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Sample records for increase adherence south

  1. Program Spending to Increase Adherence: South African Cervical Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D.; Denny, Lynette A.; De Souza, Michelle; Kuhn, Louise; Goldie, Sue J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Adherence is crucial for public health program effectiveness, though the benefits of increasing adherence must ultimately be weighed against the associated costs. We sought to determine the relationship between investment in community health worker (CHW) home visits and increased attendance at cervical cancer screening appointments in Cape Town, South Africa. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted an observational study of 5,258 CHW home visits made in 2003–4 as part of a community-based screening program. We estimated the functional relationship between spending on these visits and increased appointment attendance (adherence). Increased adherence was noted after each subsequent CHW visit. The costs of making the CHW visits was based on resource use including both personnel time and vehicle-related expenses valued in 2004 Rand. The CHW program cost R194,018, with 1,576 additional appointments attended. Adherence increased from 74% to 90%; 55% to 87%; 48% to 77%; and 56% to 80% for 6-, 12-, 24-, and 36-month appointments. Average per-woman costs increased by R14–R47. The majority of this increase occurred with the first 2 CHW visits (90%, 83%, 74%, and 77%; additional cost: R12–R26). Conclusions/Significance We found that study data can be used for program planning, identifying spending levels that achieve adherence targets given budgetary constraints. The results, derived from a single disease program, are retrospective, and should be prospectively replicated. PMID:19492097

  2. Strategies to Increase Adherence through Diabetes Technology

    PubMed Central

    Gabbay, Robert A.; Durdock, Kendra

    2010-01-01

    A variety of new technologies have been developed to assist patients with self-managing their diabetes and yet hemoglobin A1c has not changed dramatically over the last decade. Although more data available from these new diabetes technologies can be helpful, it is clear that an informed, motivated, and adherent patient is the key to success. This article focuses on increasing patient adherence through the use of motivational interviewing, an evidence-based behavior change counseling technique. Specific skills of motivational interviewing may help the provider assess what the patient already knows about the technology, explore the patient's motivation for using the technology, and, finally, assess the patient's barriers, importance, and confidence in using the technology, leading to better adherence. PMID:20513334

  3. Strategies to increase adherence through diabetes technology.

    PubMed

    Gabbay, Robert A; Durdock, Kendra

    2010-05-01

    A variety of new technologies have been developed to assist patients with self-managing their diabetes and yet hemoglobin A1c has not changed dramatically over the last decade. Although more data available from these new diabetes technologies can be helpful, it is clear that an informed, motivated, and adherent patient is the key to success. This article focuses on increasing patient adherence through the use of motivational interviewing, an evidence-based behavior change counseling technique. Specific skills of motivational interviewing may help the provider assess what the patient already knows about the technology, explore the patient's motivation for using the technology, and, finally, assess the patient's barriers, importance, and confidence in using the technology, leading to better adherence. PMID:20513334

  4. Technological adjuncts to increase adherence to therapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Clough, Bonnie A; Casey, Leanne M

    2011-07-01

    This paper identified and reviewed technological adjuncts to increase client adherence to therapy. Three areas of adherence were identified, namely treatment dropout and non-attendance, engagement during and between therapy sessions, and aftercare. Database searches were conducted in each of these areas to identify relevant studies published between the years of 1990 and 2010. Adjuncts designed to replace or reduce direct therapist contact, change the medium of communication between the client and therapist, or alter the content or style of the therapy were not included in this review. Adjuncts were reviewed in light of theories of adherence, including Self Determination Theory, the Transtheoretical Model, and the Theory of Planned Behaviour. Adjuncts reviewed included appointment reminders, exercises and monitoring delivered by mobile phone, and exercises and data collection delivered by computer. Limitations and directions for future research were addressed and discussed. PMID:21497153

  5. Offering Financial Incentives to Increase Adherence to Antipsychotic Medication

    PubMed Central

    Highton-Williamson, Elizabeth; Barnicot, Kirsten; Kareem, Tarrannum; Priebe, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Financial incentives for medication adherence in patients with psychotic disorders are controversial. It is not yet known whether fears expressed by clinicians are borne out in reality. We aimed to explore community mental health clinicians’ experiences of the consequences of giving patients with psychotic disorders a financial incentive to take their depot medication. We implemented descriptive and thematic analyses of semistructured interviews with the clinicians of patients assigned to receive incentives within a randomized controlled trial. Fifty-nine clinicians were interviewed with regard to the effect of the incentives on 73 of the 78 patients allocated to receive incentives in the trial. Most commonly, the clinicians reported benefits for clinical management including improved adherence, contact, patient monitoring, communication, and trust (n = 52). Positive effects on symptoms, insight, or social functioning were reported for some (n = 33). Less commonly, problems for patient management were reported (n = 19) such as monetarization of the therapeutic relationship or negative consequences for the patient (n = 15) such as increased drug and alcohol use. Where requests for increased money occurred, they were rapidly resolved. It seems that, in most cases, the clinicians found that using incentives led to benefits for patient management and for patient health. However, in 33% of cases, some adverse effects were reported. It remains unclear whether certain clinical characteristics are associated with increased risk for adverse effects of financial incentives. The likelihood of benefit versus the smaller risk for adverse effects should be weighed up when deciding whether to offer incentives to individual patients. PMID:25692797

  6. Provider-Focused Intervention Increases Adherence-Related Dialogue, But Does Not Improve Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in Persons with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Ira B.; Laws, M. Barton; Safren, Steven A.; Lee, Yoojin; Lu, Minyi; Coady, William; Skolnik, Paul R.; Rogers, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Physicians' limited knowledge of patients' antiretroviral adherence may reduce their ability to perform effective adherence counseling. Methods We conducted a randomized, cross-over study of an intervention to improve physicians' knowledge of patients' antiretroviral adherence. The intervention was a report given to the physician prior to a routine office visit that included data on: MEMS and self-reported data on antiretroviral adherence, patients' beliefs about antiretroviral therapy, reasons for missed doses, alcohol and drug use, and depression. We audio-recorded one intervention and one control visit for each patient to analyze differences in adherence related dialogue. Results 156 patients were randomized, and 106 completed all 5 study visits. Paired audio-recorded visits were available for 58 patients. Using a linear regression model that adjusted for site and baseline MEMS adherence, adherence following intervention visits did not differ significantly from control visits (2.0% higher, p=0.31, 95% CI -1.95% – 5.9%). There was a trend toward more total adherence-related utterances (median of 76 vs. 49.5, p=0.07) and a significant increase in utterances about the current regimen (median of 51.5 vs. 32.5, p=0.0002) in intervention compared with control visits. However less than 10% of adherence-related utterances were classified as “problem solving” in content, and one third of physicians' problem solving utterances were directive in nature. Conclusions Receipt of a detailed report prior to clinic visits containing data about adherence and other factors did not improve patients' antiretroviral adherence. Analyses of patient-provide dialogue suggests that providers who care for persons with HIV may benefit from training in adherence counseling techniques. PMID:20048680

  7. Increased Chain Length Promotes Pneumococcal Adherence and Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jesse L.; Dalia, Ankur B.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a mucosal pathogen that grows in chains of variable lengths. Short-chain forms are less likely to activate complement, and as a consequence they evade opsonophagocytic clearance more effectively during invasive disease. When grown in human nasal airway surface fluid, pneumococci exhibited both short- and long-chain forms. Here, we determined whether longer chains provide an advantage during colonization when the organism is attached to the epithelial surface. Chain-forming mutants and the parental strain grown under conditions to promote chain formation showed increased adherence to human epithelial cells (A549 cells) in vitro. Additionally, adherence to A549 cells selected for longer chains within the wild-type strain. In vivo in a murine model of colonization, chain-forming mutants outcompeted the parental strain. Together, our results demonstrate that morphological heterogeneity in the pneumococcus may promote colonization of the upper respiratory tract by enhancing the ability of the organism to bind to the epithelial surface. PMID:22825449

  8. Motivational Interviewing to Increase Cognitive Rehabilitation Adherence in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fiszdon, Joanna M; Kurtz, Matthew M; Choi, Jimmy; Bell, Morris D; Martino, Steve

    2016-03-01

    Adherence to treatment in psychiatric populations is notoriously low. In this randomized, controlled, proof-of-concept study, we sought to examine whether motivational interviewing (MI) could be used to enhance motivation for, adherence to, and benefit obtained from cognitive rehabilitation. Dual diagnosis MI, developed specifically for individuals with psychotic symptoms and disorganization, was further adapted to focus on cognitive impairments and their impact. Sixty-four outpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorders completed baseline assessments and were randomized to receive either the 2-session MI focused on cognitive functioning or a 2-session sham control interview focused on assessment and feedback about preferred learning styles. Next, all participants were given 4 weeks during which they could attend up to 10 sessions of a computer-based math training program, which served as a brief analog for a full course of cognitive rehabilitation. As hypothesized, MI condition was associated with greater increases in task-specific motivation along with greater training program session attendance. Moreover, postinterview motivation level predicted session attendance. There were no significant differences in improvement on a measure of cognitive training content, which may have been due to the abbreviated nature of the training. While the literature on the efficacy of MI for individuals with psychosis has been mixed, we speculate that our positive findings may have been influenced by the adaptations made to MI as well as the focus on a nonpharmacological intervention. PMID:26420905

  9. Barriers and facilitators to paediatric adherence to antiretroviral therapy in rural South Africa: a multi-stakeholder perspective.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Bronwyne; Kagee, Ashraf; Bland, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) contributes to the development of drug resistance. HIV-infected children, especially those 5 years and under, are dependent on a caregiver to adhere to ART. However, characteristics of the caregiver, child, regimen, clinic and social context affect clinic attendance and medication-taking, both of which constitute adherent behaviour. We conducted nine interviews and three focus groups to determine how doctors, nurses, counsellors, traditional healers and caregivers understood the barriers and facilitators to ART adherence among children residing in rural South Africa. The data were transcribed, translated into English from isiZulu where necessary, and coded using Atlas.ti version 7. Results were interpreted through the lens of Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Systems Theory. We found that at the micro-level, palatability of medication and large volumes of medication were problematic for young children. Characteristics of the caregiver including absent mothers, grandmothers as caregivers and denial of HIV amongst fathers were themes related to the micro-system. Language barriers and inconsistent attendance of caregivers to monthly clinic visits were factors affecting adherence in the meso-system. Adherence counselling and training were the most problematic features in the exo-system. In the macro-system, the effects of food insecurity and the controversy surrounding the use of traditional medicines were most salient. Increased supervision and regular training amongst lay adherence counsellors are needed, as well as regular monitoring of the persons attending the clinic on the child's behalf. PMID:25355176

  10. Designing a mobile phone-based intervention to promote adherence to antiretroviral therapy in South India.

    PubMed

    Shet, Anita; Arumugam, Karthika; Rodrigues, Rashmi; Rajagopalan, Nirmala; Shubha, K; Raj, Tony; D'souza, George; De Costa, Ayesha

    2010-06-01

    Integration of mobile phone technology into HIV care holds potential, particularly in resource-constrained settings. Clinic attendees in urban and rural South India were surveyed to ascertain usage of mobile phones and perceptions of their use as an adherence aid. Mobile phone ownership was high at 73%; 26% reported shared ownership. A high proportion (66%) reported using phones to call their healthcare provider. There was interest in weekly telephonic automated voice reminders to facilitate adherence. Loss of privacy was not considered a deterrent. The study presents important considerations in the design of a mobile phone-based adherence intervention in India. PMID:20054634

  11. Hypertension education and adherence in South Africa: a cost-effectiveness analysis of community health workers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine whether training community health workers (CHWs) about hypertension in order to improve adherence to medications is a cost-effective intervention among community members in South Africa. Methods We used an established Markov model with age-varying probabilities of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events to assess the benefits and costs of using CHW home visits to increase hypertension adherence for individuals with hypertension and aged 25–74 in South Africa. Subjects considered for CHW intervention were those with a previous diagnosis of hypertension and on medications but who had not achieved control of their blood pressure. We report our results in incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) in US dollars per disability-adjusted life-year (DALY) averted. Results The annual cost of the CHW intervention is about $8 per patient. This would lead to over a 2% reduction in CVD events over a life-time and decrease DALY burden. Due to reductions in non-fatal CVD events, lifetime costs are only $6.56 per patient. The CHW intervention leads to an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $320/DALY averted. At an annual cost of $6.50 or if the blood pressure reduction is 5 mmHg or greater per patient the intervention is cost-saving. Conclusions Additional training for CHWs on hypertension management could be a cost-effective strategy for CVD in South Africa and a very good purchase according to World Health Organization (WHO) standards. The intervention could also lead to reduced visits at the health centres freeing up more time for new patients or reducing the burden of an overworked staff at many facilities. PMID:24606986

  12. Does the association between prescription copayment increases and medication adherence differ by race?

    PubMed

    Wong, Edwin S; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Liu, Chuan-Fen

    2013-08-01

    Previous studies have shown prescription copayment increases are associated with decreases in adherence to diabetes and hypertension medications, but have not investigated whether these associations differ by race. Veterans Affairs (VA) administrative data were used to analyze medication adherence before and after an increase in prescription copayments from $2 to $7 for a 30-day supply in February 2002. Applying a difference-in-difference approach, we compared adherence changes among White and Black veterans who were exempt from or required to pay medication copayments. The likelihood patients were adherent to diabetes or hypertension medications decreased after the copayment increase for both White and Black veterans. However, differences in medication adherence reductions between White and Black veterans were small and statistically insignificant. Despite barriers faced by minority patients related to lower perceived value of medications, the impact of a copayment increase on adherence was similar across the two largest racial groups in the VA. PMID:23974401

  13. A Qualitative Study of Patient Motivation to Adhere to Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Debra; Gengiah, Santhanalakshmi; Kunene, Pinky; Gengiah, Tanuja N.; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Grant, Alison D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Taken as prescribed, that is, with high adherence, combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) has changed HIV infection and disease from being a sure predictor of death to a manageable chronic illness. Adherence, however, is difficult to achieve and maintain. The CAPRISA 058 study was conducted between 2007 and 2009 to test the efficacy of individualized motivational counselling to enhance ART adherence in South Africa. As part of the overall trial, a qualitative sub-study was conducted, including 30 individual interviews and four focus group discussions with patients in the first 9 months of ART initiation. Data were inductively analyzed, using thematic analysis, to identify themes central to ART adherence in this context. Four themes emerged that characterize the participants' experiences and high motivation to adhere to ART. Participants in this study were highly motivated to adhere, as they acknowledged that ART was ‘life-giving’, in the face of a large amount of morbidity and mortality. They were further supported by techniques of routine remembering, and highlighted the importance of good social support and access to supportive healthcare workers, to their continued success in negotiating their treatment. Participants in the current study told us that their adherence motivation is enhanced by free accessible care, approachable and supportive healthcare workers, broad social acceptance of ART, and past first-hand experiences with AIDS-related co-morbidity and mortality. Programs that include specific attention to these aspects of care will likely be successful in the long term. PMID:25692575

  14. SMS messages increase adherence to rapid diagnostic test results among malaria patients: results from a pilot study in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization now recommends parasitological confirmation for malaria case management. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malaria are an accurate and simple diagnostic to confirm parasite presence in blood. However, where they have been deployed, adherence to RDT results has been poor, especially when the test result is negative. Few studies have examined adherence to RDTs distributed or purchased through the private sector. Methods The Rapid Examination of Malaria and Evaluation of Diagnostic Information (REMEDI) study assessed the acceptability of and adherence to RDT results for patients seeking care from private sector drug retailers in two cities in Oyo State in south-west Nigeria. In total, 465 adult participants were enrolled upon exit from a participating drug shop having purchased anti-malaria drugs for themselves. Participants were given a free RDT and the appropriate treatment advice based on their RDT result. Short Message Service (SMS) text messages reiterating the treatment advice were sent to a randomly selected half of the participants one day after being tested. Participants were contacted via phone four days after the RDT was conducted to assess adherence to the RDT information and treatment advice. Results Adherence to RDT results was 14.3 percentage points (P-val <0.001) higher in the treatment group who were sent the SMS. The higher adherence in the treatment group was robust to several specification tests and the estimated difference in adherence ranged from 9.7 to 16.1 percentage points. Further, the higher adherence to the treatment advice was specific to the treatment advice for anti-malarial drugs and not other drugs purchased to treat malaria symptoms in the RDT-negative participants who bought both anti-malarial and symptom drugs. There was no difference in adherence for the RDT-positive participants who were sent the SMS. Conclusions SMS text messages substantially increased adherence to RDT results for

  15. Achieving equity in HIV-treatment outcomes: can social protection improve adolescent ART-adherence in South Africa?

    PubMed Central

    Cluver, L. D.; Toska, E.; Orkin, F. M.; Meinck, F.; Hodes, R.; Yakubovich, A. R.; Sherr, L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Low ART-adherence amongst adolescents is associated with morbidity, mortality and onward HIV transmission. Reviews find no effective adolescent adherence-promoting interventions. Social protection has demonstrated benefits for adolescents, and could potentially improve ART-adherence. This study examines associations of 10 social protection provisions with adherence in a large community-based sample of HIV-positive adolescents. All 10–19-year-olds ever ART-initiated in 53 government healthcare facilities in a health district of South Africa’s Eastern Cape were traced and interviewed in 2014–2015 (n = 1175 eligible). About 90% of the eligible sample was included (n = 1059). Social protection provisions were “cash/cash in kind”: government cash transfers, food security, school fees/materials, school feeding, clothing; and “care”: HIV support group, sports groups, choir/art groups, positive parenting and parental supervision/monitoring. Analyses used multivariate regression, interaction and marginal effects models in SPSS and STATA, controlling for socio-demographic, HIV and healthcare-related covariates. Findings showed 36% self-reported past-week ART non-adherence (<95%). Non-adherence was associated with increased opportunistic infections (p = .005, B .269, SD .09), and increased likelihood of detectable viral load at last test (>75 copies/ml) (aOR 1.98, CI 1.1–3.45). Independent of covariates, three social protection provisions were associated with reduced non-adherence: food provision (aOR .57, CI .42–.76, p < .001); HIV support group attendance (aOR .60, CI .40–.91, p < .02), and high parental/caregiver supervision (aOR .56, CI .43–.73, p < .001). Combination social protection showed additive benefits. With no social protection, non-adherence was 54%, with any one protection 39–41%, with any two social protections, 27–28% and with all three social protections, 18%. These results demonstrate that social protection provisions

  16. Achieving equity in HIV-treatment outcomes: can social protection improve adolescent ART-adherence in South Africa?

    PubMed

    Cluver, L D; Toska, E; Orkin, F M; Meinck, F; Hodes, R; Yakubovich, A R; Sherr, L

    2016-03-01

    Low ART-adherence amongst adolescents is associated with morbidity, mortality and onward HIV transmission. Reviews find no effective adolescent adherence-promoting interventions. Social protection has demonstrated benefits for adolescents, and could potentially improve ART-adherence. This study examines associations of 10 social protection provisions with adherence in a large community-based sample of HIV-positive adolescents. All 10-19-year-olds ever ART-initiated in 53 government healthcare facilities in a health district of South Africa's Eastern Cape were traced and interviewed in 2014-2015 (n = 1175 eligible). About 90% of the eligible sample was included (n = 1059). Social protection provisions were "cash/cash in kind": government cash transfers, food security, school fees/materials, school feeding, clothing; and "care": HIV support group, sports groups, choir/art groups, positive parenting and parental supervision/monitoring. Analyses used multivariate regression, interaction and marginal effects models in SPSS and STATA, controlling for socio-demographic, HIV and healthcare-related covariates. Findings showed 36% self-reported past-week ART non-adherence (<95%). Non-adherence was associated with increased opportunistic infections (p = .005, B .269, SD .09), and increased likelihood of detectable viral load at last test (>75 copies/ml) (aOR 1.98, CI 1.1-3.45). Independent of covariates, three social protection provisions were associated with reduced non-adherence: food provision (aOR .57, CI .42-.76, p < .001); HIV support group attendance (aOR .60, CI .40-.91, p < .02), and high parental/caregiver supervision (aOR .56, CI .43-.73, p < .001). Combination social protection showed additive benefits. With no social protection, non-adherence was 54%, with any one protection 39-41%, with any two social protections, 27-28% and with all three social protections, 18%. These results demonstrate that social protection provisions, particularly combinations of "cash

  17. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet among employees in South West England: Formative research to inform a web-based, work-place nutrition intervention

    PubMed Central

    Papadaki, Angeliki; Wood, Lesley; Sebire, Simon J.; Jago, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to assess internet usage patterns and adherence to the Mediterranean diet among employees in South West England, UK and their differences by personal characteristics. Method A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2014 among 590 adults (428 women, 162 men, mean age 43.8 years), employees of four work-place settings. Mediterranean diet adherence was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Adherence differences were assessed by gender, marital status, education, number of children and food shopping and preparation responsibility. Results On average, participants reported moderate adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Higher adherence was reported for alcohol, vegetables, cereals and fruit. Few participants achieved high adherence to the Mediterranean diet recommendations for legumes (5.3%), fish (3.2%), dairy products (4.8%), red meat (11.9%), poultry (11.1%) and olive oil (18.2%). A higher Mediterranean diet score was reported among participants who were married/cohabiting, those with higher education attainment and shared responsibility for food preparation. Conclusion Improvement in the consumption of several Mediterranean diet components is needed to increase adherence in this sample of adults. The findings have the potential to inform the development of a web-based intervention that will focus on these foods to promote the Mediterranean diet in work-place settings in South West England. PMID:26844075

  18. Potential Savings From Increasing Adherence to Inhaled Corticosteroid Therapy in Medicaid-Enrolled Children

    PubMed Central

    Rust, George; Zhang, Shun; McRoy, Luceta; Pisu, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Many asthma-related exacerbations could be prevented by consistent use of daily inhaled corticosteroid therapy (ICS-Rx). Objectives We sought to measure the potential cost savings that could accrue from increasing ICS-Rx adherence in children. Study Design We measured observed costs for a cohort of 43,156 Medicaid-enrolled children in 14 southern states whose initial ICS-Rx was prescribed in 2007. Methods Adherence rates and associated costs were calculated from Medicaid claims. Children were categorized as high or low adherence based on the ratio of ICS-Rx claims filled to total asthma drug claims. Branching tree simulation was used to project the potential cost savings achieved by increasing the proportion of children with ICS-Rx to total asthma Rx ratios greater than 0.5 to 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100%. Results Increasing the proportion of children who maintain higher adherence after initial ICS-Rx to 40% would generate savings of $95 per child per year. An intervention costing $10 per member per month that resulted in even half of the children maintaining high adherence would generate a 98% return on investment for managed care plans or state Medicaid programs. Net costs decreased incrementally at each level of increase in ICS-Rx adherence. The projected Medicaid cost savings for these 14 states in 2007 ranged from $8.2 million if 40% of the children achieved high adherence, to $57.5 million if 80% achieved high adherence. Conclusions If effective large-scale interventions can be found, there are substantial cost savings to be gained from even modest increases in real-world adherence to ICS-Rx among Medicaid-enrolled children with asthma. PMID:25880622

  19. A performance improvement plan to increase nurse adherence to use of medication safety software.

    PubMed

    Gavriloff, Carrie

    2012-08-01

    Nurses can protect patients receiving intravenous (IV) medication by using medication safety software to program "smart" pumps to administer IV medications. After a patient safety event identified inconsistent use of medication safety software by nurses, a performance improvement team implemented the Deming Cycle performance improvement methodology. The combined use of improved direct care nurse communication, programming strategies, staff education, medication safety champions, adherence monitoring, and technology acquisition resulted in a statistically significant (p < .001) increase in nurse adherence to using medication safety software from 28% to above 85%, exceeding national benchmark adherence rates (Cohen, Cooke, Husch & Woodley, 2007; Carefusion, 2011). PMID:22703685

  20. Adherence to cardiovascular medications in the South Asian population: A systematic review of current evidence and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Akeroyd, Julia M; Chan, Winston J; Kamal, Ayeesha K; Palaniappan, Latha; Virani, Salim S

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To review methods of assessing adherence and strategies to improve adherence to cardiovascular disease (CVD) medications, among South Asian CVD patients. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of English language studies that examined CVD medication adherence in South Asian populations from 1966 to April 1, 2015 in SCOPUS and PubMed. Working in duplicate, we identified 61 studies. After exclusions, 26 studies were selected for full text review. Of these, 17 studies were included in the final review. We abstracted data on several factors including study design, study population, method of assessing adherence and adherence rate. RESULTS: These studies were conducted in India (n = 11), Pakistan (n = 3), Bangladesh (n = 1), Nepal (n = 1) and Sri Lanka (n = 1). Adherence rates ranged from 32%-95% across studies. Of the 17 total publications included, 10 focused on assessing adherence to CVD medications and 7 focused on assessing the impact of interventions on medication adherence. The validated Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS) was used as the primary method of assessing adherence in five studies. Three studies used validated questionnaires similar to the MMAS, and one study utilized Medication Event Monitoring System caps, with the remainder of the studies utilizing pill count and self-report measures. As expected, studies using non-validated self-report measures described higher rates of adherence than studies using validated scale measurements and pill count. The included intervention studies examined the use of polypill therapy, provider education and patient counseling to improve medication adherence. CONCLUSION: The overall medication adherence rates were low in the region, which suggest a growing need for future interventions to improve adherence. PMID:26730300

  1. Educational opportunities in bladder cancer: increasing cystoscopic adherence and the availability of smoking-cessation programs.

    PubMed

    Kowalkowski, Marc A; Goltz, Heather Honoré; Petersen, Nancy J; Amiel, Gilad E; Lerner, Seth P; Latini, David M

    2014-12-01

    Cancer survivors who continue to smoke following diagnosis are at increased risk for recurrence. Yet, smoking prevalence among survivors is similar to the general population. Adherence to cystoscopic surveillance is an important disease-management strategy for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) survivors, but data from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program (SEER) suggest current adherence levels are insufficient to identify recurrences at critically early stages. This study was conducted to identify actionable targets for educational intervention to increase adherence to cystoscopic monitoring for disease recurrence or progression. NMIBC survivors (n = 109) completed telephone-based surveys. Adherence was determined by measuring time from diagnosis to interview date; cystoscopies received were then compared to American Urological Association (AUA) guidelines. Data were analyzed using non-parametric tests for univariate and logistic regression for multivariable analyses. Participants averaged 65 years (SD = 9.3) and were primarily white (95 %), male (75 %), married (75 %), and non-smokers (84 %). Eighty-three percent reported either Ta- or T1-stage bladder tumors. Forty-five percent met AUA guidelines for adherence. Compared to non-smokers, current smokers reported increased fear of recurrence and psychological distress (p < 0.05). In regression analyses, non-adherence was associated with smoking (OR = 33.91, p < 0.01), providing a behavioral marker to describe a survivor group with unmet needs that may contribute to low cystoscopic adherence. Research assessing survivorship needs and designing and evaluating educational programs for NMIBC survivors should be a high priority. Identifying unmet needs among NMIBC survivors and developing programs to address these needs may increase compliance with cystoscopic monitoring, improve outcomes, and enhance quality of life. PMID:24719024

  2. Factors Predicting Adherence to Risk Management Behaviors of Women at Increased Risk for Developing Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Kerry A.; Miller, Suzanne M.; Roussi, Pagona; Taylor, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Lymphedema affects 20-30% of women following breast cancer treatment. However, even when women are informed, they do not necessarily adhere to recommended lymphedema self-management regimens. Utilizing the Cognitive-Social Health Information Processing framework, we assessed cognitive and emotional factors influencing adherence to lymphedema risk management. Methods Women with breast cancer who had undergone breast and lymph node surgery were recruited through the Fox Chase Cancer Centre breast clinic. Participants (N=103) completed measures of lymphedema-related perceived risk, beliefs and expectancies, distress, self-regulatory ability to manage distress, knowledge, and adherence to risk management behaviors. They then received the American Cancer Society publication “Lymphedema: What Every Woman with Breast Cancer Should Know”. Cognitive and affective variables were reassessed at 6- and 12-months post-baseline. Results Maximum likelihood multilevel model analyses indicated that overall adherence increased over time, with significant differences between baseline and 6- and 12- month assessments. Adherence to wearing gloves was significantly lower than that for all other behaviors except electric razor use. Distress significantly decreased, and knowledge significantly increased, over time. Greater knowledge, higher self-efficacy to enact behaviors, lower distress, and higher self-regulatory ability to manage distress were associated with increased adherence. Conclusions Women who understand lymphedema risk management and feel confident in managing this risk are more likely to adhere to recommended strategies. These factors should be rigorously assessed as part of routine care to ensure that women have the self-efficacy to seek treatment and the self-regulatory skills to manage distress, which may undermine attempts to seek medical assistance. PMID:24970542

  3. Packaging interventions to increase medication adherence: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Vicki S.; Ruppar, Todd M.; Chan, Keith C.; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Pepper, Ginette A.; De Geest, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    Objective Inadequate medication adherence is a widespread problem that contributes to increase chronic disease complications and health care expenditures. Packaging interventions using pill boxes and blister packs have been widely recommended to address the medication adherence issue. This meta-analysis review determined the overall effect of packaging interventions on medication adherence and health outcomes. In addition, we tested whether effects vary depending on intervention, sample, and design characteristics. Research design and methods Extensive literature search strategies included examination of 13 computerized databases and 19 research registries, hand searches of 57 journal, and author and ancestry searches. Eligible studies included either pill-boxes or blister packaging interventions to increase medication adherence. Primary study characteristics and outcomes were reliably coded. Random-effects analyses were used to calculate overall effect sizes and conduct moderator analyses. Results Data were synthesized across 22,858 subjects from 52 reports. The overall mean weighted standardized difference effect size for two-group comparisons was 0.593 (favoring treatment over control), which is consistent with the mean of 71% adherence for treatment subjects compared to 63% among control subjects. We found using moderator analyses that interventions were most effective when they used blister packs and were delivered in pharmacies, while interventions were less effective when studies included older subjects and those with cognitive impairment. Methodological moderator analyses revealed significantly larger effect sizes in studies reporting continuous data outcomes instead of dichotomous results and in studies using pharmacy refill medication adherence measures as compared to studies with self-report measures. Conclusions Overall, meta-analysis findings support the use of packaging interventions to effectively increase medication adherence. Limitations of the

  4. A test of interventions to increase adherence to hypertensive medical regimens.

    PubMed

    Kirscht, J P; Kirscht, J L; Rosenstock, I M

    1981-01-01

    Low rates of adherence to hypertensive therapy limit patients' securing the full benefits of treatment. While some factors related to adherence have been identified research on the effectiveness of interventions to increase adherence levels is sparse. The present study was designed to assess the impact of a series of different interventions on a group of some 400 patients, all under the care of private physicians in a small community. A factorial design was employed to deliver four, sequential educational interventions, about four months apart, to randomly selected sub-groups. Interviews before and after each intervention provided information concerning self-reported adherence, health status, health beliefs, and personal characteristics. Pertinent medical records and pharmacy data were also obtained. The first intervention - printed material - did not significantly affect adherence. The second and fourth interventions - nurse telephone calls and social support - each increased medication taking and the third intervention - self-monitoring - led to better weight control. There was no cumulative impact of the interventions and different aspects of regimens were not significantly related to one another. PMID:7333851

  5. The connection between serious life events, anti-retroviral adherence, and mental health among HIV-positive individuals in the Western Cape, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Brinkley-Rubinstein, Lauren; Chadwick, Caleb; Graci, Matt

    2013-01-01

    South Africa currently has one of the world's largest rates of HIV infection. A majority of the existing research focuses on individual risk behaviors that lead to increased risk of HIV contraction while also acknowledging the importance of the social and contextual determinants of HIV transmission and disease progression. Therefore, the present study aims to understand the ways in which experience of serious life events increases risk of both adherence lapse and mental illness in HIV-positive populations. Strikingly, our findings suggest that HIV-positive individuals are approximately 24 times as likely to have an anti-retroviral adherence lapse and are nearly four times likely to report mental health issues if they have experienced a recent serious life event. Implications of our results include the incorporation of socially relevant assessment tools and the development of interventions that address social and contextual issues for effecting adherence behaviors. PMID:23656514

  6. Behavioral training for increasing preschool children's adherence with positive airway pressure: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Slifer, Keith J; Kruglak, Deborah; Benore, Ethan; Bellipanni, Kimberly; Falk, Lroi; Halbower, Ann C; Amari, Adrianna; Beck, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    Behavioral training was implemented to increase adherence with positive airway pressure (PAP) in 4 preschool children. The training employed distraction, counterconditioning, graduated exposure, differential reinforcement, and escape extinction. A non-concurrent multiple baseline experimental design was used to demonstrate program effects. Initially, the children displayed distress and escape-avoidance behavior when PAP was attempted. With training, all 4 children tolerated PAP while sleeping for age appropriate durations. For the 3 children with home follow-up data, the parents maintained benefits. The results are discussed in relation to behavior principles, child health, and common barriers to PAP adherence. PMID:17441784

  7. An adapted education program to increase adherence to the dietary guidelines for Americans: a feasibility study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) We Can! (Ways to Enhance Children's Activity and Nutrition) was culturally tailored in order to increase adherence to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, as the vehicle for preventing childhood overweight and obesity in Louisiana families. We Can! Louisiana ...

  8. The Efficacy of Symbolic Modeling and Vicarious Reinforcement in Increasing Coping-Method Adherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rooke, Sally E.; Malouff, John M.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test a method of increasing adherence to a coping method assignment in individuals interested in reducing stress. Eighty university students and 48 adult nonstudents were asked to write about their emotions for 15 minutes per day over 3 days. Participants were randomly assigned to experimental or control conditions,…

  9. What factors increase Dutch child health care professionals' adherence to a national guideline on preventing child abuse and neglect?

    PubMed

    Konijnendijk, Annemieke A J; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M; Fleuren, Margot A H; Haasnoot, Maria E; Need, Ariana

    2016-03-01

    Guidelines to support health care professionals in early detection of, and responses to, suspected Child Abuse and Neglect (CAN) have become increasingly widely available. Yet little is known about professionals' adherence to these guidelines or the determinants that affect their uptake. This study used a cross-sectional design to assess the adherence of Dutch Child Health Care (CHC) professionals to seven key activities described in a national guideline on preventing CAN. This study also examined the presence and strengths of determinants of guideline adherence. Online questionnaires were filled in between May and July 2013 by 164 CHC professionals. Adherence was defined as the extent to which professionals performed each of seven key activities when they suspected CAN. Thirty-three determinants were measured in relation to the guideline, the health professional, the organisational context and the socio-political context. Bivariate and multivariate regression analyses tested associations between determinants and guideline adherence. Most of the responding CHC professionals were aware of the guideline and its content (83.7%). Self-reported rates of full adherence varied between 19.5% and 42.7%. Stronger habit to use the guideline was the only determinant associated with higher adherence rates in the multivariate analysis. Understanding guideline adherence and associated determinants is essential for developing implementation strategies that can stimulate adherence. Although CHC professionals in this sample were aware of the guideline, they did not always adhere to its key recommended activities. To increase adherence, tailored interventions should primarily focus on enhancing habit strength. PMID:26687328

  10. Increased neutrophil adherence and adhesion molecule mRNA expression in endothelial cells during selenium deficiency.

