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Sample records for incomplete hippocampal inversion

  1. Incomplete Hippocampal Inversion: A Comprehensive MRI Study of Over 2000 Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Claire; Toro, Roberto; Cohen, Fanny; Fischer, Clara; Mhaya, Amel; Samper-González, Jorge; Hasboun, Dominique; Mangin, Jean-François; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bokde, Arun L. W.; Bromberg, Uli; Buechel, Christian; Cattrell, Anna; Conrod, Patricia; Flor, Herta; Gallinat, Juergen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lemaitre, Hervé; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paillère Martinot, Marie-Laure; Orfanos, Dimitri P.; Paus, Tomas; Poustka, Luise; Smolka, Michael N.; Walter, Henrik; Whelan, Robert; Frouin, Vincent; Schumann, Gunter; Glaunès, Joan A.; Colliot, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The incomplete-hippocampal-inversion (IHI), also known as malrotation, is an atypical anatomical pattern of the hippocampus, which has been reported in healthy subjects in different studies. However, extensive characterization of IHI in a large sample has not yet been performed. Furthermore, it is unclear whether IHI are restricted to the medial-temporal lobe or are associated with more extensive anatomical changes. Here, we studied the characteristics of IHI in a community-based sample of 2008 subjects of the IMAGEN database and their association with extra-hippocampal anatomical variations. The presence of IHI was assessed on T1-weighted anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using visual criteria. We assessed the association of IHI with other anatomical changes throughout the brain using automatic morphometry of cortical sulci. We found that IHI were much more frequent in the left hippocampus (left: 17%, right: 6%, χ2−test, p < 10−28). Compared to subjects without IHI, subjects with IHI displayed morphological changes in several sulci located mainly in the limbic lobe. Our results demonstrate that IHI are a common left-sided phenomenon in normal subjects and that they are associated with morphological changes outside the medial temporal lobe. PMID:26733822

  2. Incomplete Hippocampal Inversion: A Comprehensive MRI Study of Over 2000 Subjects.

    PubMed

    Cury, Claire; Toro, Roberto; Cohen, Fanny; Fischer, Clara; Mhaya, Amel; Samper-González, Jorge; Hasboun, Dominique; Mangin, Jean-François; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Buechel, Christian; Cattrell, Anna; Conrod, Patricia; Flor, Herta; Gallinat, Juergen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lemaitre, Hervé; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paillère Martinot, Marie-Laure; Orfanos, Dimitri P; Paus, Tomas; Poustka, Luise; Smolka, Michael N; Walter, Henrik; Whelan, Robert; Frouin, Vincent; Schumann, Gunter; Glaunès, Joan A; Colliot, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The incomplete-hippocampal-inversion (IHI), also known as malrotation, is an atypical anatomical pattern of the hippocampus, which has been reported in healthy subjects in different studies. However, extensive characterization of IHI in a large sample has not yet been performed. Furthermore, it is unclear whether IHI are restricted to the medial-temporal lobe or are associated with more extensive anatomical changes. Here, we studied the characteristics of IHI in a community-based sample of 2008 subjects of the IMAGEN database and their association with extra-hippocampal anatomical variations. The presence of IHI was assessed on T1-weighted anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using visual criteria. We assessed the association of IHI with other anatomical changes throughout the brain using automatic morphometry of cortical sulci. We found that IHI were much more frequent in the left hippocampus (left: 17%, right: 6%, χ(2)-test, p < 10(-28)). Compared to subjects without IHI, subjects with IHI displayed morphological changes in several sulci located mainly in the limbic lobe. Our results demonstrate that IHI are a common left-sided phenomenon in normal subjects and that they are associated with morphological changes outside the medial temporal lobe. PMID:26733822

  3. The incomplete inverse and its applications to the linear least squares problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morduch, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    A modified matrix product is explained, and it is shown that this product defiles a group whose inverse is called the incomplete inverse. It was proven that the incomplete inverse of an augmented normal matrix includes all the quantities associated with the least squares solution. An answer is provided to the problem that occurs when the data residuals are too large and when insufficient data to justify augmenting the model are available.

  4. Inverse relationship between adult hippocampal cell proliferation and synaptic rewiring in the dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Butz, Markus; Teuchert-Noodt, Gertraud; Grafen, Keren; van Ooyen, Arjen

    2008-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis is a key feature of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). Neurogenesis is accompanied by synaptogenesis as new cells become integrated into the circuitry of the hippocampus. However, little is known to what extent the embedding of new neurons rewires the pre-existing network. Here we investigate synaptic rewiring in the DG of gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) under different rates of adult cell proliferation caused by different rearing conditions as well as juvenile methamphetamine treatment. Surprisingly, we found that an increased cell proliferation reduced the amount of synaptic rewiring. To help explain this unexpected finding, we developed a novel model of dentate network formation incorporating neurogenesis and activity-dependent synapse formation and remodelling. In the model, we show that homeostasis of neuronal activity can account for the inverse relationship between cell proliferation and synaptic rewiring. PMID:18481284

  5. Incomplete inversion and double-valued fundamental linewidth of infrared HeNe and HeXe lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kuppens, S.J.M.; Eijkelenborg, M.A. van; Schrama, C.A.; Exter, M.P. van; Woerdman, J.P.

    1996-03-01

    The authors have measured the quantum-limited linewidths of small HeNe 3.39 {micro}m and HeXe 3.51 {micro}m lasers. In contrast to the expected Schawlow-Townes behavior strong deviations from the inverse power dependence are observed, leading to a double-valued relation between the linewidth and the output power. This phenomenon is analyzed in terms of the increase of spontaneous emission, by a factor N{sub sp}, due to incompleteness of the inversion. The analysis shows that typically N{sub sp} has a value ranging from 1--10. Combining existing models for the pump power dependence of the level populations with measurements of the small signal gain they are able to explain the observed double-valued linewidth behavior in a quantitative way.

  6. Cleavage, incomplete inversion, and cytoplasmic bridges in Gonium pectorale (Volvocales, Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Iida, Hitoshi; Ota, Shuhei; Inouye, Isao

    2013-09-01

    Multicellularity arose several times in evolution of eukaryotes. The volvocine algae have full range of colonial organization from unicellular to colonies, and thus these algae are well-known models for examining the evolution and mechanisms of multicellularity. Gonium pectorale is a multicellular species of Volvocales and is thought to be one of the first small colonial organisms among the volvocine algae. In these algae, a cytoplasmic bridge is one of the key traits that arose during the evolution of multicellularity. Here, we observed the inversion process and the cytoplasmic bridges in G. pectorale using time-lapse, fluorescence, and electron microscopy. The cytoplasmic bridges were located in the middle region of the cell in 2-, 4-, 8-, and 16-celled stages and in inversion stages. However, there were no cytoplasmic bridges in the mature adult stage. Cytoplasmic bridges and cortical microtubules in G. pectorale suggest that a mechanism of kinesin-microtubule machinery similar to that in other volvocine algae is responsible for inversion in this species. PMID:23455615

  7. Inversions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    Inversions are fascinating phenomena. They are reversals of the normal or expected order. They occur across a wide variety of contexts. What do inversions have to do with learning spaces? The author suggests that they are a useful metaphor for the process that is unfolding in higher education with respect to education. On the basis of…

  8. Increased Cortical Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Precedes Incomplete Extinction of Conditioned Fear and Increased Hippocampal Excitatory Tone in a Mouse Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Brandy L; Ghoddoussi, Farhad; Charlton, Jennifer L; Kohler, Robert J; Galloway, Matthew P; Perrine, Shane A; Conti, Alana C

    2016-09-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) contributes to development of affective disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Psychiatric symptoms typically emerge in a tardive fashion post-TBI, with negative effects on recovery. Patients with PTSD, as well as rodent models of PTSD, demonstrate structural and functional changes in brain regions mediating fear learning, including prefrontal cortex (PFC), amygdala (AMYG), and hippocampus (HC). These changes may reflect loss of top-down control by which PFC normally exhibits inhibitory influence over AMYG reactivity to fearful stimuli, with HC contribution. Considering the susceptibility of these regions to injury, we examined fear conditioning (FC) in the delayed post-injury period, using a mouse model of mTBI. Mice with mTBI displayed enhanced acquisition and delayed extinction of FC. Using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ex vivo, we examined PFC, AMYG, and HC levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate as surrogate measures of inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission, respectively. Eight days post-injury, GABA was increased in PFC, with no significant changes in AMYG. In animals receiving FC and mTBI, glutamate trended toward an increase and the GABA/glutamate ratio decreased in ventral HC at 25 days post-injury, whereas GABA decreased and GABA/glutamate decreased in dorsal HC. These neurochemical changes are consistent with early TBI-induced PFC hypoactivation facilitating the fear learning circuit and exacerbating behavioral fear responses. The latent emergence of overall increased excitatory tone in the HC, despite distinct plasticity in dorsal and ventral HC fields, may be associated with disordered memory function, manifested as incomplete extinction and enhanced FC recall. PMID:26529240

  9. Elevated cerebrospinal fluid 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in macaques following early life stress and inverse association with hippocampal volume: preliminary implications for serotonin-related function in mood and anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    Coplan, Jeremy D.; Fulton, Sasha L.; Reiner, Wade; Jackowski, Andrea; Panthangi, Venkatesh; Perera, Tarique D.; Gorman, Jack M.; Huang, Yung-yu; Tang, Cheuk Y.; Hof, Patrick R.; Kaffman, Arie; Dwork, Andrew J.; Mathew, Sanjay J.; Kaufman, Joan; Mann, J. John

    2014-01-01

    Background: Early life stress (ELS) is cited as a risk for mood and anxiety disorders, potentially through altered serotonin neurotransmission. We examined the effects of ELS, utilizing the variable foraging demand (VFD) macaque model, on adolescent monoamine metabolites. We sought to replicate an increase in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) observed in two previous VFD cohorts. We hypothesized that elevated cisternal 5-HIAA was associated with reduced neurotrophic effects, conceivably due to excessive negative feedback at somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptors. A putatively decreased serotonin neurotransmission would be reflected by reductions in hippocampal volume and white matter (WM) fractional anisotropy (FA). Methods: When infants were 2–6 months of age, bonnet macaque mothers were exposed to VFD. We employed cisternal CSF taps to measure monoamine metabolites in VFD (N = 22) and non-VFD (N = 14) offspring (mean age = 2.61 years). Metabolites were correlated with hippocampal volume obtained by MRI and WM FA by diffusion tensor imaging in young adulthood in 17 males [10 VFD (mean age = 4.57 years)]. Results: VFD subjects exhibited increased CSF 5-HIAA compared to non-VFD controls. An inverse correlation between right hippocampal volume and 5-HIAA was noted in VFD- but not controls. CSF HVA and MHPG correlated inversely with hippocampal volume only in VFD. CSF 5-HIAA correlated inversely with FA of the WM tracts of the anterior limb of the internal capsule (ALIC) only in VFD. Conclusions: Elevated cisternal 5-HIAA in VFD may reflect increased dorsal raphe serotonin, potentially inducing excessive autoreceptor activation, inducing a putative serotonin deficit in terminal fields. Resultant reductions in neurotrophic activity are reflected by smaller right hippocampal volume. Convergent evidence of reduced neurotrophic activity in association with high CSF 5-HIAA in VFD was reflected by reduced FA of the ALIC. PMID:25566007

  10. Relating incomplete data and incomplete theory

    SciTech Connect

    Binetruy, P.; Kane, G.L.; Wang, Ting T.; Nelson, Brent D.; Wang, L.-T.

    2004-11-01

    Assuming string theorists will not soon provide a compelling case for the primary theory underlying particle physics, the field will proceed as it has historically: with data stimulating and testing ideas. Ideally the soft supersymmetry breaking Lagrangian will be measured and its patterns will point to the underlying theory. But there are two new problems. First a matter of principle: the theory may be simplest at distance scales and in numbers of dimensions where direct experiments are not possible. Second a practical problem: in the foreseeable future (with mainly hadron collider data) too few observables can be measured to lead to direct connections between experiment and theory. In this paper we discuss and study these issues and consider ways to circumvent the problems, studying models to test methods. We propose a semiquantitative method for focusing and sharpening thinking when trying to relate incomplete data to incomplete theory, as will probably be necessary.

  11. Decomposition of incomplete fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sobotka, L.B.; Sarantities, D.G.; Stracener, D.W.; Majka, Z.; Abenante, V.; Semkow, T.M.; Hensley, D.C.; Beene, J.R.; Halbert, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    The velocity distribution of fusion-like products formed in the reaction 701 MeV /sup 28/Si+/sup 100/Mo is decomposed into 26 incomplete fusion channels. The momentum deficit of the residue per nonevaporative mass unit is approximately equal to the beam momentum per nucleon. The yields of the incomplete fusion channels correlate with the Q-value for projectile fragmentation rather than that for incomplete fusion. The backward angle multiplicities of light particles and heavy ions increase with momentum transfer, however, the heavy ion multiplicities also depend on the extent of the fragmentation of the incomplete fusion channel. These data indicate that at fixed linear momentum transfer, increased fragmentation of the unfused component is related to a reduced transferred angular momentum. 22 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Nonlinear dynamical model based control of in vitro hippocampal output

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Min-Chi; Song, Dong; Berger, Theodore W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a modeling-control paradigm to control the hippocampal output (CA1 response) for the development of hippocampal prostheses. In order to bypass a damaged hippocampal region (e.g., CA3), downstream hippocampal signal (e.g., CA1 responses) needs to be reinstated based on the upstream hippocampal signal (e.g., dentate gyrus responses) via appropriate stimulations to the downstream (CA1) region. In this approach, we optimize the stimulation signal to CA1 by using a predictive DG-CA1 nonlinear model (i.e., DG-CA1 trajectory model) and an inversion of the CA1 input–output model (i.e., inverse CA1 plant model). The desired CA1 responses are first predicted by the DG-CA1 trajectory model and then used to derive the optimal stimulation intensity through the inverse CA1 plant model. Laguerre-Volterra kernel models for random-interval, graded-input, contemporaneous-graded-output system are formulated and applied to build the DG-CA1 trajectory model and the CA1 plant model. The inverse CA1 plant model to transform desired output to input stimulation is derived from the CA1 plant model. We validate this paradigm with rat hippocampal slice preparations. Results show that the CA1 responses evoked by the optimal stimulations accurately replicate the CA1 responses recorded in the hippocampal slice with intact trisynaptic pathway. PMID:23429994

  13. Hippocampal gray matter volume in bilateral vestibular failure.

    PubMed

    Göttlich, Martin; Jandl, Nico M; Sprenger, Andreas; Wojak, Jann F; Münte, Thomas F; Krämer, Ulrike M; Helmchen, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Bilateral vestibular failure (BVF) is a severe chronic disorder of the labyrinth or the eighth cranial nerve characterized by unsteadiness of gait and disabling oscillopsia during head movements. According to animal data, vestibular input to the hippocampus is proposed to contribute to spatial memory and spatial navigation. Except for one seminal study showing the association of impaired spatial navigation and hippocampal atrophy, patient data in BVF are lacking. Therefore, we performed a voxel-wise comparison of the hippocampal gray matter volume (GMV) in a clinically representative sample of 27 patients with incomplete BVF and 29 age- and gender-matched healthy controls to test the hypothesis of hippocampal atrophy in BVF. Although the two groups did not generally differ in their hippocampal GMV, a reduction of GMV in the bilateral hippocampal CA3 region was significantly correlated with increased vestibulopathy-related clinical impairment. We propose that GMV reduction in the hippocampus of BVF patients is related to the severity of vestibular-induced disability which is in line with combined hippocampal atrophy and disorders of spatial navigation in complete vestibular deafferentation due to bilateral nerve section. Clinically, however, the most frequent etiologies of BVF cause incomplete lesions. Accordingly, hippocampus atrophy and deficits in spatial navigation occur possibly less frequently than previously suspected. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1998-2006, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26918638

  14. Incomplete Dirac reduction of constrained Hamiltonian systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chandre, C.

    2015-10-15

    First-class constraints constitute a potential obstacle to the computation of a Poisson bracket in Dirac’s theory of constrained Hamiltonian systems. Using the pseudoinverse instead of the inverse of the matrix defined by the Poisson brackets between the constraints, we show that a Dirac–Poisson bracket can be constructed, even if it corresponds to an incomplete reduction of the original Hamiltonian system. The uniqueness of Dirac brackets is discussed. The relevance of this procedure for infinite dimensional Hamiltonian systems is exemplified.

  15. Electromagnetic inverse scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bojarski, N. N.

    1972-01-01

    A three-dimensional electromagnetic inverse scattering identity, based on the physical optics approximation, is developed for the monostatic scattered far field cross section of perfect conductors. Uniqueness of this inverse identity is proven. This identity requires complete scattering information for all frequencies and aspect angles. A nonsingular integral equation is developed for the arbitrary case of incomplete frequence and/or aspect angle scattering information. A general closed-form solution to this integral equation is developed, which yields the shape of the scatterer from such incomplete information. A specific practical radar solution is presented. The resolution of this solution is developed, yielding short-pulse target resolution radar system parameter equations. The special cases of two- and one-dimensional inverse scattering and the special case of a priori knowledge of scatterer symmetry are treated in some detail. The merits of this solution over the conventional radar imaging technique are discussed.

  16. Changes in fitness are associated with changes in hippocampal microstructure and hippocampal volume among older adults.

    PubMed

    Kleemeyer, Maike Margarethe; Kühn, Simone; Prindle, John; Bodammer, Nils Christian; Brechtel, Lars; Garthe, Alexander; Kempermann, Gerd; Schaefer, Sabine; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the effects of fitness changes on hippocampal microstructure and hippocampal volume. Fifty-two healthy participants aged 59-74years with a sedentary lifestyle were randomly assigned to either of two levels of exercise intensity. Training lasted for six months. Physical fitness, hippocampal volumes, and hippocampal microstructure were measured before and after training. Hippocampal microstructure was assessed by mean diffusivity, which inversely reflects tissue density; hence, mean diffusivity is lower for more densely packed tissue. Mean changes in fitness did not differ reliably across intensity levels of training, so data were collapsed across groups. Multivariate modeling of pretest-posttest differences using structural equation modeling (SEM) revealed that individual differences in latent change were reliable for all three constructs. More positive changes in fitness were associated with more positive changes in tissue density (i.e., more negative changes in mean diffusivity), and more positive changes in tissue density were associated with more positive changes in volume. We conclude that fitness-related changes in hippocampal volume may be brought about by changes in tissue density. The relative contributions of angiogenesis, gliogenesis, and/or neurogenesis to changes in tissue density remain to be identified. PMID:26584869

  17. Approximate inverse preconditioning of iterative methods for nonsymmetric linear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Benzi, M.; Tuma, M.

    1996-12-31

    A method for computing an incomplete factorization of the inverse of a nonsymmetric matrix A is presented. The resulting factorized sparse approximate inverse is used as a preconditioner in the iterative solution of Ax = b by Krylov subspace methods.

  18. Estimation of incomplete multinomial data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Credeur, K. R.

    1980-01-01

    Program estimates cell probabilities for data observed to fall in one of two or more categories when exact category cannot be determined. Data are assumed to be randomly incomplete. Estimation minimizes risk of quadratic loss. Program should be useful in projects where multinomial data is analyzed, but where observations are sometimes incomplete. Program is in FORTRAN IV and Assembler for batch execution on CYBER 173.

  19. Hippocampal internal architecture and postoperative seizure outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy due to hippocampal sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Elkommos, Samia; Weber, Bernd; Niehusmann, Pitt; Volmering, Elisa; Richardson, Mark P.; Goh, Yen Y.; Marson, Anthony G.; Elger, Christian; Keller, Simon S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Semi-quantitative analysis of hippocampal internal architecture (HIA) on MRI has been shown to be a reliable predictor of the side of seizure onset in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). In the present study, we investigated the relationship between postoperative seizure outcome and preoperative semi-quantitative measures of HIA. Methods We determined HIA on high in-plane resolution preoperative T2 short tau inversion recovery MR images in 79 patients with presumed unilateral mesial TLE (mTLE) due to hippocampal sclerosis (HS) who underwent amygdalohippocampectomy and postoperative follow up. HIA was investigated with respect to postoperative seizure freedom, neuronal density determined from resected hippocampal specimens, and conventionally acquired hippocampal volume. Results HIA ratings were significantly related to some neuropathological features of the resected hippocampus (e.g. neuronal density of selective CA regions, Wyler grades), and bilaterally with preoperative hippocampal volume. However, there were no significant differences in HIA ratings of the to-be-resected or contralateral hippocampus between patients rendered seizure free (ILAE 1) compared to those continuing to experience seizures (ILAE 2-5). Conclusions This work indicates that semi-quantitative assessment of HIA on high-resolution MRI provides a surrogate marker of underlying histopathology, but cannot prospectively distinguish between patients who will continue to experience postoperative seizures and those who will be rendered seizure free. The predictive power of HIA for postoperative seizure outcome in non-lesional patients with TLE should be explored. PMID:26803053

  20. Empathy in Hippocampal Amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Beadle, J. N.; Tranel, D.; Cohen, N. J.; Duff, M. C.

    2013-01-01

    Empathy is critical to the quality of our relationships with others and plays an important role in life satisfaction and well-being. The scientific investigation of empathy has focused on characterizing its cognitive and neural substrates, and has pointed to the importance of a network of brain regions involved in emotional experience and perspective taking (e.g., ventromedial prefrontal cortex, amygdala, anterior insula, cingulate). While the hippocampus has rarely been the focus of empathy research, the hallmark properties of the hippocampal declarative memory system (e.g., representational flexibility, relational binding, on-line processing capacity) make it well-suited to meet some of the crucial demands of empathy, and a careful investigation of this possibility could make a significant contribution to the neuroscientific understanding of empathy. The present study is a preliminary investigation of the role of the hippocampal declarative memory system in empathy. Participants were three patients (1 female) with focal, bilateral hippocampal (HC) damage and severe declarative memory impairments and three healthy demographically matched comparison participants. Empathy was measured as a trait through a battery of gold standard questionnaires and through on-line ratings and prosocial behavior in response to a series of empathy inductions. Patients with hippocampal amnesia reported lower cognitive and emotional trait empathy than healthy comparison participants. Unlike healthy comparison participants, in response to the empathy inductions hippocampal patients reported no increase in empathy ratings or prosocial behavior. The results provide preliminary evidence for a role for hippocampal declarative memory in empathy. PMID:23526601

  1. Incomplete

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stauffer, Sandra L.

    2011-01-01

    Elizabeth Parker's reflection on her experience as a musician educator working with children in an urban non-profit context is an uncomfortable read for me. In a courageous act, Parker makes public her private misgivings about her past experience and allows scrutiny of them in the form of two public commentaries as well as the private musings of…

  2. Matriculation Research Report: Incomplete Grades; Data & Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerda, Joe

    The policy on incomplete grades at California's College of the Canyons states that incompletes may only be given under circumstances beyond students' control and that students must make arrangements with faculty prior to the end of the semester to clear the incomplete. Failure to complete an incomplete may result in an "F" grade. While incompletes…

  3. Incomplete Kochen-Specker coloring

    SciTech Connect

    Granstroem, Helena

    2007-09-15

    A particular incomplete Kochen-Specker coloring, suggested by Appleby [Stud. Hist. Philos. Mod. Phys. 36, 1 (2005)] in dimension three, is generalized to arbitrary dimension. We investigate its effectivity as a function of dimension, using two different measures. A limit is derived for the fraction of the sphere that can be colored using the generalized Appleby construction as the number of dimensions approaches infinity. The second, and physically more relevant measure of effectivity, is to look at the fraction of properly colored ON bases. Using this measure, we derive a ''lower bound for the upper bound'' in three and four real dimensions.

  4. Incomplete Closure of the Left Atrial Appendage: Implication and Management.

    PubMed

    Aryana, Arash; d'Avila, André

    2016-09-01

    Incomplete left atrial appendage closure (LAAC) occurs in ∼30-40 % of cases following both surgical and percutaneous closure methods. Incomplete surgical LAAC may further be classified as incompletely surgically ligated LAA (ISLL) or LAA stump. ISLL is associated with a significantly increased risk of thrombus formation/thromboembolism. Moreover, this risk is highest in the absence of oral anticoagulation (OAC) and inversely correlates with the size of the ISLL neck. Not only routine screening for ISLL seems critical, but also long-term OAC should strongly be considered in this high-risk cohort. Alternatively, complete endocardial occlusion using a surrogate method may represent a reasonable option, particularly in those intolerant to long-term OAC therapy. Although thrombus formation/thromboembolic events have also been described in patients with incomplete LAAC following percutaneous occlusion, an association between the two remains less clear. However, given the rise and growing interest in percutaneous LAAC methods, additional research in this area is clearly warranted. PMID:27443378

  5. Semantic Borders and Incomplete Understanding.

    PubMed

    Silva-Filho, Waldomiro J; Dazzani, Maria Virgínia

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we explore a fundamental issue of Cultural Psychology, that is our "capacity to make meaning", by investigating a thesis from contemporary philosophical semantics, namely, that there is a decisive relationship between language and rationality. Many philosophers think that for a person to be described as a rational agent he must understand the semantic content and meaning of the words he uses to express his intentional mental states, e.g., his beliefs and thoughts. Our argument seeks to investigate the thesis developed by Tyler Burge, according to which our mastery or understanding of the semantic content of the terms which form our beliefs and thoughts is an "incomplete understanding". To do this, we discuss, on the one hand, the general lines of anti-individualism or semantic externalism and, on the other, criticisms of the Burgean notion of incomplete understanding - one radical and the other moderate. We defend our understanding that the content of our beliefs must be described in the light of the limits and natural contingencies of our cognitive capacities and the normative nature of our rationality. At heart, anti-individualism leads us to think about the fact that we are social creatures, living in contingent situations, with important, but limited, cognitive capacities, and that we receive the main, and most important, portion of our knowledge simply from what others tell us. Finally, we conclude that this discussion may contribute to the current debate about the notion of borders. PMID:26111737

  6. Rhythms of the hippocampal network.

    PubMed

    Colgin, Laura Lee

    2016-04-01

    The hippocampal local field potential (LFP) shows three major types of rhythms: theta, sharp wave-ripples and gamma. These rhythms are defined by their frequencies, they have behavioural correlates in several species including rats and humans, and they have been proposed to carry out distinct functions in hippocampal memory processing. However, recent findings have challenged traditional views on these behavioural functions. In this Review, I discuss our current understanding of the origins and the mnemonic functions of hippocampal theta, sharp wave-ripples and gamma rhythms on the basis of findings from rodent studies. In addition, I present an updated synthesis of their roles and interactions within the hippocampal network. PMID:26961163

  7. Interictal Hippocampal Spiking Influences the Occurrence of Hippocampal Sleep Spindles

    PubMed Central

    Frauscher, Birgit; Bernasconi, Neda; Caldairou, Benoit; von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Bernasconi, Andrea; Gotman, Jean; Dubeau, François

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The significance of hippocampal sleep spindles and their relation to epileptic activity is still a matter of controversy. Hippocampal spindles have been considered a physiological phenomenon, an evoked response to afferent epileptic discharges, or even the expression of an epileptic manifestation. To address this question, we investigated the presence and rate of hippocampal spindles in focal pharmacoresistant epilepsy patients undergoing scalp-intracerebral electroencephalography (EEG). Design: Sleep recording with scalp-intracerebral EEG. Setting: Tertiary referral epilepsy center. Patients: Twenty-five epilepsy patients (extratemporal: n = 6, temporal: n = 15, and multifocal including the temporal lobe: n = 4). Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: We analyzed associations between hippocampal spindles and hippocampal electrophysiological findings (interictal spiking, seizure onset zone) and magnetic resonance imaging volumetry. Sixteen of 25 patients (64%) had hippocampal spindles (extratemporal epilepsy: 6/6; temporal epilepsy: 10/15; and multifocal epilepsy: 0/4; P = 0.005). Median spindle rate was 0.6 (range, 0.1–8.6)/min in nonrapid eye movement sleep. Highest spindle rates were found in hippocampi of patients with extratemporal epilepsy (P < 0.001). A negative association was found between hippocampal spiking activity and spindle rate (P = 0.003). We found no association between the presence (n = 21) or absence (n = 17) of hippocampal seizure onset zone and hippocampal spindle rate (P = 0.114), and between a normal (n = 30) or atrophic (n = 8) hippocampus and hippocampal spindle rate (P = 0.195). Conclusions: Hippocampal spindles represent a physiological phenomenon, with an expression that is diminished in epilepsy affecting the temporal lobe. Hippocampal spiking lowered the rate of hippocampal spindles, suggesting that epileptic discharges may at least in part be a transformation of these physiological events, similar to the

  8. Hippocampal MR volumetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, John W.; Botteron, K.; Brunsden, Barry S.; Sheline, Yvette I.; Walkup, Ronald K.; Black, Kevin J.; Gado, Mokhtar; Vannier, Michael W.

