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Sample records for incoloy alloys

  1. INCOLOY alloy 803, a cost effective alloy for high temperature service

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesan, P.; Plyburn, J.A.; Tassen, C.S.

    1995-12-31

    INCOLOY alloy 800 was the first of the 800 series of alloys invented by Inco Alloys International in the 1940`s. Because of its excellent oxidation and carburization resistance as well as high temperature creep strength, alloy 800 found uses for many applications such as heat treating hardware, petrochemical processing, home appliances, food processing, industrial heating, super-heater and re-heater tubing and soon became the workhorse material for the chemical processing industries. Alloy 803 has superior resistance to oxidation and carburization without sacrificing mechanical properties. In this paper the history of alloy 800 with introductions of alloys 800H and 800HT and the differences in properties and chemical compositions among them will be described. The development of alloy 803 for petrochemical applications is also covered. The performance of alloy 803 in cyclic oxidation, carburization and sulfidation tests will be presented and compared with several alloys including alloy HPM. The mechanical properties of alloy 803 including room temperature and high temperature tensile data and stress rupture and creep strengths up to 1,093 C (2,000 F) will be presented. The choice of available filler metals and welding electrodes to join alloy 803, using gas metal arc welding and shielded metal arc welding processes, will also be presented.

  2. The corrosion behavior of TiN coated and uncoated Incoloy 800 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Yilbas, B.S.; Khaled, M.M.; Kahraman, R.; Qutub, A.; Khan, Z.; Abdulaleem, B.J.; Ouerfelli, M.

    1998-12-01

    Incoloy alloy 800 is used in a variety of applications in industry as well as in domestic appliances for sheeting on electric heating elements. The composition of the alloy enables it to resist deterioration in many corrosive environments. However, resistance of the alloy to corrosion in aqueous media needs to be further examined. The present study examines the corrosion properties of Incoloy 800 alloy of both coated and uncoated workpieces obtained in a 0.1N H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 0.05N NaCl solution. TiN coating is achieved using a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique while corrosion tests are carried out using electrochemical polarization methods. Moreover, in order to examine the influence of hydrogen diffusion, reduction of hydrogen at the Incoloy 800 surface is carried out in a solution of 0.1N HNO{sub 3} + 1 g/L thiourea. Tensile tests are conducted on the workpieces to determine the influence of hydrogen embrittlement on the resulting mechanical properties of the substrate. To examine the pit formation and stress induced microcracking, scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis is carried out. The results show that the corrosion resistance of the alloy improves after TiN coating. In addition, no specific pattern or differentiation on the pit geometry is observed. The pitting rate and its size reduce considerably for TiN coated workpieces.

  3. Hydrogen Permeability of Incoloy 800H, Inconel 617, and Haynes 230 Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pattrick Calderoni

    2010-07-01

    A potential issue in the design of the NGNP reactor and high-temperature components is the permeation of fission generated tritium and hydrogen product from downstream hydrogen generation through high-temperature components. Such permeation can result in the loss of fission-generated tritium to the environment and the potential contamination of the helium coolant by permeation of product hydrogen into the coolant system. The issue will be addressed in the engineering design phase, and requires knowledge of permeation characteristics of the candidate alloys. Of three potential candidates for high-temperature components of the NGNP reactor design, the hydrogen permeability has been documented well only for Incoloy 800H, but at relatively high partial pressures of hydrogen. Hydrogen permeability data have been published for Inconel 617, but only in two literature reports and for partial pressures of hydrogen greater than one atmosphere, far higher than anticipated in the NGNP reactor. The hydrogen permeability of Haynes 230 has not been published. To support engineering design of the NGNP reactor components, the hydrogen permeability of Inconel 617 and Haynes 230 were determined using a measurement system designed and fabricated at the Idaho National Laboratory. The performance of the system was validated using Incoloy 800H as reference material, for which the permeability has been published in several journal articles. The permeability of Incoloy 800H, Inconel 617 and Haynes 230 was measured in the temperature range 650 to 950 °C and at hydrogen partial pressures of 10-3 and 10-2 atm, substantially lower pressures than used in the published reports. The measured hydrogen permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617 were in good agreement with published values obtained at higher partial pressures of hydrogen. The hydrogen permeability of Inconel 617 and Haynes 230 were similar, about 50% greater than for Incoloy 800H and with similar temperature dependence.

  4. A Study of the Oscillation Marks' Characteristics of Continuously Cast Incoloy Alloy 825 Blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Saud; Vynnycky, Michael; Fredriksson, Hasse

    2016-06-01

    A comprehensive experimental study of oscillation mark (OM) formation and its characteristics during the solidification of Incoloy alloy 825 in the continuous casting of blooms is investigated by plant trials and metallographic study. The experiments involved two heats with the same casting and mold conditions and sampling at different locations across the strand. The metallographic study combined macro/micro-examinations of OMs and segregation analysis of Cr, Mn, Mo, Ni, and Si by microprobe analysis. The results show that OMs have widely different characteristics, such as mark type, depth, segregation, and accompanying microstructure. Furthermore, the mark pitch can vary considerably even for the similar casting conditions, leading to different conditions for the marks' formation in relation to the mold's cyclic movement. Finally, a mechanism for the OM formation is discussed and proposed. Possible solutions for minimizing the observed defects by optimizing the mold conditions are suggested.

  5. A Study of the Oscillation Marks' Characteristics of Continuously Cast Incoloy Alloy 825 Blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Saud; Vynnycky, Michael; Fredriksson, Hasse

    2016-08-01

    A comprehensive experimental study of oscillation mark (OM) formation and its characteristics during the solidification of Incoloy alloy 825 in the continuous casting of blooms is investigated by plant trials and metallographic study. The experiments involved two heats with the same casting and mold conditions and sampling at different locations across the strand. The metallographic study combined macro/micro-examinations of OMs and segregation analysis of Cr, Mn, Mo, Ni, and Si by microprobe analysis. The results show that OMs have widely different characteristics, such as mark type, depth, segregation, and accompanying microstructure. Furthermore, the mark pitch can vary considerably even for the similar casting conditions, leading to different conditions for the marks' formation in relation to the mold's cyclic movement. Finally, a mechanism for the OM formation is discussed and proposed. Possible solutions for minimizing the observed defects by optimizing the mold conditions are suggested.

  6. Determination of structural engineering properties of incoloy 903 and CTX-1 alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, P. E.

    1975-01-01

    Tension, notched tension, compression, density, thermal conductivity, and thermal expansion tests were conducted on Incoloy 903 over the temperature range 20 K (-423 F) through 1033 K (1400 F). Fracture toughness tests were performed at room temperature (RT). Creep and rupture tests were conducted at 811 K (1000 F), 922 K (1200 F), and 1033 K (1400 F) for this alloy. Transverse unnotched and notched fatigue tests at R = 0.1 were performed at RT and 922 K (1200 F). For CTX-1 alloy, tension, Charpy V-notch impact, density, thermal conductivity, and thermal expansion tests were conducted over the temperature range 20 K (-423 F) through 1033 K (1400 F). Poisson's ratio was determined at RT, 811 K (1000 F), 922 K (1200 F), and 1033 K (1400 F). Notched tension and compression tests were performed at 20 K (-423 F), RT, and 922 K (1200 F); plane strain fracture toughness tests were conducted at RT, 77 K (-320 F), and 20 K (-423 F). Creep and rupture tests were performed at 811 K (1000 F), 922 K (1200 F), and 1033 K (1400 F); longitudinal unnotched and notched fatigue tests at R = 0.1 were conducted at RT and 922 K (1200 F). Results are presented and discussed.

  7. Flux Entrapment and Titanium Nitride Defects in Electroslag Remelting of INCOLOY Alloys 800 and 825

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, Jonathan D.; deBarbadillo, John J.; Krane, Matthew J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Electroslag remelted (ESR) ingots of INCOLOY alloys 800 and 825 are particularly prone to macroscale slag inclusions and microscale cleanliness issues. Formation of these structures near the ingot surface can cause significant production yield losses (~10 pct) due to the necessity of extensive surface grinding. Slag inclusions from near the outer radius of the toe end of alloy 800 and 825 ingots were found to be approximately 1 to 3 mm in size and have a multiphase microstructure consisting of CaF2, CaTiO3, MgAl2O4, MgO, and some combination of Ca12Al14O32F2 and/or Ca12Al14O33. These inclusions were often surrounded by fields of 1- to 10- μm cuboidal TiN particles. A large number of TiN cuboids were observed in the ESR electrode with similar size and morphology to those observed surrounding slag inclusions in the ESR ingots, suggesting that the TiN particles are relics from the ESR electrode production process. Samples taken sequentially throughout the AOD processes showed that the TiN cuboidals that are found in ESR ingots form between tapping the AOD vessel into the AOD ladle and the casting of ESR electrodes.

  8. INCOLOY 908, a low coefficient of expansion alloy for high-Strength cryogenic applications: Part I. Physical metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morra, M. M.; Ballinger, R. G.; Hwang, I. S.

    1992-12-01

    INCOLOY 908 is a low coefficient of thermal expansion (COE) iron-nickel base superalloy that was developed jointly by The Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the International Nickel Company for cryogenic service. The alloy is stable against phase transformation during prolonged thermal treatments and has a COE compatible with that of Nb3Sn. These properties make the material ideal for use as a structural component in superconducting magnets using Nb3Sn. The evolution of microstructure has been studied as a function of time at temperature over the temperature range of 650 °C to 900 °C for times between 50 and 200 hours. A detailed analysis of precipitated phases has been conducted using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and analytical scanning and scanning transmission electron mi- croscopy (STEM) techniques. The primary strengthening phase has been found to be γ ', Ni3(Al, Ti). INCOLOY 908 is stable against overaging, which is defined as the transformation of γ' to η, Ni3Ti, for times to 100 hours at temperatures up to 750 °C. Upon overaging, the strengthening phase transforms to η. A new phase, H x , has been identified and characterized.

  9. Friction consolidation of oxide dispersion strengthened INCOLOY RTM alloy MA956 powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalini, David

    INCOLOYRTM MA956 is a ferritic ODS alloy. It has very good oxidation resistance by virtue of its large chromium and aluminum concentrations and high mechanical strength and creep resistance at elevated temperatures thanks to oxide dispersion strengthening. The conventional processing route utilized to obtain this alloy involves two main multistep stages. The first (or front end) stage of the process consists of a dry, high-energy milling process which mixes very fine Y2O3 particles with elemental alloy powders by Mechanical Alloying (MA) in an attritor. The second (or back end) stage of the process consists of consolidating the mechanically alloyed powder by hot extrusion in vacuum-sealed cans at about 1000°C, or by degassing followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The precipitation of a fine dispersion of yttrium-aluminum-rich oxides (Y-Al-O) during the consolidation is at the origin of the high temperature mechanical strength of this alloy. Three different thermodynamically stable oxides are known to exist for the binary Y2O3:Al 2O3 system: Y4Al2O9, YAlO 3 and Y3Al5O12. All three of them have been observed in this type of alloys when processed by the route described above. Their size ranges from just a few up to hundreds of nm. In this work, the applicability of Friction Consolidation to this ODS alloy was investigated in order to tackle the downsides of the conventional processing route (multisteps and extremely high raw material final cost). For this study, mechanically alloyed INCOLOYRTM MA956 powder was consolidated through Friction Consolidation under three different sets of processing conditions. As a result, three small compacts of low porosity have been achieved with a refined equiaxed ferritic grain structure smaller than 10 microns and the desired oxide dispersion. Two types of mixed Y-Al oxides were observed by different complementary techniques, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD

  10. Influence of gaseous hydrogen on the mechanical properties of incoloy 903. [gas-metal interactions/iron alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Solid specimens of the alloy Inconel 903 (iron based alloy) were exposed to four gaseous environments and high temperatures. Air, pure helium, pure hydrogen, and hydrogen and water vapor combined were the gaseous environments employed, and the temperature was 1400 F. Various mechanical property tests (low cycle fatigue, creep-rupture, tensile properties) were performed on the alloy. Results indicate that the hydrogen and water vapor environment cause a sharp reduction in the mechanical properties of the alloy. Photographs of the test equipment used and the microstructure of the tested alloy are included.

  11. Engineering properties of Incoloy-903 and CTX-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, P. E.

    1980-01-01

    Engineering properties of Incoloy-903 sheet and CTX-1 (high strength austentic Fe-Ni-Co alloy) bar are characterized in report. Report includes tables and plots of test data and photographs of microstructure of samples used. Two appendixes include specimen configuration and data collected from industrial survey.

  12. Tritium Permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617

    SciTech Connect

    Philip Winston; Pattrick Calderoni; Paul Humrickhouse

    2011-09-01

    Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor and its high-temperature components requires information regarding the permeation of fission generated tritium and hydrogen product through candidate heat exchanger alloys. Release of fission-generated tritium to the environment and the potential contamination of the helium coolant by permeation of product hydrogen into the coolant system represent safety basis and product contamination issues. Of the three potential candidates for high-temperature components of the NGNP reactor design, only permeability for Incoloy 800H has been well documented. Hydrogen permeability data have been published for Inconel 617, but only in two literature reports and for partial pressures of hydrogen greater than one atmosphere, far higher than anticipated in the NGNP reactor. To support engineering design of the NGNP reactor components, the tritium permeability of Inconel 617 and Incoloy 800H was determined using a measurement system designed and fabricated at Idaho National Laboratory. The tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617, was measured in the temperature range 650 to 950 C and at primary concentrations of 1.5 to 6 parts per million volume tritium in helium. (partial pressures of 10-6 atm) - three orders of magnitude lower partial pressures than used in the hydrogen permeation testing. The measured tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617 deviated substantially from the values measured for hydrogen. This may be due to instrument offset, system absorption, presence of competing quantities of hydrogen, surface oxides, or other phenomena. Due to the challenge of determining the chemical composition of a mixture with such a low hydrogen isotope concentration, no categorical explanation of this offset has been developed.

  13. Tritium Permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617

    SciTech Connect

    Philip Winston; Pattrick Calderoni; Paul Humrickhouse

    2012-07-01

    Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor and its high-temperature components requires information regarding the permeation of fission generated tritium and hydrogen product through candidate heat exchanger alloys. Release of fission-generated tritium to the environment and the potential contamination of the helium coolant by permeation of product hydrogen into the coolant system represent safety basis and product contamination issues. Of the three potential candidates for high-temperature components of the NGNP reactor design, only permeability for Incoloy 800H has been well documented. Hydrogen permeability data have been published for Inconel 617, but only in two literature reports and for partial pressures of hydrogen greater than one atmosphere, far higher than anticipated in the NGNP reactor. To support engineering design of the NGNP reactor components, the tritium permeability of Inconel 617 and Incoloy 800H was determined using a measurement system designed and fabricated at Idaho National Laboratory. The tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617, was measured in the temperature range 650 to 950°C and at primary concentrations of 1.5 to 6 parts per million volume tritium in helium. (partial pressures of 10-6 atm)—three orders of magnitude lower partial pressures than used in the hydrogen permeation testing. The measured tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617 deviated substantially from the values measured for hydrogen. This may be due to instrument offset, system absorption, presence of competing quantities of hydrogen, surface oxides, or other phenomena. Due to the challenge of determining the chemical composition of a mixture with such a low hydrogen isotope concentration, no categorical explanation of this offset has been developed.

  14. A Study on Fretting Fatigue Life in Elevated Temperature for Incoloy 800

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jae Do; Woo, Seung Wan; Chung, Il Sup; Yoon, Dong Hwan; Park, Dae Kyu

    Incoloy 800, which is used within steam generator tubes, is a heat resistant material since it is an iron-nickel-chromium alloy. However, construction of a systematic database is needed to receive integrity data defecting insurance of specific data about room and elevated temperature fretting fatigue behavior for Incoloy 800. Accordingly, this study investigates the specific change in fatigue limitations under the condition of the fretting fatigue as compared to that under the condition of the plain fatigue by performing plain and fretting fatigue tests on Incoloy 800 at 320°C, real operating temperature and at room-temperature, respectively. The change in the frictional force is measured during the fretting fatigue testing against the repeated cycle, and the mechanism of fretting fatigue is investigated through the observation of the fatigue-fracture surface.

  15. Incoloy 908 database report: On process -- structure -- property relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Toma, L.S.; Hwang, I.S.; Steeves, M.M.

    1993-05-01

    Incoloy 908 is a nickel-iron base superalloy with a coefficient of expansion (COE) and mechanical properties that have been optimized for use in Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting magnets. It has been proposed for use as a conduit material for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) magnets. The relationship between manufacturing processes, microstructures and mechanical properties of Incoloy 908 are characterized in support of the magnet fabrication and quality control. This report presents microhardness, microstructure, and yield and ultimate tensile strengths as functions of thermomechanical process variables including heat treatment, annealing and cold work for laboratory prepared Incoloy 908 specimens. Empirical correlations have been developed for the microhardness at room temperature and tensile strength at room temperature and at 4K. These results may be used for manufacturing quality control or for design.

  16. Microstructural characterization and thermal fatigue study of a coated Incoloy 909 Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachander, Mettupalayam

    This research focuses on studying the microstructure of alloy 909, its susceptibility to oxidation at elevated temperatures (˜700°C) and substrate coatings compatibility with high velocity oxy fuel (HVOF) sprayed oxidation resistance coatings. The characterization work involved in studying the microstructure of Incoloy 909 at three heat treated conditions namely solution treated condition (ST), commercially recommended solution heat treated and aged condition (STA), and solution treated and over aged condition (STOA) using optical microscopy, analytical scanning electron microscopy, and analytical transmission electron microscopy. The oxidation susceptibility were investigated at elevated temperatures of bare and coated alloy 909 substrates by subjecting test materials to isothermal and thermal cycle testing. The microstructure of alloy 909 in the ST condition showed only the presence of blocky Laves phase. The Laves phase in this alloy is a well known for its grain pinning effect that prevents excessive grain growth. In the STA condition, the microstructure revealed the presence of fine gamma prime, intergranular and intragranular Laves phase and occasionally gamma prime precipitates orienting in a platelet form ready to transition into the epsilon phase. In the STOA condition, the microstructure consisted of Laves phase in inter and intragranular locations, and a copious amount of Widmanstatten type epsilon phase. Incoloy 909 was observed to form oxide scales in both isothermal and cyclic thermal exposures, the oxide scale consisted of distinct outer and inner scales in the micrographs. The comparison base alloy (alloyl 718) used in this study surprisingly did not show any visible presence of oxide scale after 1000 hour exposure at ˜700°C. Three coatings (CoNiCrAlY, 718 , and NiAl) were sprayed on alloy 909 and alloy 718 test coupons using the HVOF process to investigate the compatibility of the coatings with the substrate. The test results points out that

  17. The crystallography of fatigue crack initiation in Incoloy-908 and A-286 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Krenn, C.R. |

    1996-12-01

    Fatigue crack initiation in the austenitic Fe-Ni superalloys Incoloy-908 and A-286 is examined using local crystallographic orientation measurements. Results are consistent with sharp transgranular initiation and propagation occurring almost exclusively on {l_brace}111{r_brace} planes in Incoloy-908 but on a variety of low index planes in A-286. This difference is attributed to the influence of the semicoherent grain boundary {eta} phase in A-286. Initiation in each alloy occurred both intergranularly and transgranularly and was often associated with blocky surface oxide and carbide inclusions. Taylor factor and resolved shear stress and strain crack initiation hypotheses were tested, but despite an inconclusive suggestion of a minimum required {l_brace}111{r_brace} shear stress, none of the hypotheses were found to convincingly describe preferred initiation sites, even within the subsets of transgranular cracks apparently free from the influence of surface inclusions. Subsurface inclusions are thought to play a significant role in crack initiation. These materials have applications for use in structural conduit for high field superconducting magnets designed for fusion energy use.

  18. Rupture Strength of Several Nickel-base Alloys in Sheet Form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dance, James H; Clauss, Francis J

    1957-01-01

    The 100-hour rupture strengths of Inconel X, Inconel 700, Incoloy 901, Refractaloy 26, and R-235 at 1200 and 1350 F. in both the annealed and heat-treated conditions were determined. Inconel 700 had the highest rupture strength at both temperatures; Incoloy 901 was second strongest at 1200 F, and R-235 second strongest at 1350 F. With the exception of Incoloy 901, ductility was low. Photomicrographs show that fractures are through the grain boundaries. Results are compared with published data for other sheet alloys and bar stock.

  19. Effects of PbO on the oxide films of incoloy 800HT in simulated primary circuit of PWR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yu; Yang, Junhan; Wang, Wanwan; Shi, Rongxue; Liang, Kexin; Zhang, Shenghan

    2016-05-01

    Effects of trace PbO on oxide films of Incoloy 800HT were investigated in simulated primary circuit water chemistry of PWR, also with proper Co addition. The trace PbO addition in high temperature water blocked the protective spinel oxides formation of the oxide films of Incoloy 800HT. XPS results indicated that the lead, added as PbO into the high temperature water, shows not only +2 valance but also +4 and 0 valances in the oxide film of 800HT co-operated with Fe, Cr and Ni to form oxides films. Potentiodynamic polarization results indicated that as PbO concentration increased, the current densities of the less protective oxide films of Incoloy 800HT decreased in a buffer solution tested at room temperature. The capacitance results indicated that the donor densities of oxidation film of Incoloy 800HT decreased as trace PbO addition into the high temperature water.

  20. Microstructural characterization of dissimilar welds between Incoloy 800H and 321 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Sayiram, G. Arivazhagan, N.

    2015-04-15

    In this work, the microstructural character of dissimilar welds between Incoloy 800H and 321 Stainless Steel has been discussed. The microscopic examination of the base metals, fusion zones and interfaces was characterized using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy. The results revealed precipitates of Ti (C, N) in the austenitic matrix along the grain boundaries of the base metals. Migration of grain boundaries in the Inconel 82 weld metal was very extensive when compared to Inconel 617 weldment. Epitaxial growth was observed in the 617 weldment which increases the strength and ductility of the weld metal. Unmixed zone near the fusion line between 321 Stainless Steel and Inconel 82 weld metal was identified. From the results, it has been concluded that Inconel 617 filler metal is a preferable choice for the joint between Incoloy 800H and 321 Stainless Steel. - Highlights: • Failure mechanisms produced by dissimilar welding of Incoloy 800H to AISI 321SS • Influence of filler wire on microstructure properties • Contemplative comparisons of metallurgical aspects of these weldments • Microstructure and chemical studies including metallography, SEM–EDS • EDS-line scan study at interface.

