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Sample records for incontinence inpatient procedures

  1. Urinary incontinence - vaginal sling procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of surgeries that help control stress urinary incontinence . This is urine leakage that happens when you ... sling procedures are done to treat stress urinary incontinence. Before discussing surgery, your doctor will have you ...

  2. Urinary incontinence - vaginal sling procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007376.htm Urinary incontinence - vaginal sling procedures To use the sharing features ... are types of surgeries that help control stress urinary incontinence . This is urine leakage that happens when you ...

  3. Voiding trial outcome following pelvic floor repair without incontinence procedures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Won, Sara; Haviland, Miriam J.; Bargen, Emily Von; Hacker, Michele R.; Li, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis Our aim was to identify predictors of postoperative voiding trial failure among patients who had a pelvic floor repair without a concurrent incontinence procedure in order to identify low-risk patients in whom postoperative voiding trials may be modified. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of women who underwent pelvic floor repair without concurrent incontinence procedures at two institutions from 1 November 2011 through 13 October 2013 after abstracting demographic and clinical data from medical records. The primary outcome was postoperative retrograde voiding trial failure. We used modified Poisson regression to calculate the risk ratio (RR) and 95 % confidence interval (CI). Results Of the 371 women who met eligibility criteria, 294 (79.2 %) had complete data on the variables of interest. Forty nine (16.7%) failed the trial, and those women were less likely to be white (p = 0.04), more likely to have had an anterior colporrhaphy (p = 0.001), and more likely to have had a preoperative postvoid residual (PVR) ≥150 ml (p = 0.001). After adjusting for race, women were more likely to fail their voiding trial if they had a preoperative PVR of ≥150 ml (RR: 1.9; 95 % CI: 1.1–3.2); institution also was associated with voiding trial failure (RR: 3.0; 95 % CI: 1.6–5.4). Conclusions Among our cohort, postoperative voiding trial failure was associated with a PVR of ≥150 ml and institution at which the surgery was performed. PMID:26886553

  4. [Urinary incontinence, should fertile women undergo surgical procedure?].

    PubMed

    Panel, L; Mares, P; de Tayrac, R

    2009-02-01

    The goal of this study was to make a Medline research about pregnancies which occur after surgical procedures for stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Therefore, we do not know the recurrence rate of SUI after pregnancy and the influence of the way of delivery on the risk of recurrence. We do not know either if we should apply a surgical procedure on women who have not achieved their pregnancies. In 1998, a questionnaire based survey conducted in the USA showed a lower risk of recurrence after a caesarean section than after a vaginal delivery (p=0,03) when women had previously colposuspension or sling procedures. We found ten case reports and a French national survey (2006) about pregnancies after TOT or TVT procedure. No complication related to the tape was described during pregnancy. The recurrence rate along the pregnancy is about 15%, and the global recurrence rate (during pregnancy and after the childbirth) is about 20%. As a conclusion, pregnancy itself has an influence, and vaginal delivery seams to increase the risk of recurrence after the birth compare to the c-section. However this recurrence rate and these data do not appear enough to us to refuse a surgical treatment for women who have not completed their pregnancies and who suffer from UI without efficacy of physiotherapy. We do not have objective data to assess the best way of delivery. Further and large studies are needed although they are difficult to be carried through. PMID:19117785

  5. [Ambulatory procedures to replace inpatient care. Background and applications].

    PubMed

    Hensen, P; Bunzemeier, H; Fürstenberg, T; Luger, T A; Rochell, B; Roeder, N

    2004-07-01

    Since January 2004, German hospitals and specialists in private practice have equal rights to provide and to charge for ambulatory surgeries according to paragraph 115b, 5th Code of Social Law. The current agreement between the German self-governing bodies replaces the existing contracts from 1993. In contrast to the previous version, the revised catalogue contains additional non-operative procedures. Some procedures may be provided either in an ambulatory or inpatient setting. However, for the hospitals it is of particular importance that some specified procedures should be performed on an ambulatory basis. If these particular services are delivered in an inpatient setting at least one stipulated criteria of exception has to be fulfilled. From the perspective of dermatology, not only opportunities but also obligations for ambulatory care arise from the new conditions. The critical facts and aspects with special relevance to dermatology are reviewed in detail. PMID:15168028

  6. 42 CFR 416.75 - Performance of listed surgical procedures on an inpatient hospital basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... inpatient hospital basis. 416.75 Section 416.75 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... on an inpatient hospital basis. The inclusion of any procedure as a covered surgical procedure under § 416.65 does not preclude its coverage in an inpatient hospital setting under Medicare....

  7. [Anal incontinence].

    PubMed

    Signorelli, I; Andreoni, G M; Capelli, G; Gozzini, P A

    1983-06-01

    The Authors describe the clinical rectal incontinence according to etiology, physiology and pathologic anatomy. They report a case of such rectal incontinence followed to hemorroidectom and treated by transplantation of gracilis muscle according to Pikrell technique, comparing this approach with other current surgical procedures. PMID:6680848

  8. Current interventional management of male stress urinary incontinence following urological procedures

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, Ireneusz; Śledź, Emil; Ciechan, Janusz; Bukowczan, Jakub; Przydacz, Mikolaj; Wiatr, Tomasz; Stangel-Wojcikiewicz, Klaudia; Chłosta, Piotr L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite improvements in surgical techniques and implementation of minimally invasive procedures, male stress urinary incontinence affects a substantial number of patients after prostatic surgery. In response to increasing demand of optimal treatment modality, new alternatives to artificial urinary sphincter have recently been introduced. This review summarises the therapeutic surgical options with their outcomes in management of postprostatectomy stress incontinence. Material and methods We performed a literature review by searching the PubMed, Web of Science and Embase databases for articles published from January 2000 until April 2015 based on clinical relevance. Results Artificial urinary sphincter is currently considered the “gold standard” treatment of male stress urinary incontinence. Although the new devices in this group have recently been investigated, the AMS 800 remains the only widely used implant. Male slings and adjustable continence devices, achieve the social continence rates up to 60%. Periurethral injections of bulking agents, have limited efficacy of male stress incontinence. Argus sling and ProACT are both associated with substantial explantation rates. Stem cell therapy is a promising option but still requires additional testing. Conclusions The development of new alternatives to artificial urinary sphincter is constantly progressing. Although recently introduced minimally invasive treatment options have not yet surpassed the outcomes of the artificial urinary sphincter they should continue to be evaluated and compared against the gold standard. PMID:26568879

  9. [Postoperative evaluation of different surgical procedures in genuine stress urinary incontinence: a retrospective study].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Colorado, S; Pérez-Soriano, P; Alvarez-Mercado, R L; Herbert, A; Kunhardt-Rasch, J

    1996-06-01

    An evaluation of the surgical treatment for stress and mixed urinary incontinence and pelvic relaxation. One-year follow-up, was done. A retrospective study with 144 files from the surgeries performed between February 1993 and June 1994, at the Clínica de Urología Ginecológica del Instituto Nacional de Perinatología. We excluded 37 files because of incomplete information. The age, parity, hormonal stage, preoperative diagnosis by urodynamic studies, surgical treatments and one-year follow-up were analyzed. The mean age was 45.5 years. Pereyra procedure was performed in 53, Burch procedure in 47, anterior colporrhaphy in 5, and sling procedure in 2 patients. The incidence of complications was similar between the different groups. Resumption of spontaneous postsurgical voiding was delayed in the Pereyra group. The Burch urethropexy and Pereyra procedures were equally effective, with no statistical differences observed. Burch vaginal suspension was not more effective for the correction of urinary stress incontinence than Pereyra procedure. PMID:8754724

  10. Urinary incontinence - retropubic suspension

    MedlinePlus

    Retropubic suspension is surgery to help control stress incontinence . This is urine leakage that happens when you ... This procedure is done to treat stress incontinence . Before discussing ... medicines, or other options. If you tried these and are ...

  11. Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Urinary Incontinence What Is Urinary Incontinence? Urinary incontinence means a person leaks urine by ... about what you can do. Types of Urinary Incontinence There are different types of urinary incontinence. Stress ...

  12. Different sling procedures for stress urinary incontinence: a lesson from 453 patients.

    PubMed

    Luo, De-Yi; Wang, Kun-Jie; Zhang, Han-Chao; Dai, Yi; Yang, Tong-Xing; Shen, Hong

    2014-03-01

    Several midurethral sling (MUS) procedures, such as tension-free vaginal tape (TVT), TVT obturator (TVT-O), tension-free vaginal tape SECUR (TVT-S), and pubovaginal sling (PVS), have been used for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI); however, which method is best for a particular patient group is not known. This study aimed to identify the best rationale for choosing the optimal MUS procedure for each patient. In total, 453 consecutive female patients with SUI who were treated with MUSs in West China Hospital of Sichuan University from September 2003 to September 2011 were enrolled in this study. All the patients underwent comprehensive pre-, intra-, and postoperative evaluations, including collection of demographic information, pelvic examination, and urodynamic testing, and operation-related complications were recorded. The Incontinence Quality of Life questionnaire was also completed. Under local or general anesthesia, 105 cases were treated with TVT, 243 with TVT-O, 90 with TVT-S, and 15 with PVS. Patients with different profiles in terms of age, symptom duration, concomitant procedures, urodynamic parameters, and pelvic organ prolapse (POP) quantification score were treated successfully; the body mass index did not differ significantly among the various treatment options. The cure and improvement rates were similar among the treatment groups: 97.14% (102/105) in TVT, 100% (243/243) in TVT-O, 98.89% (89/90) in TVT-S, and 100% (15/15) in PVS. Only minor complications were experienced by the patients. In conclusion, each MUS procedure was observed to be safe and effective in different subpopulations of patients, and the results suggest that appropriate patient selection is crucial for the success of each MUS procedure. PMID:24581214

  13. Analysis of risk factors associated with vaginal erosion after synthetic sling procedures for stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huey-Yi; Ho, Ming; Hung, Yao-Ching; Huang, Li-Chia

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study was to analyze the risk factors associated with vaginal erosion after synthetic sling procedure for stress urinary incontinence. Follow-up evaluations were at 1 week, 1 to 3 months, 6 months, and annually after the operation. The evaluations included detailed history taking, vaginal examinations, and perineal ultrasonographic urethrocystography. The vaginal erosion rate (6/239) after the synthetic sling procedure was 2.5%. We assessed the relationship between clinical features and vaginal erosion. Of these, only diabetes mellitus (DM) was a significant risk factor for vaginal erosion. Women with DM were 8.3 times more at risk than women without DM for developing vaginal erosion after synthetic sling procedure (p < 0.05). The vaginal erosion-free rate during the 24-month follow-up decreased significantly in women with DM. The rate of vaginal erosion associated with type III multifilamentous polypropylene sling (intravaginal slingplasty) is 10.7% more than that with type I monofilament polypropylene sling (such as tension-free vaginal tape and inside out transobturator vaginal tape) (p = 0.054). Women with DM should be informed that vaginal erosion is a possible complication after synthetic sling procedure. PMID:17594046

  14. 42 CFR 405.1206 - Expedited determination procedures for inpatient hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... hospital care. 405.1206 Section 405.1206 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT... Hospital Discharges § 405.1206 Expedited determination procedures for inpatient hospital care. (a... expedited determination by the QIO when a hospital (acting directly or through its utilization...

  15. Incontinence - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - incontinence ... The following organizations are good resources for information on incontinence. Fecal incontinence : The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists -- www.acog.org/~/media/for%20patients/faq139.ashx ...

  16. Electrostimulated gracilis neosphincter for faecal incontinence and in total anorectal reconstruction: still an experimental procedure?

    PubMed

    Altomare, D F; Rinaldi, M; Pannarale, O C; Memeo, V

    1997-01-01

    The possibility of converting an easily fatiguable muscle like the gracilis muscle into a fatigue-resistant one using chronic electrostimulation has renewed interest in Pickrell's procedure. Between July 1991 and June 1996, 9 patients (2 M; 7 F) mean age = 45 y (range 14-72) underwent dynamic graciloplasty using Medtronic electrostimulators. Five patients had faecal incontinence (2 congenitally anomaly, 1 neurological, 2 post-operative) and 4 had a perineal colostomy performed either simultaneously (two cases) or at 3 to 4 years after abdominoperineal excision of the rectum. Early post-operative complications included distal tendon necrosis [1], perineal colostomy breakdown [1], detachment of the gracilis tendon [2] and seroma in the thigh [1]. Long-term complications included rectocele with faecal impaction in one patient with imperforate anus, anal stricture in one patient who had refashioning of a perineal colostomy, and displacement of the lead from the main nerve in 3 with external expulsion in 2. The patient with anal stricture was successfully treated with anoplasty but subsequently returned to an abdominal colostomy due to stricture recurrence 2 years later. The rectocele was successfully treated using a transvaginal approach. Electrical conversion of the muscle was completed in all patients but long term functional results are available for only 5 cases. Manometry revealed a significant improvement in anal pressure under electro-stimulation and the continence grading scale score significantly improved in 4 patients. The technique is applicable to a very selected group of patients with no other options but is still in the experimental phase and should not be performed outside controlled trials. Repeated hospitalisation and reoperations are often required although the complication rate may diminish and improve with experience. PMID:9401848

  17. The artificial urinary sphincter and male sling for postprostatectomy incontinence: Which patient should get which procedure?

    PubMed Central

    Dobberfuhl, Amy D.

    2016-01-01

    Surgery is the most efficacious treatment for postprostatectomy incontinence. The ideal surgical approach depends on a variety of patient factors including history of prior incontinence surgery or radiation treatment, bladder contractility, severity of leakage, and patient expectations. Most patients choose to avoid a mechanical device, opting for the male sling over the artificial urinary sphincter. The modern male sling has continued to evolve with respect to device design and surgical technique. Various types of slings address sphincteric incompetence via different mechanisms of action. The recommended surgery, however, must be individualized to the patient based on degree of incontinence, detrusor contractility, and urethral compliance. A thorough urodynamic evaluation is indicated for the majority of patients, and the recommendation for an artificial urinary sphincter, a transobturator sling, or a quadratic sling will depend on urodynamic findings and the patient's particular preference. As advancements in this field evolve, and our understanding of the pathophysiology of incontinence and mechanisms of various devices improves, we expect to see continued evolution in device design. PMID:26966721

  18. Stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Ingrid E; Heit, Michael

    2004-09-01

    Stress urinary incontinence, the complaint of involuntary leakage during effort or exertion, occurs at least weekly in one third of adult women. The basic evaluation of women with stress urinary incontinence includes a history, physical examination, cough stress test, voiding diary, postvoid residual urine volume, and urinalysis. Formal urodynamics testing may help guide clinical care, but whether urodynamics improves or predicts the outcome of incontinence treatment is not yet clear. The distinction between urodynamic stress incontinence associated with hypermobility and urodynamic stress incontinence associated with intrinsic sphincter deficiency should be viewed as a continuum, rather than a dichotomy, of urethral function. Initial treatment should include behavioral changes and pelvic floor muscle training. Estrogen is not indicated to treat stress urinary incontinence. Bladder training, vaginal devices, and urethral inserts also may reduce stress incontinence. Bulking agents reduce leakage, but effectiveness generally decreases after 1-2 years. Surgical procedures are more likely to cure stress urinary incontinence than nonsurgical procedures but are associated with more adverse events. Based on available evidence at this time, colposuspension (such as Burch) and pubovaginal sling (including the newer midurethral synthetic slings) are the most effective surgical treatments. PMID:15339776

  19. Comparison Between the Transobturator Tape Procedure and Anterior Colporrhaphy With the Kelly’s Plication in the Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence: a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sohbati, Samira; Salari, Zohreh; Eftekhari, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    Background Stress urinary incontinence in women is a common problem that impairs the quality of life in patients. The extraordinary number of procedures to treat stress urinary incontinence reflects a lack of consensus on an appropriate intervention for this problem. Objectives The current study aimed to compare the results of transobturator tape (TOT) procedure and anterior colporrhaphy with the Kelly’s Plication to treat women with stress urinary incontinence. Patients and Methods This randomized clinical trial was conducted on 60 patients with stress urinary incontinence referred to Afzalipour Hospital in Kerman, Iran. The patients were randomly divided into two surgery groups and were subsequently assessed regarding the outcomes of the procedures, incontinence symptoms and complications during the follow-up period. Results The cure rates at follow-up period of one month, six months and one year after surgery were 86.7%, 80% and 80% in the TOT group versus 80%, 70% and 66.7% in the anterior colporrhaphy with the Kelly’s Plication group, respectively. There were no significant differences between the two groups in the aforementioned follow-up periods (P = 0.68, P = 0.54 and P = 0.22, respectively). Conclusions The current results showed no significant differences between the outcomes of the two procedures at short-term follow-up. However, the results might have changed in the long term. PMID:26543834

  20. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    MedlinePlus

    Injectable implants are injections of material into the urethra to help control urine leakage ( urinary incontinence ) caused by a ... into the tissue next to the sphincter. The implant procedure is usually done in the hospital. Or ...

  1. Bowel incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    Uncontrollable passage of feces; Loss of bowel control; Fecal incontinence; Incontinence - bowel ... and weaken, leading to diarrhea and stool leakage. Fecal impaction . It is usually caused by chronic constipation. ...

  2. Fecal Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... control than formed stool, it is an added stress that can lead to fecal incontinence. Diagnosis & Tests How will my doctor diagnose the cause of fecal incontinence? Along with a physical exam, your doctor may want to do other tests ...

  3. Urinary incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    Loss of bladder control; Uncontrollable urination; Urination - uncontrollable; Incontinence - urinary ... Causes of urinary incontinence include: Blockage in the urinary system Brain or nerve problems Dementia or other mental health problems that make ...

  4. [Conservative treatment in male urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Kirschner-Hermanns, R; Anding, R

    2014-03-01

    Prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches of urinary incontinence are well studied in women; however, studies on male urinary incontinence focus on incontinence following surgery of the bladder or prostate, predominantly incontinence after radical prostatectomy. Aging men suffer from incontinence, most frequently urge incontinence (overactive bladder, OAB), nearly as often as women do.The domain of conservative therapy of urinary stress incontinence in men is pelvic floor training. It remains unclear whether biofeedback procedures, electrostimulation therapy, or magnetic stimulation therapy can enhance pelvic floor training. There are data suggesting that an off-label therapy with Duloxetin®, a selective serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SSNRI), improves urinary incontinence following radical prostatectomy. Antimuscarinic agents in combination with bladder training have been proven as safe and effective treatment in men with OAB. Data, however, suggest that men with OAB are far less frequently treated than women. PMID:24585116

  5. Opioid Use Is Not Associated with Incomplete Wireless Capsule Endoscopy for Inpatient or Outpatient Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Kleinman, Bryan; Stanich, Peter P.; Betkerur, Kavita; Porter, Kyle; Meyer, Marty M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) is commonly used to directly visualize the small bowel. Opioids have variably been linked with incomplete studies and prolonged transit times in heterogeneous cohorts. We aimed to investigate the effect of opioid use on WCE for inpatient and outpatient cohorts. Methods. We performed a retrospective review of patients receiving WCE at our institution from April 2010 to March 2013. Demographic data, medical history, and WCE details were collected. Transit times were compared by log-rank analysis. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox proportional hazard models were utilized. Results. We performed 314 outpatient and 280 inpatient WCE that met study criteria. In the outpatient cohort, gastric transit time (GTT) was not significantly different between opioid and nonopioid users. Completion rates were similar as well (88% and 87%, P = 0.91). In the inpatient cohort, GTT was significantly longer in patients receiving opioids than in patients not receiving opioids (44 versus 23 min, P = 0.04), but completion rates were similar (71% versus 75%, P = 0.31). Conclusion. Opioid use within 24 hours of WCE did not significantly affect completion rates for inpatients or outpatients. GTT was prolonged in inpatients receiving opioids but not in outpatients. PMID:25214757

  6. Incontinence Treatment: Biofeedback

    MedlinePlus

    Donate Find a Doctor Join eNewsletter Sidebar × MOBILE MENU About Us What is Incontinence? Prevalence Causes of Incontinence Fecal Incontinence in Children Reporter's Guide to Bowel Incontinence Signs & Symptoms Symptoms of ...

  7. Fecal Incontinence in Children

    MedlinePlus

    Donate Find a Doctor Join eNewsletter Sidebar × MOBILE MENU About Us What is Incontinence? Prevalence Causes of Incontinence Fecal Incontinence in Children Reporter's Guide to Bowel Incontinence Signs & Symptoms Symptoms of ...

  8. Incontinence Treatment: Surgical Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... Incontinence Managing Incontinence: A Survey The Patient's Perspective Barriers on Diagnosis and Treatment Personal Stories Contact Us ... Incontinence Managing Incontinence: A Survey The Patient's Perspective Barriers on Diagnosis and Treatment Personal Stories Contact Us ...

  9. Symptoms of Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Incontinence Managing Incontinence: A Survey The Patient's Perspective Barriers on Diagnosis and Treatment Personal Stories Contact Us ... Incontinence Managing Incontinence: A Survey The Patient's Perspective Barriers on Diagnosis and Treatment Personal Stories Contact Us ...

  10. Incontinence Treatment: Medication

    MedlinePlus

    ... Incontinence Managing Incontinence: A Survey The Patient's Perspective Barriers on Diagnosis and Treatment Personal Stories Contact Us ... Incontinence Managing Incontinence: A Survey The Patient's Perspective Barriers on Diagnosis and Treatment Personal Stories Contact Us ...

  11. Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... you risk getting rashes, sores, skin infections and urinary tract infections. Also, you may find yourself avoiding friends and ... elderly and may be a sign of a urinary tract infection or an overactive bladder. Overflow incontinence This type ...

  12. Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is loss of bladder control. Symptoms can range from mild leaking to uncontrollable wetting. It can happen to anyone, but it becomes more common with age. Women experience ...

  13. Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... injury, birth defects, stroke, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and physical changes associated with aging. Pregnancy — Unborn babies push down ... incontinence in women. It is often caused by physical changes from pregnancy, childbirth, and menopause. It can be ...

  14. Surgical Management for Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Anandam, Joselin L.

    2014-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is a socially debilitating condition that can lead to social isolation, loss of self-esteem and self-confidence, and depression in an otherwise healthy person. After the appropriate clinical evaluation and diagnostic testing, medical management is initially instituted to treat fecal incontinence. Once medical management fails, there are a few surgical procedures that can be considered. This article is devoted to the various surgical options for fecal incontinence including the history, technical details, and studies demonstrating the complication and success rate. PMID:25320569

  15. Incontinence and incontinence-associated dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Langemo, Diane; Hanson, Darlene; Hunter, Susan; Thompson, Patricia; Oh, In Eui

    2011-03-01

    Incontinence is a prevalent problem and can lead to many complications. Both urinary and fecal incontinence can result in tissue breakdown, now commonly referred to as incontinence-associated dermatitis. This article addresses the types of incontinence, its etiology and pathophysiology, assessment, prevention and treatment, and the latest research. PMID:21326024

  16. Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Urinary Incontinence Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Caregiving How ...

  17. Fecal Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Fecal Incontinence Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Caregiving How ...

  18. MedlinePlus: Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Also in Spanish Stress incontinence Also in Spanish Suprapubic catheter care Also in Spanish Urge incontinence Also in ... catheterization - male Skin care and incontinence Stress incontinence Suprapubic catheter care Urge incontinence Urinary catheters Urinary catheters - what ...

  19. Stress urinary incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    Incontinence - stress ... over 2 cups of urine in their bladder. Stress incontinence occurs when the muscles that control your ... area or the prostate (in men) Unknown causes Stress incontinence is the most common type in women. ...

  20. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... repair; ISD repair; Injectable bulking agents for stress urinary incontinence ... Blaivas JM, Gormley EA, et al. Female Stress Urinary Incontinence Update Panel of the American Urological Association Education ...

  1. Current Management of Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jennifer Y; Abbas, Maher A

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To review the management of fecal incontinence, which affects more than 1 in 10 people and can have a substantial negative impact on quality of life. Methods: The medical literature between 1980 and April 2012 was reviewed for the evaluation and management of fecal incontinence. Results: A comprehensive history and physical examination are required to help understand the severity and type of symptoms and the cause of incontinence. Treatment options range from medical therapy and minimally invasive interventions to more invasive procedures with varying degrees of morbidity. The treatment approach must be tailored to each patient. Many patients can have substantial improvement in symptoms with dietary management and biofeedback therapy. For younger patients with large sphincter defects, sphincter repair can be helpful. For patients in whom biofeedback has failed, other options include injectable medications, radiofrequency ablation, or sacral nerve stimulation. Patients with postdefecation fecal incontinence and a rectocele can benefit from rectocele repair. An artificial bowel sphincter is reserved for patients with more severe fecal incontinence. Conclusion: The treatment algorithm for fecal incontinence will continue to evolve as additional data become available on newer technologies. PMID:24355892

  2. Incontinence Treatment: Newer Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Incontinence Managing Incontinence: A Survey The Patient's Perspective Barriers on Diagnosis and Treatment Personal Stories Contact Us ... Incontinence Managing Incontinence: A Survey The Patient's Perspective Barriers on Diagnosis and Treatment Personal Stories Contact Us ...

  3. Urinary Incontinence Could Be Controlled by an Inflatable Penile Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyung Ki; Lee, Hye-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Due to the increasing numbers of radical prostatectomies (RP) performed for prostate cancer, a substantial and increasing number of patients suffer from postoperative urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction (ED). The objective of our study was to see whether an inflatable penile prosthesis implantation could control urinary incontinence for patients with the dual problems of ED and incontinence. Materials and Methods From March 2010 through May 2015, 25 post-RP patients were referred to our clinic with ED or incontinence. The degree of incontinence was classified according to the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form. Inflatable penile prostheses were implanted in all 25 patients. Results For one month after implantation, partial or full inflation was performed progressively to control urine leakage. Of 18 patients, 13 patients were categorized with mild or moderate stress incontinence. All 13 patients obtained control of incontinence with partial inflation (30% to 60%) and all reported satisfactory outcomes. Five out of the 18 patients were categorized with severe total incontinence. Three of the 5 patients could tolerate incontinence with full inflation on and off. Thirteen patients out of the total of 18 (72.2%) had their incontinence controlled by an inflating penile prosthesis. Conclusions An inflatable penile prosthesis is highly recommended as an initial procedure, especially in patients with the dual problems of ED and incontinence. PMID:27169127

  4. Sphincteroplasty for anal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Pescatori, Lorenzo Carlo; Pescatori, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Sphincteroplasty (SP) is the operation most frequently performed in patients suffering from moderate-to-severe anal incontinence (AI) who do not respond to conservative treatment. Other costly surgeries, such as artificial bowel sphincter (ABS) and electro-stimulated graciloplasty, have been more or less abandoned due to their high morbidity rate. Minimally invasive procedures are widely used, such as sacral neuromodulation and injection of bulking agents, but both are costly and the latter may cure only mild incontinence. The early outcome of SP is usually good if the sphincters are not markedly denervated, but its effect diminishes over time. SP is more often performed for post-traumatic than for idiopathic AI. It may also be associated to the Altemeier procedure, aimed at reducing the recurrence rate of rectal prolapse, and may be useful when AI is due either to injury to the sphincter, or to a narrowed rectum following the procedure for prolapse and haemorrhoids (PPH) and stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR). The outcome of SP is likely to be improved with biological meshes and post-operative pelvic floor rehabilitation. SP is more effective in males than in multiparous women, whose sphincters are often denervated, and its post-operative morbidity is low. In conclusion, SP, being both low-cost and safe, remains a good option in the treatment of selected patients with AI. PMID:24759337

  5. Urinary incontinence in women.

    PubMed

    Wood, Lauren N; Anger, Jennifer T

    2014-01-01

    Urinary incontinence affects women of all ages. History, physical examination, and certain tests can guide specialists in diagnosing stress urinary incontinence, urgency urinary incontinence, and mixed urinary incontinence. First line management includes lifestyle and behavior modification, as well as pelvic floor strength and bladder training. Drug therapy is helpful in the treatment of urgency incontinence that does not respond to conservative measures. In addition, sacral neuromodulation, intravesical onabotulinumtoxinA injections, and posterior tibial nerve stimulation can be used in select patient populations with drug refractory urgency incontinence. Midurethral synthetic slings, including retropubic and transobturator approaches, are safe and efficacious surgical options for stress urinary incontinence and have replaced more invasive bladder neck slings that use autologous or cadaveric fascia. Despite controversy surrounding vaginal mesh for prolapse, synthetic slings for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence are considered safe and minimally invasive. PMID:25225003

  6. External incontinence devices

    MedlinePlus

    ... of products that are available in your area. URINARY INCONTINENCE DEVICES Urine collection devices are mainly used by ... urinary system References Payne CK. Conservative management of urinary incontinence: Behavioral and pelvic floor therapy, urethral and pelvic ...

  7. Urinary incontinence - retropubic suspension

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007374.htm Urinary incontinence - retropubic suspension To use the sharing features on ... may be because other problems are causing your urinary incontinence. Over time, some or all of the leakage ...

  8. [Update on fecal incontinence].

    PubMed

    Buhmann, Helena; Nocito, Antonio

    2014-10-29

    Fecal incontinence is defined as an accidental loss of stool or the inability to control defecation. There are three subtypes of fecal incontinence: passive incontinence, urge incontinence and soiling. About 8% of the adult population suffer from fecal incontinence, but only 1/3 consults a doctor. Beside the individual handicap, fecal incontinence has a huge socio-economic impact. Causes of fecal incontinence are changes in the quantity or quality of the stool and structural or functional disorders. Diagnostics encompass the medical history, clinical examination including the digital rectal examination, imaging (particularly endoanal ultrasound) as well as functional diagnostics (anal manometry and defecography). Nowadays, the most promising conservative treatment option consists of loperamide and biofeedback therapy. The most successful invasive method is the sacral neuromodulation. PMID:25351694

  9. Midurethral slings for stress urinary incontinence: a urogynecology perspective.

    PubMed

    Ridgeway, Beri; Barber, Matthew D

    2012-08-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), the involuntary leakage of urine associated with an increase in intraabdominal pressure (coughing, laughing, and sneezing), affects 12.8% to 46.0% of women. SUI is the most common type of urinary incontinence in women younger than 60 years and accounts for at least half of incontinence in all women. Retropubic and transobturator midurethral sling procedures are safe and effective treatments for stress urinary incontinence but have different complication profiles. History, examination, and additional testing may assist in choosing the correct sling type. Appropriate counseling and managing patient expectation are necessary to optimize patient satisfaction. PMID:22877711

  10. Skin care and incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    Incontinence - skin care ... in a wheelchair, regular chair, or bed TAKING CARE OF THE SKIN Using diapers and other products ... skin. Over time, the skin breaks down. Special care must be taken to keep the skin clean ...

  11. Urinary Incontinence: Bladder Training

    MedlinePlus

    ... following ways: Lengthen the amount of time between bathroom trips. Increase the amount of urine your bladder ... Kegel exercises may also help control urges. Scheduled bathroom trips: Some people control their incontinence by going ...

  12. Prevalence of Bowel Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... and how improve living with these conditions . Publication Library Books of Interest Medical Definitions About IFFGD About us Our Mission Awareness Activities Advocacy Activities Research Leadership IFFGD Symposium Report Industry Council Contact Us Living with Incontinence A Personal ...

  13. [Diagnosis of urinary stress incontinence in men].

    PubMed

    Goepel, M

    2014-03-01

    Male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) occur more frequently with increasing age. LUTS can either be caused by benign prostatic syndrome (BPS) and consecutive subvesical obstruction as well as detrusor hyperactivity. On the other hand, stress urinary incontinence is mostly seen after surgical intervention in the pelvis like radical prostatectomy. Also high volume centers report persisting incontinence rates of 2-4 % after radical prostatectomy.The diagnostic procedure in men with LUTS is divided in two steps: basic diagnostics, followed by a conservative treatment option, and extended diagnostic procedures including measurement of bladder pressure during filling and voiding. In addition, radiologic examinations, including voiding cystouretherogram, retrograde cystogram, CT scan, MRI scan, are added according to the severity of the symptoms and the scheduled surgical procedure. According to the guidelines of the DGU, EAU, AUA, and ICS, this extended examination is also mandatory prior to any surgical procedure like suburethral tapes, artificial sphincters, and sacral foramen neuronal stimulators. PMID:24615463

  14. [Pharmacotherapy of stress incontinence].

    PubMed

    Jost, W H; Marsalek, P; Michel, M C

    2005-10-14

    Female urinary incontinence is a medical and social problem with a large prevalence. Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is the most common form of urinary incontinence and is responsible for 49 % of all incontinence, if mixed forms are included even for 78 %. As of yet, apart from "off-label" treatment, there is no pharmacological treatment available for stress urinary incontinence. For instance, estrogens are used in menopausal patients but a substantial effect in the treatment of SUI has not been demonstrated. a-Adrenergics, such as phenylpropanolamine and midodrine, and b-adrenergics, such as clenbuterol, are also used in "off-label" therapy. A recently conducted meta-analysis of 15 randomised studies with female patients who received a- und b-adrenergics as part of their therapy, failed to detect efficacy compared to placebo. Tricyclic antidepressives, such as imipramine and doxepine, which are used for the treatment of urge incontinence, are also used "off-label" in the treatment of SUI. However, no placebo-controlled studies have been conducted so far. The serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor duloxetine represents a new therapeutic approach in the treatment of SUI. It has shown positive effects on bladder and urethra in animal experiments, most likely through an effect on the Onuf's nucleus in the spinal cord. In randomised, placebo-controlled studies (phase II and III) in women with SUI, a significant and clinically relevant reduction in urinary incontinence episodes as well as an improvement in the quality of life compared to placebo was shown. PMID:16231235

  15. Urinary incontinence surgery - female - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000134.htm Urinary incontinence surgery - female - discharge To use the sharing features ... Blaivas JM, Gormley EA, et al; Female Stress Urinary Incontinence Update Panel of the American Urological Association Education ...

  16. Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education FAQs Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence FAQ166, July 2014 ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  17. Management of patients with faecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Duelund-Jakobsen, Jakob; Worsoe, Jonas; Lundby, Lilli; Christensen, Peter; Krogh, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Faecal incontinence, defined as the involuntary loss of solid or liquid stool, is a common problem affecting 0.8-8.3% of the adult population. Individuals suffering from faecal incontinence often live a restricted life with reduced quality of life. The present paper is a clinically oriented review of the pathophysiology, evaluation and treatment of faecal incontinence. First-line therapy should be conservative and usually include dietary adjustments, fibre supplement, constipating agents or mini enemas. Biofeedback therapy to improve external anal sphincter function can be offered but the evidence for long-term effect is poor. There is good evidence that colonic irrigation can reduce symptoms and improve quality of life, especially in patients with neurogenic faecal incontinence. Surgical interventions should only be considered if conservative measures fail. Sacral nerve stimulation is a minimally invasive procedure with high rate of success. Advanced surgical procedures should be restricted to highly selected patients and only performed at specialist centres. A stoma should be considered if other treatment modalities fail. PMID:26770270

  18. Management of patients with faecal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Duelund-Jakobsen, Jakob; Worsoe, Jonas; Lundby, Lilli; Christensen, Peter; Krogh, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Faecal incontinence, defined as the involuntary loss of solid or liquid stool, is a common problem affecting 0.8–8.3% of the adult population. Individuals suffering from faecal incontinence often live a restricted life with reduced quality of life. The present paper is a clinically oriented review of the pathophysiology, evaluation and treatment of faecal incontinence. First-line therapy should be conservative and usually include dietary adjustments, fibre supplement, constipating agents or mini enemas. Biofeedback therapy to improve external anal sphincter function can be offered but the evidence for long-term effect is poor. There is good evidence that colonic irrigation can reduce symptoms and improve quality of life, especially in patients with neurogenic faecal incontinence. Surgical interventions should only be considered if conservative measures fail. Sacral nerve stimulation is a minimally invasive procedure with high rate of success. Advanced surgical procedures should be restricted to highly selected patients and only performed at specialist centres. A stoma should be considered if other treatment modalities fail. PMID:26770270

  19. Incontinence: The Potential Budget Buster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Someone who lives with incontinence, whether bowel, bladder, or both, knows the social stigma and personal toll on his life. Incontinence is the ever-present shadowy silhouette lurking over almost every decision, sometimes requiring complex preplanning. In this article, the author describes the challenges of incontinence and discusses how she…

  20. Female urinary incontinence rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Di Benedetto, P

    2004-08-01

    Pelvic floor rehabilitation (PFR) is an important and recommended strategy for the treatment of many urogynecological disorders including urinary incontinence (UI). The recognised pioneer of PFR is the American gynecologist Arnold Kegel who, over 50 years ago, proposed pelvic floor muscle exercises (PFME) to prevent and/or treat female UI. Kegel's techniques were successfully used by others too, but as the years passed these techniques sank into unjustified oblivion. In the 1980s in Europe the medical world's interest in PFME techniques gained ground, contemporaneously with functional electrical stimulation (FES) and biofeedback (BFB). As a general rule, the least invasive and least dangerous procedure for the patient should be the first choice, and behavioural and rehabilitative techniques should be considered as the first line of therapy for UI. The behavioural approaches in women with UI and without cognitive deficits are tailored to the patient's underlying problem, such as bladder training or retraining (BR) for urge UI. BR has many variations but generally consists of education, scheduled voiding, and positive reinforcements. The rehabilitative approaches comprise BFB, FES, PFME, and vaginal cones (VC). BFB allows the subject to modify the unconscious physiological events, while FES is aimed at strengthening perineal awareness, increasing the tone and trophism of the pelvic floor, and inhibiting detrusor overactivity. PFME play an extremely important role in the conservative treatment of UI and overactive bladder, and many studies have demonstrated their effectiveness. Many authors have used the different methods for PFR in a heterogeneous manner: the best results were obtained when protocols requiring the contemporary use of 2 or more techniques were followed. PMID:15377984

  1. [Postpartum incontinence. Narrative review].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Rodolfo; Alós, Rafael; Carceller, M Soledad; Solana, Amparo; Frangi, Andrés; Ruiz, M Dolores; Lozoya, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The development of fecal incontinence after childbirth is a common event. This incontinence responds to a multifactorial etiology in which the most common element is external anal sphincter injury. There are several risk factors, and it is very important to know and avoid them. Sphincter injury may result from perineal tear or sometimes by incorrectly performing an episiotomy. It is very important to recognize the injury when it occurs and repair it properly. Pudendal nerve trauma may contribute to the effect of direct sphincter injury. Persistence of incontinence is common, even after sphincter repair. Surgical sphincteroplasty is the standard treatment of obstetric sphincter injuries, however, sacral or tibial electric stimulation therapies are being applied in patients with sphincter injuries not repaired with promising results. PMID:25467972

  2. Faecal incontinence in the elderly : epidemiology and management.

    PubMed

    Wald, Arnold

    2005-01-01

    Faecal incontinence occurs in up to 10% of community dwelling persons > or = 65 years of age and approximately 50% of nursing home residents. It is a vastly under-reported problem that has a devastating effect on those who experience it as well as their spouses and caregivers. There are three broad categories of faecal incontinence among the elderly: (i) overflow incontinence; (ii) reservoir incontinence; and (iii) rectosphincteric incontinence. The first two can be diagnosed based upon the patient's history and physical examination and the response to dietary and pharmacological interventions. The third is assessed by careful physical examination supplemented by diagnostic tests directed towards evaluation of anorectal continence mechanisms. The most important of these is anorectal manometry, which can be supplemented by studies of structure (anal ultrasonography or pelvic floor magnetic resonance imaging) and neuromuscular function (electromyogram). A variety of therapeutic interventions are employed in patients with rectosphincteric incontinence; these include dietary, behavioural, pharmacological and surgical modalities chosen on the basis of the results of diagnostic testing. For isolated internal anal sphincter weakness, a cotton barrier in the anal canal is often effective. Acute sphincter injury is best treated with sphincteroplasty but, otherwise, surgical procedures are of uncertain benefit. Peripheral neurogenic incontinence may be treated with antidiarrhoeal agents, biofeedback techniques and dietary manipulations. Sacral spinal nerve stimulation is a promising new technique for selected patients with neurogenic faecal incontinence and is currently undergoing testing in the US and Europe. Significant improvement in quality of life can be achieved in most elderly persons with faecal incontinence. PMID:15733020

  3. Sacral Nerve Stimulation For Urinary Urge Incontinence, Urgency-Frequency, Urinary Retention, and Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness, safety, and cost of sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) to treat urinary urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, urinary retention, and fecal incontinence. Background: Condition and Target Population Urinary urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, urinary retention, and fecal incontinence are prevalent, yet rarely discussed, conditions. They are rarely discussed because patients may be uncomfortable disclosing their symptoms to a health professional or may be unaware that there are treatment options for these conditions. Briefly, urge incontinence is an involuntary loss of urine upon a sudden urge. Urgency-frequency is an uncontrollable urge to void, which results in frequent, small-volume voids. People with urgency-frequency may or may not also experience chronic pelvic pain. Urinary retention refers to the inability to void despite having the urge to void. It can be caused by a hypocontractile detrusor (weak or no bladder muscle contraction) or obstruction due to urethral overactivity. Fecal incontinence is a loss of voluntary bowel control. The prevalence of urge incontinence, urgency-frequency, and urinary retention in the general population is 3.3% to 8.2%, and the prevalence of fecal incontinence is 1.4% to 1.9%. About three-quarters of these people will be successfully treated by behaviour and/or drug therapy. For those who do not respond to these therapies, the options for treatment are management with diapers or pads, or surgery. The surgical procedures are generally quite invasive, permanent, and are associated with complications. Pads and/or diapers are used throughout the course of treatment as different therapies are tried. Patients who respond successfully to treatment may still require pads or diapers, but to a lesser extent. The Technology Being Reviewed: Sacral Nerve Stimulation Sacral nerve stimulation is a procedure where a small device attached to an electrode is

  4. Emerging surgical therapies for faecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Peter J; Sagar, Peter M

    2014-05-01

    Faecal incontinence is a common condition and is associated with considerable morbidity and economic cost. The majority of patients are managed with conservative interventions. However, for those patients with severe or refractory incontinence, surgical treatment might be required. Over the past 20 years, numerous developments have been made in the surgical therapies available to treat such patients. These surgical therapies can be classified as techniques of neuromodulation, neosphincter creation (muscle or artificial) and injection therapy. Techniques of neuromodulation, particularly sacral nerve stimulation, have transformed the management of these patients with a minimally invasive procedure that offers good results and low morbidity. By contrast, neosphincter procedures are characterized by being more invasive and associated with considerable morbidity, although some patients will experience substantial improvements in their continence. Injection of bulking agents into the anal canal can improve symptoms and quality of life in patients with mild-to-moderate incontinence, and the use of autologous myoblasts might be a future therapy. Further research and development is required not only in terms of the devices and procedures, but also to identify which patients are likely to benefit most from such interventions. PMID:24275793

  5. Efficacy of Physiotherapy for Urinary Incontinence following Prostate Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bakuła, Stanisław

    2014-01-01

    The study enrolled 81 with urinary incontinence following radical prostate-only prostatectomy for prostatic carcinoma. The patients were divided into two groups. The patients in Group I were additionally subdivided into two subgroups with respect to the physiotherapeutic method used. The patients of subgroup IA received a rehabilitation program consisting of three parts. The patients of subgroup IB rehabilitation program consist of two parts. Group II, a control group, had reported for therapy for persistent urinary incontinence following radical prostatectomy but had not entered therapy for personal reasons. For estimating the level of incontinence, a 1-hour and 24-hour urinary pad tests, the miction diary, and incontinence questionnaire were used, and for recording the measurements of pelvic floor muscles tension, the sEMG (surface electromyography) was applied. The therapy duration depended on the level of incontinence and it continued for not longer than 12 months. Superior continence outcomes were obtained in Group I versus Group II and the difference was statistically significant. The odds ratio for regaining continence was greater in the rehabilitated Group I and smaller in the group II without the rehabilitation. A comparison of continence outcomes revealed a statistically significant difference between Subgroups IA versus IB. The physiotherapeutic procedures applied on patients with urine incontinence after prostatectomy, for most of them, proved to be an effective way of acting, which is supported by the obtained results. PMID:24868546

  6. Slings in iatrogenic male incontinence: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Fabrizio; Schenone, M.; Giberti, C.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The increasing number of prostatectomies entails an increasing number of patients suffering from iatrogenic incontinence despite improved surgical techniques. The severity of this problem often requires invasive treatments such as periurethral injection of bulking agents, artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) implantation, and sub-urethral sling positioning. The artificial urethral sphincter has represented, until today, the gold standard but, in the recent years, sling systems have been investigated as minimally invasive alternative options. Today, three different sling procedures are commonly performed: bone-anchored, readjustable, and trans-obturator slings systems. The aim of this review is to critically report the current status of sling systems in the treatment of iatrogenic male incontinence. Materials and Methods: MEDLINE and PubMed databases were searched and all articles between 1974 and 2009 were evaluated. Results: With regard to bone-anchored, readjustable, and trans-obturator slings systems, cure rates ranged between 58.0% and 86.0%, 55.5% and 73.0%, and 40.0% and 63.0%, respectively, while major complication rates ranged between 0 and 14.5%, 10.0 and 22.2%, and 0 and 10.0%, respectively. Conclusions: Suburethral slings are the only alternative techniques which can be favorably compared with the AUS, showing more advantages with respect to AUS implantations which are mainly represented by a quick and less invasive approach, low morbidity, and low costs. In spite of the difficulty in identifying the most effective sling procedure, overall, sling systems can be recommended for patients with persistent mild or moderate incontinence. However, the indication can also be extended to patients with severe incontinence, after appropriate counseling, allowing AUS implantation in the event of sling failure. PMID:20877609

  7. Incontinence in Elderly Cared for by Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noelker, Linda S.

    1987-01-01

    Analyzed the consequences of incontinence for both the family members caring for the incontinent elderly and for the elderly. Found that incontinence was related to perceived negative affect in family relations and to considering an alternative care arrangement. Suggests that interventions directed to the management of incontinence may help to…

  8. Urogynecologic conditions: urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Robert; Garely, Alan D

    2015-03-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI), the leakage of urine, is a condition that frequently goes untreated. There are many different types of UI, including stress and urge UI, and the etiology is multifactorial. Diagnosis can be made with a pertinent history, including use of a questionnaire; a pelvic examination; and direct observation. Additional testing can include physical maneuvers to elicit stress leakage and urodynamic studies. Treatment ranges from pelvic floor exercise to surgical support of the pelvic floor for stress UI and, typically, behavioral therapy and/or pharmacotherapy, starting with antimuscarinic drugs, for urge UI. PMID:25756372

  9. Obstetrics and Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Anal incontinence (AI) can be a debilitating condition for women following vaginal delivery. Operative vaginal delivery and anal sphincter laceration are important risk factors for the development of postpartum AI. Obtaining a comprehensive delivery history, along with a thorough physical examination of the perineum, vagina and rectum may aid the clinician in the diagnosis of an anal sphincter defect. Sonographic imaging can also assist in identifying sphincter defects. The treatment of AI may include a combination of dietary modification, medications that promote constipation, pelvic floor physical therapy, biofeedback, anal sphincteroplasty, and/or sacral neuromodulation. PMID:25320570

  10. Obstetrics and fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Chin, Kathleen

    2014-09-01

    Anal incontinence (AI) can be a debilitating condition for women following vaginal delivery. Operative vaginal delivery and anal sphincter laceration are important risk factors for the development of postpartum AI. Obtaining a comprehensive delivery history, along with a thorough physical examination of the perineum, vagina and rectum may aid the clinician in the diagnosis of an anal sphincter defect. Sonographic imaging can also assist in identifying sphincter defects. The treatment of AI may include a combination of dietary modification, medications that promote constipation, pelvic floor physical therapy, biofeedback, anal sphincteroplasty, and/or sacral neuromodulation. PMID:25320570

  11. The relationship of urinary incontinence to early spaying in bitches.

    PubMed

    Stöcklin-Gautschi, N M; Hässig, M; Reichler, I M; Hubler, M; Arnold, S

    2001-01-01

    It is still controversial whether a bitch should be spayed before or after the first oestrus. It would be desirable to spay bitches at an age that would minimize the side effects of neutering. With regard to the risk of mammary tumours, early spaying must be recommended because the incidence of tumours is reduced considerably. The aim of the present study was to determine whether early spaying also reduces the risk of urinary incontinence. The owners of 206 bitches that had been spayed before their first oestrus and for at least 3 years were questioned on the occurrence of urinary incontinence as a result of spaying. At the time of the enquiry the average age of the bitches was 6.5 years, and the average age at the time of surgery was 7.1 months. Urinary incontinence after spaying occurred in 9.7% of bitches. This incidence is approximately half that of spaying after the first oestrus. Urinary incontinence affected 12.5% of bitches that were of a large body weight (> 20 kg body weight) and 5.1% of bitches that were of a small body weight (< 20 kg body weight). The surgical procedure (ovariectomy versus ovariohysterectomy) had no influence on the incidence, or on the period between spaying and the occurrence of urinary incontinence. Urinary incontinence occurred on average at 2 years and 10 months after surgery and occurred each day, while the animals were awake or during sleep. However, compared with late spaying the clinical signs of urinary incontinence were more distinct after early spaying. PMID:11787155

  12. HealthLines: Incontinent? You're Not Alone

    MedlinePlus

    ... or are injured. The three main disorders are urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence, and pelvic organ prolapse, which happens ... least one pelvic disorder; nearly 16 percent reported urinary incontinence; 9 percent had fecal incontinence; and nearly 3 ...

  13. [The anal incontinence-- study on 20 operated cases].

    PubMed

    Iusuf, T; Sârbu, V; Grasa, C; Cristache, C; Botea, F

    2001-01-01

    The authors present 20 cases operated for anal incontinence. Two techniques were performed: direct repair (18 cases) and Musset-Cottrell procedure (2 cases). The results were excellent in 12 cases, good in 5 cases and satisfactory in 3 cases. The method of choice seems to be the direct repair of the anal sphincter after a proper local and general preparation. PMID:12731180

  14. Incontinence-associated dermatitis: a cross-sectional prevalence study in the Australian acute care hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jill L; Coyer, Fiona M; Osborne, Sonya R

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to identify the prevalence of incontinence and incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) in Australian acute care patients and to describe the products worn to manage incontinence, and those provided at the bedside for perineal skin care. Data on 376 inpatients were collected over 2 days at a major Australian teaching hospital. The mean age of the sample group was 62 years and 52% of the patients were male. The prevalence rate of incontinence was 24% (91/376). Urinary incontinence was significantly more prevalent in females (10%) than males (6%) (χ(2)  = 4·458, df = 1, P = 0·035). IAD occurred in 10% (38/376) of the sample group, with 42% (38/91) of incontinent patients having IAD. Semi-formed and liquid stool were associated with IAD (χ(2)  = 5·520, df = 1, P = 0·027). Clinical indication of fungal infection was present in 32% (12/38) of patients with IAD. Absorbent disposable briefs were the most common incontinence aids used (80%, 70/91), with soap/water and disposable washcloths being the clean-up products most commonly available (60%, 55/91) at the bedside. Further data are needed to validate this high prevalence. Studies that address prevention of IAD and the effectiveness of management strategies are also needed. PMID:24974872

  15. Anal encirclement with polypropylene mesh for rectal prolapse and incontinence.

    PubMed

    Sainio, A P; Halme, L E; Husa, A I

    1991-10-01

    Seventeen selected patients (mean age, 74 years)--14 with rectal prolapse and 3 with persisting anal incontinence after previous operations--underwent high anal encirclement with polypropylene mesh. There was no operative mortality. Prolapse recurred in 2 (15 percent) of the 13 patients followed up for 6 months or more (mean, 3.5 years). Three (27 percent) of the 11 patients with associated anal incontinence improved functionally, as did the three operated on for persisting incontinence, but only one patient regained normal continence. No breakage, cutting out, or infection related to the mesh was observed. Because of the risk of fecal impaction encountered in three of our patients, the procedure is not advocated for severely constipated patients. Despite the somewhat disappointing results regarding restoration of continence, we find this method useful in patients with rectal prolapse who are unfit for more extensive surgery, in controlling the prolapse to an acceptable degree. PMID:1914725

  16. When you have urinary incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... rub baking soda into the stain, and then vacuum off the baking powder. You can also use ... management of urinary incontinence: behavioral and pelvic floor therapy, urethral and pelvic devices. In: Wein AJ, ed. ...

  17. Managing incontinence: women's normalizing strategies.

    PubMed

    Skoner, M M; Haylor, M J

    1993-01-01

    Women's strategies for managing urinary incontinence were examined in a grounded-theory study. The women's basic social concern was dealing with incontinence in a manner that enabled them to feel normal. Feeling normal meant being able to do what they wanted to do and needed to do to have a normal life-style as they perceived it. This goal was accomplished by normalizing incontinence and its management. Normalization was achieved by directing its course through self-management, accounting for it in terms of personal history and life experiences, and delaying medical counsel. These strategies are described. The findings provide fresh insights about women's response to incontinence and their practice of self-managing its consequences. PMID:8138472

  18. [Incontinence - Etiology, diagnostics and Therapy].

    PubMed

    Frieling, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Fecal incontinence is defined by the unintentional loss of solid or liquid stool, and anal incontinence includes leakage of gas and / or fecal incontinence. Anal-fecal incontinence is not a diagnosis but a symptom. Many patients hide the problem from their families, friends, and even their doctors. Epidemiologic studies indicate a prevalence between 7-15 %, up to 30 % in hospitals and up to 70 % in longterm care settings. Anal-fecal incontinence causes a significant socio-economic burden. There is no widely accepted approach for classifying anal-fecal incontinence available. Anal-fecal continence is maintained by anatomical factors, rectoanal sensation, and rectal compliance. The diagnostic approach comprises muscle and nerve injuries by iatrogenic, obstetric or surgical trauma, descending pelvic floor or associated diseases. A basic diagnostic workup is sufficient to characterize the different manifestations of fecal incontinence in most of the cases. This includes patient history with a daily stool protocol and digital rectal investigation. Additional investigations may include anorectal manometry, anal sphincter EMG, conduction velocity of the pudendal nerve, needle EMG, barostat investigation, defecography and the dynamic MRI. Therapeutic interventions are focused on the individual symptoms and should be provided in close cooperation with gastroenterologists, surgeons, gynecologists, urologists, physiotherapeutics and psychologists (nutritional-training, food fibre content, pharmacological treatment of diarrhea/constipation, toilet training, pelvic floor gymnastic, anal sphincter training, biofeedback). Surgical therapy includes the STARR operation for rectoanal prolapse and sacral nerve stimulation for chronic constipation and anal-fecal incontinence. Surgery should not be applied unless the diagnostic work-up is complete and all conservative treatment options failed. PMID:27557074

  19. Urge incontinence: the patient's perspective.

    PubMed

    Brown, J S; Subak, L L; Gras, J; Brown, B A; Kuppermann, M; Posner, S F

    1998-12-01

    Urge incontinence has a profound effect on the day-to-day lives of women. The purpose of this study was to identify specific aspects of functioning and well-being affected by urge incontinence or mixed incontinence with a primary urge component. We conducted six focus groups of 65 racially and age diverse, community-dwelling women with urge incontinence. Transcripts of the focus groups were quantitatively analyzed for word use frequency with QSR NUD*IST software. Demographics, symptomatology, and the impact of incontinence on daily activities and feelings were assessed by questionnaire. Participants in the focus groups were on average 62 years of age; 52% were nonwhite, and 26% had a high school or less education. In the three identified broad domains, 52% of domain-related words were associated with feelings, 40% with activities, and 8% with relationships. Frequently identified references were bathroom availability (24%), loss of control (14%), anxiety (11%), and sleep disturbance (10%). Women under the age of 70 compared with older women more commonly identified feeling unattractive and low self-esteem (12% versus 2%, p < 0.007) and adverse effects on dating and sexual activity (45% versus 0%, p < 0.02). The effect of incontinence on quality of life correlated with frequency, nocturia, and pad use (Kendall's tau beta 0.02-0.32, p < 0.05). Urge incontinence affects many quality of life issues and contributes to limitation of activities, loss of control, and negative self-perception. Focus groups of diverse women with urge incontinence symptomatology are useful in understanding these effects. PMID:9929859

  20. Intractable incontinence in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Ouslander, J G

    2000-05-01

    The number of people living into extreme old age is rising exponentially in the USA, Europe and other developed countries. Urinary incontinence is prevalent in this population. While many very old (age > 75 years) incontinent individuals are relatively healthy and respond well to various treatments, a substantial proportion has impaired cognitive function and impaired mobility. These impairments make urinary incontinence much more difficult to assess, manage and cure than in younger populations. Irrespective of age and disability, a basic assessment of incontinence should be carried out to identify potentially reversible causes and indications for further evaluation. The outcome of such an assessment may not be cure or improvement of incontinence, but better quality of life and the prevention of morbid and expensive medical conditions that may result from poorly managed incontinence. Incontinence in this population should generally not be considered 'intractable' until a trial of noninvasive therapy (i.e. behavioural and/or pharmacological) has been undertaken. Some very frail elderly respond well to a toileting programme such as prompted voiding, and a small but significant proportion benefit from the careful addition of a bladder relaxant drug to the toileting programme. Others, depending on their ability and willingness to toilet and their preferences for further treatment, may be candidates for surgical intervention. Pads and garments should not be used so that they foster dependency, or as a primary treatment until other specific interventions have been tried. Indwelling catheters should be used only for specific and well-documented indications, because of the risks of urinary tract infection and sepsis associated with their long-term use. The dictionary defines 'intractable' as 'not easily relieved or cured'. In the elderly, cure for incontinence, and most other chronic conditions, is the exception rather than rule. Relief (or amelioration), improvement in

  1. Brief inpatient psychotherapeutic technique.

    PubMed

    Stein, Michelle B; Jacobo, Michelle C

    2013-09-01

    Trainees rotate onto the medical psychiatric inpatient unit at Massachusetts General Hospital every 6 weeks to learn how to conduct brief inpatient psychotherapy from two staff psychologists and one staff psychiatrist. This article focuses on four key therapeutic principles/techniques used when teaching these trainees about brief inpatient psychotherapy. These include support, affective experience and expression, chain analysis, and identification of relational styles/maladaptive relational patterns. We also briefly discuss our approach to training. Theoretical rationale, numerous clinical examples, and empirical support (of inpatient psychotherapy) are provided. PMID:24000872

  2. Incidence and predicting factors of falls of older inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Hellen Cristina de Almeida; Reiners, Annelita Almeida Oliveira; Azevedo, Rosemeiry Capriata de Souza; da Silva, Ageo Mário Cândido; Abreu, Débora Regina de Oliveira Moura; de Oliveira, Adriana Delmondes

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the incidence and predicting factors associated with falls among older inpatients. METHODS Prospective cohort study conducted in clinical units of three hospitals in Cuiaba, MT, Midwestern Brazil, from March to August 2013. In this study, 221 inpatients aged 60 or over were followed until hospital discharge, death, or fall. The method of incidence density was used to calculate incidence rates. Bivariate analysis was performed by Chi-square test, and multiple analysis was performed by Cox regression. RESULTS The incidence of falls was 12.6 per 1,000 patients/day. Predicting factors for falls during hospitalization were: low educational level (RR = 2.48; 95%CI 1.17;5.25), polypharmacy (RR = 4.42; 95%CI 1.77;11.05), visual impairment (RR = 2.06; 95%CI 1.01;4.23), gait and balance impairment (RR = 2.95; 95%CI 1.22;7.14), urinary incontinence (RR = 5.67; 95%CI 2.58;12.44) and use of laxatives (RR = 4.21; 95%CI 1.15;15.39) and antipsychotics (RR = 4.10; 95%CI 1.38;12.13). CONCLUSIONS The incidence of falls of older inpatients is high. Predicting factors found for falls were low education level, polypharmacy, visual impairment, gait and balance impairment, urinary incontinence and use of laxatives and antipsychotics. Measures to prevent falls in hospitals are needed to reduce the incidence of this event. PMID:26083943

  3. Managing stress incontinence in postnatal women.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, Tracy

    Urinary incontinence can have a significant impact on quality of life. This article explores the causes of stress urinary incontinence, and the impact of childbirth in particular, and discusses the importance of thorough assessment and treatment options. PMID:22708190

  4. Inpatients hypospadias care: Trends and outcomes from the American nationwide inpatient sample

    PubMed Central

    Sukumar, Shyam; Sood, Akshay; Hanske, Julian; Vetterlein, Malte; Elder, Jack S.; Fisch, Margit; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Friedman, Ariella A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Hypospadias is the most common congenital penile anomaly. Information about current utilization patterns of inpatient hypospadias repair as well as complication rates remain poorly evaluated. Materials and Methods The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was used to identify all patients undergoing inpatient hypospadias repair between 1998 and 2010. Patient and hospital characteristics were attained and outcomes of interest included intra- and immediate postoperative complications. Utilization was evaluated temporally and also according to patient and hospital characteristics. Predictors of complications and excess length of stay were evaluated by logistic regression models. Results A weighted 10,201 patients underwent inpatient hypospadias repair between 1998 and 2010. Half were infants (52.2%), and were operated in urban and teaching hospitals. Trend analyses demonstrated a decline in incidence of inpatient hypospadias repair (estimated annual percentage change, -6.80%; range, -0.51% to -12.69%; p=0.037). Postoperative complication rate was 4.9% and most commonly wound-related. Hospital volume was inversely related to complication rates. Specifically, higher hospital volume (>31 cases annually) was the only variable associated with decreased postoperative complications. Conclusions Inpatient hypospadias repair have substantially decreased since the late 1990's. Older age groups and presumably more complex procedures constitute most of the inpatient procedures nowadays. PMID:26279829

  5. Factors associated with urinary incontinence in women.

    PubMed Central

    Yarnell, J W; Voyle, G J; Sweetnam, P M; Milbank, J; Richards, C J; Stephenson, T P

    1982-01-01

    Possible aetiological factors for urinary incontinence were examined in a prevalence study among a random sample of 1000 women aged 18 and over. Infective factors were not markedly associated with incontinence but mechanical factors such as parity and obesity were. No association was found, however, between a history of perineal damage at childbirth and incontinence. Women with incontinence had on average a higher score for a 'neuroticism' trait elicited by questionnaire than women without the disorder. PMID:7069357

  6. Urinary Incontinence: Management and Treatment Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griebling, Tomas L.

