Science.gov

Sample records for increased effective beam

  1. The model of electrophysical processes increasing effectiveness of electric power technology based on electron beams *

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazmin, B. N.; Trifanov, I. V.; Ryzhov, D. R.; Savelyeva, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    The research focuses on electrophysical model of processes increasing energy efficiency of electric power technology based on electron beams that are generated by crossed electric field. The energy of beams is transformed with compression and simultaneous deceleration with crossed electric field into electric power to transfer into users’ electric power grid. We perform computer modeling of the processes to confirm the energy efficiency of the proposed model.

  2. Beam Effects from an Increase of LINAC Current from 40 ma to 49 Milliamperes

    SciTech Connect

    Ray Tomlin

    2002-06-05

    On March 25, 2002 the FNAL Linac had been running at a decreased 40 ma of beam current for some time. Both the 400 MeV Linac and the 8GeV Booster had been tuned to optimum running during that time. Optimum running for the Booster was at 4.1e12 per pulse. Losses at injection and at transition were limiting intensity at the time. By March 26, 2002 the Linac beam current had been increased to 49 ma. The optimum Booster intensity immediately jumped to 4.5e12 per pulse and increased in the next few days to 4.8e12 and 5e12 per pulse. Booster was not retuned until early April when a low-loss 5.0e12 was obtained for stacking operations. Linac current had sagged to 47 ma by then. Measurements were made on the 25th at 40 ma and the 26th and 27th at 49 ma. This is a report and discussion of those measurements.

  3. Increasing the effective aperture of a detector and enlarging the receiving field of view in a 3D imaging lidar system through hexagonal prism beam splitting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Xiaobao; Wang, Xiaoyi; Cui, Tianxiang; Wang, Chunhui; Li, Yunxi; Li, Hailong; Wang, Qi

    2016-07-11

    The detector in a highly accurate and high-definition scanning 3D imaging lidar system requires high frequency bandwidth and sufficient photosensitive area. To solve the problem of small photosensitive area of an existing indium gallium arsenide detector with a certain frequency bandwidth, this study proposes a method for increasing the receiving field of view (FOV) and enlarging the effective photosensitive aperture of such detector through hexagonal prism beam splitting. The principle and construction of hexagonal prism beam splitting is also discussed in this research. Accordingly, a receiving optical system with two hexagonal prisms is provided and the splitting beam effect of the simulation experiment is analyzed. Using this novel method, the receiving optical system's FOV can be improved effectively up to ±5°, and the effective photosensitive aperture of the detector is increased from 0.5 mm to 1.5 mm. PMID:27410800

  4. Range modulation in proton therapy planning: a simple method for mitigating effects of increased relative biological effectiveness at the end-of-range of clinical proton beams

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The increase in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of proton beams at the distal edge of the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) is a well-known phenomenon that is difficult to quantify accurately in vivo. For purposes of treatment planning, disallowing the distal SOBP to fall within vulnerable tissues hampers sparing to the extent possible with proton beam therapy (PBT). We propose the distal RBE uncertainty may be straightforwardly mitigated with a technique we call “range modulation”. With range modulation, the distal falloff is smeared, reducing both the dose and average RBE over the terminal few millimeters of the SOBP. Methods One patient plan was selected to serve as an example for direct comparison of image-guided radiotherapy plans using non-range modulation PBT (NRMPBT), and range-modulation PBT (RMPBT). An additional plan using RMPBT was created to represent a re-treatment scenario (RMPBTrt) using a vertex beam. Planning statistics regarding dose, volume of the planning targets, and color images of the plans are shown. Results The three plans generated for this patient reveal that in all cases dosimetric and device manufacturing advantages are able to be achieved using RMPBT. Organ at risk (OAR) doses to critical structures such as the cochleae, optic apparatus, hypothalamus, and temporal lobes can be selectively spared using this method. Concerns about the location of the RBE that did significantly impact beam selection and treatment planning no longer have the same impact on the process, allowing these structures to be spared dose and subsequent associated issues. Conclusions This present study has illustrated that RMPBT can improve OAR sparing while giving equivalent coverage to target volumes relative to traditional PBT methods while avoiding the increased RBE at the end of the beam. It has proven easy to design and implement and robust in our planning process. The method underscores the need to optimize treatment plans in PBT for both

  5. Mass spectrometer and methods of increasing dispersion between ion beams

    DOEpatents

    Appelhans, Anthony D.; Olson, John E.; Delmore, James E.

    2006-01-10

    A mass spectrometer includes a magnetic sector configured to separate a plurality of ion beams, and an electrostatic sector configured to receive the plurality of ion beams from the magnetic sector and increase separation between the ion beams, the electrostatic sector being used as a dispersive element following magnetic separation of the plurality of ion beams. Other apparatus and methods are provided.

  6. Self-organization of coupling optical waveguides by the "pulling water" effect of write beam reflections in photo-induced refractive-index increase media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Tetsuzo; Kaburagi, Hiroshi

    2009-02-01

    To reduce efforts for optical assembly, we developed the reflective self-organized lightwave network (R-SOLNET). In R-SOLNET, optical devices with wavelength filters on their core facets are distributed in photo-induced refractive-index increase (PRI) media such as photo-polymers. Write beams from some devices and reflected write beams from the wavelength filters of the other devices overlap. In the overlap regions, the refractive index increases, pulling the write beams to the wavelength filter locations (the "pulling water" effect). By self-focusing, self-aligned optical waveguide networks are formed between the optical devices. Simulations based on the finite difference time domain method revealed that self-aligned optical waveguides of R-SOLNET are formed between cores with 2-μm and 0.5-μm widths including Y-branching waveguides. Experiments demonstrated that R-SOLNET is formed between an optical fiber and a micro-mirror placed with ~800-μm gap. For angular misalignment of 3o between the optical fiber and the micro-mirror, a bow-shaped R-SOLNET was observed. For lateral misalignment of 30 μm, an S-shaped R-SOLNET was observed. These results suggest that by placing reflective elements in PRI media, optical waveguides can be lead to the elements to form R-SOLNET. This enables self-aligned optical couplings for optoelectronic boards, intra-chip optical circuits, VCSELs/PDs, optical switches, and so on.

  7. Magnitude of observer error using cone beam CT for prostate interfraction motion estimation: effect of reducing scan length or increasing exposure

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Emma J; Hansen, Vibeke N; Thomas, Karen; South, Christopher; Hafeez, Shaista; Huddart, Robert; Dearnaley, David P

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Cone beam CT (CBCT) enables soft-tissue registration to planning CT for position verification in radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to determine the interobserver error (IOE) in prostate position verification using a standard CBCT protocol, and the effect of reducing CBCT scan length or increasing exposure, compared with standard imaging protocol. Methods: CBCT images were acquired using a novel 7 cm length image with standard exposure (1644 mAs) at Fraction 1 (7), standard 12 cm length image (1644 mAs) at Fraction 2 (12) and a 7 cm length image with higher exposure (2632 mAs) at Fraction 3 (7H) on 31 patients receiving radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Eight observers (two clinicians and six radiographers) registered the images. Guidelines and training were provided. The means of the IOEs were compared using a Kruzkal–Wallis test. Levene's test was used to test for differences in the variances of the IOEs and the independent prostate position. Results: No significant difference was found between the IOEs of each image protocol in any direction. Mean absolute IOE was the greatest in the anteroposterior direction. Standard deviation (SD) of the IOE was the least in the left–right direction for each of the three image protocols. The SD of the IOE was significantly less than the independent prostate motion in the anterior–posterior (AP) direction only (1.8 and 3.0 mm, respectively: p = 0.017). IOEs were within 1 SD of the independent prostate motion in 95%, 77% and 96% of the images in the RL, SI and AP direction. Conclusion: Reducing CBCT scan length and increasing exposure did not have a significant effect on IOEs. To reduce imaging dose, a reduction in CBCT scan length could be considered without increasing the uncertainty in prostate registration. Precision of CBCT verification of prostate radiotherapy is affected by IOE and should be quantified prior to implementation. Advances in knowledge: This study shows the importance

  8. Beam-beam effects in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Lebedev, V.; Lebrun, P.; Moore, R.S.; Sen, T.; Tollestrup, A.; Valishev, A.; Zhang, X.L.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with 6 times more bunches, many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Electromagnetic long-range and head-on interactions of high intensity proton and antiproton beams have been significant sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations. We present observations of the beam-beam phenomena in the Tevatron and results of relevant beam studies. We analyze the data and various methods employed in operations, predict the performance for planned luminosity upgrades, and discuss ways to improve it.

  9. Simulation of beam-induced plasma for the mitigation of beam-beam effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.; Wang, G.; Samulyak, R.; Yu, K.; Litvinenko, V.

    2015-05-03

    One of the main challenges in the increase of luminosity of circular colliders is the control of the beam-beam effect. In the process of exploring beam-beam mitigation methods using plasma, we evaluated the possibility of plasma generation via ionization of neutral gas by proton beams, and performed highly resolved simulations of the beam-plasma interaction using SPACE, a 3D electromagnetic particle-in-cell code. The process of plasma generation is modelled using experimentally measured cross-section coefficients and a plasma recombination model that takes into account the presence of neutral gas and beam-induced electromagnetic fields. Numerically simulated plasma oscillations are consistent with theoretical analysis. In the beam-plasma interaction process, high-density neutral gas reduces the mean free path of plasma electrons and their acceleration. A numerical model for the drift speed as a limit of plasma electron velocity was developed. Simulations demonstrate a significant reduction of the beam electric field in the presence of plasma. Preliminary simulations using fully-ionized plasma have also been performed and compared with the case of beam-induced plasma.

  10. Beam Breakup Effects in Dielectric Based Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Jing, C.; Kustov, A.; Altmark, A.; Power, J. G.; Gai, W.

    2009-01-22

    The dynamics of the beam in structure-based wakefield accelerators leads to beam stability issues not ordinarily found in other machines. In particular, the high current drive beam in an efficient wakefield accelerator loses a large fraction of its energy in the decelerator structure, resulting in physical emittance growth, increased energy spread, and the possibility of head-tail instability for an off axis beam, all of which can lead to severe reduction of beam intensity. Beam breakup (BBU) effects resulting from parasitic wakefields provide a potentially serious limitation to the performance of dielectric structure based wakefield accelerators as well. We report on experimental and numerical investigation of BBU and its mitigation. The experimental program focuses on BBU measurements at the AWA facility in a number of high gradient and high transformer ratio wakefield devices. New pickup-based beam diagnostics will provide methods for studying parasitic wakefields that are currently unavailable. The numerical part of this research is based on a particle-Green's function beam breakup code we are developing that allows rapid, efficient simulation of beam breakup effects in advanced linear accelerators. The goal of this work is to be able to compare the results of detailed experimental measurements with the accurate numerical results and to design an external FODO channel for the control of the beam in the presence of strong transverse wakefields.

  11. Beam intensity increases at the intense pulsed neutron source accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Potts, C.; Brumwell, F.; Norem, J.; Rauchas, A.; Stipp, V.; Volk, G.

    1985-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) accelerator system has managed a 40% increase in time average beam current over the last two years. Currents of up to 15.6..mu..A (3.25 x 10/sup 12/ protons at 30 Hz) have been successfully accelerated and cleanly extracted. Our high current operation demands low loss beam handling to permit hands-on maintenance. Synchrotron beam handling efficiencies of 90% are routine. A new H/sup -/ ion source which was installed in March of 1983 offered the opportunity to get above 8 ..mu..A but an instability caused unacceptable losses when attempting to operate at 10 ..mu..A and above. Simple techniques to control the instabilities were introduced and have worked well. These techniques are discussed below. Other improvements in the regulation of various power supplies have provided greatly improved low energy orbit stability and contributed substantially to the increased beam current.

  12. Sealing Force Increasing of ACM Gasket through Electron Beam Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, D. J.; Batalha, G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Rubber is an engineering material largely used as sealing parts, in form of O-rings, solid gaskets and liquid gaskets, materials applied in liquid state with posterior vulcanization and sealing. Stress relaxation is a rubber characteristic which impacts negatively in such industrial applications (rings and solid gaskets). This work has the purpose to investigate the use of electron beam radiation (EB) as a technology able to decrease the stress relaxation in acrylic rubber (ACM), consequently increasing the sealing capability of this material. ACM samples were irradiated with dose of 100 kGy and 250 kGy, its behavior was comparatively investigated using, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and compression stress relaxation (CSR) experiments. The results obtained by DMA shown an increase of Tg and changes in dynamic mechanical behavior.