  1. Fatigue crack growth behavior of a solid solution-strengthened nickel-base superalloy (Incoloy 825)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartosiewicz, L.; Krause, A. R.; Spis, A.; Raghavan, J.; Putatunda, S. K.

    1992-02-01

    Fatigue crack growth behavior of a solid solution-strengthened nickel-base superalloy (Incoloy 825)* was investigated. The investigation also examined the influence of heat treatment on resultant microstructures and the near-threshold fatigue crack growth behavior. In addition, the influence of load ratios (R), material strength, and grain size on fatigue threshold was studied. Compact tension specimens prepared from Incoloy 825 with transverse-longitudinal (TL) orientation in the as-received, as well as two different heat treated conditions, were used. The heat treatment studies revealed a peak hardness condition after solution treatment at 1200 °C for 1/2 hr, followed by aging at 600 °C for 434 hr. Among all the heat treated conditions, the fatigue threshold was the highest and the near-threshold crack growth rate was lowest in this peak aged condition. Fatigue threshold values were observed to decrease with an increase in load ratio, whereas an increased grain diameter resulted in a higher fatigue threshold. An earlier mathematical model was found applicable to characterize the relationship between load ratio and fatigue threshold. Preferential etching of grain boundary suggests formation of a thin film of carbide precipitation along the grain boundary region in the aged specimens. This carbide precipitation facilitated intergranular crack growth in these samples, resulting in higher roughness-induced crack closure. The highest fatigue threshold in the peak aged condition can be attributed to this large roughness-induced crack closure process.

  2. Numerical Simulation and Experimental Investigation of Residual Stresses in the Circumferential Butt GTAW of Incoloy 800H Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purmohamad, H.; Kermanpur, A.; Shamanian, M.

    2010-02-01

    The residual stresses developed during the circumferential butt gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process of Incoloy 800H pipes were simulated using the finite element method. A decoupled thermostructural model was developed in three dimensions. The element birth and death technique was used for the addition of filler material in the weld pool. The Goldak double ellipsoidal model was used to simulate the distribution of arc heat during welding. The plastic behavior of the material was described by Von Mises yield function and the bilinear kinematics hardening was assumed. To validate the thermostructural model, both temperature and residual stress distributions within the pipes were measured using thermocouples and strain gages, respectively. Good agreements were found between the experimental and simulation results. The model was then used to predict distribution of residual stresses during the GTAW of Incoloy 800H pipes and to study effects of process parameters on the residual stresses.

  3. Interdiffusional effects between tungsten fibers and an iron-nickel-base alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caulfield, T.; Bellows, R. S.; Tien, J. K.

    1985-01-01

    Tungsten fibers in the INCOLOY 903 alloy were annealed for over 100 hours at 1038 C and 1200 C. It was found that interdiffusion results in the formation of a reaction zone. SEM-EDS probe analysis showed that the chemistries across this zone were constant, suggesting the zone was a compound phase. The composition of the compound was estimated to be that of a mu-type phase. The local chemistry (in atomic percent) at the reaction zone/alloy matrix interface was found to be approximately 8 pct W, 1.2 pct Nb, 40 pct Fe, 14 pct Co, and 36 pct Ni. In addition, recrystallization was observed in both the remaining tungsten fiber and the nearby INCOLOY 903 matrix after annealing at 1200 C, but not at 1038 C. The results of this study suggest that reaction zone growth kinetics can be minimized by the reduction of Co and Fe and the increase of W in the matrix alloy.

  4. The effect of weldability of alloy JBK-75 with various filler metal wire additions

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.L.

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the compositional factors that affect the weldability of alloy JBK-75. This study was accomplished by using a variety of different commercial filler materials to systematically evaluate the weldability in the compositional range surrounding alloy JBK-75. The experimental design included varestraint testing, scanning electron microscopy, and phase diagram analysis. The varestraint testing demonstrated that the weldability of alloy JBK-75 could be improved with the use of other commercially available filler metals. The best improvement to weldability of alloy JBK-75 was with type 308L stainless steel and Hastelloy W filler metals. Adequate improvement to the weldability of alloy JBK-75 was obtained when utilizing types 309L and 310 stainless steel filler metals. Alloy 320LR, alloy 650 (NiCrFe-1), Incoloy 901, and Inconel 92 (NiCrFe-6) filler metals only marginally improved the weldability of alloy JBK-75. 59 refs., 27 figs., 24 tabs.

  5. High-temperature corrosion of metallic alloys in an oxidizing atmosphere containing NaCl

    SciTech Connect

    Federer, J.I.

    1989-02-01

    A particular heat-exchanger application involved metallic alloys exposed to flue gases of an aluminum remelt furnace. Because the flue gases might contain NaCl and other halides, the corrosion behavior of the alloys was to be investigated. Planned direct exposure of candidate alloys to the flue gases, however, was not conducted because of premature termination of the project. Complementary laboratory testing was conducted on seven commercially available alloys and two nickel aluminides. These materials were exposed to an oxidizing atmosphere containing 0.06 wt % NaCl for 1100 h at 1000/degree/C. Most of the alloy exhibited grain-boundary attack, which resulted in complete oxidation of enveloped grains. The alloys Incoloy MA-956, Incoloy 800, Inconel 625, Inconel 601, Hastelloy X, Haynes 188, and nickel aluminide IC-50 were substantially more corroded than Alloy 214 and nickel aluminide IC-221. The latter two alloys, therefore, would probably be superior to the others in application involving flue gases containing NaCl. Strength fabricability, and weldability, which are briefly discussed, would also affect selection of materials. 8 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Creep crack growth behavior of several structural alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadananda, K.; Shahinian, P.

    1983-07-01

    Creep crack growth behavior of several high temperature alloys, Inconel 600, Inconel 625, Inconel X-750, Hastelloy X, Nimonic PE-16, Incoloy 800, and Haynes 25 (HS-25) was examined at 540, 650, 760, and 870 °C. Crack growth rates were analyzed in terms of both linear elastic stress intensity factor and J*-integral parameter. Among the alloys Inconel 600 and Hastelloy X did not show any observable crack growth. Instead, they deformed at a rapid rate resulting in severe blunting of the crack tip. The other alloys, Inconel 625, Inconel X-750, Incoloy 800, HS-25, and PE-16 showed crack growth at one or two temperatures and deformed continuously at other temperatures. Crack growth rates of the above alloys in terms ofJ* parameter were compared with the growth rates of other alloys published in the literature. Alloys such as Inconel X-750, Alloy 718, and IN-100 show very high growth rates as a result of their sensitivity to an air environment. Based on detailed fracture surface analysis, it is proposed that creep crack growth occurs by the nucleation and growth of wedge-type cracks at triple point junctions due to grain boundary sliding or by the formation and growth of cavities at the boundaries. Crack growth in the above alloys occurs only in some critical range of strain rates or temperatures. Since the service conditions for these alloys usually fall within this critical range, knowledge and understanding of creep crack growth behavior of the structural alloys are important.

  7. High cycle fatigue behavior of Incoloy 800H in a simulated high-temperature gas-cooled reactor helium environment

    SciTech Connect

    Soo, P.; Sabatini, R.L.; Epel, L.G.; Hare, J.R. Sr.

    1980-01-01

    The current study was an attempt to evaluate the high cycle fatigue strength of Incoloy 800H in a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor helium environment containing significant quantities of moisture. As-heat-treated and thermally-aged materials were tested to determine the effects of long term corrosion in the helium test gas. Results from in-helium tests were compared to those from a standard air environment. It was found that the mechanisms of fatigue failure were very complex and involved recovery/recrystallization of the surface ground layer on the specimens, sensitization, hardness changes, oxide scale integrity, and oxidation at the tips of propagation cracks. For certain situations a corrosion-fatigue process seems to be controlling. However, for the helium environment studied, there was usually no aging or test condition for which air gave a higher fatigue strength.

  8. Incology alloy 908 data handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Toma, L.S.; Steeves, M.M.; Reed, R.P.

    1994-03-01

    This handbook is a compilation of all available properties of Incoloy alloy 908 as of March, 1994. Data included in this paper cover mechanical, elastic, thermal and magnetic characteristics. The mechanical properties include tensile, fracture toughness, fatigue, and stress-rupture for both the base metal and related weld filler metals. Elastic properties listed are Young`s, shear and bulk moduli and Poisson`s ratio. Thermal expansion, thermal conductivity and specific heat and magnetization are also reported. Data presented are summarized in the main body and presented in detail in the supplements. Areas of ongoing research are briefly described, and topics for future research are suggested. The data have been compiled to assist in the design of large-scale superconducting magnets for fusion reactors.

  9. Reduction of tritium permeation through Inconel 718 and Incoloy 800 HT by means of natural oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, A.; Utili, M.; Ciampichetti, A.

    2011-10-01

    Chronical releases of tritium from the helium primary coolant into the water secondary coolant is a fundamental safety issue in the design of a fusion reactor steam generator. It is well known that the steam/water circuit of a fusion reactor would be considered not relevant from a radiological point of view, while if a strong permeation of tritium will be present it will be released together with incondensable gases in the condenser. The permeation of hydrogen isotopes through candidate steam generator materials in different conditions was studied in the past. Further experiments demonstrated that nickel alloys of nuclear interest are always covered by a thin and adherent oxide layer able to reduce permeation of orders of magnitude. The major objective of this work is the evaluation of the permeated flux through nickel alloys, when exposed to pure hydrogen and to an oxidant gas stream, to verify the real permeability of these materials in conditions close to those foreseen in the helium side of the steam generator.

  10. Changes in acoustic emission peaks in precipitation strengthened alloys with heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Heiple, C.R.; Carpenter, S.H.

    1983-01-01

    Acoustic emission was measured during tensile deformation in a number of precipitation-strengthened alloys as a function of prior heat treatment. The alloys tested included 7075, 6061, and 2219 aluminum; a modified A-286 stainless steel (JBK-75) and an experimental beryllium-containing stainless steel; and Incoloy 903. A rms voltage peak was observed in all the alloys near the onset of plastic flow, and a second peak was usually observed in 7075, 2219, and Incoloy 903 at plastic strains greater than 1%. Some evidence of a second peak was also observed in 6061 aluminum. Changes with heat treatment in the stress and strain at which the second peak occurred were consistent with the peak arising from the fracture of inclusions. The shifts in the location of the peak were in a direction so as to make the stress on the inclusions at the second peak relatively insensitive to prior heat treatment. The amplitude distributions of acoustic emission signals were also consistent with this interpretation. The strain at which the first acoustic emission peak occurred also varied with heat treatment, but the dependence of peak location on prior aging was different for the various alloys.

  11. The potential for SAGBO cracking in a Nb{sub 3}Sn wind-and-react solenoid using a CICC with Incoloy 908 jacket and glass fabric insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bonito-Oliva, A.; Kenney, S.; Schneider-Muntau, H.J.; Summers, L.

    1996-07-01

    The 45-T Hybrid Magnet System being constructed for the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) in collaboration with the Francis Bitter National Laboratory is composed of a resistive insert and superconducting outsert. Two of the outsert solenoids use Nb{sub 3}Sn and will be wound with cable-in-conduit conductors (CICCs) using the wind-and-react technique. A candidate for the jacket material is Incoloy 908, but an obstacle to this choice is its sensitivity to Stress Accelerated Grain Boundary Oxidation (SAGBO). The conditions for SAGBO--residual stress, elevated temperature, and exposure to oxygen (even in extremely low levels)--are difficult to avoid in coils fabricated by the wind-and-react process. The glass fabric insulation, applied during winding, is at high temperature, both a source of oxygen (primarily in the form of absorbed water vapor) and, being highly compacted by the winding, an impediment to its removal. In attempt to solve this problem NHMFL has developed a pre-baking procedure in vacuum at 730 C, to be applied to the glass fabric before to insulate the coil. In order to test the efficiency of pre-baking and to check the existence of possible other features that also lead to SAGBO, a dummy coil, wound with a CIC conductor jacketed with Incoloy 908, has been manufactured. The coil has been heat treated in very high purity helium atmosphere. The results are reported.

  12. Evaluation of candidate Stirling engine heater tube alloys for 1000 hours at 760 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misencik, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Six tubing alloys were endurance tested in a diesel fired, Stirling engine simulator materials test rig for 1000 hours of 760 C while pressurized at 17 to 21 MPa with either hydrogen or helium. The alloys tested were N 155, A 286, Incoloy 800, 19 9DL, Nitronic 40 and 316 stainless steel. The alloys were in the form of thin wall tubing. Hydrogen permeated rapidly through the tube walls of all six alloys when they were heated to 760 C. Helium was readily contained. Creep rupture failures occurred in four of the six alloys pressurized with hydrogen. Only two alloys survived the 1000 hour endurance test with no failures. Simultaneous exposure to either hydrogen or helium and the combustion environment did not seriously degrade the tensile strength of the six alloys in room temperature or 760 C tests after exposure. Decreases in room temperature ductility were observed and are attributed to aging rather than to hydrogen embrittlement in three of the alloys. However, there may be a hydrogen embrittlement effect in the N 155, 19 9DL, and Nitronic 40 alloys.

  13. Pitting, galvanic, and long-term corrosion studies on candidate container alloys for the Tuff Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Thompson, N.G.; Durr, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    Contest Columbus Technologies, Inc. (CC Technologies) investigated the long-term performance of container materials for high-level radioactive waste packages as part of the information needed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to assess the Department of Energy`s application to construct a geologic repository for the high-level radioactive waste. The scope of work focused on the Tuff Repository and employed short-term techniques, such as electrochemical and mechanical techniques to examine a wide range of possible failure modes. Two classes of alloys were evaluated for use as container materials for the Tuff Repository; Fe-Cr-Ni alloys and copper-base alloys. The candidate Fe-Cr-Ni alloys were Type 304L Stainless Steel (Alloy 304L) and Incoloy Alloy 825 (Alloy 825). The candidate copper-base alloys were CDA 102 Copper (Alloy CDA 102) and CDA 715 Copper-3D Nickel (Alloy CDA 715). The corrosion testing was performed in a simulated J-13 well water and in solutions selected from an experimental matrix from Task 2 of the program. This report summarizes the results of Task 4 (Pitting Studies), Task 6 (Other Failure Modes) and Task 7 (Long-Term Exposures) of the program. Pit-initiation studies, performed in Task 4, focused on anomalous Cyclic Potentiodynamic Polarization (CPP) behavior of the copper-base alloys reported in Task 2 of the program. Pit propagation studies were performed on Alloy CDA 102 in Task A of the program. Two types of galvanic corrosion studies were performed in Task 6 of the program; thermogalvanic couples and borehole linear-container interactions. In the thermogalvanic couples tests, the effect of temperature variation on the surface of the container on acceleration of corrosion was evaluated for two alloys; Alloy CDA 102 and Alloy 304L. Long-term immersion tests were conducted in Task 7 of the program.

  14. Pitting, galvanic, and long-term corrosion studies on candidate container alloys for the Tuff Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Thompson, N.G.; Durr, C.L. )

    1992-01-01

    Contest Columbus Technologies, Inc. (CC Technologies) investigated the long-term performance of container materials for high-level radioactive waste packages as part of the information needed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to assess the Department of Energy's application to construct a geologic repository for the high-level radioactive waste. The scope of work focused on the Tuff Repository and employed short-term techniques, such as electrochemical and mechanical techniques to examine a wide range of possible failure modes. Two classes of alloys were evaluated for use as container materials for the Tuff Repository; Fe-Cr-Ni alloys and copper-base alloys. The candidate Fe-Cr-Ni alloys were Type 304L Stainless Steel (Alloy 304L) and Incoloy Alloy 825 (Alloy 825). The candidate copper-base alloys were CDA 102 Copper (Alloy CDA 102) and CDA 715 Copper-3D Nickel (Alloy CDA 715). The corrosion testing was performed in a simulated J-13 well water and in solutions selected from an experimental matrix from Task 2 of the program. This report summarizes the results of Task 4 (Pitting Studies), Task 6 (Other Failure Modes) and Task 7 (Long-Term Exposures) of the program. Pit-initiation studies, performed in Task 4, focused on anomalous Cyclic Potentiodynamic Polarization (CPP) behavior of the copper-base alloys reported in Task 2 of the program. Pit propagation studies were performed on Alloy CDA 102 in Task A of the program. Two types of galvanic corrosion studies were performed in Task 6 of the program; thermogalvanic couples and borehole linear-container interactions. In the thermogalvanic couples tests, the effect of temperature variation on the surface of the container on acceleration of corrosion was evaluated for two alloys; Alloy CDA 102 and Alloy 304L. Long-term immersion tests were conducted in Task 7 of the program.

  15. Mechanical properties of several nickel alloys in hydrogen at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, J. R.; Harris, J. A., Jr.; Vanwanderham, M. C.

    1977-01-01

    Tests were performed to determine low cycle fatigue and crack growth rate properties of one iron-base and two forms of one cast nickel-base alloy. The alloys were tested in various forms and/or heat-treat conditions that are proposed for use in a high-pressure hydrogen or a hydrogen-water vapor environment. Some general conclusions can be made comparing the results of tests in a hydrogen environment with those in a hydrogen-water vapor environment. The hydrogen-water vapor environment caused a 50 percent average reduction in fatigue life, indicating extreme degradation when compared with tests conducted in air, for Incoloy 903 at 1033 K (1400 F). Crack growth rates increased significantly for all materials with increasing test temperature. A very significant increase (three orders of magnitude) in crack growth rate occurred for Incoloy 903 tested in the hydrogen-water vapor environment when compared with testing done in hydrogen along at 922 K (1200 F).

  16. Swelling in commercial Fe-Cr-Ni based alloys under electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, L. E.; Gelles, D. S.

    1982-08-01

    Electron irradiation in a 1 MeV electron microscope has been used to study the void swelling response of several commercial austenitic stainless steels and iron-nickel based superalloys. Use of the 1 MeV microscope permits direct, continuous observation of the void development during elevated-temperature irradiations at displacement rates about 10 000 times greater then those in a fast breeder reactor. The alloys examined in this work included AISI 310, RA 330, A286, M813, Nimonic PE16, Inconel 706, Inconel 718 and Incoloy 901. Both helium preinjected specimens and uninjected specimens were studied. In all of the above alloys, swelling proceeds by formation of irradiation-induced dislocations and voids, followed by growth of the voids. The swelling rates and peak swelling temperatures vary considerably with alloy composition, heat treatment and helium preinjection. Comparisons of these results with recently reported swelling data from the same alloys after high fluence neutron irradiation in the EBR-II reactor shows good qualitative agreement in most cases. Helium preinjection of the electron irradiated specimens generally produced a poorer simulation than no helium preinjection. In one or two cases where the electron and neutron irradiation results strongly disagree, the differences appear to result from differences in irradiation-induced precipitation. Although the correlations between neutron and electron irradiation results are inadequate to obtain reliable engineering data by simulation, in-reactor swelling behavior is in general qualitatively well-represented by swelling response in the 1 MeV electron microscope. Nimonic is the registered trademark of Henry Wiggin and Company, UK. Inconel and Incoloy are registered trademarks of the International Nickel Company, Inc.

  17. Erosion-Corrosion of Iron and Nickel Alloys at Elevated Temperature in a Combustion Gas Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Tylczak, Joseph

    2014-05-02

    This paper reports on the results of a study that compares the erosion-corrosion behavior of a variety of alloys (Fe- 2¼Cr 1Mo, 304 SS, 310 SS, Incoloy 800, Haynes 230 and a Fe3Al) in a combustion environment. Advanced coal combustion environments, with higher temperatures, are driving re-examination of traditional and examination of new alloys in these hostile environments. In order to simulate conditions in advanced coal combustion boilers, a special erosion apparatus was used to allow for impingement of particles under a low abrasive flux in a gaseous environment comprised of 20 % CO2, 0.05 % HCl, 77 % N2, 3 % O2, and 0.1 % SO2. Tests were conducted at room temperature and 700 °C with ~ 270 μm silica, using an impact velocity of 20 m/s in both air and the simulated combustion gas environment. The erosion-corrosion behavior was characterized by gravimetric measurements and by examination of the degraded surfaces optically and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). At room temperature most of the alloys had similar loss rates. Not surprisingly, at 700 °C the lower chrome-iron alloy had a very high loss rate. The nickel alloys tended to have higher loss rates than the high chrome austenitic alloys.

  18. Mechanically Alloyed-Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels for Use in Space Nuclear Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel

    2004-02-01

    The mechanical and thermo-physical properties of Mechanically Alloyed (MA)-Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels are reviewed and their potential for use in space nuclear reactor power systems is examined. The three MA-ODS alloys examined are Inconel MA-ODS754 (77.55Ni, 20Cr, 1Fe, 0.5Ti, 0.3Al, 0.05C, and 0.6Y2O3), Incoloy MA-ODS956 (74.45Fe, 20Cr, 4.5Al, 0.5Ti, 0.05C, 0.5Y2O3), and Incoloy MA-ODS957 (84.55Fe, 14Cr, 0.3Mo, 0.9Ti, 0.25Y2O3). The major advantages of these alloys are: (a) their strength at high temperatures (>1000 K) is relatively higher and decreases slower with temperature than niobium (Nb) and molybdenum (Mo) refractory alloys; (b) they are relatively lightweight and less expensive; (c) they have been shown to experience low swelling and embrittlement with exposure to high-energy neutrons (> 0.1 MeV) up to a fluence of 1023 n/cm2; and (d) their high resistance to oxidation and nitration at high temperatures, which simplifies handling and assembly. These MS-ODS alloys are also lighter and much stronger than 316-stainless steel and super-alloys such as Inconel 601, Haynes 25, and Hastalloy-X at moderately high temperatures (688-1000 K). The little data available on the compatibility of the MA-ODS alloys with alkali liquid metals up to 1100 K are encouraging, however, additional tests at typical operation temperatures (1000-1400 K) in liquid metal cooled and alkali metal heat pipe-cooled space nuclear reactors are needed. The anisotropy of the MA-ODS alloys when cold worked, and in particularly when rolled into tubes, should not hinder their use in space nuclear power systems, in which the operation pressure is either near atmospheric or as high as 2 MPa.