    2009-01-01

    Urinary incontinence, defined as the involuntary leakage of urine, is a common health problem in both women and men. Children may also suffer from this condition. Management and treatment of urinary incontinence depends primarily on the specific type of incontinence and the underlying problem causing the leakage for a given patient. Because…

  7. Urinary incontinence in the bitch: an update.

    PubMed

    Reichler, I M; Hubler, M

    2014-06-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI), defined as the involuntary loss of urine during the filling phase of the bladder (Abrams et al. 2002), is a commonly seen problem in veterinary practice. Urinary sphincter mechanism incompetence (USMI) after spaying is the most common micturition disorder, and its medical treatment is normally successful, even though the underlying pathophysiological mechanism is not fully understood. Hormonal changes inducing structural and functional alterations in the bladder, as well as in the urethra composition, are discussed. To manage incontinent patients successfully, possible underlying abnormalities besides USMI should be ruled out. In the majority of cases, history, physical examination and simple tests including urinalysis and urine bacterial culture lead to a presumed aetiology. If USMI is the most likely cause, then the advantage of further diagnostic tests should be discussed with the owner before starting a trial therapy with alpha-adrenergic drugs. Potential side effects of this therapy have to be mentioned even though they rarely occur. It is important to thoroughly evaluate the success of the initial treatment. Its failure should lead to further diagnostic testing. Specialized clinical assessments may provide an aetiological diagnosis, and this could serve as a basis for discussing further treatment options. Surgical procedures, which may in rare cases cause irreversible side effects, may be instituted. If incontinence reoccurs after initial treatment was successfully performed, the diagnostic work-up including urinalysis should always be repeated. As results of urinalysis did not correlate well with results of bacterial culture, a urine culture is recommended (Comer and Ling 1981). Cystocentesis is the preferred method of urine collection (Bartges 2004). Equivocal results of quantitative cultures of urine samples obtained during midstream voiding or by catheterization require repeat collection by cystocentesis (Comer and Ling 1981

  8. Surgical management of fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Bleier, Joshua I S; Kann, Brian R

    2013-12-01

    The surgical approach to treating fecal incontinence is complex. After optimal medical management has failed, surgery remains the best option for restoring function. Patient factors, such as prior surgery, anatomic derangements, and degree of incontinence, help inform the astute surgeon regarding the most appropriate option. Many varied approaches to surgical management are available, ranging from more conservative approaches, such as anal canal bulking agents and neuromodulation, to more aggressive approaches, including sphincter repair, anal cerclage techniques, and muscle transposition. Efficacy and morbidity of these approaches also range widely, and this article presents the data and operative considerations for these approaches. PMID:24280402

  9. [Male Urinary Incontinence--a Taboo Issue].

    PubMed

    Kozomara-Hocke, Marko; Hermanns, Thomas; Poyet, Cédric

    2016-03-01

    Male urinary incontinence is an underestimated and frequently not broached issue. The urinary incontinence is divided into stress-, urge incontinence and hybrid forms as well as overflow incontinence. The fact that there are increasingly more men over 60 means that the prevalence of the urinary incontinence is up to 40%, and urinary incontinence will increasingly gain importance in daily routine practice. Many investigations and therapies can be realized by the general practitioner. Already simple therapy approaches can lead to a considerable clinical improvement of male urinary incontinence. If the initial therapy fails or pathological results (i. e. microhaematuria, recurrent urinary tract infections, raised residual urine and so on) are found, the patient should be referred to a urologist. PMID:26934011

  10. Midurethral Slings for Women with Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of the current review was to evaluate the safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of midurethral slings compared with traditional surgery. Background This assessment was undertaken in order to update and expand upon the health technology & policy assessment of tension-free vaginal tape (TVT, Gynecare Worldwide, a division of Ethicon Inc, a Johnson & Johnson company, Somerville, New Jersey) sling procedure for stress urinary incontinence published by the Medical Advisory Secretariat in February 2004. Since the publication of the 2004 assessment, a number of TVT-like sling alternatives have become available which employ the same basic principles as TVT slings: minimally invasive, midurethral placement, self-fixing, and tension-free. This update will evaluate the efficacy and safety of midurethral slings. Clinical Need Normal continence is controlled by the nervous system and involves co-ordination between bladder, urethra, urethral sphincter, and pelvic floor. Incontinence occurs when the relationship among the above components is compromised, either due to physical damage or nerve dysfunction. (1) Stress urinary incontinence is the most common form of urinary incontinence in women. It is characterized by the “complaint of involuntary leakage on effort or exertion, or on sneezing or coughing” when there is increased abdominal pressure without detrusor (bladder wall) contraction. (2) There are 2 factors which define stress urinary incontinence: a weakening in the support of the proximal urethra, causing urethral hyper-mobility and deficiency in the sphincter, causing urethral leakage. Both factors are thought to coexist. (1) Accurate tests are not available to distinguish these 2 types of stress urinary incontinence. Urinary incontinence is estimated to affect about 250,000 Canadian women and 8 million American women aged 65 and over. (3;4) The prevalence of stress urinary incontinence is very difficult to measure because

  11. [Urinary incontinence in castrated bitches. 2. Diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Arnold, S

    1997-01-01

    Urinary incontinence due to spaying is caused by a sphincter incompetence of the urethra. In practice the diagnosis is established by ruling out other causes of incontinence such as neurological disease, bacterial cystitis, urinary tract malformation, iatrogenic ureterovaginal fistula and neoplasia of the urinary tract. An accurate diagnosis of urethral sphincter incompetence is made by urethral pressure profilometry. A urethral closure pressure of 7.4 cm H2O allowed the differentiation of bitches with urinary incontinence, due to spaying, from healthy control dogs with a diagnostic accuracy of 91%. For therapy alpha-adrenergic drugs (Ephedrine or Phenylpropanolamine) are recommended, which result in continence in 74% and improvement in 24% of incontinent patients. In the absence of response estrogens may be used. If the medical therapy fails to achieve urinary continence, the endoscopic injection of collagen into the submucosa of the proximal urethra can be performed. This is a simple and minimally invasive procedure. It rarely leads to complications and may be repeated when necessary. The method is successful in 75% of cases. PMID:9281063

  12. Fecal incontinence: A review of current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Fejka, Michael David

    2016-09-01

    Fecal incontinence affects patients of all sexes, races, and ethnicities; however, those affected often are afraid or too embarrassed to ask for help. Attention to risk factors and directed physical examinations can help healthcare providers diagnose and formulate treatment plans. Numerous diagnostic tests are available. Diligent follow-up is needed to direct patients to second-line therapies such as sacral nerve stimulation or surgical procedures. PMID:27580000

  13. High Costs of Urinary Incontinence Among Women Electing Surgery to Treat Stress Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Subak, Leslee L.; Brubaker, Linda; Chai, Toby C.; Creasman, Jennifer M.; Diokno, Ananias C.; Goode, Patricia S.; Kraus, Stephen R.; Kusek, John W.; Leng, Wendy W.; Lukacz, Emily S.; Norton, Peggy; Tennstedt, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate costs for incontinence management, health-related quality of life, and willingness to pay for incontinence improvement in women electing surgery for stress urinary incontinence. METHODS A total of 655 incontinent women enrolled in the Stress Incontinence Surgical Treatment Efficacy Trial, a randomized surgical trial. Baseline out-of-pocket costs for incontinence management were calculated by multiplying self-report of resources used (supplies, laundry, dry cleaning) by national resource costs ($2006). Health-related quality of life was estimated with the Health Utilities Index Mark 3. Participants estimated willingness to pay for 100% improvement in incontinence. Potential predictors of these outcomes were examined by using multivariable linear regression. RESULTS Mean age was 52±10 years, and mean number of weekly incontinence episodes was 22±21. Mean and median (25%, 75% interquartile range) estimated personal costs for incontinence management among all women were $14±$24 and $8 (interquartile range $3, $18) per week, and 617 (94%) women reported any cost. Costs increased significantly with incontinence frequency and mixed compared with stress incontinence. The mean and median Health Utilities Index Mark 3 scores were 0.73±0.25 and 0.84 (interquartile range 0.63, 0.92). Women were willing to pay a mean of $118±$132 per month for complete resolution of incontinence, and willingness to pay increased significantly with greater expected incontinence improvement, household income, and incontinent episode frequency. CONCLUSION Urinary incontinence is associated with substantial costs. Women spent nearly $750 per year out of pocket for incontinence management, had a significant decrement in quality of life, and were willing to pay nearly $1,400 per year for cure. PMID:18378749

  14. Fecal Incontinence: Etiology, Evaluation, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Dana M.; Weiss, Eric G.

    2011-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is a debilitating problem facing ~2.2% of the U.S. general population over 65 years of age. Etiologic factors include traumatic, neurologic, congenital, and iatrogenic. Most commonly, obstetric trauma causes fecal incontinence as well as poorly performed anorectal surgery or pelvic radiation. Several severity scores and quality of life indexes have been developed to quantify incontinent symptoms. There are several nonsurgical and surgical options for the treatment of fecal incontinence. Biofeedback is among the most successful nonoperative strategies. Depending on the cause, anal sphincter repair, artificial bowel sphincter, and sacral nerve stimulation are used to treat fecal incontinence with some success. Unfortunately, fecal incontinence is an extremely difficult problem to manage: there has not been one, single treatment option that has proven to be both safe and effective in long-term studies. PMID:22379407

  15. Female urinary incontinence: effective treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Castro, R A; Arruda, R M; Bortolini, M A T

    2015-04-01

    Urinary incontinence is a dysfunction that tremendously affects women's quality of life, involving social, emotional and economic aspects. Although various treatments for urinary incontinence have been described, it is important to know which of them are truly effective. This review seeks to determine the current available therapies for women with stress urinary incontinence and overactive bladder syndrome, based on the best scientific evidence. PMID:25307986

  16. Psychosomatic Aspects of Urinary Incontinence in Women

    PubMed Central

    Debus, G.; Kästner, R.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary incontinence in women is a common problem. With increasing age its prevalence and severity of its manifestations increase. Among nursing home residents the frequency is between 43 and 77 %, 6 to 10 % of all admissions to nursing homes are due to urinary incontinence. The risk for urinary incontinence among women with cognitive deficits is 1.5- to 3.4-fold higher than for women without mental disorders. The most common form is stress incontinence (50 %), followed by mixed stress-urge incontinence (40 %) and purely urge incontinence (OAB = overactive bladder, 20 %). With regard to its cause, the latter remains unclarified in about 80 % of the cases. It is often difficult to treat. There are also cases in which urge incontinence is related to traumatic events. In such cases behavioural and psychotherapeutic options may be helpful. Almost inevitably every form of incontinence has psychological consequences: shame and insecurity are often results of uncontrolled loss of urine. Among others, in the long term, they lead to the avoidance of social contacts and possibly to depression and isolation. Consideration of the psychosomatics is important in the therapy for female urinary incontinence from three points of view: 1) the efficacy of treatment is better suited to the patient, 2) the treatment costs are lower, 3) the professional satisfaction of the responsible physician increases. PMID:25797959

  17. Effectiveness of psychiatric inpatient care.

    PubMed

    Sonesson, Ove; Arvidsson, Hans; Tjus, Tomas

    2013-06-01

    There is a growing demand for evaluating the process and outcome of mental health care. Most healthcare providers routinely collect and register data related to the process of treatment, and it is important to acquire more knowledge about how to make use of these databases. The aim of this study was to investigate the outcome of psychiatric inpatient care in relation to different clinical factors, using the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale (GAF) as a measure of outcome. Another objective was to explore the ability of routinely collected and registered data to provide valuable information about patients and their care. The studied psychiatric inpatient sample consisted of 816 care episodes with GAF ratings made both at admission and at discharge for 648 patients. Variables used in the study included GAF score at admission and at discharge, age, gender, diagnosis, length of stay and ward affiliation. The overall mean GAF change was 20.74, and the overall effect size Cohen's d 1.67, which corresponds to a large effect. The mean GAF change for women was 21.6, with an effect size of 1.80, and for men 19.4 with an effect size of 1.52. The effect size spectra including all groups of diagnoses ranged from 1.03 (substance-related disorders) to 2.33 (other mood disorders). Length of stay and ward affiliation also showed significant results concerning GAF change. Some limitations in this study could depend on the absence of randomization procedures and a control group. Another limitation concerns the insufficient control of the inpatient care interventions performed. The results support the capacity of the GAF to function as a measure of outcome in relation to different clinical factors, such as length of stay and diagnosis. Support was also found for the importance and usefulness of routinely collected and registered data. PMID:22775246

  18. Conservative treatment for anal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Anal incontinence (AI) in adults is a troublesome condition that negatively impacts upon quality of life and results in significant embarrassment and social isolation. The conservative management of AI is the first step and targets symptomatic relief. The reported significant improvement with conservative treatments for AI is close to 25% and involves prescribed changes in lifestyle habits, a reduced intake of foods that may cause or aggravate diarrhea or rectal urgency, and the use of specific anti-diarrheal agents. The use of a mechanical barrier in the form of an anal plug and the outcomes and principles of pelvic kinesitherapies and biofeedback options are outlined. This review discusses a gastroenterologist's approach towards conservative therapy in patients referred with anal incontinence. PMID:24759347

  19. Recent concepts in fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Douglas, J M; Smith, L E

    2001-08-01

    Fecal incontinence is an inability to defer release of gas or stool from the anus and rectum by mechanisms of voluntary control. It is an important medical disorder affecting the quality of life of more than 2% of the US population. The most common contributing factors include previous vaginal deliveries, pelvic or perineal trauma, previous anorectal surgery, and rectal prolapse. Many physicians lack experience and knowledge related to pelvic floor incontinence disorders, but advancing technology has improved this knowledge. Increased experience with endoanal ultrasound and endoanal magnetic resonance imaging have given us better understanding of the anatomy of the anal canal, and new techniques with muscle translocation and artificial neosphincters and neuromodulation have expanded our armamentarium of options for restoring continence. PMID:12112954

  20. Neuromodulation for fecal incontinence: an effective surgical intervention.

    PubMed

    Chiarioni, Giuseppe; Palsson, Olafur S; Asteria, Corrado R; Whitehead, William E

    2013-11-01

    Fecal incontinence is a disabling symptom with medical and social implications, including fear, embarrassment, isolation and even depression. Most patients live in seclusion and have to plan their life around the symptom, with secondary impairment of their quality of life. Conservative management and biofeedback therapy are reported to benefit a good percentage of those affected. However, surgery must be considered in the non-responder population. Recently, sacral nerve electrostimulation, lately named neuromodulation, has been reported to benefit patients with fecal incontinence in randomized controlled trials more than placebo stimulation and conservative management, by some unknown mechanism. Neuromodulation is a minimally invasive procedure with a low rate of adverse events and apparently favorable cost-efficacy profile. This review is intended to expand knowledge about this effective intervention among the non-surgically skilled community who deals with this disabled group of patients. PMID:24222947

  1. A Prospective, Descriptive, Quality Improvement Study to Decrease Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis and Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Hall, Kimberly D; Clark, Rebecca C

    2015-07-01

    Incontinence is a common problem among hospitalized patients and has been associated with multiple health complications, including incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) and hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs). A prospective, descriptive study was conducted in 2 acute care neurology units to 1) assess the prevalence of incontinence and incidence of IAD and HAPUs among incontinent patients, and 2) evaluate the effect of caregiver education and use of a 1-step cleanser, moisturizer, barrier product on the development of IAD and HAPUs among patients with incontinence. During a period of 1 month, the incontinence status of admitted patients was recorded and skin was assessed for the presence/absence of IAD and HAPUs twice per day. After the 1-month data collection, all clinicians on the study units completed a facility-based online education program about IAD, HAPUs, and skin care followed by the implementation of a 1-step cleanser/barrier product for skin care of all patients with incontinence. Data collection procedures remained the same. Data were collected using a paper/pencil instrument and entered into a spreadsheet for analysis. Descriptive statistics were calculated and prevalence and incidence rates were compared between the pre-intervention and post-intervention phase using Fisher's exact analysis. During the first phase of the study, 17 of 40 admitted patients (42.5%) were incontinent. Of those, 5 (29.4%) developed IAD and all of these patients developed HAPUs (5 of 40 admitted, 29.4%) during an average length of stay of 7.3 (range: 2-14) days. In the intervention phase of the study, 25 of 46 (54.3%) patients were incontinent and none developed IAD or a HAPU during an average length of stay of 7.4 (range: 2-14) days. The average Braden scale score was 14.14 in the pre-intervention group of patients with incontinence and 12.74 in the intervention group. The prevalence of incontinence among patients admitted to acute care neurology units and the rate

  2. Preventing Suicide Among Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Sakinofsky, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    Objective Inpatient suicide comprises a proportionately small but clinically important fraction of suicide. This study is intended as a qualitative analysis of the comprehensive English literature, highlighting what is known and what can be done to prevent inpatient suicide. Method: A systematic search was conducted on the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, Web of Knowledge, and a personal database for articles on cohort series, preferably controlled, of inpatient suicide (not deliberate self-harm or attempted suicide, unless they also dealt specifically with suicide data). Results: A qualitative discussion is presented, based on the findings of the literature searched. Conclusions: The bulk of inpatient suicides actually occur not on the ward but off premises, when the patient was on leave or had absconded. Peaks occur shortly after admission and discharge. It is possible to reduce suicide risk on the ward by having a safe environment, optimizing patient visibility, supervising patients appropriately, careful assessment, awareness of and respect for suicide risk, good teamwork and communication, and adequate clinical treatment. PMID:24881161

  3. Incontinent Children Discover Hope at Camp Oakhurst.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raps, Marvin A.

    1991-01-01

    Describes summer-camp experiences of young people who are incontinent because of spina bifida. Focuses on residential camp program as encouragement for youth to learn independent incontinence management. Describes self-catheterization program and process as minor inconvenience and positive alternative to soiled clothing and accompanying…

  4. Urinary Incontinence: Causes and Methods of Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griebling, Tomas L.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the third of a multi-part series offering the most timely educational information, innovative approaches, products and technology solutions as well as coping and stigma-fighting approaches available on the subject of incontinence. Here, the author introduces the types and physiology of urinary incontinence. The author also…

  5. Characterizing hospital inpatients: the importance of demographics and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Danko, W D; Janakiramanan, B; Stanley, T J

    1988-01-01

    To compete effectively, hospital administrators must understand inpatients who are involved in hospital-choice decisions more clearly. To this end, a methodology is presented to measure and assess the importance of inpatients' personal attributes in predicting hospital selection. Empirical results show that demographic characteristics are poor--but attitudes are useful--segmentation variables that delineate differences between two particular hospitals' inpatients. More generally, the survey method and statistical procedures outlined are applicable (with slight modification) to markets with a greater number of competitors. PMID:10288638

  6. Current and Emerging Treatment Options for Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Fecal incontinence (FI) is a multifactorial disorder that imposes considerable social and economic burdens. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of current and emerging treatment options for FI. A MEDLINE search was conducted for English-language articles related to FI prevalence, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment published from January 1, 1990 through June 1, 2013. The search was extended to unpublished trials on ClinicalTrials.gov and relevant publications cited in included articles. Conservative approaches, including dietary modifications, medications, muscle-strengthening exercises, and biofeedback, have been shown to provide short-term benefits. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation was considered ineffective in a randomized clinical trial. Unlike initial studies, sacral nerve stimulation has shown reasonable short-term effectiveness and some complications. Dynamic graciloplasty and artificial sphincter and bowel devices lack randomized controlled trials and have shown inconsistent results and high rates of explantation. Of injectable bulking agents, dextranomer microspheres in non-animal stabilized hyaluronic acid (NASHA Dx) has shown significant improvement in incontinence scores and frequency of incontinence episodes, with generally mild adverse effects. For the treatment of FI, conservative measures and biofeedback therapy are modestly effective. When conservative therapies are ineffective, invasive procedures, including sacral nerve stimulation, may be considered, but they are associated with complications and lack randomized, controlled trials. Bulking agents may be an appropriate alternative therapy to consider before more aggressive therapies in patients who fail conservative therapies. PMID:25014235

  7. 42 CFR 412.405 - Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.405 Section 412.405 Public... PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. The prospective payment...

  8. [Decubitus or incontinence-associated dermatitis?].

    PubMed

    Houwing, Ronald H; Koopman, Eddy S M

    2014-01-01

    A lack of understanding about the distinction between incontinence-associated dermatitis and pressure sores leads to inadequate treatment and therefore a higher incidence of pressure sores. Pressure relief may not be adequately carried out due to concentration exclusively on treatment of incontinence. In this article we will discuss the multifactorial approach, based on 2 patient cases. In order to prevent pressure sores, the cause of incontinence has to be investigated and treated if possible. Appropriate pressure relief must be carried out, in addition to adequate skin care. PMID:25159696

  9. Adynamic and dynamic muscle transposition techniques for anal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Barišić, Goran; Krivokapić, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Gracilis muscle transposition is well established in general surgery and has been the main muscle transposition technique for anal incontinence. Dynamization, through a schedule of continuous electrical stimulation, converts the fatigue-prone muscle fibres to a tonic fatigue-resistant morphology with acceptable results in those cases where there is limited sphincter muscle mass. The differences between gluteoplasty and graciloplasty, as well as the techniques and complications of both procedures, are outlined in this review. Overall, these techniques are rarely carried out in specialized units with experience, as there is a high revision and explantation rate. PMID:24759348

  10. Validation of questionnaires to assess quality of life related to fecal incontinence in children with anorectal malformations and Hirschsprung's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Arthur Loguetti; Tannuri, Ana Cristina Aoun; Ferreira, Mariana Aparecida Elisei; Santos, Maria Mercês; Tannuri, Uenis

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Surgical treatment of anorectal malformations (ARMs) and Hirschsprung's disease (HD) leads to alterations in bowel habits and fecal incontinence, with consequent quality of life impairment. The objectives were to create and validate a Questionnaire for the Fecal Incontinence Index (FII) based on the Holschneider score, as well as a Questionnaire for the Assessment of Quality of Life Related to Fecal Incontinence in Children and Adolescents (QQVCFCA), based on the Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life. Methods: The questionnaires were applied to 71 children submitted to surgical procedure, in two stages. Validity was tested by comparing the QQVCFCA and a generic quality of life questionnaire (SF-36), and between QQVCFCA and the FII. A group of 59 normal children was used as control. Results: At two stages, 45.0% (32/71) and 42.8% (21/49) of the patients had fecal incontinence. It was observed that the QQVCFCA showed a significant correlation with the SF-36 and FII (Pearson's correlation 0.57), showing that the quality of life is directly proportional to improvement in fecal incontinence. Quality of life in patients with fecal incontinence is still globally impaired, when compared with control subjects (p<0.05, Student's t-test). There were also significant differences between the results of children with ARMs and children with HD. Conclusions: QQVCFCA and FII are useful tools to assess the quality of life and fecal incontinence in these groups of children. Children with ARMs submitted to surgical procedure and HD have similar quality of life impairment. PMID:26522822

  11. Urinary incontinence - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... I use to clean a mattress? How much water or liquids should I drink every day? Which foods or liquids can make my urinary incontinence worse? Are there activities I should avoid that may cause problems with ...

  12. Management of urinary incontinence in women.

    PubMed Central

    O'Dowd, T C

    1993-01-01

    Control of micturition is a complex physiological and anatomical process which often fails in women. The sequelae of urinary incontinence in women range from inconvenience to social and psychological stigmatization. Surprisingly, many women are tolerant of often quite severe sequelae, despite a range of management techniques that exist to alleviate or cure incontinence. Some of the more successful techniques are well suited to general practice management and can be carried out by the patient under the supervision of her doctor, district nurse, practice nurse or midwife. This paper reviews the physiology of micturition, stress urinary incontinence and incontinence caused by detrusor instability, and the management techniques available to alleviate or cure the problem. PMID:8260222

  13. General practitioners and women with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed Central

    Grealish, M; O'Dowd, T C

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Urinary incontinence is a common problem for adult women. It results in a large financial and psychosocial cost. Much urinary incontinence goes unreported. Women with urinary incontinence can be successfully assessed and treated in general practice but studies have shown that many GPs manage the condition inadequately. AIM: This study aims to examine GPs' awareness of urinary incontinence in women and their management of, and attitudes to, female urinary incontinence. METHOD: A qualitative study was conducted with 21 GPs responding to semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis was carried out on these interviews, with recurrent views and experiences being identified and grouped. RESULTS: The interviews of 11 male and nine female GPs were suitable for analysis. GPs were aware of the prevalence and under-reporting of urinary incontinence in women. Many were unhappy with their own management of the condition and with the management options available to them. Male GPs in particular were reluctant to carry out gynaecological examinations, and few GPs expressed enthusiasm for teaching pelvic floor exercises or bladder drills. Medications were frequently used but generally considered ineffective or intolerable. The services of both public health nurses and practice nurses were under-used, largely because of lack of training in this area. Although incontinence nurses were employed in the area, many GPs did not know of their availability and, of those who did, few referred to them more than infrequently. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that many GPs avoid dealing with the problem of urinary incontinence in women and that they find it to be a difficult, chronic problem to treat. Specialist options seem not to be useful in general practice. The findings need to be explored in other GP settings. PMID:9624768

  14. The management of urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Barnard, R J

    1982-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is defined as the involuntary loss of urine which is a social or hygienic problem and is objectively demonstrable. It is common in the general population and not all patients will report the presence of the problem because of, among other things, embarrassment. Assessment is important and should be multi-disciplinary. It includes a history, physical examination and some simple tests. A bladder chart kept by the patient aids assessment. Most patients can then be categorized and further testing planned. These tests are usually invasive and include urodynamic tests and electromyographic studies. With their conclusion treatment can be instituted, such as bladder training, drugs and various aids and appliances. PMID:7095985

  15. [Faecal incontinence - serious medical and social issue].

    PubMed

    Ihnát, Peter; Kozáková, Radka; Vávra, Petr; Pelikán, Anton; Zonča, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Faecal incontinence presents gastrointestinal disorder with high prevalence (more than 2% of population) and serious impact on the quality of life. General practitioners, gastroenterologists and colorectal surgeons play the principal role in screening, diagnostics and providing health care to patients who suffer from faecal incontinence. Insufficient knowledge about faecal incontinence and minimal training aimed at its diagnostics and therapy lead to the low quality of provided health care.Authors offer comprehensive up-to-date review focused on faecal incontinence - its definition, prevalence, seriousness, consequences, pathophysiology, diagnostics and management. Detailed anatomical and physiological assessment of each patient is fundamental in determining correct cause of faecal incontinence and consequent selection of the most appropriate therapeutic modality.Broad spectrum of available therapeutic options comprises conservative management (lifestyle modification, diet, medications, and absorbent tools), biofeedback and surgical interventions (sphincter augmentation, sphincter reconstruction, sacral nerve stimulation, sphincter substitution and stools diversion). Application of the most appropriate treatment can lead in majority of patients to significant improvement in faecal incontinence and quality of life. Early diagnosis prevents possible complications, which would possibly deteriorate patients quality of life. PMID:27256145

  16. Pad testing in incontinent women: a review.

    PubMed

    Ryhammer, A M; Djurhuus, J C; Laurberg, S

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on pad-weighing tests used for objectifying and quantifying incontinence in urinary incontinent women. The patients wear pads weighed before and after the test period. A weight gain is taken as a measure of the amount of urine loss. The tests are in principle of two different types: short-term office tests and long-term home tests, and measure different aspects of urinary control and dysfunction. Both have an inherent large intra- and interindividual variability. Pad weight gains obtained from patients referred for incontinence and those from self-reported continent controls overlap to a certain degree, and it is not possible to identify distinct numerical cut-off values separating continence from incontinence. This suggests that incontinence is a complex condition in which the amount of leakage, other sources of weight gain, and differences in the individual patients' personal characteristics influence the identification and quantification of the problem. In spite of the shortcomings the pad tests remain a valuable tool for both the clinician and the researcher. The home pad tests are superior to the office tests in terms of authenticity, and should be performed with a concomitant systematic registration of the participant's voidings, fluid intake and episodes of incontinence. PMID:10384973

  17. The use of synthetic materials in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Kądziołka, Przemysław; Stanek, Anna M.; Szymanowski, Krzysztof; Wilczak, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence is a very serious problem which has been noticed by the WHO. This difficult medical condition poses a serious problem as it affects c.a. 20% of the female population and it increases up to 35% in the group of females over 60 years of age. Since there is no single standard surgical procedure which could solve this problem, numerous synthetic materials are used for the operations. It seems that the materials are effective as they improve the condition of women suffering from stress urinary incontinence. Unfortunately these materials have their shortcomings which might lead to certain post-operative complications. Stress urinary incontinence is a disease which affects the social life of the patients. It has a high percentage of recurrence and causes the patient substantial difficulties with keeping high standards of personal hygiene which is consequence makes it impossible to fulfill their social roles. The etiology of this disease is complex and calls for a cross-disciplinary approach to the problem. As there are no standardized or unanimous treatment methods of stress urinary incontinence, numerous sources based on the clinical experience of many medical centers suggest performing TVT and TOT procedures as the most effective treatment methods. The efficacy of the TOT procedure is about 90.8%. PMID:27582680

  18. The use of synthetic materials in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Stanek, Robert; Kądziołka, Przemysław; Stanek, Anna M; Szymanowski, Krzysztof; Wilczak, Maciej

    2016-06-01

    Stress urinary incontinence is a very serious problem which has been noticed by the WHO. This difficult medical condition poses a serious problem as it affects c.a. 20% of the female population and it increases up to 35% in the group of females over 60 years of age. Since there is no single standard surgical procedure which could solve this problem, numerous synthetic materials are used for the operations. It seems that the materials are effective as they improve the condition of women suffering from stress urinary incontinence. Unfortunately these materials have their shortcomings which might lead to certain post-operative complications. Stress urinary incontinence is a disease which affects the social life of the patients. It has a high percentage of recurrence and causes the patient substantial difficulties with keeping high standards of personal hygiene which is consequence makes it impossible to fulfill their social roles. The etiology of this disease is complex and calls for a cross-disciplinary approach to the problem. As there are no standardized or unanimous treatment methods of stress urinary incontinence, numerous sources based on the clinical experience of many medical centers suggest performing TVT and TOT procedures as the most effective treatment methods. The efficacy of the TOT procedure is about 90.8%. PMID:27582680

  19. Transurethral Radiofrequency Collagen Denaturation for Treatment of Female Stress Urinary Incontinence: A Review of the Literature and Clinical Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Lukban, James Chivian

    2012-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence is a prevalent condition in women with a significant negative effect on quality of life. Intervention includes behavioral modification, intravaginal devices, pelvic floor muscle exercises, biofeedback, functional electrical stimulation, and surgical procedures. We will review a new in-office procedure for the treatment of SUI that may serve as a viable nonsurgical option. PMID:22007230

  20. Urinary Incontinence Treatments for Women (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... neurogenic urinary incontinence: results of a single treatment, randomized, placebo controlled 6-month study. J Urol 2005; ... treatment of urge incontinence in older women: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA 2002; 288:2293. Herbison P, ...

  1. Socioeconomic Factors Impact Inpatient Mortality in Pediatric Lymphoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Puckett, Yana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Our objective was to determine the risk factors for inpatient mortality of pediatric patients diagnosed with lymphoma through the utilization of a large national pediatric database. Methods: This cross-sectional study uses data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database (HCUP KID) for the year of 2012 to estimate the risk factors for inpatient mortality for pediatric patients diagnosed with lymphoma. All patients diagnosed with lymphoma between the ages of one and 18 years were included. Chi-square test was used to analyze categorical variables. Independent t-test was used to analyze continuous variables. Results: A total of 2,908 study subjects with lymphoma were analyzed. Of those, 56.1% were male and the average age was three years old. Total inpatient mortality was 1.2% or 34 patients. We found that patients with four or more chronic conditions were much more likely to die while hospitalized (p < 0.0001). In addition, we also saw that patients with median household incomes below $47,999 dollars (p = 0.05) having a need for a major procedure (p = 0.008) were associated with inpatient mortality. Congestive heart failure, renal failure, coagulopathy, metastatic disease, and electrolyte abnormalities were all found to be associated with inpatient mortality. Conclusions: Pediatric lymphoma mortality in children is not only influenced by their medical condition but also by their socioeconomic condition as well. PMID:27433403

  2. Intersphincteric anal lipofilling with micro-fragmented fat tissue for the treatment of faecal incontinence: preliminary results of three patients

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, Michele; Massa, Salvatore; Amato, Bruno; Gentile, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Faecal incontinence is a very debilitating problem. Many techniques have been proposed to treat this condition, with controversial results. Autologous transplant of fat tissue is an established procedure used for the repair of tissue damage, and recent studies revealed the potentiality of tissue regeneration by human adipose-derived stem cells. We treated this condition with the injection, in the intersphincteric anal groove, of lipoaspirate processed by an innovative technology (Lipogems). The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of Lipogems injection for the treatment of faecal incontinence. In February 2014 we treated 3 patients with faecal incontinence. The surgical procedure required three phases: lipoaspiration, processing of lipoaspirate with the Lipogems system, and injection of the obtained product in the intersphincteric anal groove. An accurate proctological examination followed at 1 week, 1 month and 6 months after treatment. Each patient reported an improved Wexner incontinence score at 1 month after the procedure. We observed an increase of resting pressure (by at least 10 mm Hg) and thickness of the internal anal sphincter respectively at ano-rectal manometry and by ultrasound (US) evaluation at the sixth month of follow-up. Our preliminary results are encouraging, but multicentric studies with longer follow-up are needed to validate this novel technique for treatment of faecal incontinence. PMID:26240640

  3. 21 CFR 876.5920 - Protective garment for incontinence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Protective garment for incontinence. 876.5920... garment for incontinence. (a) Identification. A protective garment for incontinence is a device that... garment from the patient's excreta. This generic type of device does not include diapers for infants....

  4. 21 CFR 876.5920 - Protective garment for incontinence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Protective garment for incontinence. 876.5920... garment for incontinence. (a) Identification. A protective garment for incontinence is a device that... garment from the patient's excreta. This generic type of device does not include diapers for infants....

  5. 21 CFR 876.5920 - Protective garment for incontinence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Protective garment for incontinence. 876.5920... garment for incontinence. (a) Identification. A protective garment for incontinence is a device that... garment from the patient's excreta. This generic type of device does not include diapers for infants....

  6. 21 CFR 876.5920 - Protective garment for incontinence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Protective garment for incontinence. 876.5920... garment for incontinence. (a) Identification. A protective garment for incontinence is a device that... garment from the patient's excreta. This generic type of device does not include diapers for infants....

  7. 21 CFR 876.5920 - Protective garment for incontinence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Protective garment for incontinence. 876.5920... garment for incontinence. (a) Identification. A protective garment for incontinence is a device that... garment from the patient's excreta. This generic type of device does not include diapers for infants....

  8. Comorbidity of ADHD and incontinence in children.

    PubMed

    von Gontard, Alexander; Equit, Monika

    2015-02-01

    ADHD and incontinence are common childhood disorders which co-occur at much higher rates than expected by chance. The aim of this review was to provide an overview both of the comorbidity of nocturnal enuresis (NE), daytime urinary incontinence (DUI) and faecal incontinence (FI) in children with ADHD; and, vice versa, of the co-occurrence of ADHD in children with NE, DUI and FI. Most clinical studies have focussed on the association of ADHD and NE. Population-based studies have shown that children with DUI have an even greater risk for ADHD than those with NE. While children with FI have the highest overall comorbidity rates of psychological disorders, these are heterogeneous with a wide range of internalising and externalising disorders--not necessarily of ADHD. Genetic studies indicate that ADHD and NE, DUI and FI do not share the same genetic basis. The comorbidity is conferred by non-genetic factors. Possible aetiological and pathogenetic links between ADHD and incontinence are provided by neurophysiological, imaging and pharmacological studies. The co-occurrence has clinical implications: children with ADHD and NE, DUI and FI are more difficult to treat, show lower compliance and have less favourable treatment outcomes for incontinence. Therefore, both groups of disorders have to be assessed and treated specifically. PMID:24980793

  9. Diagnostic Testing for Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Craig H.

    2014-01-01

    Many tests are available to assist in the diagnosis and management of fecal incontinence. Imaging studies such as endoanal ultrasonography and defecography provide an anatomic and functional picture of the anal canal which can be useful, especially in the setting of planned sphincter repair. Physiologic tests including anal manometry and anal acoustic reflexometry provide objective data regarding functional values of the anal canal. The value of this information is of some debate; however, as we learn more about these methods, they may prove useful in the future. Finally, nerve studies, such as pudendal motor nerve terminal latency, evaluate the function of the innervation of the anal canal. This has been shown to have significant prognostic value and can help guide clinical decision making. Significant advances have also happened in the field, with the relatively recent advent of magnetic resonance defecography and high-resolution anal manometry, which provide even greater objective anatomic and physiologic information about the anal canal and its function. PMID:25320566

  10. Prevention and management of incontinence-associated dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bardsley, Alison

    Maintaining skin integrity in people with incontinence is challenging. Incontinence is common in older people and those compromised by medical or surgical comorbidities. Urinary and faecal incontinence can result in skin breakdown, which is characterised by erosion of the epidermis, creating a moist, macerated appearance to the skin. Incontinence and associated skin breakdown can have a considerable effect on an individual's physical and psychological wellbeing. This article discusses the aetiology of incontinence-associated dermatitis and considers the best options for the prevention, management and treatment of this condition. PMID:23940938

  11. Prevalence and Risk Indicators for Anal Incontinence among Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Skjeldestad, Finn Egil; Sandvik, Leiv

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and risk factors of anal incontinence in an unselected pregnant population at second trimester. A survey of pregnant women attending a routine ultrasound examination was conducted in a university hospital in Oslo, Norway. A questionnaire consisting of 105 items concerning anal incontinence (including St. Mark's score), urinary incontinence, medication use, and comorbidity was posted to women when invited to the ultrasound examination. Results. Prevalence of self-reported anal incontinence (St. Mark's score ≥ 3) was the lowest in the group of women with a previous cesarean section only (6.4%) and the highest among women with a previous delivery complicated by obstetric anal sphincter injury (24.4%). Among nulliparous women the prevalence of anal incontinence was 7.7% and was associated to low educational level and comorbidity. Prevalence of anal incontinence increased with increasing parity. Urinary incontinence was associated with anal incontinence in all parity groups. Conclusions. Anal incontinence was most frequent among women with a history of obstetric anal sphincter injury. Other obstetrical events had a minor effect on prevalence of anal incontinence among parous women. Prevention of obstetrical sphincter injury is likely the most important factor for reducing bothersome anal incontinence among fertile women. PMID:23819058

  12. Electrokinetic properties of incontinence nonwoven devices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An understanding of the water transport properties of nonwoven incontinence devices is a prerequisite to the design of cotton-based nonwovens. A complete understanding of the interfacial moisture movement which occurs between the layers of coverstock, acquisition layer, distribution layer, absorbent...

  13. [Rare differential diagnosis of urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Coutty, Nadège; Dubreucq, Sylvie; Delahousse, Guy; Cosson, Michel

    2003-04-01

    The authors report the case of a 55-year-old woman with prolapse presenting a differential diagnosis of urinary incontinence: a peritoneo-vaginal fistula with serous discharge in a patient with ascites and a history of hysterectomy. The only cases of peritoneo-vaginal fistula reported in the literature were discovered during extra-uterine pregnancy after hysterectomy. PMID:12765075

  14. Coping with the Impact of Incontinence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartley, Cheryle

    2008-01-01

    This article presents Part 2 of a multi-part series offering the most timely educational information, innovative approaches, products and technology solutions as well as coping and stigma-fighting approaches available on the subject of incontinence. In this article, the author contends that it is extremely important to teach children coping skills…

  15. Urinary incontinence quality improvement in nursing homes: where have we been? Where are we going?

    PubMed

    Palmer, Mary H

    2008-12-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has made urinary incontinence (UI) a quality indicator as part of the Nursing Home Quality Initiative (NHQI). In addition, CMS issued revised guidance on UI and catheters (known as tag F315) for nursing homes regarding compliance in the evaluation and management of UI and catheters, and an investigative protocol for state nursing home surveyors to use during regulatory inspections. The prevalence of UI in nursing homes remains high despite many years of research and clinical efforts to cure or improve it. Nurses play a key role in assuring appropriate assessment of nursing home residents to prevent and treat UI. Changes at the organizational level and inpatient care are needed to make dignity of nursing home residents central to UI quality improvement efforts. This article reviews the epidemiology of UI, the evidence for behavioral interventions, and the types of quality improvement strategies used for UI in nursing homes. PMID:19241782

  16. Efficacy of an improved absorbent pad on incontinence-associated dermatitis in older women: cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Most older adults with urinary incontinence use absorbent pads. Because of exposure to moisture and chemical irritating substances in urine, the perineal skin region is always at risk for development of incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD). The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of an improved absorbent pad against IAD. Methods A cluster randomized controlled design was used to compare the efficacy of two absorbent pads. Female inpatients aged ≥65 years who had IAD and used an absorbent pad or diaper all day were enrolled. Healing rate of IAD and variables of skin barrier function such as skin pH and skin moisture were compared between the usual absorbent pad group (n = 30) and the test absorbent pad group (n = 30). Results Thirteen patients (43.3%) from the test absorbent pad group and 4 patients (13.3%) from the usual absorbent pad group recovered completely from IAD. Moreover, the test absorbent pad group healed significantly faster than the usual absorbent pad group (p = 0.009). On the other hand, there were no significant differences between the two groups in skin barrier function. Conclusion The test absorbent pad for older adults with urinary incontinence might be more efficacious against IAD than usual absorbent pad. Trial registration UMIN-CTR: UMIN000006188 PMID:22642800

  17. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient care means an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility, including... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inpatient care. 825.114 Section 825.114 Labor...

  18. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient care means an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility, including... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inpatient care. 825.114 Section 825.114 Labor...

  19. Prosecuting Assaultive Forensic and Psychiatric Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angus, Kerri C.; Reddon, John R.; Chudleigh, Michele D.

    2008-01-01

    Inpatient assault of forensic and psychiatric staff is a complex and multifaceted issue. Hence, the consequences reported in the literature regarding prosecuting assaultive inpatients are quite variable. In this article, issues pertaining to the prosecution of violent inpatients are reviewed. Illustrative cases, challenges of prosecution,…

  20. An Inpatient Vocational Rehabilitation Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bielefeld, Martin

    This paper describes the Cleveland Veterans Administration inpatient Vocational Rehabilitation Unit (VRU), an intensive vocational assessment and counseling program designed to maximize the self-reliance and productivity of patients. The VRU is presented as a minimal care, 3-month maximum treatment program in which patients work on incentive pay…

  1. Risk Factors for Urinary Incontinence among Middle-aged Women

    PubMed Central

    DANFORTH, Kim N.; TOWNSEND, Mary K.; LIFFORD, Karen; CURHAN, Gary C.; RESNICK, Neil M.; GRODSTEIN, Francine

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Identify risk factors for urinary incontinence in middle-aged women. Study Design: Cross-sectional analysis of 83,355 Nurses' Health Study II participants. Since 1989, women have provided health information on mailed questionnaires; in 2001, at age 37-54 years, information on urinary incontinence was requested. We examined adjusted odds ratios of incontinence using logistic regression. Results: 43% of women reported incontinence. After adjustment, African-American (OR=0.49, 95% CI 0.40-0.60) and Asian-American women (OR=0.57, 95% CI 0.46-0.72) were at reduced odds of severe incontinence compared to Caucasians. Increased age, body mass index, and parity were all positively associated with incontinence, as were current smoking, type 2 diabetes, and hysterectomy. Women aged 50-54 years had 1.81 times the odds of severe incontinence compared to women <40 years (95% CI 1.66-1.97); women with BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 had 3.10 times the odds of severe incontinence compared to BMI 22-24 kg/m2 (95% CI 2.91-3.30). Conclusions: Urinary incontinence is highly prevalent among these middle-aged women. Potential risk factors include age, race/ethnicity, body mass index, parity, smoking, diabetes, and hysterectomy. PMID:16458626

  2. Male urinary incontinence and the urinary sheath.

    PubMed

    Smart, Clare

    This article addresses the assessment and management of male incontinence with a specific focus on the use of the male external catheter (MEC) or urinary sheath. Education and expertise when dealing with a man with urinary incontinence, as well as a tactful and sensitive attitude towards this embarrassing problem, are essential for a successful outcome. The urinary sheath is often perceived by nurses and patients as a difficult product to master and is prone to failure owing to incorrect fitting and management. With correct usage it can make a great difference to a patient's quality of life and avoid problems often associated with urinary catheters and pads such as urinary infection and skin excoriation. Detailed assessment of the patient as well as his suitability for the MEC is essential for a successful outcome. PMID:24820510

  3. Ischemic fecal incontinence and rectal angina.

    PubMed

    Devroede, G; Vobecky, S; Massé, S; Arhan, P; Léger, C; Duguay, C; Hémond, M

    1982-11-01

    In 36 patients who consulted for fecal incontinence or rectal pain, or both, there was grossly visible scarring of the rectum and biopsy revealed mucosal atrophy and fibrosis. A steal from the hemorrhoidal arteries to the iliac vessels was demonstrated in 3 subjects. Maximum tolerable volumes within a rectal balloon were smaller than in control subjects, both in men (192 vs. 273 ml) and in women (142 vs. 217 ml) (p less than 0.01). The rectoanal inhibitory reflex was abnormal in all but 1 patient. Specific abnormalities were a decreased amplitude or a prolonged duration of the reflex. It was totally absent in 2 patients. This study is compatible with the hypothesis that chronic ischemia of the rectum may cause fecal incontinence or rectal pain. PMID:7117809

  4. [Treatment of cystoceles with urinary stress incontinence].

    PubMed

    Sarf, I; Aboutaieb, R; Dakir, M; el Moussaoui, A; Rabii, R; Hafiani, M; Bennani, S; el Mrini, M; Meziane, F; Benjelloun, S

    1998-01-01

    Thirteen women were operated for cystocele associated with urinary stress incontinence. Cystoceles were grade I in 6 cases, grade II in 6 cases and grade III in 1 case. Five patients underwent retropubic colposuspension according to Burch (3 cases) and M.M.K. (2 cases). Eight patients were treated by RAZ's technique associated with anterior colporaphy in order to reduce the cystocele. In this latter group, only one recurrence was observed and was treated by repeat colporaphy with good results. Colposuspension associated with anterior colporaphy is a reliable method for the treatment of cystocele with urinary stress incontinence, associated with low morbidity and short hospitalization. Its results are probably comparable to those of retropubic colposuspension, at least for a 6 months follow-up. PMID:9827204

  5. A Curious Case of Continuous Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, Amanda; Roth, Christopher C

    2016-06-01

    Obstructed hemivagina, ipsilateral renal anomaly (OHVIRA) is a rare Müllerian duct abnormality with renal manifestations. Classical presentation is an adolescent female with abdominal pain following menarche. Because of its rarity, diagnosis is often delayed. There have been <20 reported cases of prepubertal OHVIRA. We present a case of missed OHVIRA diagnosis that presented with continuous incontinence following incision of the obstructed hemivagina and discuss the current medical literature on this subject. PMID:26898899

  6. Fecal Incontinence: Epidemiology, Impact, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bochenska, Katarzyna; Boller, Anne-Marie

    2016-09-01

    Fecal incontinence (FI) is a chronic and debilitating condition that carries a significant health, economic, and social burden. FI has a considerable psychosocial and financial impact on patients and their families. A variety of treatment modalities are available for FI including behavioral and dietary modifications, pharmacotherapy, pelvic floor physical therapy, bulking agents, anal sphincteroplasty, sacral nerve stimulation, artificial sphincters, magnetic sphincters, posterior anal sling, and colostomy. PMID:27582653

  7. The treatment of iatrogenic male incontinence: latest results and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Adamakis, Ioannis; Vasileiou, Ioanna; Constantinides, Constantinos A

    2013-03-01

    Male Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI) is an increasingly recognized problem particularly after the treatment of prostate cancer. Postprostatectomy incontinence is a major problem that needs to be solved, since it has great impact on quality of life affecting the patient's physical activity and social well-being. The initial treatment for SUI that persists after 12 months consists of conservative measures such as pelvic floor muscle exercises and behavioral therapy. Properly selected and informed patients can also be treated efficiently with minimally invasive procedures such as the implantation of a male suburethral sling, although the experience with such devices is not extensive. However, the implantation of artificial urinary sphincter is the gold standard therapy. PMID:23259418

  8. Mini-invasive tension-free surgery for female urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    LEANZA, V.; INTAGLIATA, E.; FERLA, F.; LEANZA, A.; LEANZA, G.; CANNIZZARO, M.A.; VECCHIO, R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The Authors describe the techniques they perform of prepubic, retropubic and transobturator mini-invasive anti-incontinence surgical procedures and point-out some technical details. The state of art and the results of these three main surgical procedure are compared and discussed. Data from the Literature have been reviewed in order to evaluate the efficacy of the techniques. A Medline search has been performed, and 65 relevant articles from 1996 to 2012 were selected. Literature showed similar cure rates among retropubic (71,4–91%), trans-oburator (77,3–95%) and prepubic (81–87,2%) anti-incontinence procedures. Cystoscopy was considered necessary in the retropubic, optional in transobturator and in the prepubic techniques. Intra-operative cough stress test was believed useful only in the retropubic and prepubic procedures. Obstruction symptoms prevailed in the retropubic, were rare in the transobturator and missing in the prepubic technique. Erosion rate was very low and similar for all the three techniques. Intra-operative vascular and perforating risks prevailed in the retropubic technique, due to the danger present in the retropubic space, whereas late infective complications overcame in the transobturator procedure. Severe complications in the prepubic procedure were not reported, but the procedure is performed only in few centers. PMID:24690339

  9. Addressing Inpatient Glycaemic Control with an Inpatient Glucometry Alert System

    PubMed Central

    Seheult, J. N.; Pazderska, A.; Gaffney, P.; Fogarty, J.; Sherlock, M.; Gibney, J.; Boran, G.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Poor inpatient glycaemic control has a prevalence exceeding 30% and results in increased length of stay and higher rates of hospital complications and inpatient mortality. The aim of this study was to improve inpatient glycaemic control by developing an alert system to process point-of-care blood glucose (POC-BG) results. Methods. Microsoft Excel Macros were developed for the processing of daily glucometry data downloaded from the Cobas IT database. Alerts were generated according to ward location for any value less than 4 mmol/L (hypoglycaemia) or greater than 15 mmol/L (moderate-severe hyperglycaemia). The Diabetes Team provided a weekday consult service for patients flagged on the daily reports. This system was implemented for a 60-day period. Results. There was a statistically significant 20% reduction in the percentage of hyperglycaemic patient-day weighted values >15 mmol/L compared to the preimplementation period without a significant change in the percentage of hypoglycaemic values. The time-to-next-reading after a dysglycaemic POC-BG result was reduced by 14% and the time-to-normalization of a dysglycaemic result was reduced from 10.2 hours to 8.4 hours. Conclusion. The alert system reduced the percentage of hyperglycaemic patient-day weighted glucose values and the time-to-normalization of blood glucose. PMID:26290664

  10. An Overview of Bowel Incontinence: What Can Go Wrong?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, William F.

    2008-01-01

    Bowel incontinence, also called fecal incontinence, is the loss of control over liquid or solid stools. It can occur at any age--as a child, teenager, or adult. Severity can range from infrequent leakage of a small amount of stool to total loss of bowel control. Some persons might feel the urge to have a bowel movement but be unable to control it…

  11. School Experiences of an Adolescent with Medical Complexities Involving Incontinence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filce, Hollie Gabler; Bishop, John B.

    2014-01-01

    The educational implications of chronic illnesses which involve incontinence are not well represented in the literature. The experiences of an adolescent with multiple complex illnesses, including incontinence, were explored via an intrinsic case study. Data were gathered from the adolescent, her mother, and teachers through interviews, email…

  12. The Management of Urinary Incontinence by Community-Living Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitteness, Linda S.

    1987-01-01

    Explored ways elderly people (N=30) manage urinary incontinence. Subjects tended to dismiss their urinary incontinence as a normal part of aging and used various behavioral and psychological strategies to maintain their independence, usually without any assistance from the health professions. Management strategies commonly involved some degree of…

  13. [Conservative therapy of female urinary incontinence--potential and effect].

    PubMed

    Horcicka, L; Chmel, R; Novácková, M

    2005-01-01

    Non-surgical treatment of female stress urinary incontinence is not as effective as surgical methods but it is very successful in indicated cases. Rehabilitation of the pelvic floor muscles (Kegel exercises, vaginal cones, and electrostimulation of the pelvic floor muscles), drug treatment (alfa-mimetics, tricyclic antidepressives, estrogens, duloxetin), pessarotherapy and uretral obturator devices represent possibilities of conservative therapy of the stress incontinence. Conservative therapy is the method of choice in the treatment of urge incontinence. The most successful are anticholinergic drugs but they have very frequent serious side effects (dryness of the mucous membranes, accommodation disorders, constipation). Spasmolytics, estrogens and tricyclic antidepressives are the other popular used drugs. Life style modification, bladder training and electrostimulation represent very important parts of the conservative treatment. Effectiveness of the non-surgical treatment of both urge and stress urinary incontinence can not reach 100 percent but it helps very much in the quality of life improvement of incontinent women. PMID:15887395

  14. Office management of urinary incontinence among older patients

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Christopher; Szlanta, Agata

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To provide family physicians with a guide to office management of urinary incontinence (UI) among older patients. SOURCES OF INFORMATION Ovid MEDLINE and the Cochrane database were searched using the terms urinary incontinence, stress incontinence, overactive bladder, urge incontinence, elderly, and geriatrics. MAIN MESSAGE A variety of conditions affecting the nervous system and the lower urinary tract can affect bladder function and UI. Among older patients the effects of decreased cognition and impaired mobility can be substantial, and environmental barriers can play a role. When managing older patients with UI, emphasis on treating concurrent conditions, optimizing medications, and working on lifestyle and behavioural factors is at least as important as pharmacologic treatment. Medications are relevant, but the potential for adverse effects increases among older patients. CONCLUSION Various resources are available to support family physicians in office management of UI, and family physicians can improve symptoms and the quality of patients’ lives by screening for and helping patients to manage incontinence. PMID:21075990

  15. The Differential Impact of Flatal Incontinence in Women With Anal Versus Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Isuzu; Tang, Ying; Szychowski, Jeff M; Richter, Holly E

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The differential impact on quality of life (QOL) that leakage of both stool and flatus confers on women compared to stool only is unclear. Our aim was to characterize differences in symptom distress, impact on QOL, and anorectal testing among women with leakage of stool and flatus, stool only, and flatus only. Methods A retrospective review was conducted of women undergoing evaluation of at least monthly bowel incontinence symptoms. Subjects were divided into 3 groups: liquid/solid stool and flatus (anal incontinence, AI); liquid/solid stool only (fecal incontinence, FI); and flatal only (FL). Baseline assessment included the Modified Manchester Health Questionnaire (MMHQ) including the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index (FISI), Short Form-12 (SF-12), as well as anorectal manometry and endoanal ultrasound evaluations. Results Of 436 subjects, 381 had AI, 45 FI, and 10 FL. Significant between-group differences were noted in MMHQ (p=0.0002) and FISI total scores (p<0.0001) where women with AI reflected greater negative impact than women with FI. The SF-12 (PCS, MCS) scores were similar in all three groups (p=0.22, 0.08). Resting/squeeze pressures were significantly lower in AI and FI groups compared to FL (p=0.0004), whereas rectal capacity was similar in all three groups. Although exploratory, MMHQ scores were similar between FI and FL groups, although FISI scores were higher in the FI group (p<0.0001). Conclusions Women with AI have higher symptom specific distress and greater negative impact on QOL compared to women with FI. Treatment of all bowel incontinence symptoms is important to improve symptom-specific and general QOL. PMID:26506162

  16. Management of fecal incontinence - focus on a vaginal insert for bowel control.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Eric R

    2016-01-01

    Fecal incontinence, also referred to as accidental bowel leakage, is a debilitating condition that impacts quality of life in a significant number of women. Current treatments for fecal incontinence include behavioral modification, biofeedback, drug therapy, and invasive surgical procedures. However, these treatments have suboptimal efficacy due to patient adherence, variability of presentation across patients, cost, and additional health risks. A vaginal bowel control system (Eclipse™ System) was developed to offer a low-risk, effective, and patient-managed approach to treating accidental bowel leakage. The vaginal bowel control system consists of a vaginal insert and user-controlled, pressure-regulated pump. Once inflated, the balloon of the vaginal insert is directed posteriorly to occlude the rectum, allowing the woman to immediately regain control of bowel function. This article will introduce the design evolution and feasibility studies of the Eclipse System. In addition, this review will discuss the results from a recent clinical trial that demonstrated the safety and efficacy of the vaginal bowel control system in managing fecal incontinence and other symptoms of bowel dysfunction. PMID:27274318

  17. Management of fecal incontinence – focus on a vaginal insert for bowel control

    PubMed Central

    Sokol, Eric R

    2016-01-01

    Fecal incontinence, also referred to as accidental bowel leakage, is a debilitating condition that impacts quality of life in a significant number of women. Current treatments for fecal incontinence include behavioral modification, biofeedback, drug therapy, and invasive surgical procedures. However, these treatments have suboptimal efficacy due to patient adherence, variability of presentation across patients, cost, and additional health risks. A vaginal bowel control system (Eclipse™ System) was developed to offer a low-risk, effective, and patient-managed approach to treating accidental bowel leakage. The vaginal bowel control system consists of a vaginal insert and user-controlled, pressure-regulated pump. Once inflated, the balloon of the vaginal insert is directed posteriorly to occlude the rectum, allowing the woman to immediately regain control of bowel function. This article will introduce the design evolution and feasibility studies of the Eclipse System. In addition, this review will discuss the results from a recent clinical trial that demonstrated the safety and efficacy of the vaginal bowel control system in managing fecal incontinence and other symptoms of bowel dysfunction. PMID:27274318

  18. Inpatient Applications of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    STUART, SCOTT; THASE, MICHAEL E.

    1994-01-01

    The authors review empirical research of the past decade on cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in the treatment of depressed inpatients and offer suggestions for future investigations. CBT appears to offer additive benefits in combination with pharmacotherapy, particularly after the transition from inpatient to outpatient treatment. CBT also holds promise as a primary treatment for inpatients but has not been clearly shown to be as effective as antidepressants. There is as yet no evidence that inpatient CBT is superior to other psychotherapies of comparable intensity or that short-term inpatient CBT has enduring value if not followed by outpatient therapy. Further research is needed to clarify the specific effects of CBT for inpatients and to establish its cost-effectiveness. PMID:22700196

  19. [Significance of conservative treatment for faecal incontinence].

