residences (ICR). Walking, physical activity, fear and falls may differ based on residence. Purpose We describe characteristics of walking, physical activity, fear of falling and fall history between community dwelling older adults by residence. Methods Participants of this secondary analysis included community dwelling older adults from independent living units within a senior life care community (SLR) and older adults recruited from the Pittsburgh community (ICR). Demographic information, physical (gait speed and physical activity), psychosocial (fear of falling and confidence in walking) and fall history measures were collected. Results Adults living in SLR compared to ICR were older, more likely to live alone and had greater disease burden. Compared to ICR, individuals in SLR reported less fear of falling (SAFFE fear .24 and .50 respectively). Fewer older adults in SLR compared to ICR reported falling in the past year. Discussion Older adults living in SLR compared to ICR had similar physical function but differed in report of fear of falling and fall history. Recognizing the possible differences in psychosocial function by place of residence is important for healthcare providers and researchers conducting interventions and studies for community-dwelling older adults. PMID:20503733

  18. Individualizing Medicare.

    PubMed

    Chollet, D J

    1999-05-01

    Despite the enactment of significant changes to the Medicare program in 1997, Medicare's Hospital Insurance trust fund is projected to be exhausted just as the baby boom enters retirement. To address Medicare's financial difficulties, a number of reform proposals have been offered, including several to individualize Medicare financing and benefits. These proposals would attempt to increase Medicare revenues and reduce Medicare expenditures by having individuals bear risk--investment market risk before retirement and insurance market risk after retirement. Many fundamental aspects of these proposals have yet to be worked out, including how to guarantee a baseline level of saving for health insurance after retirement, how retirees might finance unanticipated health insurance price increases after retirement, the potential implications for Medicaid of inadequate individual saving, and whether the administrative cost of making the system fair and adequate ultimately would eliminate any rate-of-return advantages from allowing workers to invest their Medicare contributions in corporate stocks and bonds. PMID:10915458

  19. Resident-to-Resident Aggression in Long-Term Care Facilities: An Understudied Problem

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Tony; Pillemer, Karl; Lachs, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Resident-to-resident aggression (RRA) between long-term care residents includes negative and aggressive physical, sexual, or verbal interactions that in a community setting would likely be construed as unwelcome and have high potential to cause physical or psychological distress in the recipient. Although this problem potentially has high incidence and prevalence and serious consequences for aggressors and victims, it has received little direct attention from researchers to date. This article reviews the limited available literature on this topic as well as relevant research from related areas including: resident violence toward nursing home staff, aggressive behaviors by elderly persons, and community elder abuse. We present hypothesized risk factors for aggressor, victim, and nursing home environment, including issues surrounding cognitive impairment. We discuss methodological challenges to studying RRA and offer suggestions for future research. Finally, we describe the importance of designing effective interventions, despite the lack currently available, and suggest potential areas of future research. PMID:19750126

  20. Program Strengths and Opportunities for Improvement Identified by Residents During ACGME Site Visits in 5 Surgical Specialties.

    PubMed

    Caniano, Donna A; Hamstra, Stanley J

    2016-05-01

    Background There is limited information about how residents in surgical specialties view program strengths and opportunities for improvement (OFIs). Objective This study aggregated surgical residents' perspectives on program strengths and OFIs to determine whether there was agreement in perspectives among residents in 5 surgical specialties. Methods Resident consensus lists of program strengths and areas for improvement were aggregated from site visits reports during 2012 and 2013 for obstetrics and gynecology, orthopaedic surgery, otolaryngology, plastic surgery, and surgery programs. Four trained individuals coded each strength or OFI in 1 of 3 categories: (1) factors common to all specialties; (2) program or institutional resources; and (3) factors unique to surgical specialties. Themes were classified as most frequent when listed by residents in more than 20% of the programs and less frequent when listed by residents in less than 20% of the programs. Results This study included a total of 359 programs, representing 27% to 49% of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education accredited programs in the 5 specialties. The most frequent strengths were progressive autonomy, collegiality, program leadership, and operative volume. Improving research and didactics, increasing faculty teaching and attendance at educational sessions, and increasing the number of nurse practitioners and physician assistants were common OFIs. Conclusions Factors identified as important by surgical residents related to their learning environment, their educational program, and program and institutional support. Across programs in the study, similar attributes were listed as both program strengths and OFIs. PMID:27168889

  1. The impact of a sleep hygiene intervention on residents of a private residential facility for individuals with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders: results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Morse, Siobhan A; MacMaster, Samuel A; Kodad, Vicki; Robledo, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of Americans are experiencing sleep problems. There is evidence of a complex, bidirectional relationship between sleep disorders, substance abuse, and mental health symptoms. Institutional settings have been shown to elicit sleep problems as well. This pilot study was conducted with 28 patients in private, residential, dual-diagnosis treatment for addiction and mental health disorders. Upon admission, consenting patients were administered the Addiction Severity Index to assess pretreatment substance use and mental health symptoms. Patients followed a normal course of treatment as well as participated in a nightly sleep hygiene group that included relaxation suggestions. Evaluations with the Addiction Severity Index were completed again 30 days after discharge from treatment. Significant improvements in some substance use patterns as well as mental health symptoms were noted. Although results cannot be directly attributed to the use of a sleep hygiene group, this pilot study lays the foundation for future investigations of interventions supporting sleep in the dual-diagnosis population. PMID:25514691

  2. The residence time of carbon in Amazonian primary forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumbore, S.; Vieira, S. A.; Camargo, P.; Chambers, J. Q.; Higuchi, N.; Selhorst, D.; Martinelli, L. A.

    2004-12-01

    The residence time of carbon is a major determiner of the capacity of an ecosystem to function as a source or sink of carbon. The overall residence time of carbon in primary forests is determined by (1) what fraction of photosynthetic products get respired quickly and (2) the residence time of C allocated to living plant tissues, and (3) the time each of these components takes to decay, including what fraction is oxidized to CO2 versus what becomes stabilized in soil organic matter. Using radiocarbon to determine the age of carbon in various pools in forests, we conclude that: (1) carbon use efficiency of these forests is low, with ~70% of photosynthetic products respired within a year, and only 30% allocated to growth of wood, root and leaf tissues; (2) carbon resides on average for 2-3 years in leaves and 3-10 years in fine roots; very rapid or ephemeral root turnover is assigned in our budgets to AƒAøAøâ_sA¬A<Å"autotrophicAƒAøAøâ_sA¬Aøâ_zAø respiration (3) the mean age of carbon in living trees is longer (200-260 years) than the mean residence time of carbon derived from the biomass stock divided by annual wood growth increment (40-100 years) because most of the biomass is in the largest, fastest growing, trees, while most of the individuals are smaller, slower growing, shaded trees; (4) decomposition rates are rapid, but potentially recycling of carbon in the microbial community leads to a significant decadally cycling pool in near-surface organic matter. We will summarize these findings and use them with models of carbon dynamics to estimate carbon storage and loss potential on interannual to decadal timescales. The overall age of heterotrophically respired carbon (carbon derived from microbial decomposition) is 6-10 years, with much of the time lag due to the time spent by C in living leaf and root tissues. Even when combined with 70% autotrophically respired C with residence times of <1 year, this significant time lag can lead to large

  3. Variable residence time vortex combustor

    DOEpatents

    Melconian, Jerry O.

    1987-01-01

    A variable residence time vortex combustor including a primary combustion chamber for containing a combustion vortex, and a plurality of louvres peripherally disposed about the primary combustion chamber and longitudinally distributed along its primary axis. The louvres are inclined to impel air about the primary combustion chamber to cool its interior surfaces and to impel air inwardly to assist in driving the combustion vortex in a first rotational direction and to feed combustion in the primary combustion chamber. The vortex combustor also includes a second combustion chamber having a secondary zone and a narrowed waist region in the primary combustion chamber interconnecting the output of the primary combustion chamber with the secondary zone for passing only lower density particles and trapping higher density particles in the combustion vortex in the primary combustion chamber for substantial combustion.

  4. Taste detection ability of elderly nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, T; Uota, M; Ikebe, K; Notomi, Y; Iwamoto, Y; Shirobayashi, I; Kibi, M; Masayasu, S; Sasaki, S; Maeda, Y

    2016-07-01

    Due to the rapid rise of aged populations throughout the world, it is essential to elucidate the cause of taste dysfunction, because it may reduce appetite, leading to inadequate dietary intake. We aimed to compare taste detection ability between dependently and independently living geriatric individuals of nearly the same age with oral status. Forty-three elderly individuals considered to be cognitively eligible and residing in nursing homes in Japan were enrolled (n = 43, 82·3 ± 8·5 years) and were compared with an independently living elderly group (n = 949, 79·9 ± 0·8 years), aiming to compare taste detection ability between dependently and independently living elders of nearly the same age. Information regarding comorbidity and medication was obtained as general health status, and oral status including number of present teeth, denture usage and maximal occlusal force was also noted. In the dependently living group, 69·4%, 14·3%, 16·3% and 8·2% of participants could detect sweet, sour, salty and bitter tastes, respectively, which was significantly lower than the independently living group for each taste (97·9%, 70·8%, 89·6% and 43·8% for sweet, sour, salty and bitter tastes, respectively). The multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that residing in nursing homes was associated with reduced sensitivity for four different tastes. The diseases and the situation of dependent elders were more likely the cause of the decreased taste sensitivity. PMID:27027615

  5. The Effects of Resident and Nursing Home Characteristics on Activities of Daily Living

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jye; Kane, Robert L.; Eberly, Lynn E.; Virnig, Beth A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Existing studies on the relationships between impairments and activities of daily living (ADLs) in nursing home residents have serious limitations. This study examines the relationships among admission impairments, including pain, depression, incontinence, balance, and falls, and follow-up ADLs, as well as the effect of the nursing home on follow-up ADLs of extended-stay nursing home residents. Methods This longitudinal cohort study consisted of 4,942 extended-stay residents who were admitted into 377 Minnesota nursing homes during 2004. General linear mixed models were used for all analyses, with 14 resident-level and 8 facility-level control variables. Results Incontinence and balance function at admission were significantly associated with increases in ADL dependence at follow-up. Individual nursing homes had independent effects on all three ADL models. Similar findings were found after facility-level control variables were added. Conclusions Incontinence predicts subsequent ADL functional levels. The relationship between balance dysfunction and subsequent ADL dependence could be causal. Future studies of the causal relationships between impairments and ADL should examine the effectiveness of impairment interventions on ADL as well as these relationships in different subgroups of nursing home residents. PMID:19201787

  6. Teaching clinical decision-making to pediatric residents in an era of managed care.

    PubMed

    Chessare, J B

    1998-04-01

    The growth of managed care has brought a new focus on physician competency in the appropriate use of resources to help patients. The community of pediatric educators must improve residency curricula and teaching methodologies to ensure that graduates of their programs can effectively and efficiently meet the needs of children and their families. The educational approach in many pediatric residency programs is an implicit apprenticeship model, with which the residents follow the actions of attending physicians with little attention to scrutiny of the clinical evidence for and against diagnostic and treatment strategies. Evidence-based medicine stresses to the trainee the importance of the evaluation of evidence from clinical research and cautions against the use of intuition, unsystematic clinical experience, and untested pathophysiologic reasoning as sufficient for medical decision-making. Managed care also has helped to create a heightened awareness of the need to educate residents to incorporate the preferences of patients and families into diagnostic and treatment decisions. Trainees must know how to balance their duty to maximize the health of populations at the lowest resource use with their duty to each individual patient and family. Changes in the residency curriculum will bring change in educational settings and the structure of rotations. Potential barriers to implementation will include the need for faculty development and financial resources for information technology. PMID:9544180

  7. Seasonal movement, residency, and migratory patterns of Wilson's Snipe (Gallinago delicata)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cline, Brittany B.; Haig, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Cross-seasonal studies of avian movement establish links between geographically distinct wintering, breeding, and migratory stopover locations, or assess site fidelity and movement between distinct phases of the annual cycle. Far fewer studies have investigated individual movement patterns within and among seasons over an annual cycle. Within western Oregon's Willamette Valley throughout 2007, we quantified intra- and interseasonal movement patterns, fidelity (regional and local), and migratory patterns of 37 radiomarked Wilson's Snipe (Gallinago delicata) to elucidate residency in a region of breeding- and wintering-range overlap. Telemetry revealed complex regional population structure, including winter residents (74%), winter transients (14%), summer residents (9%), and one year-round resident breeder (3%). Results indicated a lack of connectivity between winter and summer capture populations, some evidence of partial migration, and between-season fidelity to the region (winter-resident return; subsequent fall). Across seasons, the extent of movements and use of multiple wetland sites suggested that Wilson's Snipe were capable of exploratory movements but more regularly perceived local and fine-scale segments of the landscape as connected. Movements differed significantly by season and residency; individuals exhibited contracted movements during late winter and more expansive movements during precipitation-limited periods (late spring, summer, fall). Mean home-range size was 3.5& plusmn; 0.93 km2 (100% minimum convex polygon [MCP]) and 1.6 ± 0.42 km2 (95% fixed kernel) and did not vary by sex; however, home range varied markedly by season (range of 100% MCPs: 1.04-7.56 km2). The results highlight the need to consider seasonal and interspecific differences in shorebird life histories and space-use requirements when developing regional wetland conservation plans.

  8. Knowledge of medical-legal issues. Survey of Ontario family medicine residents.

    PubMed Central

    Saltstone, S. P.; Saltstone, R.; Rowe, B. H.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain how much family medicine residents know about medical-legal issues and what their attitudes toward medical-legal training are. DESIGN: Survey using multiple-choice questions to assess knowledge of typical legal scenarios and attitudes to training. Responses to questions were assessed using a Likert scale. SETTING: University of Ottawa's Family Medicine Program, including the Northeastern Ontario Family Medicine Program and the Melrose and Elizabeth Bruyere Family Medicine Centres. PARTICIPANTS: Forty-five family medicine residents in the University of Ottawa's Family Medicine Program. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Demographic information and answers to questions assessing respondents' knowledge of and attitudes toward medical-legal issues. RESULTS: Mean score for correct responses was 8.6 out of 16 possible correct responses. Resident's knowledge about certain issues was excellent, such as knowing that comments can be constructed as sexual abuse and that they should report patients whose medical conditions make it dangerous for them to operate motor vehicles. On other issues, such as how to treat incompetent individuals and how to treat minors when parents refuse consent for treatment, residents' knowledge seemed poor. Although residents thought knowledge of medical-legal issues was important for providing good-quality care to patients and avoiding litigation, they felt inadequately trained in and uncomfortable about dealing with these issues. CONCLUSIONS: Residents are somewhat confused about medical-legal issues. They seem very interested in learning medical-legal principles. These findings should encourage educators to provide opportunity for residents to gain knowledge in these areas. PMID:9111983

  9. Implementing the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations on resident physician work hours, supervision, and safety.

    PubMed

    Blum, Alexander B; Shea, Sandra; Czeisler, Charles A; Landrigan, Christopher P; Leape, Lucian

    2011-01-01

    Institute of Medicine report has been largely confined to the medical education community, led by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). To begin gathering these perspectives and developing a plan to implement safer work hours for resident physicians, a conference entitled "Enhancing sleep, supervision and safety: What will it take to implement the Institute of Medicine recommendations?" was held at Harvard Medical School on June 17-18, 2010. This White Paper is a product of a diverse group of 26 representative stakeholders bringing relevant new information and innovative practices to bear on a critical patient safety problem. Given that our conference included experts from across disciplines with diverse perspectives and interests, not every recommendation was endorsed by each invited conference participant. However, every recommendation made here was endorsed by the majority of the group, and many were endorsed unanimously. Conference members participated in the process, reviewed the final product, and provided input before publication. Participants provided their individual perspectives, which do not necessarily represent the formal views of any organization. In September 2010 the ACGME issued new rules to go into effect on July 1, 2011. Unfortunately, they stop considerably short of the Institute of Medicine's recommendations and those endorsed by this conference. In particular, the ACGME only applied the limitation of 16 hours to first-year resident physicans. Thus, it is clear that policymakers, hospital administrators, and residency program directors who wish to implement safer health care systems must go far beyond what the ACGME will require. We hope this White Paper will serve as a guide and provide encouragement for that effort. RESIDENT PHYSICIAN WORKLOAD AND SUPERVISION: By the end of training, a resident physician should be able to practice independently. Yet much of resident physicians' time is dominated by tasks with little

  10. 31 CFR 542.514 - Transactions related to U.S. persons residing in Syria authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... residing in Syria authorized. 542.514 Section 542.514 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to... related to U.S. persons residing in Syria authorized. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, individuals who are U.S. persons residing in Syria are authorized to pay their personal...

  11. 42 CFR 435.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... State placement, the term also includes foster care homes, licensed as set forth in 45 CFR 1355.20, and... accordance with 45 CFR 233.40, the rules governing residence under the AFDC program. (4) For any... receiving Federal payments for foster care and adoption assistance under title IV-E of the Social...

  12. 36 CFR 72.73 - Residency requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... facilities managed by the recipient, are covered in 43 CFR part 17 which implements the provisions of title...(b)) including preferential reservation or membership systems on properties improved with UPARR... for UPARR assisted programs or services on the basis of residence, except in reasonable...

  13. Drug Information Residency Rotation with Pharmaceutical Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Richard L.

    1986-01-01

    Program objectives of a drug information rotation at the Upjohn Company include improving communication between the pharmaceutical industry and hospital pharmacy/academia, exposing the resident to the challenges the industry encounters, improving proficiency in drug information practice, and providing insight into the working relationships of…

  14. Global health education in general preventive medicine residencies.

    PubMed

    Bussell, Scottie A; Kihlberg, Courtney J; Foderingham, Nia M; Dunlap, Julie A; Aliyu, Muktar H

    2015-05-01

    Opportunities for global health training during residency are steadily increasing. For example, surveys show that more than half of residency programs now offer international electives. Residency programs are increasingly recognizing that global health training improves communication skills, fosters awareness of health disparities, and inspires careers in primary care and public health. Although research has focused on global health education in other specialties, there is a paucity of research on global health training in public health and general preventive medicine (GPM). We sought to describe the extent of global health training across GPM residencies, capture the perspectives of program directors regarding competencies residents need for careers in global health, and identify program directors' perceived barriers to providing global health training. The survey was sent electronically to 42 U.S. GPM residency program directors from September to October 2013. Twenty-three completed surveys were returned. Information from residencies that did not complete the study survey was collected through a predefined search protocol. Data analysis was performed from February through July 2014. Among program directors completing the survey, the most common types of reported global health education were courses (n=17), followed by international rotations (n=10). Ten program directors indicated that resident(s) were involved in global health training, research, or service initiatives. Commonly perceived barriers included funding (87%), scheduling (56.5%), and partnership and sustainability (34.8%). Through global health coursework, research, and practicum rotations, GPM residents could acquire skills, knowledge, and attitudes contributing to careers in global health. PMID:25891059

  15. Resident Exposure to Peripheral Nerve Surgical Procedures During Residency Training.

    PubMed

    Gil, Joseph A; Daniels, Alan H; Akelman, Edward

    2016-05-01

    Background Variability in case exposures has been identified for orthopaedic surgery residents. It is not known if this variability exists for peripheral nerve procedures. Objective The objective of this study was to assess ACGME case log data for graduating orthopaedic surgery, plastic surgery, general surgery, and neurological surgery residents for peripheral nerve surgical procedures and to evaluate intraspecialty and interspecialty variability in case volume. Methods Surgical case logs from 2009 to 2014 for the 4 specialties were compared for peripheral nerve surgery experience. Peripheral nerve case volume between specialties was performed utilizing a paired t test, 95% confidence intervals were calculated, and linear regression was calculated to assess the trends. Results The average number of peripheral nerve procedures performed per graduating resident was 54.2 for orthopaedic surgery residents, 62.8 for independent plastic surgery residents, 84.6 for integrated plastic surgery residents, 22.4 for neurological surgery residents, and 0.4 for surgery residents. Intraspecialty comparison of the 10th and 90th percentile peripheral nerve case volume in 2012 revealed remarkable variability in training. There was a 3.9-fold difference within orthopaedic surgery, a 5.0-fold difference within independent plastic surgery residents, an 8.8-fold difference for residents from integrated plastic surgery programs, and a 7.0-fold difference within the neurological surgery group. Conclusions There is interspecialty and intraspecialty variability in peripheral nerve surgery volume for orthopaedic, plastic, neurological, and general surgery residents. Caseload is not the sole determinant of training quality as mentorship, didactics, case breadth, and complexity play an important role in training. PMID:27168883

  16. Including the Group Quarters Population in the US Synthesized Population Database

    PubMed Central

    Chasteen, Bernadette M.; Wheaton, William D.; Cooley, Philip C.; Ganapathi, Laxminarayana; Wagener, Diane K.

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, RTI International researchers developed methods to generate synthesized population data on US households for the US Synthesized Population Database. These data are used in agent-based modeling, which simulates large-scale social networks to test how changes in the behaviors of individuals affect the overall network. Group quarters are residences where individuals live in close proximity and interact frequently. Although the Synthesized Population Database represents the population living in households, data for the nation’s group quarters residents are not easily quantified because of US Census Bureau reporting methods designed to protect individuals’ privacy. Including group quarters population data can be an important factor in agent-based modeling because the number of residents and the frequency of their interactions are variables that directly affect modeling results. Particularly with infectious disease modeling, the increased frequency of agent interaction may increase the probability of infectious disease transmission between individuals and the probability of disease outbreaks. This report reviews our methods to synthesize data on group quarters residents to match US Census Bureau data. Our goal in developing the Group Quarters Population Database was to enable its use with RTI’s US Synthesized Population Database in the Modeling of Infectious Diseases Agent Study. PMID:21841972

  17. Implementing the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations on resident physician work hours, supervision, and safety

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Alexander B; Shea, Sandra; Czeisler, Charles A; Landrigan, Christopher P; Leape, Lucian

    2011-01-01

    , discussion of the Institute of Medicine report has been largely confined to the medical education community, led by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). To begin gathering these perspectives and developing a plan to implement safer work hours for resident physicians, a conference entitled “Enhancing sleep, supervision and safety: What will it take to implement the Institute of Medicine recommendations?” was held at Harvard Medical School on June 17–18, 2010. This White Paper is a product of a diverse group of 26 representative stakeholders bringing relevant new information and innovative practices to bear on a critical patient safety problem. Given that our conference included experts from across disciplines with diverse perspectives and interests, not every recommendation was endorsed by each invited conference participant. However, every recommendation made here was endorsed by the majority of the group, and many were endorsed unanimously. Conference members participated in the process, reviewed the final product, and provided input before publication. Participants provided their individual perspectives, which do not necessarily represent the formal views of any organization. In September 2010 the ACGME issued new rules to go into effect on July 1, 2011. Unfortunately, they stop considerably short of the Institute of Medicine’s recommendations and those endorsed by this conference. In particular, the ACGME only applied the limitation of 16 hours to first-year resident physicans. Thus, it is clear that policymakers, hospital administrators, and residency program directors who wish to implement safer health care systems must go far beyond what the ACGME will require. We hope this White Paper will serve as a guide and provide encouragement for that effort. Resident physician workload and supervision By the end of training, a resident physician should be able to practice independently. Yet much of resident physicians’ time is dominated by

  18. 26 CFR 301.7701(b)-4 - Residency time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... meets the substantial presence test is the first day during the calendar year on which the individual is... resident test (green card test), described in paragraph (b)(1) of § 301.7701(b)-1, is the first day during... test and the green card test will be the earlier of the first day the individual is physically...

  19. BBA Impacts on Hospital Residents, Finances, and Medicare Subsidies

    PubMed Central

    Cromwell, Jerry; Adamache, Walter; Drozd, Edward M.

    2006-01-01

    Concern over rapidly rising Medicare expenditures prompted Congress to pass the 1997 Balanced Budget Act (BBA) that included provisions reducing graduate medical education (GME) payments and capped the growth in residents for payment purposes. Using Medicare cost reports through 2001, we find that both actual and capped residents continued to grow post-BBA. While teaching hospital total margins declined, GME payment reductions of approximately 17 percent had minimal impact on revenue growth (-0.5 percent annually). Four years after BBA, residents remained a substantial line of business for nearly one-half of teaching hospitals with Medicare effective marginal subsidies exceeding resident stipends by nearly $50,000 on average. Coupled with an estimated replacement cost of over $100,000 per resident, it is not surprising that hospitals accepted nearly 4,000 residents beyond their allowable payment caps in just 4 years post-BBA. PMID:17290672

  20. Development of residency program guidelines for interaction with the pharmaceutical industry. Education Council, Residency Training Programme in Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont.

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Medical residency programs are likely to face increasing pressure to address their relations with the pharmaceutical industry. Our internal medicine residency program has developed guidelines that were adopted after extensive debate by residents and faculty members. The guidelines are based on the principles that residents and faculty should set the educational agenda and that the residency program should not allow gifts of any sort from industry to residents. Specific policies include obtaining and screening educational materials from the industry before residents are exposed to them, proscribing "drug lunches" and accepting industry sponsorship only when the residency program maintains complete control of the educational event being sponsored. The industry response to the guidelines was split; about half reacted negatively, and half found the guidelines acceptable. Our experience suggests that productive debate about guidelines for the interaction of residency programs with the pharmaceutical industry is possible and desirable and that explicit policies can clarify areas of ambiguity. PMID:8348422

  1. Individualized Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    IntelliWeb and IntelliPrint, products from MicroMass Communications, utilize C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS), a development and delivery expert systems tool developed at Johnson Space Center. IntelliWeb delivers personalized messages by dynamically creating single web pages or entire web sites based on information provided by each website visitor. IntelliPrint is a product designed to create tailored, individualized messages via printed media. The software uses proprietary technology to generate printed messages that are personally relevant and tailored to meet each individual's needs. Intelliprint is in use in many operations including Brystol-Myers Squibb's personalized newsletter, "Living at Your Best," geared to each recipient based on a health and lifestyle survey taken earlier; and SmithKline Beecham's "Nicorette Committed Quitters Program," in which customized motivational materials support participants in their attempt to quit smoking.

  2. A Longitudinal "Teaching-to-Teach" Curriculum for Psychiatric Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Susan W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Psychiatric residents' self-reported confidence levels related to teaching medical students were assessed before and after a five-part teaching seminar series. Methods: Five 1-hour seminars on teaching medical students in the psychiatry clerkship were presented to second postgraduate year (PGY-2) residents. Topics included how to teach…

  3. A Larger Scale. Tenth Annual Residence Hall Construction Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argon, Joe

    1999-01-01

    Presents data from the American School & University's 10th Annual Residence Hall Construction Report that show dormitories are costing more per square foot to build while also becoming larger accommodations. Data tables are provided as are highlighted discussions that include residence hall design flexibility, environmental concerns and building…

  4. Room To Grow. 13th Annual Residence Hall Construction Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agron, Joe

    2002-01-01

    Discusses data from an annual survey of residence hall construction, including the fact that while the total cost and overall size of newly constructed housing facilities remained steady compared with last year's survey, the cost and square footage per resident dropped considerably. Also discusses the focus on amenities in construction. (EV)

  5. Resident Duty Hours: Enhancing Sleep, Supervision, and Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulmer, Cheryl, Ed.; Wolman, Dianne Miller, Ed.; Johns, Michael M. E., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    Medical residents in hospitals are often required to be on duty for long hours. In 2003 the organization overseeing graduate medical education adopted common program requirements to restrict resident workweeks, including limits to an average of 80 hours over 4 weeks and the longest consecutive period of work to 30 hours in order to protect…

  6. Teaching Residents Genomic Pathology: A Novel Approach for New Technology

    PubMed Central

    Haspel, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Genomics-based diagnostics have become part of patient care. As pathologists have the expertise in clinical laboratory testing as well as access to patient samples, all genomic medicine is genomic pathology. This article will review the evidence that there is a critical need for pathology resident training in genomics. Several individual program curricula are described as well as the progress of the Training Residents in Genomic (TRIG) Working Group. This group has made significant advances towards developing, implementing and evaluating a national curriculum in genomics for pathology residents. The novel approach of the TRIG Working Group can be used as a model for training pathology professionals in any new technology. PMID:23399798

  7. Implementation of the resident assessment instrument: a Canadian experience.

    PubMed

    Brunton, B; Rook, M

    1999-01-01

    As the population ages, the increasing number and complexity of needs of individuals requiring institutionalization will increase the demands for chronic care services. In this article, the authors describe the implementation process used to introduce interdisciplinary staff to the use of the Minimum Data Set (MDS) for assessment of both nursing home and chronic care residents. This screening tool assesses resident characteristics over a wide spectrum of dimensions. The assessment findings are then integrated into the clinical plan of care. PMID:10538542

  8. Preparedness of Entering Pediatric Dentistry Residents: Advanced Pediatric Program Directors' and First-Year Residents' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Rutkauskas, John; Seale, N Sue; Casamassimo, Paul; Rutkauskas, John S

    2015-11-01

    For children to receive needed oral health care, adequate training at both the predoctoral and postdoctoral levels of dental education is required, but previous studies have found inadequacies in predoctoral education that lead to general dentists' unwillingness to treat certain young populations. As another way of assessing predoctoral preparation, the aim of this study was to determine the perspectives of first-year residents and pediatric program directors about residents' preparedness to enter advanced education programs in pediatric dentistry. Surveys were sent to all 74 U.S. program directors and 360 first-year residents. The survey focused on procedures related to prevention, behavior management, restorative procedures, pulp therapy, sedation, and surgery, as well as treating patients funded by Medicaid and with special health care needs. Among the first-year residents, 173 surveys were returned for a 48% response rate; 61 directors returned surveys for an 82% response rate. Only half of the residents (55%) reported feeling adequately prepared for their first year in residency; less than half cited adequate preparation to place stainless steel crowns (SSCs) (42%) and perform pulpotomies (45%). Far fewer felt adequately prepared to provide treatment for children six months to three years of age, including examinations (29%), infant oral exams (27%), and children with severe caries (37%). The program directors were even less positive about the adequacy of residents' preparation. Only 17% deemed them adequately prepared to place SSCs and 13% to perform pulpotomies. Approximately half reported their first-year residents were inadequately prepared to treat very young children and children with severe caries (55% each). This study found that the perceived inadequacy of predoctoral education in pediatric dentistry was consistent at both the learner and educator levels, supporting previous studies identifying inadequacies in this area. PMID:26522630

  9. Differences in the Nature of Body Image Disturbances between Female Obese Individuals with versus without a Comorbid Binge Eating Disorder: An Exploratory Study Including Static and Dynamic Aspects of Body Image

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legenbauer, Tanja; Vocks, Silja; Betz, Sabrina; Puigcerver, Maria Jose Baguena; Benecke, Andrea; Troje, Nikolaus F.; Ruddel, Heinz

    2011-01-01

    Various components of body image were measured to assess body image disturbances in patients with obesity. To overcome limitations of previous studies, a photo distortion technique and a biological motion distortion device were included to assess static and dynamic aspects of body image. Questionnaires assessed cognitive-affective aspects, bodily…

  10. Sexual Education for Psychiatric Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Stephen B.; Scott, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors seek to promote sexuality curriculum development in departments of psychiatry. Methods: The authors first focus on educational philosophy about what residents can be taught about sexual topics and then provide numerical and narrative resident evaluation data following a 6-month, half day per week rotation in a sexuality…

  11. Substance Abuse by Anesthesiology Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutsky, Irving; And Others

    1991-01-01

    The analysis of 183 responses to a survey of former anesthesiology residents of the Medical College of Wisconsin found that 29 had been self-administered problematic substance abusers during their residencies, 23 had been alcohol dependent, and 6 had been drug dependent. More than 85 percent of respondents considered the drug policy information…

  12. Medical Residency Goes to School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boatright, Beth; Gallucci, Chrysan; Swanson, Judy; Van Lare, Michelle; Yoon, Irene

    2009-01-01

    The Highline School District, located roughly 10 miles south of Seattle, Washington, has begun to implement a residency model for professional learning. Like the medical model, current teachers often traveled from other schools to be "in residency" at a previously selected classroom for six half-day sessions during the 2005-06 school year. Some…

  13. Resident Care Guide. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodbridge State School, NJ.

    The third edition of the Woodbridge State School Cottage Life Department Resident Care Guide is explained to be a developmental status scale devised in 1969 as part of a 5-year study for the purposes of measuring the entire population's self-help training abilities. The department is said to serve 954 residents; 424 are non-ambulatory and 530 are…

  14. Residence Hall Seating That Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiens, Janet

    2003-01-01

    Describes the seating chosen for residence halls at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of New England. The seating required depends on ergonomics, aesthetics, durability, cost, and code requirements. In addition, residence halls must have a range of seating types to accommodate various uses. (SLD)

  15. 26 CFR 1.82-1 - Payments for or reimbursements of expenses of moving from one residence to another residence...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Specifically Included in Gross Income § 1.82-1 Payments... the sale or exchange of personal property, storage charges, taxes, or expenses of refitting rugs or... goods and personal effects from the employee's old resident to his new residence using the...