    1994-09-01

    Goal: To estimate hippocampal volumes from in vivo 3D magnetic resonance (MR) brain images and determine inter-rater and intra- rater repeatability. Objective: The precision and repeatability of hippocampal volume estimates using stereologic measurement methods is sought. Design: Five normal control and five schizophrenic subjects were MR scanned using a MPRAGE protocol. Fixed grid stereologic methods were used to estimate hippocampal volumes on a graphics workstation. The images were preprocessed using histogram analysis to standardize 3D MR image scaling from 16 to 8 bits and image volumes were interpolated to 0.5 mm3 isotropic voxels. The following variables were constant for the repeated stereologic measures: grid size, inter-slice distance (1.5 mm), voxel dimensions (0.5 mm3), number of hippocampi measured (10), total number of measurements per rater (40), and number of raters (5). Two grid sizes were tested to determine the coefficient of error associated with the number of sampled 'hits' (approximately 140 and 280) on the hippocampus. Starting slice and grid position were randomly varied to assure unbiased volume estimates. Raters were blind to subject identity, diagnosis, and side of the brain from which the image volumes were extracted and the order of subject presentation was randomized for each of the raters. Inter- and intra-rater intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were determined. Results: The data indicate excellent repeatability of fixed grid stereologic hippocampal volume measures when using an inter-slice distance of 1.5 mm and a 6.25 mm2 grid (inter-rater ICCs equals 0.86 - 0.97, intra- rater ICCs equals 0.85 - 0.97). One major advantage of the current study was the use of 3D MR data which significantly improved visualization of hippocampal boundaries by providing the ability to access simultaneous orthogonal views while counting stereological marks within the hippocampus. Conclusion: Stereological estimates of 3D volumes from 2D MR

  9. Incompletely compacted equilibrated ordinary chondrites

    SciTech Connect

    Sasso, M.R.; Macke, R.J.; Boesenberg, J.S.; Britt, D.T.; Rovers, M.L.; Ebel, D.S.; Friedrich, J.M.

    2010-01-22

    We document the size distributions and locations of voids present within five highly porous equilibrated ordinary chondrites using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray microtomography ({mu}CT) and helium pycnometry. We found total porosities ranging from {approx}10 to 20% within these chondrites, and with {mu}CT we show that up to 64% of the void space is located within intergranular voids within the rock. Given the low (S1-S2) shock stages of the samples and the large voids between mineral grains, we conclude that these samples experienced unusually low amounts of compaction and shock loading throughout their entire post accretionary history. With Fe metal and FeS metal abundances and grain size distributions, we show that these chondrites formed naturally with greater than average porosities prior to parent body metamorphism. These materials were not 'fluffed' on their parent body by impact-related regolith gardening or events caused by seismic vibrations. Samples of all three chemical types of ordinary chondrites (LL, L, H) are represented in this study and we conclude that incomplete compaction is common within the asteroid belt.

  10. 32 CFR 651.44 - Incomplete information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Incomplete information. 651.44 Section 651.44 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Environmental Impact Statement § 651.44 Incomplete...

  11. 32 CFR 651.44 - Incomplete information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Incomplete information. 651.44 Section 651.44 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Environmental Impact Statement § 651.44 Incomplete information. When the proposed action...

  12. Combined effects of marijuana and nicotine on memory performance and hippocampal volume.

    PubMed

    Filbey, Francesca M; McQueeny, Tim; Kadamangudi, Shrinath; Bice, Collette; Ketcherside, Ariel

    2015-10-15

    Combined use of marijuana (MJ) and tobacco is highly prevalent in today's population. Individual use of either substance is linked to structural brain changes and altered cognitive function, especially with consistent reports of hippocampal volume deficits and poorer memory performance. However, the combined effects of MJ and tobacco on hippocampal structure and on learning and memory processes remain unknown. In this study, we examined both the individual and combined effects of MJ and tobacco on hippocampal volumes and memory performance in four groups of adults taken from two larger studies: MJ-only users (n=36), nicotine-only (Nic-only, n=19), combined marijuana and nicotine users (MJ+Nic, n=19) and non-using healthy controls (n=16). Total bilateral hippocampal volumes and memory performance (WMS-III logical memory) were compared across groups controlling for total brain size and recent alcohol use. Results found MJ and MJ+Nic groups had smaller total hippocampal volumes compared to Nic-only and controls. No significant difference between groups was found between immediate and delayed story recall. However, the controls showed a trend for larger hippocampal volumes being associated with better memory scores, while MJ+Nic users showed a unique inversion, whereby smaller hippocampal volume was associated with better memory. Overall, results suggest abnormalities in the brain-behavior relationships underlying memory processes with combined use of marijuana and nicotine use. Further research will need to address these complex interactions between MJ and nicotine. PMID:26187691

  13. Failsafe modes in incomplete minority game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xiaobo; Wan, Shaolong; Chen, Wen

    2009-09-01

    We make a failsafe extension to the incomplete minority game model, give a brief analysis on how incompleteness will effect system efficiency. Simulations that limited incompleteness in strategies can improve the system efficiency. Among three failsafe modes, the “Back-to-Best” mode brings most significant improvement and keeps the system efficiency in a long range of incompleteness. A simple analytic formula has a trend which matches simulation results. The IMMG model is used to study the effect of distribution, and we find that there is one junction point in each series of curves, at which system efficiency is not influenced by the distribution of incompleteness. When pIbar > the concentration of incompleteness weakens the effect. On the other side of , concentration will be helpful. When pI is close to zero agents using incomplete strategies have on average better profits than those using standard strategies, and the “Back-to-Best” agents have a wider range of pI to win.

  14. Quantum Bertrand duopoly of incomplete information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Gan; Chen, Xi; Sun, Min; Du, Jiangfeng

    2005-05-01

    We study Bertrand's duopoly of incomplete information. It is found that the effect of quantum entanglement on the outcome of the game is dramatically changed by the uncertainty of information. In contrast with the case of complete information where the outcome increases with entanglement, when information is incomplete the outcome is maximized at some finite entanglement. As a consequence, information and entanglement are both crucial factors that determine the properties of a quantum oligopoly.

  15. Multi-View Learning With Incomplete Views.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chang; Tao, Dacheng; Xu, Chao

    2015-12-01

    One underlying assumption of the conventional multi-view learning algorithms is that all examples can be successfully observed on all the views. However, due to various failures or faults in collecting and pre-processing the data on different views, we are more likely to be faced with an incomplete-view setting, where an example could be missing its representation on one view (i.e., missing view) or could be only partially observed on that view (i.e., missing variables). Low-rank assumption used to be effective for recovering the random missing variables of features, but it is disabled by concentrated missing variables and has no effect on missing views. This paper suggests that the key to handling the incomplete-view problem is to exploit the connections between multiple views, enabling the incomplete views to be restored with the help of the complete views. We propose an effective algorithm to accomplish multi-view learning with incomplete views by assuming that different views are generated from a shared subspace. To handle the large-scale problem and obtain fast convergence, we investigate a successive over-relaxation method to solve the objective function. Convergence of the optimization technique is theoretically analyzed. The experimental results on toy data and real-world data sets suggest that studying the incomplete-view problem in multi-view learning is significant and that the proposed algorithm can effectively handle the incomplete views in different applications. PMID:26469202

  16. Fast wavelet based sparse approximate inverse preconditioner

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, W.L.

    1996-12-31

    Incomplete LU factorization is a robust preconditioner for both general and PDE problems but unfortunately not easy to parallelize. Recent study of Huckle and Grote and Chow and Saad showed that sparse approximate inverse could be a potential alternative while readily parallelizable. However, for special class of matrix A that comes from elliptic PDE problems, their preconditioners are not optimal in the sense that independent of mesh size. A reason may be that no good sparse approximate inverse exists for the dense inverse matrix. Our observation is that for this kind of matrices, its inverse entries typically have piecewise smooth changes. We can take advantage of this fact and use wavelet compression techniques to construct a better sparse approximate inverse preconditioner. We shall show numerically that our approach is effective for this kind of matrices.

  17. GABA release by hippocampal astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Le Meur, Karim; Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Grandes, Pedro; Audinat, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes can directly influence neuronal activity through the release of various transmitters acting on membrane receptors expressed by neurons. However, in contrast to glutamate and ATP for instance, the release of GABA (γ-amino-butyric acid) by astrocytes is still poorly documented. Here, we used whole-cell recordings in rat acute brain slices and electron microscopy to test whether hippocampal astrocytes release the inhibitory transmitter GABA. We observed that slow transient inhibitory currents due to the activation of GABAA receptors occur spontaneously in principal neurons of the three main hippocampal fields (CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus). These currents share characteristics with the slow NMDA receptor-mediated currents previously shown to result from astrocytic glutamate release: they occur in the absence of synaptic transmission and have variable kinetics and amplitudes as well as low frequencies. Osmotic pressure reduction, known to enhance transmitter release from astrocytes, similarly increased the frequency of non-synaptic GABA and glutamate currents. Simultaneous occurrence of slow inhibitory and excitatory currents was extremely rare. Yet, electron microscopy examination of immunostained hippocampal sections shows that about 80% of hippocampal astrocytes [positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)] were immunostained for GABA. Our results provide quantitative characteristics of the astrocyte-to-neuron GABAergic signaling. They also suggest that all principal neurons of the hippocampal network are under a dual, excitatory and inhibitory, influence of astrocytes. The relevance of the astrocytic release of GABA, and glutamate, on the physiopathology of the hippocampus remains to be established. PMID:22912614

  18. Hippocampal BOLD response during category learning predicts subsequent performance on transfer generalization.

    PubMed

    Fera, Francesco; Passamonti, Luca; Herzallah, Mohammad M; Myers, Catherine E; Veltri, Pierangelo; Morganti, Giuseppina; Quattrone, Aldo; Gluck, Mark A

    2014-07-01

    To test a prediction of our previous computational model of cortico-hippocampal interaction (Gluck and Myers [1993, 2001]) for characterizing individual differences in category learning, we studied young healthy subjects using an fMRI-adapted category-learning task that has two phases, an initial phase in which associations are learned through trial-and-error feedback followed by a generalization phase in which previously learned rules can be applied to novel associations (Myers et al. [2003]). As expected by our model, we found a negative correlation between learning-related hippocampal responses and accuracy during transfer, demonstrating that hippocampal adaptation during learning is associated with better behavioral scores during transfer generalization. In addition, we found an inverse relationship between Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) activity in the striatum and that in the hippocampal formation and the orbitofrontal cortex during the initial learning phase. Conversely, activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex and parietal lobes dominated over that of the hippocampal formation during the generalization phase. These findings provide evidence in support of theories of the neural substrates of category learning which argue that the hippocampal region plays a critical role during learning for appropriately encoding and representing newly learned information so that that this learning can be successfully applied and generalized to subsequent novel task demands. PMID:24142480

  19. Incomplete fusion dynamics by spin distribution measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D.; Ali, R.; Ansari, M. Afzal; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Sharma, M. K.; Singh, B. P.; Babu, K. Surendra; Sinha, Rishi K.; Kumar, R.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Bhowmik, R. K.

    2010-02-15

    Spin distributions for various evaporation residues populated via complete and incomplete fusion of {sup 16}O with {sup 124}Sn at 6.3 MeV/nucleon have been measured, using charged particles (Z=1,2)-{gamma} coincidence technique. Experimentally measured spin distributions of the residues produced as incomplete fusion products associated with 'fast'{alpha}- and 2{alpha}-emission channels observed in the 'forward cone' are found to be distinctly different from those of the residues produced as complete fusion products. Moreover, 'fast'{alpha}-particles that arise from larger angular momentum in the entrance channel are populated at relatively higher driving input angular momentum than those produced through complete fusion. The incomplete fusion residues are populated in a limited, higher-angular-momentum range, in contrast to the complete fusion products, which are populated over a broad spin range.

  20. Indirect inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Since Doug MacAyeal's pioneering studies of the ice-stream basal traction optimizations by control methods, inversions for unknown parameters (e.g., basal traction, accumulation patterns, etc) have become a hallmark of the present-day ice-sheet modeling. The common feature of such inversion exercises is a direct relationship between optimized parameters and observations used in the optimization procedure. For instance, in the standard optimization for basal traction by the control method, ice-stream surface velocities constitute the control data. The optimized basal traction parameters explicitly appear in the momentum equations for the ice-stream velocities (compared to the control data). The inversion for basal traction is carried out by minimization of the cost (or objective, misfit) function that includes the momentum equations facilitated by the Lagrange multipliers. Here, we build upon this idea, and demonstrate how to optimize for parameters indirectly related to observed data using a suite of nested constraints (like Russian dolls) with additional sets of Lagrange multipliers in the cost function. This method opens the opportunity to use data from a variety of sources and types (e.g., velocities, radar layers, surface elevation changes, etc.) in the same optimization process.

  1. New molecules for hippocampal development.

    PubMed

    Skutella, T; Nitsch, R

    2001-02-01

    Pathfinding by developing axons towards their proper targets is an essential step in establishing appropriate neuronal connections. Recent work involving cell culture assays and molecular biology strategies, including knockout animals, strongly indicates that a complex network of guidance signals regulates the formation of hippocampal connections during development. Outgrowing axons are routed towards the hippocampal formation by specific expression of long-range cues, which include secreted class 3 semaphorins, netrin 1 and Slit proteins. Local membrane- or substrate-anchored molecules, such as ligands of the ephrin A subclass, provide layer-specific positional information. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie axonal guidance during hippocampal development might be of importance in making therapeutic use of sprouting fibers, which are produced following the loss of afferents in CNS lesion. PMID:11164941

  2. CIMGS: An incomplete orthogonal factorization preconditioner

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Bramley, R.; Gallivan, K.

    1994-12-31

    This paper introduces, analyzes, and tests a preconditioning method for conjugate gradient (CG) type iterative methods. The authors start by examining incomplete Gram-Schmidt factorization (IGS) methods in order to motivate the new preconditioner. They show that the IGS family is more stable than IC, and they successfully factor any full rank matrix. Furthermore, IGS preconditioners are at least as effective in accelerating convergence of CG type iterative methods as the incomplete Cholesky (IC) preconditioner. The drawback of IGS methods are their high cost of factorization. This motivates finding a new algorithm, CIMGS, which can generate the same factor in a more efficient way.

  3. PIC (PRODUCTS OF INCOMPLETE COMBUSTION) ANALYSIS METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of method evaluations for products of incomplete combustion (PICs): 36 proposed PICs were evaluated by previously developed gas chromatography/flame ionization detection (GC/FID) and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) methods. It also gives resu...

  4. Aesthetic plastic correction of incomplete testicular feminization.

    PubMed

    Hinderer, U T

    1979-12-01

    Surgery was performed for feminization of ambiguous (male) external genitalia in 1973 on a patient with incomplete testicular feminization (familial male hermaphroditism of mixed variety). Rhinoplasty and augmentation of the chin, the malar region, the breasts were also performed not only to improve the patient's sexual role but to enhance the aesthetic appearance, as an aid in better phychosocial adaptation. PMID:24173991

  5. Sonographic and MR features of puerperal uterine inversion.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Shruti; Sharma, Sanjiv; Jhobta, Anupam; Aggarwal, Neeti; Thakur, Charu S

    2014-06-01

    Puerperal uterine inversion is a rare and potentially life-threatening complication of a mismanaged third stage of labour. Early diagnosis is mandatory for proper management of the patient. Complete uterine inversion is a clinical diagnosis. However, incomplete uterine inversion is difficult to identify and warrants further workup. Sonographic evaluation, although a bedside procedure, may be confusing. The conspicuity of findings is much greater on MR examination than on ultrasound. Only a few diagnostic imaging findings in uterine inversion have been described in previous reports. We present the case of a 26-year-old woman who had a full-term vaginal delivery and presented after 20 days with acute urinary retention and mild vaginal bleeding. She was diagnosed as a case of neglected subacute incomplete uterine inversion. Both greyscale and Doppler sonographic and MR features of the case are described with an emphasis on better delineation of uterine and adnexal anatomy on MR imaging. PMID:24619161

  6. Pharmacological Intervention of Hippocampal CA3 NMDA Receptors Impairs Acquisition and Long-Term Memory Retrieval of Spatial Pattern Completion Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fellini, Laetitia; Florian, Cedrick; Courtey, Julie; Roullet, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    Pattern completion is the ability to retrieve complete information on the basis of incomplete retrieval cues. Although it has been demonstrated that this cognitive capacity depends on the NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs) of the hippocampal CA3 region, the role played by these glutamatergic receptors in the pattern completion process has not yet been…

  7. Hippocampal Sclerosis: Causes and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Walker, Matthew Charles

    2015-06-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis is the commonest cause of drug-resistant epilepsy in adults, and is associated with alterations to structures and networks beyond the hippocampus.In addition to being a cause of epilepsy, the hippocampus is vulnerable to damage from seizure activity. In particular, prolonged seizures (status epilepticus) can result in hippocampal sclerosis. The hippocampus is also vulnerable to other insults including traumatic brain injury, and inflammation. Hippocampal sclerosis can occur in association with other brain lesions; the prevailing view is that it is probably a secondary consequence. In such instances, successful surgical treatment usually involves the resection of both the lesion and the involved hippocampus. Experimental data have pointed to numerous neuroprotective strategies to prevent hippocampal sclerosis. Initial neuroprotective strategies aimed at glutamate receptors may be effective, but later, metabolic pathways, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species, and inflammation are involved, perhaps necessitating the use of interventions aimed at multiple targets. Some of the therapies that we use to treat status epilepticus may neuroprotect. However, prevention of neuronal death does not necessarily prevent the later development of epilepsy or cognitive deficits. Perhaps, the most important intervention is the early, aggressive treatment of seizure activity, and the prevention of prolonged seizures. PMID:26060898

  8. GENETIC INFLUENCE OF APOE4 GENOTYPE ON HIPPOCAMPAL MORPHOMETRY - AN N=725 SURFACE-BASED ADNI STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jie; Leporé, Natasha; Gutman, Boris A.; Thompson, Paul M.; Baxter, Leslie C.; Caselli, Richard L.; Wang, Yalin

    2014-01-01

    The apolipoprotein E (APOE) e4 allele is the most prevalent genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Hippocampal volumes are generally smaller in AD patients carrying the e4 allele compared to e4 non-carriers. Here we examined the effect of APOE e4 on hippocampal morphometry in a large imaging database – the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). We automatically segmented and constructed hippocampal surfaces from the baseline MR images of 725 subjects with known APOE genotype information including 167 with AD, 354 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 204 normal controls. High-order correspondences between hippocampal surfaces were enforced across subjects with a novel inverse consistent surface fluid registration method. Multivariate statistics consisting of multivariate tensor-based morphometry (mTBM) and radial distance were computed for surface deformation analysis. Using Hotelling’s T2 test, we found significant morphological deformation in APOE e4 carriers relative to non-carriers in the entire cohort as well as in the non-demented (pooled MCI and control) subjects, affecting the left hippocampus more than the right, and this effect was more pronounced in e4 homozygotes than heterozygotes. Our findings are consistent with previous studies that showed e4 carriers exhibit accelerated hippocampal atrophy; we extend these findings to a novel measure of hippocampal morphometry. Hippocampal morphometry has significant potential as an imaging biomarker of early stage AD. PMID:24453132

  9. 19 CFR 4.75 - Incomplete manifest; incomplete export declarations; bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 15 CFR 30.24), the port director may accept in lieu thereof an incomplete manifest (referred to as a... Polish People's Republic (Including Danzig) Rumania South Yemen Union of Soviet Socialist Republics...

  10. 19 CFR 4.75 - Incomplete manifest; incomplete export declarations; bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 15 CFR 30.24), the port director may accept in lieu thereof an incomplete manifest (referred to as a... Polish People's Republic (Including Danzig) Rumania South Yemen Union of Soviet Socialist Republics...

  11. 19 CFR 4.75 - Incomplete manifest; incomplete export declarations; bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 15 CFR 30.24), the port director may accept in lieu thereof an incomplete manifest (referred to as a... Polish People's Republic (Including Danzig) Rumania South Yemen Union of Soviet Socialist Republics...

  12. 19 CFR 4.75 - Incomplete manifest; incomplete export declarations; bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 15 CFR 30.24), the port director may accept in lieu thereof an incomplete manifest (referred to as a... Polish People's Republic (Including Danzig) Rumania South Yemen Union of Soviet Socialist Republics...

  13. 19 CFR 4.75 - Incomplete manifest; incomplete export declarations; bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 15 CFR 30.24), the port director may accept in lieu thereof an incomplete manifest (referred to as a... sector of Berlin) Hungary Iran Iraq Laos Latvia Libya Lithuania Mongolian People's Republic North...

  14. Advanced incomplete factorization algorithms for Stiltijes matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Il`in, V.P.

    1996-12-31

    The modern numerical methods for solving the linear algebraic systems Au = f with high order sparse matrices A, which arise in grid approximations of multidimensional boundary value problems, are based mainly on accelerated iterative processes with easily invertible preconditioning matrices presented in the form of approximate (incomplete) factorization of the original matrix A. We consider some recent algorithmic approaches, theoretical foundations, experimental data and open questions for incomplete factorization of Stiltijes matrices which are {open_quotes}the best{close_quotes} ones in the sense that they have the most advanced results. Special attention is given to solving the elliptic differential equations with strongly variable coefficients, singular perturbated diffusion-convection and parabolic equations.

  15. Past incompleteness of a bouncing multiverse

    SciTech Connect

    Vilenkin, Alexander; Zhang, Jun E-mail: jun.zhang@tufts.edu

    2014-06-01

    According to classical GR, Anti-de Sitter (AdS) bubbles in the multiverse terminate in big crunch singularities. It has been conjectured, however, that the fundamental theory may resolve these singularities and replace them by nonsingular bounces. This may have important implications for the beginning of the multiverse. Geodesics in cosmological spacetimes are known to be past-incomplete, as long as the average expansion rate along the geodesic is positive, but it is not clear that the latter condition is satisfied if the geodesic repeatedly passes through crunching AdS bubbles. We investigate this issue in a simple multiverse model, where the spacetime consists of a patchwork of FRW regions. The conclusion is that the spacetime is still past-incomplete, even in the presence of AdS bounces.

  16. Incomplete discoid lateral meniscus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Murlimanju, B V; Nair, N; Ganesan, S; Krishnamurthy, A

    2013-01-01

    The variations of lateral meniscus include pathologic entities which vary in size, shape and attachment. In this manuscript, we report a case of discoid lateral meniscus which was observed in an embalmed fetal cadaver. It was an incomplete variety of the discoid meniscus and observed on the right side knee. The clinical implication of this discoid meniscus has been emphasized along with the review of literature. The morphological and embryologic details of the discoid lateral menisci are discussed. PMID:24045517

  17. Classification and data acquisition with incomplete data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, David P.

    In remote-sensing applications, incomplete data can result when only a subset of sensors (e.g., radar, infrared, acoustic) are deployed at certain regions. The limitations of single sensor systems have spurred interest in employing multiple sensor modalities simultaneously. For example, in land mine detection tasks, different sensor modalities are better-suited to capture different aspects of the underlying physics of the mines. Synthetic aperture radar sensors may be better at detecting surface mines, while infrared sensors may be better at detecting buried mines. By employing multiple sensor modalities to address the detection task, the strengths of the disparate sensors can be exploited in a synergistic manner to improve performance beyond that which would be achievable with either single sensor alone. When multi-sensor approaches are employed, however, incomplete data can be manifested. If each sensor is located on a separate platform ( e.g., aircraft), each sensor may interrogate---and hence collect data over---only partially overlapping areas of land. As a result, some data points may be characterized by data (i.e., features) from only a subset of the possible sensors employed in the task. Equivalently, this scenario implies that some data points will be missing features. Increasing focus in the future on using---and fusing data from---multiple sensors will make such incomplete-data problems commonplace. In many applications involving incomplete data, it is possible to acquire the missing data at a cost. In multi-sensor remote-sensing applications, data is acquired by deploying sensors to data points. Acquiring data is usually an expensive, time-consuming task, a fact that necessitates an intelligent data acquisition process. Incomplete data is not limited to remote-sensing applications, but rather, can arise in virtually any data set. In this dissertation, we address the general problem of classification when faced with incomplete data. We also address the

  18. Medial septum regulates the hippocampal spatial representation

    PubMed Central

    Mamad, Omar; McNamara, Harold M.; Reilly, Richard B.; Tsanov, Marian

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal circuitry undergoes attentional modulation by the cholinergic medial septum. However, it is unclear how septal activation regulates the spatial properties of hippocampal neurons. We investigated here what is the functional effect of selective-cholinergic and non-selective septal stimulation on septo-hippocampal system. We show for the first time selective activation of cholinergic cells and their differential network effect in medial septum of freely-behaving transgenic rats. Our data show that depolarization of cholinergic septal neurons evokes frequency-dependent response from the non-cholinergic septal neurons and hippocampal interneurons. Our findings provide vital evidence that cholinergic effect on septo-hippocampal axis is behavior-dependent. During the active behavioral state the activation of septal cholinergic projections is insufficient to evoke significant change in the spiking of the hippocampal neurons. The efficiency of septo-hippocampal processing during active exploration relates to the firing patterns of the non-cholinergic theta-bursting cells. Non-selective septal theta-burst stimulation resets the spiking of hippocampal theta cells, increases theta synchronization, entrains the spiking of hippocampal place cells, and tunes the spatial properties in a timing-dependent manner. The spatial properties are augmented only when the stimulation is applied in the periphery of the place field or 400–650 ms before the animals approached the center of the field. In summary, our data show that selective cholinergic activation triggers a robust network effect in the septo-hippocampal system during inactive behavioral state, whereas the non-cholinergic septal activation regulates hippocampal functional properties during explorative behavior. Together, our findings uncover fast septal modulation on hippocampal network and reveal how septal inputs up-regulate and down-regulate the encoding of spatial representation. PMID:26175674

  19. Inverse Floatation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Saurabh; Mukherjee, Anish; Chatterjee, Souvick; Ganguly, Ranjan; Sen, Swarnendu; Mukhopadhyay, Achintya; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    We have observed that capillarity forces may cause floatation in a few non-intuitive configurations. These may be divided into 2 categories: i) floatation of heavier liquid droplets on lighter immiscible ones and ii) fully submerged floatation of lighter liquid droplets in a heavier immiscible medium. We call these counter-intuitive because of the inverse floatation configuration. For case (i) we have identified and studied in detail the several factors affecting the shape and maximum volume of the floating drop. We used water and vegetable oil combinations as test fluids and established the relation between Bond Number and maximum volume contained in a floating drop (in the order of μL). For case (ii), we injected vegetable oil drop-wise into a pool of water. The fully submerged configuration of the drop is not stable and a slight perturbation to the system causes the droplet to burst and float in partially submerged condition. Temporal variation of a characteristic length of the droplet is analyzed using MATLAB image processing. The constraint of small Bond Number establishes the assumption of lubrication regime in the thin gap. A brief theoretical formulation also shows the temporal variation of the gap thickness. Jadavpur University, Jagadis Bose Centre of Excellence, Virginia Tech.

  20. Hippocampal amnesia disrupts creative thinking

    PubMed Central

    Duff, Melissa C.; Kurczek, Jake; Rubin, Rachael; Cohen, Neal J.; Tranel, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Creativity requires the rapid combination and recombination of existing mental representations to create novel ideas and ways of thinking. The hippocampal system, through its interaction with neocortical storage sites, provides a relational database necessary for the creation, updating, maintenance, and juxtaposition of mental representations used in service of declarative memory. Given this functionality, we hypothesized that hippocampus would play a critical role in creative thinking. We examined creative thinking, as measured by verbal and figural forms of the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT), in a group of participants with hippocampal damage and severe declarative memory impairment as well as in a group of demographically matched healthy comparison participants. The patients with bilateral hippocampal damage performed significantly worse than comparison participants on both the verbal and figural portions of the TTCT. These findings suggest that hippocampus plays a role critical in creative thinking, adding to a growing body of work pointing to the diverse ways the hallmark processing features of hippocampus serve a variety of behaviors that require flexible cognition. PMID:24123555

  1. Topographic specificity of functional connections from hippocampal CA3 to CA1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brivanlou, Iman H.; Dantzker, Jami L. M.; Stevens, Charles F.; Callaway, Edward M.

    2004-02-01

    The hippocampus is a cortical region thought to play an important role in learning and memory. Most of our knowledge about the detailed organization of hippocampal circuitry responsible for these functions is derived from anatomical studies. These studies present an incomplete picture, however, because the functional character and importance of connections are often not revealed by anatomy. Here, we used a physiological method (photostimulation with caged glutamate) to probe the fine pattern of functional connectivity between the CA3 and CA1 subfields in the mouse hippocampal slice preparation. We recorded intracellularly from CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons while scanning with photostimulation across the entire CA3 subfield with high spatial resolution. Our results show that, at a given septotemporal level, nearby CA1 neurons receive synaptic inputs from neighboring CA3 neurons. Thus, the CA3 to CA1 mapping preserves neighbor relations.

  2. Dynamic pattern matcher using incomplete data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Gordon G. (Inventor); Wang, Lui (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    This invention relates generally to pattern matching systems, and more particularly to a method for dynamically adapting the system to enhance the effectiveness of a pattern match. Apparatus and methods for calculating the similarity between patterns are known. There is considerable interest, however, in the storage and retrieval of data, particularly, when the search is called or initiated by incomplete information. For many search algorithms, a query initiating a data search requires exact information, and the data file is searched for an exact match. Inability to find an exact match thus results in a failure of the system or method.

  3. Catalytic combustion with incompletely vaporized residual fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosfjord, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    Catalytic combustion of fuel lean mixtures of incompletely vaporized residual fuel and air was investigated. The 7.6 cm diameter, graded cell reactor was constructed from zirconia spinel substrate and catalyzed with a noble metal catalyst. Streams of luminous particles exited the rector as a result of fuel deposition and carbonization on the substrate. Similar results were obtained with blends of No. 6 and No. 2 oil. Blends of shale residual oil and No. 2 oil resulted in stable operation. In shale oil blends the combustor performance degraded with a reduced degree of fuel vaporization. In tests performed with No. 2 oil a similar effect was observed.