    PubMed

    Schwandner, O

    2012-08-01

    Based on a variety of aetiological factors and combined disorders in faecal incontinence, a conservative treatment option as the primary treatment can be recommended. Conservative treatment includes medical therapy influencing stool consistency and stool passage, pelvic floor exercises and biofeedback as well as local treatment options. However, defining the role of conservative treatment concepts related to success or failure remains a challenging task. The lack of evidence derived from studies is related to a variety of reasons including inclusion criteria, patient selection, treatment standardisation, and the principal difficulty to objectively define functional success. PMID:22933004

  20. Stress Urinary Incontinence: Comparative Efficacy Trials.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Erin Seifert; Zyczynski, Halina M

    2016-03-01

    Women seeking relief from symptoms of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) may choose from a broad array of treatment options. Therapies range from lifestyle/behavioral modification to surgical interventions, and differ in terms of both effectiveness and risk. Individualized treatment plans can be developed to address a patient's expectations and goals for treatment, as well as her tolerance for potential adverse events. This article reviews the highest-quality clinical trials comparing contemporary treatment options for women with SUI. Clinicians and patients can use this compendium to inform their treatment selection. PMID:26880507

  1. [Inpatient-ambulatory network of psychotherapy care].

    PubMed

    Studt, Hans Henning

    2003-01-01

    The development and state of the art is presented for inpatient psychotherapy in neurotic and psychosomatic patients. The question is then posed whether time-tested inpatient psychotherapy can survive the introduction of "diagnosis-related groups" (DRG) with its threat of flat-rate case billing. Thus, the development of an "in- and outpatient network" has been considered as a possible alternative, in which hospitals and private practices combine intervals of inpatient and outpatient psychotherapy. PMID:14733063

  2. Internal Medicine Training in the Inpatient Setting

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Di Francesco; Pistoria, Michael J; Auerbach, Andrew D; Nardino, Robert J; Holmboe, Eric S

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE Although the inpatient setting has served as the predominant educational site of internal medicine training programs, many changes and factors are currently affecting education in this setting. As a result, many educational organizations are calling for reforms in inpatient training. This report reviews the available literature on specific internal medicine inpatient educational interventions and proposes recommendations for improving internal medicine training in this setting. METHOD We searched Medline for articles published between 1966 and August 2004 which focused on internal medicine training interventions in the inpatient setting; bibliographies of Medline-identified articles, as well as articles suggested by experts in the field provided additional citations. We then reviewed, classified, and abstracted only articles where an assessment of learner outcomes was included. RESULTS Thirteen studies of inpatient internal medicine educational interventions were found that included an outcome assessment. All were single institution studies. The majority of these studies was of poor methodological quality and focused on specific content areas of internal medicine. None assessed the effectiveness or impact of internal medicine core inpatient experiences or curriculum. CONCLUSION This review identifies significant gaps in our understanding of what constitutes effective inpatient education. The paucity of high quality research in the internal medicine inpatient setting highlights the urgent need to formally define and study what constitutes an effective “core” inpatient curriculum. PMID:16423111

  3. Paliperidone Palmitate-induced Urinary Incontinence: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Karslıoǧlu, Ersin Hatice; Özalp, Elvan; Çayköylü, Ali

    2016-02-29

    Urinary incontinence, although rarely reported, is one of the most important adverse effects of antipsychotic medication. It can be an embarrassing, distressing, and potentially treatment-limiting. Several antipsychotics, including both typical and atypical varieties, are known to induce urinary incontinence. Many antipsychotic drugs target the neural pathways controlling continence by binding to receptors of some neurotransmitters such as serotonin, dopamine, acetylcholine, and adrenaline. Pharmacological management of incontinence should be considered if there is a risk of cessation of the antipsychotic therapy or any decline in patients' compliance. Amitriptyline, desmopressin, ephedrine, and anticholinergics such as oxybutynin and trihexyphenidyl are the most frequently used agents to treat incontinence. We think that the frequency of incontinence is higher than reported in the literature, and that follow-up routines should include a form of standardized screening for all possible adverse effects, including incontinence, of any given antipsychotic. In this article, we report a case of urinary incontinence as an adverse effect of paliperidone palmitate use during maintenance therapy in a patient with schizophrenia. PMID:26792046

  4. Screening for incontinence in a secure psychiatric service for women.

    PubMed

    Long, Clive G; West, Rachel; Siddique, Rizwana; Rigg, Samantha; Banyard, Ellen; Stillman, Swee-Kit; Butler, Sarah; Dolley, Olga

    2015-12-01

    Incontinence is associated with mental illness and neuroleptic medications but diagnosis and treatment is often poor or non-existent. Problems of incontinence are compounded in secure psychiatric services for women by poor health, obesity, and a sedentary lifestyle. Addressing the physical health of this group necessitates a more accurate picture of the nature, incidence, and management of incontinence. A point-in-time survey of 108 women who agreed to be interviewed (93%) covered presence, frequency, and nature of incontinence, and information on management case note data was used to gather demographic and previous medical history, comparisons were made between patients with and without problems of incontinence. Findings indicate a problem of incontinence in 48% of women with a dominance of problems of stress and urge enuresis. Of modifiable factors that contribute to enuresis, the current study highlighted the contribution of obesity, smoking and clozapine medication. A further finding was the preference for managing rather than treating problems of incontinence. Actions to improve the detection and treatment of this problem are described. PMID:26146962

  5. Paliperidone Palmitate-induced Urinary Incontinence: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Karslıoǧlu, Ersin Hatice; Özalp, Elvan; Çayköylü, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Urinary incontinence, although rarely reported, is one of the most important adverse effects of antipsychotic medication. It can be an embarrassing, distressing, and potentially treatment-limiting. Several antipsychotics, including both typical and atypical varieties, are known to induce urinary incontinence. Many antipsychotic drugs target the neural pathways controlling continence by binding to receptors of some neurotransmitters such as serotonin, dopamine, acetylcholine, and adrenaline. Pharmacological management of incontinence should be considered if there is a risk of cessation of the antipsychotic therapy or any decline in patients’ compliance. Amitriptyline, desmopressin, ephedrine, and anticholinergics such as oxybutynin and trihexyphenidyl are the most frequently used agents to treat incontinence. We think that the frequency of incontinence is higher than reported in the literature, and that follow-up routines should include a form of standardized screening for all possible adverse effects, including incontinence, of any given antipsychotic. In this article, we report a case of urinary incontinence as an adverse effect of paliperidone palmitate use during maintenance therapy in a patient with schizophrenia. PMID:26792046

  6. Treatment histories of borderline inpatients.

    PubMed

    Zanarini, M C; Frankenburg, F R; Khera, G S; Bleichmar, J

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we describe the types and amounts of psychiatric treatment received by a well-defined sample of borderline personality disorder (BPD) inpatients, and compare these parameters with those of a group of carefully diagnosed personality-disordered controls. Finally, we assess the risk factors associated with a history of intensive, high-cost treatment, which we defined as having had two or more prior psychiatric hospitalizations. The treatment histories of 290 borderline inpatients and 72 axis II controls were assessed using a reliable semistructured interview. All nine forms of treatment studied except electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) were common among borderline patients (36% to 96%). In addition, a significantly higher percentage of borderline patients than axis II controls reported a history of individual and group therapy, day and residential treatment, psychiatric hospitalization, participating in self-help groups, and taking standing medications. They were also significantly younger when they first entered individual therapy and began to take standing medications. In addition, borderline patients spent more time than axis II controls in individual therapy and psychiatric hospitals, and were on standing medications for a significantly longer period of time. They also reported a significantly higher number of psychiatric hospitalizations, lifetime number of standing medications, and number of psychotropic medications taken at the same time. In addition, we found a highly significant multivariate predictive model for multiple prior hospitalizations. The six significant predictors were age 26 or older, a history of quasi psychotic thought, lifetime number of self-mutilative efforts and suicide attempts, a childhood history of reported sexual abuse, and an adult history of being physically and/or sexually assaulted. Taken together, these results confirm clinical impressions concerning the high rates of mental health services used by borderline patients

  7. Utilization of incontinence clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Roe, B; Moore, K N

    2001-11-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are evidence-based recommendations for best practice and have been developed with the assumption they will be embraced by practitioners; a further assumption is that clinical practice guidelines will improve the delivery of care. In this article, we provide a working definition of evidence-based practice, discuss the strengths and limitations of CPGs, describe the implementation of CPGs in the context of urinary incontinence, and consider the steps that the WOCN has taken to initiate evidence-based practice. Current issues are presented along with initiatives that have resulted in clinical practice guidelines on incontinence from the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada. On the basis of the current literature, it is concluded that clinical practice guidelines can play an important role in WOCN practice and that the implementation of guidelines may improve clinical practice. However, guidelines are only as valid as the evidence on which they are based and may not take into account gender or cultural differences or the effect that comorbid conditions can have on treatment outcomes. Finally, guidelines must follow a comprehensive approach that involves management and staff and includes education, facilitation, evaluation, feedback, and an understanding of change strategies. PMID:11707762

  8. A comprehensive inpatient discharge system.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, E. M.; Teich, J. M.; Pedraza, L. A.; Thomas, D.

    1996-01-01

    Our group has developed a computer system that supports all phases of the inpatient discharge process. The system fills in most of the physician's discharge order form and the nurse's discharge abstract, using information available from sign-out, order entry, scheduling, and other databases. It supplies information for referrals to outside institutions, and provides a variety of instruction materials for patients. Discharge forms can be completed in advance, so that the patient is not waiting for final paperwork. Physicians and nurses can work on their components independently, rather than in series. Response to the system has been very favorable. PMID:8947755

  9. Steinert's syndrome presenting as anal incontinence: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Myotonic dystrophy (MD) or Steinert's syndrome is a rare cause of chronic diarrhea and anal incontinence. In the presence of chronic diarrhea and fecal incontinence with muscle weakness, neuromuscular disorders such as myotonic dystrophy should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Case Presentation We present the case of a 45-year-old Turkish man with Steinert's syndrome, who was not diagnosed until the age of 45. Conclusions In clinical practice, the persistence of diarrhea and fecal incontinence with muscle weakness should suggest that the physician perform an anal manometric study and electromyography. Neuromuscular disorders such as myotonic dystrophy should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:21838873

  10. Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of Mixed Urinary Incontinence in Women

    PubMed Central

    Chughtai, Bilal; Laor, Leanna; Dunphy, Claire; Lee, Richard; Te, Alexis; Kaplan, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Mixed urinary incontinence (MUI) is a common clinical problem in the community and hospital setting. The broad definition of the term makes it difficult to diagnose, as well as determine effective treatment strategies. There are no current guidelines recommended for physicians. The estimated prevalence of this condition is approximately 30% in all women with incontinence. It has also been suggested that patients with MUI report more bothersome symptoms than either stress or urge incontinence; approximately 32% of 40- to 64-year-olds with MUI report symptoms of depression. The authors examine the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of patients with MUI. PMID:27222643

  11. Evaluation and management of voiding dysfunction after midurethral sling procedures

    PubMed Central

    Çelik, Hatice; Harmanlı, Özgür

    2012-01-01

    Midurethral slings have become the most popular surgical procedure for the correction of stress urinary incontinence in women. Urinary retention or obstructive voiding symptoms may arise from partial urethral obstruction as a result of oversuspension of the urethra or exaggerated tension. Fortunately, most cases of voiding dysfunction are transient and resolve spontaneously within days. Clean intermittent self-catheterization is the mainstay of conservative treatment. If symptoms persist, tape mobilization, incision or urethrolysis may be performed. Recurrent stress urinary incontinence may occur in a small group of patients, who may benefit from another incontinence treatment. PMID:24592021

  12. A CBT Approach to Inpatient Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, Kim J.

    2005-01-01

    During a psychiatric hospitalization of 5 to 10 days, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) strategies can be used for the management of inpatients and to support the transition to outpatient treatment. This format was chosen after several years of frustration dealing with crisis inpatient care. The use of CBT is well known, and it seemed that an…

  13. Dietary Issues Inpatients Face With Being Vegetarian

    PubMed Central

    Potter-Dunlop, Julie A.; Tse, Alice M.

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the literature from 1985 through 2010 on research related to the dietary issues vegetarian inpatients may encounter in the acute care setting. A thematic portrayal of vegetarianism in the context of the inpatient setting is described. Implications for future research and nursing practice are identified. PMID:22157507

  14. Pelvic artery embolization in the management of pelvic arterial bleeding following midurethral sling surgery for stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun-Ji; Kim, Jun-Bum; Park, So-Yun; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Chung-Hoon; Kang, Byung-Moon

    2016-01-01

    The transobturator tape (TOT) method is the recent minimally invasive midurethral sling surgery. The TOT method was invented to reduce complication rate of surgical technique for female stress urinary incontinence. Pelvic bleeding following TOT procedure, although extremely rare, could be occurred. We presented three cases which treat pelvic arterial bleeding after midurethral sling (TOT and tension-free vaginal tape Secur) surgery via pelvic artery embolization. Therefore we report our cases with brief review of the literature. PMID:27004210

  15. Adjustable perineal male sling using tissue expander as an effective treatment of post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Balci, Melih; Tuncel, Altug; Bilgin, Ovunc; Aslan, Yilmaz; Atan, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report our intermediate experience in treating patients with severe incontinence using an adjustable perineal male sling with a tissue expander. Materials and Methods An adjustable male sling procedure was performed on 21 patients with severe incontinence. The underlying etiology of urinary incontinence was radical prostatectomy in 13 patients, open prostatectomy in 5 patients and transurethral prostate resection in 3 patients. The difference between the classical and the adjustable sling is that in the latter there is a 25 mL tissue expander between the two layers of polypropylene mesh with an injection port. Adjustment of the sling was performed with saline via an inflation port, in case of recurrence or persistence of incontinence. Results The mean age of the patients was 66.2±7.3 (50-79) years and mean pad usage was 6.4±0.6 per day. The mean follow-up time was 40.1±23.2 (6-74) months. The balloon was postoperatively inflated on average with 11.6±5.7 (5-25) mL. After the mean 40.1 months of follow-up, 16 of the 21 patients (76.2%) were dry (11 patients, 0 pads; 5 patients using safety pads), 3 patients (14%) had mild and 2 (9.8%) had moderate degree post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence (PPI). The average maximum urine flow rate of the patients was 15.6±4.7 (10-31) mL/s. No residual urine was found. In 2 patients, all parts of the device were removed due to infection and discomfort, and in 3 patients only the inflation component was removed due to local scrotal infection. Conclusions Our results show that using an adjustable perineal male sling with a tissue expander seems to be an efficient, and safe surgical treatment option in patients with PPI. PMID:26005973

  16. Anterior vaginal wall repair (surgical treatment of urinary incontinence) - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100110.htm Anterior vaginal wall repair (surgical treatment of urinary incontinence) - series ... 4 out of 4 Normal anatomy Overview The vaginal opening lies just below the urethral opening, and ...

  17. [Urinary incontinence caused by urocolpos. Report of a new case].

    PubMed

    Ortega Mariscal, J; Congregado Ruiz, B; Campoy Martínez, P; Pérez Pérez, M; Rodríguez Pérez, A; Soltero González, A

    2001-06-01

    We present a new case of urocolpos that appeared as urinary incontinence. We discuss the etiology and the available therapeutic choices, emphasizing on the value of the clinical history and physical exploration showed data. PMID:11512514

  18. [Health care of geriatric patients with urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Mueller, Edgar A; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2015-04-01

    Urinary incontinence occurs frequently in geriatric patients. In the doctor's practice, the symptoms are often not mentioned by the patients; this may lead to loss of autonomy and social isolation. A screening for urinary incontinence should therefore be part of each geriatric assessment. In the presence of urinary incontinence, several treatment options are available, which need to be tailored according to the individual capabilities (mobility, motivation and cognitive performance) of the patient. Non-pharmacological treatment options, such as behavior modification, toilet training and pelvic floor training, should be exploited before any pharmacotherapy commences. If the pharmacological treatment involves the use of anticholinergic agents, the cognitive performance should be monitored. An interdisciplinary collaboration is a prerequisite for the optimized treatment and adequate health care of geriatric patients with urinary incontinence. PMID:25826038

  19. Pelvic floor muscle training for urinary incontinence postpartum.

    PubMed

    Hall, Bethany; Woodward, Sue

    The offering of pelvic floor muscle exercises to all women during their first pregnancy is recommended by National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines. Pelvic floor muscles suffer significant trauma throughout pregnancy and childbirth, which may sometimes lead to urinary incontinence postpartum. However, it is uncertain how effective pelvic floor muscle exercises are in treating this incontinence. Several trials have been analysed to try to understand this question. Issues such as when the exercises were undertaken, how often they were performed and in what circumstances they were carried out, have all been considered. While it is still uncertain whether they are effective in reducing urinary incontinence postpartum, as they are non-invasive and fairly simple to carry out, they are still the first-line management for urinary incontinence postpartum with other treatments being considered if this is ineffective. PMID:26067791

  20. What's New in the Toolbox for Constipation and Fecal Incontinence?

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeong Yeh

    2014-01-01

    Constipation and fecal incontinence (FI) are common complaints predominantly affecting the elderly and women. They are associated with significant morbidity and high healthcare costs. The causes are often multi-factorial and overlapping. With the advent of new technologies, we have a better understanding of their underlying pathophysiology which may involve disruption at any levels along the gut-brain-microbiota axis. Initial approach to management should always be the exclusion of secondary causes. Mild symptoms can be approached with conservative measures that may include dietary modifications, exercise, and medications. New prokinetics (e.g., prucalopride) and secretagogues (e.g., lubiprostone and linaclotide) are effective and safe in constipation. Biofeedback is the treatment of choice for dyssynergic defecation. Refractory constipation may respond to neuromodulation therapy with colectomy as the last resort especially for slow-transit constipation of neuropathic origin. Likewise, in refractory FI, less invasive approach can be tried first before progressing to more invasive surgical approach. Injectable bulking agents, sacral nerve stimulation, and SECCA procedure have modest efficacy but safe and less invasive. Surgery has equivocal efficacy but there are promising new techniques including dynamic graciloplasty, artificial bowel sphincter, and magnetic anal sphincter. Despite being challenging, there are no short of alternatives in our toolbox for the management of constipation and FI. PMID:25705618

  1. Fecal incontinence in men: Causes and clinical and manometric features

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Yagüe, Teresa; Solís-Muñoz, Pablo; Ciriza de los Ríos, Constanza; Muñoz-Garrido, Francisco; Vara, Jesús; Solís-Herruzo, José Antonio

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the causes and characteristics of fecal incontinence in men and to compare these features with those presented by a group of women with the same problem. METHODS: We analyzed the medical history, clinical and manometric data from 119 men with fecal incontinence studied in our unit and compared these data with those obtained from 645 women studied for the same problem. Response to treatment was evaluated after 6 mo of follow-up. RESULTS: Fifteen percent of patients studied in our unit for fecal incontinence were male. Men took longer than women before asking for medical help. Ano-rectal surgery was the most common risk factor for men related to fecal incontinence. Chronic diarrhea was present in more than 40% of patients in both groups. Decreased resting and external anal sphincter pressures were more frequent in women. No significant differences existed between the sexes regarding rectal sensitivity and recto-anal inhibitory reflex. In 17.8% of men, all presenting soiling, manometric findings did not justify fecal incontinence. Response to treatment was good in both groups, as 80.4% of patients improved and fecal incontinence disappeared in 13.2% of them. CONCLUSION: In our series, it was common that men waited longer in seeking medical help for fecal incontinence. Ano-rectal surgery was the major cause of this problem. Chronic diarrhea was a predisposing factor in both sexes. Manometric differences between groups were limited to an increased frequency of hypotony of the external anal sphincter in women. Fecal incontinence was controllable in most patients. PMID:24976729

  2. Office-Based Management of Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Costilla, Vanessa C.; Mayer, Anita P.; Crowell, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Fecal incontinence (FI) is a devastating disorder that is more prevalent than previously realized. FI is the involuntary loss of stool. Many factors contribute to the pathophysiology of FI, including advanced age, bowel irregularity, parity, and obesity. A detailed history and focused rectal examination are important to making the diagnosis and determining contributing causes. Although multiple diagnostic studies are available to assess the cause of FI, specific guidelines that delineate when testing should be done do not exist. Clinicians must weigh the risk, benefit, and burden of testing against the need for empiric treatment. All types of FI are initially managed in the same way, which includes lifestyle modification to reduce bowel derangements, improved access to toileting, and initiation of a bulking regimen to improve stool consistency. If initial conservative management fails, pharmaco-logic agents, biofeedback, or surgery may be indicated. PMID:23935551

  3. Incontinence-associated dermatitis: a consensus.

    PubMed

    Gray, Mikel; Bliss, Donna Z; Doughty, Dorothy B; Ermer-Seltun, JoAnn; Kennedy-Evans, Karen L; Palmer, Mary H

    2007-01-01

    Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) is an inflammation of the skin that occurs when urine or stool comes into contact with perineal or perigenital skin. Little research has focused on IAD, resulting in significant gaps in our understanding of its epidemiology, natural history, etiology, and pathophysiology. A growing number of studies have examined clinical and economic outcomes associated with prevention strategies, but less research exists concerning the efficacy of various treatments. In the clinical and research settings, IAD is often combined with skin damage caused by pressure and shear or related factors, sometimes leading to confusion among clinicians concerning its etiology and diagnosis. This article reviews existing literature related to IAD, outlines strategies for assessing, preventing, and treating IAD, and provides suggestions for additional research needed to enhance our understanding and management of this common but under-reported and understudied skin disorder. PMID:17228207

  4. Animal Models of Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hai-Hong

    2011-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a common health problem significantly affecting the quality of life of women worldwide. Animal models that simulate SUI enable the assessment of the mechanism of risk factors for SUI in a controlled fashion, including childbirth injuries, and enable preclinical testing of new treatments and therapies for SUI. Animal models that simulate childbirth are presently being utilized to determine the mechanisms of the maternal injuries of childbirth that lead to SUI with the goal of developing prophylactic treatments. Methods of assessing SUI in animals that mimic diagnostic methods used clinically have been developed to evaluate the animal models. Use of these animal models to test innovative treatment strategies has the potential to improve clinical management of SUI. This chapter provides a review of the available animal models of SUI, as well as a review of the methods of assessing SUI in animal models, and potential treatments that have been tested on these models. PMID:21290221

  5. Female sexual function following mid-urethral slings for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Alwaal, A; Tian, X; Huang, Y; Zhao, L; Ma, L; Lin, G; Deng, D

    2016-07-01

    The aim of our study was to describe the impact of mid-urethral sling procedure for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) on female sexual function. We used PubMed (updated March 2015) to conduct a literature electronic search that included peer-reviewed English language articles. We analyzed the studies about the impact of mid-urethral slings on female sexual function. There are different and contradictory results of the effects of mid-urethral sling on female sexual function. However, more papers show that women undergoing mid-urethral sling procedures report that their sexual function is improved or remains unchanged. The main mechanism of this improved sexuality is the complete relief from coital incontinence, reduction in anxiety and avoidance of sex, whereas the most common symptom related to worsened sexual activity is dyspareunia. Women undergoing sling procedures for SUI should be informed that their sexual activity is likely to remain unchanged or even improve after the operation, but that dyspareunia may occur. PMID:27146350

  6. Incontinence in Intellectual Disability: An Under Recognized Cause.

    PubMed

    Nair, Lal Devayanivasudevan; Sagayaraj, Benjamin; V T T, Rajan; Kumar, Radha

    2015-09-01

    Many children with Down syndrome may develop urinary incontinence during adolescence or nearing adulthood. Most often low mental ability, behavioural issues, urinary tract infection, hypothyroidism, atlanto-axial subluxation or sexual abuse may be suspected to be the reason. We report a case of Down syndrome with tethered cord syndrome (TCS) and Lipoma of Filum terminale with Cauda equina in normal position, as a cause of bowel and bladder incontinence. The need for operating with Cauda Equina in normal position is debated. But a conscious decision was taken to operate and the incontinence improved markedly which was documented by using a standardized questionnaire (King's questionnaire) and thereby making a difference in the child's life. A literature search did not result in any case of Down syndrome with tethered cord syndrome and secondary incontinence as presentation. Considering the possibility of TCS as a cause of incontinence, often neglected even in normal children, careful evaluation and correction of such problems will make a difference in the life of many intellectually disabled children. Incontinence should not be casually attributed to intellectual disability without ruling out other causes. PMID:26500975

  7. [Urinary incontinence in the elderly can be treated].

    PubMed

    van Houten, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A recent survey on the use of drugs for incontinence in the elderly stated that only anticholinergic drugs used for urge incontinence have a slight positive effect on incontinence episodes. However, this does not mean that there are no potential treatments for incontinence in the frail elderly. The Dutch surveillance on problems in the care sector, the 'National prevalence survey of care problems' ('Landelijke prevalentiemeting zorgproblemen'), shows that between 2004 and 2014 the prevalence of urinary incontinence dropped from 76% to 49%. This fall in prevalence is due to the policies developed by institutions, and by training for nurses and physicians. Successful treatment begins with assessment of functionality (mobility and cognition), assessment of relevant multimorbidity and reconsideration of the use of drugs with an impact on continence. As a next step, bladder retraining and pelvic floor exercises may be used if the elderly person is able to perform these exercises independently. An anticholinergic drug can be tried as a last resort if there is urge incontinence and there are no contraindications. PMID:26732219

  8. Development of Computer-Based Training to Enhance Resident Physician Management of Inpatient Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Curtiss B.; Wilson, Rebecca D.; Hovan, Michael J.; Hull, Bryan P.; Gray, Richard J.; Apsey, Heidi A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Treating hyperglycemia promotes better outcomes among inpatients. Knowledge deficits about management of inpatient diabetes are prevalent among resident physicians, which may affect the care of a substantial number of these patients. Methods A computer-based training (CBT) curriculum on inpatient diabetes and hyperglycemia was developed and implemented for use by resident physicians and focuses on several aspects of the management of inpatient diabetes and hyperglycemia: (1) review of importance of inpatient glucose control, (2) overview of institution-specific data, (3) triaging and initial admission actions for diabetes or hyperglycemia, (4) overview of pharmacologic management, (5) insulin-dosing calculations and ordering simulations, (6) review of existing policies and procedures, and (7) discharge planning. The curriculum was first provided as a series of lectures, then formatted and placed on the institutional intranet as a CBT program. Results Residents began using the inpatient CBT in September 2008. By August 2009, a total of 29 residents had participated in CBT: 8 in family medicine, 12 in internal medicine, and 9 in general surgery. Most of the 29 residents confirmed that module content met stated objectives, considered the information valuable to their inpatient practices, and believed that the quality of the online modules met expectations. The majority reported that the modules took just the right amount of time to complete (typically 30 min each). Conclusions Improvement in inpatient diabetes care requires continuous educational efforts. The CBT format and curriculum content were well accepted by the resident physicians. Ongoing assessment must determine whether resident practice patterns are influenced by such training. PMID:20144392

  9. The Decline of Inpatient Penile Prosthesis over the 10‐Year Period, 2000–2010

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Catherine R.; Hussein, Ahmed A.; Sanford, Thomas H.; McCulloch, Charles E.; Shindel, Alan W.; Breyer, Benjamin N.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Across all specialties, economic pressure is driving increased utilization of outpatient surgery when feasible. Aims Our aims were to analyze national trends of penile prosthesis (PP) surgery and to examine patient and hospital characteristics, and perioperative complications in the inpatient setting. Methods We analyzed data from National Inpatient Sample. Patients in NIS who underwent PP insertion between 2000 and 2010 were included. Main Outcome Measures Our main outcomes were the number of inpatient PP procedures, type of prosthesis, patient demographics, comorbidities, hospital characteristics, and immediate perioperative complications. Results There was a progressive and dramatic decline by nearly half in the number of both inflatable (IPP) and noninflatable (NIPP) inpatient insertions performed from 2000 to 2010 (P = 0.0001). The overall rate of inpatient complications for PP insertion was 13.5%. Patients with three or more comorbidities were found to have a higher risk of complications than patients with no comorbidities (OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.18–1.78) (P = 0.0001). Surgeries performed in high‐volume hospitals (10 or more PP cases per year) were associated with reduced risk of complications (OR = 0.6) (P < 0.0001). There was a dramatic decrease in inpatient setting for PP placement in high‐volume hospitals (32% in 2000 compared with 6% in 2010; P < 0.0001), and when compared with lower volume hospitals. NIPP was more likely performed in younger patients and in community hospitals, and less likely in white patients. Medicaid health insurance was associated with much higher rate of NIPP insertion than other types of insurance. Conclusions The number of PP procedures performed in the inpatient setting declined between 2000 and 2010, likely reflecting a shift toward increasing outpatient procedures. Our data also suggest a better outcome for patients having the procedure done at a high‐volume center in

  10. Effective inpatient medication reconciliation: The 10 commandments.

    PubMed

    Siu, Henry K

    2015-01-01

    Medication Reconciliation (MedRec) is the comprehensive process of medication verification, clarification and documentation in an effort to avoid medication errors. There are many reasons that contribute to the inadequacies of current day inpatient MedRec. Among these include the limited medical literacy of patients, communication between providers and teams of providers, and the intrinsic difficulties of medical charting. Although the best approach to inpatient MedRec is not known, the following outlines the 10 most important aspects, or "Commandments", for effective inpatient MedRec. The tenets are not listed in any particular order of importance. PMID:25758318

  11. Tension-Free vaginal tape: analysis of outcomes and complications in 404 stress incontinent women.

    PubMed

    Meschia, M; Pifarotti, P; Bernasconi, F; Guercio, E; Maffiolini, M; Magatti, F; Spreafico, L

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this prospective multicenter study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) for the surgical treatment of female stress incontinence. Four hundred and four women underwent the TVT procedure. Their mean age was 57 years (range 31-83). The median follow-up time was 21 months (range 12-35). The subjective and objective cure rates were 92% and 90%, respectively. Another 4% of the women were significantly improved by the procedure. Intra- and postoperative complications were few and included uneventful bladder perforations (6%), retropubic bleeding requiring surgery (0.5%), voiding difficulties (4%) in the postoperative course, and one obturator nerve injury. We conclude that the TVT procedure is associated with a high cure rate and a low morbidity. PMID:11450976

  12. De Novo Pudendal Neuropathy After TOT-O Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Baker, James

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Five cases of pelvic nerve complications after transobturator tape (TOT) inside-out surgical procedures for stress urinary incontinence are presented. Methods: We conducted a chart review of patients with complications referred to our practice. Results: Five patients with nerve complications after TOT inside-out procedures were investigated. Pudendal neuropathy and interstitial cystitis were seen in this series of patients with several patients having myofascial pain in the lower abdominal area. Conclusions: Although not commonly reported, complications from needle placement and from the area of needle exit in a TOT procedure can exist, and the surgeon must be careful when placing the needle through the area of the obturator fossa. PMID:21985718

  13. Nonsurgical Management of Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Clinical Practice Guideline

    MedlinePlus

    Annals of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Nonsurgical Management of Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Clinical Practice ... of Physicians The full report is titled “Nonsurgical Management of Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Clinical Practice ...

  14. Taking Control: Non-Surgical Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... UI? Taking Control: Non-surgical Treatment Options for Urinary Incontinence in Women What is UI? “Taking Control” (5- ... own home. Page 0 Page 2 What is urinary incontinence (UI)? Taking Control (5-minute video) Click on ...

  15. New Guidelines Recommend Inpatient Rehab After Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158656.html New Guidelines Recommend Inpatient Rehab After Stroke American Heart ... skilled nursing facility or nursing home, according to new guidelines by the American Heart Association/American Stroke ...

  16. Novel bulking agent for faecal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Ratto, C; Parello, A; Donisi, L; Litta, F; De Simone, V; Spazzafumo, L; Giordano, P

    2011-01-01

    Background Various injectable bulking agents have been used for the treatment of faecal incontinence (FI). However, encouraging early results are not maintained over time. This study aimed to assess short- and medium-term results of a new bulking agent for the treatment of FI. Methods The Gatekeeper™ prosthesis comprises a thin solid polyacrylonitrile cylinder that becomes thicker, shorter and softer within 24 h after implantation. Fourteen patients with FI underwent treatment with Gatekeeper™ under local anaesthesia. Four prostheses were implanted in the intersphincteric space in each patient, under endoanal ultrasound guidance. Number of episodes of major FI, Cleveland Clinic FI score (CCFIS), Vaizey score, anorectal manometry, endoanal ultrasonography (EUS), health status and quality of life (Short Form 36 and Faecal Incontinence Quality of Life questionnaires) were assessed before and after treatment. Results Mean(s.d.) follow-up was 33·5(12·4) months. There were no complications. There was a significant decrease in major FI episodes from 7·1(7·4) per week at baseline to 1·4(4·0), 1·0(3·2) and 0·4(0·6) per week respectively at 1-month, 3-month and last follow-up (P = 0·002). CCFIS improved significantly from 12·7(3·3) to 4·1(3·0), 3·9(2·6) and 5·1(3·0) respectively (P < 0·001), and Vaizey score from 15·4(3·3) to 7·1(3·9), 4·7(3·0) and 6·9(5·0) respectively (P = 0·010). Soiling and ability to postpone defaecation improved significantly, and patients reported significant improvement in health status and quality of life. At follow-up, manometric parameters had not changed and EUS did not demonstrate any prosthesis dislocation. Conclusion The Gatekeeper™ anal implant seemed safe, reliable and effective. Initial clinical improvement was maintained over time, and follow-up data were encouraging. Copyright © 2011 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:21928378

  17. Pelvic Organ Prolapse Repair with and without Concomitant Burch Colposuspension in Incontinent Women: A Randomised Controlled Trial with at Least 5-Year Followup

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Elisabetta; Lazzeri, Massimo; Bini, Vittorio; Del Zingaro, Michele; Frumenzio, Emanuela; Porena, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reevaluate and update the followup of a previously published randomized controlled trial (RCT) on the impact of Burch Colposuspension (BC), as an anti-incontinence procedure, in patients with UI and POP, who underwent POP repair. Forty-seven women were randomly assigned to abdominal POP repair and concomitant BC (24 patients; group A) or POP repair alone without any anti-incontinence procedure (23 patients; group B). Median followup was 82 months (range 60–107); from over 47 patients, 30 reached 6-year followup. Two patients were lost at followup. In group A, 2 patients showed a stage I rectocele. In group B, 2 patients had a stage I rectocele and 1 a stage II rectocele. In group A, 13/23 (56.5%) were still incontinent after surgery compared with 9/22 patients (40.9%) in group B (P = 0.298). No significant changes were observed between the first and the current followup. The update of long-term followup confirmed that BC did not improve outcome significantly in incontinent women when they undergo POP repair. PMID:22028719

  18. Anticholinergic Therapy vs. OnabotulinumtoxinA for Urgency Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Visco, Anthony G.; Brubaker, Linda; Richter, Holly E.; Nygaard, Ingrid; Paraiso, Marie Fidela R.; Menefee, Shawn A.; Schaffer, Joseph; Lowder, Jerry; Khandwala, Salil; Sirls, Larry; Spino, Cathie; Nolen, Tracy L.; Wallace, Dennis; Meikle, Susan F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Anticholinergic medications and onabotulinumtoxinA are used to treat urgency urinary incontinence, but data directly comparing the two types of therapy are needed. METHODS We performed a double-blind, double-placebo–controlled, randomized trial involving women with idiopathic urgency urinary incontinence who had five or more episodes of urgency urinary incontinence per 3-day period, as recorded in a diary. For a 6-month period, participants were randomly assigned to daily oral anticholinergic medication (solifenacin, 5 mg initially, with possible escalation to 10 mg and, if necessary, subsequent switch to trospium XR, 60 mg) plus one intradetrusor injection of saline or one intradetrusor injection of 100 U of onabotulinumtoxinA plus daily oral placebo. The primary outcome was the reduction from baseline in mean episodes of urgency urinary incontinence per day over the 6-month period, as recorded in 3-day diaries submitted monthly. Secondary outcomes included complete resolution of urgency urinary incontinence, quality of life, use of catheters, and adverse events. RESULTS Of 249 women who underwent randomization, 247 were treated, and 241 had data available for the primary outcome analyses. The mean reduction in episodes of urgency urinary incontinence per day over the course of 6 months, from a baseline average of 5.0 per day, was 3.4 in the anticholinergic group and 3.3 in the onabotulinumtoxinA group (P = 0.81). Complete resolution of urgency urinary incontinence was reported by 13% and 27% of the women, respectively (P = 0.003). Quality of life improved in both groups, without significant between-group differences. The anticholinergic group had a higher rate of dry mouth (46% vs. 31%, P = 0.02) but lower rates of catheter use at 2 months (0% vs. 5%, P = 0.01) and urinary tract infections (13% vs. 33%, P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS Oral anticholinergic therapy and onabotulinumtoxinA by injection were associated with similar reductions in the frequency of

  19. Heart Failure Update: Inpatient Management.

    PubMed

    Korabathina, Ravi

    2016-03-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure (HF) is one of most common reasons for hospitalization among individuals older than 65 years. A thorough evaluation, including history, physical examination, and laboratory assessment, is required to optimize care of these patients. In uncertain cases, serum brain-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) or N-terminal proBNP level, stress testing, and/or invasive coronary angiography may be helpful in establishing the diagnosis. The hospital setting provides an opportunity to identify etiologies and stabilize the patient. The primary goal of inpatient HF therapy is systemic and pulmonary decongestion, achieved most effectively using intravenous diuretic therapy. Rate and rhythm control may be needed for patients with concurrent atrial fibrillation and, in American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association stage D HF, intravenous inotropes may become necessary. New pharmacologic or device therapies also are considered as a means of transitioning patients, especially those with severe disease, to the outpatient setting. Patients hospitalized for acute decompensated HF have high postdischarge mortality and rehospitalization rates and, thus, should be monitored carefully. PMID:26974002

  20. Endoanal ultrasonography in fecal incontinence: Current and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Andreia

    2015-06-10

    Fecal incontinence has a profound impact in a patient's life, impairing quality of life and carrying a substantial economic burden due to health costs. It is an underdiagnosed condition because many affected patients are reluctant to report it and also clinicians are usually not alert to it. Patient evaluation with a detailed clinical history and examination is very important to indicate the type of injury that is present. Endoanal ultrasonography is currently the gold standard for sphincter evaluation in fecal incontinence and is a simple, well-tolerated and non-expensive technique. Most studies revealed 100% sensitivity in identifying sphincter defect. It is better than endoanal magnetic resonance imaging for internal anal sphincter defects, equivalent for the diagnosis of external anal sphincter defects, but with a lower capacity for assessment of atrophy of this sphincter. The most common cause of fecal incontinence is anal sphincter injury related to obstetric trauma. Only a small percentage of women are diagnosed with sphincter tears immediately after vaginal delivery, but endoanal ultrasonography shows that one third of these women have occult sphincter defects. Furthermore, in patients submitted to primary repair of these tears, ultrasound revealed a high frequency of persistent sphincter defects after surgery. Three-dimensional endoanal ultrasonography is currently largely used and accepted for sphincter evaluation in fecal incontinence, improving diagnostic accuracy and our knowledge of physiologic and pathological sphincters alterations. Conversely, there is currently no evidence to support the use of elastography in fecal incontinence evaluation. PMID:26078826

  1. Endoanal ultrasonography in fecal incontinence: Current and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Andreia

    2015-01-01

    Fecal incontinence has a profound impact in a patient’s life, impairing quality of life and carrying a substantial economic burden due to health costs. It is an underdiagnosed condition because many affected patients are reluctant to report it and also clinicians are usually not alert to it. Patient evaluation with a detailed clinical history and examination is very important to indicate the type of injury that is present. Endoanal ultrasonography is currently the gold standard for sphincter evaluation in fecal incontinence and is a simple, well-tolerated and non-expensive technique. Most studies revealed 100% sensitivity in identifying sphincter defect. It is better than endoanal magnetic resonance imaging for internal anal sphincter defects, equivalent for the diagnosis of external anal sphincter defects, but with a lower capacity for assessment of atrophy of this sphincter. The most common cause of fecal incontinence is anal sphincter injury related to obstetric trauma. Only a small percentage of women are diagnosed with sphincter tears immediately after vaginal delivery, but endoanal ultrasonography shows that one third of these women have occult sphincter defects. Furthermore, in patients submitted to primary repair of these tears, ultrasound revealed a high frequency of persistent sphincter defects after surgery. Three-dimensional endoanal ultrasonography is currently largely used and accepted for sphincter evaluation in fecal incontinence, improving diagnostic accuracy and our knowledge of physiologic and pathological sphincters alterations. Conversely, there is currently no evidence to support the use of elastography in fecal incontinence evaluation. PMID:26078826

  2. Anti-diuresis in the management of daytime urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, D.; Cardozo, L.

    2009-01-01

    Urinary incontinence and lower urinary tract dysfunction, whilst not life threatening conditions, remain an important cause of morbidity in women and are responsible for significant impairment of quality of life. Drug therapy is often used to treat women who complain of urgency and urge incontinence and has an emerging role in the management of stress urinary incontinence. However, bothersome side effects are known to affect compliance and therefore compromise efficacy, making longterm drug therapy unpopular. The principle aim of this thesis is to assess the role of antidiuresis in women complaining of daytime urinary incontinence and also to examine its role as a ‘designer therapy’ which women can choose to use as, or when, required. In addition both the patients’ and clinicians’ attitudes towards treatment have been studied to clarify the meaning of ‘cure’, and to determine treatment acceptability, overall outcome and patient satisfaction. In the first study the patients’ concept of cure is explored as well as their expectations regarding treatment and outcome. The second study examines cure from the clinician’s perspective in addition to reviewing outcome measures in the clinical and research settings. Finally in the third study the use of desmopressin in women complaining of daytime urinary incontinence is reported. PMID:25478070

  3. Faecal incontinence: Current knowledges and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Benezech, Alban; Bouvier, Michel; Vitton, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Faecal incontinence (FI) is a disabling and frequent symptom since its prevalence can vary between 5% and 15% of the general population. It has a particular negative impact on quality of life. Many tools are currently available for the treatment of FI, from conservative measures to invasive surgical treatments. The conservative treatment may be dietetic measures, various pharmacological agents, anorectal rehabilitation, posterior tibial nerve stimulation, and transanal irrigation. If needed, patients may have miniinvasive approaches such as sacral nerve modulation or antegrade irrigation. In some cases, a surgical treatment is proposed, mainly external anal sphincter repair. Although these different therapeutic options are available, new techniques are arriving allowing new hopes for the patients. Moreover, most of them are non-invasive such as local application of an α1-adrenoceptor agonist, stem cell injections, rectal injection of botulinum toxin, acupuncture. New more invasive techniques with promising results are also coming such as anal magnetic sphincter and antropylorus transposition. This review reports the main current available treatments of FI and the developing therapeutics tools. PMID:26909229

  4. Clinical challenges of preventing incontinence-associated dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Beeckman, Dimitri; Woodward, Sue; Rajpaul, Kumal; Vanderwee, Katrien

    Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) is a common skin disorder in patients with faecal and/or urinary incontinence. The past decade has seen a huge growth in publications focusing on the complexity and inconsistency of the clinical observation of IAD and the differentiation between IAD and pressure ulcers. IAD and superficial pressure ulcers cause confusion in clinical practice when trying to determine the true nature and underlying pathology of the lesion. It is a daily challenge for health professionals in hospitals, nursing homes and community care to maintain a healthy skin in patients with incontinence. The aim of this article is to provide a brief update on recent developments regarding the differentiation between pressure ulcers and IAD and the prevention of IAD. Recommendations for clinical practice and research are provided. PMID:21841685

  5. Vaginal diaphragm rings in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Realini, J P; Walters, M D

    1990-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of wearing vaginal diaphragm rings in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence, 10 women with genuine stress incontinence were studied. Patients underwent urodynamic evaluation and perineal pad testing before and after fitted diaphragm rings were in place. Patients kept symptom diaries for 1 week without the ring and then for 1 week with the ring. They also gave an overall subjective evaluation of their experience. Urodynamic findings were essentially unchanged by wearing diaphragm rings. Trends toward improvement were observed in the results of pad tests and symptom diaries. Four of the 10 women experienced clinically significant improvement in amount of urine lost during pad tests, number of leaks per week, and overall assessment of response. Vaginal diaphragm rings may be an effective treatment for some women with stress urinary incontinence. PMID:2333769

  6. Diagnostic evaluation of urinary incontinence in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Weiss, B D

    1998-06-01

    In most cases, the evaluation of urinary incontinence requires only a history, a physical examination, urinalysis and measurement of postvoid residual urine volume. The initial purposes of the evaluation are to identify conditions requiring referral or specialized work-up and to detect and treat reversible causes that may be present. If the patient does not appear to require referral and a reversible cause is not identified, the next step is to categorize the patient's symptoms as typical of either urge or stress incontinence and treat the patient accordingly. If treatment fails or a presumptive diagnosis of urge or stress incontinence cannot be reached, the final step would be to perform more sophisticated tests or refer the patient for testing to define the cause and determine the best treatment. PMID:9636332

  7. The Artificial Urinary Sphincter in the Management of Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Oscar A; McCammon, Kurt A

    2016-06-01

    Despite the emergence of different devices in the treatment of postprostatectomy urinary incontinence, the AMS 800 (American Medical Systems, Minnetonka, MN) remains the gold standard for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in men. We reviewed the current literature regarding the indications, surgical principles, outcomes, and complications of artificial urinary sphincter placement for stress urinary incontinence after prostatectomy. Despite all the available information, heterogeneous data, different success definitions, and the lack of high-quality prospective studies with long-term follow-up, it is difficult to compare outcomes between studies. In spite of these, the perineal implantation of a single cuff artificial urinary sphincter has withstood the test of time. PMID:26845050

  8. Pathophysiology of Overactive Bladder and Urge Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Steers, William D

    2002-01-01

    Storage symptoms such as urgency, frequency, and nocturia, with or without urge incontinence, are characterized as overactive bladder (OAB). OAB can lead to urge incontinence. Disturbances in nerves, smooth muscle, and urothelium can cause this condition. In some respects the division between peripheral and central causes of OAB is artificial, but it remains a useful paradigm for appreciating the interactions between different tissues. Models have been developed to mimic the OAB associated with bladder instability, lower urinary tract obstruction, neuropathic disorders, diabetes, and interstitial cystitis. These models share the common features of increased connectivity and excitability of both detrusor smooth muscle and nerves. Increased excitability and connectivity of nerves involved in micturition rely on growth factors that orchestrate neural plasticity. Neurotransmitters, prostaglandins, and growth factors, such as nerve growth factor, provide mechanisms for bidirectional communication between muscle or urothelium and nerve, leading to OAB with or without urge incontinence. PMID:16986023

  9. Evaluation of a behavioral treatment for female urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Santacreu, Marta; Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío

    2011-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a medical, psychological, social, economic, and hygienic problem. Although it is difficult to state its prevalence, all authors agree that it is related to age and gender. This study aimed to carry out a urinary incontinence behavioral treatment in order to reduce urine leakages in 14 participants recruited from a senior center. The program consists of daily training of the pelvic floor muscles with a weekly control by a supervisor during a 2-month period and follow-up of results 2 months after the last control session. Urinary incontinence episodes were reduced by 75.67% after program completion. It appears that pelvic floor muscles training, carried out under controlled and constant supervision, significantly reduces urinary leakage. Moreover, maintaining this improvement after treatment depends on the continuation of the exercises as well as on the urinary leakage frequency baseline and the urinary leakage frequency during the last treatment session. PMID:21753868

  10. Post-stroke emotional incontinence or bipolar disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Mnif, Leila; Sellami, Rim; Masmoudi, Jawaher

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Post-stroke emotional incontinence and bipolar disorder are two disorders that involve the dysfunction of brain structures responsible for emotional regulation. The objective of this work is to study the links between these disorders through a clinical case. Case report We present the case of a 43-year-old man without previous psychiatric history who experienced emotional incontinence after cerebrovascular events. He reacted promptly to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment. However, he experienced his first episode of hypomania after 6 months of antidepressant therapy. Adjunctive therapy with valproic acid and low-dose paroxetine was eventually added, resulting in complete improvement of both emotional incontinence and hypomania after 4 additional months of treatment. Conclusion The clinician should carefully explore any history of premorbid bipolar disorder, personality disorder characterized by mood instability, and family history of bipolar disorder. PMID:27536109

  11. Stress incontinence and pelvic floor exercises in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sahakian, Josine

    This literature review is a critique of the research looking at the impact of pelvic floor exercises during pregnancy on urinary stress incontinence in postnatal women. Seven studies were selected for review following a database search on the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Embase, Medline and the British Nursing Index (BNI). The research produced mixed findings. Four of the seven studies demonstrated a significant improvement in urinary stress incontinence in postnatal women following pelvic floor muscle exercise during pregnancy. However, the studies that spanned a longer time period found no long-term effectiveness. More research is needed for a more conclusive picture as to whether antenatal pelvic floor exercises can improve stress incontinence in the postpartum period. PMID:23123811

  12. Prevention and management of incontinence-associated dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Nix, Denise; Haugen, Vicki

    2010-06-01

    Perineal dermatitis, recently relabelled 'incontinence-associated dermatitis' (IAD), is an inflammation of the skin that occurs when urine and/or stool comes into contact with the skin. It can range in severity from erythema with or without loss of skin integrity to infection. IAD affects as many as 41% of adults in long-term care; it is costly, painful and, for the most part, preventable. An effective plan of care for individuals with IAD must include assessment and management of incontinence aetiology, perineal skin and risk assessment, gentle cleansing and moisturization, application of skin barriers and treatment of secondary infection, and the use of containment devices if indicated. PMID:20524708

  13. Non-surgical management of urinary incontinence in children.

    PubMed

    Duel, Barry

    2009-01-01

    Urinary incontinence and neurogenic bladder are common in children, and can be difficult to treat. This themed issue includes contributions by experts in the management of these disorders. Dr. John Kryger discusses the nonsurgical management of neurogenic bladder in children with spina bifida. Drs. Lori Dyer and Israel Franco summarize the literature and their experience with the use of botulinum toxin in neurogenic and non-neurogenic incontinence in children. Dr. Paul Austin summarizes the use of alpha-adrenergic blockers. These drugs are primarily used to treat bladder outlet obstruction due to prostatic hyperplasia, but show great promise in the treatment of dysfunctional voiding in children. PMID:19936567

  14. [Duloxetine. A new preparation for patients with urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Walter, Steen

    2005-11-28

    Stress Urinary Incontinence is a common symptom among women. The urethral closure is insufficient. Pelvic floor exercise can minish the symptoms, but many women need an operation. Duloxetine, a new drug, is believed to strengthen the contraction of the external urethral sphincter through central neuromodulation, resulting in enhanced urethral closure during the urine storage phase. In controlled studies a significant effect are found in women suffer from Stress Urinary Incontinence. Discontinuate rates for adverse events were high especially nausea and fatigue. The adverse event deminish after 4 weeks. PMID:16324435

  15. Update on the Management of Fecal Incontinence for the Gastroenterologist.

    PubMed

    Wald, Arnold

    2016-03-01

    Many patients with fecal incontinence respond to conservative measures based upon a careful assessment and a multimodality approach that Is within the expertise of the practicing gastroenterologist. However, there Is a need for new and effective strategies when conservative therapy fails. This article reviews established therapies for fecal incontinence, such as biofeedback, as well as new therapies that have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), such as sacral neuromodulation and an injectable bulking agent. Also reviewed are some of the newer approaches that have not yet been approved by the FDA or that have uncertain efficacy. PMID:27231444

  16. Pregnancy and postpartum bowel changes: constipation and fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Shin, Grace Hewon; Toto, Erin Lucinda; Schey, Ron

    2015-04-01

    Pregnancy and the postpartum period are often associated with many gastrointestinal complaints, including nausea, vomiting, and heartburn; however, the most troublesome complaints in some women are defecatory disorders such as constipation and fecal incontinence, especially postpartum. These disorders are often multifactorial in etiology, and many studies have looked to see what risk factors lead to these complications. This review discusses the current knowledge of pelvic floor and anorectal physiology, especially during pregnancy, and reviews the current literature on causes and treatments of postpartum bowel symptoms of constipation and fecal incontinence. PMID:25803402

  17. Update on the Management of Fecal Incontinence for the Gastroenterologist

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with fecal incontinence respond to conservative measures based upon a careful assessment and a multimodality approach that Is within the expertise of the practicing gastroenterologist. However, there Is a need for new and effective strategies when conservative therapy fails. This article reviews established therapies for fecal incontinence, such as biofeedback, as well as new therapies that have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), such as sacral neuromodulation and an injectable bulking agent. Also reviewed are some of the newer approaches that have not yet been approved by the FDA or that have uncertain efficacy. PMID:27231444

  18. Hospital Organization and Importance of an Interventional Radiology Inpatient Admitting Service: Italian Single-Center 3-Year Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Simonetti, Giovanni; Bollero, Enrico; Ciarrapico, Anna Micaela; Gandini, Roberto; Konda, Daniel Bartolucci, Alberto; Di Primio, Massimiliano; Mammucari, Matteo; Chiocchi, Marcello; D'Alba, Fabrizio; Masala, Salvatore

    2009-03-15

    In June 2005 a Complex Operating Unit of Interventional Radiology (COUIR), consisting of an outpatient visit service, an inpatient admitting service with four beds, and a day-hospital service with four beds was installed at our department. Between June 2005 and May 2008, 1772 and 861 well-screened elective patients were admitted to the inpatient ward of the COUIR and to the Internal Medicine Unit (IMU) or Surgery Unit (SU) of our hospital, respectively, and treated with IR procedures. For elective patients admitted to the COUIR's inpatient ward, hospital stays were significantly shorter and differences between reimbursements and costs were significantly higher for almost all IR procedures compared to those for patients admitted to the IMU and SU (Student's t-test for unpaired data, p < 0.05). The results of the 3-year activity show that the activation of a COUIR with an inpatient admitting service, and the better organization of the patient pathway that came with it, evidenced more efficient use of resources, with the possibility for the hospital to save money and obtain positive margins (differences between reimbursements and costs). During 3 years of activity, the inpatient admitting service of our COUIR yielded a positive difference between reimbursements and effective costs of Euro 1,009,095.35. The creation of an inpatient IR service and the admission of well-screened elective patients allowed short hospitalization times, reduction of waiting lists, and a positive economic outcome.

  19. Minimally invasive treatment for female stress urinary incontinence – Romanian highlights

    PubMed Central

    Surcel, C; Chibelean, C; Iordache, A; Mirvald, C; Gîngu, C; Margaritis, S; Stoica, R; Codoiu, C; Savu, C; Marksteiner, R; Sinescu, I

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Stress urinary incontinence is still a "battlefield" for many minimally invasive therapies, but, unfortunately, few can restore the anatomical and functional background of this disorder. Objective: Assessing the latest minimally invasive procedures of intra and perisphincterian injection of autologous stem cells. Method and Result: The first stem cell implantation (myoblasts and /or mature fibroblasts grown and multiplied in the laboratory from biopsy samples taken from the pectoralis muscle) in the urethral sphincter was performed on October 18, 2010, in “Fundeni” Clinic of Urology and Renal Transplantation, in Romania. Discussion: The follow-up at six weeks with the quality of life questionnaires, micturition diary and clinical examination revealed a decrease of urine loss from six pads/ day at one per day, which significantly improved the patient’s quality of life according to visual analogue scale. Clinical and urodynamic evaluations will continue and will be future scientific topics. Abbreviations: SUI = stress urinary incontinence; TVT = tension free vaginal tape; TVT-O = tension free vaginal tape obturator; QoL = quality of life PMID:22514562

  20. The artificial bowel sphincter for faecal incontinence: a single centre study

    PubMed Central

    Melenhorst, Jarno; Koch, Sacha M.; van Gemert, Wim G.

    2007-01-01

    Background and aims Faecal incontinence (FI) is a socially devastating problem. The treatment algorithm depends on the aetiology of the problem. Large anal sphincter defects can be treated by sphincter replacement procedures: the dynamic graciloplasty and the artificial bowel sphincter (ABS). Materials and methods Patients were included between 1997 and 2006. A full preoperative workup was mandatory for all patients. During the follow-up, the Williams incontinence score was used to classify the symptoms, and anal manometry was performed. Results Thirty-four patients (25 women) were included, of which, 33 patients received an ABS. The mean follow-up was 17.4 (0.8–106.3) months. The Williams score improved significantly after placement of the ABS (p < 0.0001). The postoperative anal resting pressure with an empty cuff was not altered (p = 0.89). The postoperative ABS pressure was significantly higher then the baseline squeeze pressure (p = 0.003). Seven patients had an infection necessitating explantation. One patient was successfully reimplanted. Conclusion The artificial bowel sphincter is an effective treatment for FI in patients with a large anal sphincter defect. Infectious complications are the largest threat necessitating explantation of the device. PMID:17929038

  1. Concomitant repair of stress urinary incontinence with proximal urethrovaginal fistula: Our experience

    PubMed Central

    Chodisetti, Subbarao; Boddepalli, Yogesh; Kota, Malakonda Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Proximal urethrovaginal fistula (UVF) located close to the bladder neck may cause extensive sphincter damage and is usually associated with continuous incontinence, which may mask the associated stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Simultaneous correction of SUI avoids a second surgery for SUI, which needs dissection in ischemic fields and carries a high risk of failure. The aim of this study is to describe our technique of concomitant repair of SUI with proximal UVF and our results. Methods: Between July 2010 and August 2014, 14 patients underwent UVF repair in Jackknife position by the interposition of a Martius flap and simultaneous correction of SUI by modified McGuire pubovaginal autologous fascial sling. The procedure was carried out a minimum of 3 months of presentation and after detailed preoperative evaluation. Results: After a mean follow-up of 28 months, all 14 patients were continent. None of the patients developed recurrence of the UVF. Two patients presented with retention immediately after catheter removal and clean intermittent catheterization training was given to both of them. Two patients became pregnant during the follow-up period and were advised cesarean section near term. Conclusions: Repair of proximal UVF and correction of SUI can be performed in the same session to avoid the operation in an ischemic field. PMID:27555683

  2. [Urinary incontinence - what can be done by the family doctor and when is the urologist needed?].