  13. Aperture Effects and Mismatch Oscillations in an Intense Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R; O'Shea, P G

    2008-05-12

    When an electron beam is apertured, the transmitted beam current is the product of the incident beam current density and the aperture area. Space charge forces generally cause an increase in incident beam current to result in an increase in incident beam spot size. Under certain circumstances, the spot size will increase faster than the current, resulting in a decrease in current extracted from the aperture. When using a gridded electron gun, this can give rise to negative transconductance. In this paper, we explore this effect in the case of an intense beam propagating in a uniform focusing channel. We show that proper placement of the aperture can decouple the current extracted from the aperture from fluctuations in the source current, and that apertures can serve to alter longitudinal space charge wave propagation by changing the relative contribution of velocity and current modulation present in the beam.

  14. Ion-beam sputtering increases solar-cell efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burk, D. E.; Dubow, J. B.; Sites, R. R.

    1977-01-01

    Ion-beam sputtering, fabrication of oxide-semiconductor-on-silicon (OSOS) solar cells, results in cells of 12% efficiency. Ion-beam sputtering technique is compatible with low-cost continuous fabrication and requires no high-temperature processing.

  15. Effect of beam emittance on self-modulation of long beams in plasma wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lotov, K. V.

    2015-12-15

    The initial beam emittance determines the maximum wakefield amplitude that can be reached as a result of beam self-modulation in the plasma. The wakefield excited by the fully self-modulated beam decreases linearly with the increase in the beam emittance. There is a value of initial emittance beyond which the self-modulation does not develop even if the instability is initiated by a strong seed perturbation. The emittance scale at which the wakefield is suppressed by a factor of two with respect to the zero-emittance case (the so called critical emittance) is determined by inability of the excited wave to confine beam particles radially and is related to beam and plasma parameters by a simple formula. The effect of beam emittance can be observed in several discussed self-modulation experiments.

  16. Effects of Electron Beam Irradiation on the Electrospinning of Polyacrylonitrile.

    PubMed

    Jeun, Joon-Pyo; Kim, Hyun-Bin; Oh, Seung-Hwan; Park, Jung-Ki; Kang, Phil-Hyun

    2015-08-01

    Electron beam (e-beam) irradiation of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) was performed to investigate the effects of radiation on the electrospinning process. For this study, polyacrylonitrile powder was subjected to e-beam irradiation with different doses of up to 100 kGy under an N2 atmosphere. Polymer solutions were prepared by dissolving PAN in N,N-dimethyl-formamide (DMF) at a 1:9 ratio by weight. The prepared PAN/DMF solutions showed different colors with different e-beam doses. The resulting structures in solutions contained conjugated C=N bonds, which caused the observed color formation. In addition, the conductivity of the PAN/DMF solution increased with an increase in e-beam irradiation dose. In the DSC spectra of electrospun PAN fibers, the peak temperature of the exothermic reactions was observed to decrease with an increase in the e-beam irradiation strength. PMID:26369176

  17. Helicopter engine exhaust rotor downwash effects on laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksson, Markus; Sjöqvist, Lars; Seiffer, Dirk

    2015-10-01

    The hot exhaust gases from engines on helicopters are pushed down by the rotor in a turbulent flow. When the optical path of a laser beam or optical sensor passes through this region severe aberrations of the optical field may result. These perturbations will lead to beam wander and beam distortions that can limit the performance of optical countermeasure systems. To quantify these effects the Italian Air Force Flight Test Centre hosted a trial for the "Airborne platform effects on lasers and warning sensors" (ALWS) EDA-project. Laser beams were propagated from the airport control tower to a target screen in a slant path with the helicopter hovering over this path. Collimated laser beams at 1.55-, 2- and 4.6-μm wavelength were imaged with high speed cameras. Large increases in beam wander and beam divergence were found, with beam wander up to 200 μrad root-mean-square and increases in beam divergence up to 1 mrad. To allow scaling to other laser beam parameters and geometries formulas for propagation in atmospheric turbulence were used even though the turbulence may not follow Kolmogorov statistics. By assuming that the plume is short compared to the total propagation distance the integrated structure parameter through the plume could be calculated. Values in the range 10-10 to 10-8 m1/3 were found when the laser beams passed through the exhaust gases below the helicopter tail. The integrated structure parameter values calculated from beam wander were consistently lower than those calculated from long term spot size, indicating that the method is not perfect but provides information about order of magnitudes. The measured results show that the engine exhaust for worst case beam directions will dominate over atmospheric turbulence even for kilometer path lengths from a helicopter at low altitude. How severe the effect is on system performance will depend on beam and target parameters.

  18. Interplay of space-charge and beam-beam effects in a collider

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.V.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.

    2010-09-27

    Operation of a collider at low energy or use of cooling techniques to increase beam density may result in luminosity limitation due to the space-charge effects. Understanding of such limitation became important for Low-Energy RHIC physics program with heavy ions at the center of mass energies of 5-20 GeV/nucleon. For a collider, we are interested in a long beam lifetime, which limits the allowable space-charge tune shift. An additional complication comes from the fact that ion beams are colliding, which requires careful consideration of the interplay of direct space-charge and beam-beam effects. This paper summarizes the initial observations during experimental studies in RHIC at low energies.

  19. Staging laser plasma accelerators for increased beam energy

    SciTech Connect

    Panasenko, Dmitriy; Shu, Anthony; Schroeder, Carl; Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Matlis, Nicholas; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Plateau, Guillaume; Lin, Chen; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2008-09-29

    Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies with compact laser systems. The concept of staging includes coupling of additional laser energy and transporting the electron beam from one accelerating module to another. Due to laser damage threshold constraints, in-coupling laser energy with conventional optics requires distances between the accelerating modules of the order of 10m, resulting in decreased average accelerating gradient and complicated e-beam transport. In this paper we use basic scaling laws to show that the total length of future laser plasma accelerators will be determined by staging technology. We also propose using a liquid jet plasma mirror for in-coupling the laser beam and show that it has the potential to reduce distance between stages to the cm-scale.

  20. Staging Laser Plasma Accelerators for Increased Beam Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Panasenko, D.; Shu, A. J.; Schroeder, C. B.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Matlis, N. H.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Plateau, G.; Lin, C.; Toth, C.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies with compact laser systems. The concept of staging includes coupling of additional laser energy and transporting the electron beam from one accelerating module to another. Due to laser damage threshold constraints, in-coupling laser energy with conventional optics requires distances between the accelerating modules of the order of 10 m, resulting in decreased average accelerating gradient and complicated e-beam transport. In this paper we use basic scaling laws to show that the total length of future laser plasma accelerators will be determined by staging technology. We also propose using a liquid jet plasma mirror for in-coupling the laser beam and show that it has the potential to reduce distance between stages to the cm-scale.

  1. Hydrologic effects of increased urbanization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guay, Joel R.

    1995-01-01

    Urban areas in Perris Valley, California, have more than tripled during the last 20 years, resulting in increased storm-runoff volumes and peak discharges. To quantify the effects of increased urbanization, rainfall-runoff models of the basin were developed to simulate runoff for 1970-75 and 1990-93 conditions. Hourly rainfall data for 1949-93 were used with the rainfall-runoff models to simulate a long-term record of storm runoff. The hydrologic effects of increased urbanization from 1970-75 to 1990-93 conditions were analyzed by comparing the frequency of annual peak discharges and runoff volumes, and a duration analysis of storm peak discharges. The maximum annual-peak discharge for the 1990-93 model simulation was 32 percent higher than the discharge for 1970-75 model simulation. However, the frequency analysis of each time series indicated the 100-year peak discharges for each study period were identical.

  2. Electron beam effects in a UV FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.K.; Blau, J.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    At the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), a free electron laser (FEL) is designed to produce ultraviolet (UV) light. A four-dimensional FEL simulation studies the effects of betatron oscillations, external focusing, and longitudinal pulse compression of the electron beam on the FEL performance.

  3. Effects of Beam Filling Pattern on Beam Ion Instability and Beam Loading In PEP-X

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; /SLAC

    2009-06-02

    A proposed high-brightness synchrotron light source (PEP-X) is under design at SLAC. The 4.5-GeV PEP-X storage ring has four theoretical minimum emittance (TME) cells to achieve the very low emittance and two double-bend achromat (DBA) cells to provide spaces for IDs. Damping wigglers will be installed in zero-dispersion straights to reduce the emittance below 0.1 nm. Ion induced beam instability is one critical issue due to its ultra small emittance. Third harmonic cavity can be used to lengthen the bunch in order to improve the beam's life time. Bunch-train filling pattern is proposed to mitigate both the fast ion instability and beam loading effect. This paper investigates the fast ion instability and beam loading for different beam filling patterns.

  4. Quantum effects in electron beam pumped GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Yahia, M. E.; Azzouz, I. M.; Moslem, W. M.

    2013-08-19

    Propagation of waves in nano-sized GaAs semiconductor induced by electron beam are investigated. A dispersion relation is derived by using quantum hydrodynamics equations including the electrons and holes quantum recoil effects, exchange-correlation potentials, and degenerate pressures. It is found that the propagating modes are instable and strongly depend on the electron beam parameters, as well as the quantum recoil effects and degenerate pressures. The instability region shrinks with the increase of the semiconductor number density. The instability arises because of the energetic electron beam produces electron-hole pairs, which do not keep in phase with the electrostatic potential arising from the pair plasma.

  5. Disruption effects on the beam size measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, P.; Decker, F.J.; Chen, P.

    1995-06-01

    At the SLC Final Focus with higher currents and smaller beam sizes, the disruption parameter D{sub y} is close to one and so the pinch effect should produce a luminosity enhancement. Since a flat beam-beam function is fit to deflection scan data to measure the beam size, disruption can affect the measurement. Here the authors discuss the quantitative effects of disruption for typical SLC beam parameters. With 3.5 10{sup 10} particles per pulse, bunch length of 0.8 mm and beam sizes of 2.1 {mu}m horizontally and 0.55 {mu}m vertically, the measured vertical size can be as much as 25% bigger than the real one. Furthermore during the collision the spot size actually decrease, producing an enhancement factor H{sub D} of about 1.25. This would yield to a true luminosity which is 1.6 times that which is estimated from the beam-beam deflection fit.

  6. Effective Electron Beam Injection With Broad Energy Initial Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, J.H.; Hubbard, R.F.; Gordon, D.F.; Ting, A.; Sprangle, P.; Zigler, A.

    2004-12-07

    Laser Wakefield Accelerators (LWFA), in the resonant regime, require use of an injected electron beam. Several optical methods for generating electron bunches exist e.g., Laser Ionization and Ponderomotive Acceleration (LIPA) and Self-Modulated LWFA among others. Each of these schemes produces an electron bunch with a characteristic energy distribution. We examine the trapping characteristics in a resonant LWFA for an injection electron beam with a broad energy spread that can be characterized using a Boltzmann distribution with an 'effective temperature'. We present results of both analytic calculations and simulations which provide a methodology for optimizing the resulting accelerated electron bunch characteristics i.e., energy and energy spread, for a given LWFA configuration.

  7. ION BEAM ETCHING EFFECTS IN BIOLOGICAL MICROANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxygen ion beam sputter etching used in SIMS has been shown to produce morphologic effects which have similarities and differences in comparison to rf plasma etching of biological specimens. Sputter yield variations resulting from structural microheterogeneity are illustrated (e....

  8. Radii effect on the translation spring constant of force transducer beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    Multi-component strain-gage force transducer design requires the designer to determine the spring constant of the numerous beams or flexures incorporated in the transducer. The classical beam deflection formulae that are used in calculating these spring constants typically assume that the beam has a uniform moment of inertia along the entire beam length. In practice all beams have a radius at the end where the beam interfaces with the shoulder of the transducer, and on short beams in particular this increases the beam spring constant considerably. A Basic computer program utilizing numerical integration is presented to determine this effect.