    PubMed

    Maddox, J F; Aherne, K M; Reddy, C C; Sordillo, L M

    1999-05-01

    Leukocyte aggregation and activation on endothelial cells (EC) are important preliminary events in leukocyte migration into tissue and subsequent inflammation. Thus, an increase in leukocyte adherence has the potential to affect inflammatory disease outcome. Selenium (Se) is an integral part of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and plays an important role in the maintenance of the redox state of a cell. Se supplementation in the bovine has been shown to improve the outcome of acute mastitis caused by coliform bacteria, in part by enhancing the speed of neutrophil migration into the affected mammary gland. However, the mechanisms by which Se modulates neutrophil migration have not been elucidated. Therefore, an in vitro model of Se deficiency in primary bovine mammary artery EC was used to examine the impact of Se status on the adhesive properties of EC. The effect of Se on functional activities was examined by measuring neutrophil adherence to Se-deficient and Se-supplemented EC. Se-deficient EC showed significantly enhanced neutrophil adherence when stimulated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) for 4 or 24 h, interleukin-1 for 12 h, or H2O2 for 20 min (P < 0.05). To determine the mechanisms underlying these changes in neutrophil adherence, the expression of EC adhesion molecules, ICAM-1, E-selectin, and P-selectin were examined at the molecular level by a competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results revealed higher mRNA expression for E-selectin and ICAM-1 in Se-deficient EC stimulated with TNF-alpha for 3 and 6 h, and greater expression of P-selectin mRNA in Se-supplemented EC with 3-h TNF-alpha stimulation. These studies provide new information to establish the role of Se nutrition in the initiation of leukocyte adherence to endothelium. PMID:10331495

  11. Impact of a Prescription Copayment Increase on Lipid Lowering Medication Adherence in Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Jalpa A.; Zhu, Jingsan; Lee, Bruce; Kimmel, Stephen; Volpp, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Background In February 2002, the VA increased copayments from $2 to $7 per 30-day drug supply of each medication for many veterans. We examined the impact of the copayment increase on lipid lowering medication adherence. Methods and Results Quasi-experimental study using electronic records of 5,604 veterans receiving care at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center from November, 1999 to April, 2004. The “All Copayment” group included veterans subject to copayments for all drugs with no annual cap. Veterans subject to copayments for drugs only if indicated for a non-service connected condition with an annual cap of $840 for out-of-pocket costs comprised the “Some Copayment” group. Veterans who remained copayment exempt formed a natural control group (“No copayment” group). Patients were identified as “adherent” if the proportion of days covered (PDC) with lipid-lowering medications was >= 80%. Patients were identified as having a “continuous gap” if they had at least one continuous episode with no lipid lowering medications for >= 90 days. A difference-indifference approach comparing changes in lipid lowering medication adherence during the 24 months pre- and post- copayment increase among veterans subject to the copayment change versus those who were not. Adherence declined in all three groups after the copayment increase. However, the percent of patients who were adherent (PDC>=80%) declined significantly more in the all copayment (-19.2%) and some copayment (-19.3%) groups relative to the exempt group (-11.9%). The incidence of a continuous gap increased significantly at twice the rate in both copayment groups (+24.6% all copayment group and 24.1% some copayment group) than the exempt group (+11.7%). Compared to the exempt group, the odds of having a continuous gap in the post- relative to the pre-period were significantly higher in both the all copayment group (OR 3.04 95% CI 2.29-4.03) and the some copayment group (OR 1.85 95% CI 1

  12. Increased resistance to detachment of adherent microspheres and Bacillus spores subjected to a drying step.

    PubMed

    Faille, Christine; Bihi, Ilyesse; Ronse, Annette; Ronse, Gilles; Baudoin, Michael; Zoueshtiagh, Farzam

    2016-07-01

    In various environments, including that of food processing, adherent bacteria are often subjected to drying conditions. These conditions have been shown to result in changes in the ability of biofilms to cross-contaminate food in contact with them. In this study, we investigated the consequences of a drying step on the further ability of adherent bacterial spores to resist detachment. An initial series of experiment was set up with latex microspheres as a model. A microsphere suspension was deposited on a glass slide and incubated at 25, 35 and 50°C for times ranging from 1h to 48h. By subjecting the dried slides to increasing water flow rates, we showed that both time and temperature affected the ease of microsphere detachment. Similar observations were made for three Bacillus spores despite differences in their surface properties, especially regarding their surface physicochemistry. The differences in ease of adherent spore detachment could not be clearly linked to the minor changes in spore morphology, observed after drying in various environmental conditions. In order to explain the increased interaction between spheres or spores and glass slides, the authors made several assumptions regarding the possible underlying mechanisms: the shape of the liquid bridge between the sphere and the substratum, which is greatly influenced by the hydrophilic/hydrophobic characters of both surfaces; the accumulation of soil at the liquid/air interface; the presence of trapped nano-bubbles around and/or under the sphere. PMID:27022869

  13. AVAPROMISE: A randomized clinical trial for increasing adherence through behavioural modification in essential hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hamet, Pavel; Campbell, Norman; Curnew, Greg; Eastwood, Clive; Pradhan, Ashish

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with hypertension often do not adhere to their medications. OBJECTIVE: To improve medication adherence in patients with essential hypertension by modifying their behaviours. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From general practice settings, 4864 patients with essential hypertension were recruited and randomly assigned to receive the angiotensin receptor blocker irbesartan (Avapro) with (intervention group) or without (nonintervention group) a behavioural modification program (Avapromise) based on a model of change. Patients were followed up for 12 months. Patients were subgrouped based on their stage of change in the behavioural change continuum, and the intervention was tailored to address the needs of the particular subgroup. The primary efficacy measure was rate and time to discontinuation with irbesartan. RESULTS: At the end of the study, there was no significant difference in the discontinuation rates between the intervention (25.4%, 95% CI 23.7 to 27.2) and nonintervention (25.5%, 95% CI 23.8 to 27.3) groups (P=0.94). The time to discontinuation (P=0.87) and the extrapolated rate of discontinuation estimated from the Kaplan-Meir curve (intervention 23.1%, 95% CI 21.3 to 24.8; nonintervention 23.5%, 95% CI 21.8 to 25.3) were not different between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: This behavioural modification intervention based on a model of change was not efficacious at increasing rates of adherence in patients with essential hypertension in this setting. More individualized interventions may be required to increase adherence in this population. PMID:19644587

  14. Adherence to Concurrent Tuberculosis Treatment and Antiretroviral Treatment among Co-Infected Persons in South Africa, 2008–2010

    PubMed Central

    Webb Mazinyo, Ernesha; Kim, Lindsay; Masuku, Sikhethiwe; Lancaster, Joey L.; Odendaal, Ronel; Uys, Margot; Podewils, Laura Jean; Van der Walt, Martie L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adherence to tuberculosis (TB) treatment and antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces morbidity and mortality among persons co-infected with TB/HIV. We measured adherence and determined factors associated with non-adherence to concurrent TB treatment and ART among co-infected persons in two provinces in South Africa. Methods A convenience sample of 35 clinics providing integrated TB/HIV care was included due to financial and logistic considerations. Retrospective chart reviews were conducted among persons who received concurrent TB treatment and ART and who had a TB treatment outcome recorded during 1 January 2008–31 December 2010. Adherence to concurrent TB and HIV treatment was defined as: (1) taking ≥80% of TB prescribed doses by directly observed therapy (DOT) as noted in the patient card; and (2) taking >90% ART doses as documented in the ART medical record during the concurrent treatment period (period of time when the patient was prescribed both TB treatment and ART). Risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to identify factors associated with non-adherence. Results Of the 1,252 persons receiving concurrent treatment, 138 (11.0%) were not adherent. Non-adherent persons were more likely to have extrapulmonary TB (RR: 1.71, 95% CI: 1.12 to 2.60) and had not disclosed their HIV status (RR: 1.96, 95% CI: 1.96 to 3.76). Conclusions The majority of persons with TB/HIV were adherent to concurrent treatment. Close monitoring and support of persons with extrapulmonary TB and for persons who have not disclosed their HIV status may further improve adherence to concurrent TB and antiretroviral treatment. PMID:27442440

  15. Interventions to increase antiretroviral adherence in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review of evaluation studies

    PubMed Central

    Bärnighausen, Till; Chaiyachati, Krisda; Chimbindi, Natsayi; Peoples, Ashleigh; Haberer, Jessica; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2014-01-01

    The success of potent antiretroviral treatment (ART) for HIV infection is primarily determined by the level of medication adherence. We systematically review the evidence on effectiveness of interventions to enhance ART adherence in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where four fifths of the more than five million people receiving ART live. We identified 26 relevant publications reporting on 25 studies, conducted between 2003 and 2010, of behavioural, cognitive, biological, structural, and combination interventions. The majority (16) of the studies took place in hospital outpatient facilities in urban settings. Studies differed widely in design, sample size, length of follow-up, and outcome measurement. Despite study diversity and limitations, the evidence to date suggest that treatment supporters, directly observed therapy, cell phone short message services, diary cards and food rations and can be effective in increasing adherence in some settings in SSA. However, our synthesis of studies also shows that some interventions are unlikely to produce large or lasting effects, while other interventions are effective in some but not in other settings, emphasizing the need for more research, in particular, RCTs, to allow examination of the influence of context and particular features of intervention content on effectiveness. Important avenues for future work include intervention targeting and selection of interventions based on behavioural theories relevant to SSA. PMID:22030332

  16. Patterns of disclosure and antiretroviral treatment adherence in a South African mining workplace programme and implications for HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Bhagwanjee, Anil; Govender, Kaymarlin; Akintola, Olagoke; Petersen, Inge; George, Gavin; Johnstone, Leigh; Naidoo, Kerisha

    2011-01-01

    Social and psychological barriers to the disclosure of one's seropositive HIV status to significant others and poor adherence to taking medications pose significant challenges to the scaling-up of access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) in the workplace. Such barriers are predictive of sub-optimal treatment outcomes and bedevil HIV-prevention interventions at a societal level. Against this background, this article explores the lived experiences of 19 HIV-positive male participants, between the ages of 33 and 57 years, who were enrolled in an ART programme managed at an occupational health clinic at a mining company in South Africa. The majority of these mineworkers had been aware of their HIV status for between 5 and 7 years. The study explored psychological and relational factors, as aspects of these participants lived experiences, which had a bearing on their adherence to their ART regimen and the disclosure choices that they made regarding their HIV status. In our sample, those participants who were adherent demonstrated higher levels of control and acceptance of their HIV infection and were more confident in their ability to manage their treatment, while the group who were non-adherent presented with lower levels of adherence motivation and self-efficacy, difficulties in maintaining a healthy lifestyle and significant challenges in maintaining control over their lives. While most of the men favoured disclosing their HIV status to their partners for the sake of treatment support, they were less sure about disclosing to family members and non-family members, respectively, because of their need to protect these persons and due to their fear of being stigmatised. It was evident that treatment adherence choices and behaviours were impacted by psychological and relational factors, including disclosure decisions. We conclude with a bivariate model for understanding the adherence behaviours that influenced different patterns of ART adherence among the sample, and

  17. Increasing Equity in Education in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RTI International, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The South African government has made significant efforts to overcome the legacy of apartheid education, committing itself to the dual goals of achieving high-quality education with more equitable access for all South Africans. Substantial investments have been made to achieve this vision, however, translating policies into improved school-level…

  18. Measles virus hemagglutinin mediates monocyte aggregation and increased adherence to measles-infected endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Soilu-Hänninen, M; Hänninen, A; Ilonen, J; Salmi, A; Salonen, R

    1996-09-01

    The effect of measles virus (MV) infection on monocyte adhesion was studied using human peripheral blood monocytes and monocytic and endothelial cell lines. The infection of monocytic U-937 cells led to the formation of large cellular aggregates. Aggregation was independent of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1)/lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), but could be inhibited by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against the MV hemagglutinin glycoprotein (MV-H). mAb against the MV receptor, CD46, also blocked aggregation. No significant changes in the cell surface expression of adhesion molecules CD11a, CD11b, CD11c, CD18, CD54, CD44, CD49d (alpha 4-integrin) and CD62L (L-selectin) were observed on MV-infected monocytes. Infection of a human endothelial cell line, EAhy 926 (HEC), with MV led to a two-fold increase in 1CAM-1 expression and a two-fold increase in monocyte adherence to the HEC (from 22 +/- 1.6% to 42 +/- 4.8%). However, ICAM-1 mAb reduced monocyte adhesion to the control and MV-infected HEC to a similar degree, whereas anti-MV-H antibodies abolished the difference between binding to infected and control HEC. We conclude that MV hemagglutinin mediated both the homo typic aggregation in infected monocyte cultures and increased monocyte adherence to the infected endothelial cells. PMID:8884738

  19. How to Increase Reach and Adherence of Web-Based Interventions: A Design Research Viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Ludden, Geke D S; van Rompay, Thomas J L; Kelders, Saskia M; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E W C

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, technology is increasingly used to increase people's well-being. For example, many mobile and Web-based apps have been developed that can support people to become mentally fit or to manage their daily diet. However, analyses of current Web-based interventions show that many systems are only used by a specific group of users (eg, women, highly educated), and that even they often do not persist and drop out as the intervention unfolds. In this paper, we assess the impact of design features of Web-based interventions on reach and adherence and conclude that the power that design can have has not been used to its full potential. We propose looking at design research as a source of inspiration for new (to the field) design approaches. The paper goes on to specify and discuss three of these approaches: personalization, ambient information, and use of metaphors. Central to our viewpoint is the role of positive affect triggered by well-designed persuasive features to boost adherence and well-being. Finally, we discuss the future of persuasive eHealth interventions and suggest avenues for follow-up research. PMID:26163456

  20. How to Increase Reach and Adherence of Web-Based Interventions: A Design Research Viewpoint

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, technology is increasingly used to increase people’s well-being. For example, many mobile and Web-based apps have been developed that can support people to become mentally fit or to manage their daily diet. However, analyses of current Web-based interventions show that many systems are only used by a specific group of users (eg, women, highly educated), and that even they often do not persist and drop out as the intervention unfolds. In this paper, we assess the impact of design features of Web-based interventions on reach and adherence and conclude that the power that design can have has not been used to its full potential. We propose looking at design research as a source of inspiration for new (to the field) design approaches. The paper goes on to specify and discuss three of these approaches: personalization, ambient information, and use of metaphors. Central to our viewpoint is the role of positive affect triggered by well-designed persuasive features to boost adherence and well-being. Finally, we discuss the future of persuasive eHealth interventions and suggest avenues for follow-up research. PMID:26163456

  1. Connecticut's Value-Based Insurance Plan Increased The Use Of Targeted Services And Medication Adherence.

    PubMed

    Hirth, Richard A; Cliff, Elizabeth Q; Gibson, Teresa B; McKellar, M Richard; Fendrick, A Mark

    2016-04-01

    In 2011 Connecticut implemented the Health Enhancement Program for state employees. This voluntary program followed the principles of value-based insurance design (VBID) by lowering patient costs for certain high-value primary and chronic disease preventive services, coupled with requirements that enrollees receive these services. Nonparticipants in the program, including those removed for noncompliance with its requirements, were assessed a premium surcharge. The program was intended to curb cost growth and improve health through adherence to evidence-based preventive care. To evaluate its efficacy in doing so, we compared changes in service use and spending after implementation of the program to trends among employees of six other states. Compared to employees of other states, Connecticut employees were similar in age and sex but had a slightly higher percentage of enrollees with chronic conditions and substantially higher spending at baseline. During the program's first two years, the use of targeted services and adherence to medications for chronic conditions increased, while emergency department use decreased, relative to the situation in the comparison states. The program's impact on costs was inconclusive and requires a longer follow-up period. This novel combination of VBID principles and participation requirements may be a tool that can help plan sponsors increase the use of evidence-based preventive services. PMID:27044964

  2. Predictors of poor adherence among people on antiretroviral treatment in Cape Town, South Africa: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Dewing, Sarah; Mathews, Cathy; Lurie, Mark; Kagee, Ashraf; Padayachee, Trishanta; Lombard, Carl

    2015-01-01

    A case-control study was conducted to describe the frequency with which structural- and individual-level barriers to adherence are experienced by people receiving antiretroviral (ARV) treatment and to determine predictors of non-adherence. Three hundred adherent and 300 non-adherent patients from 6 clinics in Cape Town completed the LifeWindows Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills ART Adherence Questionnaire, the Substance Abuse and Mental Illness Symptoms Screener and the Structural Barriers to Clinic Attendance (SBCA) and Medication-taking (SBMT) scales. Overall, information-related barriers were reported most frequently followed by motivation and behaviour skill defects. Structural barriers were reported least frequently. Logistic regression analyses revealed that gender, behaviour skill deficit scores, SBCA scores and SBMT scores predicted non-adherence. Despite the experience of structural barriers being reported least frequently, structural barriers to medication-taking had the greatest impact on adherence (OR: 2.32, 95% CI: 1.73 to 3.12), followed by structural barriers to clinic attendance (OR: 2.06, 95% CI: 1.58 to 2.69) and behaviour skill deficits (OR: 1.34, 95% CI: 1.05 to 1.71). Our data indicate the need for policy directed at the creation of a health-enabling environment that would enhance the likelihood of adherence among antiretroviral therapy users. Specifically, patient empowerment strategies aimed at increasing treatment literacy and management skills should be strengthened. Attempts to reduce structural barriers to antiretroviral treatment adherence should be expanded to include increased access to mental health care services and nutrition support. PMID:25559444

  3. Antiretroviral therapy initiation and adherence in rural South Africa: community health workers' perspectives on barriers and facilitators.

    PubMed

    Loeliger, Kelsey B; Niccolai, Linda M; Mtungwa, Lillian N; Moll, Anthony; Shenoi, Sheela V

    2016-08-01

    South Africa has the largest global HIV/AIDS epidemic, but barriers along the HIV care continuum prevent patients from initiating and adhering to antiretroviral therapy (ART). To qualitatively explore reasons for poor ART initiation and adherence rates from the unique perspective of community health workers (CHWs), we conducted focus groups during May-August 2014 with 21 CHWs in rural Msinga, KwaZulu-Natal. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and translated from Zulu into English. Hybrid deductive and inductive analytical methods were applied to identify emergent themes. Multiple psychosocial, socioeconomic, and socio-medical barriers acted at the level of the individual, social network, broader community, and healthcare environment to simultaneously hinder initiation of and adherence to ART. Key themes included insufficient patient education and social support, patient dissatisfaction with healthcare services, socioeconomic factors, and tension between ART and alternative medicine. Fear of lifelong therapy thwarted initiation whereas substance abuse principally impeded adherence. In conclusion, HIV/AIDS management requires patient counselling and support extending beyond initial diagnosis. Treating HIV/AIDS as a chronic rather than acute infectious disease is key to improving ART initiation and long-term adherence. Public health strategies include expanding CHWs' roles to strengthen healthcare services, provide longitudinal patient support, and foster collaboration with alternative medicine providers. PMID:27043077

  4. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy Among Children Living with HIV in South India.

    PubMed

    Mehta, K; Ekstrand, M L; Heylen, E; Sanjeeva, G N; Shet, A

    2016-05-01

    Adherence to ART, fundamental to treatment success, has been poorly studied in India. Caregivers of children attending HIV clinics in southern India were interviewed using structured questionnaires. Adherence was assessed using a visual analogue scale representing past-month adherence and treatment interruptions >48 h during the past 3 months. Clinical features, correlates of adherence and HIV-1 viral-load were documented. Based on caregiver reports, 90.9 % of the children were optimally adherent. In multivariable analysis, experiencing ART-related adverse effects was significantly associated with suboptimal adherence (p = 0.01). The proportion of children who experienced virological failure was 16.5 %. Virological failure was not linked to suboptimal adherence. Factors influencing virological failure included running out of medications (p = 0.002) and the child refusing to take medications (p = 0.01). Inclusion of drugs with better safety profiles and improved access to care could further enhance outcomes. PMID:26443264

  5. Prevalence and determinants of adherence to HAART amongst PLHIV in a tertiary health facility in south-south Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adherence to Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is a major predictor of the success of HIV/AIDS treatment. Good adherence to HAART is necessary to achieve the best virologic response, lower the risk of drug resistance and reduce morbidity and mortality. This study therefore aimed to determine the prevalence and determinants of adherence to HAART amongst PLHIV accessing treatment in a tertiary location in Cross River State, Nigeria. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among patients on HAART attending the Presidential Emergency plan for AIDS relief (PEPFAR) clinic of the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital between October–December 2011. A total of 411 PLHIV visiting the study site during the study period were interviewed. PLHIV who met the inclusion criteria were consecutively recruited into the study till the desired sample size was attained. Information was obtained from participants using a semi-structured, pretested, interviewer administered questionnaire. Adherence was measured via patients self report and were termed adherent if they took at least 95% of prescribed medication in the previous week prior to the study. Data were summarized using proportions, and χ2 test was used to explore associations between categorical variables. Predictors of adherence to HAART were determined by binary logistic regression. Level of significance was set at p < 0.05. Results The mean age of PLHIV who accessed treatment was 35.7 ± 9.32 years. Females constituted 68.6% of all participants. The self reported adherence rate based on a one week recall prior to the study was 59.9%. The major reasons cited by respondents for skipping doses were operating a busy schedule, simply forgot medications, felt depressed, and travelling out of town. On logistic regression analysis, perceived improved health status [OR 3.11; CI: 1.58-6.11], reduced pill load [OR 1.25; 95% CI: 0.46-2.72] and non-use of herbal remedies [OR 1.83; 95% CI: 1

  6. Increasing Antiretroviral Adherence for HIV-Positive African Americans (Project Rise): A Treatment Education Intervention Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bogart, Laura M; Mutchler, Matt G; McDavitt, Bryce; Mutepfa, Kieta D; Risley, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV-positive African Americans have been shown to have lower adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) than those of other races/ethnicities, yet adherence interventions have rarely been tailored to the needs of this population. Objective We developed and will evaluate a treatment education adherence intervention (called Rise) that was culturally adapted to address the needs of African Americans living with HIV. Methods This randomized controlled trial will examine the effects of the Rise intervention on ART adherence and HIV viral load. African Americans on ART who report adherence problems will be recruited from the community and randomly assigned to receive the intervention or usual care for 6 months. The intervention consists of 6-10 individual counseling sessions, with more sessions provided to those who demonstrate lower adherence. Primary outcomes include adherence as monitored continuously with Medication Event Monitoring Systems (MEMS) caps, and viral load data received from the participant’s medical provider. Survey assessments will be administered at baseline and month 6. Results The trial is ongoing. Conclusions If effective, the Rise intervention will provide community-based organizations with an intervention tailored to address the needs of African Americans for promoting optimal ART adherence and HIV clinical outcomes. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01350544; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01350544 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6fjqqnmn0). PMID:27025399

  7. Shortcomings of adherence counselling provided to caregivers of children receiving antiretroviral therapy in rural South Africa.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Bronwyne; Kagee, Ashraf; Bland, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    In order to achieve optimal benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), caregivers of children receiving ART are required to attend routine clinic visits monthly and administer medication to the child as prescribed. Yet, the level of adherence to these behaviours varies considerably in many settings. As a way to achieve optimal adherence in rural KwaZulu-Natal, caregivers are required to attend routine counselling sessions at HIV treatment clinics that are centred on imparting information, motivation, and behavioural skills related to medication administration. According to the information-motivation-behavioural skills model, information related to adherence, motivation, and behavioural skills are necessary and fundamental determinants of adherence to ART. The purpose of the study was to observe and document the content of adherence counselling sessions that caregivers attending rural clinics in KwaZulu Natal receive. We observed 25 adherence counselling sessions, which lasted on average 8.1 minutes. Counselling typically consisted of counsellors recording patient attendance, reporting CD4 count and viral load results to caregivers, emphasising dose times, and asking caregivers to name their medications and dosage amounts. Patients were seldom asked to demonstrate how they measure the medication. They were also not probed for problems regarding treatment, even when an unsuppressed VL was reported to a caregiver. This paper calls attention to the sub-optimal level of counselling provided to patients on ART and the urgent need to standardise and improve the training, support, and debriefing provided to counsellors. PMID:27392000

  8. Shortcomings of adherence counselling provided to caregivers of children receiving antiretroviral therapy in rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Coetzee, Bronwyne; Kagee, Ashraf; Bland, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to achieve optimal benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), caregivers of children receiving ART are required to attend routine clinic visits monthly and administer medication to the child as prescribed. Yet, the level of adherence to these behaviours varies considerably in many settings. As a way to achieve optimal adherence in rural KwaZulu-Natal, caregivers are required to attend routine counselling sessions at HIV treatment clinics that are centred on imparting information, motivation, and behavioural skills related to medication administration. According to the information-motivation-behavioural skills model, information related to adherence, motivation, and behavioural skills are necessary and fundamental determinants of adherence to ART. The purpose of the study was to observe and document the content of adherence counselling sessions that caregivers attending rural clinics in KwaZulu Natal receive. We observed 25 adherence counselling sessions, which lasted on average 8.1 minutes. Counselling typically consisted of counsellors recording patient attendance, reporting CD4 count and viral load results to caregivers, emphasising dose times, and asking caregivers to name their medications and dosage amounts. Patients were seldom asked to demonstrate how they measure the medication. They were also not probed for problems regarding treatment, even when an unsuppressed VL was reported to a caregiver. This paper calls attention to the sub-optimal level of counselling provided to patients on ART and the urgent need to standardise and improve the training, support, and debriefing provided to counsellors. PMID:27392000

  9. Does treatment collection and observation each day keep the patient away? An analysis of the determinants of adherence among patients with Tuberculosis in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Birch, Stephen; Govender, Veloshnee; Fried, Jana; Eyles, John; Daries, Vanessa; Moshabela, Mosa; Cleary, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Directly observed treatment short course (DOTS) has been the recommended strategy for Tuberculosis (TB) control since 1995. Developed as an alternative to inpatient treatment, it involves observation of patients' medication intake to promote adherence. However, the burden of daily clinic visits may affect access to care. Using a mixed methods approach, we consider whether (1) non-adherence differs systematically between patients required to make daily clinic visits and patients cared for under less frequent clinic visits and (2) the association between frequency of required clinic visits and adherence depends on affordability and acceptability of care. Data were collected in facility exit interviews with 1200 TB patients in two rural and two urban sub-districts in South Africa. Additionally, 17 in-depth interviews were completed with TB patients. After controlling for socioeconomic and demographic factors, patient type (new or retreatment) and treatment duration, regression analyses showed that daily attending patients were over twice as likely to report a missed clinic visit (P < 0.001) or a missed dose of treatment (P = 0.002) compared with patients required to attend clinics for treatment collection less frequently. Missed visits increased with treatment duration (P = 0.01). The significant interaction between clinic visit frequency and treatment duration indicated that sustaining daily visits over time may become increasingly difficult over the course of treatment. The qualitative analysis identified treatment cost and duration, patients' physical condition and varying social contexts (family, community and work) as important influences on adherence. These findings suggest that strategies involving daily clinic visits may require reconsideration if resources for TB care are to be used efficiently. The adoption of approaches that place patient interests at the centre of TB treatment delivery would appear to be of high priority, particularly in

  10. Improving medication adherence for severely mentally ill adults by decreasing coercion and increasing cooperation.

    PubMed

    Danzer, Graham; Rieger, Sarah M

    2016-01-01

    Severe mental illnesses, mainly schizophrenia and bipolar disorders, often go untreated until the afflicted persons become dangerous to themselves or others. In such states, they must be hospitalized and medicated, often involuntarily due to the stigma and low insight into need for treatment that can be considered characteristic of severe illnesses. Hospitalization and medications can help the mentally ill stabilize. But these options also can have a demoralizing effect on future engagement with providers. Accordingly, the process of involuntary hospitalization and medication treatment must be maximally dignified and respectful of patient autonomy, within the limits of manifest illnesses. Literature that was reviewed and synthesized suggests best practice strategies for helping involuntary mentally ill patients grow into voluntary consumers of medication. In turn, risk of relapse is lowered and quality of life is enhanced. Best practice strategies included decreasing usage of coercive tactics, helping patients cope with medication side effects, and emphasizing the necessity of family involvement. The authors conclude with a review of the limitations of arguing for involuntary hospitalization and treatment as restoring patient autonomy, along with implications for future practice focusing on increasing the medication adherence of severely mentally ill populations. PMID:27028337

  11. Masivukeni: Development of a Multimedia Based Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence Intervention for Counselors and Patients in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Remien, Robert H; Mellins, Claude A.; Robbins, Reuben N.; Kelsey, Ryan; Rowe, Jessica; Warne, Patricia; Chowdhury, Jenifar; Lalkhen, Nuruneesa; Hoppe, Lara; Abrams, Elaine J.; El-Bassel, Nabila; Witte, Susan; Stein, Dan J.

    2013-01-01

    Effective medical treatment for HIV/AIDS requires patients’ optimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). In resource-constrained settings, lack of adequate standardized counseling for patients on ART remains a significant barrier to adherence. Masivukeni (“Lets Wake Up” in Xhosa) is an innovative multimedia-based intervention designed to help people living with HIV in resource-limited settings achieve and maintain high levels of ART adherence. Adapted from a couples-based intervention tested in the United States (US), Masivukeni was developed through community-based participatory research with US and South African partners and informed by Ewart’s Social Action Theory. Innovative computer-based multimedia strategies were used to translate a labor- and training-intensive intervention into one that could be readily and widely used by lay counselors with relatively little training with low-literacy patients. In this paper, we describe the foundations of this new intervention, the process of its development, and the evidence of its high acceptability and feasibility. PMID:23468079

  12. Developing and Evaluating an Individually-Tailored Intervention to Increase Mammography Adherence among Chinese American women

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tsu-Yin; Lin, Chiuman

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast cancer consistently is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second most common cause of cancer mortality among Asian Americans in the U.S. The incidence of breast cancer in Asian American women has been increasing at a much higher rate than that of White women. Objectives A randomized control single blind study was conducted comparing the efficacy of an individually-tailored telephone counseling and NCI brochure. Methods The sample consisted of 193 Chinese American women with no breast cancer history. The participants were randomly assigned to either intervention or control group. Self-reported data that included demographic variables, knowledge, beliefs, and screening behaviors were collected at baseline and 4 months. Results The intervention group had increased screening to 40% compared with 33% for the control group at 4 months; the difference was not statistically significant. When the sub-analyses were performed, the intervention is effective in certain demographic groups (i.e., elderly women age 65 and older and recent immigrants). The study intervention was well accepted by participants and perceived as feasible and culturally appropriate based on process evaluation. Conclusions The study also demonstrates the feasibility of recruiting and retaining eligible women to participate, and the results show that both study intervention and printed materials increase awareness of the importance of breast cancer screening and screening behaviors for Chinese American women Implications for Practice Oncology nurses and advanced practice nurses can play critical roles on this medically-underserved population that experiences disparities in breast cancer mortality by providing culturally-appropriate counseling to promote screening adherence. PMID:24621965

  13. Cost-Effectiveness of Patient Navigation to Increase Adherence with Screening Colonoscopy Among Minority Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Ladabaum, Uri; Mannalithara, Ajitha; Jandorf, Lina; Itzkowitz, Steven H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is underutilized by minority populations. Patient navigation increases adherence with screening colonoscopy. We estimated the cost-effectiveness of navigation for screening colonoscopy from the perspective of a payer seeking to improve population health. Methods We informed our validated model of CRC screening with inputs from navigation studies in New York City (population 43% African American, 49% Hispanic, 4% White, 4% Other; base case screening 40% without and 65% with navigation, navigation costs $29/colonoscopy completer, $21/non-completer, $3/non-navigated). We compared: 1) navigation vs. no navigation for one-time screening colonoscopy in unscreened persons age ≥50; 2) programs of colonoscopy with vs. without navigation, vs. fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) or immunochemical testing (FIT) for ages 50-80. Results In the base case: 1) one-time navigation gained quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and decreased costs; 2) longitudinal navigation cost $9,800/QALY gained vs. no navigation, and assuming comparable uptake rates, it cost $118,700/QALY gained vs. FOBT, but was less effective and more costly than FIT. Results were most dependent on screening participation rates and navigation costs: 1) assuming a 5% increase in screening uptake with navigation and navigation cost of $150/completer, one-time navigation cost $26,400/QALY gained; 2) longitudinal navigation with 75% colonoscopy uptake cost <$25,000/QALY gained vs. FIT when FIT uptake was <50%. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses did not alter the conclusions. Conclusions Navigation for screening colonoscopy appears to be cost-effective, and one-time navigation may be cost-saving. In emerging healthcare models that reward outcomes, payers should consider covering the costs of navigation for screening colonoscopy. PMID:25492455

  14. A family group approach to increasing adherence to therapy in HIV-infected youths: results of a pilot project.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Maureen E; Trexler, Connie; Akpan-Townsend, Carleen; Pao, Maryland; Selden, Keith; Fletcher, Jean; Addlestone, Irene C; D'Angelo, Lawrence J

    2003-06-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel, pilot program in which a combined family group and peer approach were used to increase adherence to antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected youths. Twenty-three HIV-positive youths, 15-22 years of age and 23 family members or "treatment buddies" participated in one of three 12-week programs. The intervention had six biweekly family and youth education sessions and six biweekly youth-only education sessions. Devices to increase adherence to antiretroviral therapy such as pill boxes, calendars, and watch alarms were introduced at youth-only sessions. Eighteen of the 23 youths completed a group. Ninety-one percent of youths self-reported increased adherence to medications after completion of a group. Four participants experienced a one-log reduction in viral loads to undetectable levels during the intervention. Two participants continued to decline antiretroviral medications at the end of the intervention and demonstrated no decrease in viral load. Participants tested five devices and rated the multiple alarm watch as the best aid for improving adherence to medication. Family/treatment buddies rated the overall program as highly helpful, citing social support as most valuable. An unanticipated benefit was an increase in other health behaviors, including medical and dental appointments, hepatitis B and influenza immunizations, and referrals to mental health and substance abuse treatment. PMID:12880493

  15. Individualised motivational counselling to enhance adherence to antiretroviral therapy is not superior to didactic counselling in South African patients: Findings of the CAPRISA 058 randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    van Loggerenberg, Francois; Grant, Alison D.; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Murrman, Marita; Gengiah, Santhanalakshmi; Gengiah, Tanuja N.; Fielding, Katherine; Karim, Salim S. Abdool

    2014-01-01

    Concerns that standard didactic adherence counselling may be inadequate to maximise antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence led us to evaluate more intensive individualised motivational adherence counselling. We randomised 297 HIV-positive ART-naïve patients in Durban, South Africa, to receive either didactic counselling, prior to ART initiation (n=150), or an intensive motivational adherence intervention after initiating ART (n=147). Study arms were similar for age (mean 35.8 years), sex (43.1% male), CD4+ cell count (median 121.5 cells/μl) and viral load (median 119 000 copies/ml). Virologic suppression at nine months was achieved in 89.8% of didactic and 87.9% of motivational counselling participants (risk ratio [RR] 0.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.90-1.07, p=0.62). 82.9% of didactic and 79.5% of motivational counselling participants achieved >95% adherence by pill count at six months (RR 0.96, 95%CI 0.85-1.09, p=0.51). Participants receiving intensive motivational counselling did not achieve higher treatment adherence or virological suppression than those receiving routinely provided didactic adherence counselling. These data are reassuring that less resource intensive didactic counselling was adequate for excellent treatment outcomes in this setting. PMID:24696226

  16. Individualised motivational counselling to enhance adherence to antiretroviral therapy is not superior to didactic counselling in South African patients: findings of the CAPRISA 058 randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van Loggerenberg, Francois; Grant, Alison D; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Murrman, Marita; Gengiah, Santhanalakshmi; Gengiah, Tanuja N; Fielding, Katherine; Abdool Karim, Salim S

    2015-01-01

    Concerns that standard didactic adherence counselling may be inadequate to maximise antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence led us to evaluate more intensive individualised motivational adherence counselling. We randomised 297 HIV-positive ART-naïve patients in Durban, South Africa, to receive either didactic counselling, prior to ART initiation (n = 150), or an intensive motivational adherence intervention after initiating ART (n = 147). Study arms were similar for age (mean 35.8 years), sex (43.1 % male), CD4+ cell count (median 121.5 cells/μl) and viral load (median 119,000 copies/ml). Virologic suppression at 9 months was achieved in 89.8 % of didactic and 87.9 % of motivational counselling participants (risk ratio [RR] 0.98, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.90-1.07, p = 0.62). 82.9 % of didactic and 79.5 % of motivational counselling participants achieved >95 % adherence by pill count at 6 months (RR 0.96, 95 % CI 0.85-1.09, p = 0.51). Participants receiving intensive motivational counselling did not achieve higher treatment adherence or virological suppression than those receiving routinely provided didactic adherence counselling. These data are reassuring that less resource intensive didactic counselling was adequate for excellent treatment outcomes in this setting. PMID:24696226

  17. Increasing Prescription Length Could Cut Cardiovascular Disease Burden And Produce Savings In South Africa.

    PubMed

    Gaziano, Thomas; Cho, Sylvia; Sy, Stephen; Pandya, Ankur; Levitt, Naomi S; Steyn, Krisela

    2015-09-01

    South Africa's rates of statin use are among the world's lowest, despite statins' demonstrated effectiveness for people with a high blood cholesterol level or history of cardiovascular disease. Almost 5 percent of the country's total mortality has been attributed to high cholesterol levels, fueled in part by low levels of statin adherence. Drawing upon experience elsewhere, we used a microsimulation model of cardiovascular disease to investigate the health and economic impacts of increasing prescription length from the standard thirty days to either sixty or ninety days, for South African adults on a stable statin regimen. Increasing prescription length to sixty or ninety days could save 1,694 or 2,553 lives per million adults, respectively. In addition, annual per patient costs related to cardiovascular disease would decrease by $152.41 and $210.29, respectively. Savings would largely accrue to patients in the form of time savings and reduced transportation costs, as a result of less frequent trips to the pharmacy. Increasing statin prescription length would both save resources and improve health outcomes in South Africa. PMID:26355061

  18. NLRP3 protects alveolar barrier integrity by an inflammasome-independent increase of epithelial cell adherence

    PubMed Central

    Kostadinova, Elena; Chaput, Catherine; Gutbier, Birgitt; Lippmann, Juliane; Sander, Leif E.; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin; Opitz, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, characterized by alveolar barrier disruption. NLRP3 is best known for its ability to form inflammasomes and to regulate IL-1β and IL-18 production in myeloid cells. Here we show that NLRP3 protects the integrity of the alveolar barrier in a mouse model of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced pneumonia, and ex vivo upon treatment of isolated perfused and ventilated lungs with the purified bacterial toxin, pneumolysin. We reveal that the preserving effect of NLRP3 on the lung barrier is independent of inflammasomes, IL-1β and IL-18. NLRP3 improves the integrity of alveolar epithelial cell monolayers by enhancing cellular adherence. Collectively, our study uncovers a novel function of NLRP3 by demonstrating that it protects epithelial barrier function independently of inflammasomes. PMID:27476670

  19. NLRP3 protects alveolar barrier integrity by an inflammasome-independent increase of epithelial cell adherence.

    PubMed

    Kostadinova, Elena; Chaput, Catherine; Gutbier, Birgitt; Lippmann, Juliane; Sander, Leif E; Mitchell, Timothy J; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin; Opitz, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, characterized by alveolar barrier disruption. NLRP3 is best known for its ability to form inflammasomes and to regulate IL-1β and IL-18 production in myeloid cells. Here we show that NLRP3 protects the integrity of the alveolar barrier in a mouse model of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced pneumonia, and ex vivo upon treatment of isolated perfused and ventilated lungs with the purified bacterial toxin, pneumolysin. We reveal that the preserving effect of NLRP3 on the lung barrier is independent of inflammasomes, IL-1β and IL-18. NLRP3 improves the integrity of alveolar epithelial cell monolayers by enhancing cellular adherence. Collectively, our study uncovers a novel function of NLRP3 by demonstrating that it protects epithelial barrier function independently of inflammasomes. PMID:27476670

  20. Realist evaluation of the antiretroviral treatment adherence club programme in selected primary healthcare facilities in the metropolitan area of Western Cape Province, South Africa: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Mukumbang, Ferdinand C; Van Belle, Sara; Marchal, Bruno; Van Wyk, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Suboptimal retention in care and poor treatment adherence are key challenges to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa. Community-based approaches to HIV service delivery are recommended to improve patient retention in care and ART adherence. The implementation of the adherence clubs in the Western Cape province of South Africa was with variable success in terms of implementation and outcomes. The need for operational guidelines for its implementation has been identified. Therefore, understanding the contexts and mechanisms for successful implementation of the adherence clubs is crucial to inform the roll-out to the rest of South Africa. The protocol outlines an evaluation of adherence club intervention in selected primary healthcare facilities in the metropolitan area of the Western Cape Province, using the realist approach. Methods and analysis In the first phase, an exploratory study design will be used. Document review and key informant interviews will be used to elicit the programme theory. In phase two, a multiple case study design will be used to describe the adherence clubs in five contrastive sites. Semistructured interviews will be conducted with purposively selected programme implementers and members of the clubs to assess the context and mechanisms of the adherence clubs. For the programme's primary outcomes, a longitudinal retrospective cohort analysis will be conducted using routine patient data. Data analysis will involve classifying emerging themes using the context-mechanism-outcome (CMO) configuration, and refining the primary CMO configurations to conjectured CMO configurations. Finally, we will compare the conjectured CMO configurations from the cases with the initial programme theory. The final CMOs obtained will be translated into middle range theories. Ethics and dissemination The study will be conducted according to the principles of the declaration of Helsinki (1964). Ethics clearance was obtained from the

  1. How to Evaluate Health-Related Quality of Life and Its Association with Medication Adherence in Pulmonary Tuberculosis – Designing a Prospective Observational Study in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kastien-Hilka, Tanja; Rosenkranz, Bernd; Bennett, Bryan; Sinanovic, Edina; Schwenkglenks, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has become an important measure to identify and shape effective and patient-relevant healthcare interventions innovations through outcomes. Adherence to tuberculosis (TB) treatment is a public health concern. The main objective of this research is to develop a study design for evaluation of HRQOL and its association with medication adherence in TB in South Africa. Methodology: A conceptual framework for HRQOL in TB has been developed to identify Patient-Reported Outcomes and Quality of Life Database (PROQOLID), (n.d.) measures for HRQOL and adherence and to generate an endpoint model. Two generic (SF-12 and EQ-5D-5L), one disease-specific (St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire) and one condition-specific (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) measure for HRQOL and Morisky Medication Adherence Scale for adherence assessment were identified. All measures are applied in a longitudinal multi-center study at five data collection time points during standard TB treatment. Statistical analysis includes multivariable analysis. Change over time in the physical component score of SF-12 is defined as primary endpoint. Sample size estimation based thereupon has led to a recruitment target of 96 patients. This study is on-going. Discussion: This is the first longitudinal study in South Africa which evaluates HRQOL and its association with medication adherence in TB in a comprehensive manner. Results will help to improve current treatment programs and medication adherence and will support the identification of sustainable health innovations in TB, determining the value of new products, and supporting decision making with regard to health policy and pricing. PMID:27303294

  2. TB tracer teams in South Africa: knowledge, practices and challenges of tracing TB patients to improve adherence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2008–2009 the South African National Tuberculosis (TB) Program (NTP) implemented a national pilot project, the TB Tracer Project, aiming to decrease default rates and improve patient outcomes. The current study aimed to inform the NTP by describing the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of TB program personnel involved with tracing activities. Methods A self-administered written questionnaire was sent to TB staff, managers and tracer team leaders to assess basic TB knowledge, attitudes and practices. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize results and the chi-squared statistic was used to compare responses of staff at facilities that participated in the TB Tracer Project (tracer) and those that followed standard NTP care (non-tracer). Results Of 560 total questionnaires distributed, 270 were completed and returned (response rate 48%). Total TB knowledge ranged from 70.8-86.3% correct across all response groups. However, just over half (range 50–59.3%) of each respondent group was able to correctly identify the four components of a DOT encounter. A patient no longer feeling sick was cited by 72.1% of respondents as the reason patients fail to adhere to treatment. Tracer teams were viewed as an effective means to get patients to return to treatment by 96.3% of health facility level respondents. Tracer team leaders reported concerns including lack of logistical support (41.7%), insufficient physical safety precautions (41.7%), and inadequate protection from contracting TB (39.1%). Upon patients returning to treatment at the clinic, facilities included in the TB Tracer Project were significantly more likely to discuss alternate DOTS arrangements than non-tracer facilities (79.2 vs. 66.4%, p = 0.03). Conclusions This study identified key components of knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding TB patient tracing activities in South Africa. Educating patients on the essential need to complete treatment irrespective of clinical symptoms may

  3. Understanding Specific Contexts of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in Rural South Africa: A Thematic Analysis of Digital Stories from a Community with High HIV Prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Treffry-Goatley, Astrid; Lessells, Richard; Sykes, Pam; Bärnighausen, Till; de Oliveira, Tulio; Moletsane, Relebohile; Seeley, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Near-perfect adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is required to achieve the best possible prevention and treatment outcomes. Yet, there have been particular concerns about the challenges of adherence among patients living in resource-limited settings in sub-Saharan Africa. The primary objective of this study was to explore adherence in a low-resourced, rural community of high HIV prevalence in South Africa and to identify specific individual and structural factors that can either challenge or support adherence in this context. We applied digital stories as a qualitative research tool to gain insights into personal contexts of HIV and ART adherence. Through an inductive thematic analysis of twenty story texts, soundtracks and drawings, we explored experiences, understandings, and contexts of the participants and identified potential barriers and facilitators for those on lifelong treatment. We found that many of the stories reflected a growing confidence in the effectiveness of ART, which should be viewed as a key facilitator to successful adherence since this attitude can promote disclosure and boost access to social support. Nevertheless, stories also highlighted the complexity of the issues that individuals and households face as they deal with HIV and ART in this setting and it is clear that an overburdened local healthcare system has often struggled to meet the demands of a rapidly expanding epidemic and to provide the necessary medical and emotional support. Our analysis suggests several opportunities for further research and the design of novel health interventions to support optimal adherence. Firstly, future health promotion campaigns should encourage individuals to test together, or at least accompany each other for testing, to encourage social support from the outset. Additionally, home-based testing and ART club interventions might be recommended to make it easier for individuals to adhere to their treatment regimens and to provide a sense of

  4. Understanding Specific Contexts of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in Rural South Africa: A Thematic Analysis of Digital Stories from a Community with High HIV Prevalence.