  4. Rate-dependent incompleteness of earthquake catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainzl, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Important information about the earthquake generation process can be gained from instrumental earthquake catalogs, but this requires complete recordings to avoid biased results. The local completeness magnitude Mc is known to depend on general conditions such as the seismographic network and the environmental noise, which generally limit the possibility to detect small events. The detectability can be additionally reduced by an earthquake-induced increase of the noise-level leading to short-term variations of Mc, which cannot be resolved by traditional methods relying on the analysis of the frequency-magnitude distribution. Based on simple assumptions, I propose a new method to estimate such temporal excursions of Mc solely based on the estimation of the earthquake rate resulting in a high temporal resolution of Mc. The approach is shown to be in agreement with the apparent decrease of the estimated Gutenberg-Richter b-value in high-activity phases of recorded data sets and the observed incompleteness periods after mainshocks. Furthermore, an algorithm to estimate temporal changes of Mc is introduced and applied to empirical aftershock and swarm sequences from California and central Europe, indicating that observed b-value fluctuations are often related to rate-dependent incompleteness of the earthquake catalogs.

  5. Robust pulmonary lobe segmentation against incomplete fissures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Suicheng; Zheng, Qingfeng; Siegfried, Jill; Pu, Jiantao

    2012-03-01

    As important anatomical landmarks of the human lung, accurate lobe segmentation may be useful for characterizing specific lung diseases (e.g., inflammatory, granulomatous, and neoplastic diseases). A number of investigations showed that pulmonary fissures were often incomplete in image depiction, thereby leading to the computerized identification of individual lobes a challenging task. Our purpose is to develop a fully automated algorithm for accurate identification of individual lobes regardless of the integrity of pulmonary fissures. The underlying idea of the developed lobe segmentation scheme is to use piecewise planes to approximate the detected fissures. After a rotation and a global smoothing, a number of small planes were fitted using local fissures points. The local surfaces are finally combined for lobe segmentation using a quadratic B-spline weighting strategy to assure that the segmentation is smooth. The performance of the developed scheme was assessed by comparing with a manually created reference standard on a dataset of 30 lung CT examinations. These examinations covered a number of lung diseases and were selected from a large chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) dataset. The results indicate that our scheme of lobe segmentation is efficient and accurate against incomplete fissures.

  6. Incomplete flagellar structures in Escherichia coli mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, T; Komeda, Y

    1981-01-01

    Escherichia coli mutants with defects in 29 flagellar genes identified so far were examined by electron microscopy for possession of incomplete flagellar structures in membrane-associated fractions. The results are discussed in consideration of the known transcriptional interaction of flagellar genes. Hook-basal body structures were detected in flaD, flaS, flaT, flbC, and hag mutants. The flaE mutant had a polyhook-basal body structure. An intact basal body appeared in flaK mutants. Putative precursors of the basal body were detected in mutants with defects in flaM, flaU, flaV, and flaY. No structures homologous to the flagellar basal body or its parts were detected in mutants with defects in flaA, flaB, flaC, flaG, flaH, flaI, flaL, flaN, flaO, flaP, flaQ, flaR, flaW, flaX, flbA, flbB, and flbD. One flaZ mutant had an incomplete flagellar basal body structure and another formed no significant structure, suggesting that flaZ is responsible for both basal body assembly and the transcription of the hag gene. Images PMID:7007337

  7. Optimization and geophysical inverse problems

    SciTech Connect

    Barhen, J.; Berryman, J.G.; Borcea, L.; Dennis, J.; de Groot-Hedlin, C.; Gilbert, F.; Gill, P.; Heinkenschloss, M.; Johnson, L.; McEvilly, T.; More, J.; Newman, G.; Oldenburg, D.; Parker, P.; Porto, B.; Sen, M.; Torczon, V.; Vasco, D.; Woodward, N.B.

    2000-10-01

    A fundamental part of geophysics is to make inferences about the interior of the earth on the basis of data collected at or near the surface of the earth. In almost all cases these measured data are only indirectly related to the properties of the earth that are of interest, so an inverse problem must be solved in order to obtain estimates of the physical properties within the earth. In February of 1999 the U.S. Department of Energy sponsored a workshop that was intended to examine the methods currently being used to solve geophysical inverse problems and to consider what new approaches should be explored in the future. The interdisciplinary area between inverse problems in geophysics and optimization methods in mathematics was specifically targeted as one where an interchange of ideas was likely to be fruitful. Thus about half of the participants were actively involved in solving geophysical inverse problems and about half were actively involved in research on general optimization methods. This report presents some of the topics that were explored at the workshop and the conclusions that were reached. In general, the objective of a geophysical inverse problem is to find an earth model, described by a set of physical parameters, that is consistent with the observational data. It is usually assumed that the forward problem, that of calculating simulated data for an earth model, is well enough understood so that reasonably accurate synthetic data can be generated for an arbitrary model. The inverse problem is then posed as an optimization problem, where the function to be optimized is variously called the objective function, misfit function, or fitness function. The objective function is typically some measure of the difference between observational data and synthetic data calculated for a trial model. However, because of incomplete and inaccurate data, the objective function often incorporates some additional form of regularization, such as a measure of smoothness

  8. Building Chaotic Model From Incomplete Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siek, Michael; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a number of novel techniques for building a predictive chaotic model from incomplete time series. A predictive chaotic model is built by reconstructing the time-delayed phase space from observed time series and the prediction is made by a global model or adaptive local models based on the dynamical neighbors found in the reconstructed phase space. In general, the building of any data-driven models depends on the completeness and quality of the data itself. However, the completeness of the data availability can not always be guaranteed since the measurement or data transmission is intermittently not working properly due to some reasons. We propose two main solutions dealing with incomplete time series: using imputing and non-imputing methods. For imputing methods, we utilized the interpolation methods (weighted sum of linear interpolations, Bayesian principle component analysis and cubic spline interpolation) and predictive models (neural network, kernel machine, chaotic model) for estimating the missing values. After imputing the missing values, the phase space reconstruction and chaotic model prediction are executed as a standard procedure. For non-imputing methods, we reconstructed the time-delayed phase space from observed time series with missing values. This reconstruction results in non-continuous trajectories. However, the local model prediction can still be made from the other dynamical neighbors reconstructed from non-missing values. We implemented and tested these methods to construct a chaotic model for predicting storm surges at Hoek van Holland as the entrance of Rotterdam Port. The hourly surge time series is available for duration of 1990-1996. For measuring the performance of the proposed methods, a synthetic time series with missing values generated by a particular random variable to the original (complete) time series is utilized. There exist two main performance measures used in this work: (1) error measures between the actual

  9. Post's program and incomplete recursively enumerable sets.

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, L; Soare, R I

    1991-01-01

    A set A of nonnegative integers is recursively enumerable (r.e.) if A can be computably listed. It is shown that there is a first-order property, Q(X), definable in E, the lattice of r.e. sets under inclusion, such that (i) if A is any r.e. set satisfying Q(A) then A is nonrecursive and Turing incomplete and (ii) there exists an r.e. set A satisfying Q(A). This resolves a long open question stemming from Post's program of 1944, and it sheds light on the fundamental problem of the relationship between the algebraic structure of an r.e. set A and the (Turing) degree of information that A encodes. PMID:11607241

  10. Enhanced photoabsorption efficiency of incomplete nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Venkatapathi, Murugesan; Dastidar, Sudipta G; Bharath, P; Roy, Arindam; Ghosh, Anupam

    2013-09-01

    The rather low scattering or extinction efficiency of small nanoparticles, metallic and otherwise, is significantly enhanced when they are adsorbed on a larger core particle. But the photoabsorption by particles with varying surface area fractions on a larger core particle is found to be limited by saturation. It is found that the core-shell particle can have a lower absorption efficiency than a dielectric core with its surface partially nucleated with absorbing particles-an "incomplete nanoshell" particle. We have both numerically and experimentally studied the optical efficiencies of titania (TiO2) nucleated in various degrees on silica (SiO2) nanospheres. We show that optimal surface nucleation over cores of appropriate sizes and optical properties will have a direct impact on the applications exploiting the absorption and scattering properties of such composite particles. PMID:23988933

  11. Regulatory perspective on incomplete control rod insertions

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterton, M.

    1997-01-01

    The incomplete control rod insertions experienced at South Texas Unit 1 and Wolf Creek are of safety concern to the NRC staff because they represent potential precursors to loss of shutdown margin. Even before it was determined if these events were caused by the control rods or by the fuel there was an apparent correlation of the problem with high burnup fuel. It was determined that there was also a correlation between high burnup and high drag forces as well as with rod drop time histories and lack of rod recoil. The NRC staff initial actions were aimed at getting a perspective on the magnitude of the problem as far as the number of plants and the amount of fuel that could be involved, as well as the safety significance in terms of shutdown margin. As tests have been performed and data has been analyzed the focus has shifted more toward understanding the problem and the ways to eliminate it. At this time the staff`s understanding of the phenomena is that it was a combination of factors including burnup, power history and temperature. The problem appears to be very sensitive to these factors, the interaction of which is not clearly understood. The model developed by Westinghouse provides a possible explanation but there is not sufficient data to establish confidence levels and sensitivity studies involving the key parameters have not been done. While several fixes to the problem have been discussed, no definitive fixes have been proposed. Without complete understanding of the phenomena, or fixes that clearly eliminate the problem the safety concern remains. The safety significance depends on the amount of shutdown margin lost due to incomplete insertion of the control rods. Were the control rods to stick high in the core, the reactor could not be shutdown by the control rods and other means such as emergency boration would be required.

  12. In praise of the incomplete leader.

    PubMed

    Ancona, Deborah; Malone, Thomas W; Orlikowski, Wanda J; Senge, Peter M

    2007-02-01

    Today's top executives are expected to do everything right, from coming up with solutions to unfathomably complex problems to having the charisma and prescience to rally stakeholders around a perfect vision of the future. But no one leader can be all things to all people. It's time to end the myth of the complete leader, say the authors. Those at the top must come to understand their weaknesses as well as their strengths. Only by embracing the ways in which they are incomplete can leaders fill in the gaps in their knowledge with others' skills. The incomplete leader has the confidence and humility to recognize unique talents and perspectives throughout the organization--and to let those qualities shine. The authors' work studying leadership over the past six years has led them to develop a framework of distributed leadership. Within that model, leadership consists of four capabilities: sensemaking, relating, "visioning," and inventing. Sensemaking involves understanding and mapping the context in which a company and its people operate. A leader skilled in this area can quickly identify the complexities of a given situation and explain them to others. The second capability, relating, means being able to build trusting relationships with others through inquiring (listening with intention), advocating (explaining one's own point of view), and connecting (establishing a network of allies who can help a leader accomplish his or her goals). Visioning, the third capability, means coming up with a compelling image of the future. It is a collaborative process that articulates what the members of an organization want to create. Finally, inventing involves developing new ways to bring that vision to life. Rarely will a single person be skilled in all four areas. That's why it's critical that leaders find others who can offset their limitations and complement their strengths. Those who don't will not only bear the burden of leadership alone but will find themselves at the helm

  13. Reduction of adult hippocampal neurogenesis confers vulnerability in an animal model of cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Michele A; Bulin, Sarah E; Fuller, Dwain C; Eisch, Amelia J

    2010-01-01

    Drugs of abuse dynamically regulate adult neurogenesis, which appears important for some types of learning and memory. Interestingly, a major site of adult neurogenesis, the hippocampus, is important in the formation of drug-context associations and in the mediation of drug-taking and drug-seeking behaviors in animal models of addiction. Correlative evidence suggests an inverse relationship between hippocampal neurogenesis and drug-taking or drug-seeking behaviors, but the lack of a causative link has made the relationship between adult-generated neurons and addiction unclear. We used rat intravenous cocaine self-administration in rodents, a clinically relevant animal model of addiction, to test the hypothesis that suppression of adult hippocampal neurogenesis enhances vulnerability to addiction and relapse. Suppression of adult hippocampal neurogenesis via cranial irradiation before drug-taking significantly increased cocaine self-administration on both fixed-ratio and progressive-ratio schedules, as well as induced a vertical shift in the dose-response curve. This was not a general enhancement of learning, motivation, or locomotion, because sucrose self-administration and locomotor activity were unchanged in irradiated rats. Suppression of adult hippocampal neurogenesis after drug-taking significantly enhanced resistance to extinction of drug-seeking behavior. These studies identify reduced adult hippocampal neurogenesis as a novel risk factor for addiction-related behaviors in an animal model of cocaine addiction. Furthermore, they suggest that therapeutics to specifically increase or stabilize adult hippocampal neurogenesis could aid in preventing initial addiction as well as future relapse. PMID:20053911

  14. Reduction of adult hippocampal neurogenesis confers vulnerability in an animal model of cocaine addiction

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Michele A.; Bulin, Sarah; Fuller, Dwain C.; Eisch, Amelia J.

    2010-01-01

    Drugs of abuse dynamically regulate adult neurogenesis, which appears important for some types of learning and memory. Interestingly, a major site of adult neurogenesis - the hippocampus - is important in the formation of drug-context associations and in the mediation of drug-taking and drug-seeking behaviors in animal models of addiction. Correlative evidence suggests an inverse relationship between hippocampal neurogenesis and drug-taking or drug-seeking behaviors, but the lack of a causative link has made the relationship between adult-generated neurons and addiction unclear. We used rat i.v. cocaine self-administration in rodents, a clinicall-relevant animal model of addiction, to test the hypothesis that suppression of adult hippocampal neurogenesis enhances vulnerability to addiction and relapse. Suppression of adult hippocampal neurogenesis via cranial irradiation before drug-taking significantly increased cocaine self-administration on both fixed-ratio and progressive-ratio schedules, as well as induced a vertical shift in the dose-response curve. This was not a general enhancement of learning, motivation or locomotion, as sucrose self-administration and locomotor activity were unchanged in irradiated rats. Suppression of adult hippocampal neurogenesis after drug-taking significantly enhanced resistance to extinction of drug-seeking behavior. These studies identify reduced adult hippocampal neurogenesis as a novel risk factor for addiction-related behaviors in an animal model of cocaine addiction. Further, they suggest that therapeutics to specifically increase or stabilize adult hippocampal neurogenesis could aid in preventing initial addiction as well as future relapse. PMID:20053911

  15. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Hippocampal Anatomy in Adolescents With Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bearden, Carrie E.; Soares, Jair C.; Klunder, Andrea D.; Nicoletti, Mark; Dierschke, Nicole; Hayashi, Kiralee M.; Narr, Katherine L.; Brambilla, Paolo; Sassi, Roberto B.; Axelson, David; Ryan, Neal; Birmaher, Boris; Thompson, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Early-onset bipolar disorder is thought to be a particularly severe variant of the illness. Continuity with the adult form of illness remains unresolved, but preliminary evidence suggests similar biological underpinnings. Recently, we observed localized hippocampal decreases in unmedicated adults with bipolar disorder that were not detectable with conventional volumetric measures. Using the same three-dimensional mapping methods, we sought to investigate whether a similar pattern exists in adolescents with bipolar disorder. Method High-resolution brain magnetic resonance images were acquired from 16 adolescents meeting DSM-IV criteria for bipolar disorder (mean age 15.5 ± 3.4 years, 50% female) and 20 demographically matched, typically developing control subjects. Three-dimensional parametric mesh models of the hippocampus were created from manual tracings of the hippocampal formation. Results Controlling for total brain volume, total hippocampal volume was significantly smaller in adolescent patients with bipolar disorder relative to controls (by 9.2%). Statistical mapping results, confirmed by permutation testing, revealed significant localized deformations in the head and tail of the left hippocampus in adolescents with bipolar disorder, relative to normal controls. In addition, there was a significant positive correlation between hippocampal size and age in patients with bipolar disorder, whereas healthy controls showed an inverse relation. Discussion Localized hippocampal deficits in adolescent patients with bipolar disorder suggest a possible neural correlate for memory deficits observed in this illness. Moreover, age-related increases in hippocampal size in patients with bipolar disorder, not observed in healthy controls, may reflect abnormal developmental mechanisms in bipolar disorder. This possibility must be confirmed by longitudinal studies. PMID:18356767

  16. Abnormalities of hippocampal-cortical connectivity in temporal lobe epilepsy patients with hippocampal sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; He, Huiguang; Lu, Jingjing; Wang, Chunheng; Li, Meng; Lv, Bin; Jin, Zhengyu

    2011-03-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) is the most common damage seen in the patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). In the present study, the hippocampal-cortical connectivity was defined as the correlation between the hippocampal volume and cortical thickness at each vertex throughout the whole brain. We aimed to investigate the differences of ipsilateral hippocampal-cortical connectivity between the unilateral TLE-HS patients and the normal controls. In our study, the bilateral hippocampal volumes were first measured in each subject, and we found that the ipsilateral hippocampal volume significantly decreased in the left TLE-HS patients. Then, group analysis showed significant thinner average cortical thickness of the whole brain in the left TLE-HS patients compared with the normal controls. We found significantly increased ipsilateral hippocampal-cortical connectivity in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus, the right cingulate gyrus and the left parahippocampal gyrus of the left TLE-HS patients, which indicated structural vulnerability related to the hippocampus atrophy in the patient group. However, for the right TLE-HS patients, no significant differences were found between the patients and the normal controls, regardless of the ipsilateral hippocampal volume, the average cortical thickness or the patterns of hippocampal-cortical connectivity, which might be related to less atrophies observed in the MRI scans. Our study provided more evidence for the structural abnormalities in the unilateral TLE-HS patients.

  17. Scalable tensor factorizations with incomplete data.

    SciTech Connect

    Morup, Morten; Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Acar, Evrim; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2010-07-01

    The problem of incomplete data - i.e., data with missing or unknown values - in multi-way arrays is ubiquitous in biomedical signal processing, network traffic analysis, bibliometrics, social network analysis, chemometrics, computer vision, communication networks, etc. We consider the problem of how to factorize data sets with missing values with the goal of capturing the underlying latent structure of the data and possibly reconstructing missing values (i.e., tensor completion). We focus on one of the most well-known tensor factorizations that captures multi-linear structure, CANDECOMP/PARAFAC (CP). In the presence of missing data, CP can be formulated as a weighted least squares problem that models only the known entries. We develop an algorithm called CP-WOPT (CP Weighted OPTimization) that uses a first-order optimization approach to solve the weighted least squares problem. Based on extensive numerical experiments, our algorithm is shown to successfully factorize tensors with noise and up to 99% missing data. A unique aspect of our approach is that it scales to sparse large-scale data, e.g., 1000 x 1000 x 1000 with five million known entries (0.5% dense). We further demonstrate the usefulness of CP-WOPT on two real-world applications: a novel EEG (electroencephalogram) application where missing data is frequently encountered due to disconnections of electrodes and the problem of modeling computer network traffic where data may be absent due to the expense of the data collection process.

  18. Incomplete pneumolysin oligomers form membrane pores.

    PubMed

    Sonnen, Andreas F-P; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Gilbert, Robert J C

    2014-01-01

    Pneumolysin is a member of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) family of pore-forming proteins that are produced as water-soluble monomers or dimers, bind to target membranes and oligomerize into large ring-shaped assemblies comprising approximately 40 subunits and approximately 30 nm across. This pre-pore assembly then refolds to punch a large hole in the lipid bilayer. However, in addition to forming large pores, pneumolysin and other CDCs form smaller lesions characterized by low electrical conductance. Owing to the observation of arc-like (rather than full-ring) oligomers by electron microscopy, it has been hypothesized that smaller oligomers explain smaller functional pores. To investigate whether this is the case, we performed cryo-electron tomography of pneumolysin oligomers on model lipid membranes. We then used sub-tomogram classification and averaging to determine representative membrane-bound low-resolution structures and identified pre-pores versus pores by the presence of membrane within the oligomeric curve. We found pre-pore and pore forms of both complete (ring) and incomplete (arc) oligomers and conclude that arc-shaped oligomeric assemblies of pneumolysin can form pores. As the CDCs are evolutionarily related to the membrane attack complex/perforin family of proteins, which also form variably sized pores, our findings are of relevance to that class of proteins as well. PMID:24759615

  19. Structural Plasticity and Hippocampal Function

    PubMed Central

    Leuner, Benedetta; Gould, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The hippocampus is a region of the mammalian brain that shows an impressive capacity for structural reorganization. Preexisting neural circuits undergo modifications in dendritic complexity and synapse number, and entirely novel neural connections are formed through the process of neurogenesis. These types of structural change were once thought to be restricted to development. However, it is now generally accepted that the hippocampus remains structurally plastic throughout life. This article reviews structural plasticity in the hippocampus over the lifespan, including how it is investigated experimentally. The modulation of structural plasticity by various experiential factors as well as the possible role it may have in hippocampal functions such as learning and memory, anxiety, and stress regulation are also considered. Although significant progress has been made in many of these areas, we highlight some of the outstanding issues that remain. PMID:19575621

  20. Support vector machines for geophysical inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzma, Heidi Anderson

    This thesis explores what it means to replace classical non-linear geophysical inversion with computer learning via Support Vector Machines. Geophysical inverse problems are almost always ill-posed which means that many different models (i.e. descriptions of the earth) can be found to explain a given noisy or incomplete data set. Regularization and constraints encourage inversions to find physically realistic models. The set of preferred models needs to be defined a priori using as much geologic knowledge as is available. In inversion, it is assumed that data and a forward modeling process is known. The goal is to solve for a model. In the SVM paradigm, a series of models and associated data are known. The goal is to solve for a reverse modeling process. Starting with a series of initial models assembled using all available geologic information, synthetic data is created using the most realistic forward modeling program available. With the synthetic data as inputs and the known models as outputs, a Support Vector Machine is trained to approximate a local inverse to the forward modeling program. The advantages of this approach are that it is honest about the need to establish, a priori, the kinds of models that are reasonable in a particular field situation. There is no need to adjust the forward process to accommodate inversion, because SVMs can be easily modified to capture complicated, non-linear relationships. SVMs are transparent and require very little programming. If an SVM is trained using model/data pairs that are drawn from the same probability distribution that is implicit in the regularization of an inversion, then it will get very similar results to the inversion. Because SVMs can interpret as much data as desired so long as the conditions of an experiment do not change, they can be used to perform otherwise computationally expensive procedures. The SVMs in this paper are trained to emulate linear and non-linear seismic Amplitude Variation with Offset

  1. Dynamic mapping of normal human hippocampal development.

    PubMed

    Gogtay, Nitin; Nugent, Tom F; Herman, David H; Ordonez, Anna; Greenstein, Deanna; Hayashi, Kiralee M; Clasen, Liv; Toga, Arthur W; Giedd, Jay N; Rapoport, Judith L; Thompson, Paul M

    2006-01-01

    The hippocampus, which plays an important role in memory functions and emotional responses, has distinct subregions subserving different functions. Because the volume and shape of the hippocampus are altered in many neuropsychiatric disorders, it is important to understand the trajectory of normal hippocampal development. We present the first dynamic maps to reveal the anatomical sequence of normal human hippocampal development. A novel hippocampal mapping technique was applied to a database of prospectively obtained brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans (100 scans in 31 children and adolescents), scanned every 2 yr for 6-10 yr between ages 4 and 25. Our results establish that the structural development of the human hippocampus is remarkably heterogeneous, with significant differences between posterior (increase over time) and anterior (loss over time) subregions. These distinct developmental trajectories of hippocampal subregions may parallel differences in their functional development. PMID:16826559

  2. Extracting molecular potentials from incomplete spectroscopic information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuan; Dutta, Sourav

    2015-12-01

    We extend our recently developed inversion method to extract excited-state potentials from fluorescence line positions and line strengths. We consider a previous limitation of the method arising due to insufficient input data in cases where the relatively weaker emission data are not experimentally available. We develop a solution to this problem by 'regenerating' these weak transition lines via applying a model potential, e.g. a Morse potential. The result of this procedure, illustrated for the Q-branch emission from the lowest three vibrational levels of the B(1Π) state of LiRb, is shown to have an error of 0.29 cm-1 in the classically allowed region and a global error of 5.67 cm-1 for V ≤ E(ν‧ = 10). The robustness of this procedure is also demonstrated by considering the statistical error in the measured line intensities.

  3. Incomplete fusion in 16O+159Tb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vijay R.; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Shuaib, Mohd.; Yadav, Abhishek; Bala, Indu; Sharma, Manoj K.; Gupta, S.; Singh, D. P.; Kumar, R.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.; Bhowmik, R. K.

    2016-02-01

    In heavy-ion induced reactions, incomplete fusion (ICF) has been found to be a process of greater importance and of distinct nature even at slightly above the barrier energies where complete fusion (CF) is supposed to be dominant. However, the studies are limited to a few projectile target combinations only. To confirm the distinctly different decay patterns observed in case of CF and ICF residues, and to understand the role of high ℓ-values in the onset of ICF, a particle-γ-coincidence technique has been employed to measure spin-distributions and feeding intensity profiles of CF and ICF residues populated via xn / pxn / αxn-channels in 16O+159Tb interactions at Elab ≈ 83.5 ± 1.5, 88.5 ± 1.5, 93.5 ± 1.5 and 97.6 ± 1.4 MeV. The Gamma Detector Array and the Charged Particles Detector Array have been used to detect prompt γ-rays in coincidence with charged particles (p and α). CF-α and ICF-α channels have been identified from backward (B)- and forward (F)-α-gated-γ-spectra, respectively. Reaction dependent decay patterns (thus, the feeding intensity profiles) have been observed in different α emitting channels. The CF channels are found to be widely populated and strongly fed over a broad spin range. In case of ICF-α channels, narrow range feeding was observed only for high-spin states or the low spin states were not populated. The mean ℓ-values involved in the production of ICF- αxn-channels are found to be higher than those involved in the production of CF- αxn-channels associated with fusion-evaporation reactions.

  4. Abnormalities in Hippocampal Functioning with Persistent Pain

    PubMed Central

    Mutso, Amelia A.; Radzicki, Daniel; Baliki, Marwan N.; Huang, Lejian; Banisadr, Ghazal; Centeno, Maria Virginia; Radulovic, Jelena; Martina, Marco; Miller, Richard J.; Apkarian, A. Vania

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain patients exhibit increased anxiety, depression, and deficits in learning and memory. Yet how persistent pain affects the key brain area regulating these behaviors, the hippocampus, has remained minimally explored. In this study we investigated the impact of spared nerve injury (SNI) neuropathic pain in mice on hippocampal-dependent behavior and underlying cellular and molecular changes. In parallel, we measured the hippocampal volume of three groups of chronic pain patients. We found that SNI animals were unable to extinguish to contextual fear and showed increased anxiety-like behavior. Additionally, SNI mice in comparison to sham animals exhibited hippocampal 1) reduced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) expression and phosphorylation, 2) decreased neurogenesis and 3) altered short-term synaptic plasticity. In order to relate the observed hippocampal abnormalities with human chronic pain, we measured the volume of human hippocampus in chronic back pain (CBP), complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), and osteoarthritis patients (OA). Compared to controls, CBP and CRPS, but not OA, had significantly less bilateral hippocampal volume. These results indicate that hippocampus-mediated behavior, synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis are abnormal in neuropathic rodents. The changes may be related to the reduction in hippocampal volume we see in chronic pain patients, and these abnormalities may underlie learning and emotional deficits commonly observed in such patients. PMID:22539837

  5. 7 CFR 764.52 - Processing an incomplete application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Processing an incomplete application. 764.52 Section 764.52 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS DIRECT LOAN MAKING Loan Application Process § 764.52 Processing an incomplete application. (a) Within 10...

  6. The Grade of Incomplete: A Brief Review and Comment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Counelis, James Steve

    Current policy on the distribution of incomplete grades designates such grades as indicating postponement of an examination and/or other assignment for some serious reason. The current policy of converting a grade of incomplete to F after some stated time interval is open to question. Current university policy on the automatic conversion of…

  7. Loss of Information in Estimating Item Parameters in Incomplete Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggen, Theo J. H. M.; Verelst, Norman D.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the efficiency of conditional maximum likelihood (CML) and marginal maximum likelihood (MML) estimation of the item parameters of the Rasch model in incomplete designs is investigated. The use of the concept of F-information (Eggen, 2000) is generalized to incomplete testing designs. The scaled determinant of the F-information…

  8. Reducing Unnecessary Accumulation of Incomplete Grades: A Quality Improvement Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domocmat, Maria Carmela L.

    2015-01-01

    It has been noted that there is an increasing percentage of students accumulating incomplete (INC) grades. This paper aims to identify the factors that contribute to the accumulation of incomplete grades of students and, utilizing the best practices of various universities worldwide, it intends to recommend solutions in limiting the number of…

  9. The Incomplete Social Psychology of Aging: A Psychologist's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Thomas O.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests that the social psychology of aging, as currently practiced within social gerontology, is incomplete. Examines this incompleteness (its origins, range, and effects), and presents outlines of a more complete social psychology of aging. Suggests a life span developmental social psychology would have beneficial effects. (Author)

  10. 49 CFR 630.6 - Late and incomplete reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Late and incomplete reports. 630.6 Section 630.6 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION NATIONAL TRANSIT DATABASE § 630.6 Late and incomplete reports. (a) Late...

  11. 49 CFR 630.6 - Late and incomplete reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Late and incomplete reports. 630.6 Section 630.6 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION NATIONAL TRANSIT DATABASE § 630.6 Late and incomplete reports. (a) Late...

  12. 49 CFR 630.6 - Late and incomplete reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Late and incomplete reports. 630.6 Section 630.6 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION NATIONAL TRANSIT DATABASE § 630.6 Late and incomplete reports. (a) Late...

  13. 49 CFR 630.6 - Late and incomplete reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Late and incomplete reports. 630.6 Section 630.6 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION NATIONAL TRANSIT DATABASE § 630.6 Late and incomplete reports. (a) Late...

  14. 49 CFR 630.6 - Late and incomplete reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Late and incomplete reports. 630.6 Section 630.6 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION NATIONAL TRANSIT DATABASE § 630.6 Late and incomplete reports. (a) Late...