  9. Beam-beam effects in the Tevatron Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Yu.; Lebedev, V.; Lebrun, P.; Moore, R.; Sen, T.; Valishev, A.; Zhang, X.L.; /FERMILAB

    2005-05-01

    Electromagnetic long-range and head-on interactions of high intensity proton and antiproton beams are significant sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations in the Tevatron Collider Run II (2001-present). We present observations of the beam-beam phenomena in the Tevatron and results of relevant beam studies. We analyze the data and various methods employed in high energy physics (HEP) operation, predict the performance for planned luminosity upgrades and discuss ways to improve it.

  10. Undulator Beam Pipe Magnetic Shielding Effect Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Andrew; Wolf, Zachary; ,

    2010-11-23

    The proposed stainless steel beampipe for the LCLS undulator has a measurable shielding effect on the magnetic field of the LCLS undulators. This note describes the tests used to determine the magnitude of the shielding effect, as well as deviations in the shielding effect caused by placing different phase shims in the undulator gap. The effect of the proposed Steel strongback which will be used to support the beam pipe, was also studied. A hall probe on a 3 axis movement system was set up to measure the main component of the magnetic field in the Prototype Undulator. To account for temperature variations of the magnetic field of the undulator for successive tests, a correction is applied which is described in this technical note. Using this method, we found the shielding effect, the amount which the field inside the gap was reduced due to the placement of the beampipe, to be {approx}10 Gauss. A series of tests was also performed to determine the effect of phase shims and X and Y correction shims on the shielding. The largest effect on shielding was found for the .3 mm phase shims. The effect of the .3 mm phase shims was to increase the shielding effect {approx}4 Gauss. The tolerance for the shielding effect of the phase shims is less than 1 gauss. The effect of the strongback was seen in its permanent magnetic field. It introduced a dipole field across the measured section of the undulator of {approx}3 gauss. This note documents the tests performed to determine these effects, as well as the results of those tests.

  11. Ion bunch length effects on the beam-beam interaction and its compensation in a high-luminosity ring-ring electron-ion collider

    SciTech Connect

    Montag C.; Oeftiger, A.; Fischer, W.

    2012-05-20

    One of the luminosity limits in a ring-ring electron-ion collider is the beam-beam effect on the electrons. In the limit of short ion bunches, simulation studies have shown that this limit can be significantly increased by head-on beam-beam compensation with an electron lens. However, with an ion bunch length comparable to the beta-function at the IP in conjunction with a large beam-beam parameter, the electrons perform a sizeable fraction of a betatron oscillation period inside the long ion bunches. We present recent simulation results on the compensation of this beam-beam interaction with multiple electron lenses.

  12. Electron gun jitter effects on beam bunching

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, M. S.; Iqbal, M.

    2014-02-15

    For routine operation of Beijing Electron Positron Collider II (BEPCII) linac, many factors may affect the beam bunching process directly or indirectly. We present the measurements and analyses of the gun timing jitter, gun high voltage jitter, and beam energy at the exit of the standard acceleration section of the linac quantitatively. Almost 80 mV and more than 200 ps of gun high voltage and time jitters have ever been measured, respectively. It was analyzed that the gun timing jitter produced severe effects on beam energy than the gun high voltage jitter, if the timing jitter exceeded 100 ps which eventually deteriorates both the beam performance and the injection rate to the storage ring.

  13. RHIC PROTON BEAM LIFETIME INCREASE WITH 10- AND 12-POLE CORRECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2010-05-23

    The RHIC beam lifetime in polarized proton operation is dominated by the beam-beam effect, parameter modulations, and nonlinear magnet errors in the interaction region magnets. Sextupole and skew sextupole errors have been corrected deterministically for a number of years based on tune shift measurements with orbit bumps in the triplets. During the most recent polarized proton run 10- and 12- pole correctors were set through an iterative procedure, and used for the first time operationally in one of the beams. We report on the procedure to set these high-order multipole correctors and estimate their effect on the integrated luminosity.

  14. Increasing Extracted Beam Current Density in Ion Thrusters through Plasma Potential Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Neil; Foster, John

    2015-09-01

    A gridded ion thruster's maximum extractable beam current is determined by the space charge limit. The classical formulation does not take into account finite ion drift into the acceleration gap. It can be shown that extractable beam current can be increased beyond the conventional Child-Langmuir law if the ions enter the gap at a finite drift speed. In this work, ion drift in a 10 cm thruster is varied by adjusting the plasma potential relative to the potential at the extraction plane. Internal plasma potential variations are achieved using a novel approach involving biasing the magnetic cusps. Ion flow variations are assessed using simulated beam extraction in conjunction with a retarding potential analyzer. Ion beam current density changes at a given total beam voltage in full beam extraction tests are characterized as a function of induced ion drift velocity as well.

  15. Bunch length effects in the beam-beam compensation with an electron lens

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Montag, C.

    2010-02-25

    Electron lenses for the head-on beam-beam compensation are under construction at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The bunch length is of the same order as the {beta}-function at the interaction point, and a proton passing through another proton bunch experiences a substantial phase shift which modifies the beam-beam interaction. We review the effect of the bunch length in the single pass beam-beam interaction, apply the same analysis to a proton passing through a long electron lens, and study the single pass beam-beam compensation with long bunches. We also discuss the beam-beam compensation of the electron beam in an electron-ion collider ring.

  16. Experimental Studies of Compensation of Beam-Beam Effects with Tevatron Electron Lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Yu.; Bishofberger, Kip; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Parkhomchuk, V.; Reva, V.; Solyak, N.; Wildman, D.; Zhang, X.-L.; Zimmermann, F.; /Fermilab /Los Alamos /Novosibirsk, IYF /CERN

    2008-02-01

    Applying the space-charge forces of a low-energy electron beam can lead to a significant improvement of the beam-particle lifetime limit arising from the beam-beam interaction in a high-energy collider [1]. In this article we present the results of various beam experiments with 'electron lenses', novel instruments developed for the beam-beam compensation at the Tevatron, which collides 980-GeV proton and antiproton beams. We study the dependencies of the particle betatron tunes on the electron beam current, energy and position; we explore the effects of electron-beam imperfections and noises; and we quantify the improvements of the high-energy beam intensity and the collider luminosity lifetime obtained by the action of the Tevatron Electron Lenses.

  17. Experimental studies of compensation of beam beam effects with Tevatron electron lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Bishofberger, K.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Parkhomchuk, V.; Reva, V.; Solyak, N.; Wildman, D.; Zhang, X.-L.; Zimmermann, F.

    2008-04-01

    Applying the space-charge forces of a low-energy electron beam can lead to a significant improvement of the beam-particle lifetime limit arising from the beam-beam interaction in a high-energy collider [1]. In this paper, we present the results of various beam experiments with 'electron lenses', novel instruments developed for the beam-beam compensation at the Tevatron, which collides 980 GeV proton and antiproton beams. We study the dependencies of the particle betatron tunes on the electron beam current, energy and position; we explore the effects of electron-beam imperfections and noises; and we quantify the improvements of the high-energy beam intensity and the collider luminosity lifetime obtained by the action of the Tevatron electron lenses.

  18. Nonlinear Interaction of Elliptical Laser Beam with Collisional Plasma: Effect of Linear Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshav, Walia; Sarabjit, Kaur

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, nonlinear interaction of elliptical laser beam with collisional plasma is studied by using paraxial ray approximation. Nonlinear differential equations for the beam width parameters of semi-major axis and semi-minor axis of elliptical laser beam have been set up and solved numerically to study the variation of beam width parameters with normalized distance of propagation. Effects of variation in absorption coefficient and plasma density on the beam width parameters are also analyzed. It is observed from the analysis that extent of self-focusing of beam increases with increase/decrease in plasma density/absorption coefficient.

  19. Effects of scattered radiation and beam quality on low contrast performance in cone beam breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altunbas, M. Cem; Shaw, Chris; Chen, Lingyun; Wang, Tianpeng; Tu, Shuju

    2006-03-01

    In this work, we investigated the effects of scattered radiation and beam quality on the low contrast performance relevant to cone beam breast CT imaging. For experiments, we used our benchtop conebeam CT system and constructed a phantom consisting of simulated fat and soft tissues. We varied the field of view (FOV) along the z direction to observe its effect on scattered radiation. The beam quality was altered by varying the tube voltage from 50 to 100 kV. We computed the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) from reconstructed images and normalized it to the square root of dose measured at the center of the phantom. The results were used as the figure of merit (FOM). The effect of the beam quality on the scatter to primary ratio (SPR) had minimal impact and the SPR was primarily dominated by the FOV. In the central section of the phantom, increasing the FOV from 4 to 16 cm resulted in drop of CNR in the order of 15-20% at any given kVp setting. For a given FOV, the beam quality had insignificant effect on the FOM in the central section of the phantom. In the peripheral section, a 10 % drop in FOM was observed when the kVp setting was increased from 50 to 100. At lower kVp values, the primary x-ray transmission through the thicker parts of the phantom was severely reduced. Under such circumstances, ring artifacts were observed due to imperfect flat field correction at very low signal intensities. Higher kVp settings and higher SPRs helped to increase the signal intensity in highly attenuating regions and suppressed the ring artifacts.

  20. Statins Increase Rifampin Mycobactericidal Effect

    PubMed Central

    Lobato, Lívia Silva; Rosa, Patrícia Sammarco; Ferreira, Jessica da Silva; Neumann, Arthur da Silva; da Silva, Marlei Gomes; do Nascimento, Dejair Caitano; Soares, Cleverson Teixeira; Pedrini, Silvia Cristina Barbosa; de Oliveira, Diego Sá Leal; Monteiro, Cláudia Peres; Pereira, Geraldo Moura Batista; Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Hacker, Mariana Andrea; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Duarte, Rafael Silva

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis antimicrobial resistance has been followed with great concern during the last years, while the need for new drugs able to control leprosy and tuberculosis, mainly due to extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB), is pressing. Our group recently showed that M. leprae is able to induce lipid body biogenesis and cholesterol accumulation in macrophages and Schwann cells, facilitating its viability and replication. Considering these previous results, we investigated the efficacies of two statins on the intracellular viability of mycobacteria within the macrophage, as well as the effect of atorvastatin on M. leprae infections in BALB/c mice. We observed that intracellular mycobacteria viability decreased markedly after incubation with both statins, but atorvastatin showed the best inhibitory effect when combined with rifampin. Using Shepard's model, we observed with atorvastatin an efficacy in controlling M. leprae and inflammatory infiltrate in the BALB/c footpad, in a serum cholesterol level-dependent way. We conclude that statins contribute to macrophage-bactericidal activity against Mycobacterium bovis, M. leprae, and M. tuberculosis. It is likely that the association of statins with the actual multidrug therapy effectively reduces mycobacterial viability and tissue lesion in leprosy and tuberculosis patients, although epidemiological studies are still needed for confirmation. PMID:25049257

  1. Increase of the beam intensity for BNCT by changing the core configuration at THOR.

    PubMed

    Liu, H M; Peir, J J; Liu, Y H; Tsai, P E; Jiang, S H

    2009-07-01

    In this article, we will consider several core configurations and run the core calculation with MCNP to obtain the neutrons distribution at THOR. The thermal neutron flux inside the vertical tubes (VT-B-VT-E) and the fast neutron flux in the first row facing to the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) facility (I3-I5) were tallied for indication. Based on these simulation results, the fuel elements were rearranged during the annual repair period in 2007. The epithermal neutron flux at the center of BNCT beam exit in air was measured again, and the results showed that the beam intensity increased by 50%. Comparing the neutron intensities both in reactor core and at the BNCT beam exit for several core configurations, the results show that the BNCT beam intensity can be increased without decreasing the neutron intensity in core. PMID:19394237

  2. Implementation of depolarization due to beam-beam effects in the beam-beam interaction simulation tool GUINEA-PIG++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimbault, C.; Le Meur, G.; Blampuy, F.; Bambade, P.; Schulte, D.

    2009-12-01

    Depolarization is a new feature in the beam-beam simulation tool GUINEA-PIG++ (GP++). The results of this simulation are studied and compared with another beam-beam simulation tool, CAIN, considering different beam parameters for the International Linear Collider (ILC) with a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV.