    PubMed

    Treffry-Goatley, Astrid; Lessells, Richard; Sykes, Pam; Bärnighausen, Till; de Oliveira, Tulio; Moletsane, Relebohile; Seeley, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Near-perfect adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is required to achieve the best possible prevention and treatment outcomes. Yet, there have been particular concerns about the challenges of adherence among patients living in resource-limited settings in sub-Saharan Africa. The primary objective of this study was to explore adherence in a low-resourced, rural community of high HIV prevalence in South Africa and to identify specific individual and structural factors that can either challenge or support adherence in this context. We applied digital stories as a qualitative research tool to gain insights into personal contexts of HIV and ART adherence. Through an inductive thematic analysis of twenty story texts, soundtracks and drawings, we explored experiences, understandings, and contexts of the participants and identified potential barriers and facilitators for those on lifelong treatment. We found that many of the stories reflected a growing confidence in the effectiveness of ART, which should be viewed as a key facilitator to successful adherence since this attitude can promote disclosure and boost access to social support. Nevertheless, stories also highlighted the complexity of the issues that individuals and households face as they deal with HIV and ART in this setting and it is clear that an overburdened local healthcare system has often struggled to meet the demands of a rapidly expanding epidemic and to provide the necessary medical and emotional support. Our analysis suggests several opportunities for further research and the design of novel health interventions to support optimal adherence. Firstly, future health promotion campaigns should encourage individuals to test together, or at least accompany each other for testing, to encourage social support from the outset. Additionally, home-based testing and ART club interventions might be recommended to make it easier for individuals to adhere to their treatment regimens and to provide a sense of

  5. Late 20th Century increase in South Pole snow accumulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosley-Thompson, E.; Paskievitch, J.F.; Gow, A.J.; Thompson, L.G.

    1999-01-01

    A compilation of the 37-year history of net accumulation at the South Pole [Mosley-Thompson et al., 1995] suggests an increase in net annual accumulation since 1965. This record is sporadic and its quality is compromised by spatially restricted observations and nonsystematic measurement procedures. Results from a new, spatially extensive network of 236 accumulation poles document that the current 5-year (1992-1997) average annual net accumulation at the South Pole is 84.5??8.9 mm water equivalent (w.e.). This accumulation rate reflects a 30% increase since the 1960s when the best, although not optimal, records indicate that it was 65 mm w.e. Identification of two prominent beta radioactivity horizons (1954/1955 and 1964/1965) in six firn cores confirms an increase in accumulation since 1965. Viewed from a longer perspective of accumulation provided by ice cores and a snow mine study, the net accumulation of the 30-year period, 1965-1994, is the highest 30-year average of this millennium. Limited data suggest this recent accumulation increase extends beyond the South Pole region and may be characteristic of the high East Antarctic Plateau. Enhanced accumulation over the polar ice sheets has been identified as a potential early indicator of warmer sea surface temperatures and may offset a portion of the current rise in global sea level. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Randomized trial of DVD, telephone, and usual care for increasing mammography adherence.

    PubMed

    Champion, Victoria L; Rawl, Susan M; Bourff, Sara A; Champion, Kristen M; Smith, Lisa G; Buchanan, Adam H; Fish, Laura J; Monahan, Patrick O; Stump, Timothy E; Springston, Jeffery K; Gathirua-Mwangi, Wambui G; Skinner, Celette Sugg

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to test an intervention to increase mammography screening in women 51-75 years of age who had not received a mammogram in the last 15 months. A total of 1681 women were randomized to (1) a mailed tailored interactive DVD, (2) a computer-tailored telephone counseling, or (3) usual care. Women with income below US$75,000 who were in the interactive DVD group had significantly more mammograms than women in usual care. Women with income above US$75,000 had significantly fewer mammograms than women with income less than US$75,000 regardless of group. Further investigation is needed to understand why women with income above US$75,000 did not show the same benefit of the intervention. PMID:25070967

  7. Assessing the reporting of adherence and sexual activity in a simulated microbicide trial in South Africa: an interview mode experiment using a placebo gel.

    PubMed

    Mensch, Barbara S; Hewett, Paul C; Abbott, Sharon; Rankin, Johanna; Littlefield, Sarah; Ahmed, Khatija; Cassim, Nazira; Patel, Smruti; Ramjee, Gita; Palanee, Thesla; Mierzwa, Stan; Skoler-Karpoff, Stephanie

    2011-02-01

    Misreporting of adherence undermines detection of an association between product use and HIV infection in microbicide trials. This study investigates whether, in a placebo trial, audio computer-assisted self-interviewing (ACASI) produces more accurate reporting of adherence and sexual behavior than a face-to-face interview (FTFI). At three South African clinics, 849 women were enrolled and instructed to use applicators filled with placebo gel; participants were randomly assigned to FTFI or ACASI. Behavioral reports were validated through two biomarkers that detect product usage and unprotected sex. For most behaviors, ACASI generated significantly higher reporting, although differences by interview mode appeared to diminish over time. ACASI participants were more likely to report having had sex without gel, but reported and tested applicators did not indicate greater honesty about gel insertion with ACASI. While comparisons of reported unprotected sex with the validated biomarker revealed more agreement with ACASI than with FTFI, differences were small. PMID:20886278

  8. Adherence to intermittent preventive treatment for malaria with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine and outcome of pregnancy among parturients in South East Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Onyebuchi, Azubike Kanario; Lawani, Lucky Osaheni; Iyoke, Chukwuemeka Anthony; Onoh, Chukwudi Robinson; Okeke, Nwabunike Ekene

    2014-01-01

    Background Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria for pregnant women (IPTp) is a very important strategy for the control of malaria in pregnancy in malaria-endemic tropical countries, where mosquito bites easily occur during evening outdoor activities. Issues related to provision, cost, and acceptability may affect the use of IPTp in some developing countries. The aim of the study was to assess the uptake and adherence to sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine-based intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy and the relationship of IPTp use to pregnancy outcomes in two major obstetric centers in South East Nigeria. Methods This was a prospective descriptive study involving women who received antenatal and delivery services. All recruited women were followed-up from booking until delivery, and statistical analysis was done with Epi Info version 7. Results A total of 516 parturients were studied. The mean gestational age at booking was 21.8±6.9 weeks while the mean number of antenatal visits throughout the pregnancy was 5.5±3.1. The rate of uptake of at least one dose of prescribed IPTp was 72.1% (367/516). Of the 367 who took prescribed IPTp, adherence to second doses of IPTp was 59.7% (219/367), and only 4.9% (18/367) took a third dose. Clinical malaria occurred in 85% (127/149) of women who did not receive IPTp at all compared to 20.5% of those who received at least one dose of IPTp. All those who had clinical malaria despite IPTp had only one dose of IPTp despite booking in the second trimester. Malaria in pregnancy occurred significantly more in women who failed to adhere to subsequent doses of IPTp than in those who adhered (24.6% versus 14.3%, respectively; risk ratio =2.5; 95% confidence interval 2.1, 3.0; P<0.001). Similarly, neonatal malaria occurred significantly more in neonates whose mothers did not receive IPTp compared to those whose mothers received at least one dose of IPTp (7.4% versus 3.4%; risk ratio =1.4; 95% confidence interval 0

  9. Predictors of warfarin non-adherence in younger adults after valve replacement surgery in the South Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sheyab, Nihaya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Globally, mechanical valves are predominant as replacements for adolescents and younger adults with rheumatic heart disease (RHD). Mechanical valve implantation necessitates lifelong antithrombotic management (warfarin) and associated lifestyle modification, with event-free survival largely dependent on international normalised therapeutic ratios (INRs) remaining within the target therapeutic range. There is limited information on factors that may influence warfarin adherence among younger people or those in resource-limited settings. This study sought to identify predictors of warfarin adherence after valve replacement surgery for RHD in Fiji (n=127). Methods A cross-sectional study design was used. Results The sample had a mean age of 31.23 years (SD 13.34) and a mean time-since-surgery of 3.72 years (SD 3.95). Just over half were women (n=71, 56%) and almost two-thirds were indigenous (I-taukei, n=78, 61%). Most had an isolated valve procedure (n=94, 74%) and at the time of survey, they were in New York Heart Association Class I (n=97, 76%). A quarter (n=33, 26%) reported poor adherence with anticoagulation therapy and 13.38% (n=17) reported complete warfarin cessation. While younger age was significantly associated with non-adherence to warfarin therapy (p=0.008), the independent predictors of people who discontinue warfarin completely were those not understanding why warfarin was needed (OR=9.97, p=0.006); a history of forgetting to take warfarin (OR=8.64, p=0.0013) and travel time to heart clinic >1 hour (OR=5.80, p=0.039). Conclusions While medication adherence is complex and multifactorial, the consequences of warfarin non-adherence are potentially catastrophic. These results provide an important first step towards the development of country-specific and disease-specific strategies to improve warfarin adherence. PMID:27347009

  10. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV and AIDS patients at the Kwa-Thema clinic in Gauteng Province, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Eyassu, Melaku A.; Mbambo-Kekana, Nonceba P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has shown reduction in HIV-related mortality and morbidity in people living with HIV and AIDS. Since high levels of adherence of more than 95.0% is required to achieve effective suppression of viral load, researchers found it important to establish whether people are pursuing what is expected of them. Aim and setting The study was aimed at determining adherence to ART among HIV and AIDS patients at the Kwa-Thema clinic in Gauteng Province Methods Quantitative cross-sectional descriptive design was used. Ethical clearance was sort from MEDUNSA Research Ethics Committee. Validity and reliability were maintained throughout the study. A non-probability systematic sampling was used. Data were collected using administered structured questionnaire, and a total of 290 respondents were involved. Data were analysed using SPSS software version 22. Results The findings indicated that the adherence to ART was 77.0%. Factors that were significantly associated with adherence were gender (χ2 = 3.78, df = 1, p < 0.05), level of education (χ2 = 3.52, df = 3, p = 0.032), co-treatment of HIV and other infections (χ2 = 5.46, df = 4, p = 0.019), ability to follow ART (χ2 = 12.82, df = 1, p = 0.000 < 0.05), and types of antiretroviral drugs. Recommendation The study recommends intensification of health education campaign against stigma and gender discrimination. Providing feedback to patients regarding benefits of ART is important. Conclusion The study concluded that adherence to ART at the Kwa-Thema clinic was sub-optimal (less than 95%) at 77%, but comparable with the adherence levels in other developing countries. PMID:27380858

  11. Preferential adherence to antiretroviral therapy over tuberculosis (TB) treatment: a qualitative study of drug–resistant TB/HIV co–infected patients in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Daftary, Amrita; Padayatchi, Nesri; O’Donnell, Max

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and second–line antituberculosis medications is essential to achieve successful outcomes among individuals co–infected with HIV and multi or extensively drug-resistant TB (M/XDR–TB). In 2012–13, we designed a qualitative study to explore barriers to adherence in KwaZulu–Natal, South Africa. We conducted six focus groups comprising 23 adults receiving treatment for either MDR-TB (n=2) or XDR-TB (n=21); 17 were on concurrent ART. Participants expressed a preference for ART over M/XDR–TB treatment as a result of greater tolerability, lower pill burden, and a commitment to ART. Treatment outcomes and the social morbidity associated with M/XDR-TB, characterised by public notification, stigma, and social isolation, were perceived to be worse than with HIV. Poor communication, low patient involvement, and provider supervision of treatment exacerbated participants’ negative experiences with TB care. To improve adherence, it is critical that new regimens for drug-resistant TB be developed with better efficacy, lower pill burden, and fewer adverse effects. For the first time, such improved regimens are on the horizon. In parallel and equally important is the implementation of a cohesive approach that promotes patient involvement, empowerment, and treatment literacy for HIV and for TB. PMID:25035943

  12. Biosurfactant Produced by Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 Can Increase Adherence and Resistance to Sanitizers on Lettuce Leaves (Lactuca sativa L., cichoraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Eliandra M.; Beilke, Luniele; Kochhann, Marília; Sarzi, Diana H.; Tondo, Eduardo C.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 is an important foodborne pathogen in Southern Brazil and it is able to produce a biosurfactant. However, the importance of this compound for the microorganism is still unknown. This study aimed to investigate the influence of the biosurfactant produced by S. Enteritidis SE86 on adherence to slices of lettuce leaves and on resistance to sanitizers. First, lettuce leaves were inoculated with S. Enteritidis SE86 in order to determine the amount of biosurfactant produced. Subsequently, lettuce leaves were inoculated with S. Enteritidis SE86 with and without the biosurfactant, and the adherence and bacterial resistance to different sanitization methods were evaluated. S. Enteritidis SE86 produced biosurfactant after 16 h (emulsification index of 11 to 52.15 percent, P < 0.05) and showed greater adherence capability and resistance to sanitization methods when the compound was present. The scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that S. Enteritidis was able to adhere, form lumps, and invade the lettuce leaves’ stomata in the presence of the biosurfactant. Results indicated that the biosurfactant produced by S. Enteritidis SE86 contributed to adherence and increased resistance to sanitizers when the microorganism was present on lettuce leaves. PMID:26834727

  13. Biosurfactant Produced by Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 Can Increase Adherence and Resistance to Sanitizers on Lettuce Leaves (Lactuca sativa L., cichoraceae).

    PubMed

    Rossi, Eliandra M; Beilke, Luniele; Kochhann, Marília; Sarzi, Diana H; Tondo, Eduardo C

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 is an important foodborne pathogen in Southern Brazil and it is able to produce a biosurfactant. However, the importance of this compound for the microorganism is still unknown. This study aimed to investigate the influence of the biosurfactant produced by S. Enteritidis SE86 on adherence to slices of lettuce leaves and on resistance to sanitizers. First, lettuce leaves were inoculated with S. Enteritidis SE86 in order to determine the amount of biosurfactant produced. Subsequently, lettuce leaves were inoculated with S. Enteritidis SE86 with and without the biosurfactant, and the adherence and bacterial resistance to different sanitization methods were evaluated. S. Enteritidis SE86 produced biosurfactant after 16 h (emulsification index of 11 to 52.15 percent, P < 0.05) and showed greater adherence capability and resistance to sanitization methods when the compound was present. The scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that S. Enteritidis was able to adhere, form lumps, and invade the lettuce leaves' stomata in the presence of the biosurfactant. Results indicated that the biosurfactant produced by S. Enteritidis SE86 contributed to adherence and increased resistance to sanitizers when the microorganism was present on lettuce leaves. PMID:26834727

  14. Using Propensity to Succeed Modeling to Increase Utilization and Adherence in a Nurse HealthLine Telephone Triage Program.

    PubMed

    Navratil-Strawn, Jessica L; Hawkins, Kevin; Hartley, Stephen K; Wells, Timothy S; Ozminkowski, Ronald J; Migliori, Richard J; Yeh, Charlotte S

    2016-01-01

    Propensity to succeed modeling was used to identify characteristics associated with higher utilization of a telephone triage program and adherence to nurse recommendations among callers. Characteristics significantly associated with calling the telephone triage service and engaging in triage services were being female and having an elevated health risk score. Callers most likely to adhere to nurse recommendations were younger than 85 years of age, had called on a weekday, and had received a recommendation to seek care at an emergency department or a doctor's office visit. Additional analyses suggest the propensity to succeed modeling is stable and valid. PMID:27232680

  15. A Group-Based Mobile Application to Increase Adherence in Exercise and Nutrition Programs: A Factorial Design Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Venkatakrishnan, Anusha; Youngblood, Gregory Michael; Ram, Ashwin; Pirolli, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Novel methods of promoting self-monitoring and social support are needed to ensure long-term maintenance of behavior change. In this paper, we directly investigate the effects of group support in an exercise and nutrition program delivered by an mHealth application called Fittle. Objective Our first specific study aim was to explore whether social support improved adherence in wellness programs. Our second specific study aim was to assess whether media types (ePaper vs mobile) were associated with different levels of compliance and adherence to wellness programs. The third aim was to assess whether the use of an mHealth application led to positive changes to participants’ eating behavior, physical activity, and stress level, compared to traditional paper-based programs. Methods A 2 × 2 (eg, Media: Mobile vs ePaper × Group Type: Team vs Solo) factorial design feasibility study was conducted. A sample of 124 volunteers who were interested in improving eating behavior, increasing physical activity, or reducing stress participated in this study. The study duration was 8 weeks. All groups were self-directed with no ongoing human input from the research team. Results Participants in ePaper conditions had higher attrition rates compared to participants in Mobile conditions, χ3 2=9.96, P=.02 (N=124). Participants in Mobile conditions reported their compliance with a much higher frequency closer to the time of challenge activity completion (2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test comparing distributions was highly significant—KS=0.33, P<.001 [N=63]). Participants in ePaper conditions had a much higher frequency of guessing while reporting as compared with those in Mobile conditions—χ1 2=25.25, P<.001 (N=63). Together, these findings suggest that the mobile app allowed a more accurate method to report and track health behaviors over a longer period than traditional ePaper-based diaries or log books. There was a significant difference in the overall compliance

  16. Can Rapid Diagnostic Testing for Malaria Increase Adherence to Artemether-Lumefantrine?: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Saran, Indrani; Yavuz, Elif; Kasozi, Howard; Cohen, Jessica

    2016-04-01

    Most patients with suspected malaria do not receive diagnostic confirmation before beginning antimalarial treatment. We investigated the extent to which uncertainty about malaria diagnosis contributes to patient nonadherence to artemether-lumefantrine (AL) treatment through a randomized controlled trial in central Uganda. Among 1,525 patients purchasing a course of AL at private drug shops, we randomly offered 37.6% a free malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT) and then assessed adherence through home visits 3 days later. Of these subjects, 68.4% tested positive for malaria and 65.8% adhered overall. Patients who tested positive did not have significantly higher odds of adherence than those who were not offered the test (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.07, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.734-1.57,P= 0.719). Patients who received a positive malaria test had 0.488 fewer pills remaining than those not offered the test (95% CI: -1.02 to 0.043,P= 0.072). We found that patients who felt relatively healthy by the second day of treatment had lower odds of completing treatment (adjusted OR: 0.532, 95% CI: 0.394-0.719,P< 0.001). Our results suggest that diagnostic testing may not improve artemisinin-based combination therapy adherence unless efforts are made to persuade patients to continue taking the full course of drugs even if symptoms have resolved. PMID:26928828

  17. Early Warning Indicators for First-Line Virologic Failure Independent of Adherence Measures in a South African Urban Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Baohua; Hampton, Jane; Ordóñez, Claudia E.; Johnson, Brent A.; Singh, Dinesh; John, Sally; Gordon, Michelle; Hare, Anna; Murphy, Richard; Nachega, Jean; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; del Rio, Carlos; Sunpath, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We sought to develop individual-level Early Warning Indicators (EWI) of virologic failure (VF) for clinicians to use during routine care complementing WHO population-level EWI. A case-control study was conducted at a Durban clinic. Patients after≥5 months of first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) were defined as cases if they had VF [HIV-1 viral load (VL)>1000 copies/mL] and controls (2:1) if they had VL≤1000 copies/mL. Pharmacy refills and pill counts were used as adherence measures. Participants responded to a questionnaire including validated psychosocial and symptom scales. Data were also collected from the medical record. Multivariable logistic regression models of VF included factors associated with VF (p<0.05) in univariable analyses. We enrolled 158 cases and 300 controls. In the final multivariable model, male gender, not having an active religious faith, practicing unsafe sex, having a family member with HIV, not being pleased with the clinic experience, symptoms of depression, fatigue, or rash, low CD4 counts, family recommending HIV care, and using a TV/radio as ART reminders (compared to mobile phones) were associated with VF independent of adherence measures. In this setting, we identified several key individual-level EWI associated with VF including novel psychosocial factors independent of adherence measures. PMID:24320011

  18. Increased protein secretion and adherence to HeLa cells by Shigella spp. following growth in the presence of bile salts.

    PubMed Central

    Pope, L M; Reed, K E; Payne, S M

    1995-01-01

    Growth of Shigella spp. in the presence of the bile salt deoxycholate or chenodeoxycholate enhanced the bacterial invasion of HeLa cells. Growth in the presence of other structurally similar bile salts or detergents had little or no effect. Deoxycholate-enhanced invasion was not observed when bacteria were exposed to deoxycholate at low temperatures or when chloramphenicol was added to the growth medium, indicating that bacterial growth and protein synthesis are required. Increased invasion is associated with the presence of an intact Shigella virulence plasmid and is correlated with increased secretion of a set of proteins, including the Ipa proteins, to the outer membrane and into the growth medium. The increased invasion induced by the bile salts appears to be due to increased adherence. The enhanced adherence was specific to Shigella spp., since the enteroinvasive Escherichia coli strains tested did not exhibit the effect in response to growth in bile salts. PMID:7642302

  19. Granulocytes and phorbol myristate acetate increase permeability to albumin of cultured endothelial monolayers and isolated perfused lungs. Role of oxygen radicals and granulocyte adherence.

    PubMed

    Shasby, D M; Shasby, S S; Peach, M J

    1983-01-01

    Human granulocytes and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) increased permeability to albumin of monolayers of cultured endothelial cells grown on micropore filters. Granulocytes from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease and PMA did not increase endothelial permeability to albumin, demonstrating that the increase in permeability is dependent on granulocyte-derived oxygen radicals. When granulocytes were separated from the endothelial cells by a micropore filter, granulocytes and PMA no longer increased endothelial permeability to albumin, demonstrating that PMA-stimulated granulocytes must be closely approximated to endothelial cells to increase endothelial permeability. The relevance of these in vitro findings to an intact microvasculature was confirmed by demonstrating that agents that reduce granulocyte adherence to endothelium reduce edema formed in isolated lungs by granulocytes and PMA, an oxygen radical dependent process. Pretreatment of granulocytes with cytochalasin B or addition of 2% dextran to isolated lung perfusates reduced granulocyte adherence and markedly reduced edema formation in isolated lungs. These studies demonstrate that PMA-stimulated granulocytes must be closely apposed to endothelial cells to increase endothelial permeability through an oxygen-radical-dependent mechanism, and they suggest that reduction of granulocyte adherence may protect against granulocyte-dependent edema. PMID:6849554

  20. Towards Developing an Initial Programme Theory: Programme Designers and Managers Assumptions on the Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence Club Programme in Primary Health Care Facilities in the Metropolitan Area of Western Cape Province, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mukumbang, Ferdinand C.; van Belle, Sara; Marchal, Bruno; van Wyk, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background The antiretroviral adherence club intervention was rolled out in primary health care facilities in the Western Cape province of South Africa to relieve clinic congestion, and improve retention in care, and treatment adherence in the face of growing patient loads. We adopted the realist evaluation approach to evaluate what aspects of antiretroviral club intervention works, for what sections of the patient population, and under which community and health systems contexts, to inform guidelines for scaling up of the intervention. In this article, we report on a step towards the development of a programme theory—the assumptions of programme designers and health service managers with regard to how and why the adherence club intervention is expected to achieve its goals and perceptions on how it has done so (or not). Methods We adopted an exploratory qualitative research design. We conducted a document review of 12 documents on the design and implementation of the adherence club intervention, and key informant interviews with 12 purposively selected programme designers and managers. Thematic content analysis was used to identify themes attributed to the programme actors, context, mechanisms, and outcomes. Using the context-mechanism-outcome configurational tool, we provided an explanatory focus of how the adherence club intervention is roll-out and works guided by the realist perspective. Results We classified the assumptions of the adherence club designers and managers into the rollout, implementation, and utilisation of the adherence club programme, constructed around the providers, management/operational staff, and patients, respectively. Two rival theories were identified at the patient-perspective level. We used these perspectives to develop an initial programme theory of the adherence club intervention, which will be tested in a later phase. Conclusion The perspectives of the programme designers and managers provided an important step towards developing

  1. Using protection motivation theory and formative research to guide an injury prevention intervention: increasing adherence to the North American Guidelines for Children's Agricultural Tasks.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Sato; Heaney, Catherine A; Kmet, Jennifer M; Wilkins, J R

    2011-05-01

    The North American Guidelines for Children's Agricultural Tasks (NAGCAT) were developed to reduce childhood agricultural injuries by assisting adults in assigning appropriate chores and providing needed supervision and training. To develop an effective intervention to increase adherence to NAGCAT among farm parents, formative research (focus groups and pilot-testing) was conducted. Protection motivation theory (PMT) was used to guide this research and inform intervention development. Focus group results suggested how PMT constructs might be addressed to increase adherence. A home visit intervention, using a standardized presentation in POWERPoint™, was developed to (a) introduce NAGCAT, (b) increase motivation to use NAGCAT and enhance safe work behaviors, and (c) ultimately reduce agricultural work-related injuries among youth. Process evaluation data suggests that the intervention was well received by farm parents. Conducting theory-guided formative research identified motivational barriers and strategies for overcoming these barriers that might not have been otherwise apparent. PMID:21518923

  2. Value-based insurance design program in north Carolina increased medication adherence but was not cost neutral.

    PubMed

    Maciejewski, Matthew L; Wansink, Daryl; Lindquist, Jennifer H; Parker, John C; Farley, Joel F

    2014-02-01

    Value-based insurance design (VBID) has shown promise for improving medication adherence by lowering or eliminating patients' payments for some medications. Yet the business case for VBID remains unclear. VBID is based on the premise that higher medication and administrative expenses incurred by insurers will be offset by lower nonmedication expenditures that result from better disease control. This article examines Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina's VBID program, which began in 2008. The program eliminated copayments for generic medications and reduced copays for brand-name medications. Patient adherence improved 2.7-3.4 percent during the two-year study period. Hospital admissions decreased modestly, but there were no significant changes in emergency department use or total health expenditures. The insurer incurred $6.4 million in higher medication expenditures; total nonmedication expenditures for the study population decreased $5.7 million. Our results provide limited support for the idea that VBID can be cost-neutral in specific subpopulations. The business case for VBID may be more compelling over the long term and in high risk subgroups for whose members cost is an important barrier to improved medication adherence. PMID:24493774

  3. Adherence to treatment in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Taddeo, Danielle; Egedy, Maud; Frappier, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Health care professionals must be alert to the high prevalence of low adherence to treatment during adolescence. Low adherence increases morbidity and medical complications, contributes to poorer quality of life and an overuse of the health care system. Many different factors have an impact on adherence. However, critical factors to consider in teens are their developmental stage and challenges, emotional issues and family dysfunction. Direct and indirect methods have been described to assess adherence. Eliciting an adherence history is the most useful way for clinicians to evaluate adherence, and could be the beginning of a constructive dialogue with the adolescent. Interventions to improve adherence are multiple – managing mental health issues appropriately, building a strong relationship, customizing the treatment regimen if possible, empowering the adolescent to deal with adherence issues, providing information, ensuring family and peer support, and motivational enhancement therapy. Evaluation of adherence at regular intervals should be an important aspect of health care for adolescents. PMID:19119348

  4. An Ecosystem-Based Intervention to Reduce HIV Transmission Risk and Increase Medication Adherence Among Prisoners Being Released to the Community

    PubMed Central

    Reznick, Olga Grinstead; McCartney, Kathleen; Gregorich, Steven; Zack, Barry; Feaster, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    HIV+ prisoners reentering their communities are at increased risk for poor health outcomes and to transmit HIV. We report on a randomized trial comparing an ecosystem-based intervention and an individually-focused intervention for reducing HIV transmission risk and improving medication adherence. Reincarceration was considered as a secondary variable. Both groups decreased sexual risk behavior over the 12-month follow-up period. Unexpectedly, the ecosystem intervention group was less likely to be taking medication or to be adherent and more likely to have been reincarcerated. Failure to demonstrate a significant advantage of the ecosystem intervention may have resulted from the difficulty of engaging family and other ecosystem members in the intervention. Implications for developing and applying interventions for this population are discussed. PMID:23657796

  5. Rethinking adherence.

    PubMed

    Steiner, John F

    2012-10-16

    In 2012, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will introduce measures of adherence to oral hypoglycemic, antihypertensive, and cholesterol-lowering drugs into its Medicare Advantage quality program. To meet these quality goals, delivery systems will need to develop and disseminate strategies to improve adherence. The design of adherence interventions has too often been guided by the mistaken assumptions that adherence is a single behavior that can be predicted from readily available patient characteristics and that individual clinicians alone can improve adherence at the population level.Effective interventions require recognition that adherence is a set of interacting behaviors influenced by individual, social, and environmental forces; adherence interventions must be broadly based, rather than targeted to specific population subgroups; and counseling with a trusted clinician needs to be complemented by outreach interventions and removal of structural and organizational barriers. To achieve the adherence goals set by CMS, front-line clinicians, interdisciplinary teams, organizational leaders, and policymakers will need to coordinate efforts in ways that exemplify the underlying principles of health care reform. PMID:23070491

  6. Increased arterial stiffness in South Dakota American Indian children.

    PubMed

    Litz, Andrew M; Van Guilder, Gary P

    2016-02-01

    Arterial stiffness has been observed in white American obese children, yet there are no data in American Indian youth, who are affected disproportionately by the cardiovascular consequences of childhood obesity and its accompanying risk factors. The purpose of this study was to determine the association of childhood overweight-obesity and cardiometabolic risk factors with arterial stiffness in South Dakota white American and American Indian children. Thirty-six (28 white American and 8 American Indian) children (age, 13 ± 1 years; grades 6-8) from a rural South Dakota elementary and middle school were studied: 18 had a healthy weight (body mass index (BMI), 19.5 ± 1.9 kg/m(2)) and 18 were overweight-obese (BMI, 26.8 ± 3.5 kg/m(2)). Arterial stiffness was assessed using applanation tonometry via pulse wave analysis to determine carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (crPWV) and aortic augmentation index (AIx). There were no differences (P = 0.94) in crPWV between healthy weight (7.1 ± 1.4 m/s) and overweight-obese (7.3 ± 1.0 m/s) children, even after controlling for risk factors. However, crPWV was markedly elevated (P = 0.002) in overweight-obese American Indian children (7.7 ± 1.1 m/s) compared with white American children (6.8 ± 0.5 m/s), and these differences remained after controlling for blood pressure and more severe obesity in the American Indians. An obesity-matched subgroup analysis indicated that crPWV (7.7 ± 1.1 vs 6.8 ± 0.4 m/s) remained significantly greater in the American Indians (P = 0.03). There were no between-group differences in aortic AIx. These findings indicate an adverse influence of American Indian ethnicity on arterial stiffening in children with elevated adiposity. Arterial stiffness in American Indian children may accelerate early adulthood vascular disease. PMID:26761621

  7. Not at All Effective: Differences in Views on the Causes of Prescription Non-adherence Between North Korean Defectors and Medical Providers in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Hong, Soo Jung

    2015-06-01

    By focusing on North Korean defectors' medical experiences in South Korea and their medical providers' experiences treating the defectors, this article considers the differences between the views of these two groups in regard to the causes of prescription non-adherence. The results suggest that (a) whereas the defectors tended to see their symptoms as being physical in nature, the medical providers often ascribed symptoms to psychological/socio-cultural influence; (b) whereas the defectors tended to trust in their ability to self-diagnose and in their belief systems established in North Korea, the medical providers tended not to place trust in these aspects; (c) whereas the defectors tended to view the available medical treatment as inappropriate for them, the medical providers often noted the presence of tolerant bacterial strains as causes of treatment failure; and (d) whereas the defectors felt that the treatment they received was slow and ineffective and attributed this to capitalism, the medical providers felt that the defectors failed to understand the concept of staged treatments. Based on the findings, some solutions are suggested to address the complex issue of North Korean defectors' prescription non-adherence in terms of subjective/objective health assessments and patient-centered care. North Korean defectors' established health beliefs/lack of medical knowledge based on their previous medical and cultural experiences gave rise to beliefs and practices associated with medicine that differ significantly from those of the health providers and that have the potential to severely compromise the defectors' health. Therefore, therapy negotiation and appropriate education are suggested as possible solutions, and as an agenda, the notion of civic friendship is addressed. Implications for medical practice, prevention, and intervention are also discussed. PMID:24647785

  8. 78 FR 8047 - Onions Grown in South Texas; Increased Assessment Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 959 Onions Grown in South Texas; Increased Assessment Rate AGENCY... rate established for the South Texas Onion Committee (Committee) for the 2012-13 and subsequent fiscal periods from $0.025 to $0.03 per 50-pound equivalent of onions handled. The Committee locally...

  9. Cost-effectiveness of a tailored intervention designed to increase breast cancer screening among a non-adherent population: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the percentage of women who initiate breast cancer screening is rising, the rate of continued adherence is poor. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a tailored print intervention compared with a non-tailored print intervention for increasing the breast cancer screening rate among a non-adherent population. Methods In total, 1859 participants aged 51–59 years (except those aged 55 years) were recruited from a Japanese urban community setting. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either a tailored print reminder (tailored intervention group) or non-tailored print reminder (non-tailored intervention group). The primary outcome was improvement in the breast cancer screening rate. The screening rates and cost-effectiveness were examined for each treatment group (tailored vs. non-tailored) and each intervention subgroup during a follow-up period of five months. All analyses followed the intention-to-treat principle. Results The number of women who underwent a screening mammogram following the reminder was 277 (19.9%) in the tailored reminder group and 27 (5.8%) in the non-tailored reminder group. A logistic regression model revealed that the odds of a woman who received a tailored print reminder undergoing mammography was 4.02 times those of a women who had received a non-tailored print reminder (95% confidence interval, 2.67–6.06). The cost of one mammography screening increase was 2,544 JPY or 30 USD in the tailored intervention group and 4,366 JPY or 52 USD in the non-tailored intervention group. Conclusions Providing a tailored print reminder was an effective and cost-effective strategy for improving breast cancer screening rates among non-adherent women. PMID:22962858

  10. Theory-Based Behavioral Intervention Increases Self-Reported Physical Activity in South African Men: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jemmott, John B.; Jemmott, Loretta S.; Ngwane, Zolani; Zhang, Jingwen; Heeren, G. Anita; Icard, Larry D.; O’Leary, Ann; Mtose, Xoliswa; Teitelman, Anne; Carty, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether a health-promotion intervention increases South African men’s adherence to physical-activity guidelines. Method We utilized a cluster-randomized controlled trial design. Eligible clusters, residential neighborhoods near East London, South Africa, were matched in pairs. Within randomly selected pairs, neighborhoods were randomized to theory-based, culturally congruent health-promotion intervention encouraging physical activity or attention-matched HIV/STI risk-reduction control intervention. Men residing in the neighborhoods and reporting coitus in the previous 3 months were eligible. Primary outcome was self-reported individual-level adherence to physical-activity guidelines averaged over 6-month and 12-month post-intervention assessments. Data were collected in 2007–2010. Data collectors, but not facilitators or participants, were blind to group assignment. Results Primary outcome intention-to-treat analysis included 22 of 22 clusters and 537 of 572 men in the health-promotion intervention and 22 of 22 clusters and 569 of 609 men in the attention-control intervention. Model-estimated probability of meeting physical-activity guidelines was 51.0% in the health-promotion intervention and 44.7% in attention-matched control (OR = 1.34; 95% CI, 1.09–1.63), adjusting for baseline prevalence and clustering from 44 neighborhoods. Conclusion A theory-based culturally congruent intervention increased South African men’s self-reported physical activity, a key contributor to deaths from non-communicable diseases in South Africa. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01490359. PMID:24736094

  11. Microcirculatory rarefaction in South Asians - a potential mechanism for increased cardiovascular risk and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Alun D; Bathula, Raj; Park, Chloe; Tillin, Therese; Wit, Nicholas; McG Thom, Simon; Chaturvedi, Nish

    2013-01-01

    People of South Asian descent have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes, but little is known about the microcirculation in South Asian people despite evidence that this plays an important role in the aetiology of CVD. We compared the retinal microcirculation in a population-based sample of 287 middle-aged adults (144 European 143 South Asian) matched for age and sex. Retinal photographs were taken and analysed using a validated semi-automated program and microvascular measures were compared. Blood pressure, anthropometry and fasting bloods were also measured. South Asians had significantly fewer arteriolar and venular vessels and bifurcations. Arterioles and venules were longer and venules were also more tortuous in South Asians. These differences were not explained by adjustment for traditional risk factors including blood pressure, body mass index, diabetes or measures of insulin resistance. People of South Asian descent have rarefaction of the retinal microcirculation compared to age-sex matched individuals of European descent. Reduced microvascular density could contribute to the elevated risk of CVD and impaired glucose tolerance in South Asian people. PMID:24116136

  12. 75 FR 55942 - Avocados Grown in South Florida; Increased Assessment Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 915 Avocados Grown in South Florida; Increased Assessment Rate AGENCY... increases the assessment rate established for the Avocado Administrative Committee (Committee) for the 2010... avocados handled. The Committee locally administers the marketing order which regulates the handling...

  13. HIV Medication Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking ... exactly as prescribed. Why is adherence to an HIV regimen important? Adherence to an HIV regimen gives ...