  15. Treatment of Intravenous Leiomyomatosis with Cardiac Extension following Incomplete Resection.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Mathew P; Li, Annette; Villanueva, Claudia I; Peeceeyen, Sheen C S; Cooper, Michael G; Hanel, Kevin C; Fermanis, Gary G; Robertson, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Intravenous leiomyomatosis (IVL) with cardiac extension (CE) is a rare variant of benign uterine leiomyoma. Incomplete resection has a recurrence rate of over 30%. Different hormonal treatments have been described following incomplete resection; however no standard therapy currently exists. We review the literature for medical treatments options following incomplete resection of IVL with CE. Methods. Electronic databases were searched for all studies reporting IVL with CE. These studies were then searched for reports of patients with inoperable or incomplete resection and any further medical treatments. Our database was searched for patients with medical therapy following incomplete resection of IVL with CE and their results were included. Results. All studies were either case reports or case series. Five literature reviews confirm that surgery is the only treatment to achieve cure. The uses of progesterone, estrogen modulation, gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonism, and aromatase inhibition have been described following incomplete resection. Currently no studies have reviewed the outcomes of these treatments. Conclusions. Complete surgical resection is the only means of cure for IVL with CE, while multiple hormonal therapies have been used with varying results following incomplete resection. Aromatase inhibitors are the only reported treatment to prevent tumor progression or recurrence in patients with incompletely resected IVL with CE. PMID:26783463

  16. Treatment of Intravenous Leiomyomatosis with Cardiac Extension following Incomplete Resection

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Mathew P.; Li, Annette; Villanueva, Claudia I.; Peeceeyen, Sheen C. S.; Cooper, Michael G.; Hanel, Kevin C.; Fermanis, Gary G.; Robertson, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Intravenous leiomyomatosis (IVL) with cardiac extension (CE) is a rare variant of benign uterine leiomyoma. Incomplete resection has a recurrence rate of over 30%. Different hormonal treatments have been described following incomplete resection; however no standard therapy currently exists. We review the literature for medical treatments options following incomplete resection of IVL with CE. Methods. Electronic databases were searched for all studies reporting IVL with CE. These studies were then searched for reports of patients with inoperable or incomplete resection and any further medical treatments. Our database was searched for patients with medical therapy following incomplete resection of IVL with CE and their results were included. Results. All studies were either case reports or case series. Five literature reviews confirm that surgery is the only treatment to achieve cure. The uses of progesterone, estrogen modulation, gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonism, and aromatase inhibition have been described following incomplete resection. Currently no studies have reviewed the outcomes of these treatments. Conclusions. Complete surgical resection is the only means of cure for IVL with CE, while multiple hormonal therapies have been used with varying results following incomplete resection. Aromatase inhibitors are the only reported treatment to prevent tumor progression or recurrence in patients with incompletely resected IVL with CE. PMID:26783463

  17. 49 CFR 568.4 - Requirements for incomplete vehicle manufacturers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Requirements for incomplete vehicle manufacturers. 568.4 Section 568.4 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES MANUFACTURED IN TWO OR MORE STAGES-ALL INCOMPLETE, INTERMEDIATE...

  18. Optimizing Balanced Incomplete Block Designs for Educational Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Veldkamp, Bernard P.; Carlson, James E.

    2004-01-01

    A popular design in large-scale educational assessments as well as any other type of survey is the balanced incomplete block design. The design is based on an item pool split into a set of blocks of items that are assigned to sets of "assessment booklets." This article shows how the problem of calculating an optimal balanced incomplete block…

  19. Microglial VPAC1R mediates a novel mechanism of neuroimmune-modulation of hippocampal precursor cells via IL-4 release

    PubMed Central

    Nunan, Robert; Sivasathiaseelan, Harri; Khan, Damla; Zaben, Malik; Gray, William

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis, the production of new neurons from neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs), occurs throughout adulthood in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, where it supports learning and memory. The innate and adaptive immune systems are increasingly recognized as important modulators of hippocampal neurogenesis under both physiological and pathological conditions. However, the mechanisms by which the immune system regulates hippocampal neurogenesis are incompletely understood. In particular, the role of microglia, the brains resident immune cell is complex, as they have been reported to both positively and negatively regulate neurogenesis. Interestingly, neuronal activity can also regulate the function of the immune system. Here, we show that depleting microglia from hippocampal cultures reduces NSPC survival and proliferation. Furthermore, addition of purified hippocampal microglia, or their conditioned media, is trophic and proliferative to NSPCs. VIP, a neuropeptide released by dentate gyrus interneurons, enhances the proliferative and pro-neurogenic effect of microglia via the VPAC1 receptor. This VIP-induced enhancement is mediated by IL-4 release, which directly targets NSPCs. This demonstrates a potential neuro-immuno-neurogenic pathway, disruption of which may have significant implications in conditions where combined cognitive impairments, interneuron loss, and immune system activation occurs, such as temporal lobe epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24801739

  20. Regulating hippocampal hyperexcitability through GABAB Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Min; Moradi‐Chameh, Homeira; Zahid, Tariq; Gane, Jonathan; Wu, Chiping; Valiante, Taufik; Zhang, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Disturbances of GABAergic inhibition are a major cause of epileptic seizures. GABA exerts its actions via ionotropic GABAA receptors and metabotropic G protein‐coupled GABAB receptors. Malfunction of GABAA inhibition has long been recognized in seizure genesis but the role of GABAB receptors in controlling seizure activity is still not well understood. Here, we examined the anticonvulsive, or inhibitory effects, of GABAB receptors in a mouse model of hippocampal kindling as well as mouse hippocampal slices through the use of GS 39783, a positive allosteric GABAB receptor modulator, and CGP 55845, a selective GABAB receptor antagonist. When administered via intraperitoneal injections in kindled mice, GS 39783 (5 mg/kg) did not attenuate hippocampal EEG discharges, but did reduce aberrant hippocampal spikes, whereas CGP 55845 (10 mg/kg) prolonged hippocampal discharges and increased spike incidences. When examined in hippocampal slices, neither GS 39783 at 5 μmol/L nor the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen at 0.1 μmol/L alone significantly altered repetitive excitatory field potentials, but GS 39783 and baclofen together reversibly abolished these field potentials. In contrast, CGP 55845 at 1 μmol/L facilitated induction and incidence of these field potentials. In addition, CGP 55845 attenuated the paired pulse depression of CA3 population spikes and increased the frequency of EPSCs in individual CA3 pyramidal neurons. Collectively, these data suggest that GABABB receptors regulate hippocampal hyperexcitability by inhibiting CA3 glutamatergic synapses. We postulate that positive allosteric modulation of GABAB receptors may be effective in reducing seizure‐related hyperexcitability. PMID:24771688

  1. Hippocampal replay of extended experience.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Thomas J; Kloosterman, Fabian; Wilson, Matthew A

    2009-08-27

    During pauses in exploration, ensembles of place cells in the rat hippocampus re-express firing sequences corresponding to recent spatial experience. Such "replay" co-occurs with ripple events: short-lasting (approximately 50-120 ms), high-frequency (approximately 200 Hz) oscillations that are associated with increased hippocampal-cortical communication. In previous studies, rats exploring small environments showed replay anchored to the rat's current location and compressed in time into a single ripple event. Here, we show, using a neural decoding approach, that firing sequences corresponding to long runs through a large environment are replayed with high fidelity and that such replay can begin at remote locations on the track. Extended replay proceeds at a characteristic virtual speed of approximately 8 m/s and remains coherent across trains of ripple events. These results suggest that extended replay is composed of chains of shorter subsequences, which may reflect a strategy for the storage and flexible expression of memories of prolonged experience. PMID:19709631

  2. Moxibustion upregulates hippocampal progranulin expression

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Tao; Qi, Li; Li, Ji; Le, Jing-jing; Shao, Lei; Du, Xin; Dong, Jing-cheng

    2016-01-01

    In China, moxibustion is reported to be useful and has few side effects for chronic fatigue syndrome, but its mechanisms are largely unknown. More recently, the focus has been on the wealth of information supporting stress as a factor in chronic fatigue syndrome, and largely concerns dysregulation in the stress-related hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. In the present study, we aimed to determine the effect of moxibustion on behavioral symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome rats and examine possible mechanisms. Rats were subjected to a combination of chronic restraint stress and forced swimming to induce chronic fatigue syndrome. The acupoints Guanyuan (CV4) and Zusanli (ST36, bilateral) were simultaneously administered moxibustion. Untreated chronic fatigue syndrome rats and normal rats were used as controls. Results from the forced swimming test, open field test, tail suspension test, real-time PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and western blot assay showed that moxibustion treatment decreased mRNA expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone in the hypothalamus, and adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone levels in plasma, and markedly increased progranulin mRNA and protein expression in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that moxibustion may relieve the behavioral symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome, at least in part, by modulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and upregulating hippocampal progranulin. PMID:27212922

  3. Moxibustion upregulates hippocampal progranulin expression.

    PubMed

    Yi, Tao; Qi, Li; Li, Ji; Le, Jing-Jing; Shao, Lei; Du, Xin; Dong, Jing-Cheng

    2016-04-01

    In China, moxibustion is reported to be useful and has few side effects for chronic fatigue syndrome, but its mechanisms are largely unknown. More recently, the focus has been on the wealth of information supporting stress as a factor in chronic fatigue syndrome, and largely concerns dysregulation in the stress-related hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. In the present study, we aimed to determine the effect of moxibustion on behavioral symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome rats and examine possible mechanisms. Rats were subjected to a combination of chronic restraint stress and forced swimming to induce chronic fatigue syndrome. The acupoints Guanyuan (CV4) and Zusanli (ST36, bilateral) were simultaneously administered moxibustion. Untreated chronic fatigue syndrome rats and normal rats were used as controls. Results from the forced swimming test, open field test, tail suspension test, real-time PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and western blot assay showed that moxibustion treatment decreased mRNA expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone in the hypothalamus, and adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone levels in plasma, and markedly increased progranulin mRNA and protein expression in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that moxibustion may relieve the behavioral symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome, at least in part, by modulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and upregulating hippocampal progranulin. PMID:27212922

  4. Developmental Changes in Hippocampal Associative Coding

    PubMed Central

    Goldsberry, Mary E.; Kim, Jangjin

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral analyses of the ontogeny of memory have shown that hippocampus-dependent learning emerges relatively late in postnatal development compared with simple associative learning. Maturation of hippocampal mnemonic mechanisms has been hypothesized to underlie the development of the later emerging learning processes. However, the role of hippocampal maturation in learning has not been examined directly. The goal of the present study was to examine developmental changes in hippocampal neuronal coding during acquisition of a hippocampus-dependent learning task. We recorded activity from CA1 pyramidal cells in rat pups while they were trained on trace eyeblink conditioning. Trace eyeblink conditioning is a Pavlovian conditioning task that involves the association of a conditioned stimulus (CS) with an unconditioned stimulus over a stimulus-free trace interval. The inclusion of the trace interval is what makes the task hippocampus dependent. In the present study, rats were trained at 21–23, 24–26, and 31–33 d of age. Previous research from our laboratory and others shows that trace conditioning begins to emerge during the third postnatal week. The results indicate that hippocampal neurons show a substantial increase in responsiveness to task-relevant events during development. Moreover, there is an age-related increase in the proportion of neurons that respond to a combination of trial events (e.g., CS and trace). Our findings indicate that the developmental emergence of hippocampally mediated learning is related to increases in the strength and complexity of CA1 associative coding. PMID:25762670

  5. M-Plasty for Correction of Incomplete Penoscrotal Transposition

    PubMed Central

    Manjunath, KN; Venkatesh, MS

    2014-01-01

    Penoscrotal transposition (PST) is a rare anomaly of the external genitalia that can be complete or incomplete while incomplete type is more common. Various surgical methods are described for correction of incomplete PST. Modified Glenn Anderson’s method is commonly used. This method is known to cause major penile lymphoedema following surgery. Various modifications have been described to preserve the dorsal penile skin to reduce this lymphoedema. We present here our experience with M-Plasty, where the dorsal penile skin is cut in the form of V so that it breaks the constricting effect of circumferential incision and prevents lymphoedema. PMID:25489538

  6. The topology of integrable systems with incomplete fields

    SciTech Connect

    Aleshkin, K R

    2014-09-30

    Liouville's theorem holds for Hamiltonian systems with complete Hamiltonian fields which possess a complete involutive system of first integrals; such systems are called Liouville-integrable. In this paper integrable systems with incomplete Hamiltonian fields are investigated. It is shown that Liouville's theorem remains valid in the case of a single incomplete field, while if the number of incomplete fields is greater, a certain analogue of the theorem holds. An integrable system on the algebra sl(3) is taken as an example. Bibliography: 11 titles.

  7. A "voice inversion effect?".

    PubMed

    Bédard, Catherine; Belin, Pascal

    2004-07-01

    Voice is the carrier of speech but is also an "auditory face" rich in information on the speaker's identity and affective state. Three experiments explored the possibility of a "voice inversion effect," by analogy to the classical "face inversion effect," which could support the hypothesis of a voice-specific module. Experiment 1 consisted of a gender identification task on two syllables pronounced by 90 speakers (boys, girls, men, and women). Experiment 2 consisted of a speaker discrimination task on pairs of syllables (8 men and 8 women). Experiment 3 consisted of an instrument discrimination task on pairs of melodies (8 string and 8 wind instruments). In all three experiments, stimuli were presented in 4 conditions: (1) no inversion; (2) temporal inversion (e.g., backwards speech); (3) frequency inversion centered around 4000 Hz; and (4) around 2500 Hz. Results indicated a significant decrease in performance caused by sound inversion, with a much stronger effect for frequency than for temporal inversion. Interestingly, although frequency inversion markedly affected timbre for both voices and instruments, subjects' performance was still above chance. However, performance at instrument discrimination was much higher than for voices, preventing comparison of inversion effects for voices vs. non-vocal stimuli. Additional experiments will be necessary to conclude on the existence of a possible "voice inversion effect." PMID:15177788

  8. Neuromorphic VLSI realization of the hippocampal formation.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Anu

    2016-05-01

    The medial entorhinal cortex grid cells, aided by the subicular head direction cells, are thought to provide a matrix which is utilized by the hippocampal place cells for calculation of position of an animal during spatial navigation. The place cells are thought to function as an internal GPS for the brain and provide a spatiotemporal stamp on episodic memories. Several computational neuroscience models have been proposed to explain the place specific firing patterns of the cells of the hippocampal formation - including the GRIDSmap model for grid cells and Bayesian integration for place cells. In this work, we present design and measurement results from a first ever system of silicon circuits which successfully realize the function of the hippocampal formation of brain based on these models. PMID:26914394

  9. Cholinergic modulation of hippocampal network function

    PubMed Central

    Teles-Grilo Ruivo, Leonor M.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic septohippocampal projections from the medial septal area to the hippocampus are proposed to have important roles in cognition by modulating properties of the hippocampal network. However, the precise spatial and temporal profile of acetylcholine release in the hippocampus remains unclear making it difficult to define specific roles for cholinergic transmission in hippocampal dependent behaviors. This is partly due to a lack of tools enabling specific intervention in, and recording of, cholinergic transmission. Here, we review the organization of septohippocampal cholinergic projections and hippocampal acetylcholine receptors as well as the role of cholinergic transmission in modulating cellular excitability, synaptic plasticity, and rhythmic network oscillations. We point to a number of open questions that remain unanswered and discuss the potential for recently developed techniques to provide a radical reappraisal of the function of cholinergic inputs to the hippocampus. PMID:23908628

  10. Active Sulforhodamine 101 Uptake into Hippocampal Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Christian; Hagos, Yohannes; Hülsmann, Swen

    2012-01-01

    Sulforhodamine 101 (SR101) is widely used as a marker of astrocytes. In this study we investigated labeling of astrocytes by SR101 in acute slices from the ventrolateral medulla and the hippocampus of transgenic mice expressing EGFP under the control of the astrocyte-specific human GFAP promoter. While SR101 efficiently and specifically labeled EGFP-expressing astrocytes in hippocampus, we found that the same staining procedure failed to label astrocytes efficiently in the ventrolateral medulla. Although carbenoxolone is able to decrease the SR101-labeling of astrocytes in the hippocampus, it is unlikely that SR101 is taken up via gap-junction hemichannels because mefloquine, a blocker for pannexin and connexin hemichannels, was unable to prevent SR101-labeling of hippocampal astrocytes. However, SR101-labeling of the hippocampal astrocytes was significantly reduced by substrates of organic anion transport polypeptides, including estron-3-sulfate and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, suggesting that SR101 is actively transported into hippocampal astrocytes. PMID:23189143

  11. Human hippocampal theta activity during virtual navigation.

    PubMed

    Ekstrom, Arne D; Caplan, Jeremy B; Ho, Emily; Shattuck, Kirk; Fried, Itzhak; Kahana, Michael J

    2005-01-01

    This study examines whether 4-8-Hz theta oscillations can be seen in the human hippocampus, and whether these oscillations increase during virtual movement and searching, as they do in rodents. Recordings from both hippocampal and neocortical depth electrodes were analyzed while six epileptic patients played a virtual taxi-driver game. During the game, the patients alternated between searching for passengers, whose locations were random, and delivering them to stores, whose locations remained constant. In both hippocampus and neocortex, theta increased during virtual movement in all phases of the game. Hippocampal and neocortical theta activity were also significantly correlated with each other, but this correlation did not differ between neocortex and hippocampus and within disparate neocortical electrodes. Our findings demonstrate the existence of movement-related theta oscillations in human hippocampus, and suggest that both cortical and hippocampal oscillations play a role in attention and sensorimotor integration. PMID:16114040

  12. Neurobiological toxicity of radiation in hippocampal cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Sun; Yang, Miyoung; Kim, Sung-Ho; Shin, Taekyun; Moon, Changjong

    2013-03-01

    Worldwide radiation exposure is increasing due to recent nuclear accidents, space travel, atomic weapons testing and use, and medical treatments. In adult animals, ionizing radiation can significantly impact hippocampal neurogenesis and negatively affect hippocampal functions such as cognition. However, there is considerable uncertainty regarding the mechanisms underlying these effects. This article reviews in vivo and in vitro studies on the effects of irradiation on hippocampal neurogenesis and function in order to gain new mechanistic insights. This information will provide complementary views of our understanding of the normal brain's tolerance to radiation exposure, the potentially serious implications of radiation exposure to cognition, and lead to a discussion of potential strategies for pharmacotherapy and behavioral intervention. PMID:23348383

  13. Incomplete-data CT image reconstructions in industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, K. C.; Eberhard, J. W.; Mitchell, K. W.

    1990-06-01

    In industrial X-ray computerized tomography (CT), the objects to be inspected are usually very attenuating to X-rays, and their shape may not permit complete scannings at all view angles; incomplete-data imaging situations usually result. Image reconstruction from incomplete data can be achieved through an iterative transform algorithm, which utilizes the a priori information on the object to compensate for the missing data. The results of validating the iterative transform algorithm on experimental data from a cross section of a high-pressure turbine blade made of Ni-based superalloy are reported. From the data set, two kinds of incomplete data situations are simulated: incomplete projection and limited-angle scanning. The results indicate that substantial improvements, both visually and in wall thickness measurements, were brought about in all cases through the use of the iterative transform algorithm.

  14. FORMATION AND CONTROL OF PRODUCTS OF INCOMPLETE COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxygenated organic products of incomplete combustion, including oxygenated PAHs and phthalates, have been found in combustor emissions. Some have substantial health effects and significantly influence the risk assessment calculations. Others are found that may or may not be a...

  15. 40 CFR 86.085-20 - Incomplete vehicles, classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Heavy-Duty Engines, and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.085-20 Incomplete...

  16. Systematics for low energy incomplete fusion: Still a puzzle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Abhishek; Shuaib, Mohd; Aggarwal, Abhay V.; Sharma, Vijay R.; Bala, Indu; Singh, D. P.; Singh, P. P.; Unnati; Sharma, M. K.; Kumar, R.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.

    2016-05-01

    In order to have a better and clear picture of incomplete fusion reactions at energies ≈4-7MeV/nucleon, the excitation function measurements have been performed for 18O+159Tb system. The experimental data have been analyzed within the framework of compound nucleus decay. The cross-section for xn/pxn-channels are found to be well reproduced by PACE4 predictions, which suggest their production via complete fusion process. However, a significant enhancement in the excitation functions of α-emitting channels has been observed over the theoretical ones, which has been attributed due to the incomplete fusion processes. The incomplete fusion fractions have been deduced at each studied energy and compared with other nearby systems for better insight into the underlying dynamics. The incomplete fusion fraction has been found to be sensitive to the projectile's energy and α-Q-value.

  17. Predictors of Incomplete Optical Colonoscopy Using Computed Tomographic Colonography

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Reetika; Tsai, Salina D.; El Zein, Mohamad H.; Tieu, Alan A.; Abdelgelil, Ahmed; Besharati, Sepideh; Khashab, Mouen A.; Kalloo, Anthony N.; Kumbhari, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Optical colonoscopy (OC) is the primary modality for investigation of colonic pathology. Although there is data on demographic factors for incomplete OC, paucity of data exists for anatomic variables that are associated with an incomplete OC. These anatomic variables can be visualized using computed tomographic colonography (CTC). We aim to retrospectively identify variables associated with incomplete OC using CTC and develop a scoring method to predict the outcome of OC. Patients and Methods: In this case–control study, 70 cases (with incomplete OC) and 70 controls (with complete OC) were identified. CTC images of cases and controls were independently reviewed by a single CTC radiologist. Demographic and anatomical parameters were recorded. Data was examined using descriptive linear statistics and multivariate logistic regression model. Results: On analysis, female gender (80% vs 58.6% P = 0.007), prior abdominal/pelvic surgeries (51.4% vs 14.3% P < 0.001), colonic length (187.6 ± 30.0 cm vs 163.8 ± 27.2 cm P < 0.001), and number of flexures (11.4 ± 3.1 vs 8.4 ± 2.9 P < 0.001) increased the risk for incomplete OC. No significant association was observed for increasing age (P = 0.881) and history of severe diverticulosis (P = 0.867) with incomplete OC. A scoring system to predict the outcome of OC is proposed based on CTC findings. Conclusion: Female gender, prior surgery, and increasing colonic length and tortuosity were associated with incomplete OC, whereas increasing age and history of severe diverticulosis were not. These factors may be used in the future to predict those patients who are at risk of incomplete OC. PMID:26831606

  18. Hippocampal Atrophy and Subsequent Depressive Symptoms in Older Men and Women: Results From a 10-Year Prospective Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Elbejjani, Martine; Fuhrer, Rebecca; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Mazoyer, Bernard; Crivello, Fabrice; Tzourio, Christophe; Dufouil, Carole

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have reported smaller hippocampal volume in patients with depression. However, the temporality of the association is undetermined. One hypothesis is that hippocampal atrophy might be a susceptibility factor for depression. In the present study, we assessed whether hippocampal atrophy was associated with subsequent depressive symptoms in a cohort of older French adults (n = 1,309) who were 65–80 years of age and enrolled into the study in 1999–2001 in Dijon, France. Subjects were followed for more than 10 years. Participants underwent 2 cerebral magnetic resonance imaging scans, one at baseline and one at the 4-year follow-up. We used linear mixed models to estimate the associations of hippocampal atrophy with 1) the average depressive symptom scores over follow-up (using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale) measured biennially over the subsequent 6 years and 2) changes in symptom scores over follow-up. In women, a 2-standard-deviation increase in annual hippocampal atrophy was associated with a 1.67-point (95% confidence interval: 0.59, 2.77) increase in the average depressive symptom score over follow-up and with a 1.97-point (95% confidence interval: 0.68, 3.24) increase in scores over the 2 subsequent years but not with later changes in symptoms. No association was detected in men. Accounting for potential selective attrition (using inverse probability weights) did not alter results. Hippocampal atrophy was associated with more subsequent depressive symptoms and with shorter-term worsening of symptoms in women. PMID:25086051

  19. Volume of hippocampal substructures in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Kreisel, Stefan Henner; Labudda, Kirsten; Kurlandchikov, Oleg; Beblo, Thomas; Mertens, Markus; Thomas, Christine; Rullkötter, Nina; Wingenfeld, Katja; Mensebach, Christoph; Woermann, Friedrich G; Driessen, Martin

    2015-03-30

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) may be associated with smaller hippocampi in comparison to hippocampal size in controls. However, specific pathology in hippocampal substructures (i.e., head, body and tail) has not been sufficiently investigated. To address hippocampal structure in greater detail, we studied 39 psychiatric inpatients and outpatients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of BPD and 39 healthy controls. The hippocampus and its substructures were segmented manually on magnetic resonance imaging scans. The volumes of hippocampal substructures (and total hippocampal volume) did not differ between BPD patients and controls. Exploratory analysis suggests that patients with a lifetime history of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may have a significantly smaller hippocampus - affecting both the hippocampal head and body - in comparison to BPD patients without comorbid PTSD (difference in total hippocampal volume: -10.5%, 95%CI -2.6 to -18.5, significant). Also, patients fulfilling seven or more DSM-IV BPD criteria showed a hippocampal volume reduction, limited to the hippocampal head (difference in volume of the hippocampal head: -16.5%, 95%CI -6.1 to -26.8, significant). Disease heterogeneity in respect to, for example, symptom severity and psychiatric comorbidities may limit direct comparability between studies; the results presented here may reflect hippocampal volumes in patients who are "less" affected or they may simply be a chance finding. However, there is also the possibility that global effects of BPD on the hippocampus may have previously been overestimated. PMID:25624067

  20. Hippocampal structural and functional changes associated with electroconvulsive therapy response

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, C C; Jones, T; Lemke, N T; Gallegos, P; McClintock, S M; Mayer, A R; Bustillo, J; Calhoun, V D

    2014-01-01

    Previous animal models and structural imaging investigations have linked hippocampal neuroplasticity to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) response, but the relationship between changes in hippocampal volume and temporal coherence in the context of ECT response is unknown. We hypothesized that ECT response would increase both hippocampal resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity and hippocampal volumes. Patients with major depressive disorder (n=19) were scanned before and after the ECT series. Healthy, demographically matched comparisons (n=20) were scanned at one-time interval. Longitudinal changes in functional connectivity of hippocampal regions and volumes of hippocampal subfields were compared with reductions in ratings of depressive symptoms. Right hippocampal connectivity increased (normalized) after the ECT series and correlated with depressive symptom reduction. Similarly, the volumes of the right hippocampal cornu ammonis (CA2/3), dentate gyrus and subiculum regions increased, but the hippocampal subfields were unchanged relative to the comparison group. Connectivity changes were not evident in the left hippocampus, and volume changes were limited to the left CA2/3 subfields. The laterality of the right hippocampal functional connectivity and volume increases may be related to stimulus delivery method, which was predominately right unilateral in this investigation. The findings suggested that increased hippocampal functional connectivity and volumes may be biomarkers for ECT response. PMID:25405780

  1. Hippocampal Subregions Exhibit Both Distinct and Shared Transcriptomic Responses to Aging and Nonneurodegenerative Cognitive Decline

    PubMed Central

    Masser, Dustin R.; Bixler, Georgina V.; Brucklacher, Robert M.; Yan, Han; Giles, Cory B.; Wren, Jonathan D.; Sonntag, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Impairment of hippocampal-dependent spatial learning and memory with aging affects a large segment of the aged population. Hippocampal subregions (CA1, CA3, and DG) have been previously reported to express both common and specific morphological, functional, and gene/protein alterations with aging and cognitive decline. To comprehensively assess gene expression with aging and cognitive decline, transcriptomic analysis of CA1, CA3, and DG was conducted using Adult (12M) and Aged (26M) F344xBN rats behaviorally characterized by Morris water maze performance. Each subregion demonstrated a specific pattern of responses with aging and with cognitive performance. The CA1 and CA3 demonstrating the greatest degree of shared gene expression changes. Analysis of the pathways, processes, and regulators of these transcriptomic changes also exhibit a similar pattern of commonalities and differences across subregions. Gene expression changes between Aged cognitively Intact and Aged cognitively Impaired rats often showed an inversion of the changes between Adult and Aged rats. This failure to adapt rather than an exacerbation of the aging phenotype questions a conventional view that cognitive decline is exaggerated aging. These results are a resource for investigators studying cognitive decline and also demonstrate the need to individually examine hippocampal subregions in molecular analyses of aging and cognitive decline. PMID:24994846

  2. Hippocampal subregions exhibit both distinct and shared transcriptomic responses to aging and nonneurodegenerative cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Masser, Dustin R; Bixler, Georgina V; Brucklacher, Robert M; Yan, Han; Giles, Cory B; Wren, Jonathan D; Sonntag, William E; Freeman, Willard M

    2014-11-01

    Impairment of hippocampal-dependent spatial learning and memory with aging affects a large segment of the aged population. Hippocampal subregions (CA1, CA3, and DG) have been previously reported to express both common and specific morphological, functional, and gene/protein alterations with aging and cognitive decline. To comprehensively assess gene expression with aging and cognitive decline, transcriptomic analysis of CA1, CA3, and DG was conducted using Adult (12M) and Aged (26M) F344xBN rats behaviorally characterized by Morris water maze performance. Each subregion demonstrated a specific pattern of responses with aging and with cognitive performance. The CA1 and CA3 demonstrating the greatest degree of shared gene expression changes. Analysis of the pathways, processes, and regulators of these transcriptomic changes also exhibit a similar pattern of commonalities and differences across subregions. Gene expression changes between Aged cognitively Intact and Aged cognitively Impaired rats often showed an inversion of the changes between Adult and Aged rats. This failure to adapt rather than an exacerbation of the aging phenotype questions a conventional view that cognitive decline is exaggerated aging. These results are a resource for investigators studying cognitive decline and also demonstrate the need to individually examine hippocampal subregions in molecular analyses of aging and cognitive decline. PMID:24994846

  3. Role of hippocampal H1 receptors in radial maze performance and hippocampal theta activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Masuoka, Takayoshi; Kamei, Chiaki

    2007-07-12

    Histamine H1 antagonists impaired the spatial memory performance. On the other hand, it is well recognized that the hippocampal theta rhythm plays a critical role in spatial memory. However, little work has been done the effect of H1 antagonists on the hippocampal theta rhythm which was associated with the memory performance. We investigated the effect of pyrilamine, a selective H1 receptor antagonist, on spatial memory performance as well as hippocampal theta rhythm during the memory task in rats. Effect of pyrilamine on spatial memory was measured using eight-arm radial maze with four arms baited. Hippocampal theta rhythm during the radial maze task was recorded with a polygraph system with a telemetric technique. Intraperitoneal injection of pyrilamine resulted in impairments of both reference and working memory on the radial maze task. The working memory deficit induced by pyrilamine was antagonized by the intrahippocampal injection of histamine and 6-[2-(4-imidazolyl)ethylamino]-N-(4-trifluoromethylphenyl)heptanecarboxamide (HTMT), a histamine H1 agonist. Intraperitoneal injection of pyrilamine decreased the hippocampal theta power at a dose that impaired reference and working memory. This effect was antagonized by the intrahippocampal injection of histamine and HTMT at a dose that ameliorated the working memory deficit. Intrahippocampal injection of pyrilamine impaired working memory and simultaneously decreased the hippocampal theta power. These results suggest that: (i) the hippocampal H1 receptors play an important role in the working memory processes on the radial maze performance and (ii) the decrease in the hippocampal theta power is associated with the working memory deficit induced by the blocking of H1 receptors. PMID:17562388

  4. A ''Voice Inversion Effect?''

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedard, Catherine; Belin, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    Voice is the carrier of speech but is also an ''auditory face'' rich in information on the speaker's identity and affective state. Three experiments explored the possibility of a ''voice inversion effect,'' by analogy to the classical ''face inversion effect,'' which could support the hypothesis of a voice-specific module. Experiment 1 consisted…

  5. Seismic Inversion Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Jackiewicz, Jason

    2009-09-16

    With the rapid advances in sophisticated solar modeling and the abundance of high-quality solar pulsation data, efficient and robust inversion techniques are crucial for seismic studies. We present some aspects of an efficient Fourier Optimally Localized Averaging (OLA) inversion method with an example applied to time-distance helioseismology.