  3. Collective effects on the wakefield and stopping power of an ion beam pulse in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ling-yu; Zhao, Xiao-ying; Qi, Xin E-mail: duanws@nwnu.edu.cn Duan, Wen-shan E-mail: duanws@nwnu.edu.cn Xiao, Guo-qing; Yang, Lei E-mail: duanws@nwnu.edu.cn

    2015-05-15

    A two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell simulation is carried out to study the collective effects on the wakefield and stopping power for a hydrogen ion beam pulse propagation in hydrogen plasmas. The dependence of collective effects on the beam velocity and density is obtained and discussed. For the beam velocity, it is found that the collective effects have the strongest impact on the wakefield as well as the stopping power in the case of the intermediate beam velocities, in which the stopping power is also the largest. For the beam density, it is found that at low beam densities, the collective contribution to the stopping power increase linearly with the increase of the beam density, which corresponds well to the results calculated using the dielectric theory. However, at high beam densities, our results show that after reaching a maximum value, the collective contribution to the stopping power starts to decrease significantly with the increase of the beam density. Besides, at high beam densities, the wakefield loses typical V-shaped cone structures, and the wavelength of the oscillation wakefield increases as the beam density increases.

  4. The effect of head-on beam-beam compensation on the stochastic boundaries and particle diffusion in RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu,N.; Beebe-Wang, J.; FischW; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

    2008-06-23

    To compensate the effects from the head-on beam-beam interactions in the polarized proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), an electron lens (elens) is proposed to collide head-on with the proton beam. We used an extended version of SixTrack for multiparticle beam-beam simulation in order to study the effect of the e-lens on the stochastic boundary and also on diffusion. The stochastic boundary was analyzed using Lyapunov exponents and the diffusion was characterized as the increase in the rms spread of the action. For both studies the simulations were performed with and without the e-lens and with full and partial compensation. Using the simulated values of the diffusion an attempt to calculate the emittance growth rate is presented.

  5. Relativistic Beaming Effect in Fermi Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J. H.; Bastieri, D.; Yang, J. H.; Liu, Y.; Wu, D. X.; Li, S. H.

    2014-09-01

    The most identified sources observed by Fermi/LAT are blazars, based on which we can investigate the emission mechanisms and beaming effect in the γ-ray bands for blazars. Here, we used the compiled around 450 Fermi blazars with the available X-ray observations to estimate their Doppler factors and compared them with the integral γ-ray luminosity in the range of 1-100 GeV. It is interesting that the integral γ-ray luminosity is closely correlated with the estimated Doppler factor, for the whole sample. When the dependence of the correlation between them and the X-ray luminosity is removed, the correlation is still strong, which suggests that the γ-ray emissions are strongly beamed.

  6. Scrape-off layer-induced beam density fluctuations and their effect on beam emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, D.; Marandet, Y.; Tamain, P.; Dif-Pradalier, G.

    2015-07-01

    A statistical model is presented to calculate the magnitude of beam density fluctuations generated by a turbulent scrape-off layer (SOL). It is shown that the SOL can induce neutral beam density fluctuations of a similar magnitude to the plasma density fluctuations in the core, potentially corrupting beam emission spectroscopy measurements. The degree of corruption is quantified by combining simulations of beam and plasma density fluctuations inside a simulated measurement window. A change in pitch angle from the separatrix to the measurement window is found to reduce the effect of beam fluctuations, whose largest effect is to significantly reduce the measured correlation time.

  7. A new Bernoulli-Euler beam model incorporating microstructure and surface energy effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.-L.; Mahmoud, F. F.

    2014-04-01

    A new Bernoulli-Euler beam model is developed using a modified couple stress theory and a surface elasticity theory. A variational formulation based on the principle of minimum total potential energy is employed, which leads to the simultaneous determination of the equilibrium equation and complete boundary conditions for a Bernoulli-Euler beam. The new model contains a material length scale parameter accounting for the microstructure effect in the bulk of the beam and three surface elasticity constants describing the mechanical behavior of the beam surface layer. The inclusion of these additional material constants enables the new model to capture the microstructure- and surface energy-dependent size effect. In addition, Poisson's effect is incorporated in the current model, unlike existing beam models. The new beam model includes the models considering only the microstructure dependence or the surface energy effect as special cases. The current model reduces to the classical Bernoulli-Euler beam model when the microstructure dependence, surface energy, and Poisson's effect are all suppressed. To demonstrate the new model, a cantilever beam problem is solved by directly applying the general formulas derived. Numerical results reveal that the beam deflection predicted by the new model is smaller than that by the classical beam model. Also, it is found that the difference between the deflections predicted by the two models is very significant when the beam thickness is small but is diminishing with the increase of the beam thickness.

  8. Electron beam induced conductivity effect of polymer resists and charging induced electron beam deflection simulation in electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwu, Justin Jia-Jen

    2000-10-01

    The electron beam induced conductivity (EBIC) effect of polymer materials was investigated and three electron beam resists, PBS, EBR900, and ZEP7000, were used as target materials in this research. An external bias method was applied for the direct measurements of EBIC current and the EBIC conductivity was then derived. The temperature effect on EBIC was illustrated by EBR900 and a simple single trap level analysis gave good agreement in explanation of initial state conductivity dependence on temperature change. The dependence of initial state EBIC values on dose rates and bias was also determined and an empirical from of EBIC-bias relationship was established for the electron beam deflection modeling. The long term EBIC characteristics of resists were investigated under different dose rates. The variation of EBIC versus time was explained by a transient theory that considers rates of carrier generation, carrier trapping, carrier detrapping, and carrier recombination contribution. The trapping model analysis on steady state EBIC results revealed that PBS has a uniform distribution of traps, while EBR900 and ZEP7000 fall in the same category that has exponential distribution of traps. The steady state EBIC gain was also determined for the three resists and the onset of the plasma region was observed for EBR900 and ZEP7000. A simulation model for the calculation of electron beam deflection owing to resist charging was developed in the second part of this research. Charging patterns of circles and squares of different dimensions were considered. Both SIMION and MATHEMATICA were used as simulation tools and the limitation of SIMION was illustrated and discussed. The model programmed in MATHEMATICA simulated electron beam deflection during e-beam writing. With the combination of the empirical EBIC-bias relationship of EBR900, the model simulated surface potential decay after irradiation and the results showed good agreement with literature values. The extent of

  9. Effective beam method for element concentrations.

    PubMed

    Tolhurst, Thomas; Barbi, Mauricio; Tokaryk, Tim

    2015-03-01

    There is a great diversity of research being conducted at synchrotron facilities around the world and a diverse set of beamlines to accommodate this research. Time is a precious commodity at synchrotron facilities; therefore, methods that can maximize the time spent collecting data are of value. At the same time the incident radiation spectrum, necessary for some research, may not be known on a given beamline. A preliminary presentation of a method applicable to X-ray fluorescence spectrocopic analyses that overcomes the lack of information about the incident beam spectrum that addresses both of these concerns is given here. The method is equally applicable for other X-ray sources so long as local conditions are considered. It relies on replacing the polychromatic spectrum in a standard fundamental parameters analysis with a set of effective monochromatic photon beams. A beam is associated with each element and can be described by an analytical function allowing extension to elements not included in the necessary calibration measurement(s). PMID:25723941

  10. Effective beam method for element concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Tolhurst, Thomas; Barbi, Mauricio; Tokaryk, Tim

    2015-01-01

    There is a great diversity of research being conducted at synchrotron facilities around the world and a diverse set of beamlines to accommodate this research. Time is a precious commodity at synchrotron facilities; therefore, methods that can maximize the time spent collecting data are of value. At the same time the incident radiation spectrum, necessary for some research, may not be known on a given beamline. A preliminary presentation of a method applicable to X-ray fluorescence spectrocopic analyses that overcomes the lack of information about the incident beam spectrum that addresses both of these concerns is given here. The method is equally applicable for other X-ray sources so long as local conditions are considered. It relies on replacing the polychromatic spectrum in a standard fundamental parameters analysis with a set of effective monochromatic photon beams. A beam is associated with each element and can be described by an analytical function allowing extension to elements not included in the necessary calibration measurement(s). PMID:25723941

  11. Fundamental proximity effects in focused electron beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Plank, Harald; Smith, Daryl A; Haber, Thomas; Rack, Philip D; Hofer, Ferdinand

    2012-01-24

    Fundamental proximity effects for electron beam induced deposition processes on nonflat surfaces were studied experimentally and via simulation. Two specific effects were elucidated and exploited to considerably increase the volumetric growth rate of this nanoscale direct write method: (1) increasing the scanning electron pitch to the scale of the lateral electron straggle increased the volumetric growth rate by 250% by enhancing the effective forward scattered, backscattered, and secondary electron coefficients as well as by strong recollection effects of adjacent features; and (2) strategic patterning sequences are introduced to reduce precursor depletion effects which increase volumetric growth rates by more than 90%, demonstrating the strong influence of patterning parameters on the final performance of this powerful direct write technique. PMID:22181556

  12. Fundamental Proximity Effects in Focused electron Beam Induced Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Plank, Harald; Smith, Daryl; Haber, Thomas; Rack, Philip D; Hofer, Ferdinand

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental proximity effects for electron beam induced deposition processes on nonflat surfaces were studied experimentally and via simulation. Two specific effects were elucidated and exploited to considerably increase the volumetric growth rate of this nanoscale direct write method: (1) increasing the scanning electron pitch to the scale of the lateral electron straggle increased the volumetric growth rate by 250% by enhancing the effective forward scattered, backscattered, and secondary electron coefficients as well as by strong recollection effects of adjacent features; and (2) strategic patterning sequences are introduced to reduce precursor depletion effects which increase volumetric growth rates by more than 90%, demonstrating the strong influence of patterning parameters on the final performance of this powerful direct write technique.

  13. Increasing Student Engagement through Faculty Development: A Practice Brief Based on BEAMS Project Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malnarich, Gillies

    2008-01-01

    During 2003-07, the Building Engagement and Attainment for Minority Students (BEAMS) project fostered data-based campus change initiatives at more than 100 four-year Historically Black, Hispanic-Serving, and Tribal colleges and universities to increase student engagement and learning. Each campus made a commitment to analyze the scope and…

  14. GPU-optimized Code for Long-term Simulations of Beam-beam Effects in Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Roblin, Yves; Morozov, Vasiliy; Terzic, Balsa; Aturban, Mohamed A.; Ranjan, D.; Zubair, Mohammed

    2013-06-01

    We report on the development of the new code for long-term simulation of beam-beam effects in particle colliders. The underlying physical model relies on a matrix-based arbitrary-order symplectic particle tracking for beam transport and the Bassetti-Erskine approximation for beam-beam interaction. The computations are accelerated through a parallel implementation on a hybrid GPU/CPU platform. With the new code, a previously computationally prohibitive long-term simulations become tractable. We use the new code to model the proposed medium-energy electron-ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab.

  15. Investigation of the effects of beam scattering and beam wandering on laser beams passing thorough the off-gas duct of an Electric Arc Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alikhanzadeh, Amirhossein

    The project sets to determine the effects of scattering and beam wandering on light that passes through the off-gas of EAF. The effects of light scattering from metallic dust and beam wandering due to temperature gradient and turbulence in the medium are investigated. Using Matlab, a model was developed based on Mie theory to calculate light transmission when the optical properties are known; most importantly refractive index of the dust as well as incident wavelength, particle size and concentration of the particles per cm 3 of the gas. The model was validated and was used to show that as the particle size parameter increases, the scattering losses decreases. Turbulence and temperature gradients in the air cause the laser beam to change shape. Using a big collection lens can minimize the signal fluctuation caused by the beam wandering. A thorough understanding of these phenomena helps in designing optical sensors in the industry.

  16. Thermal effects in high power cavities for photoneutralization of D- beams in future neutral beam injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorucci, Donatella; Feng, Jiatai; Pichot, Mikhaël; Chaibi, Walid

    2015-04-01

    Photoneutralization may represent a key issue in the neutral beam injectors for future fusion reactors. In fact, photodetachment based neutralization combined with an energy recovery system increase the injector overall efficiency up to 60%. This is the SIPHORE injector concept in which photoneutralization is realized in a refolded cavity [1]. However, about 1 W of the several megaWatts intracavity power is absorbed by the mirrors coatings and gives rise to important thermoelastic distortions. This is expected to change the optical behavior of the mirrors and reduce the enhancement factor of the cavity. In this paper, we estimate these effects and we propose a thermal system to compensate it.