  16. A Longitudinal Study of Employment and Skill Acquisition among Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Dawn L.; Collins, Michael D.; Dodder, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    Recent legislation, especially the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990, generated the closure of institutions for people with disabilities and inclusion into community residences and employment. It has been well documented that individuals with developmental disabilities often experience difficulties with employment including both obtaining…

  17. An Academic Multihealth System PGY2 Pediatric Pharmacy Residency Program

    PubMed Central

    Klosterman, Theresa; Siu, Anita; Shah, Pooja; Kimler, Katelin; Sturgill, Marc; Robinson, Christine

    2015-01-01

    We describe a novel multihealth system pediatric pharmacy residency program through the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy at Rutgers University. Pediatric clinical pharmacy is a growing field that has seen an increase in demand for practitioners. Practice sites include freestanding children's hospitals, children's hospitals within adult hospitals, and pediatric units within adult hospitals. To accommodate a residency program in a region with no freestanding children's hospital, the pediatric faculty members at the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy at Rutgers University developed a multihealth system postgraduate year 2 (PGY2) pediatric pharmacy residency program with 6 pediatric faculty members functioning as preceptors at their 5 respective practice sites. The multihealth system setup of the program provides the resident exposure to a multitude of patient populations, pediatric specialties, and pediatric pharmacy practices. In addition, the affiliation with Rutgers University allows an emphasis on academia with opportunities for the resident to lecture in small and large classrooms, facilitate discussion periods, assist with clinical laboratory classes, and precept pharmacy students. The resident has the unique opportunity to develop a research project with a large and diverse patient population owing to the multihealth system rotation sites. A multihealth system PGY2 residency in pediatric pharmacy provides the resident a well-rounded experience in pediatric clinical practice, research, and academia that will enhance the resident's ability to build his or her own pediatric pharmacy practice. PMID:26766936

  18. Satisfaction and Difficulties of Korean Family Medicine Resident Training Faculty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Ha; Kim, Ju Young; Kwon, Kil Young; Lee, Chul-Min; Hyun, Seung Soo

    2013-01-01

    Background Practitioners of family medicine are essential to primary care practices in Korea. Resident training staffs in Korean family medicine departments have a crucial role in producing well-trained family physicians. This study assesses the aspects of satisfaction and difficulties of Korean family medicine resident training staffs. Methods We surveyed the resident training staffs of various Korean family medicine departments using an online survey tool. The survey used in this study was modified from previously used questionnaires. Respondents rated items using a five-point Likert scale and a 0-10 visual analogue scale. Results The response rate was 43.9% (122/278). The mean satisfaction score with regard to current family medicine residency programs was 7.59 out of 10. Resident training staffs found the administrative aspects of their role to be the most difficult. There were considerable differences in the reported difficulties of resident training according to the differing characteristics of each staff member, including age, sex, type of hospital, number of staff members, role as chief, and duration of staff. Most respondents (91.9%) cited a need for faculty development programs. Conclusion Korean family medicine resident training staffs need faculty development programs for the improvement of resident training. For the strengthening of core competencies among resident training staffs, faculty development programs or courses should be designed and implemented in Korea. PMID:24106588

  19. An Academic Multihealth System PGY2 Pediatric Pharmacy Residency Program.

    PubMed

    Klosterman, Theresa; Meyers, Rachel; Siu, Anita; Shah, Pooja; Kimler, Katelin; Sturgill, Marc; Robinson, Christine

    2015-01-01

    We describe a novel multihealth system pediatric pharmacy residency program through the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy at Rutgers University. Pediatric clinical pharmacy is a growing field that has seen an increase in demand for practitioners. Practice sites include freestanding children's hospitals, children's hospitals within adult hospitals, and pediatric units within adult hospitals. To accommodate a residency program in a region with no freestanding children's hospital, the pediatric faculty members at the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy at Rutgers University developed a multihealth system postgraduate year 2 (PGY2) pediatric pharmacy residency program with 6 pediatric faculty members functioning as preceptors at their 5 respective practice sites. The multihealth system setup of the program provides the resident exposure to a multitude of patient populations, pediatric specialties, and pediatric pharmacy practices. In addition, the affiliation with Rutgers University allows an emphasis on academia with opportunities for the resident to lecture in small and large classrooms, facilitate discussion periods, assist with clinical laboratory classes, and precept pharmacy students. The resident has the unique opportunity to develop a research project with a large and diverse patient population owing to the multihealth system rotation sites. A multihealth system PGY2 residency in pediatric pharmacy provides the resident a well-rounded experience in pediatric clinical practice, research, and academia that will enhance the resident's ability to build his or her own pediatric pharmacy practice. PMID:26766936

  20. Building a resident research program in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Nocera, Romy; Ramoska, Edward Anthony; Hamilton, Richard Joseph

    2016-03-01

    Residency training programs requirements state, "Residents should participate in scholarly activity." However, there is little consensus regarding how best to achieve these requirements. The objective of this study is to implement a resident research program that emphasizes resident participation in quantitative or qualitative empirical work. A three-step program "Think, Do, Write" roughly follows the 3 years of the residency. During the first phase, the resident chooses a topic, formulates a hypothesis, and completes standard research certifications. Phase 2 involves obtaining Institutional Review Board approval, and conducting the study. The final phase entails analyzing and interpreting the data, and writing an abstract to present during an annual research day. Residents are encouraged to submit their projects for presentation at scientific conferences and for publication. Multiple departmental resources are available, including a Resident Research Fund, and full support of the faculty. Prior to the new program, most scholarly activity consisted of case reports, book chapters, review articles, or other miscellaneous projects; only 27 % represented empirical studies. Starting in 2012, the new program was fully implemented, resulting in notable growth in original empirical works among residents. Currently there is almost 100 % participation in studies, and numerous residents have presented at national conferences, and have peer-reviewed publications. With a comprehensive and supported program in place, emergency medicine residents proved capable of conducting high-quality empirical research within their relatively limited time. Overall, residents developed valuable skills in research design and statistical analysis, and greatly increased their productivity as academic and clinical researchers. PMID:26597875

  1. Fracture Risk among Nursing Home Residents Initiating Antipsychotic Medications

    PubMed Central

    Rigler, Sally K.; Shireman, Theresa I.; Cook-Wiens, Galen J.; Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Whittle, Jeffrey C.; Mehr, David R.; Mahnken, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives to determine whether antipsychotic medication initiation is associated with subsequent fracture in nursing home residents, whether fracture rates differ between first-generation versus second-generation antipsychotic use, and whether fracture rates differ among users of haloperidol, risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine. Design time-to-event analyses were conducted in a retrospective cohort using linked Medicaid, Medicare, Minimum Data Set and Online Survey, Certification and Reporting data sets. Setting and Participants nursing home residents aged ≥ 65 years in CA, FL, MO, NJ and PA. Measurements fracture outcomes (any fracture; hip fracture) in first-versus second-generation antipsychotic users, and specifically among users of haloperidol, risperidone, olanzapine and quetiapine. Comparisons incorporated propensity scores that included patient-level variables (demographics, comorbidity, diagnoses, weight, fall history, concomitant medications, cognitive performance, physical function, aggressivebehavior) and facility-level variables (nursing home size, ownership factors, staffing levels). Results Among 8,262 subjects (within 4,131 pairs), 4.3% suffered any fracture during observation with 1% having a hip fracture during an average follow up period of 93 ± 71 days; range 1 to 293 days). Antipsychotic initiation was associated with any fracture (hazard ratio (HR) 1.39, p=0.004) and with hip fracture (HR 1.76, p=0.024). The highest risk was found for hip fracture when antipsychotic use was adjusted for dose(HR=2.96; p=0.008). However, no differences in time-to-fracture were found in first-versus second-generation agents or across competing individual drugs. Conclusion Antipsychotic initiation is associated with fracture in nursing home residents, but risk does not differ across commonly used antipsychotics. PMID:23590366

  2. Use of Drugs with Anticholinergic Properties among Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Jacqueline B.; Albrecht, Jennifer S.; Park, Yujin; Dutcher, Sarah; Rattinger, Gail B.; Simoni-Wastila, Linda; Walker, Loreen D.; Zuckerman, Ilene H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Older adults with dementia are vulnerable to the central deteriorating effects of drugs with anticholinergic properties (DAP). These effects include falls and confusion and may exacerbate dementia-related symptoms. Many individuals with dementia also receive acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEI), indicated for mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. AChEI have opposing effects to DAP and consequently, concomitant use of DAP and AChEI may further impair cognition among patients with dementia. Objectives Our objectives were to 1) evaluate the anticholinergic burden among nursing home (NH) residents with dementia; 2) characterize trends in use of DAP and concomitant use of DAP and AChEI among NH residents with dementia; and 3) identify factors associated with the use of DAP and concomitant use of DAP and AChEI. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of Medicare data from 2007-2008 linked to the Minimum Data Set. Results During the study period, 53,805 (77%) NH residents with dementia used at least one DAP each month. Sixty-seven percent of residents with dementia used Anticholinergic Burden Scale (ACBS) level 1 DAPs, 3% used level 2 and 31% used level 3 DAP. Thirteen percent of NH residents with dementia concomitantly used ACBS levels 2 or3 DAPs and AChEI. Conclusions This study sheds new light on the prevalence of DAP use and concomitant use of DAP and AChEI among NH residents with dementia. Clinicians should consider alternatives with lower anticholinergic effects, particularly in patients already taking DAP. PMID:25491558

  3. Migratory New World blackbirds (icterids) are more neophobic than closely related resident icterids.

    PubMed

    Mettke-Hofmann, Claudia; Winkler, Hans; Hamel, Paul B; Greenberg, Russell

    2013-01-01

    Environments undergo short-term and long-term changes due to natural or human-induced events. Animals differ in their ability to cope with such changes which can be related to their ecology. Changes in the environment often elicit avoidance reactions (neophobia) which protect animals from dangerous situations but can also inhibit exploration and familiarization with novel situations and thus, learning about new resources. Studies investigating the relationship between a species' ecology and its neophobia have so far been restricted to comparing only a few species and mainly in captivity. The current study investigated neophobia reactions to experimentally-induced changes in the natural environment of six closely-related blackbird species (Icteridae), including two species represented by two distinct populations. For analyses, neophobic reactions (difference in number of birds feeding and time spent feeding with and without novel objects) were related to several measures of ecological plasticity and the migratory strategy (resident or migratory) of the population. Phylogenetic relationships were incorporated into the analysis. The degree of neophobia was related to migratory strategy with migrants expressing much higher neophobia (fewer birds feeding and for a shorter time with objects present) than residents. Furthermore, neophobia showed a relationship to diet breadth with fewer individuals of diet generalists than specialists returning when objects were present supporting the dangerous niche hypothesis. Residents may have evolved lower neophobia as costs of missing out on opportunities may be higher for residents than migrants as the former are restricted to a smaller area. Lower neophobia allows them approaching changes in the environment (e.g. novel objects) quickly, thereby securing access to resources. Additionally, residents have a greater familiarity with similar situations in the area than migrants and the latter may, therefore, initially stay behind

  4. Resident memory T cells in human health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Rachael A.

    2015-01-01

    Resident memory T cells are non-recirculating memory T cells that persist long term in epithelial barrier tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract, lung, skin and reproductive tract. Resident memory T cells persist in the absence of antigens, have impressive effector functions and provide rapid on-site immune protection against known pathogens in peripheral tissues. A fundamentally distinct gene expression program differentiates resident memory T cells from circulating T cells. Although these cells likely evolved to provide rapid immune protection against pathogens, autoreactive, aberrantly activated and malignant resident memory cells contribute to numerous human inflammatory diseases including mycosis fungoides and psoriasis. This review will discuss both the science and medicine of resident memory T cells, exploring how these cells contribute to healthy immune function and discussing what is known about how these cells contribute to human inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:25568072

  5. Applying Expectancy Theory to residency training: proposing opportunities to understand resident motivation and enhance residency training.

    PubMed

    Shweiki, Ehyal; Martin, Niels D; Beekley, Alec C; Jenoff, Jay S; Koenig, George J; Kaulback, Kris R; Lindenbaum, Gary A; Patel, Pankaj H; Rosen, Matthew M; Weinstein, Michael S; Zubair, Muhammad H; Cohen, Murray J

    2015-01-01

    Medical resident education in the United States has been a matter of national priority for decades, exemplified initially through the Liaison Committee for Graduate Medical Education and then superseded by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. A recent Special Report in the New England Journal of Medicine, however, has described resident educational programs to date as prescriptive, noting an absence of innovation in education. Current aims of contemporary medical resident education are thus being directed at ensuring quality in learning as well as in patient care. Achievement and work-motivation theories attempt to explain people's choice, performance, and persistence in tasks. Expectancy Theory as one such theory was reviewed in detail, appearing particularly applicable to surgical residency training. Correlations between Expectancy Theory as a work-motivation theory and residency education were explored. Understanding achievement and work-motivation theories affords an opportunity to gain insight into resident motivation in training. The application of Expectancy Theory in particular provides an innovative perspective into residency education. Afforded are opportunities to promote the development of programmatic methods facilitating surgical resident motivation in education. PMID:25995656

  6. Applying Expectancy Theory to residency training: proposing opportunities to understand resident motivation and enhance residency training

    PubMed Central

    Shweiki, Ehyal; Martin, Niels D; Beekley, Alec C; Jenoff, Jay S; Koenig, George J; Kaulback, Kris R; Lindenbaum, Gary A; Patel, Pankaj H; Rosen, Matthew M; Weinstein, Michael S; Zubair, Muhammad H; Cohen, Murray J

    2015-01-01

    Medical resident education in the United States has been a matter of national priority for decades, exemplified initially through the Liaison Committee for Graduate Medical Education and then superseded by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. A recent Special Report in the New England Journal of Medicine, however, has described resident educational programs to date as prescriptive, noting an absence of innovation in education. Current aims of contemporary medical resident education are thus being directed at ensuring quality in learning as well as in patient care. Achievement and work-motivation theories attempt to explain people’s choice, performance, and persistence in tasks. Expectancy Theory as one such theory was reviewed in detail, appearing particularly applicable to surgical residency training. Correlations between Expectancy Theory as a work-motivation theory and residency education were explored. Understanding achievement and work-motivation theories affords an opportunity to gain insight into resident motivation in training. The application of Expectancy Theory in particular provides an innovative perspective into residency education. Afforded are opportunities to promote the development of programmatic methods facilitating surgical resident motivation in education. PMID:25995656

  7. Preliminary FISH-based assessment of external dose for residents exposed on the Techa River.

    PubMed

    Vozilova, A V; Shagina, N B; Degteva, M O; Edwards, A A; Ainsbury, E A; Moquet, J E; Hone, P; Lloyd, D C; Fomina, J N; Darroudi, F

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a feasibility cytogenetic study using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) translocation assay for residents of villages located on the Techa River (Southern Urals, Russia) contaminated with liquid radioactive wastes from the Mayak plutonium facility in 1949-1956. The study was conducted with two groups of donors that differed in their main pathways of exposure. The first group comprised 18 residents of the middle Techa region who were exposed predominantly from ingestion of radionuclides (mostly (89,90)Sr) via the river water and local foodstuffs. The second group included 20 residents of Metlino, the closest village to the site of releases, who were exposed to external γ radiation from the contaminated river bank and exposed internally from dietary intake of radionuclides. A significant linear dependence between the radiation-induced translocation frequency and individual red bone marrow dose from incorporated (89,90)Sr, calculated with the Techa River Dosimetry System (TRDS), was found in the first group of donors. This allowed us to take the contribution of (89,90)Sr to the total radiation-induced translocation frequency into account for the second group of donors and to analyze translocations resulting from external γ-ray exposure. Individual doses from external exposure derived from the corrected translocation frequency for the second group of donors (Metlino residents), using a linear dose-response coefficient of 0.015 translocation/cell/Gy recommended by Edwards et al. in 2005, were shown to vary up to 2.1 Gy, with an average value of 0.48 Gy, which was in agreement with TRDS-based external dose estimates for Metlino residents. PMID:22026585

  8. 75 FR 62186 - Proposed Information Collection (Residency Verification Report-Veterans and Survivors) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Residency Verification Report-- Veterans and Survivors) Activity... proper performance of VBA's functions, including whether the information will have practical utility; (2... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: Residency Verification...

  9. International Child Health Elective for Pediatric Residents

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are increasing evidence highlighting the importance of incorporating issues of global health into pre- and post-graduate medical curricula. Medical international cooperation is a fundamental component of strategies to include global health issues in post-graduate medical curricula. Methods Here we describe a seven-year cooperation between the Non Governmental Organization (NGO) “Doctors for Africa CUAMM” and the Pediatric Residency Program (PRP) of the University of Padua (Italy) that offers residents a well-articulated personalized international child’s health (ICH) elective in Africa, called “Junior Project Officer”. The elective includes: a careful candidate selection process; pre-departure educational course; preceptorship in Padua and Africa, personalized learning objectives, a personalized job description, a six-month hands-on learning experience in Africa, evaluation of the experience, and formal private and open feed-backs/reports. Results Between 2006 and 2012, 14 residents aged from 27 to 31 years, six attending the III, nine the IV and two the V year of residency completed the six-month stage in Africa. All worked in pediatric in-patient units; seven also worked in out-patient clinics, six in emergency rooms and seven in community health centers. Eleven were involved in teaching activities and four in clinical research projects. All residents claimed to have achieved their learning objectives. Conclusions A strong partnership between the NGO and the PRP, and well-articulated personalized learning objectives and job description contributed to a successful ICH elective. PMID:24499625

  10. Coping with disaster: relocating a residency program.

    PubMed

    Conlay, Lydia A; Searle, Nancy S; Gitlin, Melvin C

    2007-08-01

    In September 2005, in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the Tulane University School of Medicine relocated temporarily from New Orleans to the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. For Tulane's residency program in anesthesiology, a training consortium was formed in Texas consisting of the University of Texas at Houston, Baylor College of Medicine, the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, and the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. The authors explain the collaborative process that allowed the consortium to find spaces to accommodate Tulane's 30 anesthesiology residents within 30 days after they left New Orleans, and they offer reflections and recommendations. The residents were grateful to continue training close to home, and for maintaining the Tulane program. The consortium successfully provided an administrative and academic framework, logistical support, clinical capacity for the residents to complete the required numbers and types of cases, and integration into preexisting didactic programs. Communications represented a major challenge; the importance of having an up-to-date disaster plan, including provisions for communication using more than one modality or provider, cannot be underestimated. Other challenges included resuming a training program without basic information regarding medical credentials or training status, competing for resources with businesses that had also relocated, maintaining a coordinated decision-making process, and managing the behavioral sequelae after the disaster. Of the original 30 Tulane residents, 23 (77%) relocated to Houston. Seventeen (74%) of those who relocated either graduated or returned with the program to New Orleans. The program has retained its status of full accreditation. PMID:17762250

  11. Learning styles of orthodontic residents.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Janeen M; Fallis, Drew W; Peel, Jennifer L; Murchison, David F

    2009-03-01

    Significant challenges face many orthodontic residency programs, particularly a shortage of full-time experienced faculty members. Due to this shortage, it is critical that program directors design comprehensive curricula that incorporate the most effective and efficient teaching methods. It is theorized that teaching effectiveness and efficiency are optimized when the course design and content closely match students' learning preferences. This survey study was designed to distinguish the learning preferences of orthodontic residents utilizing Felder and Soloman's Index of Learning Styles, which assesses student learning preferences in four dimensions using dichotomous scales, thereby providing insight into how teaching strategies can best be structured. As a secondary focus, additional questions on the survey were asked to gain information about residents' access to the Internet and comfort level with online learning so as to address acceptance of web-based courses in response to the shortage of full-time faculty members. Orthodontic residents, contacted via email, were requested to complete an online survey; 261 responses were collected. The results indicate that orthodontic residents are highly visual learners and show a preference for sensing and sequential learning strategies. In terms of information technology, the residents are comfortable with and have adequate access to current technological assets; therefore, they may be well suited for inclusion of computer-based teaching modules and other multimedia devices in their residency curriculum. PMID:19289721

  12. Global health training for pediatric residents.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Bonita; Huang, Chi-Cheng; Armstrong, Robert W; Sectish, Theodore C; Palfrey, Judith; Nelson, Brett D; Herlihy, Julie M; Alden, Errol; Keenan, William; Szilagyi, Peter

    2008-12-01

    The FOPO Global Health Working Group concludes that global health experiences are important for pediatric residency training and offers five recommendations: 1) There is a need to articulate clearly the rationale supporting the creation of global health experiences in pediatric residency programs. 2) A core curriculum needs to be established for a consistent and meaningful educational experience. The curriculum should include the underlying principles discussed above and should engage representatives from potential host countries in the development of the curriculum. 3) Promoting the opportunity for a global health experience in all residency programs will require a collaborative effort across programs, perhaps at the national level through the Association of Pediatric Program Directors or through the already established Global Health Education Consortium (GHEC).34 A clearinghouse for curricula and for host organizations/institutions both abroad and within the United States and Canada should be established. 4) Global health training needs to be studied rigorously, and lessons learned should be shared. 5) Pediatric residency programs should respect the rights, autonomy, and confidentiality of patients and families in clinical care, research, and operational programs. The FOPO Global Health Working Group looks forward to serving as a focal point to promote discussion on this important issue to the health of our world's children. PMID:19143329

  13. Leadership and business education in orthopaedic residency training programs.

    PubMed

    Kiesau, Carter D; Heim, Kathryn A; Parekh, Selene G

    2011-01-01

    Leadership and business challenges have become increasingly present in the practice of medicine. Orthopaedic residency programs are at the forefront of educating and preparing orthopaedic surgeons. This study attempts to quantify the number of orthopaedic residency programs in the United States that include leadership or business topics in resident education program and to determine which topics are being taught and rate the importance of various leadership characteristics and business topics. A survey was sent to all orthopaedic department chairpersons and residency program directors in the United States via e-mail. The survey responses were collected using a survey collection website. The respondents rated the importance of leadership training for residents as somewhat important. The quality of character, integrity, and honesty received the highest average rating among 19 different qualities of good leaders in orthopaedics. The inclusion of business training in resident education was also rated as somewhat important. The topic of billing and coding received the highest average rating among 14 different orthopaedically relevant business topics. A variety of topics beyond the scope of clinical practice must be included in orthopaedic residency educational curricula. The decreased participation of newly trained orthopaedic surgeons in leadership positions and national and state orthopaedic organizations is concerning for the future of orthopaedic surgery. Increased inclusion of leadership and business training in resident education is important to better prepare trainees for the future. PMID:21838073

  14. Identification of odour sources in an industrial park from resident diaries statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, Jacques; Cors, Marie; Romain, Anne-Claude; Delva, Julien

    2010-05-01

    A methodology based on social participation through the use of resident diaries was applied to evaluate the odour annoyance in the surroundings of an industrial park in Belgium during one year. The studied area covers about 8 km 2 and includes13 potential odour emitting facilities. The network involved 44 residents in the survey, among whom 19 were particularly considered for a detailed analysis. The questionnaire aimed at providing an odour rating twice-daily on a 6-level scale together with an odour type. The fact that the response rate corresponding to "no-odour" was high (79%) is particularly discussed. Some tests are proposed to check the plausibility of the answers, the coherence within clusters of residents and the individual performance of respondents to discriminate among odour ratings. The odour rose is presented as an attractive and visual tool, particularly suited in the case of multi-source areas, to map the different odour emissions, to point out the most worrying ones, to identify others creating less annoyance and possibly new unpredicted ones. The resident diary method has proven to be particularly useful, conjointly to other ones, to the case of multi-sources facilities in large areas, when the purpose is the assessment of the long-term evolution of odour annoyance.

  15. Social Individualism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornille, Thomas A.; Harrigan, John

    Relationships between individuals and society have often been presented from the perspective of the social institution. Social psychology has addressed the variables that affect the individual in relationships with larger groups. Social individualism is a conceptual framework that explores the relationship of the individual and society from the…

  16. Connecting resident education to patient outcomes: the evolution of a quality improvement curriculum in an internal medicine residency.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Muhammad A; Diers, Tiffiny; Schauer, Daniel P; Warm, Eric J

    2014-10-01

    As part of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System, residency programs must connect resident-physician education to improved patient care outcomes. Residency training programs, however, face multiple obstacles in doing so. Results from residency quality improvement (QI) curricula tend to show improvement in simple process-based measures but not in more complex outcomes of care such as diabetes or blood pressure control. In this article, the authors describe the evolution of their QI educational program for internal medicine residents at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center within the structure of a novel training model called the Ambulatory Long Block. They discuss a resident-run project that led to reduced rates of patients with uncontrolled diabetes as an example of improvement in outcome measures. Despite favorable results from that particular resident group, the successful intervention did not spread practice-wide. Using this example, they detail the phases of evolution and lessons learned from their curriculum from 2006 to 2014 within a framework of previously published general principles for successful QI education, including those of exemplary care and learning sites. Successful programs require leadership, faculty expertise and mentorship, data management, learner buy-in, and patient engagement. Their experience will hopefully be of help to others as they attempt to simultaneously improve care and education. Further research and innovation are needed in this area, including optimizing strategies for strengthening resident-driven projects through partnership with nursing, allied health, and longitudinally engaged faculty members. PMID:25054419

  17. Bahamas connection: residence areas selected by breeding female loggerheads tagged in Dry Tortugas National Park, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, Kristen M.; Sartain-Iverson, Autumn R.; Fujisaki, Ikuko

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a previously unknown link between Dry Tortugas nesting beaches and Bahamas residence areas; 17/39 (43.6%) of nesting loggerheads tagged in and tracked from the Dry Tortugas take up residence at sites in the Bahamas. Residence area estimates for these turtles were similar in size to previous foraging area estimates for two turtles tracked to the Bahamas in other studies. We show inter-annual residence area repeatability, and that residence areas of different individuals generally did not overlap. We suggest that these loggerheads possibly establish territories.

  18. Transition within a graduate nurse residency program.

    PubMed

    Varner, Kendra D; Leeds, Ruth A

    2012-11-01

    As evidence of the effectiveness of these programs grows, nurse leaders feel the pressure to establish high-quality, yet cost-effective graduate nurse transition programs. In 2009, the authors developed an innovative program by incorporating transition theory, research results, stakeholder involvement, and the recommendations of the National Council of State Boards of Nursing. The graduate nurse residency program yielded positive outcomes, including stakeholder satisfaction and high retention rates. PMID:23061408

  19. Person–environment interactions among residents of Oxford Houses

    PubMed Central

    Beasley, Christopher R.; Jason, Leonard A.; Miller, Steven A.; Stevens, Ed; Ferrari, Joseph R.