  6. Inverse structure functions

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Bruce R.; Water, Willem van de

    2005-03-01

    While the ordinary structure function in turbulence is concerned with the statistical moments of the velocity increment {delta}u measured over a distance r, the inverse structure function is related to the distance r where the turbulent velocity exits the interval {delta}u. We study inverse structure functions of wind-tunnel turbulence which covers a range of Reynolds numbers Re{sub {lambda}}=400-1100. We test a recently proposed relation between the scaling exponents of the ordinary structure functions and those of the inverse structure functions [S. Roux and M. H. Jensen, Phys. Rev. E 69, 16309 (2004)]. The relatively large range of Reynolds numbers in our experiment also enables us to address the scaling with Reynolds number that is expected to highlight the intermediate dissipative range. While we firmly establish the (relative) scaling of inverse structure functions, our experimental results fail both predictions. Therefore, the question of the significance of inverse structure functions remains open.

  7. Alterations of Hippocampal Projections in Adult Macaques with Neonatal Hippocampal Lesions: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yuguang; Payne, Christa; Li, Longchuan; Hu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xiaodong; Bachevalier, Jocelyne

    2014-01-01

    Neuropsychological and brain imaging studies have demonstrated persistent deficits in memory functions and structural changes after neonatal neurotoxic hippocampal lesion in monkeys. However, the relevant microstructural changes in the white matter of affected brain regions following this early insult remain unknown. This study assessed white matter integrity in the main hippocampal projections of adult macaque monkeys with neonatal hippocampal lesions, by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Data analysis was performed using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) and compared with volume of interest statistics. Alterations of fractional anisotropy (FA) and diffusivity indices were observed in fornix, temporal stem, ventromedial prefrontal cortex and optical radiations. To further validate the lesion effects on the prefrontal cortex, probabilistic diffusion tractography was used to examine the integrity of the fiber connections between hippocampus and ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and alterations were found in these connections. In addition, increased radial diffusivity in the left ventromedial prefrontal cortex correlated negatively with the severity of deficits in working memory in the same monkeys. The findings revealed microstructural changes due to neonatal hippocampal lesion, and confirmed that neonatal neurotoxic hippocampal lesions resulted in significant and enduring functional alterations in the hippocampal projection system. PMID:25204865

  8. Evidence of Incomplete Left Ventricular Relaxation in the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Weisfeldt, Myron L.; Frederiksen, James W.; Yin, Frank C. P.; Weiss, James L.

    1978-01-01

    Although it has been proposed that incomplete relaxation explains certain increases in left ventricular end diastolic pressure relative to volume, there has been no clear demonstration that incomplete relaxation occurs in the intact working ventricle. To identify incomplete relaxation, left ventricular pressure-dimension relationships were studied in 10 canine right heart bypass preparations during ventricular pacing. The fully relaxed, exponential diastolic pressure-dimension line for each ventricle was first determined from pressure and dimension values at the end of prolonged diastoles after interruption of pacing. For 167 beats during pacing under widely varying hemodynamic conditions, diastolic pressure-dimension values encountered this line defining the fully relaxed state during the filling period indicating that relaxation was complete before end diastole. The time constant for isovolumic exponential pressure fall (T) was determined for all beats. For this exponential function, if no diastolic filling occurred, 97% of pressure fall would be complete by 3.5 T after maximal negative dP/dt. For the 167 beats the fully relaxed pressure-dimension line was always encountered before 3.5 T. With very rapid pacing rates (170-200 beats/min) and(or) with pharmacologic prolongation of relaxation, incomplete relaxation occurred as evidenced by the fact that the line defining the fully relaxed state was never reached during diastole (n = 15). This evidence of incomplete relaxation occurred only when the subsequent beat began before 3.5 T but did not always occur under these conditions. Thus, an increase in end diastolic pressure relative to diastolic volume may result from incomplete relaxation under conditions of sufficiently rapid heart rate or sufficiently prolonged ventricular relaxation. Incomplete relaxation does not occur when the next beat begins more than 3.5 T after maximum negative dP/dt. PMID:748380

  9. Nocturnal Mnemonics: Sleep and Hippocampal Memory Processing

    PubMed Central

    Saletin, Jared M.; Walker, Matthew P.

    2012-01-01

    As critical as waking brain function is to learning and memory, an established literature now describes an equally important yet complementary role for sleep in information processing. This overview examines the specific contribution of sleep to human hippocampal memory processing; both the detriments caused by a lack of sleep, and conversely, the proactive benefits that develop following the presence of sleep. First, a role for sleep before learning is discussed, preparing the hippocampus for initial memory encoding. Second, a role for sleep after learning is considered, modulating the post-encoding consolidation of hippocampal-dependent memory. Third, a model is outlined in which these encoding and consolidation operations are symbiotically accomplished, associated with specific NREM sleep physiological oscillations. As a result, the optimal network outcome is achieved: increasing hippocampal independence and hence overnight consolidation, while restoring next-day sparse hippocampal encoding capacity for renewed learning ability upon awakening. Finally, emerging evidence is considered suggesting that, unlike previous conceptions, sleep does not universally consolidate all information. Instead, and based on explicit as well as saliency cues during initial encoding, sleep executes the discriminatory offline consolidation only of select information. Consequently, sleep promotes the targeted strengthening of some memories while actively forgetting others; a proposal with significant theoretical and clinical ramifications. PMID:22557988

  10. Food restriction modifies ultrastructure of hippocampal synapses.

    PubMed

    Babits, Réka; Szőke, Balázs; Sótonyi, Péter; Rácz, Bence

    2016-04-01

    Consumption of high-energy diets may compromise health and may also impair cognition; these impairments have been linked to tasks that require hippocampal function. Conversely, food restriction has been shown to improve certain aspects of hippocampal function, including spatial memory and memory persistence. These diet-dependent functional changes raise the possibility that the synaptic structure underlying hippocampal function is also affected. To examine how short-term food restriction (FR) alters the synaptic structure of the hippocampus, we used quantitative electron microscopy to analyze the organization of neuropil in the CA1 stratum radiatum of the hippocampus in young rats, consequent to reduced food. While four weeks of FR did not modify the density, size, or shape of postsynaptic spines, the synapses established by these spines were altered, displaying increased mean length, and more frequent perforations of postsynaptic densities. That the number of perforated synapses (believed to be an indicator of synaptic enhancement) increased, and that the CA1 spine population had on average significantly longer PSDs suggests that synaptic efficacy of axospinous synapses also increased in the CA1. Taken together, our ultrastructural data reveal previously unrecognized structural changes at hippocampal synapses as a function of food restriction, supporting a link between metabolic balance and synaptic plasticity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26386363

  11. Resveratrol: A Potential Hippocampal Plasticity Enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Gisele Pereira; Cocks, Graham; do Nascimento Bevilaqua, Mário Cesar; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2016-01-01

    The search for molecules capable of restoring altered hippocampal plasticity in psychiatric and neurological conditions is one of the most important tasks of modern neuroscience. It is well established that neural plasticity, such as the ability of the postnatal hippocampus to continuously generate newly functional neurons throughout life, a process called adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN), can be modulated not only by pharmacological agents, physical exercise, and environmental enrichment, but also by “nutraceutical” agents. In this review we focus on resveratrol, a phenol and phytoalexin found in the skin of grapes and red berries, as well as in nuts. Resveratrol has been reported to have antioxidant and antitumor properties, but its effects as a neural plasticity inducer are still debated. The current review examines recent evidence implicating resveratrol in regulating hippocampal neural plasticity and in mitigating the effects of various disorders and diseases on this important brain structure. Overall, findings show that resveratrol can improve cognition and mood and enhance hippocampal plasticity and AHN; however, some studies report opposite effects, with resveratrol inhibiting aspects of AHN. Therefore, further investigation is needed to resolve these controversies before resveratrol can be established as a safe coadjuvant in preventing and treating neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:27313836

  12. Stimulus Configuration, Classical Conditioning, and Hippocampal Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmajuk, Nestor A.; DiCarlo, James J.

    1991-01-01

    The participation of the hippocampus in classical conditioning is described in terms of a multilayer network portraying stimulus configuration. A model of hippocampal function is presented, and computer simulations are used to study neural activity in the various brain areas mapped according to the model. (SLD)

  13. Hidden Depths in the Hippocampal Circuitry.

    PubMed

    Overington, Dorothy W U; Jeffery, Kate J

    2016-08-01

    Danielson et al. (2016) use calcium imaging in mice performing a treadmill task to reveal differences in space-coding dynamics between deep and superficial sublayers of hippocampal CA1, suggesting how the hippocampus might encode both stable and dynamic information simultaneously. PMID:27497217

  14. Resveratrol: A Potential Hippocampal Plasticity Enhancer.

    PubMed

    Dias, Gisele Pereira; Cocks, Graham; do Nascimento Bevilaqua, Mário Cesar; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Thuret, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    The search for molecules capable of restoring altered hippocampal plasticity in psychiatric and neurological conditions is one of the most important tasks of modern neuroscience. It is well established that neural plasticity, such as the ability of the postnatal hippocampus to continuously generate newly functional neurons throughout life, a process called adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN), can be modulated not only by pharmacological agents, physical exercise, and environmental enrichment, but also by "nutraceutical" agents. In this review we focus on resveratrol, a phenol and phytoalexin found in the skin of grapes and red berries, as well as in nuts. Resveratrol has been reported to have antioxidant and antitumor properties, but its effects as a neural plasticity inducer are still debated. The current review examines recent evidence implicating resveratrol in regulating hippocampal neural plasticity and in mitigating the effects of various disorders and diseases on this important brain structure. Overall, findings show that resveratrol can improve cognition and mood and enhance hippocampal plasticity and AHN; however, some studies report opposite effects, with resveratrol inhibiting aspects of AHN. Therefore, further investigation is needed to resolve these controversies before resveratrol can be established as a safe coadjuvant in preventing and treating neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:27313836

  15. Incomplete caries removal: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Schwendicke, F; Dörfer, C E; Paris, S

    2013-04-01

    Increasing numbers of clinical trials have demonstrated the benefits of incomplete caries removal, in particular in the treatment of deep caries. This study systematically reviewed randomized controlled trials investigating one- or two-step incomplete compared with complete caries removal. Studies treating primary and permanent teeth with primary caries lesions requiring a restoration were analyzed. The following primary and secondary outcomes were investigated: risk of pulpal exposure, post-operative pulpal symptoms, overall failure, and caries progression. Electronic databases were screened for studies from 1967 to 2012. Cross-referencing was used to identify further articles. Odds ratios (OR) as effect estimates were calculated in a random-effects model. From 364 screened articles, 10 studies representing 1,257 patients were included. Meta-analysis showed risk reduction for both pulpal exposure (OR [95% CI] 0.31 [0.19-0.49]) and pulpal symptoms (OR 0.58 [0.31-1.10]) for teeth treated with one- or two-step incomplete excavation. Risk of failure seemed to be similar for both complete and incomplete excavation, but data for this outcome were of limited quality and inconclusive (OR 0.97 [0.64-1.46]). Based on reviewed studies, incomplete caries removal seems advantageous compared with complete excavation, especially in proximity to the pulp. However, evidence levels are currently insufficient for definitive conclusions because of high risk of bias within studies. PMID:23396521

  16. Observation of incomplete fusion reactions at l < l {sub crit}

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Abhishek Sharma, Vijay R. Singh, Devendra P. Unnati,; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Bala, Indu; Kumar, R.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Sharma, M. K.

    2014-08-14

    In order to understand the presence of incomplete fusion at low energies i.e. 4-7MeV/nucleon and also to study its dependence on various entrance-channel parameters, the two type of measurements (i) excitation function for {sup 12}C+{sup 159}Tb, and (ii) forward recoil ranges for {sup 12}C+{sup 159}Tb systems have been performed. The experimentally measured excitation functions have been analyzed within the framework of compound nucleus decay using statistical model code PACE4. Analysis of data suggests the production of xn/px)n-channels via complete fusion, as these are found to be well reproduced by PACE4 predictions, while, a significant enhancement in the excitation functions of α-emitting channels has been observed over the theoretical ones, which has been attributed due to the incomplete fusion processes. Further, the incomplete fusion events observed in case of forward recoil range measurements have been explained on the basis of the breakup fusion model, where these events may be attributed to the fusion of {sup 8}Be and/or {sup 4}He from {sup 12}C projectile to the target nucleus. In the present work, the SUMRULE model calculations are found to highly underestimate the observed incomplete fusion cross-sections which indicate that the l-values lower than l {sub crit} (limit of complete fusion) significantly contribute to the incomplete fusion reactions.

  17. Handling incomplete smoking history data in survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Kyoji; Preston, Dale L; Misumi, Munechika; Cullings, Harry M

    2014-10-26

    While data are unavoidably missing or incomplete in most observational studies, consequences of mishandling such incompleteness in analysis are often overlooked. When time-varying information is collected irregularly and infrequently over a long period, even precisely obtained data may implicitly involve substantial incompleteness. Motivated by an analysis to quantitatively evaluate the effects of smoking and radiation on lung cancer risks among Japanese atomic-bomb survivors, we provide a unique application of multiple imputation to incompletely observed smoking histories under the assumption of missing at random. Predicting missing values for the age of smoking initiation and, given initiation, smoking intensity and cessation age, analyses can be based on complete, though partially imputed, smoking histories. A simulation study shows that multiple imputation appropriately conditioned on the outcome and other relevant variables can produce consistent estimates when data are missing at random. Our approach is particularly appealing in large cohort studies where a considerable amount of time-varying information is incomplete under a mechanism depending in a complex manner on other variables. In application to the motivating example, this approach is expected to reduce estimation bias that might be unavoidable in naive analyses, while keeping efficiency by retaining known information. PMID:25348676

  18. Involvement of the GABAergic septo-hippocampal pathway in brain stimulation reward.

    PubMed

    Vega-Flores, Germán; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José M

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus is a structure related to several cognitive processes, but not very much is known about its putative involvement in positive reinforcement. In its turn, the septum has been related to instrumental brain stimulation reward (BSR) by its electrical stimulation with trains of pulses. Although the anatomical relationships of the septo-hippocampal pathway are well established, the functional relationship between these structures during rewarding behaviors remains poorly understood. To explore hippocampal mechanisms involved in BSR, CA3-evoked field excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs, fIPSPs) were recorded in the CA1 area during BSR in alert behaving mice. The synaptic efficiency was determined from changes in fEPSP and fIPSP amplitudes across the learning of a BSR task. The successive BSR sessions evoked a progressive increase of the performance in inverse relationship with a decrease in the amplitude of fEPSPs, but not of fIPSPs. Additionally, we evaluated CA1 local field potentials (LFPs) during a preference task, comparing 8-, 20-, and 100-Hz trains of septal BSR. We corroborate a clear preference for BSR at 100 Hz (in comparison with BSR at 20 Hz or 8 Hz), in parallel with an increase in the spectral power of the low theta band, and a decrease in the gamma. These results were replicated by intrahippocampal injections of a GABAB antagonist. Thus, the GABAergic septo-hippocampal pathway seems to carry information involved in the encoding of reward properties, where GABAB receptors seem to play a key role. With regard to the dorsal hippocampus, fEPSPs evoked at the CA3-CA1 synapse seem to reflect the BSR learning process, while hippocampal rhythmic activities are more related to reward properties. PMID:25415445

  19. Involvement of the GABAergic Septo-Hippocampal Pathway in Brain Stimulation Reward

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Flores, Germán; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José M.

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus is a structure related to several cognitive processes, but not very much is known about its putative involvement in positive reinforcement. In its turn, the septum has been related to instrumental brain stimulation reward (BSR) by its electrical stimulation with trains of pulses. Although the anatomical relationships of the septo-hippocampal pathway are well established, the functional relationship between these structures during rewarding behaviors remains poorly understood. To explore hippocampal mechanisms involved in BSR, CA3-evoked field excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs, fIPSPs) were recorded in the CA1 area during BSR in alert behaving mice. The synaptic efficiency was determined from changes in fEPSP and fIPSP amplitudes across the learning of a BSR task. The successive BSR sessions evoked a progressive increase of the performance in inverse relationship with a decrease in the amplitude of fEPSPs, but not of fIPSPs. Additionally, we evaluated CA1 local field potentials (LFPs) during a preference task, comparing 8-, 20-, and 100-Hz trains of septal BSR. We corroborate a clear preference for BSR at 100 Hz (in comparison with BSR at 20 Hz or 8 Hz), in parallel with an increase in the spectral power of the low theta band, and a decrease in the gamma. These results were replicated by intrahippocampal injections of a GABAB antagonist. Thus, the GABAergic septo-hippocampal pathway seems to carry information involved in the encoding of reward properties, where GABAB receptors seem to play a key role. With regard to the dorsal hippocampus, fEPSPs evoked at the CA3-CA1 synapse seem to reflect the BSR learning process, while hippocampal rhythmic activities are more related to reward properties. PMID:25415445

  20. Plasma inverse transition acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    2001-06-18

    It can be proved fundamentally from the reciprocity theorem with which the electromagnetism is endowed that corresponding to each spontaneous process of radiation by a charged particle there is an inverse process which defines a unique acceleration mechanism, from Cherenkov radiation to inverse Cherenkov acceleration (ICA) [1], from Smith-Purcell radiation to inverse Smith-Purcell acceleration (ISPA) [2], and from undulator radiation to inverse undulator acceleration (IUA) [3]. There is no exception. Yet, for nearly 30 years after each of the aforementioned inverse processes has been clarified for laser acceleration, inverse transition acceleration (ITA), despite speculation [4], has remained the least understood, and above all, no practical implementation of ITA has been found, until now. Unlike all its counterparts in which phase synchronism is established one way or the other such that a particle can continuously gain energy from an acceleration wave, the ITA to be discussed here, termed plasma inverse transition acceleration (PITA), operates under fundamentally different principle. As a result, the discovery of PITA has been delayed for decades, waiting for a conceptual breakthrough in accelerator physics: the principle of alternating gradient acceleration [5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]. In fact, PITA was invented [7, 8] as one of several realizations of the new principle.

  1. Computationally efficient Bayesian inference for inverse problems.

    SciTech Connect

    Marzouk, Youssef M.; Najm, Habib N.; Rahn, Larry A.

    2007-10-01

    Bayesian statistics provides a foundation for inference from noisy and incomplete data, a natural mechanism for regularization in the form of prior information, and a quantitative assessment of uncertainty in the inferred results. Inverse problems - representing indirect estimation of model parameters, inputs, or structural components - can be fruitfully cast in this framework. Complex and computationally intensive forward models arising in physical applications, however, can render a Bayesian approach prohibitive. This difficulty is compounded by high-dimensional model spaces, as when the unknown is a spatiotemporal field. We present new algorithmic developments for Bayesian inference in this context, showing strong connections with the forward propagation of uncertainty. In particular, we introduce a stochastic spectral formulation that dramatically accelerates the Bayesian solution of inverse problems via rapid evaluation of a surrogate posterior. We also explore dimensionality reduction for the inference of spatiotemporal fields, using truncated spectral representations of Gaussian process priors. These new approaches are demonstrated on scalar transport problems arising in contaminant source inversion and in the inference of inhomogeneous material or transport properties. We also present a Bayesian framework for parameter estimation in stochastic models, where intrinsic stochasticity may be intermingled with observational noise. Evaluation of a likelihood function may not be analytically tractable in these cases, and thus several alternative Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) schemes, operating on the product space of the observations and the parameters, are introduced.

  2. Conjunctive input processing drives feature selectivity in hippocampal CA1 neurons.

    PubMed

    Bittner, Katie C; Grienberger, Christine; Vaidya, Sachin P; Milstein, Aaron D; Macklin, John J; Suh, Junghyup; Tonegawa, Susumu; Magee, Jeffrey C

    2015-08-01

    Feature-selective firing allows networks to produce representations of the external and internal environments. Despite its importance, the mechanisms generating neuronal feature selectivity are incompletely understood. In many cortical microcircuits the integration of two functionally distinct inputs occurs nonlinearly through generation of active dendritic signals that drive burst firing and robust plasticity. To examine the role of this processing in feature selectivity, we recorded CA1 pyramidal neuron membrane potential and local field potential in mice running on a linear treadmill. We found that dendritic plateau potentials were produced by an interaction between properly timed input from entorhinal cortex and hippocampal CA3. These conjunctive signals positively modulated the firing of previously established place fields and rapidly induced new place field formation to produce feature selectivity in CA1 that is a function of both entorhinal cortex and CA3 input. Such selectivity could allow mixed network level representations that support context-dependent spatial maps. PMID:26167906

  3. Conjunctive input processing drives feature selectivity in hippocampal CA1 neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bittner, Katie C.; Grienberger, Christine; Vaidya, Sachin P.; Milstein, Aaron D.; Macklin, John J.; Suh, Junghyup; Tonegawa, Susumu; Magee, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Feature selective firing allows networks to produce representations of the external and internal environments. Despite its importance, the mechanisms generating neuronal feature selectivity are incompletely understood. In many cortical microcircuits the integration of two functionally distinct inputs occurs nonlinearly via generation of active dendritic signals that drive burst firing and robust plasticity. To examine the role of this processing in feature selectivity we recorded CA1 pyramidal neuron membrane potential and local field potential in mice running on a linear treadmill. We found that dendritic plateau potentials are produced by an interaction between properly timed input from entorhinal cortex (EC3) and hippocampal CA3. These conjunctive signals positively modulate the firing of previously established place fields and rapidly induce novel place field formation to produce feature selectivity in CA1 that is a function of both EC3 and CA3 input. Such selectivity could allow mixed network level representations that support context-dependent spatial maps. PMID:26167906

  4. A novel method to assess incompleteness of mammography reports.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Francisco J; Wu, Yirong; Burnside, Elizabeth S; Rubin, Daniel L

    2014-01-01

    Mammography has been shown to improve outcomes of women with breast cancer, but it is subject to inter-reader variability. One well-documented source of such variability is in the content of mammography reports. The mammography report is of crucial importance, since it documents the radiologist's imaging observations, interpretation of those observations in terms of likelihood of malignancy, and suggested patient management. In this paper, we define an incompleteness score to measure how incomplete the information content is in the mammography report and provide an algorithm to calculate this metric. We then show that the incompleteness score can be used to predict errors in interpretation. This method has 82.6% accuracy at predicting errors in interpretation and can possibly reduce total diagnostic errors by up to 21.7%. Such a method can easily be modified to suit other domains that depend on quality reporting. PMID:25954448

  5. A Novel Method to Assess Incompleteness of Mammography Reports

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Francisco J.; Wu, Yirong; Burnside, Elizabeth S.; Rubin, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Mammography has been shown to improve outcomes of women with breast cancer, but it is subject to inter-reader variability. One well-documented source of such variability is in the content of mammography reports. The mammography report is of crucial importance, since it documents the radiologist’s imaging observations, interpretation of those observations in terms of likelihood of malignancy, and suggested patient management. In this paper, we define an incompleteness score to measure how incomplete the information content is in the mammography report and provide an algorithm to calculate this metric. We then show that the incompleteness score can be used to predict errors in interpretation. This method has 82.6% accuracy at predicting errors in interpretation and can possibly reduce total diagnostic errors by up to 21.7%. Such a method can easily be modified to suit other domains that depend on quality reporting. PMID:25954448

  6. Incomplete fuzzy data processing systems using artificial neural network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patyra, Marek J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the implementation of a fuzzy data processing system using an artificial neural network (ANN) is discussed. The binary representation of fuzzy data is assumed, where the universe of discourse is decartelized into n equal intervals. The value of a membership function is represented by a binary number. It is proposed that incomplete fuzzy data processing be performed in two stages. The first stage performs the 'retrieval' of incomplete fuzzy data, and the second stage performs the desired operation on the retrieval data. The method of incomplete fuzzy data retrieval is proposed based on the linear approximation of missing values of the membership function. The ANN implementation of the proposed system is presented. The system was computationally verified and showed a relatively small total error.