  17. Increasing the intensity of an induction accelerator and reduction of the beam breakup instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, J. E.; Moir, D. C.; Ekdahl, C. A.; Johnson, J. B.; McCuistian, B. T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Crawford, M. T.

    2014-03-01

    A 7 cm cathode has been deployed for use on a 3.8 MV, 80 ns (FWHM) Blumlein, to increase the extracted electron current from the nominal 1.7 to 2.9 kA. The intense relativistic electron bunch is accelerated and transported through a nested solenoid and ferrite induction core lattice consisting of 64 elements, exiting the accelerator with a nominal energy of 19.8 MeV. The principal objective of these experiments is to quantify the space-charge limitations on the beam quality, its coupling with the beam breakup (BBU) instability, and provide an independent validation of the BBU theory in a higher current regime, I >2 kA. Time resolved centroid measurements indicate a reduction in BBU >10× with simply a 50% increase in the average B-field used to transport the beam through the accelerator. A qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results are presented, which include time resolved current density distributions, radial BBU amplitude relative to the calculated beam envelope, and frequency analyzed BBU amplitude with different accelerator lattice tunes.

  18. Disruption effects from the collision of quasi-flat beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pisin

    1993-04-01

    The disruption effects from the collision of round beams and flat beams in linear colliders have been studied in the past, and has by now been well understood. In practice, however, in the current SLC running condition and in several designs of the next generation linear colliders, the quasi-flat beam geometries are expected. Namely, the beam aspect ratio R {equivalent_to} {sigma}{sub x}/{sigma}{sub y} > 1, but not infinitely large. In this regime the disruption effects in both x and y dimensions should be carefully included in order to properly describe the beam-beam interaction phenomena. In this paper we investigate two major disruption effects for the quasi-flat beam regime: The luminosity enhancement factor and the effective beamstrahlung. Computer simulations are employed and simple scaling laws are deduced.

  19. Increasing relative nonclassicality quantified by standard entanglement potentials by dissipation and unbalanced beam splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranowicz, Adam; Bartkiewicz, Karol; Lambert, Neill; Chen, Yueh-Nan; Nori, Franco

    2015-12-01

    If a single-mode nonclassical light is combined with the vacuum on a beam splitter, then the output state is entangled. As proposed in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 173602 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.94.173602], by measuring this output-state entanglement for a balanced lossless beam splitter, one can quantify the input-state nonclassicality. These measures of nonclassicality (referred to as entanglement potentials) can be based, in principle, on various entanglement measures, leading to the negativity (NP) and concurrence (CP) potentials, and the potential for the relative entropy of entanglement (REEP). We search for the maximal relative nonclassicality, which can be achieved by comparing two entanglement measures for (i) arbitrary two-qubit states and (ii) those which can be generated from a photon-number qubit via a balanced lossless beam splitter, where the qubit basis states are the vacuum and single-photon states. Surprisingly, we find that the maximal relative nonclassicality, measured by the REEP for a given value of the NP, can be increased (if NP <0.527 ) by using either a tunable beam splitter or by amplitude damping of the output state of the balanced beam splitter. We also show that the maximal relative nonclassicality, measured by the NP for a given value of the REEP, can be increased by phase damping (dephasing). Note that the entanglement itself is not increased by these losses (since they act locally), but the possible ratios of different measures are affected. Moreover, we show that partially dephased states can be more nonclassical than both pure states and completely dephased states, by comparing the NP for a given value of the REEP. Thus, one can conclude that not all standard entanglement measures can be used as entanglement potentials. Alternatively, one can infer that a single balanced lossless beam splitter is not always transferring the whole nonclassicality of its input state into the entanglement of its output modes. The application of a lossy

  20. SU-E-T-568: Improving Normal Brain Sparing with Increasing Number of Arc Beams for Volume Modulated Arc Beam Radiosurgery of Multiple Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, S; Hildebrand, K; Ahmad, S; Larson, D; Ma, L; Sahgal, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated arc beams have been newly reported for treating multiple brain metastases. The purpose of this study was to determine the variations in the normal brain doses with increasing number of arc beams for multiple brain metastases treatments via the TrueBeam Rapidarc system (Varian Oncology, Palo Alto, CA). Methods: A patient case with 12 metastatic brain lesions previously treated on the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (GK) was used for the study. All lesions and organs at risk were contoured by a senior radiation oncologist and treatment plans for a subset of 3, 6, 9 and all 12 targets were developed for the TrueBeam Rapidarc system via 3 to 7 intensity modulated arc-beams with each target covered by at least 99% of the prescribed dose of 20 Gy. The peripheral normal brain isodose volumes as well as the total beam-on time were analyzed with increasing number of arc beams for these targets. Results: All intensisty modulated arc-beam plans produced efficient treatment delivery with the beam-on time averaging 0.6–1.5 min per lesion at an output of 1200 MU/min. With increasing number of arc beams, the peripheral normal brain isodose volumes such as the 12-Gy isodose line enclosed normal brain tissue volumes were on average decreased by 6%, 11%, 18%, and 28% for the 3-, 6-, 9-, 12-target treatment plans respectively. The lowest normal brain isodose volumes were consistently found for the 7-arc treatment plans for all the cases. Conclusion: With nearly identical beam-on times, the peripheral normal brain dose was notably decreased when the total number of intensity modulated arc beams was increased when treating multiple brain metastases. Dr Sahgal and Dr Ma are currently serving on the board of international society of stereotactic radiosurgery.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Beam-Beam Effects in the Proposed Electron-Ion Colider at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Balsa Terzic, Yuhong Zhang

    2010-05-01

    One key limiting factor to a collider luminosity is beam-beam interactions which usually can cause serious emittance growth of colliding beams and fast reduction of luminosity. Such nonlinear collective beam effect can be a very serious design challenge when the machine parameters are pushed into a new regime. In this paper, we present simulation studies of the beam-beam effect for a medium energy ring-ring electron-ion collider based on CEBAF.

  2. Simulations of the performance of the Fusion-FEM, for an increased e-beam emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Tulupov, A.V.; Urbanus, W.H.; Caplan, M.

    1995-12-31

    The original design of the Fusion-FEM, which is under construction at the FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, was based on an electron beam emittance of 50 {pi} mm mrad. Recent measurements of the emittance of the beam emitted by the electron gun showed that the actual emittance is 80 {pi} mm mrad. This results in a 2.5 times lower beam current density inside the undulator. As a result it changes the linear gain, the start-up time, the saturation level and the frequency spectrum. The main goal of the FEM project is to demonstrate a stable microwave output power of at least 1 MW. The decrease of the electron beam current density has to be compensated by variations of the other FEM parameters, such as the reflection (feedback) coefficient of the microwave cavity and the length of the drift gap between the two sections of the step-tapered undulator. All basic dependencies of the linear and nonlinear gain, and of the output power on the main FEM parameters have been simulated numerically with the CRMFEL code. Regimes of stable operation of the FEM with the increased emittance have been found. These regimes could be found because of the original flexibility of the FEM design.

  3. The effects of betatron phase advances on beam-beam and its compensation in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Gu, X.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2011-03-28

    In this article we perform simulation studies to investigate the effects of betatron phase advances between the beam-beam interaction points on half-integer resonance driving term, second order chromaticty and dynamic aperture in RHIC. The betatron phase advances are adjusted with artificial matrices inserted in the middle of arcs. The lattices for the 2011 RHIC polarized proton (p-p) run and 2010 RHIC Au-Au runs are used in this study. We also scan the betatron phase advances between IP8 and the electron lens for the proposed Blue ring lattice with head-on beam-beam compensation.

  4. Increasing efficiency of BEAMnrc-simulated Co-60 beams using directional source biasing

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, B. R. B.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: This study describes the implementation of a directional source biasing (DSB) scheme for efficiently simulating Cobalt-60 treatment heads using the BEAMnrc Monte Carlo code. Previous simulation of Co-60 beams with BEAMnrc was impractical because of the time required to track photons not directed into the treatment field and to simulate secondary charged particles. Methods: In DSB, efficiency is increased by splitting each photon emitted by the Co-60 source a user-defined number of times. Only those split primary photons directed into a user-defined splitting field (encompassing the treatment field) are sampled, yielding many low-weight photons directed into the field. Efficiency can be further increased by taking advantage of radial symmetry at the top of the treatment head to reduce the number of split primary photons tracked in this portion. There is also an option to generate contaminant electrons in DSB. Results: The DSB scheme in BEAMnrc increases the photon fluence calculation efficiency in a 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} Co-60 beam by a factor of 1800 with a concurrent increase in contaminant electron fluence calculation efficiency by a factor of 1200. Implementation of DSB in beampp, a C++ code for accelerator simulations based on EGSnrc and the C++ class library, egspp, increases photon fluence efficiency by a factor of 2800 and contaminant electron fluence efficiency by a factor of 1600. Optimum splitting numbers are in the range of 20 000–40 000. For dose calculations in a water phantom (0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 cm{sup 3} voxels) this translates into a factor of ∼400 increase in dose calculation efficiency (all doses > 0.5 × D{sub max}). An example calculation of the ratio of dose to water to dose to chamber (the basis of the beam quality correction factor) to within 0.2% in a realistic chamber using a full simulation of a Co-60 treatment head as a source indicates the practicality of Co-60 simulations with DSB. Conclusions: The efficiency improvement

  5. Effective Strategies for Increasing Citation Frequency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebrahim, Nader Ale; Salehi, Hadi; Embi, Mohamed Amin; Tanha, Farid Habibi; Gholizadeh, Hossein; Motahar, Seyed Mohammad; Ordi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Due to the effect of citation impact on The Higher Education (THE) world university ranking system, most of the researchers are looking for some helpful techniques to increase their citation record. This paper by reviewing the relevant articles extracts 33 different ways for increasing the citations possibilities. The results show that the article…

  6. Effect of beam arrangement on oral cavity dose in external beam radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Vincent W.C.; Yang Zhining; Zhang Wuzhe; Wu Lili; Lin Zhixiong

    2012-07-01

    This study compared the oral cavity dose between the routine 7-beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) beam arrangement and 2 other 7-beam IMRT with the conventional radiotherapy beam arrangements in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Ten NPC patients treated by the 7-beam routine IMRT technique (IMRT-7R) between April 2009 and June 2009 were recruited. Using the same computed tomography data, target information, and dose constraints for all the contoured structures, 2 IMRT plans with alternative beam arrangements (IMRT-7M and IMRT-7P) by avoiding the anterior facial beam and 1 conventional radiotherapy plan (CONRT) were computed using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the planning target volumes (PTVs) and oral cavity from which the dose parameters and the conformity index of the PTV were recorded for dosimetric comparisons among the plans with different beam arrangements. The dose distributions to the PTVs were similar among the 3 IMRT beam arrangements, whereas the differences were significant between IMRT-7R and CONRT plans. For the oral cavity dose, the 3 IMRT beam arrangements did not show significant difference. Compared with IMRT-7R, CONRT plan showed a significantly lower mean dose, V30 and V-40, whereas the V-60 was significantly higher. The 2 suggested alternative beam arrangements did not significantly reduce the oral cavity dose. The impact of varying the beam angles in IMRT of NPC did not give noticeable effect on the target and oral cavity. Compared with IMRT, the 2-D conventional radiotherapy irradiated a greater high-dose volume in the oral cavity.

  7. Increasing beam power and energy with the SBS forward energy transfer instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkwood, R. K.; London, R. A.; Dunlop, W. H.; Michel, P. A.; Williams, E. A.; Fournier, K. B.; Landen, O. L.; MacGowan, B. J.

    2012-10-01

    The understanding of the exchange of forward going power and energy between two crossing beams in a plasma [1] is now sufficiently developed that it can be used to enable access to new experimental configurations. The existing models of the process allow the design of beam combiners that will produce higher energy in individual beams for new applications in ignition and HED physics. For example the Energy Partitioning and Energy Coupling (EPEC) [2] program is simulating nuclear events in various environments by delivering energy to the center of a chamber through a narrow tube that allows minimal perturbation of the surrounding region. We will describe the design of gas filled targets that will allow a 2x to 5x increase in the energy in a single NIF quad to enable higher yield events to be simulated in EPEC. These designs as well as advanced ignition target designs will require models with improved precision to predict their performance accurately. We will also compare the predictions of existing and emerging models of wave saturation [3] with the existing experimental data to determine the uncertainty in the models.[4pt] [1] P. Michel Physics of Plasmas 2010.[0pt] [2] K. Fournier, these proceedings[0pt] [3] P. Michel, E. Williams, these proceedings.