  14. Does Pay-For-Performance Program Increase Providers Adherence to Guidelines for Managing Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Taiwan?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long-Sheng; Chou, Yiing-Jenq; Li, Chung-Pin; Wu, Chen-Yi; Chang, Yu-Chia

    2016-01-01

    Background Many people are concerned about that the quality of preventive care for patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is suboptimal. Taiwan, a hyperendemic area of chronic HBV and HCV infection, implemented a nationwide pay-for-performance (P4P) program in 2010, which aimed to improve the preventive care provided to HBV and HCV patients by increasing physicians’ adherence to guidelines through financial incentives. The objective of this study was to evaluate the early effects of the P4P program on utilization of preventive services by HBV and HCV patients. Methods Using a quasi-experimental design with propensity score matching method, we matched the HBV and HCV patients enrolled in the P4P program with non-enrollees in 2010, resulting in 21,643 patients in each group. Generalized estimating equations was applied to examine the difference-in-difference effects of P4P program enrollment on the utilization of three guideline-recommended preventive services (regular outpatient follow-up visits, abdominal ultrasonography (US) examinations, and aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase (AST/ALT) tests by HBV and HCV patients. Results The P4P program enrollees were significantly more likely to attend twice-annual follow-up visits, to receive recommended US examinations and AST/ALT tests, than non-enrollees. Conclusions The results of our preliminary assessment indicate that financial incentives offered by the P4P program was associated with a modest improvement in adherence to guidelines for better chronic HBV and HBC management. PMID:27517172

  15. Development and Pilot Testing of a Standardized Training Program for a Patient-Mentoring Intervention to Increase Adherence to Outpatient HIV Care

    PubMed Central

    Mignogna, Joseph; Stanley, Melinda A.; Davila, Jessica; Wear, Jackie; Amico, K. Rivet; Giordano, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Although peer interventionists have been successful in medication treatment-adherence interventions, their role in complex behavior-change approaches to promote entry and reentry into HIV care requires further investigation. The current study sought to describe and test the feasibility of a standardized peer-mentor training program used for MAPPS (Mentor Approach for Promoting Patient Self-Care), a study designed to increase engagement and attendance at HIV outpatient visits among high-risk HIV inpatients using HIV-positive peer interventionists to deliver a comprehensive behavioral change intervention. Development of MAPPS and its corresponding training program included collaborations with mentors from a standing outpatient mentor program. The final training program included (1) a half-day workshop; (2) practice role-plays; and (3) formal, standardized patient role-plays, using trained actors with “real-time” video observation (and ratings from trainers). Mentor training occurred over a 6-week period and required demonstration of adherence and skill, as rated by MAPPS trainers. Although time intensive, ultimate certification of mentors suggested the program was both feasible and effective. Survey data indicated mentors thought highly of the training program, while objective rating data from trainers indicated mentors were able to understand and display standards associated with intervention fidelity. Data from the MAPPS training program provide preliminary evidence that peer mentors can be trained to levels necessary to ensure intervention fidelity, even within moderately complex behavioral-change interventions. Although additional research is needed due to limitations of the current study (e.g., limited generalizability due to sample size and limited breadth of clinical training opportunities), data from the current trial suggest that training programs such as MAPPS appear both feasible and effective. PMID:22248331

  16. Increased S-Nitrosylation and Proteasomal Degradation of Caspase-3 during Infection Contribute to the Persistence of Adherent Invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) in Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, Karl A.; Allam, Amr; McIntosh, Anne; Houston, Stephanie A.; Cerovic, Vuk; Goodyear, Carl S.; Roe, Andrew J.; Beatson, Scott A.; Milling, Simon W.; Walker, Daniel; Wall, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    Adherent invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) have been implicated as a causative agent of Crohn’s disease (CD) due to their isolation from the intestines of CD sufferers and their ability to persist in macrophages inducing granulomas. The rapid intracellular multiplication of AIEC sets it apart from other enteric pathogens such as Salmonella Typhimurium which after limited replication induce programmed cell death (PCD). Understanding the response of infected cells to the increased AIEC bacterial load and associated metabolic stress may offer insights into AIEC pathogenesis and its association with CD. Here we show that AIEC persistence within macrophages and dendritic cells is facilitated by increased proteasomal degradation of caspase-3. In addition S-nitrosylation of pro- and active forms of caspase-3, which can inhibit the enzymes activity, is increased in AIEC infected macrophages. This S-nitrosylated caspase-3 was seen to accumulate upon inhibition of the proteasome indicating an additional role for S-nitrosylation in inducing caspase-3 degradation in a manner independent of ubiquitination. In addition to the autophagic genetic defects that are linked to CD, this delay in apoptosis mediated in AIEC infected cells through increased degradation of caspase-3, may be an essential factor in its prolonged persistence in CD patients. PMID:23861899

  17. Efficient entry of cell-penetrating peptide nona-arginine into adherent cells involves a transient increase in intracellular calcium

    PubMed Central

    Melikov, Kamran; Hara, Ann; Yamoah, Kwabena; Zaitseva, Elena; Zaitsev, Eugene; Chernomordik, Leonid V.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of entry of cationic peptides such as nona-arginine (R9) into cells remains an important challenge to their use as efficient drug-delivery vehicles. At nanomolar to low micromolar R9 concentrations and at physiological temperature, peptide entry involves endocytosis. In contrast, at a concentration ≥10 μM, R9 induces a very effective non-endocytic entry pathway specific for cationic peptides. We found that a similar entry pathway is induced at 1–2 μM concentrations of R9 if peptide application is accompanied by a rapid temperature drop to 15°C. Both at physiological and at sub-physiological temperatures, this entry mechanism was inhibited by depletion of the intracellular ATP pool. Intriguingly, we found that R9 at 10–20 μM and 37°C induces repetitive spikes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. This Ca2+ signalling correlated with the efficiency of the peptide entry. Pre-loading cells with the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA (1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid) inhibited both Ca2+ spikes and peptide entry, suggesting that an increase in intracellular Ca2+ precedes and is required for peptide entry. One of the hallmarks of Ca2+ signalling is a transient cell-surface exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS), a lipid normally residing only in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Blocking the accessible PS with the PS-binding domain of lactadherin strongly inhibited non-endocytic R9 entry, suggesting the importance of PS externalization in this process. To conclude, we uncovered a novel mechanistic link between calcium signalling and entry of cationic peptides. This finding will enhance our understanding of the properties of plasma membrane and guide development of future drug-delivery vehicles. PMID:26272944

  18. 78 FR 23671 - Onions Grown in South Texas; Increased Assessment Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... action was published in the Federal ] Register on February 5, 2013 (78 FR 8047). Copies of the proposed... / Monday, April 22, 2013 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 959 Onions Grown in South Texas; Increased Assessment Rate AGENCY:...

  19. A Step Toward Equal Justice: Programs to Increase Black Lawyers in the South.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Eli, Ed.

    An extensive evaluation of 5 years of grants from private foundations, corporations, and individuals to increase the number of black lawyers in the South is summarized in this pamphlet. The results of the evaluation of the Earl Warren Legal Training Program, Inc., and the Law Students Civil Rights Research Council indicated: (1) Larger numbers of…

  20. Language Shift or Increased Bilingualism in South Africa: Evidence from Census Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posel, Dorrit; Zeller, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    In the post-apartheid era, South Africa has adopted a language policy that gives official status to 11 languages (English, Afrikaans, and nine Bantu languages). However, English has remained the dominant language of business, public office, and education, and some research suggests that English is increasingly being spoken in domestic settings.…

  1. Providing Increased Access to English L2 Students of Computer Science at a South African University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalvitt, Lorenzo; Murray, Sarah; Terzoli, Alfredo; Zhao, Xiaogeng; Mini, Buyiswa

    2005-01-01

    In our paper we describe an intervention aimed at providing increased chances of success in the study of Computer Science (CS) to members of South Africa's historically disadvantaged communities. Research has shown that many African students perform poorly in CS, possibly because of language problems. We have developed a web-based application that…

  2. Increasing incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma in black South Africans in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa (1983-2006).

    PubMed

    Mosam, A; Carrara, H; Shaik, F; Uldrick, T; Berkman, A; Aboobaker, J; Coovadia, H M

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the temporal trends in the incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) in black South Africans in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN). The study was designed as a retrospective record review. The incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma was estimated using administrative records for patients receiving care for KS through public sector oncology clinics in KZN, 1983-2006. Annual age-standardized incidence rates were calculated using provincial census data for the denominator. Age-specific rates were calculated for the pre-AIDS (1983-1989) and for the generalized AIDS epidemic eras (2006). Age-standardized incidence of KS increased in KZN from <1:100,000 in 1990 to at least 15:100,000 in 2006; this increase was observed in both men and women. There was a shift in the peak age-specific incidence rates from the sixth decade of life in the pre-AIDS era to the fourth and fifth decades in the AIDS era. In conclusion, KS is a growing public health problem in KZN, South Africa. These data reinforce the need for comprehensive national access to and roll-out of antiretroviral drugs, given their success in prevention and treatment of KS in first-world settings. PMID:19625587

  3. The Improvement of Ion Plated Ag and Au Film Adherence to Si3N4 and SiC Surfaces for Increased Tribological Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, Talivaldis

    1998-01-01

    A modified dc-diode plating system, utilizing a metallic screen cage as a cathode and referred as SCREEN CAGE ION PLATING (SCIP), is used to deposit Ag and Au lubricating films on Si3N4 and SiC surfaces. When deposition is performed in Ar or N2, glow discharge, the surface displays poor adhesive strength (less than 5 MPa). A dramatic increase in adhesive strength (less than 80 MPa) is achieved when plating is performed in a reactive 50% 02 + 50% Ar glow discharge. The excited/ionized oxygen species (O2(+)/O(+) in the glow discharge contribute to the oxidation of the Si3N4 or SiC surfaces as determined by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XTS) depth profiling. The reactively sputter-oxidized S3N4 or SiC surfaces and the activated-oxidized-metastable Ag or Au species formed in the plasma cooperatively contribute to the increased adherence. As a result, the linear thermal expansion coefficient mismatch at the interface is reduced. These lubricating Ag and Au films under sliding conditions reduce the friction coefficient by a factor of 2-1/2 to 4.

  4. Increased lead availability and enzyme activities in root-adhering soil of Lantana camara during phytoextraction in the presence of earthworms.

    PubMed

    Jusselme, My Dung; Miambi, Edouard; Mora, Philippe; Diouf, Michel; Rouland-Lefèvre, Corinne

    2013-02-15

    Earthworms are known to increase availability of heavy metals in soils and also play an important role in maintaining the structure and quality of soil. The introduction of earthworms into soils contaminated with metals in the presence of a potential hyperaccumulator has been suggested as an aid for phytoremediation processes. The present study was conducted to evaluate: (i) the effects of earthworms on lead availability in artificially contaminated soil at 500 and 1000 mg kg(-1) Pb in the presence of Lantana camara, a hyperaccumulator, (ii) the effects of earthworms and lead on soil properties such as pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC), organic matter (OM), total and available N, P and K and (iii) soil enzyme activities. Earthworms increased the bioavailable Pb in root-adhering soil by a factor of 2 to 3 in the contaminated soils at concentrations of 500 to 1000 mg Pb kg(-1), respectively. In lead contaminated soils, the presence of earthworms led to a significant decrease in soil pH by about 0.2 but increased CEC by 17% and OM by more than 30%. Earthworm activities also increased the activities of N-acetylglucosamidase, β-glucosidase, cellulase, xylanase, alkaline and acid phosphatase, urease and fluorescein diacetate assay (FDA). These results indicate that the ecological context for phytoremediation should be broadened by considering plant-soil-earthworm interactions as they influence both plant health and absorption of heavy metals. They also showed that the enzyme activities monitored could serve as useful proxies for phytoremediation capability and, more generally, for soil quality as a whole. PMID:23321070

  5. Improved adherence with contingency management.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Marc I; Dieckhaus, Kevin; McMahon, Thomas J; Valdes, Barbara; Petry, Nancy M; Cramer, Joyce; Rounsaville, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) based interventions that reinforce adherence to prescribed medications have shown promise in a variety of disadvantaged populations. Fifty-six participants with histories of illicit substance use who were prescribed antiretroviral medication but evidenced suboptimal adherence during a baseline assessment were randomly assigned to 16 weeks of weekly CM-based counseling or supportive counseling, followed by 16 additional weeks of data collection and adherence feedback to providers. The CM intervention involved review of data generated by electronic pill-bottle caps that record bottle opening (MEMS) and brief substance abuse counseling. CM participants were reinforced for MEMS-measured adherence with drawings from a bowl for prizes and bonus drawings for consecutive weeks of perfect adherence. Potential total earnings averaged $800. Mean MEMS-measured adherence to the reinforced medication increased from 61% at baseline to 76% during the 16-week treatment phase and was significantly increased relative to the supportive counseling group (p = 0.01). Furthermore, mean log-transformed viral load was significantly lower in the CM group. However, by the end of the 16-week follow-up phase, differences between groups in adherence and viral load were no longer significantly different. Proportions of positive urine toxicology tests did not differ significantly between the two groups at any phase. A brief CM-based intervention was associated with significantly higher adherence and lower viral loads. Future studies should evaluate methods to extend effects for longer term benefits. PMID:17263651

  6. Implementation and Operational Research: What Happens After a Negative Test for Tuberculosis? Evaluating Adherence to TB Diagnostic Algorithms in South African Primary Health Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Grant, A. D.; Chihota, V.; Ginindza, S.; Mvusi, L.; Churchyard, G. J.; Fielding, K.L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Background: Diagnostic tests for tuberculosis (TB) using sputum have suboptimal sensitivity among HIV-positive persons. We assessed health care worker adherence to TB diagnostic algorithms after negative sputum test results. Methods: The XTEND (Xpert for TB—Evaluating a New Diagnostic) trial compared outcomes among people tested for TB in primary care clinics using Xpert MTB/RIF vs. smear microscopy as the initial test. We analyzed data from XTEND participants who were HIV positive or HIV status unknown, whose initial sputum Xpert MTB/RIF or microscopy result was negative. If chest radiography, sputum culture, or hospital referral took place, the algorithm for TB diagnosis was considered followed. Analysis of intervention (Xpert MTB/RIF) effect on algorithm adherence used methods for cluster-randomized trials with small number of clusters. Results: Among 4037 XTEND participants with initial negative test results, 2155 (53%) reported being or testing HIV positive and 540 (14%) had unknown HIV status. Among 2155 HIV-positive participants [684 (32%) male, mean age 37 years (range, 18–79 years)], there was evidence of algorithm adherence among 515 (24%). Adherence was less likely among persons tested initially with Xpert MTB/RIF vs. smear [14% (142/1031) vs. 32% (364/1122), adjusted risk ratio 0.34 (95% CI: 0.17 to 0.65)] and for participants with unknown vs. positive HIV status [59/540 (11%) vs. 507/2155 (24%)]. Conclusions: We observed poorer adherence to TB diagnostic algorithms among HIV-positive persons tested initially with Xpert MTB/RIF vs. microscopy. Poor adherence to TB diagnostic algorithms and incomplete coverage of HIV testing represents a missed opportunity to diagnose TB and HIV, and may contribute to TB mortality. PMID:26966843

  7. Antidepressant adherence after psychiatric hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Zivin, Kara; Ganoczy, Dara; Pfeiffer, Paul N.; Miller, Erin M.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2010-01-01

    Objective Depressed patients discharged from psychiatric hospitalizations face increased risks for adverse outcomes including suicide, yet antidepressant adherence rates during this high-risk period are unknown. Using Veterans Affairs (VA) data, we assessed antidepressant adherence and predictors of poor adherence among depressed veterans following psychiatric hospitalization. Method We identified VA patients nationwide with depressive disorders who had a psychiatric hospitalization between April 1, 1999 and September 30, 2003, received antidepressant medication, and had an outpatient appointment following discharge. We calculated medication possession ratios (MPRs), a measure of medication adherence, within three and six months following discharge. We assessed patient factors associated with having lower levels of adherence (MPRs <0.8) after discharge. Results 20,931 and 23,182 patients met criteria for three and six month MPRs. The mean three month MPR was 0.79 (s.d.=0.37). The mean six month MPR was 0.66 (s.d.=0.40). Patients with poorer adherence were male, younger, non-white, and had a substance abuse disorder, but were less likely to have PTSD or other anxiety disorders. Conclusion Poor antidepressant adherence is common among depressed patients after psychiatric hospitalization. Efforts to improve adherence at this time may be critical in improving the outcomes of these high-risk patients. PMID:19609666

  8. [Treatment adherence: a key element].

    PubMed

    Bastida, Guillermo; Sánchez Montes, Cristina; Aguas, Mariam

    2011-12-01

    A substantial percentage of patients fail to follow health professionals' recommendations, which affects the management of chronic diseases, reducing the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions and increasing the costs of the disease. Lack of adherence is a multidimensional phenomenon and is influenced by numerous factors that should be identified. A multiplicity of measures is available to improve adherence, such as simplifying treatment administration, but none of these measures is effective when used alone. One way of tackling lack of adherence is by identifying patients' barriers to medication and involving them in decision making. Ulcerative colitis (UC) poses a risk for lack of treatment adherence. In this disease, poor adherence correlates with poor disease control (drug effectiveness) and with higher costs. As in other chronic diseases, the causes associated with poor adherence are multiple, including psychosocial factors, the physician-patient relationship and patients' prejudices toward medication. A single dose of aminosalycylates (5-ASA) should be recommended, as this dose is as safe and effective as other regimens. However, by itself, this recommendation does not seem to improve adherence. Identifying the scale of the problem and developing strategies to involve the patient in decision making is crucial to improve treatment adherence. PMID:25443221

  9. Deep South Atlantic carbonate chemistry and increased interocean deep water exchange during last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jimin; Anderson, Robert F.; Jin, Zhangdong; Menviel, Laurie; Zhang, Fei; Ryerson, Fredrick J.; Rohling, Eelco J.

    2014-04-01

    Carbon release from the deep ocean at glacial terminations is a critical component of past climate change, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We present a 28,000-year high-resolution record of carbonate ion concentration, a key parameter of the global carbon cycle, at 5-km water depth in the South Atlantic. We observe similar carbonate ion concentrations between the Last Glacial Maximum and the late Holocene, despite elevated concentrations in the glacial surface ocean. This strongly supports the importance of respiratory carbon accumulation in a stratified deep ocean for atmospheric CO2 reduction during the last ice age. After ˜9 μmol/kg decline during Heinrich Stadial 1, deep South Atlantic carbonate ion concentration rose by ˜24 μmol/kg from the onset of Bølling to Pre-boreal, likely caused by strengthening North Atlantic Deep Water formation (Bølling) or increased ventilation in the Southern Ocean (Younger Drays) or both (Pre-boreal). The ˜15 μmol/kg decline in deep water carbonate ion since ˜10 ka is consistent with extraction of alkalinity from seawater by deep-sea CaCO3 compensation and coral reef growth on continental shelves during the Holocene. Between 16,600 and 15,000 years ago, deep South Atlantic carbonate ion values converged with those at 3.4-km water depth in the western equatorial Pacific, as did carbon isotope and radiocarbon values. These observations suggest a period of enhanced lateral exchange of carbon between the deep South Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, probably due to an increased transfer of momentum from southern westerlies to the Southern Ocean. By spreading carbon-rich deep Pacific waters around Antarctica for upwelling, invigorated interocean deep water exchange would lead to more efficient CO2 degassing from the Southern Ocean, and thus to an atmospheric CO2 rise, during the early deglaciation.

  10. Increased Rate of Apoptosis and Diminished Phagocytic Ability of Human Neutrophils Infected with Afa/Dr Diffusely Adhering Escherichia coli Strains

    PubMed Central

    Brest, Patrick; Bétis, Frédéric; Çuburu, Nicolas; Selva, Eric; Herrant, Magali; Servin, Alain; Auberger, Patrick; Hofman, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The proinflammatory effect of Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (Afa/Dr DAEC) strains have been recently demonstrated in vitro by showing that polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) transepithelial migration is induced after bacterial colonization of apical intestinal monolayers. The effect of Afa/Dr DAEC-PMN interaction on PMN behavior has been not investigated. Because of the putative virulence mechanism of PMN apoptosis during infectious diseases and taking into account the high level of expression of the decay-accelerating factor (DAF, or CD55), the receptor of Afa/Dr DAEC on PMNs, we sought to determine whether infection of PMNs by Afa/Dr DAEC strains could promote cell apoptosis. We looked at the behavior of PMNs incubated with Afa/Dr DAEC strains once they had transmigrated across polarized monolayers of intestinal (T84) cells. Infection of PMNs by Afa/Dr DAEC strains induced PMN apoptosis characterized by morphological nuclear changes, DNA fragmentation, caspase activation, and a high level of annexin V expression. However, transmigrated and nontransmigrated PMNs incubated with Afa/Dr DAEC strains showed similar elevated global caspase activities. PMN apoptosis depended on their agglutination, induced by Afa/Dr DAEC, and was still observed after preincubation of PMNs with anti-CD55 and/or anti-CD66 antibodies. Low levels of phagocytosis of Afa/Dr DAEC strains were observed both in nontransmigrated and in transmigrated PMNs compared to that observed with the control E. coli DH5α strain. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that interaction of Afa/Dr DAEC with PMNs may increase the bacterial virulence both by inducing PMN apoptosis through an agglutination process and by diminishing their phagocytic capacity. PMID:15385473

  11. Factors influencing human leukocyte adherence in vitro.

    PubMed

    Stepniewicz, W; Tchórzewski, H; Luciak, M

    1983-01-01

    Studies were performed on factors influencing leucocyte adherence in vitro. Blood condensation was found to increase leukocyte adherence. Addition of heparin, dextran or ethanol caused a significant reduction of white blood cell count in blood samples in comparison with blood mixed with sodium EDTA or ACD solution. This suggests the existence of two granulocyte subpopulations; viz, rapidly adhering and slowly adhering. Heparin enhanced granulocyte adherence, while dextran and ethanol decreased it. Five-day storage of ACD blood led to a decrease in granulocyte adherence, while addition of heparin or histamine to ACD blood prevented this change to occur. The glucose concentration of 1,000 mg/dl augmented granulocyte adherence, while higher glucose concentrations induced its progressive fall below the control values. There was no significant change of lymphocyte adherence during the experiments. PMID:6194070

  12. Social Support, Stigma and Disclosure: Examining the Relationship with HIV Medication Adherence among Ryan White Program Clients in the Mid-South USA.

    PubMed

    Pichon, Latrice C; Rossi, Kristen R; Ogg, Siri A; Krull, Lisa J; Griffin, Dorcas Young

    2015-06-01

    Social support from friends and family is positively related to better health outcomes among adults living with HIV. An extension of these networks such as religious communities may be an untapped source of social support for promoting HIV medical adherence. This paper explores the association of HIV medication adherence to satisfaction with support from family, friends and church members, as well as HIV-related stigma, and HIV disclosure. In partnership with the Shelby County Health Department, the Memphis Ryan White Part A Program, and the University of Memphis School of Public Health, a total of 286 interviewer-administered surveys were conducted with Ryan White clients. Seventy-six percent (n = 216) of participants reported being prescribed antiretroviral medication (ARVs). Nearly all participants (n = 202, 94%) prescribed ARVs reported disclosing their HIV status to someone. Almost 20% (n = 40) of those prescribed ARVs reported not being satisfied with support received from his/her church. Interestingly, participants reported rarely experiencing stigma as a result of their HIV status. The extent to which satisfaction with support from personal networks and institutional settings like the church affect medication adherence is yet to be understood. The complexity of HIV disclosure and HIV stigma in relation to these supports warrants further investigation to understand how best to improve HIV health outcomes. PMID:26103592

  13. Palaeotectonic implications of increased late Eocene-early Oligocene volcanism from South Pacific DSDP sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennett, J.P.; Von Der Borch, C.; Baker, P.A.; Barton, C.E.; Boersma, A.; Cauler, J.P.; Dudley, W.C., Jr.; Gardner, J.V.; Jenkins, D.G.; Lohman, W.H.; Martini, E.; Merrill, R.B.; Morin, R.; Nelson, Campbell S.; Robert, C.; Srinivasan, M.S.; Stein, R.; Takeuchi, A.; Murphy, M.G.

    1985-01-01

    Late Eocene-early Oligocene (42-35 Myr) sediments cored at two DSDP sites in the south-west Pacific contain evidence of a pronounced increase in local volcanic activity, particularly in close association with the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. This pulse of volcanism is coeval with that in New Zealand and resulted from the development of an Indo- Australian / Pacific Plate boundary through the region during the late Eocene. The late Eocene / earliest Oligocene was marked by widespread volcanism and tectonism throughout the Pacific and elsewhere, and by one of the most important episodes of Cenozoic climatic cooling. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  14. Predictors of tuberculosis (TB) and antiretroviral (ARV) medication non-adherence in public primary care patients in South Africa: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the downward trend in the absolute number of tuberculosis (TB) cases since 2006 and the fall in the incidence rates since 2001, the burden of disease caused by TB remains a global health challenge. The co-infection between TB and HIV adds to this disease burden. TB is completely curable through the intake of a strict anti-TB drug treatment regimen which requires an extremely high and consistent level of adherence.The aim of this study was to investigate factors associated with adherence to anti-TB and HIV treatment drugs. Methods A cross-sectional survey method was used. Three study districts (14 primary health care facilities in each) were selected on the basis of the highest TB caseload per clinic. All new TB and new TB retreatment patients were consecutively screened within one month of anti-tuberculosis treatment. The sample comprised of 3107 TB patients who had been on treatment for at least three weeks and a sub-sample of the total sample were on both anti-TB treatment and anti-retro-viral therapy(ART) (N = 757). Data collection tools included: a Socio-Demographic Questionnaire; a Post-Traumatic-Stress-Disorder (PTSD) Screen; a Psychological Distress Scale; the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT); and self-report measures of tobacco use, perceived health status and adherence to anti-TB drugs and ART. Results The majority of the participants (N = 3107) were new TB cases with a 55.9% HIV co-infection rate in this adult male and female sample 18 years and older. Significant predictors of non-adherence common to both anti-TB drugs and to dual therapy (ART and anti-TB drugs) included poverty, having one or more co-morbid health condition, being a high risk for alcohol mis-use and a partner who is HIV positive. An additional predictor for non-adherence to anti-TB drugs was tobacco use. Conclusions A comprehensive treatment programme addressing poverty, alcohol mis-use, tobacco use and psycho-social counseling is indicated

  15. Association of Medicare Part D Low-Income Cost Subsidy Program Enrollment with Increased Fill Adherence to Clopidogrel After Coronary Stent Placement

    PubMed Central

    Duru, O. Kenrik; Edgington, Sarah; Mangione, Carol; Turk, Norman; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Kimbro, Lindsay; Ettner, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective To determine the association between enrollment in the Medicare Part D low-income cost subsidy (LIS) program, which reduces out-of-pocket medication costs, and fill adherence to the antiplatelet drug, clopidogrel, after coronary stent placement. Design Retrospective cohort study. Data Source Pharmacy claims database of a large, national Medicare Part D insurer. Patients A total of 2967 beneficiaries of a national Medicare Part D plan who had a coronary stent placed between April and December 2006 and were prescribed clopidogrel but were not preexisting users of clopidogrel; of these patients, 504 were enrolled in the LIS program and 2463 were not enrolled in the LIS program. Measurements and Main Results We defined LIS status as being enrolled in the LIS program at any point during the 12 months after the procedure. We examined the association between LIS status and good medication fill adherence to clopidogrel, defined as proportion of days covered ≥ 80%, or discontinuation of clopidogrel over the 12-month window starting from the date of their stent placement. We also identified patients with claims-based diagnoses of major bleeding events while taking clopidogrel. For those patients, we calculated fill adherence only for the period between medication initiation and the onset of major bleeding and/or did not classify them as having inappropriately discontinued the medication. We created a propensity score predicting the propensity of being eligible for the LIS benefit and used inverse propensity score weighting with regression adjustment to generate estimates of the effect parameters. LIS enrollment was associated with a higher predicted likelihood of good clopidogrel fill adherence after stent placement (54.8% for LIS enrollees vs 47.6% for non-enrollees, p=0.008). No significant difference was noted between the two groups in predicted risk of discontinuing clopidogrel after stent placement (18.3% for LIS enrollees vs 21.0% for non-enrollees, p

  16. Blood oxygen affinity increases during digestion in the South American rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus terrificus.

    PubMed

    Bovo, Rafael P; Fuga, Adriana; Micheli-Campbell, Mariana A; Carvalho, José E; Andrade, Denis V

    2015-08-01

    Digesting snakes experience massive increases in metabolism that can last for many days and are accompanied by adjustments in the oxygen transport cascade. Accordingly, we examined the oxygen-binding properties of the blood in the South American rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus) during fasting and 24 and 48h after the snakes have ingested a rodent meal corresponding to 15% (±2%) of its own body mass. In general, oxygen-hemoglobin (Hb-O2) affinity was significantly increased 24h post-feeding, and then returned toward fasting values within 48h post-feeding. Content of organic phosphates ([NTP] and [NTP]/[Hb]), hemoglobin cooperativity (Hill's n), and Bohr Effect (ΔlogP50/ΔpH) were not affected by feeding. The postprandial increase in Hb-O2 affinity in the South American rattlesnake can be almost entirely ascribed by the moderate alkaline tide that follows meal ingestion. In general, digesting snakes were able to regulate blood metabolites at quite constant levels (e.g., plasma osmolality, lactate, glucose, and total protein levels). The level of circulating lipids, however, was considerably increased, which may be related to their mobilization, since lipids are known to be incorporated by the enterocytes after snakes have fed. In conclusion, our results indicate that the exceptional metabolic increment exhibited by C. d. terrificus during meal digestion is entirely supported by the aerobic pathways and that among the attending cardiorespiratory adjustments, pulmonary Hb-O2 loading is likely improved due to the increment in blood O2 affinity. PMID:25446935

  17. Medication Adherence Measures: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Lam, Wai Yin; Fresco, Paula

    2015-01-01

    WHO reported that adherence among patients with chronic diseases averages only 50% in developed countries. This is recognized as a significant public health issue, since medication nonadherence leads to poor health outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Improving medication adherence is, therefore, crucial and revealed on many studies, suggesting interventions can improve medication adherence. One significant aspect of the strategies to improve medication adherence is to understand its magnitude. However, there is a lack of general guidance for researchers and healthcare professionals to choose the appropriate tools that can explore the extent of medication adherence and the reasons behind this problem in order to orchestrate subsequent interventions. This paper reviews both subjective and objective medication adherence measures, including direct measures, those involving secondary database analysis, electronic medication packaging (EMP) devices, pill count, and clinician assessments and self-report. Subjective measures generally provide explanations for patient's nonadherence whereas objective measures contribute to a more precise record of patient's medication-taking behavior. While choosing a suitable approach, researchers and healthcare professionals should balance the reliability and practicality, especially cost effectiveness, for their purpose. Meanwhile, because a perfect measure does not exist, a multimeasure approach seems to be the best solution currently. PMID:26539470

  18. Medication Adherence Measures: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Wai Yin; Fresco, Paula

    2015-01-01

    WHO reported that adherence among patients with chronic diseases averages only 50% in developed countries. This is recognized as a significant public health issue, since medication nonadherence leads to poor health outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Improving medication adherence is, therefore, crucial and revealed on many studies, suggesting interventions can improve medication adherence. One significant aspect of the strategies to improve medication adherence is to understand its magnitude. However, there is a lack of general guidance for researchers and healthcare professionals to choose the appropriate tools that can explore the extent of medication adherence and the reasons behind this problem in order to orchestrate subsequent interventions. This paper reviews both subjective and objective medication adherence measures, including direct measures, those involving secondary database analysis, electronic medication packaging (EMP) devices, pill count, and clinician assessments and self-report. Subjective measures generally provide explanations for patient's nonadherence whereas objective measures contribute to a more precise record of patient's medication-taking behavior. While choosing a suitable approach, researchers and healthcare professionals should balance the reliability and practicality, especially cost effectiveness, for their purpose. Meanwhile, because a perfect measure does not exist, a multimeasure approach seems to be the best solution currently. PMID:26539470

  19. Increasing cervical cancer screening for a multiethnic population of women in South Texas.

    PubMed

    Fornos, Laura B; Urbansky, Kathleen A; Villarreal, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Cervical cancer is a preventable disease. Precancers can be identified and treated through cervical screenings. The HPV vaccine prevents precancers from becoming cancers. The aim of the A Su Salud Cervical Cancer Prevention Program was to apply well-understood health promotion techniques and increase the rate of cervical cancer screening among a high-risk, multiethnic, low-income population in South Texas. Qualitative research was used to identify uptake barriers and tailor media messaging. Using existing resources, we applied evidence-based strategies in novel ways that changed personal behaviors, leading to cancer screening, risk reduction, and early detection. We created a database to track a cohort of 32,807 women and measured cervical cancer screenings over 3 years. Our analysis revealed an increase in cervical cancer screenings after use of highly targeted automated telephone reminders and media dissemination on multiple platforms. Those women at low risk for cervical cancer obtained the highest proportion of Pap tests. This innovative, theory-based program increased overall Pap tests up to 9% among women enrolled in a safety net hospital financial assistance plan. This study fills a gap in research on Pap test compliance in uninsured, mostly Hispanic women by building on cultural strengths and tailored messaging. PMID:24170274

  20. Biomass Increases Go under Cover: Woody Vegetation Dynamics in South African Rangelands.

    PubMed

    Mograbi, Penelope J; Erasmus, Barend F N; Witkowski, E T F; Asner, Gregory P; Wessels, Konrad J; Mathieu, Renaud; Knapp, David E; Martin, Roberta E; Main, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Woody biomass dynamics are an expression of ecosystem function, yet biomass estimates do not provide information on the spatial distribution of woody vegetation within the vertical vegetation subcanopy. We demonstrate the ability of airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) to measure aboveground biomass and subcanopy structure, as an explanatory tool to unravel vegetation dynamics in structurally heterogeneous landscapes. We sampled three communal rangelands in Bushbuckridge, South Africa, utilised by rural communities for fuelwood harvesting. Woody biomass estimates ranged between 9 Mg ha(-1) on gabbro geology sites to 27 Mg ha(-1) on granitic geology sites. Despite predictions of woodland depletion due to unsustainable fuelwood extraction in previous studies, biomass in all the communal rangelands increased between 2008 and 2012. Annual biomass productivity estimates (10-14% p.a.) were higher than previous estimates of 4% and likely a significant contributor to the previous underestimations of modelled biomass supply. We show that biomass increases are attributable to growth of vegetation <5 m in height, and that, in the high wood extraction rangeland, 79% of the changes in the vertical vegetation subcanopy are gains in the 1-3 m height class. The higher the wood extraction pressure on the rangelands, the greater the biomass increases in the low height classes within the subcanopy, likely a strong resprouting response to intensive harvesting. Yet, fuelwood shortages are still occurring, as evidenced by the losses in the tall tree height class in the high extraction rangeland. Loss of large trees and gain in subcanopy shrubs could result in a structurally simple landscape with reduced functional capacity. This research demonstrates that intensive harvesting can, paradoxically, increase biomass and this has implications for the sustainability of ecosystem service provision. The structural implications of biomass increases in communal rangelands could be

  1. Biomass Increases Go under Cover: Woody Vegetation Dynamics in South African Rangelands

    PubMed Central

    Mograbi, Penelope J.; Knapp, David E.; Martin, Roberta E.; Main, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Woody biomass dynamics are an expression of ecosystem function, yet biomass estimates do not provide information on the spatial distribution of woody vegetation within the vertical vegetation subcanopy. We demonstrate the ability of airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) to measure aboveground biomass and subcanopy structure, as an explanatory tool to unravel vegetation dynamics in structurally heterogeneous landscapes. We sampled three communal rangelands in Bushbuckridge, South Africa, utilised by rural communities for fuelwood harvesting. Woody biomass estimates ranged between 9 Mg ha-1 on gabbro geology sites to 27 Mg ha-1 on granitic geology sites. Despite predictions of woodland depletion due to unsustainable fuelwood extraction in previous studies, biomass in all the communal rangelands increased between 2008 and 2012. Annual biomass productivity estimates (10–14% p.a.) were higher than previous estimates of 4% and likely a significant contributor to the previous underestimations of modelled biomass supply. We show that biomass increases are attributable to growth of vegetation <5 m in height, and that, in the high wood extraction rangeland, 79% of the changes in the vertical vegetation subcanopy are gains in the 1-3m height class. The higher the wood extraction pressure on the rangelands, the greater the biomass increases in the low height classes within the subcanopy, likely a strong resprouting response to intensive harvesting. Yet, fuelwood shortages are still occurring, as evidenced by the losses in the tall tree height class in the high extraction rangeland. Loss of large trees and gain in subcanopy shrubs could result in a structurally simple landscape with reduced functional capacity. This research demonstrates that intensive harvesting can, paradoxically, increase biomass and this has implications for the sustainability of ecosystem service provision. The structural implications of biomass increases in communal rangelands could be

  2. Factors Contributing to Increases in Prescription Drug Expenditures Borne by National Health Insurance in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Jeong-Sook; Kim, Young-Man; Paek, Kyung Won; Bea, Min Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Rapid growth of prescription drug expenditures is a problem in South Korea. The objective of this study was to assess the contributions of four variables (therapeutic choice, drug-mix, original use, and price changes) to increases in drug expenditures paid by the National Health Insurance (NHI) in Korea. Materials and Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted between January 1, 2008 and June 30, 2012 utilizing data from the NHI Claims Database of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. The number of target drug types for final analysis was 13959. To analyze the growth rates of drug expenditures, this study used Fisher ideal index and the Laspeyres and Paasche indexes. Results With the exception of 2012, therapeutic choice contributed to about 40–60% of the increase in drug expenditures every year, while drug-mix contributed to another 30–40%. Conclusion The rapid growth in prescription drug expenditure was found to be largely due to drug-mix and therapeutic choice over time. Original use had little impact on drug spending. PMID:27189299

  3. The World Health Organization's mechanisms for increasing the health sector budget: The South African context.

    PubMed

    Venter, Fouche Hendrik Johannes; Wolfaardt, Jaqueline Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    South Africa (SA) has limited scope for raising income taxes, and the proposed National Health Insurance (NHI) scheme will necessitate growth in the health sector budget. The NHI White Paper suggests five funding scenarios to meet the expected shortfall. These scenarios are a mixture of a surcharge on taxable income, an increase in value-added tax and a payroll tax. Five alternative options, suggested by the World Health Organization, are interrogated as ways to decrease the general taxation proposed in the White Paper. The five mechanisms (corporate tax, financial transaction levy, and taxes on tobacco, alcohol and unhealthy foods) were chosen based on their fund-raising potential and their mandatory element. A literature review provides the information for a discussion of the potential costs of each mechanism. Within specific assumptions, potential budgetary contribution is compared with the requirement. First, raising corporate tax rates could raise enough funds, but the losses due to capital flight might be too much for the local economy to bear. Second, a levy on currency transactions is unlikely to raise the required resources, even without a probable decrease in the number of transactions. Third, the increase in the tax on tobacco and alcohol would need to be very large, even assuming that consumption patterns would remain unchanged. Lastly, a tax on unhealthy food products is a new idea and could be explored as an option - especially as the SA Treasury has announced its future implementation. Implementing only one of the mechanisms is unlikely to increase available funding sufficiently, but if they are implemented together the welfare-maximising tax rate for each mechanism may be high enough to fulfil the NHI scheme's budgetary requirement, moderating the increases in the tax burden of the SA population. PMID:27499398

  4. Medication adherence among adult patients on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Alkatheri, Abdulmalik M; Alyousif, Sarah M; Alshabanah, Najla; Albekairy, Abdulkareem M; Alharbi, Shemylan; Alhejaili, Fayze F; Alsayyari, Abdullah A; Qandil, Abeer Ma; Qandil, Amjad M

    2014-07-01

    Medication adherence was assessed in 89 patients on hemodialysis (HD) at the King Abdul Aziz Medical City using an Arabic version of the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MASS-8). The results of the study revealed that 31.46% and 40.45% of the participants showed low and medium adherence, respectively, while 28.09% showed high medication adherence. Accordingly, 71.91% of the patients visiting the dialysis unit were considered medication non-adherent. While being of older age (P = 0.012), being married (P = 0.012) increased the level of adherence, being of medium level of education (P = 0.024) decreased adherence levels. On the other hand, gender, presence of a care-giver, number of members in the household and employment status seems to have no effect on the level of medication adherence. These results call upon the practitioners in HD units to develop intervention programs that can increase the level of medication adherence. PMID:24969185

  5. Patient Characteristics Associated with Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Rolnick, Sharon J; Pawloski, Pamala A.; Hedblom, Brita D.; Asche, Stephen E.; Bruzek, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Despite evidence indicating therapeutic benefit for adhering to a prescribed regimen, many patients do not take their medications as prescribed. Non-adherence often leads to morbidity and to higher health care costs. The objective of the study was to assess patient characteristics associated with medication adherence across eight diseases. Design Retrospective data from a repository within an integrated health system was used to identify patients ≥18 years of age with ICD-9-CM codes for primary or secondary diagnoses for any of eight conditions (depression, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, multiple sclerosis, cancer, or osteoporosis). Electronic pharmacy data was then obtained for 128 medications used for treatment. Methods Medication possession ratios (MPR) were calculated for those with one condition and one drug (n=15,334) and then for the total population having any of the eight diseases (n=31,636). The proportion of patients adherent (MPR ≥80%) was summarized by patient and living-area (census) characteristics. Bivariate associations between drug adherence and patient characteristics (age, sex, race, education, and comorbidity) were tested using contingency tables and chi-square tests. Logistic regression analysis examined predictors of adherence from patient and living area characteristics. Results Medication adherence for those with one condition was higher in males, Caucasians, older patients, and those living in areas with higher education rates and higher income. In the total population, adherence increased with lower comorbidity and increased number of medications. Substantial variation in adherence was found by condition with the lowest adherence for diabetes (51%) and asthma (33%). Conclusions The expectation of high adherence due to a covered pharmacy benefit, and to enhanced medication access did not hold. Differences in medication adherence were found across condition and by

  6. Biomarker evidence for increasing aridity in south-central India over the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, S.; Wilkes, H.; Prasad, S.; Brauer, A.; Basavaiah, N.; Strecker, M. R.; Sachse, D.