    2013-01-01

    The continued struggle of addiction recovery support systems suggest that the paradigm of this field needs to continue its evolution, which has increasingly emphasized environments. Field Theory suggests that the products of individual and environmental characteristics be considered rather than a summation of the two. This study examined such interactions in Oxford Houses, a network of democratic, and self-governed addiction recovery homes. This study examined sobriety in experienced houses (average length of residency > six months) compared to less experienced houses (average length of residency ≤ six months) in relation to individual resident characteristics (age, length of residence in an Oxford House, and referral from the criminal justice system). Using multilevel modeling, findings indicated that older residents living in an experienced Oxford Houses were more likely to remain abstinent over time than those in inexperienced homes. Additionally, for inexperienced houses, residents who had been in the Oxford House for a longer period had a higher the probability of abstinence than those that had been in the house for a shorter period of time. Finally, legal referral was related to a lower probability of one-year abstinence but only for those in experienced homes. These types of person-environment interactions point to the need for more research to better understand how person variables interact with environmental variables in the processes of recovery and adaptation to settings, as well as for treatment professionals' consideration of both person and environment when making recovery home referrals. PMID:24273474

  20. Measuring "humanism" in medical residents.

    PubMed

    Merrill, J M; Boisaubin, E V; Laux, L; Lynch, E C; Roessler, R; Thornby, J I

    1986-02-01

    The American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) has charged directors of residency programs with evaluating "humanistic attributes" in residents seeking certification. To investigate whether traditional measures of residents' performance assess humanistic attributes, 38 second- and third-year medical residents completed the Totalitarian-Authoritarian-Dogmatism (TAD) and Rokeach tests for attitudinal assessment. Five primary sources were used to measure performance. When the measures of performance and attitude were correlated, two negative correlations with "antipathy toward patients" were found: professional maturity (r = -.43, P less than .01) and compassion and concern for patients (r = -.35, P less than .04). The TAD Opinionnaire and the special performance evaluation detect "nonhumanistic dimensions" that routine faculty assessments do not. Since the new Likert scale distributed by ABIM does not differ materially from the rating form used at Baylor for 2 1/2 years, it is unlikely that "humanistic attributes" will be measured by the ABIM's new scale. PMID:3945843

  1. The Optometric Residency: Its Bloom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleything, Willard B.

    1979-01-01

    Guidelines for proposed residencies in optometry are presented for pediatric, rehabilitative, and hospital optometry. Their significance in terms of costs, patient population, faculty expertise, and critical mass are discussed. (JMF)

  2. Alcohol, tobacco and breast cancer--collaborative reanalysis of individual data from 53 epidemiological studies, including 58,515 women with breast cancer and 95,067 women without the disease.

    PubMed

    Hamajima, N; Hirose, K; Tajima, K; Rohan, T; Calle, E E; Heath, C W; Coates, R J; Liff, J M; Talamini, R; Chantarakul, N; Koetsawang, S; Rachawat, D; Morabia, A; Schuman, L; Stewart, W; Szklo, M; Bain, C; Schofield, F; Siskind, V; Band, P; Coldman, A J; Gallagher, R P; Hislop, T G; Yang, P; Kolonel, L M; Nomura, A M Y; Hu, J; Johnson, K C; Mao, Y; De Sanjosé, S; Lee, N; Marchbanks, P; Ory, H W; Peterson, H B; Wilson, H G; Wingo, P A; Ebeling, K; Kunde, D; Nishan, P; Hopper, J L; Colditz, G; Gajalanski, V; Martin, N; Pardthaisong, T; Silpisornkosol, S; Theetranont, C; Boosiri, B; Chutivongse, S; Jimakorn, P; Virutamasen, P; Wongsrichanalai, C; Ewertz, M; Adami, H O; Bergkvist, L; Magnusson, C; Persson, I; Chang-Claude, J; Paul, C; Skegg, D C G; Spears, G F S; Boyle, P; Evstifeeva, T; Daling, J R; Hutchinson, W B; Malone, K; Noonan, E A; Stanford, J L; Thomas, D B; Weiss, N S; White, E; Andrieu, N; Brêmond, A; Clavel, F; Gairard, B; Lansac, J; Piana, L; Renaud, R; Izquierdo, A; Viladiu, P; Cuevas, H R; Ontiveros, P; Palet, A; Salazar, S B; Aristizabel, N; Cuadros, A; Tryggvadottir, L; Tulinius, H; Bachelot, A; Lê, M G; Peto, J; Franceschi, S; Lubin, F; Modan, B; Ron, E; Wax, Y; Friedman, G D; Hiatt, R A; Levi, F; Bishop, T; Kosmelj, K; Primic-Zakelj, M; Ravnihar, B; Stare, J; Beeson, W L; Fraser, G; Bullbrook, R D; Cuzick, J; Duffy, S W; Fentiman, I S; Hayward, J L; Wang, D Y; McMichael, A J; McPherson, K; Hanson, R L; Leske, M C; Mahoney, M C; Nasca, P C; Varma, A O; Weinstein, A L; Moller, T R; Olsson, H; Ranstam, J; Goldbohm, R A; van den Brandt, P A; Apelo, R A; Baens, J; de la Cruz, J R; Javier, B; Lacaya, L B; Ngelangel, C A; La Vecchia, C; Negri, E; Marubini, E; Ferraroni, M; Gerber, M; Richardson, S; Segala, C; Gatei, D; Kenya, P; Kungu, A; Mati, J G; Brinton, L A; Hoover, R; Schairer, C; Spirtas, R; Lee, H P; Rookus, M A; van Leeuwen, F E; Schoenberg, J A; McCredie, M; Gammon, M D; Clarke, E A; Jones, L; Neil, A; Vessey, M; Yeates, D; Appleby, P; Banks, E; Beral, V; Bull, D; Crossley, B; Goodill, A; Green, J; Hermon, C; Key, T; Langston, N; Lewis, C; Reeves, G; Collins, R; Doll, R; Peto, R; Mabuchi, K; Preston, D; Hannaford, P; Kay, C; Rosero-Bixby, L; Gao, Y T; Jin, F; Yuan, J-M; Wei, H Y; Yun, T; Zhiheng, C; Berry, G; Cooper Booth, J; Jelihovsky, T; MacLennan, R; Shearman, R; Wang, Q-S; Baines, C-J; Miller, A B; Wall, C; Lund, E; Stalsberg, H; Shu, X O; Zheng, W; Katsouyanni, K; Trichopoulou, A; Trichopoulos, D; Dabancens, A; Martinez, L; Molina, R; Salas, O; Alexander, F E; Anderson, K; Folsom, A R; Hulka, B S; Bernstein, L; Enger, S; Haile, R W; Paganini-Hill, A; Pike, M C; Ross, R K; Ursin, G; Yu, M C; Longnecker, M P; Newcomb, P; Bergkvist, L; Kalache, A; Farley, T M M; Holck, S; Meirik, O

    2002-11-18

    Alcohol and tobacco consumption are closely correlated and published results on their association with breast cancer have not always allowed adequately for confounding between these exposures. Over 80% of the relevant information worldwide on alcohol and tobacco consumption and breast cancer were collated, checked and analysed centrally. Analyses included 58,515 women with invasive breast cancer and 95,067 controls from 53 studies. Relative risks of breast cancer were estimated, after stratifying by study, age, parity and, where appropriate, women's age when their first child was born and consumption of alcohol and tobacco. The average consumption of alcohol reported by controls from developed countries was 6.0 g per day, i.e. about half a unit/drink of alcohol per day, and was greater in ever-smokers than never-smokers, (8.4 g per day and 5.0 g per day, respectively). Compared with women who reported drinking no alcohol, the relative risk of breast cancer was 1.32 (1.19-1.45, P<0.00001) for an intake of 35-44 g per day alcohol, and 1.46 (1.33-1.61, P<0.00001) for >/=45 g per day alcohol. The relative risk of breast cancer increased by 7.1% (95% CI 5.5-8.7%; P<0.00001) for each additional 10 g per day intake of alcohol, i.e. for each extra unit or drink of alcohol consumed on a daily basis. This increase was the same in ever-smokers and never-smokers (7.1% per 10 g per day, P<0.00001, in each group). By contrast, the relationship between smoking and breast cancer was substantially confounded by the effect of alcohol. When analyses were restricted to 22 255 women with breast cancer and 40 832 controls who reported drinking no alcohol, smoking was not associated with breast cancer (compared to never-smokers, relative risk for ever-smokers=1.03, 95% CI 0.98-1.07, and for current smokers=0.99, 0.92-1.05). The results for alcohol and for tobacco did not vary substantially across studies, study designs, or according to 15 personal characteristics of the women; nor were

  3. Residents' leadership styles and effectiveness as perceived by nurses.

    PubMed

    McCue, J D; Magrinat, G; Hansen, C J; Bailey, R S

    1986-01-01

    Although physicians are required to act as leaders in a variety of situations, leadership ability and leadership training have been largely ignored by medical educators. The leadership styles and leadership effectiveness of 17 residents in a community hospital were studied as part of a leadership training seminar. Self-ratings and ratings of the residents by nurses who had worked with them were used to assess the residents' leadership style and the nurses' perceptions of the effectiveness of those styles. Styles that emphasized relationships with co-workers (encouraging and coaching styles) predominated over low relationship-oriented styles (delegating and structuring). The nurses perceived individual residents who exhibited encouraging and coaching leadership styles as being distinctly more effective leaders than the residents who exhibited structuring and delegating styles. The residents, however, rated all four styles as similarly effective. Leadership training programs and studies of the type reported here may provide an opportunity for faculty members to help residents learn more appropriate and productive styles of leadership. PMID:3941422

  4. Integrating family medicine residents into a rural practice.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, L.

    1997-01-01

    PROBLEM: Integrating residents into community family practices can be challenging for busy doctors, especially when new preceptors have no formal preparation or teaching experience. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To develop an organized and practical approach to teaching residents in our busy rural group practice. Our seven northern Ontario family doctors have been training elective residents and clerks for 15 years. Recently, we have gone from hosting elective residents and students to teaching core family medicine residents. Our precepting plan allows us to dedicate a reasonable time to teaching while fulfilling our primary care duties. MAIN COMPONENTS: The program involves contracting, teaching, monitoring, feedback, and evaluation. CONCLUSION: We think we have developed a sustainable, workable set of teaching parameters that is applicable by various preceptors in different settings. It has simplified our teaching role and lessened our anxieties. Residents have benefited from the consistent protocol, which can be flexible enough to adapt to individual residents and preceptors, and have valued this teaching approach. Images p278-a p280-a PMID:9040915

  5. The Effect of Hospice on Hospitalizations of Nursing Home Residents

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Nan Tracy; Mukamel, Dana B.; Friedman, Bruce; Caprio, Thomas V.; Temkin-Greener, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hospice enrollment is known to reduce risk of hospitalizations for nursing home residents who use it. We examined whether residing in facilities with a higher hospice penetration: 1) reduces hospitalization risk for non-hospice residents; and 2) decreases hospice-enrolled residents’ hospitalization risk relative to hospice-enrolled residents in facilities with a lower hospice penetration. Method Medicare Beneficiary File, Inpatient and Hospice Claims, Minimum Data Set Version 2.0, Provider of Services File and Area Resource File. Retrospective analysis of long-stay nursing home residents who died during 2005-2007. Overall, 505,851 non-hospice (67.66%) and 241,790 hospice-enrolled (32.34%) residents in 14,030 facilities nationwide were included. We fit models predicting the probability of hospitalization conditional on hospice penetration and resident and facility characteristics. We used instrumental variable method to address the potential endogeneity between hospice penetration and hospitalization. Distance between each nursing home and the closest hospice was the instrumental variable. Main Findings In the last 30 days of life, 37.63% of non-hospice and 23.18% of hospice residents were hospitalized. Every 10% increase in hospice penetration leads to a reduction in hospitalization risk of 5.1% for non-hospice residents and 4.8% for hospice-enrolled residents. Principal Conclusions Higher facility-level hospice penetration reduces hospitalization risk for both non-hospice and hospice-enrolled residents. The findings shed light on nursing home end-of-life care delivery, collaboration among providers and cost benefit analysis of hospice care. PMID:25304181

  6. Doll therapy: an intervention for nursing home residents with dementia.

    PubMed

    Shin, Juh Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The use of dolls as a therapeutic intervention for nursing home residents with dementia is relatively new. The current article describes a research study implemented with nursing home residents in Korea to examine the effects of doll therapy on their mood, behavior, and social interactions. A one-group, pretest-posttest design was used to measure the impact of doll therapy on 51 residents with dementia. Linear regression demonstrated statistically significant differences in aggression, obsessive behaviors, wandering, negative verbalization, negative mood, and negative physical appearance after introduction of the doll therapy intervention. Interactions with other individuals also increased over time. Findings support the benefits of doll therapy for nursing home residents with dementia; however, further research is needed to provide more empirical evidence and explore ethical considerations in the use of doll therapy in this vulnerable population. PMID:25622273

  7. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.70 Resident rights. The resident has a...; (iii) Physicians of the resident's choice (to provide care in the nursing home, physicians must...

  8. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.70 Resident rights. The resident has a...; (iii) Physicians of the resident's choice (to provide care in the nursing home, physicians must...

  9. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.70 Resident rights. The resident has a...; (iii) Physicians of the resident's choice (to provide care in the nursing home, physicians must...

  10. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.70 Resident rights. The resident has a...; (iii) Physicians of the resident's choice (to provide care in the nursing home, physicians must...

  11. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.70 Resident rights. The resident has a...; (iii) Physicians of the resident's choice (to provide care in the nursing home, physicians must...

  12. Towards the reliable calculation of residence time for off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Kathleen C.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2016-08-01

    Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) methods have the potential to extend the accessible timescales of off-lattice atomistic simulations beyond the limits of molecular dynamics by making use of transition state theory and parallelization. However, it is a challenge to identify a complete catalog of events accessible to an off-lattice system in order to accurately calculate the residence time for KMC. Here we describe possible approaches to some of the key steps needed to address this problem. These include methods to compare and distinguish individual kinetic events, to deterministically search an energy landscape, and to define local atomic environments. When applied to the ground state  ∑5(2 1 0) grain boundary in copper, these methods achieve a converged residence time, accounting for the full set of kinetically relevant events for this off-lattice system, with calculable uncertainty.

  13. Dientes! Community dental clinic: dental care for low-income residents of Santa Cruz County.

    PubMed

    Balzer, J; Webb, C

    1998-05-01

    Dientes! is a private nonprofit community dental clinic that was established in 1994 to provide dental care for low-income residents of Santa Cruz County. Its founders were successful in securing support from a diverse group of community agencies, including city and county governments, philanthropic foundations, the dental community, and corporate and individual donors. Dientes! provides approximately 250 visits per month in a three-chair clinic in Santa Cruz; a school-based program in Watsonville began March 1998. The major challenge facing Dientes! is to establish a reliable financial base that will allow the program to better meet the needs of low-income county residents over the long term. PMID:10528572

  14. Family medicine residency training and burnout: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Kimberly; Oda, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Background Almost three-quarters of family practice residents in British Columbia (BC) meet criteria for burnout. We sought to understand how burnout is perceived and experienced by family medicine residents, and to identify both contributory and protective factors for resident burnout. Method Two semi-structured focus groups were conducted with ten family practice residents from five distinct University of British Columbia training sites. Participants completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The data were analyzed using a thematic analysis approach. Results Seventy percent of the focus group participants met criteria for burnout using the MBI. The experience of burnout was described as physical and emotional exhaustion, loss of motivation, isolation from loved ones, and disillusionment with the medical profession. Contributory factors included high workload, burned-out colleagues, perceived undervaluing of family medicine, lack of autonomy, and inability to achieve work-life balance. Protective factors included strong role models in medicine, feeling that one’s work is valued and rotations in family medicine. Conclusions The high level of burnout in family medicine residents in BC is a multifactorial and complex phenomenon. Training programs and faculty should be aware of burnout risk factors and strive to implement changes to reduce burnout, including allowing residents increased control over scheduling, access to counseling services and training for resident mentors. PMID:26451218

  15. The Effects of Evacuation on Nursing Home Residents With Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lisa M.; Dosa, David M.; Thomas, Kali; Hyer, Kathryn; Feng, Zhanlian; Mor, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Background In response to the hurricane-related deaths of nursing home residents, there has been a steady increase in the number of facilities that evacuate under storm threat. This study examined the effects of evacuation during Hurricane Gustav on residents who were cognitively impaired. Methods Nursing homes in counties located in the path of Hurricane Gustav were identified. The Minimum Data Set resident assessment files were merged with the Centers for Medicare enrollment file to determine date of death for residents in identified facilities. Difference-in-differences analyses were conducted adjusting for residents’ demographic characteristics and acuity. Results The dataset included 21,255 residents living in 119 at risk nursing homes over three years of observation. Relative to the two years before the storm, there was a 2.8 percent increase in death at 30 days and a 3.9 percent increase in death at 90 days for residents with severe dementia who evacuated for Hurricane Gustav, controlling for resident demographics and acuity. Conclusions The findings of this research reveal the deleterious effects of evacuation on residents with severe dementia. Interventions need to be developed and tested to determine the best methods for protecting this at risk population when there are no other options than to evacuate the facility. PMID:22930698

  16. Female residents experiencing medical errors in general internal medicine: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Doctors, especially doctors-in-training such as residents, make errors. They have to face the consequences even though today’s approach to errors emphasizes systemic factors. Doctors’ individual characteristics play a role in how medical errors are experienced and dealt with. The role of gender has previously been examined in a few quantitative studies that have yielded conflicting results. In the present study, we sought to qualitatively explore the experience of female residents with respect to medical errors. In particular, we explored the coping mechanisms displayed after an error. This study took place in the internal medicine department of a Swiss university hospital. Methods Within a phenomenological framework, semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight female residents in general internal medicine. All interviews were audiotaped, fully transcribed, and thereafter analyzed. Results Seven main themes emerged from the interviews: (1) A perception that there is an insufficient culture of safety and error; (2) The perceived main causes of errors, which included fatigue, work overload, inadequate level of competences in relation to assigned tasks, and dysfunctional communication; (3) Negative feelings in response to errors, which included different forms of psychological distress; (4) Variable attitudes of the hierarchy toward residents involved in an error; (5) Talking about the error, as the core coping mechanism; (6) Defensive and constructive attitudes toward one’s own errors; and (7) Gender-specific experiences in relation to errors. Such experiences consisted in (a) perceptions that male residents were more confident and therefore less affected by errors than their female counterparts and (b) perceptions that sexist attitudes among male supervisors can occur and worsen an already painful experience. Conclusions This study offers an in-depth account of how female residents specifically experience and cope with medical errors. Our

  17. 24 CFR 964.140 - Resident training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...: (1) Community organization and leadership training; (2) Organizational development training for Resident Management Corporations and duly elected Resident Councils; (3) Public housing policies,...

  18. 24 CFR 964.140 - Resident training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...: (1) Community organization and leadership training; (2) Organizational development training for Resident Management Corporations and duly elected Resident Councils; (3) Public housing policies,...

  19. 42 CFR 409.15 - Services furnished by an intern or a resident-in-training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Services furnished by an intern or a resident-in... Inpatient Critical Access Hospital Services § 409.15 Services furnished by an intern or a resident-in-training. Medical or surgical services provided by an intern or a resident-in-training are included...

  20. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... SETTINGS Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home... nursing facility. Payment to a participating skilled nursing facility may include the cost of services...

  1. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... SETTINGS Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home... nursing facility. Payment to a participating skilled nursing facility may include the cost of services...

  2. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... SETTINGS Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home... nursing facility. Payment to a participating skilled nursing facility may include the cost of services...

  3. Utilization of Residence Hall Facilities, Fall 1981 with Trends from Fall 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Albany. Office of Institutional Research and Analytical Studies.

    Residence hall facility use for the State University of New York (SUNY) is examined in data collected in fall 1981 and compared with fall 1974 data. The study includes all state-operated/funded institutions that have residence hall facilities. Any residence hall facilities available at locally sponsored SUNY community colleges are financed in a…

  4. 42 CFR 409.15 - Services furnished by an intern or a resident-in-training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Services furnished by an intern or a resident-in... Inpatient Critical Access Hospital Services § 409.15 Services furnished by an intern or a resident-in-training. Medical or surgical services provided by an intern or a resident-in-training are included...

  5. 42 CFR 409.15 - Services furnished by an intern or a resident-in-training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Services furnished by an intern or a resident-in... Inpatient Critical Access Hospital Services § 409.15 Services furnished by an intern or a resident-in-training. Medical or surgical services provided by an intern or a resident-in-training are included...

  6. 42 CFR 409.15 - Services furnished by an intern or a resident-in-training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Services furnished by an intern or a resident-in... Inpatient Critical Access Hospital Services § 409.15 Services furnished by an intern or a resident-in-training. Medical or surgical services provided by an intern or a resident-in-training are included...

  7. 42 CFR 409.15 - Services furnished by an intern or a resident-in-training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Services furnished by an intern or a resident-in... Inpatient Critical Access Hospital Services § 409.15 Services furnished by an intern or a resident-in-training. Medical or surgical services provided by an intern or a resident-in-training are included...

  8. 24 CFR 982.610 - Group home: Who may reside in a group home.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... disabilities in accordance with 24 CFR part 8. See § 982.316 concerning occupancy by a live-in aide. (c) Except for a live-in aide, all residents of a group home, whether assisted or unassisted, must be elderly... reside in the unit, including assisted and unassisted residents and any live-in aide....

  9. 24 CFR 982.610 - Group home: Who may reside in a group home.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... disabilities in accordance with 24 CFR part 8. See § 982.316 concerning occupancy by a live-in aide. (c) Except for a live-in aide, all residents of a group home, whether assisted or unassisted, must be elderly... reside in the unit, including assisted and unassisted residents and any live-in aide....

  10. 24 CFR 982.610 - Group home: Who may reside in a group home.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... disabilities in accordance with 24 CFR part 8. See § 982.316 concerning occupancy by a live-in aide. (c) Except for a live-in aide, all residents of a group home, whether assisted or unassisted, must be elderly... reside in the unit, including assisted and unassisted residents and any live-in aide....

  11. 24 CFR 982.610 - Group home: Who may reside in a group home.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... disabilities in accordance with 24 CFR part 8. See § 982.316 concerning occupancy by a live-in aide. (c) Except for a live-in aide, all residents of a group home, whether assisted or unassisted, must be elderly... reside in the unit, including assisted and unassisted residents and any live-in aide....

  12. 24 CFR 982.610 - Group home: Who may reside in a group home.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... disabilities in accordance with 24 CFR part 8. See § 982.316 concerning occupancy by a live-in aide. (c) Except for a live-in aide, all residents of a group home, whether assisted or unassisted, must be elderly... reside in the unit, including assisted and unassisted residents and any live-in aide....

  13. Association of the duration of residence with obesity-related eating habits and dietary patterns among Latin-American immigrants in Spain.

    PubMed

    Marín-Guerrero, A C; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando; Guallar-Castillón, P; López-García, Esther; Gutiérrez-Fisac, Juan L

    2015-01-28

    The dietary patterns of immigrants usually change with the duration of residence and progressively resemble those of the host country. However, very few studies have investigated individuals migrating to countries with a high-quality diet, such as the Mediterranean diet (MD), and none has yet focused on Latin-American immigrants. The present study examined the association of the duration of residence with obesity-related eating habits and dietary patterns among Latin-American immigrants residing in Spain. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2008-10 in a representative sample of the adult population residing in Spain. Adherence to the MD was defined as a MD Adherence Screener score ≥ 9. Analyses were conducted by including 419 individuals aged 18-64 years born in Latin-American countries. Compared with immigrants residing in Spain for < 5 years, those residing for ≥ 10 years accounted for a lower percentage of individuals who habitually ate at fast-food restaurants and never trimmed visible fat from meat. Moreover, these immigrants were found to have a lower intake of sugary beverages and a higher intake of Na, saturated fat, fibre, olive oil, vegetables and fish and to more frequently strictly adhere to the MD. A longer duration of residence in Spain was found to be associated with both healthy and unhealthy changes in some eating habits and dietary patterns among Latin-American immigrants. Some of the healthy changes observed contrasted the 'Westernisation' of the diet reported in studies conducted in other Western countries. The results of the present study support the role of the food environment of the host country in the modification of the dietary patterns of immigrants. PMID:25418887

  14. Cancer Incidence among Former Love Canal Residents

    PubMed Central

    Gensburg, Lenore J.; Pantea, Cristian; Kielb, Christine; Fitzgerald, Edward; Stark, Alice; Kim, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Background The Love Canal was a rectangular 16-acre, 10-ft-deep chemical waste landfill situated in a residential neighborhood in Niagara Falls, New York. This seriously contaminated site came to public attention in 1978. Only one prior study examined cancer incidence in former residents of the Love Canal neighborhood (LC). Objective In this study we aimed to describe cancer incidence in former LC residents from 1979 to 1996 and to investigate whether it differs from that of New York State (NYS) and Niagara County (NC). Methods From 1978 to 1982, we interviewed 6,181 former residents, and 5,052 were eligible to be included in this study. In 1996, we identified 304 cancer diagnoses in this cohort using the NYS Cancer Registry. We compared LC cancer incidence with that of NYS and NC using standardized incidence ratios (SIRs), and we compared risks within the LC group by potential exposure to the landfill using survival analysis. Results SIRs were elevated for cancers of the bladder [SIRNYS = 1.44; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.91–2.16] and kidney (SIRNYS = 1.48; 95% CI, 0.76–2.58). Although CIs included 1.00, other studies have linked these cancers to chemicals similar to those found at Love Canal. We also found higher rates of bladder cancer among residents exposed as children, based on two cases. Conclusions In explaining these excess risks, the role of exposure to the landfill is unclear given such limitations as a relatively small and incomplete study cohort, imprecise exposure measurements, and the exclusion of cancers diagnosed before 1979. Given the relatively young age of the cohort, further surveillance is warranted. PMID:19672407

  15. Vision impairment and nutritional status among older assisted living residents.

    PubMed

    Muurinen, Seija M; Soini, Helena H; Suominen, Merja H; Saarela, Riitta K T; Savikko, Niina M; Pitkälä, Kaisu H

    2014-01-01

    Vision impairment is common among older persons. It is a risk factor for disability, and it may be associated with nutritional status via decline in functional status. However, only few studies have examined the relationship between vision impairment and nutritional status, which was investigated in this cross-sectional study. The study included all residents living in the assisted living facilities in Helsinki and Espoo in 2007. Residents in temporary respite care were excluded (5%). Of permanent residents (N=2214), 70% (N=1475) consented. Trained nurses performed a personal interview and assessment of each resident including the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), functional and health status. Patient records were used to confirm demographic data and medical history. Mortality in 2010 was retrieved from central registers. Of the residents, 17.5% (N=245) had vision impairment and they were not able to read regular print. Those with vision impairment were older, more often females, and malnourished according to MNA. They had lower BMI, and suffered more often from dementia and chewing problems than those without vision impairment. In logistic regression analysis controlling for age, gender, chewing problems and dementia, vision impairment was independently associated with resident's malnutrition (OR 2.51, 95% CI 1.80-3.51). According to our results older residents in assisted living with vision impairment are at high risk for malnutrition. Therefore it is important to assess nutritional status of persons with vision impairment. It would be beneficial to repeat this kind of a study also in elderly community population. PMID:24398167

  16. Models for Individualized Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiades, William, Ed.; Clark, Donald C., Ed.

    This book, consisting of five parts, provides a collection of source materials that will assist in implementing individualized instruction; provides examples of interrelated systems for individualizing instruction; and describes the components of individualized instructional systems, including flexible use of time, differentiated staffing, new…

  17. 34 CFR 303.15 - Include; including.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Include; including. 303.15 Section 303.15 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS...

  18. Resident Health Advocates in Public Housing Family Developments

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Deborah J; Bhosrekar, Sarah Gees; Rorie, Jo-Anna; Goodman, Rachel; Thomas, Gerry; Maxwell, Nancy Irwin; Smith, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Translation of research to practice often needs intermediaries to help the process occur. Our Prevention Research Center has identified a total of 89 residents of public housing in the last 11 years who have been working in the Resident Health Advocate (RHA) program to engage residents in improving their own and other residents’ health status, by becoming trained in skills needed by Community Health Workers. Future directions include training for teens to become Teen RHAs and further integration of our RHA program with changes in the health care system and in the roles of community health workers in general. PMID:25739061

  19. Chiropractic Use by Urban and Rural Residents with Insurance Coverage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Bonnie K.; Diehr, Paula K.; Grembowski, David E.; Lafferty, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the use of chiropractic care by urban and rural residents in Washington state with musculoskeletal diagnoses, all of whom have insurance coverage for this care. The analyses investigate whether restricting the analyses to insured individuals attenuates previously reported differences in the prevalence of chiropractic use…

  20. 42 CFR 483.13 - Resident behavior and facility practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... has the right to be free from verbal, sexual, physical, and mental abuse, corporal punishment, and... resident property. (1) The facility must— (i) Not use verbal, mental, sexual, or physical abuse, corporal punishment, or involuntary seclusion; (ii) Not employ individuals who have been— (A) Found guilty of...