  7. Algodystrophy: complex regional pain syndrome and incomplete forms.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Stefano; Bottai, Vanna; Dell'Osso, Giacomo; Bugelli, Giulia; Celli, Fabio; Cazzella, Niki; Guido, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    The algodystrophy, also known as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), is a painful disease characterized by erythema, edema, functional impairment, sensory and vasomotor disturbance. The diagnosis of CRPS is based solely on clinical signs and symptoms, and for exclusion compared to other forms of chronic pain. There is not a specific diagnostic procedure; careful clinical evaluation and additional test should lead to an accurate diagnosis. There are similar forms of chronic pain known as bone marrow edema syndrome, in which is absent the history of trauma or triggering events and the skin dystrophic changes and vasomotor alterations. These incomplete forms are self-limited, and surgical treatment is generally not needed. It is still controversial, if these forms represent a distinct self-limiting entity or an incomplete variant of CRPS. In painful unexplained conditions such as frozen shoulder, post-operative stiff shoulder or painful knee prosthesis, the algodystrophy, especially in its incomplete forms, could represent the cause. PMID:27252736

  8. Algodystrophy: complex regional pain syndrome and incomplete forms

    PubMed Central

    Giannotti, Stefano; Bottai, Vanna; Dell’Osso, Giacomo; Bugelli, Giulia; Celli, Fabio; Cazzella, Niki; Guido, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Summary The algodystrophy, also known as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), is a painful disease characterized by erythema, edema, functional impairment, sensory and vasomotor disturbance. The diagnosis of CRPS is based solely on clinical signs and symptoms, and for exclusion compared to other forms of chronic pain. There is not a specific diagnostic procedure; careful clinical evaluation and additional test should lead to an accurate diagnosis. There are similar forms of chronic pain known as bone marrow edema syndrome, in which is absent the history of trauma or triggering events and the skin dystrophic changes and vasomotor alterations. These incomplete forms are self-limited, and surgical treatment is generally not needed. It is still controversial, if these forms represent a distinct self-limiting entity or an incomplete variant of CRPS. In painful unexplained conditions such as frozen shoulder, post-operative stiff shoulder or painful knee prosthesis, the algodystrophy, especially in its incomplete forms, could represent the cause. PMID:27252736

  9. BDNF val66met affects hippocampal volume and emotion-related hippocampal memory activity.

    PubMed

    Molendijk, M L; van Tol, M-J; Penninx, B W J H; van der Wee, N J A; Aleman, A; Veltman, D J; Spinhoven, P; Elzinga, B M

    2012-01-01

    The val(66)met polymorphism on the BDNF gene has been reported to explain individual differences in hippocampal volume and memory-related activity. These findings, however, have not been replicated consistently and no studies to date controlled for the potentially confounding impact of early life stress, such as childhood abuse, and psychiatric status. Using structural and functional MRI, we therefore investigated in 126 depressed and/or anxious patients and 31 healthy control subjects the effects of val(66)met on hippocampal volume and encoding activity of neutral, positive and negative words, while taking into account childhood abuse and psychiatric status. Our results show slightly lower hippocampal volumes in carriers of a met allele (n=54) relative to val/val homozygotes (n=103) (P=0.02, effect size (Cohen's d)=0.37), which appeared to be independent of childhood abuse and psychiatric status. For hippocampal encoding activity, we found a val(66)met-word valence interaction (P=0.02) such that carriers of a met allele showed increased levels of activation in response to negative words relative to activation in the neutral word condition and relative to val/val homozygotes. This, however, was only evident in the absence of childhood abuse, as abused val/val homozygotes showed hippocampal encoding activity for negative words that was comparable to that of carriers of a met allele. Neither psychiatric status nor memory accuracy did account for these associations. In conclusion, BDNF val(66)met has a significant impact on hippocampal volume independently of childhood abuse and psychiatric status. Furthermore, early adverse experiences such as childhood abuse account for individual differences in hippocampal encoding activity of negative stimuli but this effect manifests differently as a function of val(66)met. PMID:22832736

  10. Incomplete defect filling after third generation autologous chondrocyte implantation

    PubMed Central

    Pietschmann, Matthias F.; Ficklscherer, Andreas; Gülecyüz, Mehmet F.; Hammerschmid, Florian; Müller, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Third generation autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a suitable method for the treatment of cartilage defects in the knee joint. However, knowledge about the development of graft thickness and the clinical relevance of incomplete defect filling in the postoperative course is low. This prospective study analyses the graft integration into the surrounding cartilage, with special consideration of the graft thickness. Material and methods A total of 71 consecutive patients with 79 cartilage defects were treated with third generation autologous chondrocyte implantation (NOVOCART 3D) in the knee. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at 0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2 years. Graft thickness was measured compared to the surrounding healthy cartilage. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scoring system and the visual analogue scale (VAS) were used for clinical evaluation. Cartilage defect filling was classified as the percentage of the surrounding cartilage. Results The average graft thickness showed a significant increase between 3 and 6 months after autologous chondrocyte implantation. Incomplete defect filling occurred in 44 (55.7%) cases. Of these, 33 cases showed incomplete defect filling grade I (> 75%), 10 cases were grade II (> 50%) and one case grade III (> 25%). Incomplete defect filling grade IV (< 25%) was not observed. Incomplete defect filling occurred significantly more often in women (p = 0.021), without worse clinical results. Conclusions Graft thickness after third generation autologous chondrocyte implantation shows increasing graft thickness over the period of 2 years postoperatively. A high rate of incomplete defect filling in the surrounding cartilage was observed, without worse clinical results. PMID:27478460

  11. Effect of the Target Deformation on Incomplete Fusion Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, D.; Ali, Rahbar; Afzal Ansari, M.; Kumar, R.; Singh, R. P.; Muralither, S.; Bhowmik, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the role of target deformation on incomplete fusion dynamics, a particle-gamma coincidence experiment has been performed at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi. Spin distributions for various evaporation residues populated via complete and incomplete fusion of 16O with 124Sn at 6.3MeV/nucleon have been measured. Experimentally measured spin distributions of the residues produced as incomplete fusion products associated with fast α and 2α-emission channels observed in forward cone are found to be distinctly different from those of the residues produced as complete fusion products. The mean value of input angular momentum J0 for evaporation residues produced through xn channels (complete fusion products) is found to be J0≈ 7ħ, while the mean value of input angular momentum J0 for the residues produced through direct αxn and 2αxn channels (incomplete fusion products) in forward cone, are found to be J0 ≈ 9ħ and ≈ 12ħ respectively for 16O + 124Sn (spherical) system [7]. The mean value of input angular momentum J0 for the system 16O + 169Tm (deformed) reported in ref. [8], are found to be ≈10ħ for xn-channels (complete fusion products) and for direct αxn and 2αxn channels (incomplete fusion products) the value of J0 approaches to ≈ 13ħ and ≈16ħ, respectively. The mean values of the input angular momentum observed for xn (complete fusion products), αxn and 2αxn (incomplete fusion products) in 16O + 124Sn (spherical) system are smaller than that of the mean values of the input angular momentum observed for xn (complete fusion products), αxn and 2αxn (incomplete fusion products) in 16O + 169Tm (deformed) system. The comparison of data inferred that the mean values of the input angular momentum are smaller in case of spherical target than that of deformed target at same projectile energy of 16O-ion beam. It means that the target deformation affect the incomplete fusion dynamics.

  12. Quantum Stackelberg duopoly with incomplete information [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C.-F.; Kiang, D.

    2005-10-01

    We investigate the quantum version of the Stackelberg duopoly with incomplete information, especially how the quantum entanglement affects the first-mover advantage in the classical form. It is found that while positive entanglement enhances the first-mover advantage beyond the classical limit, the advantage is dramatically suppressed by negative entanglement. Moreover, despite that positive quantum entanglement improves the first-mover's tolerance for the informational incompleteness, the quantum effect does not change the basic fact that Firm A's lack of complete information of Firm B's unit cost is eradicating the first-mover advantage.

  13. Low Complexity Models to improve Incomplete Sensitivities for Shape Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanciu, Mugurel; Mohammadi, Bijan; Moreau, Stéphane

    2003-01-01

    The present global platform for simulation and design of multi-model configurations treat shape optimization problems in aerodynamics. Flow solvers are coupled with optimization algorithms based on CAD-free and CAD-connected frameworks. Newton methods together with incomplete expressions of gradients are used. Such incomplete sensitivities are improved using reduced models based on physical assumptions. The validity and the application of this approach in real-life problems are presented. The numerical examples concern shape optimization for an airfoil, a business jet and a car engine cooling axial fan.

  14. Generalized emissivity inverse problem.

    PubMed

    Ming, DengMing; Wen, Tao; Dai, XianXi; Dai, JiXin; Evenson, William E

    2002-04-01

    Inverse problems have recently drawn considerable attention from the physics community due to of potential widespread applications [K. Chadan and P. C. Sabatier, Inverse Problems in Quantum Scattering Theory, 2nd ed. (Springer Verlag, Berlin, 1989)]. An inverse emissivity problem that determines the emissivity g(nu) from measurements of only the total radiated power J(T) has recently been studied [Tao Wen, DengMing Ming, Xianxi Dai, Jixin Dai, and William E. Evenson, Phys. Rev. E 63, 045601(R) (2001)]. In this paper, a new type of generalized emissivity and transmissivity inverse (GETI) problem is proposed. The present problem differs from our previous work on inverse problems by allowing the unknown (emissivity) function g(nu) to be temperature dependent as well as frequency dependent. Based on published experimental information, we have developed an exact solution formula for this GETI problem. A universal function set suggested for numerical calculation is shown to be robust, making this inversion method practical and convenient for realistic calculations. PMID:12005916

  15. The inverse electroencephalography pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, David Michael

    The inverse electroencephalography (EEG) problem is defined as determining which regions of the brain are active based on remote measurements recorded with scalp EEG electrodes. An accurate solution to this problem would benefit both fundamental neuroscience research and clinical neuroscience applications. However, constructing accurate patient-specific inverse EEG solutions requires complex modeling, simulation, and visualization algorithms, and to date only a few systems have been developed that provide such capabilities. In this dissertation, a computational system for generating and investigating patient-specific inverse EEG solutions is introduced, and the requirements for each stage of this Inverse EEG Pipeline are defined and discussed. While the requirements of many of the stages are satisfied with existing algorithms, others have motivated research into novel modeling and simulation methods. The principal technical results of this work include novel surface-based volume modeling techniques, an efficient construction for the EEG lead field, and the Open Source release of the Inverse EEG Pipeline software for use by the bioelectric field research community. In this work, the Inverse EEG Pipeline is applied to three research problems in neurology: comparing focal and distributed source imaging algorithms; separating measurements into independent activation components for multifocal epilepsy; and localizing the cortical activity that produces the P300 effect in schizophrenia.

  16. Direct and indirect inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virieux, Jean; Brossier, Romain; Métivier, Ludovic; Operto, Stéphane; Ribodetti, Alessandra

    2016-06-01

    A bridge is highlighted between the direct inversion and the indirect inversion. They are based on fundamental different approaches: one is looking after a projection from the data space to the model space while the other one is reducing a misfit between observed data and synthetic data obtained from a given model. However, it is possible to obtain similar structures for model perturbation, and we shall focus on P-wave velocity reconstruction. This bridge is built up through the Born approximation linearizing the forward problem with respect to model perturbation and through asymptotic approximations of the Green functions of the wave propagation equation. We first describe the direct inversion and its ingredients and then we focus on a specific misfit function design leading to a indirect inversion. Finally, we shall compare this indirect inversion with more standard least-squares inversion as the FWI, enabling the focus on small weak velocity perturbations on one side and the speed-up of the velocity perturbation reconstruction on the other side. This bridge has been proposed by the group led by Raul Madariaga in the early nineties, emphasizing his leading role in efficient imaging workflows for seismic velocity reconstruction, a drastic requirement at that time.

  17. MRI Shows More Severe Hippocampal Atrophy and Shape Deformation in Hippocampal Sclerosis Than in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zarow, C.; Wang, L.; Chui, H. C.; Weiner, M. W.; Csernansky, J. G.

    2011-01-01

    While hippocampal atrophy is a key feature of both hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), the pathology underlying this finding differs in these two conditions. In AD, atrophy is due primarily to loss of neurons and neuronal volume as a result of neurofibrillary tangle formation. While the etiology of HS is unknown, neuron loss in the hippocampus is severe to complete. We compared hippocampal volume and deformations from premortem MRI in 43 neuropathologically diagnosed cases of HS, AD, and normal controls (NC) selected from a longitudinal study of subcortical ischemic vascular disease (IVD Program Project). HS cases (n = 11) showed loss of neurons throughout the rostral-caudal extent of the hippocampus in one or both hemispheres. AD cases (n = 24) met NIA-Reagan criteria for high likelihood of AD. Normal control cases (n = 8) were cognitively intact and showed no significant AD or hippocampal pathology. The mean hippocampal volumes were significantly lower in HS versus AD groups (P < .001). Mean shape deformations in the CA1 and subiculum differed significantly between HS versus AD, HS versus NC, and AD versus NC (P < .0001). Additional study is needed to determine whether these differences will be meaningful for clinical diagnosis of individual cases. PMID:21547227

  18. Hippocampal culture stimulus with 4-megahertz ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratore, Robert; LaManna, Justine K.; Lamprecht, Michael R.; Morrison, Barclay, III

    2012-10-01

    Among current modalities, ultrasound uniquely offers both millisecond and millimeter accuracy in noninvasively stimulating brain tissue. In addition, by sweeping the ultrasound beam within the refractory period of the neuronal tissue, ultrasonic neuromodulation can be adapted to target extended or multiply connected regions with quasi-simultaneity. Towards the development of this safe brain stimulus technique, the response of rat hippocampal cultures to ultrasound was investigated. Hippocampal slices, 0.4-mm thick, were obtained from 8-day old Sprague Dawley rats and cultured for 6 days. The in vitro cultures were exposed to multiple 100-ms 4.04-MHz ultrasound pulses from a 42-mm diameter, 90-mm spherical cap transducer. Peak pressure ranged from 0 through about 77 kPa. Responses in the form of electrical potentials from a sixty channel electrode array were digitized and recorded. The DG and CA1 regions of the hippocampus exhibited similar ultrasonically-evoked field potentials.

  19. Tutoring with Incomplete and Uncertain Knowledge. CITE Report No. 38.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Michael

    The design of an Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS) in a knowledge domain where expertise is modeled as a set of uncertain and incomplete beliefs that are justifiable and expressible in the form of a critical argument is outlined. Issues concerning knowledge communication in a tutorial interaction are discussed with reference to a cognitive model…

  20. Root cause of incomplete control rod insertions at Westinghouse reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, S.

    1997-01-01

    Within the past year, incomplete RCCA insertions have been observed on high burnup fuel assemblies at two Westinghouse PWRs. Initial tests at the Wolf Creek site indicated that the direct cause of the incomplete insertions observed at Wolf Creek was excessive fuel assembly thimble tube distortion. Westinghouse committed to the NRC to perform a root cause analysis by the end of August, 1996. The root cause analysis process used by Westinghouse included testing at ten sites to obtain drag, growth and other characteristics of high burnup fuel assemblies. It also included testing at the Westinghouse hot cell of two of the Wolf Creek incomplete insertion assemblies. A mechanical model was developed to calculate the response of fuel assemblies when subjected to compressive loads. Detailed manufacturing reviews were conducted to determine if this was a manufacturing related issue. In addition, a review of available worldwide experience was performed. Based on the above, it was concluded that the thimble tube distortion observed on the Wolf Creek incomplete insertion assemblies was caused by unusual fuel assembly growth over and above what would typically be expected as a result of irradiation exposure. It was determined that the unusual growth component is a combination of growth due to oxide accumulation and accelerated growth, and would only be expected in high temperature plants on fuel assemblies that see long residence times and high power duties.

  1. 10 CFR 782.7 - Incomplete notice of infringement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CLAIMS FOR PATENT AND COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT Requirements and Procedures § 782.7 Incomplete notice of infringement. (a) If a communication alleging patent or copyright infringement is received that does not meet the requirements set forth above in § 782.5, the sender shall...

  2. Vulvar myiasis following suction and evacuation for incomplete abortion.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anju; Goel, Bharti; Rani, Shikha

    2015-07-01

    Myiasis is caused by fly larva capable of penetrating healthy or necrotic tissue, usually in tropical and subtropical countries. The involvement of an exposed area is common; however it may very rarely involve the genital region. We present a rare case of vulvar myiasis which occurred after suction and evacuation performed for incomplete abortion. PMID:25740831

  3. Nonallelic heterogeneity in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa with incomplete penetrance

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.K.; Berson, E.L.; Dryja, T.P.

    1994-08-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of retinal diseases in which photoreceptor cells throughout the retina degenerate. Although there is considerable genetic heterogeneity (autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked forms exist), there is a possibility that some clinically defined subtypes of the disease may be the result of mutations at the same locus. One possible clinically defined subtype is that of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) with incomplete penetrance. Whereas in most families with ADRP, carriers can be clearly identified because of visual loss, ophthalmological findings, or abnormal electroretinograms (ERGs), in occasional families some obligate carriers are asymptomatic and have normal or nearly normal ERGs even late in life. A recent paper reported the mapping of the diseases locus in one pedigree (designated adRP7) with ADRP with incomplete penetrance to chromosome 7p. To test the idea that ADRP with incomplete penetrance may be genetically homogeneous, we have evaluated whether a different family with incomplete penetrance also has a disease gene linked to the same region. 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Limit Pricing with Incomplete Information: Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorenson, Timothy L.

    2004-01-01

    Strategic pricing is an important and exciting topic in industrial organization and the economics of strategy. A wide range of texts use what has become a standard version of the Milgrom and Roberts (1982a) limit-pricing model to convey the essential ideas of strategic pricing under incomplete information. In addition to providing a formal, but…

  5. An Interactive Approach to Analyzing Incomplete Multivariate Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, Mark R.

    This paper examines some of the problems that arise when conducting multivariate analyses with incomplete data. The literature on the effectiveness of several missing data procedures (MDP) is summarized. The most widely used MDPs are: (1) listwise deletion; (2) pairwise deletion; (3) variable mean; (4) correlational methods. No MDP should be used…

  6. Computer Simulation of Incomplete-Data Interpretation Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Douglas Frederick

    1987-01-01

    Described is a computer simulation that was used to help general education students enrolled in a large introductory geology course. The purpose of the simulation is to learn to interpret incomplete data. Students design a plan to collect bathymetric data for an area of the ocean. Procedures used by the students and instructor are included.…

  7. 49 CFR 529.4 - Requirements for incomplete automobile manufacturers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... determined by the incomplete automobile manufacturer for the automobile in accordance with 40 CFR part 600... economy label specified in paragaph (b)(2) of this section to that automobile in accordance with 40 CFR... take into account the presence of air conditioning. (2) A fuel economy label conforming with 40...

  8. 49 CFR 529.4 - Requirements for incomplete automobile manufacturers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... determined by the incomplete automobile manufacturer for the automobile in accordance with 40 CFR part 600... economy label specified in paragaph (b)(2) of this section to that automobile in accordance with 40 CFR... take into account the presence of air conditioning. (2) A fuel economy label conforming with 40...

  9. 49 CFR 529.4 - Requirements for incomplete automobile manufacturers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... determined by the incomplete automobile manufacturer for the automobile in accordance with 40 CFR part 600... economy label specified in paragaph (b)(2) of this section to that automobile in accordance with 40 CFR... take into account the presence of air conditioning. (2) A fuel economy label conforming with 40...

  10. 49 CFR 529.4 - Requirements for incomplete automobile manufacturers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... determined by the incomplete automobile manufacturer for the automobile in accordance with 40 CFR part 600... economy label specified in paragaph (b)(2) of this section to that automobile in accordance with 40 CFR... take into account the presence of air conditioning. (2) A fuel economy label conforming with 40...

  11. 49 CFR 529.4 - Requirements for incomplete automobile manufacturers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... determined by the incomplete automobile manufacturer for the automobile in accordance with 40 CFR part 600... economy label specified in paragaph (b)(2) of this section to that automobile in accordance with 40 CFR... take into account the presence of air conditioning. (2) A fuel economy label conforming with 40...

  12. 49 CFR 568.4 - Requirements for incomplete vehicle manufacturers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Listing of the vehicle types as defined in 49 CFR 571.3 (e.g., truck, MPV, bus, trailer) into which the... standards applicable to the vehicle pursuant to 49 CFR 568.4(a)(7). (9) A certification that the statements... STAGES-ALL INCOMPLETE, INTERMEDIATE AND FINAL-STAGE MANUFACTURERS OF VEHICLES MANUFACTURED IN TWO OR...

  13. 49 CFR 568.4 - Requirements for incomplete vehicle manufacturers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Listing of the vehicle types as defined in 49 CFR 571.3 (e.g., truck, MPV, bus, trailer) into which the... standards applicable to the vehicle pursuant to 49 CFR 568.4(a)(7). (9) A certification that the statements... STAGES-ALL INCOMPLETE, INTERMEDIATE AND FINAL-STAGE MANUFACTURERS OF VEHICLES MANUFACTURED IN TWO OR...

  14. 49 CFR 568.4 - Requirements for incomplete vehicle manufacturers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Listing of the vehicle types as defined in 49 CFR 571.3 (e.g., truck, MPV, bus, trailer) into which the... standards applicable to the vehicle pursuant to 49 CFR 568.4(a)(7). (9) A certification that the statements... STAGES-ALL INCOMPLETE, INTERMEDIATE AND FINAL-STAGE MANUFACTURERS OF VEHICLES MANUFACTURED IN TWO OR...

  15. 49 CFR 568.4 - Requirements for incomplete vehicle manufacturers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Listing of the vehicle types as defined in 49 CFR 571.3 (e.g., truck, MPV, bus, trailer) into which the... standards applicable to the vehicle pursuant to 49 CFR 568.4(a)(7). (9) A certification that the statements... STAGES-ALL INCOMPLETE, INTERMEDIATE AND FINAL-STAGE MANUFACTURERS OF VEHICLES MANUFACTURED IN TWO OR...

  16. 19 CFR 122.74 - Incomplete (pro forma) manifest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard Commercial Aircraft Departing From the United States § 122.74 Incomplete (pro forma) manifest. (a) Application—(1) Shipments to foreign countries. Except for aircraft bound for foreign locations referred to in paragraph...

  17. 19 CFR 122.74 - Incomplete (pro forma) manifest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard Commercial Aircraft Departing From the United States § 122.74 Incomplete (pro forma) manifest. (a) Application—(1) Shipments to foreign countries. Except for aircraft bound for foreign locations referred to in paragraph...

  18. 19 CFR 122.74 - Incomplete (pro forma) manifest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard Commercial Aircraft Departing From the United States § 122.74 Incomplete (pro forma) manifest. (a) Application—(1) Shipments to foreign countries. Except for aircraft bound for foreign locations referred to in paragraph...

  19. 19 CFR 122.74 - Incomplete (pro forma) manifest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard Commercial Aircraft Departing From the United States § 122.74 Incomplete (pro forma) manifest. (a) Application—(1) Shipments to foreign countries. Except for aircraft bound for foreign locations referred to in paragraph...

  20. An Uncertainty Measure for Incomplete Decision Tables and Its Applications.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jianhua; Wang, Wentao; Xu, Qing

    2013-08-01

    Uncertainty measures can supply new viewpoints for analyzing data. They can help us in disclosing the substantive characteristics of data. The uncertainty measurement issue is also a key topic in the rough-set theory. Although there are some measures to evaluate the uncertainty for complete decision systems (also called decision tables), they cannot be trivially transplanted into incomplete decision systems. There are relatively few studies on uncertainty measurement in incomplete decision systems. In this paper, we propose a new form of conditional entropy, which can be used to measure the uncertainty in incomplete decision systems. Some important properties of the conditional entropy are obtained. In particular, two validity theorems guarantee that the proposed conditional entropy can be used as a reasonable uncertainty measure for incomplete decision systems. Experiments on some real-life data sets are conducted to test and verify the validity of the proposed measure. Applications of the proposed uncertainty measure in ranking attributes and feature selection are also studied with experiments. PMID:26502436

  1. A qualitative model for temporal reasoning with incomplete information

    SciTech Connect

    Geffner, H.

    1996-12-31

    We develop a qualitative framework for temporal reasoning with incomplete information that features a modeling language based on rules and a semantics based on infinitesimal probabilities. The framework relates logical and probabilistical models, and accommodates in a natural way features that have been found problematic in other models like non-determinism, action qualifications, parallel actions, and abduction to actions and fluents.

  2. Gender under Incomplete Acquisition: Heritage Speakers' Knowledge of Noun Categorization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polinsky, Maria

    2008-01-01

    The author discusses a study of gender assignment (noun categorization) in heritage Russian and presents issues in the methodology of heritage language study. To anticipate the conclusions of this article, the gender assignment data presented argue for the systematicity of what emerges under incomplete acquisition. The system is different from its…

  3. 40 CFR 86.085-20 - Incomplete vehicles, classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., classification. For purposes of this part: (a) A heavy-duty gasoline-fueled vehicle is considered to be a complete vehicle if it has the primary load carrying device or container attached at the time the vehicle leaves the control of the manufacturer of the engine, and is considered to be an incomplete vehicle if...

  4. Coexistent arteriovenous malformation and hippocampal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Prayson, Richard A; O'Toole, Elizabeth E

    2016-06-01

    Cavernous angiomas or cavernomas have been occasionally described in patients presenting with medically intractable epilepsy. Reports of cavernomas associated with a second pathology potentially causative of seizures have rarely been documented; most commonly, the second pathology is focal cortical dysplasia or less frequently, hippocampal sclerosis. To our knowledge, cases of arteriovenous malformation arising in this clinical setting and associated with hippocampal sclerosis have not been previously described. We report a 56-year-old woman who initially presented at age 24years with staring spells. Imaging studies revealed an arteriovenous malformation in the right parietal lobe. At age 51years, she represented with signs and symptoms related to a hemorrhage from the malformation. The patient underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) of the lesion. She subsequently developed seizures, refractory to medical management. MRI studies showed atrophy in the right hippocampus. She underwent resection of the right parietal lobe and hippocampus. Histopathologic examination of the right parietal lesion revealed an arteriovenous malformation marked by focally prominent vascular sclerosis, calcification and adjacent hemosiderin deposition. The hippocampus was marked by prominent neuronal loss and gliosis in the CA1 region, consistent with CA1 sclerosis or hippocampal sclerosis International League Against Epilepsy type 2. PMID:26899356

  5. Tuberous sclerosis complex coexistent with hippocampal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lang, Min; Prayson, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    Tuberous sclerosis and hippocampal sclerosis are both well-defined entities associated with medically intractable epilepsy. To our knowledge, there has been only one prior case of these two pathologies being co-existent. We report a 7-month-old boy who presented with intractable seizures at 2 months of age. MRI studies showed diffuse volume loss in the brain with bilateral, multiple cortical tubers and subcortical migration abnormalities. Subependymal nodules were noted without subependymal giant cell astrocytoma. Genetic testing revealed TSC2 and PRD gene deletions. Histopathology of the hippocampus showed CA1 sclerosis marked by loss of neurons in the CA1 region. Sections from the temporal, parietal and occipital lobes showed multiple cortical tubers characterized by cortical architectural disorganization, gliosis, calcifications and increased number of large balloon cells. Focal white matter balloon cells and spongiform changes were also present. The patient underwent resection of the right fronto-parietal lobe and a subsequent resection of the right temporal, parietal and occipital lobes. The patient is free of seizures on anti-epileptic medication 69 months after surgery. Although hippocampal sclerosis is well documented to be associated with coexistent focal cortical dysplasia, the specific co-existence of cortical tubers and hippocampal sclerosis appears to be rare. PMID:26498091

  6. Alterations in hippocampal connectivity across the psychosis dimension.

    PubMed

    Samudra, Niyatee; Ivleva, Elena I; Hubbard, Nicholas A; Rypma, Bart; Sweeney, John A; Clementz, Brett A; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Tamminga, Carol A

    2015-08-30

    Recent evidence demonstrates that hippocampal hyperactivity helps mediate psychosis. Using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI), we examined hippocampal connectivity alterations in individuals with psychosis (PS) versus healthy controls (HC). Because of its putative greater involvement in psychiatric disorders, we hypothesized that the anterior hippocampus network would show greater dysconnectivity in psychosis. We tested rsfMRI connectivity in 88 PS (including 21 with schizophrenia; 40 with schizoaffective disorder; 27 with psychotic bipolar I disorder) and 65 HC. Seed-based voxel-wise connectivity analyses were carried out using whole, anterior, and posterior hippocampal seeds. No significant differences in functional hippocampal connectivity were found across the three conventional diagnoses. PS were then contrasted with HC, showing strong reductions in anterior hippocampal connectivity to anterior neocortical regions, including medial frontal and anterior cingulate cortices, as well as superior temporal gyrus, precuneus, thalamus and cerebellum. Posterior hippocampal seeds also demonstrated decreased connectivity in PS, with fewer dysconnected regions and a posterior/cerebellar distribution. Whole hippocampal outcomes were consistent with anterior/posterior hippocampal connectivity changes. Connectivity alterations did not correlate with cognition, clinical symptoms, or medication effect variables. Our results suggest a psychosis network of decreased hippocampal connectivity with limbic and frontal contributions, independent of diagnostic categories. PMID:26123450

  7. Kynurenine pathway metabolites are associated with hippocampal activity during autobiographical memory recall in patients with depression.

    PubMed

    Young, Kymberly D; Drevets, Wayne C; Dantzer, Robert; Teague, T Kent; Bodurka, Jerzy; Savitz, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    Inflammation-related changes in the concentrations of inflammatory mediators such as c-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 1β (IL-1), and IL-6 as well as kynurenine metabolites are associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) and affect depressive behavior, cognition, and hippocampal plasticity in animal models. We previously reported that the ratios of kynurenic acid (KynA) to the neurotoxic metabolites, 3-hydroxykynurenine (3HK) and quinolinic acid (QA), were positively correlated with hippocampal volume in depression. The hippocampus is critical for autobiographical memory (AM) recall which is impaired in MDD. Here we tested whether the ratios, KynA/3HK and KynA/QA were associated with AM recall performance as well as hippocampal activity during AM recall. Thirty-five unmedicated depressed participants and 25 healthy controls (HCs) underwent fMRI scanning while recalling emotionally-valenced AMs and provided serum samples for the quantification of kynurenine metabolites, CRP, and cytokines (IL-1 receptor antagonist - IL-1RA; IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha - TNF, interferon gamma -IFN-γ, IL-10). KynA/3HK and KynA/QA were lower in the MDD group relative to the HCs. The concentrations of the CRP and the cytokines did not differ significantly between the HCs and the MDD group. Depressed individuals recalled fewer specific AMs and displayed increased left hippocampal activity during the recall of positive and negative memories. KynA/3HK was inversely associated with left hippocampal activity during specific AM recall in the MDD group. Further, KynA/QA was positively correlated with percent negative specific memories recalled in the MDD group and showed a non-significant trend toward a positive correlation with percent positive specific memories recalled in HCs. In contrast, neither CRP nor the cytokines were significantly associated with AM recall or activity of the hippocampus during AM recall. Conceivably, an imbalance in levels of KynA versus QA

  8. Classic hippocampal sclerosis and hippocampal-onset epilepsy produced by a single “cryptic” episode of focal hippocampal excitation in awake rats

    PubMed Central

    Norwood, Braxton A.; Bumanglag, Argyle V.; Osculati, Francesco; Sbarbati, Andrea; Marzola, Pasquina; Nicolato, Elena; Fabene, Paolo F.; Sloviter, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    In refractory temporal lobe epilepsy, seizures often arise from a shrunken hippocampus exhibiting a pattern of selective neuron loss called “classic hippocampal sclerosis.” No single experimental injury has reproduced this specific pathology, suggesting that hippocampal atrophy might be a progressive “endstage” pathology resulting from years of spontaneous seizures. We posed the alternate hypothesis that classic hippocampal sclerosis results from a single excitatory event that has never been successfully modeled experimentally because convulsive status epilepticus, the insult most commonly used to produce epileptogenic brain injury, is too severe and necessarily terminated before the hippocampus receives the needed duration of excitation. We tested this hypothesis by producing prolonged hippocampal excitation in awake rats without causing convulsive status epilepticus. Two daily 30-minute episodes of perforant pathway stimulation in Sprague-Dawley rats increased granule cell paired-pulse inhibition, decreased epileptiform afterdischarge durations during 8 hours of subsequent stimulation, and prevented convulsive status epilepticus. Similarly, one 8-hour episode of reduced-intensity stimulation in Long-Evans rats, which are relatively resistant to developing status epilepticus, produced hippocampal discharges without causing status epilepticus. Both paradigms immediately produced the extensive neuronal injury that defines classic hippocampal sclerosis, without giving any clinical indication during the insult that an injury was being inflicted. Spontaneous hippocampal-onset seizures began 16–25 days post-injury, before hippocampal atrophy developed, as demonstrated by sequential magnetic resonance imaging. These results indicate that classic hippocampal sclerosis is uniquely produced by a single episode of clinically “cryptic” excitation. Epileptogenic insults may often involve prolonged excitation that goes undetected at the time of injury. PMID

  9. Treatment Strategy after Incomplete Endoscopic Resection of Early Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Gyun

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer is defined as incomplete when tumor cells are found at the resection margin upon histopathological examination. However, a tumor-positive resection margin does not always indicate residual tumor; it can also be caused by tissue contraction during fixation, by the cautery effect during endoscopic resection, or by incorrect histopathological mapping. Cases of highly suspicious residual tumor require additional endoscopic or surgical resection. For inoperable patients, argon plasma coagulation can be used as an alternative endoscopic treatment. Immediately after the incomplete resection or residual tumor has been confirmed by the pathologist, clinicians should also decide upon any additional treatment to be carried out during the follow-up period. PMID:27435699

  10. Investigations on the Incompletely Developed Plane Diagonal-Tension Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Paul

    1940-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation on the incompletely developed diagonal-tension field. Actual diagonal-tension beams work in an intermediate stage between pure shear and pure diagonal tension; the theory developed by wagner for diagonal tension is not directly applicable. The first part of the paper reviews the most essential items of the theory of pure diagonal tension as well as previous attempts to formulate a theory of incomplete diagonal tension. The second part of the paper describes strain measurement made by the N. A. C. A. to obtain the necessary coefficients for the proposed theory. The third part of the paper discusses the stress analysis of diagonal-tension beams by means of the proposed theory.