  19. Mechanically Alloyed-Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels for Use in Space Nuclear Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel

    2004-02-04

    The mechanical and thermo-physical properties of Mechanically Alloyed (MA)-Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels are reviewed and their potential for use in space nuclear reactor power systems is examined. The three MA-ODS alloys examined are Inconel MA-ODS754 (77.55Ni, 20Cr, 1Fe, 0.5Ti, 0.3Al, 0.05C, and 0.6Y2O3), Incoloy MA-ODS956 (74.45Fe, 20Cr, 4.5Al, 0.5Ti, 0.05C, 0.5Y2O3), and Incoloy MA-ODS957 (84.55Fe, 14Cr, 0.3Mo, 0.9Ti, 0.25Y2O3). The major advantages of these alloys are: (a) their strength at high temperatures (>1000 K) is relatively higher and decreases slower with temperature than niobium (Nb) and molybdenum (Mo) refractory alloys; (b) they are relatively lightweight and less expensive; (c) they have been shown to experience low swelling and embrittlement with exposure to high-energy neutrons (> 0.1 MeV) up to a fluence of 1023 n/cm2; and (d) their high resistance to oxidation and nitration at high temperatures, which simplifies handling and assembly. These MS-ODS alloys are also lighter and much stronger than 316-stainless steel and super-alloys such as Inconel 601, Haynes 25, and Hastalloy-X at moderately high temperatures (688-1000 K). The little data available on the compatibility of the MA-ODS alloys with alkali liquid metals up to 1100 K are encouraging, however, additional tests at typical operation temperatures (1000-1400 K) in liquid metal cooled and alkali metal heat pipe-cooled space nuclear reactors are needed. The anisotropy of the MA-ODS alloys when cold worked, and in particularly when rolled into tubes, should not hinder their use in space nuclear power systems, in which the operation pressure is either near atmospheric or as high as 2 MPa.

  20. Evaluation of candidate stirling engine heater tube alloys at 820 deg and 860 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misencik, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Seven commercial alloys were evaluated in Stirling simulator materials rigs. Five iron base alloys (N-155, A-286, Incoloy 800, 19-9DL, and 316 stainless steel), one nickel base alloy (Inconel 718), and one cobalt base alloy (HS-188) were tested in the form of thin wall tubing in a diesel fuel fired test rig. Tubes filled with hydrogen or helium at gas pressure of 21.6 MPa and temperatures of 820 and 860 C were endurance tested for 1000 and 535 hours, respectively. Results showed that under these conditions hydrogen permeated rapidly through the tube walls, thus requiring refilling during each five hour cycle. Helium was readily contained, exhibiting no measurable loss by permeation. Helium filled tubes tested at 860 C all exhibited creep-rupture failures within the 535 hour endurance test. Subsequent tensile test evaluation after removal from the rig indicated reduced room temperature ductility for some hydrogen-filled tubes compared to helium-filled tubes, suggesting possible hydrogen embrittlement in these alloys.

  1. Materials for Advanced Turbine Engines (MATE): Project 3: Design, fabrication and evaluation of an oxide dispersion strengthened sheet alloy combustor liner, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henricks, R. J.; Sheffler, K. D.

    1984-01-01

    The suitability of wrought oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) superalloy sheet for gas turbine engine combustor applications was evaluated. Incoloy MA 956 (FeCrAl base) and Haynes Developmental Alloy (HDA) 8077 (NiCrAl base) were evaluated. Preliminary tests showed both alloys to be potentially viable combustor materials, with neither alloy exhibiting a significant advantage over the other. Both alloys demonstrated a +167C (300 F) advantage of creep and oxidation resistance with no improvement in thermal fatigue capability compared to a current generation combustor alloy (Hastelloy X). MA956 alloy was selected for further demonstration because it exhibited better manufacturing reproducibility than HDA8077. Additional property tests were conducted on MA956. To accommodate the limited thermal fatigue capability of ODS alloys, two segmented, mechanically attached, low strain ODS combustor design concepts having predicted fatigue lives or = 10,000 engine cycles were identified. One of these was a relatively conventional louvered geometry, while the other involved a transpiration cooled configuration. A series of 10,000 cycle combustor rig tests on subscale MA956 and Hastelloy X combustor components showed no cracking, thereby confirming the beneficial effect of the segmented design on thermal fatigue capability. These tests also confirmed the superior oxidation and thermal distortion resistance of the ODS alloy. A hybrid PW2037 inner burner liner containing MA956 and Hastelloy X components was designed and constructed.

  2. Alloy materials

    DOEpatents

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo; Thompson, Elliott D.; Fritzemeier, Leslie G.; Cameron, Robert D.; Siegal, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  3. Progress toward determining the potential of ODS alloys for gas turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Hoppin, G., III; Sheffler, K.

    1983-01-01

    The Materials for Advanced Turbine Engine (MATE) Program managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center is supporting two projects to evaluate the potential of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys for aircraft gas turbine applications. One project involves the evaluation of Incoloy (TM) MA-956 for application as a combustor liner material. An assessment of advanced engine potential will be conducted by means of a test in a P&WA 2037 turbofan engine. The other project involves the evaluation of Inconel (TM) MA 6000 for application as a high pressure turbine blade material and includes a test in a Garrett TFE 731 turbofan engine. Both projects are progressing toward these engine tests in 1984.

  4. Etchant for incoloy-903 welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstmeyer, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Special reagent consists of 1 part 90% lactic acid, 1 part 70% nitric acid, and 4 part, 37% hydrochloric acid. Solution etches parent and weld metals at same rate, without overetching. Underlying grain structure of both metals is revealed.

  5. Corrosion of high Ni-Cr alloys and Type 304L stainless steel in HNO/sub 3/-HF

    SciTech Connect

    Ondrejcin, R.S.; McLaughlin, B.D.

    1980-04-01

    Nineteen alloys were evaluated as possible materials of construction for steam heating coils, the dissolver vessel, and the off-gas system of proposed facilities to process thorium and uranium fuels. Commercially available alloys were found that are satisfactory for all applications. With thorium fuel, which requires HNO/sub 3/-HF for dissolution, the best alloy for service at 130/sup 0/C when complexing agents for fluoride are used is Inconel 690; with no complexing agents at 130/sup 0/C, Inconel 671 is best. At 95/sup 0/C, six other alloys tested would be adequate: Haynes 25, Ferralium, Inconel 625, Type 304L stainless steel, Incoloy 825, and Haynes 20 (in order of decreasing preference); based on composition, six untested alloys would also be adequate. The ions most effective in reducing fluoride corrosion were the complexing agents Zr/sup 4 +/ and Th/sup 4 +/; Al/sup 3 +/ was less effective. With uranium fuel, modestly priced Type 304L stainless steel is adequate. Corrosion will be most severe in HNO/sub 3/-HF used occasionally for flushing and in solutions of HNO/sub 3/ and corrosion products (ferric and dichromate ions). HF corrosion can be minimized by complexing the fluoride ion and by passivation of the steel with strong nitric acid. Corrosion caused by corrosion products can be minimized by operating at lower temperatures.

  6. Evaluation of a diffusion/trapping model for hydrogen ingress in high-strength alloys. Final technical report, November 1988-November 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Pound, B.G.

    1990-11-14

    The objective of this research was to obtain the hydrogen ingress and trapping characteristics for a range of microstructures and so identify the dominant type of irreversible trap in different alloys. A diffusion/trapping model was used in conjunction with a potentiostatic pulse technique to study the ingress of hydrogen in three precipitation-hardened alloys (Inconel 718, Incoloy 925, and 18Ni maraging steel), two work-hardened alloys (Inconel 625 and Hastelloy C-276), titanium (pure and grade 2), and copper-enriched AISI 4340 steel in 1 mol/L acetic acid-1 mol/L sodium acetate containing 15 ppm arsenic oxide. In all cases except pure titanium, the data were shown to fit the interface-control form of the model and values were determined for the irreversible trapping constants (k) and the flux of hydrogen into the alloys. The density of irreversible trap defects were calculated from k and generally found to be in close agreement with the concentration of a specific heterogeneity in each alloy. Moreover, the trapping constants for the alloys were found to be consistent with their relative susceptibilities to hydrogen embrittlement.

  7. BRAZING ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, R.G.; Gilliland, R.G.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1963-02-26

    A brazing alloy which, in the molten state, is characterized by excellent wettability and flowability, said alloy being capable of forming a corrosion resistant brazed joint wherein at least one component of said joint is graphite and the other component is a corrosion resistant refractory metal, said alloy consisting essentially of 20 to 50 per cent by weight of gold, 20 to 50 per cent by weight of nickel, and 15 to 45 per cent by weight of molybdenum. (AEC)

  8. VANADIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Smith, K.F.; Van Thyne, R.J.

    1959-05-12

    This patent deals with vanadium based ternary alloys useful as fuel element jackets. According to the invention the ternary vanadium alloys, prepared in an arc furnace, contain from 2.5 to 15% by weight titanium and from 0.5 to 10% by weight niobium. Characteristics of these alloys are good thermal conductivity, low neutron capture cross section, good corrosion resistance, good welding and fabricating properties, low expansion coefficient, and high strength.

  9. Protective coatings for alloys in contact with molten drawsalt (NaNO/sub 3/-KNO/sub 3/)

    SciTech Connect

    Carling, R.W.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Mar, R.W.

    1982-09-01

    Molten drawsalt (NaNO/sub 3/-KNO/sub 3/) is being considered as the energy transfer and storage medium for many solar central receiver applications. In an effort to reduce the cost of the containment material while maintaining corrosion resistance, alloys with aluminide coatings have been examined while in contact with molten drawsalt for more than 6000 hours at 600/sup 0/C. The alloys examined were 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo, 5 Cr-1/2 Mo, and 9 Cr-1 Mo low-alloy steels, and 316 stainless steel. The results show a steady, albeit slow, net weight loss over the course of the experiment. The weight loss has been attributed to spalling of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ from the surface (the occurrence of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ is a result of the aluminizing process) and dissolution of corrosion products NaAlO/sub 2/ and/or NaFeO/sub 2/ during post-immersion handling. Scanning electron micrographs of exposed surfaces revealed little or no corrosion of the base metal. It has been concluded that aluminide coated alloys could provide significant cost savings (approx. 50%) relative to Incoloy 800, and provide at least equivalent corrosion resistance.

  10. Characterization of Alloys with Potential for Application in Cable-in-Conduit Conductors for High-Field Superconducting Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, R.P.; Miller, J.R.; Toplosky, V.J.

    2004-06-28

    Since the introduction of the cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) concept, a variety of alloys have been proposed for fabricating the jacket. The jacket provides primary containment of the supercritical helium coolant and is typically also the primary structural component for the magnet. These functions create requirements for strength, toughness, weldability, and fabricability in tubular form. When the CICC uses Nb3Sn, there are additional requirements to accommodate the manufacturing and heat-treatment processes for the superconductor as well as its strain-sensitive performance during operation. Both of the present favorite jacket alloys, Incoloy 908 and modified (ultra-low carbon) 316LN, have both demonstrated acceptable functionality as well as a few undesirable features. In this paper, we present data from cryogenic mechanical tests on a group of heat-resistant, high-strength superalloys that appear to offer equal or better mechanical performance (e.g. strength, toughness, and modulus) while mitigating the undesirable aspects (e.g. SAGBO in the case of I908 and thermal-expansion mismatch with Nb3Sn in the case of 316LN). Data are presented for each alloy in the as-received and aged conditions. These alloys are presently being considered as candidates for use in the next-generation hybrid magnet for the NHMFL but may also be of interest to the fusion and energy storage communities.

  11. Characterization of Alloys with Potential for Application in Cable-in-Conduit Conductors for High-Field Superconducting Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, R. P.; Miller, J. R.; Toplosky, V. J.

    2004-06-01

    Since the introduction of the cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) concept, a variety of alloys have been proposed for fabricating the jacket. The jacket provides primary containment of the supercritical helium coolant and is typically also the primary structural component for the magnet. These functions create requirements for strength, toughness, weldability, and fabricability in tubular form. When the CICC uses Nb3Sn, there are additional requirements to accommodate the manufacturing and heat-treatment processes for the superconductor as well as its strain-sensitive performance during operation. Both of the present favorite jacket alloys, Incoloy 908 and modified (ultra-low carbon) 316LN, have both demonstrated acceptable functionality as well as a few undesirable features. In this paper, we present data from cryogenic mechanical tests on a group of heat-resistant, high-strength superalloys that appear to offer equal or better mechanical performance (e.g. strength, toughness, and modulus) while mitigating the undesirable aspects (e.g. SAGBO in the case of I908 and thermal-expansion mismatch with Nb3Sn in the case of 316LN). Data are presented for each alloy in the as-received and aged conditions. These alloys are presently being considered as candidates for use in the next-generation hybrid magnet for the NHMFL but may also be of interest to the fusion and energy storage communities.

  12. ZIRCONIUM ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Wilhelm, H.A.; Ames, D.P.

    1959-02-01

    A binary zirconiuin--antimony alloy is presented which is corrosion resistant and hard containing from 0.07% to 1.6% by weight of Sb. The alloys have good corrosion resistance and are useful in building equipment for the chemical industry.

  13. URANIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Seybolt, A.U.

    1958-04-15

    Uranium alloys containing from 0.1 to 10% by weight, but preferably at least 5%, of either zirconium, niobium, or molybdenum exhibit highly desirable nuclear and structural properties which may be improved by heating the alloy to about 900 d C for an extended period of time and then rapidly quenching it.

  14. MATE (Materials for Advanced Turbine Engines) Program, Project 3. Volume 2: Design, fabrication and evaluation of an oxide dispersion strengthened sheet alloy combustor liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, S.; Sheffler, K. D.

    1988-01-01

    The suitability of wrought oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) superalloy sheet for gas turbine engine combustor applications was evaluated. Two yttria (Y2O3) dispersion strengthened alloys were evaluated; Incoloy MA956 and Haynes Development Alloy (HDA) 8077 (NiCrAl base). Preliminary tests showed both alloys to be potentially viable combustor materials, with neither alloy exhibiting a significant advantage over the other. MA956 was selected as the final alloy based on manufacturing reproducibility for evaluation as a burner liner. A hybrid PW2037 inner burner liner containing MA956 and Hastelloy X components and using a louvered configuration was designed and constructed. The louvered configuration was chosen because of field experience and compatibility with the bill of material PW2037 design. The simulated flight cycle for the ground based engine tests consisted of 4.5 min idle, 1.5 min takeoff and intermediate conditions in a PW2037 engine with average uncorrected combustor exit temperature of 1527 C. Post test evaluation consisting of visual observations and fluorescent penetrant inspections was conducted after 500 cycles of testing. No loss of integrity in the burner liner was shown.

  15. Aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, Linda B. (Inventor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to aluminum alloys, particularly to aluminum-copper-lithium alloys containing at least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium as an essential component, which are suitable for applications in aircraft and aerospace vehicles. At least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium is added as an essential component to an alloy which precipitates a T1 phase (Al2CuLi). This addition enhances the nucleation of the precipitate T1 phase, producing a microstructure which provides excellent strength as indicated by Rockwell hardness values and confirmed by standard tensile tests.

  16. PLUTONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Chynoweth, W.

    1959-06-16

    The preparation of low-melting-point plutonium alloys is described. In a MgO crucible Pu is placed on top of the lighter alloying metal (Fe, Co, or Ni) and the temperature raised to 1000 or 1200 deg C. Upon cooling, the alloy slug is broke out of the crucible. With 14 at. % Ni the m.p. is 465 deg C; with 9.5 at. % Fe the m.p. is 410 deg C; and with 12.0 at. % Co the m.p. is 405 deg C. (T.R.H.) l6262 l6263 ((((((((Abstract unscannable))))))))

  17. COATED ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Harman, C.G.; O'Bannon, L.S.

    1958-07-15

    A coating is described for iron group metals and alloys, that is particularly suitable for use with nickel containing alloys. The coating is glassy in nature and consists of a mixture containing an alkali metal oxide, strontium oxide, and silicon oxide. When the glass coated nickel base metal is"fired'' at less than the melting point of the coating, it appears the nlckel diffuses into the vitreous coating, thus providing a closely adherent and protective cladding.

  18. BRAZING ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, R.G.; Gilliland, R.G.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1962-02-20

    A brazing alloy is described which, in the molten state, is characterized by excellent wettability and flowability and is capable of forming a corrosion-resistant brazed joint. At least one component of said joint is graphite and the other component is a corrosion-resistant refractory metal. The brazing alloy consists essentially of 40 to 90 wt % of gold, 5 to 35 wt% of nickel, and 1 to 45 wt% of tantalum. (AEC)

  19. Microstructural characterization of dissimilar welds between alloy 800 and HP heat-resistant steel

    SciTech Connect

    Dehmolaei, R.; Shamanian, M. Kermanpur, A.

    2008-10-15

    In this study, dissimilar welds between HP heat-resistant steel and Incoloy 800 were made with four different filler materials including: 309 stainless steel and nickel-based Inconel 82, 182 and 617. The microstructure of the base metals, weld metals and their interfaces were characterized by utilizing optical and scanning electron microscopy. Grain boundaries migration in the weld metals was studied. It was found that the migration of grain boundaries in the Inconel 82 weld metal was very extensive. Precipitates of TiC and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} (M = Cr and Mo) in the Inconel 617 weld metal are identified. The necessary conditions for the formation of cracks close to the fusion line of the 309-HP joints are described. Furthermore unmixed zone near the fusion line between HP steel base metal and Inconel 82 weld metal is discussed. An epitaxial growth is characterized at the fusion line of the 309-Alloy 800 and Inconel 617-Alloy 800 joints.

  20. Corrosion studies on Mo- and Cr-bearing alloys for flue gas desulfurization systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maiya, P.S.

    1983-01-01

    Critical components of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, especially those in downstream locations (e.g., stack linings, ducts, bypass-duct junctions, and reheaters), are subjected to environments in which the pH can vary from as low as 0.5 to about 4.0. Hence, proper selection of materials of construction through an appropriate research and development plan can be expected to have great economic impact on current FGD technology. Also to facilitate a mechanistic understanding of the corrosion process in FGD environments, a quantitative description of the effects of pertinent variables such as pH, alloy composition, and chloride ion concentration on corrosion rates is required. In the present study, the corrosion rates of several alloys of interest to FGD systems (viz., 316L, 317LX, 317LM, 904L, A1-4X, A1-6X, Hastelloys G and C-276, Incoloy 825, Inconel 625, and 29-4-2) have been evaluated in sulfuric acid containing 0.03-5.0 wt% Cl/sup -/ at different pH levels (0.5-3.0) and at a temperature of 85/sup 0/C.

  1. Attack of high-strength, oxidation-resistant alloys during in-can melting of simulated waste glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, W.N.

    1980-01-01

    The restistance of candidate canister alloys to penetration under the most severe conditions expected during in-can melting was directly proportional to the chromium content of the alloy, and inversely proportional to the Na/sub 2/O content of the glass melt. Specimens were exposed for 24 hours, which is the time required for in-can melting full-size waste-glass forms based on tests carried out at Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) and at SRL. The penetration resistance to Frit 211 at 1150/sup 0/C for 24 hours of most alloys tested was satisfactory. The amount of penetration would not affect the integrity of the waste form. Inconel 625, Hastelloy X, and Inconel 601 were penetrated < 20 mils. This was considered excellent. Incoloy 801, Type 310 stainless steel, Type 304L stainless steel, Inconel 600, and Type 347 stainless steel were penetrated < 40 mils. This was considered good. Hastelloy C-4 was penetrated > 100 mils by a glass composed of 65 wt % Frit 21 and 35 wt % composite sludge (with uranium) at 1150/sup 0/C for only 7 hours. This amount of penetration of an in-can melting canister would not be satisfactory. 12 figures.

  2. Elevated temperature aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meschter, Peter (Inventor); Lederich, Richard J. (Inventor); O'Neal, James E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Three aluminum-lithium alloys are provided for high performance aircraft structures and engines. All three alloys contain 3 wt % copper, 2 wt % lithium, 1 wt % magnesium, and 0.2 wt % zirconium. Alloy 1 has no further alloying elements. Alloy 2 has the addition of 1 wt % iron and 1 wt % nickel. Alloy 3 has the addition of 1.6 wt % chromium to the shared alloy composition of the three alloys. The balance of the three alloys, except for incidentql impurities, is aluminum. These alloys have low densities and improved strengths at temperatures up to 260.degree. C. for long periods of time.

  3. Evaluation of dopants in hydrogen to reduce hydrogen permeation in candidate Stirling engine heater head tube alloys at 760 deg and 820 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misencik, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Alloy tubes filled with hydrogen doped with various amounts of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, ethane, ethylene, methane, ammonia, or water were heated in a diesel fuel-fired Stirling engine simulator materials test rig for 100 hours at 21 MPa and 760 or 820 C to determine the effectiveness of the dopants in reducing hydrogen permeation through the hot tube walls. Ultra high purity (UHP) hydrogen was used for comparison. The tube alloys were N-155, A-286, Incoloy 800, Nitronic 40, 19-9DL, 316 stainless steel, Inconel 718, and HS-188. Carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide in the concentration range 0.2 to 5 vol % were most effective in reducing hydrogen permeation through the hot tube walls for all alloys. Ethane, ethylene, methane, ammonia, and water at the concentrations investigated were not effective in reducing the permeation below that achieved with UHP hydrogen. One series of tests were conducted with UHP hydrogen in carburized tubes. Carburization of the tubes prior to exposure reduced permeation to values similar to those for carbon monoxide; however, carbon dioxide was the most effective dopant.

  4. Alloy softening in binary molybdenum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of alloy additions of Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt on the hardness of Mo. Special emphasis was placed on alloy softening in these binary Mo alloys. Results showed that alloy softening was produced by those elements having an excess of s+d electrons compared to Mo, while those elements having an equal number or fewer s+d electrons than Mo failed to produce alloy softening. Alloy softening and hardening can be correlated with the difference in number of s+d electrons of the solute element and Mo.

  5. Metal alloy identifier

    DOEpatents

    Riley, William D.; Brown, Jr., Robert D.

    1987-01-01

    To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

  6. Turbine Blade Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    The High Speed Research Airfoil Alloy Program developed a fourth-generation alloy with up to an +85 F increase in creep rupture capability over current production airfoil alloys. Since improved strength is typically obtained when the limits of microstructural stability are exceeded slightly, it is not surprising that this alloy has a tendency to exhibit microstructural instabilities after high temperature exposures. This presentation will discuss recent results obtained on coated fourth-generation alloys for subsonic turbine blade applications under the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program. Progress made in reducing microstructural instabilities in these alloys will be presented. In addition, plans will be presented for advanced alloy development and for computational modeling, which will aid future alloy development efforts.

  7. SUPERCONDUCTING VANADIUM BASE ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Cleary, H.J.

    1958-10-21

    A new vanadium-base alloy which possesses remarkable superconducting properties is presented. The alloy consists of approximately one atomic percent of palladium, the balance being vanadium. The alloy is stated to be useful in a cryotron in digital computer circuits.

  8. Separation in Binary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Facemire, B. R.; Kaukler, W. F.; Witherow, W. K.; Fanning, U.