    PubMed

    Keller, Isabelle Sonja; Brachlow, Jan Frederic; Padevit, Christian; Kurz, Michael; John, Hubert

    2014-10-01

    About 15% of the women and 10% of the men past the age of 65 years suffer from urinary incontinence. In most cases, accurate history taking can help differentiate between urge incontinence, stress incontinence and overflow incontinence, and is essential in choosing the appropriate treatment. Initial diagnostic testing can be conducted by the general practitioner, especially tests to exclude urinary tract infections or to rule out an overactive bladder. Patient education on changes to fluid intake and voiding habits as well as advice on suitable incontinence products are important first steps in the management of urinary continence. Also, drug treatment can be initiated in general practice. Patients with refractory urinary incontinence, particularly those who did not respond to anticholinergic medication, should be referred to a urologist for further evaluation since there may be an underlying tumour or other disorder of the bladder that is causing the incontinence. PMID:25270747

  3. Diagnosis and office-based treatment of urinary incontinence in adults. Part two: treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jimbo, Masahito; Heidelbaugh, Joel J.

    2013-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common problem in both men and women. In this review article we address treatment of the various forms of incontinence with conservative treatments, medical therapy, devices and surgery. The US Preventive Services Task Force, The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and PubMed were reviewed for articles focusing on urinary incontinence. Conservative therapy with education, fluid and food management, weight loss, timed voiding and pelvic floor physical therapy are all simple office-based treatments for incontinence. Medical therapy for incontinence currently is only available for urgency incontinence in the form of anticholinergic medication. Condom catheters, penile clamps, urethral inserts and pessaries can be helpful in specific situations. Surgical therapies vary depending on the type of incontinence, but are typically offered if conservative measures fail. PMID:23904858

  4. [Translabial ultrasonography in pelvic floor prolapse and urinary incontinence diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Pietrus, Miłosz; Pityński, Kazimierz; Bałajewicz-Nowak, Marta; Wiecheć, Marcin; Knafel, Anna; Ludwin, Artur; Dziechciowski, Marek; Nocuń, Agnieszka

    2012-09-01

    increasingly frequent in the surgical treatment of pelvic organs prolapse. The remedial kits currently in use are not visible in classic X-ray examinations and CT however, they can be easily visualized by means of a sonographic test. This way it is possible to locate the positioned tapes or meshes and to establish their orientation towards the urethra, the bladder and the anus. It is also possible to observe the complications (e.g. hematomas) following the surgical procedures via the transvaginal access. Transperineal sonography is a relatively inexpensive method that may be performed in almost every ultrasonographic laboratory Its value, approaching the MRI diagnostic value in the assessment of the pelvic floor defects and its low cost, place ultrasonography on the first place among the methods of imaging the pelvic and uro-genital diaphragm. The results of diagnostics of pelvic organs prolapse obtained by placing the sonographic head on the patient's perineum may also help in establishing the changes of the support apparatus for the uterus and the vagina, bladder urethra and perineum during functional testing and, thus, to verify the clinically established degree of the prolapse. It seems, also, that this method may be used during peri-urethral injections of specific substances and post-application follow-up, an increasingly frequently employed method of urinary incontinence treatment. PMID:23342899

  5. Outpatient versus inpatient uterine polyp treatment for abnormal uterine bleeding: randomised controlled non-inferiority study

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Natalie A M; Middleton, Lee; Diwakar, Lavanya; Smith, Paul; Denny, Elaine; Roberts, Tracy; Stobert, Lynda; Jowett, Susan; Daniels, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness and acceptability of outpatient polypectomy with inpatient polypectomy. Design Pragmatic multicentre randomised controlled non-inferiority study. Setting Outpatient hysteroscopy clinics in 31 UK National Health Service hospitals. Participants 507 women who attended as outpatients for diagnostic hysteroscopy because of abnormal uterine bleeding and were found to have uterine polyps. Interventions Participants were randomly assigned to either outpatient uterine polypectomy under local anaesthetic or inpatient uterine polypectomy under general anaesthesia. Data were collected on women’s self reported bleeding symptoms at baseline and at 6, 12, and 24 months. Data were also collected on pain and acceptability of the procedure at the time of polypectomy. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was successful treatment, determined by the women’s assessment of bleeding at six months, with a prespecified non-inferiority margin of 25%. Secondary outcomes included generic (EQ-5D) and disease specific (menorrhagia multi-attribute scale) quality of life, and feasibility and acceptability of the procedure. Results 73% (166/228) of women in the outpatient group and 80% (168/211) in the inpatient group reported successful treatment at six months (intention to treat relative risk 0.91, 95% confidence interval 0.82 to 1.02; per protocol relative risk 0.92, 0.82 to 1.02). Failure to remove polyps was higher (19% v 7%; relative risk 2.5, 1.5 to 4.1) and acceptability of the procedure was lower (83% v 92%; 0.90, 0.84 to 0.97) in the outpatient group Quality of life did not differ significantly between the groups. Four uterine perforations, one of which necessitated bowel resection, all occurred in the inpatient group. Conclusions Outpatient polypectomy was non-inferior to inpatient polypectomy. Failure to remove a uterine polyp was, however, more likely with outpatient polypectomy and acceptability of the procedure was slightly lower. Trial

  6. Prevalence and risk factors of urinary incontinence in Indian women: A hospital-based survey

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Uma; Agarwal, Pragati; Verma, Manju Lata; Dalela, Diwakar; Singh, Nisha; Shankhwar, Pushplata

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Urinary incontinence is a problem that creates both physical and psychological nuisance to a woman. This problem needs to be studied in detail in Indian population because of lack of precise data. The objectives of this study were to study the prevalence and risk factors of urinary incontinence in Indian women. Materials and Methods: This hospital-based cross-sectional study conducted from August 2005 to June 2007 included women attending gynecology OPD (consulters) and hospital employees (nonconsulters). Subjects who were incontinent were asked a standard set of questions. Incontinence was classified as urge, stress, or mixed based on symptoms. A univariate followed by multivariate analysis was done to look for risk factors. Results: Of 3000 women enrolled, 21.8% (656/3000) women were incontinent. There was no significant difference in incontinence rate between consulters and nonconsulters [618/2804 (22.1%) vs. 38/196 (19.4%); P value = 0.6). Of the total women having incontinence, highest numbers were found to have stress incontinence [73.8% (484/656)] followed by mixed [16.8% (110/656)] and urge incontinence [9.5% (62/656)]. Age more than 40 years; multiparity; postmenopausal status; body mass index more than 25; history of diabetes and asthma; and habit of taking tea, tobacco, pan, and betel are risk factors found to be associated with increased prevalence of urinary incontinence in univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, age more than 40 years, multiparity, vaginal delivery, hysterectomy, menopause, tea and tobacco intake, and asthma were found to be significantly associated with overall incontinence. Stress incontinence was separately not associated with menopause. Urge incontinence was not associated with vaginal delivery. Conclusion: Urinary incontinence is a bothersome problem for women. Simple questionnaire can help to detect this problem and diagnose associated risk factors, so that necessary steps can be taken in its

  7. An Update on Inpatient Hypertension Management.

    PubMed

    Axon, R Neal; Turner, Mason; Buckley, Ryan

    2015-11-01

    Hypertension is highly prevalent affecting nearly one third of the US adult population. Though generally approached as an outpatient disorder, elevated blood pressure is observed in a majority of hospitalized patients. The spectrum of hypertensive disease ranges from patients with hypertensive emergency including markedly elevated blood pressure and associated end-organ damage to asymptomatic patients with minimally elevated pressures of unclear significance. It is important to note that current evidence-based hypertension guidelines do not specifically address inpatient hypertension. This narrative review focuses primarily on best practices for diagnosing and managing nonemergent hypertension in the inpatient setting. We describe examples of common hypertensive syndromes, provide suggestions for optimal post-acute management, and point to evidence-based or consensus guidelines where available. In addition, we describe a practical approach to managing asymptomatic elevated blood pressure observed in the inpatient setting. Finally, arranging effective care transitions to ensure optimal ongoing hypertension management is appropriate in all cases. PMID:26362300

  8. Confusion ahead as CMS changes inpatient criteria.

    PubMed

    2013-10-01

    In the Inpatient Prospective Payment System final rule for 2014, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services established a benchmark of two midnights for an inpatient admission and issued robust requirements for documentation. Case managers must work closely with physicians to ensure that the documentation includes the expected length of stay, the rationale for hospital treatment, the treatment plan, and a written order for admission. Case managers must review every admission within 24 hours to make sure the hospital doesn't lose reimbursement. Auditors will be looking for incidents where hospitals keep patients over two midnights when it's not medically necessary in order to get inpatient reimbursement. CMS continues to emphasize quality in care. PMID:24195133

  9. The development of national quality performance standards for disposable absorbent products for adult incontinence.

    PubMed

    Muller, Nancy; McInnis, Elaine

    2013-09-01

    Disposable absorbent products are widely used in inpatient care settings and in the community to manage adult urinary and fecal incontinence, but few product standards exist to help guide their production or optimal use. Increasing costs and reduced revenues have caused a number of states to evaluate absorbent product use among persons who receive care at home with the assistance of the Medicaid Waiver Program, further increasing concerns about the lack of product performance standards. To address these issues, the National Association For Continence (NAFC) formed a council of experts and key stakeholders with the objective of establishing national, independent quality performance standards for disposable absorbent products provided by states to Waiver Program recipients. The Council consisted of representatives from five purposefully selected states, technical directors from six nonwoven product manufacturers, an officer of the nonwoven manufactures trade association, a delegate from an academic nursing program and professional societies, a family caregiver, and a patient representative. Following a consensus method and guidelines for use, nine specific recommendations were developed, posted for public comment, and further refined. Final recommendations for product performance assessment include: rewet rate (a measure of a product's ability to withstand multiple incontinent episodes between changes), rate of acquisition (a measure of the speed at which urine is drawn away from the skin by a product, product retention capacity (a measure of a product's capacity to hold fluid without rewetting the skin), sizing options, absorbency levels, product safety, closure technology, breathable zones (a measure of the air permeability across a textile-like fabric at a controlled differential pressure), and elasticity. The Council also set values for and recommended four quantifiable parameters, and the testing methodology associated with each, to help consumers and states

  10. Rural and Urban Hospitals' Role in Providing Inpatient Care, 2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC/NCHS, National Hospital Discharge Survey, 2010. How did rural hospital inpatients differ from urban hospital inpatients ... CDC/NCHS, National Hospital Discharge Survey, 2010. How did patients' first-listed diagnoses differ in rural and ...

  11. Management of faecal incontinence in graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Sue

    Graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), a common yet serious complication of allogeneic haemopoietic stem cell transplantation, can cause significant morbidity and negatively impact on patients' quality of life. The gastrointestinal tract is frequently affected resulting in nausea and vomiting, abdominal pain and profuse diarrhoea (Washington and Jagasia, 2009) which can be both distressing and humiliating for patients. The volume of watery, green diarrhoea produced can be greater than 2 litres per day (Ferrara et al, 2009) and is one indicator of the severity of GvHD. It may, in some cases, lead to faecal incontinence. Management of GvHD-associated diarrhoea involves the use of high-dose steroids to control the exaggerated immune response, anti-diarrhoeal medication, management of fluid and electrolytes, and nutritional management. It may also require management of faecal incontinence and prevention of incontinence-associated dermatitis. This paper describes the pathology of GvHD, the management of GvHD-associated diarrhoea and faecal incontinence and discusses the potential use of a faecal management system inappropriately selected individuals with uncontrolled diarrhoea and limited mobility. PMID:22306636

  12. Electrokinetic profiles of nonowoven cotton for absorbent incontinence material

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper discusses recent work on cotton/synthetic nonwovens, their electrokinetic analysis, and their potential use in incontinence materials. Electrokinetic analysis is useful in exploring fiber surface polarity properties, and it is a useful tool to render a snap shot of the role of fiber char...

  13. Quality of life in women with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Senra, Cláudia; Pereira, M Graça

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationship among psychological, clinical and sociodemographic variables, and quality of life in women with urinary incontinence. The sample consisted of 80 women diagnosed with urinary incontinence (UI) followed in a Northern Central Hospital in Portugal. Participants answered the Incontinence Quality of Life (I-QOL); Satisfaction with Sexual Relationship Questionnaire (SSRQ); Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales (HADS) and the Brief Cope. The results revealed that women with higher quality of life considered their symptoms of urine loss as mild or moderated compared to those with severe urine loss. The less severe urine loss was associated with greater sexual satisfaction and less use of religion and self-blame as coping strategies. In terms of coping, women who considered the loss of urine as severe expressed more feelings regarding UI. Stress urinary incontinence, high sexual satisfaction, and less use of denial, distraction, and religion as coping strategies, predicted higher quality of life. According to the results, UI has an impact on women's sexual satisfaction and quality of life. Therefore, intervention programs should target these women, including their partners, helping them to adjust to their condition and teaching effective coping strategies in order to improve their sexual satisfaction and quality of life. PMID:26107369

  14. Severe rectal haemorrhage after treatment for faecal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Taggarshe, Deepa; Visco, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Bulking agent injected submucosally is an alternative effective treatment for faecal incontinence in elderly patients who fail conservative measures. Since most elderly patients are on antiplatelet therapy and are sometimes unaware of their medication, this can lead to serious complications. PMID:25180215

  15. Fecal Incontinence and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction in Women: A Review.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Alison; Menees, Stacy

    2016-06-01

    Pelvic floor dysfunction and fecal incontinence is a common and debilitating condition in women, particularly as women age, and often goes under-reported to health care providers. It is important for providers to ask patients about possible symptoms. An algorithm for evaluation and treatment is presented. Current and future therapies are described and discussed. PMID:27261895

  16. Urinary incontinence, pelvic floor dysfunction, exercise and sport.

    PubMed

    Bø, Kari

    2004-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is defined as "the complaint of any involuntary leakage of urine" and is a common problem in the female population with prevalence rates varying between 10% and 55% in 15- to 64-year-old women. The most frequent form of urinary incontinence in women is stress urinary incontinence, defined as "involuntary leakage on effort or exertion, or on sneezing or coughing". The aim of this article is to systematically review the literature on urinary incontinence and participation in sport and fitness activities with a special emphasis on prevalence and treatment in female elite athletes. Stress urinary incontinence is a barrier to women's participation in sport and fitness activities and, therefore, it may be a threat to women's health, self-esteem and well-being. The prevalence during sports among young, nulliparous elite athletes varies between 0% (golf) and 80% (trampolinists). The highest prevalence is found in sports involving high impact activities such as gymnastics, track and field, and some ball games. A 'stiff' and strong pelvic floor positioned at an optimal level inside the pelvis may be a crucial factor in counteracting the increases in abdominal pressure occurring during high-impact activities. There are no randomised controlled trials or reports on the effect of any treatment for stress urinary incontinence in female elite athletes. However, strength training of the pelvic floor muscles has been shown to be effective in treating stress urinary incontinence in parous females in the general population. In randomised controlled trials, reported cure rates, defined as <2g of leakage on pad tests, varied between 44% and 69%. Pelvic floor muscle training has no serious adverse effects and has been recommended as first-line treatment in the general population. Use of preventive devices such as vaginal tampons or pessaries can prevent leakage during high impact physical activity. The pelvic floor muscles need to be much stronger in elite athletes

  17. Guideline-Based Strategies in the Surgical Treatment of Female Urinary Incontinence: The New Gold Standard is Almost the Same as the Old One

    PubMed Central

    Viereck, V.; Bader, W.; Lobodasch, K.; Pauli, F.; Bentler, R.; Kölbl, H.

    2016-01-01

    The modern sling procedures for treating female stress urinary incontinence encompass numerous methods, materials and manufacturers. On the basis of the current S2e guidelines, the methods used most frequently in the diagnosis of and therapy for stress urinary incontinence in women are critically illustrated. An individualised procedure is necessary for the choice of the surgical method, especially in the presence of accompanying pathologies. This article is intended to help the treating physician to carry out quality-assured diagnostics and therapy for the patient and to offer the best possible urogynaecological management. In addition to the complications and chances of success of the surgical options, the legal aspects of therapy planning are also taken into consideration. PMID:27570251

  18. Beyond incontinence: The stigma of other urinary symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Elstad, Emily A.; Taubenberger, Simone P.; Botelho, Elizabeth M.; Tennstedt, Sharon L.

    2010-01-01

    Aim This paper is a report of a study conducted to characterize the stigma of urinary frequency and urgency and differentiate it from the stigma of incontinence and to describe race/ethnic and gender differences in the experience of stigma among a diverse sample of individuals. Background Lower urinary tract symptoms, including frequency, urgency and incontinence, are susceptible to stigma, but previous stigma research has focused almost exclusively on incontinence. Method The Boston Area Community Health Survey is a population-based, random sample epidemiological survey of urologic symptoms (N=5503). Qualitative data for this study came from in-depth interviews conducted between 2007 and 2008 with a random subsample of 151 black, white and Hispanic men and women with urinary symptoms. Findings Respondents reported stigma associated with frequency and urgency – not just incontinence. The stigma of frequency/urgency is rooted in social interruption, loss of control of the body, and speculation as to the nature of a non-specific “problem.” Overall, the stigma of urinary symptoms hinged upon whether or not the problem was “perceptible.” Men felt stigmatized for making frequent trips to the bathroom and feared being seen as impotent. Women feared having an unclean body or compromised social identity. Hispanic people in particular voiced a desire to keep their urinary symptoms a secret. Conclusion The stigma of urinary symptoms goes beyond incontinence to include behaviors associated with frequency and urgency. Healthcare practitioners should assess for stigma sequelae (e.g. anxiety, depression) in individuals with frequency and urgency, and stress treatment options to circumvent stigmatization. PMID:20735505

  19. 42 CFR 409.83 - Inpatient hospital coinsurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inpatient hospital coinsurance. 409.83 Section 409... MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Hospital Insurance Deductibles and Coinsurance § 409.83 Inpatient hospital coinsurance. (a) General provisions—(1) Inpatient hospital coinsurance is the...

  20. 42 CFR 409.82 - Inpatient hospital deductible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inpatient hospital deductible. 409.82 Section 409... MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Hospital Insurance Deductibles and Coinsurance § 409.82 Inpatient hospital deductible. (a) General provisions—(1) The inpatient hospital deductible is a...

  1. 42 CFR 441.12 - Inpatient hospital tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inpatient hospital tests. 441.12 Section 441.12... General Provisions § 441.12 Inpatient hospital tests. Except in an emergency situation (see § 440.170(e)(1) of this chapter for definition), FFP is not available in expenditures for inpatient hospital...

  2. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Time to Cure of Incontinence Present at Nursing Home Admission

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Donna Z.; Gurvich, Olga; Savik, Kay; Eberly, Lynn E.; Harms, Susan; Wyman, Jean F.

    2015-01-01

    As many as half of older people that are admitted to nursing homes (NHs) are incontinent of urine and/or feces. Not much is known about the rate of cure of incontinence present at NH admission, but available reports suggest the rate is low. There have been racial and ethnic disparities in incontinence treatment, but the role of disparities in the cure of incontinence is understudied. Using the Peters-Belson method and multilevel predictors, our findings showed that there were disparities in the time to cure of incontinence for Hispanic NH admissions. A significantly smaller proportion of older Hispanic admissions were observed to have their incontinence cured and cured later than expected had they been White. Reducing disparities in incontinence cure will improve health outcomes of Hispanic NH admissions. Significant predictors in our model suggest strategies to reduce the disparity including attention to managing fecal incontinence and incontinence in those with cognitive impairment, improving residents’ functional status, and increasing resources to NHs admitting older Hispanics with incontinence to develop innovative and cost effective ways to provide equitable quality care. PMID:26295010

  3. Stress Urinary Incontinence in Women with a History of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, Laura N.; Sarma, Aruna V.; Piette, John D.; Herman, William H.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Objective Stress urinary incontinence may serve as a barrier to lifestyle modification among women at high risk for diabetes, but the prevalence of stress urinary incontinence among women with histories of gestational diabetes mellitus (hGDM) is unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of stress incontinence among women with hGDM and to examine its association with their current physical activity. Methods We surveyed women with hGDM within the past 5 years who were currently enrolled in a managed care plan (n = 228). In a cross-sectional analysis, self-reported weekly or more frequent stress incontinence was the primary independent variable and measures of physical activity and body mass index (BMI) were the outcomes of interest. We constructed multivariable models that adjusted for participant characteristics associated with the measure of incontinence or outcomes in bivariate analyses. Results Of the 228 women with hGDM, 49% reported weekly or more frequent incontinence during pregnancy, and 28% reported that incontinence affected their activities during pregnancy. Fifty percent reported weekly or more frequent incontinence after delivery, with 27% reporting interference of incontinence with activity. Less than a third of women reported optimal physical activity, and 42% were obese. After adjustment for characteristics associated with measures of activity and incontinence, there was minimal association between levels of activity and stress urinary incontinence; similarly, there was no association between BMI and measures of stress incontinence. Conclusions Stress urinary incontinence is common among women with hGDM but does not appear to be associated with physical activity levels or BMI. PMID:18537481

  4. Dynamic versus Adynamic Graciloplasty in Treatment of End-Stage Fecal Incontinence: Is the Implantation of the Pacemaker Really Necessary? 12-Month Follow-Up in a Clinical, Physiological, and Functional Study

    PubMed Central

    Walega, Piotr; Romaniszyn, Michal; Siarkiewicz, Benita; Zelazny, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of the study is to compare functional results of end-stage fecal incontinence treatment with dynamic graciloplasty and adynamic graciloplasty augmented with transanal conditioning of the transposed muscle. Methods. A total of 20 patients were qualified for graciloplasty procedure due to end-stage fecal incontinence. 7 patients underwent dynamic graciloplasty (DGP), whereas 13 patients were treated with adynamic graciloplasty, with transanal stimulation in the postoperative period (AGP). Clinical, functional, and quality of life assessments were performed 3, 6, and 12 months after the procedures. Results. There were no intraoperative or early postoperative complications. The detachment of gracilis muscle tendon was observed in one patient in DGP group and two in AGP group. There was a significant improvement of Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life (FIQL) and Fecal Incontinence Severity Index (FISI) scores in both groups 12 months after procedure. Anorectal manometry showed improvement regarding basal and squeeze pressures in both groups, with significantly better squeeze pressures in AGP group. Conclusions. The functional effects in the DGP and AGP groups were similar. Significantly lower price of the procedure and avoidance of implant-related complication risk suggest the attractiveness of the AGP method augmented by transanal stimulation. PMID:25861261

  5. Depression in Geriatric and Adult Medical Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magni, Guido; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Administered two scales for the evaluation of depression to two groups of medical inpatients: adults (N=201) and geriatric subjects (N=178). Results confirmed a high presence of depressive symptoms among patients with medical problems, particularly among geriatric subjects. Factors most predictive of depressive symptoms are identified. (JAC)

  6. Detecting Depression in Elderly Medical Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, Stephen R.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Used Research Diagnostic Criteria to assess base rate of detection of depression in 150 elderly medical inpatients by nonpsychiatric physicians, and evaluated psychometric properties of screening instruments to assess depression. Found detection of depression by house staff extremely low (8.7 percent). Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), BDI…

  7. The Impact of Central Obesity on Storage Luts and Urinary Incontinence After Prostatic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gacci, Mauro; Sebastianelli, Arcangelo; Salvi, Matteo; De Nunzio, Cosimo; Tubaro, Andrea; Gravas, Stavros; Moncada, Ignacio; Serni, Sergio; Maggi, Mario; Vignozzi, Linda

    2016-09-01

    In the developed and developing countries, the overall prevalence of central obesity in the elderly men is growing. In addition, the progressive aging of male population increased the possibilities of coexisting morbidities associated with obesity such as lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic enlargement (BPE) or to prostate cancer (PCa) needing primary treatment, including radical prostatectomy (RP), which can further adversely affect the quality of life. Simple and radical prostatectomy are the most common surgical procedures in urologic unit all over the world for BPE and PCa, respectively. After both interventions, patients can present bothering storage LUTS that can worsen all the other clinical outcomes. Preset study will review the role of central obesity as a risk factor for storage LUTS or urinary incontinence, after prostatic surgery for BPE or PCa. PMID:27432378

  8. Durability, safety and efficacy of polyacrylamide hydrogel (Bulkamid®) in the management of stress and mixed urinary incontinence: three year follow up outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Al-Singary, Waleed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There are a myriad of treatment options available for patients suffering with the increasingly prevalent condition of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). The minimally invasive nature of periurethral bulking agents makes them an attractive proposition in the correctly selected patient. There is, however, limited data available on the medium to long term safety and efficacy of this procedure. The aim of our study is to evaluate the outcomes of Polyacrylamide Hydrogel (PAHG) (Bulkamid®) as a periurethral bulking agent at our institution. Material and methods From 2006 to 2011, two hundred and fifty six women underwent periurethral bulking with PAHG in the management of SUI or mixed urinary incontinence (MUI). Women were assessed with at least yearly quality of life and ICIQ questionnaires. Results The majority of patients had the procedure under a local anaesthetic, with a median operative time of 9 minutes. Median follow up was 38 months. 82% of patients reported cure/significant improvement at 3 months. Importantly, this high satisfaction rate was maintained at final follow up and was reflected in both VAS and ICIQ scores. There were no reported adverse reactions and no significant safety concerns. Conclusions We conclude that Bulkamid® injection is an efficacious, minimally invasive, and safe procedure for a selected group of patients with stress incontinence. In our study, PAHG has been shown to be durable and safe. PMID:26855795

  9. An Open Multicenter Study of Clinical Efficacy and Safety of Urolastic, an Injectable Implant for the Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence: One-Year Observation

    PubMed Central

    Miotła, Paweł; Gałczyński, Krzysztof; Baranowski, Włodzimierz; Doniec, Jacek; Jóźwik, Maciej; Oniszczuk, Małgorzata; Rechberger, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of stress urinary incontinence rises and affects up to 30% of women after 50 years of age. Midurethral slings are currently the mainstay of surgical anti-incontinence therapy. Some patients experience recurrent SUI (RSUI) which is defined as a failure of anti-incontinence surgery after a period of time or persistence of SUI after the procedure aimed at correcting it. The urethral bulking agent application decreases invasiveness of treatment and meets patients requirements. The objective of this study was to assess the safety and clinical efficacy of Urolastic injection. One hundred and five patients with SUI (including 91 patients with RSUI) were treated with Urolastic in three tertiary gynecological clinics. The efficacy of the procedure was assessed objectively at each follow-up visit by means of cough test and a standard 1-hour pad test. Objective success rate after 12 months after primary procedure in RSUI patients was found in 59.3% of patients. In 14 patients with primary SUI improvement after 1 year was found in 71.4% of patients. Although cure rates after MUS are up to 90% there is still place for less invasive treatment option like periurethral injection of bulking agents, especially in patients with previous SUI surgical management. PMID:26106616

  10. An Open Multicenter Study of Clinical Efficacy and Safety of Urolastic, an Injectable Implant for the Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence: One-Year Observation.

    PubMed

    Futyma, Konrad; Miotła, Paweł; Gałczyński, Krzysztof; Baranowski, Włodzimierz; Doniec, Jacek; Wodzisławska, Agnieszka; Jóźwik, Maciej; Oniszczuk, Małgorzata; Rechberger, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of stress urinary incontinence rises and affects up to 30% of women after 50 years of age. Midurethral slings are currently the mainstay of surgical anti-incontinence therapy. Some patients experience recurrent SUI (RSUI) which is defined as a failure of anti-incontinence surgery after a period of time or persistence of SUI after the procedure aimed at correcting it. The urethral bulking agent application decreases invasiveness of treatment and meets patients requirements. The objective of this study was to assess the safety and clinical efficacy of Urolastic injection. One hundred and five patients with SUI (including 91 patients with RSUI) were treated with Urolastic in three tertiary gynecological clinics. The efficacy of the procedure was assessed objectively at each follow-up visit by means of cough test and a standard 1-hour pad test. Objective success rate after 12 months after primary procedure in RSUI patients was found in 59.3% of patients. In 14 patients with primary SUI improvement after 1 year was found in 71.4% of patients. Although cure rates after MUS are up to 90% there is still place for less invasive treatment option like periurethral injection of bulking agents, especially in patients with previous SUI surgical management. PMID:26106616

  11. Primary Prevention of Urinary Incontinence: A Case Study of Prenatal and Intrapartum Interventions.

    PubMed

    Kissler, Katherine; Yount, Susan M; Rendeiro, Melissa; Zeidenstein, Laura

    2016-07-01

    A wealth of information is available regarding the diagnosis and treatment of urinary incontinence. However, there is a dearth of quality information and clinical practice guidelines regarding the primary prevention of urinary incontinence. Given the high prevalence of this concern and the often cited correlation between pregnancy, childbirth, and urinary incontinence, women's health care providers should be aware of risk factors and primary prevention strategies for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in order to reduce associated physical and emotional suffering. This case report describes several common risk factors for SUI and missed opportunities for primary prevention of postpartum urinary incontinence. The most effective methods for preventing urinary incontinence include correct teaching of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT; specifically Kegel exercises), moderate combined physical exercise regimens, counseling and support for weight loss, counseling against smoking, appropriate treatment for asthma and constipation, and appropriate labor management to prevent pelvic organ prolapse, urethral injury, and pelvic floor muscle damage. PMID:26971402

  12. Annual Hospital Volume of High Dose Interleukin-2 and Inpatient Mortality in Melanoma and Renal Cell Carcinoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Kathan; Appleman, Leonard; Wang, Hong; Tarhini, Ahmad A.; Parikh, Rahul A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Immunotherapy using high dose interleukin-2 (HD IL2) in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and melanoma is associated with severe toxicities. The association between annual hospital volume of HD IL2 and inpatient mortality is not well studied. In this study we aim to quantify the impact of annual hospital volume of HD IL2 on inpatient mortality using National Inpatient Sample (NIS) data. Methods We did a cross-sectional study using NIS, one of the largest inpatient datasets in United States, from 2003 to 2011. Patients with melanoma and RCC receiving HD IL2 were identified by ICD9 procedure code 00.15. The primary outcome was inpatient mortality. Using Joinpoint regression, which detects change in trend of inpatient mortality with change in annual volume, the hospitals were classified in three volume categories (low: 1–40, medium: 41–120, high: >120). Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify predictors of inpatient mortality controlling for confounders. Results From 2003 to 2011, 29,532 patients with RCC or melanoma who received HD IL2 were identified, and 124 died during the hospitalization (0.4%). The hospitals with low, medium and high annual volume had significant difference in inpatient mortality (0.83%, 0.29% and 0.13% respectively, p = 0.0003). On multivariate analysis, low volume hospitals were associated with significantly higher odds of inpatient mortality (OR 6.1, 95% CI 1.6–23.2, p = 0.003) as compared to high volume hospitals. Additionally, the hospitals with annual volume of 1–20 had even higher rates (1.31% vs. 0.13%, p<0.0001) and multivariate odds (OR 8.9, 95% CI 2.4–33.2, p = 0.0006) of inpatient mortality as compared to high volume hospitals. Conclusions Lower annual hospital volume of HD IL2 is associated with worse outcomes. Annual hospital volume of 1–40 and 1–20 treatments per year is associated with 6 and 9 times higher odds of inpatient mortality respectively as compared to high volume hospitals

  13. Urinary incontinence in women: its prevalence and its management in a health promotion clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, G L; Memel, D S

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND. It has been suggested that regular clinics might improve the management of urinary incontinence in general practice. AIM. A study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of urinary incontinence among women in one general practice and the feasibility of using a health promotion clinic in its management. METHOD. Questionnaires were sent to a 10% sample of women aged 20 years and over on the practice register. Pregnant women were excluded. RESULTS. Of 384 questionnaires sent to eligible women, 314 were completed correctly (82%). The overall reported prevalence of urinary incontinence was 53%; 8% of these women had urge incontinence, 46% had stress incontinence and 43% had mixed incontinence. Incontinence was positively correlated with parity and with gynaecological operation other than hysterectomy and repair of prolapse but not with perineal suturing after childbirth, delivery of a baby weighing 9 lb (4.1 kg) or more or mode of delivery. Twenty seven out of 78 incontinent women (35%) who completed a second questionnaire admitted to worrying about their incontinence but only 10 (13%) had consulted their doctor about the problem. The main reason given for not consulting was that incontinence was a minor inconvenience only. The 167 incontinent women were offered an appointment at a women's clinic but only 13 attended. Of these, 10 were entered into a 12 week treatment trial. Various treatments were offered, such as the women being taught bladder training and pelvic floor exercises. One woman was lost to follow up, and for eight out of nine women their continence had improved, both subjectively and objectively. CONCLUSION. Urinary incontinence in women is a common problem. It can be successfully diagnosed and treated in general practice but low attendance makes the health promotion clinic setting an inefficient means of achieving this. PMID:8185987

  14. Post-Radical-Prostatectomy Urinary Incontinence: The Management of Concomitant Bladder Neck Contracture

    PubMed Central

    King, Thomas; Almallah, Y. Zaki

    2012-01-01

    Urinary incontinence postradical prostatectomy is a common problem which adversely affects quality of life. Concomitant bladder neck contracture in the setting of postprostatectomy incontinence represents a challenging clinical problem. Postprostatectomy bladder neck contracture is frequently recurrent and makes surgical management of incontinence difficult. The aetiology of bladder neck contracture and what constitutes the optimum management strategy are controversial. Here we review the literature and also present our approach. PMID:22611382

  15. Radiation therapy in carcinoma of the prostate: a contributing cause of urinary incontinence

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, J.J.; Smith, R.B.; Raz, S.

    1984-11-01

    The authors believe that radiation therapy as a postoperative adjuvant or preceding salvage prostatectomy for carcinoma is particularly conducive to the complication of urinary incontinence by virtue of its sclerosing effect on residual sphincter mechanisms. Obviously, such dual therapy will continue to prevail in the foreseeable future but patients should be notified of the added risk and be prepared for further treatment of the incontinence. Unfortunately, these patients have an extra risk of complications and failure from anti-incontinence operations.

  16. Female stress urinary incontinence: standard techniques revisited and critical evaluation of innovative techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Riese, Cornelia; de Riese, Werner T. W.

    2003-06-01

    Objectives: The treatment of female urinary incontinence (UI) is a growing health care concern in our aging society. Publications of recent innovations and modifications are creating expectations. This brief review provides some insight and structure regarding indications and expected outcomes for the different approaches. Materials: Data extraction is part of a Medline data base search, which was performed for "female stress incontinence" from 1960 until 2000. Additional literature search was performed to cover 2001 and 2002. Outcome data were extracted. Results: (1) INJECTION OF BULKING AGENTS (collagen, synthetic agents): The indication for mucosal coaptation was more clearly defined and in the majority of articles limited to ISD. (2) OPEN COLPOSUSPENSION (Burch, MMK): Best long-term results of all operative procedures, to date considered the gold standard. (3) LAPAROSCOPIC COLPOSUSPENSION (different modifications): Long-term success rates appear dependent on operator skills. There are few long-term data. (4) NEEDLE SUSPENSION: (Stamey, Pareyra and modifications): Initial results were equal to Burch with less morbidity, but long-term success rates are worse. (5) SLING PROCEDURES (autologous, synthetic, allogenic graft materials, different modes of support and anchoring, free tapes): The suburethral sling has traditionally been considered a procedure for those in whom suspension had failed and for those with severe ISD. The most current trend shows its use as a primary procedure for SUI. Long-term data beyond 5 years are insufficient. (6) EXTERNAL OCCLUSIVE DEVICES (vaginal sponges and pessaries, urethral insert): Both vaginal and urethral insert devices can be effective in selected patients. (7) IMPLANTABLE ARTEFICIAL URETHRAL SPHINCTERS: Modifications and improvements of the devices resulted in improved clinical results regarding durability and efficacy. CONCLUSION: (1) The Burch colposuspension is still considered the gold standard in the treatment of female

  17. Urinary Incontinence in Juvenile Female Soft-Coated Wheaten Terriers: Hospital Prevalence and Anatomic Urogenital Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Callard, Jason; McLoughlin, Mary A; Byron, Julie K; Chew, Dennis J

    2016-01-01

    Urinary incontinence in juvenile female dogs is often associated with urogenital anatomic anomalies. Study objectives include: (1) determine hospital prevalence of urinary incontinence in juvenile female soft-coated wheaten terriers (SCWTs) compared to other affected dogs; (2) characterize anatomic anomalies affecting urinary incontinent juvenile female SCWTs utilizing uroendoscopy; and (3) compare incidence of ectopic ureters, paramesonephric remnants, and short urethras in juvenile female urinary incontinent SCWTs to other juvenile female dogs with urinary incontinence. We hypothesize juvenile SCWTs have an increased prevalence of urinary incontinence and an increased incidence of ectopic ureters, paramesonephric remnants, and short urethras compared to non-SCWTs with urinary incontinence within our hospital population. Medical records of female dogs 6 mo of age and younger with clinical signs of urinary incontinence and video uroendoscopic evaluation presenting to The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center from January 2000 to December 2011 were reviewed. Twelve juvenile SCWTs and 107 juvenile non-SCWTs met the inclusion criteria. Juvenile SCWTs were found to have an increased hospital prevalence of urinary incontinence compared to other affected breeds. Observed anomalies in SCWTs include: ectopic ureters, shortened urethras, paramesonephric remnants, and bifid vaginas. This information will help guide veterinarians in recognizing a breed-related disorder of the lower urogenital tract in SCWTs. PMID:26606208

  18. Incontinence-associated dermatitis: new insights into an old problem.

    PubMed

    Voegeli, David

    Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) is a common skin disorder seen in patients with incontinence. Typically IAD presents as inflammation of the skin surface characterised by redness, and in extreme cases, swelling and blister formation. If untreated this usually rapidly leads to excoriation and skin breakdown, which may subsequently become infected by the skin flora. While this is a common condition encountered in all areas of nursing practice, gaps remain in our understanding of the many contributing factors. A lack of standardised definitions of IAD, differences in terminology, and a bewildering increase in products available to prevent and manage IAD, makes it difficult for nurses to deliver evidence-based care. However, it is an area where nursing research has made a considerable contribution over the past few years. This article explores the current thinking on IAD and the implications for nursing practice. PMID:26972998

  19. Incontinence-associated dermatitis: identification, prevention and care.

    PubMed

    Holroyd, Sharon

    Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) is a common skin disorder experienced by people who suffer from faecal and/or urinary incontinence. It is painful and in some cases accompanied by significant secondary infections. The prevalence is higher in those people receiving long-term care at home. IAD is often misdiagnosed and confused with pressure ulcers. Care providers now crossover health and social care boundaries and education on continence-related issues is often not prioritised. This article looks at normal skin physiology and the aetiology of IAD versus pressure ulcers. It suggests prevention and management strategies in relation to IAD; in particular, the use of barrier creams. A selection of case studies evaluating the efficacy of using Cutimed PROTECT cream in cases of IAD are presented. PMID:25978474

  20. Barrier products in the treatment of incontinence-associated dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Lian, Yaping

    2016-07-20

    This article reviews contemporary primary research studies to establish the evidence supporting the use of barrier products and evaluate practice regarding their use in the acute hospital setting. Six primary research studies investigating the use of barrier products for preventing and managing incontinence-associated dermatitis were reviewed. The aim was to identify the most effective treatments for incontinence-associated dermatitis to enhance the quality of life of patients. The studies identified that there is no significant difference in efficacy between petrolatum, zinc oxide oil and a polymer-based barrier film, and that a polymer-based barrier film is more cost-effective than petrolatum or zinc oxide. However, further robust research studies are required to inform practice. The efficacy and cost-effectiveness of barrier products can be enhanced by providing education in clinical practice on consistent skin care regimens and effective use of barrier products. PMID:27440366

  1. Gracilis muscle as neoanal sphincter for faecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Zailani, M H M; Azmi, M N; Deen, K I

    2010-03-01

    Faecal incontinence is a debilitating chronic clinical condition which may affect the patient and care givers. Modality of treatment is based on severity of the symptoms as well as the anatomical defect itself, availability of resources and expertise. We describe a modified technique of dynamic graciloplasty as neoanal sphincter for the treatment severe faecal incontinence who has failed previous over lapping sphincteroplasty. In our modified version, instead of using implanted intramuscular electrodes and subcutaneous neurostimulator to provide continuous stimulation, the patient will undergo an external stimulation on the nerve of transplanted gracilis periodically and concurrent biofeedback therapy. We believe the technique is relatively easy to learn and very cost effective without any electrodes or neurostimulator related complications. PMID:21265253

  2. Fecal incontinence: a review of prevalence and obstetric risk factors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Andrea; Guess, Marsha; Connell, Kathleen; Powers, Kenneth; Lazarou, George; Mikhail, Magdy

    2006-05-01

    Anal incontinence (AI) is a significant problem that causes social and hygienic inconvenience. The true prevalence of AI is difficult to estimate due to inconsistencies in research methods, but larger studies suggest a rate of 2-6% for incontinence to stool. There is a significant association between sonographically detected anal sphincter defects and symptoms of AI. The intrapartum factors most consistently associated with a higher risk of AI include: forceps delivery, third or fourth degree tears, and length of the second stage of labor. Fetal weight of > 4,000 g is also associated with AI. Repair of the sphincter can be performed in either an overlapping or an end-to-end fashion, with similar results for both methods. The role of cesarean delivery for the prevention of AI remains unclear, and further study should be devoted to this question. PMID:15973465

  3. [Incontinence in old age: a social and economic problem].

    PubMed

    Welz-Barth, A

    2007-04-01

    Being afflicted with urinary incontinence in old age represents manifold medical, social, and economic problems and restrictions. The objective loss of control and decreased self-confidence result in reduced social interactions and lead to isolation and ostracism accompanied by withdrawal and depression. Giving up leisure time activities, losing social contacts, and the increasing need for long-term care often lead inevitably to a higher degree of dependency and institutionalization. In addition, the taboo still placed on this problem by those affected as well as by the attending physicians has resulted in too few patients receiving adequate diagnosis and being offered sensible treatment options. These problems can only be solved by an interdisciplinary approach. Further information, continuing education, and sensitivity toward these aspects are needed. Only then can incontinence in old age as a social and economic problem exacerbated by the demographic changes be improved. PMID:17310392

  4. Treatment strategies in obstructed defecation and fecal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Khaikin, Marat; Wexner, Steven D

    2006-01-01

    Obstructed defecation (OD) and fecal incontinence (FI) are challenging clinical problems, which are commonly encountered in the practice of colorectal surgeons and gastroenterologists. These disorders socially and psychologically distress patients and greatly impair their quality of life. The underlying anatomical and pathophysiological changes are complex, often incompletely understood and cannot always be determined. As a consequence, many medical, surgical, and behavioral approaches have been described, with no panacea. Over the past decade, advances in an understanding of these disorders together with rational and similar methods of evaluation in anorectal physiology laboratories (ARP), radiology studies, and new surgical techniques have led to promising results. In this brief review, we discuss treatment strategies and recent updates on clinical and therapeutic aspects of obstructed defecation and fecal incontinence. PMID:16718835

  5. Hypnotherapy for incontinence caused by the unstable detrusor.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, R M; Baxby, K

    1982-01-01

    Fifty incontinent women with proved detrusor instability completed 12 sessions of hypnosis (symptom removal by direct suggestion and "ego strengthening") over one month. This was continued at home with a prerecorded cassette, and all patients were followed up for at least six months. At the end of the 12 sessions 29 patients were entirely symptom free, 14 improved, and seven unchanged. Three months later cystometry in 44 of the patients showed conversion of the cystometrogram to stability in 22 and a significant improvement in a further 16; only six showed no objective improvement. Seven patients relapsed (three after bereavement). Further treatment was given and five out of six patients were rendered symptom free again. Patients with detrusor instability were not found to have a noticeably increased susceptibility to hypnosis. It is concluded that psychological factors are very important in "idiopathic" detrusor instability and that hypnotherapy is effective for incontinence due to this disorder. PMID:6805716

  6. Stem cells for stress urinary incontinence: the adipose promise

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Régis; Festy, Franck; Fritel, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), the most common type of incontinence in women, is a frequent and costly ailment responsible for an alteration in the quality of life. Although medical treatment gives some rather deceiving results, surgical techniques that include colposuspension or tension-free vaginal tape, employed in cases of urethral support defect, give a 5-year cure rate of more than 80%. However, these techniques could lead to complications or recurrence of symptoms. Recently, the initiation of urethral cell therapy has been undertaken by doctors and researchers. One principal source of autologous adult stem cells is generally used: muscle precursor cells (MPCs) which are the progenitors of skeletal muscle cells. Recently, a few research groups have shown interest in the MPCs and their potential for the treatment of urinary incontinence. However, using MPCs or fibroblasts isolated from a striated muscle biopsy could be questionable on several points. One of them is the in vitro cultivation of cells, which raises issues over the potential cost of the technique. Besides, numerous studies have shown the multipotent or even the pluripotent nature of stromal vascular fraction (SVF) or adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) from adipose tissue. These cells are capable of acquiring in vitro many different phenotypes. Furthermore, recent animal studies have highlighted the potential interest of SVF cells or ASCs in cell therapy, in particular for mesodermal tissue repair and revascularization. Moreover, the potential interest of SVF cells or ASCs for the treatment of urinary incontinence in women is supported by many other characteristics of these cells that are discussed here. Because access to these cells via lipoaspiration is simple, and because they are found in very large numbers in adipose tissue, their future potential as a stem cell reservoir for use in urethral or other types of cell therapy is enormous. PMID:19799652

  7. Regenerative medicine based applications to combat stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Thaker, Hatim; Sharma, Arun K

    2013-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), as an isolated symptom, is not a life threatening condition. However, the fear of unexpected urine leakage contributes to a significant decline in quality of life parameters for afflicted patients. Compared to other forms of incontinence, SUI cannot be easily treated with pharmacotherapy since it is inherently an anatomic problem. Treatment options include the use of bio-injectable materials to enhance closing pressures, and the placement of slings to bolster fascial support to the urethra. However, histologic findings of degeneration in the incontinent urethral sphincter invite the use of tissues engineering strategies to regenerate structures that aid in promoting continence. In this review, we will assess the role of stem cells in restoring multiple anatomic and physiological aspects of the sphincter. In particular, mesenchymal stem cells and CD34+ cells have shown great promise to differentiate into muscular and vascular components, respectively. Evidence supporting the use of cytokines and growth factors such as hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor and insulin-like growth factor further enhance the viability and direction of differentiation. Bridging the benefits of stem cells and growth factors involves the use of synthetic scaffolds like poly (1,8-octanediol-co-citrate) (POC) thin films. POC scaffolds are synthetic, elastomeric polymers that serve as substrates for cell growth, and upon degradation, release growth factors to the microenvironment in a controlled, predictable fashion. The combination of cellular, cytokine and scaffold elements aims to address the pathologic deficits to urinary incontinence, with a goal to improve patient symptoms and overall quality of life. PMID:24179600

  8. Inpatient care in Kazakhstan: A comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ainur B.; Izekenova, Aigulsum; Abikulova, Akmaral

    2013-01-01

    Background: Reforms in inpatient care are critical for the enhancement of the efficiency of health systems. It still remains the main costly sector of the health system, accounting for more than 60% of all expenditures. Inappropriate and ineffective use of the hospital infrastructure is also a big issue. We aimed to analyze statistical data on health indices and dynamics of the hospital stock in Kazakhstan in comparison with those of developed countries. Materials and Methods: Study design is comparative quantitative analysis of inpatient care indicators. We used information and analytical methods, content analysis, mathematical treatment, and comparative analysis of statistical data on health system and dynamics of hospital stock in Kazakhstan and some other countries of the world [Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), USA, Canada, Russia, China, Japan, and Korea] over the period 2001-2011. Results: Despite substantial and continuous reductions over the past 10 years, hospitalization rates in Kazakhstan still remain high compared to some developed countries, including those of the OECD. In fact, the hospital stay length for all patients in Kazakhstan in 2011 is around 9.9 days, hospitalization ratio per 100 people is 16.3, and hospital beds capacity is 100 per 10,000 inhabitants. Conclusion: The decreased level of beds may adversely affect both medical organization and health system operations. Alternatives to the existing inpatient care are now being explored. The introduction of the unified national healthcare system allows shifting the primary focus on primary care organizations, which can decrease the demand on inpatient care as a result of improving the health status of people at the primary care level. PMID:24516484

  9. Management of the inpatient canine blood donor.

    PubMed

    Hohenhaus, A E

    1992-12-01

    The availability of inpatient blood donors as a source for transfusion allows flexibility that is lacking in an outpatient program. Choosing the appropriate dog as a donor is essential to the success of a hospital blood bank. Once a dog becomes a blood donor, routine physical and clinicopathologic examinations are necessary to monitor the animal's health and to ensure the quality of blood products. PMID:1472767

  10. Optimal management of incontinence-associated dermatitis in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Gray, Mikel

    2010-01-01

    Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD), sometimes referred to as perineal dermatitis, is an inflammation of the skin associated with exposure to urine or stool. Elderly adults, and especially those in long-term care facilities, are at risk for urinary or fecal incontinence and IAD. Traditionally, IAD has received little attention as a distinct disorder, and it is sometimes confused with stage I or II pressure ulcers. However, a modest but growing body of research is beginning to provide insights into the epidemiology, etiology, and pathophysiology of IAD. In addition, recent changes in reimbursement policies from the US Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services regarding pressure ulcer prevention has focused attention on the differential diagnosis of IAD versus pressure ulcer, and its influence on pressure ulcer risk. Color, location, depth, and the presence or absence of necrotic tissue are visual indicators used to differentiate IAD from pressure-related skin damage. Prevention is based on avoiding or minimizing exposure to stool or urine combined with a structured skin-care program based on principles of gentle cleansing, moisturization, preferably with an emollient, and application of a skin protectant. Treatment of IAD focuses on three main goals: (i) removal of irritants from the affected skin; (ii) eradication of cutaneous infections such as candidiasis; and (iii) containment or diversion of incontinent urine or stool. PMID:20131923

  11. [Management of female stress urinary incontinence in a specialized unit].

    PubMed

    Medina López, R A; Campoy Martínez, P; Ramírez Mendoza, A; Soltero González, A

    1998-02-01

    Urinary exertional incontinence is a very common condition which requires a broad range of therapeutic options being available. Besides, the creation of specialised units in urology is now evident, one of the areas involved being Urogynaecology. To focus the issue of female urinary incontinence, the following should be considered: to begin with, treatment is not imperative, patients must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, the least invasive principle must prevail, diagnosis must be early, and it should be taken into account that primary and secondary prevention is both possible and necessary. A working pattern was designed accordingly, to sustain therapeutic decisions, which consisted in a detailed anamnesis, complete examination and application of an established diagnostic-therapeutic algorithm. Even so, a therapeutic, medical or surgical decision will be chosen and patients will be monitored at one, four and sixteen months after completion of treatment. To achieve good results in the management of female urinary exertional incontinence it is essential to include a large number of patients. In fact, the key is to establish a close collaboration with the gynaecologists. PMID:9586264

  12. Review of the diagnosis, management and treatment of fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Rezvan, Azadeh; Jakus-Waldman, Sharon; Abbas, Maher A; Yazdany, Tajnoos; Nguyen, John

    2015-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is a common problem affecting women but is underreported because of patients' reluctance to discuss their symptoms and an inconsistent use of screening tools by physicians. Obstetric injury from vaginal delivery is the principal cause of fecal incontinence among young women. Prevalence rates are highest in the elderly, especially those with declining cognitive function. There are multiple diagnostic tests including anal manometry, endosonography, defecography, and pudendal nerve latency testing to assist physicians in the workup of patients and aid in the selection of appropriate treatment options. After patient identification and workup, most patients can be offered conservative measures including dietary measures and biofeedback. Surgery is indicated for specific abnormalities such as rectal prolapse, fistula, and recent obstetrical sphincter injury repair. Management of refractory cases may include sacral nerve stimulation and percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation. Fecal diversion or an artificial bowel sphincter may be considered when all else has failed. Primary care physicians, gynecologists, and specialists in female pelvic medicine should screen women for fecal incontinence. Initial conservative therapy may be directed by the primary health provider, and those resistant to this approach should be referred to specialist care. PMID:25185605

  13. Urolastic—A New Bulking Agent for the Treatment of Women with Stress Urinary Incontinence: Outcome of 12 Months Follow Up

    PubMed Central

    Zajda, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the new injectable implant, Urolastic, in women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) after 12-month followup. Materials and Methods. A prospective, cohort study included adult women with SUI. Patients were treated with Urolastic periurethral injections under local anaesthesia. The injection procedure was repeated after 6 weeks when indicated. Patients were evaluated for efficacy and safety parameters 6 weeks, 3 months, and 12 months after therapy. Results. Twenty women 56 (33–71) years old were included. Thirteen patients (65%) received one injection each (overall average of 2,1 mL); 7 patients (35%) received a second injection. Nineteen patients complete the 12-month followup. The mean Stamey incontinence grade significantly decreased from 1.9 at baseline to 0.4 at 12 months (visit IV) (P < 0.001). None of the patients were dry at baseline; 68% of them were dry at 12 months. The mean number of incontinence episodes significantly decreased from 6/day at baseline to 1.6/day at visit IV (P < 0.001). Reduction in pad weight went from 20.2 to 7.8 g at one year. The mean I-QoL score significantly increased from 51 at baseline to 76 at visit IV (P < 0.001). Six patients (30%) developed minor complications related to the injection procedure. Conclusions. Urolastic is effective and long-standing urethral bulking agent with moderate adverse events. PMID:24454351

  14. Urolastic-a new bulking agent for the treatment of women with stress urinary incontinence: outcome of 12 months follow up.

    PubMed

    Zajda, Janusz; Farag, Fawzy

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the new injectable implant, Urolastic, in women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) after 12-month followup. Materials and Methods. A prospective, cohort study included adult women with SUI. Patients were treated with Urolastic periurethral injections under local anaesthesia. The injection procedure was repeated after 6 weeks when indicated. Patients were evaluated for efficacy and safety parameters 6 weeks, 3 months, and 12 months after therapy. Results. Twenty women 56 (33-71) years old were included. Thirteen patients (65%) received one injection each (overall average of 2,1 mL); 7 patients (35%) received a second injection. Nineteen patients complete the 12-month followup. The mean Stamey incontinence grade significantly decreased from 1.9 at baseline to 0.4 at 12 months (visit IV) (P < 0.001). None of the patients were dry at baseline; 68% of them were dry at 12 months. The mean number of incontinence episodes significantly decreased from 6/day at baseline to 1.6/day at visit IV (P < 0.001). Reduction in pad weight went from 20.2 to 7.8 g at one year. The mean I-QoL score significantly increased from 51 at baseline to 76 at visit IV (P < 0.001). Six patients (30%) developed minor complications related to the injection procedure. Conclusions. Urolastic is effective and long-standing urethral bulking agent with moderate adverse events. PMID:24454351

  15. Clinical and Cost Implications of Inpatient Versus Outpatient Orthopedic Surgeries: A Systematic Review of the Published Literature

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Dennis C.; Sprague, Sheila; Bhandari, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    The number of outpatient orthopedic surgeries performed within North America continues to increase. The impact of this change in services on patient outcomes is largely unknown. The objective of this review is to compare patient outcomes and associated costs for outpatient orthopedic surgeries traditionally performed in hospital to inpatient surgeries, as well as to summarize the eligibility and preoperative education requirements for outpatient orthopedic surgery in North America. We performed a systematic review of Medline, Pubmed and Embase databases for articles comparing the clinical and economic impact of outpatient orthopedic surgical procedures versus inpatient procedures in North America. We reported on requirements for inpatient versus outpatient care, preoperative education requirements, complications and patient outcomes, patient satisfaction, and when available total mean costs. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria for this review. Eligibility requirements for outpatient orthopedic surgery within the included studies varied, but generally included: patient consent, a caregiver at home following surgery, close proximity to an outpatient center, and no history of serious medical problems. Preoperative education programs were not always compulsory and practices varied between outpatient centers. All of the reviewed studies reported that outpatient surgeries had similar or improved level of pain and rates of nausea. Outpatients reported increased satisfaction with the care they received. As expected, outpatient procedures were less expensive than inpatient procedures. This review found that outpatient procedures in North America appear to be less expensive and safe alternatives to inpatient care for patients who are at lower risk for complications and procedures that do not necessarily require close hospital level care monitoring following same day surgery. PMID:26793295

  16. Current Developments and Perspectives on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Urinary Incontinence and Genital Prolapse in Women

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, G.; Kölbl, H.