  11. Treatment Strategy after Incomplete Endoscopic Resection of Early Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Gyun

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer is defined as incomplete when tumor cells are found at the resection margin upon histopathological examination. However, a tumor-positive resection margin does not always indicate residual tumor; it can also be caused by tissue contraction during fixation, by the cautery effect during endoscopic resection, or by incorrect histopathological mapping. Cases of highly suspicious residual tumor require additional endoscopic or surgical resection. For inoperable patients, argon plasma coagulation can be used as an alternative endoscopic treatment. Immediately after the incomplete resection or residual tumor has been confirmed by the pathologist, clinicians should also decide upon any additional treatment to be carried out during the follow-up period. PMID:27435699

  12. Bayesian Inference of Natural Rankings in Incomplete Competition Networks

    PubMed Central

    Park, Juyong; Yook, Soon-Hyung

    2014-01-01

    Competition between a complex system's constituents and a corresponding reward mechanism based on it have profound influence on the functioning, stability, and evolution of the system. But determining the dominance hierarchy or ranking among the constituent parts from the strongest to the weakest – essential in determining reward and penalty – is frequently an ambiguous task due to the incomplete (partially filled) nature of competition networks. Here we introduce the “Natural Ranking,” an unambiguous ranking method applicable to a round robin tournament, and formulate an analytical model based on the Bayesian formula for inferring the expected mean and error of the natural ranking of nodes from an incomplete network. We investigate its potential and uses in resolving important issues of ranking by applying it to real-world competition networks. PMID:25163528

  13. Quantum Stackelberg Duopoly with Continuous Distributed Incomplete Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xia; Hu, Cheng-Zheng

    2012-12-01

    A general model of the quantum Stackelberg duopoly is constructed by introducing the “minimal" quantum structure into the Stackelberg duopoly with continuous distributed incomplete information, where both players only know the continuous distribution of the competitor's unit cost. In this model, the cases with complete information, discrete distributed incomplete information, and continuous distributed asymmetric information are all involved. Because of different roles played by the total information uncertainty and the information asymmetry, the game exhibits some new interesting features, such as the total information uncertainty can counteract or improve the first-mover advantage according to the value of the quantum entanglement. What's more, this general model will be helpful for the government to reduce the abuses of oligopolistic competition and to improve the economic efficiency.

  14. Discrete Inverse and State Estimation Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunsch, Carl

    2006-06-01

    The problems of making inferences about the natural world from noisy observations and imperfect theories occur in almost all scientific disciplines. This book addresses these problems using examples taken from geophysical fluid dynamics. It focuses on discrete formulations, both static and time-varying, known variously as inverse, state estimation or data assimilation problems. Starting with fundamental algebraic and statistical ideas, the book guides the reader through a range of inference tools including the singular value decomposition, Gauss-Markov and minimum variance estimates, Kalman filters and related smoothers, and adjoint (Lagrange multiplier) methods. The final chapters discuss a variety of practical applications to geophysical flow problems. Discrete Inverse and State Estimation Problems is an ideal introduction to the topic for graduate students and researchers in oceanography, meteorology, climate dynamics, and geophysical fluid dynamics. It is also accessible to a wider scientific audience; the only prerequisite is an understanding of linear algebra. Provides a comprehensive introduction to discrete methods of inference from incomplete information Based upon 25 years of practical experience using real data and models Develops sequential and whole-domain analysis methods from simple least-squares Contains many examples and problems, and web-based support through MIT opencourseware

  15. Inverse temperature in Superstatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loguercio, Humberto; Davis, Sergio

    2016-05-01

    In this work, it is shown that there are (at least) three alternative definitions of the inverse temperature for a non-canonical ensemble. These definitions coincide in expectation but, in general, not in their higher moments. We explore in detail the application to the recent formalism of Superstatistics (C. Beck, 2003), and, in particular, to the configurational probability distribution in the microcanonical ensemble.

  16. Radiopaque Tagging Masks Caries Lesions following Incomplete Excavation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schwendicke, F; Meyer-Lueckel, H; Schulz, M; Dörfer, C E; Paris, S

    2014-06-01

    One-step incomplete excavation seals caries-affected dentin under a restoration and appears to be advantageous in the treatment of deep lesions. However, it is impossible to discriminate radiographically between intentionally left, arrested lesions and overlooked or active lesions. This diagnostic uncertainty decreases the acceptance of minimally invasive excavation and might lead to unnecessary re-treatment of incompletely excavated teeth. Radiopaque tagging of sealed lesions might mask arrested lesions and assist in discrimination from progressing lesions. Therefore, we microradiographically screened 4 substances (SnCl2, AgNO3, CsF, CsCH3COO) for their effect on artificial lesions. Since water-dissolved tin chloride (SnCl2×Aq) was found to stably mask artificial lesions, we then investigated its radiographic effects on progressing lesions. Natural lesions were incompletely excavated and radiopaque tagging performed. Grey-value differences (△GV) between sound and carious dentin were determined and radiographs assessed by 20 dentists. While radiographic effects of SnCl2×Aq were stable for non-progressing lesions, they significantly decreased during a second demineralization (p < .001, t test). For natural lesions, tagging with SnCl2×Aq significantly reduced △GV (p < .001, Wilcoxon). Tagged lesions were detected significantly less often than untagged lesions (p < .001). SnCl2×Aq was suitable to mask caries-affected dentin and discriminate between arrested and progressing lesions in vitro. Radiopaque tagging could resolve diagnostic uncertainties associated with incomplete excavation. PMID:24718110

  17. An automatic ordering method for incomplete factorization iterative solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Forsyth, P.A.; Tang, W.P. . Dept. of Computer Science); D'Azevedo, E.F.D. )

    1991-01-01

    The minimum discarded fill (MDF) ordering strategy for incomplete factorization iterative solvers is developed. MDF ordering is demonstrated for several model son-symmetric problems, as well as a water-flooding simulation which uses an unstructured grid. The model problems show a three to five fold decrease in the number of iterations compared to natural orderings. Greater than twofold improvement was observed for the waterflooding simulation. 26 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Contributions to the theory of incomplete tension bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schapitz, E

    1937-01-01

    The present report offers an approximate theory for the stress and deformation condition after buckling of the skin in reinforced panels and shells loaded in simple shear and compression and under combined stresses. The theory presents a unified scheme for stresses of these types. It is based upon the concept of a nonuniform stress distribution in the metal panel and its marked power of resistance against compressive stresses ("incomplete" tension bay).

  19. Distributed control systems with incomplete and uncertain information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jingpeng

    Scientific and engineering advances in wireless communication, sensors, propulsion, and other areas are rapidly making it possible to develop unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) with sophisticated capabilities. UAVs have come to the forefront as tools for airborne reconnaissance to search for, detect, and destroy enemy targets in relatively complex environments. They potentially reduce risk to human life, are cost effective, and are superior to manned aircraft for certain types of missions. It is desirable for UAVs to have a high level of intelligent autonomy to carry out mission tasks with little external supervision and control. This raises important issues involving tradeoffs between centralized control and the associated potential to optimize mission plans, and decentralized control with great robustness and the potential to adapt to changing conditions. UAV capabilities have been extended several ways through armament (e.g., Hellfire missiles on Predator UAVs), increased endurance and altitude (e.g., Global Hawk), and greater autonomy. Some known barriers to full-scale implementation of UAVs are increased communication and control requirements as well as increased platform and system complexity. One of the key problems is how UAV systems can handle incomplete and uncertain information in dynamic environments. Especially when the system is composed of heterogeneous and distributed UAVs, the overall system complexity is increased under such conditions. Presented through the use of published papers, this dissertation lays the groundwork for the study of methodologies for handling incomplete and uncertain information for distributed control systems. An agent-based simulation framework is built to investigate mathematical approaches (optimization) and emergent intelligence approaches. The first paper provides a mathematical approach for systems of UAVs to handle incomplete and uncertain information. The second paper describes an emergent intelligence approach for UAVs

  20. Abducens nerve palsy in a girl with incomplete Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Emiroglu, Melike; Alkan, Gulsum; Kartal, Ayse; Cimen, Derya

    2016-08-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis that can involve the nervous system, including the cranial nerves. Central nervous system findings, especially irritability, lethargy, and aseptic meningitis, occur in 1-30 % of KD patients (1). Cranial nerve palsies are seen rarely, and abducens nerve palsy has been reported in only three children. We describe a 2.5-year-old girl with incomplete KD who developed transient abducens nerve palsy after intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment. PMID:27329470

  1. Effects of incomplete adaptation and disturbance in adaptive control.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindorff, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    In this paper consideration is given to the effects of disturbance and incomplete parameter adaptation on the performance of adaptive control systems in which Liapunov theory is used in deriving the control law. A design equation for the bounded error is derived. It is further shown that parameters in the adaptive controller may not converge in the presence of disturbance unless the input signal has a rich enough frequency constant. Design examples are presented.

  2. Automatic calculation of hippocampal atrophy rates using a hippocampal template and the boundary shift integral.

    PubMed

    Barnes, J; Boyes, R G; Lewis, E B; Schott, J M; Frost, C; Scahill, R I; Fox, N C

    2007-11-01

    We describe a method of automatically calculating hippocampal atrophy rates on T1-weighted MR images without manual delineation of hippocampi. This method was applied to a group of Alzheimer's disease (AD) (n=36) and control (n=19) subjects and compared with manual methods (manual segmentation of baseline and repeat-image hippocampi) and semi-automated methods (manual segmentation of baseline hippocampi only). In controls, mean (S.D.) atrophy rates for manual, semi-automated, and automated methods were 18.1 (53.5), 15.3 (50.2) and 11.3 (50.4) mm3 loss per year, respectively. In AD patients these rates were 174.6 (106.5) 159.4 (101.2) and 172.1 (123.1) mm3 loss per year, respectively. The automated method was a significant predictor of disease (p=0.001) and gave similar group discrimination compared with both semi-automated and manual methods. The automated hippocampal analysis in this small study took approximately 20 min per hippocampal pair on a 3.4 GHz Intel Xeon server, whereas manual delineation of each hippocampal pair took approximately 90 min of operator-intensive labour. This method may be useful diagnostically or in studies where analysis of many scans may be required. PMID:16934913

  3. Anterior Thalamic Lesions Alter Both Hippocampal-Dependent Behavior and Hippocampal Acetylcholine Release in the Rat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Lisa M.; Hall, Joseph M.; Vetreno, Ryan P.

    2011-01-01

    The anterior thalamic nuclei (ATN) are important for learning and memory as damage to this region produces a persistent amnestic syndrome. Dense connections between the ATN and the hippocampus exist, and importantly, damage to the ATN can impair hippocampal functioning. Acetylcholine (ACh) is a key neurotransmitter in the hippocampus, and in vivo…

  4. The Impact of Sleep Loss on Hippocampal Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, Toni-Moi; Abel, Ted

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampal cellular and molecular processes critical for memory consolidation are affected by the amount and quality of sleep attained. Questions remain with regard to how sleep enhances memory, what parameters of sleep after learning are optimal for memory consolidation, and what underlying hippocampal molecular players are targeted by sleep…

  5. Sparing of Spatial Mental Imagery in Patients with Hippocampal Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Soyun; Borst, Grégoire; Thompson, William L.; Hopkins, Ramona O.; Kosslyn, Stephen M.; Squire, Larry R.

    2013-01-01

    In four experiments, we explored the capacity for spatial mental imagery in patients with hippocampal lesions, using tasks that minimized the role of learning and memory. On all four tasks, patients with hippocampal lesions performed as well as controls. Nonetheless, in separate tests, the patients were impaired at remembering the materials that…

  6. The Neuropsychology of Down Syndrome: Evidence for Hippocampal Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Bruce F.; Moon, Jennifer; Edgin, Jamie; Stedron, Jennifer; Nadel, Lynn

    2003-01-01

    Tested prefrontal and hippocampal functions in school-aged individuals with Down syndrome (DS) compared functions with those of typically developing children individually matched on mental age. Found that hippocampal and prefrontal composite scores contributed unique variance to the prediction of mental age and adaptive behavior. Noted a…

  7. Incomplete mixing and reactions in laminar shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paster, A.; Aquino, T.; Bolster, D.

    2015-07-01

    Incomplete mixing of reactive solutes is well known to slow down reaction rates relative to what would be expected from assuming perfect mixing. In purely diffusive systems, for example, it is known that small initial fluctuations in reactant concentrations can lead to reactant segregation, which in the long run can reduce global reaction rates due to poor mixing. In contrast, nonuniform flows can enhance mixing between interacting solutes. Thus, a natural question arises: Can nonuniform flows sufficiently enhance mixing to restrain incomplete mixing effects and, if so, under what conditions? We address this question by considering a specific and simple case, namely, a laminar pure shear reactive flow. Two solution approaches are developed: a Lagrangian random walk method and a semianalytical solution. The results consistently highlight that if shear effects in the system are not sufficiently strong, incomplete mixing effects initially similar to purely diffusive systems will occur, slowing down the overall reaction rate. Then, at some later time, dependent on the strength of the shear, the system will return to behaving as if it were well mixed, but represented by a reduced effective reaction rate.

  8. Incomplete penetrance: The role of stochasticity in developmental cell colonization.

    PubMed

    Binder, Benjamin J; Landman, Kerry A; Newgreen, Donald F; Ross, Joshua V

    2015-09-01

    Cell colonization during embryonic development involves cells migrating and proliferating over growing tissues. Unsuccessful colonization, resulting from genetic causes, can result in various birth defects. However not all individuals with the same mutation show the disease. This is termed incomplete penetrance, and it even extends to discordancy in monozygotic (identical) twins. A one-dimensional agent-based model of cell migration and proliferation within a growing tissue is presented, where the position of every cell is recorded at any time. We develop a new model that approximates this agent-based process - rather than requiring the precise configuration of cells within the tissue, the new model records the total number of cells, the position of the most advanced cell, and then invokes an approximation for how the cells are distributed. The probability mass function (PMF) for the most advanced cell is obtained for both the agent-based model and its approximation. The two PMFs compare extremely well, but using the approximation is computationally faster. Success or failure of colonization is probabilistic. For example for sufficiently high proliferation rate the colonization is assured. However, if the proliferation rate is sufficiently low, there will be a lower, say 50%, chance of success. These results provide insights into the puzzle of incomplete penetrance of a disease phenotype, especially in monozygotic twins. Indeed, stochastic cell behavior (amplified by disease-causing mutations) within the colonization process may play a key role in incomplete penetrance, rather than differences in genes, their expression or environmental conditions. PMID:26047851

  9. Hippocampal “Time Cells”: Time versus Path Integration

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Benjamin J.; Robinson, Robert J.; White, John A.; Eichenbaum, Howard; Hasselmo, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Recent studies have reported the existence of hippocampal “time cells,” neurons that fire at particular moments during periods when behavior and location are relatively constant. However, an alternative explanation of apparent time coding is that hippocampal neurons “path integrate” to encode the distance an animal has traveled. Here, we examined hippocampal neuronal firing patterns as rats ran in place on a treadmill, thus “clamping” behavior and location, while we varied the treadmill speed to distinguish time elapsed from distance traveled. Hippocampal neurons were strongly influenced by time and distance, and less so by minor variations in location. Furthermore, the activity of different neurons reflected integration over time and distance to varying extents, with most neurons strongly influenced by both factors and some significantly influenced by only time or distance. Thus, hippocampal neuronal networks captured both the organization of time and distance in a situation where these dimensions dominated an ongoing experience. PMID:23707613

  10. Effortful retrieval reduces hippocampal activity and impairs incidental encoding.

    PubMed

    Reas, Emilie T; Brewer, James B

    2013-05-01

    Functional imaging studies frequently report that the hippocampus is engaged by successful episodic memory retrieval. However, considering that concurrent encoding of the background environment occurs during retrieval and influences medial temporal lobe activity, it is plausible that hippocampal encoding functions are reduced with increased attentional engagement during effortful retrieval. Expanding upon evidence that retrieval efforts suppress activity in hippocampal regions implicated in encoding, this study examines the influence of retrieval effort on encoding performance and the interactive effects of encoding and retrieval on hippocampal and neocortical activity. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted while subjects performed a word recognition task with incidental picture encoding. Both lower memory strength and increased search duration were associated with encoding failure and reduced hippocampal and default network activity. Activity in the anterior hippocampus tracked encoding, which was more strongly deactivated when incidental encoding was unsuccessful. These findings highlight potential contributions from background encoding processes to hippocampal activations during neuroimaging studies of episodic memory retrieval. PMID:23378272

  11. Modeling Impaired Hippocampal Neurogenesis after Radiation Exposure.

    PubMed

    Cacao, Eliedonna; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2016-03-01

    Radiation impairment of neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus is one of several factors associated with cognitive detriments after treatment of brain cancers in children and adults with radiation therapy. Mouse models have been used to study radiation-induced changes in neurogenesis, however the models are limited in the number of doses, dose fractions, age and time after exposure conditions that have been studied. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel predictive mathematical model of radiation-induced changes to neurogenesis using a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) to represent the time, age and dose-dependent changes to several cell populations participating in neurogenesis as reported in mouse experiments exposed to low-LET radiation. We considered four compartments to model hippocampal neurogenesis and, consequently, the effects of radiation treatment in altering neurogenesis: (1) neural stem cells (NSCs), (2) neuronal progenitor cells or neuroblasts (NB), (3) immature neurons (ImN) and (4) glioblasts (GB). Because neurogenesis is decreasing with increasing mouse age, a description of the age-related dynamics of hippocampal neurogenesis is considered in the model, which is shown to be an important factor in comparisons to experimental data. A key feature of the model is the description of negative feedback regulation on early and late neuronal proliferation after radiation exposure. The model is augmented with parametric descriptions of the dose and time after irradiation dependences of activation of microglial cells and a possible shift of NSC proliferation from neurogenesis to gliogenesis reported at higher doses (∼10 Gy). Predictions for dose-fractionation regimes and for different mouse ages, and prospects for future work are then discussed. PMID:26943452

  12. Updating the Lamellar Hypothesis of Hippocampal Organization

    PubMed Central

    Sloviter, Robert S.; Lømo, Terje

    2012-01-01

    Andersen et al. (1971) proposed that excitatory activity in the entorhinal cortex propagates topographically to the dentate gyrus, and on through a “trisynaptic circuit” lying within transverse hippocampal “slices” or “lamellae.” In this way, a relatively simple structure might mediate complex functions in a manner analogous to the way independent piano keys can produce a nearly infinite variety of unique outputs. The lamellar hypothesis derives primary support from the “lamellar” distribution of dentate granule cell axons (the mossy fibers), which innervate dentate hilar neurons and area CA3 pyramidal cells and interneurons within the confines of a thin transverse hippocampal segment. Following the initial formulation of the lamellar hypothesis, anatomical studies revealed that unlike granule cells, hilar mossy cells, CA3 pyramidal cells, and Layer II entorhinal cells all form axonal projections that are more divergent along the longitudinal axis than the clearly “lamellar” mossy fiber pathway. The existence of pathways with “translamellar” distribution patterns has been interpreted, incorrectly in our view, as justifying outright rejection of the lamellar hypothesis (Amaral and Witter, 1989). We suggest that the functional implications of longitudinally projecting axons depend not on whether they exist, but on what they do. The observation that focal granule cell layer discharges normally inhibit, rather than excite, distant granule cells suggests that longitudinal axons in the dentate gyrus may mediate “lateral” inhibition and define lamellar function, rather than undermine it. In this review, we attempt a reconsideration of the evidence that most directly impacts the physiological concept of hippocampal lamellar organization. PMID:23233836

  13. Chemotherapy, cognitive impairment and hippocampal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, J; Prust, M; Kaiser, J

    2015-11-19

    Cancer therapies can be associated with significant central nervous system (CNS) toxicity. While radiation-induced brain damage has been long recognized both in pediatric and adult cancer patients, CNS toxicity from chemotherapy has only recently been acknowledged. Clinical studies suggest that the most frequent neurotoxic adverse effects associated with chemotherapy include memory and learning deficits, alterations of attention, concentration, processing speed and executive function. Preclinical studies have started to shed light on how chemotherapy targets the CNS both on cellular and molecular levels to disrupt neural function and brain plasticity. Potential mechanisms include direct cellular toxicity, alterations in cellular metabolism, oxidative stress, and induction of pro-inflammatory processes with subsequent disruption of normal cellular and neurological function. Damage to neural progenitor cell populations within germinal zones of the adult CNS has been identified as one of the key mechanisms by which chemotherapy might exert long-lasting and progressive neurotoxic effects. Based on the important role of the hippocampus for maintenance of brain plasticity throughout life, several experimental studies have focused on the study of chemotherapy effects on hippocampal neurogenesis and associated learning and memory. An increasing body of literature from both animal studies and neuroimaging studies in cancer patients suggests a possible relationship between chemotherapy induced hippocampal damage and the spectrum of neurocognitive deficits and mood alterations observed in cancer patients. This review aims to briefly summarize current preclinical and neuroimaging studies that are providing a potential link between the neurotoxic effects of chemotherapy and hippocampal dysfunction, highlighting challenges and future directions in this field of investigation. PMID:26086545

  14. Support Vector Machines for Non-linear Geophysical Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzma, H. A.; Rector, J. W.

    2004-12-01

    Classical non-linear geophysical inversion can be simulated using computer learning via Support Vector Machines. Geophysical inverse problems are almost always ill-posed which means that many different models (i.e. descriptions of the earth) can be found to explain a given noisy or incomplete data set. Regularization and constraints encourage inversions to find physically realistic models. The set of preferred models needs to be defined a priori using as much geologic knowledge as is available. In inversion, it is assumed that data and a forward modeling process is known. The goal is to solve for a model. In the SVM paradigm, a series of models and associated data are known. The goal is to solve for a reverse modeling process. Starting with a series of initial models assembled using all available geologic information, synthetic data is created using the most realistic forward modeling program available. With the synthetic data as inputs and the known models as outputs, a Support Vector Machine is trained to approximate a local inverse to the forward modeling program. The advantages of this approach are that it is honest about the need to establish, a priori, the kinds of models that are reasonable in a particular field situation. There is no need to adjust the forward process to accommodate inversion, because SVMs can be easily modified to capture complicated, non-linear relationships. SVMs are transparent and require very little programming. If an SVM is trained using model/data pairs that are drawn from the same probability distribution that is implicit in the regularization of an inversion, then it will get very similar results to the inversion. Because SVMs can interpret as much data as desired so long as the conditions of an experiment do not change, they can be used to perform otherwise computationally expensive procedures. Support Vector Machines are trained to emulate non-linear seismic Amplitude Variation with Offset (AVO) inversions, gravity inversions

  15. AVO inversion based on inverse operator estimation in trust region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xing-Yao; Deng, Wei; Zong, Zhao-Yun

    2016-04-01

    Amplitude variation with offset (AVO) inversion is widely utilized in exploration geophysics, especially for reservoir prediction and fluid identification. Inverse operator estimation in the trust region algorithm is applied for solving AVO inversion problems in which optimization and inversion directly are integrated. The L1 norm constraint is considered on the basis of reasonable initial model in order to improve effciency and stability during the AVO inversion process. In this study, high-order Zoeppritz approximation is utilized to establish the inversion objective function in which variation of {{v}\\text{p}}/{{v}\\text{s}} with time is taken into consideration. A model test indicates that the algorithm has a relatively higher stability and accuracy than the damp least-squares algorithm. Seismic data inversion is feasible and inversion values of three parameters ({{v}\\text{p}},{{v}\\text{s}},ρ ) maintain good consistency with logging curves.

  16. Determination of the upper and lower limits of the mechanistic stoichiometry of incompletely coupled fluxes. Stoichiometry of incompletely coupled reactions.

    PubMed

    Beavis, A D; Lehninger, A L

    1986-07-15

    A rationale is formulated for the design of experiments to determine the upper and lower limits of the mechanistic stoichiometry of any two incompletely coupled fluxes J1 and J2. Incomplete coupling results when there is a branch at some point in the sequence of reactions or processes coupling the two fluxes. The upper limit of the mechanistic stoichiometry is given by the minimum value of dJ2/dJ1 obtained when the fluxes are systematically varied by changes in steps after the branch point. The lower limit is given by the maximum value of dJ2/dJ1 obtained when the fluxes are varied by changes in steps prior to the branch point. The rationale for determining these limits is developed from both a simple kinetic model and from a linear nonequilibrium thermodynamic treatment of coupled fluxes, using the mechanistic approach [Westerhoff, H. V. & van Dam, K. (1979) Curr. Top. Bioenerg. 9, 1-62]. The phenomenological stoichiometry, the flux ratio at level flow and the affinity ratio at static head of incompletely coupled fluxes are defined in terms of mechanistic conductances and their relationship to the mechanistic stoichiometry is discussed. From the rationale developed, experimental approaches to determine the mechanistic stoichiometry of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are outlined. The principles employed do not require knowledge of the pathway or the rate of transmembrane leaks or slippage and may also be applied to analysis of the stoichiometry of other incompletely coupled systems, including vectorial H+/O and K+/O translocation coupled to mitochondrial electron transport. PMID:3015612

  17. Blunted response of hippocampal AMPK associated with reduced neurogenesis in older versus younger mice.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sooah; Kim, Hyunjeong; Jeong, Jihyeon; Lee, Su Kyoung; Kim, Eun Woo; Park, Minsun; Kim, Chul Hoon; Lee, Jong Eun; Namkoong, Kee; Kim, Eosu

    2016-11-01

    The rate of hippocampal neurogenesis declines with aging. This is partly explained by decreased neural responsiveness to various cues stimulating metabolism. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a pivotal enzyme regulating energy homeostasis in response to metabolic demands, showed the diminished sensitivity in peripheral tissues during aging. AMPK is also known to be involved in neurogenesis. We aimed to see whether AMPK reactivity is also blunted in the aged hippocampus, and thus is associated with aging-related change in neurogenesis. Following subchronic (7days) intraperitoneal and acute intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of either 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAR; AMPK activator) or saline (sham) to young (16-week-old) and old (72-week-old) mice, we measured changes in AMPK activity, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression or neurogenesis in the hippocampus. AICAR-induced changes in AMPK activity were observed in the hippocampus of young mice after acute i.c.v. injection. However, neither subchronic nor acute treatment induced significant changes in AMPK activity in old mice. Intriguingly, directions of AICAR-induced changes in AMPK activity were opposite between the hippocampus (decrease) and skeletal muscle (increase). ATP levels were inversely correlated with hippocampal AMPK activity, suggesting that the higher energy levels achieved by AICAR treatment might deactivate neuronal AMPK in young mice. The blunted response of AMPK to AICAR in old age was also indicated by the observations that the levels of neurogenesis and BDNF expression were significantly changed only in young mice upon AICAR treatment. Our findings suggest that the blunted response of neuronal AMPK in old age might be responsible for aging-associated decline in neurogenesis. Therefore, in addition to activation of AMPK, recovering its sensitivity may be necessary to enhance hippocampal neurogenesis in old age. PMID:27343360

  18. Molecular inversion probe assay.

    PubMed

    Absalan, Farnaz; Ronaghi, Mostafa

    2007-01-01

    We have described molecular inversion probe technologies for large-scale genetic analyses. This technique provides a comprehensive and powerful tool for the analysis of genetic variation and enables affordable, large-scale studies that will help uncover the genetic basis of complex disease and explain the individual variation in response to therapeutics. Major applications of the molecular inversion probes (MIP) technologies include targeted genotyping from focused regions to whole-genome studies, and allele quantification of genomic rearrangements. The MIP technology (used in the HapMap project) provides an efficient, scalable, and affordable way to score polymorphisms in case/control populations for genetic studies. The MIP technology provides the highest commercially available multiplexing levels and assay conversion rates for targeted genotyping. This enables more informative, genome-wide studies with either the functional (direct detection) approach or the indirect detection approach. PMID:18025701

  19. Silk inverse opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunghwan; Mitropoulos, Alexander N.; Spitzberg, Joshua D.; Tao, Hu; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2012-12-01

    Periodic nanostructures provide the facility to control and manipulate the flow of light through their lattices. Three-dimensional photonic crystals enable the controlled design of structural colour, which can be varied by infiltrating the structure with different (typically liquid) fillers. Here, we report three-dimensional photonic crystals composed entirely of a purified natural protein (silk fibroin). The biocompatibility of this protein, as well as its favourable material properties and ease of biological functionalization, present opportunities for otherwise unattainable device applications such as bioresorbable integration of structural colour within living tissue or lattice functionalization by means of organic and inorganic material doping. We present a silk inverse opal that demonstrates a pseudo-photonic bandgap in the visible spectrum and show its associated structural colour beneath biological tissue. We also leverage silk's facile dopability to manufacture a gold nanoparticle silk inverse opal and demonstrate patterned heating mediated by enhancement of nanoparticle absorption at the band-edge frequency of the photonic crystal.