  1. Clinician-Educator Tracks for Residents: Three Pilot Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jibson, Michael D.; Hilty, Donald M.; Arlinghaus, Kimberly; Ball, Valdesha L.; McCarthy, Tracy; Seritan, Andreea L.; Servis, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Over the past 30 years, clinician-educators have become a prominent component of medical school faculties, yet few of these individuals received formal training for this role and their professional development lags behind other faculty. This article reviews three residency tracks designed to build skills in teaching, curriculum…

  2. Nutritarity: A New Twist For the Residence Hall Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, C. Jay; Smith, Roderick

    1979-01-01

    Discusses current role models for residence hall staffing and promotes the avuncular model rather than the in loco parentis. However, because of the students' levels of maturity, a nurturing staff model is chosen to allow students to develop individual responsibility for their behavior. (BEF)

  3. Firearm Anticipatory Guidance Training in Psychiatric Residency Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, James H.; Thompson, Amy J.; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Mrdjenovich, Adam J.; Price, Joy A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Most suicides (60%) are committed with firearms, and most (80%) of individuals attempting suicide meet diagnostic criteria for mental illness. This study assessed the prevalence of firearm injury prevention training in psychiatric residency programs. Methods: A three-wave mail survey was sent to the directors of 179 psychiatric…

  4. Healthcare Preferences among Nursing Home Residents: Perceived Barriers and Situational Dependencies

    PubMed Central

    Bangerter, Lauren R.; Abbott, Katherine; Heid, Allison R.; Klumpp, Rachel E.; Van Haitsma, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    While much research has examined end of life care preferences of nursing home (NH) residents, little work has examined resident preferences for everyday healthcare. The present study conducted interviews with 255 residents recruited from 35 NHs. Content analysis identified barriers (hindrances to the fulfillment of resident preferences) and situational dependencies (what would make residents change their mind about the importance of these preferences) associated with preferences for utilizing mental health services, choosing a medical care provider, and choosing individuals involved in care discussions. Barriers and situational dependencies were embedded within the person, facility environment, and social environment. Nearly half of residents identified barriers to their preferences of choosing others involved in care and choosing a medical care provider. In contrast, the importance of mental health services was situationally dependent on needs of residents. Results highlight opportunities for improvement in practice and facility policies that promote person-centered care. PMID:26716460

  5. Preventable measles among U.S. residents, 2001-2004.

    PubMed

    2005-08-26

    Elimination of endemic measles has been achieved in the United States; however, measles continues to be imported from areas of the world where the disease remains endemic, resulting in substantial morbidity and expenditure of local, state, and federal public health resources. Measles among U.S. residents results from returning residents who become infected while living or traveling abroad, from contact or association with an infected traveler, or from an unknown source. This report summarizes surveillance data reported to CDC by state and local health departments regarding confirmed measles cases among U.S. residents during 2001-2004; an illustrative case report is included. The majority of measles cases occurring among U.S. residents can be prevented by following current recommendations for vaccination, including specific guidelines for travelers. PMID:16121120

  6. 28 CFR 115.233 - Resident education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Resident education. 115.233 Section 115... STANDARDS Standards for Community Confinement Facilities Training and Education § 115.233 Resident education... resident is transferred to a different facility. (c) The agency shall provide resident education in...

  7. 28 CFR 115.233 - Resident education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Resident education. 115.233 Section 115... STANDARDS Standards for Community Confinement Facilities Training and Education § 115.233 Resident education... resident is transferred to a different facility. (c) The agency shall provide resident education in...

  8. 28 CFR 115.233 - Resident education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Resident education. 115.233 Section 115... STANDARDS Standards for Community Confinement Facilities Training and Education § 115.233 Resident education... resident is transferred to a different facility. (c) The agency shall provide resident education in...

  9. Predictors of Success in an Anesthesiology Residency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warrick, Shirley S.; Crumrine, Robert S.

    1986-01-01

    Factors that contributed to successful residency performance by anesthesiology residents were examined in order to assist the program's selection committee in developing selection criteria. The best predictor of a resident's academic average in the anethesiology program was the number of years the resident had spent in other specialities.…

  10. 42 CFR 483.10 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Care Facilities § 483.10 Resident rights. The resident has a right to a dignified existence, self...) Exercise of rights. (1) The resident has the right to exercise his or her rights as a resident of...

  11. 42 CFR 483.10 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Care Facilities § 483.10 Resident rights. The resident has a right to a dignified existence, self...) Exercise of rights. (1) The resident has the right to exercise his or her rights as a resident of...

  12. Investigating factors for disaster preparedness among residents of Kuala Lumpur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad-pajooh, E.; Aziz, K. Ab.

    2014-05-01

    The review of past researches discussed that factors such as climate change and movement toward urbanization will result in more frequent and severe disasters in the near future (Yasuhara et al., 2011). Flash flood is the most common type of disaster that residents of Kuala Lumpur (KL) come across, thus in this study, it was desired to discover the factors affecting preparedness among residents of KL as well as assessing the variation of individual preparedness among residents. With the aid of SPSS analysis, the reliability of data, correlation and regression analysis between the investigated factors and disaster preparedness were obtained. According to this research it was found that level of preparedness of residents of KL is still below average; majority of social demographic indicators such as income, education, age, and property ownership showed significant contribution to the variation of disaster preparedness among the residents. For instance men were much more prepared in comparison to women; residents with high level of income and education had also significantly higher preparedness compared to those with low level of income and education. Race was the only factor that differs from the findings of previous studies; since race does not affect the preparedness.

  13. Activity Engagement: Perspectives from Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Tak, Sunghee H.; Kedia, Satish; Tongumpun, Tera Marie; Hong, Song Hee

    2014-01-01

    Engagement in social and leisure activities is an indicator of quality of life and well-being in nursing homes. There are few studies in which nursing home residents with dementia self-reported their experiences in activity engagement. This qualitative study describes types of current activity involvement and barriers to activities as perceived by nursing home residents with dementia. Thirty-one residents participated in short, open-ended interviews and six in in-depth interviews. Thematic content analysis showed that participants primarily depended on activities organized by their nursing homes. Few participants engaged in self-directed activities such as walking, visiting other residents and family members, and attending in church services. Many residents felt they had limited opportunities and motivation for activities. They missed past hobbies greatly but could not continue them due to lack of accommodation and limitation in physical function. Environmental factors, along with fixed activity schedule, further prevented them from engaging in activities. Residents with dementia should be invited to participate in activity planning and have necessary assistance and accommodation in order to engage in activities that matter to them. Based on the findings, a checklist for individualizing and evaluating activities for persons with dementia is detailed. PMID:25489122

  14. 13 CFR 124.105 - What does it mean to be unconditionally owned by one or more disadvantaged individuals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... licensed or chartered by Federal, state or local government, including investment companies which are... or more socially and economically disadvantaged individuals who are citizens of the United States... an owner resides in any of the community property states or territories of the United States...

  15. Emissions of VPOC from residences in the metropolitan Toronto area

    SciTech Connect

    Fellin, P.; Otson, R.

    1997-12-31

    Airborne vapor phase organic compound (VPOC) concentrations were determined indoors and outdoors concurrently over 24 h periods for 44 randomly selected residences in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). Indoor to outdoor air exchange rates, measured by means of a perfluorocarbon tracer technique, averaged 0.45 and ranged from 0.04 to 2.2 air changes per hour (ach). For compounds occurring above the method detection limits (MDL), indoor sources contributed significantly to the occurrence of 7 of the 30 target VPOC since indoor to outdoor concentration ratios were greater than 1 for more than 50% of the homes for these compounds. Emissions from residences to the ambient air were calculated, and ranged up to 725 g/yr/residence for the sum of the target compounds for the residence with the largest emissions and averaged 96 g/yr/residence for all residences. The four compounds with the largest emissions averaged 53 (maximum, 500), 41 (maximum, 220), 22 (maximum, 110) and 20 (maximum, 240) g/yr/residence, respectively, for 1,4-dichlorobenzene, d-limonene, naphthalene and toluene. In a previous study, 1,4-dichlorobenzene and toluene were among the three VPOC with the greatest emissions from residences. However, the emissions were calculated from measured indoor concentrations, outdoor values were obtained at different times or by different methods, and average rather than individually measured air exchange rates were used. The emissions estimated in this study were compared to those from the previous study, and their impact on ambient air quality was estimated.

  16. Burnout and Physical Activity in Minnesota Internal Medicine Resident Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Shawn M.; Odo, Nnaemeka U.; Duran, Alisa M.; Pereira, Anne G.; Mandel, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Regular physical activity plays an important role in the amelioration of several mental health disorders; however, its relationship with burnout has not yet been clarified. Objective To determine the association between achievement of national physical activity guidelines and burnout in internal medicine resident physicians. Methods A Web-based survey of internal medicine resident physicians at the University of Minnesota and Hennepin County Medical Center was conducted from September to October 2012. Survey measures included the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Results Of 149 eligible residents, 76 (51.0%) completed surveys, which were used in the analysis. Burnout prevalence, determined by the Maslach Burnout Inventory, was 53.9% (41 of 76). Prevalence of failure to achieve US Department of Health and Human Services physical activity guidelines was 40.8% (31 of 76), and 78.9% (60 of 76) of residents reported that their level of physical activity has decreased since they began medical training. Residents who were able to meet physical activity guidelines were less likely to be burned out than their fellow residents (OR, 0.38, 95% CI 0.147–0.99). Conclusions Among internal medicine resident physicians, achievement of national physical activity guidelines appears to be inversely associated with burnout. Given the high national prevalence of burnout and inactivity, additional investigation of this relationship appears warranted. PMID:26140116

  17. Five Key Leadership Actions Needed to Redesign Family Medicine Residencies

    PubMed Central

    Kozakowski, Stanley M.; Eiff, M. Patrice; Green, Larry A.; Pugno, Perry A.; Waller, Elaine; Jones, Samuel M.; Fetter, Gerald; Carney, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Background New skills are needed to properly prepare the next generation of physicians and health professionals to practice in medical homes. Transforming residency training to address these new skills requires strong leadership. Objective We sought to increase the understanding of leadership skills useful in residency programs that plan to undertake meaningful change. Methods The Preparing the Personal Physician for Practice (P4) project (2007–2014) was a comparative case study of 14 family medicine residencies that engaged in innovative training redesign, including altering the scope, content, sequence, length, and location of training to align resident education with requirements of the patient-centered medical home. In 2012, each P4 residency team submitted a final summary report of innovations implemented, overall insights, and dissemination activities during the study. Six investigators conducted independent narrative analyses of these reports. A consensus meeting held in September 2012 was used to identify key leadership actions associated with successful educational redesign. Results Five leadership actions were associated with successful implementation of innovations and residency transformation: (1) manage change; (2) develop financial acumen; (3) adapt best evidence educational strategies to the local environment; (4) create and sustain a vision that engages stakeholders; and (5) demonstrate courage and resilience. Conclusions Residency programs are expected to change to better prepare their graduates for a changing delivery system. Insights about effective leadership skills can provide guidance for faculty to develop the skills needed to face practical realities while guiding transformation. PMID:26221432

  18. Recognizing and Alleviating Moral Distress Among Obstetrics and Gynecology Residents

    PubMed Central

    Aultman, Julie; Wurzel, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Background Obstetrics and gynecology residents face difficult clinical situations and decisions that challenge their moral concepts. Objective We examined how moral and nonmoral judgments about patients are formulated, confirmed, or modified and how moral distress may be alleviated among obstetrics-gynecology residents. Methods Three focus groups, guided by open-ended interview questions, were conducted with 31 obstetrics-gynecology residents from 3 academic medical institutions in northeast Ohio. Each focus group contained 7 to 14 participants and was recorded. Two investigators independently coded and thematically analyzed the transcribed data. Results Our participants struggled with 3 types of patients perceived as difficult: (1) patients with chronic pain, including patients who abuse narcotics; (2) demanding and entitled patients; and (3) irresponsible patients. Difficult clinical encounters with such patients contribute to unalleviated moral distress for residents and negative, and often inaccurate, judgment made about patients. The residents reported that they were able to prevent stigmatizing judgments about patients by keeping an open mind or recognizing the particular needs of patients, but they still felt unresolved moral distress. Conclusions Moral distress that is not addressed in residency education may contribute to career dissatisfaction and ineffective patient care. We recommend education and research on pedagogical approaches in residency education in a model that emphasizes ethics and professional identity development as well as the recognition and alleviation of moral distress. PMID:26279769

  19. Predictors of Residence Hall Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arboleda, Ana; Wang, Yongyi; Shelley, Mack C., II; Whalen, Donald F.

    2003-01-01

    Residence hall students' (N = 1,186, 52% male, 90% White, 66% freshmen) involvement in their living community is influenced significantly by precollege student characteristics (gender, ethnicity), classification, attitudes (toward hall director, house cabinet, academic comfort, social environment, group study), and environmental variables (noise,…

  20. Cleaner in Hall of Residence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotel and Catering Industry Training Board, Wembley (England).

    This syllabus is intended for the use of training personnel in drawing up training programs for cleaners in halls of residence. Its main objective is to produce fully trained cleaners, thereby maintaining and raising standards. The syllabus is divided into three sections: Introduction to Housekeeping Employees, and Tasks Performed by the Majority…

  1. Aspiring Teachers Take up Residence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honawar, Vaishall

    2008-01-01

    The Boston Teacher Residency program is a yearlong, selective preparation route that trains aspiring teachers, many of them career-changers, to take on jobs in some of the city's highest-needs schools. The program, which fits neither of the two most common types of teacher preparation--alternative routes and traditional teacher education…

  2. IL-2 and IL-10 gene polymorphisms are associated with respiratory tract infection and may modulate the effect of vitamin E on lower respiratory tract infections in elderly nursing home residents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin E supplementation has been suggested as a potential strategy to prevent respiratory infections (RI) in the elderly. Previously, we showed that vitamin E reduced RI in some but not all nursing home residents. The efficacy of vitamin E supplementation may depend on individual factors including...

  3. Individual Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corsini, Raymond

    1981-01-01

    Paper presented at the 66th Convention of the International Association of Pupil Personnel Workers, October 20, 1980, Baltimore, Maryland, describes individual education based on the principles of Alfred Adler. Defines six advantages of individual education, emphasizing student responsibility, mutual respect, and allowing students to progress at…

  4. The Care of Non-English Speaking Background Residents in Mainstream Nursing Homes and Hostels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkons, Rita

    A survey of 104 individuals of non-English-speaking backgrounds (NESBs) living in South Australia nursing homes and personal care homes and staff of 75 institution housing NESB residents is reported. The study's objectives was to determine the culturally-based needs of the residents and the provision of culturally appropriate services to them. The…

  5. 26 CFR 1.163-10T - Qualified residence interest (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Qualified residence interest (temporary). 1.163-10T Section 1.163-10T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.163-10T Qualified residence interest...

  6. 26 CFR 1.163-10T - Qualified residence interest (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Qualified residence interest (temporary). 1.163-10T Section 1.163-10T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.163-10T Qualified residence interest...

  7. 26 CFR 1.163-10T - Qualified residence interest (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Qualified residence interest (temporary). 1.163-10T Section 1.163-10T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.163-10T Qualified residence interest...

  8. 26 CFR 1.163-10T - Qualified residence interest (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Qualified residence interest (temporary). 1.163-10T Section 1.163-10T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.163-10T Qualified residence interest...

  9. 26 CFR 1.163-10T - Qualified residence interest (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Qualified residence interest (temporary). 1.163-10T Section 1.163-10T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.163-10T Qualified residence interest...

  10. Directory of Resident Outdoor Education Sites in Northern Illinois and Southern Wisconsin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Ramona E.

    Designed as a tool for school personnel seeking sites and facilities for resident outdoor education, this directory provides information on 45 resident outdoor education sites in Northern Illinois and Southern Wisconsin. The document is organized in a comprehensive table and in individual site descriptions. For each site, the table briefly…

  11. Bioassay measurements of individuals living near the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State, Fall 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Sula, M.J.; Bihl, D.E.

    1986-05-01

    The purpose of the bioassay measurements was to provide individuals, living within a specific area near the Hanford Site, information on the current levels of radionuclides in their bodies. The measurements included whole body counter (in vivo) examinations and urine sample analyses for detecting the presence of major radionuclides related to current and historical operations at Hanford. Notifications of the special measurements were sent by letter to 515 residences in north Franklin County. Eighty-nine individuals from 52 of the 515 residences requested and received whole body counts. Of these, 32 also provided urine samples. The measurements gave no evidence of unusual levels of radioactivity in any individual. The ability of bioassay measurements to detect the presence of radioactivity in an individual following an exposure is dependent on the quality of the measurement and the nature of the exposure. This report includes a discussion of the capability, under various circumstances, of the measurements that were provided.

  12. Workplace Violence and Harassment Against Emergency Medicine Residents

    PubMed Central

    Schnapp, Benjamin H.; Slovis, Benjamin H.; Shah, Anar D.; Fant, Abra L.; Gisondi, Michael A.; Shah, Kaushal H.; Lech, Christie A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several studies have shown that workplace violence in the emergency department (ED) is common. Residents may be among the most vulnerable staff, as they have the least experience with these volatile encounters. The goal for this study was to quantify and describe acts of violence against emergency medicine (EM) residents by patients and visitors and to identify perceived barriers to safety. Methods This cross-sectional survey study queried EM residents at multiple New York City hospitals. The primary outcome was the incidence of violence experienced by residents while working in the ED. The secondary outcomes were the subtypes of violence experienced by residents, as well as the perceived barriers to safety while at work. Results A majority of residents (66%, 78/119) reported experiencing at least one act of physical violence during an ED shift. Nearly all residents (97%, 115/119) experienced verbal harassment, 78% (93/119) had experienced verbal threats, and 52% (62/119) reported sexual harassment. Almost a quarter of residents felt safe “Occasionally,” “Seldom” or “Never” while at work. Patient-based factors most commonly cited as contributory to violence included substance use and psychiatric disease. Conclusion Self-reported violence against EM residents appears to be a significant problem. Incidence of violence and patient risk factors are similar to what has been found previously for other ED staff. Understanding the prevalence of workplace violence as well as the related systems, environmental, and patient-based factors is essential for future prevention efforts. PMID:27625721

  13. Mean residence time in barchan dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Yang, X.; Rozier, O.; Narteau, C.

    2013-12-01

    A barchan dune migrates when the sediment trapped on its lee side is remobilized by the flow. Then, sand grains may undergo many dune turnover cycles before their ejection along the horns, but the amount of time a sand grain contributes to the dune morphodynamics remains unknown. To estimate such a residence time, we analyze sediment particle motions in steady-state barchan dunes by tracking individual cells of a 3D cellular automaton dune model. The overall sediment flux may be decomposed into advective and dispersive fluxes to estimate the relative contribution of the underlying physical processes to the barchan dune shape. The net lateral sediment transport from the center to the horns indicates that dispersion on the stoss slope is more efficient than avalanches on the lee slope. The combined effect of these two antagonistic dispersive processes restricts the lateral mixing of sediment particles in the central region of barchan dunes. Then, for different flow strengths and dune sizes, we find that the mean residence time of sediment particles in barchan dunes is equal to the surface of the central longitudinal dune slices divided by the input sand flux. We infer that this central slice contains most of the relevant information about barchan dune morphodynamics. Finally, we initiate a discussion about sediment transport and memory in presence of bed forms using the advantages of the particle tracking technique.

  14. Mean sediment residence time in barchan dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Yang, X.; Rozier, O.; Narteau, C.

    2014-03-01

    When a barchan dune migrates, the sediment trapped on its lee side is later mobilized when exposed on the stoss side. Then sand grains may undergo many dune turnover cycles before their ejection along the horns, but the amount of time a sand grain contributes to the dune morphodynamics remains unknown. To estimate such a residence time, we analyze sediment particle motions in steady state barchans by tracking individual cells of a 3-D cellular automaton dune model. The overall sediment flux may be decomposed into advective and dispersive fluxes to estimate the relative contribution of the underlying physical processes to the barchan shape. The net lateral sediment transport from the center to the horns indicates that dispersion on the stoss slope is more efficient than the convergent sediment fluxes associated with avalanches on the lee slope. The combined effect of these two antagonistic dispersive processes restricts the lateral mixing of sediment particles in the central region of barchans. Then, for different flow strengths and dune sizes, we find that the mean residence time of sediment particles in barchans is equal to the surface of the central longitudinal dune slices divided by the input sand flux. We infer that this central slice contains most of the relevant information about barchan morphodynamics. Finally, we initiate a discussion about sediment transport and memory in the presence of bed forms using the advantages of the particle tracking technique.

  15. Improving Reliability of a Residency Interview Process

    PubMed Central

    Serres, Michelle L.; Gundrum, Todd E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To improve the reliability and discrimination of a pharmacy resident interview evaluation form, and thereby improve the reliability of the interview process. Methods. In phase 1 of the study, authors used a Many-Facet Rasch Measurement model to optimize an existing evaluation form for reliability and discrimination. In phase 2, interviewer pairs used the modified evaluation form within 4 separate interview stations. In phase 3, 8 interviewers individually-evaluated each candidate in one-on-one interviews. Results. In phase 1, the evaluation form had a reliability of 0.98 with person separation of 6.56; reproducibly, the form separated applicants into 6 distinct groups. Using that form in phase 2 and 3, our largest variation source was candidates, while content specificity was the next largest variation source. The phase 2 g-coefficient was 0.787, while confirmatory phase 3 was 0.922. Process reliability improved with more stations despite fewer interviewers per station—impact of content specificity was greatly reduced with more interview stations. Conclusion. A more reliable, discriminating evaluation form was developed to evaluate candidates during resident interviews, and a process was designed that reduced the impact from content specificity. PMID:24159209

  16. Uncertainty and decision making for residents with dementia.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Ruth Palan; Guarino, A J

    2011-08-01

    Uncertainty is a significant barrier confronting surrogate decision makers(SDMs) who make treatment decisions for nursing home (NH) residents with dementia. The study purpose is to describe uncertainty among SDMs of NH residents with dementia and to identify factors associated with greater Uncertainty. We employed a nonexperimental, cross-sectional design using mailed survey and recruited 155 SDM participants from eight NHs in New England. The survey contained the Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale For Family Members. Independent variables included resident and SDM sociodemographic characteristics, Advance Directives, Credible Authority, Social Support, and Perceived Self-Efficacy for Surrogate Decision Making. Results of a simultaneous multiple regression analysis identified Perceived Self-Efficacy,Social Support, and Close Relative explained 22% of the Uncertainty variance.These findings suggest that close family relatives who serve as SDMs for NH residents with dementia may benefit from increasing social support and enhancing SDMs’ self-efficacy for decision making. PMID:21521825

  17. Factors influencing candidates' choice of a pediatric dental residency program.

    PubMed

    da Fonseca, Marcio A; Pollock, Matthew; Majewski, Robert; Tootla, Ruwaida; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol Anne

    2007-09-01

    The goal of this study was to identify the factors and program characteristics that influenced the program ranking decisions of applicants to pediatric dentistry residency programs. A questionnaire was sent to the first-year resident class in 2005 with a response rate of 69.2 percent (n=260). Approximately 55 percent were female (104/180) and 61 percent were non-His-panic white (110/180). The respondents reported that they applied to an average of nine programs, of which five were ranked. Most applicants were interested in a program that had a hospital component with a duration of two years. A program's ability to prepare the resident for an academic career was a minimal influence for 48.6 percent (87/179), and 57.5 percent (103/179) were not interested in a master's or Ph.D. degree. Factors associated with program ranking included modern clinical facilities, high ratio of dental assistants and faculty to residents, availability of assistants for sedation and general anesthesia cases, availability of a salary or stipend, and amount of clinical experience. Important non-clinical factors included hospitality during the interview, geographic location, and perceived reputation of the program. Opportunity to speak with the current residents in private, observing the interaction between residents and faculty, and touring the facilities were also highly considered. These findings may help program directors tailor their interviews and programs to suit the needs of applicants. PMID:17761626

  18. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Depressive Reaction among Resident Survivors after the Tsunami following the Great East Japan Earthquake, March 11, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Chieko; Murakami, Hitoshi; Imai, Koubun; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Akashi, Hidechika; Miyoshi, Chiaki; Nakasa, Tamotsu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The Great East Japan Earthquake caused a gigantic tsunami which devastated coastal areas of northern Japan on 11 March 2011. Despite the large number of ‘resident survivors’ who continued to reside in their damaged houses on the second or upper floors, research on the mental health of these individuals has been limited. This study explored the prevalence of depressive reaction and risk factors for depressive reaction among these resident survivors. Methods A cross-sectional household health support needs screening was conducted for resident survivors in Higashi-Matsushima city, Miyagi prefecture, two to four months after the tsunami. The health interview that was conducted including mental status, assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-2 (PHQ-2). Results Of 5,454 respondents, 8.1% had depressive reaction. After adjustment by the number of weeks from the tsunami and the mortality rate at each respondent's place of residence, depressive reaction was significantly associated with house flooding below or above the ground floor (odds ratios of 1.92, 2.36, respectively), the unavailability of gas supply (odds ratio, 1.67), being female (odds ratio, 1.47), middle aged or elderly (odds ratios of 2.41, 2.42, respectively), regular intake of psychotropic medicine(s) since before the tsunami (odds ratio, 2.53) and the presence of one to five or more than six cohabiters (odds ratios of 0.61, 0.52, respectively). Conclusions The results suggest a considerable psychological burden (depressive reaction) following the tsunami among resident survivors. Special supports for families with psychiatric problems need to be considered among resident survivors. Restoration of lifeline utilities and the strengthening of social ties of persons living alone may help prevent depressive reaction among resident survivors after a tsunami. PMID:25279563

  19. Treatment of heart failure in nursing home residents

    PubMed Central

    Daamen, Mariëlle AMJ; Hamers, Jan PH; Gorgels, Anton PM; Tan, Frans ES; Schols, Jos MGA; Rocca, Hans-Peter Brunner-la

    2016-01-01

    Background For the treatment of chronic heart failure (HF), both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment should be employed in HF patients. Although HF is highly prevalent in nursing home residents, it is not clear whether the recommendations in the guidelines for pharmacological therapy also are followed in nursing home residents. The aim of this study is to investigate how HF is treated in nursing home residents and to determine to what extent the current treatment corresponds to the guidelines. Methods Nursing home residents of five large nursing home care organizations in the southern part of the Netherlands with a previous diagnosis of HF based on medical records irrespective of the left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) were included in this cross-sectional design study. Data were gathered on the (medical) records, which included clinical characteristics and pharmacological- and non-pharmacological treatment. Echocardiography was used as part of the study to determine the LVEF. Results Out of 501 residents, 112 had a diagnosis of HF at inclusion. One-third of them received an ACE-inhibitor and 40% used a β-blocker. In 66%, there was a prescription of diuretics with a preference of a loop diuretic. Focusing on the residents with a LVEF ≤ 40%, only 46% of the 22 residents used an ACE-inhibitor and 64% a β-blocker. The median daily doses of prescribed medication were lower than those that were recommended by the guidelines. Non-pharmacological interventions were recorded in almost none of the residents with HF. Conclusions The recommended medical therapy of HF was often not prescribed; if prescribed, the dosage was usually far below what was recommended. In addition, non-pharmacological interventions were mostly not used at all. PMID:26918012

  20. Coaching for Success: A Residency Search Primer and Update for Preceptors and Faculty.

    PubMed

    Bright, David R; Adams, Alex J; Ulbrich, Timothy R; Soric, Mate M

    2015-06-01

    Pharmacy residency programs have become increasingly competitive in recent years, and changes to the residency search and application process have altered the process for matching with a residency. In this article, major residency topics, from the benefits of residency training to searching for and ranking programs, are summarized. A discussion of tips and tricks for applying for residencies and interviewing for positions is included along with specific suggestions developed with data following the implementation of the Pharmacy Online Residency Centralized Application Service (PhORCAS). The article is organized in a question and answer format to help facilitate understanding of key concepts and common questions that may arise from applicants. Many changes have taken place in the residency search and application process in recent years, and the process of obtaining a residency is complex. Residency applicants and those advising applicants may find value in the answers to commonly asked residency application questions to help ensure the greatest chance of a successful residency match. PMID:26405338

  1. Coaching for Success: A Residency Search Primer and Update for Preceptors and Faculty

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Alex J.; Ulbrich, Timothy R.; Soric, Mate M.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacy residency programs have become increasingly competitive in recent years, and changes to the residency search and application process have altered the process for matching with a residency. In this article, major residency topics, from the benefits of residency training to searching for and ranking programs, are summarized. A discussion of tips and tricks for applying for residencies and interviewing for positions is included along with specific suggestions developed with data following the implementation of the Pharmacy Online Residency Centralized Application Service (PhORCAS). The article is organized in a question and answer format to help facilitate understanding of key concepts and common questions that may arise from applicants. Many changes have taken place in the residency search and application process in recent years, and the process of obtaining a residency is complex. Residency applicants and those advising applicants may find value in the answers to commonly asked residency application questions to help ensure the greatest chance of a successful residency match. PMID:26405338

  2. Test of Integrated Professional Skills: Objective Structured Clinical Examination/Simulation Hybrid Assessment of Obstetrics-Gynecology Residents' Skill Integration

    PubMed Central

    Winkel, Abigail Ford; Gillespie, Colleen; Hiruma, Marissa T.; Goepfert, Alice R.; Zabar, Sondra; Szyld, Demian