    2012-01-01

    As a key area of gynaecology, urogynaecology has undergone impressive changes in the past few years. Together with the high prevalence of functional pelvic floor disorders, modern anaesthesia procedures and the introduction of new, innovative minimally invasive operation techniques have led to a dramatic increase in the number of operations for incontinence and prolapses. The increasingly subtle diagnostic options, such as, e. g., 2D and 3D sonography of the pelvic floor provide unambiguous findings and facilitate decision making. Tension-free vaginal slings in retro-pubic, trans-obturator or single-incision techniques show a high success rate with few complications and have almost completely replaced the more invasive abdominal surgical techniques for the operative management of stress incontinence. Especially for recurrent prolapse the use of alloplastic nets leads to a markedly improved anatomic and functional outcome. In spite of the euphoria about modern operation techniques and novel net materials, in-depth knowledge of pelvic floor anatomy, sufficient surgical experience and unequivocal guideline-conform indications are mandatory for satisfactory treatment outcomes. The afflicted women must be informed in detail about alternative procedures and more emphasis should be placed on conservative therapy. Novel surgical techniques should be monitored by registers or clinical trials. The professional society is called upon to improve the training curricula for pelvic floor surgery. PMID:25308980

  17. Comparison of the clinical outcomes of transobturator and single-incision slings for stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ling-Ying; Yang, Tsai-Hwa; Kung, Fu-Tsai; Chuang, Fei-Chi; Huang, Kuan-Hui

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of anti-incontinence surgeries employing the transobturator sling and single-incision sling (SIS). Our hypothesis is that the outcome of the SIS is not inferior to the obturator sling. This retrospective study reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent anti-incontinence surgery with the transobturator sling or SIS from July 2005 to November 2014. Patients who underwent concomitant pelvic organ reconstruction with an artificial mesh were excluded. Assessments included preoperative and postoperative urodynamic examinations, perioperative complications, and postoperative urogenital symptoms. A total of 122 women were recruited according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Among them, 68 patients underwent transobturator sling procedures while 54 patients underwent SIS procedures. The subjective failure rate of the transobturator sling and SIS were 10.2% and 18.5%, respectively (p = 0.292). The objective failure rate, defined as a pad test showing more than 2 g of urine, was 10.2% for the transobturator sling and 12.9% for the SIS (p = 0.777). SIS resulted in less blood loss, operative time, length of hospital stay, and transient voiding dysfunction after the operation. No major complication occurred after either surgical intervention. In conclusion, SIS and transobturator slings might have similar efficacy, safety, and effects on new-onset urogenital symptoms. PMID:27450026

  18. Prevalence of incontinence, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and oppositional defiant disorder in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Niemczyk, Justine; Equit, Monika; Braun-Bither, Katrin; Klein, Anna-Maria; von Gontard, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    Externalizing disorders as attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) are common in children with nocturnal enuresis (NE), daytime urinary incontinence (DUI) and faecal incontinence (FI). We examined the prevalence rates of ADHD, ODD and incontinence in a defined geographical area and analysed the association between externalizing disorders and subtypes of incontinence. 1,676 parents of children who were presented at the mandatory school-entry medical examination completed a questionnaire with all DSM-IV items of ADHD, ODD and six questions regarding incontinence. 50.2% were male and mean age was 5.7 years. 9.1% had at least one subtype of incontinence (8.5% had NE, 1.9% DUI and 0.8% FI). Boys were significantly more affected by incontinence overall, NE, FI and ADHD than girls. 6.4% had ADHD, 6.2% had ODD and 2.6% were affected by ADHD and ODD. 10.3% of the children with incontinence had ADHD and 10.3% ODD. Children with FI were significantly more affected by externalizing disorders (50%) than children with isolated NE (14.5%), children with DUI (9.5%) and continent children (9.5%). Children with incontinence, especially those with FI, are at much higher risk of externalizing disorders. An additional effect of children with both ADHD and ODD having higher rates of incontinence than children with only one disorder could not be found. However, these children represent a high-risk group with lower compliance to treatment and worse outcome. Therefore, screening not only for ADHD but also for ODD should be implemented for all children with incontinence. PMID:25331539

  19. A methodology to estimate the potential to move inpatient to one day surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gilliard, Nicolas; Eggli, Yves; Halfon, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    Background The proportion of surgery performed as a day case varies greatly between countries. Low rates suggest a large growth potential in many countries. Measuring the potential development of one day surgery should be grounded on a comprehensive list of eligible procedures, based on a priori criteria, independent of local practices. We propose an algorithmic method, using only routinely available hospital data to identify surgical hospitalizations that could have been performed as one day treatment. Methods Moving inpatient surgery to one day surgery was considered feasible if at least one surgical intervention was eligible for one day surgery and if none of the following criteria were present: intervention or affection requiring an inpatient stay, patient transferred or died, and length of stay greater than four days. The eligibility of a procedure to be treated as a day case was mainly established on three a priori criteria: surgical access (endoscopic or not), the invasiveness of the procedure and the size of the operated organ. Few overrides of these criteria occurred when procedures were associated with risk of immediate complications, slow physiological recovery or pain treatment requiring hospital infrastructure. The algorithm was applied to a random sample of one million inpatient US stays and more than 600 thousand Swiss inpatient stays, in the year 2002. Results The validity of our method was demonstrated by the few discrepancies between the a priori criteria based list of eligible procedures, and a state list used for reimbursement purposes, the low proportion of hospitalizations eligible for one day care found in the US sample (4.9 versus 19.4% in the Swiss sample), and the distribution of the elective procedures found eligible in Swiss hospitals, well supported by the literature. There were large variations of the proportion of candidates for one day surgery among elective surgical hospitalizations between Swiss hospitals (3 to 45.3%). Conclusion

  20. Comparing Traditional Clinical Procedures with Four Systems to Diagnose Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newmark, Charles S.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The present investigation attempts to compare four formal systematic approaches (loose associations, autism, loss of ego boundaries, and delusions) to the diagnosis of schizophrenia with the traditional, more informal hospital procedures typically used in psychiatric inpatient settings. (Author/RK)

  1. Urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse in a population-based, racially diverse cohort. Prevalence and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    RORTVEIT, Guri; SUBAK, Leslee L.; THOM, David H.; CREASMAN, Jennifer M.; VITTINGHOFF, Eric; VAN DEN EEDEN, Stephen K.; BROWN, Jeanette S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We investigated the prevalence of and risk factors for combinations of urinary incontinence (UI), fecal incontinence (FI) and pelvic organ prolapse (POP) in racially diverse women over age 40. Methods The Reproductive Risks for Incontinence Study at Kaiser (RRISK) is a population-based study with data from 2106 women > 40 years. Pelvic floor conditions were determined by self-report. Risk factors were assessed by self-report, interview and record review. Independent risk factors were identified by multinomial logistic regression analysis. Results At least one pelvic floor condition was reported by 714 (34%) women. Of these, 494 (69%) had UI only, 60 (8%) POP only, and 46 (6%) had FI only. Both UI and FI were reported by 64 (9%), both UI and POP by 51 (7%). Among women with FI, 60% reported more than one condition. Corresponding figures for POP and UI were 49% and 18%. Estrogen use and constipation were shared risk factors for UI, FI and POP. BMI was a unique risk factor for UI only, diabetes for FI only and parity for POP only. No clear pattern could be found to support the hypothesis that risk factors for single conditions are more strongly associated with combined conditions. Conclusions Patients with FI or POP often have concomitant UI. These diseases both share and have unique risk factors in a complex pattern. PMID:22453506

  2. Cystolithiasis in women as a distant complication after minimal invasive treatment of stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Markowski, Michał; Kliś, Rafał; Różański, Waldemar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a condition of social dimension which generally pertains to women of various age. The only effective treatments of SUI are surgical procedures. The use of tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) ensures low invasiveness but also carries the risk of complications. One of the complications may be migration of the tape into the urinary bladder creating conditions for urinary stones. There is a number of treatment methods for cystolithiasis, among them the optical lithotripter, ultrasound and pneumatic probes, and recently, the holmium laser. Material and methods From January 2009 to February 2010, six women suffering from bladder stones were treated at our department. All patients had previously undergone SUI procedures and over time, thread or tape had penetrated into the urinary bladder. The stone diameters were in the range of 1.6 cm–3.5 cm. Lithotripsy was performed with the use of an 80 W holmium YAG laser as an endoscopic procedure: beam frequency length of 2100 nm and applied energy was in the range of 0.2–3.5 J. Results The urinary bladder stones were disintegrated and suctioned out. During the same procedure, the threads or tape from the SUI procedure were excised from the bladder. All patients were discharged from the hospital in good general condition after two days. Conclusions The holmium laser is an effective treatment for patients with bladder stone complications after SUI procedures when threads or tape have migrated and penetrated the bladder wall. The procedure is straightforward and safe for patients. PMID:25247087

  3. An examination of inpatient medical record keeping in the Orthopaedic Department of Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC), Moshi, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Hollis, Alexander Conor; Ebbs, Samuel Robert

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is a lack of published evidence examining the quality of patient notes in African healthcare settings. We aim to examine the completeness of the orthopaedic inpatient notes and begin development of a formal audit framework in a large Tanzanian Hospital. Methods A retrospective review of 155 orthopaedic inpatient notes at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC) was conducted spanning 3 months. Notes were reviewed using an agreed data collection pro forma considering 3 main outcomes; i) quantity of complete entries, ii) percentage completeness of individual sections, iii) documentation of follow-up. Results: Primary outcome 8% (n = 13) of the inpatient documents were complete (10/10 sections). 11% (n = 17) of the inpatient documents had 9 of 10 sections completed. 30% (n = 46) of the inpatient documents had 8 of 10 sections completed. Therefore, 51% (n = 79) of inpatient entries had 7 or fewer sections filled in. Secondary outcome Admission information and Demographics were both completed 88% (n = 137) of the time. History and the Examination sections were complete in 96% (n = 149) of cases. Investigations were complete in 77% (n = 119) and Diagnosis in 88% (n = 137). The Treatment section was complete 85% (n = 132) of the time and the Attending doctor 50% (n = 78). Procedures were 27% (n = 42) filled in while Summary of a day and Follow-up were 32% (n = 49) and 0% (n = 0) respectively. Tertiary outcome Follow-up was not completed in any entries. Conclusion There are a number of sections of the inpatient pro forma that remain inadequately completed. Regular auditing is essential for the continued progress in patient care. PMID:27347296

  4. Health Literacy Needs Related to Incontinence and Skin Damage among Family and Friend Caregivers of Individuals with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Rolnick, Cheri; Jackson, Jody; Arntson, Casey; Mullins, Jean; Hepburn, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to describe health literacy needs related to incontinence and skin care among family or friend caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and develop supportive and educational materials that address these needs. Design Descriptive Subjects and Settings The sample included 48 family/friend adult caregivers of individuals who had advanced dementia. Caregivers were spouses (44%), daughters (31%) or extended family members/friends (25%) recruited from community-based agencies, aged 64 (14) years (mean (SD)), and 75% female. Nearly half (48%) had a racially or ethnically diverse background. Methods Focus groups, interviews, and written surveys were conducted to assess health literacy needs of AD caregivers related to incontinence and skin care; verbal responses were audiotaped, transcribed, and summarized. To address these needs, a set of educational and supportive materials were developed whose content was directed by caregiver responses and supported by a literature review of current evidence and consultation with clinical and research experts. Study procedures were guided by advisory committee of AD caregivers. Results Caregivers had numerous health literacy needs related to incontinence and skin care; areas of need were categorized into knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Caregivers expressed a need to validate the health literacy they possessed. Fourteen educational and supportive documents were developed to address these needs. Conclusion Materials developed in this study are suitable to incorporate into interventions that support caregivers of persons with Alzheimer’s disease. They offer the potential to raise health literacy and care capacity of caregivers, increase communication with healthcare providers, and improve health outcomes of care recipients. PMID:24448620

  5. Introducing Narrative Practices in a Locked, Inpatient Psychiatric Unit

    PubMed Central

    Mehl-Madrona, Lewis

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Narrative approaches to psychotherapy are becoming more prevalent throughout the world. We wondered if a narrative-oriented psychotherapy group on a locked, inpatient unit, where most of the patients were present involuntarily, could be useful. The goal would be to help involuntary patients develop a coherent story about how they got to the hospital and what happened that led to their being admitted and link that to a story about what they would do after discharge that would prevent their returning to hospital in the next year. Methods: A daily, one-hour narrative group was implemented on one of three locked adult units in a psychiatric hospital. Quality-improvement procedures were already in place for assessing outcomes by unit using the BASIS-32 (32-item Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale). Unit outcomes were compared for the four quarters before the group was started and then four months after the group had been ongoing. Results: The unit on which the narrative group was implemented had a mean overall improvement in BASIS-32 scores of 2.8 units, compared with 1.0 unit for the other locked units combined. The results were statistically significant at the p < 0.0001 level. No differences were found between units for the four quarters prior to implementation of the intervention, and no other changes occurred during the quarter in which the group was conducted. Qualitative descriptions of the leaders' experiences are included in this report. Conclusions: A daily, one-hour narrative group can make a difference in a locked inpatient unit, presumably by creating cognitive structure for patients in how to understand what has happened to them. Further research is indicated in a randomized, controlled-trial format. PMID:21412477

  6. An unusual case of urinary incontinence in an intersex West Highland white terrier

    PubMed Central

    Connery, Neil A.; Spotswood, Tim

    2012-01-01

    A 5-year-old neutered female West Highland white terrier dog was presented with a history of congenital urinary incontinence that had become refractory to medical management. Complex urogenital anomalies including urethrovestibular and vestibuloperineal fistulae with low vulvar position along with a penoclitoris were present. Vaginectomy with perineal urethral reconstruction resolved the incontinence. PMID:23633714

  7. Resident and Family Satisfaction with Incontinence and Mobility Care: Sensitivity to Intervention Effects?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Sandra F.; Ouslander, Joseph G.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated whether the satisfaction levels of long-term-care residents and their family members concerning incontinence and mobility care were sensitive to an improvement intervention. Design and Methods: A randomized, controlled intervention trial with incontinent long-term-care residents was conducted wherein research staff…

  8. Current management of fecal incontinence: Choosing amongst treatment options to optimize outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Van Koughnett, Julie Ann M; Wexner, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    The severity of fecal incontinence widely varies and can have dramatic devastating impacts on a person’s life. Fecal incontinence is common, though it is often under-reported by patients. In addition to standard treatment options, new treatments have been developed during the past decade to attempt to effectively treat fecal incontinence with minimal morbidity. Non-operative treatments include dietary modifications, medications, and biofeedback therapy. Currently used surgical treatments include repair (sphincteroplasty), stimulation (sacral nerve stimulation or posterior tibial nerve stimulation), replacement (artificial bowel sphincter or muscle transposition) and diversion (stoma formation). Newer augmentation treatments such as radiofrequency energy delivery and injectable materials, are minimally invasive tools that may be good options before proceeding to surgery in some patients with mild fecal incontinence. In general, more invasive surgical treatments are now reserved for moderate to severe fecal incontinence. Functional and quality of life related outcomes, as well as potential complications of the treatment must be considered and the treatment of fecal incontinence must be individualized to the patient. General indications, techniques, and outcomes profiles for the various treatments of fecal incontinence are discussed in detail. Choosing the most effective treatment for the individual patient is essential to achieve optimal outcomes in the treatment of fecal incontinence. PMID:24409050

  9. A Graduate Nursing Curriculum for the Evaluation and Management of Urinary Incontinence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogalski, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Geriatric nurse practitioners should be educated in the evaluation and treatment of common geriatric syndromes like urinary incontinence. However, many advanced-practice nursing programs do not place an educational emphasis on urinary incontinence management. The purpose of this project is to provide information that supports the need for…

  10. The academic dilemma of the inpatient unit director.

    PubMed

    Leibenluft, E; Summergrad, P; Tasman, A

    1989-01-01

    Inpatient units in academic departments are typically directed by junior faculty members, who quickly abandon these positions for less demanding, more rewarding jobs. These frequent turnovers in the directorship compromise the clinical, research, and educational functions of the inpatient unit. The authors believe that the average inpatient director's truncated term can be traced to two causes: an exacerbation of the junior faculty member's developmental crisis by factors intrinsic to the inpatient unit and a disparity between the expectations for academic productivity and the opportunities for scholarly activity. These conflicts are elaborated and pragmatic ways of relieving this situation are suggested. PMID:2643358

  11. Positive behavioral support planning in the inpatient treatment of severe disruptive behaviors: A description of service features.

    PubMed

    Hamlett, Nakia M; Carr, Erika R; Hillbrand, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Positive behavior support (PBS) plans are increasingly used on inpatient units to assess and treat serious and dangerous behaviors displayed by patients with serious psychiatric impairment. A contemporary extension of traditional applied behavior analytic procedures, PBS plans integrate theories from several domains with perspectives on community psychology, positive psychology, and recovery-oriented care. Because there is little evidence to suggest that more invasive, punitive disciplinary strategies lead to long-term positive behavioral change (Parkes, 1996), PBS plans have emerged as an alternative to the use of seclusion and restraint or other forms of restrictive measures typically used on inpatient psychiatric units (Hammer et al., 2011). Moreover, PBS plans are a preferred method of intervention because more invasive interventions often cause more harm than good to all involved (Elliott et al., 2005). This article seeks to provide an integrated framework for the development of positive behavior support plans in inpatient psychiatric settings. In addition to explicating the philosophy and core elements of PBS plans, this work includes discussion of the didactic and pragmatic aspects of training clinical staff in inpatient mental health settings. A case vignette is included for illustration and to highlight the use of PBS plans as a mechanism for helping patients transition to less restrictive settings. This work will add to the scant literature examining the use of positive behavioral support plans in inpatient psychiatric settings. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27148952

  12. A systematic review and meta-analysis of incontinence-associated dermatitis, incontinence, and moisture as risk factors for pressure ulcer development.

    PubMed

    Beeckman, Dimitri; Van Lancker, Aurélie; Van Hecke, Ann; Verhaeghe, Sofie

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this analysis was to identify the association between incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD), its most important etiologic factors (incontinence and moisture), and pressure ulcers (PUs). A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed. We searched Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library for relevant papers dating through March 15, 2013. Fifty-eight studies were included. Measures of relative effect at the univariate level were meta-analyzed. In most studies (86%), a significant association between variables of interest was found, with pooled odds ratios of PUs in univariate models between 1.92 (95% CI 1.54-2.38) for urinary incontinence and 4.99 (95% CI 2.62-9.50) for double incontinence (p < .05). This evidence indicates an association between IAD, its most important etiological factors, and PUs. Methodological issues should be considered when interpreting the results of this review. PMID:24700170

  13. Female stress urinary incontinence: an evidence-based, case study approach.

    PubMed

    Knarr, Jamie; Musil, Carol; Warner, Camille; Kless, Jack R; Long, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Over half of all women are affected by urinary incontinence at some point during their lives. Due to patients' embarrassment and health care providers' reluctance to discuss this sensitive subject, many women may go untreated, and in turn, suffer with disruptive symptoms and co-morbid complications associated with urinary incontinence. This article highlights a literature review of the evaluation and management of female stress urinary incontinence using a corresponding case study example. Increasing awareness and implementing evidence-based, nonsurgical treatment options are essential components of high-quality care for women with stress urinary incontinence. Urologic nurses and other health care professionals are in an ideal position to evaluate and identify strategies for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence. PMID:25112024

  14. Diagnosis and office-based treatment of urinary incontinence in adults. Part one: diagnosis and testing

    PubMed Central

    Heidelbaugh, Joel J.; Jimbo, Masahito

    2013-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common problem in both men and women. This review article addresses its prevalence, risk factors, cost, the various types of incontinence, as well as how to diagnose them. The US Preventive Services Task Force, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and PubMed were reviewed for articles focusing on urinary incontinence. Incontinence is a common problem with a high societal cost. It is frequently underreported by patients so it is appropriate for primary-care providers to screen all women and older men during visits. A thorough history and physical examination combined with easy office-based tests can often yield a clear diagnosis and rule out other transient illnesses contributing to the incontinence. Specialist referral is occasionally needed in specific situations before embarking on a treatment plan. PMID:23904857

  15. [Practice guideline 'Urinary incontinence in women' from the Dutch College of General Practitioners].

    PubMed

    Damen-van Beek, Z; Wiersma, Tj

    2016-01-01

    - The Dutch College of General Practitioners' (NHG) practice guideline 'Urinary incontinence in women' provides guidelines for diagnosis and management of stress, urgency and mixed urinary incontinence in adult women.- General practitioners (GPs) should be alert to signals for urinary incontinence in women and offer active diagnosis and treatment if necessary.- Shared decision making is central in the guideline; the GP and the patient should discuss therapeutic options and decide on treatment policy in mutual consultation.- Women with stress urinary incontinence can choose between pelvic floor exercises or a pessary as initial treatment. Placing a midurethral sling (MUS) will be discussed if initial treatment is insufficiently effective or in the case of serious symptoms.- When bladder training is ineffective in urgency incontinence, the GP will discuss the pros and cons of adding an anticholinergic agent.- Exercise therapy can take place in the GPs practice or under supervision of a pelvic physical therapist. PMID:27484432

  16. Patients’ experience compared to physicians’ recommendations for the treatment of fecal incontinence: A qualitative approach

    PubMed Central

    Cichowski, Sara B; Dunivan, Gena C; Rogers, Rebecca G; Komesu, Yuko M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To compare physician-recommended treatment options for fecal incontinence to patients’ knowledge of treatment options using qualitative methods. Our hypothesis was that physician recommendations were not being communicated well to patients’ and that this impaired patients’ ability to cope with fecal incontinence. Methods Cognitive interviews were conducted with physicians who routinely care for women with fecal incontinence. Physicians were asked to describe their typical non-surgical treatment recommendations and counseling for fecal incontinence. Women with bothersome fecal incontinence were recruited to participate in focus groups and asked about personal experience with fecal incontinence symptoms and treatments. For both the physician interviews and patient focus groups, qualitative data analysis was performed using grounded theory methodology. Results Physicians identified several barriers patients face when seeking treatment: lack of physician interest towards fecal incontinence and patients’ embarrassment in discussing fecal incontinence. Physicians universally recommended fiber and pelvic floor exercise; they felt the majority (approximately 70–80%) of patients will improve with these therapies. Collectively, patients were able to identify all treatment recommendations given by physicians although many had discovered these treatments through personal experience. Three concepts emerged regarding treatment options that physicians did not identify but that patients felt were important in their treatment: hope for improvement, personal effort to control symptoms and encouragement to go on living life. Conclusions While physicians had treatment to offer women with fecal incontinence, women with fecal incontinence had found the best treatments through personal research and effort. Women want to hear a message of hope, encouragement and personal effort from providers. PMID:24573357

  17. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in octogenarians: A population-based study using the nationwide inpatient sample

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Clancy J.; Coe, Adam; Fino, Nora F.; Pawa, Rishi

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: In the elderly population, there is a growing demand for minimally invasive procedures as the incidence of pancreaticobiliary disease increases with age. Patients with advanced age offer unique challenges for any procedure because they also tend to have a higher rate of baseline comorbidities and malignancy. The aim of the current study was to characterize the mortality and length of stay of octogenarians undergoing inpatient endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Patients and methods: Using the 2007 – 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS), we performed a retrospective analysis of health-related outcomes among 80- to 89-year-old patients undergoing inpatient ERCP. Surgical patients were excluded. Results: An estimated 61,322 octogenarians underwent inpatient ERCP in the United States from 2007 to 2010. The mean age was 84.2 (SE 0.02) with 59.5 % (n = 36,460) of the patients being female. A large majority of the patients were white (79. %, n = 41,144) and 63.5 % (n = 38,940) had a comorbidity index of at least 2. The mean length of stay was 7.1 days (SE 0.08) with an in-hospital mortality of 3.1 % (n = 1,919). The primary discharge diagnosis was most often biliary stone disease (55.9 %, n = 34,263). A diagnosis of any infection was recorded in 45.0 % (n = 27,609) of patients. Infection was associated with a significantly higher risk of in-hospital mortality (OR 3.3, 95 % CI 2.6 – 4.2, P < 0.001). Conclusions: ERCP is now routinely being performed during inpatient admissions for octogenarians with diseases of the biliary tract. The mortality of octogenarians undergoing inpatient ERCP is higher than previous reports and is likely due to superimposed infection during the same admission. PMID:27556068

  18. [Inpatient treatment in the addicted patient].

    PubMed

    Capece, José

    2010-01-01

    We review the patient hospitalization criteria for Substance Abuse Disorder, taking into account current controversies and the weight of the evidence in the investigation in relation to clinical efficacy and effectiveness. We raise the parameters that mark the 24.455 law on the basic treatment plan from the current data in Argentina, which are inpatient detoxification and residential rehabilitation. We identify the need for detoxification and comprehensive for dual patients rehabilitation centers as peremptory. Criteria are defined according to international validation. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of hospitalization. Finally, we conclude in the need for a system where devices appropriate epidemiological needs, and that the clinical handle current information. PMID:20440409

  19. Subject-Controlled, On-demand, Dorsal Genital Nerve Stimulation to Treat Urgency Urinary Incontinence; a Pilot

    PubMed Central

    van Breda, Hendrikje M. K.; Farag, Fawzy F.; Martens, Frank M. J.; Heesakkers, John P. F. A.; Rijkhoff, Nico J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of subject-controlled, on-demand, dorsal genital nerve (DGN) stimulation on non-neurogenic urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) in a domestic setting. Materials and Methods:Non-neurogenic patients >18 years with overactive bladder symptoms and UUI were included. Exclusion criteria were mainly stress urinary incontinence. Patients underwent 1 week of subject-controlled, on-demand, DGN stimulation, delivered by a percutaneously placed electrode near the DGN connected to an external stimulator (pulse-rate 20 Hz, pulse-width 300 μs). Patients activated the stimulator when feeling the urge to void and stimulated for 30 s. The amplitude was set at the highest tolerable level. A bladder diary including a severity score of the UUI episodes/void (scores: 0 = none, 1 = drops, 2 = dashes, 3 = soaks) and a padtest was kept 3 days prior to, during, and 3 days after the test period. The subjective improvement was also scored. Results: Seven patients (4 males/3 females) were enrolled, the mean age was 55 years (range 23–73). Six completed the test week. In the remaining patient the electrode migrated and was removed. 5/6 finalized the complete bladder diary, 1/6 recorded only the heavy incontinence episodes (score = 3). 4/6 completed the padtest. In all patients who finalized the bladder diary the number of UUI episodes decreased, in 3/5 with ≥60%. The heavy incontinence episodes (score = 3) were resolved in 2/6 patients, and improved ≥80% in the other 4. The severity score of the UUI episodes/void was improved with ≥ 60% in 3/5 patients. The mean subjective improvement was 73%. Conclusion: This feasibility study indicates that subject-controlled, on-demand DGN stimulation using a percutaneously placed electrode is possible over a longer time period, in a home setting, with a positive effect on non-neurogenic overactive bladder symptoms with UUI. Although the placement is an easy procedure, it is difficult to fixate the electrode to keep

  20. [The devices used to correct the urinary incontinence by tension-free meshes. Are all them equals?].

    PubMed

    Galmés Belmonte, I; Díaz Gómez, E

    2004-01-01

    Since 1996, when Ulmsten described the TVT procedure (Tension-free Vaginal Tape) for correction of women urinary stress incontinence, a large number of different devices have been manufactured with that purpose. Results depend not only of the surgical procedure but also of two principal factors: 1. Characteristics and properties of the mesh. 2. System and way for the implantation. Properties of the mesh used are probably as important as surgical technique. It's not possible to assume that results achieved with the TVT device will be similar with other meshes. Further randomized studies will be necessary to make these affirmations. In this paper we analyse properties of the mesh, characteristics of the implantation system and the influence of those factors in the surgical results. Finally, we describe some of the devices available and the mesh characteristics of each one. PMID:15384273

  1. Follow-up of inpatient cocaine withdrawal for cocaine-using methadone patients.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, A; Foote, J; Magura, S; Sturiano, V; Xu, N; Stimmel, B

    1996-01-01

    Significant proportions of opiate-dependent persons entering methadone treatment are also addicted to cocaine and continue to use cocaine during treatment. One standard response to cocaine use has been inpatient detoxification. This study examined the effectiveness of this procedure by comparing pre- and posttreatment urine toxicologies for methadone patients who had been hospitalized for cocaine withdrawal. The results showed a negligible effect on cocaine abstinence (less than 1 out of 10 patients abstinent 12 weeks after detox) and a modest reduction in the frequency of cocaine use (one-quarter decline in urine tests positive after 12 weeks). These findings raise serious doubts about the cost-effectiveness of inpatient cocaine detoxification. Better strategies need to be implemented to enhance the chances of remaining abstinent once detoxified. PMID:9219143

  2. 42 CFR 412.50 - Furnishing of inpatient hospital services directly or under arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL... Inpatient Capital-Related Costs § 412.50 Furnishing of inpatient hospital services directly or...

  3. Urethral hypermobility after anti-incontinence surgery - a prognostic indicator?

    PubMed

    Viereck, Volker; Pauer, Hans-Ulrich; Hesse, Oda; Bader, Werner; Tunn, Ralf; Lange, Rainer; Hilgers, Reinhard; Emons, Günter

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to define the concept of hypermobility of the bladder neck and determine its effects on the cure rate and postoperative complications in patients undergoing colposuspension. In a retrospective study, 310 patients who underwent primary colposuspension for urodynamically proven genuine stress urinary incontinence were assessed by introital ultrasound before surgery and during follow-up for up to 48 months postoperatively. A total of 152 women completed 48 months of follow-up. Mobility of the bladder neck during straining was described as linear dorsocaudal movement (LDM) with LDM >15 mm being defined as hypermobility. The overall objective cure rate was 90.0% at 6-month follow-up vs 76.8% at 48-month follow-up (Kaplan-Meier estimators). Urge symptoms occurred in 12.6% (39/310) of the women and de novo urge incontinence in 2.3% (7/310). Bladder neck hypermobility was significantly reduced after anti-incontinence surgery, from 67.1% (208/310) before surgery to 5.5% (17/310) immediately after surgery (P<0.0001). Postoperative hypermobility was associated with a higher recurrence rate. In the hypermobility group, 52.9 and 34.0% of the patients were continent for up to 6 and 48 months, respectively, as opposed to 92.2 and 79.2% in the group without hypermobility (P<0.0001). Women with postoperative hypermobility had a 3.2-fold higher risk of recurrence within 48 months. Bladder neck hypermobility after surgery was also associated with postoperative voiding difficulty (P=0.0278). Patients in whom hypermobility of the bladder neck diagnosed before surgery persists after colposuspension have a higher risk of recurrence and are more likely to develop postoperative complications than those without this hypermobility. PMID:16538422

  4. Incontinence-associated dermatitis: protecting the older person.

    PubMed

    Beldon, Pauline

    As the older population in the UK continues to grow, so too will the number of people presenting with dermatological problems. Older people's skin is subject to dehydration internally and environmental factors externally. If, in addition, the individual suffers continence problems, he or she is at risk of painful incontinence-associated dermatitis, or even formation of a moisture lesion. The use of an effective barrier cream that gives protection while not interfering with continence pad efficacy can be an invaluable means of comfort to the older person. PMID:22585017

  5. Factors that Affect Consultation and Screening for Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Kunduru, Lalitha; Kim, Sung Min; Heymen, Steve; Whitehead, William E.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Fecal incontinence (FI) affects 15% of people age 70 years and older, but only 10%–30% discuss FI with their physicians. We aimed to identify barriers that prevent people from consulting with their physicians, and physicians from screening for FI. Methods We performed structured interviews of 124 individuals with FI (mean 56 years old, 87.9% women) recruited from 6 medical offices at the University of North Carolina Hospitals from June 2012 through March 2013. The subjects completed the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index and Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life Scale questionnaires. Interview questions aimed to determine which patients had consulted physicians for FI. Eleven of the 56 physicians with patients included in the study responded to the survey. Results Eighty-eight of the 124 participants consulted with their physicians about FI (consulters). These individuals had a higher incidence of depression than the 36 subjects who did not consult with their physicians about FI (non-consulters; P=.04), but similar Fecal Incontinence Severity Index scores. A smaller proportion of non-consulters were aware of available treatments than consulters (P<.01). Fifty-six percent of non-consulters said their FI was not serious enough to consult a physician. There was no difference between consulters and non-consulters in embarrassment in talking about FI. Among consulters, 88% initiated the conversation about FI with their physician. Seven of the 11 responding physicians screened for FI, and only screened high-risk patients. The 4 physicians who did not screen for FI were unaware of its prevalence, viewed FI as a low priority, or stated that patients were responsible for reporting their own symptoms. Conclusions Based on surveys of physicians and patients, many patients have insufficient knowledge about the availability and effectiveness of treatments for FI. Some people with FI do not discuss it with their physician because their symptoms are mild, and most

  6. Urinary incontinence and related urogenital symptoms in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Molander, U

    1993-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI), urinary tract infections (UTI) and related urogenital symptoms (UGS) in a representative sample of elderly women (Papers I & II), and to investigate factors (Papers II & III) influencing the prevalence of UI in these women. The effects of treatment with oral estriol and placebo on the vaginal bacterial flora, vaginal cytology and urogenital symptoms in elderly women suffering from the urogenital estrogen deficiency syndrome were compared (Paper IV). A health care programme, based on an algorithm model, for the investigation and treatment of elderly women suffering from UI and related UGS, was designed and applied to a large group of elderly women (Paper V). The prevalence of UI increased in a linear fashion from 12% in the 1940 birth cohort to 25% in the 1900 birth cohort (Papers I & II). There was similar increase in the prevalence of UTI from 14% in the 1920 birth cohort to 23% in the 1900 birth cohort. In contrast, the reported prevalence of UGS such as vaginal discomfort, discharge and pruritus did not increase with age. The prevalence of UI increased with increasing parity and after hysterectomy, but was unaffected by the duration of previous oral contraceptive usage. There was no evidence to suggest that the prevalence of UI increased at the time of the last menstrual period. Neurological illnesses were an uncommon cause of UI in women < or = to 75 years of age (Paper III). Oral estriol (3 mg/day for 4 weeks followed by 2 mg/day for a further 6 weeks) had a positive influence on vaginal pH, cytology and the vaginal bacteria flora, and on UGS in elderly women suffering from the urogenital estrogen deficiency syndrome (Paper IV). Using objective techniques of evaluation (Paper V) it was possible to demonstrate successful treatment of elderly women with urge and mixed incontinence using a simple health care programme. There was however no evidence of improvement in women

  7. Engineered structures for use in disposable incontinence products.

    PubMed

    White, C F

    2003-01-01

    The background and evolution of absorbent disposable hygiene products is discussed. The current technology used to produce disposable hygiene products such as baby diapers, feminine hygiene products and adult incontinence management products is shown to have a number of manufacturing and in-use problems. Alternative technologies, such as multilayer composite webs offer the opportunity to achieve better product weight control, and therefore better control over the other related properties, reduced raw material waste and improved functional characteristics. There are still problems to be resolved when using such composite materials, but the potential of these new technologies has now been established. PMID:12885194

  8. Pelvic floor muscle exercises in genuine urinary stress incontinence.

    PubMed

    Cammu, H; Van Nylen, M

    1997-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle exercises, in the treatment of genuine stress incontinence, have been used successfully since 1948. One may expect a significant improvement (warranting no further therapy), or cure rate of about 50%. These exercises have a long-lasting effect. Poorly motivated women should be discouraged to follow exercise sessions. An active co-operation between urogynecologist, physiotherapist and the patient is important in order to avoid undertreated and dissatisfied women. The option to be operated upon must be easily available. PMID:9557995

  9. Current Use of Injectable Agents for Female Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Herschorn, Sender

    2005-01-01

    Injectable materials of various types have been used for decades as an alternative to surgery for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence. Their success stems from their ability to improve intrinsic sphincter function, and patients with hypermobility may benefit as well. Nevertheless, the ideal agent has yet to be discovered, and surgery still may be necessary after treatment in some patients. Results vary among the different materials used, and safety, durability, and cost-effectiveness are important areas of concern in which more research is needed. PMID:16985872

  10. Urinary Incontinence and Urosepsis due to Forgotten Ureteral Stent.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Diego Martin; Losada, Johanna Belén; Montiel, Francisco Castro; Lafos, Norberto

    2016-09-01

    Case report of a patient who, while being under study due to total urinary incontinence and multiple urinary tract infections, interoccurs with urosepsis due to a forgotten and encrusted double-J stent. An open surgery is performed with two surgical approaches, suprapubic and minimal lumbotomy, in which a nephrectomy of the atrophic kidney, a resection of the urether with a calcified double-J in its interior and a cystolithotomy were conducted with the resulting favorable resolution of the pathology. PMID:27547734

  11. Tomographic Ultrasound Imaging to Control the Placement of Tension-Free Transobturator Tape in Female Urinary Stress Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Kupec, Tomas; Stickeler, Elmar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The objective was to evaluate, by means of tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI), the reliability of a novel approach for determining the position of the implanted tension-free transobturator tape (TOT). Furthermore, we analyzed the association between the position of the tape at rest and the subjective cure in stress incontinent women. Methods. This retrospective pilot study consists of 32 stress incontinent women, who underwent TOT procedure and routine sonographic control at day 1 postoperatively and at follow-up visit. TUI was applied on the resulting 4D volumes, thereby delivering 9 axial slices with a 4 mm interslice distance starting at the meatus urethrae internus in caudal direction. The reliability of the approach was tested by two examiners. Postoperative and follow-up ultrasound parameters of uncured and cured patients were analyzed. Results. Measurements of the position of the TOT demonstrated high intraclass correlation coefficients. We found minor differences between sonographic parameters at day 1 postoperatively and at follow-up after a median period of 321 days. In cured patients, the position of the tape was measured in a more caudal position than in uncured patients. Conclusions. TUI can be a reliable method for determining the position of the tape. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether the postoperatively determined position can be used as an indicator of future subjective cure. PMID:27610378

  12. The first Iraqi experience with the rectus fascia sling and transobturator tape for female stress incontinence: A randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Al-Azzawi, Issam S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To present the first experience in Iraq of autologous rectus fascia sling (RFS) procedures and transobturator tape (TOT) for treating female stress urinary incontinence (SUI), and to review the validity of the RFS in the era of synthetic tapes. Patients and methods From December 2004 to July 2012, 80 female patients with SUI were enrolled in the study, and randomly assigned into two types of surgery, with 40 treated by RFS (retropubic route) and 40 by TOT. The surgical results were compared between the groups and with those from previous studies. Results The mean operative duration was 80 min for RFS vs. 20 min for TOT. The early cure rate was 98% for RFS (with one failure due to prolonged urinary retention) and 95% for TOT (with two failures due to persistent incontinence). The early complications were mainly abdominal wound problems (20%) for RFS, and groin and upper thigh pain (13%) for TOT. The late complications were the development of postvoid residual urine (8% in RFS vs. 5% in TOT) and de novo detrusor overactivity (5% in each group). There were no vaginal or urethral erosions up to the end of the study. Conclusions RFS and TOT have comparable efficacy and safety in treating SUI. Nevertheless RFS, with its more invasive nature and long operative duration, should only be used when synthetic tapes are not available or not preferable. PMID:26019950

  13. Tomographic Ultrasound Imaging to Control the Placement of Tension-Free Transobturator Tape in Female Urinary Stress Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Gräf, Charlotte M; Kupec, Tomas; Stickeler, Elmar; Goecke, Tamme W; Meinhold-Heerlein, Ivo; Najjari, Laila

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The objective was to evaluate, by means of tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI), the reliability of a novel approach for determining the position of the implanted tension-free transobturator tape (TOT). Furthermore, we analyzed the association between the position of the tape at rest and the subjective cure in stress incontinent women. Methods. This retrospective pilot study consists of 32 stress incontinent women, who underwent TOT procedure and routine sonographic control at day 1 postoperatively and at follow-up visit. TUI was applied on the resulting 4D volumes, thereby delivering 9 axial slices with a 4 mm interslice distance starting at the meatus urethrae internus in caudal direction. The reliability of the approach was tested by two examiners. Postoperative and follow-up ultrasound parameters of uncured and cured patients were analyzed. Results. Measurements of the position of the TOT demonstrated high intraclass correlation coefficients. We found minor differences between sonographic parameters at day 1 postoperatively and at follow-up after a median period of 321 days. In cured patients, the position of the tape was measured in a more caudal position than in uncured patients. Conclusions. TUI can be a reliable method for determining the position of the tape. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether the postoperatively determined position can be used as an indicator of future subjective cure. PMID:27610378

  14. Characteristics of repeatedly assaultive psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Convit, A; Isay, D; Otis, D; Volavka, J

    1990-10-01

    Investigations of assaults in psychiatric hospitals have found that a small proportion of inpatients are responsible for a large percentage of the violence that occurs. In a large state hospital patients who were repeatedly violent (recidivists) were compared with patients who were violent only once or twice (nonrecidivists), and the relationships between repeatedly violent behavior and gender, age, and diagnosis were examined. All reports of violent incidents over a six-month period for a population of 1,552 inpatients--a total of 497 incidents involving 313 patients--were reviewed. Seventy patients were involved in three or more incidents each and were responsible for 53 percent of all violence. Recidivist men inflicted serious injuries at a rate ten times higher than that for all the other violent patients. Recidivist women were significantly younger than nonrecidivist assaultive women and were about the same mean age as the assaultive men. Recidivist women were also more likely to have organic brain disorder or personality disorder. PMID:2242874

  15. Therapeutic recreation treatment time during inpatient rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Gassaway, Julie; Dijkers, Marcel; Rider, Cecelia; Edens, Kelly; Cahow, Claire; Joyce, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Objective Following spinal cord injury (SCI), certified therapeutic recreation specialists (CTRSs) work with patients during rehabilitation to re-create leisure lifestyles. Although there is much literature available to describe the benefits of recreation, little has been written about the process of inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation therapeutic recreation (TR) programs or the effectiveness of such programs. To delineate how TR time is used during inpatient rehabilitation for SCI. Methods Six rehabilitation centers enrolled 600 patients with traumatic SCI for an observational study. CTRSs documented time spent on each of a set of specific TR activities during each patient encounter. Patterns of time use are described, for all patients and by neurologic category. Ordinary least-squares stepwise regression models are used to identify patient and injury characteristics predictive of total treatment time (overall and average per week) and time spent in TR activities. Results Ninety-four percent of patients enrolled in the SCIRehab study participated in TR. Patients received a mean total of 17.5 hours of TR; significant differences were seen in the amount of time spent in each activity among and within neurologic groups. The majority (76%) of patients participated in at least one structured therapeutic outing. Patient and injury characteristics explained little of the variation in time spent within activities. Conclusion The large amount of variability seen in TR treatment time within and among injury group categories, which is not explained well by patient and injury characteristics, sets the stage for future analyses to associate treatments with outcomes. PMID:21675356

  16. Self-Reported Suicidal Ideation in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steer, Robert A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Administered Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation (BSI) to 108 adolescent inpatients diagnosed with mixed psychiatric disorders. Examined relationships of Beck Depression Inventory, Anxiety Inventory, and Hopelessness Scale with BSI. Results support use of BSI with adolescent inpatients. Findings indicated that hopelessness was related to suicidal…

  17. A randomised controlled trial of Outpatient versus inpatient Polyp Treatment (OPT) for abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, T Justin; Middleton, Lee J; Cooper, Natalie Am; Diwakar, Lavanya; Denny, Elaine; Smith, Paul; Gennard, Laura; Stobert, Lynda; Roberts, Tracy E; Cheed, Versha; Bingham, Tracey; Jowett, Sue; Brettell, Elizabeth; Connor, Mary; Jones, Sian E; Daniels, Jane P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Uterine polyps cause abnormal bleeding in women and conventional practice is to remove them in hospital under general anaesthetic. Advances in technology make it possible to perform polypectomy in an outpatient setting, yet evidence of effectiveness is limited. OBJECTIVES To test the hypothesis that in women with abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) associated with benign uterine polyp(s), outpatient polyp treatment achieved as good, or no more than 25% worse, alleviation of bleeding symptoms at 6 months compared with standard inpatient treatment. The hypothesis that response to uterine polyp treatment differed according to the pattern of AUB, menopausal status and longer-term follow-up was tested. The cost-effectiveness and acceptability of outpatient polypectomy was examined. DESIGN A multicentre, non-inferiority, randomised controlled trial, incorporating a cost-effectiveness analysis and supplemented by a parallel patient preference study. Patient acceptability was evaluated by interview in a qualitative study. SETTING Outpatient hysteroscopy clinics and inpatient gynaecology departments within UK NHS hospitals. PARTICIPANTS Women with AUB - defined as heavy menstrual bleeding (formerly known as menorrhagia) (HMB), intermenstrual bleeding or postmenopausal bleeding - and hysteroscopically diagnosed uterine polyps. INTERVENTIONS We randomly assigned 507 women, using a minimisation algorithm, to outpatient polypectomy compared with conventional inpatient polypectomy as a day case in hospital under general anaesthesia. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The primary outcome was successful treatment at 6 months, determined by the woman's assessment of her bleeding. Secondary outcomes included quality of life, procedure feasibility, acceptability and cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. RESULTS At 6 months, 73% (166/228) of women who underwent outpatient polypectomy were successfully treated compared with 80% (168/211) following inpatient polypectomy [relative

  18. Suicide-specific Safety in the Inpatient Psychiatric Unit.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Mark L; Myrick, Hugh; Lamis, Dorian A; Pelic, Christopher P; Rhue, Colette; Rhue, Collete; York, Janet

    2015-03-01

    In total, 75% of suicides reported to the Joint Commission as sentinel events since 1995, have occurred in psychiatric settings. Ensuring patient safety is one of the primary tasks of inpatient psychiatric units. A review of inpatient suicide-specific safety components, inclusive of incidence and risk; guidelines for evidence-based care; environmental safety; suicide risk assessment; milieu observation and monitoring; psychotherapeutic interventions; and documentation is provided. The Veterans Health Administration (VA) has been recognized as an exemplar system in suicide prevention. A VA inpatient psychiatric unit is used to illustrate the operationalization of a culture of suicide-specific safety. We conclude by describing preliminary unit outcomes and acknowledging limitations of suicide-specific inpatient care and gaps in the current inpatient practices and research on psychotherapeutic interventions, observation, and monitoring. PMID:25898018

  19. A Qualitative Study of Family Caregiver Experiences of Managing Incontinence in Stroke Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chien-Ning; Huang, Guey-Shiun; Yu, Po-Jui; Lou, Meei-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Background Incontinence is a common problem faced by family caregivers that is recognized as a major burden and predictor of institutionalization. However, few studies have evaluated the experiences of family caregivers caring for stroke survivors with incontinence. Purpose To describe experiences of caregivers managing incontinence in stroke survivors. Design This qualitative descriptive study employed a grounded-theory approach. Methods Semi-structured in-depth interviews with ten family caregivers of stroke survivors with incontinence were conducted during 2011. Audiotaped interviews were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis. Findings Data analysis identified four themes: chaos, hypervigilance, exhaustion, and creating a new life. There were nine related subcategories: fluster, dirtiness, urgency, fear of potential health-hazard, physically demanding and time-consuming, mentally draining, financial burden, learning by doing, and attitude adjustment. Together, these described a process of struggling to cope with the care of stroke survivors with urinary/fecal incontinence. Of the four categories, “creating a new life” developed gradually over time to orient caregivers to their new life, while the other three categories occurred in a chronological order. Conclusion The research highlighted unique caring experiences of family caregivers of stroke patients, which focused solely on the ‘incontinence issue’. Understanding these experiences may help nurses provide better support and resources for family caregivers when caring for stroke survivors with incontinence. PMID:26066345

  20. The Current Role of the Artificial Urinary Sphincter in Male and Female Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Islah, MAR; Cho, Sung Yong

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of the artificial urinary sphincter has affected the current surgical options for urinary incontinence. With its unique features, the artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) has been an attractive option for the treatment of urinary incontinence regardless of gender. The current paper discusses the indications, contraindications, types of devices, surgical approaches, outcomes, and complications of the AUS in the treatment of both male and female urinary incontinence. A PubMed review of the available literature was performed and articles reporting implantation of artificial urinary sphincters for urinary incontinence in both male and female patients were evaluated. There was a comparable satisfactory continence rate after the implantation of an AUS (59~97% in males vs. 60~92% in females). In comparison, there were some differences in the indications, contraindications, surgical approaches, outcomes, and complications of the AUS implanted for urinary incontinence in male and female patients. AUS implantation is a safe and effective surgical option for the treatment of urinary incontinence of various etiologies. Continuous evolution of the device has made it an attractive option for the treatment of both male and female urinary incontinence. PMID:23658862

  1. Incontinence-associated dermatitis: a comprehensive review and update.

    PubMed

    Gray, Mikel; Beeckman, Dimitri; Bliss, Donna Z; Fader, Mandy; Logan, Susan; Junkin, Joan; Selekof, Joan; Doughty, Dorothy; Kurz, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, a multinational group of clinicians was charged with reviewing and evaluating the research base pertaining to incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) and synthesizing this knowledge into best practice recommendations based on existing evidence. This is the first of 2 articles focusing on IAD; it updates current research and identifies persistent gaps in our knowledge. Our literature review revealed a small but growing body of evidence that provides additional insight into the epidemiology, etiology, and pathophysiology of IAD when compared to the review generated by the first IAD consensus group convened 5 years earlier. We identified research supporting the use of a defined skin care regimen based on principles of gentle perineal cleansing, moisturization, and application of a skin protectant. Clinical experience also supports application of an antifungal powder, ointment, or cream in patients with evidence of cutaneous candidiasis, aggressive containment of urinary or fecal incontinence, and highly selective use of a mild topical anti-inflammatory product in selected cases. The panel concluded that research remains limited and additional studies are urgently needed to enhance our understanding of IAD and to establish evidence-based protocols for its prevention and treatment. PMID:22193141

  2. Research on a novel artificial anal sphincter for human incontinence.

    PubMed

    Zan, P; Yang, B; Zhang, J Y; Shao, Y

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses a novel artificial anal sphincter with sensor feedback for controlling anal incontinence. The artificial anal sphincter system is a novel hydraulic-electric muscle which mainly comprises an artificial anal sphincter, a wireless power supply subsystem, and a communication subsystem. High integration of all functional components and no wire linking to the outer device make surgical implantation easier and lower risk. The wireless power supply subsystem employs a Class-E power amplifier based on adaptive control technique, and the electromagnetic compatibility in biological tissue is analysed. With the goal of designing a reliable and safe instrument, the models of human colonic blood flow and rectum motion are developed, the biomechanical material properties of human rectum and tissue ischaemia are analysed. The results show that the deformation of the artificial anal sphincter can be controlled by the press of reservoir below the upper limit of human tissue ischaemia. In vitro experiments demonstrate the artificial anal sphincter system is a good cure for human anal incontinence problems. PMID:20653341

  3. Artificial Muscle Devices: Innovations and Prospects for Fecal Incontinence Treatment.

    PubMed

    Fattorini, Elisa; Brusa, Tobia; Gingert, Christian; Hieber, Simone E; Leung, Vanessa; Osmani, Bekim; Dominietto, Marco D; Büchler, Philippe; Hetzer, Franc; Müller, Bert

    2016-05-01

    Fecal incontinence describes the involuntary loss of bowel content, which is responsible for stigmatization and social exclusion. It affects about 45% of retirement home residents and overall more than 12% of the adult population. Severe fecal incontinence can be treated by the implantation of an artificial sphincter. Currently available implants, however, are not part of everyday surgery due to long-term re-operation rates of 95% and definitive explantation rates of 40%. Such figures suggest that the implants fail to reproduce the capabilities of the natural sphincter. This article reviews the artificial sphincters on the market and under development, presents their physical principles of operation and critically analyzes their performance. We highlight the geometrical and mechanical parameters crucial for the design of an artificial fecal sphincter and propose more advanced mechanisms of action for a biomimetic device with sensory feedback. Dielectric electro-active polymer actuators are especially attractive because of their versatility, response time, reaction forces, and energy consumption. The availability of such technology will enable fast pressure adaption comparable to the natural feedback mechanism, so that tissue atrophy and erosion can be avoided while maintaining continence during daily activities. PMID:26926695

  4. Incontinence-associated dermatitis and pressure ulcers in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kottner, J; Beeckman, D

    2015-12-01

    The key characteristics of geriatric patients are advanced age, multimorbidity, a decrease of psychical performance and care dependency. In addition, advanced age, chronic and acute diseases and treatments (e.g. polypharmacy) lead, either directly or indirectly, to a wide range of skin and tissue problems. Incontinence-associated dermatitis and pressure ulcers (PUs) belong to the most prevalent in geriatric settings. Prolonged exposure of the skin to urine and/or stool can cause an irritant contact dermatitis. Skin surface 'wetness', increased skin surface pH, digestive intestinal enzymes, repeated skin cleansing activities, and a possible occlusive environment contribute to irritation and inflammation. Prevention and treatment includes activities to maintain and to enhance continence and to limit, to reduce exposure of the skin to urine and stool, and to promote healing and reepithelialisation. In frail aged skin, it is recommended to use incontinence products with smooth and breathable materials with maximum absorption capacity. Immediate skin cleansing after soiling using mild cleansers and protective and caring leave-on products are recommended. PUs are localized injuries to the skin and/or underlying tissue caused by sustained deformations of skin and underlying soft tissues. PUs management includes risk assessment, repositioning and mobilization, and the use of appropriate support surfaces. Patients must be never positioned directly on an existing PU. Especially at end of life, the PU closure and wound healing may not be the primary therapeutic goal. PMID:26186379

  5. Major Odorants Released as Urinary Volatiles by Urinary Incontinent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Sudhir Kumar; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Choi, Si On; Sa, In Young; Oh, Soo Yeon

    2013-01-01

    In this study, volatile urinary components were collected using three different types of samples from patients suffering from urinary incontinence (UI): (1) urine (A); (2) urine + non-used pad (B); and (3) urine + used pad (C). In addition, urine + non-used pad (D) samples from non-patients were also collected as a reference. The collection of urinary volatiles was conducted with the aid of a glass impinger-based mini-chamber method. Each of the four sample types (A through D) was placed in a glass impinger and incubated for 4 hours at 37 °C. Ultra pure air was then passed through the chamber, and volatile urine gas components were collected into Tedlar bags at the other end. These bag samples were then analyzed for a wide range of VOCs and major offensive odorants (e.g., reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs), carbonyls, trimethylamine (TMA), ammonia, etc.). Among the various odorants, sulfur compounds (methanethiol and hydrogen sulfide) and aldehydes (acetaldehyde, butylaldehyde, and isovaleraldehyde) were detected above odor threshold and predicted to contribute most effectively to odor intensity of urine incontinence. PMID:23823973

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in urinary continence and incontinence.

    PubMed

    Song, Qi-Xiang; Chermansky, Christopher J; Birder, Lori A; Li, Longkun; Damaser, Margot S

    2014-10-01

    Urinary incontinence adversely affects quality of life and results in an increased financial burden for the elderly. Accumulating evidence suggests a connection between neurotrophins, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and lower urinary tract function, particularly with regard to normal physiological function and the pathophysiological mechanisms of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC). The interaction between BDNF and glutamate receptors affects both bladder and external urethral sphincter function during micturition. Clinical findings indicate reduced BDNF levels in antepartum and postpartum women, potentially correlating with postpartum SUI. Experiments with animal models demonstrate that BDNF is decreased after simulated childbirth injury, thereby impeding the recovery of injured nerves and the restoration of continence. Treatment with exogenous BDNF facilitates neural recovery and the restoration of continence. Serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, used to treat both depression and SUI, result in enhanced BDNF levels. Understanding the neurophysiological roles of BDNF in maintaining normal urinary function and in the pathogenesis of SUI and BPS/IC could lead to future therapies based on these mechanisms. PMID:25224451

  7. Psychosocial co-morbidity affects treatment outcome in children with fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    van Everdingen-Faasen, Els Q; Gerritsen, Bert J; Mulder, Paul G H; Fliers, Ellen A; Groeneweg, Michael

    2008-09-01

    Fecal incontinence is a common disorder in children. Many children with fecal incontinence have psychosocial co-morbidity. In this study, the effect of psychosocial co-morbidity on the treatment outcome of children with fecal incontinence was evaluated. One hundred and fifty children with fecal incontinence were treated in a multidisciplinary program. All children had been treated unsuccessfully for at least one year before entering the program. The treatment consisted of laxative treatment, psychosocial interventions, and biofeedback training. Psychosocial co-morbidity was classified according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition (DSM-IV). One hundred and forty-one children were completely analyzed (102 boys, mean age 9.6 (range 6.5-16.5) years). Of these, 31 (22%) children had fecal incontinence without constipation and 110 (78%) children had fecal incontinence associated with constipation. In 95% of children, at least one psychosocial co-morbidity was present. Treatment was successful at 12 months in 69% of patients. Treatment was less successful in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), in children with parent-child relational problems, and in mentally retarded children. The results indicate that the early assessment and treatment of psychosocial co-morbidity might improve treatment response in children with fecal incontinence. Children with fecal incontinence are treated less successfully in the first year if they have ADHD, parent-child relational problems, or mental retardation. Psychosocial evaluation and the early assessment and treatment of psychosocial co-morbidity is indicated in order to improve response rate. Family counseling--aimed at improving parent-child relations--should be an integral part of a multidisciplinary treatment program for fecal incontinence. PMID:17952465

  8. A Group-Based Yoga Therapy Intervention for Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Pilot Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Alison J.; Jenny, Hillary E.; Chesney, Margaret A.; Schembri, Michael; Subak, Leslee L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of a group-based yoga therapy intervention for middle-aged and older women with urinary incontinence. Methods We conducted a pilot randomized trial of ambulatory women aged 40 years and older with stress, urgency, or mixed-type incontinence. Women were randomized to a 6-week yoga therapy program (N=10) consisting of twice weekly group classes and once weekly home practice or a waitlist control group (N=9). All participants also received written pamphlets about standard behavioral self-management strategies for incontinence. Changes in incontinence were assessed by 7-day voiding diaries. Results Mean (±SD) age was 61.4 (±8.2) years, and mean baseline frequency of incontinence was 2.5 (±1.3) episodes/day. After 6 weeks, total incontinence frequency decreased by 66% (1.8 [±0.9] fewer episodes/day) in the yoga therapy versus 13% (0.3 [±1.7] fewer episodes/day) in the control group (P=0.049). Participants in the yoga therapy group also reported an average 85% decrease in stress incontinence frequency (0.7 [±0.8] fewer episodes/day) compared to a 25% increase in controls (0.2 [± 1.1] more episodes/day) (P=0.039). No significant differences in reduction in urgency incontinence were detected between the yoga therapy versus control groups (1.0 [±1.0] versus 0.5 [±0.5] fewer episodes/day, P=0.20). All women starting the yoga therapy program completed at least 90% of group classes and practice sessions. Two participants in each group reported adverse events unrelated to the intervention. Conclusions Findings provide preliminary evidence to support the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of a group-based yoga therapy intervention to improve urinary incontinence in women. PMID:24763156

  9. The Effect of Pelvic Muscle Exercises on Urinary Incontinency and Self-Esteem of Elderly Females With Stress Urinary Incontinency, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Jahromi, Marzieh Kargar; Talebizadeh, Malihe; Mirzaei, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Millions of women are afflicted with stress urinary incontinence. Urinary incontinence is mentioned as one of the geriatric syndromes, together with pressure ulcers, functional decline, falls, and low self-esteem. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of pelvic muscle exercises on urinary incontinency and self- esteem of elderly females with stress urinary incontinency in Shiraz, Iran, 2013. Material and Method: In this interventional study, 50 old females aged 60-74 years were chosen among the members of Jahandidegan center, and they were asked to sign the informed consent form and complete the demographic questionnaire. Then, Quid questionnaire was used for choosing the type of incontinence in the elderly females. Next, the participants completed the ICIQ and self-esteem questionnaires. Then, they were randomly assigned to case and control groups. Each participant took part in 8 training classes. Finally, the subjects filled the ICIQ and self-esteem questionnaires before and 2 months after the intervention. Result: The results is shown that after the intervention, ICIQ score has a significant difference between the two groups (P=0.001). Also, after the treatment, self-esteem average scores of studied unit indicated a significant statistical difference in experimental group. In other words, the training sessions improved the score of self-esteem in the experimental group (P<0.001) versus control group (P=0.08). Conclusion: Pelvic muscle exercises were an empowerment mechanism for incontinent women in improving their quality of life and self-esteem, so recommended that such these exercising programs be used in elderly health care centers as a factor to improve health promotion of elderlies ’that are suffering from urinary incontinence. PMID:25716389

  10. Hidden female urinary incontinence in urology and obstetrics and gynecology outpatient clinics in Turkey: what are the determinants of bothersome urinary incontinence and help-seeking behavior?