    2012-12-01

    Summer monsoonal rainfall has played an important role in the development and sustenance of the largely agro-based economy in the Indian subcontinent in the recent past. A better understanding of past variations in monsoonal rainfall can therefore lead to an assessment of its potential impact on early human societies. However, our knowledge of spatiotemporal patterns of past monsoon strength, as inferred from proxy records, is limited due to the lack of high-resolution paleo-hydrological records from continental archives. Here, we reconstruct centennial-scale hydrological variability associated with changes in the intensity of the Indian Summer Monsoon based on a record of lipid biomarker abundances and compound-specific stable isotopic composition of a 10-m-long sediment core from saline-alkaline Lonar Lake, situated in the core 'monsoon zone' of south-central India. We identified three periods of distinct hydrology over the Holocene in south-central India. The period between 10.4 and 6.5 ka BP was characterized by a relatively high abundance of land-plant biomarkers, such as long-chain n-alkanes. The composition of these leaf-wax n-alkanes (weighted average of concentration of different chain-length n-alkanes, expressed as the ACL index) and their negative δ13C (-30‰ to -33 ‰) indicate the dominance of woody C3 vegetation in the catchment, and negative δD (-170‰ to -175‰) values argue for a wet period due to an intensified monsoon. Rapid fluctuations in abundance of both terrestrial and aquatic biomarkers between 6.5 and 4 ka BP indicate an unstable lake ecosystem, culminating in a transition to arid conditions. Higher ACL values and a pronounced shift to more positive δ13C values (up to -22‰) of leaf-wax n-alkanes over this period indicate a change of dominant vegetation to C4 grasses. Along with a 40‰ increase in leaf wax n-alkane δD values, which likely resulted from less rainfall and/or higher plant evapotranspiration, we interpret this period

  7. Reducing Sexual Violence by Increasing the Supply of Toilets in Khayelitsha, South Africa: A Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Gonsalves, Gregg S.; Kaplan, Edward H.; Paltiel, A. David

    2015-01-01

    Background Sexual violence is a major public health issue, affecting 35% of women worldwide. Major risk factors for sexual assault include inadequate indoor sanitation and the need to travel to outdoor toilet facilities. We estimated how increasing the number of toilets in an urban township (Khayelitsha, South Africa) might reduce both economic costs and the incidence and social burden of sexual assault. Methods We developed a mathematical model that links risk of sexual assault to the number of sanitation facilities and the time a woman must spend walking to a toilet. We defined a composite societal cost function, comprising both the burden of sexual assault and the costs of installing and maintaining public chemical toilets. By expressing total social costs as a function of the number of available toilets, we were able to identify an optimal (i.e., cost-minimizing) social investment in toilet facilities. Findings There are currently an estimated 5600 toilets in Khayelitsha. This results in 635 sexual assaults and US$40 million in combined social costs each year. Increasing the number of toilets to 11300 would minimize total costs ($35 million) and reduce sexual assaults to 446. Higher toilet installation and maintenance costs would be more than offset by lower sexual assault costs. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis shows that the optimal number of toilets exceeds the original allocation of toilets in the township in over 80% of the 5000 iterations of the model. Interpretation Improving access to sanitation facilities in urban settlements will simultaneously reduce the incidence of sexual assaults and overall cost to society. Since our analysis ignores the many additional health benefits of improving sanitation in resource-constrained urban areas (e.g., potential reductions in waterborne infectious diseases), the optimal number of toilets identified here should be interpreted as conservative. PMID:25923105

  8. Media interventions to increase cervical screening uptake in South Africa: an evaluation study of effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Risi, L; Bindman, J P; Campbell, O M R; Imrie, J; Everett, K; Bradley, J; Denny, L

    2004-08-01

    Successful cervical cancer prevention depends on reaching, screening and treating women with pre-invasive disease. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of two media interventions-a photo-comic and a radio-drama-in increasing cervical screening uptake. A randomized controlled trial compared a photo-comic on cervical cancer screening with a placebo comic. One month after the comics were distributed a radio-drama paralleling the photo-comic was broadcast on the community radio station and a retrospective evaluation was carried out. The trial was set in Khayelitsha, a peri-urban squatter community near Cape Town, South Africa. A random sample consisted of 658 women between the ages of 35 and 65 years, from a stratified sample of census areas. The main outcome measure was self-reported cervical screening uptake 6 months after distribution of the comics. Seven percent (18 of 269) of women who received the intervention photo-comic reported cervical screening during the 6 months follow-up, compared with 6% (25 of 389) of controls (P = 0.89). Women who recalled hearing the radio-drama were more likely to report attending screening (nine of 53, 17%) than those who did not (19 of 429, 4%; P < 0.001). We conclude that the photo-comic was ineffective in increasing cervical screening uptake in this population. The radio-drama may have had more impact, but only a minority of women recalled being exposed to it. Future research must concentrate not only on achieving high level of exposure to health messages, but also on investigating the links between exposure and action. PMID:15155598

  9. 76 FR 12969 - Campaign To Improve Poor Medication Adherence (U18)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ... ] importance of good medication adherence, a vital first step toward improved adherence behavior and better... toward improved adherence behavior and better health outcomes. Relevance Inadequate medication adherence... behaviors to increase appropriate medication adherence and thus enhance health outcomes is an important...

  10. Correlates of Adherence to Varenicline Among HIV+ Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Tuo-Yen; Gonzalez, Mirelis; Krebs, Paul; Wong, Selena; Furberg, Robert; Sherman, Scott; Schoenthaler, Antoinette; Urbina, Anthony; Cleland, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Low rates of adherence to smoking cessation pharmacotherapy may limit the effectiveness of treatment. However, few studies have examined adherence in smoking cessation trials thus, there is a limited understanding of factors that influence adherence behaviors. This brief report analyzes correlates of adherence to varenicline among people living with HIV/AIDS. Methods: Study participants were recruited from three HIV care centers in New York City and enrolled in a three-arm randomized controlled pilot study in which all subjects received varenicline. At the 1-month study visit, there were no significant differences in adherence by study condition, therefore we combined treatment arms to examine correlates of adherence (n = 127). We used pill counts to assess varenicline adherence, defined as taking at least 80% of the prescribed dose. We conducted a multivariate path analysis to assess factors proposed by the information-motivation-behavioral skills model to predict adherence. Results: Only 56% of smokers were at least 80% adherent to varenicline at 1 month. Adherence-related information, self-efficacy, a college degree, and non-Hispanic white race/ethnicity were associated with increased varenicline adherence. In path analysis, information and motivation were associated with increased adherence self-efficacy, and adherence self-efficacy was associated with increased adherence, but with marginal significance. These associations with adherence were no longer significant after controlling for race/ethnicity and education. Conclusions: Further exploration of the role of a modifiable correlates of adherence, such as adherence-related information, motivation and self-efficacy is warranted. Interventions are needed that can address disparities in these and other psychosocial factors that may mediate poor medication adherence. PMID:26180221

  11. Research Spotlight: Ozone hole shift exposed South America to increased ultraviolet light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofori, Leslie; Tretkoff, Ernie

    2010-12-01

    The ozone layer, which protects humans, plants, and animals from potentially damaging ultraviolet (UV) light from the Sun, develops a hole above Antarctica in September that typically lasts until early December. However, in November 2009, that hole shifted its position, leaving the southern tip of South America exposed to UV light at levels much greater than normal.

  12. HIV/AIDS Competent Households: Interaction between a Health-Enabling Environment and Community-Based Treatment Adherence Support for People Living with HIV/AIDS in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Masquillier, Caroline; Wouters, Edwin; Mortelmans, Dimitri; van Wyk, Brian; Hausler, Harry; Van Damme, Wim

    2016-01-01

    In the context of severe human resource shortages in HIV care, task-shifting and especially community-based support are increasingly being cited as potential means of providing durable care to chronic HIV patients. Socio-ecological theory clearly stipulates that–in all social interventions–the interrelatedness and interdependency between individuals and their immediate social contexts should be taken into account. People living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) seldom live in isolation, yet community-based interventions for supporting chronic HIV patients have largely ignored the social contexts in which they are implemented. Research is thus required to investigate such community-based support within its context. The aim of this study is to address this research gap by examining the way in which HIV/AIDS competence in the household hampers or facilitates community-based treatment adherence support. The data was analyzed carefully in accordance with the Grounded Theory procedures, using Nvivo 10. More specifically, we analyzed field notes from participatory observations conducted during 48 community-based treatment adherence support sessions in townships on the outskirts of Cape Town, transcripts of 32 audio-recorded in-depth interviews with PLWHA and transcripts of 4 focus group discussions with 36 community health workers (CHWs). Despite the fact that the CHWs try to present themselves as not being openly associated with HIV/AIDS services, results show that the presence of a CHW is often seen as a marker of the disease. Depending on the HIV/AIDS competence in the household, this association can challenge the patient’s hybrid identity management and his/her attempt to regulate the interference of the household in the disease management. The results deepen our understanding of how the degree of HIV/AIDS competence present in a PLWHA’s household affects the manner in which the CHW can perform his or her job and the associated benefits for the patient and his

  13. HIV/AIDS Competent Households: Interaction between a Health-Enabling Environment and Community-Based Treatment Adherence Support for People Living with HIV/AIDS in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Masquillier, Caroline; Wouters, Edwin; Mortelmans, Dimitri; van Wyk, Brian; Hausler, Harry; Van Damme, Wim

    2016-01-01

    In the context of severe human resource shortages in HIV care, task-shifting and especially community-based support are increasingly being cited as potential means of providing durable care to chronic HIV patients. Socio-ecological theory clearly stipulates that-in all social interventions-the interrelatedness and interdependency between individuals and their immediate social contexts should be taken into account. People living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) seldom live in isolation, yet community-based interventions for supporting chronic HIV patients have largely ignored the social contexts in which they are implemented. Research is thus required to investigate such community-based support within its context. The aim of this study is to address this research gap by examining the way in which HIV/AIDS competence in the household hampers or facilitates community-based treatment adherence support. The data was analyzed carefully in accordance with the Grounded Theory procedures, using Nvivo 10. More specifically, we analyzed field notes from participatory observations conducted during 48 community-based treatment adherence support sessions in townships on the outskirts of Cape Town, transcripts of 32 audio-recorded in-depth interviews with PLWHA and transcripts of 4 focus group discussions with 36 community health workers (CHWs). Despite the fact that the CHWs try to present themselves as not being openly associated with HIV/AIDS services, results show that the presence of a CHW is often seen as a marker of the disease. Depending on the HIV/AIDS competence in the household, this association can challenge the patient's hybrid identity management and his/her attempt to regulate the interference of the household in the disease management. The results deepen our understanding of how the degree of HIV/AIDS competence present in a PLWHA's household affects the manner in which the CHW can perform his or her job and the associated benefits for the patient and his/her household

  14. Improving Patient's Primary Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Leguelinel-Blache, Géraldine; Dubois, Florent; Bouvet, Sophie; Roux-Marson, Clarisse; Arnaud, Fabrice; Castelli, Christel; Ray, Valérie; Kinowski, Jean-Marie; Sotto, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Quality of transitions of care is one of the first concerns in patient safety. Redesigning the discharge process to incorporate clinical pharmacy activities could reduce the incidence of postdischarge adverse events by improving medication adherence. The present study investigated the value of pharmacist counseling sessions on primary medication adherence after hospital discharge. This study was conducted in a 1844-bed hospital in France. It was divided in an observational period and an interventional period of 3 months each. In both periods, ward-based clinical pharmacists performed medication reconciliation and inpatient follow-up. In interventional period, initial counseling and discharge counseling sessions were added to pharmaceutical care. The primary medication adherence was assessed by calling community pharmacists 7 days after patient discharge. We compared the measure of adherence between the patients from the observational period (n = 201) and the interventional period (n = 193). The rate of patients who were adherent increased from 51.0% to 66.7% between both periods (P < 0.01). When discharge counseling was performed (n = 78), this rate rose to 79.7% (P < 0.001). The multivariate regression performed on data from both periods showed that age of at least 78 years old, and 3 or less new medications on discharge order were predictive factors of adherence. New medications ordered at discharge represented 42.0% (n = 1018/2426) of all medications on discharge order. The rate of unfilled new medications decreased from 50.2% in the observational period to 32.5% in the interventional period (P < 10−7). However, patients included in the observational period were not significantly more often readmitted or visited the emergency department than the patients who experienced discharge counseling during the interventional period (45.3% vs. 46.2%; P = 0.89). This study highlights that discharge counseling sessions are

  15. Integrating Group Counseling, Cell Phone Messaging, and Participant-Generated Songs and Dramas into a Microcredit Program Increases Nigerian Women’s Adherence to International Breastfeeding Recommendations123

    PubMed Central

    Flax, Valerie L.; Negerie, Mekebeb; Ibrahim, Alawiyatu Usman; Leatherman, Sheila; Daza, Eric J.; Bentley, Margaret E.

    2014-01-01

    In northern Nigeria, interventions are urgently needed to narrow the large gap between international breastfeeding recommendations and actual breastfeeding practices. Studies of integrated microcredit and community health interventions documented success in modifying health behaviors but typically had uncontrolled designs. We conducted a cluster-randomized controlled trial in Bauchi State, Nigeria, with the aim of increasing early breastfeeding initiation and exclusive breastfeeding among female microcredit clients. The intervention had 3 components. Trained credit officers led monthly breastfeeding learning sessions during regularly scheduled microcredit meetings for 10 mo. Text and voice messages were sent out weekly to a cell phone provided to small groups of microcredit clients (5–7 women). The small groups prepared songs or dramas about the messages and presented them at the monthly microcredit meetings. The control arm continued with the regular microcredit program. Randomization occurred at the level of the monthly meeting groups. Pregnant clients were recruited at baseline and interviewed again when their infants were aged ≥6 mo. Logistic regression models accounting for clustering were used to estimate the odds of performing recommended behaviors. Among the clients who completed the final survey (n = 390), the odds of exclusive breastfeeding to 6 mo (OR: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.4, 4.0) and timely breastfeeding initiation (OR: 2.6; 95% CI: 1.6, 4.1) were increased in the intervention vs. control arm. Delayed introduction of water explained most of the increase in exclusive breastfeeding among clients receiving the intervention. In conclusion, a breastfeeding promotion intervention integrated into microcredit increased the likelihood that women adopted recommended breastfeeding practices. This intervention could be scaled up in Nigeria, where local organizations provide microcredit to >500,000 clients. Furthermore, the intervention could be adopted more widely

  16. Integrating group counseling, cell phone messaging, and participant-generated songs and dramas into a microcredit program increases Nigerian women's adherence to international breastfeeding recommendations.

    PubMed

    Flax, Valerie L; Negerie, Mekebeb; Ibrahim, Alawiyatu Usman; Leatherman, Sheila; Daza, Eric J; Bentley, Margaret E

    2014-07-01

    In northern Nigeria, interventions are urgently needed to narrow the large gap between international breastfeeding recommendations and actual breastfeeding practices. Studies of integrated microcredit and community health interventions documented success in modifying health behaviors but typically had uncontrolled designs. We conducted a cluster-randomized controlled trial in Bauchi State, Nigeria, with the aim of increasing early breastfeeding initiation and exclusive breastfeeding among female microcredit clients. The intervention had 3 components. Trained credit officers led monthly breastfeeding learning sessions during regularly scheduled microcredit meetings for 10 mo. Text and voice messages were sent out weekly to a cell phone provided to small groups of microcredit clients (5-7 women). The small groups prepared songs or dramas about the messages and presented them at the monthly microcredit meetings. The control arm continued with the regular microcredit program. Randomization occurred at the level of the monthly meeting groups. Pregnant clients were recruited at baseline and interviewed again when their infants were aged ≥6 mo. Logistic regression models accounting for clustering were used to estimate the odds of performing recommended behaviors. Among the clients who completed the final survey (n = 390), the odds of exclusive breastfeeding to 6 mo (OR: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.4, 4.0) and timely breastfeeding initiation (OR: 2.6; 95% CI: 1.6, 4.1) were increased in the intervention vs. control arm. Delayed introduction of water explained most of the increase in exclusive breastfeeding among clients receiving the intervention. In conclusion, a breastfeeding promotion intervention integrated into microcredit increased the likelihood that women adopted recommended breastfeeding practices. This intervention could be scaled up in Nigeria, where local organizations provide microcredit to >500,000 clients. Furthermore, the intervention could be adopted more widely

  17. Enhancing adherence through education.

    PubMed

    Smrtka, Jennifer; Caon, Christina; Saunders, Carol; Becker, Brenda L; Baxter, Nancy

    2010-10-01

    The treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) has advanced greatly since the introduction of disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) in the early 1990s. Although the DMTs have exhibited significant efficacy in relapsing-remitting MS and other forms of the disease, the degree of benefit depends heavily on patient adherence to recommended regimens. This article addresses some of the most pressing areas of unmet need in educating advanced-practice nurses, neurologists, patients, and support care partners regarding strategies that can overcome obstacles to adherence. The observations presented here are based on clinical experience with real-life cognitive, psychosocial, and cultural impediments to adherence. The article also explores the ways in which adherence may be affected by emerging therapies for MS (such as oral agents) as well as the educational needs that will arise with the further evolution of MS care. PMID:21049830

  18. Adherence to Insulin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sarbacker, G Blair; Urteaga, Elizabeth M

    2016-08-01

    IN BRIEF Six million people with diabetes use insulin either alone or in combination with an oral medication. Many barriers exist that lead to poor adherence with insulin. However, there is an underwhelming amount of data on interventions to address these barriers and improve insulin adherence. Until pharmacological advancements create easier, more acceptable insulin regimens, it is imperative to involve patients in shared decision-making. PMID:27574371

  19. Population increase and environmental deterioration correspond with microlithic innovations in South Asia ca. 35,000 years ago

    PubMed Central

    Petraglia, Michael; Clarkson, Christopher; Boivin, Nicole; Haslam, Michael; Korisettar, Ravi; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Ditchfield, Peter; Fuller, Dorian; James, Hannah; Jones, Sacha; Kivisild, Toomas; Koshy, Jinu; Lahr, Marta Mirazón; Metspalu, Mait; Roberts, Richard; Arnold, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Genetic studies of South Asia's population history have led to postulations of a significant and early population expansion in the subcontinent, dating to sometime in the Late Pleistocene. We evaluate this argument, based on new mtDNA analyses, and find evidence for significant demographic transition in the subcontinent, dating to 35–28 ka. We then examine the paleoenvironmental and, particularly, archaeological records for this time period and note that this putative demographic event coincides with a period of ecological and technological change in South Asia. We document the development of a new diminutive stone blade (microlithic) technology beginning at 35–30 ka, the first time that the precocity of this transition has been recognized across the subcontinent. We argue that the transition to microlithic technology may relate to changes in subsistence practices, as increasingly large and probably fragmented populations exploited resources in contracting favorable ecological zones just before the onset of full glacial conditions. PMID:19620737

  20. Carbon storage increases by major forest ecosystems in tropical South America since the Last Glacial Maximum and the early Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behling, Hermann

    2002-06-01

    To study the carbon storage increase of major forest ecosystems in tropical South America, such as Amazon rain forest, Atlantic rain forest, semideciduous forest, and Araucaria forest, the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and the early Holocene vegetation cover were reconstructed by pollen records. Marked forest expansion points to a significant total carbon storage increase by tropical forests in South America since the LGM and the early Holocene. The Amazon rain forest expansion, about 39% in area, had 28.3×10 9 tC (+20%), the highest carbon storage increase since the LGM. The expansion of the other much smaller forest areas also had a significant carbon storage increase since the LGM, the Atlantic rain forest with 4.9×10 9 tC (+55%), the semideciduous forest of eastern Brazil with 6.3×10 9 tC (+46%), the Araucaria forest with 3.4×10 9 tC (+108%). The estimated carbon storage increase of the four forest biomes since the early Holocene is also remarkable. The extensive deforestation in the last century strongly affected the carbon storage by tropical forests.

  1. Evaluation of medication adherence in Lebanese hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Yassine, Mohammad; Al-Hajje, Amal; Awada, Sanaa; Rachidi, Samar; Zein, Salam; Bawab, Wafa; Bou Zeid, Mayssam; El Hajj, Maya; Salameh, Pascale

    2016-09-01

    Controlling hypertension is essential in cardiovascular diseases. Poor medication adherence is associated with poor disease outcomes, waste of healthcare resources, and contributes to reduced blood pressure control. This study evaluates treatment adherence to antihypertensive therapy in Lebanese hypertensive patients by estimating the proportion of adherent hypertensive patients using a validated tool and investigates what factors predict this behavior. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was conducted on a random sample of 210 hypertensive outpatients selected from clinics located in tertiary-care hospitals and from private cardiology clinics located in Beirut. Adherence level was measured using a validated 8-item Modified Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMMAS). Among 210 patients, 50.5% showed high adherence, 27.1% medium adherence, and 22.4% low adherence to medication. Mean MMMAS score was 6.59±2.0. In bivariate analyses, having controlled blood pressure (p=0.003) and taking a combination drug (p=0.023) were predictors of high adherence. Forgetfulness (p<0.01), complicated drug regimen (p=0.001), and side effects (p=0.006) were predictors of low adherence after multiple liner regression. Logistic regression results showed that calcium channel blockers (p=0.030) were associated with increased adherence levels. In conclusion, developing multidisciplinary intervention programs to address the factors identified, in addition to educational strategies targeting healthcare providers, are necessary to enhance patient adherence. PMID:26232704

  2. Increase of genetic diversity and clonal replacement of epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains in South-East Austria.

    PubMed

    Zarfel, Gernot; Luxner, Josefa; Folli, Bettina; Leitner, Eva; Feierl, Gebhard; Kittinger, Clemens; Grisold, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Spa-typing and microarray techniques were used to study epidemiological changes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in South-East Austria. The population structure of 327 MRSA isolated between 2002 and 2012 was investigated. MRSA was assigned to 58 different spa types and 14 different MLST CC (multilocus sequence type clonal complexes); in particular, between 2007 and 2012, an increasing diversity in MRSA clones could be observed. The most abundant clonal complex was CC5. On the respective SCCmec cassettes, the CC5 isolates differed clearly within this decade and CC5/SCCmecI, the South German MRSA, predominant in 2002, was replaced by CC5/SCCmecII, the Rhine-Hesse MRSA in 2012. Whereas in many European countries MLST CC22-MRSA (EMRSA 15, the Barnim epidemic MRSA) is predominant, this clone occurred in Austria nearly 10 years later than in neighbouring countries. CC45, the Berlin EMRSA, epidemic in Germany, was only sporadically found in South-East Austria. The Irish ST8-MRSA-II represented by spa-type t190 was frequently found in 2002 and 2007, but disappeared in 2012. Our results demonstrate clonal replacement of MRSA clones within the last years in Austria. Ongoing surveillance is warranted for detection of changes within the MRSA population. PMID:27231237

  3. Increase of genetic diversity and clonal replacement of epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains in South-East Austria

    PubMed Central

    Zarfel, Gernot; Luxner, Josefa; Folli, Bettina; Leitner, Eva; Feierl, Gebhard; Kittinger, Clemens; Grisold, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Spa-typing and microarray techniques were used to study epidemiological changes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in South-East Austria. The population structure of 327 MRSA isolated between 2002 and 2012 was investigated. MRSA was assigned to 58 different spa types and 14 different MLST CC (multilocus sequence type clonal complexes); in particular, between 2007 and 2012, an increasing diversity in MRSA clones could be observed. The most abundant clonal complex was CC5. On the respective SCCmec cassettes, the CC5 isolates differed clearly within this decade and CC5/SCCmecI, the South German MRSA, predominant in 2002, was replaced by CC5/SCCmecII, the Rhine-Hesse MRSA in 2012. Whereas in many European countries MLST CC22-MRSA (EMRSA 15, the Barnim epidemic MRSA) is predominant, this clone occurred in Austria nearly 10 years later than in neighbouring countries. CC45, the Berlin EMRSA, epidemic in Germany, was only sporadically found in South-East Austria. The Irish ST8-MRSA-II represented by spa-type t190 was frequently found in 2002 and 2007, but disappeared in 2012. Our results demonstrate clonal replacement of MRSA clones within the last years in Austria. Ongoing surveillance is warranted for detection of changes within the MRSA population. PMID:27231237

  4. Adherence to Sublingual Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Mauro, Marina; Leo, Gualtiero; Ridolo, Erminia

    2016-02-01

    Adherence is a major issue in any medical treatment. Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is particularly affected by a poor adherence because a flawed application prevents the immunological effects that underlie the clinical outcome of the treatment. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) was introduced in the 1990s, and the early studies suggested that adherence and compliance to such a route of administration was better than the traditional subcutaneous route. However, the recent data from manufacturers revealed that only 13% of patients treated with SLIT reach the recommended 3-year duration. Therefore, improved adherence to SLIT is an unmet need that may be achieved by various approaches. The utility of patient education and accurate monitoring during the treatment was demonstrated by specific studies, while the success of technology-based tools, including online platforms, social media, e-mail, and a short message service by phone, is currently considered to improve the adherence. This goal is of pivotal importance to fulfill the object of SLIT that is to modify the natural history of allergy, ensuring a long-lasting clinical benefit, and a consequent pharmaco-economic advantage, when patients complete at least a 3-year course of treatment. PMID:26758865

  5. Increasing Patient Acceptance and Adherence Toward Insulin.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Matthew; Peters, Anne; Funnell, Martha

    2016-10-01

    Because of the progressive nature of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the majority of patients will need insulin to achieve and maintain glycemic control. By maintaining glycemic control, patients will avoid acute osmotic symptoms of hyperglycemia, instability in plasma glucose (PG) over time, and prevent or delay the development of diabetes complications without adversely affecting quality of life. Despite recommendations for initiating insulin therapy, both patient and health system barriers stand in the way. To develop confidence in individualizing patient therapy and maximize outcomes for patients with T2DM, healthcare practitioners (HCPs) were updated on recommendations and clinical evidence supporting when to initiate insulin therapy, strategies for overcoming provider and patient barriers for initiating insulin therapy, and the safety and efficacy of current and emerging insulin therapy and delivery technology for patients with T2DM. PMID:27109558

  6. Anti-Retroviral Therapy Increases the Prevalence of Dyslipidemia in South African HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Joel A.; Levitt, Naomi S.; Ross, Ian L.; Lacerda, Miguel; Maartens, Gary; Blom, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Data on the prevalence of dyslipidaemia and associated risk factors in HIV-infected patients from sub-Saharan Africa is sparse. We performed a cross-sectional analysis in a cohort of HIV-infected South African adults. Methods We studied HIV-infected patients who were either antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive or receiving non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based or protease inhibitor (PI)-based ART. Evaluation included fasting lipograms, oral glucose tolerance tests and clinical anthropometry. Dyslipidemia was defined using the NCEP ATPIII guidelines. Results The median age of the participants was 34 years (range 19–68 years) and 78% were women. The prevalence of dyslipidemia in 406 ART-naive and 551 participants on ART was 90.0% and 85%, respectively. Low HDL-cholesterol (HDLC) was the most common abnormality [290/406 (71%) ART-naïve and 237/551 (43%) ART- participants]. Participants on ART had higher triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), LDL-cholesterol (LDLC) and HDLC than the ART-naïve group. Severe dyslipidaemia, (LDLC> 4.9 mmol/L or TG >5.0 mmol/L) was present in <5% of participants. In multivariate analyses there were complex associations between age, gender, type and duration of ART and body composition and LDLC, HDLC and TG, which differed between ART-naïve and ART-participants. Conclusion Participants on ART had higher TG, TC, LDLC and HDLC than those who were ART-naïve but severe lipid abnormalities requiring evaluation and treatment were uncommon. PMID:26986065

  7. Evidence of increasing intra and inter-species transmission of Mycobacterium bovis in South Africa: are we losing the battle?

    PubMed

    Hlokwe, T M; van Helden, P; Michel, A L

    2014-07-01

    Tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis is recognized worldwide as a significant health risk in domestic cattle, farmed and wild animal species as well as in humans. We carried out spoligotyping and variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) typing methods to characterize 490 M. bovis isolates from livestock (cattle, n=230; pig n=1) and wildlife species (n=259) originating from different farms and regions in South Africa, with the aim to further establish the genetic diversity of the isolates, study the population structure of M. bovis and elucidate the extent of interspecies transmission of bovine tuberculosis. A total of ten spoligotype patterns were identified, two of which were novel (SB2199 and SB2200) and reported for the first time in the literature, while VNTR typing revealed a total of 97 VNTR profiles. Our results showed evidence of clonal expansion for some ancestral strains as well as co-infections with two or three M. bovis strains on some of the cattle and game farms, which suggested independent introductions of infected animals from epidemiologically unrelated sources. Five spoligotypes and nine VNTR profiles were shared between cattle and wildlife. Our findings showed that besides cattle, at least 16 different animal species in South Africa are infected with bovine tuberculosis, and highlight a strong evidence of inter and intra-species transmission of M. bovis. Infection of the blue wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) with M. bovis is described for the first time in this report. This update in epidemiological information raises concerns that bovine tuberculosis has increased its spatial distribution in South Africa and is also affecting an increasing number of wildlife species compared to ten years ago. PMID:24703246

  8. Increase of perceived frequency of neighborhood domestic violence is associated with increase of women's depression symptoms in a nationally representative longitudinal study in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Meffert, Susan M; McCulloch, Charles E; Neylan, Thomas C; Gandhi, Monica; Lund, Crick

    2015-04-01

    Studies that examine the effects of neighborhood characteristics on mental health show that perceptions of general neighborhood violence are associated with depression across diverse populations (Clark et al., 2008; Velez-Gomez et al., 2013; Wilson-Genderson & Pruchno, 2013). However, to our knowledge, none have examined the specific effect of perceived frequency of neighborhood domestic violence (PFNDV) on residents' mental health, despite knowledge that domestic violence is a potent predictor of depression at the level of the individual. This study investigates the impact of PFNDV on mental health using the South African National Income Dynamics Study (SA-NIDS). NIDS Waves 2 and 3 measure the perceived frequency of six neighborhood violence subtypes through the NIDS household respondent questionnaire and depression through a questionnaire administered to all NIDS participants. Linear regression was used to model the relationship between change in depression symptoms and change in violence subtypes between Waves 2 and 3. We found that two-year increase in PFNDV was significantly correlated with increase of depression symptoms over the same time period for women, independently of individual, household and neighborhood level characteristics, including five other types of neighborhood violence. No other type of violence was associated with increased depression in women in the fully adjusted model. Research and policy implications are discussed. PMID:25769107

  9. Increase of perceived frequency of neighborhood domestic violence is associated with increase of women's depression symptoms in a nationally representative longitudinal study in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Meffert, Susan M.; McCulloch, Charles E.; Neylan, Thomas C.; Gandhi, Monica; Lund, Crick

    2015-01-01

    Studies that examine the effects of neighborhood characteristics on mental health show that perceptions of general neighborhood violence are associated with depression across diverse populations (Clark et al., 2008; Velez-Gomez et al., 2013; Wilson-Genderson & Pruchno, 2013). However, to our knowledge, none have examined the specific effect of perceived frequency of neighborhood domestic violence (PFNDV) on residents' mental health, despite knowledge that domestic violence is a potent predictor of depression at the level of the individual. This study investigates the impact of PFNDV on mental health using the South African National Income Dynamics Study (SA-NIDS). NIDS Waves 2 and 3 measure the perceived frequency of six neighborhood violence subtypes through the NIDS household respondent questionnaire and depression through a questionnaire administered to all NIDS participants. Linear regression was used to model the relationship between change in depression symptoms and change in violence subtypes between Waves 2 and 3. We found that two-year increase in PFNDV was significantly correlated with increase of depression symptoms over the same time period for women, independently of individual, household and neighborhood level characteristics, including five other types of neighborhood violence. No other type of violence was associated with increased depression in women in the fully adjusted model. Research and policy implications are discussed. PMID:25769107

  10. Experiences of participating in an antiretroviral treatment adherence club

    PubMed Central

    Dudhia, Raashika; Kagee, Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to streamline the management of large numbers of patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in South Africa, adherence clubs were introduced in some districts in the Western Cape since 2008. Adherence clubs are group clinic visits of approximately thirty ART users who receive group adherence counselling and obtain a supply of medication. We sought to document the experiences of patients attending adherence clubs and health care workers at clinics where clubs were operating. Participants were six ART adherence club members and seven health care workers, which included HIV nurses, medical doctors, pharmacists and counsellors. Data in the form of one-on-one interviews were collected at the Infectious Diseases Clinic of a large district hospital in a peri-urban area in the Western Cape region of South Africa. The interviews covered ART users’ experiences of the clubs, advantages and challenges that arose in the context of the club-based method of providing treatment, and the concerns facing ART users and health care workers (HCW’s) with regard to the clubs. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. There were clear benefits to the introduction of adherence clubs, most importantly the reduced amount of time ART users needed to spend at the clinic. Yet, various problems also emerged, the most important one being the logistical problems associated with the timely and correct delivery of drugs. These benefits and disadvantages are discussed in the context of providing ART services to large numbers of patients in post-apartheid South Africa. PMID:25168720

  11. Iron Chelation Adherence to Deferoxamine and Deferasirox in Thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    Trachtenberg, Felicia; Vichinsky, Elliott; Haines, Dru; Pakbaz, Zahra; Mednick, Lauren; Sobota, Amy; Kwiatkowski, Janet; Thompson, Alexis A.; Porter, John; Coates, Thomas; Giardina, Patricia J.; Olivieri, Nancy; Yamashita, Robert; Neufeld, Ellis J.

    2015-01-01

    The Thalassemia Clinical Research Network collected adherence information from 79 patients on deferoxamine and 186 on deferasirox from 2007 to 2009. Chelation adherence was defined as percent of doses administered in the last 4 weeks (patient report) out of those prescribed (chart review). Chelation history since 2002 was available for 97 patients currently on deferoxamine and 217 on deferasirox, with crude estimates of adherence from chart review. Self-reported adherence to both deferoxamine and deferasirox were quite high, with slightly higher adherence to the oral chelator (97 vs. 92%). Ninety percent of patients on deferasirox reported at least 90% adherence, compared with 75% of patients on deferoxamine. Adherence to both chelators was highest in children, followed by adolescents and older adults. Predictors of lower deferoxamine adherence were smoking in the past year, problems sticking themselves (adults only), problems wearing their pump, and fewer transfusions in the past year. Predictors of lower deferasirox adherence were bodily pain and depression. Switching chelators resulted in increased adherence, regardless of the direction of the switch, although switching from deferoxamine to deferasirox was far more common. As adherence to deferoxamine is higher than previously reported, it appears beneficial for patients to have a choice in chelators. PMID:21523808

  12. 76 FR 7095 - Avocados Grown in South Florida; Increased Assessment Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... (75 FR 55942, Doc. No. AMS-FV-10-0067; FV10-915-1 IR), Sec. 915.235 was amended by increasing the... rule, without change, as published in the Federal Register (75 FR 55942, September 15, 2010) will tend... rule amending 7 CFR part 915, which was published at 75 FR 55942 on September 15, 2010, is adopted as...

  13. South Africa?s Increased Matriculation Passes: What Skunks behind the Rose?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monyooe, Lebusa; Tjatji, Martin; Mosese, Eulenda

    2014-01-01

    This article argues that the exponential increases in the Grade 12 (Matriculation) passes post 1994 do not necessarily translate to quality because of the low performance norms and standards set for passing Grade 12. It further calls for a serious reflection and interrogation of existing policies on performance, benchmarks, teacher education…

  14. Patient Education and Adherence to Aerosol Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ari, Arzu

    2015-06-01

    Nonadherence to prescribed medications results in disease instability and poor clinical control, with increases in hospital admissions, emergency room visits, school/work absenteeism, morbidity, and mortality. Poor patient adherence to therapy can be due to lack of cognition, competence, or contrivance. Patients who have not been trained or fail to understand use of drug and device combinations (cognition) often do not have the ability to use an aerosol device correctly (competence). Many patients have the competence to use the device correctly and know why they should use the device in the way they were taught; however, they still contrive to use it in an ineffective and suboptimal manner that reduces its efficiency and effectiveness. Ensuring effective aerosol therapy and optimizing its role in disease management involve not only delivery of aerosolized medications to the lungs, but also understanding why, when, and how to use the medications, competence to use the device, motivation to adhere to therapy, and not contriving to use the device in a way that will prevent effective drug delivery. This paper explains some of the problems with patient education and adherence to aerosol therapy and suggests strategies to evaluate, monitor, and improve patient adherence effectively in primary care. Factors affecting patient adherence to prescribed medications, effective educational interventions, and strategies to promote patient adherence to aerosol therapy are also discussed. PMID:26070585

  15. Increasing prevalence of comorbidity in patients with colorectal cancer in the South of the Netherlands 1995-2010.

    PubMed

    van Leersum, N J; Janssen-Heijnen, M L G; Wouters, M W J M; Rutten, H J T; Coebergh, J W; Tollenaar, R A E M; Lemmens, V E P P

    2013-05-01

    Comorbidity has large impact on colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment and outcomes and may increase as the population ages. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence and time trends of comorbid diseases in patients with CRC from 1995 to 2010. The Eindhoven Cancer Registry registers comorbidity in all patients with primary CRC in the South of the Netherlands. We analyzed the prevalence of serious comorbid diseases in four time frames from 1995 to 2010. Thereby, we addressed its association with age, gender and socio-economic status (SES). The prevalence of comorbidity was registered in 27,339 patients with primary CRC. During the study period, the prevalence of comorbidity increased from 47% to 62%, multimorbidity increased from 20% to 37%. Hypertension and cardiovascular diseases were most prevalent and increased largely over time (respectively 16-29% and 12-24%). Pulmonary diseases increased in women, but remained stable in men. Average age at diagnosis increased from 68.3 to 69.5 years (p = 0.004). A low SES and male gender were associated with a higher risk of comorbidity (not changing over time). This study indicates that comorbidity among patients with CRC is common, especially in males and patients with a low SES. The prevalence of comorbidity increased from 1995 to 2010, in particular in presumably nutritional diseases. Ageing, increased life expectancy and life style changes may contribute to more comorbid diseases. Also, improved awareness among health care providers on the importance of comorbidity may have resulted in better registration. The increasing burden of comorbidity in patients with CRC emphasizes the need for more focus on individualized medicine. PMID:23015513

  16. [Increase of entomological indices during the pre-epidemic period of dengue in Ben Tre, South Vietnam].