    2014-01-01

    Background Assessment of obstetrics-gynecology residents' ability to integrate clinical judgment, interpersonal skills, and technical ability in a uniform fashion is required to document achievement of benchmarks of competency. An observed structured clinical examination that incorporates simulation and bench models uses direct observation of performance to generate formative feedback and standardized evaluation. Methods The Test of Integrated Professional Skills (TIPS) is a 5-station performance-based assessment that uses standardized patients and complex scenarios involving ultrasonography, procedural skills, and evidence-based medicine. Standardized patients and faculty rated residents by using behaviorally anchored checklists. Mean scores reflecting performance in TIPS were compared across competency domains and by developmental level (using analysis of variance) and then compared to standard faculty clinical evaluations (using Spearman ρ). Participating faculty and residents were also asked to evaluate the usefulness of the TIPS. Results Twenty-four residents participated in the TIPS. Checklist items used to assess competency were sufficiently reliable, with Cronbach α estimates from 0.69 to 0.82. Performance improved with level of training, with wide variation in performance. Standard faculty evaluations did not correlate with TIPS performance. Several residents who were rated as average or above average by faculty performed poorly on the TIPS (> 1 SD below the mean). Both faculty and residents found the TIPS format useful, providing meaningful evaluation and opportunity for feedback. Conclusions A simulation-based observed structured clinical examination facilitates observation of a range of skills, including competencies that are difficult to observe and measure in a standardized way. Debriefing with faculty provides an important interface for identification of performance gaps and individualization of learning plans. PMID:24701321

  3. Motivation to maintain sobriety among residents of sober living recovery homes

    PubMed Central

    Polcin, Douglas L; Korcha, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Background The study of motivation in the substance abuse field has typically examined the extent to which substance users want to quit or reduce substance use. Less frequently examined is the desire to maintain sobriety after achieving abstinence. The current study examined motivation to maintain sobriety among residents of sober living houses (SLHs), a type of recovery home for individuals with alcohol and drug problems. Previous research on this population showed favorable longitudinal outcomes over 18 months. Resident views about the costs of not using substances (ie, the difficulties encountered when not using), as well as the perceived benefits of not using, were strong predictors of substance use outcomes. Methods This study adds to these findings by conducting two focus groups with individuals familiar with the structure and day-to-day operations of SLHs, including administrators of SLH organizations, owners, and peer managers. Results Focus group results supported the importance of costs and benefits as motivational forces influencing abstinence. However, participants also emphasized characteristics of the sober living recovery environment as important factors influencing motivation. Interactions among recovering peers offer unique opportunities for feeling understood, recognizing vulnerability in others, identifying with the recovery processes of others, receiving supportive confrontation, and engaging in mutual accountability. These experiences are important elements of motivation that become activated by involvement in the SLH environment and are difficult to replicate outside of that context. Conclusion In addition to recognizing how motivation can be enhanced by addressing costs and benefits experienced by individuals, operators of recovery homes need to understand motivation as a function of the recovery home social environment. Additional studies are needed on motivation as a longitudinal construct in a variety of peer-oriented environments. Studies

  4. Co–Residence between Males and Their Mothers and Grandmothers Is More Frequent in Bonobos Than Chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Grit; Vigilant, Linda; Boesch, Christophe; Klenke, Reinhard; Langergraber, Kevin; Mundry, Roger; Surbeck, Martin; Hohmann, Gottfried

    2013-01-01

    In long–lived social mammals such as primates, individuals can benefit from social bonds with close kin, including their mothers. In the patrilocal chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes spp.) and bonobo (Pan paniscus), sexually mature males reside and reproduce in their natal groups and can retain post-dependency bonds with their mothers, while immatures of both sexes might also have their paternal grandmothers available. However, quantitative information on the proportion of males and immatures that co-reside with both types of these close female relatives is limited for both species. Combining genetic parentage determination and group composition data from five communities of wild chimpanzees and three communities of wild bonobos, we estimated the frequency of co-residence between (1) mature males and their mothers, and (2) immature males and females and their paternal grandmothers. We found that adult males resided twice as frequently with their mothers in bonobos than in chimpanzees, and that immature bonobos were three times more likely to possess a living paternal grandmother than were immature chimpanzees. Patterns of female and male survivorship from studbook records of captive individuals of both species suggest that mature bonobo females survive longer than their chimpanzee counterparts, possibly contributing to the differences observed in mother–son and grandmother–immature co-residency levels. Taking into account reports of bonobo mothers supporting their sons' mating efforts and females sharing food with immatures other than their own offspring, our findings suggest that life history traits may facilitate maternal and grandmaternal support more in bonobos than in chimpanzees. PMID:24358316

  5. Co-residence between males and their mothers and grandmothers is more frequent in bonobos than chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Grit; Vigilant, Linda; Boesch, Christophe; Klenke, Reinhard; Langergraber, Kevin; Mundry, Roger; Surbeck, Martin; Hohmann, Gottfried

    2013-01-01

    In long-lived social mammals such as primates, individuals can benefit from social bonds with close kin, including their mothers. In the patrilocal chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes spp.) and bonobo (Pan paniscus), sexually mature males reside and reproduce in their natal groups and can retain post-dependency bonds with their mothers, while immatures of both sexes might also have their paternal grandmothers available. However, quantitative information on the proportion of males and immatures that co-reside with both types of these close female relatives is limited for both species. Combining genetic parentage determination and group composition data from five communities of wild chimpanzees and three communities of wild bonobos, we estimated the frequency of co-residence between (1) mature males and their mothers, and (2) immature males and females and their paternal grandmothers. We found that adult males resided twice as frequently with their mothers in bonobos than in chimpanzees, and that immature bonobos were three times more likely to possess a living paternal grandmother than were immature chimpanzees. Patterns of female and male survivorship from studbook records of captive individuals of both species suggest that mature bonobo females survive longer than their chimpanzee counterparts, possibly contributing to the differences observed in mother-son and grandmother-immature co-residency levels. Taking into account reports of bonobo mothers supporting their sons' mating efforts and females sharing food with immatures other than their own offspring, our findings suggest that life history traits may facilitate maternal and grandmaternal support more in bonobos than in chimpanzees. PMID:24358316

  6. THE ETHICAL EDUCATION OF OPHTHALMOLOGY RESIDENTS: AN EXPERIMENT

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Samuel

    2005-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the effect of ethics education on a resident’s ability to answer questions that relate to moral dilemmas and on the clinical evaluations of residents by faculty. Methods The curriculum for the ethics education that was used for this study was designed by the author and consisted of 10 lectures of 1.5 hours each. Five residencies were included in the project. One residency received one lecture, two residencies received three lectures, and two residencies received 10 lectures. To evaluate the moral skills of the residents at the beginning of the course and at the end, the residents were given the Defining Issues Test (DIT-2) developed by James Rest, which involves answering standardized questions about four moral dilemmas. Faculty evaluations were completed before and after the ethics lectures were given. At the beginning of the ethics course, each resident was given a social survey that was designed to assess participation in community, religious, political, and societal activities as well as attitudes about these activities. All residents were also asked demographic information, including their age, gender, and year of residency. Results The results of the DIT-2 taken before and after the ethics lectures were compared. No correlations were found in faculty evaluations of clinical performance of the residents before and after the course (P = .052). Associations between DIT-2 scores and questions on community and religion in the social survey were noted. Conclusion The finding that the effect of an ethics course on residents’ ability to answer moral dilemmas did not achieve statistical significance should be accepted with the understanding that this was a first attempt at standardization of many variables, especially the format of the curriculum and materials used. The use of faculty evaluations to assess clinical performance needs to be standardized, and the faculty members need additional training to ensure validity of the results. The

  7. [Medical ethics in residency training].

    PubMed

    Civaner, Murat; Sarikaya, Ozlem; Balcioğlu, Harun

    2009-04-01

    Medical ethics education in residency training is one of the hot topics of continuous medical education debates. Its importance and necessity is constantly stressed in declarations and statements on national and international level. Parallel to the major structural changes in the organization and the finance model of health care system, patient-physician relationship, identity of physicianship, social perception and status of profession are changing. Besides, scientific developments and technological advancements create possibilities that never exists before, and bring new ethical dilemmas along with. To be able to transplant human organs has created two major problems for instance; procurement of organs in sufficient numbers, and allocating them to the patients in need by using some prioritizing criteria. All those new and challenging questions force the health care workers to find authentic and justifiable solutions while keeping the basic professional values. In that sense, proper medical ethics education in undergraduate and postgraduate term that would make physician-to-be's and student-physicians acquire the core professional values and skill to notice, analyze and develop justifiable solutions to ethical problems is paramount. This article aims to express the importance of medical ethics education in residency training, and to propose major topics and educational methods to be implemented into. To this aim, first, undergraduate medical education, physician's working conditions, the exam of selection for residency training, and educational environment were revised, and then, some topics and educational methods, which are oriented to educate physicians regarding the professional values that they should have, were proposed. PMID:19357056

  8. Teaching prenatal ultrasound to family medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Dresang, Lee T; Rodney, William MacMillan; Dees, Jason

    2004-02-01

    Prenatal ultrasound is a powerful diagnostic tool, but there has been little research on how to teach ultrasound to family physicians. The available evidence supports teaching through didactics followed by supervised scanning. Didactic topics include physics and machine usage, indications, fetal biometry, anatomic survey, practice management, ethical issues, and resources. Supervised scanning reinforces the didactic components of training. A "hand-on-hand" supervised scanning technique is recommended for the transmission of psychomotor skills in these sessions. Curricula for teaching ultrasound should include information on which residents will be taught prenatal ultrasound, who will teach them, how to create time for learning ultrasound skills, and how to test for competency. The literature suggests that competency can be achieved within 25-50 supervised scans. Measures of competency include examination and qualitative analysis of scanning. Competency-based testing needs further development because no uniform standards have been established. PMID:14872356

  9. 42 CFR 483.116 - Residents and applicants determined to require NF level of services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Individuals needing NF services. If the State mental health or mental retardation authority determines that a... individual. (b) Individuals needing NF services and specialized services. If the State mental health or... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Residents and applicants determined to require...

  10. 42 CFR 483.116 - Residents and applicants determined to require NF level of services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Individuals needing NF services. If the State mental health or mental retardation authority determines that a... individual. (b) Individuals needing NF services and specialized services. If the State mental health or... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Residents and applicants determined to require...

  11. Getting By: Underuse of Interpreters by Resident Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Schenker, Yael; Curry, Leslie; Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Fernandez, Alicia

    2008-01-01

    Background Language barriers complicate physician–patient communication and adversely affect healthcare quality. Research suggests that physicians underuse interpreters despite evidence of benefits and even when services are readily available. The reasons underlying the underuse of interpreters are poorly understood. Objective To understand the decision-making process of resident physicians when communicating with patients with limited English proficiency (LEP). Design Qualitative study using in-depth interviews. Participants Internal medicine resident physicians ( = 20) from two urban teaching hospitals with excellent interpreter services. Approach An interview guide was used to explore decision making about interpreter use. Results Four recurrent themes emerged: 1) Resident physicians recognized that they underused professional interpreters, and described this phenomenon as “getting by;” 2) Resident physicians made decisions about interpreter use by weighing the perceived value of communication in clinical decision making against their own time constraints; 3) The decision to call an interpreter could be preempted by the convenience of using family members or the resident physician’s use of his/her own second language skills; 4) Resident physicians normalized the underuse of professional interpreters, despite recognition that patients with LEP are not receiving equal care. Conclusions Although previous research has identified time constraints and lack of availability of interpreters as reasons for their underuse, our data suggest that the reasons are far more complex. Residents at the study institutions with interpreters readily available found it easier to “get by” without an interpreter, despite misgivings about negative implications for quality of care. Findings suggest that increasing interpreter use will require interventions targeted at both individual physicians and the practice environment. PMID:19089503

  12. Resident identification using kinect depth image data and fuzzy clustering techniques.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Tanvi; Keller, James M; Skubic, Marjorie

    2012-01-01

    As a part of our passive fall risk assessment research in home environments, we present a method to identify older residents using features extracted from their gait information from a single depth camera. Depth images have been collected continuously for about eight months from several apartments at a senior housing facility. Shape descriptors such as bounding box information and image moments were extracted from silhouettes of the depth images. The features were then clustered using Possibilistic C Means for resident identification. This technology will allow researchers and health professionals to gather more information on the individual residents by filtering out data belonging to non-residents. Gait related information belonging exclusively to the older residents can then be gathered. The data can potentially help detect changes in gait patterns which can be used to analyze fall risk for elderly residents by passively observing them in their home environments. PMID:23367076

  13. Alternative families in recovery: fictive kin relationships among residents of sober living homes.

    PubMed

    Heslin, Kevin C; Hamilton, Alison B; Singzon, Trudy K; Smith, James L; Anderson, Nancy Lois Ruth

    2011-04-01

    Sober living homes are group residences for people attempting to maintain abstinence from alcohol and drugs in a mutually supportive setting. Residents typically develop strong psychological and economic ties and have been referred to as "alternative families," thus evoking the anthropological concept of fictive kinship. We analyzed data from seven focus groups with sober living home residents to assess the prevalence and functions of fictive kinship in these settings. Results suggest that residents created kinship by exchanging various types of support, and by incorporating other residents into existing family relationships, particularly in homes where there were children. Residents perceived fictive kin as more supportive than actual kin, encouraging them toward greater individuation, in contrast with family backgrounds that were sometimes described as stifling. These accounts of the therapeutic qualities of fictive kin in sober living homes could inform the work of fair housing advocates and other community stakeholders. PMID:20952602

  14. Biomarker monitoring of a population residing near uranium mining activities.

    PubMed Central

    Au, W W; Lane, R G; Legator, M S; Whorton, E B; Wilkinson, G S; Gabehart, G J

    1995-01-01

    We investigated whether residents residing near uranium mining operations (target population), who are potentially exposed to toxicants from mining waste, have increased genotoxic effects compared with people residing elsewhere (reference population). Population surveys were conducted, and 24 target and 24 reference residents were selected. The selected subjects and controls were matched on age and gender and they were nonsmokers. Blood samples were collected for laboratory studies. The standard cytogenetic assay was used to determine chromosome aberration frequencies, and the challenge assay was used to investigate DNA repair responses. We found that individuals who resided near uranium mining operations had a higher mean frequency of cells with chromosome aberrations and higher deletion frequency but lower dicentric frequency than the reference group, although the difference was not statistically significant. After cells were challenged by exposure to gamma-rays, the target population had a significantly higher frequency of cells with chromosome aberrations and deletion frequency than the reference group. The latter observation is indicative of abnormal DNA repair response in the target population. PMID:7656876

  15. Personality types of family practice residents in the 1980s.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A D; Clark, C; Sinclair, A E

    1990-03-01

    This study was based on a nationwide sample of 778 family practice residents in the mid-1980s and was conducted to determine the personality types that were most common among those residents. The results showed that the single most common personality type was that in which the individual prefers to see the world in terms of challenges and future possibilities and to make decisions based upon his or her subjective values. These results showed that the sample differed significantly in Myers-Briggs personality type from both the general practitioners of the 1950s and the early family practice residents of the 1970s, who preferred to see the world in terms of the immediate facts of experience and to make decisions objectively. There were also significant differences between the civilian and military family practice residents, but not between the community-based and university-based residents. Implications regarding future practice styles, physicians' personal values, and manpower needs are discussed. PMID:2306322

  16. Clinical Evaluation in a Family Medicine Residency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, James M.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A study assessed (1) the validity of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine evaluation instrument regarding the occurrence of halo effects and (2) possible relationships between the faculty's evaluations of the residents and the residents' cognitive knowledge and productivity. (MLW)

  17. 38 CFR 51.110 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.110 Resident assessment. The...) Review of assessments. The nursing facility management must examine each resident no less than once...

  18. 38 CFR 51.110 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.110 Resident assessment. The...) Review of assessments. The nursing facility management must examine each resident no less than once...

  19. 38 CFR 51.110 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.110 Resident assessment. The...) Review of assessments. The nursing facility management must examine each resident no less than once...

  20. 38 CFR 51.110 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.110 Resident assessment. The...) Review of assessments. The nursing facility management must examine each resident no less than once...

  1. 38 CFR 51.110 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.110 Resident assessment. The...) Review of assessments. The nursing facility management must examine each resident no less than once...

  2. Defining skilled nursing facility residents' dining style preferences.

    PubMed

    Adams, Katy; Anderson, Janet B; Archuleta, Martha; Smith Kudin, Janette

    2013-01-01

    The desire of skilled nursing facilities to increase quality of service to meet changes in residents' expectations, improve marketability, and adhere to regulations warrant a new look at culture change and homelike dining as defined by residents in skilled nursing facilities (SNF). The objectives of this study were to determine residents' home dining practices, to define residents' desired dining style practices in the SNF, and to determine the relationship between home dining practices and dining preferences in SNF. One hundred and four residents in three SNF in the central Texas area who met the cognition criteria and consumed facility-provided food were engaged in a standardized interview using the Resident Dining Style Preferences Survey. Data were analyzed to determine the degree to which home practices determine SNF dining preferences. Our findings showed that the majority of the participants want hot, home cooked meals served in the dining room. They want to be seated at the table with friends and neighbors and served on every day plates in a quiet atmosphere, with food served restaurant or table service style. Length of stay and generational group were not significant predictors of dining style preferences. Study limitations included small sample size and lack of ethnic diversity. Our study results show that removing dining time restrictions may be the most valuable adaptation for a SNF looking to initiate culture change. PMID:23924255

  3. Principles of fatigue in residency education: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Taryn S.; Watling, Christopher J.; Teunissen, Pim W.; Dornan, Tim; Lingard, Lorelei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Proposals to implement fatigue-management strategies in residency education assume that medicine shares the view of other risk-adverse industries that fatigue is hazardous. This view is an essential underpinning of fatigue-management strategies that other industries have embedded as part of their workplace occupational health and safety programs. We sought to explore how residents understand fatigue in the context of their training environment. Methods: We interviewed 21 residents in 7 surgical and nonsurgical programs at Western University in 2014. All participants met the inclusion criteria of routinely working 24-hour call shifts while enrolled in their training program. Data collection and analysis occurred iteratively in keeping with constructivist grounded theory methodology and informed theoretical sampling to sufficiency. Results: Four predominant principles of fatigue captured how the social learning environment shaped residents' perceptions of fatigue. These included the conceptualization of fatigue as (a) inescapable and therefore accepted, (b) manageable through experience, (c) necessary for future practice and (d) surmountable when required. Interpretation: This study elaborates our understanding of how principles of fatigue are constructed and reinforced by the training environment. Whereas fatigue is seen as a collective hazard in other industries, our data showed that, in residency training, fatigue may be seen as a personal challenge. Consequently, fatigue-management strategies that conceptualize fatigue as an occupational threat may have a limited impact on resident behaviour and patient safety. PMID:27398364

  4. Trends in ophthalmology resident surgical experience from 2009 to 2015

    PubMed Central

    Chadha, Nisha; Liu, Ji; Maslin, Jessica S; Teng, Christopher C

    2016-01-01

    Background Resident procedure minimums have been established in surgical training programs to ensure adequate training experience. However, achievement of these minimums may fluctuate. Review of resident experience is essential for maintaining successful training curricula. Objective To evaluate trends in ophthalmology resident surgical experience from 2009 to 2015. Methods This was a database study reviewing Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education ophthalmology resident surgical case logs. Case logs from 2,797 US ophthalmology residents were reviewed for trends in average surgical cases performed by residents as primary surgeon in the area of cataract, cornea, retina, glaucoma, pediatrics, plastics, and trauma from 2009 to 2015. Results Significant trends in resident surgical experience were demonstrated in the areas of cataract, retina, and glaucoma, while experience in cornea, pediatrics, plastics, and trauma remained stable. These trends included an increase in average cases of phacoemulsification cataract surgery from 143.8 to 173.6, vitreous tap/inject procedures from 31.3 to 93.1, and glaucoma shunt surgery from 4.5 to 6.7, with a decline in average cases of nonphacoemulsification cataract surgery from 3.8 to 2.2, retinal photocoagulation from 59.6 to 45.5, and filtering surgery from 6 to 4.5. Conclusion Trends in ophthalmology surgical experience in cataract, retina, and glaucoma paralleled new surgical or therapeutic developments as well as practice pattern shifts in these fields. Educators should be cognizant of the impact of such trends on resident experience and determine if curricular adjustments should be made to maintain comprehensive education of physicians-in-training. PMID:27418803

  5. First Author Research Productivity of United States Radiation Oncology Residents: 2002-2007

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Peter B. Sopka, Dennis M.; Kathpal, Madeera; Haynes, Jeffrey C.; Lally, Brian E.; Li, Linna

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: Participation in investigative research is a required element of radiation oncology residency in the United States. Our purpose was to quantify the first author research productivity of recent U.S. radiation oncology residents during their residency training. Methods and Materials: We performed a computer-based search of PubMed and a manual review of the proceedings of the annual meetings of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology to identify all publications and presented abstracts with a radiation oncology resident as the first author between 2002 and 2007. Results: Of 1,098 residents trained at 81 programs, 50% published {>=}1 article (range, 0-9), and 53% presented {>=}1 abstract (range, 0-3) at an American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology annual meeting. The national average was 1.01 articles published and 1.09 abstracts presented per resident during 4 years of training. Of 678 articles published, 82% represented original research and 18% were review articles. Residents contributed 15% of all abstracts at American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology annual meetings, and the resident contribution to orally presented abstracts increased from 12% to 21% during the study period. Individuals training at programs with >6 residents produced roughly twice as many articles and abstracts. Holman Research Pathway residents produced double the national average of articles and abstracts. Conclusion: Although variability exists among individuals and among training programs, U.S. radiation oncology residents routinely participate in investigative research suitable for publication or presentation at a scientific meeting. These data provide national research benchmarks that can assist current and future radiation oncology residents and training programs in their self-assessment and research planning.

  6. Mentoring Emotionally Sensitive Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.; Self, Elizabeth

    Mentoring individuals who are gifted, talented, and creative, but somewhat emotionally sensitive is a challenging and provocative arena. Several reasons individuals experience heightened sensitivity include: lack of nurturing, abuse, alcoholism in the family, low self-esteem, unrealistic parental expectations, and parental pressure to achieve.…

  7. Individualized Adult Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, C. G.

    As the proceedings of a national seminar on individualized adult science education, a total of 13 articles is compiled in this volume concerning the theory and techniques of curriculum development and the individualization process in upgrading Canadian science courses. The topics include: The Characteristics and Formulation of Behavioral…

  8. Understanding Nurses Decisions to Treat Pain in Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore-Bykovskyi, Andrea L.; Bowers, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing home (NH) residents with dementia continue to receive inadequate pain treatment. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how nurses make decisions to pharmacologically treat pain in NH residents with dementia. Using Grounded Dimensional Analysis, 15 in-depth interviews were conducted with 13 nurses from 4 Skilled Nursing Facilities in Wisconsin. Nurses experienced varying levels of certainty regarding suspected pain in response to certain resident characteristics and whether pain was perceived as visible/obvious or non-visible/not obvious. Nurses felt highly uncertain about pain in residents with dementia. Suspected pain in residents with dementia was nearly always conceptualized as a change in behavior which nurses responded to by trialing multiple interventions in attempts to return the resident to baseline, which despite current recommendations, did not include pain relief trials. Residents with dementia were described as being at greatest risk for experiencing underassessment, undertreatment and delayed treatment for pain. PMID:23330944

  9. 42 CFR 483.20 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR STATES AND LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES Requirements for Long Term Care Facilities § 483.20 Resident assessment. The facility must conduct initially and periodically a... resident's immediate care. (b) Comprehensive assessments—(1) Resident assessment instrument. A...

  10. 8 CFR 325.3 - Residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Residence. 325.3 Section 325.3 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY NATIONALITY REGULATIONS NATIONALS BUT NOT CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES; RESIDENCE WITHIN OUTLYING POSSESSIONS § 325.3 Residence. (a) For purposes of applying...

  11. 8 CFR 325.3 - Residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Residence. 325.3 Section 325.3 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY NATIONALITY REGULATIONS NATIONALS BUT NOT CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES; RESIDENCE WITHIN OUTLYING POSSESSIONS § 325.3 Residence. (a) For purposes of applying...

  12. Residency and In-State Tuition. Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Persons classified as residents for higher education purposes under Texas law may pay in-state tuition. Although Texas does not have any programs specifically for undocumented students, some undocumented persons are among those who are eligible for in-state tuition under current residency statutes. The residency statutes for higher education…

  13. Recommendations for nurse practitioner residency programs.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kameka; Poppe, Anne; Kaminetzky, Catherine; Wipf, Joyce; Woods, Nancy Fugate

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and prioritize critical aspects needed in the design and execution of new nurse practitioner (NP) residency programs. Subjects answered a series of questions on formulating residency programs and on key outcomes and cost measures related to their sustainability. These results serve as potential guideposts for future work in NP residency standardization and sustainability development. PMID:25501654

  14. Sexual Health Education: A Psychiatric Resident's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waineo, Eva; Arfken, Cynthia L.; Morreale, Mary K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This report discusses psychiatric residents' perceptions of sexual health education and their opinions regarding curricular improvements. Methods: An anonymous, web-based survey was sent to residents in one general psychiatry program (N = 33). The response rate was 69.7%. Results: Residents reported inadequate experience in multiple…

  15. Resident transfers from aged care facilities to emergency departments: Can they be avoided?

    PubMed Central

    Innes, Kelli; Griffiths, Debra L; Crawford, Kimberley; Williams, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective Residents from aged care facilities make up a considerable proportion of ED presentations. There is evidence that many residents transferred from aged care facilities to EDs could be managed by primary care services. The present study aimed to describe the characteristics of residents transferred from residential aged care facilities to EDs, and to evaluate the appropriateness and cost of these presentations. Methods A retrospective review of ED records was undertaken for residents transferred from residential aged care facilities to two EDs in Melbourne, Victoria, in 2012. Data examined included residents' mode and time of arrival to ED, presenting complaint, triage category, procedures within ED, diagnosis, length of stay, and disposition. Data were examined against a previously established tool to identify resident transfers that might be ‘potentially avoidable’. Results There were 2880 resident transfers included in the sample, of which 408 transfers were randomly selected for scrutiny of documentation. Seventy‐one residents (17.4%) were identified as being potentially avoidable transfers. Conclusion Many resident transfers might have been avoided with better primary care services in place. Future strategies to improve resident care might include aged care staff skill mix and the availability of outreach or primary care services. PMID:26095333

  16. Pain monitoring and medication assessment in elderly nursing home residents with dementia

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Mette Marie; Wollsen, Morten Gill; Aagaard, Lise

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To monitor pain intensity, pain symptoms, and medication use in elderly with dementia. Methods: Nursing home residents above 65 years of age, diagnosed with dementia, and showing pain symptoms were included in the study. The patients’ mental status was monitored through a mini-mental state examination score and observations of pain symptoms using Part 1 of the Mobilization-Observation-Behaviour-Intensity-Dementia-2 (MOBID-2) pain scale. Community pharmacists reviewed the patients’ medication use, and the prescriptions were compared with guidelines for treatment of geriatric patients. Alterations to the patients’ medicine use were forwarded to the general practitioners. Findings: Sixty-one nursing home residents diagnosed with dementia were identified, 15 of these fulfilled the inclusion criteria, and 12 agreed to participate in the study. The mean age was 87 years of age (range: 77-96), and 42% of the residents were males. The patients’ overall pain intensity was 83% for observations on the numeric pain rating scale (NRS) >0 and 67% for NRS ≥3. Most painful were the situations in which the residents were to mobilize their legs, turn around to both sides of the bed, and when sitting on the bed. The medication reviews identified a total of 95 individual prescriptions, and 33% of these were for nervous system medications, followed by medicines for the treatment of alimentary tract and metabolism disorders (31% of total). Eleven prescriptions for pain medicine were identified; the majority of these were for paracetamol and opioids. Seventeen proposals to patients’ medication use were suggested, but the general practitioners accepted only 6% of these. Conclusion: This study indicates that the MOBID-2 pain scale in combination with medication reviews can be used as a tool for optimization of patients’ medication use. However, we recommend the conduction of a larger-scale study in multiple settings, to validate our results and the generalizability

  17. The professionalism disconnect: do entering residents identify yet participate in unprofessional behaviors?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Professionalism has been an important tenet of medical education, yet defining it is a challenge. Perceptions of professional behavior may vary by individual, medical specialty, demographic group and institution. Understanding these differences should help institutions better clarify professionalism expectations and provide standards with which to evaluate resident behavior. Methods Duke University Hospital and Vidant Medical Center/East Carolina University surveyed entering PGY1 residents. Residents were queried on two issues: their perception of the professionalism of 46 specific behaviors related to training and patient care; and their own participation in those specified behaviors. The study reports data analyses for gender and institution based upon survey results in 2009 and 2010. The study received approval by the Institutional Review Boards of both institutions. Results 76% (375) of 495 PGY1 residents surveyed in 2009 and 2010 responded. A majority of responders rated all 46 specified behaviors as unprofessional, and a majority had either observed or participated in each behavior. For all 46 behaviors, a greater percentage of women rated the behaviors as unprofessional. Men were more likely than women to have participated in behaviors. There were several significant differences in both the perceptions of specified behaviors and in self-reported observation of and/or involvement in those behaviors between institutions. Respondents indicated the most important professionalism issues relevant to medical practice include: respect for colleagues/patients, relationships with pharmaceutical companies, balancing home/work life, and admitting mistakes. They reported that professionalism can best be assessed by peers, patients, observation of non-medical work and timeliness/detail of paperwork. Conclusion Defining professionalism in measurable terms is a challenge yet critical in order for it to be taught and assessed. Recognition of the differences by

  18. Stress and burnout in residents: impact of mindfulness-based resilience training

    PubMed Central

    Goldhagen, Brian E; Kingsolver, Karen; Stinnett, Sandra S; Rosdahl, Jullia A

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Stress and burnout impact resident physicians. This prospective study tests the hypothesis that a mindfulness-based resilience intervention would decrease stress and burnout in residents. Methods Resident physicians from the Departments of Family Medicine, Psychiatry, and Anesthesia at Duke University, Durham, NC, USA, participated in two or three 1-hour sessions of mindfulness-based resilience activities, which introduced mindful-awareness and included practical exercises for nurturing resilience. Anonymous surveys were distributed before (completed by 47 residents) and after the intervention (both completed by 30 residents); a follow-up survey was distributed 1 month later (seven residents completed all three surveys). The survey included the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale, 21-question version (DASS-21), the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory, the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale, and ten questions from the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire. Results At baseline, most residents’ scores were in the normal range with respect to stress; however, female residents had higher DASS-21 scores than male residents (31.7, females vs 18.4, males; P=0.002). Most residents’ burnout scores were in the abnormal range, both with respect to exhaustion (38/47 residents, subscore ≥2.25) and disengagement (37/47 residents, subscore ≥2.1). Higher perceived levels of stress correlated with the instruments. Analysis of the surveys before and after the intervention showed no significant short-term change in stress, burnout, mindful-awareness, or cognitive failure. There was a trend for females and post-medical school graduate year 1 and 2 (PGY1 and PGY2) residents to have a reduction in DASS-21 scores after intervention. There was also a trend of reduced stress and burnout in residents who perceived higher stress. Conclusion Residents who are female, PGY1 and PGY2, and who perceive residency to be stressful may benefit most from a mindfulness-based resilience

  19. Experiences in end-of-life care in the Intensive Care Unit: A survey of resident physicians

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Zubair Umer; Muhammed, Fazil; Singh, Charu; Sudhakar, Abish

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The practice of intensive care includes withholding and withdrawal of care, when appropriate, and the goals of care change around this time to comfort and palliation. We decided to survey the attitudes, training, and skills of intensive care residents in relation to end-of-life (EoL) care. All residents at our institute who has worked for at least a month in an adult Intensive Care Unit were invited to participate. Materials and Methods: After Institutional Ethics Committee approval, a Likert-scale questionnaire, divided into five composite measures of EoL skills including training and attitude, was handed over to individual residents and completed data were anonymized. Frequency and descriptive analysis was performed for the demographic variables. Central tendency, variability, and reliability were examined for the five composite measures. Scale internal consistency was checked by Cronbach's coefficient alpha. Multivariate forward conditional regression analysis was conducted to examine the association of demographic data or EoL experience to composite measures. Results: Of the 170 eligible residents, we received 120 (70.5%) responses. Conclusions: Internal medicine residents have more experience in caring for dying patients and conducting EoL discussions. Even though majority of participants reported that they are comfortable with the concept of EoL care, this does not always reflect the actual practice in the hospital. There is a need for further training in skills around EoL care. As this is a self-assessment survey, the specific measures of attitudes and skills in EoL are poorly reflected, indicating a need for further research.