  8. Lifetime increased cancer risk in mice following exposure to clinical proton beam generated neutrons

    PubMed Central

    Gerweck, Leo E.; Huang, Peigen; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Paganetti, Harald; Zhou, Yenong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the lifespan and risk of cancer following whole-body exposure of mice to neutrons generated by a passively scattered clinical SOBP proton beam. Methods and Materials Three hundred young adult female FVB/N mice, 152 test and 148 control, were entered into the experiment. Mice were placed in an annular cassette around a cylindrical phantom, which was positioned lateral to the mid SOBP of a 165 MeV, clinical proton beam. The average distance from the edge of the mid SOBP to the conscious active mice was 21.5 cm. The phantom was irradiated with once daily fractions of 25 Gy, 4 days per week, for 6 weeks. The age at death and cause of death, i.e., cancer and type vs. non-cancer causes, were assessed over the lifespan of the mice. Results Exposure of mice to a dose of 600 Gy of proton beam generated neutrons, reduced the median lifespan of the mice by 4.2% (Kaplan-Meier cumulative survival, P = 0.053). The relative risk of death from cancer in neutron exposed vs. control mice was 1.40 for cancer of all types (P = 0.0006) and 1.22 for solid cancers (P = 0.09). For a typical 60 Gy dose of clinical protons, the observed 22% increased risk of solid cancer would be expected to decrease by a factor of 10. Conclusions Exposure of mice to neutrons generated by a proton dose which exceeds a typical course of radiotherapy by a factor of 10, resulted in a statistically significant increase in the background incidence of leukemia and a marginally significant increase in solid cancer. The results indicate that the risk of out-of-field 2nd solid cancers from SOBP proton generated neutrons and typical treatment schedules, is 6 - 10 times less than is suggested by current neutron risk estimates. PMID:24725699

  9. Wakefield Effects in the Beam Delivery System of the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Seryi, A.; /SLAC

    2007-06-27

    The main linac of the International Linear Collider (ILC) accelerates short, high peak current bunches into the Beam Delivery System (BDS) on the way to the interaction point. In the BDS wakefields, excited by the resistance of the beam pipe walls and by beam pipe transitions, will tend to degrade the emittance of the beam bunches. In this report we calculate the effect on single bunch emittance of incoming jitter or drift, and of misalignments of the beam pipes with respect to the beam axis, both analytically and through multi-particle tracking. As we want to keep emittance growth due to this effect small, we consider also mitigation measures of changing the metallic surface material and/or the beam pipe aperture. The wake effects are studied in that part of the BDS which includes the collimation and final focus systems. Typical ILC beam parameters are given in Table 1. Initially a stainless steel (SS) beam pipe is considered. Note that the ILC collimator wakes, though very important, are not included in this study; their effects have been studied elsewhere [1]. Note also that similar methods are presented in recent reports Refs. [2],[3].

  10. Beam profile effects on NPB performance

    SciTech Connect

    Leclaire, R.J. Jr.; Bunker, W.J.

    1988-03-01

    A comparison of neutral particle beam (NPB) brightness for various neutral beam profiles indicates that the widely used assumption of a Gaussian profile may be misleading for collisional neutralizers. An analysis of available experimental evidence shows that lower peaks and higher tails, compared to a Gaussian beam profile, are observed out of collisional neutralizers, which implies that peak brightness is over estimated, and for a given NPB platform-to-target range, the beam current (power), dwell time or some combination of such engagement parameters would have to be altered to maintain a fixed dose on the target. Based on the present analysis, this factor is nominally about 2.4 but may actually be as low as 1.8 or as high as 8. This is an important consideration in estimating NPB constellation performance in SDI engagement contexts.

  11. Increasing the Brightness of Cold Ion Beams by Suppressing Disorder-Induced Heating with Rydberg Blockade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, D.; Scholten, R. E.; Sparkes, B. M.

    2015-11-01

    A model for the equilibrium coupling of an ion system with varying initial hard-sphere Rydberg blockade correlations is used to quantify the suppression of disorder-induced heating in Coulomb-expanding cold ion bunches. We show that bunches with experimentally achievable blockade parameters have an emittance reduced by a factor of 2.6 and increased focusability and brightness compared to a disordered bunch. Demonstrating suppression of disorder-induced heating is an important step in the development of techniques for the creation of beam sources with sufficient phase-space density for ultrafast, single-shot coherent diffractive imaging.

  12. Electron beam injection during active experiments. II - Collisional effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    During active beam experiments, the presence of high neutral densities at low altitudes and/or during thruster firings has been observed to modify the spacecraft charging and the properties of the beam. Two-dimensional (three-velocity) electromagnetic particle simulations with ionizing collisions incorporated are used to investigate the modification of the beam-plasma interaction as the neutral density is increased. It is shown that when the spacecraft is uniformly immersed in a neutral cloud, most of the ionization is produced by direct ionization by the beam and its secondaries, rather than via vehicle-induced or wave-induced ionization for the neutral densities considered.

  13. The dose delivery effect of the different Beam ON interval in FFF SBRT: TrueBEAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawonwong, T.; Suriyapee, S.; Oonsiri, S.; Sanghangthum, T.; Oonsiri, P.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the dose delivery effect of the different Beam ON interval in Flattening Filter Free Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (FFF-SBRT). The three 10MV-FFF SBRT plans (2 half rotating Rapid Arc, 9 to10 Gray/Fraction) were selected and irradiated in three different intervals (100%, 50% and 25%) using the RPM gating system. The plan verification was performed by the ArcCHECK for gamma analysis and the ionization chamber for point dose measurement. The dose delivery time of each interval were observed. For gamma analysis (2%&2mm criteria), the average percent pass of all plans for 100%, 50% and 25% intervals were 86.1±3.3%, 86.0±3.0% and 86.1±3.3%, respectively. For point dose measurement, the average ratios of each interval to the treatment planning were 1.012±0.015, 1.011±0.014 and 1.011±0.013 for 100%, 50% and 25% interval, respectively. The average dose delivery time was increasing from 74.3±5.0 second for 100% interval to 154.3±12.6 and 347.9±20.3 second for 50% and 25% interval, respectively. The same quality of the dose delivery from different Beam ON intervals in FFF-SBRT by TrueBEAM was illustrated. While the 100% interval represents the breath-hold treatment technique, the differences for the free-breathing using RPM gating system can be treated confidently.

  14. Simulation Studies of Beam-Beam Effects of a Ring-Ring Electron-Ion Collider Based on CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Yuhong Zhang,Ji Qiang

    2009-05-01

    The collective beam-beam effect can potentially cause a rapid growth of beam sizes and reduce the luminosity of a collider to an unacceptably low level. The ELIC, a proposed ultra high luminosity electron-ion collider based on CEBAF, employs high repetition rate crab crossing colliding beams with very small bunch transverse sizes and very short bunch lengths, and collides them at up to 4 interaction points with strong final focusing. All of these features can make the beam-beam effect challenging. In this paper, we present simulation studies of the beam-beam effect in ELIC using a self-consistent strong-strong beam-beam simulation code developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This simulation study is used for validating the ELIC design and for searching for an optimal parameter set.

  15. Effect of beam types on the scintillations: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baykal, Yahya; Eyyuboglu, Halil T.; Cai, Yangjian

    2009-02-01

    waist size along the long axis to that along the short axis (i.e., astigmatism). Comparing against the fundamental Gaussian beam on equal source size and equal power basis, it is observed that the scintillation index of the lowest order Bessel-Gaussian beam is lower at large source sizes and large width parameters. However, for excessively large width parameters and beyond certain propagation lengths, the advantage of the lowest order Bessel-Gaussian beam seems to be lost. Compared to Gaussian beam, laser array beam exhibits less scintillations at long propagation ranges and at some midrange radial displacement parameters. When compared among themselves, laser array beams tend to have reduced scintillations for larger number of beamlets, longer wavelengths, midrange radial displacement parameters, intermediate Gaussian source sizes, larger inner scales and smaller outer scales of turbulence. The number of beamlets used does not seem to be so effective in this improvement of the scintillations.

  16. Effects of electron-beam irradiation on conducting polypyrrole nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Young Ki; Park, Dong Hyuk; Park, Se Hee; Park, Soung Kyu; Joo, Jinsoo

    2009-02-02

    Conducting polypyrrole (PPy) nanowires (NWs) were irradiated by a relatively high energy (300 keV-2 MeV) electron-beam (e-beam) generated from a linear electron accelerator in an atmospheric environment. From the current-voltage characteristics of pristine and 2 MeV e-beam irradiated PPy NWs, we observed a dramatic variation in resistance from 8.0x10{sup 2} to 1.45x10{sup 8} {omega}, that is, we observed a transition from conducting states to nonconducting states through the e-beam irradiation. To discern conformational changes and the doping states of PPy NWs through the e-beam irradiation, we measured Raman and ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra for the PPy NWs. As the energy of the e-beam irradiation increased, we observed that the PPy NWs were changed from doping states to dedoping states with conformational modification including the variation in {pi}-conjugation length.

  17. Microdosimetric relative biological effectiveness of therapeutic proton beams.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chuan-Jong

    2015-01-01

    When compared to photon beams, particle beams have distinct spatial distributions on the energy depositions in both the macroscopic and microscopic volumes. In a macroscopic volume, the absorbed dose distribution shows a rapid increase near the particle range, that is, Bragg peak, as particle penetrates deep inside the tissue. In a microscopic volume, individual particle deposits its energy along the particle track by producing localized ionizations through the formation of clusters. These highly localized clusters can induce complex types of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage which are more difficult to repair and lead to higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE) as compared to photons. To describe the biological actions, biophysical models on a microscopic level have been developed. In this review, microdosimetric approaches are discussed for the determination of RBE at different depths in a patient under particle therapy. These approaches apply the microdosimetric lineal energy spectra obtained from measurements or calculations. Methods to determine these spectra will be focused on the tissue equivalent proportional counter and the Monte Carlo program. Combining the lineal energy spectrum and the biological model, RBE can be determined. Three biological models are presented. A simplified model applies the dose-mean lineal energy and the measured RBE (linear energy transfer) data. A more detailed model makes use of the full lineal energy spectrum and the biological weighting function spectrum. A comprehensive model calculates the spectrum-averaged yields of DNA damages caused by all primary and secondary particles of a particle beam. Results of these models are presented for proton beams. PMID:26459792

  18. INCREASED UNDERSTANDING OF BEAM LOSSES FROM THE SNS LINAC PROTON EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Shishlo, Andrei P; Plum, Michael A; Lebedev, Valerie; Laface, Emanuele; Galambos, John D

    2013-01-01

    Beam loss is a major concern for high power hadron accelerators such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). An unexpected beam loss in the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) was observed during the power ramp up and early operation. Intra-beam-stripping (IBS) loss, in which interactions between H- particles within the accelerated bunch strip the outermost electron, was recently identified as a possible cause of the beam loss. A set of experiments using proton beam acceleration in the SNS linac was conducted, which supports IBS as the primary beam loss mechanism in the SNS SCL.

  19. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement in the forward region at CLIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukić, S.; Božović-Jelisavčić, I.; Pandurović, M.; Smiljanić, I.

    2013-05-01

    Procedures for correcting the beam-beam effects in luminosity measurements at CLIC at 3 TeV center-of-mass energy are described and tested using Monte Carlo simulations. The angular counting loss due to the combined Beamstrahlung and initial-state radiation effects is corrected based on the reconstructed velocity of the collision frame of the Bhabha scattering. The distortion of the luminosity spectrum due to the initial-state radiation is corrected by deconvolution. At the end, the counting bias due to the finite calorimeter energy resolution is numerically corrected. To test the procedures, BHLUMI Bhabha event generator, and Guinea-Pig beam-beam simulation were used to generate the outgoing momenta of Bhabha particles in the bunch collisions at CLIC. The systematic effects of the beam-beam interaction on the luminosity measurement are corrected with precision of 1.4 permille in the upper 5% of the energy, and 2.7 permille in the range between 80 and 90% of the nominal center-of-mass energy.