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T P Q; Luu, L L; Vu, T Q H; Buisson, Y

    2011-10-01

    Dengue has emerged in Vietnam 50 years ago and since has become endemo-epidemic throughout the whole country. Each year, major epidemics of dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) hit South Vietnam during the rainy season, causing significant morbidity and mortality, especially among young children. The only preventive measure is vector control, but it is often implemented too late or indiscriminately. The aim of this study was to investigate, in the pre-epidemic stage, the existence of significant changes in vector indices, which will predict DF/DHF outbreaks. We conducted a descriptive transversal study, repeated once a month for four months (March to June) in the village of Locthuan (province Ben Tre) in the Mekong's delta. Adult mosquitoes were caught in 30 houses, and larvae were collected in water holding containers of 50 houses. The houses were randomly selected. Vector densities were calculated according to the indices recommended by WHO. Virological analysis was carried out on lots of female Aedes and larvae in order to determine viral infection rates. Catches of adult mosquitoes collected 496 specimens including 329 Aedes, 139 Culex and 28 Anopheles. Aedes aegypti was present in 63% of visited homes that is an average density of 1.8 mosquitoes per house. The increase in imaginal indices during the 4 months was not significant. The survey of breeding sites of Ae. aegypti identified 1292 water containers in which 71,569 larval specimens were collected. The values of house index, container index [CI] and Breteau index [BI] increased each month, the latter from 166 to 442. This increase was significant for CI and BI. Breeding sites were mostly intra-home, mainly consisting of large and small ceramic jars. Larval density of Ae. aegypti in the containers also increased significantly over the 4 months. It was correlated with the lack of cover and predators such as Mesocyclops spp., Micronecta spp. and larvivorous fishes. Cultivation of 15 pools of

  17. Side effects, adherence self-efficacy, and adherence to antiretroviral treatment: a mediation analysis in a Chinese sample.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liying; Li, Xiaoming; Lin, Zhenping; Jacques-Tiura, Angela J; Xu, Jinping; Zhou, Yuejiao; Qiao, Shan; Shen, Zhiyong; Stanton, Bonita

    2016-07-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a lifelong treatment. To date, ART adherence is suboptimal for most patients in resource-poor settings. Previous research indicates that medication side effects are perceived to be a significant barrier of high ART adherence. Data regarding the role of adherence self-efficacy in mediating the relationship between side effects from ART and adherence to ART are limited; thus, this study examines this potential mediational role of self-efficacy. A cross-sectional survey of 2987 people living with HIV aged ≥18 years was conducted in 2012-2013 in Guangxi Autonomous Region (Guangxi) which has one of the fastest-growing HIV rates in China. Of the total sample, 2146 (72.1%) participants had initiated ART. Participants reported the number of days of completing the daily dose of ART in the past month; adherence was defined as completing the daily dose at least 28 days in the last month (≥90%). Side effects were significantly negatively related to adherence to ART. Mediation analyses indicated that adherence self-efficacy significantly mediated the side effects-adherence relationship. Future interventions to increase adherence self-efficacy and effective coping with side effects among HIV patients are needed in order to improve their ART adherence. PMID:27010870

  18. Serum Calcium Increase Correlates With Worsening of Lipid Profile: An Observational Study on a Large Cohort From South Italy.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Luigia; Faniello, Maria C; Canino, Giovanni; Tripolino, Cesare; Gnasso, Agostino; Cuda, Giovanni; Costanzo, Francesco S; Irace, Concetta

    2016-02-01

    Despite the well-documented role of calcium in cell metabolism, its role in the development of cardiovascular disease is still under heavy debate. Several studies suggest that calcium supplementation might be associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, whereas others underline a significant effect on lowering high blood pressure and hyperlipidemia. The purpose of this study was to investigate, in a large nonselected cohort from South Italy, if serum calcium levels correlate with lipid values and can therefore be linked to higher individual cardiovascular risk.Eight-thousand-six-hundred-ten outpatients addressed to the Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, University of Magna Græcia, Catanzaro, Italy from January 2012 to December 2013 for routine blood tests, were enrolled in the study. Total HDL-, LDL- and non-HDL colesterol, triglycerides, and calcium were determined with standard methods.We observed a significant association between total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and serum calcium in men and postmenopause women. Interestingly, in premenopause women, we only found a direct correlation between serum calcium, total cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol. Calcium significantly increased while increasing total cholesterol and triglycerides in men and postmenopause women.Our results confirm that progressive increase of serum calcium level correlates with worsening of lipid profile in our study population. Therefore, we suggest that a greater caution should be used in calcium supplement prescription particularly in men and women undergoing menopause, in which an increase of serum lipids is already known to be associated with a higher cardiovascular risk. PMID:26937904

  19. Efavirenz and rifampicin in the South African context: is there a need to dose increase efavirenz with concurrent rifampicin therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Orrell, Catherine; Cohen, Karen; Conradie, Francesca; Zeinecker, Jennifer; Ive, Prudence; Sanne, Ian; Wood, Robin

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Increasing EFV dose from 600mg to 800mg daily has been suggested with concomitant RFN, as induction of cytochrome p450 isoenzymes may reduce EFV plasma concentrations Methods Individuals from the CIPRA-South Africa cohort taking EFV-based ART with concomitant TB were dosed with either increased-(800mg) or standard-(600mg) dose EFV during TB treatment. After TB therapy all took 600mg EFV. Two mid-dosing interval EFV concentrations were determined from each individual: after 4 weeks of concomitant EFV and RFN therapy, and at least 4 weeks after TB therapy completion. Mid-dosing interval EFV concentrations were compared within individuals using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results Paired-samples were collected from 72 individuals. 45(63%) were women; median weight 59kg (IQR52-67kg). At ART start median CD4 count was114 cells/mm3 (IQR37-165), median viral load 5.5log (IQR5.1–5.9). 38 (53%) took 800mg EFV during TB treatment and 34(47%) took 600mg. EFV concentrations in the 800mg group were higher with RFN [[2.9mg/L (IQR 1.8–5.6)] than without [2.1mg/L (IQR 1.4–3.0)

  20. Reconceptualizing medication adherence: six phases of dynamic adherence.

    PubMed

    Gearing, Robin E; Townsend, Lisa; MacKenzie, Michael; Charach, Alice

    2011-01-01

    Nonadherence is the Achilles' heel of effective psychiatric treatment. It affects the resolution of mental health symptoms and interferes with the assessment of treatment response. The meaning of the term adherence has evolved over time and is now associated with a variety of definitions and measurement methods. The result has been a poorly operationalized and nonstandardized term that is often interpreted differently by providers and patients. Drawing extensively from the literature, this article aims to (1) describe changes in the concept of adherence, drawing from the mental health treatment literature, (2) present a more comprehensive definition of adherence that recognizes the role of patient-provider transactions, (3) introduce dynamic adherence, a six-phase model, which incorporates the role of transactional processes and other factors that influence patients' adherence decisions, and (4) provide recommendations for providers to improve adherence as well as their relationships with patients. PMID:21790266

  1. Materials Adherence Experiment: Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, P.P.; Landis, G.A.; Oberle, L.G.

    1997-12-31

    NASA`s Mars Pathfinder mission, launched December 4, 1996, reflects a new philosophy of exploiting new technologies to reduce mission cost and accelerate the pace of space exploration. Pathfinder will demonstrate a variety of new technologies aimed at reducing the cost of Mars exploration. Chief among these will be the demonstration of a solar-powered spacecraft on the surface of Mars. The Materials Adherence Experiment on Pathfinder was designed to measure the degradation of solar arrays due to dust settling out of the atmosphere and blocking light to the solar array, lowering the array power output.

  2. Improving Adherence to Hand Hygiene among Health Care Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maskerine, Courtney; Loeb, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Increased adherence to hand hygiene is widely acknowledged to be the most important way of reducing infections in health care facilities. Despite evidence of benefit, adherence to hand hygiene among health care professionals remains low. Several behavioral and organizational theories have been proposed to explain this. As a whole, the success of…

  3. Enhancing Commitment Improves Adherence to a Medical Regimen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putnam, Dana E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Evaluated commitment-based intervention for improvement of adherence to 10-day antibiotic regimen. Subjects were 60 college students. Experimental subjects made verbal and written commitments for adherence and completed tasks designed to increase their investment in medication regimen. Controls performed similarly structured tasks unrelated to…

  4. Increased Drought Impacts on Temperate Rainforests from Southern South America: Results of a Process-Based, Dynamic Forest Model

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Alvaro G.; Armesto, Juan J.; Díaz, M. Francisca; Huth, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Increased droughts due to regional shifts in temperature and rainfall regimes are likely to affect forests in temperate regions in the coming decades. To assess their consequences for forest dynamics, we need predictive tools that couple hydrologic processes, soil moisture dynamics and plant productivity. Here, we developed and tested a dynamic forest model that predicts the hydrologic balance of North Patagonian rainforests on Chiloé Island, in temperate South America (42°S). The model incorporates the dynamic linkages between changing rainfall regimes, soil moisture and individual tree growth. Declining rainfall, as predicted for the study area, should mean up to 50% less summer rain by year 2100. We analysed forest responses to increased drought using the model proposed focusing on changes in evapotranspiration, soil moisture and forest structure (above-ground biomass and basal area). We compared the responses of a young stand (YS, ca. 60 years-old) and an old-growth forest (OG, >500 years-old) in the same area. Based on detailed field measurements of water fluxes, the model provides a reliable account of the hydrologic balance of these evergreen, broad-leaved rainforests. We found higher evapotranspiration in OG than YS under current climate. Increasing drought predicted for this century can reduce evapotranspiration by 15% in the OG compared to current values. Drier climate will alter forest structure, leading to decreases in above ground biomass by 27% of the current value in OG. The model presented here can be used to assess the potential impacts of climate change on forest hydrology and other threats of global change on future forests such as fragmentation, introduction of exotic tree species, and changes in fire regimes. Our study expands the applicability of forest dynamics models in remote and hitherto overlooked regions of the world, such as southern temperate rainforests. PMID:25068869

  5. Increased drought impacts on temperate rainforests from southern South America: results of a process-based, dynamic forest model.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Alvaro G; Armesto, Juan J; Díaz, M Francisca; Huth, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Increased droughts due to regional shifts in temperature and rainfall regimes are likely to affect forests in temperate regions in the coming decades. To assess their consequences for forest dynamics, we need predictive tools that couple hydrologic processes, soil moisture dynamics and plant productivity. Here, we developed and tested a dynamic forest model that predicts the hydrologic balance of North Patagonian rainforests on Chiloé Island, in temperate South America (42°S). The model incorporates the dynamic linkages between changing rainfall regimes, soil moisture and individual tree growth. Declining rainfall, as predicted for the study area, should mean up to 50% less summer rain by year 2100. We analysed forest responses to increased drought using the model proposed focusing on changes in evapotranspiration, soil moisture and forest structure (above-ground biomass and basal area). We compared the responses of a young stand (YS, ca. 60 years-old) and an old-growth forest (OG, >500 years-old) in the same area. Based on detailed field measurements of water fluxes, the model provides a reliable account of the hydrologic balance of these evergreen, broad-leaved rainforests. We found higher evapotranspiration in OG than YS under current climate. Increasing drought predicted for this century can reduce evapotranspiration by 15% in the OG compared to current values. Drier climate will alter forest structure, leading to decreases in above ground biomass by 27% of the current value in OG. The model presented here can be used to assess the potential impacts of climate change on forest hydrology and other threats of global change on future forests such as fragmentation, introduction of exotic tree species, and changes in fire regimes. Our study expands the applicability of forest dynamics models in remote and hitherto overlooked regions of the world, such as southern temperate rainforests. PMID:25068869

  6. Assessing adherence in Thai patients taking combination antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Kerr, S J; Avihingsanon, A; Putcharoen, O; Chetchotisakd, P; Layton, M; Ubolyam, S; Ruxrungtham, K; Cooper, D A; Phanuphak, P; Duncombe, C

    2012-03-01

    In settings where medications and viral load (VL) monitoring are limited by cost, clinicians need reliable ways to assess patient adherence to therapy. We assessed sensitivity and specificity of two self-reported adherence tools (a visual analogue scale [VAS] and the CASE [Center for Adherence Support Evaluation] adherence index), against a standard of detectable VL, with 288 patients from three sites in Thailand. We also assessed predictors of non-adherence. The sensitivity and specificity of the VAS <95% and CASE adherence index ≤11 against a VL >50 copies/mL were 26% and 90%, 19% and 95%, respectively. Against a VL ≥1000 copies/mL sensitivities increased to 55% and 36%, respectively, and specificities were unchanged. Attending a clinic not staffed by HIV specialists (odds ratio [OR] 3.14; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.19-8.34) and being educated to primary school level or less (OR 2.24; 95% CI 1.01-4.94) were associated with self-reported adherence <95% on the VAS in multivariate analysis. Adherence assessed by the VAS was a more accurate predictor of detectable VL. Policy-makers in resource-limited settings should ensure that treatment centres are staffed with well-trained personnel aware of the importance of good patient adherence. PMID:22581867

  7. Non-adherence to topical treatments for actinic keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Shergill, Bav; Zokaie, Simon; Carr, Alison J

    2014-01-01

    Background There is limited information on the patterns of use, adherence rates, and factors that impact adherence with topical treatments for actinic keratosis (AK). Objectives To establish patterns of use and adherence with topical treatments for AK and to identify treatment-related factors that impact on adherence. Methods A community-based, cross-sectional study was performed using a standardized questionnaire completed online or via telephone interview. Patients were stratified according to the presence of AK lesions on the scalp and/or other extremities; and presence of scarring resulting from treatment. Results This study included 305 patients with AK who were currently using a patient-applied topical therapy for AK or had used one within the previous 12 months. In total, 88% (n = 268/305) of patients were either non-adherent, non-persistent or both non-adherent and non-persistent to topical therapy. Duration of treatment was associated with increasing rates of non-adherence (adjusted odds ratio [OR]; for treatment durations greater than 4 weeks, 2.2, P < 0.01): 52% of patients were non-adherent with 3–4 week treatment duration; 69% of patients with 4–8 week treatment duration; and 71% of patients with 6–12 week treatment duration. There were similar increases in non-persistence with increasing treatment duration (adjusted OR; for treatment durations greater than 4 weeks, 2.1, P < 0.05). Conclusion This study found high rates of non-adherence and non-persistence in patients with AK. Duration of treatment was a significant factor contributing to non-adherence and non-persistence to topical treatments. Patient-applied topical therapies that require less frequent application and have shorter treatment duration may be associated with improved adherence rates. PMID:24379656

  8. Origin of increased terrigenous supply to the NE South American continental margin during Heinrich Stadial 1 and the Younger Dryas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yancheng; Chiessi, Cristiano M.; Mulitza, Stefan; Zabel, Matthias; Trindade, Ricardo I. F.; Hollanda, Maria Helena B. M.; Dantas, Elton L.; Govin, Aline; Tiedemann, Ralf; Wefer, Gerold

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the redistribution of terrigenous materials in the northeastern (NE) South American continental margin during slowdown events of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). The compilation of stratigraphic data from 108 marine sediment cores collected across the western tropical Atlantic shows an extreme rise in sedimentation rates off the Parnaíba River mouth (about 2°S) during Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1, 18-15 ka). Sediment core GeoB16206-1, raised offshore the Parnaíba River mouth, documents relatively constant 143Nd/144Nd values (expressed as εNd(0)) throughout the last 30 ka. Whereas the homogeneous εNd(0) data support the input of fluvial sediments by the Parnaíba River from the same source area directly onshore, the increases in Fe/Ca, Al/Si and Rb/Sr during HS1 indicate a marked intensification of fluvial erosion in the Parnaíba River drainage basin. In contrast, the εNd(0) values from sediment core GeoB16224-1 collected off French Guiana (about 7°N) suggest Amazon-sourced materials within the last 30 ka. We attribute the extremely high volume of terrigenous sediments deposited offshore the Parnaíba River mouth during HS1 to (i) an enhanced precipitation in the catchment region and (ii) a reduced North Brazil Current, which are both associated with a weakened AMOC.

  9. Evidence that extracellular components function in adherence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, D H; Fives-Taylor, P M

    1993-01-01

    Extracellular microvesicles and a highly proteinaceous polymer associated with a leukotoxin-producing strain, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans SUNY 75, were shown to increase adherence of other weakly adherent A. actinomycetemcomitans strains to KB epithelial cells. Images PMID:8406899

  10. Improving adherence to antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan African HIV-positive populations: an enhanced adherence package.

    PubMed

    Kunutsor, S; Walley, J; Muchuro, S; Katabira, E; Balidawa, H; Namagala, E; Ikoona, E

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing access to antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan African HIV-positive populations, it is important to find additional simple, effective, and feasible methods of improving and maintaining adequately high levels of adherence. In this study, we undertook the development, testing, implementation, and evaluation of various adherence support interventions at four sites in Uganda. A one-group pre- and post-intervention design was employed under routine operational conditions. Various adherence support strategies were identified, adapted, and developed. These strategies which included a combination of elements such as counseling, group education, leaflets, late attendee tracing, and adherence diaries was implemented for an antiretroviral treatment cohort which had baseline levels of adherence measured preintervention. Follow-up was from August 2009 through August 2010. Mean adherence and proportions of clients achieving adherence levels of 95% and above were determined at end of follow-up. Of the 967 participants enrolled, 856 (88.5%) completed follow-up. A before-and-after comparison of outcomes demonstrated that mean adherence (95% confidence interval [CI]) improved statistically significant from baseline following implementation of the interventions (97.4% [96.9-97.9%] to 99.1% [99.0-99.3%], P=0.001). There was also a significant difference between proportions with optimal (≥ 95%) and suboptimal adherence (<95%) pre- and post-intervention (7.0% difference, 95% CI: 4.6-9.4%, P<0.001). We conclude that additional adherence strategies (including counseling, group education, leaflets, late attendee tracing, and adherence diaries) can substantially improve and maintain high levels of treatment adherence in the long term. Health systems in sub-Saharan African countries should consider integrating these elements into their treatment programs for HIV/AIDS. PMID:22621288

  11. Adherence of sputtered titanium carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    The study searches for interface treatment that would increase the adhesion of TiC coating to nickel- and titanium-base alloys. Rene 41 (19 wt percent Cr, 11 wt percent Mo, 3 wt percent Ti, balance Ni) and Ti-6Al-4V (6 wt percent Al, 4 wt percent V, balance Ti) are considered. Adhesion of the coatings is evaluated in pin-and disk friction tests. The coatings and interface regions are examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results suggest that sputtered refractory compound coatings adhere best when a mixed compound of coating and substrate metals is formed in the interfacial region. The most effective type of refractory compound interface appears to depend on both substrate and coating material. A combination of metallic interlayer deposition and mixed compound interface formation may be more effective for some substrate coating combinations than either alone.

  12. Pharmacists' perspectives on monitoring adherence to treatment in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Karen; Ryan, Cristín; Downey, Damian G

    2016-04-01

    specialist pharmacist involvement could facilitate improved adherence monitoring. Conclusion Current adherence knowledge is largely based on self-report. Further work is required to establish the most appropriate method of adherence monitoring in CF centres, to improve the recording of adherence and to understand the impact of increased specialist pharmacist involvement on that adherence. PMID:26715548

  13. Adherence of Clostridium thermocellum to cellulose.

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, E A; Kenig, R; Lamed, R

    1983-01-01

    The adherence of Clostridium thermocellum, a cellulolytic, thermophilic anaerobe, to its insoluble substrate (cellulose) was studied. The adherence phenomenon was determined to be selective for cellulose. The observed adherence was not significantly affected by various parameters, including salts, pH, temperature, detergents, or soluble sugars. A spontaneous adherence-defective mutant strain (AD2) was isolated from the wild-type strain YS. Antibodies were prepared against the bacterial cell surface and rendered specific to the cellulose-binding factor (CBF) by adsorption to mutant AD2 cells. By using these CBF-specific antibodies, crossed immunoelectrophoresis of cell extracts revealed a single discrete precipitation peak in the parent strain which was absent in the mutant. This difference was accompanied by an alteration in the polypeptide profile whereby sonicates of strain YS contained a 210,000-molecular-weight band which was missing in strain AD2. The CBF antigen could be removed from cell extracts by adsorption to cellulose. A combined gel-overlay--immunoelectrophoretic technique demonstrated that the cellulose-binding properties of the CBF were accompanied by carboxymethylcellulase activity. During the exponential phase of growth, a large part of the CBF antigen and related carboxymethylcellulase activity was associated with the cells of wild-type strain YS. However, the amounts decreased in stationary-phase cells. Cellobiose-grown mutant AD2 cells lacked the cell-associated CBF, but the latter was detected in the extracellular fluid. Increased levels of CBF were observed when cells were grown on cellulose. In addition, mutant AD2 regained cell-associated CBF together with the property of cellulose adherence. The presence of the CBF antigen and related adherence characteristics appeared to be a phenomenon common to other naturally occurring strains of this species. Images PMID:6630152

  14. [Adherence to psychopharmacological treatment: Psychotherapeutic strategies to enhance adherence].

    PubMed

    Lencer, R; Korn, D

    2015-05-01

    Effective psychopharmacological medication with good tolerability represents the cornerstone of treatment for severe mental illness; however, the 1-year adherence rates are only approximately 50%. The term adherence emphasizes the collaborative responsibility of the clinician and the patient for a positive treatment outcome. Reasons for non-adherence are manifold and include patient-specific factors, such as self-stigmatization, lack of social and familial support, cognitive impairment and substance use besides insufficient effectiveness and the occurrence of side effects of the psychotropic drugs. To enhance adherence, both clinician and patient have to fully understand all the reasons for and against adherence to medication before a collaborative decision is made on future long-term treatment. A positive attitude towards medication critically depends on whether patients feel that the medication supports the attainment of the individual goals. PMID:25903501

  15. Optimizing adherence to antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Seema; Reddy, K. Srikanth; Dhayarkar, Sampada

    2011-01-01

    HIV has now become a manageable chronic disease. However, the treatment outcomes may get hampered by suboptimal adherence to ART. Adherence optimization is a concrete reality in the wake of ‘universal access’ and it is imperative to learn lessons from various studies and programmes. This review examines current literature on ART scale up, treatment outcomes of the large scale programmes and the role of adherence therein. Social, behavioural, biological and programme related factors arise in the context of ART adherence optimization. While emphasis is laid on adherence, retention of patients under the care umbrella emerges as a major challenge. An in-depth understanding of patients’ health seeking behaviour and health care delivery system may be useful in improving adherence and retention of patients in care continuum and programme. A theoretical framework to address the barriers and facilitators has been articulated to identify problematic areas in order to intervene with specific strategies. Empirically tested objective adherence measurement tools and approaches to assess adherence in clinical/ programme settings are required. Strengthening of ART programmes would include appropriate policies for manpower and task sharing, integrating traditional health sector, innovations in counselling and community support. Implications for the use of theoretical model to guide research, clinical practice, community involvement and policy as part of a human rights approach to HIV disease is suggested. PMID:22310817

  16. Biologic Influences on Exercise Adherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.

    1981-01-01

    Diagnostic profiles of 362 male participants in an exercise program were analyzed to determine the biological variables between exercise adherence and symptoms of coronary disease. Findings indicated that individuals with lower metabolic capacity tended to adhere longer, to be less fit, were leaner, and began with more symptoms related to coronary…

  17. A system dynamics modelling approach to studying the increasing prevalence of people with intellectual developmental disorders in New South Wales.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lynette; Heffernan, Mark; McDonnell, Geoffrey; Short, Stephanie D; Naganathan, Vasi

    2016-06-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence count of people with intellectual developmental disorders (IDD) in New South Wales (NSW) in 2003, by age groups, and to forecast their prevalence until 2043. Methods Administrative data obtained from NSW government departments of education, pensions, health and disability were used to profile the number of people whose characteristics met the criteria for 'intellectual developmental disorders' who had received services in 2003. These figures were compared with published tables of NSW data from the national self-report Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers (SDAC) of 2003 to estimate the likely prevalence of people with intellectual developmental disorders, by age groups in that year. The results were then used as baseline figures in a computational system dynamics model of the aging chain of people with these disorders, built to project prevalence to 2043. Results The number of people who met the criteria for having intellectual developmental disorder in NSW in 2003 was estimated to be 57000 (a ratio of 85 per 10000), with 32000 aged 0-15 years, 15000 aged 16-39 years, 9000 aged 40-64 years and 1000 aged 65+ years. Using these figures as baseline, the computer simulation predicted a total increase to 77225 people in 2013 and 135905 people by 2043. By 2043, the number of children with intellectual developmental disorders will have doubled, from 32000 to 59480, and the number of adults will have tripled, from 25000 to 76420. Conclusions This modelling technique forecast an increase in the prevalence count of people with intellectual developmental disorders in NSW over the period 2003-43 from 57000 (85 per 10000) to 135905 (135 per 10000). These predictions may have important implications for the planning of specialist health services for this group of people. What is known about the topic? The prevalence ratio of people with intellectual developmental disorders is quoted at lying between 1% and 2% of

  18. Cognitive mediators linking social support networks to colorectal cancer screening adherence.

    PubMed

    Honda, Keiko; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie

    2006-10-01

    This paper argues that normative considerations are more important than attitudinal factors in engaging colorectal cancer screening, and tests a model explaining how unique cultural expressions of social networks influence screening adherence. Structural equation modeling was used to understand colorectal cancer screening in a population-based sample of 341 Japanese Americans aged 50 and over. The model accounted for 25% of the variance in screening adherence. Adherence was most strongly associated with family/friend subjective norms about colorectal cancer screening use. Emotional family support, but not the size of the networks, was indirectly related to adherence via increased family/friend subjective norms, while emotional friend support was directly related to adherence. While usual source of care was directly associated with adherence, better provider-patient communication was directly and indirectly associated with adherence via increased perceived benefits. The findings of this study support strengthening informal support networks to enhance adherence among Japanese Americans at risk. PMID:16958004

  19. Interventional tools to improve medication adherence: review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Elísio; Giardini, Anna; Savin, Magda; Menditto, Enrica; Lehane, Elaine; Laosa, Olga; Pecorelli, Sergio; Monaco, Alessandro; Marengoni, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Medication adherence and persistence is recognized as a worldwide public health problem, particularly important in the management of chronic diseases. Nonadherence to medical plans affects every level of the population, but particularly older adults due to the high number of coexisting diseases they are affected by and the consequent polypharmacy. Chronic disease management requires a continuous psychological adaptation and behavioral reorganization. In literature, many interventions to improve medication adherence have been described for different clinical conditions, however, most interventions seem to fail in their aims. Moreover, most interventions associated with adherence improvements are not associated with improvements in other outcomes. Indeed, in the last decades, the degree of nonadherence remained unchanged. In this work, we review the most frequent interventions employed to increase the degree of medication adherence, the measured outcomes, and the improvements achieved, as well as the main limitations of the available studies on adherence, with a particular focus on older persons. PMID:26396502

  20. [Granulocyte adherence and chemotaxis in children (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Rister, M; Horatz, M

    1981-01-01

    Granulocyte adherence to endothelial surfaces associated with their chemotactic property enables these cells to leave the peripheral blood and to migrate into the tissue. This study was performed to investigate the effect of bacterial and viral infections as well as various kinds of therapies on these leukocyte functions. The adherence of control granulocytes to nylon fibers was 70%. In contrast to viral infections bacterial infections increased the adherence to 91%. Following the treatment with high dose methotrexate or vincristine the adherence was reduced to 20%. This granulocyte function defect was evident up to 14 days after the high dose methotrexate infusion. An age dependency of granulocyte adherence was not observed. In addition, viral infections as well as cytostatic therapy did not effect granulozyte chemotaxis. But bacterial infections and various defined phagocytic defects impaired the granulocyte chemotactic activity. PMID:7193772

  1. Symptom severity, self-reported adherence, and electronic pill monitoring in poorly adherent patients with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sajatovic, Martha; Levin, Jennifer; Sams, Johnny; Cassidy, Kristin A; Akagi, Kouri; Aebi, Michelle E; Ramirez, Luis F; Safren, Steven A; Tatsuoka, Curtis

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This analysis of screening and baseline data from an ongoing trial examined self-report versus automated adherence monitoring and assessed the relationship between bipolar disorder (BD) symptoms and adherence in 104 poorly adherent individuals. Methods Adherence was measured with the Tablets Routine Questionnaire (TRQ) and the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS). Symptoms were measured with the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). Results Mean age of the sample was 46.3 years [standard deviation (SD) = 9.41], with 72% (n = 75) women and 71% (n = 74) African American subjects. Adherence improved from screening to baseline with a mean missed drug proportion measured by TRQ of 61.43% (SD = 26.48) versus baseline mean of 46.61% (SD = 30.55). Mean proportion of missed medication using MEMS at baseline was 66.43% (SD = 30.40). Correlation between TRQ and MEMS was 0.47. Correlation between a single index drug and all BD medications was 0.95. Symptoms were generally positively correlated with TRQ (worse adherence = more severe symptoms), but in most instances was only at a trend level (p > 0.05) with the exception of correlation between baseline TRQ and MADRS and BPRS, which were positive (r = 0.20 and r = 0.21, respectively) and significant (p ≤ 0.05). Conclusions In patients with BD, monitoring increased adherence by 15%. MEMS identified 20% more non-adherence than self-report. Using a standard procedure to identify a single index drug for adherence monitoring may be one way to assess global adherence in patients with BD receiving polypharmacy treatment. Greater BD symptom severity may be a clinical indicator to assess for adherence problems. PMID:26529124

  2. Long-Term Adherence to Health Behavior Change

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Kathryn R.; Anton, Stephen D.; Perri, Michal G.

    2016-01-01

    The utility of lifestyle-based health promotion interventions is directly impacted by participant adherence to prescribed behavior changes. Unfortunately, poor adherence to behaviors recommended in lifestyle interventions is widespread, particularly over the long-term; thus, the “adherence problem” represents a significant challenge to the effectiveness of these interventions. The current review provides an overview of the adherence problem and describes a theoretical framework through which the factors that impact adherence can be understood. To further understand the difficulties individuals face when adhering to health behavior changes, we focus our discussion on challenges associated with adherence to lifestyle behaviors recommended for weight loss and healthy weight management (i.e., reductions in dietary intake and increases in physical activity). We describe strategies that improve long-term adherence to health behaviors related to healthy weight management, including the provision of extended care, skills training, improving social support, and strategies specific to maintaining changes in dietary intake and physical activity. Finally, we discuss difficulties involved in implementing long-term weight management programs and suggest practical solutions for providers.

  3. Genetic factors in exercise adoption, adherence and obesity.

    PubMed

    Herring, M P; Sailors, M H; Bray, M S

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity and exercise play critical roles in energy balance. While many interventions targeted at increasing physical activity have demonstrated efficacy in promoting weight loss or maintenance in the short term, long term adherence to such programmes is not frequently observed. Numerous factors have been examined for their ability to predict and/or influence physical activity and exercise adherence. Although physical activity has been demonstrated to have a strong genetic component in both animals and humans, few studies have examined the association between genetic variation and exercise adherence. In this review, we provide a detailed overview of the non-genetic and genetic predictors of physical activity and adherence to exercise. In addition, we report the results of analysis of 26 single nucleotide polymorphisms in six candidate genes examined for association to exercise adherence, duration, intensity and total exercise dose in young adults from the Training Interventions and Genetics of Exercise Response (TIGER) Study. Based on both animal and human research, neural signalling and pleasure/reward systems in the brain may drive in large part the propensity to be physically active and to adhere to an exercise programme. Adherence/compliance research in other fields may inform future investigation of the genetics of exercise adherence. PMID:24034448

  4. Methodologies for medication adherence evaluation: Focus on psoriasis topical treatment.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Ana; Teixeira, Maribel; Almeida, Vera; Torres, Tiago; Sousa Lobo, José Manuel; Almeida, Isabel Filipa

    2016-05-01

    Adherence to topical treatment has been less studied in comparison with systemic therapeutic regimens and is poorly understood. High-quality research on this area is essential to outline a strategy to increase medication adherence and clinical outcomes. For a more comprehensive understanding of this issue, a systematic review of the methodologies for topical treatment adherence evaluation in psoriasis was undertaken. Twenty one studies were selected from the literature which used six different adherence methodologies. Merely three studies used multiple adherence measurement methods. The most used method was questionnaire (44%) which was also associated with higher variability of the adherence results. One possible explanation is the lack of a validated questionnaire designed specifically for the evaluation of adherence to topical treatment. Only one method (medication weight) takes into consideration the applied dose. However, the estimation of the expected weight is complex, which renders this method, as used presently, less effective. The use of a dosing device could improve its accuracy and be helpful to clearly instruct the patients about the correct dose. As there is no single method that allows an accurate and complete assessment of adherence it is recommended to use a combination of methods, including self-report and medicines' weight measurements. PMID:26917347

  5. Medication Adherence and Treatment Satisfaction Among Renal Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Alkatheri, Abdulmalik A; Albekairy, Abdulkareem M; Jarab, Anan; Bustami, Rami; Khalidi, Nabil; Alshaya, Abdulrahman; Bin Saleh, Khalid; Alraddadi, Sultan; Alharbi, Shmeylan; Vasudevan, Senthilvel; Alsayyari, Abdullah; Qandil, Amjad M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Evidence suggests that patients who are more satisfied with their treatment show better adherence with the prescribed therapy. Although there is valuable data about medication adherence among renal transplant recipients (RTRs), there is a limited literature about their treatment satisfaction and its relation to adherence. The aim of the present study was to investigate factors that can predict medication adherence and to explore the relationship between treatment satisfaction and medication adherence in renal transplant recipients. MATERIAL AND METHODS Adult RTRs were included in the study using convenient sampling. The participants were asked to complete the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) and Treatment Satisfaction Scale TSQM 1.4 in addition to several socio-demographic and treatment-related data. The results were statistically analyzed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression modelling in a stepwise procedure. RESULTS A total of 151 RTRs were included in the study, of which 52 were classified as adherent (34%). Univariate analysis showed that, in comparison with non-adherent RTRs, the adherent group demonstrated significantly higher satisfaction scores in the domains of convenience (96.6±8.7 vs. 85.3±19.3), side effects (95.9±14.1 vs. 82.6±24.1), and global satisfaction (93.4±9.8 vs. 86.7±16.7), while they had marginally higher satisfaction scores in the effectiveness domain (90.4±11.6 vs. 86.5±14.5). Results from multiple logistic regression showed that higher likelihood of adherence was significantly associated with increased satisfaction score in the convenience domain [AOR=1.76, 95% CI=(1.21, 2.55); p=0.003] and marginally related to increased satisfaction scores in the side effects domain [AOR=1.31, 95% CI=(0.99, 1.74); p=0.061]. Male RTRs were significantly more likely to be adherent than female RTRs [AOR=2.23, 95% CI=(1.02, 4.84); p=0.043]. CONCLUSIONS Although the adherence rate among RTRs is relatively

  6. Adherence to insulin treatment in diabetes: can it be improved?

    PubMed

    Doggrell, Sheila Anne; Chan, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    Insulin is used in all subjects with Type 1 diabetes, and when Type 2 diabetes is not controlled by oral anti-diabetic medicines, insulin is also used in Type 2 diabetes. However, despite this use, there is still increased mortality and morbidity in subjects with diabetes, compared to subjects without diabetes. One of the factors, which may be involved in this increased mortality and morbidity in subjects with diabetes, is nonadherence to insulin. Nonadherence rates to insulin are in the range of 20-38%, and many factors contribute to the nonadherence. The major aim of the review was to determine whether interventions to improve adherence to insulin do actually improve adherence to insulin. Most studies have shown that adherence to insulin was improved by changing from the vial-and-syringe approach to prefilled insulin pens, but not all studies have shown that this translated into better glycemic control and clinical outcomes. The results of studies using automatic telephone messages to improve adherence to insulin to date are inconclusive. There is limited and variable evidence that an intervention by a nurse/educator, which discusses adherence to medicines, does improve adherence to insulin. In contrast, there is little or no evidence that an extra intervention by a doctor or an intervention by a pharmacist, which discusses adherence to insulin, does actually improve the measured adherence to insulin. In conclusion, rather than assuming that an intervention by a health professional discussing adherence to insulin actually improves adherence to insulin, long-term studies investigating this are required. PMID:25195971

  7. "They Have Opened Our Mouths": Increasing Women's Skills and Motivation for Sexual Communication with Young People in Rural South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phetla, Godfrey; Busza, Joanna; Hargreaves, James R.; Pronyk, Paul M.; Kim, Julia C.; Morison, Linda A.; Watts, Charlotte; Porter, John D. H.

    2008-01-01

    Communication between parents and young people about sex has been identified as a positive influence on young people's sexual behavior. This article presents findings from South Africa, where a social intervention to reduce levels of HIV and intimate partner violence actively promoted sexual communication between adults and young people. We…

  8. 77 FR 66744 - Temporary Rule to Increase the Commercial Annual Catch Limit for South Atlantic Yellowtail Snapper

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... Coral and Coral Reefs FMPs for the Gulf of Mexico (Generic ACL Amendment) (76 FR 82044, December 29... Snapper-Grouper Fishery of the South Atlantic Region, and several other plans (77 FR 15916, March 16, 2012... (77 FR 53776), NMFS published a temporary rule to close the commercial sector for yellowtail...

  9. Age, Stigma, Adherence and Clinical Indicators in HIV-Infected Women

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Katryna; Higgins, Melinda; Zuñiga, Julie Ann; Holstad, Marcia McDonnell

    2016-01-01

    Stigma has become a gendered phenomenon that affects increasing numbers of HIV-infected women worldwide. This study examined the role of age as a possible moderator of the relationship between stigma and antiretroviral therapy adherence, CD4% and viral load among 120 HIV-infected women. A secondary analysis was conducted using data from the Keeping Healthy and Active with Risk Reduction and Medication Adherence (KHARMA) Project, an National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded randomized controlled trial to improve Antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence and reduce risky behaviors in HIV-infected women at five clinical sites in a South-eastern city from 2005 to 2008. Stigma was measured using the Perceived Personal Stigma of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) scale. Among participants <50 years old (n=90), age was significantly associated with viral load (rho=−.24, p=.02) and stigma was negatively associated with CD4% (r =−.26, p=.02). For the 30 participants >50 years old, age was not significantly associated with viral load, stigma or CD4%, and there was no significant association between stigma and CD4% (r=.07, p=.70). These findings indicate the need for further study regarding this potential moderating effect and possible interventions to address the susceptibility of younger women to the harmful effects of stigma. PMID:27200416

  10. Clustering based on adherence data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Adherence to a medical treatment means the extent to which a patient follows the instructions or recommendations by health professionals. There are direct and indirect ways to measure adherence which have been used for clinical management and research. Typically adherence measures are monitored over a long follow-up or treatment period, and some measurements may be missing due to death or other reasons. A natural question then is how to describe adherence behavior over the whole period in a simple way. In the literature, measurements over a period are usually combined just by using averages like percentages of compliant days or percentages of doses taken. In the paper we adapt an approach where patient adherence measures are seen as a stochastic process. Repeated measures are then analyzed as a Markov chain with finite number of states rather than as independent and identically distributed observations, and the transition probabilities between the states are assumed to fully describe the behavior of a patient. The patients can then be clustered or classified using their estimated transition probabilities. These natural clusters can be used to describe the adherence of the patients, to find predictors for adherence, and to predict the future events. The new approach is illustrated and shown to be useful with a simple analysis of a data set from the DART (Development of AntiRetroviral Therapy in Africa) trial in Uganda and Zimbabwe. PMID:21385451

  11. Sexual relationships outside primary partnerships and abstinence are associated with lower adherence and adherence gaps: data from the Partners PrEP Ancillary Adherence Study

    PubMed Central

    Kintu, Alexander; Hankinson, Susan E.; Balasubramanian, Raji; Ertel, Karen; Tumwesigye, Elioda; Bangsberg, David R.; Haberer, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the role of sexual relationships on levels and patterns of adherence to medication for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) against HIV. Methods We enrolled 1,147 HIV-negative individuals in long-term serodiscordant relationships at three sites in Uganda from the Partners PrEP Study- a randomized placebo-controlled trial of daily oral tenofovir and emtricitabine/tenofovir. We used generalized estimation equations to assess the effects of sexual relationships on low adherence (<80%) and on gaps in adherence. Results Fifty-three percent were male, 51% were 18-34 years and 24% were polygamous. Participants who reported sex in the past month with someone other than their primary partner and with <100% condom use were more than twice as likely to have low adherence (aOR 2.48, 95% CI: 1.70-3.62) compared to those who had sex with only their primary partners and 100% condom use. Using the same reference group, those who abstained from sex in the previous month had 30% increased odds of low adherence (aOR 1.30, 95% CI: 1.05-1.62), and participants in non-polygamous marriages who reported sex with both their primary and other partners and <100% condom use were almost twice as likely to be low adherers (aOR 1.76, 95% CI: 1.01-3.08). At least one 72-hour gap in adherence was seen in 598 participants (54.7%); 23.2% had at least one one-week gap. Conclusions Risk of low overall adherence was higher in participants who reported sex outside primary partnerships and suboptimal condom use, as well as in those who abstained from sex. Adherence gaps were common, potentially creating risk for HIV acquisition. PMID:25942457

  12. An ethA-ethR-Deficient Mycobacterium bovis BCG Mutant Displays Increased Adherence to Mammalian Cells and Greater Persistence In Vivo, Which Correlate with Altered Mycolic Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Michelle Lay Teng; Siti, Zarina Zainul Rahim; Shui, Guanghou; Dianišková, Petronela; Madacki, Jan; Lin, Wenwei; Koh, Vanessa Hui Qi; Martinez Gomez, Julia Maria; Sudarkodi, Sukumar; Bendt, Anne; Wenk, Markus; Mikušová, Katarína; Korduláková, Jana; Pethe, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major worldwide epidemic because of its sole etiological agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Ethionamide (ETH) is one of the major antitubercular drugs used to treat infections with multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains. ETH is a prodrug that requires activation within the mycobacterial cell; its bioactivation involves the ethA-ethR locus, which encodes the monooxygenase EthA, while EthR is a transcriptional regulator that binds to the intergenic promoter region of the ethA-ethR locus. While most studies have focused on the role of EthA-EthR in ETH bioactivation, its physiological role in mycobacteria has remained elusive, although a role in bacterial cell detoxification has been proposed. Moreover, the importance of EthA-EthR in vivo has never been reported on. Here we constructed and characterized an EthA-EthR-deficient mutant of Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Our results indicate that absence of the ethA-ethR locus led to greater persistence of M. bovis BCG in the mouse model of mycobacterial infection, which correlated with greater adherence to mammalian cells. Furthermore, analysis of cell wall lipid composition by thin-layer chromatography and mass spectrometry revealed differences between the ethA-ethR KO mutant and the parental strain in the relative amounts of α- and keto-mycolates. Therefore, we propose here that M. bovis BCG ethA-ethR is involved in the cell wall-bound mycolate profile, which impacts mycobacterial adherence properties and in vivo persistence. This study thus provides some experimental clues to the possible physiological role of ethA-ethR and proposes that this locus is a novel factor involved in the modulation of mycobacterial virulence. PMID:24566628

  13. Antiretroviral adherence and treatment outcomes among adult Ethiopian patients.

    PubMed

    Bezabhe, Woldesellassie M; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R; Gee, Peter; Peterson, Gregory M

    2016-08-01

    Developing appropriate strategies to sustain optimal medication adherence among the increasing number of HIV-positive patients taking antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa is a major challenge. The objective of this study was to determine patient, regimen, disease, patient-provider, and healthcare-related factors associated with adherence with ART over a one-year period, and assess the impact of adherence on treatment outcomes. We performed a prospective, observational study among 246 patients who were initiated on ART in Ethiopia. Of 172 who completed follow-up, 130 (75.6%) had ≥95% adherence. In the multivariate analyses, a higher baseline BMI (OR, 1.2; 95% CI 1.0, 1.4) and use of reminder devices (OR, 9.1; 95% CI 2.0, 41.6) remained positively associated with adherence, while a higher HIV symptom and adverse drug reaction distress score was an independent negative predictor of adherence (OR, 0.90; 95% CI 0.9, 1.0) CD4 count increase was significantly higher in the adherent patients compared to non-adherent patients at 12 months (159 cells/µL [interquartile range (IQR), 72-324 cells/µL] vs. 132 cells/µL [IQR, 43-190 cells/µL]; p = 0.026). Our findings indicate that interventions aimed at improving adherence and thereby treatment outcomes in patients initiated on ART should promote the use of reminder devices, and monitor HIV symptoms and adverse reaction distress and nutritional status. PMID:26829232

  14. Has the conversion of natural wetlands to agricultural land increased the incidence and severity of damaging freezes in south Florida?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marshall, C.H.; Pielke, R.A., Sr.; Steyaert, L.T.