  20. Assessment of Factors Influencing Community Pharmacy Residents' Pursuit of Academic Positions

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Colleen A.; Rodis, Jennifer L.; Pruchnicki, Maria C.; Pedersen, Craig A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To determine the percentage of residents accepting faculty positions following completion of a community pharmacy residency program (CPRP) and identify influences to pursue/not pursue an academic career. Methods CPRP directors and preceptors across the United States were contacted and 53 community pharmacy residents were identified. The residents were invited to participate in surveys at the beginning and end of the 2005-2006 residency year. Results Forty-five residents (85%) completed the preliminary survey instrument and 40 (75%) completed the follow-up survey instrument. Of these, 36 completed both survey instruments. Initially, 28 (62%) respondents indicated a faculty position as one of their potential job preferences. After completing their residency program, 3 (8%) residents accepted faculty positions; and 3 (8%) others were awaiting offers at follow-up. Reasons for accepting a faculty position were positive teaching experiences and the influence of a mentor or preceptor. Reasons for not pursuing a faculty position included lack of interest, geographic location, disliked teaching experiences, lack of preparedness, and non-competitive salary. Conclusion Many community pharmacy residents consider faculty positions early in their residency but few pursue faculty positions. CPRPs and colleges of pharmacy should work together to enhance residents' experiences to foster interest in academia. PMID:18322566

  1. Health Literacy Teaching in U.S. Family Medicine Residency Programs: A National Survey.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Clifford A; Nguyen, Nancy T; Garvin, Roger; Sou, Channbunmorl; Carney, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Health care providers, including medical residents, often lack adequate knowledge and skills to work effectively with patients who have limited health literacy. Little is known about the degree to which medical residents are trained to communicate effectively with people who have limited health literacy. This study aimed to assess the status of health literacy training for physicians in U.S. family medicine residency programs. We conducted an online survey of residency directors at 444 U.S. family medicine residencies. Among 138 respondents (31% response rate), 58 programs (42%) reported teaching residents about health literacy as part of the required curriculum. Most instruction occurred during the 1st year of training. Hours of instruction ranged from 2 to 5 during Years 1 through 3. Skills-based training (e.g., plain language techniques) was taught by most programs. Not having access to a faculty authority on health literacy was strongly associated with lack of a required health literacy curriculum. Respondents overwhelmingly agreed that increasing health literacy training for medical students and residents would help improve residents' clinical skills. This study provides a baseline snapshot of health literacy curricula in U.S. family medicine residencies and likely overestimates the prevalence of such curricula. Additional studies are needed to determine the quality of health literacy instruction in U.S. family medicine residencies and the most effective methods for teaching residents about health literacy. PMID:27043758

  2. Trajectories of posttraumatic stress among urban residents.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Sarah R; Galea, Sandro; Uddin, Monica; Koenen, Karestan C

    2014-03-01

    Urban residents experience a wide range of traumatic events and are at increased risk of assaultive violence. Although previous research has examined trajectories of posttraumatic stress (PTS) through latent class growth analysis (LCGA) among persons exposed to the same index events (e.g., a natural disaster), PTS trajectories have not been documented among urban residents. The aims of this study were to conduct LGCA with a sample of trauma survivors from Detroit, Michigan (N = 981), and to explore predictors of trajectory membership. Participants completed three annual telephone surveys, each of which included the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Checklist-Civilian Version. Four PTS trajectories were detected. Although the majority evidenced a trajectory of consistently few symptoms (Low: 72.5%), 4.6% were in a trajectory of chronic severe PTSD (High), and the remainder were in trajectories of consistently elevated, but generally subclinical, levels of PTS (Decreasing: 12.3%; Increasing: 10.6%). Socioeconomic disadvantage (e.g., lower income), more extensive trauma history (e.g., childhood abuse), and fewer social resources (e.g., lower social support) were associated with membership in higher PTS trajectories, relative to the Low trajectory. The results suggest that efforts to reduce PTS in urban areas need to attend to socioeconomic vulnerabilities in addition to trauma history and risk for ongoing trauma exposure. PMID:24469249

  3. Trajectories of Posttraumatic Stress Among Urban Residents

    PubMed Central

    Galea, Sandro; Uddin, Monica; Koenen, Karestan C.

    2014-01-01

    Urban residents experience a wide range of traumatic events and are at increased risk of assaultive violence. Although previous research has examined trajectories of posttraumatic stress (PTS) through latent class growth analysis (LCGA) among persons exposed to the same index events (e.g., a natural disaster), PTS trajectories have not been documented among urban residents. The aims of this study were to conduct LGCA with a sample of trauma survivors from Detroit, Michigan (N = 981), and to explore predictors of trajectory membership. Participants completed three annual telephone surveys, each of which included the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Check-list-Civilian Version. Four PTS trajectories were detected. Although the majority evidenced a trajectory of consistently few symptoms (Low: 72.5 %), 4.6 % were in a trajectory of chronic severe PTSD (High), and the remainder were in trajectories of consistently elevated, but generally subclinical, levels of PTS (Decreasing: 12.3 %; Increasing: 10.6 %). Socioeconomic disadvantage (e.g., lower income), more extensive trauma history (e.g., childhood abuse), and fewer social resources (e.g., lower social support) were associated with membership in higher PTS trajectories, relative to the Low trajectory. The results suggest that efforts to reduce PTS in urban areas need to attend to socioeconomic vulnerabilities in addition to trauma history and risk for ongoing trauma exposure. PMID:24469249

  4. Nurse manager residency program: an innovative leadership succession plan.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Amy; Wagner, Jennifer; Martin, Christina; Grant, Brandy; Maule, Katrina; Resh, Kimberly; King, Lisa; Eaton, Holly; Fetter, Katrina; King, Stacey L; Thompson, Elizabeth J

    2014-01-01

    To ensure succession planning within the ranks of nurse managers meet current and projected nursing management needs and organizational goals, we developed and implemented a nurse manager residency program at our hospital. By identifying, supporting, and mentoring clinical experts who express a desire and display an aptitude for nursing leadership, we are graduating individuals who can transition to a nurse manager position with greater ease and competence. PMID:24704735

  5. Public Health Education for Emergency Medicine Residents

    PubMed Central

    Betz, Marian E.; Bernstein, Steven L.; Gutman, Deborah; Tibbles, Carrie D.; Joyce, Nina; Lipton, Robert; Schweigler, Lisa; Fisher, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Emergency medicine (EM) has an important role in public health, but the ideal approach for teaching public health to EM residents is unclear. As part of the national regional public health–medicine education centers-graduate medical education (RPHMEC-GM) initiative from the CDC and the American Association of Medical Colleges, three EM programs received funding to create public health curricula for EM residents. Curricula approaches varied by residency. One program used a modular, integrative approach to combine public health and EM clinical topics during usual residency didactics, one partnered with local public health organizations to provide real-world experiences for residents, and one drew on existing national as well as departmental resources to seamlessly integrate more public health–oriented educational activities within the existing residency curriculum. The modular and integrative approaches appeared to have a positive impact on resident attitudes toward public health, and a majority of EM residents at that program believed public health training is important. Reliance on pre-existing community partnerships facilitated development of public health rotations for residents. External funding for these efforts was critical to their success, given the time and financial restraints on residency programs. The optimal approach for public health education for EM residents has not been defined. PMID:21961671

  6. Public health education for emergency medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Betz, Marian E; Bernstein, Steven L; Gutman, Deborah C; Tibbles, Carrie D; Joyce, Nina R; Lipton, Robert I; Schweigler, Lisa M; Fisher, Jonathan

    2011-10-01

    Emergency medicine (EM) has an important role in public health, but the ideal approach for teaching public health to EM residents is unclear. As part of the national Regional Public Health-Medicine Education Centers-Graduate Medical Education initiative from the CDC and the American Association of Medical Colleges, three EM programs received funding to create public health curricula for EM residents. Curricula approaches varied by residency. One program used a modular, integrative approach to combine public health and EM clinical topics during usual residency didactics, one partnered with local public health organizations to provide real-world experiences for residents, and one drew on existing national as well as departmental resources to seamlessly integrate more public health-oriented educational activities within the existing residency curriculum. The modular and integrative approaches appeared to have a positive impact on resident attitudes toward public health, and a majority of EM residents at that program believed public health training is important. Reliance on pre-existing community partnerships facilitated development of public health rotations for residents. External funding for these efforts was critical to their success, given the time and financial restraints on residency programs. The optimal approach for public health education for EM residents has not been defined. PMID:21961671

  7. 2003 survey of Canadian radiation oncology residents

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Don . E-mail: donyee@cancerboard.ab.ca; Fairchild, Alysa; Keyes, Mira; Butler, Jim; Dundas, George

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncology's popularity as a career in Canada has surged in the past 5 years. Consequently, resident numbers in Canadian radiation oncology residencies are at all-time highs. This study aimed to survey Canadian radiation oncology residents about their opinions of their specialty and training experiences. Methods and Materials: Residents of Canadian radiation oncology residencies that enroll trainees through the Canadian Resident Matching Service were identified from a national database. Residents were mailed an anonymous survey. Results: Eight of 101 (7.9%) potential respondents were foreign funded. Fifty-two of 101 (51.5%) residents responded. A strong record of graduating its residents was the most important factor residents considered when choosing programs. Satisfaction with their program was expressed by 92.3% of respondents, and 94.3% expressed satisfaction with their specialty. Respondents planning to practice in Canada totaled 80.8%, and 76.9% plan to have academic careers. Respondents identified job availability and receiving adequate teaching from preceptors during residency as their most important concerns. Conclusions: Though most respondents are satisfied with their programs and specialty, job availability and adequate teaching are concerns. In the future, limited time and resources and the continued popularity of radiation oncology as a career will magnify the challenge of training competent radiation oncologists in Canada.

  8. Marguerite Arnet Residence, exterior window detail, looking north. Adam ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Marguerite Arnet Residence, exterior window detail, looking north. - Adam & Bessie Arnet Homestead, Marguerite Arnet Residence, 560 feet northeast of Adam & Bessie Arnet Residence, Model, Las Animas County, CO

  9. Marguerite Arnet Residence, exterior door detail, looking north. Adam ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Marguerite Arnet Residence, exterior door detail, looking north. - Adam & Bessie Arnet Homestead, Marguerite Arnet Residence, 560 feet northeast of Adam & Bessie Arnet Residence, Model, Las Animas County, CO

  10. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOEpatents

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  11. Utilization of Residence Hall Facilities, Fall 1994 with Trends from Fall 1985. Report No. 9-95.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Albany. Office of Institutional Research and Planning.

    Data were gathered and analyzed in fall 1994 on the use of residence hall facilities at all New York state operated colleges with residence halls, and these data were also analyzed for trends in comparison with data since 1985. Twenty-six institutions were surveyed. Findings included the following: (1) total utilization of residence hall…

  12. Light, Including Ultraviolet

    PubMed Central

    Maverakis, Emanual; Miyamura, Yoshinori; Bowen, Michael P.; Correa, Genevieve; Ono, Yoko; Goodarzi, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light is intricately linked to the functional status of the cutaneous immune system. In susceptible individuals, UV radiation can ignite pathogenic inflammatory pathways leading to allergy or autoimmunity. In others, this same UV radiation can be used as a phototherapy to suppress pathogenic cutaneous immune responses. These vastly different properties are a direct result of UV light’s ability to ionize molecules in the skin and thereby chemically alter them. Sometimes these UV-induced chemical reactions are essential, the formation of pre-vitamin D3 from 7-dehydrocholesterol, for example. In other instances they can be potentially detrimental. UV radiation can ionize a cell’s DNA causing adjacent pyrimidine bases to chemically bond to each other. To prevent malignant transformation, a cell may respond to this UV-induced DNA damage by undergoing apoptosis. Although this pathway prevents skin cancer it also has the potential of inducing or exacerbating autoreactive immune responses by exposing the cell’s nuclear antigens. Ultaviolet-induced chemical reactions can activate the immune system by a variety of other mechanisms as well. In response to UV irradiation keratinocytes secrete cytokines and chemokines, which activate and recruit leukocytes to the skin. In some individuals UV-induced chemical reactions can synthesize novel antigens resulting in a photoallergy. Alternatively, photosensitizing molecules can damage cells by initiating sunburn-like phototoxic reactions. Herein we review all types of UV-induced skin reactions, especially those involving the immune system. PMID:20018479

  13. The Impact of the Physical Environment on the Social Integration of Individuals with Disabilities in Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Keith M.

    2010-01-01

    Social integration in community is especially important for individuals with disabilities well-being. Although individuals with disabilities reside within the community's physical environment, they are often marginalized in the social environment. This may be the result of individuals with disabilities residing in physical environments that…

  14. Validation of core competencies during residency training in anaesthesiology

    PubMed Central

    Ortwein, Heiderose; Knigge, Michel; Rehberg, Benno; Vargas Hein, Ortrud; Spies, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Background and goal: Curriculum development for residency training is increasingly challenging in times of financial restrictions and time limitations. Several countries have adopted the CanMEDS framework for medical education as a model into their curricula of specialty training. The purpose of the present study was to validate the competency goals, as derived from CanMEDS, of the Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine of the Berlin Charité University Medical Centre, by conducting a staff survey. These goals for the qualification of specialists stipulate demonstrable competencies in seven areas: expert medical action, efficient collaboration in a team, communications with patients and family, management and organisation, lifelong learning, professional behaviour, and advocacy of good health. We had previously developed a catalogue of curriculum items based on these seven core competencies. In order to evaluate the validity of this catalogue, we surveyed anaesthetists at our department in regard to their perception of the importance of each of these items. In addition to the descriptive acquisition of data, it was intended to assess the results of the survey to ascertain whether there were differences in the evaluation of these objectives by specialists and registrars. Methods: The questionnaire with the seven adapted CanMEDS Roles included items describing each of their underlying competencies. Each anaesthetist (registrars and specialists) working at our institution in May of 2007 was asked to participate in the survey. Individual perception of relevance was rated for each item on a scale similar to the Likert system, ranging from 1 (highly relevant) to 5 (not at all relevant), from which ratings means were calculated. For determination of reliability, we calculated Cronbach’s alpha. To assess differences between subgroups, we performed analysis of variance. Results: All seven roles were rated as relevant. Three of the seven competency goals

  15. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  16. Sediment residence time distributions: Theory and application from bed elevation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voepel, Hal; Schumer, Rina; Hassan, Marwan A.

    2013-12-01

    distance and residence time probability distributions are the key components of stochastic models for coarse sediment transport. Residence time for individual grains is difficult to measure, and residence time distributions appropriate to field and laboratory settings are typically inferred theoretically or from overall transport characteristics. However, bed elevation time series collected using sonar transducers and lidar can be translated into empirical residence time distributions at each elevation in the bed and for the entire bed thickness. Sediment residence time at a given depth can be conceptualized as a stochastic return time process on a finite interval. Overall sediment residence time is an average of residence times at all depths weighted by the likelihood of deposition at each depth. Theory and experiment show that when tracers are seeded on the bed surface, power law residence time will be observed until a timescale set by the bed thickness and bed fluctuation statistics. After this time, the long-time (global) residence time distribution will take exponential form. Crossover time is the time of transition from power law to exponential behavior. The crossover time in flume studies can be on the order of seconds to minutes, while that in rivers can be days to years.

  17. Effect of family medicine residents on use of diagnostic investigations

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Augene; Osmun, W.E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the effect of the presence of family medicine residents on the use of laboratory and imaging investigations in a rural emergency department (ED). Design A retrospective cross-sectional electronic chart audit was completed. Background characteristics, as well as type and number of ordered investigations, were compared between study groups. Setting Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital in Strathroy, Ont, a rural community hospital that sees approximately 20 000 ED visits per year. Participants A total of 2000 sequential ED visits, including adult and pediatric patients. The test group consisted of patients seen while a resident was present in the ED. The control group consisted of patients seen while no residents were present in the ED. Main outcome measures Twenty-two distinct categories of common ED investigations were studied. Results There was no statistically significant difference between study groups for 19 of the 22 categories of investigations. There were significant differences in 3 categories: an increased number of D-dimer assays for patients seen while there were no residents in the ED (1.7% of patients vs 0.5% of patients, P = .03) and increased computed tomography and ultrasound imaging for patients seen while a resident was in the ED (4.8% vs 1.8%, P = .0012, and 5.3% and 1.7%, P < .001, respectively). These differences are likely not owing to resident involvement but are explained by a difference in test availability between groups. Conclusion The study was underpowered for most categories of studied investigations. However, the trends demonstrated in this study suggest that the presence of family medicine residents in a rural community ED does not substantially affect the overall use of diagnostic investigations. PMID:25217692

  18. Role of the resid solvent in catalytic coprocessing with finely divided catalysts. Quarterly report, April 1995--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The research reported in this progress report describes the continuation of coal-resid coprocessing reactions that were discussed in the January to March 1995 Quarterly Report. During previous quarters, Maya and FHC-623 resids were evaluated in non-catalytic and catalytic reactions at 400{degrees}C with Pittsburgh No. 8 and DECS-17 Blind Canyon coals. From the complete reaction matrix containing the two coals and two resids, it was found that the influence of resids on coprocessing depended on the type of coal used; for example, under catalytic reaction conditions, the hexane solubles of Maya resid increased coal conversion of Pittsburgh No. 8 coal but decreased that of DECS-17. In order to observe the intrinsic behavior of resids during coprocessing, another resid, Manjii, and another coal, Illinois No. 6, are being tested. These reactions were begun this quarter. The results are reported herein. In order to evaluate the role of the different components in resids, the resids were separated into hexane soluble materials and hexane insoluble materials. The hexane solubles, which should contain the naphthenes present in the resid, and the untreated whole resids were reacted with coal at equivalent liquefaction conditions and at the same conditions as when the resids were reacted individually.

  19. Project ASPIRE: Incorporating Integrative Medicine Into Residency Training.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Haq; Via, Christina M; Ali, Ather; Rosenberger, Lisa D

    2015-11-01

    Griffin Hospital, a community hospital affiliated with Yale School of Public Health and Yale School of Medicine, received Health Resources and Services Administration funding to strengthen and improve its combined internal medicine and general preventive medicine residency program by incorporating an integrative medicine curriculum. The purpose of project ASPIRE (Advancing Skills of Preventive medicine residents through Integrative medicine Education, Research and Evaluation) was to create, implement, and evaluate a needs-based, innovative training curriculum in integrative medicine. Through this robust new training, the authors aimed to produce preventive medicine-trained physicians with competencies in integrative medicine to collaboratively work with other integrative medicine practitioners in interdisciplinary teams to provide holistic, patient-centered care. The multifaceted collaborative curriculum was composed of didactics, grand rounds, journal club, objective structured clinical examinations, and two new practicum rotations in integrative medicine. The new practicum rotations included block rotations at the Integrative Medicine Center at Griffin Hospital and the Yale Stress Center. Between 2012 and 2014, three cohorts participated in the curriculum; two of these cohorts included three advanced preventive medicine residents each and the fourth included four residents. Project faculty conducted 14 lectures and journal clubs, and two grand rounds. Six of the ten participating residents (60%) completed integrative medicine clinical rotations. Residents' attitudes toward integrative medicine were evaluated through self-assessment using the Complementary, Alternative, and Integrative Medicine Attitudes Questionnaire; data were analyzed in 2015. This article describes the results of this prospective observational study based on single-institution experience over the course of the 2-year project period. PMID:26477907

  20. Costs Associated With Residency Training.

    PubMed

    Bready, Lois L; Luber, M Philip

    2016-02-01

    Texas needs more physicians to care for a rapidly growing population, and new physicians who complete medical training in Texas are likely to remain in the state to practice. The expansion of existing Texas medical schools, along with the development of new schools, has created a need for a corresponding increase in residency and fellowship (graduate medical education, or GME) positions in Texas, and the 2013 and 2015 legislative sessions have funded expanded GME support. While the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services pays for the majority of GME positions nationally, those numbers were capped in 1997. Growing populations, particularly in the southern states, have led many institutions--when funds are available--to increase GME positions "over the cap." Texas physicians need to be aware of costs associated with development of accredited GME positions, as well as other measures being taken to support the growth of the physician workforce in the state. PMID:26859373

  1. Hands-On Sports Medicine Training for Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanji, Jeffrey L.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the development of a hands-on sports medicine training program for residents at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center. Education strategies include clinical teaching, on-the-field education, experiential learning, and didactic instruction. Programs focusing exclusively on sports medicine are needed because the number of…

  2. Training Resident Assistants to Make Effective Referrals to Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Deborah J.; Servaty-Seib, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing numbers of college and university students are experiencing psychological distress, including depression, anxiety, and suicide ideation. Yet students in distress are unlikely to seek counseling services. Resident assistants (RAs) can serve an important function in identifying and referring students in distress. However, adequate…

  3. Interpersonal Skills Training: Evaluation in an Internal Medicine Residency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Alan S.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of teaching interpersonal skills in a general internal medicine residency, a program was developed utilizing videotape feedback of hospital house-staff/patient interactions. Fifty-one randomly selected house officers were included in a controlled pre- and post-test study design. The results suggest that such a…

  4. Cross-Cultural Psychiatric Residency Training: The Oregon Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boehnlein, James K.; Leung, Paul K.; Kinzie, John David

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to describe the goals and structure of cross-cultural psychiatric training at Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU). This training in core knowledge, skills, and attitudes of cultural psychiatry over the past three decades has included medical students, residents, and fellows, along with allied…

  5. 42 CFR 51.42 - Access to facilities and residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... residents at all times necessary to conduct a full investigation of an incident of abuse or neglect. This... persons, including the person thought to be the victim of such abuse, who might be reasonably believed by...; or (3) The P&A system determines that there is or may be imminent danger of serious abuse or...

  6. 42 CFR 51.42 - Access to facilities and residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... residents at all times necessary to conduct a full investigation of an incident of abuse or neglect. This... persons, including the person thought to be the victim of such abuse, who might be reasonably believed by...; or (3) The P&A system determines that there is or may be imminent danger of serious abuse or...

  7. 42 CFR 51.42 - Access to facilities and residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... residents at all times necessary to conduct a full investigation of an incident of abuse or neglect. This... persons, including the person thought to be the victim of such abuse, who might be reasonably believed by...; or (3) The P&A system determines that there is or may be imminent danger of serious abuse or...

  8. Pottery as Art Therapy with Elderly Nursing Home Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doric-Henry, Lee

    1997-01-01

    Reports on an art therapy intervention which was implemented with 20 elderly nursing home residents so as to improve their psychological well-being. Program evaluation included self-evaluations, case progress notes, journal notes, and photography. Results indicate that participants showed significantly improved measures of self-esteem, and reduced…

  9. Developing an Ethics Curriculum for a Family Practice Residency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitt, Cheryl; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 319 residents, recent graduates, and faculty of McGill University medical school investigated which ethical issues were viewed as important to include in the curriculum, frequency of occurrence, difficulty of management, and helpfulness of discussion. Gender differences were also studied. Results indicate little consensus on ethics…

  10. Indiana Residents' Perceptions of Driving and Lower Blood Alcohol Concentration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seo, Dong-Chul; Torabi, Mohammed R.

    2005-01-01

    Since Congress passed .08 blood alcohol concentration (BAC) as the national standard for impaired driving in October 2000, 28 U.S. States including Indiana have enacted .08 BAC law. This study investigated perceived impact of the .08 law among Indiana residents and their attitudinal and perceptional changes since the enforcement of the law. The…

  11. SU-E-E-03: Shared Space Fosters Didactic and Professional Learning Across Professions for Medical and Physics Residents

    SciTech Connect

    Dieterich, S; Perks, J; Fragoso, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Medical Physicists and Radiation Oncologists are two professions who should be working as a team for optimal patient care, yet lack of mutual understanding about each others respective role and work environment creates barriers To improve collaboration and learning, we designed a shared didactic and work space for physics and radiation oncology residents to maximize interaction throughout their professional training. Methods: Physician and Physics residents are required to take the same didactic classes, including journal clubs and respective seminars. The residents also share an office environment among the seven physician and two physic residents. Results: By maximizing didactic overlap and sharing office space, the two resident groups have developed a close professional relationship and supportive work environment. Several joint research projects have been initiated by the residents. Awareness of physics tasks in the clinic has led to a request by the physician residents to change physics didactics, converting the physics short course into a lab-oriented course for the medical residents which is in part taught by the physics residents. The physics seminar is given by both residency groups; increased motivation and interest in learning about physics has led to several medical resident-initiated topic selections which generated lively discussion. The physics long course has changed toward including more discussion among residents to delve deeper into topics and study beyond what passing the boards would require. A supportive work environment has developed, embedding the two physics residents into a larger residents group, allowing them to find mentor and peers more easily. Conclusion: By creating a shared work and didactic environment, physician and physics residents have improved their understanding of respective professional practice. Resident-initiated changes in didactic practice have led to improved learning and joint research. A strong social

  12. Residency Work-Hours Reform

    PubMed Central

    Nuckols, Teryl K; Escarce, José J

    2005-01-01

    Background In response to proposed federal legislation, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education limited resident work-hours in July 2003. The cost may be substantial but, if successful, the reform might lower preventable adverse event costs in hospital and after discharge. Objectives This study sought to estimate the reform's net cost in 2001 dollars, and to determine the reduction in preventable adverse events needed to make reform cost neutral from teaching hospital and societal perspectives. Design Cost analysis using published literature and data. Net costs were determined for 4 reform strategies and over a range of potential effects on preventable adverse events. Results Nationwide, transferring excess work to task-tailored substitutes (the lowest-level providers appropriate for noneducational tasks) would cost $673 million; mid-level providers would cost $1.1 billion. Reform strategies promoting adverse events would increase net teaching hospital and societal costs as well as mortality. If task-tailored substitutes decrease events by 5.1% or mid-level providers decrease them by 8.5%, reform would be cost neutral for society. Events must fall by 18.5% and 30.9%, respectively, to be cost neutral for teaching hospitals. Conclusions Because most preventable adverse event costs occur after discharge, a modest decline (5.1% to 8.5%) in them might make residency work-hours reform cost neutral for society but only a much larger drop (18.5% to 30.9%) would make it cost neutral for teaching hospitals, unless additional funds are allocated. Future research should evaluate which reform approaches prevent adverse events and at what cost. PMID:16191130

  13. Living in institutional care: residents' experiences and coping strategies.

    PubMed

    Timonen, Virpi; O'Dwyer, Ciara

    2009-01-01

    Insights into daily living in residential care settings are rare. This article draws on a qualitative dataset (semi-structured interviews and recordings of residents' council meetings) that gives a glimpse of the experiences and coping strategies of (older) people living in residential care. The data highlight the range of unmet needs of the residents, similar to the categories of physiological, safety, love, esteem, and self-actualization needs in Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory. Our analysis indicates that "higher" and "lower" needs are closely intertwined and mutually reinforcing and should therefore be accorded equal emphasis by professionals (including social workers) employed within residential care settings. PMID:19860294

  14. Does the Neighborhood Area of Residence Influence Non-Attendance in an Urban Mammography Screening Program? A Multilevel Study in a Swedish City

    PubMed Central

    Lagerlund, Magdalena; Merlo, Juan; Vicente, Raquel Pérez; Zackrisson, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim The public health impact of population-based mammography screening programs depends on high participation rates. Thus, monitoring participation rates, as well as understanding and considering the factors influencing attendance, is important. With the goal to acquire information on the appropriate level of intervention for increasing screening participation our study aimed to (1) examine whether, over and above individual factors, the neighborhood of residence influences a woman’s mammography non-attendance, and (2) evaluate, whether knowing a woman’s neighborhood of residence would be sufficient to predict non-attendance. Methods We analyze all women invited to mammography screening in 2005–09, residing in the city of Malmö, Sweden. Information regarding mammography screening attendance was linked to data on area of residence, demographic and socioeconomic characteristics available from Statistics Sweden. The influence of individual and neighborhood factors was assessed by multilevel logistic regression analysis with 29,901 women nested within 212 neighborhoods. Results The prevalence of non-attendance among women was 18.3%. After adjusting for individual characteristics, the prevalence in the 212 neighborhoods was 3.6%. Neighborhood of residence had little influence on non-attendance. The multilevel analysis indicates that 8.4% of the total individual differences in the propensity of non-attendance were at the neighborhood level. However, when adjusting for specific individual characteristics this general contextual effect decreased to 1.8%. This minor effect was explained by the sociodemographic characteristic of the neighborhoods. The discriminatory accuracy of classifying women according to their non-attendance was 0.747 when considering only individual level variables, and 0.760 after including neighborhood level as a random effect. Conclusion Our results suggest that neighborhoods of residence in Malmö, Sweden (as defined by small

  15. [The new residency program in neurological surgery in Spain].