    PubMed

    Cetinel, Bulent; Demirkesen, Oktay; Tarcan, Tufan; Yalcin, Onay; Kocak, Taner; Senocak, Mustafa; Itil, Ismail

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of female urinary incontinence (UI) and risk factors of bothersomeness and help-seeking behavior of hidden female UI in urology and obstetrics and gynecology outpatient clinics. This multicentric and cross-sectional study was conducted as a part of the Turkish Overactive Bladder Study. Female patients (n = 5,565) who were referred with complaints other than UI and overactive bladder symptoms were surveyed using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form (ICIQ-SF) with supplementation of five more questions. The crude prevalence of UI was found to be 35.7%. The prevalence of frequent and severe incontinence was 8.2 and 6.8%, respectively. The mean age of incontinent patients was significantly higher (p < 0.001). The prevalence of stress, urge, and mixed UI was 39.8, 24.8, and 28.9%, respectively. More than half (53%) of incontinent patients were not bothered by UI, and only 12% of incontinent patients had previously sought medical help for their problem. Frequency, severity, and type of UI were independent factors for predicting bothersome UI, while only bothersomeness increased help-seeking behavior. The ICIQ-SF score of 8 has been found to be the best cutoff value to delineate the bothersome UI. Although the crude prevalence of female UI was found to be high, bothersome UI was not so common. The majority of incontinent female patients did not seek medical help. Frequency, severity, and mixed type of UI were found to be the determinants of bothersome UI for which the ICIQ-SF cutoff score of 8 was obtained. PMID:17164988

  11. Non stress non urge female urinary incontinence--diagnosis and cure: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Petros, P E; Ulmsten, U I

    1990-01-01

    Six patients, average age 80 years, with no previous operations, presented with urinary incontinence. The predominant symptoms were "being wet all the time" and "sudden uncontrolled urine loss". They had no symptoms of urgency or stress incontinence, and no objective evidence of "detrusor instability" or urine loss on cough stress pad testing. All but one patients were cured by the simultaneous combined Intravaginal Sling and Tuck operation, indicating that the primary cause of the symptoms was an anatomical defect in the vagina and the ligamentous supports in the region of the bladder neck, as stated in the Integral Theory of Urinary Incontinence, this supplement, elderly. PMID:2093277

  12. Faecal incontinence as presentation of an ependymomas of the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Jeyarajah, Santhini; King, Andrew; Papagrigoriadis, Savvas

    2007-01-01

    Background Spinal tumours and ependymomas in particular are rare causes of cauda equina syndrome that present with faecal incontinence. Case presentation We present a case of a 45 year old gentleman who presents to a colorectal clinic with incontinence. We then present a review of ependymomas with particular reference to the symptoms they cause as well a review of the neurophysiology of faecal continence. Conclusion Suspicion for non-colonic causes for faecal incontinence should arise when there is absence of other etiologic factors. Establishment of the diagnosis of spinal tumours is with neurological examination and MRI spine. PMID:17894884

  13. Clinical criteria to screen for inpatient diagnostic errors: a scoping review

    PubMed Central

    Shenvi, Edna C.; El-Kareh, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic errors are common and costly, but difficult to detect. “Trigger” tools have promise to facilitate detection, but have not been applied specifically for inpatient diagnostic error. We performed a scoping review to collate all individual “trigger” criteria that have been developed or validated that may indicate that an inpatient diagnostic error has occurred. We searched three databases and screened 8568 titles and abstracts to ultimately include 33 articles. We also developed a conceptual framework of diagnostic error outcomes using real clinical scenarios, and used it to categorize the extracted criteria. Of the multiple criteria we found related to inpatient diagnostic error and amenable to automated detection, the most common were death, transfer to a higher level of care, arrest or “code”, and prolonged length of hospital stay. Several others, such as abrupt stoppage of multiple medications or change in procedure, may also be useful. Validation for general adverse event detection was done in 15 studies, but only one performed validation for diagnostic error specifically. Automated detection was used in only two studies. These criteria may be useful for developing diagnostic error detection tools. PMID:26097801

  14. Preparing for the inpatient rehabilitation PPS.

    PubMed

    Rielinger, J A

    2001-12-01

    To assess the financial impact of the inpatient rehabilitation prospective payment system (PPS) on its future revenues, the MetroHealth Center for Rehabilitation (MHCR), Cleveland, Ohio, undertook a three-phase process using data from calendar year 2000 to estimate its potential profit or loss for each case-mix group (CMG) identified in the final rule. This process entailed developing a database to facilitate the combination and comparison of patient-charge and clinical data by CMG, using the combined data to estimate costs by cost center, and using payment information included in the final rule to estimate revenues by CMG. Following the assessment, the MHCR decided to expand the database to assist clinicians in making informed decisions in their patient-assessment and care-delivery processes that would account for cost and revenue considerations under the PPS. PMID:11765633

  15. Parental bonding in severely suicidal adolescent inpatients.

    PubMed

    Freudenstein, O; Zohar, A; Apter, A; Shoval, G; Weizman, A; Zalsman, G

    2011-11-01

    Family environment has a clear role in suicidal behavior of adolescents. We assessed the relationship between parental bonding and suicidal behavior in suicidal (n=53) and non-suicidal (n=47) adolescent inpatients. Two dimensions of parental bonding: care and overprotection, were assessed with the Parental Bonding Instrument. Results showed that adolescents with severe suicidal behavior tended to perceive their mothers as less caring and more overprotective compared to those with mild or no suicidal behavior. A discriminant analysis distinguished significantly between adolescents with high suicidality and those with low suicidality [χ2 (5) = 15.54; p=0.01] in 71% of the cases. The perception of the quality of maternal bonding may be an important correlate of suicidal behavior in adolescence and may guide therapeutic strategies and prevention. PMID:21398097

  16. A "facilitated" model of inpatient psychiatric care.

    PubMed

    Olden, K W; Johnson, M P

    1993-09-01

    The authors describe a model for an effective partnership between a large health maintenance organization and a fee-for-service acute inpatient psychiatric unit. They present data from five years of experience with the model on a unit serving a catchment area of one million plan members. The model, which is based on "facilitated" care rather than managed care, emphasizes crisis intervention and a strong medical orientation. The HMO contracted with seven psychiatrists to provide treatment and helped develop a value system shared by the physicians and hospital staff. A clinician represented the HMO on the unit and played a key decision-making role in patient care. A total of 4,945 patients were admitted over five years. Costs per admission were reduced 47 percent during this period; the readmission rate was 16.9 percent. Implementation of the model resulted in the delivery of high-quality cost-effective care. PMID:8225303

  17. Approach bias modification in inpatient psychiatric smokers.

    PubMed

    Machulska, Alla; Zlomuzica, Armin; Rinck, Mike; Assion, Hans-Jörg; Margraf, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Drug-related automatic approach tendencies contribute to the development and maintenance of addictive behavior. The present study investigated whether a nicotine-related approach bias can be modified in smokers undergoing inpatient psychiatric treatment by using a novel training variant of the nicotine Approach-Avoidance-Task (AAT). Additionally, we assessed whether the AAT-training would affect smoking behavior. Inpatient smokers were randomly assigned to either an AAT-training or a sham-training condition. In the AAT-training condition, smokers were indirectly instructed to make avoidance movements in response to nicotine-related pictures and to make approach movements in response to tooth-cleaning pictures. In the sham-training condition, no contingency between picture content und arm movements existed. Trainings were administered in four sessions, accompanied by a brief smoking-cessation intervention. Smoking-related self-report measures and automatic approach biases toward smoking cues were measured before and after training. Three months after training, daily nicotine consumption was obtained. A total of 205 participants were recruited, and data from 139 participants were considered in the final analysis. Prior to the trainings, smokers in both conditions exhibited a stronger approach bias for nicotine-related pictures than for tooth-cleaning pictures. After both trainings, this difference was no longer evident. Although reduced smoking behavior at posttest was observed after both trainings, only the AAT-training led to a larger reduction of nicotine consumption at a three-month follow-up. Our preliminary data partially support the conclusion that the AAT might be a feasible tool to reduce smoking in the long-term in psychiatric patients, albeit its effect on other smoking-related measures remains to be explored. PMID:26874269

  18. Psychiatric inpatient services in general hospitals.

    PubMed

    HUME, P B; RUDIN, E

    1960-10-01

    Traditional asylum care of psychiatric patients leads to the isolation, confinement, and restraint of the patients, and to isolation of psychiatric practice from the rest of medicine. Modern psychiatric advances have demonstrated the disadvantages to both patients and their families of such isolation, confinement and restraint. It is in the best interests of patients and professional workers that inpatient psychiatric services be continuous with, and contiguous to, other medical services and to rehabilitation services of all kinds. Examination of currently available information reveals a shortage of psychiatric beds in California, particularly for diagnosis and brief treatment. Thus, not only is there a need to develop psychiatric inpatient facilities, but also an opportunity to develop them along several different lines. Since both the Hill-Burton Act (federal) and the Short-Doyle Act (state) give financial assistance to only those psychiatric services established in general hospitals or affiliated with general hospitals, this requirement calls for examination in the light of experience with services so operated. At first, the Short-Doyle Act was perceived as a panacea for the psychiatric ills of the state. Now it is beginning to be recognized as one method of providing additional mental health resources, rather than the exclusive method. As more short-term cases are treated in local, tax-supported, psychiatric units in general hospitals, an impact can be expected on the state hospital program. In its administration of the Short-Doyle Act, the Department of Mental Hygiene attempts to respond to community needs as locally determined. It tries to insure local option and encourage local responsibility while furthering high standards of staffing and of service. PMID:13716797

  19. An occurrence of sepsis during inpatient fecal disimpaction.

    PubMed

    Darrow, Cory J; Devito, Justin F

    2014-01-01

    Functional constipation is a common pediatric problem that is often treated through well-established algorithms. Fecal disimpaction is the initial therapeutic step, and severe cases require hospitalization for intensive therapies. We describe a significant unexpected complication of this common clinical situation. An 8-year-old boy with suspected chronic functional constipation was hospitalized for disimpaction by continuous nasogastric administration of polyethylene glycol electrolyte (PEG-E) solution. On the sixth day of disimpaction, the patient abruptly developed fever, tachycardia, and tachypnea. Evaluation included blood culture, which grew Escherichia coli, and treatment with a course of appropriate antibiotics was provided. The safety of PEG-E solutions has been shown in studies of children with constipation, which made this patient's illness surprising. Several potential etiologies of his infection were considered, including bacterial translocation (BT). BT is defined as the passage of live microbes and microbial products from the gastrointestinal tract to extraintestinal sites, such as the bloodstream. It has been shown to occur in a variety of clinical conditions but is of unclear clinical significance. In this case, physical damage to the intestinal mucosa was thought to contribute to the potential occurrence of BT, and prolonged disimpaction was considered as a risk factor. E coli sepsis in a child undergoing inpatient nasogastric fecal disimpaction with PEG-E represents a clinical problem never before reported in the literature and should increase clinicians' indices of suspicion for uncommon complications of common procedures. PMID:24366993

  20. Accuracy and Calibration of Computational Approaches for Inpatient Mortality Predictive Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Nakas, Christos T.; Schütz, Narayan; Werners, Marcus; Leichtle, Alexander B.

    2016-01-01

    Electronic Health Record (EHR) data can be a key resource for decision-making support in clinical practice in the “big data” era. The complete database from early 2012 to late 2015 involving hospital admissions to Inselspital Bern, the largest Swiss University Hospital, was used in this study, involving over 100,000 admissions. Age, sex, and initial laboratory test results were the features/variables of interest for each admission, the outcome being inpatient mortality. Computational decision support systems were utilized for the calculation of the risk of inpatient mortality. We assessed the recently proposed Acute Laboratory Risk of Mortality Score (ALaRMS) model, and further built generalized linear models, generalized estimating equations, artificial neural networks, and decision tree systems for the predictive modeling of the risk of inpatient mortality. The Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) for ALaRMS marginally corresponded to the anticipated accuracy (AUC = 0.858). Penalized logistic regression methodology provided a better result (AUC = 0.872). Decision tree and neural network-based methodology provided even higher predictive performance (up to AUC = 0.912 and 0.906, respectively). Additionally, decision tree-based methods can efficiently handle Electronic Health Record (EHR) data that have a significant amount of missing records (in up to >50% of the studied features) eliminating the need for imputation in order to have complete data. In conclusion, we show that statistical learning methodology can provide superior predictive performance in comparison to existing methods and can also be production ready. Statistical modeling procedures provided unbiased, well-calibrated models that can be efficient decision support tools for predicting inpatient mortality and assigning preventive measures. PMID:27414408

  1. Prospective study on Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis and its Severity instrument for verifying its ability to predict the development of pressure ulcers in patients with fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Hee; Choi, Heejung

    2016-03-01

    Fecal incontinence with loose stools is a risk factor for skin damage that may develop into a pressure ulcer (PU). The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of applying the Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis and its Severity (IADS) instrument to patients with fecal incontinence as a tool to predict PU development. This prospective study enrolled 120 intensive care unit patients with bowel incontinence of Bristol Stool type 5, 6, and 7. Trained nurses evaluated IADS scores and the occurrence of PUs daily for 7 days. Patients with higher IADS scores were significantly more likely to develop a PU (odds ratio = 1·22, 95% confidence interval = 1·12-1·33). The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed the area under curve to be 0·790, suggesting that higher IADS scores are associated with an increased likelihood of developing a PU (sensitivity 72·5%, specificity 71·2%, using a cut-off value of 8/9). Our results suggest that the IADS instrument can serve as a tool for predicting the occurrence of PUs in patients with fecal incontinence. Patients with IADS scores that exceed eight points should be classified as being at risk of developing a PU, and placed under intensive care as a proactive measure to prevent PU development. PMID:26847935

  2. Impact of incontinence on the quality of life of caregivers of older persons with incontinence: A qualitative study in four European countries.

    PubMed

    Santini, Sara; Andersson, Gunnel; Lamura, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of incontinence management on informal caregivers of older persons with incontinence. In order to investigate this phenomenon in different welfare systems via qualitative interviews and a content analysis methodology, the study was carried out in four European countries (Italy, the Netherlands, Slovak Republic and Sweden). To this purpose, 50 semi-structured interviews were conducted with spouses and children of older people receiving their help to manage the consequences of involuntary urinary and/or faecal leakage. Findings show that incontinence has a remarkably strong effect on caregivers' quality of life, because it results in progressive social isolation, causing them financial problems as well as psychological and physical exhaustion. The lack of appropriate support and the general silence regarding the problem, which is still considered a taboo by many, aggravate the caregivers' situation. It is therefore crucial that caregivers can count on a strong public and private support network, appropriate information and suitable incontinent products, in order to better handle incontinence and care tasks in general. PMID:26620553

  3. Prevalence of urinary incontinence in Andorra: impact on women's health.

    PubMed

    Avellanet, Mercè; Fiter, Meritxell; Cirera, Eva; Coll, Margarida

    2003-07-16

    BACKGROUND: Urinary incontinence (UI) is a frequent public health problem with negative social consequences, particularly for women. Female susceptibility is the result of anatomical, social, economic and cultural factors. The main objectives of this study are to evaluate the prevalence of UI in the female population of Andorra over the age of 15 and, specifically, to determine the influence of socio-demographic factors. A secondary aim of the study is to measure the degree of concern associated with UI and whether the involved subjects have asked for medical assistance, or not. METHODS: Women aged 15 and over, answered a self-administered questionnaire while attending professional health units in Andorra during the period November 1998 to January 2000. A preliminary study was carried out to ensure that the questionnaire was both understandable and simple. RESULTS: 863 completed questionnaires were obtained during a one year period. The breakdown of the places where the questionnaires were obtained and filled out is as follows: 32.4% - medical specialists' offices; 31.5% - outpatient centres served exclusively by nurses; 24% - primary care doctors' offices; 12% from other sources. Of the women who answered the questionnaire, 37% manifested urine losses. Of those,45.3% presented regular urinary incontinence (RUI) and 55.7% presented sporadic urinary incontinence (SporadicUI). In those women aged between 45 and 64, UI was present in 56% of the subjects. UI was more frequent among parous than non-parous women. UI was perceived as a far more bothersome and disabling condition by working, middle-class women than in other socio-economic groups. Women in this particular group are more limited by UI, less likely to seek medical advice but more likely to follow a course of treatment. From a general point of view, however, less than 50% of women suffering from UI sought medical advice. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of UI in the female population of Andorra stands at about 37

  4. Minor burn injuries in children: inpatient versus outpatient treatment?

    PubMed Central

    La Ferla, G. A.; Fyfe, A. H.; Drainer, I. K.

    1983-01-01

    Seventy-two children with minor superficial burns presented at our casualty department over a 5-month period. Half were treated as inpatients and the other half as outpatients. The colonisation rates were similar in the two groups. Colonised and sterile burns treated as inpatients showed no significant difference in healing rates. The healing time, however, was prolonged in colonised outpatient treated burns. Cosmetic results were satisfactory overall. In the absence of a definite benefit from inpatient treatment, outpatient care of a child with a minor burn should therefore be used if circumstances allow. PMID:6357035

  5. Gender differences in factors associated with patients' decisions to seek treatment for urinary incontinence in Alexandria, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, A M; Hassouna, M S; Kassem, M S

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this descriptive, hospital-based comparative cross-sectional survey was to determine gender differences in factors associated with patients' decisions to seek treatment for urinary incontinence (Ul). Using an interview questionnaire, data were collected from 353 patients attending clinics at hospitals in Alexandria, Egypt. There were differences between males and females regarding specific psychosocial factors motivating health care seeking behaviour. Women had fewer hospital admissions and hospital days and less use of diagnostic procedures and surgery. More women suffered from at least one negative impact on their social lives compared to men. The impact of symptoms on quality of life appeared to be the main trigger for seeking help for UI in both men and women. PMID:21218742

  6. Improving Quality by Taking Aim at Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis in Hospitalized Adults.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Therese M; Wright, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    A practice-improvement project was launched to implement an evidence-based intervention bundle for incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) and evaluate its impact on the identification, prevention, and management of IAD in hospitalized adults. PMID:26821450

  7. Improving Quality by Taking Aim at Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis in Hospitalized Adults.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Therese M; Wright, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    A practice-improvement project was launched to implement an evidence-based intervention bundle for incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) and evaluate its impact on the identification, prevention, and management of IAD in hospitalized adults. PMID:26285369

  8. Anterior vaginal wall repair (surgical treatment of urinary incontinence) - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... or rectocele. This is occasionally performed to treat stress incontinence in women by supporting the bladder and urethra in its ... straining with bowel movements since this can cause stress on the incision.

  9. The physical finding of stress urinary incontinence among African women in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Adanu, Richard M K; De Lancey, John O L; Miller, Janis M; Asante, Abena

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the proportion of women with the physical sign of stress urinary incontinence in a sample of Ghanaian women. Two hundred randomly selected women from attendants at a convenience selected ultrasound clinic were interviewed about symptoms of urinary incontinence. A paper towel test was performed to objectively demonstrate the physical sign of stress urinary incontinence as leakage on coughing. Forty-two percent of the women had a positive paper towel test. The two major symptoms reported by the women with positive paper towel test were (1) loss of urine while waiting to use the toilet (48.2%) and (2) loss of urine on coughing (43.4%) in daily life. The physical sign of stress urinary incontinence could be present in up to 42% of Ghanaian women. PMID:16491324

  10. Critical evaluation of electro-stimulation for management of female urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, K; Yamanishi, T

    1999-10-01

    Electro-stimulation has been reported to be effective in the relief of stress and urge urinary incontinence. The rates of cure and improvement brought about by pelvic floor electro-stimulation in patients with urinary incontinence are 30-50% and 60-90%, respectively. In clinical practice, vaginal, anal and surface electrodes are used for external, short-term stimulation, and sacral root stimulation for internal, chronic (long-term) stimulation. The effectiveness of electro-stimulation has been verified in a randomized, placebo-controlled study. However, its superiority over other conservative treatments, such as pelvic floor exercise, has not been confirmed. A long-term effect has also been reported. In conclusion, pelvic floor exercise together with electro-stimulation is the mainstay of conservative management for the treatment of stress incontinence. For urge and mixed stress plus urge incontinence, electro-stimulation may be the first choice alternative treatment to drug therapy. PMID:10526930

  11. Malone antegrade continence enema (MACE) for fecal incontinence in imperforate anus improves quality of life.

    PubMed

    Mattix, Kelly D; Novotny, Nathan M; Shelley, Anita A; Rescorla, Frederick J

    2007-12-01

    The MACE procedure has been used in patients with imperforate anus (IA) to improve fecal continence. Our aim was to assess the impact of the MACE on the quality of life (QOL) in children with IA and fecal incontinence. A retrospective review was performed of children with IA that underwent the MACE procedure between 1997 and 2004. Patients and their parents were contacted by telephone survey regarding continence and its psychosocial effects before and after MACE. The same survey was given to the patients' teachers. Responses to 15 questions were compiled and a QOL score calculated and significance evaluated by t-test (P < or = 0.05). IRB approval was obtained. Thirty-two patients were identified with a mean age at operation of 9 years (4-19 years) and mean follow-up of 3.8 years (7 months to 8 years). Four patients had a low malformation, 8 were intermediate, 15 were high, and 5 had a cloacal anomaly. Twenty patients had documented sacral/spinal anomalies, including five with tethered cord. Post-MACE complications included stenosis in 16 (50%), with 11 requiring an operative revision at a mean of 21.7 months (2 months to 6 years), takedown in one at 4 years and volvulus in one at 18 months. Prior to the MACE, 18/25 (72%) had poor QOL scores. Post-MACE QOL results were similar between patients, parents and teachers. Patients' mean QOL score improved from 59.9 to 26.3% (P < 0.001), with parents from 59.7 to 26.4% (P < 0.001). QOL score improved >50% in nine families, 25-50% in ten and <25% in six. All patients and parents interviewed reported an improvement in their QOL following the MACE. This procedure should be offered to children with IA with the expectation of significant improvement in QOL. PMID:17938937

  12. Validation of a severity index in female urinary incontinence and its implementation in an epidemiological survey.

    PubMed Central

    Sandvik, H; Hunskaar, S; Seim, A; Hermstad, R; Vanvik, A; Bratt, H

    1993-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim was to validate a simple severity index of female urinary incontinence for subsequent use in an epidemiological survey. DESIGN--The index was created by multiplying the reported frequency (four levels) by the amount of leakage (two levels). The resulting index value (1-8) was further categorised into slight (1-2), moderate (3-4), and severe (6-8). It was validated against a 48 hour "pad weighing" test. Thereafter, an anonymous postal questionnaire survey was performed and the index was used to assess the severity of the leakage. A question about the impact of incontinence was also included. SETTING--The outpatient clinic of the Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Trondheim University Hospital and the rural community of Rissa, Norway. PARTICIPANTS--Altogether 116 incontinent women referred to the clinic by their GP and all 2366 adult women living in Rissa. RESULTS--The difference in median pad weights between moderate and slight incontinence was 9g/24h (95% confidence interval 0-27). The corresponding difference between severe and moderate incontinence was 17g/24h (95% CI 5-30). In the epidemiological survey 29.4% reported urinary incontinence (response rate 77%). The prevalence tended to be highest in middle life and old age. Forty six per cent were classified as slight, 27% moderate, and 27% severe. There was a strong correlation between severity and impact (R = 0.59, p < 0.001). CONCLUSION--The severity index may be a useful tool for assessing the severity of female urinary incontinence in epidemiological surveys. It is confirmed that urinary incontinence is very prevalent in adult women, but most should not be regarded as potential patients. PMID:8120507

  13. The epidemiology of anal incontinence and symptom severity scoring

    PubMed Central

    Nevler, Avinoam

    2014-01-01

    For many patients, anal incontinence (AI) is a devastating condition that can lead to social isolation and loss of independence, contributing to a substantial economic health burden, not only for the individual but also for the allocation of healthcare resources. Its prevalence is underestimated because of poor patient reporting, with many unrecorded but symptomatic cases residing in nursing homes. Endosonography has improved our understanding of the incidence of post-obstetric sphincter tears that are potentially suitable for repair and those cases resulting from anorectal surgery, most notably after fistula and hemorrhoid operations. The clinical scoring systems assessing the severity of AI are discussed in this review, along with their limitations. Improvements in the standardization of these scales will advance our understanding of treatment response in an era where the therapeutic options have multiplied and will permit a better comparison between specific therapies. PMID:24759339

  14. Stem Cells for the Treatment of Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Staack, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is highly prevalent. As of now, there is no minimally invasive long-term treatment available. Adult stem cells are nonimmunogenic and have the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into multiple cell types. Over the past decade, in vivo studies have described periurethral injections of adult-derived stem cells for the treatment of SUI. The ultimate goal has been to achieve a permanent cure for SUI by restoration of the intrinsic and extrinsic urethral sphincter and the surrounding connective tissue, including peripheral nerves and blood vessels. For this purpose, future studies need to focus on delivery systems, cell survival, and functional improvement of the urethral closure mechanism, including improvement of innervation and vascularization. PMID:21113694

  15. Pelvic Floor Rehabilitation in the Treatment of Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Kelly M.

    2014-01-01

    Fecal incontinence (FI) is a prevalent problem that can drastically affect quality of life. Pelvic floor rehabilitation is an important first-line treatment for patients with FI, and many published case reports and a small number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) provide limited evidence for its efficacy. Pelvic floor rehabilitation approaches to the treatment of FI include pelvic floor muscle training, biofeedback, and volumetric training with rectal balloon catheters. Various forms of external electrical stimulation have also been described and may be of added benefit. Behavioral bowel retraining is an important part of a good rehabilitative approach as well. Pelvic floor rehabilitation treatment for FI is thought to be effective and safe, with reported success rates in a majority of studies at 50 to 80%. Many more high-quality RCTs are needed to define optimal treatment protocols. PMID:25320568

  16. [Ectopic ureter as cause of pyonephrosis and urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Martín, Martín S; García-Ripoll, Torrecilla J R; Ruíz, Sanz A; Rodríguez, Gonzalo V; Ferro, Rivera J; del Busto, Fernández E

    2008-02-01

    Ectopic ureter accounts with an incidence of 1 in 2000 newborns. When present, ectopic ureter can be associated with duplex kidneys in an 85 % of the cases. Clinical manifestations of this malformation include incontinence and urinary tract infections. Ectopic ureter frequently occurs in association with a dysplastic upper pole renal moiety. When a poorly functioning upper pole segment is present, a standard surgical treatment is upper pole heminephrectomy. A 23-years old woman presented with left renal colic pain, fever and urinary leak. Ultrasound, intravenous pyelogram and antegrade pyelogram revealed a partial duplex right kidney and a complete duplex left kidney with hydronephrosis and ectopic insertion into the urethra of the left upper pole moiety. Following diagnosis upper pole heminephrectomy and partial ureterectomy was performed. PMID:18409479

  17. Transient bladder and fecal incontinence following epidural blood patch

    PubMed Central

    Palomero-Rodríguez, Miguel Angel; Palacio-Abinzada, Francisco J.; Campollo, Sara Chacón; Laporta-Báez, Yolanda; Mendez Cendón, Jose Carlos; López-García, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Epidural blood patch (EBP) is the currently accepted treatment of choice for postdural puncture headache because of its high initial success rates and infrequent complications. Many authors recommended a small volume (10-20 mL) of blood to be delivered for an effective EBP. Here, we report an obstetric patient who developed a transient bladder and fecal incontinence after 19 mL of blood EBP at L1 -L2 level. Since the magnetic resonance image did not demonstrate any definitive spinal cord lesion, the exact mechanism remains unclear. We suggest that accumulation of blood performed at L1 to L2 level in a closed relationship with the sacral cord, may have trigger a significant pressure elevation of the epidural space at this level, resulting in a temporal spinal cord-related injury in the sacral cord. PMID:26543470

  18. Sling and Bulking Agent Placement Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Bent, Alfred E

    2004-01-01

    Sling procedures have been used for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence since the early 1900s. Traditional sling procedures are best performed with autologous rectus fascia or fascia lata, and the sling material should penetrate the urogenital diaphragm (perineal membrane) into the retropubic space. Tension-free slings using polypropylene have excellent efficacy and safety data and are applicable in an outpatient setting. They are a good firstline surgical choice. Periurethral bulking agents have application for patients with a relatively immobile bladder neck and in cases of medical compromise or a desire for a simple, office-type treatment. PMID:16985906

  19. Treatment Outcomes of Transurethral Macroplastique Injection for Postprostatectomy Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sin Woo; Kang, Jung Hun; Sung, Hyun Hwan; Jeong, U-Seok; Lee, Young-Suk; Baek, Minki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the efficacy of transurethral injection of Macroplastique bulking agent (Uroplasty) for male stress urinary incontinence (SUI) after prostate surgery. Materials and Methods This retrospective review included men with SUI treated by transurethral injection for symptoms resulting from prostate surgery. Patients were evaluated at 1 month and 6 months after injection by determining the number of pads used per day and changes in incontinence symptoms. Treatment success was defined as use of 1 pad or fewer per day combined with subjective symptom improvement. Results The study population comprised 30 men with a mean age of 66.1±5.3 years. Of the 30 patients, 24 (80.0%) underwent prostate cancer surgery and the remaining 6 (20.0%) underwent surgery for benign prostatic hyperplasia. The preinjection pad number was 2.9±1.9 pads per day. After injection treatment, the mean follow-up period was 9.3±12.7 months and the success rate was 43% (13/30) at 1 month and 32% (6/19) at 6 months. Injection was more likely to result in a successful outcome in patients with no preinjection radiation treatment history and higher abdominal leak point pressure (ALPP) than in those with a previous history of radiation treatment and lower ALPP, although this result was not statistically significant. Acute urinary retention occurred in 5 patients (17%). Conclusions Transurethral Macroplastique injection treatment is a relatively non-invasive treatment method for male SUI with a success rate of 43% at 1 month and 32% at 6 months. Patients with a higher ALPP and no previous history of radiation therapy may experience better treatment outcomes. PMID:24648873

  20. Urinary incontinence in spina bifida: Initial instrument validation.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Katherine C; Sideridis, Georgios; Sherlock, Rebecca; Rosoklija, Ilina; Kringle, Greta; Johnson, Kathryn; Bauer, Stuart B; Nelson, Caleb P

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a psychometric assessment of the Incontinence Symptom Index-Pediatric (ISI-P) in a cohort of adolescents with spina bifida (SB) and neuropathic urinary incontinence (UI) to test its validity and reliability. The ISI-P, an 11-item instrument with domains for symptom severity and impairment, was self-administered by subjects 11-17 years old with SB and UI. Controls were 11-17 years old, with nephrolithiasis and no history of UI. Formal psychometric assessment included an evaluation of internal consistency, test re-test reliability and factor analysis. Of 78 study-eligible subjects we attempted to contact, 33 (66.7% female) with a median age of 13.1 years completed the ISI-P (42.3% response rate). 21 control patients also completed the ISI-P. Cronbach's alpha was 0.936 and 0.792 for the severity and bother factors respectively. The delta Chi-square test for the two-factor (vs. one-factor) model was significantly [χ(2)(89) = 107.823, p < 0.05] in favor of the former model with descriptive fit indices being excellent (e.g., comparative fit index = 0.969). Furthermore, category information analysis showed that all categories were associated with different threshold values, namely that each category contributed unique information for the measurement of the latent trait. In conclusion, the ISI-P has desirable psychometric properties for the measurement of UI symptom severity and impairment in adolescents with SB. PMID:25841183

  1. Dietary Fiber Supplementation for Fecal Incontinence: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Donna Z.; Savik, Kay; Jung, Hans-Joachim G.; Whitebird, Robin; Lowry, Ann; Sheng, Xioayan

    2014-01-01

    Dietary fiber supplements are used to manage fecal incontinence (FI), but little is known about the fiber type to recommend or the level of effectiveness of such supplements, which appear related to the fermentability of the fiber. The aim of this single-blind, randomized controlled trial was to compare the effects of three dietary fiber supplements (carboxymethylcellulose [CMC], gum arabic [GA], or psyllium) with differing levels of fermentability to a placebo in community-living individuals incontinent of loose/liquid feces. The primary outcome was FI frequency; secondary outcomes included FI amount and consistency, supplement intolerance, and quality of life (QoL). Possible mechanisms underlying supplement effects were also examined. After a 14-day baseline, 189 subjects consumed a placebo or 16g total fiber/day of one of the fiber supplements for 32 days. FI frequency significantly decreased after psyllium supplementation versus placebo, in both intent-to-treat and per-protocol mixed model analyses. CMC increased FI frequency. In intent-to-treat analysis, the number of FI episodes/week after supplementation was estimated to be 5.5 for Placebo, 2.5 for Psyllium, 4.3 for GA, and 6.2 for CMC. Only psyllium consumption resulted in a gel in feces. Supplement intolerance was low. QoL scores did not differ among groups. Patients with FI may experience a reduction in FI frequency after psyllium supplementation, and decreased FI frequency has been shown to be an important personal goal of treatment for patients with FI. Formation of a gel in feces appears to be a mechanism by which residual psyllium improved FI. PMID:25155992

  2. Artificial urinary sphincters for male stress urinary incontinence: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Cordon, Billy H; Singla, Nirmish; Singla, Ajay K

    2016-01-01

    The artificial urinary sphincter (AUS), which has evolved over many years, has become a safe and reliable treatment for stress urinary incontinence and is currently the gold standard. After 4 decades of existence, there is substantial experience with the AUS. Today AUS is most commonly placed for postprostatectomy stress urinary incontinence. Only a small proportion of urologists routinely place AUS. In a survey in 2005, only 4% of urologists were considered high-volume AUS implanters, performing >20 per year. Globally, ~11,500 AUSs are placed annually. Over 400 articles have been published regarding the outcomes of AUS, with a wide variance in success rates ranging from 61% to 100%. Generally speaking, the AUS has good long-term outcomes, with social continence rates of ~79% and high patient satisfaction usually between 80% and 90%. Despite good outcomes, a substantial proportion of patients, generally ~25%, will require revision surgery, with the rate of revision increasing with time. Complications requiring revision include infection, urethral atrophy, erosion, and mechanical failure. Most infections are gram-positive skin flora. Urethral atrophy and erosion lie on a spectrum resulting from the same problem, constant urethral compression. However, these two complications are managed differently. Mechanical failure is usually a late complication occurring on average later than infection, atrophy, or erosions. Various techniques may be used during revisions, including cuff relocation, downsizing, transcorporal cuff placement, or tandem cuff placement. Patient satisfaction does not appear to be affected by the need for revision as long as continence is restored. Additionally, AUS following prior sling surgery has comparable outcomes to primary AUS placement. Several new inventions are on the horizon, although none have been approved for use in the US at this point. PMID:27445509

  3. Prevalence and conditions of urinary incontinence among the elderly.

    PubMed

    Koyama, W; Koyanagi, A; Mihara, S; Kawazu, S; Uemura, T; Nakano, H; Gotou, Y; Nishizawa, M; Noyama, A; Hasegawa, C; Nakano, M

    1998-06-01

    In Japan, elderly disorders and diseases have markedly increased in recent years, because of rapid aging and an increasing number of older persons. The situation is creating serious social and community problems. These disorders, particularly dysuria and urinary incontinence (UI), disturb the quality of life (QOL) in latelife. Few reports on UI have been published, but precise investigation into the community level remains to be made. Our presentation is the development, implementation and evaluation of elderly UI in Kumamoto Prefecture. This study includes 2,304 people (male: 856, female: 1,448), over 65 years of age, living in two different communities; one is an urban (K) and the other is a typical rural area (S). The rate of UI was in homebound elderly persons, male: 4.7%, female: 11.3%, and in nursing home residents, male: 16.2%, female: 23.2%. The condition of UI was: almost Urinary Urgency in male (61.5%), and Stress Incontinence (such as, caused by coughing, sneezing, and exercise) in female (46.3%). The influence of UI on the activity of daily life was investigated. Most of the male cases were giving concerns for family and community. In contrast, females hesitated to participate in group excursions and outdoor exercise, and had a tendency to live alone or indoors. However, most persons (81.5%) with UI did not visit a physician. From this investigation, we conclude that a community health care program and public support system are essential for proper understanding and solution of the elderly UI problem. PMID:9656656

  4. mirabegron (BETMIGA⁰). Poorly effective in urge urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Mirabegron interacts with many other drugs via cytochrome P450 isoenzymes. It also has additive adverse effects, in particular cardiac disorders, when combined with antimuscarinic drugs. In view of animal data and the lack of clinical data, mirabegron should not be used by women who are or may be pregnant. In practice, drugs have little value in treating urinary urgency attributed to "overactive bladder". The risk of adverse drug reactions is rarely justified, even when the disorder is severe. Antimuscarinic disorders, such as dry mouth, are less frequent with mirabegron than with antimuscarinic drugs. Like antimuscarinic drugs, mirabegron can cause cardiac arrhythmias, especially tachycardia. Mirabegron may also cause a dose-dependent increase in blood pressure. Other adverse effects include rare cases of kidney stones and rare but sometimes serious skin reactions. When a treatable cause of urinary urgency with incontinence has been ruled out and non-drug measures have failed, recourse to an antimuscarinic drug is slightly effective but exposes patients to numerous, potentially severe adverse effects. Mirabegron (Betmiga⁰, Astellas Pharma), a beta-3 adrenergic receptor agonist, is authorised for use in this setting in the European Union. Clinical evaluation of mirabegron is mainly based on five randomised, double-blind trials versus antimuscarinic drugs, lasting 3 to 12 months and including about 8000 patients with urinary urgency. Mirabegron and the antimuscarinic comparators were similarly effective, even after antimuscarinic drug failure. A meta-analysis of four placebo-controlled trials including about 3500 patients suggested that mirabegron was poorly effective: on average, treatment prevented one episode of urinary incontinence every 2 days. PMID:26942249

  5. Sexual function and help seeking for urinary incontinence in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Pakgohar, Minoo; Sabetghadam, Shadi; Rahimparvar, Seyedeh Fatemeh Vasegh; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2016-01-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a common condition, especially in middle-aged and older women. UI is known to affect sexual function. Many women with UI do not consult a doctor about their condition. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship of sexual function and help seeking in postmenopausal women with urinary incontinence. This cross-sectional correlation study took place from March to May 2012. The subjects were selected by a clustered sampling method from various zones of Rasht (North of Iran). The data were collected using personal data forms, Questionnaire for Urinary Incontinence Diagnosis, Incontinence Severity Index, and Incontinence Quality of Life questionnaire. Data were analyzed by SPSS17 at the significant level of P < .05 and then were compared by parametric and nonparametric tests. A total of 313 menopausal women aged 45 to 60 years (mean 52.9) were recruited for the study. The mean sexual function score was 31.07 ± 7.52. Only 27.3% of subjects seek care for urinary incontinence. There was a significant correlation between sexual function and help seeking. The results of this study indicate that there is a significant correlation between sexual function and help seeking in postmenopausal women who participated in the present study. Health-care professionals should pay more attention to sexual symptoms of UI and make patients aware of available treatments. PMID:26882204

  6. An evaluation of three community-based projects to improve care for incontinence.

    PubMed

    Byles, Julie E; Chiarelli, Pauline; Hacker, Andrew H; Bruin, Corinna; Cockburn, Jill; Parkinson, Lynne

    2005-01-01

    The Australian National Continence Management Strategy commissioned the implementation and evaluation of three community-based projects designed to improve care for people with incontinence by improving the detection and treatment of urinary incontinence. Projects were located in demographically diverse areas, overseen by co-operating professional groups with an interest in continence and aimed at facilitating a pathway of care for those with incontinence. Project activities focused on health care provider training and improving local referral networks, as well as raising public awareness. Multifaceted evaluation of each project was designed to inform principles for a national approach to continence care. The evaluation indicated that providers involved in each project became more confident in their ability to manage incontinence, had significantly increased knowledge of issues around incontinence and became more aware of local options for referral. However, there was little evidence that projects achieved an increase in seeking professional help among those with incontinence. From the evaluation, six principles were developed to guide future models of community-based continence care. PMID:15316593

  7. The Effect of Asymptomatic Urethral Caruncle on Micturition in Women with Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Ozkan, Levend; Tarcan, Tufan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of asymptomatic urethral caruncle (UC) on micturition in women suffering from urinary incontinence. Materials and Methods A total of 232 patients participated in the study. UC was diagnosed in 50 of 232 patients with urinary incontinence during a physical examination in our clinic. All cases were divided into 2 groups: UC combined with urinary incontinence (group 1) and urinary incontinence only (group 2). Urodynamic evaluations were performed according to the International Continence Society standards. Results Both groups were similar in terms of voiding diary, pad test and residual urine volume. Urodynamic studies revealed no significant difference between group 1 and 2 (infravesical obstruction: 6% vs. 4.4%; overactive detrusor: 44% vs. 42.9% respectively). The rates of severe IPSS (37.8% vs. 20.9%) and severe cystocele (20.9% vs. 13.8%) were numerically higher in group 1 with no statistically significant difference. Conclusions Our results suggest that there is no effect of asymptomatic UC on lower urinary tract symptoms in women with urinary incontinence. Therefore, treating asymptomatic UC is unnecessary in these patients. However, during incontinence surgery, it is the surgeon's decision whether to treat asymptomatic UC. PMID:20428428

  8. Integrating yoga therapy in the management of urinary incontinence: a case report.

    PubMed

    Vinchurkar, Suhas Ashok; Arankalle, Dhananjay Vijay

    2015-04-01

    A 63-year-old overweight female prediagnosed of stress urinary incontinence presented with exacerbated events of urine leakage. She was advised a residential lifestyle and behavioral program, primarily consisting of a monitored yoga therapy module, apart from her ongoing anticholinergic medicine, for 21 days. Assessments were based on a frequency volume chart, a bladder diary for the entire duration of treatment, and the International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence Short Form questionnaire on the days of admission and discharge. A total of 1.9 kg of weight loss was observed during her stay. Usage of pad, as reported in her diary, reduced from 3 to 1 per day. Her International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence Short Form score reduced from 16 to 9, indicating better continence. She expressed subjective well-being and confidence in her social interactions. This is probably the first case report demonstrating feasibility of integration of yoga therapy in the management of urinary incontinence. PMID:25539839

  9. A Controlled Trial of An Intervention to Improve Urinary/Fecal Incontinence and Constipation

    PubMed Central

    Schnelle, John F.; Leung, Felix W.; Rao, Satish SC; Beuscher, Linda; Keeler, Emmett; Clift, Jack W.; Simmons, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Evaluate effects of a multi component intervention on fecal (FI) and urinary incontinence (UI) outcomes Design Randomized controlled trial Setting Six nursing homes Participants One hundred and twelve Nursing Home (NH) residents Intervention Intervention subjects offered toileting assistance, exercise, and choice of food /fluid snacks every 2 hours for 8 hours per day over 3 months. Measurements Frequency of UI and FI and rate of appropriate toileting as determined by direct checks from research staff. Anorectal assessments were completed on subset of 29 residents. Results Intervention significantly increased physical activity, frequency of toileting and food/ fluid intake Urinary incontinence improved (p<.05) as did frequency of bowel movements (p<.01) and percent of bowel movements (p <.01) in toilet. The frequency of fecal incontinence did not change. Most subjects (89%) who underwent anorectal testing showed a dyssynergic voiding pattern which could explain the lack of efficacy of this intervention program alone on fecal incontinence. Conclusion The multi-component intervention significantly changed multiple risk factors associated with fecal incontinence and increased bowel movements without decreasing fecal incontinence. The dyssynergic voiding pattern and rectal hyposensitivity suggest that future interventions may have to be supplemented with bulking agents (fiber) and/or biofeedback therapy to improve bowel function. PMID:20653804

  10. Colonisation of dentures by Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA in out-patient and in-patient populations.

    PubMed

    Lewis, N; Parmar, N; Hussain, Z; Baker, G; Green, I; Howlett, J; Kearns, A; Cookson, B; McDonald, A; Wilson, M; Ready, D

    2015-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important human pathogen, and colonisation with this organism can result in localised or systemic infections which may be fatal. One hundred in-patients admitted to a London teaching hospital and 100 out-patients attending prosthetic dentistry clinics were recruited into this study. Of the 100 out-patients, 27 % harboured S. aureus on their dentures, compared to 33 % of in-patients. Only one out-patient had MRSA colonising their dentures whereas 12 % of the in-patients harboured MRSA. The median total bacterial count of the denture plaque samples was 6.2 × 10(7) cfu/sample and 6.9 × 10(7) cfu/sample for the out-patient and in-patient populations, respectively. In most instances, where present, S. aureus comprised less than 1 % of the total viable denture microbiota. Phage typing demonstrated that EMRSA-15 and non-typeable strains were harboured on dentures. The results of this study have revealed that dentures are a potential reservoir of MRSA and so account should be taken of these findings when planning decontamination procedures for elimination of this pathogen. PMID:26071000

  11. Temporal trends in the use of diagnostic imaging for inpatients with pancreatic conditions: How much ionizing radiation are we using?

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Alexsander K.; Ouellet, Jean-Francois; Tanyingoh, Divine; Dixon, Elijah; Kaplan, Gilaad G.; Grondin, Sean C.; Myers, Robert P.; Mohamed, Rachid; Ball, Chad G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-dose ionizing radiation from medical imaging has been indirectly linked with subsequent cancer and increased costs. Computed tomography (CT) is the gold standard for defining pancreatic anatomy and complications. Our primary goal was to identify the temporal trends associated with diagnostic imaging for inpatients with pancreatic diseases. Methods Data were extracted from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 2000 to 2008. Pancreas-related ICD-9 diagnostic codes were matched to all relevant imaging modalities. Results Between 2000 and 2008, a significant increase in admissions (p < 0.001), but decrease in overall imaging procedures (p = 0.032), for all pancreatic disorders was observed. This was primarily a result of a reduction in the number of CT and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography examinations (i.e., reduced radiation exposure, p = 0.008). A concurrent increase in the number of inpatient magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography/magnetic resonance imaging performed was observed (p = 0.040). Intraoperative cholangiography and CT remained the dominant imaging modality of choice overall (p = 0.027). Conclusion Inpatients with pancreatic diseases often require diagnostic imaging during their stay. This results in substantial exposure to ionizing radiation. The observed decrease in the use of CT may reflect an improved awareness of potential stochastic risks. PMID:27240285

  12. [Inpatient care in the treatment of alcohol use disorders].

    PubMed

    Balester Mouret, Sylvain

    2011-12-01

    Inpatient treatment has long been considered the reference in the treatment of alcoholism. It may indeed have many conceptual advantages, but practically it is a method of treatment with high costs and long waiting period. Moreover, reviews of studies evaluating effectiveness of treatment settings for alcohol dependence suggest that no significant differences exist between inpatient and outpatient programs. Therefore, it seems useful to determine indications of inpatient detoxification programs. As we may see, the choice of inpatient detox should be primarily guided by the contra-indications of outpatient detox. However, it also depends very much on patients' preference, essential to success, since they are the lead actors. Some other situations require urgent residential care, regardless of readiness to change or type of alcohol disorder underlying. PMID:22288351

  13. Reducing unnecessary inpatient laboratory testing in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    May, Todd A; Clancy, Mary; Critchfield, Jeff; Ebeling, Fern; Enriquez, Anita; Gallagher, Carmel; Genevro, Jim; Kloo, Jay; Lewis, Paul; Smith, Rita; Ng, Valerie L

    2006-08-01

    After an inpatient phlebotomy-laboratory test request audit for 2 general inpatient wards identified 5 tests commonly ordered on a recurring basis, a multidisciplinary committee developed a proposal to minimize unnecessary phlebotomies and laboratory tests by reconfiguring the electronic order function to limit phlebotomy-laboratory test requests to occur singly or to recur within one 24-hour window. The proposal was implemented in June 2003. Comparison of fiscal year volume data from before (2002-2003) and after (2003-2004) implementation revealed 72,639 (12.0%) fewer inpatient tests, of which 41,765 (57.5%) were related directly to decreases in the 5 tests frequently ordered on a recurring basis. Because the electronic order function changes did not completely eliminate unnecessary testing, we concluded that the decrease in inpatient testing represented a minimum amount of unnecessary inpatient laboratory tests. We also observed 17,207 (21.4%) fewer inpatient phlebotomies, a decrease sustained in fiscal year 20042005. Labor savings allowed us to redirect phlebotomists to our understaffed outpatient phlebotomy service. PMID:16891194

  14. Socioeconomic Disparity in Inpatient Mortality Following Traumatic Injury in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mays T.; Hui, Xuan; Hashmi, Zain G.; Dhiman, Nitasha; Scott, Valerie K.; Efron, David; Schneider, Eric B.; Haider, Adil H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prior studies have demonstrated that race and insurance status predict inpatient trauma mortality, but have been limited by their inability to adjust for direct measures of socioeconomic status (SES) and comorbidities. Our study aims to identify whether a relationship exists between SES and inpatient trauma mortality, after adjusting for known confounders. Methods Trauma patients aged 18–65 years with Injury Severity Scores (ISS) ≥ 9 were identified using the 2003–2009 Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Median household income (MHI) by zip code, available by quartiles, was used to measure SES. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to determine odds of inpatient mortality by MHI quartile, adjusting for ISS, type of injury, comorbidities, and patient demographics. Results 267,621 patients met inclusion criteria. Patients in lower wealth quartiles had significantly higher unadjusted inpatient mortality compared with the wealthiest quartile. Adjusted odds of death were also higher compared with the wealthiest quartile for Q1 (OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.06–1.20), Q2 (OR 1.09, 95% CI 1.02–1.17), and Q3 (OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.04–1.19). Conclusions Median household income predicts inpatient mortality after adult trauma, even after adjusting for race, insurance status, and comorbidities. Efforts to mitigate trauma disparities should address SES as an independent predictor of outcomes. PMID:23972652

  15. US population aging and demand for inpatient services.

    PubMed

    Pallin, Daniel J; Espinola, Janice A; Camargo, Carlos A

    2014-03-01

    US inpatient capacity increased until the 1970s, then declined. The US Census Bureau expects the population aged ≥65 years to more than double by 2050. The implications for national inpatient capacity requirements have not been quantified. Our objective was to calculate the number of hospital admissions that will be necessitated by population aging, ceteris paribus. We estimated 2011 nationwide age-specific hospitalization rates using data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and Census data. We applied these rates to the population expected by the Census Bureau to exist through 2050. By 2050, the US population is expected to increase by 41%. Our analysis suggests that based on expected changes in the population age structure by then, the annual number of hospitalizations will increase by 67%. Thus, inpatient capacity would have to expand 18% more than population growth to meet demand. Total aggregate inpatient days is projected to increase 22% more than population growth. The total projected growth in required inpatient capacity is 72%, accounting for both number of admissions and length of stay. This analysis accounts only for changes in the population's age structure. Other factors could increase or decrease demand, as discussed in the article. PMID:24464735

  16. Treatment - mother-infant inpatient units.

    PubMed

    Glangeaud-Freudenthal, Nine M C; Howard, Louise M; Sutter-Dallay, Anne-Laure

    2014-01-01

    Infants of parents with psychiatric disorders may be particularly vulnerable and have a higher risk of developing psychiatric disorders in adulthood. Until the second half of the 20th century, women and infants were cared for separately. Today, hospitalisation of women with their babies in psychiatric mother-baby units enables psychiatric care of women and promotion of parent-infant interactions and child development. The distribution of psychiatric mother-baby units around the world, as well as within countries, varies strongly. Reasons for this may be related to the absence of national perinatal mental health policies related to psychiatric mother-baby unit location, differences in sources of referral for admission, and criteria for psychiatric mother-baby unit admission. Two principal national epidemiologic studies, in England and in France and Belgium, have described issues related to discharge from such care, as have smaller local studies, but no epidemiologic studies have yet demonstrated that joint inpatient psychiatric mother-baby unit care is cost-effective compared with separate care. PMID:24054169

  17. [Ambulatory heart groups after inpatient cardiologic rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Keck, M; Budde, H G

    1999-05-01

    In n = 1504 consecutive patients after inpatient cardiac rehabilitation, we investigate how many patients can be motivated to join a so-called outpatient heart group, which sociographical and medical variables influence participation, and whether participation in a heart group prompts a more health-orientated nutrition. Applying a special team-based motivation programme, almost 30% of patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation under the pension insurance scheme for workers can be motivated to join a heart group, who otherwise can hardly be prompted to do so. About 75% of them still participate in the heart group 7 months later. Initial and continuing participation are more probable in patients of middle age, male gender, with previous PTCA, moderately or severely restricted left ventricular function, and--for patients up to the age of 55 years--in case of reintegration or expected reintegration into work life. Patients after heart valve surgery are significantly less liable to join a heart group than CHD patients. Seven months after cardiac rehabilitation, medium cholesterol values have less increased among participants of heart groups than among non-participants. This may indicate a more stabilized health-orientated lifestyle among members of heart groups. PMID:10413799

  18. Assessment of aggression in inpatient settings.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Barbara E; Holoyda, Brian J

    2014-10-01

    The threat of violence is a major concern for all individuals working or receiving treatment in an inpatient psychiatric setting. One major focus in forensic psychology and psychiatry over the past several decades has been the development of risk assessments to aid in the identification of those individuals most at risk of exhibiting violent behavior. So-called second- and third-generation risk assessments were developed to improve the accuracy of decision making. While these instruments were developed for use in the community, many have proven to be effective in identifying patients more likely to exhibit institutional aggression. Because the purpose of risk assessment is the reduction of violence, dynamic factors were included in third-generation risk instruments to provide opportunities for intervention and methods for measuring change. Research with these instruments indicates that both static factors (second-generation) and dynamic factors (third-generation) are important in identifying those patients most likely to engage in institutional aggression, especially when the aggression is categorized by type (impulsive/reactive, organized/predatory/instrumental, psychotic). Recent research has indicated that developing a typology of aggressive incidents may provide insight both into precipitants to assaults as well as appropriate interventions to reduce such aggression. The extant literature suggests that both static and dynamic risk factors are important, but may be differentially related to the type of aggression exhibited and the characteristics of the individuals exhibiting the aggression. PMID:25296966

  19. Adaptation and validation of the Michigan Incontinence Severity Index in a Turkish population

    PubMed Central

    Sargın, Mehmet Akif; Yassa, Murat; Taymur, Bilge Dogan; Ergun, Emrah; Akca, Gizem; Tug, Niyazi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To translate and validate the Michigan Incontinence Severity Index (M-ISI) for its use in Turkish-speaking women with urinary incontinence. Methods The translation and cross-cultural adaptation were based on international guidelines. Content validity by content validity ratio/content validity index, internal consistency by Cronbach’s alpha, test–retest reliability by Pearson’s correlation, and construct validity by using Spearman rank correlations to show the relationship between individual items and the relevant domains and subdomains were analyzed in 100 female participants with a chief complaint of urinary incontinence. Correlations between the relevant scores of M-ISI and The International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire – Short Form scores were analyzed to indicate convergent validity. The Varimax rotation method was used to conduct exploratory factor analysis in order to investigate the factor structures/distribution of M-ISI items. Results Content validity index and content validity ratio values increased to 0.97 and 1.00, respectively, showing sufficient content validity of the Turkish version of the M-ISI. The analysis formed three factors which was slightly different from original developers. In our proposed three-factor construct, all of the ten items demonstrated high correlations with their subdomains and lower correlations with the other domains, indicating good construct validity. Correlations between stress urinary incontinence and urge urinary incontinence (UUI) scores and The International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire – Short Form scores were found high, which indicated convergent validity (r: 0.953, P<0.001). Good internal consistency of the scores for each subdomain was observed (stress urinary incontinence, 0.787; UUI, 0.862; pad usage and bother, 0.832). Test–retest reliability was shown for each subdomain (stress urinary incontinence, 0.973; UUI, 0.973; pad usage and bother, 0.979). Conclusion

  20. Mini–slings – an option in stress urinary incontinence treatment. Case studies

    PubMed Central

    Markowski, Michał; Kliś, Rafał; Różański, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a social disease caused by numerous contributing factors such as natural childbirth, obesity, hormonal deficiencies and changes in collagen fibers, to name a few. Currently, mini–slings, among all the surgical treatment methods, have gained significance. The aim of this study was to establish the effectiveness of this method. Material and methods From 2008 to 2012, one hundred sixty women suffering from SUI underwent surgical procedures to implant mini–slings under the middle part of the urethra and 140 (87.5%) of them remained under observation. In 65 cases, Johnson & Johnson's TVT–Secur was used; in 70 cases, BARD's Adjust mini–sling was used; and in 5 cases, AMS Mini–Arc mini–sling was used. The average period of hospitalization was 3 days per admission, operation and discharge day. Results In 82 cases, patients urinated well after the removal of the catheter, and had full urine continence. Fourteen patients showed great improvement, and in four cases temporary urine retention was observed. In two cases vaginal bleeding was observed, yet there was no need for wound revision. Evaluation of the ‘quality of life improvement’ was done using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Conclusions The obtained results allowed the conclusion that the implantation of mini–slings is a low invasive, relatively safe and effective procedure for the treatment of SUI even in cases of recurrence. Almost full recovery was achieved in all the cases of this study. The mini–sling has become an important element in modern urogynecology. PMID:25914841

  1. Urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy – experience of the last 100 cases

    PubMed Central

    Szymański, Michał; Wolski, Jan Karol; Nadolski, Tomasz; Kalinowski, Tomasz; Demkow, Tomasz; Peczkowski, Piotr; Pilichowska, Małgorzata; Ligaj, Marcin; Michalski, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    Radical prostatectomy (RP) is a recognized treatment method of organ-confined prostate cancer. Among post-surgery complications, urinary incontinence is a major one. The aim of this study was to determine the incontinence rate after RP and to analyze factors that might affect it. Between March 2007 and December 2008, 132 RP's were performed at Warsaw Cancer Center. A questionnaire to assess the condition before and after RP was developed by the authors and sent to all treated patients. The questionnaire focused on health status information, function in urinary domain, rate of returning to “normal” activity level as before RP and satisfaction from the treatment. The median age of patients was 62 years. Out of 132 patients 102 subjects (77.2%) responded to the questionnaire. Of all responders, 35 patients (34.3%) reported total urinary continence after RP. After RP 35(34.3%) patients reported total urinary continence and in 55(53.9%) patients urinary incontinence of medium degree was present. In 12 (11.8%) patients significant urinary incontinence developed. The most common cause of urine dripping (82% of patients with any degree of urinary incontinence) was associated with abdominal muscle pressure. No statistically significant association between urinary incontinence and adjuvant radiotherapy after RP or the surgeon performing the RP was found (>0.79, >0.803). Radical prostatectomy carries a certain risk of complications. We observed an 88.2% rate of significant (total and moderate degree) urinary continence. The adjuvant radiotherapy and surgeons, who performed the RP, did not affect the rate of incontinence. PMID:24578896

  2. Urinary incontinence in Moroccan and Turkish women: a qualitative study on impact and preferences for treatment

    PubMed Central

    van den Muijsenbergh, Maria ETC; Lagro-Janssen, Toine ALM

    2006-01-01

    Aim To gain insight into the impact of urinary incontinence on the daily lives of Moroccan and Turkish women and their preferences for treatment. Design of study A qualitative analysis of data from semi-structured in depth interviews with 30 Moroccan and Turkish migrant women with urinary incontinence. Setting Six general practices with large numbers of immigrant families in four cities in the Netherlands. Method Semi-structured in depth interviews were conducted with Moroccan and Turkish migrant women, who presented with complaints of urinary incontinence in six general practices with large numbers of immigrant families on the practice list in four different cities in the Netherlands. Results All the women adhered closely to bodily cleanliness and considered incontinence to be dirty. As Muslims, they were obliged to perform ritual prayers preceded by ablution five times per day and the urinary incontinence breached their status of ritual purity. Therefore, they had to wash more often and experienced this as a heavy burden. In a number of the women, shame formed a reason why they could not talk to anybody about the incontinence, not even with the doctor. One-third of the women felt that their GP had not taken them seriously. Knowledge about anatomy, physiology and available treatments was mostly lacking. In addition, the women did not understand the aim of the exercises from the physiotherapist. The majority of women gave preference to help from a female doctor. Conclusion Urinary incontinence in Moroccan and Turkish migrant women formed a considerable problem in their daily following of the Islam faith. Shame on the part of the patient and miscommunication at the doctor's surgery led to inadequate care. PMID:17132383