  20. Apparatus and method for increasing the bandwidth of a laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Chaffee, Paul H.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus is disclosed that provides a laser output beam having a broad bandwidth and an intensity smooth over time. The bandwidth of the laser output can be varied easily by varying the intensity of a broadband source. The present invention includes an optical modulation apparatus comprising a narrowband laser that outputs a horizontally polarized beam (a "signal beam") and a broadband laser that outputs a vertically polarized beam (a "pump beam") whose intensity varies rapidly. The two beam are coupled into a birefringent laser material so that the respective polarizations coincide with the principal axes of the material. As the two beams travel through the material, the polarization preserving properties of the birefringent material maintain the respective polarizations of the two beam; however there is coupling between the two beams as a result of cross phase modulations, which induces a bandwidth change of the signal beam. The amount of bandwidth change is dependent upon the average intensity of the pump beam. The beams are coupled out from the birefringent material and the modulated signal beam is separated by a polarization selector. The modulated signal beam now has a wider bandwidth, and its shape remains smooth in time. This signal beam can be applied to incoherence inducing systems. The different bandwidths required by these different incoherence inducing systems can be obtained by varying the intensity of the pump beam. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. W7405-ENG-48 between the United States Department of Energy and the University of California for the operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  1. Effect of Electron Beam Irradiation on the Tensile Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Sheets and Yarns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Tiffany S.; Miller, Sandi G.; Baker, James S.; McCorkle, Linda S.; Meador, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotube sheets and yarns were irradiated using electron beam (e-beam) energy to determine the effect of irradiation dose on the tensile properties. Results showed that a slight change in tensile strength occurred after irradiating as-received CNT sheets for 20 minutes, and a slight decrease in tensile strength as the irradiation time approached 90 minutes. On the other hand, the addition of small molecules to the CNT sheet surface had a greater effect on the tensile properties of e-beam irradiated CNT sheets. Some functionalized CNT sheets displayed up to a 57% increase in tensile strength following 90 minutes of e-beam exposure. In addition, as-received CNT yarns showed a significant increase in tensile strength as the irradiation time increased.

  2. Evaluation of the BEAM--BEAM effect in PEP using Myer's simulation program

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, A.

    1982-09-01

    The program BEAM BEAM written by Steve Myers for the LEP machine at CERN has given encouraging results in the simulation of the beam-beam effect in electron-positron storage rings. It therefore seemed worthwhile to apply the program to PEP with two main intentions. Firstly, to confirm the validity of the program by comparison with experimental data from previous PEP runs and secondly, to search for an improvement in the operating conditions of PEP. Clearly a successful prediction would also enhance the credibility of the program. The program itself has been extensively described in the literature and will not be repeated here, except for some comments of direct relevance to the present simulation. 14 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. The Effect of Increasing Mass upon Locomotion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, John; Hagan, Donald

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if increasing body mass while maintaining bodyweight would affect ground reaction forces and joint kinetics during walking and running. It was hypothesized that performing gait with increased mass while maintaining body weight would result in greater ground reaction forces, and would affect the net joint torques and work at the ankle, knee and hip when compared to gait with normal mass and bodyweight. Vertical ground reaction force was measured for ten subjects (5M/5F) during walking (1.34 m/s) and running (3.13 m/s) on a treadmill. Subjects completed one minute of locomotion at normal mass and bodyweight and at four added mass (AM) conditions (10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of body mass) in random order. Three-dimensional joint position data were collected via videography. Walking and running were analyzed separately. The addition of mass resulted in several effects. Peak impact forces and loading rates increased during walking, but decreased during running. Peak propulsive forces decreased during walking and did not change during running. Stride time increased and hip extensor angular impulse and positive work increased as mass was added for both styles of locomotion. Work increased at a greater rate during running than walking. The adaptations to additional mass that occur during walking are different than during running. Increasing mass during exercise in microgravity may be beneficial to increasing ground reaction forces during walking and strengthening hip musculature during both walking and running. Future study in true microgravity is required to determine if the adaptations found would be similar in a weightless environment.

  4. The effect of discrete viscous damping on the transverse vibration of beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierson, Harry; Brevick, Jerald; Hubbard, Kevin

    2013-09-01

    The effect of a discrete elastic element on the transverse vibration of a Bernoulli-Euler beam has been well-studied; however, the same cannot be said for a beam with a viscous damper. While the former can be analyzed via separation of variables and the solution of the eigenvalue problem, this article presents a method for computing the resonances of the latter case. The nature of a discrete viscous damper's effect on the fundamental frequency of a beam is revealed as the method is applied to the case of a cantilevered beam. In this process, it is shown that damping has the capacity to increase the fundamental frequency of the beam, and that there exists both a particular location and critical value of damping that maximize this frequency.

  5. Effect of skin-core debonding on the dynamic behaviour of GFRP composite beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayatilake, Indunil; Karunasena, Karu; Lokuge, Weena

    2013-08-01

    Composites are materials made by combining two individual materials where one material forms the matrix while the other provides the reinforcement. A novel composite sandwich made up of glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) face sheets and modified phenolic core has been developed recently. Although perfect bond between the skin and the core is a common assumption, an important issue that needs to be considered in using a composite beam is the development of debonding between the skin and the core. Debonding may arise during fabrication or under service conditions, which causes changes to the dynamic behaviour in addition to the strength degradation. This paper focuses on the effect of debonding on dynamic characteristics of sandwich beams of different debonding sizes and end conditions. Strand7 software is used for 3D finite element simulation. Free vibration behaviour reported in the literature for composite beams will first be used to compare the analytical results with the fully bonded and debonded beams. Study is extended to depict the effect of debonding on free vibration behaviour of novel composite beams. It is revealed that the decrease in natural frequency with the increase in the extent of debonding is more dependent on the width of debonding across the beam than the length along the beam. It is also perceived that full width debonding leads to increased participation of twisting modes in comparison to half-width debonding in clamped-clamped end condition. End conditions of the beam are a governing factor dictating which modes are more affected.

  6. Cooperative effect of ultraviolet and near-infrared beams in laser-induced condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, M.; Henin, S.; Pomel, F.; Kasparian, J.; Wolf, J.-P.; Théberge, F.; Daigle, J.-F.; Lassonde, P.; Kieffer, J.-C.

    2013-12-23

    We demonstrate the cooperative effect of near infrared (NIR) and ultraviolet (UV) beams on laser-induced condensation. Launching a UV laser after a NIR pulse yields up to a 5-fold increase in the production of nanoparticles (25–300 nm) as compared to a single NIR beam. This cooperative effect exceeds the sum of those from the individual beams and occurs for delays up to 1 μs. We attribute it to the UV photolysis of ozone created by the NIR pulses. The resulting OH radicals oxidize NO{sub 2} and volatile organic compounds, producing condensable species.

  7. Beam-Plasma Interaction and Nonlinear Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Peter H.

    2009-11-10

    This paper presents a survey of perturbative nonlinear plasma theory known as the weak turbulence theory. After the basic concepts and methodology of the weak turbulence theory are outlined in sufficient detail, numerical solutions of the weak turbulence theory obtained in the context of the beam-plasma interaction are compared against particle-in-cell (PIC) numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that theory and PIC simulation are in excellent agreement.

  8. Apparatus and method for increasing the bandwidth of a laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell B.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus using sinusoidal cross-phase modulation, provides a laser pulse having a very broad bandwidth while substantially retaining the input laser's temporal shape. The modulator may be used in a master oscillator system for a laser having a master oscillator-power amplifier (MOPA) configration. The modulator utilizes a first laser providing an output wavelength .lambda. and a second laser providing an output wavelength shifted by a small amount to .lambda.+.DELTA..lambda.. Each beam has a single, linear polarization. Each beam is coupled into a length of polarization-preserving optical fiber. The first laser beam is coupled into the optical fiber with the beam's polarization aligned with the fiber's main axis, and the second beam is coupled into the fiber with its polarization rotated from the main axis by a predetermined angle. Within the fiber, the main axis' polarization defines an interference beam and the orthogonal axis' polarization defines a signal beam. In the interference beam, the first laser beam and the parallel polarized vector component of the other beam interfere to create areas of high and low intensity, which modulates the signal beam by cross phase modulation. Upon exit from the optical fiber, the beams are coupled out and the modulated signal beam is separated out by a polarization selector. The signal beam can be applied to coherence reducing systems to provide an output that is temporally and spatially incoherent. The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. W7405-ENG-48 between the U.S. Department of Energy and the University of California for the operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  9. Effects of Increasing Drag on Conjunction Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frigm, Ryan Clayton; McKinley, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Conjunction Assessment Risk Analysis relies heavily on the computation of the Probability of Collision (Pc) and the understanding of the sensitivity of this calculation to the position errors as defined by the covariance. In Low Earth Orbit (LEO), covariance is predominantly driven by perturbations due to atmospheric drag. This paper describes the effects of increasing atmospheric drag through Solar Cycle 24 on Pc calculations. The process of determining these effects is found through analyzing solar flux predictions on Energy Dissipation Rate (EDR), historical relationship between EDR and covariance, and the sensitivity of Pc to covariance. It is discovered that while all LEO satellites will be affected by the increase in solar activity, the relative effect is more significant in the LEO regime around 700 kilometers in altitude compared to 400 kilometers. Furthermore, it is shown that higher Pc values can be expected at larger close approach miss distances. Understanding these counter-intuitive results is important to setting Owner/Operator expectations concerning conjunctions as solar maximum approaches.

  10. Effects of Cell Windows on TwinSol Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushman, Kimmy

    2016-04-01

    In order to study reactions with unstable nuclei, radioactive-ion beams must be used. One method for producing radioactive beams is the TwinSol experimental setup at the University of Notre Dame. At TwinSol, stable and unstable isotope beams bombard a gas target, where one atmosphere of gas must be confined from the surrounding vacuum. Thin foil windows are used to contain the gas in the cell. In order to optimize the quality of secondary beams from TwinSol, it is necessary to understand and minimize the effects of energy loss and straggling in the windows. This work is the beginning of a process to improve the TwinSol design so that secondary beams produced with heavier ions such as Oxygen, Fluorine, and Neon can be pursued.

  11. Thermal effect on prebunched two-beam free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Mirian, N. S.; Maraghechi, B.

    2013-08-15

    A numerical simulation in one-dimension is conducted to study the two-beam free electron laser. The fundamental resonance of the fast electron beam coincides with the fifth harmonic of the slow electron beam in order to generate extreme ultraviolet radiation. Thermal effect in the form of the longitudinal velocity spread is included in the analysis. In order to reduce the length of the wiggler, prebunched slow electron beam is considered. The evaluation of the radiation power, bunching parameter, distribution function of energy, and the distribution function of the pondermotive phase is studied. Sensitivity of the power of the fifth harmonic to the jitter in the energy difference between the two beams is also studied. A phase space is presented that shows the trapped electrons at the saturation point.

  12. Effects of space charge in beams for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.

    1995-09-01

    A new analytic model is presented that accurately estimates the radially averaged axial component of the space-charge field of an axisymmetric heavy-ion beam in a cylindrical beam pipe. The model recovers details of the field near the beam ends that are overlooked by simpler models, and the results compare well to exact solutions of Poisson`s equation. Field values are shown for several simple beam profiles and are compared with values obtained from simpler models. The model has been implemented in the fluid/envelope code CIRCE and used to study longitudinal confinement in beams with a variety of axial profiles. The effects of errors in the longitudinal-control fields are presented.

  13. Increased Tensile Strength of Carbon Nanotube Yarns and Sheets through Chemical Modification and Electron Beam Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Williams, Tiffany S.; Baker, James S.; Sola, Francisco; Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; McCorkle, Linda S.; Wilmoth, Nathan G.; Gaier, James; Chen, Michelle; Meador, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The inherent strength of individual carbon nanotubes offers considerable opportunity for the development of advanced, lightweight composite structures. Recent work in the fabrication and application of carbon nanotube (CNT) forms such as yarns and sheets has addressed early nanocomposite limitations with respect to nanotube dispersion and loading; and has pushed the technology toward structural composite applications. However, the high tensile strength of an individual CNT has not directly translated to macro-scale CNT forms where bulk material strength is limited by inter-tube electrostatic attraction and slippage. The focus of this work was to assess post processing of CNT sheet and yarn to improve the macro-scale strength of these material forms. Both small molecule functionalization and e-beam irradiation was evaluated as a means to enhance tensile strength and Youngs modulus of the bulk CNT material. Mechanical testing results revealed a tensile strength increase in CNT sheets by 57 when functionalized, while an additional 48 increase in tensile strength was observed when functionalized sheets were irradiated; compared to unfunctionalized sheets. Similarly, small molecule functionalization increased yarn tensile strength up to 25, whereas irradiation of the functionalized yarns pushed the tensile strength to 88 beyond that of the baseline yarn.