    1986-01-01

    Studies of monotectic alloys and alloy analogs reviewed. Report surveys research on liquid/liquid and solid/liquid separation in binary monotectic alloys. Emphasizes separation processes in low gravity, such as in outer space or in free fall in drop towers. Advances in methods of controlling separation in experiments highlighted.

  9. DELTA PHASE PLUTONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Cramer, E.M.; Ellinger, F.H.; Land. C.C.

    1960-03-22

    Delta-phase plutonium alloys were developed suitable for use as reactor fuels. The alloys consist of from 1 to 4 at.% zinc and the balance plutonium. The alloys have good neutronic, corrosion, and fabrication characteristics snd possess good dimensional characteristics throughout an operating temperature range from 300 to 490 deg C.

  10. PLUTONIUM-THORIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schonfeld, F.W.

    1959-09-15

    New plutonium-base binary alloys useful as liquid reactor fuel are described. The alloys consist of 50 to 98 at.% thorium with the remainder plutonium. The stated advantages of these alloys over unalloyed plutonium for reactor fuel use are easy fabrication, phase stability, and the accompanying advantuge of providing a means for converting Th/sup 232/ into U/sup 233/.

  11. High strength alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  12. High strength alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  13. Spark alloying of an AL9 alloy by hard alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuptsov, S. G.; Fominykh, M. V.; Mukhinov, D. V.; Magomedova, R. S.; Nikonenko, E. A.

    2015-08-01

    The phase compositions of spark coatings of Kh12M steel with a VT1-0 (titanium) alloy and T15K6 and T30K4 hard alloys are studied. It is shown that the TiC titanium carbide forms in all cases and tungsten carbide decomposes with the formation of tungsten in a coating. These processes are intensified by increasing time, capacitance, and frequency. The surface hardness, the sample weight, and the white layer thickness increase monotonically.

  14. Creep Resistant Zinc Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Frank E. Goodwin

    2002-12-31

    This report covers the development of Hot Chamber Die Castable Zinc Alloys with High Creep Strengths. This project commenced in 2000, with the primary objective of developing a hot chamber zinc die-casting alloy, capable of satisfactory service at 140 C. The core objectives of the development program were to: (1) fill in missing alloy data areas and develop a more complete empirical model of the influence of alloy composition on creep strength and other selected properties, and (2) based on the results from this model, examine promising alloy composition areas, for further development and for meeting the property combination targets, with the view to designing an optimized alloy composition. The target properties identified by ILZRO for an improved creep resistant zinc die-casting alloy were identified as follows: (1) temperature capability of 1470 C; (2) creep stress of 31 MPa (4500 psi); (3) exposure time of 1000 hours; and (4) maximum creep elongation under these conditions of 1%. The project was broadly divided into three tasks: (1) Task 1--General and Modeling, covering Experimental design of a first batch of alloys, alloy preparation and characterization. (2) Task 2--Refinement and Optimization, covering Experimental design of a second batch of alloys. (3) Task 3--Creep Testing and Technology transfer, covering the finalization of testing and the transfer of technology to the Zinc industry should have at least one improved alloy result from this work.

  15. Weldability of High Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maroef, I

    2003-01-22

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of silicon and iron on the weldability of HAYNES HR-160{reg_sign} alloy. HR-I60 alloy is a solid solution strengthened Ni-Co-Cr-Si alloy. The alloy is designed to resist corrosion in sulfidizing and other aggressive high temperature environments. Silicon is added ({approx}2.75%) to promote the formation of a protective oxide scale in environments with low oxygen activity. HR-160 alloy has found applications in waste incinerators, calciners, pulp and paper recovery boilers, coal gasification systems, and fluidized bed combustion systems. HR-160 alloy has been successfully used in a wide range of welded applications. However, the alloy can be susceptible to solidification cracking under conditions of severe restraint. A previous study by DuPont, et al. [1] showed that silicon promoted solidification cracking in the commercial alloy. In earlier work conducted at Haynes, and also from published work by DuPont et al., it was recognized that silicon segregates to the terminal liquid, creating low melting point liquid films on solidification grain boundaries. Solidification cracking has been encountered when using the alloy as a weld overlay on steel, and when joining HR-160 plate in a thickness greater than19 millimeters (0.75 inches) with matching filler metal. The effect of silicon on the weldability of HR-160 alloy has been well documented, but the effect of iron is not well understood. Prior experience at Haynes has indicated that iron may be detrimental to the solidification cracking resistance of the alloy. Iron does not segregate to the terminal solidification product in nickel-base alloys, as does silicon [2], but iron may have an indirect or interactive influence on weldability. A set of alloys covering a range of silicon and iron contents was prepared and characterized to better understand the welding metallurgy of HR-160 alloy.

  16. Catalyst Alloys Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xincai

    2014-10-01

    Catalysts are one of the key materials used for diamond formation at high pressures. Several such catalyst products have been developed and applied in China and around the world. The catalyst alloy most widely used in China is Ni70Mn25Co5 developed at Changsha Research Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. In this article, detailed techniques for manufacturing such a typical catalyst alloy will be reviewed. The characteristics of the alloy will be described. Detailed processing of the alloy will be presented, including remelting and casting, hot rolling, annealing, surface treatment, cold rolling, blanking, finishing, packaging, and waste treatment. An example use of the catalyst alloy will also be given. Industrial experience shows that for the catalyst alloy products, a vacuum induction remelt furnace can be used for remelting, a metal mold can be used for casting, hot and cold rolling can be used for forming, and acid pickling can be used for metal surface cleaning.

  17. Amorphous metal alloy

    DOEpatents

    Wang, R.; Merz, M.D.

    1980-04-09

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  18. PLUTONIUM-ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schonfeld, F.W.; Waber, J.T.

    1960-08-30

    A series of nuclear reactor fuel alloys consisting of from about 5 to about 50 at.% zirconium (or higher zirconium alloys such as Zircaloy), balance plutonium, and having the structural composition of a plutonium are described. Zirconium is a satisfactory diluent because it alloys readily with plutonium and has desirable nuclear properties. Additional advantages are corrosion resistance, excellent fabrication propenties, an isotropie structure, and initial softness.

  19. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  20. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  1. Rechargeable sodium alloy anode

    SciTech Connect

    Jow, T.R.

    1988-06-28

    A secondary battery is described comprising: (a) an anode which comprises an alloy of sodium and one or metals selected from the group consisting of tin, lead antimony, bismuth, selenium and tellerium, (b) an electrolyte comprising one or more organic solvents and one or more sodium salts dissolved therein forming dissolved sodium cations in solution; and (c) a cathode; the sodium cations from the electrolyte alloying with the one or more metals of the alloy in the anode during the charging of the battery and sodium in the alloy disoloving in the electrolyte during the discharging of the battery.

  2. NICKEL-BASE ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Inouye, H.; Manly, W.D.; Roche, T.K.

    1960-01-19

    A nickel-base alloy was developed which is particularly useful for the containment of molten fluoride salts in reactors. The alloy is resistant to both salt corrosion and oxidation and may be used at temperatures as high as 1800 deg F. Basically, the alloy consists of 15 to 22 wt.% molybdenum, a small amount of carbon, and 6 to 8 wt.% chromium, the balance being nickel. Up to 4 wt.% of tungsten, tantalum, vanadium, or niobium may be added to strengthen the alloy.

  3. Copper-tantalum alloy

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1986-07-15

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  4. Cesium iodide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Kim, H.E.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1992-12-15

    A transparent, strong CsI alloy is described having additions of monovalent iodides. Although the preferred iodide is AgI, RbI and CuI additions also contribute to an improved polycrystalline CsI alloy with outstanding multispectral infrared transmittance properties. 6 figs.

  5. Surface composition of alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachtler, W. M. H.

    1984-11-01

    In equilibrium, the composition of the surface of an alloy will, in general, differ from that of the bulk. The broken-bond model is applicable to alloys with atoms of virtually equal size. If the heat of alloy formation is zero, the component of lower heat of atomization is found enriched in the surface. If both partners have equal heats of sublimination, the surface of a diluted alloy is enriched with the minority component. Size effects can enhance or weaken the electronic effects. In general, lattice strain can be relaxed by precipitating atoms of deviating size on the surface. Two-phase alloys are described by the "cherry model", i.e. one alloy phase, the "kernel" is surrounded by another alloy, the "flesh", and the surface of the outer phase, the "skin" displays a deviating surface composition as in monophasic alloys. In the presence of molecules capable of forming chemical bonds with individual metal atoms, "chemisorption induced surface segregation" can be observed at low temperatures, i.e. the surface becomes enriched with the metal forming the stronger chemisorption bonds.

  6. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, D.S.; Scott, D.H.

    1984-09-28

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cells are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  7. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David S.; Scott, Darwin H.

    1985-01-01

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cs are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  8. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Shaber, Eric L.; DuPont, John N.; Robino, Charles V.; Williams, David B.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  9. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Conner, William V.

    1983-01-01

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as sources of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  10. PLUTONIUM-CERIUM ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-01-01

    An alloy is presented for use as a reactor fuel. The binary alloy consists essentially of from about 5 to 90 atomic per cent cerium and the balance being plutonium. A complete phase diagram for the cerium--plutonium system is given.

  11. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Conner, W.V.

    1981-10-09

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as souces of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  12. Ultrahigh temperature intermetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.P.; Zhu, J.H.; Liu, C.T.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Wright, J.L.; Carmichael, C.A.; Walker, L.R.

    1997-12-01

    A new family of Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys with fabricability, mechanical properties, and oxidation resistance superior to previously developed Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys has been identified. The new alloys can be arc-melted/cast without cracking, and exhibit excellent room temperature and high-temperature tensile strengths. Preliminary evaluation of oxidation behavior at 1100 C in air indicates that the new Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys form an adherent chromia-based scale. Under similar conditions, Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys suffer from extensive scale spallation.

  13. Alloys in energy development

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, B.R.T.

    1984-02-01

    The development of new and advanced energy systems often requires the tailoring of new alloys or alloy combinations to meet the novel and often stringent requirements of those systems. Longer life at higher temperatures and stresses in aggressive environments is the most common goal. Alloy theory helps in achieving this goal by suggesting uses of multiphase systems and intermediate phases, where solid solutions were traditionally used. However, the use of materials under non-equilibrium conditions is now quite common - as with rapidly solidified metals - and the application of alloy theory must be modified accordingly. Under certain conditions, as in a reactor core, the rate of approach to equilibrium will be modified; sometimes a quasi-equilibrium is established. Thus an alloy may exhibit enhanced general diffusion at the same time as precipitate particles are being dispersed and solute atoms are being carried to vacancy sinks. We are approaching an understanding of these processes and can begin to model these complex systems.

  14. THORIUM-SILICON-BERYLLIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Foote, F.G.

    1959-02-10

    Th, Si, anol Bt alloys where Be and Si are each present in anmounts between 0.1 and 3.5% by weight and the total weight per cent of the minor alloying elements is between 1.5 and 4.5% are discussed. These ternary alloys show increased hardness and greater resistant to aqueous corrosion than is found in pure Th, Th-Si alloys, or Th-Be alloys.

  15. Magnesium silicide intermetallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gh.; Gill, H. S.; Varin, R. A.

    1993-11-01

    Methods of induction melting an ultra-low-density magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) intermetallic and its alloys and the resulting microstructure and microhardness were studied. The highest quality ingots of Mg2Si alloys were obtained by triple melting in a graphite crucible coated with boron nitride to eliminate reactivity, under overpressure of high-purity argon (1.3 X 105 Pa), at a temperature close to but not exceeding 1105 °C ± 5 °C to avoid excessive evaporation of Mg. After establishing the proper induction-melting conditions, the Mg-Si binary alloys and several Mg2Si alloys macroalloyed with 1 at. pct of Al, Ni, Co, Cu, Ag, Zn, Mn, Cr, and Fe were induction melted and, after solidification, investigated by optical microscopy and quantitative X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Both the Mg-rich and Si-rich eutectic in the binary alloys exhibited a small but systematic increase in the Si content as the overall composition of the binary alloy moved closer toward the Mg2Si line compound. The Vickers microhardness (VHN) of the as-solidified Mg-rich and Si-rich eutectics in the Mg-Si binary alloys decreased with increasing Mg (decreasing Si) content in the eutectic. This behavior persisted even after annealing for 75 hours at 0.89 pct of the respective eutectic temperature. The Mg-rich eutectic in the Mg2Si + Al, Ni, Co, Cu, Ag, and Zn alloys contained sections exhibiting a different optical contrast and chemical composition than the rest of the eutectic. Some particles dispersed in the Mg2Si matrix were found in the Mg2Si + Cr, Mn, and Fe alloys. The EDS results are presented and discussed and compared with the VHN data.

  16. TUNGSTEN BASE ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schell, D.H.; Sheinberg, H.

    1959-12-15

    A high-density quaternary tungsten-base alloy having high mechanical strength and good machinability composed of about 2 wt.% Ni, 3 wt.% Cu, 5 wt.% Pb, and 90wt.% W is described. This alloy can be formed by the powder metallurgy technique of hot pressing in a graphite die without causing a reaction between charge and the die and without formation of a carbide case on the final compact, thereby enabling re-use of the graphite die. The alloy is formable at hot- pressing temperatures of from about 1200 to about 1350 deg C. In addition, there is little component shrinkage, thereby eliminating the necessity of subsequent extensive surface machining.

  17. Alloy Selection System

    SciTech Connect

    2001-02-01

    Software will Predict Corrosion Rates to Improve Productivity in the Chemical Industry. Many aspects of equipment design and operation are influenced by the choice of the alloys used to fabricate process equipment.

  18. Electroplating on titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Activation process forms adherent electrodeposits of copper, nickel, and chromium on titanium alloy. Good adhesion of electroplated deposits is obtained by using acetic-hydrofluoric acid anodic activation process.

  19. PLUTONIUM-URANIUM ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.; Schonfeld, F.W.

    1959-09-01

    Pu-U-Fe and Pu-U-Co alloys suitable for use as fuel elements tn fast breeder reactors are described. The advantages of these alloys are ease of fabrication without microcracks, good corrosion restatance, and good resistance to radiation damage. These advantages are secured by limitation of the zeta phase of plutonium in favor of a tetragonal crystal structure of the U/sub 6/Mn type.

  20. Correlation between diffusion barriers and alloying energy in binary alloys.

    PubMed

    Vej-Hansen, Ulrik Grønbjerg; Rossmeisl, Jan; Stephens, Ifan E L; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2016-01-28

    In this paper, we explore the notion that a negative alloying energy may act as a descriptor for long term stability of Pt-alloys as cathode catalysts in low temperature fuel cells. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that there is a correlation between the alloying energy of an alloy, and the diffusion barriers of the minority component. Alloys with a negative alloying energy may show improved long term stability, despite the fact that there is typically a greater thermodynamic driving force towards dissolution of the solute metal over alloying. In addition to Pt, we find that this trend also appears to hold for alloys based on Al and Pd. PMID:26750475

  1. Hot Microfissuring in Nickel Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. G.; Nunes, A.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments in intergranular cracking of nickel alloy near solidus temperature discussed in contractor report. Purpose of investigation development of schedule for welding, casting, forging, or other processing of alloy without causing microfissuring.

  2. PLUTONIUM-URANIUM-TITANIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-07-28

    A plutonium-uranium alloy suitable for use as the fuel element in a fast breeder reactor is described. The alloy contains from 15 to 60 at.% titanium with the remainder uranium and plutonium in a specific ratio, thereby limiting the undesirable zeta phase and rendering the alloy relatively resistant to corrosion and giving it the essential characteristic of good mechanical workability.

  3. Tantalum and tantalum alloy tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The specification includes ordering information, manufacture, chemical requirements, tension testing, flare test, ultrasonic test, hydrostatic test, pneumatic proof test, dimensions and tolerances, finish, packaging, marking, inspection, and certification. The specification covers tantalum and tantalum alloy tubing of the following types: Alloy 400 (unalloyed tantalum) and Alloy 401 (tantalum-10% tungsten). (JMT)

  4. De-alloyed platinum nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Strasser, Peter; Koh, Shirlaine; Mani, Prasanna; Ratndeep, Srivastava

    2011-08-09

    A method of producing de-alloyed nanoparticles. In an embodiment, the method comprises admixing metal precursors, freeze-drying, annealing, and de-alloying the nanoparticles in situ. Further, in an embodiment de-alloyed nanoparticle formed by the method, wherein the nanoparticle further comprises a core-shell arrangement. The nanoparticle is suitable for electrocatalytic processes and devices.

  5. Semiconductor alloys - Structural property engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.; Van Schilfgaarde, M.; Berding, M.; Chen, A.-B.

    1987-01-01

    Semiconductor alloys have been used for years to tune band gaps and average bond lengths to specific applications. Other selection criteria for alloy composition, and a growth technique designed to modify their structural properties, are presently considered. The alloys Zn(1-y)Cd(y)Te and CdSe(y)Te(1-y) are treated as examples.

  6. Noble alloys in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Gettleman, L

    1991-04-01

    Noble metals used for dental castings continue to consist of alloys of gold, palladium, and silver (not a noble metal), with smaller amounts of iridium, ruthenium, and platinum. The majority are used as a backing for ceramic baking, with the rest used as inlays, onlays, and unveneered crowns. Base metal alloys, principally made of nickel, chromium, and beryllium have gained widespread usage, especially in the United States, due to their lower cost and higher mechanical properties. The current literature, for the most part, cites the use of noble alloys as controls for trials of alternative materials. Direct gold (gold foil) still retains a following and a number of new patents were founded. PMID:1777669

  7. Boron addition to alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Coad, B. C.

    1985-08-20

    A process for addition of boron to an alloy which involves forming a melt of the alloy and a reactive metal, selected from the group consisting of aluminum, titanium, zirconium and mixtures thereof to the melt, maintaining the resulting reactive mixture in the molten state and reacting the boric oxide with the reactive metal to convert at least a portion of the boric oxide to boron which dissolves in the resulting melt, and to convert at least portion of the reactive metal to the reactive metal oxide, which oxide remains with the resulting melt, and pouring the resulting melt into a gas stream to form a first atomized powder which is subsequently remelted with further addition of boric oxide, re-atomized, and thus reprocessed to convert essentially all the reactive metal to metal oxide to produce a powdered alloy containing specified amounts of boron.

  8. Hydrogen in titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wille, G W; Davis, J W

    1981-04-01

    The titanium alloys that offer properties worthy of consideration for fusion reactors are Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-Si (Ti-6242S) and Ti-5Al-6Sn-2Zr-1Mo-Si (Ti-5621S). The Ti-6242S and Ti-5621S are being considered because of their high creep resistance at elevated temperatures of 500/sup 0/C. Also, irradiation tests on these alloys have shown irradiation creep properties comparable to 20% cold worked 316 stainless steel. These alloys would be susceptible to slow strain rate embrittlement if sufficient hydrogen concentrations are obtained. Concentrations greater than 250 to 500 wppm hydrogen and temperatures lower than 100 to 150/sup 0/C are approximate threshold conditions for detrimental effects on tensile properties. Indications are that at the elevated temperature - low hydrogen pressure conditions of the reactors, there would be negligible hydrogen embrittlement.

  9. A sourcebook of titanium alloy superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collings, E. W.

    1983-09-01

    The development, properties, and applications of Ti-based superconducting alloys are presented in a handbook based on an extensive review of published investigations. The literature is compiled and characterized in a table arranged by alloy, and individual chapters are devoted to unalloyed Ti; Ti-V binary alloys; binary Ti-Cr, Ti-Mn, Ti-Fe, Ti-Co, and Ti-Ni alloys; binary alloys of Ti with the 4d and 5d transition elements; ternary alloys of Ti with simple and transition metals; Ti-Nb binary alloys; Ti-Nb alloys with small amounts of B, C, N, or O; ternary alloys of Ti-Nb with simple metals; Soviet technical alloys; Ti-Zr-Nb alloys; other Ti-Nb-transition-metal alloys; Ti-Nb-based quaternary alloys; and amorphous Ti-alloy superconductors. Tables, graphs, diagrams, and micrographs are provided.

  10. Surface modification of high temperature iron alloys

    DOEpatents

    Park, Jong-Hee

    1995-01-01

    A method and article of manufacture of a coated iron based alloy. The method includes providing an iron based alloy substrate, depositing a silicon containing layer on the alloy surface while maintaining the alloy at a temperature of about 700.degree. C.-1200.degree. C. to diffuse silicon into the alloy surface and exposing the alloy surface to an ammonia atmosphere to form a silicon/oxygen/nitrogen containing protective layer on the iron based alloy.

  11. Surface modification of high temperature iron alloys

    DOEpatents

    Park, J.H.

    1995-06-06

    A method and article of manufacture of a coated iron based alloy are disclosed. The method includes providing an iron based alloy substrate, depositing a silicon containing layer on the alloy surface while maintaining the alloy at a temperature of about 700--1200 C to diffuse silicon into the alloy surface and exposing the alloy surface to an ammonia atmosphere to form a silicon/oxygen/nitrogen containing protective layer on the iron based alloy. 13 figs.

  12. Evaluation of candidate Stirling engine heater tube alloys after 3500 hours exposure to high pressure doped hydrogen or helium. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Misencik, J.A.; Titran, R.H.

    1984-10-01

    Sixteen commercial tubing alloys were endurance tested at 820/sup 0/ C, 15 MPa in a diesel-fuel fired Stirling engine simulator materials test rig: iron-base N-155, A-286, Incoloy 800, 19-9DL, CG-27, W-545, 12RN72, 253MA, Sanicro 31H and Sanicro 32; nickel-base Inconel 601, Inconel 625, Inconel 718, Inconel 750 and Pyromet 901; and cobalt-base HS-188. The iron-nickel alloys CG-27 and Pyromet 901 exhibited superior oxidation/corrosion resistance to the diesel-fuel combustion products and surpassed the design criterias' 3500 h creep-rupture endurance life. Three other alloys, Inconel 625, W-545, and 12RN72, had creep-rupture failures after 2856, 2777, and 1598 h, respectively. Hydrogen permeability coefficients determined after 250 h of rig exposure show that Pyromet 901 had the lowest Phi value, 0.064x10/sup -6/ cm/sup 2//s MPa/sup 1///sup 2/. The next five hairpin tubes, CG-27, Inconel 601, Inconel 718(wd), Inconel 750, and 12RN72(cw) all had Phi values below 0.2x10/sup -6/ more than a decade lower than the design criteria. Based upon its measured high strength and low hydrogen permeation, CG-27 was selected for 3500 h endurance testing at 21 MPa gas pressure and 820/sup 0/C. Results of the high pressure, 21 MPa, CG-27 endurance test demonstrated that the 1.0 vol % C0/sub 2/ dopant is an effective deterrent to hydrogen permeation. The 21 MPa hydrogen gas pressure apparent permeability coefficient at 820/sup 0/C approached 0.1x10/sup -6/ cm/sup 2/sec MPa/sup 1///sup 2/ after 500 hr, the same as the 15 MPa test. Even at this higher gas pressure and comparable permeation rate, CG-27 passed the 3500 hr endurance test without creep-rupture failures. It is concluded that the CG-27 alloy, in the form of thin wall tubing is suitable for Stirling engine applications at 820/sup 0/C and gas pressures up to 21 MPa.