  3. Standard Compared With Mnemonic Counseling for Fecal Incontinence: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cichowski, Sara B; Dunivan, Gena C; Rogers, Rebecca G; Murrietta, Ambroshia M; Komesu, Yuko M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate whether women who underwent mnemonic counseling had better recall of fecal incontinence therapies at 2 months and if mnemonic counseling resulted in greater satisfaction with physician counseling and improvement in quality of life when compared to a group who underwent standard counseling. Methods Counseling naive women with fecal incontinence were recruited from an academic Urogynecology clinic. Women underwent physical examinations, completed the Quality of the Physician-Patient Interaction, recorded fecal incontinence treatment options they recalled, and completed the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index and Manchester Health Questionnaire immediately after counseling and again at 2 months. Results Ninety women consented to participate, were randomized and completed baseline questionnaires. At baseline women did not differ in age, ethnicity, education, fecal incontinence severity index or Manchester Health Questionnaire scores. After counseling the mnemonic group reported higher satisfaction on Quality of the Physician-Patient Interaction (66.4± 6.5 vs 62.2 ± 10.7, p=0.03). Ninety percent (81/90) of women followed-up at 2 months. Our primary endpoint, two month recall of fecal incontinence treatments was not different between groups (2.3 ± 1.6 mnemonic counseling vs 1.8 ± 1.0 standard counseling; p=0.08). Secondary endpoints the mnemonic group reported greater improvement on total Manchester Health Questionnaire (p=0.02), emotional (p=0.03), sleep (0.045), role limitations (<0.01), and physical limitations (p=0.04) when compared to the standard group. Conclusions Fecal incontinence counseling with a mnemonic aid did not improve recall at 2 months but improved patient satisfaction and quality of life at 2 months. PMID:25932833

  4. Do Physical Therapy Interventions Affect Urinary Incontinence and Quality of Life in People with Multiple Sclerosis?

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Monica; Melnick, Marsha; Allen, Diane D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) presents with many debilitating symptoms, including urinary incontinence (UI), that physical therapy (PT) may address; UI is widely prevalent, but PT management of symptoms lacks consensus. A meta-analysis of long-term nonsurgical and nonpharmaceutical treatment options may supply this deficiency. We analyzed the current evidence for effectiveness of PT to decrease UI and improve quality of life (QOL) in people with MS. Methods: An electronic search conducted through November 26, 2013, included the following search terms: incontinence, bladder dysfunction, urinary incontinence, multiple sclerosis, MS, physical therapy, physiotherapy, therapy, and rehabilitation. Criteria for inclusion were as follows: MS diagnosis, intervention involved PT for UI or bladder dysfunction, outcomes assessed QOL or UI, and at least a 4 of 10 on the Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale or a 2b level of evidence. Outcomes were combined across studies, and effect sizes are depicted in forest plots. Results: Six studies met the inclusion criteria. Between-group analysis revealed statistically significant differences in incontinence episodes and QOL, but did not reach significance for functional control mechanisms (eg, electromyography data on strength of contraction, relaxation, and endurance). Incontinence leakage episodes and QOL participation improved within groups. Conclusions: Meta-analysis indicates support for PT for minimizing incontinence compared with pretreatment and affecting incontinence and QOL more than control in people with MS. Protocols were heterogeneous regarding duration and type of PT intervention and were applied in different types of MS. Further research may reveal the most effective combination and variety of PT interventions for people with MS. PMID:26300703

  5. What are the probable predictors of urinary incontinence during pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Demircan, Nejat; Özmen, Ülkü; Köktürk, Fürüzan; Küçük, Hamdi; Ata, Şevket; Harma, Müge; Arıkan, İnan İlker

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The frequency, predisposing factors and impact of urinary incontinence (UI) on quality of life (QoL) during pregnancy were investigated. Materials and Method. A preliminary cross-sectional survey was studied among pregnant women between January and July of 2014. A total of 132 pregnant women were recruited using a questionnaire form for sociodemographic features, the Turkish version of the International Consultation on Incontinence-Short Form (ICIQ-SF), for the characteristics of UI and Wagner's Quality of Life scale to assess impact on QoL. p < 0.05 was set significant. Results.Urinary incontinence was present in 56 out of 132 pregnant women (42.4%, UI-present group): mean age, 26.7 ± 5.4y(p = 0.780); median height, 160 cm (min-max: 153-176, p = 0.037); median BMI, 28.7 kg/m(2)(min-max: 22.4-50.0, p = 0.881); urine leakage occurred per week once (n = 18, 32.1%), twice or thrice (n = 8, 14.3%); per day few times (n = 14, 25%), once (n = 5, 8.9%) and always (n = 8, 14.3%) with mainly a small amount of urine leakage (n = 33, 58.9%) or a moderate (n = 4, 7.1%). There were statistically significant relationships between QoL scores and frequency of UI (p = 0.002) or amount of leakage (p = 0.002). Impact on QoL scores ranged from mild (n = 33, 58.9%), moderate (n = 4, 7.1%) to severe (n = 4, 7.1%) levels in daily life. UI impacted the daily life activities of women by making them less likely to undertake activities outside their homes (23.2%), by affecting their working performance and friendships (8.9%), their daily home activities (7.1%), their general health status (12.5%), their sexual relations (12.5%), by making them more nervous or anxious (10.7%) and by the need to wear pads or protectors (25%). ANOVA, Tukey, and Tamhane tests as the minimal important difference model yielded significant relevance between statistical analyses and clinical outcomes by using standard deviations (p = 0.001, 0.001 and 0.005 respectively). The following features favored

  6. What are the probable predictors of urinary incontinence during pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Özmen, Ülkü; Köktürk, Fürüzan; Küçük, Hamdi; Ata, Şevket; Harma, Müge; Arıkan, İnan İlker

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The frequency, predisposing factors and impact of urinary incontinence (UI) on quality of life (QoL) during pregnancy were investigated. Materials and Method. A preliminary cross-sectional survey was studied among pregnant women between January and July of 2014. A total of 132 pregnant women were recruited using a questionnaire form for sociodemographic features, the Turkish version of the International Consultation on Incontinence-Short Form (ICIQ-SF), for the characteristics of UI and Wagner’s Quality of Life scale to assess impact on QoL. p < 0.05 was set significant. Results.Urinary incontinence was present in 56 out of 132 pregnant women (42.4%, UI-present group): mean age, 26.7 ± 5.4y(p = 0.780); median height, 160 cm (min–max: 153–176, p = 0.037); median BMI, 28.7 kg/m2(min–max: 22.4–50.0, p = 0.881); urine leakage occurred per week once (n = 18, 32.1%), twice or thrice (n = 8, 14.3%); per day few times (n = 14, 25%), once (n = 5, 8.9%) and always (n = 8, 14.3%) with mainly a small amount of urine leakage (n = 33, 58.9%) or a moderate (n = 4, 7.1%). There were statistically significant relationships between QoL scores and frequency of UI (p = 0.002) or amount of leakage (p = 0.002). Impact on QoL scores ranged from mild (n = 33, 58.9%), moderate (n = 4, 7.1%) to severe (n = 4, 7.1%) levels in daily life. UI impacted the daily life activities of women by making them less likely to undertake activities outside their homes (23.2%), by affecting their working performance and friendships (8.9%), their daily home activities (7.1%), their general health status (12.5%), their sexual relations (12.5%), by making them more nervous or anxious (10.7%) and by the need to wear pads or protectors (25%). ANOVA, Tukey, and Tamhane tests as the minimal important difference model yielded significant relevance between statistical analyses and clinical outcomes by using standard deviations (p = 0.001, 0.001 and 0.005 respectively). The following features

  7. Comparison of Effectiveness between Tension-Free Vaginal Tape (TVT) and Trans-Obturator Tape (TOT) in Patients with Stress Urinary Incontinence and Intrinsic Sphincter Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeong Gon; Park, Hyoung Keun; Paick, Sung Hyun; Choi, Woo Suk

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the two types of mid-urethral slings for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) with intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD). Methods This retrospective study included patients who underwent tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) procedure or transobturator tape (TOT) procedure by a single surgeon for SUI with ISD, defined as Valsalva leak point pressure (VLPP) < 60 cmH2O in a urodynamic study. Cases of neurogenic bladder, previous SUI surgery, and concomitant cystocele repair were excluded. The primary outcome was treatment success at 12 months, defined by self-reported absence of symptoms, no leakage episodes recorded, and no retreatment. Results Among the 157 women who were included in the final analysis, 105 patients received TVT and 52 patients received TOT. Age, underlying diseases, Stamey grade, cystocele grade, and presence of urge incontinence were not significantly different between the two groups. Urodynamic parameters including maximal urethral closing pressure, detrusor overactivity, VLPP, urethral hypermobility (Q-tip ≥ 30°), were also comparable between the two groups. Success rate was significantly higher in the TVT group than in the TOT group (95.2% vs. 82.7%, p = 0.009). On multivariate analysis, only TOT surgery (OR = 3.922, 95%CI = 1.223–12.582, p = 0.022) was a risk factor for failure following surgical treatment. Conclusion TVT is more effective than TOT in treatment of female SUI with ISD. PMID:27228092

  8. Frequency, Characteristics and Management of Adolescent Inpatient Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Baeza, Immaculada; Saito, Ema; Amanbekova, Dinara; Ramani, Meena; Kapoor, Sandeep; Chekuri, Raja; De Hert, Marc; Carbon, Maren

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Inpatient aggression is a serious challenge in pediatric psychiatry. Methods A chart review study in adolescent psychiatric inpatients consecutively admitted over 24 months was conducted, to describe aggressive events requiring an intervention (AERI) and to characterize their management. AERIs were identified based on specific institutional event forms and/or documentation of as-needed (STAT/PRN) medication administration for aggression, both recorded by nursing staff. Results Among 408 adolescent inpatients (age: 15.2±1.6 years, 43.9% male), 1349 AERIs were recorded, with ≥1 AERI occurring in 28.4% (n=116; AERI+). However, the frequency of AERIs was highly skewed (median 4, range: 1–258). In a logistical regression model, the primary diagnosis at discharge of disruptive behavior disorders and bipolar disorders, history of previous inpatient treatment, length of hospitalization, and absence of a specific precipitant prior to admission were significantly associated with AERIs (R2=0.32; p<0.0001). The first line treatment of patients with AERIs (AERI+) was pharmacological in nature (95.6%). Seclusion or restraint (SRU) was used at least once in 59.4% of the AERI+ subgroup (i.e., in 16.9% of all patients; median within-group SRU frequency: 3). Treatment and discharge characteristics indicated a poorer prognosis in the AERI+ (discharge to residential care AERI+: 22.8%, AERI−: 5.6%, p<0.001) and a greater need for psychotropic polypharmacy (median number of psychotropic medications AERI+: 2; AERI−: 1, p<0.001). Conclusions Despite high rates of pharmacological interventions, SRU continue to be used in adolescent inpatient care. As both of these approaches lack a clear evidence base, and as adolescents with clinically significant inpatient aggression have increased illness acuity/severity and service needs, structured research into the most appropriate inpatient aggression management is sorely needed. PMID:23647136

  9. Inpatient Transfers to the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Young, Michael P; Gooder, Valerie J; McBride, Karen; James, Brent; Fisher, Elliott S

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine if delayed transfer to the intensive care unit (ICU) after physiologic deterioration is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. DESIGN Inception cohort. SETTING Community hospital in Ogden, Utah. PATIENTS Ninety-one consecutive inpatients with noncardiac diagnoses at the time of emergent transfer to the ICU. We determined the time when each patient first met any of 11 pre-specified physiologic criteria. We classified patients as “slow transfer” when patients met a physiologic criterion 4 or more hours before transfer to the ICU. Patients were followed until discharge. INTERVENTIONS None. MEASUREMENTS In-hospital mortality, functional status at hospital discharge, hospital resources. MAIN RESULTS At the time when the first physiologic criterion was met on the ward, slow- and rapid-transfer patients were similar in terms of age, gender, diagnosis, number of days in hospital prior to ICU transfer, prehospital functional status, and APACHE II scores. By the time slow-transfer patients were admitted to the ICU, they had significantly higher APACHE II scores (21.7 vs 16.2; P = .002) and were more likely to die in-hospital (41% vs 11%; relative risk [RR], 3.5; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.4 to 9.5). Slow-transfer patients were less likely to have had their physician notified of deterioration within 2 hours of meeting physiologic criteria (59% vs 31%; P = .001) and less likely to have had a bedside physician evaluation within the first 3 hours after meeting criteria (23% vs 83%; P = .001). CONCLUSIONS Slow transfer to the ICU of physiologically defined high-risk hospitalized patients was associated with increased risk of death. Slow response to physiologic deterioration may explain these findings. PMID:12542581

  10. Improving diaper design to address incontinence associated dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Incontinence associated dermatitis (IAD) is an inflammatory skin disease mainly triggered by prolonged skin contact with urine, feces but also liberal detergent use when cleansing the skin. To minimize the epidermal barrier challenge we optimized the design of adult incontinence briefs. In the fluid absorption area we interposed a special type of acidic, curled-type of cellulose between the top sheet in contact with the skin and the absorption core beneath containing the polyacrylate superabsorber. The intention was to minimize disturbance of the already weak acid mantle of aged skin. We also employed air-permeable side panels to minimize skin occlusion and swelling of the stratum corneum. Methods The surface pH of diapers was measured after repeated wetting with a urine substitute fluid at the level of the top sheet. Occlusive effects and hydration of the stratum corneum were measured after a 4 hour application of different side panel materials by corneometry on human volunteers. Finally, we evaluated skin symptoms in 12 patients with preexisting IAD for 21 days following the institutional switch to the optimized diaper design. Local skin care protocols remained in place unchanged. Results The improved design created a surface pH of 4.6 which was stable even after repeated wetting throughout a 5 hour period. The "standard design" briefs had values of 7.1, which is alkaline compared to the acidic surface of normal skin. Side panels made from non-woven material with an air-permeability of more than 1200 l/m2/s avoided excessive hydration of the stratum corneum when compared to the commonly employed air-impermeable plastic films. Resolution of pre-existing IAD skin lesions was noted in 8 out of 12 patients after the switch to the optimized brief design. Conclusions An improved design of adult-type briefs can create an acidic pH on the surface and breathable side panels avoid over-hydration of the stratum corneum and occlusion. This may support the

  11. Patient engagement in the inpatient setting: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Prey, Jennifer E; Woollen, Janet; Wilcox, Lauren; Sackeim, Alexander D; Hripcsak, George; Bakken, Suzanne; Restaino, Susan; Feiner, Steven; Vawdrey, David K

    2014-01-01

    Objective To systematically review existing literature regarding patient engagement technologies used in the inpatient setting. Methods PubMed, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Digital Library, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Xplore, and Cochrane databases were searched for studies that discussed patient engagement (‘self-efficacy’, ‘patient empowerment’, ‘patient activation’, or ‘patient engagement’), (2) involved health information technology (‘technology’, ‘games’, ‘electronic health record’, ‘electronic medical record’, or ‘personal health record’), and (3) took place in the inpatient setting (‘inpatient’ or ‘hospital’). Only English language studies were reviewed. Results 17 articles were identified describing the topic of inpatient patient engagement. A few articles identified design requirements for inpatient engagement technology. The remainder described interventions, which we grouped into five categories: entertainment, generic health information delivery, patient-specific information delivery, advanced communication tools, and personalized decision support. Conclusions Examination of the current literature shows there are considerable gaps in knowledge regarding patient engagement in the hospital setting and inconsistent use of terminology regarding patient engagement overall. Research on inpatient engagement technologies has been limited, especially concerning the impact on health outcomes and cost-effectiveness. PMID:24272163

  12. Using no-rinse skin wipes to treat incontinence-associated dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Baadjies, Ruth; Karrouze, Irene; Rajpaul, Kumal

    2014-11-01

    Individuals who suffer with incontinence, especially in relation to faeces, will often be at risk of skin breakdown and develop incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) which, if left untreated, can lead to pressure ulcer formation ( Gray, 2004 ). IAD is caused by increased, unrelieved moisture against the skin, usually from liquid faeces and urine, which can then weaken the skin integrity. The integrity of the skin in this area is also at risk of pressure ulcers caused by shear or friction ( Beeckman et al, 2010a ). Treatment and prevention of IAD lesions involves a three-step process used in post-incontinence episodes, which includes cleansing, moisturisation and protection of the skin ( Beeckman et al, 2011a ). Using a wipe covers all of these steps immediately following incontinence episodes ( Rönner et al, 2010 ). This reduces the need to gather a number of different items required for post-incontinence skin care, which usually includes a dry wipe to be soaked in soapy water to wash the skin, a moisturiser to replace lost moisture and a skin protectant to prevent moisture from direct contact with the skin ( Foxley and Baadjies, 2009 ). This article will give some examples of the use of a particular continence and cleansing wipe in clinical practice. PMID:25382128

  13. Effects of coffee and tea consumption on urinary incontinence in female twins

    PubMed Central

    Tettamanti, G; Altman, D; Pedersen, NL; Bellocco, R; Milsom, I; Iliadou, AN

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To assess the effect of coffee and tea consumption on symptoms of urinary incontinence. Design Population based study Setting The Swedish Twin Register Population In 2005, all twins born between 1959–1985 in Sweden (n = 42 852) were invited to participate in a web-based survey to screen for common complex diseases and common exposures. The present study was limited to female twins with information about at least one urinary symptoms and coffee and tea consumption (n = 14 031). Main outcome measure The association between coffe and tea consumption and urinary incontinence, as well as, nocturia was estimated as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results Women with a high coffee intake were at lower risk of any urinary incontinence (OR 0.78, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.64-0.98) compared to women not drinking coffee. Coffee intake and incontinence subtypes showed no significant associations whereas high tea consumption was specifically associated with a risk for overactive bladder (OR 1.34, 95% CI 11.07-1.67) and nocturia (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.01-1.38). Results from co-twin control analysis suggested that the associations observed in logistic regression were mainly due to familial effects. Conclusions This study suggests that coffee and tea consumption has a limited effect on urinary incontinence symptoms. Familial and genetic effects may have confounded the associations observed in previous studies. PMID:21401855

  14. [Urinary incontinence in castrated bitches. Part 1: Significance, clinical aspects and etiopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Arnold, S

    1997-01-01

    Acquired urinary incontinence occurs in 20% of spayed dogs and there exists a strong correlation between body weight and the risk of urinary incontinence. Bitches with a body weight of more than 20 kg have a risk of 30% white smaller dogs have a risk of 10%. A particular breed disposition exists in Boxers in which 65% are affected. Other breeds with a more than average disposition for urinary incontinence are Dobermans and Giant Schnauzers. Urinary incontinence due to spaying manifests itself mainly while the dogs are sleeping. The cause is a urethral sphincter incompetence which can be verified by a urethral pressure profile (UPP). The microtransducer method proved to be a suitable method for urodynamic studies. It could be demonstrated that the urethral closure pressure is significantly lower in incontinent bitches (4.6 +/- 2.3 cm H2O) than in continent bitches (18.6 +/- 10.5 cm H2O). In addition, the urethral closure pressure for continent bitches dropped significantly within 12 months after surgery. Histological examination revealed that the functional urethral closure cannot be explained by the extent of discernible structures of the urethral wall as seen by light microscopy. PMID:9411733

  15. Vaginal position and length in the bitch: relationship to spaying and urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Gregory, S P; Holt, P E; Parkinson, T J; Wathes, C M

    1999-04-01

    A study was undertaken to determine if the vagina might be a suitable site for the measurement of intra-abdominal pressure during cystometry in the bitch. The position of the cranial vagina and vaginal length were measured radiographically and the effects of spaying and urinary incontinence on these variables were evaluated in 30 continent and 30 incontinent bitches. The study used retrograde vaginourethrograms which had been obtained from animals used in a previous study. The cranial vagina was intra-abdominal on 36 of the vaginourethrograms, being least commonly intra-abdominal in incontinent bitches (11/30). Vaginal position was related linearly to vaginal length and continence status (P < 0.01), while its length was related to bodyweight (P < 0.01). Allowing for bodyweight, neutered animals had significantly shorter vaginas than entire bitches (P < 0.01). Measurement of intra-abdominal pressure with concomitant measurement of intravesical pressure is essential if accurate assessment of detrusor pressure is to be determined during cystometry. The vagina is unlikely to be a useful location from which to measure intra-abdominal pressure since any pressure-measuring catheter inserted into it may fall outside the abdominal pressure zone. This is particularly true of neutered and/or incontinent bitches, the groups in which urodynamic investigations of urinary incontinence are most frequently indicated. PMID:10340249

  16. Incontinence-associated dermatitis in the elderly: treatment options.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Eleanor; Woodward, Sue

    Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) is a common problem in older people. However, it is frequently misdiagnosed and poorly treated. There is often uncertainty about which product to use to prevent and treat IAD; the different types, brands and how to apply them. This literature review looks specifically at the use of barrier products in the prevention and treatment of IAD. A systematic search found six primary research papers that analysed the effectiveness of various barrier products; they will be compared and contrasted in this review. There is a lack of evidence to recommend any one barrier product over another for use in a standardised skin care protocol such as the regimen suggested by Gray et al (2012). More research needs to be conducted to establish the most effective barrier products on the market. More research is also needed on the efficacy of barrier products in the prevention and treatment solely of IAD rather than combined studies looking at IAD with pressure ulcers. PMID:23905225

  17. A Wireless Self-Powered Urinary Incontinence Sensor System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Ami; Utsunomiya, Fumiyasu; Douseki, Takakuni

    A self-powered urinary incontinence sensor system consisting of a urine-activated coin battery and a wireless transmitter has been developed as an application for wireless biosensor networks. The urine-activated battery makes possible both the sensing of urine leakage and self-powered operation. An intermittent power-supply circuit that uses an electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC) with a small internal resistance suppresses the supply voltage drop due to the large internal resistance of the battery. This circuit and a 1-V surface acoustic wave (SAW) oscillator reduce the power dissipation of a wireless transmitter. The SAW oscillator quickly responds to the on-off control of the power supply, which is suitable for intermittent operation. To verify the effectiveness of the circuit scheme, the authors fabricated a prototype sensor system. When the volume of urine is 0.2 ml, the battery outputs a voltage of over 1.3 V; and the sensor system can transmit signals over a distance of 5 m.

  18. Stem Cell Therapy for Stress Urinary Incontinence: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Lue, Tom F.

    2012-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a prevailing health problem that severely impacts quality of life. Because SUI is mainly due to urethral sphincter deficiency, several preclinical and clinical trials have investigated whether transplantation of patient's own skeletal muscle–derived cells (SkMDCs) can restore the sphincter musculature. The specific cell type of SkMDCs has been described as myoblasts, satellite cells, muscle progenitor cells, or muscle-derived stem cells, and thus may vary from study to study. In more recent years, other stem cell (SC) types have also been tested, including those from the bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, and adipose tissue. These studies were mostly preclinical and utilized rat SUI models that were established predominantly by pudendal or sciatic nerve injury. Less frequently used animal models were sphincter injury and vaginal distension. While transurethral injection of SCs was employed almost exclusively in clinical trials, periurethral injection was used in all preclinical trials. Intravenous injection was also used in one preclinical study. Functional assessment of therapeutic efficacy in preclinical studies has relied almost exclusively on leak point pressure measurement. Histological assessment examined the sphincter muscle content, existence of transplanted SCs, and possible differentiation of these SCs. While all of these studies reported favorable functional and histological outcomes, there are questions about the validity of the animal model and claims of multilineage differentiation. In any event, SC transplantation appears to be a promising treatment for SUI. PMID:22121849

  19. Preventing urinary incontinence during pregnancy and postpartum: a review.

    PubMed

    Wesnes, Stian Langeland; Lose, Gunnar

    2013-06-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a common condition in association with pregnancy. Incident UI in pregnancy or postpartum are significant risk factors for UI later in life. Epidemiological studies on UI during pregnancy and postpartum list numerous variables associated with UI. For women, the main focus is on pelvic floor muscle training to prevent UI. However, several other modifiable risk factors are likely to contribute to prevention of UI during pregnancy and postpartum. This review investigated modifiable risk factors for UI during pregnancy and postpartum and also reviewed randomized controlled trials on prevention of UI in association with pregnancy. Systematic searches for publications until September 2012 on prevention of UI during pregnancy and postpartum were performed. Based on available evidence, the following recommendations to prevent UI during pregnancy and postpartum were made: women should be advised not to smoke before or during pregnancy (grade B), aim at normal weight before pregnancy (grade B), and aim at regaining prepregnancy weight postpartum (grade B). Occasional low-intensity training should be advocated (grade B), and constipation should be avoided during pregnancy (grade B) and postpartum (grade C). Women should be advised to perform pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy and postpartum (grade A) and to use perineal warm packs during delivery (grade B). Cesarean section to prevent UI cannot be recommended (grade D). If lifestyle recommendations are addressed in association with pregnancy, incidence of UI during pregnancy and postpartum is likely to decrease. PMID:23436034

  20. Physiotherapy for Women with Stress Urinary Incontinence: A Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Ghaderi, Fariba; Oskouei, Ali E.

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This review article is designed to expose physiotherapists to a physiotherapy assessment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and the treatment and possibly preventive roles that they might play for women with SUI. Specifically, the goal of this article is to provide an understanding of pelvic floor muscle function and the implications that this function has for physiotherapy treatment by reviewing articles published in this area. [Methods] A range of databases was searched to identify articles that address physiotherapy for SUI, including the Cochrane Library, Medline, and CINAHL. [Results] According to the articles identified in our databases research, greater improvements in SUI occur when women receive a supervised exercise program of at least three months. The effectiveness of physiotherapy treatment is increased if the exercise program is based on some principles, such as intensity, duration, resembling functional task, and the position in which the exercise for pelvic floor muscles is performed. Biofeedback and electrical stimulation may also be clinically useful and acceptable modalities for some women with SUI. [Conclusion] We concluded that the plan for physiotherapy care should be individualized for each patient and include standard physiotherapy interventions. PMID:25276044

  1. Female urinary incontinence: what the epidemiologic data tell us.

    PubMed

    Mallett, Veronica T

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) in women has been the subject of many epidemiologic studies. Since 1968 the field has accumulated sufficient data that we now know how stress UI and urge UI appear in populations categorized by race, age, parity, body mass index and other demographic factors. The first comprehensive study in the U.S., the MESA study, was done in 1983. For community-dwelling women 60 years or older, it came up with the now familiar figure of 38% in this age-group. Very similar figures have been found in other national populations, but there are great differences in sub-populations and also by type--stress, urge, or mixed UI. However, with all differences in prevalence acknowledged, no type of UI is unusual in a population of older women. This article delineates, with detailed discussion of individual studies, prevalence by type, age, race, obstetric and gynecologic-surgery history, and anatomic dysfunction, plus consideration of the effects of obesity and menopause on UI. The conclusion is that a problem so widespread is a candidate for prevention, and that the few trials in this direction should be augmented. PMID:15971716

  2. Knowledge and Attitudes of Nursing Home Staff and Surveyors about the Revised Federal Guidance for Incontinence Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuBeau, Catherine E.; Ouslander, Joseph G.; Palmer, Mary H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We assessed nursing home staff and state nursing home surveyors regarding their knowledge and attitudes about urinary incontinence, its management, and the revised federal Tag F315 guidance for urinary incontinence. Design and Methods: We conducted a questionnaire survey of a convenience sample of nursing home staff and state nursing home…

  3. How to prevent mesh erosion in transobturator Tension-Free Incontinence Cystocoele Treatment (TICT): a comparative survey

    PubMed Central

    LEANZA, V.; ZANGHÌ, G.; VECCHIO, R.; LEANZA, G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Tension-Free Incontinence Cystocoele Treatment (TICT) was introduced by Leanza-Gasbarro-Caschetto in 2001, on the basis of experimental and clinical investigations to obtain a physiologic mechanism of closure and opening of the urethra in the event of genuine stress urinary incontinence (S.U.I.) and cistocoele. TICT took origin from the previous retropubic tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) based on the integral theory according which mid-urethra has a main role for urinary continence but differs in that the former restores the anatomy and physiology of the entire anterior compartment. Simultaneously Delorme in 2001 spread the TOT (Trans-Obturator Tape) technique, emphasizing the needle passage across the obturator foramen which represents a new and less invasive route in comparison with the retropubic one. Transobturator TICT exploits the advantages of TOT, adding the anatomical repair of bladder prolapse. Introduction of mesh for treatment of pelvic defects gives a lower rate of recurrence, but introduces new complications due to the extraneous materials, among which the most common is represented by mesh erosion. At present the rate of mesh erosion reported is 4.7% in the TOT. Aim of our survey was to verify a technique allowing post-operative erosion prevention. Patients and methods 230 women with urodynamic stress incontinence and cystocoele after diagnostic phase were allocated to 2 treatment groups (A end B-group), with open alternative method. A-group women underwent transobturator TICT procedure after preparation of anterior compartment by means of a transversal incision taking care to preserve the integrity of the vaginal skin in the site where the mesh would be allocated. Conversely, B-group transobturator TICT was carried out in a classical way, through a longitudinal incision of anterior vaginal skin and suturing after placing the mesh. Each of the two groups was initially constituted by 115 subjects. There were 14 preoperative dropouts among

  4. Comparison between the Health Belief Model and Subjective Expected Utility Theory: predicting incontinence prevention behaviour in post-partum women.

    PubMed

    Dolman, M; Chase, J

    1996-08-01

    A small-scale study was undertaken to test the relative predictive power of the Health Belief Model and Subjective Expected Utility Theory for the uptake of a behaviour (pelvic floor exercises) to reduce post-partum urinary incontinence in primigravida females. A structured questionnaire was used to gather data relevant to both models from a sample antenatal and postnatal primigravida women. Questions examined the perceived probability of becoming incontinent, the perceived (dis)utility of incontinence, the perceived probability of pelvic floor exercises preventing future urinary incontinence, the costs and benefits of performing pelvic floor exercises and sources of information and knowledge about incontinence. Multiple regression analysis focused on whether or not respondents intended to perform pelvic floor exercises and the factors influencing their decisions. Aggregated data were analysed to compare the Health Belief Model and Subjective Expected Utility Theory directly. PMID:9238593

  5. Inpatient treatment of anorexia nervosa: review and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Bowers, W A; Andersen, A E

    1994-01-01

    Inpatient treatment of anorexia nervosa, difficult and at times complex, has been shown to promote enduring change. An integrated treatment approach that includes medical, psychological, nursing, and social interventions can restore patients to a healthy weight, improve abnormal eating behaviors, and ameliorate many of the central psychopathological attitudes and illness-driven behaviors characteristic of the disorder. This article reviews inpatient treatment of anorexia nervosa, evaluating empirical studies and providing a critique of their methodology and potential applicability, combining available published studies with clinical experience to suggest a comprehensive pragmatic treatment approach, and noting research needs for the future. More controlled double-blind studies are urgently needed to assess virtually every aspect of inpatient care, especially methods for promoting safe and rapid weight restoration. Comparative studies on the efficacy of behavioral, psychotherapeutic, and pharmacological approaches and determination of the optimum step-wise preparation for discharge into a weight-preoccupied society are also needed. PMID:9384902

  6. Preventable inpatient time: adequacy of electronic patient information systems.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, D L; Mazhari, R; Kalus, R; Nawaz, H

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study assessed hospital electronic patient information systems (EPIS) for inclusion of variables associated with avoidable and extended hospitalization (preventable inpatient time). METHODS: We searched MEDLINE and HealthSTAR databases to identify predictors of preventable inpatient time. We then audited the admissions process and the handwritten medical record at 1 hospital, and the EPIS at all hospitals, affiliated with the Yale University School of Medicine for inclusion of the predictors. RESULTS: Whereas the written medical record included all 58 predictors, the EPIS of the 10 hospitals surveyed included an average of only 38% of the predictors. CONCLUSIONS: The conventional approach to information gathering during hospital admission is highly inefficient. Revising EPIS to include predictors of preventable inpatient time could enhance efficiency and quality, while reducing costs, of hospital care. PMID:10589326

  7. Factors affecting interstate use of inpatient care by Medicare beneficiaries.

    PubMed Central

    Buczko, W

    1992-01-01

    This article examines the extent to which interstate inflow and outflow of patients affects their observed use of Medicare Part A inpatient care. Interstate patient flow can bias utilization rates and may be due to seasonal migration, interstate inpatient care market areas, or purposive seeking of specialized/high-quality care. Examination of state level patient flow data drawn from 1987 Medicare discharge indicate that most interstate patient flow occurs between adjacent states probably as an outgrowth of interstate markets. Regression analyses of patient flow data suggest that while seasonal migration is an important determinant of patient flow, its importance is secondary to that of indicators of the availability of specialized services. These findings suggest research questions that may be best answered in detailed analyses of inpatient utilization in interstate market areas and seasonal migration. PMID:1500288

  8. Predicting Inpatient Readmission and Outpatient Admission in Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kun-Pei; Chen, Pei-Chun; Huang, Ling-Ya; Mao, Hsiu-Chen; Chan, Ding-Cheng (Derrick)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recognizing potentially avoidable hospital readmission and admissions are important health care quality issues. We develop prediction models for inpatient readmission and outpatient admission to hospitals for older adults In the retrospective cohort study with 2 million sampling file of the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan, older adults (aged ≥65 y/o) with a first admission in 2008 were enrolled in the inpatient cohort (N = 39,156). The outpatient cohort included subjects who had ≥1 outpatient visit in 2008 (N = 178,286). Each cohort was split into derivation (3/4) and validation (1/4) data set. Primary outcome of the inpatient cohort: 30-day readmission from the date of discharge. The outpatient cohort included hospital admissions within the 1-year follow-up period. Candidate risk factors include demographics, comorbidities, and previous health care utilizations. Series of logistic regression models were applied with area under the receiver operating curves (AUCs) to identify the best model. Roughly 1 of 7 (14.6%) of the inpatients was readmitted within 30 days, and 1 of 5 (19.1%) of the outpatient cohort was admitted within 1 year. Age, education, use of home health care, and selected comorbidities (e.g., cancer with metastasis) were included in the final model. The AUC of the inpatient readmission model was 0.655 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.646–0.664) and outpatient admission model was 0.642 (95% CI 0.639–0.646). Predictive performance was maintained in both validation data sets. The goodness-to-fit model demonstrated good calibration in both groups. We developed and validated practical clinical prediction models for inpatient readmission and outpatient admissions for general older adults with indicators easily obtained from an administrative data set. PMID:27100455

  9. Late Fecal Incontinence After High-Dose Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Better Prediction Using Longitudinal Definitions

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorino, Claudio; Rancati, Tiziana; Fellin, Gianni; Vavassori, Vittorio; Cagna, Emanuela; Casanova Borca, Valeria; Girelli, Giuseppe; Menegotti, Loris; Monti, Angelo Filippo; Tortoreto, Francesca; Delle Canne, Stefania; Valdagni, Riccardo

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To model late fecal incontinence after high-dose prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT) in patients accrued in the AIROPROS (prostate working group of the Italian Association of Radiation Oncology) 0102 trial using different endpoint definitions. Methods and Materials: The self-reported questionnaires (before RT, 1 month after RT, and every 6 months for {<=}3 years after RT) of 586 patients were available. The peak incontinence (P{sub I}NC) and two longitudinal definitions (chronic incontinence [C{sub I}NC], defined as the persistence of Grade 1 or greater incontinence after any Grade 2-3 event; and mean incontinence score [M{sub I}NC], defined as the average score during the 3-year period after RT) were considered. The correlation between the clinical/dosimetric parameters (including rectal dose-volume histograms) and P{sub I}NC (Grade 2 or greater), C{sub I}NC, and M{sub I}NC of {>=}1 were investigated using multivariate logistic analyses. Receiver operating characteristic curves and the area under the curve were used to assess the predictive value of the different multivariate models. Results: Of the 586 patients, 36 with a Grade 1 or greater incontinence score before RT were not included in the present analysis. Of the 550 included patients, 197 (35.8%) had at least one control with a Grade 1 or greater incontinence score (M{sub I}NC >0). Of these 197 patients, 37 (6.7%), 22 (4.0%), and 17 (3.1%) were scored as having P{sub I}NC, M{sub I}NC {>=}1, and C{sub I}NC, respectively. On multivariate analysis, Grade 2 or greater acute incontinence was the only predictor of P{sub I}NC (odds ratio [OR], 5.9; p = .0009). Grade 3 acute incontinence was predictive of C{sub I}NC (OR, 9.4; p = .02), and percentage of the rectal volume receiving >40 Gy of {>=}80% was predictive of a M{sub I}NC of {>=}1 (OR, 3.8; p = .008) and of C{sub I}NC (OR, 3.6; p = .03). Previous bowel disease, previous abdominal/pelvic surgery, and the use of antihypertensive (protective factor

  10. Treatments of faecal incontinence: recommendations from the French national society of coloproctology.

    PubMed

    Vitton, V; Soudan, D; Siproudhis, L; Abramowitz, L; Bouvier, M; Faucheron, J-L; Leroi, A-M; Meurette, G; Pigot, F; Damon, H

    2014-03-01

    Faecal incontinence is common and significantly affects quality of life. Its treatment involves dietary manipulation, medical treatments, perineal rehabilitation or surgery. In this paper, the French National Society of Coloproctology offers recommendations based on the data in the current literature, including those on recently developed treatments. There is a lack of high quality data and most of the recommendations are therefore based either on grade of recommendation B or expert recommendation (Level 4). However, the literature supports the construction of an algorithm based on the available scientific evidence and expert recommendation which may be useful in clinical practice. The French National Society of Coloproctology proposes a decision-making algorithm that includes recent developments of treatment. The current recommendations support sacral nerve modulation as the key treatment for faecal incontinence. They do not support the use of sphincter substitutions except in certain circumstances. Transanal irrigation is a novel often successful treatment of faecal incontinence due to neurological disorders. PMID:24521273

  11. Management of incontinence-associated dermatitis with a skin barrier protectant.

    PubMed

    Southgate, Geraldine; Bradbury, Sarah

    The skin performs many important protective functions, one of which is to act as a barrier to moisture, irritants and bacteria. Good management of patients' skin is a fundamental part of nursing care to prevent development of complex and distressing problems, such as pressure ulceration and incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD). IAD is skin breakdown related to faecal and/or urinary incontinence, which requires adoption of a structured skin care regimen, including regular skin inspection, cleansing and the use of skin barrier protectants, to proactively protect the skin from irritant bodily fluids. Six case studies using Medi Derma-S skin barrier protectants on patients with IAD highlighted the potential for improved clinical outcomes on skin either vulnerable or compromised due to the effects of incontinence. Positive observations were noted with regard to improvement in skin condition, pain and discomfort, promotion of independence and prevention of deterioration of concurrent pressure damage. PMID:27172503

  12. Inpatient falls: the impact of family and personal caregivers.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Yin, Chang-Yi

    2009-08-01

    The impact of family and personal caregivers on inpatients with fall-related injuries in a Taiwanese medical center is investigated in this study. Taiwan has a prevalent custom for families to accompany their hospitalized loved ones during hospital stays. During the 95-day data collection period, 228 falls occurred. Results showed that if no family members were present when a patient fell, the fall-related injury was less serious. Nurses in Taiwan tend to depend on family members to help provide patient care. Regardless of whether an inpatient has a family member present, frequent bedside nursing visits are important to prevent falls. PMID:19616163

  13. Private in-patient psychiatry in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Russakoff, L. Mark

    2014-01-01

    The US healthcare system is in the midst of major changes driven by four forces: the growing consensus in the country that the current system is financially unsustainable; managed care and parity legislation; the Affordable Care Act 2010; and the ageing of the ‘baby boomer’ generation. How these forces will combine and interact is unclear. The current state of in-patient psychiatric care and trends affecting the private practice of in-patient psychiatry over the next few years will be described. PMID:25285222

  14. Comparison of Predictive Factors for Postoperative Incontinence of Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate by the Surgeons’ Experience During Learning Curve

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kazushi; Yamamichi, Fukashi; Chiba, Koji; Fujisawa, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To detect predictive factors for postoperative incontinence following holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) according to surgeon experience (beginner or experienced) and preoperative clinical data. Methods: Of 224 patients, a total of 203 with available data on incontinence were investigated. The potential predictive factors for post-HoLEP incontinence included clinical factors, such as patient age, and preoperative urodynamic study results, including detrusor overactivity (DO). We also classified the surgeons performing the procedure according to their HoLEP experience: beginner (<21 cases) and experienced (≥21 cases). Results: Our statistical data showed DO was a significant predictive factor at the super-short period (the next day of catheter removal: odds ratio [OR], 3.375; P=0.000). Additionally, patient age, surgeon mentorship (inverse correlation), and prostate volume were significant predictive factors at the 1-month interval after HoLEP (OR, 1.072; P=0.004; OR, 0.251; P=0.002; and OR, 1.008; P=0.049, respectively). With regards to surgeon experience, DO and preoperative International Prostate Symptom Score (inverse) at the super-short period, and patient age and mentorship (inverse correlation) at the 1-month interval after HoLEP (OR, 3.952; P=0.002; OR, 1.084; P=0.015; and OR,1.084; P=0.015; OR, 0.358; P=0.003, respectively) were significant predictive factors for beginners, and first desire to void (FDV) at 1 month after HoLEP (OR, 1.009; P=0.012) was a significant predictive factor for experienced surgeons in multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Preoperative DO, IPSS, patient age, and surgeon mentorship were significant predictive factors of postoperative patient incontinence for beginner surgeons, while FDV was a significant predictive factors for experienced surgeons. These findings should be taken into account by surgeons performing HoLEP to maximize the patient’s quality of life with regards to urinary continence. PMID

  15. Barriers to Urinary Incontinence Care Seeking in White, Black, and Latina Women

    PubMed Central

    Willis-Gray, Marcella G.; Sandoval, Juan S.; Maynor, Jean; Bosworth, Hayden B.; Siddiqui, Nazema Y.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We compared barriers to urinary incontinence (UI) healthcare seeking between white, black, and Latina women. Methods This is a cross-sectional study using a convenience sample of white, black, and Latina women. Women completed the Barriers to Incontinence Care Seeking Questionnaire (BICS-Q), the Incontinence Quality of Life Instrument (I-QOL), the Questionnaire for Urinary Incontinence Diagnosis (QUID), and the Incontinence Severity Index (ISI). The primary objective was to assess barriers to UI care seeking among groups, as measured by the BICS-Q. Secondary objectives were to assess factors associated with barriers to incontinence care and to compare specific barriers using BICS-Q subscale scores. Regression analyses were used to further assess for differences among groups while adjusting for potential confounding variables. Results We included a total of 93 subjects, including 30 white, 33 black, and 30 Latina women. Mean I-QOL, QUID, and ISI scores were not significantly different among our three groups. Barriers, based on BICS-Q scores, were lowest in white women and higher in blacks and Latinas (2.9 vs. 7.3 vs. 10.9 respectively, p<0.001). When adjusting for potential confounders such as age, income, education, presence of UI, ISI score, and I-QOL score, Latinas continued to demonstrate higher barriers compared to white or black women (β= 7.4, 95% CI: 2.2–12.7; p=0.006). There were no significant differences between black women compared to other groups in the adjusted analyses. Conclusions Latinas experience more barriers to UI healthcare seeking compared to white and black women. PMID:25185610

  16. Anatomical Disruption & Length-Tension Dysfunction of Anal Sphincter Complex Muscles in Women with Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Sun; Weinstein, Milena; Raizada, Varuna; Jiang, Yanfen; Bhargava, Valmik; Rajasekaran, M. Raj; Mittal, Ravinder K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Anal sphincter complex muscles; internal anal sphincter, external anal sphincter and puborectalis muscles, play important role in the anal continence mechanism. Patients with symptoms of fecal incontinence have weak anal sphincter complex muscles; however, their length-tension properties and relationship to anatomical disruption have never been studied. OBJECTIVE To assess the anatomy of anal sphincter complex muscles using 3D-ultrasound imaging system and determine the relationship between anatomical defects and length-tension property of external anal sphincter and puborectalis muscles in women with incontinence symptoms and control subjects. DESIGN Severity of anal sphincter muscle damage was determined by static and dynamic 3Dimensional-ultrasound imaging. Length-tension property was determined by anal and vaginal pressure respectively using custom designed probes. PATIENTS 44 asymptomatic controls and 24 incontinent patients participated in this study. MAIN OUTCOME MEAUSURES Anatomical defects and length-tension dysfunction of anal sphincter complex muscles in FI patients were evaluated. RESULT Prevalence of injury to sphincter muscles are significantly higher in the incontinent patients compared to controls. 85% of patients but only 9% controls reveal damage to ≥2 of the 3 muscles of anal sphincter complex. Anal and vaginal squeeze pressure increased with increase in the probe size (length-tension curve) in majority of controls. In patients, the increase in anal and vaginal squeeze pressures was either significantly smaller than controls or it decreased with the increasing probe size (abnormal length-tension). CONCLUSIONS Length-tension property of the external anal sphincter and puborectalis muscles is significantly impaired in incontinent patients. Our findings have therapeutic implication in the treatment of anal incontinence. PMID:24105004

  17. Trends in Inpatient Hospital Deaths: National Hospital Discharge Survey, 2000-2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... Has the inpatient hospital death rate decreased for all patients and for those with selected first-listed ... 2010 differ from the length of stay for all hospitalizations? Inpatients who died in the hospital stayed ...

  18. 78 FR 46733 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Prospective Payment System-Update for Fiscal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ...This notice updates the prospective payment rates for Medicare inpatient hospital services provided by inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs). These changes are applicable to IPF discharges occurring during the fiscal year (FY) beginning October 1, 2013 through September 30,...

  19. 42 CFR 418.108 - Condition of participation: Short-term inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... Inpatient care must be available for pain control, symptom management, and respite purposes, and must be... management and pain control. Inpatient care for pain control and symptom management must be provided in...

  20. 42 CFR 418.108 - Condition of participation: Short-term inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... Inpatient care must be available for pain control, symptom management, and respite purposes, and must be... management and pain control. Inpatient care for pain control and symptom management must be provided in...

  1. 42 CFR 418.108 - Condition of participation: Short-term inpatient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... Inpatient care must be available for pain control, symptom management, and respite purposes, and must be... management and pain control. Inpatient care for pain control and symptom management must be provided in...

  2. Incontinence-associated dermatitis: step-by-step prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Beeckman, Dimitri; Woodward, Sue; Gray, Mikel

    2011-08-01

    Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) is one of the clinical manifestations of moisture-associated skin damage. It is a common problem in community dwelling patients with faecal and/or urinary incontinence, and IAD management is an important challenge for community nurses. The aim of this practice focused article is to provide a brief update about the evidence of: (1) the pathophysiology of IAD, (2) the differentiation between IAD and pressure ulcers, and (3) the prevention/treatment of IAD. Recommendations for patient care in the community is described with reference to a patient case study. PMID:21841630

  3. [Invasive studies at the office in the diagnosis of stress urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Iris de la cruz, S

    1996-06-01

    A revision of the available diagnostic method is being made for the stress urinary incontinence, paying special attention to those which can be enhanced in the doctor's office. Three of the requiring catheters, endoscopic instruments or another kind of advices for his realization and they can be considered such as "Invasive test". There is mentioned that with these techniques there can be found an appropriate diagnosis of the genuine incontinence even up to a 75% of the cases. The remaining percentage requires studies either urodynamic or of any other kind in order to complete the diagnosis. The criterions are enlisted in order to send the patient to a specialized center. PMID:8754729

  4. Gastrointestinal transit and prolonged ambulatory colonic motility in health and faecal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, F; Kamm, M; Morris, G; Britton, K; Woloszko, J; Nicholls, R

    1997-01-01

    Background—Colonic motor function has not been studied in the ambulatory setting over a prolonged period in the unprepared state. Furthermore, the disturbance of this function in patients with faecal incontinence is unknown. 
Aim—To study colonic function over two to three days in the ambulatory, unprepared state in health and in patients with idiopathic faecal incontinence. 
Methods—Six healthy women and six women with faecal incontinence and a structurally intact anal sphincter ingested a dual radioisotope meal, and had a six sensor, solid state manometric probe colonoscopically inserted into the left colon. Scanning was performed until radioisotope left the gut and pressure was recorded for a median of 44hours. 
Results—Three of six patients showed abnormal gastric emptying. Patients showed no disturbance of colonic radioisotope transit. Controls had a median of 12, whereas patients had a median of 16, high amplitude propagated waves per 24 hours. In three patients urge incontinence was associated with high amplitude (up to 500 cm water) propagated waves which often reached the rectum. These high pressure waves were identical to those occuring in healthy subjects, the only difference being the lack of adequate sphincter response. Passive incontinence was not associated with colonic motor activity. Defaecation in all subjects was associated with identical propagated waves, and distal movement of 13% (median) of right colonic content and excretion of 32% from the left colon and rectum. The urge to defaecate was associated with either propagated waves (45%) or non-propagated contractions (55%). Rectal motor complexes were recorded in both groups of subjects, but similar rhythmic activity was also recorded in the sigmoid and descending colon. 
Conclusions—Normal colonic function consists of frequent high pressure propagated waves. Rhythmic activity occurs both proximal to and in the rectum. Defaecation is characterised by high pressure propagated

  5. Urinary Incontinence due to Overactive Detrusor Muscle: A Rare Side Effect of Venlafaxine

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Vithyalakshmi; Gunasekar, Palanikumar; Kumar, Suneel; Alsakaf, Imad

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of reemergence of urinary incontinence (UI) in a patient with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) after starting treatment with venlafaxine who was stabilized on tamsulosin and finasteride for about 6 years. A 66-year-old Caucasian male with prior history of major depressive disorder developed UI within a week of starting venlafaxine 75 mg per day. He described symptoms in the form of involuntary leakage of urine both during the day and at night. His symptoms of UI resolved after stopping the venlafaxine. To the best of our knowledge, there are only four case reports of venlafaxine induced urinary incontinence which have been published. PMID:26491599

  6. Macular posterior pigmentary incontinence: its relation to macular amyloidosis and notalgia paresthetica.

    PubMed

    Westermark, P; Ridderström, E; Vahlquist, A

    1996-07-01

    Patients with clinical features of dorsal macular amyloidosis but without subepidermal amyloid deposits were followed for 2-11 years. The clinical appearance was fairly stable during this period of time, with little tendency of healing. Only 2 of the patients developed typical macular amyloidosis during the follow-up. It is concluded that a condition strongly resembling macular amyloidosis but without amyloid is an entity, and the designation "macular posterior pigmentary incontinence" is proposed. The relationship between macular posterior pigmentary incontinence and the two conditions macular amyloidosis and notalgia paresthetica is discussed. PMID:8869690

  7. Surgical treatment for stress urinary incontinence in women: novelties, concerns and ethics.

    PubMed

    Zimmern, Philippe E

    2012-01-01

    The International Continence Society (ICS) is the largest international body of nurses, physical therapists, drug researchers, clinicians, gynecologists, urologists and other specialists united yearly to discuss the topic of incontinence. This year, over 2500 attendees from all over the world participated in the annual meeting held in Glasgow, Scotland. Several presentations deserve recognition, but we will focus on a few key issues, such as the latest information on the surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence, a novel approach to patient's study participation in randomized controlled trials via internet recruitment, and ethical concerns related to disclosure and transparency, as these are keenly relevant topics in women's health. PMID:22171771

  8. Epidemiology of inpatient stay in Parkinson's disease in the United States: Insights from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Abhimanyu; Balakrishnan, Poojitha; Patel, Achint; Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Nistal, Dominic; Annapureddy, Narender; Poojary, Priti; Nadkarni, Girish N; Sidiropoulos, Christos

    2016-09-01

    The total number of people living with Parkinson's disease (PD) worldwide is expected to double by 2030. The risk factors for emergency department visits in PD patients have been described before, however, there is limited data on inpatient hospitalizations of PD patients. We derived our study cohort from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 2002-2011. The NIS is a stratified 20% sample of discharges from all U.S. hospitals. We extracted causes of hospitalization using International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes and calculated inpatient mortality, length of stay and cost. Further, the significance of trends over 10 years was assessed. A total of 3,015,645 (weighted) admissions of PD patients were documented from 2002-2011. Pneumonia, urinary tract infection (UTI), septicemia and aspiration pneumonitis were the most common causes of admission, of which incidence of sepsis and UTI was trending up. Of all causes, 3.9% of the admissions resulted in inpatient mortality. Inpatient mortality for PD patients decreased from 4.9% in 2002 to 3.3% in 2011 (p<0.001). The median length of stay has also steadily declined from 3.6days in 2002 to 2.3days in 2011. However, the inflation-adjusted cost of care has been steadily rising, from $22,250 per hospitalization in 2002 to $37,942 in 2011. We conclude that the epidemiology of inpatient admissions in PD has changed significantly over the last decade. Our study underscores the need for future, in-depth prospective studies to explore this changing disease spectrum to design preventive measures and targeted interventions. PMID:27242063

  9. Predictors of Care Seeking in Women with Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Minassian, Vatche A; Yan, Xiaowei; Lichtenfeld, Marc J; Sun, Haiyan; Stewart, Walter F

    2012-01-01

    Aims To determine predictors of health care utilization in women with urinary incontinence (UI) from the population to specialty care. Methods The General Longitudinal Overactive Bladder Evaluation – UI is a population-based study on the natural history of UI in women ≥ 40 years of age. Prevalence of UI was estimated by using the bladder health survey (BHS). Survey data were linked with electronic health records (EHR) to examine factors associated with a clinical UI diagnosis using logistic regression. Risk factors analyzed included: UI symptoms, subtypes, bother, severity, duration and effect on quality of life, and demographic and other health characteristics. All statistical tests were two-sided with a p-value < 0.05 being significant. Results The overall prevalence of any UI based on responses to the BHS was 1,618/4064 (40%). Of the 1,618 women with UI, there were only 398 (25%) women with EHR (clinical) diagnosis of UI. Women with UI versus those without UI were more likely to be have a BMI >25kg/m2 (70% versus 58%), more likely to be parous (91% versus 87%) and college educated (54% versus 46%), P<0.001. After adjusting for confounders in the model, variables significantly associated with clinical UI diagnosis included: older age (OR=1.96), higher parity (> 1 birth) (OR=1.76), higher urgency UI (OR=1.08), adaptive behavior (OR=1.2), and UI bother scores (OR=1.01), as well as more frequent outpatient visits (OR=1.03), P<0.05. Conclusions UI is a highly prevalent condition with only a minority of women seeking care. Factors associated with health care utilization include older age, parity (1+), number of doctor visits, urgency UI subtype, UI bother and impact on behavior. PMID:22378605

  10. A prevalence study of bestiality (zoophilia) in psychiatric in-patients, medical in-patients, and psychiatric staff.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, W A; Freinhar, J P

    1991-01-01

    The prevalence of bestiality (both actual sexual contacts and sexual fantasy) was investigated in an experimental group (psychiatric in-patients) and two control populations (medical in-patients and psychiatric staff). Psychiatric patients were found to have a statistically significant higher prevalence rate (55%) of bestiality than the control groups (10% and 15% respectively). Implications of these findings are discussed. It is recommended that due to the obvious prevalence of this condition, questions exploring this previously ignored topic should be routinely included in the psychiatric interview. PMID:1778686

  11. 5 CFR 890.905 - Limits on inpatient hospital and physician charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limits on inpatient hospital and... Inpatient Hospital Charges, Physician Charges, and FEHB Benefit Payments § 890.905 Limits on inpatient hospital and physician charges. (a) Hospitals may not collect from FEHB plans and retired...

  12. 42 CFR 456.101 - UR plan required for inpatient hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false UR plan required for inpatient hospital services...: Hospitals Utilization Review (ur) Plan: General Requirement § 456.101 UR plan required for inpatient hospital services. (a) A State plan must provide that each hospital furnishing inpatient services under...

  13. Costing imaging procedures.

    PubMed

    Bretland, P M

    1988-01-01

    The existing National Health Service financial system makes comprehensive costing of any service very difficult. A method of costing using modern commercial methods has been devised, classifying costs into variable, semi-variable and fixed and using the principle of overhead absorption for expenditure not readily allocated to individual procedures. It proved possible to establish a cost spectrum over the financial year 1984-85. The cheapest examinations were plain radiographs outside normal working hours, followed by plain radiographs, ultrasound, special procedures, fluoroscopy, nuclear medicine, angiography and angiographic interventional procedures in normal working hours. This differs from some published figures, particularly those in the Körner report. There was some overlap between fluoroscopic interventional and the cheaper nuclear medicine procedures, and between some of the more expensive nuclear medicine procedures and the cheaper angiographic ones. Only angiographic and the few more expensive nuclear medicine procedures exceed the cost of the inpatient day. The total cost of the imaging service to the district was about 4% of total hospital expenditure. It is shown that where more procedures are undertaken, the semi-variable and fixed (including capital) elements of the cost decrease (and vice versa) so that careful study is required to assess the value of proposed economies. The method is initially time-consuming and requires a computer system with 512 Kb of memory, but once the basic costing system is established in a department, detailed financial monitoring should become practicable. The necessity for a standard comprehensive costing procedure of this nature, based on sound cost accounting principles, appears inescapable, particularly in view of its potential application to management budgeting. PMID:3349241

  14. How do Trends for Behavioral Health Inpatient Care Differ from Medical Inpatient Care in U.S. Community Hospitals?

    PubMed

    Bao, Yuhua; Sturm, Roland

    2001-06-01

    BACKGROUND: Inpatient care in the United States accounts for one third of the health care expenditures. There exists a well-established trend towards fewer inpatient admissions and shorter lengths of stay for all inpatient care, which can be attributed to cost containment efforts through managed care and advances in treatment technologies. However, different illnesses may not necessarily share the same pattern of change in inpatient care utilization. In particular, mental health and substance abuse (MHSA) care has experienced a particularly dramatic growth of specialized managed behavioral organizations, which could have led to an even faster decline. AIMS OF THE STUDY: This study contrasts the trends of MHSA inpatient care in U.S. community hospitals with medical inpatient care over the years 1988 to 1997. It also analyzes the trends for subgroups of MHSA stays by diagnostic groups, age and primary payer. METHODS: We use the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) from the Health Care Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) to estimate both number of inpatient discharges per 1,000 population and average length of stay over the years and relate the two indices. Inpatient MHSA stays are categorized into subgroups by age, primary payer of the care, and diagnostic group. We use the Clinical Classification Software (CCS) to distinguish between affective disorders, schizophrenia and related disorders, other psychoses, anxiety and related disorders, pre-adult disorders, and alcohol-, substance- related mental disorders and other mental disorders. Trends of population adjusted discharges and length of stay were tested using a weighted least squares method. RESULTS: Population-adjusted MHSA discharges from community hospitals increased by 8.1% over the study period, whereas discharges for all conditions decreased. Within MHSA discharges, the 20-39 and 40-64 age groups experienced significant increase relative to other age group; the increase was particularly high for affective and

  15. Tailoring Inpatient Group Psychotherapy to Patients' Needs: Size Matters!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxman, Elaine B.; Chambliss, Catherine

    Today's publicly funded psychiatric inpatient institutions focus increasingly in stabilization and relapse prevention, readying patients for community reentry. An increasing emphasis on consumer satisfaction and professionals' accountability for efficient outcomes has coincided with growing cost-consciousness. Therapists must strive to tailor…

  16. Psychosocial Correlates of Suicidal Ideation in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Geetha; Steer, Robert A.