    PubMed

    Lobato, R D; Fernandez Alen, J; Alday, R; Gómez, P A; Lagares, A

    2003-09-01

    A new Residency Program in Neurological Surgery has been recently elaborated by the "Comisión Nacional de Neurocirugía" following the requirement of the National Council of Specialities. This new Program, which will replace the one proposed in 1992, has been designed in a similar way as those applied in countries providing the best neurosurgical training. Changes included deal with the definition of the speciality, and the introduction of new rotations,a resident Log Book, a Tutor with a well defined profil and commitments, a structured planning of academic and clinical objectives, a rotation or training in research, and a planning for continuous evaluation of the progress of the resident. It is likely that an appropriate application of the new Program in Spanish neurosurgical units with accreditation for training will result in formation of highly competent neurosurgeons. However, there are new challenges for improving neurosurgical training and the development of our speciality in Spain, as those related with new legislation regulating resident working hours, or some political decisions changing the mechanisms for controlling the number of resident positions per year. PMID:14506551

  16. Patient safety stories: a project utilizing narratives in resident training.

    PubMed

    Cox, LeeAnn M; Logio, Lia S

    2011-11-01

    Incident reports have traditionally been the vehicle for identifying, assessing, and responding to quality gaps in hospitals. Yet because of a variety of barriers, residents often fail to participate in this formal process. The authors created a project to engage residents in incident reporting through the use of an online, anonymous narrative format, faculty-facilitated discussion groups, and involvement of patient safety officers in the educational process. During three months, 36 residents submitted a total of 79 stories about patient care that did not "go as intended." The authors reviewed and scored each story for contributing factors and outcomes. The residents met monthly in small groups with trained faculty facilitators to analyze the stories, which were also shared with the patient safety officers. The stories, narratives of both personal involvement and observed events, ranged from near-misses to sentinel events. Key contributing factors included lapses of professionalism, decision errors, communication/information mishaps, transition mix-ups, and workload difficulties. The narrative format proved a feasible tool for collecting significant, previously unrecognized patient safety issues. Internal medicine residents were willing to discuss gaps in care when given the tools and opportunity for anonymous storytelling and blame-free dialogue. PMID:21952066

  17. Community partners as co-teachers in resident continuity clinics.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Lynne A; Shultz, Janet; Kirby, Rebecca; Stelzner, Sarah M

    2011-12-01

    Standard approaches to teaching the management of psychosocial issues in pediatrics--visits to community-based organizations and stand-alone block rotations in developmental-behavioral pediatrics and community pediatrics--neither expose residents to models of interdisciplinary collaboration between faculty preceptors and community providers nor take advantage of the efficacy of learning in continuity clinics. The authors describe their project, developed from an existing Community Pediatrics Training Initiative with long-standing relationships with a domestic violence shelter, a community center for Latino families, and a special needs resource organization for parents. They lay out in detail the project's innovative use of partners from community-based organizations, colocated within pediatric continuity clinics, who teach both residents and faculty about community resources and linkages with multidisciplinary providers. The authors present lessons learned by faculty preceptors, residents, the community partners, and project staff that can guide future applications of this model in other residency training programs. Faculty and residents indicated an increased awareness of available community resources and how linkages can be incorporated into pediatric outpatient visits. Community partners identified keys to successful co-teaching, including readiness to adopt an assertive communication style and frequent presence in the clinics. Project staff recognized the challenges of staff turnover at community-based organizations and the need to choose community partners with expertise that fits the sociodemographic issues of the clinic's patients. PMID:22030765

  18. Determining radiation dose to residents of radiation-contaminated buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.J.S.; Wu, T.H.; Chong, N.S.; Dong, S.L.

    1999-08-01

    There are more than one thousand residents who lived in about 140 radiation-contaminated buildings and received the assessed radiation dose equivalent over 5 mSv/year. In this paper, a systematic approach to dose reconstruction is proposed for evaluating radiation dose equivalent to the residents. The approach includes area survey and exposure measurement, source identification and energy spectrum analysis, special designed TLD-embedded badges for residents to wear and organ dose estimation with Rando phantom simulation. From the study, it is concluded that the ionization chamber should still be considered as the primary modality for external dose measurement. However, lacking of accurate daily activity patterns of the residents, the dose equivalent estimation with the chamber measurements would be somehow overestimated. The encountered limitation could be compensated with the use of the TLD badges and Rando phantom simulation that could also provide more information for internal organ dose equivalent estimations. As the radiation patterns in the buildings are highly anisotropic, which strongly depends on the differences of structural and indoor layouts, it demands a mathematical model dealing with the above concerns. Also, further collaborations with studies on biological markers of the residents would make the entire dose equivalent estimation more helpful and reliable.

  19. Individualized Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Mariella, R.

    2000-08-29

    The recent focus of microelectromechanical-systems (MEMS) based instrumentation has largely dealt with increasing the throughput of established processes, including drug screening/drug discovery/combinatorial chemistry, or the miniaturization of accepted bench-top instruments. The miniaturization and automation of procedures that were previously performed manually are included in these activities. We suggest that BioMEMS instrumentation will adopt an additional direction, that of providing information and capabilities to the physician that are not available, today.

  20. Nursing Home Resident Symptomatology Triggering Transfer: Avoiding Unnecessary Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Ashcraft, Alyce S.; Champion, Jane Dimmitt

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe nursing home resident symptomatology and medical diagnoses associated with nursing home to hospital transfers. A retrospective chart review of documented transfers was conducted at a 120-bed, nonprofit urban Continuing Care Retirement Center nursing home facility located in the southwestern United States. The transferred residents (n = 101) had seventy different medical diagnoses prior to hospital transfer with hypertension, coronary artery disease, and congestive heart failure most frequently reported. Most frequently reported symptomatology included fatigue, lethargy or weakness, shortness of breath, and change in level of consciousness. Multiple symptomatology was indicative of a wide variety of medical diagnoses. The diagnoses and symptomatology recorded in this paper identify the importance of strategic planning concerning assessment and communication of common nursing home resident symptomatology and the importance of basic nursing and diagnostic procedures for prevention of potentially avoidable hospitalizations. PMID:23091714

  1. Regulation and Mindful Resident Care in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S.; Plowman, Donde; Bailey, Donald; Corazzini, Kirsten; Utley-Smith, Queen; Ammarell, Natalie; Toles, Mark; Anderson, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    Regulatory oversight is intended to improve the health outcomes of nursing home residents, yet evidence suggests that regulations can inhibit mindful staff behaviors that are associated with effective care. We explored the influence of regulations on mindful staff behavior as it relates to resident health outcomes, and offer a theoretical explanation of why regulations sometimes enhance mindfulness and other times inhibit it. We analyzed data from an in-depth, multiple case study including field notes, interviews, and documents collected in 8 nursing homes. We completed a conceptual/thematic description using the concept of mindfulness to reframe the observations. Shared facility mission strongly impacted staff perceptions of the purpose and utility of regulations. In facilities with a resident-centered culture, regulations increased mindful behavior, whereas in facilities with a cost-focused culture, regulations reduced mindful care practices. When managers emphasized the punitive aspects of regulation we observed a decrease in mindful practices in all facilities. PMID:20479137

  2. Goals and Objectives for Molecular Pathology Education in Residency Programs

    PubMed Central

    1999-01-01

    Increasing knowledge of the molecular basis of disease and advances in technology for analyzing nucleic acids and gene products are changing pathology practice. The explosion of information regarding inherited susceptibility to disease is an important aspect of this transformation. Pathology residency programs are incorporating molecular pathology education into their curricula to prepare newly trained pathologists for the future, yet little guidance has been available regarding the important components of molecular pathology training. We present general goals for pathology training programs for molecular pathology education. These include recommendations to pathology residents for the acquisition of both basic knowledge in human genetics and molecular biology and specific skills relevant to microbiology, molecular oncology, genetics, histocompatibility, and identity determination. The importance of residents gaining facility in integrating data gained via nucleic acid based-technology with other laboratory and clinical information available in the care of patients is emphasized. PMID:11272908

  3. The obstetrics and gynaecology resident as teacher.

    PubMed

    Cullimore, Amie J; Dalrymple, John L; Dugoff, Lorraine; Hueppchen, Nancy A; Casey, Petra M; Chuang, Alice W; Espey, Eve L; Hammoud, Maya M; Kaczmarczyk, Joseph M; Katz, Nadine T; Nuthalapaty, Francis S; Peskin, Edward G

    2010-12-01

    In this article we discuss the role residents play in the clinical training and evaluation of medical students. A literature search was performed to identify articles dealing with research, curriculum, and the evaluation of residents as teachers. We summarize the importance of resident educators and the need to provide appropriate resources for house staff in this role, and we review evidence-based literature in the area of residents as teachers. Specific attention is given to the unique circumstances of the obstetrics and gynaecology resident, who is often faced with teaching in an emotionally charged and stress-filled environment. We present examples of curricula for residents as teachers and describe barriers to their implementation and evaluation. PMID:21176331

  4. Family Medicine Residency Program Directors Attitudes and Knowledge of Family Medicine CAM Competencies

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Paula; Filippelli, Amanda C.; Lebensohn, Patricia; Bonakdar, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Context Little is known about the incorporation of integrative medicine (IM) and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) into family medicine residency programs. Objective The Society for Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) approved a set of CAM/IM competencies for family medicine residencies. We hope to evaluate with an online survey tool, whether residency programs are implementing such competencies into their curriculum. We also hope to assess the knowledge and attitudes of Residency Directors (RDs) on the CAM/IM competencies. Design A survey was distributed by the CAFM (Council of Academic Family Medicine) Educational Research Alliance to RDs via email. The survey was distributed to 431 RDs. Of those who received it, 212 responded for a response rate of 49.1%. Questions assessed the knowledge and attitudes of CAM/IM competencies and incorporation of CAM/IM into residency curriculum. Results Forty-five percent of RDs were aware of the competencies. In term of RD attitudes, 58% reported that CAM/IM is an important component of residents' curriculum yet, 60% report not having specific learning objectives for CAM/IM in their residency curriculum. Among all programs, barriers to CAM/IM implementation included: time in residents' schedules (77%); faculty training (75%); access to CAM experts (43%); lack of reimbursement (43%), and financial resources (29%). Conclusions While many RDs are aware of the STFM CAM/IM competencies and acknowledge their role in residence education, there are many barriers preventing residencies to implementing the STFM CAM/IM competencies. PMID:24021471

  5. Influence of Anesthesiology Residents' Noncognitive Skills on the Occurrence of Critical Incidents and the Residents' Overall Clinical Performances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoton, M. Frances; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of medical residents' clinical performances in five teaching hospital anesthesiology departments revealed that noncognitive performance in some areas was a powerful predictor of overall clinical performance and was related to the occurrence of critical incidents. Noncognitive predictors included conscientiousness, management, confidence,…

  6. 17 Y-STR haplotype data for a population sample of Residents in the Basque Country.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Laura; Köhnemann, Stephan; Rosique, Melania; Cardoso, Sergio; Zarrabeitia, Maite; Pfeiffer, Heidi; de Pancorbo, Marian M

    2012-07-01

    Non autochthonous population is the most numerous group in the Basque Country. This group is named "Residents" to distinguish them from the "Autochthonous Basque" population. In this work, the 17 Y-STR loci distribution of Resident population was studied in a sample of 197 individuals, who were concretely genotyped for DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385, DYS439, DYS438, DYS437, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635 and Y GATA H4. Resident population showed a high haplotype diversity and discrimination capacity. The distribution of Y-STRs haplotypes of the Resident population was statistically significant different to the one of the Autochthonous Basque population. The genetic substructure found between Resident and Autochthonous Basque 17 Y-STR haplotype distributions advises for the use of two different databases in the Basque Country, to ensure the most trustworthy frequency estimate in casework. PMID:22342392

  7. Life satisfaction and death anxiety in elderly nursing home and public housing residents.

    PubMed

    Given, J E; Range, L M

    1990-06-01

    To compare life satisfaction and death anxiety in older adults, 30 elderly residents of a public housing apartment complex and 20 nursing home residents completed the Death Anxiety Scale, the Philadelphia Geriatric Center Morale Scale, and a structured interview. Nursing home residents more frequently reported that in five years they expected to be dead, whereas public housing residents more frequently reported that in five years they would be doing about the same thing or nothing. The two groups did not differ on their reported death anxiety or life satisfaction. However, across both groups, those reporting higher life satisfaction also reported lower death anxiety and a more positive attitude toward growing older. It appears that, for the elderly individuals in this study, place of residence was not related to their expression of life satisfaction or death anxiety. PMID:10104722

  8. Knowledge about cancer screening among medical students and internal medicine residents in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; García-Aceituno, Luis; Villa, Antonio R; Perfecto-Arroyo, Miguel; Rojas-Flores, Miriam; León-Rodríguez, Eucario

    2010-12-01

    It is extremely important that physicians are aware of cancer screening precise indications. We sought to explore its knowledge among Mexican medical students and internal medicine residents. Students and residents completed a questionnaire-based survey about breast, cervical, colon, and prostate cancer screening. Four hundred fifty-one individuals answered the survey: 64.52% students and 35.48% residents. Mean knowledge score was 63.97 ± 14.97. Residents scored higher than students (p = 0.0001). No difference in the education concerning cervical and colon cancer screening was found. Knowledge of screening guidelines is suboptimal among medical students and residents. Further efforts should be targeted to educational and training programs in this country. PMID:20221811

  9. Sources of indoor air pollution in New York City residences of asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Habre, Rima; Coull, Brent; Moshier, Erin; Godbold, James; Grunin, Avi; Nath, Amit; Castro, William; Schachter, Neil; Rohr, Annette; Kattan, Meyer; Spengler, John; Koutrakis, Petros

    2014-01-01

    Individuals spend ∼90% of their time indoors in proximity to sources of particulate and gaseous air pollutants. The sulfur tracer method was used to separate indoor concentrations of particulate matter (PM) PM2.5 mass, elements and thermally resolved carbon fractions by origin in New York City residences of asthmatic children. Enrichment factors relative to sulfur concentrations were used to rank species according to the importance of their indoor sources. Mixed effects models were used to identify building characteristics and resident activities that contributed to observed concentrations. Significant indoor sources were detected for OC1, Cl, K and most remaining OC fractions. We attributed 46% of indoor PM2.5 mass to indoor sources related to OC generation indoors. These sources include cooking (NO2, Si, Cl, K, OC4 and OP), cleaning (most OC fractions), candle/incense burning (black carbon, BC) and smoking (K, OC1, OC3 and EC1). Outdoor sources accounted for 28% of indoor PM2.5 mass, mainly photochemical reaction products, metals and combustion products (EC, EC2, Br, Mn, Pb, Ni, Ti, V and S). Other indoor sources accounted for 26% and included re-suspension of crustal elements (Al, Zn, Fe, Si and Ca). Indoor sources accounted for ∼72% of PM2.5 mass and likely contributed to differences in the composition of indoor and outdoor PM2.5 exposures. PMID:24169876

  10. 20 CFR 628.320 - Services for older individuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., taking into account the relative share of the population of eligible older individuals residing in each... to assisting programs involving training for jobs in growth industries and jobs reflecting the use...

  11. 20 CFR 628.320 - Services for older individuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., taking into account the relative share of the population of eligible older individuals residing in each... to assisting programs involving training for jobs in growth industries and jobs reflecting the use...

  12. Selecting Residents in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery.

    PubMed

    Shofler, David

    2015-01-01

    Limited information exists to guide students of podiatric medicine and residency directors through the resident selection process. The present study aimed to evaluate the podiatric medicine and surgery resident selection process using an online survey. Residency directors of podiatric medicine and surgery programs across the United States and fourth-year students across all 9 colleges of podiatric medicine were contacted for participation. Two separate surveys were created, one for the directors and one for the students. The directors and students were asked the relative importance of 21 items considered in resident selection on a 7-point importance scale. Subsequent questions covered an array of related topics. The directors, compared with the students, identified the following items as more important (p < .05): previous disciplinary actions against the student, number of classes failed during school, undergraduate experiences and activities, number of Part I board attempts, class rank, involvement in research, and grade point average during podiatric medical school. The manual dexterity portion of the residency interview was considered significantly more important by the students than the directors. The directors more satisfied with their residents placed greater importance on the following items (p < .05): opinions of current residents, opinions of other attending physicians, and letters of recommendation. Additional trends and differences were also discovered. The results of the present study provide baseline data on the selection of podiatric medicine and surgery residents. PMID:25459090

  13. Reducing dehydration in residents of care homes.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Lee; Whitelock, Suzan; Bunn, Diane

    Dehydration can have serious consequences for older people and is a particular problem for residents of nursing and care homes. This article, the second in a two-part series, describes how a specialist care home for people with dementia in Great Yarmouth introduced high-quality hydration care to frail residents. By involving all staff and ensuring residents take a litre of fluid by the end of a relaxed and extended breakfast, staff have reduced anxiety and aggression and created a calmer and more sociable atmosphere. This has benefitted residents, visitors and staff, and is reflected in low levels of unplanned hospital admissions and paramedic call-outs. PMID:26492664

  14. Effect of added atmospheric resid on process indexes in cat cracking of vacuum distillate

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglova, L.E.; Khadzhiev, S.N.; Syunyaev, Z.I.; Smidovich, E.V.; Fedoseeva, V.I.; Kapustin, V.M.

    1987-09-01

    The catalytic cracking of vacuum distillates with West Siberia atmospheric resids was investigated to determine the optimal ratio of components in the blend and to define the influence of the quantity of added resid on the product yield and quality. The feedstocks tested included a low-sulfur hydrotreated vacuum distillate and a medium-sulfur atmospheric resid. Data on the quality, hydrocarbon composition, viscosity, distillation behavior, vanadium and nickel content, and sulfur content were determined and compared against a resid from a Texas crude. Physicochemical properties were determined for the naphtha and diesel fuel cuts obtained. Coke yields are also assessed.

  15. Differences between Newly Admitted Nursing Home Residents in Rural and Nonrural Areas in a National Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolin, Jane Nelson; Phillips, Charles D.; Hawes, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research in specific locales indicates that individuals admitted to rural nursing homes have lower care needs than individuals admitted to nursing homes in urban areas, and that rural nursing homes differ in their mix of short-stay and chronic-care residents. This research investigates whether differences in acuity are a function…

  16. Time- versus Competency-Based Residency Training.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vu T; Losee, Joseph E

    2016-08-01

    Graduate medical education is at the brink of a paradigm shift in educating the next generation of physicians. Over 100 years ago, the Flexner report helped usher in the Halstedian residency, based on timed exposure and knowledge assessment as the cornerstones of medical education. The addition of operative case logs and respective board examinations to the current model of surgical education has served to establish practice minimums; however, they do not provide any assessment of actual operative capability or clinical competence. Although these facets have been tempered over time, one could argue that they currently exist only as surrogates for the true goal of all graduate medical education: the development of competent, graduating physicians, capable of independent and ethical practice. There now exists a growing body of evidence that competency-based medical education is this century's Flexnerian revolution. By the objective, subjective, and global assessment of competence, it is thought that we can more effectively and efficiently educate our trainees, provide much needed accountability to our individual patients and to the public as a whole, and establish a lasting model of self-motivated, lifelong learning. PMID:27465174

  17. Residents' annoyance responses to aircraft noise events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, T. K.; Stephens, D. G.; Fields, J. M.; Shepherd, K. P.

    1983-01-01

    In a study conducted in the vicinity of Salt Lake City International Airport, community residents reported their annoyance with individual aircraft flyovers during rating sessions conducted in their homes. Annoyance ratings were obtained at different times of the day. Aircraft noise levels were measured, and other characteristics of the aircraft were noted by trained observers. Metrics commonly used for assessing aircraft noise were compared, but none performed significantly better than A-weighted sound pressure level. A significant difference was found between the ratings of commercial jet aircraft and general aviation propeller aircraft, with the latter being judged less annoying. After the effects of noise level were accounted for, no significant differences were found between the ratings of landings and takeoffs. Aircraft noise annoyance reactions are stronger in lowered ambient noise conditions. This is consistent with the theory that reduced nighttime and evening ambient levels could create different reactions at different times of day. After controlling for ambient noise in a multiple regression analysis, no significant differences were found between the ratings of single events obtained during the three time periods: morning, afternoon, and evenings.

  18. Developing and successfully implementing a competency-based portfolio assessment system in a postgraduate family medicine residency program.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Laura A; Griffiths, Jane; Schultz, Karen

    2015-11-01

    The use of portfolios in postgraduate medical residency education to support competency development is increasing; however, the processes by which these assessment systems are designed, implemented, and maintained are emergent. The authors describe the needs assessment, development, implementation, and continuing quality improvement processes that have shaped the Portfolio Assessment Support System (PASS) used by the postgraduate family medicine program at Queen's University since 2009. Their description includes the impetus for change and contextual realities that guided the effort, plus the processes used for selecting assessment components and developing strategic supports. The authors discuss the identification of impact measures at the individual, programmatic, and institutional levels and the ways the department uses these to monitor how PASS supports competency development, scaffolds residents' self-regulated learning skills, and promotes professional identity formation. They describe the "academic advisor" role and provide an appendix covering the portfolio elements. Reflection elements include learning plans, clinical question logs, confidence surveys, and reflections about continuity of care and significant incidents. Learning module elements cover the required, online bioethics, global health, and consult-request modules. Assessment elements cover each resident's research project, clinical audits, presentations, objective structured clinical exam and simulated office oral exam results, field notes, entrustable professional activities, multisource feedback, and in-training evaluation reports. Document elements are the resident's continuing medical education activities including procedures log, attendance log, and patient demographic summaries.The authors wish to support others who are engaged in the systematic portfolio-design process or who may adapt aspects of PASS for their local programs. PMID:25993277

  19. Individual Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fankhauser, Glenda; And Others

    This document contains a 44-page child assessment checklist developed by the Circle Preschool First Chance Project, a government-funded model program for integrating handicapped children into regular classes. Six skill areas of child development are detailed: language, cognitive, gross motor, fine motor, socio-emotional and self-help. Included are…

  20. Assessment of leadership training needs of internal medicine residents at the Massachusetts General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Daniel M.; Bernard, Kenneth; Iyasere, Christiana

    2015-01-01

    Internal medicine (IM) physicians, including residents, assume both formal and informal leadership roles that significantly impact clinical and organizational outcomes. However, most internists lack formal leadership training. In 2013 and 2014, we surveyed all rising second-year IM residents at a large northeastern academic medical center about their need for, and preferences regarding, leadership training. Fifty-five of 113 residents (49%) completed the survey. Forty-four residents (80% of respondents) reported a need for additional formal leadership training. A self-reported need for leadership training was not associated with respondents' gender or previous leadership training and experience. Commonly cited leadership skill needs included “leading a team” (98% of residents), “confronting problem employees” (93%), “coaching and developing others” (93%), and “resolving interpersonal conflict” (84%). Respondents preferred to learn about leadership using multiple teaching modalities. Fifty residents (91%) preferred to have a physician teach them about leadership, while 19 (35%) wanted instruction from a hospital manager. IM residents may not receive adequate leadership development education during pregraduate and postgraduate training. IM residents may be more likely to benefit from leadership training interventions that are physician-led, multimodal, and occur during the second year of residency. These findings can help inform the design of effective leadership development programs for physician trainees. PMID:26130876

  1. Assessment of leadership training needs of internal medicine residents at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Traci N; Blumenthal, Daniel M; Bernard, Kenneth; Iyasere, Christiana

    2015-07-01

    Internal medicine (IM) physicians, including residents, assume both formal and informal leadership roles that significantly impact clinical and organizational outcomes. However, most internists lack formal leadership training. In 2013 and 2014, we surveyed all rising second-year IM residents at a large northeastern academic medical center about their need for, and preferences regarding, leadership training. Fifty-five of 113 residents (49%) completed the survey. Forty-four residents (80% of respondents) reported a need for additional formal leadership training. A self-reported need for leadership training was not associated with respondents' gender or previous leadership training and experience. Commonly cited leadership skill needs included "leading a team" (98% of residents), "confronting problem employees" (93%), "coaching and developing others" (93%), and "resolving interpersonal conflict" (84%). Respondents preferred to learn about leadership using multiple teaching modalities. Fifty residents (91%) preferred to have a physician teach them about leadership, while 19 (35%) wanted instruction from a hospital manager. IM residents may not receive adequate leadership development education during pregraduate and postgraduate training. IM residents may be more likely to benefit from leadership training interventions that are physician-led, multimodal, and occur during the second year of residency. These findings can help inform the design of effective leadership development programs for physician trainees. PMID:26130876

  2. Putting Residents First: Strategies Developed by CNAs to Prevent and Manage Resident-to-Resident Violence in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Snellgrove, Susan; Beck, Cornelia; Green, Angela; McSweeney, Jean C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Resident-to-resident violence (RRV) in nursing homes (NHs) is common and threatens the safety and quality of life of both residents and caregivers. The purpose of this portion of a larger qualitative study was to explore strategies developed by certified nurses’ assistants (CNAs) to prevent and manage RRV in NHs. Design and Methods: Semistructured interviews were used to collect data. Data were analyzed utilizing content analysis and constant comparison. Results: Analysis revealed one overriding theme, “Putting Residents First” which the CNAs described as a conscious effort to put themselves or a beloved family member in the place of the resident while administering care. Within this theme, there were three related subthemes: (a) Knowing the Residents, (b) Keeping Residents Safe, and (c) Spending Quality Time. Implications: Together, these themes suggest that the formulation of strategies for decreasing and managing RRV was influenced significantly by the ability of the CNAs to empathize with the residents for whom they were caring. The results indicate that in the absence of evidence-based interventions, CNAs have developed their own strategies for the management and prevention of RRV. These strategies may provide a foundation for the development and testing of interventions aimed at preventing and managing RRV in NHs. PMID:26055786

  3. 42 CFR 441.13 - Prohibitions on FFP: Institutionalized individuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., as defined in § 435.1010 of this chapter; or (2) Any individual who is under age 65 and is in an institution for mental diseases, except an individual who is under age 22 and receiving inpatient psychiatric... § 483.440(a) of this chapter for residents of ICFs/IID and in § 441.154 for individuals under age...

  4. 42 CFR 441.13 - Prohibitions on FFP: Institutionalized individuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., as defined in § 435.1010 of this chapter; or (2) Any individual who is under age 65 and is in an institution for mental diseases, except an individual who is under age 22 and receiving inpatient psychiatric... § 483.440(a) of this chapter for residents of ICFs/IID and in § 441.154 for individuals under age...

  5. 42 CFR 441.13 - Prohibitions on FFP: Institutionalized individuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., as defined in § 435.1010 of this chapter; or (2) Any individual who is under age 65 and is in an institution for mental diseases, except an individual who is under age 22 and receiving inpatient psychiatric... § 483.440(a) of this chapter for residents of ICFs/IID and in § 441.154 for individuals under age...