  13. Alloyed coatings for dispersion strengthened alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wermuth, F. R.; Stetson, A. R.

    1971-01-01

    Processing techniques were developed for applying several diffusion barriers to TD-Ni and TD-NiCr. Barrier coated specimens of both substrates were clad with Ni-Cr-Al and Fe-Cr-Al alloys and diffusion annealed in argon. Measurement of the aluminum distribution after annealing showed that, of the readily applicable diffusion barriers, a slurry applied tungsten barrier most effectively inhibited the diffusion of aluminum from the Ni-Cr-Al clad into the TD-alloy substrates. No barrier effectively limited interdiffusion of the Fe-Cr-Al clad with the substrates. A duplex process was then developed for applying Ni-Cr-Al coating compositions to the tungsten barrier coated substrates. A Ni-(16 to 32)Cr-3Si modifier was applied by slurry spraying and firing in vacuum, and was then aluminized by a fusion slurry process. Cyclic oxidation tests at 2300 F resulted in early coating failure due to inadequate edge coverage and areas of coating porosity. EMP analysis showed that oxidation had consumed 70 to 80 percent of the aluminum in the coating in less than 50 hours.

  14. Fracture of iron aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Sikka, V.K.

    1992-08-01

    Five heats of iron aluminide alloys have been prepared, and their impact fracture properties compared to FA-129 iron aluminide. The first was a simple ternary alloy of iron, aluminum, and chromium to match the FA-129 composition. The second was similar but with additions of zirconium and carbon. The third alloy had zirconium, carbon, niobium and molybdenum. Two heats were produced produced with reduced aluminum contents so that a disordered body-centered cubic structure would be present. The impact properties, microstructures, and fractography of these alloys were compared to FA-129. The ductile-to-brittle transition temperatures of all of the Fe{sub 3}Al alloys were similar, but the simple ternary alloy had a much higher upper-shelf energy. The reduced aluminum alloys had lower transition temperatures. The microstructures were, in general, coarse and anisotropic. The fracture processes were dominated by second-phase particles.

  15. Fracture of iron aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Sikka, V.K.

    1992-01-01

    Five heats of iron aluminide alloys have been prepared, and their impact fracture properties compared to FA-129 iron aluminide. The first was a simple ternary alloy of iron, aluminum, and chromium to match the FA-129 composition. The second was similar but with additions of zirconium and carbon. The third alloy had zirconium, carbon, niobium and molybdenum. Two heats were produced produced with reduced aluminum contents so that a disordered body-centered cubic structure would be present. The impact properties, microstructures, and fractography of these alloys were compared to FA-129. The ductile-to-brittle transition temperatures of all of the Fe{sub 3}Al alloys were similar, but the simple ternary alloy had a much higher upper-shelf energy. The reduced aluminum alloys had lower transition temperatures. The microstructures were, in general, coarse and anisotropic. The fracture processes were dominated by second-phase particles.

  16. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Xianghong; Johnson, William L.

    1998-01-01

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf).sub.a (Al,Zn).sub.b (Ti,Nb).sub.c (Cu.sub.x Fe.sub.y (Ni,Co).sub.z).sub.d wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d.multidot.y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  17. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.

    1998-04-07

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3}K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf){sub a}(Al,Zn){sub b}(Ti,Nb){sub c}(Cu{sub x}Fe{sub y}(Ni,Co){sub z}){sub d} wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d{hor_ellipsis}y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  18. Annealing strained alloy 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, T. J.

    1976-01-01

    Report shows that grain coarsening in Alloy 718 can result in greatly reduced resistance to weld-heat-produced zone fissuring, especially when final grain size is ASTM 2. Tensile tests and metallographic examination of bend test specimens provide necessary data.

  19. Superplasticity in aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, T. G.

    1997-12-01

    We have characterized in the Al-Mg system the microstructure and mechanical properties of a cold-rolled Al-6Mg-0.3Sc alloy. The alloy exhibited superplasticity at relatively high strain rates (about 10-2 s-1). At a strain rate of 10-2 s-1 there exists a wide temperature range (475-520`C) within which the tensile elongation is over 1000%. There also exists a wide strain rate range (10-3 - 10-1 s-1) within which the tensile elongation is over 500%. The presence of Sc in the alloy results in a uniform distribution of fine coherent Al3SC precipitates which effectively pin grain and subgrain boundaries during static and continuous recrystallization. As a result, the alloy retains its fine grain size (about 7 micron), even after extensive superplastic deformation (>1000%). During deformation, dislocations Mg with a high Schmidt factor slip across subgrains but are trapped by subgrain boundaries, as a result of the strong pining of Al3Sc. This process leads to the conversion of low-angled subgrain boundaries to high-angled grain boundaries and the subsequent grain boundary sliding, which produces superelasticity. A model is proposed to describe grain boundary sliding accommodated by dislocation glide across grains with a uniform distribution of coherent precipitates. The model predictions is consistent with experimental observations.

  20. Eutectic-Alloy Morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirich, R. G.; Poit, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    Deviation in controlled-rod eutectic morphology anticipated for diffusion only crystal growth characterized at low solidification velocities. Naturally induced, gravity-related convective instabilities result in nonalined irregularly dispersed fibers or platelets. Lower solidification limit for controlled growth Bi/Mn alloys is 1 centimeter/ hour.

  1. Weldable ductile molybdenum alloy development

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B. V.; Ohriner, Evan Keith; Byun, Thak Sang; Schneibel, Joachim H; Miller, Michael K; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2008-01-01

    Molybdenum and its alloys are attractive structural materials for high-temperature applications. However, various practical issues have limited its use. One concern relates to the loss of ductility occurring in the heat-affected weld zone caused by segregation of oxygen to grain boundaries. In this study, a series of arc melted molybdenum alloys have been produced containing controlled additions of B, C, Zr, and Al. These alloys were characterized with respect to their tensile properties, smooth bend properties, and impact energy for both the base metal and welds. These alloys were compared with a very high purity low carbon arc cast molybdenum reference. For discussion purposes the alloys produced are separated into two categories: Mo Al B alloys, and Mo Zr B alloys. The properties of Mo Zr B alloy welds containing higher carbon levels exhibited slight improvement over unalloyed molybdenum, though the base-metal properties for all Mo Zr B alloys were somewhat inconsistent with properties better, or worse, than unalloyed molybdenum. A Mo Al B alloy exhibited the best DBTT values for welds, and the base metal properties were comparable to or slightly better than unalloyed molybdenum. The Mo Al B alloy contained a low volume fraction of second-phase particles, with segregation of boron and carbon to grain boundaries believed to displace oxygen resulting in improved weld properties. The volume fractions of second-phase particles are higher for the Mo Zr B alloys, and these alloys were prone to brittle fracture. It is also noted that these Mo Zr B alloys exhibited segregation of zirconium, boron and carbon to the grain boundaries.

  2. Advanced ordered intermetallic alloy deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Maziasz, P.J.; Easton, D.S.

    1997-04-01

    The need for high-strength, high-temperature, and light-weight materials for structural applications has generated a great deal of interest in ordered intermetallic alloys, particularly in {gamma}-based titanium aluminides {gamma}-based TiAl alloys offer an attractive mix of low density ({approximately}4g/cm{sup 3}), good creep resistance, and high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance. For rotating or high-speed components. TiAl also has a high damping coefficient which minimizes vibrations and noise. These alloys generally contain two phases. {alpha}{sub 2} (DO{sub 19} structure) and {gamma} (L 1{sub 0}), at temperatures below 1120{degrees}C, the euticoid temperature. The mechanical properties of TiAl-based alloys are sensitive to both alloy compositions and microstructure. Depending on heat-treatment and thermomechanical processing, microstructures with near equiaxed {gamma}, a duplex structure (a mix of the {gamma} and {alpha}{sub 2} phases) can be developed in TiAl alloys containing 45 to 50 at. % Al. The major concern for structural use of TiAl alloys is their low ductility and poor fracture resistance at ambient temperatures. The purpose of this project is to improve the fracture toughness of TiAl-based alloys by controlling alloy composition, microstructure and thermomechanical treatment. This work is expected to lead to the development of TiAl alloys with significantly improved fracture toughness and tensile ductility for structural use.

  3. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  4. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  5. Two phase titanium aluminide alloy

    DOEpatents

    Deevi, Seetharama C.; Liu, C. T.

    2001-01-01

    A two-phase titanic aluminide alloy having a lamellar microstructure with little intercolony structures. The alloy can include fine particles such as boride particles at colony boundaries and/or grain boundary equiaxed structures. The alloy can include alloying additions such as .ltoreq.10 at % W, Nb and/or Mo. The alloy can be free of Cr, V, Mn, Cu and/or Ni and can include, in atomic %, 45 to 55% Ti, 40 to 50% Al, 1 to 5% Nb, 0.3 to 2% W, up to 1% Mo and 0.1 to 0.3% B. In weight %, the alloy can include 57 to 60% Ti, 30 to 32% Al, 4 to 9% Nb, up to 2% Mo, 2 to 8% W and 0.02 to 0.08% B.

  6. Magnesium-lithium casting alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latenko, V. P.; Silchenko, T. V.; Tikhonov, V. A.; Maltsev, V. P.; Korablin, V. P.

    1974-01-01

    The strength properties of magnesium-lithium alloys at room, low, and high temperatures are investigated. It is found that the alloys may have practical application at ambient temperatures up to 100 C, that negative temperatures have a favorable influence on the alloy strength, and that cyclic temperature variations have practically no effect on the strength characteristics. The influence of chemical coatings on corrosion resistance of the MgLi alloys is examined. Several facilities based on pressure casting machines, low-pressure casting machines, and magnetodynamic pumps were designed for producing MgLi alloy castings. Results were obtained for MgLi alloys reinforced with fibers having a volumetric content of 15%.

  7. TERNARY ALLOY-CONTAINING PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Waber, J.T.

    1960-02-23

    Ternary alloys of uranium and plutonium containing as the third element either molybdenum or zirconium are reported. Such alloys are particularly useful as reactor fuels in fast breeder reactors. The alloy contains from 2 to 25 at.% of molybdenum or zirconium, the balance being a combination of uranium and plutonium in the ratio of from 1 to 9 atoms of uranlum for each atom of plutonium. These alloys are prepared by melting the constituent elements, treating them at an elevated temperature for homogenization, and cooling them to room temperature, the rate of cooling varying with the oomposition and the desired phase structure. The preferred embodiment contains 12 to 25 at.% of molybdenum and is treated by quenching to obtain a body centered cubic crystal structure. The most important advantage of these alloys over prior binary alloys of both plutonium and uranium is the lack of cracking during casting and their ready machinability.

  8. New alloys for pressure vessels and piping

    SciTech Connect

    Prager, M.; Cantzler, C. )

    1990-01-01

    This book describes new alloys for pressure vessels and piping applications. Topics include: Cr-Mo-Si alloys, HAZ liquation cracking in lean 316 stainless steels, copper bearing stainless steels, and Ni-Cr-W-Mo alloys.

  9. Materials data handbook, aluminum alloy 7075

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sessler, J.; Weiss, V.

    1967-01-01

    Materials data handbook on aluminum alloy 7075 includes data on the properties of the alloy at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures, and other pertinent engineering information required for the design and fabrication of components and equipment utilizing this alloy.

  10. Alloy Interface Interdiffusion Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Garces, Jorge E.; Abel, Phillip B.

    2003-01-01

    With renewed interest in developing nuclear-powered deep space probes, attention will return to improving the metallurgical processing of potential nuclear fuels so that they remain dimensionally stable over the years required for a successful mission. Previous work on fuel alloys at the NASA Glenn Research Center was primarily empirical, with virtually no continuing research. Even when empirical studies are exacting, they often fail to provide enough insight to guide future research efforts. In addition, from a fundamental theoretical standpoint, the actinide metals (which include materials used for nuclear fuels) pose a severe challenge to modern electronic-structure theory. Recent advances in quantum approximate atomistic modeling, coupled with first-principles derivation of needed input parameters, can help researchers develop new alloys for nuclear propulsion.

  11. Amorphous metal alloy and composite

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Rong; Merz, Martin D.

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  12. Surface Segregation in Ternary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Abel, Phillip B.

    2000-01-01

    Surface segregation profiles of binary (Cu-Ni, Au-Ni, Cu-Au) and ternary (Cu-Au-Ni) alloys are determined via Monte Carlo-Metropolis computer simulations using the BFS method for alloys for the calculation of the energetics. The behavior of Cu or Au in Ni is contrasted with their behavior when both are present. The interaction between Cu and Au and its effect on the segregation profiles for Cu-Au-Ni alloys is discussed.

  13. Shape memory alloy actuator

    DOEpatents

    Varma, Venugopal K.

    2001-01-01

    An actuator for cycling between first and second positions includes a first shaped memory alloy (SMA) leg, a second SMA leg. At least one heating/cooling device is thermally connected to at least one of the legs, each heating/cooling device capable of simultaneously heating one leg while cooling the other leg. The heating/cooling devices can include thermoelectric and/or thermoionic elements.

  14. Nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John H. (Inventor); Allen, Donald R. (Inventor); Foley, James C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositions and methods for obtaining nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys are described. A composition includes an amorphous matrix forming element (e.g., Al or Fe); at least one transition metal element; and at least one crystallizing agent that is insoluble in the resulting amorphous matrix. During devitrification, the crystallizing agent causes the formation of a high density nanocrystal dispersion. The compositions and methods provide advantages in that materials with superior properties are provided.

  15. Duct and cladding alloy

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1983-01-01

    An austenitic alloy having good thermal stability and resistance to sodium corrosion at 700.degree. C. consists essentially of 35-45% nickel 7.5-14% chromium 0.8-3.2% molybdenum 0.3-1.0% silicon 0.2-1.0% manganese 0-0.1% zirconium 2.0-3.5% titanium 1.0-2.0% aluminum 0.02-0.1% carbon 0-0.01% boron and the balance iron.

  16. Duct and cladding alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Korenko, M.K.

    1983-03-22

    An austenitic alloy having good thermal stability and resistance to sodium corrosion at 700/sup 0/ C consists essentially of 35-45% nick 5-14% chromi 8-3.2% molybden 3-1.0% silic 2-1.0% mangane 0-0.1% zirconiu 0-3.5% titani 0-2.0% alumin 02-0.1% car 0-0.01% boro and the balance iron.

  17. Lead alloys past present future

    SciTech Connect

    Bagshaw, N.E.

    1995-03-01

    The most critical non-active component in the lead acid battery is the grid of substrate. A review of the work on and grid alloys in the period 1960-1993 has been carried out by by the Advanced Lead-Acid Consortium, (ALABC), and, in this paper, the results are analyzed in relation to the effort expended in different alloy systems. Lead-antimony alloys and the effects on them of additions of arsenic, tin, and grain-refining elements (selenium, sulfur, copper), together with lead-calcium alloys and the effect on them of tin additions have received the greatest attention in the past.

  18. Directional Solidification of Monotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellawell, A.

    1983-01-01

    Cooling at certain rates produced fibrous composite structures. Alloy samples melted in alumina or graphite crucibles under argon and then chillcast into 33-mm-diameter rods or sucked directly into 3-mm-bore alumina or silica tubes. Alloying not automatic with immiscible components of different densities and widely different melting points.

  19. Directional Solidification Of Monotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhindaw, B. K.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Singh, A. K.; Curreri, P. A.

    1990-01-01

    Conditions promoting formation of aligned fibers sought. Report describes experiments in directional solidification of Cu/Pb and Bi/Ga monotectic alloys. Study motivated by need to understand physical mechanism governing formation of rodlike or fiberlike aligned structures in solidifying alloy and to determine process conditions favoring such structures.

  20. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOEpatents

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Martinez, David R.

    1998-01-01

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the Austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states.

  1. Aluminum and its light alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merica, Paul D

    1920-01-01

    Report is a summary of research work which has been done here and abroad on the constitution and mechanical properties of the various alloy systems with aluminum. The mechanical properties and compositions of commercial light alloys for casting, forging, or rolling, obtainable in this country are described.

  2. PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-COPPER ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-05-12

    A low melting point plutonium alloy useful as fuel is a homogeneous liquid metal fueled nuclear reactor is described. Vessels of tungsten or tantalum are useful to contain the alloy which consists essentially of from 10 to 30 atomic per cent copper and the balance plutonium and cerium. with the plutontum not in excess of 50 atomic per cent.

  3. Equivalent crystal theory of alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John

    1991-01-01

    Equivalent Crystal Theory (ECT) is a new, semi-empirical approach to calculating the energetics of a solid with defects. The theory has successfully reproduced surface energies in metals and semiconductors. The theory of binary alloys to date, both with first-principles and semi-empirical models, has not been very successful in predicting the energetics of alloys. This procedure is used to predict the heats of formation, cohesive energy, and lattice parameter of binary alloys of Cu, Ni, Al, Ag, Au, Pd, and Pt as functions of composition. The procedure accurately reproduces the heats of formation versus composition curves for a variety of binary alloys. The results are then compared with other approaches such as the embedded atom and lattice parameters of alloys from pure metal properties more accurately than Vegard's law is presented.

  4. Mo-Si alloy development

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Heatherly, L.; Wright, J.L.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this task is to develop new-generation corrosion-resistant Mo-Si intermetallic alloys as hot components in advanced fossil energy conversion and combustion systems. The initial effort is devoted to Mo{sub 5}-Si{sub 3}-base (MSB) alloys containing boron additions. Three MSB alloys based on Mo-10.5Si-1.1B (wt %), weighing 1500 g were prepared by hot pressing of elemental and alloy powders at temperatures to 1600{degrees}C in vacuum. Microporosities and glassy-phase (probably silicate phases) formations are identified as the major concerns for preparation of MSB alloys by powder metallurgy. Suggestions are made to alleviate the problems of material processing.

  5. Normal evaporation of binary alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. H.

    1972-01-01

    In the study of normal evaporation, it is assumed that the evaporating alloy is homogeneous, that the vapor is instantly removed, and that the alloy follows Raoult's law. The differential equation of normal evaporation relating the evaporating time to the final solute concentration is given and solved for several important special cases. Uses of the derived equations are exemplified with a Ni-Al alloy and some binary iron alloys. The accuracy of the predicted results are checked by analyses of actual experimental data on Fe-Ni and Ni-Cr alloys evaporated at 1600 C, and also on the vacuum purification of beryllium. These analyses suggest that the normal evaporation equations presented here give satisfactory results that are accurate to within an order of magnitude of the correct values, even for some highly concentrated solutions. Limited diffusion and the resultant surface solute depletion or enrichment appear important in the extension of this normal evaporation approach.

  6. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenall, C. E.; Gueceri, S. I.; Farkas, D.; Labdon, M. B.; Nagaswami, N.; Pregger, B.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of using metal alloys as thermal energy storage media was determined. The following major elements were studied: (1) identification of congruently transforming alloys and thermochemical property measurements; (2) development of a precise and convenient method for measuring volume change during phase transformation and thermal expansion coefficients; (3) development of a numerical modeling routine for calculating heat flow in cylindrical heat exchangers containing phase change materials; and (4) identification of materials that could be used to contain the metal alloys. Several eutectic alloys and ternary intermetallic phases were determined. A method employing X-ray absorption techniques was developed to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion of both the solid and liquid phases and the volume change during phase transformation from data obtained during one continuous experimental test. The method and apparatus are discussed and the experimental results are presented. The development of the numerical modeling method is presented and results are discussed for both salt and metal alloy phase change media.

  7. Wedlable nickel aluminide alloy

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2002-11-19

    A Ni.sub.3 Al alloy with improved weldability is described. It contains about 6-12 wt % Al, about 6-12 wt % Cr, about 0-3 wt % Mo, about 1.5-6 wt % Zr, about 0-0.02 wt % B and at least one of about 0-0.15 wt % C, about 0-0.20 wt % Si, about 0-0.01 wt % S and about 0-0.30 wt % Fe with the balance being Ni.

  8. Thermomechanical treatment of alloys

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John F.; Brager, Howard R.; Paxton, Michael M.

    1983-01-01

    An article of an alloy of AISI 316 stainless steel is reduced in size to predetermined dimensions by cold working in repeated steps. Before the last reduction step the article is annealed by heating within a temperature range, specifically between 1010.degree. C. and 1038.degree. C. for a time interval between 90 and 60 seconds depending on the actual temperature. By this treatment the swelling under neutron bombardment by epithermal neutrons is reduced while substantial recrystallization does not occur in actual use for a time interval of at least of the order of 5000 hours.

  9. New magnetic alloys.

    PubMed

    Chin, G Y

    1980-05-23

    Three notable new developments in magnetic alloys are highlighted. These include rare earth-cobalt permanent magnets with maximum energy products up to 240 kilojoules per cubic meter; chromium-cobalt-iron permanent magnets that have magnetic properties similar to those of the Alnicos, but contain only about half as much cobalt and are sufficiently ductile to be cold-formable; and high-induction grain-oriented silicon steels that exhibit 20 percent less core loss as transformer core materials than conventional oriented grades. PMID:17772813

  10. Stable palladium alloys for diffusion of hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patapoff, M.

    1973-01-01

    Literature search on hydrogen absorption effect on palladium alloys revealed existence of alloy compositions in which alpha--beta transition does not take place. Survey conclusions: 40 percent gold alloy of palladium should be used in place of palladium; alloy must be free of interstitial impurities; and metallic surfaces of tube must be clean.

  11. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Certain Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasse, K. R.; Dorward, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    SC resistance of new high-strength alloys tested. Research report describes progress in continuing investigation of stress corrosion (SC) cracking of some aluminum alloys. Objective of program is comparing SC behavior of newer high-strength alloys with established SC-resistant alloy.

  12. [Prosthetic dental alloys. 1].

    PubMed

    Quintero Engelmbright, M A

    1990-11-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements. PMID:2132464

  13. [Prosthetic dental alloys (2)].