    1995-01-01

    Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation (BSI) was administered to 121 adolescent inpatients. Twelve characteristics found to be associated with adolescent suicide ideation were entered into multiple regression to estimate BSI scores, along with Beck inventories for anxiety, depression (BDI), and hopelessness (BHS), and Youth Self Report. BHS and BDI were…

  17. Evaluation of a Pharmacy Resident Inpatient On-Call Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatoum, Hind T.

    1993-01-01

    The 440 interventions completed by pharmacy residents in an inpatient on-call program were analyzed for their source (self-initiated, solicited by physician or staff pharmacist), type (selection of dosage, schedule, drug level monitoring, route of administration), impact on quality of care, cost of care, and clinical significance. (Author/MSE)

  18. An Educational Intervention to Improve Residents' Inpatient Charting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinsley, Joyce A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This report describes an educational intervention designed to improve psychiatry residents' inpatient charting skills. Methods: The residency training committee formed a multidisciplinary team to study the problem by using quality improvement principles. The team hypothesized that residents' charting would improve with education about…

  19. Profiles of Personal Resiliency in Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Geetha; Steer, Robert A.; Gulab, Nazli A.

    2010-01-01

    To ascertain whether children and adolescents whose ages ranged from 9 to 17 years described distinct profiles of personal resiliency, the Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents (RSCA) were administered to 100 youth who were admitted to an inpatient psychiatric unit and were diagnosed with various "DSM-IV-TR" disorders along with the Beck…

  20. The Severely Disturbed Adolescent; Inpatient, Residential, and Hospital Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easson, William M.

    The text is an attempt to clarify specific indications for hospital treatment and to highlight the type of adolescent disturbance that might be helped in an inpatient therapeutic environment. Chapters discuss the prescription of residential treatment, the therapeutic facilities of a residential unit for disturbed adolescents, the continued…

  1. Domains of Chronic Stress and Suicidal Behaviors among Inpatient Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettit, Jeremy W.; Green, Kelly L.; Grover, Kelly E.; Schatte, Dawnelle J.; Morgan, Sharon T.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the role of chronic stress in youth suicidal behaviors. This study examined the relations between specific domains of chronic stress and suicidal behaviors among 131 inpatient youth (M age = 15.02 years) who completed measures of stress, suicidal ideation, suicide attempt, and suicide intent. After controlling for…

  2. Smoking Assessment and Cessation Skills in the Inpatient Medicine Clerkship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Alan L.; Kleinhenz, Mary Ellen

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of 61 inpatient medical writeups by 23 third year medicine clerks found smoking history notations in 74 percent but quantification of exposure much less commonly. None detailed patient addiction or willingness to quit, or included smoking cessation in the patient plan. Students' smoking assessment and cessation skills are seen as poorly…

  3. Negotiating Time: The Significance of Timing in Ending Inpatient Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Sarah Gustavus

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses work with young people during their stay on an NHS psychiatric inpatient unit, especially focusing on the end of treatment and the appropriate timing of discharge into the community. When approaching the end of an admission, various factors are considered that seem particularly relevant to the decision of when a young person…

  4. Pediatric aspects of inpatient health information technology systems.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Christoph U

    2015-03-01

    In the past 3 years, the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act accelerated the adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) with providers and hospitals, who can claim incentive monies related to meaningful use. Despite the increase in adoption of commercial EHRs in pediatric settings, there has been little support for EHR tools and functionalities that promote pediatric quality improvement and patient safety, and children remain at higher risk than adults for medical errors in inpatient environments. Health information technology (HIT) tailored to the needs of pediatric health care providers can improve care by reducing the likelihood of errors through information assurance and minimizing the harm that results from errors. This technical report outlines pediatric-specific concepts, child health needs and their data elements, and required functionalities in inpatient clinical information systems that may be missing in adult-oriented HIT systems with negative consequences for pediatric inpatient care. It is imperative that inpatient (and outpatient) HIT systems be adapted to improve their ability to properly support safe health care delivery for children. PMID:25713282

  5. Psychiatric Inpatient MMPI Profiles: An Exploration for Potential Racial Bias.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mark E.; Brems, Christiane

    1990-01-01

    Examined presence of racial bias in Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory's (MMPI) use with 22 Black and 22 White inpatient psychiatric patients. Found no statistically or clinically significant differences between 2 races on MMPI. Suggests that differences in previous studies may be attributable to variables other than race. (Author/PVV)

  6. Predictors of Inpatient Utilization among Veterans with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, Kyler M.; Morgan, Robert O.; Walder, Annette; Bass, David M.; Judge, Katherine S.; Wilson, Nancy; Snow, A. Lynn; Kunik, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Dementia is prevalent and costly, yet the predictors of inpatient hospitalization are not well understood. Logistic and negative binomial regressions were used to identify predictors of inpatient hospital utilization and the frequency of inpatient hospital utilization, respectively, among veterans. Variables significant at the P < 0.15 level were subsequently analyzed in a multivariate regression. This study of veterans with a diagnosis of dementia (n = 296) and their caregivers found marital status to predict hospitalization in the multivariate logistic model (B = 0.493, P = 0.029) and personal-care dependency to predict hospitalization and readmission in the multivariate logistic model and the multivariate negative binomial model (B = 1.048, P = 0.007, B = 0.040, and P = 0.035, resp.). Persons with dementia with personal-care dependency and spousal caregivers have more inpatient admissions; appropriate care environments should receive special care to reduce hospitalization. This study was part of a larger clinical trial; this trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00291161. PMID:24982674

  7. Predictors of Specialized Inpatient Admissions for Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modi, Miti; McMorris, Carly; Palucka, Anna; Raina, Poonam; Lunsky, Yona

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) have complex mental health needs and may seek specialized ID psychiatric services. This study reports on predictors of specialized inpatient admissions for 234 individuals with ID who received outpatient services at a psychiatric hospital. Overall, from 2007-2012, 55 of the 234 outpatients were triaged…

  8. Locked doors in acute inpatient psychiatry: a literature review.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, M; Bowers, L; Jones, J; Simpson, A; Haglund, K

    2009-04-01

    Many acute inpatient psychiatric wards in the UK are permanently locked, although this is contrary to the current Mental Health Act Code of Practice. To conduct a literature review of empirical articles concerning locked doors in acute psychiatric inpatient wards, an extensive literature search was performed in SAGE Journals Online, EBM Reviews, British Nursing Index, CINAHL, EMBASE Psychiatry, International Bibliography of the Social Sciences, Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Google, using the search terms 'open$', 'close$', '$lock$', 'door', 'ward', 'hospital', 'psychiatr', 'mental health', 'inpatient' and 'asylum'. A total of 11 empirical papers were included in the review. Both staff and patients reported advantages (e.g. preventing illegal substances from entering the ward and preventing patients from absconding and harming themselves or others) and disadvantages (e.g. making patients feel depressed, confined and creating extra work for staff) regarding locked doors. Locked wards were associated with increased patient aggression, poorer satisfaction with treatment and more severe symptoms. The limited literature available showed the urgent need for research to determine the real effects of locked doors in inpatient psychiatry. PMID:19291159

  9. Methodological Quality of National Guidelines for Pediatric Inpatient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hester, Gabrielle; Nelson, Katherine; Mahant, Sanjay; Eresuma, Emily; Keren, Ron; Srivastava, Rajendu

    2014-01-01

    Background Guidelines help inform standardization of care for quality improvement (QI). The Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings (PRIS) network published a prioritization list of inpatient conditions with high prevalence, cost, and variation in resource utilization across children’s hospitals. The methodological quality of guidelines for priority conditions is unknown. Objective To rate the methodological quality of national guidelines for 20 priority pediatric inpatient conditions. Design We searched sources including PubMed for national guidelines published 2002–2012. Guidelines specific to one organism, test or treatment, or institution were excluded. Guidelines were rated by two raters using a validated tool (AGREE II) with an overall rating on a 7-point scale (7–highest). Inter-rater reliability was measured with a weighted kappa coefficient. Results 17 guidelines met inclusion criteria for 13 conditions, 7 conditions yielded no relevant national guidelines. The highest methodological quality guidelines were for asthma, tonsillectomy, and bronchiolitis (mean overall rating 7, 6.5 and 6.5 respectively); the lowest were for sickle cell disease (2 guidelines) and dental caries (mean overall rating 4, 3.5, and 3 respectively). The overall weighted kappa was 0.83 (95% confidence interval 0.78–0.87). Conclusions We identified a group of moderate to high methodological quality national guidelines for priority pediatric inpatient conditions. Hospitals should consider these guidelines to inform QI initiatives. PMID:24677729

  10. Predictors of Inpatient Utilization among Veterans with Dementia.

    PubMed

    Godwin, Kyler M; Morgan, Robert O; Walder, Annette; Bass, David M; Judge, Katherine S; Wilson, Nancy; Snow, A Lynn; Kunik, Mark E

    2014-01-01

    Dementia is prevalent and costly, yet the predictors of inpatient hospitalization are not well understood. Logistic and negative binomial regressions were used to identify predictors of inpatient hospital utilization and the frequency of inpatient hospital utilization, respectively, among veterans. Variables significant at the P < 0.15 level were subsequently analyzed in a multivariate regression. This study of veterans with a diagnosis of dementia (n = 296) and their caregivers found marital status to predict hospitalization in the multivariate logistic model (B = 0.493, P = 0.029) and personal-care dependency to predict hospitalization and readmission in the multivariate logistic model and the multivariate negative binomial model (B = 1.048, P = 0.007, B = 0.040, and P = 0.035, resp.). Persons with dementia with personal-care dependency and spousal caregivers have more inpatient admissions; appropriate care environments should receive special care to reduce hospitalization. This study was part of a larger clinical trial; this trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00291161. PMID:24982674

  11. Developing an Inpatient Group Psychotherapy Program: Challenges and Lessons Learnt

    PubMed Central

    Razaghi, Emran Mohammad; Tabatabaee, Maryam; Pourramzani, Ali; Shirali Mohammadpour, Reza; Mousazade Moghaddam, Arezou; Yahyavi, Seyyed Taha

    2015-01-01

    In Iran, inpatient group psychotherapy has been limited to transient practices for research purposes or fulfilling personal interest of therapists. The goal of this paper is to share and explain the experience of developing an inpatient group psychotherapy program in Roozbeh Psychiatric Hospital, Tehran, Iran. After theoretical delineation and preparation of a draft of the program guideline, two pilot sessions were held. Based on this initial experience a final treatment guideline was prepared. Afterwards, the program was continued for more than 1 year in a female ward at Roozbeh Psychiatric Hospital. The output of this exercise was a guideline that covers important topics in development of inpatient group psychotherapy. It is concluded that inpatient group psychotherapy has its unique challenges. Of the most important challenges that can be mentioned in this regard are the participation of patients with significant differences in levels of psychopathology and psychiatric signs and symptoms, and high comorbidity with specific personality traits or disorders. Other challenges relevant to the structure of the group include items such as very limited time for working through and inevitable out-of-group contacts. PMID:26576176

  12. Development of inpatient oncology educational and support programs.

    PubMed

    Grassman, D

    1993-05-01

    Support programs are needed to help patients manage the overwhelming emotions they experience when diagnosed and treated for cancer. Although many cancer support groups exist, most programs are designed for outpatients. Support groups for hospitalized patients and their families are an excellent way to provide greatly needed education and support to those who otherwise might not be able or willing to attend outpatient programs. Inpatient programs also offer the opportunity to provide support to people at the onset of diagnosis and treatment--a time when these services are particularly needed. This paper describes special considerations regarding the establishment of inpatient educational and support programs. The evolution of the Oncology Health Management Program of the Bay Pines VA Medical Center in Bay Pines, FL, also is presented. This multidisciplinary program for inpatients includes classes in spiritual support, family support, patient support, symptom management, stress management, and laughter therapy. Evaluation of the program revealed that classes that related symptom management were most useful and that laughter therapy and emotional support were reported to be highly beneficial as well. Nursing staff also gained from their participation in leading the program and expressed greater self-awareness and self-esteem. This has resulted in improved job satisfaction and staff retention as well as in more sensitive and compassionate delivery of patient care. These findings show that providing inpatient educational and support programs is an effective means of meeting the physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual needs of patients with cancer and their families. PMID:7686668

  13. Managing Bipolar Youths in a Psychiatric Inpatient Emergency Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masi, Gabriele; Mucci, Maria; Pias, Paola; Muratori, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    Among the youths referred to our Psychiatric Inpatient Emergency Service, we focused on bipolar disorder (BD), to explore predictive elements for the outcome. Fifty-one patients (30 males, 21 females, age range 8-18 years, mean age 14.2 plus or minus 3.1 years) received a diagnosis of BD, according to historical information, prolonged…

  14. Inpatient days trending up after decade of decline.

    PubMed

    2002-03-01

    Data Insight: The latest evidence of the impact widespread adoption of consumer choice models has had on health care utilization comes from Milliman USA's latest Intercompany Rate Survey. For the first time in nearly a decade, the survey shows a significant uptick in commercial inpatient hospital days per thousand. PMID:11928649

  15. Resigned Professionalism? Non-Acute Inpatients and Resident Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanstone, Meredith; Watling, Christopher; Goldszmidt, Mark; Weijer, Charles; Lingard, Lorelei

    2014-01-01

    A growing group of inpatients on acute clinical teaching units have non-acute needs, yet require attention by the team. While anecdotally, these patients have inspired frustration and resource pressures in clinical settings, little is known about the ways in which they influence physician perceptions of the learning environment. This qualitative…

  16. MMPI differences among adolescent inpatients, rapists, sodomists, and sexual abusers.

    PubMed

    Herkov, M J; Gynther, M D; Thomas, S; Myers, W C

    1996-02-01

    This study examined Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) responding among 61 adolescent sex offenders accused of Sexual Abuse (n = 22), Rape (n = 19), and Sodomy (n = 18) and 15 adolescents without a history of sexual offending admitted to an inpatient psychiatric unit. Results indicated significant differences between sex offenders and inpatients as well as among sex offender groups on both single-scale elevations and 2-point code types. Contrary to previous research, adolescents in the sex offender groups demonstrated significantly more psychopathology than those in the inpatient sample. Subjects in the Sodomy group achieved the highest clinical scale elevations and were more likely to have scales associated with significant psychopathology as one of their 2-point pairs. In general, increased psychopathology was associated with increased sexual deviancy. That is, subjects in the sexual offender groups evidenced more psychopathology than inpatients and the more deviant Sodomy and Rape groups evidenced more psychological disturbance on the MMPI than Sexual Abuser subjects. Results indicate that the MMPI can be useful in providing both quantitative and qualitative distinctions among adolescent sex offenders. PMID:8576837

  17. Assessment of Mode of Anger Expression in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cautin, Robin L.; Overholser, James C.; Goetz, Patricia

    2001-01-01

    Evaluated internalized and externalized anger in adolescent psychiatric inpatients. Results indicated that internalized anger led to depression and feelings of hopelessness and increased chances of suicide attempts. In contrast, externalized anger was related to alcohol-related problems. Thus, different modes of anger expression appear to be…

  18. Feasibility of Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Suicidal Adolescent Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Laurence Y.; Cox, Brian J.; Gunasekara, Shiny; Miller, Alec L.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) implementation in a general child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient unit and to provide preliminary effectiveness data on DBT versus treatment as usual (TAU). Method: Sixty-two adolescents with suicide attempts or suicidal ideation were admitted to one of two…

  19. Comparison of In-Patient Costs for Children Treated on the AAML0531 Clinical Trial: A Report From the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Getz, Kelly D.; Li, Yimei; Alonzo, Todd A.; Hall, Matthew; Gerbing, Robert B.; Sung, Lillian; Huang, Yuan-Shung; Arnold, Staci; Seif, Alix E.; Miller, Tamara P.; Bagatell, Rochelle; Fisher, Brian T.; Adamson, Peter C.; Gamis, Alan; Keren, Ron; Aplenc, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Background A better understanding of drivers of treatment costs may help identify effective cost containment strategies and prioritize resources. We aimed to develop a method for estimating inpatient costs for pediatric patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) enrolled on NCI-funded Phase III trials, compare costs between AAML0531 treatment arms (standard chemotherapy ± gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GMTZ)), and evaluate primary drivers of costs for newly diagnosed pediatric AML. Procedure Patients from the AAML0531 trial were matched on hospital, sex, and dates of birth and diagnosis to the Pediatric Health Information Systems (PHIS) database to obtain daily billing data. Inpatient treatment costs were calculated as adjusted charges multiplied by hospital-specific cost-to-charge ratios. Generalized linear models were used to compare costs between treatment arms and courses, and by patient characteristics. Results Inpatient costs did not differ by randomized treatment arm. Costs varied by course with stem cell transplant being most expensive, followed by Intensification II (cytarabine/mitoxantrone) and Induction I (cytarabine/daunorubicin/etoposide). Room/board and pharmacy were the largest contributors to inpatient treatment cost, representing 74% of the total cost. Higher AML risk group (P = 0.0003) and older age (P < 0.0001) were associated with significantly higher daily inpatient cost. Conclusions Costs from external data sources can be successfully integrated into NCI-funded Phase III clinical trials. Inpatient treatment costs did not differ by GMTZ exposure but varied by chemotherapy course. Variation in cost by course was driven by differences in duration of hospitalization through room/board charges as well as increased clinical and pharmacy charges in specific courses. Pediatr Blood Cancer PMID:25946708

  20. Pharmacologic treatment for urgency-predominant urinary incontinence in women diagnosed using a simplified algorithm: a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Alison J.; Hess, Rachel; Arya, Lily A.; Richter, Holly E.; Subak, Leslee L.; Bradley, Catherine S.; Rogers, Rebecca G.; Myers, Deborah L.; Johnson, Karen C.; Gregory, W. Thomas; Kraus, Stephen R.; Schembri, Michael; Brown, Jeanette S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes associated with the initiation of treatment for urgency-predominant incontinence in women diagnosed by a simple 3-item questionnaire. Study Design We conducted a multicenter, double-blinded, 12-week randomized trial of pharmacologic therapy for urgency-predominant incontinence in ambulatory women diagnosed by the simple 3-item questionnaire. Participants (N = 645) were assigned randomly to fesoterodine therapy (4-8 mg daily) or placebo. Urinary incontinence was assessed with the use of voiding diaries; postvoid residual volume was measured after treatment. Results After 12 weeks, women who had been assigned randomly to fesoterodine therapy reported 0.9 fewer urgency and 1.0 fewer total incontinence episodes/day, compared with placebo (P ≤ .001). Four serious adverse events occurred in each group, none of which was related to treatment. No participant had postvoid residual volume of ≥250 mL after treatment. Conclusion Among ambulatory women with urgency-predominant incontinence diagnosed with a simple 3-item questionnaire, pharmacologic therapy resulted in a moderate decrease in incontinence frequency without increasing significant urinary retention or serious adverse events, which provides support for a streamlined algorithm for diagnosis and treatment of female urgency-predominant incontinence. PMID:22542122

  1. Serum Estradiol Levels Are Not Associated with Urinary Incontinence in Mid-life Women Transitioning through Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Waetjen, L. Elaine; Johnson, Wesley O.; Xing, Guibo; Feng, Wen-Ying; Greendale, Gail A.; Gold, Ellen B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the relationship between annually measured serum endogenous estradiol and the development or worsening of stress and urge incontinence symptoms over 8 years in women transitioning through menopause. Methods This is a longitudinal analysis of women with incontinence in the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN), a multi-center, multi-racial/ethnic prospective cohort study of community-dwelling women transitioning through menopause. At baseline and each of 8 annual visits, SWAN elicited frequency and type of incontinence in a self-administered questionnaire and drew a blood sample on days 2-5 of the menstrual cycle. All endocrine assays were performed using a double-antibody chemiluminescent immunoassay. We analyzed data using discrete Cox survival models and generalized estimating equations with time dependent covariates. Results Estradiol levels drawn at either the annual visit concurrent with or previous to the first report of incontinence were not associated with the development of any (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.99, 95% CI 0.99, 1.01), stress, or urge incontinence in previously continent women. Similarly, estradiol levels were not associated with worsening of any (odds ratio (OR) = 1.00, 95% CI 0.99, 1.01), stress, or urge incontinence in incontinent women. Change in estradiol levels from one year to the next was also not associated with the development (HR = 0.98, 95% confidence interval 0.97, 1.00) or worsening (OR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.99, 1.05) of incontinence. Conclusions We found that annually measured values and year-to-year changes in endogenous estradiol levels had no effect on the development or worsening of incontinence in women transitioning through menopause. PMID:21785372

  2. Bladder and rectal incontinence without paraplegia or paraparesis after endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Naritomo; Kurimoto, Yoshihiko; Maruyama, Ryushi; Ujihira, Kosuke; Iba, Yutaka; Hatta, Eiichiro; Yamada, Akira; Nakanishi, Katsuhiko

    2016-12-01

    Spinal cord ischemia is a well-known potential complication of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), and it is usually manifested by paraplegia or paraparesis. We describe a case in which spinal cord ischemia after EVAR presented by isolated bladder and rectal incontinence without other neurological deficits. A 63-year-old woman presented with intermittent claudication secondary to an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), and a left common iliac artery obstruction, for which she underwent EVAR using an aorto-uniiliac (AUI) device and ilio-femoral artery bypass. On postoperative day 3, she developed urinary and fecal incontinence without signs of paraplegia or paraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a hyper-intense signal in the spinal cord. She received hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy and was discharged after 18 days when her urinary and fecal incontinence were almost resolved. This report suggests that spinal cord ischemia after EVAR for aortoiliac occlusive disease might present as bladder and rectal incontinence without other neurological manifestations. PMID:26943687

  3. Absenteeism, Educational Plans, and Anxiety among Children with Incontinence and Their Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filce, Hollie G.; LaVergne, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    Background: Children with incontinence have more absenteeism, poorer academic performance, and potential social difficulties during the school years. These children and their parents are at risk for illness-related anxiety. Whereas educational plans are designed to remediate educational, medical, and social-emotional barriers at school, little…

  4. Distance Learning: A Strategy for Improving Incontinence Care in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Anna N.; Schnelle, John F.; Yamashita, Takashi; Patry, Gail; Prasauskas, Ruta

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes a distance learning model designed to help nursing homes implement incontinence management best practices. A basic premise is that translating research into practice requires both a feasible intervention and a dissemination strategy responsive to the target audience's needs. Design and Methods: Over 8 months, nurse…

  5. Spaying-related urinary incontinence and oestrogen therapy in the bitch.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Maria Cristina; Rota, Alessandro; Battocchio, Massimiliano; Faustini, Massimo; Mollo, Antonio

    2009-03-01

    Some aspects of spaying-related urinary incontinence in the bitch still remain incompletely clarified. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to evaluate the prevalence of the disease among spayed dogs, to detect differences in risk related to the type of surgery, to describe the characteristics of incontinent bitches, to assess the influence of age at surgery on the onset of incontinence occurrence, and to assess the effectiveness and long-term side effects of oestrogen therapy in affected bitches. Among 750 bitches submitted to ovariectomy or ovariohysterectomy, those showing spaying-related urinary incontinence were evaluated. Oestrogen replacement therapy consisted of administering an effective dose followed by an individual maintenance dose. The results showed that the disease occurred in 5% of neutered bitches, the type of surgery did not affect the disease occurrence, affected bitches frequently represented large or giant breeds or large-size mongrels, the body weight of the affected bitches at surgery was often > 20 kg, the disease seems to be associated with tail docking, the age at surgery influences the onset ofincontinence, with earlier occurrence in older bitches, and that a strong co-operation between owners and veterinarians is necessary to achieve successful response to oestrogen replacement therapy. Long-term administration seems to be unrelated to oestrogenic side effects. PMID:19457785

  6. Pelvic Floor Biofeedback via a Smart Phone App for Treatment Of Stress Urinary Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Starr, Julie A; Drobnis, Erma Z; Cornelius, Chelsea

    2016-01-01

    Biofeedback can be useful for treatment of stress urinary incontinence. Many women have difficulty isolating their pelvic floor muscles and adhering to a daily exercise regimen. This case study highlights a woman's experience using PeriCoach, a home biofeedback device that assists women in strengthening their pelvic floor muscles through Bluetooth technology using a smartphone. PMID:27281866

  7. Symptoms associated with dietary fiber supplementation over time in individuals with fecal incontinence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the severity of adverse gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during supplementation with dietary fiber or placebo over time in adults with fecal incontinence. Secondary aims were to determine the relationship between symptom severity and upset and their association...

  8. In Search of Dignity: One Family Caring for Their Child's Incontinence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coelho, Amy

    2009-01-01

    This article shares a story of a family with a child who has a spastic quadriplegia cerebral palsy, a form of cerebral palsy (CP) that affects all four limbs and torso with debilitating muscle dysfunction. It describes how the family cares for their child's incontinence. It also shares the experience of the child's mother, Kathy, who attributes…

  9. School Nurse Interventions in Managing Functional Urinary Incontinence in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivers, Charisse L.

    2010-01-01

    Uncomplicated urinary incontinence (UI) in school-age children is a prevalent yet underrecognized problem that has remained in the shadow of other concerns commonly perceived as more prominent or urgent. There is good evidence that functional UI in children can be treated and managed effectively. When there is no structural or neurologic…

  10. Education on Adult Urinary Incontinence in Nursing School Curricula: Can It Be Done in Two Hours?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morishita, Lynne; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Responses from 339 undergraduate nursing programs (74%) showed that 98% included urinary incontinence content in their curricula. Although most agreed the subject was important and felt their teaching was effective, the didactic component averaged two hours, and clinical experience was not systematic; few faculty are prepared to teach this…

  11. Effect of an Incontinence Training Program on Nursing Home Staff's Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Emily B; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Nursing staff (n=166) in four nursing homes participated in quasi-experimental study to measure knowledge and attitudes about urinary incontinence and compliance with toileting protocols. Intervention group (n=96) showed slight increase in knowledge; their attitudes remained positive over four testing times. Compliance with protocol was only 72…

  12. Predicting Nursing Home Admissions among Incontinent Older Adults: A Comparison of Residential Differences across Six Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coward, Raymond T.

    1995-01-01

    Uses data from the Longitudinal Studies on Aging (1984-90) to examine a sample who at baseline lived in community settings and reported problems with urinary incontinence (n=719). Analyses indicate that residents of less urbanized and more thinly populated nonmetropolitan counties were more likely to have a nursing home admission than others. (JPS)

  13. Behavioral Intervention to Eliminate Socially Mediated Urinary Incontinence in a Child with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricciardi, Joseph N.; Luiselli, James K.

    2003-01-01

    We report the case of an 11-year-old boy with autism who demonstrated urinary incontinence that appeared to be maintained by social contingencies (adult attention and escape from activity "demands"). Although he wet himself frequently, he also used the bathroom appropriately and made many self-initiated toileting requests. Intervention was…

  14. Inpatient or Outpatient Rehabilitation after Herniated Disc Surgery? – Setting-Specific Preferences, Participation and Outcome of Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Löbner, Margrit; Luppa, Melanie; Konnopka, Alexander; Meisel, Hans J.; Günther, Lutz; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Stengler, Katarina; Angermeyer, Matthias C.; König, Hans-Helmut; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine rehabilitation preferences, participation and determinants for the choice of a certain rehabilitation setting (inpatient vs. outpatient) and setting-specific rehabilitation outcomes. Methods The longitudinal observational study referred to 534 consecutive disc surgery patients (18–55 years). Face-to-face baseline interviews took place about 3.6 days after disc surgery during acute hospital stay. 486 patients also participated in a follow-up interview via telephone three months later (dropout-rate: 9%). The following instruments were used: depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), pain intensity (numeric analog scale), health-related quality of life (Short Form 36 Health Survey), subjective prognosis of gainful employment (SPE-scale) as well as questions on rehabilitation attendance, return to work, and amount of sick leave days. Results The vast majority of patients undergoing surgery for a herniated disc attended a post-hospital rehabilitation treatment program (93%). Thereby two-thirds of these patients took part in an inpatient rehabilitation program (67.9%). Physical, psychological, vocational and health-related quality of life characteristics differed widely before as well as after rehabilitation depending on the setting. Inpatient rehabilitees were significantly older, reported more pain, worse physical quality of life, more anxiety and depression and a worse subjective prognosis of gainful employment before rehabilitation. Pre-rehabilitation differences remained significant after rehabilitation. More than half of the outpatient rehabilitees (56%) compared to only one third of the inpatient rehabilitees (33%) returned to work three months after disc surgery (p<.001). Conclusion The results suggest a “pre-selection” of patients with better health status in outpatient rehabilitation. Gaining better knowledge about setting-specific selection processes may help optimizing rehabilitation allocation procedures and

  15. Patient Experience and Satisfaction with Inpatient Service: Development of Short Form Survey Instrument Measuring the Core Aspect of Inpatient Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Eliza L. Y.; Coulter, Angela; Hewitson, Paul; Cheung, Annie W. L.; Yam, Carrie H. K.; Lui, Siu fai; Tam, Wilson W. S.; Yeoh, Eng-kiong

    2015-01-01

    Patient experience reflects quality of care from the patients’ perspective; therefore, patients’ experiences are important data in the evaluation of the quality of health services. The development of an abbreviated, reliable and valid instrument for measuring inpatients’ experience would reflect the key aspect of inpatient care from patients’ perspective as well as facilitate quality improvement by cultivating patient engagement and allow the trends in patient satisfaction and experience to be measured regularly. The study developed a short-form inpatient instrument and tested its ability to capture a core set of inpatients’ experiences. The Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (HKIEQ) was established in 2010; it is an adaptation of the General Inpatient Questionnaire of the Care Quality Commission created by the Picker Institute in United Kingdom. This study used a consensus conference and a cross-sectional validation survey to create and validate a short-form of the Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (SF-HKIEQ). The short-form, the SF-HKIEQ, consisted of 18 items derived from the HKIEQ. The 18 items mainly covered relational aspects of care under four dimensions of the patient’s journey: hospital staff, patient care and treatment, information on leaving the hospital, and overall impression. The SF-HKIEQ had a high degree of face validity, construct validity and internal reliability. The validated SF-HKIEQ reflects the relevant core aspects of inpatients’ experience in a hospital setting. It provides a quick reference tool for quality improvement purposes and a platform that allows both healthcare staff and patients to monitor the quality of hospital care over time. PMID:25860775

  16. An eclectic inpatient treatment model for Vietnam and Desert Storm veterans suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Viola, J M; McCarthy, D A

    1994-03-01

    This paper describes the therapeutic components of an eclectic, intensive inpatient treatment strategy for Vietnam and Desert Storm veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder. A specific treatment model was devised by this author. The procedure was a collaborative effort: the staff and the patients participated in this preparatory phase treatment program at the Tripler Posttraumatic Stress Unit, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii. The basic treatment is based on group therapy, utilizing educational, cognitive-behavioral therapy, gestalt therapy, and individualized psychotherapy, and eye movement desensitization strategies. The timing and sequencing of these treatments are a critical part of the model, and we have come to refer to it as the layered model because the treatments are layered, much like the delicious parfait dessert. PMID:8041467

  17. FSH and LH plasma levels in bitches with differences in risk for urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Reichler, Iris Margaret; Hung, Elisabeth; Jöchle, Wolfgang; Piché, Claude A; Roos, Malgorzata; Hubler, Madeleine; Arnold, Susi

    2005-05-01

    To determine whether the height of the plasma gonadotropin levels after spaying is associated with urinary incontinence, the concentrations of plasma follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) were determined once in 191 intact and 308 spayed bitches. The bitches were grouped according to their risk for urinary incontinence and the medians of their respective gonadotropin levels were compared. For intact anestrous bitches, the FSH- and LH-plasma concentrations were 5.2 (4, 8) ng/mL (median (Q1, Q3)) and 0.5 (0.5-0.5) ng/mL, respectively. In the first year after spaying, the gonadotropin concentrations rose significantly, then stabilised at a level around 10 times those of intact bitches (FSH 62.5 (44, 91) ng/mL; LH 6.1(4, 11) ng/mL). The plasma gonadotropin concentrations of long-term spayed (>12 months) continent bitches (n=209) were higher (FSH 66.8 (46, 104) ng/mL; LH 6.5 (4, 11) ng/mL) than in spayed incontinent bitches (n=60) (FSH 51.5 (38, 74) ng/mL; LH 5.5 (3, 8) ng/mL), the latter also had a higher body weight. Multiple regression analysis showed that the FSH-plasma concentration and not the body weight was decisive for the occurrence of urinary incontinence. The results of this study suggest that levels of gonadotropins are associated, directly or indirectly in the pathophysiology of urinary incontinence after spaying. PMID:15826681

  18. Injectable silicone biomaterial for faecal incontinence due to internal anal sphincter dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kenefick, N J; Vaizey, C J; Malouf, A J; Norton, C S; Marshall, M; Kamm, M A

    2002-01-01

    Background: A weak or disrupted internal anal sphincter can cause passive faecal incontinence. Conservative measures may help some patients but there is no simple surgical solution for those who fail conservative treatment. A successful technique using trans-sphincteric injection of a bulking agent to augment the internal anal sphincter was developed in a previous pilot study. Aim: To determine the clinical results and underlying physiological effects of biomaterial injection. Patients: Six patients (four males, median age 53 years (range 36–65)) with faecal incontinence to solid or liquid stool related to poor internal anal sphincter function, of varied aetiology, were recruited. Methods: Silicone based biomaterial injections were performed, under local anaesthesia, with antibiotic cover. Three injections were placed circumferentially, trans-sphincterically, entering away from the anal margin and injecting at or just above the dentate line. Anorectal physiological studies, endoanal ultrasound, a bowel symptom diary, a validated incontinence score, and quality of life questionnaires were completed before treatment and on completion of follow up. Results: At a median follow up of 18 months (range 15–19), five of six patients had marked symptom improvement. Faecal incontinence scores improved from a median of 14/24 (range 11–20) before to 8/24 (6–15) after injection. Short form-36 quality of life physical and social function scores improved from a median of 26/100 (5–33) to 79/100 (25–100) and from 10/100 (5–37) to 100/100 (50–100), respectively. There was a corresponding physiological increase in maximum anal resting and squeeze pressures. Ultrasound showed the Bioplastique to be retained in the correct position in the improved patients without migration. There were no complications. Conclusion: Trans-sphincteric injection of silicone biomaterial can provide a marked improvement in faecal incontinence related to a weak or disrupted internal anal

  19. 42 CFR 412.404 - Conditions for payment under the prospective payment system for inpatient hospital services of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... described in this subpart for inpatient hospital services furnished in to Medicare Part A fee-for-service... payment system for inpatient hospital services of psychiatric facilities. 412.404 Section 412.404 Public... PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient...

  20. Utilization of inpatient and outpatient resources for the management of hemodialysis access complications.

    PubMed

    Rocco, M V; Bleyer, A J; Burkart, J M

    1996-08-01

    Complications of hemodialysis accesses are a major cause of morbidity in chronic hemodialysis patients. Although several investigators have reported on the utilization of inpatient services for hemodialysis access complications, there is a paucity of data regarding the utilization of outpatient services and temporary accesses for these complications. In this retrospective study, we identified all access-related inpatient admissions and outpatient encounters and procedures performed in an incident cohort of hemodialysis patients. Eighty-eight patients were followed for an average of 487.4 +/- 316.9 days, for a total of 119.1 patient-years of risk. The mean age was 57.0 +/- 14.6 years, with 55% females and 65% blacks; 31% of patients had diabetes mellitus as the primary cause of end-stage renal disease. Patients were referred to our nephrology practice a median of 56 days prior to the placement of a hemodialysis access and a median of 76 days prior to the initiation of hemodialysis. At the initiation of hemodialysis, 48 native arteriovenous fistulas and 40 polytetrafluoroethylene grafts were placed. Only 28 patients (31.8%) had a permanent access placed at least 14 days before the start of hemodialysis, resulting in the placement of 93 temporary accesses during the first week of dialysis therapy. Because of access complications, 21 patients had failure of their primary access, requiring the placement of 33 additional permanent accesses, including six native arteriovenous fistulas, 23 polytetrafluoroethylene grafts, and four permacaths, or an average of 0.28 new accesses per patient-year of risk. During the study period, 45 patients (51%) had at least one access complication. To manage these access complications, 25 fistulograms (0.21 per patient-year of risk) were performed and 116 additional temporary accesses (0.97 per patient-year of risk) were placed, including 50 femoral (43.1%), 52 subclavian (44.8%), and 14 internal jugular (12.1%) catheters. A total of 2

  1. [Quality of coding in acute inpatient care].

    PubMed

    Stausberg, J

    2007-08-01

    Routine data in the electronic patient record are frequently used for secondary purposes. Core elements of the electronic patient record are diagnoses and procedures, coded with the mandatory classifications. Despite the important role of routine data for reimbursement, quality management and health care statistics, there is currently no systematic analysis of coding quality in Germany. Respective concepts and investigations share the difficulty to decide what's right and what's wrong, being at the end of the long process of medical decision making. Therefore, a relevant amount of disagreement has to be accepted. In case of the principal diagnosis, this could be the fact in half of the patients. Plausibility of coding looks much better. After optimization time in hospitals, regular and complete coding can be expected. Whether coding matches reality, as a prerequisite for further use of the data in medicine and health politics, should be investigated in controlled trials in the future. PMID:17676418

  2. Nationwide trends and predictors of inpatient mortality in 83884 transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Edward Wolfgang; Kuei, Andrew; Saab, Sammy; Busuttil, Ronald W; Durazo, Francisco; Han, Steven-Huy; El-Kabany, Mohamed M; McWilliams, Justin P; Kee, Stephen T

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate and validate the national trends and predictors of in-patient mortality of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in 15 years. METHODS: Using the National Inpatient Sample which is a part of Health Cost and Utilization Project, we identified a discharge-weighted national estimate of 83884 TIPS procedures performed in the United States from 1998 to 2012 using international classification of diseases-9 procedural code 39.1. The demographic, hospital and co-morbility data were analyzed using a multivariant analysis. Using multi-nominal logistic regression analysis, we determined predictive factors related to increases in-hospital mortality. Comorbidity measures are in accordance to the Comorbidity Software designed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. RESULTS: Overall, 12.3% of patients died during hospitalization with downward trend in-hospital mortality with the mean length of stay of 10.8 ± 13.1 d. Notable, African American patients (OR = 1.809 vs Caucasian patients, P < 0.001), transferred patients (OR = 1.347 vs non-transferred, P < 0.001), emergency admissions (OR = 3.032 vs elective cases, P < 0.001), patients in the Northeast region (OR = 1.449 vs West, P < 0.001) had significantly higher odds of in-hospital mortality. Number of diagnoses and number of procedures showed positive correlations with in-hospital death (OR = 1.249 per one increase in number of procedures). Patients diagnosed with acute respiratory failure (OR = 8.246), acute kidney failure (OR = 4.359), hepatic encephalopathy (OR = 2.217) and esophageal variceal bleeding (OR = 2.187) were at considerably higher odds of in-hospital death compared with ascites (OR = 0.136, P < 0.001). Comorbidity measures with the highest odds of in-hospital death were fluid and electrolyte disorders (OR = 2.823), coagulopathy (OR = 2.016), and lymphoma (OR = 1.842). CONCLUSION: The overall mortality of the TIPS procedure is steadily decreasing, though the length of stay

  3. In-patient rehabilitation: clinical outcomes and cost implications

    PubMed Central

    Bunyan, Mel; Ganeshalingam, Yogesh; Morgan, Ehab; Thompson-Boy, Donvé; Wigton, Rebekah; Holloway, Frank; Tracy, Derek K.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method A retrospective evaluation was undertaken of the clinical and economic effectiveness of three in-patient rehabilitation units across one London National Health Service trust. Information on admission days and costs 2 years before and 2 years after the rehabilitation placement, length of rehabilitation placement and the discharge pathway was collected on 22 service users. Results There were statistically significant reductions in hospital admission days in the 2 years following rehabilitation compared with the 2 years before, further reflected in significantly lower bed costs. Longer length of rehabilitation placement was correlated with fewer admission days after the placement. A substantial proportion of the sample went into more independent living, some with no further admissions at follow-up. Clinical implications The findings suggest that in-patient rehabilitation is both clinically and cost effective: if benefits are sustained they will offset the cost of the rehabilitation placement. PMID:26958355

  4. Behavioral management of a neurologically impaired pediatric inpatient.

    PubMed

    Kumchy, C I; Kores, P J

    1981-06-01

    Neurologically-impaired pediatric inpatients often require behavioral management to facilitate attendance and performance in physical, occupational, and speech therapies. Nursing management of such patients can be simplified by the use of behavioral analysis techniques. This paper reports a case in which the patient's own behaviors along with verbal reinforcement were used to reinforce appropriate behavior patterns in a child who presented several management problems. There was improvement during behavioral sessions with generalization of desired behavior to the nursing floor and to therapy sessions. Analysis of desired or target behaviors and the levels of consciousness schema facilitated behavioral programming. This case study demonstrates how careful attention to behavioral details can improve the behavioral repertoire of a patient who would otherwise be very disruptive and not a good rehabilitation candidate. A behavioral analysis system using the Premack principle and levels of consciousness schema can be applied more generally to the behavioral management of neurologically impaired inpatients. PMID:7235925

  5. A RFID grouping proof protocol for medication safety of inpatient.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsieh-Hong; Ku, Cheng-Yuan

    2009-12-01

    In order to provide enhanced medication safety for inpatients, the medical mechanism which adopts the modified grouping proof protocol is proposed in this paper. By using the grouping proof protocol, the medical staffs could confirm the authentication and integrity of a group of Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) tags which are embedded on inpatient bracelets and the containers of drugs. This mechanism is designed to be compatible with EPCglobal Class-1 Generation-2 standard which is the most popular specification of RFID tags. Due to the light-weight computational capacity of passive tags, only the pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) and cyclic redundancy code (CRC) are allowed to be used in the communication protocol. Furthermore, a practical scenario of using this proposed mechanism in hospital to examine the medication safety is also presented. PMID:20052898

  6. Characteristics of High Staff Intensive Medicare Psychiatric Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Cromwell, Jerry; Maier, Jan; Gage, Barbara; Drozd, Edward; Osber, Deborah; Richter, Erin; Greenwald, Leslie; Goldman, Howard

    2004-01-01

    Previous analyses of the costs of Medicare psychiatric inpatients have been limited by the use of claims and provider cost reports that fail to quantify differences in patient characteristics and routine costs. This article uses new primary data from 66 psychiatric inpatient units in 40 facilities nationwide to measure the times staff spend in therapeutic and other activities caring for Medicare patients. Patient days are divided into two groups of very high and low staff intensity and patient characteristics compared in each group. Results identify key patient characteristics associated with high staffing days, including old age, dementia and cognitive impairment, severe psychiatric diagnosis, deficits in activities of daily living (ADLs), and assaultive or agitated behaviors. Policy implications and suggested enhancements are made with regard to the proposed CMS case-mix classification system based on claims data alone. PMID:15776703

  7. Circadian preference and cognitive functioning among rehabilitation inpatients.

    PubMed

    Paradee, Christine V; Rapport, Lisa J; Hanks, Robin A; Levy, James A

    2005-02-01

    The influence of circadian preference was examined among 56 morning-oriented rehabilitation inpatients with cognitive (n=28) and noncognitive (n=28) impairments. Each individual was tested twice: morning (preferred time) and evening (nonpreferred time); sessions and test batteries were counterbalanced to control for practice effects. Standard measures assessed attention, language, memory, visuospatial, and executive functions. Persons with cognitive impairment showed disproportionate vulnerability to the effects of circadian preference and time of testing, performing more poorly at nonpreferred than preferred times. Substantial effects (eta2 .12 to .48) were found on tests of executive functioning and tasks incorporating similar higher-order demands (e/g/. complex figure copy). Results are supported by tympanic temperature changes during a vigilance task, and index of cerebral blood flow in response to cognitive challenge. Cognitive reserve theory is suggested as an explanation for the differential effects. These findings may have implications for inpatient therapeutic interventions and discharge planning. PMID:15814478

  8. BRIEF IN-PATIENT FAMILY INTERVENTION IN MENTAL RETARDATION

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, H.S.; Girimaji, S.R.; Gandhi, D.H.; Raju, K. Maruthai; Rao, P. Madhu; Nardev, G.

    1988-01-01

    SUMMARY A novel programme of intervention - brief inpatient family intervention - was formulated to impart the training skills to the parents of mentally retarded children to optimise the development of their retarded child. During the period of this study. 106 mentally retarded children with different socio-demographic backgrounds and degrees of handicap participated in this programme, with encouraging results. The individualised management plan, spread over 2 weeks of inpatient stay, included intensive counselling, training of the parents in techniques of multisensory stimulation, speech, motor, and self-help skills training, behaviour modification and medical management, as required. The programme could serve as a suitable model for professionals working with the mentally retarded, to implement with limited resources. PMID:21927322

  9. Characteristics of hospice patients utilizing hospice inpatient/residential facilities.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyusuk; Burke, Sloane C

    2013-11-01

    Given the increasing popularity of a hospice inpatient/residential facility (HIRF) among hospice patients and their family members, examining who uses HIRFs has been of increasing importance. Using the 2007 National Home and Hospice Care Survey (NHHCS), we found that about 14% of the hospice patients received care in an HIRF in 2007. Characteristics of patients associated with HIRF use largely match the industry norm for a general inpatient level of care and include having no caregiver or having an incapable caregiver; having imminent death; and being directly admitted to a hospice after discharge from a hospital. Given a recent stricter enforcement of reimbursement rules, however, we call for close monitoring of any change in the number of HIRF beds--particularly in rural and low-income urban areas. PMID:23264662

  10. Hospital billing for blood processing and transfusion for inpatient stays.

    PubMed

    McCue, Michael J; Nayar, Preethy

    2009-07-01

    Medicare, an important payer for hospitals, reimburses hospitals for inpatient stays using Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs). Many private insurers also use the DRG methodology to reimburse hospitals for their services. Therefore, those blood service organizations that bill Medicare directly require an understanding of the DRG system of payment to enable them to bill Medicare correctly, and in order to be certain they are adequately reimbursed. Blood centers that do not bill Medicare directly need to understand how hospitals are reimbursed for blood and blood components as this affects a hospital's ability to pay service fees related to these products. This review presents a detailed explanation of how hospitals are reimbursed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for Medicare inpatient services, including blood services. PMID:19594718

  11. Marginal revenue and length of stay in inpatient psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Pletscher, Mark

    2016-09-01

    This study examines the changes in marginal revenue during psychiatric inpatient stays in a large Swiss psychiatric hospital after the introduction of a mixed reimbursement system with tariff rates that vary over length of stay. A discrete time duration model with a difference-in-difference specification and time-varying coefficients is estimated to assess variations in policy effects over length of stay. Among patients whose costs are fully reimbursed by the mixed scheme, the model demonstrates a significant effect of marginal revenue on length of stay. No significant policy effects are found among patients for whom only health insurance rates are delivered as mixed tariffs and government contributions are made retrospectively. The results indicate that marginal revenue can affect length of stay in inpatient psychiatry facilities, but that the reduction in marginal revenue must be sufficiently large. PMID:26445962

  12. Coating of Mesh Grafts for Prolapse and Urinary Incontinence Repair with Autologous Plasma: Exploration Stage of a Surgical Innovation

    PubMed Central

    Bär, Andreas; Lammers, Bernhard; Ramon, Albert; Ysebaert, Dirk; Klosterhalfen, Bernd; Boros, Mihaly; Otto, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Optimized biocompatibility is a major requirement for alloplastic materials currently applied for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and pelvic organ prolapse (POP) repair. In the preliminary studies the mesh modification by coating with autologous plasma resulted in the increased adherence score in vitro and improved biocompatibility in an animal model. The first use of plasma coated meshes in human is presented. Materials and Methods. Between 04/2013 and 05/2014, 20 patients with the indication for SUI and POP repair were selected in a single institution. The applied meshes were modified by autologous plasma coating prior to implantation. A retrospective chart review for peri- and early postoperative complications was performed. Functional outcome and QoL were evaluated pre- and postoperatively. Results. The functional outcome and QoL improved significantly in all groups. Two reoperations (Grade IIIB) with the release of TVT-mesh in anesthesia due to the obstruction were needed. No other severe complications were registered. Conclusion. For the first time we applied a mesh modification in a human setting according to IDEAL criteria of surgical innovations. The procedure of mesh coating with autologous plasma is safe and a prospective randomized trial proving a positive effect of plasma coating on the biocompatibility and morbidity outcome with long-term registry is planned. PMID:25313358

  13. Comparative study of polyvinylidene fluoride and polypropylene suburethral slings in the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Sabadell, Jordi; Larrain, Francisco; Gracia-Perez-Bonfils, Ana; Montero-Armengol, Anabel; Salicrú, Sabina; Gil-Moreno, Antonio; Poza, Jose L

    2016-03-01

    Aims Evaluate the effectiveness and safety of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) transobturator suburethral slings/tapes (TOTs) in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence, and compare them to polypropylene (PP) slings. Material and Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed on women treated with a TOT procedure at Vall d'Hebron Hospital between February 2010 and May 2013. A PVDF sling was used in surgeries on 23 women. A comparison group was randomly selected among all women treated with a PP sling in a 1:4 ratio (n = 92). Failure incidence was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier survival functions and a multivariate Cox regression model. Results Both groups were similar in their initial characteristics. The median follow-up was 24.6 months in the PP group and 21.3 months in the PVDF group. The survival functions showed a higher incidence of failures in the PP group, primarily because of obstructive symptoms. However, the differences were not statistically significant (hazard ratio of failure of PP vs PVDF 4.31; 95% confidence interval 0.56-33.05). Complication rates did not differ between the two groups. More cases of voiding dysfunction were observed in the PP group. Conclusions Polyvinylidene fluoride suburethral tapes have been found to have an effectiveness and safety comparable to PP tapes. PMID:26963063

  14. Contribution of ED admissions to inpatient hospital revenue.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, Alfred; Harris, Russell H; Warden, Todd; Roth, Sandra

    2002-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) practices are traditionally profiled in terms of their patient encounters. Such evaluations reflect a preponderance of outpatient visits while crediting income from admitted patients to traditional hospital-based services. This study evaluates the contribution of ED admissions to inpatient hospital revenue. The study was set at an urban tertiary care community hospital with university affiliation. Information referable to ED patients was collected from the hospital's Universal Billing Code (UB-92)-based patient information warehouse. Data fields referable to hospital charges, insurance type, and disposition were used for analysis of a 1-year period from September 1, 1998 to August 31, 1999. Statistical analysis was through chi square and ANOVA. During the study period 33,174 patients were treated in the ED with 6,671 (20%) admitted to inpatient services. Total hospital charges for all ED patients during this time were $107 million dollars with $9.1 million (8.5%) generated from discharged patients and $98.0 million (91.5%) from admitted ED patients (P <.001). Mean charges for individual discharged patients were $344.10 whereas for individual admitted patients mean charges were $14,692.28. (P <.001) Medicaid and self pay represented 55.4% of the insurance coverage for discharged ED patients whereas these same insurance classes accounted for only 16.3% of admitted patients. (P <.001) Medicare visits accounted for 12.7% of discharged ED patients but 60.7% of admitted patients (P <.001). Total hospital gross revenue for inpatient services for the study period was $288 million of which 34% was contributed from admitted ED patients. ED services represent a major source of inpatient hospital revenue. The recognition of the ED's potential in this area may be lost if income from patients admitted through the ED is credited to traditional hospital-based services. PMID:11781909

  15. Nursing Strategies to Increase Medication Safety in Inpatient Settings.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Katherine; Cochran, Gary; Barrett, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Using data obtained through 2 multidisciplinary studies focused on medication safety effectiveness, this article provides nursing recommendations to decrease medication delivery errors. Strategies to minimize and address interruptions/distractions are proposed for the 3 most problematic time frames in which medication errors typically arise: medication acquisition, transportation, and bedside delivery. With planned interventions such as programmed scripts and hospital-based protocols to manage interruptions and distractions, patient safety can be maintained in the inpatient setting. PMID:26945258

  16. Risk-adjusted outcomes in Medicare inpatient nephrectomy patients.

    PubMed

    Fry, Donald E; Pine, Michael; Nedza, Susan M; Locke, David G; Reband, Agnes M; Pine, Gregory

    2016-09-01

    Without risk-adjusted outcomes of surgical care across both the inpatient and postacute period of time, hospitals and surgeons cannot evaluate the effectiveness of current performance in nephrectomy and other operations, and will not have objective metrics to gauge improvements from care redesign efforts.We compared risk-adjusted hospital outcomes following elective total and partial nephrectomy to demonstrate differences that can be used to improve care. We used the Medicare Limited Dataset for 2010 to 2012 for total and partial nephrectomy for benign and malignant neoplasms to create prediction models for the adverse outcomes (AOs) of inpatient deaths, prolonged length-of-stay outliers, 90-day postdischarge deaths without readmission, and 90-day relevant readmissions. From the 4 prediction models, total predicted adverse outcomes were determined for each hospital in the dataset that met a minimum of 25 evaluable cases for the study period. Standard deviations (SDs) for each hospital were used to identify specific z-scores. Risk-adjusted adverse outcomes rates were computed to permit benchmarking each hospital's performance against the national standard. Differences between best and suboptimal performing hospitals defined the potential margin of preventable adverse outcomes for this operation.A total of 449 hospitals with 23,477 patients were evaluated. Overall AO rate was 20.8%; 17 hospitals had risk-adjusted AO rates that were 2 SDs poorer than predicted and 8 were 2 SDs better. The top performing decile of hospitals had a risk-adjusted AO rate of 10.2% while the lowest performing decile had 32.1%. With a minimum of 25 cases for each study hospital, no statistically valid improvement in outcomes was seen with increased case volume.Inpatient and 90-day postdischarge risk-adjusted adverse outcomes demonstrated marked variability among study hospitals and illustrate the opportunities for care improvement. This analytic design is applicable for comparing provider

  17. Use of hollow microneedles for targeted delivery of phenylephrine to treat fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Jun, Hyesun; Han, Mee-Ree; Kang, Nae-Gyu; Park, Jung-Hwan; Park, Jung Ho

    2015-06-10

    A hollow microneedle (HM) was prepared to deliver a phenylephrine (PE) solution into the anal sphincter muscle as a method for treating fecal incontinence. The goal of this study was the local targeted delivery of PE into the sphincter muscle through the perianal skin with minimal pain using hollow microneedles, resulting in the increase of resting anal sphincter pressure. PE was administered on the left and the right sides of the anus of a rat through the perianal skin using 1.5mm long HM. An in vivo imaging system study was conducted after injection of Rhodamine B, and a histological study was performed after injection of gentian violet. The resting anal sphincter pressure in response to various drug doses was measured by using an air-charged catheter. Anal pressure change produced by HM administration was compared with change produced by intravenous injection (IV), subcutaneous (SC) injection and intramuscular (IM) injection. The change in mean blood pressure produced by HM administration as a function of PE dose was compared with change produced by PBS injection. A pharmacokinetic study of the new HM administration method was performed. A model drug solution was localized in the muscle layer under the perianal skin at the injection site and then diffused out over time. HM administration of PE induced significant contraction of internal anal sphincter pressure over 12h after injection, and the maximum anal pressure was obtained between 5 and 6h. Compared to IV, SC and IM treatments, HM treatment produced greater anal pressure. There was no increase in blood pressure after HM administration of PE within the range of predetermined concentration. Administration of 800μg/kg of PE using HM produced 0.81±0.38h of tmax. Our study suggests that HM administration enables local delivery of a therapeutic dose of PE to the anal sphincter muscle layer with less pain. This new treatment has great potential as a clinical application because of the ease of the procedure

  18. Stemming the tide of mild to moderate post-prostatectomy incontinence: A retrospective comparison of transobturator male slings and the artificial urinary sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Hoy, Nathan Y.; Rourke, Keith F.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The AUS remains the gold standard treatment for post-prostatectomy incontinence (PPI), although most patients with mild-moderate PPI prefer a sling without strong evidence of procedural equivalence. This study compares outcomes of 2 procedures for the treatment of mild-moderate PPI. Methods: A retrospective review of 124 patients (76 transobturator sling, 48 AUS) with mild-moderate PPI requiring intervention over an 8-year period. The primary outcome was continence. Secondary outcomes included global patient satisfaction, improvement, and complication rates. Mild to moderate incontinence was defined as requiring ≤5 pads/day. Results: There was no significant difference in age (66.2 vs. 68.1 years; p = 0.17) or prostate cancer characteristics for slings and AUS, respectively. AUS patients had higher Charlson comorbidity scores and were more likely to have previous radiotherapy. Median length of follow up was 24 months for slings and 42 months for AUS. There was no difference in continence rates, 88.2% vs. 87.5% (p = 0.79), rate of improvement, 94.7% vs. 95.8% (p = 1.00), or patient satisfaction, 93.4% vs. 91.7% (p = 0.73), for slings and AUS, respectively. Complication rates were equivalent (19.7% vs. 16.7%; p = 1.00), though a significantly higher proportion of complications with AUS were Clavien Grade 3 (0% vs. 75%; p = 0.006). Conclusions: For mild to moderate PPI there is no difference in continence, satisfaction, or improvement rates, between AUS and slings. AUS complications tend to be more severe. Our study supports the use of slings as first-line treatment for mild-moderate PPI. PMID:25210552

  19. Dissociative Disorders Among Chinese Inpatients Diagnosed With Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Junhan; Ross, Colin A.; Keyes, Benjamin B.; Li, Ying; Dai, Yunfei; Zhang, Tianhong; Wang, Lanlan; Fan, Qing; Xiao, Zeping

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the prevalence of dissociative disorders in a sample of Chinese psychiatric inpatients. Participants in the study consisted of 569 consecutively admitted inpatients at Shanghai Mental Health Center, China, of whom 84.9% had a clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia based on the Chinese Classification and Diagnostic Criteria for Mental Disorders, Version 3 (CCMD-3). All participants completed a self-report measure of dissociation, the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) and none had a prior diagnosis of a dissociative disorder. Ninety-six randomly selected participants were interviewed with a structured interview, the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule (DDIS) and a clinical interview. These 96 patients did not differ significantly from the 473 patients who were not interviewed on any demographic measures or on the self-report measure dissociation. A total of 28 (15.3%, after weighting of the data) patients received a clinical diagnosis of a dissociative disorder based on DSM-IV-TR criteria. Dissociative identity disorder was diagnosed in 2 (0.53%, after weighting) patients. Compared to the patients without a dissociative disorder, patients with dissociative disorders were significantly more likely to report childhood abuse (57.1% versus 22.1%), but the two groups did not differ significantly on any demographic measures. Dissociative disorders were readily identified in an inpatient psychiatric population in China. PMID:20603768

  20. Evidence on the Efficacy of Inpatient Spending on Medicare Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kaestner, Robert; Silber, Jeffrey H

    2010-01-01

    Context: It is widely believed that a significant amount, perhaps as much as 20 to 30 percent, of health care spending in the United States is wasted, despite market forces such as managed care organizations and large, self-insured firms with a financial incentive to eliminate waste of this magnitude. Methods: This article uses Medicare claims data to study the association between inpatient spending and the thirty-day mortality of Medicare patients admitted to hospitals between 2001 and 2005 for surgery (general, orthopedic, vascular) and medical conditions (acute myocardial infarction [AMI], congestive heart failure [CHF], stroke, and gastrointestinal bleeding). Findings: Estimates from the analysis indicated that except for AMI patients, a 10 percent increase in inpatient spending was associated with a decrease of between 3.1 and 11.3 percent in thirty-day mortality, depending on the type of patient. Conclusions: Although some spending may be inefficient, the results suggest that the amount of waste is less than conventionally believed, at least for inpatient care. PMID:21166869