    2004-01-01

    On several occasions, winter freezes have wrought severe destruction on Florida agriculture. A series of devastating freezes around the turn of the twentieth century, and again during the 1980s, were related to anomalies in the large-scale flow of the ocean-atmosphere system. During the twentieth century, substantial areas of wetlands in south Florida were drained and converted to agricultural land for winter fresh vegetable and sugarcane production. During this time, much of the citrus industry also was relocated to those areas to escape the risk of freeze farther to the north. The purpose of this paper is to present a modeling study designed to investigate whether the conversion of the wetlands to agriculture itself could have resulted in or exacerbated the severity of recent freezes in those agricultural areas of south Florida. For three recent freeze events, a pair of simulations was undertaken with the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System. One member of each pair employed land surface properties that represent pre-1900s (near natural) land cover, whereas the other member of each pair employed data that represent near-current land-use patterns as derived from analysis of Landsat data valid for 1992/93. These two different land cover datasets capture well the conversion of wetlands to agriculture in south Florida during the twentieth century. Use of current land surface properties resulted in colder simulated minimum temperatures and temperatures that remained below freezing for a longer period at locations of key agricultural production centers in south Florida that were once natural wetlands. Examination of time series of the surface energy budget from one of the cases reveals that when natural land cover is used, a persistent moisture flux from the underlying wetlands during the nighttime hours served to prevent the development of below-freezing temperatures at those same locations. When the model results were subjected to an important sensitivity factor, the

  15. A Synchronized Prescription Refill Program Improved Medication Adherence.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Jalpa A; Lim, Raymond; Li, Pengxiang; Young, Peinie P; Lawnicki, Victor F; State, Joseph J; Troxel, Andrea B; Volpp, Kevin G

    2016-08-01

    Synchronizing medication refills-renewing all medications at the same time from the same pharmacy-is an increasingly popular strategy to improve adherence to medication regimens, but there has been little research regarding its effectiveness. In light of increasing policy interest, we evaluated the impact of a pilot refill synchronization program implemented by a large national insurer. A random sample of Medicare Advantage patients receiving mail-order refills for common maintenance medications (antihypertensive, lipid-lowering, or antidiabetic agents) were invited to join the program and followed for twelve months. On average, the absolute increase in the proportion of patients deemed adherent during follow-up was 3-10 percentage points for the intervention group, compared to 1-5 percentage points for the control group. Patients with poorer baseline adherence showed larger increases in the absolute proportion deemed adherent in intervention (23-26 percentage points) compared to a control group (13-15 percentage points). Synchronizing refills might be a promising intervention to improve adherence to maintenance medications, especially among Medicare patients with low baseline adherence. PMID:27503977

  16. Evaluation of Adherence and Factors Affecting Adherence to Combination Antiretroviral Therapy among White, Hispanic, and Black Men in the MACS Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Debora Lee; Sarafian, Farjad; Silvestre, Anthony; Brown, Todd; Jacobson, Lisa; Badri, Sheila; Detels, Roger

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated levels of adherence to antiretroviral therapy in White, Hispanic and Black men, and isolated factors associated with adherence among each racial group. Data were collected from 1102 men enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) followed between April 2002 and October 2006. Self-reported 100% adherence was defined as taking all doses and pills over the previous four-day period, reporting not typically skipping any medications, and reporting always following the medication schedule. Variables associated with adherence were determined by multi-level logistic regression for each racial group. Adherence was also analyzed by ethnicity within racial groups. After controlling for confounders, we found that Hispanics were 2.16 times and Blacks were 1.37 more likely than Whites to not report 100% adherence (95% CI (1.47, 3.18), (1.05, 1.79)). Hispanics with ethnic backgrounds from Central and South America and the Caribbean had lower rates of adherence. Blacks with ethnic backgrounds from the Caribbean had lower rates of adherence than those from other regions. PMID:19521251

  17. CONDITIONS THAT INCREASE DRUG MARKET INVOLVEMENT: THE INVITATIONAL EDGE AND THE CASE OF MEXICANS IN SOUTH TEXAS.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Avelardo; Kaplan, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Research on drug trafficking has not been able to discern the exact nature of illegal drug markets and the relationship between their individual and group participants. This article delineates the role of Mexican immigrants and Mexican-American participants involved in the stratified drug market of South Texas. This article synthesizes ethnographic materials drawn from two previous National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) studies in order identify the different types of drug distribution behaviors that occur within the groups, the differentiated roles of individuals, the organizational framework, and most significantly, the processes that link market participants to others outside of the drug market. This illegal behavior can be interpreted as an adaptive mechanism that is a direct response to the marginal economic status imposed by macro socio-economical background factors. As well, we conclude that the specific foreground factors of the opportunities offered by the context, culture, and proximity of the U.S./Mexico border and invitational edges explain this behavior. There are both parallels and particular differences between the South Texas case and the structuring and functioning of informal legal and illegal markets that are characteristic of other economically disadvantaged communities. PMID:21218142

  18. CONDITIONS THAT INCREASE DRUG MARKET INVOLVEMENT: THE INVITATIONAL EDGE AND THE CASE OF MEXICANS IN SOUTH TEXAS

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Avelardo; Kaplan, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Research on drug trafficking has not been able to discern the exact nature of illegal drug markets and the relationship between their individual and group participants. This article delineates the role of Mexican immigrants and Mexican-American participants involved in the stratified drug market of South Texas. This article synthesizes ethnographic materials drawn from two previous National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) studies in order identify the different types of drug distribution behaviors that occur within the groups, the differentiated roles of individuals, the organizational framework, and most significantly, the processes that link market participants to others outside of the drug market. This illegal behavior can be interpreted as an adaptive mechanism that is a direct response to the marginal economic status imposed by macro socio-economical background factors. As well, we conclude that the specific foreground factors of the opportunities offered by the context, culture, and proximity of the U.S./Mexico border and invitational edges explain this behavior. There are both parallels and particular differences between the South Texas case and the structuring and functioning of informal legal and illegal markets that are characteristic of other economically disadvantaged communities. PMID:21218142

  19. Interventions to improve adherence to lipid lowering medication

    PubMed Central

    Schedlbauer, Angela; Schroeder, Knut; Peters, Tim; Fahey, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Background Lipid lowering drugs are still widely underused, despite compelling evidence about their effectiveness in the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease. Poor patient adherence to medication regimen is a major factor in the lack of success in treating hyperlipidaemia. In this review we focus on interventions, which encourage patients at risk of heart disease or stroke to take lipid lowering medication regularly. Objectives To assess the effect of interventions aiming at improved adherence to lipid lowering drugs, focusing on measures of adherence and clinical outcomes. Search strategy We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycInfo and CINAHL. Date of most recent search was in February 2003. No language restrictions were applied. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of adherence-enhancing interventions to lipid lowering medication in adults for both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in an ambulatory setting. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers extracted data independently and assessed studies according to criteria outlined by the Cochrane Reviewers’ Handbook. Main results The eight studies found contained data on 5943 patients. Interventions could be stratified into four categories: 1. simplification of drug regimen, 2. patient information/education, 3. intensified patient care such as reminding and 4. complex behavioural interventions such as group sessions. Change in adherence ranged from −3% to 25% (decrease in adherence by 3% to increase in adherence by 25%). Three studies reported significantly improved adherence through simplification of drug regimen (category 1), improved patient information/education (category 2) and reminding (category 3). The fact that the successful interventions were evenly spread across the categories, does not suggest any advantage of one particular type of intervention. The methodological and analytical quality was

  20. Alcohol use, antiretroviral therapy adherence, and preferences regarding an alcohol-focused adherence intervention in patients with human immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    Kekwaletswe, Connie T; Morojele, Neo K

    2014-01-01

    Background The primary objectives of this study were to determine the association between alcohol and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and the perceived appropriateness and acceptability of elements of an adherence counseling program with a focus on alcohol-related ART nonadherence among a sample of ART recipients in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) clinics in Tshwane, South Africa. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study with purposive sampling. The sample comprised 304 male and female ART recipients at two President’s Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief-supported HIV clinics. Using an interview schedule, we assessed patients’ alcohol use (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test), other drug use, level of adherence to ART, and reasons for missing ART doses (AIDS Clinical Trials Group adherence instrument). Additionally, patients’ views were solicited on: the likely effectiveness of potential facilitators; the preferred quantity, duration, format, and setting of the sessions; the usefulness of having family members/friends attend sessions along with the patient; and potential skill sets to be imparted. Results About half of the male drinkers’ and three quarters of the female drinkers’ Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test scores were suggestive of hazardous or harmful drinking. Average self-reported ART adherence was 89.7%. There was a significant association between level of alcohol use and degree of ART adherence. Overall, participants perceived two clinic-based sessions, each of one hour’s duration, in a group format, and facilitated by a peer or adherence counselor, as most appropriate and acceptable. Participants also had a favorable attitude towards family and friends accompanying them to the sessions. They also favored an alcohol-focused adherence counseling program that employs motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioral therapy-type approaches. Conclusion The association between alcohol use and ART nonadherence points to a

  1. Investigating Reasons for CPAP Adherence in Adolescents: A Qualitative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Prashad, Priya S.; Marcus, Carole L.; Maggs, Jill; Stettler, Nicolas; Cornaglia, Mary A.; Costa, Priscilla; Puzino, Kristina; Xanthopoulos, Melissa; Bradford, Ruth; Barg, Frances K.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Adolescents with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) represent an important but understudied subgroup of long-term continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) users. The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify factors related to adherence from the perspective of adolescents and their caregivers. Methods: Individual open-ended, semi-structured interviews were conducted with adolescents (n = 21) and caregivers (n = 20). Objective adherence data from the adolescents' CPAP machines during the previous month was obtained. Adolescents with different adherence levels and their caregivers were asked their views on CPAP. Using a modified grounded theory approach, we identified themes and developed theories that explained the adolescents' adherence patterns. Results: Adolescent participants (n = 21) were aged 12-18 years, predominantly male (n = 15), African American (n = 16), users of CPAP for at least one month. Caregivers were mainly mothers (n = 17). Seven adolescents had high use (mean use 381 ± 80 min per night), 7 had low use (mean use 30 ± 24 min per night), and 7 had no use during the month prior to being interviewed. Degree of structure in the home, social reactions, mode of communication among family members, and perception of benefits were issues that played a role in CPAP adherence. Conclusions: Understanding the adolescent and family experience of using CPAP may be key to increasing adolescent CPAP adherence. As a result of our findings, we speculate that health education, peer support groups, and developmentally appropriate individualized support strategies may be important in promoting adherence. Future studies should examine these theories of CPAP adherence. Citation: Prashad PS; Marcus CL; Maggs J; Stettler N; Cornaglia MA; Costa P; Puzino K; Xanthopoulos M; Bradford R; Barg FK. Investigating reasons for CPAP adherence in adolescents: a qualitative approach. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(12):1303-1313. PMID:24340293

  2. Soft-focused extracorporeal shock waves increase the expression of tendon-specific markers and the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines in an adherent culture model of primary human tendon cells.

    PubMed

    de Girolamo, Laura; Stanco, Deborah; Galliera, Emanuela; Viganò, Marco; Lovati, Arianna Barbara; Marazzi, Monica Gioia; Romeo, Pietro; Sansone, Valerio

    2014-06-01

    Focused extracorporeal shock waves have been found to upregulate the expression of collagen and to initiate cell proliferation in healthy tenocytes and to positively affect the metabolism of tendons, promoting the healing process. Recently, soft-focused extracorporeal shock waves have also been found to have a significant effect on tissue regeneration. However, very few in vitro reports have dealt with the application of this type of shock wave to cells, and in particular, no previous studies have investigated the response of tendon cells to this impulse. We devised an original model to investigate the in vitro effects of soft-focused shock waves on a heterogeneous population of human resident tendon cells in adherent monolayer culture. Our results indicate that soft-focused extracorporeal shock wave treatment (0.17 mJ/mm(2)) is able to induce positive modulation of cell viability, proliferation and tendon-specific marker expression, as well as release of anti-inflammatory cytokines. This could prefigure a new rationale for routine employment of soft-focused shock waves to treat the failed healing status that distinguishes tendinopathies. PMID:24631378

  3. The challenge of patient adherence.

    PubMed

    Martin, Leslie R; Williams, Summer L; Haskard, Kelly B; Dimatteo, M Robin

    2005-09-01

    Quality healthcare outcomes depend upon patients' adherence to recommended treatment regimens. Patient nonadherence can be a pervasive threat to health and wellbeing and carry an appreciable economic burden as well. In some disease conditions, more than 40% of patients sustain significant risks by misunderstanding, forgetting, or ignoring healthcare advice. While no single intervention strategy can improve the adherence of all patients, decades of research studies agree that successful attempts to improve patient adherence depend upon a set of key factors. These include realistic assessment of patients' knowledge and understanding of the regimen, clear and effective communication between health professionals and their patients, and the nurturance of trust in the therapeutic relationship. Patients must be given the opportunity to tell the story of their unique illness experiences. Knowing the patient as a person allows the health professional to understand elements that are crucial to the patient's adherence: beliefs, attitudes, subjective norms, cultural context, social supports, and emotional health challenges, particularly depression. Physician-patient partnerships are essential when choosing amongst various therapeutic options to maximize adherence. Mutual collaboration fosters greater patient satisfaction, reduces the risks of nonadherence, and improves patients' healthcare outcomes. PMID:18360559

  4. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T polymorphism is associated with increased risk of coronary artery disease in young South African Indians.

    PubMed

    Ramkaran, Prithiksha; Phulukdaree, Alisa; Khan, Sajidah; Moodley, Devapregasan; Chuturgoon, Anil A

    2015-10-15

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) reduces 5',10'-methylenetetrahydrofolate to 5'-methyltetrahydrofolate, and is involved in remethylation of homocysteine to methionine, two important reactions involved in folate metabolism and methylation pathways. The common MTHFR C677T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (rs1801133) has been associated with raised levels of homocysteine, a well known risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD). CAD is a major cause of mortality worldwide. The age of onset of this chronic disorder is on the decline, particularly in the Indian population. Indians in South Africa (SA) have a higher prevalence of premature CAD compared to Black South Africans. The MTHFR C677T SNP has not been investigated in the SA Indian population. The present study therefore investigated the MTHFR C677T SNP in young SA Indian males with CAD compared to young Indian and Black male controls. A total of 290 subjects were recruited into this study which included 106 CAD patients (diagnosed on angiography, mean age 37.5, range 24-45 years), 100 Indian male controls (mean age 37.5, range 28-45 years), and 84 Black male controls (mean age 36.4, range 25-45). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was used to genotype CAD patients and healthy controls. Data for clinical markers were obtained from pathology reports. There was a significant association between the 677 MTHFR variant (T) allele and CAD patients compared to the healthy Indian controls (p=0.0353, OR=2.105 95% CI 1.077-4.114). Indian controls presented with a higher frequency of the variant allele compared to Black controls (7% vs. 2% respectively, p=0.0515 OR=3.086 95% CI 0.9958-9.564). The MTHFR C677T SNP did not influence levels of total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, triglycerides, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, HbA1c or hsCRP. The higher frequency of the MTHFR 677 variant allele in South African Indians may be a contributing factor to the higher

  5. Impact of increased horizontal resolution in coupled and atmosphere-only models of the HadGEM1 family upon the climate patterns of South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza Custodio, Maria; da Rocha, Rosmeri Porfírio; Ambrizzi, Tércio; Vidale, Pier Luigi; Demory, Marie-Estelle

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the impact of increased horizontal resolution in coupled and atmosphere-only global climate models on the simulation of climate patterns in South America (SA). We analyze simulations of the HadGEM1 model family with three different horizontal resolutions in the atmosphere—N96 (~135 km at 50°N), N144 (~90 km) and N216 (~60 km)—and two different resolutions in the ocean—1° and 1/3°. In general, the coupled simulation with the highest resolution (60 km in the atmosphere and 1/3° in the ocean) has smaller systematic errors in seasonal mean precipitation, temperature and circulation over SA than the atmosphere-only model at all resolutions. The models, both coupled and atmosphere-only, properly simulate spatial patterns of the seasonal shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), the formation and positioning of the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ), and the subtropical Atlantic and Pacific highs. However, the models overestimate rainfall, especially in the ITCZ and over the western border of high-elevation areas such as southern Chile. The coupling, combined with higher resolution, result in a more realistic spatial pattern of rain, particularly over the Atlantic ITCZ and the continental branch of the SACZ. All models correctly simulate the phase and amplitude of the annual cycle of precipitation and air temperature over most of South America. The overall results show that despite some problems, increasing the resolution in the HadGEM1 model family results in a more realistic representation of climate patterns over South America and the adjacent oceans.

  6. The Change in HbA1c Associated with Initial Adherence and Subsequent Change in Adherence among Diabetes Patients Newly Initiating Metformin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Gregory A; Rosales, A Gabriela; Kimes, Teresa M; Tunceli, Kaan; Kurtyka, Karen; Mavros, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Whether changes in adherence are associated with changes in HbA1c is assumed but not known. Methods. We conducted a observational study of 2,844 type 2 diabetes patients who initiated metformin as their first antihyperglycemic drug. Using HbA1c measures before, 6-12 months after, and up to 3 years after metformin initiation, we analyzed HbA1c change as a function of initial adherence and change in adherence. Results. Compared with no adherence, initial adherence of 50-79% was associated with an adjusted reduction in HbA1c of 0.45% while adherence ≥80% was associated with HbA1c reduction of 0.73%. Change from some initial adherence (1-79%) to total nonadherence was associated with 0.25% increase in HbA1c. Change from some to full adherence was associated with an HbA1c decrease of 0.15%. Those associations were accentuated among patients not in glycemic control: change from some to no adherence was associated with an HbA1c increase of 0.63% and change from some to full adherence was associated with an HbA1c decrease of 0.40%. Conclusions. Initial adherence to newly prescribed metformin therapy produces substantial HbA1c reduction. Among those with modest adherence but suboptimal glycemic control, the difference between moving to full adherence versus nonadherence results in lower HbA1c of one percentage point. PMID:27579326

  7. The Change in HbA1c Associated with Initial Adherence and Subsequent Change in Adherence among Diabetes Patients Newly Initiating Metformin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rosales, A. Gabriela; Kimes, Teresa M.; Tunceli, Kaan; Kurtyka, Karen; Mavros, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Whether changes in adherence are associated with changes in HbA1c is assumed but not known. Methods. We conducted a observational study of 2,844 type 2 diabetes patients who initiated metformin as their first antihyperglycemic drug. Using HbA1c measures before, 6–12 months after, and up to 3 years after metformin initiation, we analyzed HbA1c change as a function of initial adherence and change in adherence. Results. Compared with no adherence, initial adherence of 50–79% was associated with an adjusted reduction in HbA1c of 0.45% while adherence ≥80% was associated with HbA1c reduction of 0.73%. Change from some initial adherence (1–79%) to total nonadherence was associated with 0.25% increase in HbA1c. Change from some to full adherence was associated with an HbA1c decrease of 0.15%. Those associations were accentuated among patients not in glycemic control: change from some to no adherence was associated with an HbA1c increase of 0.63% and change from some to full adherence was associated with an HbA1c decrease of 0.40%. Conclusions. Initial adherence to newly prescribed metformin therapy produces substantial HbA1c reduction. Among those with modest adherence but suboptimal glycemic control, the difference between moving to full adherence versus nonadherence results in lower HbA1c of one percentage point.

  8. Long-term postpartum adherence to antiretroviral drugs among women in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Kreitchmann, Regis; Coelho, Debora Fernandes; Kakehasi, Fabiana Maria; Hofer, Cristina Barroso; Read, Jennifer S; Losso, Marcelo; Haberer, Jessica E; Siberry, George K; Harris, D Robert; Yu, Qilu

    2016-04-01

    Antiretroviral adherence in the postpartum period is crucial for maternal health and decreasing the risk of mother-to-child HIV transmission and transmission to sexual partners. Self-reported antiretroviral adherence was examined between 6- to 12-weeks and 30 months postpartum among 270 HIV-infected women enrolled in a prospective cohort study from 2008 to 2010 at multiple sites in Latin America. Adherence data were collected at each study visit to quantify the proportion of prescribed antiretrovirals taken during the previous three days, assess the timing of the last missed dose, and identify predictors of adherence. Mean adherence rates were 89.5% at 6-12 weeks and 92.4% at 30 months; the proportions with perfect adherence were 80.3% and 83.6%, respectively. The overall trend for perfect adherence was not significant (p = 0.71). In adjusted regression modelling, younger age was associated with an increased probability of non-perfect adherence at 18 and 24 months postpartum. Other factors associated with increased probability of non-perfect adherence were higher parity, current use of alcohol and tobacco, and more advanced HIV disease. Women with perfect adherence had lower viral loads. Interventions for alcohol and tobacco use cessation, and support for young women and those with advanced HIV disease should be considered to improve postpartum adherence. PMID:25931238

  9. Medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Phan, Stephanie V

    2016-01-01

    Medication nonadherence is common among patients with schizophrenia and due to a variety of factors including lack of insight, psychopathology, substance use disorder, issues associated with treatment, stigma, fragmentation of care, cultural influences, and socioeconomic status. Among this population, nonadherence is problematic because it can lead to decompensation or exacerbation of symptoms, relapse, rehospitalization or greater use of emergency psychiatric services, functional decline, and increased risk of death. Psychoeducational approaches alone are ineffective, but in combination with behavioral interventions, appear to be effective. Involving the patient's support system, in addition to other interventions, can improve treatment adherence. Many medication-related factors, such as effectiveness and tolerability of antipsychotics, regimen complexity, and past medication trials impact appropriate medication use. Therefore, optimizing the patient's pharmacotherapeutic regimens can improve adherence. Additional factors favorably influencing adherence include involving the patient in their treatment, fostering a therapeutic alliance, implementing/using reminder systems, and addressing substance use disorder. Medication nonadherence arises from multiple reasons that vary between patients. Thus, the most effective strategies to improve adherence are multifactorial and may involve both psychoeducational and behavioral techniques, as well as previously listed approaches. Strategies should be targeted toward the patient and their support system, whenever possible, to further improve the chances of appropriate medication use. Recognizing that all patients with schizophrenia are at risk for medication nonadherence is important. No one technique has been shown to be most effective; therefore, the risk for nonadherence should continually be assessed and multiple strategies should be targeted to the patient (and caregiver) and repeatedly implemented throughout the course

  10. Risk management in HIV/AIDS: ethical and economic issues associated with restricting HAART access only to adherent patients.

    PubMed

    Chawana, Richard; van Bogaert, Donna Knapp

    2011-01-01

    Like many other developing nations, South Africa faces the challenge of mobilising resources in response to the HIV pandemic. There is a large budget gap between the ideal and the actual amount of funding needed to achieve universal access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). In addition to financial demands, new burdens are being placed on HAART programmes with the emergence of HIV drug resistance (HIVDR). Thus, a major threat to successful HAART rollout is HIVDR due to non-adherence to HAART. The use of HAART as a primary and secondary HIV-prevention strategy could be ineffective in situations characterised by high rates of non-adherence. In this context, the research looked at issues related to adherence and non-adherence to HAART from the perspective of the provider. Using the software TreeAge Pro 2009, we developed a Markov model to project economic outcomes for a hypothetical cohort of HIV/AIDS patients on HAART. The model compared two scenarios: adherence and non-adherence to HAART. Input data for the model was obtained from existing literature on HAART uptake in South Africa. Moral arguments were analysed and managed through moral reasoning and critical thinking. Discounted lifetime costs for adherent and non-adherent HAART patients in South Africa were estimated at US$9 771 and US$14 762, respectively. The model showed the loss of 4.55 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for non-adherent patients, which could be otherwise gained through improved adherence. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) indicated that restricting HAART access only to adherent patients was the dominant strategy. We suggest that, although not a panacea, the withholding or withdrawal of treatment from non-adherent individuals as a precautionary intervention has economic and moral merit. PMID:25865513

  11. Adherence of sputtered titanium carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Sputtered coatings of the refractory metal carbides are of great interest for applications where hard wear-resistant materials are desired. The usefulness of sputtered refractory carbides is often limited, in practice, by spalling or interfacial separation. In this work improvements in the adherence of refractory carbides on iron, nickel and titanium based alloys were obtained by using oxidation, reactive sputtering or sputtered interlayers to alter the coating-substrate interfacial region. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and argon ion etching were used to characterize the interfacial regions, and an attempt was made to correlate adherence as measured in wear tests with the chemical nature of the interface.

  12. In vitro adherence of bacteria to prosthetic grafting materials

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, A.R.; Stromberg, B.V. )

    1990-02-01

    Adherence of bacteria to prosthetic grafting material is thought to play an important role in the ultimate development of prosthetic infections. To evaluate the role of bacterial adherence in the initiation and colonization of prosthetic materials, Proplast II, Gore-Tex, and silicone were evaluated for adherence of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Bacteria were radiolabeled and incubated with the study material. Adherence was determined by scintillation. Adherence to Proplast II and Gore-Tex reached a maximum at approximately 45 minutes of incubation and demonstrated a detachment phenomenon with E. coli. Similar results were noted with S. aureus, but with a maximal attachment at approximately 30 minutes. Interestingly, bacterial attachment to silicone continued to increase throughout the time of the incubation. In addition, adherence of S. aureus was at a faster rate than E. coli. Attachment of bacteria is a multifactorial process. However, the PTFE graft demonstrates a slower rate of attachment, lower total number of attached bacteria, and faster detachment. The importance of this phenomenon may help explain the foreign body effect of increased susceptibility to infection of foreign materials.

  13. Antiretroviral treatment adherence as a mediating factor between psychosocial variables and HIV viral load.

    PubMed

    Attonito, Jennifer; Dévieux, Jessy G; Lerner, Brenda D G; Hospital, Michelle M; Rosenberg, Rhonda

    2014-01-01

    Psychosocial factors may directly impact HIV health measures such as viral load (VL) whether or not patients are taking antiretroviral treatment (ART) consistently. Structural equation modeling plus Baron and Kenny's (1986) four-step approach were used to test a mediated model predicting VL among 246 HIV-infected adults who were on ART. Exogenous variables were social support, barriers to adherence, and stress. Moderators were alcohol use, marijuana use, and neurocognitive impairment. A small positive association between marijuana use and ART adherence approached significance. Only barriers to adherence predicted a decrease in adherence rates and an increase in VL. No other factors were significantly associated with either VL or adherence, and no interaction effects between exogenous variables and moderators were identified. The association between barriers to adherence and VL was partially mediated by ART adherence. Findings provide modest support for a direct link between psychosocial variables and a virologic response to ART. PMID:25305029

  14. Antiretroviral treatment adherence as a mediating factor between psychosocial variables and HIV viral load

    PubMed Central

    Attonito, Jennifer; Dévieux, Jessy G.; Lerner, Brenda D. G.; Hospital, Michelle M.; Rosenberg, Rhonda

    2014-01-01

    Psychosocial factors may directly impact HIV health measures such as viral load (VL), whether or not patients are taking antiretroviral treatment (ART) consistently. Structural equation modeling plus Baron and Kenny’s (1986) four-step approach were used to test a mediated model predicting VL among 246 HIV-infected adults who were on ART. Exogenous variables were social support, barriers to adherence, and stress. Moderators were alcohol use, marijuana use, and neurocognitive impairment. A small positive association between marijuana use and ART adherence approached significance. Only barriers to adherence predicted a decrease in adherence rates and an increase in VL. No other factors were significantly associated with either VL or adherence and no interaction effects between exogenous variables and moderators were identified. The association between barriers to adherence and VL was partially mediated by ART adherence. Findings provide modest support for a direct link between psychosocial variables and a virologic response to ART. PMID:25305029

  15. Mobile phone text messaging for promoting adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mobile phone text messaging (SMS) has the potential to promote adherence to tuberculosis treatment. This systematic review aims to synthesize current evidence on the effectiveness of SMS interventions in improving patients’ adherence to tuberculosis treatment. Methods We searched electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Science Citation Index), reference lists of relevant articles, conference proceedings, and selected websites for eligible studies available by 15 February 2013; regardless of language or publication status. Two authors independently screened selected eligible studies, and assessed risk of bias in included studies; resolving discrepancies by discussion and consensus. Results We identified four studies that compared the outcomes of the SMS intervention group with controls. Only one of the four studies was a randomized controlled trial. This was conducted in Argentina and the SMS intervention did not significantly improve adherence to tuberculosis treatment compared to self-administration of tuberculosis treatment (risk ratio [RR] 1.49, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.90 to 2.42). One of the non-randomized studies, conducted in South Africa, which compared SMS reminders to directly observed therapy short course (DOTS) reported similar rates of tuberculosis cure (62.35% vs. 66.4%) and treatment success (72.94% vs. 69.4%). A second study from South Africa, utilized SMS reminders when patients delayed in opening their pill bottles and reported increased tuberculosis cure (RR 2.32, 95% CI 1.60 to 3.36) and smear conversion (RR 1.62, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.42) rates compared to DOTS. In the third non-randomized study, conducted in Kenya, use of SMS reminders increased rates of clinic attendance on scheduled days compared to standard care (RR 1.56, 95% CI 1.06 to 2.29). Using the GRADE approach, we rate the quality of the evidence as low, mainly because of the high risk of bias and heterogeneity of effects across studies. Conclusions This systematic

  16. Recent intensification of the South and East Asian monsoon contrast associated with an increase in the zonal tropical SST gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Kyung-Sook; Lee, June-Yi; Ha, Kyung-Ja

    2014-07-01

    Observed analysis of the 35 years of 1979-2013 reveals considerable interdecadal change and significant recent intensification in the difference of convective precipitation between the South Asian monsoon (SAM) and East Asian monsoon (EAM) systems during the major summer monsoon season (June-July). We propose that the recent strengthening of the zonal gradient of sea surface temperature (SST) between the Indian Ocean, western Pacific, and eastern Pacific is a possible cause for the intensification of the convective precipitation contrast. It is noted that the strengthening of the zonal SST gradient associated with the recent mega-La Niña trend tends to reinforce the negative connection between SAM and EAM systems by inducing enhanced convection over the maritime continent and then facilitating the northwestward emanation of Rossby waves. Consequently, a cyclonic circulation anomaly that effectively changes the local Hadley circulation has been formed over the SAM region, resulting in the noticeable difference between the SAM and EAM. The years 2013 and 1983 are further investigated as the strongest extreme years for positive and negative phases of submonsoon contrast, respectively. The result confirms that the meridional dipole height pattern along the Asian Jet stream, which is caused by the strong zonal gradient of tropical SST, serves as a key trigger in strengthening the submonsoon contrast.

  17. Adherence to Preventive Medications: Predictors and outcomes in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; Molitch, Mark; Kramer, M. Kaye; Kahn, Steven; Ma, Yong; Edelstein, Sharon; Smith, Kellie; Johnson, Mariana Kiefer; Kitabchi, Abbas; Crandall, Jill

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate barriers to and strategies for medication adherence and predictors of adherence and the primary outcome in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Within a randomized, controlled primary prevention study for type 2 diabetes, we collected data on study medication adherence, its predictors, and health outcomes in 27 clinical centers across mainland U.S. and Hawaii. Medication arm participants included 2,155 adults with impaired glucose tolerance randomly assigned to either metformin or matched placebo treatment arms. Structured interviews were used to promote medication adherence and to collect data regarding adherence. Adherence was measured by pill count. The primary DPP outcome of type 2 diabetes was assessed by fasting plasma glucose and oral glucose tolerance test. RESULTS Older age-groups were more adherent than the youngest group (P = 0.01) in the metformin group. The most frequently reported barrier to adherence was “forgetting” (22%). Women reported more adverse effects of metformin (15 vs. 10%, P = 0.002) in the metformin group. Odds of nonadherence increased as participants reported more than one barrier (odds ratio 19.1, P < 0.001). Odds of adherence increased as participants reported multiple strategies to take medication (2.69, P < 0.0001). There was a 38.2% risk reduction for developing diabetes for those adherent to metformin compared with those adherent to placebo (P < 0.0003). CONCLUSIONS DPP medication adherence results are unique in primary prevention for a chronic disease in a large multiethnic sample. Our finding that adherence was associated with risk reduction for diabetes supports the development of brief interventions in clinical settings where medication adherence is a challenge. PMID:16936143

  18. Defining and Assessing Adherence to Oral Antipsychotics: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Velligan, Dawn I.; Lam, Yui-Wing Francis; Glahn, David C.; Barrett, Jennifer A.; Maples, Natalie J.; Ereshefsky, Larry; Miller, Alexander L.