    PubMed

    Quintero Englembright, M A

    1990-12-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements. PMID:2132470

  14. High performance alloy electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Winkelman, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    Electroformed copper and nickel are used in structural applications for advanced propellant combustion chambers. An improved process has been developed by Bell Aerospace Textron, Inc. wherein electroformed nickel-manganese alloy has demonstrated superior mechanical and thermal stability when compared to previously reported deposits from known nickel plating processes. Solution chemistry and parametric operating procedures are now established and material property data is established for deposition of thick, large complex shapes such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The critical operating variables are those governing the ratio of codeposited nickel and manganese. The deposition uniformity which in turn affects the manganese concentration distribution is affected by solution resistance and geometric effects as well as solution agitation. The manganese concentration in the deposit must be between 2000 and 3000 ppm for optimum physical properties to be realized. The study also includes data regarding deposition procedures for achieving excellent bond strength at an interface with copper, nickel-manganese or INCONEL 718. Applications for this electroformed material include fabrication of complex or re-entry shapes which would be difficult or impossible to form from high strength alloys such as INCONEL 718.

  15. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800.degree. C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800.degree. C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700.degree. C. at a low cost

  16. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost

  17. Fatigue of die cast zinc alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schrems, K.K.; Dogan, O.N.; Goodwin, F.E.

    2006-04-01

    The rotating bending fatigue limit of die cast zinc alloy 2, alloy 3, alloy 5, AcuZinc 5, and ZA-8 were determined as a part of an on-going program by ILZRO into the mechanical properties of die cast zinc. The stress-life (S-N) curves of alloys 3, 5, AcuZinc 5, and ZA-8 were determined previously. This presentation reports the results of the S-N curve for Alloy 2 and the calculated fatigue limits for all five alloys. During the previous stress-life testing, the samples were stopped at 10 million cycles and the fatigue limit for alloy 3, alloy 5, and AcuZinc 5 appeared to be higher and the fatigue limit for ZA-8 appeared to be lower than the values reported in the literature. This was further investigated in alloy 5 and ZA-8 by testing continuous cast bulk alloy 5 and ZA-8.

  18. New Amorphous Silicon Alloy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapur, Mridula N.

    1990-01-01

    The properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) have been modified by alloying with Al, Ga and S respectively. The Al and Ga alloys are in effect quaternary alloys as they were fabricated in a carbon-rich discharge. The alloys were prepared by the plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) method. This method has several advantages, the major one being the relatively low defect densities of the resulting materials. The PACVD system used to grow the alloy films was designed and constructed in the laboratory. It was first tested with known (a-Si:H and a-Si:As:H) materials. Thus, it was established that device quality alloy films could be grown with the home-made PACVD setup. The chemical composition of the alloys was characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The homogeneous nature of hydrogen distribution in the alloys was established by SIMS depth profile analysis. A quantitative analysis of the bulk elemental content was carried out by EPMA. The analysis indicated that the alloying element was incorporated in the films more efficiently at low input gas concentrations than at the higher concentrations. A topological model was proposed to explain the observed behavior. The optical energy gap of the alloys could be varied in the 0.90 to 1.92 eV range. The Al and Ga alloys were low band gap materials, whereas alloying with S had the effect of widening the energy gap. It was observed that although the Si-Al and Si-Ga alloys contained significant amounts of C and H, the magnitude of the energy gap was determined by the metallic component. The various trends in optical properties could be related to the binding characteristics of the respective alloy systems. A quantitative explanation of the results was provided by White's tight binding model. The dark conductivity-temperature dependence of the alloys was examined. A linear dependence was observed for the Al and Ga systems. Electronic conduction in

  19. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenall, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of using metal alloys as thermal energy storage media was investigated. The elements selected as candidate media were limited to aluminum, copper, magnesium, silicon, zinc, calcium, and phosphorus on the basis of low cost and latent heat of transformation. Several new eutectic alloys and ternary intermetallic phases were determined. A new method employing X-ray absorption techniques was developed to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion of both the solid and liquid phases and the volume change during phase transformation. The method and apparatus are discussed and the experimental results are presented for aluminum and two aluminum-eutectic alloys. Candidate materials were evaluated to determine suitable materials for containment of the metal alloys. Graphite was used to contain the alloys during the volume change measurements. Silicon carbide was identified as a promising containment material and surface-coated iron alloys were also evaluated. System considerations that are pertinent if alloy eutectics are used as thermal energy storage media are discussed. Potential applications to solar receivers and industrial furnaces are illustrated schematically.

  20. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birchenall, C. E.

    1980-04-01

    The feasibility of using metal alloys as thermal energy storage media was investigated. The elements selected as candidate media were limited to aluminum, copper, magnesium, silicon, zinc, calcium, and phosphorus on the basis of low cost and latent heat of transformation. Several new eutectic alloys and ternary intermetallic phases were determined. A new method employing X-ray absorption techniques was developed to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion of both the solid and liquid phases and the volume change during phase transformation. The method and apparatus are discussed and the experimental results are presented for aluminum and two aluminum-eutectic alloys. Candidate materials were evaluated to determine suitable materials for containment of the metal alloys. Graphite was used to contain the alloys during the volume change measurements. Silicon carbide was identified as a promising containment material and surface-coated iron alloys were also evaluated. System considerations that are pertinent if alloy eutectics are used as thermal energy storage media are discussed. Potential applications to solar receivers and industrial furnaces are illustrated schematically.

  1. Dendritic Alloy Solidification Experiment (DASE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; Karma, A.; Steinbach, I.; deGroh, H. C., III

    2001-01-01

    A space experiment, and supporting ground-based research, is proposed to study the microstructural evolution in free dendritic growth from a supercooled melt of the transparent model alloy succinonitrile-acetone (SCN-ACE). The research is relevant to equiaxed solidification of metal alloy castings. The microgravity experiment will establish a benchmark for testing of equiaxed dendritic growth theories, scaling laws, and models in the presence of purely diffusive, coupled heat and solute transport, without the complicating influences of melt convection. The specific objectives are to: determine the selection of the dendrite tip operating state, i.e. the growth velocity and tip radius, for free dendritic growth of succinonitrile-acetone alloys; determine the growth morphology and sidebranching behavior for freely grown alloy dendrites; determine the effects of the thermal/solutal interactions in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed alloy crystals; determine the effects of melt convection on the free growth of alloy dendrites; measure the surface tension anisotropy strength of succinon itrile -acetone alloys establish a theoretical and modeling framework for the experiments. Microgravity experiments on equiaxed dendritic growth of alloy dendrites have not been performed in the past. The proposed experiment builds on the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) of Glicksman and coworkers, which focused on the steady growth of a single crystal from pure supercooled melts (succinonitrile and pivalic acid). It also extends the Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) of the present investigators, which is concerned with the interactions and transients arising in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed crystals (succinonitrile). However, these experiments with pure substances are not able to address the issues related to coupled heat and solute transport in growth of alloy dendrites.

  2. Dissimilar friction welding of titanium alloys to alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, M.; Albright, C.E.; Baeslack, W.A. III

    1994-12-31

    The design of advanced, high-performance gas-turbine engines will require the utilization of elevated-temperature titanium-based materials, including conventional alloys, titanium aluminides, and titanium metal-matrix composites. The most efficient utilization of these materials in the engine compressor section would be achieved by directly joining these materials to existing nickel-base superalloys, such as Alloy 718. To date, the dissimilar welding of titanium alloys to nickel-based alloys has not been common practice because intermetallic compounds form in the weld and cause embrittlement. Special welding techniques must be developed to inhibit this compound formation and to provide high strength welds. In this investigation, a friction welding process was developed for joining titanium alloys (Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo and Ti-6Al-4V) to nickel-based superalloy Alloy 718. An interlayer system comprised of copper and niobium sheet layers was employed as a diffusion barrier and weld deformation enhancer. A postweld heat treatment (PWHT, 700{degrees}C for 20 min in vacuum) under axial pressure (Ksi) was used to improve the joint strength consistency. The following conclusions can be drawn from this investigation: (1) A friction welding technique has been developed for joining titanium alloys (Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo and Ti-6Al-4V) to Alloy 718 using an interlayer system of niobium and copper. Joint strengths averaging approximately 50 Ksi were achieved. (2) Deformation was concentrated in the interlayers, especially the copper interlayer, during friction welding. Increased reduction in length (RIL) during friction welding resulted in a decrease in the interlayer thicknesses. (3) The EDS results showed that the niobium and copper interlayers prevent interdiffusion between the two parent metals, producing formation of detrimental phases.

  3. Metallic alloy stability studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firth, G. C.

    1983-01-01

    The dimensional stability of candidate cryogenic wind tunnel model materials was investigated. Flat specimens of candidate materials were fabricated and cryo-cycled to assess relative dimensional stability. Existing 2-dimensional airfoil models as well as models in various stages of manufacture were also cryo-cycled. The tests indicate that 18 Ni maraging steel offers the greatest dimensional stability and that PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel is the most stable of the stainless steels. Dimensional stability is influenced primarily by metallurgical transformations (austenitic to martensitic) and manufacturing-induced stresses. These factors can be minimized by utilization of stable alloys, refinement of existing manufacturing techniques, and incorporation of new manufacturing technologies.

  4. Dislocation Formation in Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Akihiko; Onuki, Akira

    2006-05-01

    An interaction between dislocations and phase transitions is studied by a phase field model both in two and three dimensional systems. Our theory is a simple extension of the traditional linear elastic theory, and the elastic energy is a periodic function of local strains which is reflecting the periodicity of crystals. We find that the dislocations are spontaneously formed by quenching. Dislocations are formed from the interface of binary alloys, and slips are preferentially gliding into the soft metals. In three dimensional systems, formation of dislocations under applied strain is studied in two phase state. We find that the dislocation loops are created from the surface of hard metals. We also studied the phase separation above the coexisting temperature which is called as the Cottrell atmosphere. Clouds of metals cannot catch up with the motion of dislocations at highly strained state.

  5. Alloyed steel wastes utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Sokol, I.V.

    1995-12-31

    Alloyed steel chips and swarf formed during metal processing are looked upon as additional raw materials in metallurgical production. This paper presents some new methods for steel waste chips and swarf cleaning. One of them is swarf and steel chips cleaning in tetrachloroethylene with ultrasonic assistance and solvent regeneration. Thermal cleaning of waste chips and swarf provides off gas products utilization. The catalyst influence of the metal surface on the thermal decomposition of liquid hydrocarbons during the cleaning process has been studied. It has been determined that the efficiency of this metal waste cleaning technique depends on the storage time of the swarf. The waste chips and swarf cleaning procedures have been proven to be economically advantageous and environmentally appropriate.

  6. High strength ferritic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high-strength ferritic alloy useful for fast reactor duct and cladding applications where an iron base contains from about 9% to about 13% by weight chromium, from about 4% to about 8% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight niobium, from about 0.1% to about 0.3% by weight vanadium, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight silicon, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight manganese, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, and from about 0.04% to about 0.12% by weight carbon.

  7. Smart interfacial bonding alloys

    SciTech Connect

    R. Q. Hwang; J. C. Hamilton; J. E. Houston

    1999-04-01

    The goal of this LDRD was to explore the use of the newly discovered strain-stabilized 2-D interfacial alloys as smart interface bonding alloys (SIBA). These materials will be used as templates for the heteroepitaxial growth of metallic thin films. SIBA are formed by two metallic components which mix at an interface to relieve strain and prevent dislocations from forming in subsequent thin film growth. The composition of the SIBA is determined locally by the amount of strain, and therefore can react smartly to areas of the highest strain to relieve dislocations. In this way, SIBA can be used to tailor the dislocation structure of thin films. This project included growth, characterization and modeling of films grown using SIBA templates. Characterization will include atomic imaging of the dislocations structure, measurement of the mechanical properties of the film using interface force microscopy (IFM) and the nanoindenter, and measurement of the electronic structure of the SIBA with synchrotron photoemission. Resistance of films to sulfidation and oxidation will also be examined. The Paragon parallel processing computer will be used to calculate the structure of the SIBA and thin films in order to develop ability to predict and tailor SIBA and thin film behavior. This work will lead to the possible development of a new class of thin film materials with properties tailored by varying the composition of the SIBA, serving as a buffer layer to relieve the strain between the substrate and the thin film. Such films will have improved mechanical and corrosion resistance allowing application as protective barriers for weapons applications. They will also exhibit enhanced electrical conductivity and reduced electromigration making them particularly suitable for application as interconnects and other electronic needs.

  8. Tritium Production from Palladium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Claytor, T.N.; Schwab, M.J.; Thoma, D.J.; Teter, D.F.; Tuggle, D.G.

    1998-04-19

    A number of palladium alloys have been loaded with deuterium or hydrogen under low energy bombardment in a system that allows the continuous measurement of tritium. Long run times (up to 200 h) result in an integration of the tritium and this, coupled with the high intrinsic sensitivity of the system ({approximately}0.1 nCi/l), enables the significance of the tritium measurement to be many sigma (>10). We will show the difference in tritium generation rates between batches of palladium alloys (Rh, Co, Cu, Cr, Ni, Be, B, Li, Hf, Hg and Fe) of various concentrations to illustrate that tritium generation rate is dependent on alloy type as well as within a specific alloy, dependent on concentration.

  9. Technical Seminar "Shape Memory Alloys"

    NASA Video Gallery

    Shape memory alloys are a unique group of materials that remember their original shape and return to that shape after being strained. How could the aerospace, automotive, and energy exploration ind...

  10. Castable hot corrosion resistant alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A. (Inventor); Holt, William H. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Some 10 wt percent nickel is added to an Fe-base alloy which has a ferrite microstructure to improve the high temperature castability and crack resistance while about 0.2 wt percent zirconium is added for improved high temperatur cyclic oxidation and corrosion resistance. The basic material is a high temperature FeCrAl heater alloy, and the addition provides a material suitable for burner rig nozzles.

  11. Superplastic forming of alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.D.; Flower, H.L. )

    1994-04-01

    Inconel Alloy 718 (UNS N07718) is now available in a fine-grained, controlled composition modification that can be super-plastically formed. The new superplastic forming (SPF) capability allows the manufacture of large, complex, and detailed parts, which improves integrity by reducing the need for joining. Furthermore, it allows designers to fabricate components having higher strength, fatigue resistance, and temperature capability than parts made of aluminum or titanium alloys.

  12. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOEpatents

    Shahinpoor, M.; Martinez, D.R.

    1998-04-07

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states. 16 figs.

  13. Casting Characteristics of Aluminum Die Casting Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The research program investigates the casting characteristics of selected aluminum die casting alloys. Specifically, the alloys' tendencies towards die soldering and sludge formation, and the alloys' fluidity and machinability are evaluated. It was found that: When the Fe and Mn contents of the alloy are low; caution has to be taken against possible die soldering. When the alloy has a high sludge factor, particularly a high level of Fe, measures must be taken to prevent the formation of large hardspots. For this kind of alloy, the Fe content should be kept at its lowest allowable level and the Mn content should be at its highest possible level. If there are problems in die filling, measures other than changing the alloy chemistry need to be considered first. In terms of alloy chemistry, the elements that form high temperature compounds must be kept at their lowest allowable levels. The alloys should not have machining problems when appropriate machining techniques and machining parameters are used.

  14. Microstructural studies on Alloy 693

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, R.; Dutta, R. S.; Sengupta, P.; Samajdar, I.; Dey, G. K.

    2014-10-01

    Superalloy 693, is a newly identified ‘high-temperature corrosion resistant alloy’. Present study focuses on microstructure and mechanical properties of the alloy prepared by double ‘vacuum melting’ route. In general, the alloy contains ordered Ni3Al precipitates distributed within austenitic matrix. M6C primary carbide, M23C6 type secondary carbide and NbC particles are also found to be present. Heat treatment of the alloy at 1373 K for 30 min followed by water quenching (WQ) brings about a microstructure that is free from secondary carbides and Ni3Al type precipitates but contains primary carbides. Tensile property of Alloy 693 materials was measured with as received and solution annealed (1323 K, 60 min, WQ) and (1373 K, 30 min, WQ) conditions. Yield strength, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and hardness of the alloy are found to drop with annealing. It is noted that in annealed condition, considerable cold working of the alloy can be performed.

  15. Ni{sub 3}Al aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.

    1993-10-01

    This paper provides a brief review of the recent progress in research and development of Ni{sub 3}Al and its alloys. Emphasis has been placed on understanding low ductility and brittle fracture of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys at ambient and elevated temperatures. Recent studies have resulted in identifying both intrinsic and extrinsic factors governing the fracture behavior of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys. Parallel efforts on alloy design using physical metallurgy principles have led to properties for structural use. Industrial interest in these alloys is high, and examples of industrial involvement in processing and utilization of these alloys are briefly mentioned.

  16. Choosing An Alloy For Automotive Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.

    1988-01-01

    Report describes study of chemical compositions and microstructures of alloys for automotive Stirling engines. Engines offer advantages of high efficiency, low pollution, low noise, and ability to use variety of fuels. Twenty alloys evaluated for resistance to corrosion permeation by hydrogen, and high temperature. Iron-based alloys considered primary candidates because of low cost. Nickel-based alloys second choice in case suitable iron-based alloy could not be found. Cobalt-based alloy included for comparison but not candidate, because it is expensive strategic material.

  17. Kinetics of aluminum lithium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletcher, Ben A.

    2009-12-01

    Aluminum lithium alloys are increasingly used in aerospace for their high strength-to-weight ratio. Additions of lithium, up to 4.2 wt% decrease the alloy density while increasing the modulus and yield strength. The metastable, second phase Al3Li or delta' is intriguing, as it remains spherical and coherent with the matrix phase, alpha, well into the overaged condition. Small interfacial strain energy allows these precipitates to remain spherical for volume fractions (VV ) of delta' less than 0.3, making this alloy system ideal for investigation of late-stage coarsening phenomena. Experimental characterization of three binary Al-Li alloys are presented as a critical test of diffusion screening theory and multi-particle diffusion simulations. Quantitative transmission electron microscopy is used to image the precipitates directly using the centered dark-field technique. Images are analyzed autonomously within a novel Matlab function that determines the center and size of each precipitate. Particle size distribution, particle growth kinetics, and maximum particle size are used to track the precipitate growth and correlate with the predictions of screening theory and multi-particle diffusion simulations. This project is the first extensive study of Al-Li alloys, in over 25 years, applying modern transmission electron microscopy and image analysis techniques. Previous studies sampled but a single alloy composition, and measured far fewer precipitates. This study investigates 3 alloys with volume fractions of the delta precipitates, VV =0.1-0.27, aged at 225C for 1 to 10 days. More than 1000 precipitates were sampled per aging time, creating more statistically significant data. Experimental results are used to test the predictions based on diffusion screening theory and multi-particle aging simulations. (Full text of this dissertation may be available via the University of Florida Libraries web site. Please check http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/etd.html)

  18. Lightweight magnesium-lithium alloys show promise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. T.; Cataldo, C. E.

    1964-01-01

    Evaluation tests show that magnesium-lithium alloys are lighter and more ductile than other magnesium alloys. They are being used for packaging, housings, containers, where light weight is more important than strength.

  19. High strength forgeable tantalum base alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckman, R. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Increasing tungsten content of tantalum base alloy to 12-15% level will improve high temperature creep properties of existing tantalum base alloys while retaining their excellent fabrication and welding characteristics.

  20. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.

  1. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  2. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T; Lograsso, Thomas A; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  3. Alloy hardening and softening in binary molybdenum alloys as related to electron concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of alloy additions of hafnium, tantalum, tungsten, rhenium, osmium, iridium, and platinum on hardness of molybdenum. Special emphasis was placed on alloy softening in these binary molybdenum alloys. Results showed that alloy softening was produced by those elements having an excess of s+d electrons compared to molybdenum, while those elements having an equal number or fewer s+d electrons that molybdenum failed to produce alloy softening. Alloy softening and alloy hardening can be correlated with the difference in number of s+d electrons of the solute element and molybdenum.

  4. Oxidation of low cobalt alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    Four high temperature alloys: U-700, Mar M-247, Waspaloy and PM/HIP U-700 were modified with various cobalt levels ranging from 0 percent to their nominal commercial levels. The alloys were then tested in cyclic oxidation in static air at temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1150 C at times from 500 to 100 1 hour cycles. Specific weight change with time and X-ray diffraction analyses of the oxidized samples were used to evaluate the alloys. The alloys tend to be either Al2O3/aluminate spinel or Cr2O3/chromite spinel formers depending on the Cr/Al ratio in the alloy. Waspaloy with a ratio of 15:1 is a strong Cr2O3 former while this U-700 with a ratio of 3.33:1 tends to form mostly Cr2O3 while Mar M-247 with a ratio of 1.53:1 is a strong Al2O3 former. The best cyclic oxidation resistance is associated with the Al2O3 formers. The cobalt levels appear to have little effect on the oxidation resistance of the Al2O3/aluminate spinel formers while any tendency to form Cr2O3 is accelerated with increased cobalt levels and leads to increased oxidation attack.

  5. Fatigue behavior of titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, R.R.; Eylon, D.; Luetjering, G.

    1999-07-01

    This symposium was international in nature, with leaders in the fields of fatigue technology and the metallurgy of titanium from the US, Europe and Asia. It covered basic research, development, applications and modeling--life predictions and design of both fatigue crack initiation and propagation of titanium alloys. There were presentations on the full range of titanium alloy systems, from commercially pure and {alpha}-alloys, {alpha}/{beta}- and {beta}-alloys to the gamma titanium aluminides. The effects of processing/heat treatment/microstructure on the fatigue properties were discussed, and models proposed to correlate the microstructures to the observed fatigue performance. Test environments reported on included hard vacuum (and the effect of vacuum level), vacuums with partial pressures of miscellaneous gases, lab air and aqueous media. A session was devoted to the effects of environment and fatigue enhancement via surface treatments using techniques such as shot peening and roller burnishing. The effects of dwell on both S-N and crack growth rate behavior were covered. It was a very comprehensive symposium with presentations from academia, government laboratories and industry, with industrial participants ranging from the petroleum industry to medical and aerospace interests. This book has been separated into four sections, representing the technology areas covered in various sessions, namely Mechanisms of Fatigue crack Initiation and Propagation of Conventional Alloys, Fatigue in Intermetallics, Environmental and Surface Aspects of Fatigue, and Application, Life Prediction and Design. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this volume.