  20. Intersections, ideals, and inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, D.W.

    1998-10-01

    Techniques from computational algebra provide a framework for treating large classes of inverse problems. In particular, the discretization of many types of integral equations and of partial differential equations with undetermined coefficients lead to systems of polynomial equations. The structure of the solution set of such equations may be examined using algebraic techniques.. For example, the existence and dimensionality of the solution set may be determined. Furthermore, it is possible to bound the total number of solutions. The approach is illustrated by a numerical application to the inverse problem associated with the Helmholtz equation. The algebraic methods are used in the inversion of a set of transverse electric (TE) mode magnetotelluric data from Antarctica. The existence of solutions is demonstrated and the number of solutions is found to be finite, bounded from above at 50. The best fitting structure is dominantly onedimensional with a low crustal resistivity of about 2 ohm-m. Such a low value is compatible with studies suggesting lower surface wave velocities than found in typical stable cratons.

  1. Reduced hippocampal glutamate in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Rupsingh, R; Borrie, M; Smith, M; Wells, J L; Bartha, R

    2011-05-01

    Altered neurometabolic profiles have been detected in Alzheimer disease (AD) using (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), but no definitive biomarker of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or AD has been established. This study used MRS to compare hippocampal metabolite levels between normal elderly controls (NEC) and subjects with MCI and AD. Short echo-time (TE=46 ms) (1)H spectra were acquired at 4T from the right hippocampus of 23 subjects with AD, 12 subjects with MCI and 15 NEC. Absolute metabolite levels and metabolite ratios were compared between groups using a multivariate analysis of covariance (covariates: age, sex) followed by post hoc Tukey's test (p<0.05 significant). Subjects with AD had decreased glutamate (Glu) as well as decreased Glu/creatine (Cr), Glu/myo-inositol (mI), Glu/N-acetylaspartate (NAA), and NAA/Cr ratios compared to NEC. Subjects with AD also had decreased Glu/mI ratio compared to MCI. There were no differences between subjects with MCI and NEC. Therefore, in addition to NAA/Cr, decreased hippocampal Glu may be an indicator of AD. PMID:19501936

  2. Prediction of Dementia by Hippocampal Shape Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achterberg, Hakim C.; van der Lijn, Fedde; den Heijer, Tom; van der Lugt, Aad; Breteler, Monique M. B.; Niessen, Wiro J.; de Bruijne, Marleen

    This work investigates the possibility of predicting future onset of dementia in subjects who are cognitively normal, using hippocampal shape and volume information extracted from MRI scans. A group of 47 subjects who were non-demented normal at the time of the MRI acquisition, but were diagnosed with dementia during a 9 year follow-up period, was selected from a large population based cohort study. 47 Age and gender matched subjects who stayed cognitively intact were selected from the same cohort study as a control group. The hippocampi were automatically segmented and all segmentations were inspected and, if necessary, manually corrected by a trained observer. From this data a statistical model of hippocampal shape was constructed, using an entropy-based particle system. This shape model provided the input for a Support Vector Machine classifier to predict dementia. Cross validation experiments showed that shape information can predict future onset of dementia in this dataset with an accuracy of 70%. By incorporating both shape and volume information into the classifier, the accuracy increased to 74%.

  3. Microglia regulate hippocampal neurogenesis during chronic neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    De Lucia, Chiara; Rinchon, Adeline; Olmos-Alonso, Adrian; Riecken, Kristoffer; Fehse, Boris; Boche, Delphine; Perry, V Hugh; Gomez-Nicola, Diego

    2016-07-01

    Neurogenesis is altered in neurodegenerative disorders, partly regulated by inflammatory factors. We have investigated whether microglia, the innate immune brain cells, regulate hippocampal neurogenesis in neurodegeneration. Using the ME7 model of prion disease we applied gain- or loss-of CSF1R function, as means to stimulate or inhibit microglial proliferation, respectively, to dissect the contribution of these cells to neurogenesis. We found that increased hippocampal neurogenesis correlates with the expansion of the microglia population. The selective inhibition of microglial proliferation caused a reduction in neurogenesis and a restoration of normal neuronal differentiation, supporting a pro-neurogenic role for microglia. Using a gene screening strategy, we identified TGFβ as a molecule controlling the microglial pro-neurogenic response in chronic neurodegeneration, supported by loss-of-function mechanistic experiments. By the selective targeting of microglial proliferation we have been able to uncover a pro-neurogenic role for microglia in chronic neurodegeneration, suggesting promising therapeutic targets to normalise the neurogenic niche during neurodegeneration. PMID:26541819

  4. Effects of combined nicotine and fluoxetine treatment on adult hippocampal neurogenesis and conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Faillace, M P; Zwiller, J; Bernabeu, R O

    2015-08-01

    Adult neurogenesis occurs in mammals within the dentate gyrus, a hippocampal subarea. It is known to be induced by antidepressant treatment and reduced in response to nicotine administration. We checked here whether the antidepressant fluoxetine would inverse the decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis caused by nicotine. It is shown that repeated, but not a single injection of rats with fluoxetine was able to abolish the decrease in adult dentate cell proliferation produced by nicotine treatment. We measured the expression of several biochemical parameters known to be associated with neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. Both drugs increased the expression of p75 neurotrophin receptor, which promotes proliferation and early maturation of dentate gyrus cells. Using the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm, we also gave both drugs in a context in which their rewarding properties could be measured. Fluoxetine produced a significant but less robust CPP than nicotine. A single injection of fluoxetine was found to reduce nicotine-induced CPP. Moreover, the rewarding properties of nicotine were completely abolished in response to repeated fluoxetine injections. Expression of nicotine-induced CPP was accompanied by an increase of phospho-CREB (cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein) and HDAC2 (histone deacetylase 2) expression in the nucleus accumbens. The data suggest that fluoxetine reward, as opposed to nicotine reward, depends on dentate gyrus neurogenesis. Since fluoxetine was able to disrupt the association between nicotine and the environment, this antidepressant may be tested as a treatment for nicotine addiction using cue exposure therapy. PMID:25981209

  5. Trading new neurons for status: Adult hippocampal neurogenesis in eusocial Damaraland mole-rats.

    PubMed

    Oosthuizen, M K; Amrein, I

    2016-06-01

    Diversity in social structures, from solitary to eusocial, is a prominent feature of subterranean African mole-rat species. Damaraland mole-rats are eusocial, they live in colonies that are characterized by a reproductive division of labor and a subdivision into castes based on physiology and behavior. Damaraland mole-rats are exceptionally long lived and reproductive animals show delayed aging compared to non-reproductive animals. In the present study, we described the hippocampal architecture and the rate of hippocampal neurogenesis of wild-derived, adult Damaraland mole-rats in relation to sex, relative age and social status or caste. Overall, Damaraland mole-rats were found to have a small hippocampus and low rates of neurogenesis. We found no correlation between neurogenesis and sex or relative age. Social status or caste was the most prominent modulator of neurogenesis. An inverse relationship between neurogenesis and social status was apparent, with queens displaying the lowest neurogenesis while the worker mole-rats had the most. As there is no natural progression from one caste to another, social status within a colony was relatively stable and is reflected in the level of neurogenesis. Our results correspond to those found in the naked mole-rat, and may reflect an evolutionary and environmentally conserved trait within social mole-rat species. PMID:26979050

  6. Increased fronto-hippocampal connectivity in the Prrxl1 knockout mouse model of congenital hypoalgesia.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Clara; Cardoso-Cruz, Helder; Matos, Mariana; Dourado, Margarida; Lima, Deolinda; Galhardo, Vasco

    2016-09-01

    Despite the large number of studies addressing how prolonged painful stimulation affects brain functioning, there are only a handful of studies aimed at uncovering if persistent conditions of reduced pain perception would also result in brain plasticity. Permanent hypoalgesia induced by neonatal injection of capsaicin or carrageenan has already been shown to affect learning and memory and to induce alterations in brain gene expression. In this study, we used the Prrxl1 model of congenital mild hypoalgesia to conduct a detailed study of the neurophysiological and behavioral consequences of reduced pain experience. Prrxl1 knockout animals are characterized by selective depletion of small diameter primary afferents and abnormal development of the superficial dorsal laminae of the spinal cord, resulting in diminished pain perception but normal tactile and motor behaviour. Behavioral testing of Prrxl1 mice revealed that these animals have reduced anxiety levels, enhanced memory performance, and improved fear extinction. Neurophysiological recordings from awake behaving Prrxl1 mice show enhanced altered fronto-hippocampal connectivity in the theta- and gamma-bands. Importantly, although inflammatory pain by Complete Freund Adjuvant injection caused a decrease in fronto-hippocampal connectivity in the wild-type animals, Prrxl1 mice maintained the baseline levels. The onset of inflammatory pain also reverted the differences in forebrain expression of stress- and monoamine-related genes in Prrxl1 mice. Altogether our results suggest that congenital hypoalgesia may have an effect on brain plasticity that is the inverse of what is usually observed in animal models of chronic pain. PMID:27168359

  7. Influence of APOE Genotype on Hippocampal Atrophy over Time - An N=1925 Surface-Based ADNI Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bolun; Shi, Jie; Gutman, Boris A.; Baxter, Leslie C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Caselli, Richard J.; Wang, Yalin

    2016-01-01

    The apolipoprotein E (APOE) e4 genotype is a powerful risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohort, we previously reported significant baseline structural differences in APOE e4 carriers relative to non-carriers, involving the left hippocampus more than the right—a difference more pronounced in e4 homozygotes than heterozygotes. We now examine the longitudinal effects of APOE genotype on hippocampal morphometry at 6-, 12- and 24-months, in the ADNI cohort. We employed a new automated surface registration system based on conformal geometry and tensor-based morphometry. Among different hippocampal surfaces, we computed high-order correspondences, using a novel inverse-consistent surface-based fluid registration method and multivariate statistics consisting of multivariate tensor-based morphometry (mTBM) and radial distance. At each time point, using Hotelling’s T2 test, we found significant morphological deformation in APOE e4 carriers relative to non-carriers in the full cohort as well as in the non-demented (pooled MCI and control) subjects at each follow-up interval. In the complete ADNI cohort, we found greater atrophy of the left hippocampus than the right, and this asymmetry was more pronounced in e4 homozygotes than heterozygotes. These findings, combined with our earlier investigations, demonstrate an e4 dose effect on accelerated hippocampal atrophy, and support the enrichment of prevention trial cohorts with e4 carriers. PMID:27065111

  8. Effects of ganoderic acids on epileptiform discharge hippocampal neurons: insights from alterations of BDNF,TRPC3 and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-wei; Wu, Fei; Zhang, Sheng-Li

    2016-06-01

    Recently, Ganoderma lucidum spores (GLS) have shown anti-epileptic effects. However, there are no reports on the anti-epileptic effects of its chemical constituents ganoderic acids (GAs), and more research is needed to better understand the mechanism of GLS activity. In this work, rat primary hippocampal neurons in an in vitro model were used to assess the intervention effects of GAs on epileptiform discharge hippocampal neurons and expression of both BDNF and TRPC3, with the aid of immunofluorescence, MTT method and flow cytometry. It was found that BDNF and TRPC3 are expressed in all cells and were mainly localized in the cytoplasm. The fluorescence intensities of BDNF and TRPC3 in GAs groups were higher than those of normal control and model groups, especially at 80 μg/ml (P < 0.05). The apoptosis rate of neurons was inversely proportional to BDNF and TRPC3 changes (P < 0.01). Therefore, BDNF and TRPC3 should be involved in the occurrence and development of epilepsy. GAs might indirectly inhibit mossy fiber sprouting and adjust the synaptic reconstructions by promoting the expression of BDNF and TRPC3. Besides, GAs could exert a protective effect on hippocampal neurons by promoting neuronal survival and the recovery of injured neurons. PMID:27455554

  9. Social Interactions under Incomplete Information: Games, Equilibria, and Expectations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao

    My dissertation research investigates interactions of agents' behaviors through social networks when some information is not shared publicly, focusing on solutions to a series of challenging problems in empirical research, including heterogeneous expectations and multiple equilibria. The first chapter, "Social Interactions under Incomplete Information with Heterogeneous Expectations", extends the current literature in social interactions by devising econometric models and estimation tools with private information in not only the idiosyncratic shocks but also some exogenous covariates. For example, when analyzing peer effects in class performances, it was previously assumed that all control variables, including individual IQ and SAT scores, are known to the whole class, which is unrealistic. This chapter allows such exogenous variables to be private information and models agents' behaviors as outcomes of a Bayesian Nash Equilibrium in an incomplete information game. The distribution of equilibrium outcomes can be described by the equilibrium conditional expectations, which is unique when the parameters are within a reasonable range according to the contraction mapping theorem in function spaces. The equilibrium conditional expectations are heterogeneous in both exogenous characteristics and the private information, which makes estimation in this model more demanding than in previous ones. This problem is solved in a computationally efficient way by combining the quadrature method and the nested fixed point maximum likelihood estimation. In Monte Carlo experiments, if some exogenous characteristics are private information and the model is estimated under the mis-specified hypothesis that they are known to the public, estimates will be biased. Applying this model to municipal public spending in North Carolina, significant negative correlations between contiguous municipalities are found, showing free-riding effects. The Second chapter "A Tobit Model with Social

  10. Inverse avalanches on Abelian sandpiles

    SciTech Connect

    Chau, H.F. Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801-3080 )

    1994-11-01

    A simple and computationally efficient way of finding inverse avalanches for Abelian sandpiles, called the inverse particle addition operator, is presented. In addition, the method is shown to be optimal in the sense that it requires the minimum amount of computation among methods of the same kind. The method is also conceptually succinct because avalanche and inverse avalanche are placed in the same footing.

  11. Familial occurrence of congenital incomplete prepyloric mucosal diaphragm.

    PubMed Central

    Gahukamble, D B

    1998-01-01

    Incomplete prepyloric mucosal diaphragm (IPMD) is an uncommon congenital anomaly that leads to gastric outlet obstruction in infancy and childhood. This report describes the occurrence of IPMD in six children in a closely knit tribal family from a geographically isolated desert town with a small population in the Sahara. Their records showed similarities of clinical, radiological, operative, and histopathological features. These features, as well as its occurrence in brothers, sisters, and cousins, suggest that this unusual anomaly is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. Images PMID:9863605

  12. Incomplete optical shielding in cold sodium atom traps

    SciTech Connect

    Yurovsky, Vladimir; Ben-Reuven, Abraham

    1997-01-05

    A simple two-channel model, based on the semiclassical Landau-Zener (LZ) approximation, with averaging over angle-dependent exponents, is proposed as a fast means for accounting for the incomplete optical shielding of collisions, as observed in recent experiments conducted by Weiner and co-workers on ultracold sodium-atom traps, and its dependence on the laser polarization. The model yields a reasonably good agreement with the recent quantum close-coupling calculations of Julienne and co-workers. The remaining discrepancy between both theories and the data is qualitatively attributed to a partial overlap of the collision ranges at which loss processes and optical shielding occur.

  13. Conditioning analysis of incomplete Cholesky factorizations with orthogonal dropping

    SciTech Connect

    Napov, Artem

    2012-03-16

    The analysis of preconditioners based on incomplete Cholesky factorization in which the neglected (dropped) components are orthogonal to the approximations being kept is presented. General estimate for the condition number of the preconditioned system is given which only depends on the accuracy of individual approximations. The estimate is further improved if, for instance, only the newly computed rows of the factor are modified during each approximation step. In this latter case it is further shown to be sharp. The analysis is illustrated with some existing factorizations in the context of discretized elliptic partial differential equations.

  14. Incomplete block SSOR preconditionings for high order discretizations

    SciTech Connect

    Kolotilina, L.

    1994-12-31

    This paper considers the solution of linear algebraic systems Ax = b resulting from the p-version of the Finite Element Method (FEM) using PCG iterations. Contrary to the h-version, the p-version ensures the desired accuracy of a discretization not by refining an original finite element mesh but by introducing higher degree polynomials as additional basis functions which permits to reduce the size of the resulting linear system as compared with the h-version. The suggested preconditionings are the so-called Incomplete Block SSOR (IBSSOR) preconditionings.

  15. Erythema multiforme as first sign of incomplete Kawasaki disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Incomplete Kawasaki disease represents a diagnostic challenge for pediatricians. In the absence of classical presentation, the laboratoristic evaluation of systemic inflammation can help in placing the correct diagnosis to promptly start adequate therapy. Erythema multiforme is an acute, self-limiting condition considered to be a hypersensitivity reaction commonly associated with various infections or medications. This aspecific skin condition has been rarely described as a sign of Kawasaki disease. We report on the case of a 4 years old boy presenting high-grade fever associated with erythema multiforme and evidence of systemic inflammation who showed a good response to prompt treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins. PMID:23406772

  16. Incomplete block factorization preconditioning for indefinite elliptic problems

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Chun-Hua

    1996-12-31

    The application of the finite difference method to approximate the solution of an indefinite elliptic problem produces a linear system whose coefficient matrix is block tridiagonal and symmetric indefinite. Such a linear system can be solved efficiently by a conjugate residual method, particularly when combined with a good preconditioner. We show that specific incomplete block factorization exists for the indefinite matrix if the mesh size is reasonably small. And this factorization can serve as an efficient preconditioner. Some efforts are made to estimate the eigenvalues of the preconditioned matrix. Numerical results are also given.

  17. Rough Set Approach to Incomplete Multiscale Information System

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xibei; Qi, Yong; Yu, Dongjun; Yu, Hualong; Song, Xiaoning; Yang, Jingyu

    2014-01-01

    Multiscale information system is a new knowledge representation system for expressing the knowledge with different levels of granulations. In this paper, by considering the unknown values, which can be seen everywhere in real world applications, the incomplete multiscale information system is firstly investigated. The descriptor technique is employed to construct rough sets at different scales for analyzing the hierarchically structured data. The problem of unravelling decision rules at different scales is also addressed. Finally, the reduct descriptors are formulated to simplify decision rules, which can be derived from different scales. Some numerical examples are employed to substantiate the conceptual arguments. PMID:25276852

  18. A computer program for estimation from incomplete multinomial data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Credeur, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    Coding is given for maximum likelihood and Bayesian estimation of the vector p of multinomial cell probabilities from incomplete data. Also included is coding to calculate and approximate elements of the posterior mean and covariance matrices. The program is written in FORTRAN 4 language for the Control Data CYBER 170 series digital computer system with network operating system (NOS) 1.1. The program requires approximately 44000 octal locations of core storage. A typical case requires from 72 seconds to 92 seconds on CYBER 175 depending on the value of the prior parameter.

  19. Incompletely fractured teeth--a survey of endodontists.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, E H; Braly, B V; Eakle, W S

    1986-01-01

    By means of questionnaires, 303 endodontists were asked about their experiences in the diagnosis and treatment of incompletely fractured teeth. The present article discloses the results relative to which teeth are most likely to fracture, which predisposing factors involve higher or lower risk, how endodontists prefer to treat root-fractured teeth, and the success rate they have had with them. The endodontists also reported the frequency of endodontic treatment failures attributable to root fractures. These results are discussed with respect to the potential implications for clinical dental practice. PMID:3456133

  20. A Supernodal Approach to Incomplete LU Factorization with Partial Pivoting

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaoye Sherry; Shao, Meiyue

    2009-06-25

    We present a new supernode-based incomplete LU factorization method to construct a preconditioner for solving sparse linear systems with iterative methods. The new algorithm is primarily based on the ILUTP approach by Saad, and we incorporate a number of techniques to improve the robustness and performance of the traditional ILUTP method. These include the new dropping strategies that accommodate the use of supernodal structures in the factored matrix. We present numerical experiments to demonstrate that our new method is competitive with the other ILU approaches and is well suited for today's high performance architectures.

  1. Effects of incomplete adaption and disturbance in adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindorff, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    This investigation focused attention on the fact that the synthesis of adaptive control systems has often been discussed in the framework of idealizations which may represent over simplifications. A condition for boundedness of the tracking error has been derived for the case in which incomplete adaption and disturbance are present. When using Parks' design it is shown that instability of the adaptive gains can result due to the presence of disturbance. The theory has been applied to a nontrivial example in order to illustrate the concepts involved.

  2. Benzodiazepine recognition site inverse agonists Ro-15-4513 and FG 7142 both antagonize the EEG effects of ethanol in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Marrosu, F.; Mereu, G.; Giorgi, O.; Corda, M.G.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the ability of Ro 15-4513 and FG 7142, two inverse agonists for benzodiazepine recognition sites, to antagonize the EEG effects of ethanol in freely moving rats. Ethanol induced sedation and ataxia associated with a progressive suppression of the fast cortical activities and an enhancement of low frequencies in both cortical and hippocampal tracings. In contrast, Ro 15-4513 and FG 7142 both caused a state of alertness associated with desynchronized cortical activity and theta hippocampal rhythm as well as spiking activity which was predominantly observed in the cortical tracings. When rats were treated with FG 7142 or Ro 15-4513 either before or after ethanol, a reciprocal antagonism of the behavioral and EEG effects of ethanol and of the partial inverse agonists was observed. These data support the view that the anti-ethanol effects of Ro 15-4513 may be related to its partial inverse agonist properties.

  3. APOE related hippocampal shape alteration in geriatric depression.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Anqi; Taylor, Warren D; Zhao, Zheen; MacFall, James R; Miller, Michael I; Key, Cynthia R; Payne, Martha E; Steffens, David C; Krishnan, K Ranga R

    2009-02-01

    Late-onset depression often precedes the onset of dementia associated with the hippocampal degeneration. Using large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping (LDDMM), we evaluated apolipoprotein E epsilon-4 allele (apoE E4) effects on hippocampal volume and shape in 38 depressed patients without the apoE E4, 14 depressed patients with one apoE E4, and 31 healthy comparison subjects without the apoE E4. The hippocampal volumes were manually assessed. We applied a diffeomorphic template generation procedure for creating the hippocampal templates based on a subset of the population. The LDDMM mappings were used to generate the hippocampal shape of each subject and characterize the surface deformation of each hippocampus relative to the template. Such deformation was modeled as random field characterized by the Laplace-Beltrami basis functions in the template coordinates. Linear regression was used to examine group differences in the hippocampal volume and shape. We found that there were significant hippocampal shape alternations in both depressed groups while the groups of depressed patients and the group of healthy subjects did not differ in the hippocampal volume. The depressed patients with one apoE E4 show more pronounced shape inward-compression in the anterior CA1 than the depressed patients without the apoE E4 when compared with the healthy controls without the apoE E4. Thus, hippocampal shape abnormalities in late-onset depressed patients with one apoE E4 may indicate future conversion of this group to AD at higher risk than depressed patients without the apoE E4. PMID:19010425

  4. 7 CFR 1924.11 - District Director's review of incomplete development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... observations and recommendations regarding incomplete development. The report may be included in the District... 7 Agriculture 12 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false District Director's review of incomplete development... and Other Development § 1924.11 District Director's review of incomplete development. During...

  5. 7 CFR 1924.11 - District Director's review of incomplete development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... observations and recommendations regarding incomplete development. The report may be included in the District... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false District Director's review of incomplete development... and Other Development § 1924.11 District Director's review of incomplete development. During...

  6. Hippocampal abnormalities after prolonged febrile convulsion: a longitudinal MRI study.

    PubMed

    Scott, Rod C; King, Martin D; Gadian, David G; Neville, Brian G R; Connelly, Alan

    2003-11-01

    Mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) is the most common lesion in patients who require epilepsy surgery, and approximately 50% of patients with MTS have a history of prolonged febrile convulsion (PFC) in childhood. The latter led to the hypothesis that convulsive status epilepticus, including PFC, can cause MTS. Our recently published data on children investigated within 5 days of a PFC showed that children investigated by MRI within 48 h of a PFC had large hippocampal volumes and prolongation of T2 relaxation time. Patients investigated >48 h from a PFC had large hippocampal volumes and normal T2 relaxation time. These data are strongly suggestive of hippocampal oedema that is resolving within 5 days of a PFC, but do not exclude the possibility of a pre-existing hippocampal lesion. Fourteen children from the original study had follow-up investigations carried out 4-8 months after the acute investigations. Of the 14 patients, four have had further seizures. Two had short febrile convulsions, one had PFC and one had non-febrile seizures. There was a significant reduction in hippocampal volume and T2 relaxation time between the first and second investigations, and there is now no difference in hippocampal volume or T2 relaxation time in patients compared with a control population. Moreover, there is a significant increase in hippocampal volume asymmetry in patients at follow-up when compared with initial data. Five out of 14 patients had asymmetry outside the 95th percentile for control subjects and, of these, three had one hippocampal volume outside the lower 95% prediction limit for control subjects. A reduction in hippocampal volume or T2 relaxation time, into or below the normal range between the first and second scans, indicates that the earlier findings are temporary and are strongly suggestive of hippocampal oedema as the abnormality in the initial investigations. The change in hippocampal symmetry in the patient group is consistent with injury and neuronal loss

  7. Identification of isolated structural damage from incomplete spectrum information using l1-norm minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Eric M.

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide a new theoretical basis to identify localized damage in structures using incomplete modal information, such as a subset of the spectrum. The paper expands upon well-established ideas from sensitivity-based model updating and offers a new perspective on the problem by using l1 norm minimization to solve the inverse problem. It is shown that in contrast with the more traditional l2 (Euclidean) norm minimization, the proposed l1 norm minimization approach enables accurate examination of a set of potentially damaged locations significantly larger than the subset of the spectrum used in the formulation of the sensitivity matrix. The main prerequisite is that the damage must be sparse, i.e. occur in a small portion of the domain, no other information regarding the damage is required. The computational effort necessary to solve the l1 optimization is larger than in traditional Euclidean norm minimization and requires the use of convex optimization methods. However, given the results that can be obtained, the computational effort is justified.

  8. Our Electron Model vindicates Schr"odinger's Incomplete Results and Require Restatement of Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, David; McLeod, Roger

    2008-04-01

    The electron model used in our other joint paper here requires revision of some foundational physics. That electron model followed from comparing the experimentally proved results of human vision models using spatial Fourier transformations, SFTs, of pincushion and Hermann grids. Visual systems detect ``negative'' electric field values for darker so-called ``illusory'' diagonals that are physical consequences of the lens SFT of the Hermann grid, distinguishing this from light ``illusory'' diagonals. This indicates that oppositely directed vectors of the separate illusions are discretely observable, constituting another foundational fault in quantum mechanics, QM. The SFT of human vision is merely the scaled SFT of QM. Reciprocal space results of wavelength and momentum mimic reciprocal relationships between space variable x and spatial frequency variable p, by the experiment mentioned. Nobel laureate physicist von B'ek'esey, physiology of hearing, 1961, performed pressure input Rect x inputs that the brain always reports as truncated Sinc p, showing again that the brain is an adjunct built by sight, preserves sign sense of EMF vectors, and is hard wired as an inverse SFT. These require vindication of Schr"odinger's actual, but incomplete, wave model of the electron as having physical extent over the wave, and question Heisenberg's uncertainty proposal.

  9. Regularised finite element model updating using measured incomplete modal data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua-Peng; Maung, Than Soe

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents an effective approach for directly updating finite element model from measured incomplete vibration modal data with regularised algorithms. The proposed method is based on the relationship between the perturbation of structural parameters such as stiffness change and the modal data measurements of the tested structure such as measured mode shape readings. In order to adjust structural parameters at detailed locations, structural updating parameters will be selected at critical point level to reflect the modelling errors at the connections of structural elements. These updating parameters are then evaluated by an iterative or a direct solution procedure, which gives optimised solutions in the least squares sense without requiring an optimisation technique. In order to reduce the influence of modal measurement uncertainty, the Tikhonov regularisation method incorporating the L-curve criterion is employed to produce reliable solutions for the chosen updating parameters. Numerical simulation investigations and experimental studies for the laboratory tested space steel frame structure are undertaken to verify the accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed methods for adjusting the stiffness at the joints of structural members. The results demonstrate that the proposed methods provide reliable estimates of finite element model updating using the measured incomplete modal data.

  10. Cannabinoids induce incomplete maturation of cultured human leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Murison, G.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Maeda, S.; Gemmell, M.A.; Huberman, E.

    1987-08-01

    Monocyte maturation markers were induced in cultured human myeloblastic ML-2 leukemia cells after treatment for 1-6 days with 0.03-30 ..mu..M ..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana. After a 2-day or longer treatment, 2- to 5-fold increases were found in the percentages of cells exhibiting reactivity with either the murine OKM1 monoclonal antibody of the Leu-M5 monoclonal antibody, staining positively for nonspecific esterase activity, and displaying a promonocyte morphology. The increases in these differentiation markers after treatment with 0.03-1 ..mu..M THC were dose dependent. At this dose range, THC did not cause an inhibition of cell growth. The THC-induced cell maturation was also characterized by specific changes in the patterns of newly synthesized proteins. The THC-induced differentiation did not, however, result in cells with a highly developed mature monocyte phenotype. However, treatment of these incompletely matured cells with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate of 1..cap alpha..,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, which are inducers of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells (including ML-2 cells), produced cells with a mature monocyte morphology. The ML-2 cell system described here may be a useful tool for deciphering critical biochemical events that lead to the cannabinoid-induced incomplete cell differentiation of ML-2 cells and other related cell types. Findings obtained from this system may have important implications for studies of cannabinoid effects on normal human bone-marrow progenitor cells.