    2006-01-01

    The definition and assessment of adherence vary considerably across studies. Increasing consensus regarding these issues is necessary to improve our understanding of adherence and the development of more effective treatments. We review the adherence literature over the past 3 decades to explore the definitions and assessment of adherence to oral antipsychotics in schizophrenia patients. A total of 161 articles were identified through MEDLINE and PsycINFO searches. The most common method used to assess adherence was the report of the patient. Subjective and indirect methods including self-report, provider report, significant other report, and chart review were the only methods used to assess adherence in over 77% (124/161) of studies reviewed. Direct or objective measures including pill count, blood or urine analysis, electronic monitoring, and electronic refill records were used in less than 23% (37/161) of studies. Even in studies utilizing the same methodology to assess adherence, definitions of an adherent subject varied broadly from agreeing to take any medication to taking at least 90% of medication as prescribed. We make suggestions for consensus development, including the use of recommended terminology for different subject samples, the increased use of objective or direct measures, and the inclusion in all studies of an estimate of the percentage of medication taken as prescribed in an effort to increase comparability among studies. The suggestions are designed to advance the field with respect to both understanding predictors of adherence and developing interventions to improve adherence to oral antipsychotic medications. PMID:16707778

  19. Approaches to improve adherence to pharmacotherapy in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Shuler, Kimberly M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In patients with schizophrenia, nonadherence to prescribed medications increases the risk of patient relapse and hospitalization, key contributors to the costs associated with treatment. The objectives of this review were to evaluate the impact of nonadherence to pharmacotherapy in patients with schizophrenia as it relates to health care professionals, particularly social workers, and to identify effective team approaches to supporting patients based on studies assessing implementation of assertive community treatment teams. Materials and methods A systematic review of the medical literature was conducted by searching the Scopus database to identify articles associated with treatment adherence in patients with schizophrenia. Articles included were published from January 1, 2003, through July 15, 2013, were written in English, and reported findings concerning any and all aspects of nonadherence to prescribed treatment in patients with schizophrenia. Results Of 92 unique articles identified and formally screened, 47 met the inclusion criteria for the systematic review. The burden of nonadherence in schizophrenia is significant. Factors with the potential to affect adherence include antipsychotic drug class and formulation, patient-specific factors, and family/social support system. There is inconclusive evidence suggesting superior adherence with an atypical versus typical antipsychotic or with a long-acting injectable versus an oral formulation. Patient-specific factors that contribute to adherence include awareness/denial of illness, cognitive issues, stigma associated with taking medication, substance abuse, access to health care, employment/poverty, and insurance status. Lack of social or family support may adversely affect adherence, necessitating the assistance of health care professionals, such as social workers. Evidence supports the concept that an enhanced team-oriented approach to managing patients with schizophrenia improves adherence and supports

  20. Surveillance of medication use: early identification of poor adherence

    PubMed Central

    Jonikas, Magdalena A

    2011-01-01

    Background We sought to measure population-level adherence to antihyperlipidemics, antihypertensives, and oral hypoglycemics, and to develop a model for early identification of subjects at high risk of long-term poor adherence. Methods Prescription-filling data for 2 million subjects derived from a payor's insurance claims were used to evaluate adherence to three chronic drugs over 1 year. We relied on patterns of prescription fills, including the length of gaps in medication possession, to measure adherence among subjects and to build models for predicting poor long-term adherence. Results All prescription fills for a specific drug were sequenced chronologically into drug eras. 61.3% to 66.5% of the prescription patterns contained medication gaps >30 days during the first year of drug use. These interrupted drug eras include long-term discontinuations, where the subject never again filled a prescription for any drug in that category in the dataset, which represent 23.7% to 29.1% of all drug eras. Among the prescription-filling patterns without large medication gaps, 0.8% to 1.3% exhibited long-term poor adherence. Our models identified these subjects as early as 60 days after the first prescription fill, with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.81. Model performance improved as the predictions were made at later time-points, with AUC values increasing to 0.93 at the 120-day time-point. Conclusions Dispensed medication histories (widely available in real time) are useful for alerting providers about poorly adherent patients and those who will be non-adherent several months later. Efforts to use these data in point of care and decision support facilitating patient are warranted. PMID:22101969

  1. Dietary adherence during weight loss predicts weight regain.

    PubMed

    Del Corral, Pedro; Bryan, David R; Garvey, W Timothy; Gower, Barbara A; Hunter, Gary R

    2011-06-01

    This study examined the relationship between previous dietary adherence during a low-calorie diet weight loss intervention and subsequent weight change during a 2-year follow-up for weight maintenance. One hundred and sixteen healthy, recently weight reduced (lost ~12 kg, BMI 22-25 kg/m2) premenopausal women were studied. Dietary adherence was assessed by doubly labeled water (DLW) and body composition change. Comparisons were made between the upper and lower tertiles for previous dietary adherence and subsequent weight change at 1- and 2-year follow-up. Percent weight regained was significantly lower (30.9 ± 6.7% vs. 66.7 ± 9.4%; P < 0.05) in the upper compared to the lower adherence tertile for previous weight loss dietary adherence (49.9 ± 8.8% vs. 96.8 ± 12.8% P < 0.05) at 1- and 2-year follow-up, respectively. This difference was partly explained by increases in daily activity-related energy expenditure (AEE) (+95 ± 45 kcal/day vs. -44 ± 42 kcal/day, P < 0.05) and lower daily energy intake (2,066 ± 71 kcal/day vs. 2,289 ± 62 kcal/day, P < 0.05) in the higher tertile for previous dietary adherence, compared to the lower. These findings suggest that higher adherence (i.e., higher tertile) to the previous low-calorie diet predicts lower weight regain over 2-year follow-up for weight maintenance, which is explained by lower energy intake and higher physical activity. Finally, how well an individual adheres to a low-calorie diet intervention during weight loss may be a useful tool for identifying individuals who are particularly vulnerable to subsequent weight regain. PMID:21164500

  2. Medication therapy management and adherence among US renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm-Burns, Marie A; Spivey, Christina A; Tolley, Elizabeth A; Kaplan, Erin K

    2016-01-01

    Background Medication therapy management (MTM) services among patient populations with a range of disease states have improved adherence rates. However, no published studies have examined the impact of Medicare Part D MTM eligibility on renal transplant recipients’ (RTRs) immunosuppressant therapy (IST) adherence. This study’s purpose was therefore, to determine the effects of Medicare Part D MTM on IST adherence among adult RTRs at 12 months posttransplant. Methods Cross-sectional analyses were performed on Medicare Parts A, B, and D claims and transplant follow-up data reported in the United States Renal Data System. The sample included adult RTRs who were transplanted between 2006 and 2011, had graft survival for 12 months, were enrolled in Part D, and were prescribed tacrolimus. IST adherence was measured by medication possession ratio for tacrolimus. MTM eligibility was determined using criteria established by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Adherence was modeled using multiple logistic regression. Results In all, 17,181 RTRs were included. The majority of the sample were male (59.1%), and 42% were MTM-eligible. Mean medication possession ratio was 0.91±0.17 (mean ± standard deviation), with 16.83% having a medication possession ratio of <0.80. MTM eligibility, sex, age, and number of prescription drugs were significantly associated with adherence in the full model (P<0.05). MTM-eligible RTRs were more likely to be adherent than those who were not MTM-eligible (odds ratio =1.13, 95% confidence interval 1.02–1.26, P=0.02). Conclusion The findings provide evidence that access to MTM services increases IST adherence among RTRs. PMID:27175070

  3. Adherence to Antihypertensive Medication in Older Adults With Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Suzanne H. S.; Chau, Janita P. C.; Woo, Jean; Thompson, David R.; Choi, Kai Chow

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Effective prevention of cardiovascular events in people with hypertension requires optimal control of blood pressure. Despite advances in management, poor adherence to antihypertensive medications is often reported as the major reason attenuating treatment efficacy. Research has provided limited evidence of associations between illness perceptions, satisfaction with consultations, and medication adherence. The aim of this study is to identify factors significantly associated with medication adherence in a group of Chinese older adults with essential hypertension. Design/Setting/Participants: A cross-sectional correlational study was conducted. Data were collected from 195 older adults (mean [SD] age, 76 [6.6] years) recruited from 12 community centers. Measurements: The Illness Perception Questionnaire–Revised was used to measure illness perceptions, and the Medical Interview Satisfaction Scale was used to measure satisfaction with individual consultations. The Morisky Medication Adherence Scale was used to measure the extent of adherence to antihypertensive medications. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to examine factors, including illness perceptions, consultation satisfaction, and demographic and clinical characteristics, that were significantly associated with medication adherence. Results: More than half of the respondents (55.9%) acknowledged some degree of medication nonadherence. Older age, living alone, and perception related to treatment control were independently associated with increased odds of medication adherence, with odds ratios ranging from 1.14 to 1.92 (P < .05). Conclusion: The results highlight the importance of cultivating positive beliefs that hypertension is amenable to control by treatment. Furthermore, the adherence behavior of those of younger individuals and living with family should be closely monitored. PMID:25774846

  4. Addressing drug adherence using an operations management model.

    PubMed

    Nunlee, Martin; Bones, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To provide a model that enables health systems and pharmacy benefit managers to provide medications reliably and test for reliability and validity in the analysis of adherence to drug therapy of chronic disease. SUMMARY The quantifiable model described here can be used in conjunction with behavioral designs of drug adherence assessments. The model identifies variables that can be reproduced and expanded across the management of chronic diseases with drug therapy. By creating a reorder point system for reordering medications, the model uses a methodology commonly seen in operations research. The design includes a safety stock of medication and current supply of medication, which increases the likelihood that patients will have a continuous supply of medications, thereby positively affecting adherence by removing barriers. CONCLUSION This method identifies an adherence model that quantifies variables related to recommendations from health care providers; it can assist health care and service delivery systems in making decisions that influence adherence based on the expected order cycle days and the expected daily quantity of medication administered. This model addresses the possession of medication as a barrier to adherence. PMID:24407742

  5. Procoagulant activity on platelets adhered to collagen or plasma clot.

    PubMed

    Ilveskero, S; Siljander, P; Lassila, R

    2001-04-01

    In a new 2-stage assay of platelet procoagulant activity (PCA), we first subjected gel-filtered platelets to adhesion on collagen (as a model of primary hemostasis) or plasma clots (as a model of preformed thrombus) for 30 minutes, and then the adherent platelets were supplemented with pooled, reptilase-treated, diluted plasma. Defibrinated plasma provided coagulation factors for assembly on platelet membranes without uncontrolled binding of thrombin to fibrin(ogen). Platelet adhesion to both surfaces showed modest individual variation, which increased at platelet densities that allowed aggregation. However, adhesion-induced PCA varied individually and surface-independently >3-fold, suggesting a uniform platelet procoagulant mechanism. Permanently adhered platelets showed markedly enhanced PCA when compared with the platelet pool in suspension, even after strong activation. The rate of thrombin generation induced by clot-adherent platelets was markedly faster than on collagen-adherent platelets during the initial phase of coagulation, whereas collagen-induced PCA proceeded slowly, strongly promoted by tissue thromboplastin. Therefore at 10 minutes, after adjustment for adhered platelets, collagen supported soluble thrombin formation as much as 5 times that of the thrombin-retaining clots. Activation of platelets by their firm adhesion was accompanied by formation of microparticles, representing about one third of the total soluble PCA. Collagen-adhered platelets provide soluble thrombin and microparticles, whereas the preformed clot serves to localize and accelerate hemostasis at the injury site, with the contribution of retained thrombin and microparticles. PMID:11304482

  6. Topography Influences Adherent Cell Regulation of Osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, M; Cooper, L F; Ogino, Y; Mendonca, D; Liang, R; Yang, S; Mendonca, G; Uoshima, K

    2016-03-01

    The importance of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in the process of osseointegration has not been widely considered. In this study, cell culture was used to investigate the hypothesis that the function of implant-adherent bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in osteoclastogenesis is influenced by surface topography. BMSCs isolated from femur and tibia of Sprague-Dawley rats were seeded onto 3 types of titanium surfaces (smooth, micro, and nano) and a control surface (tissue culture plastic) with or without osteogenic supplements. After 3 to 14 d, conditioned medium (CM) was collected. Subsequently, rat bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) were cultured in media supplemented with soluble receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) as well as BMSC CM from each of the 4 surfaces. Gene expression levels of soluble RANKL, osteoprotegerin, tumor necrosis factor α, and M-CSF in cultured BMSCs at different time points were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The number of differentiated osteoclastic cells was determined after tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Analysis of variance and t test were used for statistical analysis. The expression of prominent osteoclast-promoting factors tumor necrosis factor α and M-CSF was increased by BMSCs cultured on both micro- and nanoscale titanium topographies (P < 0.01). BMSC CM contained a heat-labile factor that increased BMMs osteoclastogenesis. CM from both micro- and nanoscale surface-adherent BMSCs increased the osteoclast number (P < 0.01). Difference in surface topography altered BMSC phenotype and influenced BMM osteoclastogenesis. Local signaling by implant-adherent cells at the implant-bone interface may indirectly control osteoclastogenesis and bone accrual around endosseous implants. PMID:26553885

  7. Toward appropriate criteria in medication adherence assessment in older persons: Position Paper.

    PubMed

    Giardini, Anna; Martin, Maria Teresa; Cahir, Caitriona; Lehane, Elaine; Menditto, Enrica; Strano, Maria; Pecorelli, Sergio; Monaco, Alessandro; Marengoni, Alessandra

    2016-06-01

    Nonadherence to medication regimens is a worldwide challenge; adherence rates range from 38 to 57 % in older populations with an average rate of less than 45 % and nonadherence contributes to adverse drug events, increased emergency visits and hospitalisations. Accurate measurement of medication adherence is important in terms of both research and clinical practice. However, the identification of an objective approach to measure nonadherence is still an ongoing challenge. The aim of this Position Paper is to describe the advantages and disadvantages of the known medication adherence tools (self-report, pill count, medication event monitoring system (MEMS) and electronic monitoring devices, therapeutic drug monitoring, pharmacy records based on pharmacy refill and pharmacy claims databases) to provide the appropriate criteria to assess medication adherence in older persons. To the best of our knowledge, no gold standard has been identified in adherence measurement and no single method is sufficiently reliable and accurate. A combination of methods appears to be the most suitable. Secondly, adherence assessment should always consider tools enabling polypharmacy adherence assessment. Moreover, it is increasingly evident that adherence, as a process, has to be assessed over time and not just at one evaluation time point (drug discontinuation). When cognitive deficits or functional impairments may impair reliability of adherence assessment, a comprehensive geriatric assessment should be performed and the caregiver involved. Finally, studies considering the possible implementation in clinical practice of adherence assessment tools validated in research are needed. PMID:26630945

  8. An intervention to support HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) adherence in HIV serodiscordant couples in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Psaros, Christina; Haberer, Jessica E.; Katabira, Elly; Ronald, Allan; Tumwesigye, Elioda; Campbell, James D.; Wangisi, Jonathan; Mugwanya, Kenneth; Kintu, Alex; Enyakoit, Michael; Thomas, Katherine K.; Donnell, Deborah; Krows, Meighan; Kidoguchi, Lara; Ware, Norma; Baeten, Jared M.; Celum, Connie; Bangsberg, David R.; Safren, Steve A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Daily pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is an effective HIV prevention strategy, but adherence is required for maximum benefit. To date, there are no empirically supported PrEP adherence interventions. This manuscript describes the process of developing a PrEP adherence intervention and presents results on its impact on adherence. Methods The Partners PrEP Study was a placebo-controlled efficacy trial of daily oral tenofovir and emtricitabine/tenofovir PrEP among uninfected members of HIV serodiscordant couples. An ancillary adherence study was conducted at three study sites in Uganda. Participants with <80% adherence as measured by unannounced pill count received an additional adherence counseling intervention based on Lifesteps, an evidence-based HIV treatment adherence intervention, based on principles of cognitive-behavioral theory. Findings Of the 1,147 HIV seronegative participants were enrolled in the ancillary adherence study, 168 (14.6%) triggered the adherence intervention. Of participants triggering the intervention, 62% were male; median age was 32.5 years. The median number of adherence counseling sessions was 10. Mean adherence during the month before the intervention was 75.7%, and increased significantly to 84.1% in the month after the first intervention session (p<0.001). The most frequently endorsed adherence barriers at session one were travel and forgetting. Interpretation A PrEP adherence intervention was feasible in a clinical trial of PrEP in Uganda and PrEP adherence increased after the intervention. Future research should identify PrEP users with low adherence for enhanced adherence counseling and determine optimal implementation strategies for interventions to maximize PrEP effectiveness. PMID:24853311

  9. Improving medication adherence in migraine treatment.

    PubMed

    Seng, Elizabeth K; Rains, Jeanetta A; Nicholson, Robert A; Lipton, Richard B

    2015-06-01

    Medication adherence is integral to successful treatment of migraine and other headache. The existing literature examining medication adherence in migraine is small, and the methodologies used to assess adherence are limited. However, these studies broadly suggest poor adherence to both acute and preventive migraine medications, with studies using more objective monitoring reporting lower adherence rates. Methods for improving medication adherence are described, including organizational strategies, provider-monitoring and self-monitoring of adherence, regimen strategies, patient education, self-management skills training (e.g., stimulus control, behavioral contracts), and cognitive-behavioral therapy techniques. The article concludes by discussing the future of research regarding adherence to medications for migraine and other headaches. PMID:26040703

  10. Streptococcus Adherence and Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Nobbs, Angela H.; Lamont, Richard J.; Jenkinson, Howard F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Streptococci readily colonize mucosal tissues in the nasopharynx; the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary tracts; and the skin. Each ecological niche presents a series of challenges to successful colonization with which streptococci have to contend. Some species exist in equilibrium with their host, neither stimulating nor submitting to immune defenses mounted against them. Most are either opportunistic or true pathogens responsible for diseases such as pharyngitis, tooth decay, necrotizing fasciitis, infective endocarditis, and meningitis. Part of the success of streptococci as colonizers is attributable to the spectrum of proteins expressed on their surfaces. Adhesins enable interactions with salivary, serum, and extracellular matrix components; host cells; and other microbes. This is the essential first step to colonization, the development of complex communities, and possible invasion of host tissues. The majority of streptococcal adhesins are anchored to the cell wall via a C-terminal LPxTz motif. Other proteins may be surface anchored through N-terminal lipid modifications, while the mechanism of cell wall associations for others remains unclear. Collectively, these surface-bound proteins provide Streptococcus species with a “coat of many colors,” enabling multiple intimate contacts and interplays between the bacterial cell and the host. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated direct roles for many streptococcal adhesins as colonization or virulence factors, making them attractive targets for therapeutic and preventive strategies against streptococcal infections. There is, therefore, much focus on applying increasingly advanced molecular techniques to determine the precise structures and functions of these proteins, and their regulatory pathways, so that more targeted approaches can be developed. PMID:19721085

  11. Enhancing Adherence in Clinical Exercise Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, Heather A.; Blair, Steven N.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses exercise adherence from the perspective of adhering to an exercise treatment in a controlled trial, focusing on: adherence (to intervention and measurement); the development of randomized clinical trials; exemplary randomized clinical trials in exercise science (exercise training studies and physical activity interventions); and study…

  12. Artefact or reality? Increases in persons notified to the Regional Drug Misuse Database in the South West of England, 1996-2001.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Stephen; Soteriou, Tony; Gray, Selena; Orme, Judy; Myles, Judy

    2004-03-01

    The incidence of new persons and repeat attenders presenting for treatment for problem drug misuse in the South West of England more than doubled from 1996-1997 to 2000-2001. During this time there was an increase in the number and severity of chronic cases, both in terms of the prevalence of heroin and crack-cocaine use and in the frequency of injecting and sharing injecting equipment. Growth in the availability of treatment, changes in notification practice and sub-regional variation make it difficult to be confident about real rates of increase, or age, gender and substance misuse changes, but the size of these changes mean they are unlikely to be purely artefactal. PMID:15044564

  13. Procedure volume influences adherence to celiac disease guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Genta, Robert M.; Kapel, Robert C.; Sheehan, Daniel; Lerner, Nina S.; Green, Peter H.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Rundle, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the prevalence of celiac disease in the USA approaches 1%, most cases are undiagnosed, in part, because of low adherence to the recommendation of submitting at least four specimens during duodenal biopsy. We aimed to determine whether physician and practice characteristics are associated with adherence to this recommendation. Materials and methods We used a large national pathology database to identify all adult patients who underwent duodenal biopsy during 2006–2009. Hierarchical modeling was used to determine whether procedure volume, the number of gastroenterologists per endoscopy suite, and the number of gastroenterologists per capita of the zip code of the practice were associated with adherence. Results We identified 92 580 patients (67% female, mean age 53.5 years) who met our inclusion/exclusion criteria. Specimens were submitted by 669 gastroenterologists from 200 endoscopy suites, located in 191 zip codes, with a mean of 3.4 gastroenterologists per suite. On multivariate analysis, a higher procedure volume was associated with a decreased adherence [odds ratio (OR) for each additional 100 procedures, 0.92; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.88–0.97; P = 0.002]. An increased adherence was reported for gastroenterologists working at suites with higher numbers of gastroenterologists (OR for each additional gastroenterologist, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.04–1.13; P < 0.001) but not for a higher gastroenterologist density in the zip code of the practice (OR for each additional gastroenterologist per capita, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.99–1.03; P = 0.21). Conclusion High-volume physicians exhibit lower rates of adherence to biopsy guidelines, possibly because of the additional time required to submit at least four specimens. In contrast, a greater number of endoscopists working in an endoscopy suite are associated with an increased adherence, possibly because of peer education. PMID:23995767

  14. Changes in Adherence to Non-Pharmacological Guidelines for Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyong; Cho, Sukyung; Bower, Julie K

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to compare levels of adherence to non-pharmacological guidelines between patients with and without hypertension diagnoses, and examined temporal changes in adherence during recent decades. We used data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1998-2012), including 13,768 Korean hypertensive patients aged ≥ 30 years who were categorized according to the presence or absence of a hypertension diagnosis, based on blood pressure and self-reported information. Adherence to the guidelines was calculated for 6 components, including dietary and lifestyle habits. A multivariable generalized linear regression model was used. The proportion of hypertensive patients aware of their condition increased from 33.4% in 1998 to 74.8% in 2012 (p < 0.001), although these increments plateaued during recent survey years. Patients with hypertension diagnoses were older, and more likely to be female,and have lower education levels than those without hypertension diagnoses, for most survey years. Overall adherence levels were poor (mean score 2 of 6), and levels of adherence to non-pharmacological habits did not significantly differ between patients with and without hypertension diagnoses. However, overall adherence levels improved significantly among patients with hypertension diagnoses: from 2.09 in 1998 to 2.27 in 2012 (p = 0.007), particularly regarding sufficient vegetable/seaweed consumption (p = 0.03), maintaining a normal weight (p = 0.03), and avoidance of smoking (p < 0.001). Awareness of hypertension is increasing, but hypertensive Korean patients demonstrate poor overall adherence to non-pharmacological hypertension management guidelines. These findings suggest that well-planned education programs should be continued after hypertension is diagnosed. PMID:27561006

  15. Changes in Adherence to Non-Pharmacological Guidelines for Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyong; Cho, Sukyung; Bower, Julie K.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to compare levels of adherence to non-pharmacological guidelines between patients with and without hypertension diagnoses, and examined temporal changes in adherence during recent decades. We used data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1998–2012), including 13,768 Korean hypertensive patients aged ≥ 30 years who were categorized according to the presence or absence of a hypertension diagnosis, based on blood pressure and self-reported information. Adherence to the guidelines was calculated for 6 components, including dietary and lifestyle habits. A multivariable generalized linear regression model was used. The proportion of hypertensive patients aware of their condition increased from 33.4% in 1998 to 74.8% in 2012 (p < 0.001), although these increments plateaued during recent survey years. Patients with hypertension diagnoses were older, and more likely to be female,and have lower education levels than those without hypertension diagnoses, for most survey years. Overall adherence levels were poor (mean score 2 of 6), and levels of adherence to non-pharmacological habits did not significantly differ between patients with and without hypertension diagnoses. However, overall adherence levels improved significantly among patients with hypertension diagnoses: from 2.09 in 1998 to 2.27 in 2012 (p = 0.007), particularly regarding sufficient vegetable/seaweed consumption (p = 0.03), maintaining a normal weight (p = 0.03), and avoidance of smoking (p < 0.001). Awareness of hypertension is increasing, but hypertensive Korean patients demonstrate poor overall adherence to non-pharmacological hypertension management guidelines. These findings suggest that well-planned education programs should be continued after hypertension is diagnosed. PMID:27561006

  16. Differences between self-reported and electronically monitored adherence among patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in a resource-limited setting

    PubMed Central

    Thirumurthy, Harsha; Siripong, Nalyn; Vreeman, Rachel C.; Pop-Eleches, Cristian; Habyarimana, James P.; Sidle, John E.; Siika, Abraham M.; Bangsberg, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Measurement of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) by patient self-report is common in resource-limited settings but widely believed to overstate actual adherence. The extent to which these measures overstate adherence has not been examined among a large patient population. Methods HIV-infected adult patients in Kenya who initiated ART within the past 3 months were followed for 6 months. Adherence was measured by participants’ self-reports of doses missed in the past 7 days during monthly clinic visits and by continuous Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS) in participants’ pill bottles. Seven-day self-reported adherence was compared to 7-day MEMS adherence, 30-day MEMS adherence, and adherence more than 90% during each of the first 6 months. Results Self-reported and MEMS adherence measures were linked for 669 participants. Mean 7-day self-reported adherence was 98.7% and mean 7-day MEMS adherence was 86.0%, a difference of 12.7% (P <0.01). The difference between the two adherence measures increased over time due to a decline in 7-day MEMS adherence. However, patients with lower MEMS adherence were in fact more likely to self-report missed doses and the difference between self-reported and MEMS adherence was similar for each number of self-reported missed doses. When analysis was limited to patients who reported rarely or never removing multiple doses at the same time, mean difference was 10.5% (P <0.01). Conclusion There is a sizable and significant difference between self-reported and MEMS adherence. However, a strong relationship between the measures suggests that self-reported adherence is informative for clinical monitoring and program evaluation. PMID:22948266

  17. How can we improve adherence?

    PubMed

    Price, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with wound healing difficulties are also coping with the management of a chronic disease or chronic condition that requires them to make lifestyle behaviour changes, for example, managing glucose levels through diet and exercise and regular foot inspection. Many find it difficult to make such changes and often experience feelings of powerlessness when faced with a lifetime of behavioural and psychological change. This article will explore the importance of understanding the patient difficulties associated with adherence to a regime and how life changes can be difficult to maintain over sustained periods of time. However, the article will also discuss the importance of this topic in trying to understand the clinical evidence base for treatment--as many clinical trials investigating treatments for the diabetic foot do not include information on the extent to which patients in the trial conformed to the trial protocol. The article gives an overview of recent developments--including lessons we can learn from other chronic conditions where permanent life changes are required--in particular the need to keep health messages simple, tailored to the individual and repeated frequently. The evidence to date suggests that no one single form of adherence intervention will work with all patients; this is not surprising given complex and multifactorial nature of adherence and the myriad of barriers that exist that patients and health care professionals need to overcome. PMID:26453542

  18. Is increasing industrialization affecting remote ecosystem health in the South Americas? Insights from ocean surface water measurements of As, Sb and Pb from a GEOTRACES transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Dominik; Salaun, Pascal; Van den Berg, Stan; Bi, Zaoshun

    2014-05-01

    Continued industrial development of the South Americas with increasing atmospheric emission of toxic trace metals has lead to a growing concern about possible effects on pristine ecosystem health. Concentration measurements of trace metals in ocean surface waters in the North Atlantic have successfully revealed the global extent of atmospheric pollution in the Northern Hemisphere during economical growth in the USA and Europe, suggesting a similar approach can be applied to the Southern Hemisphere. To this end, we determined concentrations of lead (Pb), antimony (Sb) and arsenic (As) using voltammetry in surface water samples of the South Atlantic Ocean collected during the third leg of the GEOTRACES West Atlantic Cruise. These elements are volatile and therefore most likely suitable tracer elements of industrial emissions from South America. The samples were not filtered and the solutions were acidified and UV digested. Total concentrations of Pb were detected. Detected As levels correspond to the sum of inorganic species (AsIII + AsV) plus the mono methyl arsenic acid (MMA) while the dimethyl arsenic acid (DMA) is not detected in such conditions. For Sb, detected levels correspond at least to the sum of inorganic fractions (SbIII + SbV). The measured concentrations for Pb varied from 6 to 23 pM. Concentrations were highest at -35° latitude and lowest at -40° and -50° latitude. We found a decreasing trend from about -35° latitude southwards. The average concentrations of As was 20 nM and of Sb 1.2 nM. Arsenic showed a more significant north to south trend than Sb. Arsenic concentration was highest at -23 ° latitude (21 nM) and the lowest at -43 ° latitude (17.7 nM). Antimony concentration was highest at -31 ° latitude (1.5 nM) and lowest at -35 ° latitude (1.0 nM). Our preliminary data suggests that the major industrial centres in Brazil (i.e., Sao Paolo, Rio de Janeiro) and Argentina (i.e., Buenos Aires) affect atmospheric metal fluxes to remote

  19. Adherence and Treatment Satisfaction in Liver Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Albekairy, Abdulkareem M.; Alkatheri, Abdulmalik M.; Jarab, Anan; Khalidi, Nabil; Althiab, Khalifah; Alshaya, Abdulrahman; Saleh, Khalid Bin; Ismail, Wesam W.; Qandil, Amjad M.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Liver transplantation (LT) is a life-saving intervention for patients with liver failure. LT recipients' adherence to their therapeutic regimen is an essential element for graft survival. According to WHO, the impact of medication non-adherence in solid organ transplantation has shown to cost $15–100 million annually. The aim of the present study was to identify the factors that best predict medication adherence and to explore the relationship between treatment satisfaction and medication adherence in liver transplant recipients. Patients and Methods: Adult liver transplant patients at King Abdulaziz Medical City were included in the study. Patients completed the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) and the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM 1.4) in addition to several socio-demographic and transplant-related data. Results: A total of 154 patients were included in the study and of these 59.7% were adherent. Older age was a significant predictor of adherence (P < 0.05). The mean treatment satisfaction score was 91.9 ± 12.7 in Effectiveness, 80.0 ± 25.9 in Side Effects, 83.5 ± 15.7 in Convenience, and 94.6 ± 8.6 in Global Satisfaction. Further analysis indicated that patients in the adherent group had reported significantly higher satisfaction scores than those in the non-adherent group (P < 0.05) in all treatment satisfaction domains: Effectiveness (94.4 ± 10.4 vs. 88.6 ± 14.8), Side Effects (83.9 ± 22.0 vs. 74.2 ± 30.1), Convenience (87.0 ± 13.9 vs. 77.2 ± 16.1), and Global Satisfaction (96.9 ± 6.6 vs. 91.2 ± 8.6). Conclusion: Older patients and those who were more satisfied with their treatment tend to have better adherence to the prescribed medications. Therefore, increasing patients' satisfaction with their treatment should be an integral element of future care plans designed to improve treatment outcomes in liver transplant recipients. PMID:26997219

  20. Environmental Influences on HIV Medication Adherence: The Role of Neighborhood Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Steven P.; Levi-Minzi, Maria A.; Chen, Minxing

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We hypothesized that highly disordered neighborhoods would expose residents to environmental pressures, leading to reduced antiretroviral (ARV) medication adherence. Methods. Using targeted sampling, we enrolled 503 socioeconomically disadvantaged HIV-positive substance users in urban South Florida between 2010 and 2012. Participants completed a 1-time standardized interview that took approximately 1 hour. We tested a multiple mediation model to examine the direct and indirect effects of neighborhood disorder on diversion-related nonadherence to ARVs; risky social networks and housing instability were examined as mediators of the disordered neighborhood environment. Results. The total indirect effect in the model was statistically significant (P = .001), and the proportion of the total effect mediated was 53%. The model indicated substantial influence of neighborhood disorder on nonadherence to ARVs, operating through recent homelessness and diverter network size. Conclusions. Long-term improvements in diversion-related ARV adherence will require initiatives to reduce demand for illicit ARV medications, as well as measures to reduce patient vulnerability to diversion, including increased resources for accessible housing, intensive treatment, and support services. PMID:26066966

  1. Adherence With Therapeutic Regimens: Behavioral and Pharmacoeconomic Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Giannetti, Vincent J; Kamal, Khalid M

    2016-04-01

    There is an extensive literature regarding nonadherence with both therapeutic regimens and medication. This literature includes reviews of empirical research regarding the factors associated with nonadherence. Health care system, provider, and patient factors as well as the nature of the illness and therapeutic regimen all effect adherence rates. Different behavioral models for adherence counseling such as the Health Belief Model, the Theory of Reasoned Action, the Medication Interest Model, and Motivational Interviewing have also been reported in the research literature. This article will discuss the development of a brief model for patient counseling with specific techniques illustrated for pharmacists based on empirical findings that have demonstrated effectiveness in the adherence research literature. In addition, the article will address the measurement of the economic impact of medication nonadherence and propose a framework for assessing the cost-effectiveness of pharmacist counseling to increase adherence. The problem of nonadherence has significant effects upon health care expenditures through increase in physician's visits, emergency department incidents, rehospitalizations, and nursing home readmissions. Thus, the overall goal is to assist the pharmacist in developing a brief adherence counseling program in community pharmacy and evaluating the economic feasibility of the intervention demonstrating the value-added proposition of pharmacist intervention. PMID:25292442

  2. Pharmacist Intervention for Blood Pressure Control: Medication Intensification and Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Gums, Tyler; Uribe, Liz; Vander Weg, Mark W.; James, Paul; Coffey, Christopher; Carter, Barry L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe medication adherence and medication intensification in a physician-pharmacist collaborative management (PPCM) model compared to usual care. Design Prospective, cluster, randomized study in 32 primary care offices from 15 states. The primary outcomes were medication adherence and anti-hypertensive medication changes during the first nine months of the intervention. The nine month visit was completed by 539 patients, 345 of which received the intervention. Results There was no significant difference between intervention and usual care patients in regards to medication adherence at 9 months. Intervention patients received significantly more medication changes (4.9 vs.1.1; p=0.0003) and had significantly increased use of diuretics and aldosterone antagonists when compared to usual care (p=0.01). Conclusions The PPCM model increased medication intensification, however no significant change in medication adherence was detected. PPCM models will need to develop non-adherence identification and intervention methods to further improve the potency of the care team. PMID:26077795

  3. Factors associated with low adherence to medication in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Noemia Urruth Leão; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso; Thumé, Elaine; Facchini, Luiz Augusto; de França, Giovanny Vinícius Araújo; Mengue, Sotero Serrate

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess factors associated with low adherence to pharmacotherapy in older adults. METHODS Cross-sectional population-based study, with a representative sample of 1,593 individuals aged 60 or older, living in the urban area of Bagé, RS, Southern Brazil, in 2008. A multiple stage sampling model was used. The data were collected through individual household interviews. The analyses of the association between low adherence regarding pharmacotherapy, measured using the Brief Medication Questionnaire (BMQ), and demographic, socioeconomic, behavioral, health, assistance and prescription factors were carried out applying Poisson regression model to assess crude and adjusted prevalence ratios, their respective 95% confidence intervals and p-value (Wald test). RESULTS Around 78.0% of individuals reported have taken at least one medication in the seven days prior to the interview. Of these, approximately one third (28.7%) were considered to have low adherence to the treatment. The factors significantly associated to low adherence to treatment were: age (65 to 74 years old), not having health insurance, having to purchase (totally or partially) their own medicines, having three or more morbidities, having functional disabilities and using three or more medicines. CONCLUSIONS The increased use of medicines by older adults, because of the high prevalence of non-communicable diseases in this group, and the access to the treatment need to be considered by health care professionals regarding fostering adherence to treatment, which increases therapeutic solutions and quality of life among older people. PMID:24626547

  4. [Smoking and adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment].

    PubMed

    Underner, M; Perriot, J; Peiffer, G; Meurice, J-C; Dautzenberg, B

    2016-02-01

    Smoking and tuberculosis are two major public health issues. Tobacco smoke increases the risk of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and the severity of pulmonary tuberculosis. Active smoking increases the risk of relapse of pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis after treatment; smokers are less adherent to anti-tuberculosis treatment. Smoking cessation represent a means of controlling the tuberculosis epidemic in developing countries. This general review identified 17 studies in the international literature on the link between active smoking and the adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment. It highlights a positive association between smoking and a lack of adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment. This justifies the systematic application of aid to stopping smoking in smokers with tuberculosis. PMID:26777112

  5. Examining Adherence Among Challenging Patients in Public and Private HIV Care in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Jones, Deborah; Cook, Ryan; Cecchini, Diego; Sued, Omar; Bofill, Lina; Weiss, Stephen; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; Lopez, Maria R; Spence, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Treatment engagement, retention and adherence to care are required for optimal HIV outcomes. Yet, patients may fall below the treatment recommendations for achieving undetectable viral load or not be retained in care. This study examined the most challenging patients in Buenos Aires, Argentina, those non-adherent to HIV care. Men (n = 61) and women (n = 59) prescribed antiretrovirals (ARVs) and non-adherent to treatment in the prior 3-6 months were enrolled and assessed regarding adherence, knowledge, motivation and attitudes regarding treatment. Private clinic patients had lower viral load and higher self-reported adherence than public clinic patients. Motivations to be adherent and positive beliefs regarding ARVs were associated with increased adherence in public clinic participants. Increased self-efficacy was associated with increased adherence among participants from both clinics. Results support patient and provider interventions that strengthen the characteristics supporting adherence, engagement and retention in public and private clinic settings. PMID:25777507

  6. Adherence to prescribed medications of Iranian traditional medicine in a group of patients with chronic disease

    PubMed Central

    Dabaghian, Fataneh Hashem; Rassouli, Maryam; Sadighi, Jila; Ghods, Roshanak

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The extent to which a person's health-related behavior corresponds with medical instructions (adherence) is an important modifier of health system effectiveness. This study was designed to determine the patients’ adherence to Iranian traditional medicine in a group of patients with chronic disease. Methods: Convenience sampling was used to enroll 320 patients with chronic diseases from January 2014 to January 2015 in clinics of traditional medicine affiliated with medical universities in Tehran. Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS) was used to measure the adherence. After describing the variables and the frequency of adherence, logistic regression analysis was used to determine the influencing factors. Findings: Mean age was 40.8 (standard deviation [SD] =13) years. The mean of the duration of disease was 54.6 (SD = 56.1) months and mean of the duration of referring to the clinics 6.5 (SD = 6.9) months. Total score of MMAS was zero in 33 (10.3%) of patients (high adherence), one or two in 128 (40%) of patients (moderate adherence), and more than two in 159 (49.7%) of patients (low adherence). Forgetfulness, bad taste, not availability, and the high cost of the drugs were the most commonly reported causes of non-adherence. Adherence was associated with age (odds ratio [OR] =1.05, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1–1.1), marriage (OR = 10.8, 95% CI 2.05–57.6), number of prescribed drugs (OR = 0.05, 95% CI 0.02–0.14), and duration of disease (OR = 1.01, 95% CI 1–1.02). Conclusion: Considering the low adherence in users of medications of Iranian traditional medicine, health care practitioners need to be trained in adherence and the influencing factors and also to use some interventions to increase the adherence. PMID:26985436

  7. Association between adherence, treatment satisfaction and illness perception in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Saarti, S; Hajj, A; Karam, L; Jabbour, H; Sarkis, A; El Osta, N; Rabbaa Khabbaz, L

    2016-05-01

    The relationship between adherence to antihypertension medications, treatment satisfaction and illness perception has not been studied so far. The primary objective of this study was to examine the association between adherence to medication, treatment satisfaction and illness perception in Lebanese hypertensive patients. The relation between medication adherence and blood pressure (BP) control was also assessed. In this cross-sectional study, patients were recruited from the physician's practice offices and community pharmacies in Beirut. Patients who had been treated for hypertension for at least 3 months were invited to participate in the study; they completed three questionnaires: the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8), the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM-4) and the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (BIPQ). BP was also measured and recorded. A total of 117 subjects were included, of whom 29.1% had poor adherence to their antihypertension treatment (MMAS-8 scores<6). The odds of having well-controlled hypertension was 3.5 times higher in patients with high adherence compared with patients with poor adherence (P=0.010). Treatment satisfaction was significantly greater in patients with good adherence (P<0.001). Neither socio-demographic, disease- nor drug-related characteristics of the participants were significantly associated with medication adherence. As for illness perception, even though the mean BIPQ score of adherent participants was lower than the mean score of non-adherent participants, this difference did not reach statistical significance. In conclusion, treatment satisfaction was found to be a predictor of adherence. Studies are needed to determine whether interventions to increase satisfaction can improve adherence and BP control. PMID:26310182

  8. Bisphosphonates adherence for treatment of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis is a disease of bone metabolism in which bisphosphonates (BPS) are the most common medications used in its treatment, whose main objective is to reduce the risk of fractures. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review on BPs adherence for treatment of osteoporosis. Methods Systematic review of articles on BPs adherence for treatment of osteoporosis, indexed on MEDLINE (via PubMed) databases, from inception of databases until January 2013. Search terms were “Adherence, Medication” (MeSH term), “Bisphosphonates” (MeSH term), and “Osteoporosis” (MeSH term). Results Of the 78 identified studies, 27 met the eligibility criteria. Identified studies covered a wide range of aspects regarding adherence and associated factors, adherence and fracture, adherence and BPs dosage. The studies are mostly observational, conducted with women over 45 years old, showing low rates of adherence to treatment. Several factors may influence adherence: socio-economic and cultural, participation of physicians when guidance is given to the patient, the use of bone turnover markers, and use of generic drugs. The monthly dosage is associated with greater adherence compared to weekly dosage. Conclusions Considering the methodological differences between the studies, the results converge to show that adherence to treatment of osteoporosis with BPs is still inadequate. Further experimental studies are needed to evaluate the adherence and suggest new treatment options. PMID:23705998

  9. [Long term adherence to HAART in Senegal].

    PubMed

    Bastard, M; Fall, M Basty Koita

    2014-10-01

    Adherence is one of the main predictors of antiretroviral treatment success. A governmental initiative was launched in 1998 for HIV-infected patients in Senegal to provide access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Adherence measurements, defined as pills taken/pills prescribed, were assessed between November 1999 and June 2010 using a pill count along with a questionnaire for 330 patients. Predictors of adherence and identification of adherence trajectories were explored through latent class mixed model. We also performed a survival analysis using Cox proportional hazard model. Three adherence behaviours were revealed as well as a better adherence for women. A third of patients had a high adherence trajectory over time and a third had an intermediate one. Male gender and low adherence behaviour over time were independently associated with a higher mortality rate. This study shows that an overall good adherence can be obtained in the long term in Senegal, suggests a better adherence for women and points out a large subsample of patients with intermediate level of adherence behaviour who are at risk for developing resistance to antiretroviral drugs. PMID:24615434

  10. Sun exposure may increase risk of prostate cancer in the high UV environment of New South Wales, Australia: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Nair-Shalliker, Visalini; Smith, David P; Egger, Sam; Hughes, Ann Maree; Kaldor, John M; Clements, Mark; Kricker, Anne; Armstrong, Bruce K

    2012-09-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation in sunlight may influence risk of prostate cancer. In New South Wales (NSW), Australia, we examined the relationship between sun exposure at 30 and 50 years of age and risk of prostate cancer in a case-control study combining the NSW prostate cancer care and outcome study (cases) and the NSW non-Hodgkin's lymphoma study (controls). Prostate cancer risk increased with increasing estimated sun exposure (adjusted OR for highest vs. lowest quartiles of average weekly sun exposure in the warmer months 2.07 95% CI: 1.36-3.15) and this increase was most evident with weekend sun exposure (adjusted OR=5.55, 95% CI: 2.94-10.48). High sun sensitivity was also positively associated with risk for prostate cancer (adjusted OR=1.63, 95% CI: 1.09-2.44). The apparent effects of weekly sun exposure did not vary by disease aggressiveness. Our results suggest that increasing sun exposure in mid-adult years increases prostate cancer risk in a high ambient solar UV environment. Given that previous studies, conducted mainly in low solar UV environments, have generally found evidence of a negative association, our findings suggest there may be a U-shaped relationship between solar UV exposure and prostate cancer. Further studies are needed to test the hypothesis that high solar UV exposure is a risk factor for prostate cancer and to explore possible mechanisms for such an association. PMID:22173996