  6. Oxidation Behavior of Glassy Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yurek, G.

    1985-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of high temperature glassy alloys produced by rapid solidification processing is investigated and the effects of processing and composition on oxidation behavior is studied. Glassy Ta-44.5at%Ir, Ta-40at%Ir-10at%B and Nb-45at%Ir oxidized rapidly at 700 to 800 C at an oxygen partial pressure of .001 atm. The alloys were embrittled during the oxidation process. No apparent oxidation or embrittlement of the Ta-Ir alloy occurred after oxidation for 4h at 500 C at an oxygen partial pressure of .001 atm. Embrittlement occurred, however, after 100h of exposure under the latter conditions. Alloy embrittlement is associated with the partial or full conversion of the metallic glass to a mixture of crystalline beta-Ta2O5 and metallic iridium. Hot compaction of glassy alloys of this type must be limited to relatively low temperatures (approx. 500 C) and short times at the low temperatures unless extremely low oxygen partial pressures can be achieved during the compaction process.

  7. Superconducting compounds and alloys research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, G.

    1975-01-01

    Resistivity measurements as a function of temperature were performed on alloys of the binary material system In sub(1-x) Bi sub x for x varying between 0 and 1. It was found that for all single-phase alloys (the pure elements, alpha-In, and the three intermetallic compounds) at temperatures sufficiently above the Debye-temperature, the resistivity p can be expressed as p = a sub o T(n), where a sub o and n are composition-dependent constants. The same exponential relationship can also be applied for the sub-system In-In2Bi, when the two phases are in compositional equilibrium. Superconductivity measurements on single and two-phase alloys can be explained with respect to the phase diagram. There occur three superconducting phases (alpha-In, In2Bi, and In5Bi3) with different transition temperatures in the alloying system. The magnitude of the transition temperatures for the various intermetallic phases of In-Bi is such that the disappearance or occurrence of a phase in two component alloys can be demonstrated easily by means of superconductivity measurements.

  8. Nickel aluminide alloys with improved weldability

    DOEpatents

    Santella, M.L.; Goodwin, G.M.

    1995-05-09

    Weldable nickel aluminide alloys which are essentially free, if not entirely free, of weld hot cracking are provided by employing zirconium concentrations in these alloys of greater than 2.6 wt. % or sufficient to provide a substantial presence of Ni--Zr eutectic phase in the weld so as to prevent weld hot cracking. Weld filler metals formed from these so modified nickel aluminide alloys provide for crack-free welds in previously known nickel aluminide alloys. 5 figs.

  9. Self-disintegrating Raney metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Oden, Laurance L.; Russell, James H.

    1979-01-01

    A method of preparing a Raney metal alloy which is capable of self-disintegrating when contacted with water vapor. The self-disintegrating property is imparted to the alloy by incorporating into the alloy from 0.4 to 0.8 weight percent carbon. The alloy is useful in forming powder which can be converted to a Raney metal catalyst with increased surface area and catalytic activity.

  10. Zinc alloy enhances strength and creep resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Machler, M.

    1996-10-01

    A family of high-performance ternary zinc-copper-aluminum alloys has been developed that provides higher strength, hardness, and creep resistance than the traditional zinc-aluminum alloys Zamak 3, Zamak 5, and ZA-8. Designated ACuZinc, mechanical properties comparable to those of more expensive materials make it suitable for high-load applications and those at elevated temperatures. This article describes the alloy`s composition, properties, and historical development.

  11. Nickel aluminide alloys with improved weldability

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Goodwin, Gene M.

    1995-05-09

    Weldable nickel aluminide alloys which are essentially free, if not entirely free, of weld hot cracking are provided by employing zirconium concentrations in these alloys of greater than 2.6 wt. % or sufficient to provide a substantial presence of Ni--Zr eutectic phase in the weld so as to prevent weld hot cracking. Weld filler metals formed from these so modified nickel aluminide alloys provide for crack-free welds in previously known nickel aluminide alloys.

  12. HEAT TREATED U-Nb ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    McGeary, R.K.; Justusson, W.M.

    1959-11-24

    A fuel element for a nuclear reactor is described comprising an alloy containing uranium and from 7 to 20 wt.% niobium, the alloy being substantially in the gamma phase and having been produced by working an ingot of the alloy into the desired shape, homogenizing it by annealing it at a temperature in the gamma phase field, and quenching it to retain the gamma phase structure of the alloy.

  13. Caldron For High-Temperature Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geringer, Henry J.

    1989-01-01

    Induction-heated caldron melts high-temperature alloys. Prevents sort of contamination of melts occurring during arc melting in ceramic crucibles. Liquefies 200 grams of solid metal components of alloy like niobium aluminum and makes alloy homogeneous in less than 3 minutes. Plugged sleeve constitutes main body of caldron. Coolant flows through sleeve to prevent it from melting. Mandrel-wound induction coils adjusted to tune source of power. Also serves as mold for casting alloys into such shapes as bars.

  14. PREPARATION OF URANIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for preparing uranium--aluminum alloys from a solution of uranium halide in an about equimolar molten alkali metal halide-- aluminum halide mixture and excess aluminum. The uranium halide is reduced and the uranium is alloyed with the excess aluminum. The alloy and salt are separated from each other. (AEC)

  15. High strength uranium-tungsten alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Paul S.; Sheinberg, Haskell; Hogan, Billy M.; Lewis, Homer D.; Dickinson, James M.

    1991-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  16. High strength uranium-tungsten alloy process

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Paul S.; Sheinberg, Haskell; Hogan, Billy M.; Lewis, Homer D.; Dickinson, James M.

    1990-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  17. Ductile aluminide alloys for high temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Stiegler, J.O.

    1986-09-16

    An alloy is described consisting essentially of sufficient nickel and aluminum to form Ni/sub 3/A1, an amount of boron sufficient to promote ductility in the alloy and 0.3 to 1.5 atomic percent of an element selected from the group consisting of hafnium and zirconium. The alloy further including 6 to 12 atomic percent iron.

  18. ALLOY FOR USE IN NUCLEAR FISSION

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.A.; Wilhelm, H.A.

    1958-03-11

    This patent relates to an alloy composition capable of functioning as a solid homogeneous reactor fuel. The alloy consists of a beryllium moderator, together with at least 0.7% of U/sup 235/, and up to 50% thorium to give increased workability to the alloy.

  19. Improved thermal treatment of aluminum alloy 7075

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocks, F. H.

    1968-01-01

    Newly developed tempering treatment considerably increases the corrosion resistance of 7075-T6 alloy and concomitantly preserves its yield strength. The results of tests on samples of the alloy subjected to the above treatments show that when the overaging period is 12 hours /at 325 degrees F/, the alloy exhibits a yield strength of 73,000 psi.

  20. Materials data handbook, aluminum alloy 6061

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sessler, J.; Weiss, V.

    1969-01-01

    Comprehensive compilation of technical data on aluminum alloy 6061 is presented in handbook form. The text includes data on the properties of the alloy at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures and other pertinent information required for the design and fabrication of components and equipment utilizing this alloy.

  1. METHOD OF DISSOLVING REFRACTORY ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Helton, D.M.; Savolainen, J.K.

    1963-04-23

    This patent relates to the dissolution of alloys of uranium with zirconium, thorium, molybdenum, or niobium. The alloy is contacted with an anhydrous solution of mercuric chloride in a low-molecular-weight monohydric alcohol to produce a mercury-containing alcohol slurry. The slurry is then converted to an aqueous system by adding water and driving off the alcohol. The resulting aqueous slurry is electrolyzed in the presence of a mercury cathode to remove the mercury and produce a uranium-bearing aqueous solution. This process is useful for dissolving irradiated nuclear reactor fuels for radiochemical reprocessing by solvent extraction. In addition, zirconium-alloy cladding is selectively removed from uranium dioxide fuel compacts by this means. (AEC)

  2. [Microbiological corrosion of aluminum alloys].

    PubMed

    Smirnov, V F; Belov, D V; Sokolova, T N; Kuzina, O V; Kartashov, V R

    2008-01-01

    Biological corrosion of ADO quality aluminum and aluminum-based construction materials (alloys V65, D16, and D16T) was studied. Thirteen microscopic fungus species and six bacterial species proved to be able to attack aluminum and its alloys. It was found that biocorrosion of metals by microscopic fungi and bacteria was mediated by certain exometabolites. Experiments on biocorrosion of the materials by the microscopic fungus Alternaria alternata, the most active biodegrader, demonstrated that the micromycete attack started with the appearance of exudate with pH 8-9 on end faces of the samples. PMID:18669265

  3. Solidification morphologies in monotectic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.; Choudhury, A.; Nestler, B.

    2012-01-01

    We model the Fe-Sn system by using a higher order polynomial to describe the free energy of the liquid, and study three different aspects in morphological evolution in the monotectic alloy. Firstly, phase separation, in which case the liquid decomposes into two, is investigated inside of the spinodal decomposition region. Secondly, we study the core-shell morphology in the Fe-Sn alloy, which arises by spinodal decomposition in 2D. Finally, stable lamellar and unstable droplet morphologies in directional solidication are investigated.

  4. PROCESS OF DISSOLVING ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Shor, R.S.; Vogler, S.

    1958-01-21

    A process is described for dissolving binary zirconium-uranium alloys where the uranium content is about 2%. In prior dissolution procedures for these alloys, an oxidizing agent was added to prevent the precipitation of uranium tetrafluoride. In the present method complete dissolution is accomplished without the use of the oxidizing agent by using only the stoichiometric amount or slight excess of HF required by the zirconium. The concentration of the acid may range from 2M to 10M and the dissolution is advatageously carried out at a temperature of 80 deg C.

  5. High strength, tough alloy steel

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Gareth; Rao, Bangaru V. N.

    1979-01-01

    A high strength, tough alloy steel is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other substitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

  6. Method for calculating alloy energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1992-01-01

    A semiempirical method for the computation of alloy energies is introduced. It is based on the equivalent-crystal theory of defect-formation energies in elemental solids. The method is both simple and accurate. Heats of formation as a function of composition are computed for some binary alloys of Cu, Ni, Al, Ag, Pd, Pt, and Au using the heats of solution in the dilute limit as experimental input. The separation of heats into strain and chemical components helps in understanding the energetics. In addition, lattice-parameter contractions seen in solid solutions of Ag and Au are accurately predicted. Good agreement with experiment is obtained in all cases.

  7. Moving Dislocations in Disordered Alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Marian, J; Caro, A

    2006-11-18

    Using atomistic simulations of dislocation motion in Ni and Ni-Au alloys we report a detailed study of the mobility function as a function of stress, temperature and alloy composition. We analyze the results in terms of analytic models of phonon radiation and their selection rules for phonon excitation. We find a remarkable agreement between the location of the cusps in the {sigma}-v relation and the velocity of waves propagating in the direction of dislocation motion. We identify and characterize three regimes of dissipation whose boundaries are essentially determined by the direction of motion of the dislocation, rather than by its screw or edge character.

  8. Imparting passivity to vapor deposited magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Ryan C.

    Magnesium has the lowest density of all structural metals. Utilization of low density materials is advantageous from a design standpoint, because lower weight translates into improved performance of engineered products (i.e., notebook computers are more portable, vehicles achieve better gas mileage, and aircraft can carry more payload). Despite their low density and high strength to weight ratio, however, the widespread implementation of magnesium alloys is currently hindered by their relatively poor corrosion resistance. The objective of this research dissertation is to develop a scientific basis for the creation of a corrosion resistant magnesium alloy. The corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys is affected by several interrelated factors. Among these are alloying, microstructure, impurities, galvanic corrosion effects, and service conditions, among others. Alloying and modification of the microstructure are primary approaches to controlling corrosion. Furthermore, nonequilibrium alloying of magnesium via physical vapor deposition allows for the formation of single-phase magnesium alloys with supersaturated concentrations of passivity-enhancing elements. The microstructure and surface morphology is also modifiable during physical vapor deposition through the variation of evaporation power, pressure, temperature, ion bombardment, and the source-to-substrate distance. Aluminum, titanium, yttrium, and zirconium were initially chosen as candidates likely to impart passivity on vapor deposited magnesium alloys. Prior to this research, alloys of this type have never before been produced, much less studied. All of these metals were observed to afford some degree of corrosion resistance to magnesium. Due to the especially promising results from nonequilibrium alloying of magnesium with yttrium and titanium, the ternary magnesium-yttrium-titanium system was investigated in depth. While all of the alloys are lustrous, surface morphology is observed under the scanning

  9. Imparting passivity to vapor deposited magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Ryan C.

    Magnesium has the lowest density of all structural metals. Utilization of low density materials is advantageous from a design standpoint, because lower weight translates into improved performance of engineered products (i.e., notebook computers are more portable, vehicles achieve better gas mileage, and aircraft can carry more payload). Despite their low density and high strength to weight ratio, however, the widespread implementation of magnesium alloys is currently hindered by their relatively poor corrosion resistance. The objective of this research dissertation is to develop a scientific basis for the creation of a corrosion resistant magnesium alloy. The corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys is affected by several interrelated factors. Among these are alloying, microstructure, impurities, galvanic corrosion effects, and service conditions, among others. Alloying and modification of the microstructure are primary approaches to controlling corrosion. Furthermore, nonequilibrium alloying of magnesium via physical vapor deposition allows for the formation of single-phase magnesium alloys with supersaturated concentrations of passivity-enhancing elements. The microstructure and surface morphology is also modifiable during physical vapor deposition through the variation of evaporation power, pressure, temperature, ion bombardment, and the source-to-substrate distance. Aluminum, titanium, yttrium, and zirconium were initially chosen as candidates likely to impart passivity on vapor deposited magnesium alloys. Prior to this research, alloys of this type have never before been produced, much less studied. All of these metals were observed to afford some degree of corrosion resistance to magnesium. Due to the especially promising results from nonequilibrium alloying of magnesium with yttrium and titanium, the ternary magnesium-yttrium-titanium system was investigated in depth. While all of the alloys are lustrous, surface morphology is observed under the scanning

  10. Protective claddings for high strength chromium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    The application of a Cr-Y-Hf-Th alloy as a protective cladding for a high strength chromium alloy was investigated for its effectiveness in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of a core alloy. Cladding was accomplished by a combination of hot gas pressure bonding and roll cladding techniques. Based on bend DBTT, the cladding alloy was effective in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of the chromium core alloy for up to 720 ks (200hours) in air at 1422 K (2100 F). A significant increase in the bend DBTT occurred with longer time exposures at 1422 K or short time exposures at 1589 K (2400 F).

  11. Liquid metal ion source and alloy

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Jr., William M.; Utlaut, Mark W.; Behrens, Robert G.; Szklarz, Eugene G.; Storms, Edmund K.; Santandrea, Robert P.; Swanson, Lynwood W.

    1988-10-04

    A liquid metal ion source and alloy, wherein the species to be emitted from the ion source is contained in a congruently vaporizing alloy. In one embodiment, the liquid metal ion source acts as a source of arsenic, and in a source alloy the arsenic is combined with palladium, preferably in a liquid alloy having a range of compositions from about 24 to about 33 atomic percent arsenic. Such an alloy may be readily prepared by a combustion synthesis technique. Liquid metal ion sources thus prepared produce arsenic ions for implantation, have long lifetimes, and are highly stable in operation.

  12. Stress corrosion of high strength aluminum alloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocks, F. H.; Brummer, S. B.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation has been carried out to examine the relationship of the observed chemical and mechanical properties of Al-Cu and Al-Zn-Mg alloys to the stress corrosion mechanisms which dominate in each case. Two high purity alloys and analogous commercial alloys were selected. Fundamental differences between the behavior of Al-Cu and of Al-Zn-Mg alloys were observed. These differences in the corrosion behavior of the two types of alloys are augmented by substantial differences in their mechanical behavior. The relative cleavage energy of the grain boundaries is of particular importance.

  13. ZIRCONIUM-TITANIUM-BERYLLIUM BRAZING ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Gilliland, R.G.; Patriarca, P.; Slaughter, G.M.; Williams, L.C.

    1962-06-12

    A new and improved ternary alloy is described which is of particular utility in braze-bonding parts made of a refractory metal selected from Group IV, V, and VI of the periodic table and alloys containing said metal as a predominating alloying ingredient. The brazing alloy contains, by weight, 40 to 50 per cent zirconium, 40 to 50 per cent titanium, and the balance beryllium in amounts ranging from 1 to 20 per cent, said alloy having a melting point in the range 950 to 1400 deg C. (AEC)

  14. Alloy softening in binary iron solid solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine softening and hardening behavior in 19 binary iron-alloy systems. Microhardness tests were conducted at four temperatures in the range 77 to 411 K. Alloy softening was exhibited by 17 of the 19 alloy systems. Alloy softening observed in 15 of the alloy systems was attributed to an intrinsic mechanism, believed to be lowering of the Peierls (lattice friction) stress. Softening and hardening rates could be correlated with the atomic radius ratio of solute to iron. Softening observed in two other systems was attributed to an extrinsic mechanism, believed to be associated with scavenging of interstitial impurities.

  15. Semiempirical Analysis of Surface Alloy Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John; Ibanez-Meier, Rodrigo

    1995-01-01

    The BFS method for alloys is applied to the study of surface alloy formation. This method was previously used to examine the experimental STM observation of surface alloying of Au on Ni(110) for low Au coverages by means of a numerical simulation. In this work, we extend the study to include other cases of surface alloying for immiscible as well as miscible metals. All binary combinations of Ni, Au, Cu, and Al are considered and the simulation results are compared to experiment when data is available. The driving mechanisms of surface alloy formation are then discussed in terms of the BFS method and the available results.

  16. Alloy softening in binary iron solid solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine whether alloy softening in Fe alloys is dependent on electron concentration and to provide a direct comparison of alloy softening and hardening in several binary Fe alloy systems having the same processing history. Alloy additions to Fe included the elements in the Periods 4-6 and the Groups IV-VIII with the exception of technetium. A total of 19 alloy systems was investigated, and hardness testing was the primary means of evaluation. Testing was carried out at four temperatures over a homologous temperature range of 0.043-0.227 times the absolute melting temperature of unalloyed Fe. Major conclusions are that the atomic radius ratio of solute-to-Fe is the key factor in controlling low-temperature hardness of the binary Fe alloys and that alloy softening rates at 77 K and alloy hardening rates at 411 K are correlated with this atomic radius ratio for 15 of the binary alloy systems. Mechanisms of alloy softening and hardening are proposed.

  17. Influence of Chemical Composition of Mg Alloys on Surface Alloying by Diffusion Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirmke, J.; Zhang, M.-X.; St John, D. H.

    2012-05-01

    A recently developed technique of surface alloying by diffusion-coating has been used to produce coatings on Mg alloys with various Al and Zn contents. The experimental results show that both Al and Zn solutes in the alloy promote the diffusion of alloying elements through grain refinement of the substrate alloys and through reduction of diffusion active energy because of the reduction of melting temperature of the alloys. Therefore, the efficiency of surface alloying increases by diffusion coating. Thick, dense, uniform, and continuous layers of intermetallic compounds, which consist of a τ-phase layer and a β-phase layer, can be produced on the surface of various Mg alloys. The intermetallic compound layers not only have microhardness values that are 4 to 6 times higher than the substrate but also provide effective protection of the Mg alloys from corrosion in 5 pct NaCl solution at room temperature.

  18. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. Rebak; J.H. Payer

    2006-01-20

    Alloy 22 (NO6022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nano-meters per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids.

  19. Environmental fatigue in aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    Aluminum-lithium alloys exhibit similar environmental fatigue crack growth characteristics compared to conventional 2000 series alloys and are more resistant to environmental fatigue compared to 7000 series alloys. The superior fatigue crack growth behavior of Al-Li alloys 2090, 2091, 8090, and 8091 is due to crack closure caused by tortuous crack path morphology and crack surface corrosion products. At high R and reduced closure, chemical environment effects are pronounced resulting in accelerated near threshold da/dN. The beneficial effects of crack closure are minimized for small cracks resulting in rapid growth rates. Limited data suggest that the 'chemically small crack' effect, observed in other alloy system, is not pronounced in Al-Li alloys. Modeling of environmental fatigue in Al-Li-Cu alloys related accelerated fatigue crack growth in moist air and salt water to hydrogen embrittlement.

  20. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Payer, J H

    2006-01-10

    Alloy 22 (N06022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nanometers per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids.

  1. Aqueous recovery of actinides from aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.H.; Chostner, D.F.; Gray, L.W.

    1989-01-01

    Early in the 1980's, a joint Rocky Flats/Savannah River program was established to recover actinides from scraps and residues generated during Rocky Flats purification operations. The initial program involved pyrochemical treatment of Molten Salt Extraction (MSE) chloride salts and Electrorefining (ER) anode heel metal to form aluminum alloys suitable for aqueous processing at Savannah River. Recently Rocky Flats has expressed interest in expanding the aluminum alloy program to include treatment of chloride salt residues from a modified Molten Salt Extraction process and from the Electrorefining purification operations. Samples of the current aluminum alloy buttons were prepared at Rocky Flats and sent to Savannah River Laboratory for flowsheet development and characterization of the alloys. A summary of the scrub alloy-anode heel alloy program will be presented along with recent results from aqueous dissolution studies of the new aluminum alloys. 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. [Fatigue properties of dental alloys. 12% Au-Pd-Ag alloy and type III gold alloy].

    PubMed

    Kato, H

    1989-12-01

    Usually the mechanical properties of dental alloys are determined from the values obtained through static tests of their tensile strength, hardness, etc. Generally, high tensile strength and ductility are preferred. However, when small stresses within proportional limits are applied repeatedly (even though not amounting to destructive forces in static tests), they may cause rupture in the alloy or, at least, cause it to lose its original mechanical properties. This phenomenon is called metal fatigue. It is estimated that the intraoral stress loads received by dental restorations during mastication or during insertion and removal of appliances are repeated more than 3 x 10(5) times/year. From this standpoint, it may be more appropriate to estimate the fracture strength of such dental alloys based on the fatigue properties of the restorative materials used for clasps, bars, and fixed bridges. For this reason, it is necessary to obtain data through fatigue tests on the fatigue strength and the fatigue endurance limits of dental alloys, and it is important to find a correlation between these data and the static data on tensile strengths and ductility obtained by tensile tests. Two alloys are used in these experiments. Both wrought specimens and cast specimens of 12% Au-Pd-Ag and Type III gold alloy were prepared for the fatigue tests. The size of the rectangular wrought specimens was 3 x 4 x 110 mm. The 12% Au-Pd-Ag alloy was heated to 800 degrees C for 15 minutes, quenched, and reheated to 400 degrees C for 20 minutes and quenched again according to the manufacturer's instructions for heat treatment. The Type III gold alloy was heated to 700 degrees C for 10 minutes, quenched, and reheated to 350 degrees C for 20 minutes and quenched again. The cylindrical cast specimens were 60 mm long and 2 mm in diameter. They were invested by conventional methods and cast in a centrifugal casting machine, Thermotrol Model 2500. The four point bending test for the wrought specimen

  3. Introduction to hydrogen in alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Westlake, D.G.

    1980-01-01

    Substitutional alloys, both those that form hydrides and those that do not, are discussed, but with more emphasis on the former than the latter. This overview includes the following closely related subjects: (1) the significant effects of substitutional solutes on the pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) equilibria of metal-hydrogen systems, (2) the changes in thermodynamic properties resulting from differences in atom size and from modifications of electronic structure, (3) attractive and repulsive interactions between H and solute atoms and the effects of such interactions on the pressure dependent solubility for H, (4) H trapping in alloys of Group V metals and its effect on the terminal solubility for H (TSH), (5) some other mechanisms invoked to explain the enhancement (due to alloying) of the (TSH) in Group V metals, and (6) H-impurity complexes in alloys of the metals Ni, Co, and Fe. Some results showing that an enhanced TSH may ameliorate the resistance of a metal to hydrogen embrittlement are presented.