  6. Individual, family, and community risk markers for domestic violence in Peru.

    PubMed

    Flake, Dallan F

    2005-03-01

    This study draws on an ecological framework in testing relationships between individual, family, and community characteristics and the likelihood of women experiencing domestic violence in Peru. The sample of 15,991 women was taken from the 2000 Peru Demographic and Health Survey. Logistic regression models revealed that at the individual level, low educational attainment, early union formation, and a violent family background increase a woman's likelihood of abuse. Family-level risk markers include cohabitation, large family size, partner alcohol consumption, employment, and a woman's having higher status than her husband. At the community level, living in a noncoastal area and having an urban residence increase the likelihood of abuse. PMID:16043554

  7. Influenza vaccination coverage among medical residents

    PubMed Central

    Costantino, Claudio; Mazzucco, Walter; Azzolini, Elena; Baldini, Cesare; Bergomi, Margherita; Biafiore, Alessio Daniele; Bianco, Manuela; Borsari, Lucia; Cacciari, Paolo; Cadeddu, Chiara; Camia, Paola; Carluccio, Eugenia; Conti, Andrea; De Waure, Chiara; Di Gregori, Valentina; Fabiani, Leila; Fallico, Roberto; Filisetti, Barbara; Flacco, Maria E; Franco, Elisabetta; Furnari, Roberto; Galis, Veronica; Gallea, Maria R; Gallone, Maria F; Gallone, Serena; Gelatti, Umberto; Gilardi, Francesco; Giuliani, Anna R; Grillo, Orazio C; Lanati, Niccolò; Mascaretti, Silvia; Mattei, Antonella; Micò, Rocco; Morciano, Laura; Nante, Nicola; Napoli, Giuseppe; Nobile, Carmelo; Palladino, Raffaele; Parisi, Salvatore; Passaro, Maria; Pelissero, Gabriele; Quarto, Michele; Ricciardi, Walter; Romano, Gabriele; Rustico, Ennio; Saponari, Anita; Schioppa, Francesco S; Signorelli, Carlo; Siliquini, Roberta; Trabacchi, Valeria; Triassi, Maria; Varetta, Alessia; Ziglio, Andrea; Zoccali, Angela; Vitale, Francesco; Amodio, Emanuele

    2014-01-01

    Although influenza vaccination is recognized to be safe and effective, recent studies have confirmed that immunization coverage among health care workers remain generally low, especially among medical residents (MRs). Aim of the present multicenter study was to investigate attitudes and determinants associated with acceptance of influenza vaccination among Italian MRs. A survey was performed in 2012 on MRs attending post-graduate schools of 18 Italian Universities. Each participant was interviewed via an anonymous, self-administered, web-based questionnaire including questions on attitudes regarding influenza vaccination. A total of 2506 MRs were recruited in the survey and 299 (11.9%) of these stated they had accepted influenza vaccination in 2011–2012 season. Vaccinated MRs were older (P = 0.006), working in clinical settings (P = 0.048), and vaccinated in the 2 previous seasons (P < 0.001 in both seasons). Moreover, MRs who had recommended influenza vaccination to their patients were significantly more compliant with influenza vaccination uptake in 2011–2012 season (P < 0.001). “To avoid spreading influenza among patients” was recognized as the main reason for accepting vaccination by less than 15% of vaccinated MRs. Italian MRs seem to have a very low compliance with influenza vaccination and they seem to accept influenza vaccination as a habit that is unrelated to professional and ethical responsibility. Otherwise, residents who refuse vaccination in the previous seasons usually maintain their behaviors. Promoting correct attitudes and good practice in order to improve the influenza immunization rates of MRs could represent a decisive goal for increasing immunization coverage among health care workers of the future. PMID:24603089

  8. The Impact of Residency Training on Physicians' AIDS-Related Treatment Practices: A Longitudinal Panel Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yedidia, Michael J.; Berry, Carolyn A.

    1999-01-01

    Study of 394 physicians graduating in 1989 from six New York medical schools found that certain residency-training factors had sustained effects on physician behavior in caring for AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) patients, but not on the number of patients treated. Determinants of treatment practice included residency environment,…

  9. "Are You as Hard as 50 Cent? Negotiating Race and Masculinity in the Residence Halls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaggers, Dametraus; Iverson, Susan V.

    2012-01-01

    In a qualitative study of Black undergraduate men at a predominantly White university in the Midwest, participants shared their experiences in residence halls, including roommate conflicts, interracial tensions, and disagreements with residence hall staff. This article focuses on Black male undergraduates' negotiation of racialized…

  10. "Are You as Hard as 50 Cent?" Negotiating Race and Masculinity in the Residence Halls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaggers, Dametraus; Iverson, Susan V.

    2012-01-01

    In a qualitative study of Black undergraduate men at a predominantly White university in the Midwest, participants shared their experiences in residence halls, including roommate conflicts, interracial tensions, and disagreements with residence hall staff. This article focuses on Black male undergraduates' negotiation of racialized conceptions of…

  11. A Longitudinal Examination of Agitation and Resident Characteristics in the Nursing Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgio, Louis D.; Park, Nan Sook; Hardin, J. Michael; Sun, Fei

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Agitation frequently accompanies cognitive decline among nursing home residents. This study used cross-sectional and longitudinal (up to 18 months) methods to examine agitation among profoundly and moderately impaired residents using both staff report and direct observation methods. Design and Methods: The study included participants (N =…

  12. Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

  13. Training Psychiatry Residents in Quality Improvement: An Integrated, Year-Long Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbuckle, Melissa R.; Weinberg, Michael; Cabaniss, Deborah L.; Kistler; Susan C.; Isaacs, Abby J.; Sederer, Lloyd I.; Essock, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe a curriculum for psychiatry residents in Quality Improvement (QI) methodology. Methods: All PGY3 residents (N=12) participated in a QI curriculum that included a year-long group project. Knowledge and attitudes were assessed before and after the curriculum, using a modified Quality Improvement Knowledge Assessment…

  14. Results of a Multifaceted Intimate Partner Violence Training Program for Pediatric Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McColgan, Maria D.; Cruz, Mario; McKee, Jessica; Dempsey, Sandra H.; Davis, Martha B.; Barry, Patricia; Yoder, Ana Lisa; Giardino, Angelo P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of a multifaceted Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) intervention on knowledge, attitudes, and screening practices of pediatric residents. Methods: The intervention included: an on-site IPV counselor, IPV training for attending physicians, residents and social workers, and screening prompts. Evaluation included…

  15. Strengthening Community Partnerships through an Assessment of Residents' Issues and Priorities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibitayo, Olurominiyi O.

    2008-01-01

    Effective university-community relationships require input from community residents. This study, conducted as part of Texas Southern University's outreach program, solicits the viewpoints of the residents of Acres Homes on several issues including the community's needs and priorities. The findings show that the respondents consider job training,…

  16. Relationships of Assertiveness, Depression, and Social Support Among Older Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the relationships of assertiveness, depression, and social support among nursing home residents. The sample included 50 older nursing home residents (mean age=75 years; 75% female; 92% Caucasian). There was a significant correlation between assertiveness and depression (r=-.33), but the correlations between social support and…

  17. Utilization of Residence Hall Facilities, Fall 1977, With Trends From Fall 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Albany. Central Staff Office of Institutional Research.

    Data collected in the fourth annual survey of use of residence hall facilities in the fall of 1977, as well as summary data from fall 1974 through fall 1977 is presented in tabular form. The study includes all state-operated institutions which have residence hall facilities except facilities available at locally sponsored community colleges under…

  18. Fifteen Years of a Videotape Review Program for Internal Medicine and Medicine-Pediatrics Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Ann; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The Wayne State University (Michigan) medical school program of videotaping resident interviews with patients and reviewing them with faculty is described and evaluated. Topics discussed include the program's structure and process, recurrent themes in the review sessions, residents' perspectives on the process, potential barriers to a successful…

  19. Diversity in Libraries: Academic Residency Programs. Contributions in Librarianship and Information Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cogell, Raquel V., Ed.; Gruwell, Cindy A., Ed.

    This book contains 15 essays written by 19 librarians who participated in minority residency programs in academic libraries and 5 essays written by 6 professionals who served as residency program administrators. The following essays are included: (1) "The University of California, Santa Barbara Fellowship--A Program in Transition" (Detrice…

  20. Five Residents Speak: The Meaning of Living with Dying in a Long-Term Care Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Djivre, Sandra E.; Levin, Elizabeth; Schinke, Robert J.; Porter, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    Personal meanings given to the experience of living with nursing home death were shared by 5 nursing home residents. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews. Using M. van Manen's (1990) hermeneutic phenomenology, the lived experience of residents emerged as a compilation of 5 dynamically occurring themes, including (a) mapping…

  1. Quality of Life in the Nursing Home: Perspectives of Younger and Older Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Ashli; Konnert, Candace

    2007-01-01

    Adults aged 65 and younger make up a significant proportion of nursing-home residents. To date, however, there is no research examining their quality of life (QOL), including how their perceptions of QOL compare to those of older nursing-home residents. This study used a multidimensional approach to (a) assess the QOL of younger nursing-home…

  2. 78 FR 76313 - Proposed Information Collection; Survey of Residents' Attitudes on Jaguar Conservation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Proposed Information Collection; Survey of Residents' Attitudes on Jaguar... Drive, Arlington, VA 22203 (mail); or hope_grey@fws.gov (email). Please include ``1018-Jaguar Resident... perspectives on attitudes towards and beliefs about jaguars in the Northwestern Recovery Unit (southern...

  3. Identifying Changeable Barriers to Family Involvement in the Nursing Home for Cognitively Impaired Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Port, Cynthia Lindman

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Barriers to family involvement in the nursing home with the potential for change through intervention are examined, including transportation, caregiver health, relationships with staff, and resident characteristics. Design and Methods: Data were collected for 93 family caregiver-resident pairs by means of telephone interviews and chart…

  4. How residency duration affects the outcome of a territorial contest: Complementary game-theoretic models.

    PubMed

    Mesterton-Gibbons, Mike; Sherratt, Tom N

    2016-04-01

    While the first individuals to discover and maintain territories are generally respected as owners, under some conditions there may be ambiguity as to who got there first. Here we attempt to understand the evolutionary consequences of this ambiguity by developing a pair of game-theoretic models in which we explicitly consider rival residency-based claims to ownership. Following earlier qualitative explanations for residency effects, we assume that either the value of the territory (Model A) or an interloper׳s self-belief that it is the owner (Model B) increases with duration of residency. Model A clearly demonstrates that if the value of a territory increases to a resident over time, so should its motivation to fight in terms of the effort it invests in fighting. Indeed, only a small increase in territory value with residency duration can be sufficient for longer established residents to win disputes, even without any arbitrary convention or other form of priority effect. Likewise, Model B shows that the observed increase in fighting persistence with residency duration can be readily explained as a consequence of increasing confidence on behalf of the interloper that it is the rightful owner. Collectively, the models help to explain some general findings long observed by empiricists, and shed light on the nature of conflicts that can arise when individuals do not have complete information about rival claims to ownership. PMID:26807804

  5. Child Rearing and Individuality Among Suburban Malays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, David J.; Banks, Ellen

    This study focuses on Malaysians' perceptions of individuality in their children and on general characteristics of Malaysian child training practices. Research was carried out in three adjoining villages where well over half of the income of residents is derived from wage and salaried employment in industrial towns. The study consisted of…

  6. Driver and Traffic Safety Education: A Lesson Plan for the Residents of Gracewood State School and Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latimer, Jonathan L.

    Outlined is a course of driver education and traffic safety taught to retarded residents of a state institution. Stressed is the importance of driver education for residents able to leave the institution. The philosophy of the program is given to emphasize individualizing instruction, instructing students who possess the potential for driving,…

  7. Resident mesenchymal cells and fibrosis✩

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Nicol; Fligny, Cécile; Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrosis is a major clinical problem associated with as many as 45% of all natural deaths in developed nations. It can affect all organs and accumulating evidence indicates that fibrogenesis is not merely a bystander product of injury, but is a central pathological problem directly contributing to loss of organ function. In the majority of clinical cases, fibrogenesis is strongly associated with the recruitment of leukocytes, even in the absence of infection. Although chronic infections are a significant cause of fibrogenesis, in most cases fibrotic disease occurs in the context of sterile injury, such as microvascular disease, toxic epithelial injury or diabetes mellitus. Fibrogenesis is a direct consequence of the activation of extensive, and previously poorly appreciated, populations of mesenchymal cells in our organs which are either wrapped around capillaries and known as ‘pericytes’, or embedded in interstitial spaces between cell structures and known as resident ‘fibroblasts’. Recent fate-mapping and complementary studies in several organs indicate that these cells are the precursors of the scar-forming myofibroblasts that appear in our organs in response to injury. Here we will review the literature supporting a central role for these cells in fibrogenesis, and highlight some of the critical cell to cell interactions that are necessary for the initiation and continuation of the fibrogenic process. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fibrosis: Translation of basic research to human disease. PMID:23220259

  8. On the Relationship Between Neighborhood Perception, Length of Residence and Co-Ethnic Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Saenz, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    We investigate how co-ethnic concentration and length of residence are related to neighborhood perception in aged Mexican Americans, and discuss sources of information for measuring social environments. Neighborhood perception scale, length of residence in current home, and all individual-level covariates in a hierarchical linear model are derived from data on community-dwelling older adults. Tract-level measures are obtained from Census data. We find no relationship between co-ethnic concentration and positive neighborhood perception, and find a direct relationship between length of residence and positive neighborhood perception. Until further evidence is found, different sources of information when measuring place should be treated equally. PMID:25057331

  9. Everyday ethics in assisted living facilitites: a framework for assessing resident-focused issues.

    PubMed

    Powers, Bethel Ann

    2005-01-01

    This article describes and illustrates a framework that may be used when assessing the moral basis of everyday issues that can affect residents of assisted living facilities. The "taxonomy of everyday ethical issues" was an outcome of ethnographic research focused on care of nursing home residents with dementia. However, in this article it is shown to be equally relevant for conceptualizing issues affecting cognitively intact as well as cognitively impaired residents across these two settings. The taxonomy is grounded in some of the more common cultural characteristics of congregate living arrangements for elderly individuals who have needs for varying levels of compensatory and therapeutic oversight by a staff of service providers. PMID:15675782

  10. Who's in Our Neighborhood? Healthcare Disparities Experiential Education for Residents

    PubMed Central

    Patow, Carl; Bryan, Debra; Johnson, Gail; Canaan, Eugenia; Oyewo, Adetolu; Panda, Mukta; Walsh, Eric; Zaidan, James

    2016-01-01

    Background: Residents and fellows frequently care for patients from diverse populations but often have limited familiarity with the cultural preferences and social determinants that contribute to the health of their patients and communities. Faculty physicians at academic health centers are increasingly interested in incorporating the topics of cultural diversity and healthcare disparities into experiential education activities; however, examples have not been readily available. In this report, we describe a variety of experiential education models that were developed to improve resident and fellow physician understanding of cultural diversity and healthcare disparities. Methods: Experiential education, an educational philosophy that infuses direct experience with the learning environment and content, is an effective adult learning method. This report summarizes the experiences of multiple sponsors of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education–accredited residency and fellowship programs that used experiential education to inform residents about cultural diversity and healthcare disparities. The 9 innovative experiential education activities described were selected to demonstrate a wide range of complexity, resource requirements, and community engagement and to stimulate further creativity and innovation in educational design. Results: Each of the 9 models is characterized by residents' active participation and varies in length from minutes to months. In general, the communities in which these models were deployed were urban centers with diverse populations. Various formats were used to introduce targeted learners to the populations and communities they serve. Measures of educational and clinical outcomes for these early innovations and pilot programs are not available. Conclusion: The breadth of the types of activities described suggests that a wide latitude is available to organizations in creating experiential education programs that reflect their

  11. The ethics of conducting graduate medical education research on residents.

    PubMed

    Keune, Jason D; Brunsvold, Melissa E; Hohmann, Elizabeth; Korndorffer, James R; Weinstein, Debra F; Smink, Douglas S

    2013-04-01

    The field of graduate medical education (GME) research is attracting increased attention and broader participation. The authors review the special ethical and methodological considerations pertaining to medical education research. Because residents are at once a convenient and captive study population, a risk of coercion exists, making the provision of consent important. The role of the institutional review board (IRB) is often difficult to discern because GME activities can have multiple simultaneous purposes, educational activities may go forward with or without a research component, and the subjects of educational research studies are not patients. The authors provide a road map for researchers with regard to research oversight by the IRB and also address issues related to research quality. The matters of whether educational research studies should have educational value for the study subject and whether to use individual information obtained when residents participate as research subjects are explored. PMID:23425981

  12. The triumvirate: a new model for residency program directorship.

    PubMed

    Boiselle, Phillip M; Donohoe, Kevin; Graham, David; Siewert, Bettina; Jennette, Richard; Hatabu, Hiroto; Kressel, Herbert Y

    2007-12-01

    The authors describe their initial 5-year experience with a new model of residency directorship: a triumvirate of shared leadership consisting of a director and 2 associate directors with specific areas of expertise and assigned responsibility. The major appeal of this model is its potential to draw on the diverse talents of 3 individuals with responsibilities matched to their specific areas of strength. A major benefit of the model is that each director has more time and energy to devote to specific duties, resulting in a greater opportunity for innovation and creativity. In this article, the authors describe the roles, responsibilities, and accomplishments of each of the 3 directors. They also discuss potential benefits of the triumvirate model in comparison with a traditional residency directorship and potential pitfalls to avoid when implementing this model. PMID:18047988

  13. Role of surgical residents in undergraduate surgical education

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Marc; Belliveau, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Objectives To identify the role and impact of surgical residents on the various activities of a senior (4th year) surgical clerkship, and to explore students’ perceptions of differences between the teaching behaviours of attending physicians and residents. Design A survey by questionnaire. Setting McGill University, Montreal. Method A 67-item questionnaire was administered to fourth-year medical students at the end of their 8-week surgical clerkship. Analysis of the data was performed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test, Dunn’s multiple comparison test and mean average. Main outcome measures Overall satisfaction with the clerkship, teaching behaviours and teaching of clinical skills and basic principles. Results Overall satisfaction with the clerkship was 6.31 out of 10. Surgical residents were perceived as being significantly more active than the attending staff in 14 out of 15 teaching behaviours. They were also seen as important in teaching certain clinical skills such as suturing, assisting in the operating room and managing emergency situations. They also contributed significantly to teaching the basic principles of surgery such as infections, surgical bleeding and fluid and electrolytes. On a 10-point scale, students felt that more learning was achieved by independent reading, tutorials and residents’ teaching than by other teaching modalities, including attending physicians’ and nurses’ teaching. Conclusions Medical students perceive surgical residents as being significantly more active in their education process than the attending staff. Residents appear to be responsible for teaching various technical and patient management skills necessary for patient care. Along with independent reading and tutorials, resident teaching contributes a significant portion of the medical student’s acquisition of knowledge and appears to contribute to the students’ choice of surgery as a career. PMID:10593247

  14. Burnout, anxiety, depression, and social skills in medical residents.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Lima, K; Loureiro, S R

    2015-01-01

    The medical residency is recognized as a risk period for the development of burnout and mental health problems, such as anxiety and depression, which have impact on the physician and clientele alike. There is a need for studies that address conditions of risk and protection for the development of such problems. This study aimed to verify the rates of burnout, anxiety, and depression presented by resident physicians, as well as the associations of these problems with social skills, as potential protective factors. The hypothesis was defined that the problems (burnout, anxiety, and depression) would be negatively associated with social skills. A total of 305 medical residents, of both genders, of different specialties, from clinical and surgical areas of a Brazilian university hospital were evaluated using the following standardized self-report instruments: Burnout Syndrome Inventory, Social Skills Inventory, and the Patient Health Questionnaire-4. High rates of burnout and mental health problems were verified and social skills were negatively associated with burnout dimensions such as emotional exhaustion, emotional detachment, and dehumanization, but positively associated with personal accomplishment. Furthermore, residents with indicators of problems presented significantly lower social skills means than those of residents without indicators of burnout, anxiety, or depression. More studies are needed, which include other types of instruments in addition to self-report ones and evaluate not only social skills but also social competence in the professional practice. These should adopt intervention and longitudinal designs that allow the continuity or overcoming of the problems to be verified. Since social skills can be learned, the results of the study highlight the importance of developing the interpersonal skills of the professionals during the training of resident physicians in order to improve their practice. PMID:25030412

  15. Estimation of residence time in a shallow lacustrine embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razmi, A. M.; Barry, D. A.; Lemmin, U.; Bakhtyar, R.

    2012-12-01

    Near-shore water quality in lacustrine bays subjected to effluent or stream discharges is affected by, amongst other things, the residence time within a given bay. Vidy Bay, located on the northern shore of Lake Geneva, Switzerland, receives discharge from a wastewater treatment plant, the Chamberonne River and a storm-water drain. The residence time of water in the bay largely depends on water exchanges with the main basin (Grand Lac) of Lake Geneva. Field investigations and modeling of the hydrodynamics of Vidy Bay have shown that currents are variable, due mainly to wind variability over the lake. However, in broad terms there are two main current patterns in the bay, (i) currents are linked to large gyres in the Grand Lac, or (ii) currents are partially independent of the Grand Lac and are controlled by small-scale gyres within the bay. Residence times in Vidy Bay were computed using the hydrodynamic model Delft3D. Since the Vidy Bay shoreline follows a shallow arc, the definition of the off-shore extent of the bay is ambiguous. Here, the largest within-bay gyre is used. Particle tracking was conducted for each of the three discharges into the bay. Model results were computed using meteorological data for 2010, and thus include the natural variability in wind patterns and seasonal stratification. An analysis of the results shows that a water parcel from the waste water outfall has a residence time ranging from hours to days. The water residence time is minimum near to the surface and maximum at the near bottom layer. The results confirmed that wind force, thermal stratification, and water depth are the main factors influencing residence time.

  16. Residents' perspectives on the final year of medical school

    PubMed Central

    Obrien, Bridget; Niehaus, Brian; Teherani, Arianne; Young, John Q.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To characterize junior residents’ perspectives on the purpose, value, and potential improvement of the final year of medical school. Methods Eighteen interviews were conducted with junior residents who graduated from nine different medical schools and who were in internal medicine, surgery, and psychiatry programs at one institution in the United States. Interview transcripts were coded and analyzed inductively for themes. Results Participants’ descriptions of the purpose of their recently completed final year of medical school contained three primary themes: residency-related purposes, interest- or need-based purposes, and transitional purposes. Participants commented on the most valued aspects of the final year. Themes included opportunities to: prepare for residency; assume a higher level of responsibility in patient care; pursue experiences of interest that added breadth of knowledge, skills and perspective; develop and/or clarify career plans; and enjoy a period of respite. Suggestions for improvement included enhancing the learning value of clinical electives, augmenting specific curricular content, and making the final year more purposeful and better aligned with career goals. Conclusions The final year of medical school is a critical part of medical education for most learners, but careful attention is needed to ensure that the year is developmentally robust. Medical educators can facilitate this by creating structures to help students define personal and professional goals, identify opportunities to work toward these goals, and monitor progress so that the value of the final year is optimized and not exclusively focused on residency preparation.

  17. 20th Annual Residence Hall Construction Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agron, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Even in difficult economic times, colleges and universities continue to invest in residence hall construction projects as a way to attract new students and keep existing ones on campus. According to data from "American School & University"'s 20th annual Residence Hall Construction Report, the median new project completed in 2008 was less expensive…

  18. Current Practices in Resident Assistant Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Virginia Albaneso

    2016-01-01

    Developing resident assistant (RA) training is a challenge for most housing and residence life staff. Grounded in the author's doctoral research on the curricular design of RA training programs, this study summarizes current practices in three types of RA training programs--preservice training, in-service training, and academic courses--and…

  19. Suicide Intervention Skills among Japanese Medical Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujisawa, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yuriko; Kato, Takahiro A.; Hashimoto, Naoki; Sato, Ryoko; Aoyama-Uehara, Kumi; Fukasawa, Maiko; Tomita, Masayuki; Watanabe, Koichiro; Kashima, Haruo; Otsuka, Kotaro

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Patient suicide is a tragic occurrence, and it can be a demoralizing experience for medical residents. Few studies, however, have assessed suicide management skills among these front-line healthcare professionals. This study evaluated the self-assessed competence and confidence of medical residents with regard to the management of…

  20. Putting "Rural" into Psychiatry Residency Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, William A.; Pomerantz, Andrew; Schwartz, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Evidence indicates disparities in the number of psychiatrists practicing in rural America compared to urban areas suggesting the need for a greater emphasis on rural psychiatry in residency training programs. The authors offer suggestions for integrating a rural focus in psychiatry residency training to foster greater competency and…

  1. Assessment of Residents' Attitudes toward Patient Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falvo, Donna; Wright, W. Russel

    1981-01-01

    A questionnaire was developed at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine to elicit information from residents regarding their perceptions of and expectations of patient education. Responding residents generally felt patient education was an asset to total medical care, and that the physician should determine what information should be…

  2. 19th Annual Residence Hall Construction Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agron, Joe

    2008-01-01

    The construction of residence hall facilities at colleges and universities continues to be strong, as institutions scramble to meet the housing needs and varied demands of a growing student population. This article presents data collected from 39 new residence hall projects completed in 2007. According to American School & University's 19th annual…

  3. Teaching Psychiatry to Family Practice Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huzij, Teodor J.; Warner, Christopher H.; Lacy, Timothy; Rachal, James

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This article outlines a psychiatry curriculum developed for family practice residents by family practice-psychiatry residents. Methods: A literature review, needs assessment, planning, implementation, and initial assessment were conducted. Conclusion: Early results demonstrated improved general psychiatric knowledge and a high level of…

  4. Teaching Forensic Psychiatry to General Psychiatry Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Catherine F.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires that general psychiatry residency training programs provide trainees with exposure to forensic psychiatry. Limited information is available on how to develop a core curriculum in forensic psychiatry for general psychiatry residents and few articles have been…

  5. A Clinical Evaluation System for Anesthesiology Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viets, J. L.; Foster, Scot D.

    1988-01-01

    Baylor College of Medicine's system for evaluating the clinical progress of anesthesiology residents, developed in response to problems of standards, staff cooperation, and student dissatisfaction with evaluation, assesses resident progress in terms of performance levels based on case complexity and degree of staff intervention. (Author/MSE)

  6. Current Perspectives on Chief Residents in Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Christopher H.; Rachal, James; Breitbach, Jill; Higgins, Michael; Warner, Carolynn; Bobo, William

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors examine qualitative data from outgoing chief residents in psychiatry from the 2004-2005 academic year to 1) determine common characteristics between programs, 2) examine the residents' perspectives on their experiences, and 3) determine their common leadership qualities. Method: The authors sent out self-report surveys via…

  7. 36 CFR 59.4 - Residency requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Residency requirements. 59.4 Section 59.4 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND PROGRAM OF ASSISTANCE TO STATES; POST-COMPLETION COMPLIANCE RESPONSIBILITIES § 59.4 Residency requirements....

  8. [MENTORING PROGRAM - ANOTHER FACET OF RESIDENT EDUCATION].

    PubMed

    Fishman, Ami; Kenet, Ron; Biron-Shental, Tal

    2015-08-01

    Medical residents are exposed to physical and emotional pressure and are required to cope with numerous demands during long working hours. Often, the intense workload leads to neglect of possible difficulties and professional and personal growth and empowerment. The Mentoring Program provides each resident with an attending physician mentor to help him or her adjust to the residency and to cope with its demands. The mentor guides the resident in career development and provides support in the event of difficulties. Attending physicians received professional guidance in the objectives and meaning of mentorship and were teamed with residents. The residents completed questionnaires regarding satisfaction and self-confidence before and a year after the mentoring program was established. The program significantly increased their feelings of support, confidence and satisfaction. As the program continued, the mentors' role in guiding the residents was expanded. The Mentoring Program has become an integral part of departmental teaching and team communication. It seems that the mentors, the residents and the department, all benefit from the program. PMID:26480614

  9. Selected Health Practices Among Ohio's Rural Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, G. Howard; Pugh, Albert

    Using a stratified random sample of 12 of Ohio's 88 counties, this 1967 study had as its objectives (1) to measure the level of participation in selected health practices by Ohio's rural residents, (2) to compare the level of participation in selected health practices of farm and rural nonfarm residents, and (3) to examine levels of participation…

  10. A Sexuality Curriculum for Gynecology Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Stephen B.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The summary report of an educational research program conducted with the obstetrics and gynecology residents at University Hospitals of Cleveland in 1976 is presented. The goals were to provide residents with basic knowledge about female sexual problems, assess skill and comfort in interviewing patients with sexual problems, document the effects…

  11. Accommodating to Restrictions on Residents' Working Hours.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Henry W., Jr.; Seltzer, Vicki L.

    1991-01-01

    In response to New York State legislation limiting house staff working hours, a survey of obstetrics and gynecology resident programs (n=26) was conducted. Results were used to construct a prototype call schedule and a hypothetical monthly schedule indicating how a single resident would function without violating any state regulations. (MSE)

  12. Study of Teaching Residents How to Teach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Janine C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The effectiveness of a teaching skills program for residents at Louisiana State University Medical Center was evaluated among 22 residents in obstetrics and gynecology, medicine, and family medicine who were randomly assigned to control and experimental groups. There was greater increase in the scores of the experimental than the control groups.…

  13. 42 CFR 483.10 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Resident rights. 483.10 Section 483.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR STATES AND LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES Requirements for Long Term Care Facilities § 483.10 Resident rights....

  14. 42 CFR 483.10 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Resident rights. 483.10 Section 483.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR STATES AND LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES Requirements for Long Term Care Facilities § 483.10 Resident rights....

  15. 42 CFR 483.10 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Resident rights. 483.10 Section 483.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR STATES AND LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES Requirements for Long Term Care Facilities § 483.10 Resident rights....

  16. Resident Performance and Sleep Deprivation: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asken, Michael J.; Raham, David C.

    1983-01-01

    A review of the literature on resident performance and sleep deprivation suggests that current research is sparse and inconclusive, and existing research suggests potentially severe negative effects. It is proposed that justifications for sleep-depriving night call schedules remain untested, and their use as part of residency training should be…

  17. 28 CFR 115.333 - Resident education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Resident education. 115.333 Section 115.333 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL... provide comprehensive age-appropriate education to residents either in person or through video...

  18. 28 CFR 115.333 - Resident education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Resident education. 115.333 Section 115.333 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL... provide comprehensive age-appropriate education to residents either in person or through video...

  19. 28 CFR 115.333 - Resident education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Resident education. 115.333 Section 115.333 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL... provide comprehensive age-appropriate education to residents either in person or through video...

  20. A Rural Primary Care Pediatric Residency Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kairys, Steven; Newell, Priscilla

    1985-01-01

    The primary care pediatric residency program at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center has developed a training program in rural primary care. Residents experience the many facets of rural practice and are introduced to community-oriented approaches to child health care. (Author/MLW)