  4. Recent developments in light alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, R W

    1920-01-01

    This report is intended to cover the progress that has been made in both the manufacture and utility of light alloys in the United States since the first part of 1919. Duralumin is extensively discussed both as to manufacture and durability.

  5. Gold color in dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Cameron, T

    1997-01-01

    This article will help the dental laboratory with alloy selection by exploring how the relationship among color, ductility and strength applies to gold and how color can be quantified. Because higher quality materials translate into higher profits, upselling to the dentist and patient is also discussed. PMID:9524484

  6. Structural Properties of Mismatched Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, Normand

    The problem of understanding the local structure of disordered alloys has been around for a long time. In this thesis, I look more specifically at the effect of size-mismatch disorder in binary alloys under many forms: metallic and semiconductor alloys, bulk and surfaces, two and three dimensional systems. I have studied the limitations of a central-force model (CFM) and an embedded-atom potential (EAM) in describing the local structure of binary metallic alloys composed of Ag, Au, Cu, Ni, Pd, or Pt. Although an analytical model developed using the CFM explains qualitatively well the experimental and numerical results, in many cases, it is important to add electronic density effects through a more sophisticated potential like EAM in order to agree quantitatively with experiment. I have also looked at amorphous and crystalline silicon-germanium alloys. It turns out that the effect of size-mismatch is the same on a crystalline and an amorphous lattice. In the latter case, it can be seen as a perturbation of the much larger disorder due to the amorphisation process. However, the analytical predictions differ, for both the crystalline and amorphous alloys, from the experimental results. If one is to believe the data, there is only one possible explanation for this inconsistency: large amounts of hydrogen are present in the samples used for the measurements. Since the data analysis of EXAFS results is not always straightforward, I have proposed some experiments that could shed light on this problem. One of these experiments would be to look at the (111) surface of a Si-Ge alloy with a scanning tunneling microscope. I also present in this thesis the theoretical predictions for the height distribution at the surface as well as some more general structural information about the relaxation in the network as one goes away from the surface. Finally, I have studied the effect of size -mismatch in a purely two dimensional lattice, looking for mismatch-driven phase transitions

  7. CORROSION OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    John P. Hurley; John P. Kay

    1999-10-01

    Five alloys were tested in the presence of water vapor and water vapor with HCl for 1000 hours using simulated combustion gas. Samples were removed at intervals during each test and measured for determination of corrosion rates. One sample of each alloy was examined with a SEM after the completion of each test. Cumulative corrosion depths were similar for the superstainless alloys. Corrosion for Alloy TP310 roughly doubled. Corrosion for the enhanced stainless alloys changed dramatically with the addition of chlorine. Corrosion for Alloy RA85H increased threefold, whereas Alloy TP347HFG showed an eightfold increase. SEM examination of the alloys revealed that water vapor alone allowed the formation of chromium oxide protective layers on the superstainless alloys. The enhanced stainless alloys underwent more corrosion due to greater attack of sulfur. Iron-rich oxide layers were more likely to form, which do not provide protection from further corrosion. The addition of chlorine further increased the corrosion because of its ability to diffuse through the oxide layers and react with iron. This resulted in a broken, discontinuous, and loose oxide layer that offered less protection. Niobium, although added to aid in creep strength, was found to be detrimental to corrosion resistance. The niobium tended to be concentrated in nodules and was easily attacked through sulfidation, providing conduits for further corrosion deep into the alloy. The alloys that displayed the best corrosion resistance were those which could produce chromium oxide protective layers. The predicted microstructure of all alloys except Alloy HR3C is the same and provided no further information relating to corrosion resistance. No correlation can be found relating corrosion resistance to the quantity of minor austenite-or ferrite-stabilizing elements. Also, there does not appear to be a correlation between corrosion resistance and the Cr:Ni ratio of the alloy. These alloys were tested for their

  8. Method of producing superplastic alloys and superplastic alloys produced by the method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troeger, Lillianne P. (Inventor); Starke, Jr., Edgar A. (Inventor); Crooks, Roy (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A method for producing new superplastic alloys by inducing in an alloy the formation of precipitates having a sufficient size and homogeneous distribution that a sufficiently refined grain structure to produce superplasticity is obtained after subsequent PSN processing. An age-hardenable alloy having at least one dispersoid phase is selected for processing. The alloy is solution heat-treated and cooled to form a supersaturated solid solution. The alloy is plastically deformed sufficiently to form a high-energy defect structure useful for the subsequent heterogeneous nucleation of precipitates. The alloy is then aged, preferably by a multi-stage low and high temperature process, and precipitates are formed at the defect sites. The alloy then is subjected to a PSN process comprising plastically deforming the alloy to provide sufficient strain energy in the alloy to ensure recrystallization, and statically recrystallizing the alloy. A grain structure exhibiting new, fine, equiaxed and uniform grains is produced in the alloy. An exemplary 6xxx alloy of the type capable of being produced by the present invention, and which is useful for aerospace, automotive and other applications, is disclosed and claimed. The process is also suitable for processing any age-hardenable aluminum or other alloy.

  9. Alloy substantially free of dendrites and method of forming the same

    DOEpatents

    de Figueredo, Anacleto M.; Apelian, Diran; Findon, Matt M.; Saddock, Nicholas

    2009-04-07

    Described herein are alloys substantially free of dendrites. A method includes forming an alloy substantially free of dendrites. A superheated alloy is cooled to form a nucleated alloy. The temperature of the nucleated alloy is controlled to prevent the nuclei from melting. The nucleated alloy is mixed to distribute the nuclei throughout the alloy. The nucleated alloy is cooled with nuclei distributed throughout.

  10. First principles theory of disordered alloys and alloy phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Stocks, G.M.; Nicholson, D.M.C.; Shelton, W.A.

    1993-06-05

    These lecture notes review the LDA-KKR-CPA method for treating the electronic structure and energetics of random alloys and the MF-CF and GPM theories of ordering and phase stability built on the LDA- KKR-CPA description of the disordered phase. Section 2 lays out the basic LDA-KKR-CPA theory of random alloys and some applications. Section 3 reviews the progress made in understanding specific ordering phenomena in binary solid solutions base on the MF-CF and GPM theories of ordering and phase stability. Examples are Fermi surface nesting, band filling, off diagonal randomness, charge transfer, size difference or local strain fluctuations, magnetic effects; in each case, an attempt is made to link the ordering and the underlying electronic structure of the disordered phase. Section 4 reviews calculations of electronic structure of {beta}-phase Ni{sub c}Al{sub 1-c} alloys using a version of the LDA-KKR-CPA codes generalized to complex lattices.

  11. BAs-GaAs Semiconductor Alloys as a Photovoltaic Alternative to Nitride Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, G. L. W.; Zunger, A.

    2000-01-01

    Nitrogen alloyed III-V semiconductor compounds have been intensely studied in recent years due to unusual effects caused by nitrogen alloying. These effects are exploited in band gap engineering for specific applications such as solar cells and blue lasers.

  12. Preparation of TiMn alloy by mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F.; Weidmann, A.; Nebe, B. J.; Burkel, E.

    2009-01-01

    TiMn alloy was prepared by mechanical alloying and subsequently consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique for exploration of biomedical applications. The microstructures, mechanical properties and cytotoxicity of the TiMn alloys were investigated in comparison with the pure Ti and Mn metals. Ti8Mn and Ti12Mn alloys with high relative density (99%) were prepared by mechanical alloying for 60 h and SPS at 700 °C for 5 min. The doping of Mn in Ti has decreased the transformation temperature from α to β phase, increased the relative density and enhanced the hardness of the Ti metal significantly. The Ti8Mn alloys showed 86% cell viability which was comparable to that of the pure Ti (93%). The Mn can be used as a good alloying element for biomedical Ti metal, and the Ti8Mn alloy could have a potential use as bone substitutes and dental implants.

  13. Corrosion behavior of Alloy 690 and Alloy 693 in simulated nuclear high level waste medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samantaroy, Pradeep Kumar; Suresh, Girija; Paul, Ranita; Kamachi Mudali, U.; Raj, Baldev

    2011-11-01

    Nickel based alloys are candidate materials for the storage of high level waste (HLW) generated from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. In the present investigation Alloy 690 and Alloy 693 are assessed by potentiodynamic anodic polarization technique for their corrosion behavior in 3 M HNO 3, 3 M HNO 3 containing simulated HLW and in chloride medium. Both the alloys were found to possess good corrosion resistance in both the media at ambient condition. Microstructural examination was carried out by SEM for both the alloys after electrolytic etching. Compositional analysis of the passive film formed on the alloys in 3 M HNO 3 and 3 M HNO 3 with HLW was carried out by XPS. The surface of Alloy 690 and Alloy 693, both consists of a thin layer of oxide of Ni, Cr, and Fe under passivation in both the media. The results of investigation are presented in the paper.

  14. Progress in ODS Alloys: A Synopsis of a 2010 Workshop on Fe- Based ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kad, Bimal; Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Jones, Andy R.; Vito, Cedro III; Tatlock, Gordon J; Pint, Bruce A; Tortorelli, Peter F; Rawls, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    In Fall 2010, a workshop on the role and future of Fe-based Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys gathered together ODS alloy suppliers, potential industrial end-users, and technical experts in relevant areas. Presentations and discussions focused on the current state of development of these alloys, their availability from commercial suppliers, past major evaluations of ODS alloy components in fossil and nuclear energy applications, and the technical and economic issues attendant to commercial use of ODS alloys. Significant progress has been achieved in joining ODS alloys, with creep resistant joints successfully made by inertia welding, friction stir welding and plasma-assisted pulse diffusion bonding, and in improving models for the prediction of lifetime components. New powder and alloy fabrication methods to lower cost or improve endproduct properties were also described. The final open discussion centered on challenges and pathways for further development and large-scale use of ODS alloys.

  15. Status of Testing and Characterization of CMS Alloy 617 and Alloy 230

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju; Santella, Michael L; Battiste, Rick; Terry, Totemeier; Denis, Clark

    2006-08-01

    Status and progress in testing and characterizing CMS Alloy 617 and Alloy 230 tasks in FY06 at ORNL and INL are described. ORNL research has focused on CMS Alloy 617 development and creep and tensile properties of both alloys. In addition to refurbishing facilities to conduct tests, a significant amount of creep and tensile data on Alloy 230, worth several years of research funds and time, has been located and collected from private enterprise. INL research has focused on the creep-fatigue behavior of standard chemistry Alloy 617 base metal and fusion weldments. Creep-fatigue tests have been performed in air, vacuum, and purified Ar environments at 800 and 1000 C. Initial characterization and high-temperature joining work has also been performed on Alloy 230 and CCA Alloy 617 in preparation for creep-fatigue testing.

  16. Corrosion behavior and fatigue of alloy 625, alloy 33 and alloy 31 under conditions of decouplers in automotive exhaust systems

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, D.C.; Kloewer, J.; Koehler, M.; Kolb-Telieps, A.

    1998-12-31

    The alloys 625, 31, 33 and in some tests the newly developed alloy 626Si have been investigated with respect to their mechanical properties and their corrosion resistance against alkali salts containing chlorides at temperatures of 550 C, 65O C, 7OO C and 750 C. Concerning strength in the sensitized condition, all alloys are suitable as decoupler materials. The mechanical properties of alloys 625, 626Si and probably 31 indicate adequate manufacturing possibilities of bellows. All alloys investigated suffer accelerated corrosion in the presence of alkali salt containing chlorides at temperatures ranging from 550 C to 750 C. At 750 C alloy 626Si shows the lowest corrosion rate. At 75O C, 7OO C and 650 C no difference between the solution annealed and the sensitized specimens was found. At 55O C, however, the corrosion rate of the alloys 625 and 33 increased significantly, when the material was sensitized prior to corrosion testing. Alloy 31 does not suffer significant corrosion attack at 55O C both in the solution annealed and in the sensitized condition, thus making it a potential cost effective alternative to the more expensive alloy 625 for decoupler applications.

  17. Directionally solidified eutectic alloy gamma-beta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.

    1977-01-01

    A pseudobinary eutectic alloy composition was determined by a previously developed bleed-out technique. The directionally solidified eutectic alloy with a composition of Ni-37.4Fe-10.0Cr-9.6Al (in wt%) had tensile strengths decreasing from 1,090 MPa at room temperature to 54 MPa at 1,100 C. The low density, excellent microstructural stability, and oxidation resistance of the alloy during thermal cycling suggest that it might have applicability as a gas turbine vane alloy while its relatively low high temperature strength precludes its use as a blade alloy. A zirconium addition increased the 750 C strength, and a tungsten addition was ineffective. The gamma=beta eutectic alloys appeared to obey a normal freezing relation.

  18. Alloy Effects on the Gas Nitriding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Sisson, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Alloy elements, such as Al, Cr, V, and Mo, have been used to improve the nitriding performance of steels. In the present work, plain carbon steel AISI 1045 and alloy steel AISI 4140 were selected to compare the nitriding effects of the alloying elements in AISI 4140. Fundamental analysis is carried out by using the "Lehrer-like" diagrams (alloy specific Lehrer diagram and nitriding potential versus nitrogen concentration diagram) and the compound layer growth model to simulate the gas nitriding process. With this method, the fundamental understanding for the alloy effect based on the thermodynamics and kinetics becomes possible. This new method paves the way for the development of new alloy for nitriding.

  19. Machinability of hypereutectic silicon-aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Akasawa, T.

    1999-08-01

    The machinability of high-silicon aluminum alloys made by a P/M process and by casting was compared. The cutting test was conducted by turning on lathes with the use of cemented carbide tools. The tool wear by machining the P/M alloy was far smaller than the tool wear by machining the cast alloy. The roughness of the machined surface of the P/M alloy is far better than that of the cast alloy, and the turning speed did not affect it greatly at higher speeds. The P/M alloy produced long chips, so the disposal can cause trouble. The size effect of silicon grains on the machinability is discussed.

  20. A lightweight shape-memory magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yukiko; Ando, Daisuke; Sutou, Yuji; Koike, Junichi

    2016-07-22

    Shape-memory alloys (SMAs), which display shape recovery upon heating, as well as superelasticity, offer many technological advantages in various applications. Those distinctive behaviors have been observed in many polycrystalline alloy systems such as nickel titantium (TiNi)-, copper-, iron-, nickel-, cobalt-, and Ti-based alloys but not in lightweight alloys such as magnesium (Mg) and aluminum alloys. Here we present a Mg SMA showing superelasticity of 4.4% at -150°C and shape recovery upon heating. The shape-memory properties are caused by reversible martensitic transformation. This Mg alloy includes lightweight scandium, and its density is about 2 grams per cubic centimeter, which is one-third less than that of practical TiNi SMAs. This finding raises the potential for development and application of lightweight SMAs across a number of industries. PMID:27463668

  1. Nickel aluminide alloy suitable for structural applications

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T.

    1998-01-01

    Alloys for use in structural applications based upon NiAl to which are added selected elements to enhance room temperature ductility and high temperature strength. Specifically, small additions of molybdenum produce a beneficial alloy, while further additions of boron, carbon, iron, niobium, tantalum, zirconium and hafnium further improve performance of alloys at both room temperature and high temperatures. A preferred alloy system composition is Ni--(49.1.+-.0.8%)Al--(1.0.+-.0.8%)Mo--(0.7.+-.0.5%)Nb/Ta/Zr/Hf--(nearly zero to 0.03%)B/C, where the % is at. % in each of the concentrations. All alloys demonstrated good oxidation resistance at the elevated temperatures. The alloys can be fabricated into components using conventional techniques.

  2. Nickel aluminide alloy suitable for structural applications

    DOEpatents

    Liu, C.T.

    1998-03-10

    Alloys are disclosed for use in structural applications based upon NiAl to which are added selected elements to enhance room temperature ductility and high temperature strength. Specifically, small additions of molybdenum produce a beneficial alloy, while further additions of boron, carbon, iron, niobium, tantalum, zirconium and hafnium further improve performance of alloys at both room temperature and high temperatures. A preferred alloy system composition is Ni--(49.1{+-}0.8%)Al--(1.0{+-}0.8%)Mo--(0.7 + 0.5%)Nb/Ta/Zr/Hf--(nearly zero to 0.03%)B/C, where the % is at. % in each of the concentrations. All alloys demonstrated good oxidation resistance at the elevated temperatures. The alloys can be fabricated into components using conventional techniques. 4 figs.

  3. Annealing behavior of high permeability amorphous alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rabenberg, L.

    1980-06-01

    Effects of low temperature annealing on the magnetic properties of the amorphous alloy Co/sub 71/ /sub 4/Fe/sub 4/ /sub 6/Si/sub 9/ /sub 6/B/sub 14/ /sub 4/ were investigated. Annealing this alloy below 400/sup 0/C results in magnetic hardening; annealing above 400/sup 0/C but below the crystallization temperature results in magnetic softening. Above the crystallization temperature the alloy hardens drastically and irreversibly. Conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to show that the magnetic property changes at low temperatures occur while the alloy is truly amorphous. By imaging the magnetic microstructures, Lorentz electron microscopy has been able to detect the presence of microscopic inhomogeneities in this alloy. The low temperature annealing behavior of this alloy has been explained in terms of atomic pair ordering in the presence of the internal molecular field. Lorentz electron microscopy has been used to confirm this explanation.

  4. Wetting behavior of alternative solder alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, F.M.; Vianco, P.T.; Hernandez, C.L.; Rejent, J.A.

    1993-07-01

    Recent economic and environmental issues have stimulated interest in solder alloys other than the traditional Sn-Pb eutectic or near eutectic composition. Preliminary evaluations suggest that several of these alloys approach the baseline properties (wetting, mechanical, thermal, and electrical) of the Sn-Pb solders. Final alloy acceptance will require major revisions to existing industrial and military soldering specifications. Bulk alloy and solder joint properties are consequently being investigated to validate their producibility and reliability. The work reported in this paper examines the wetting behavior of several of the more promising commercial alloys on copper substrates. Solder wettability was determined by the meniscometer and wetting balance techniques. The wetting results suggest that several of the alternative solders would satisfy pretinning and surface mount soldering applications. Their use on plated through hole technology might be more difficult since the alloys generally did not spread or flow as well as the 60Sn-40Pb solder.

  5. A lightweight shape-memory magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Yukiko; Ando, Daisuke; Sutou, Yuji; Koike, Junichi

    2016-07-01

    Shape-memory alloys (SMAs), which display shape recovery upon heating, as well as superelasticity, offer many technological advantages in various applications. Those distinctive behaviors have been observed in many polycrystalline alloy systems such as nickel titantium (TiNi)–, copper-, iron-, nickel-, cobalt-, and Ti-based alloys but not in lightweight alloys such as magnesium (Mg) and aluminum alloys. Here we present a Mg SMA showing superelasticity of 4.4% at –150°C and shape recovery upon heating. The shape-memory properties are caused by reversible martensitic transformation. This Mg alloy includes lightweight scandium, and its density is about 2 grams per cubic centimeter, which is one-third less than that of practical TiNi SMAs. This finding raises the potential for development and application of lightweight SMAs across a number of industries.

  6. Magnesium-lithium alloys developed for low temperature use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunkerley, F. J.; Leavenworth, H. W., Jr.

    1967-01-01

    Three new magnesium-lithium alloys have been developed for application at cryogenic temperatures. These lightweight alloys have approximately doubled the tensile and yield strengths at room temperature of previously described magnesium-lithium alloys.

  7. Copper and nickel adherently electroplated on titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. E.

    1967-01-01

    Anodic treatment of titanium alloy enables electroplating of tightly adherent coatings of copper and nickel on the alloy. The alloy is treated in a solution of hydrofluoric and acetic acids, followed by the electroplating process.

  8. [Microbial corrosion of dental alloy].

    PubMed

    Li, Lele; Liu, Li

    2004-10-01

    There is a very complicated electrolytical environment in oral cavity with plenty of microorganisms existing there. Various forms of corrosion would develop when metallic prosthesis functions in mouth. One important corrosive form is microbial corrosion. The metabolic products, including organic acid and inorganic acid, will affect the pH of the surface or interface of metallic prosthesis and make a change in composition of the medium, thus influencing the electron-chemical reaction and promoting the development of corrosion. The problem of develpoment of microbial corrosion on dental alloy in the oral environment lies in the primary condition that the bacteria adhere to the surface of alloy and form a relatively independent environment that promotes corrosion. PMID:15553877

  9. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenall, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    Heats of transformation of eutectic alloys were measured for many binary and ternary systems by differential scanning calorimetry and thermal analysis. Only the relatively cheap and plentiful elements Mg, Al, Si, P, Ca, Cu, Zn were considered. A method for measuring volume change during transformation was developed using x-ray absorption in a confined sample. Thermal expansion coefficients of both solid and liquid states of aluminum and of its eutectics with copper and with silicon also were determined. Preliminary evaluation of containment materials lead to the selection of silicon carbide as the initial material for study. Possible applications of alloy PCMs for heat storage in conventional and solar central power stations, small solar receivers and industrial furnace operations are under consideration.

  10. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birchenall, C. E.

    1980-03-01

    Heats of transformation of eutectic alloys were measured for many binary and ternary systems by differential scanning calorimetry and thermal analysis. Only the relatively cheap and plentiful elements Mg, Al, Si, P, Ca, Cu, Zn were considered. A method for measuring volume change during transformation was developed using x-ray absorption in a confined sample. Thermal expansion coefficients of both solid and liquid states of aluminum and of its eutectics with copper and with silicon also were determined. Preliminary evaluation of containment materials lead to the selection of silicon carbide as the initial material for study. Possible applications of alloy PCMs for heat storage in conventional and solar central power stations, small solar receivers and industrial furnace operations are under consideration.