  14. Increased tensile strength of carbon nanotube yarns and sheets through chemical modification and electron beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Sandi G; Williams, Tiffany S; Baker, James S; Solá, Francisco; Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; McCorkle, Linda S; Wilmoth, Nathan G; Gaier, James; Chen, Michelle; Meador, Michael A

    2014-05-14

    The inherent strength of individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) offers considerable opportunity for the development of advanced, lightweight composite structures. Recent work in the fabrication and application of CNT forms such as yarns and sheets has addressed early nanocomposite limitations with respect to nanotube dispersion and loading and has pushed the technology toward structural composite applications. However, the high tensile strength of an individual CNT has not directly translated into that of sheets and yarns, where the bulk material strength is limited by intertube electrostatic attractions and slippage. The focus of this work was to assess postprocessing of CNT sheets and yarns to improve the macro-scale strength of these material forms. Both small-molecule functionalization and electron-beam irradiation were evaluated as means to enhance the tensile strength and Young's modulus of the bulk CNT materials. Mechanical testing revealed a 57% increase in tensile strength of CNT sheets upon functionalization compared with unfunctionalized sheets, while an additional 48% increase in tensile strength was observed when functionalized sheets were irradiated. Similarly, small-molecule functionalization increased tensile strength of yarn by up to 25%, whereas irradiation of the functionalized yarns pushed the tensile strength to 88% beyond that of the baseline yarn. PMID:24720450

  15. Detector dose response in megavoltage small photon beams. II. Pencil beam perturbation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Hugo Duane, Simon; Kamio, Yuji; Palmans, Hugo; Seuntjens, Jan

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To quantify detector perturbation effects in megavoltage small photon fields and support the theoretical explanation on the nature of quality correction factors in these conditions. Methods: In this second paper, a modern approach to radiation dosimetry is defined for any detector and applied to small photon fields. Fano’s theorem is adapted in the form of a cavity theory and applied in the context of nonstandard beams to express four main effects in the form of perturbation factors. The pencil-beam decomposition method is detailed and adapted to the calculation of perturbation factors and quality correction factors. The approach defines a perturbation function which, for a given field size or beam modulation, entirely determines these dosimetric factors. Monte Carlo calculations are performed in different cavity sizes for different detection materials, electron densities, and extracameral components. Results: Perturbation effects are detailed with calculated perturbation functions, showing the relative magnitude of the effects as well as the geometrical extent to which collimating or modulating the beam impacts the dosimetric factors. The existence of a perturbation zone around the detector cavity is demonstrated and the approach is discussed and linked to previous approaches in the literature to determine critical field sizes. Conclusions: Monte Carlo simulations are valuable to describe pencil beam perturbation effects and detail the nature of dosimetric factors in megavoltage small photon fields. In practice, it is shown that dosimetric factors could be avoided if the field size remains larger than the detector perturbation zone. However, given a detector and beam quality, a full account for the detector geometry is necessary to determine critical field sizes.

  16. The effect of boundaries on the ion acoustic beam-plasma instability in experiment and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rapson, Christopher; Grulke, Olaf; Matyash, Konstantin; Klinger, Thomas

    2014-05-15

    The ion acoustic beam-plasma instability is known to excite strong solitary waves near the Earth's bow shock. Using a double plasma experiment, tightly coupled with a 1-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, the results presented here show that this instability is critically sensitive to the experimental conditions. Boundary effects, which do not have any counterpart in space or in most simulations, unavoidably excite parasitic instabilities. Potential fluctuations from these instabilities lead to an increase of the beam temperature which reduces the growth rate such that non-linear effects leading to solitary waves are less likely to be observed. Furthermore, the increased temperature modifies the range of beam velocities for which an ion acoustic beam plasma instability is observed.

  17. Potential-Well Distortion, Microwave Instability, and Their Effects with Colliding Beams at KEKB

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yunhai; Flanagan, J.; Fukuma, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Ieiri, T.; Ohmi, K.; Oide, K.; Suetsugu, Y.; Rorie, Jamal; /Hawaii U.

    2009-04-01

    Microwave instability in the Low Energy Ring of KEKB was studied using a broadband impedance model. The model gave excellent descriptions of longitudinal dynamics for both positive and negative momentum compactions. Moreover, it predicted that the threshold of microwave instability was a factor of two lower than the machine nominal operating bunch current. The prediction was confirmed by a measurement using the Belle detector. Furthermore, we integrated the longitudinal wakefield into the beam-beam simulation and applied it to study the combined effects in KEKB. As a result, the beam-beam simulation became truly three-dimensional with emittance growth in all three dimensions simultaneously as the beam currents increase. In addition, an observed mystery of asymmetry in the horizontal scan could also be explained by our simulations.

  18. Simulating Electron Cloud Effects in Heavy-Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Lund, S.W.; Molvik, A.W.; Azevedo, T.; Vay, J.-L.; Stoltz, P.; Veitzer, S.

    2004-08-04

    Stray electrons can be introduced in heavy ion fusion accelerators as a result of ionization of ambient gas or gas released from walls due to halo-ion impact, or as a result of secondary-electron emission. We summarize here results from several studies of electron-cloud accumulation and effects: (1) Calculation of the electron cloud produced by electron desorption from computed beam ion loss; the importance of ion scattering is shown; (2) Simulation of the effect of specified electron cloud distributions on ion beam dynamics. We find electron cloud variations that are resonant with the breathing mode of the beam have the biggest impact on the beam (larger than other resonant and random variations), and that the ion beam is surprisingly robust, with an electron density several percent of the beam density required to produce significant beam degradation in a 200-quadrupole system. We identify a possible instability associated with desorption and resonance with the breathing mode. (3) Preliminary investigations of a long-timestep algorithm for electron dynamics in arbitrary magnetic fields.

  19. Broad beam attenuation of kilovoltage photon beams: effect of ion chambers.

    PubMed

    Das, I J

    1998-01-01

    In kilovoltage X-ray treatment, beam shaping and shielding normal tissue are accomplished by thin sheets of lead cutout, the thickness of which is selected based upon either published data or measurements. Available broad beam attenuation (BBA) data are found to be unsatisfactory and are the subject of this investigation. BBA is defined as the ratio of intensity with (I) and without (I0) attenuating medium for a large field in a phantom. BBA = I(x,t,E)/I0(x,0,E), where x is the depth of measurement, t is the thickness of attenuator, and E is the beam energy. The depth x should be zero for kilovoltage beams and dmax for megavoltage beams. Unfortunately, x is limited by the window thickness which is the core of this study. A Farmer-type cylindrical ion chamber and three parallel plate ion chambers (Capintec, PS-033; Markus; and Holt) were used to measure BBA for kilovoltage beams from a Siemens Stabilipan unit. Results indicate that attenuation is strongly dependent on the window thickness. For the 240 kVp beam, the thickness of lead for 5% and 1% transmissions are 3.1 mm, and 5.2 mm, respectively, with the Capintec chamber. The corresponding values of lead thickness for the Markus chamber are 2.3 mm and 4.0 mm; for the Holt chamber the values are 1.1 mm and 2.2 mm; and for the cylindrical chambers the values are 1.1 mm and 2.3 mm, respectively. Similar variabilities in lead thickness with ion chambers were also noted for the other kilovoltage beams. The large differences in lead thicknesses produce enormous clinical errors, especially for shielding eye and other critical structures. For small thickness of lead (< 0.1 mm), a 20-fold increase in surface dose could be observed instead of usual beam attenuation. This is due to intense low energy photoelectrons liberated from lead sheets in the contact with tissue. It is concluded that the lead thickness required to shield normal tissue varies with ion chamber. Until national or international guidelines for broad beam

  20. Effects of ionization distribution on plasma beam focusing characteristics in Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Ning Zhongxi; Liu Hui; Yu Daren; Zhou Zhongxiang

    2011-11-28

    The relationship between ionization distribution and divergence of plasma beam in a Hall thruster is investigated using spectrum and probe methods. Experimental results indicate that the shift of ionization region towards the exit of channel causes the reduction of accelerating field and the enhancement of electron thermal pressure effect, which result in further deviation of equipotential lines to magnetic field lines and further increase in divergence of plasma beam. It is, therefore, suggested that to put the ionization region deep inside the channel and separate it from the acceleration region at the design, and development stage is helpful to improve the plasma beam focusing characteristics of a Hall thruster.

  1. Refractive turbulence effects on truncated Gaussian beam heterodyne lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, R.

    1984-01-01

    A monostatic heterodyne lidar performance model is formulated to study the combined effects of beam truncation and refractive turbulence in the weak scintillation regime. The results show that there is a loss of signal power due to beam truncation and coherence loss, but there is also an enhancement of signal power due to log-amplitude covariance in suitable conditions of long paths with weak turbulence.

  2. Effective shielding to measure beam current from an ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Bayle, H.; Delferrière, O.; Gobin, R.; Harrault, F.; Marroncle, J.; Senée, F.; Simon, C.; Tuske, O.

    2014-02-15

    To avoid saturation, beam current transformers must be shielded from solenoid, quad, and RFQ high stray fields. Good understanding of field distribution, shielding materials, and techniques is required. Space availability imposes compact shields along the beam pipe. This paper describes compact effective concatenated magnetic shields for IFMIF-EVEDA LIPAc LEBT and MEBT and for FAIR Proton Linac injector. They protect the ACCT Current Transformers beyond 37 mT radial external fields. Measurements made at Saclay on the SILHI source are presented.

  3. Microbial radio-resistance of Salmonella Typhimurium in egg increases due to repetitive irradiation with electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesfai, Adiam T.; Beamer, Sarah K.; Matak, Kristen E.; Jaczynski, Jacek

    2011-04-01

    Ionizing radiation improves food safety. However, foodborne pathogens develop increased resistance in response to sub-lethal stresses such as heat, pH, antibiotics, etc. Therefore, it is hypothesized that foodborne pathogens may develop increased radio-resistance to electron beam (e-beam) radiation. The objective was to determine if D10-value for Salmonella Typhimurium in de-shelled raw egg (egg white and yolk mixed together) increases due to repetitive processing with e-beam at sub-lethal doses. Survivors were enumerated on non-selective (TSA) and selective (XLD) media. Survivors from the highest dose were isolated and used in subsequent e-beam cycle. This process was repeated four times for a total of five e-beam cycles. D10-values for S. Typhimurium enumerated on TSA and XLD following each e-beam cycle were calculated as inverse reciprocal of the slope of survivor curves. D10-values for the ATCC strain were 0.59±0.031 and 0.46±0.022 kGy on TSA and XLD, respectively. However, following the fifth e-beam cycle, the respective D10-values increased (P<0.05) to 0.69±0.026 and 0.61±0.029 kGy, respectively. S. Typhimurium showed a trend (P>0.05) to develop radio-resistance faster on selective media, likely due to facilitated selection of radio-resistant cells within microbial population following each e-beam cycle. For all five e-beam cycles, S. Typhimurium had higher (P<0.05) D10-values on non-selective media, indicating that sub-lethal injury followed by cellular repair and recovery are important for radio-resistance and inactivation of this microorganism. This study demonstrated that e-beam efficiently inactivates S. Typhimurium in raw egg; however, similar to other inactivation techniques and factors affecting microbial growth, S. Typhimurium develops increased radio-resistance if repetitively processed with e-beam at sub-lethal doses.

  4. Photoluminescence enhancement in quaternary III-nitrides alloys grown by molecular beam epitaxy with increasing Al content

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Pereiro, J.; Gonzalez-Posada, F.; Munoz, E.; Calleja, E.

    2008-02-15

    Room temperature photoluminescence and optical absorption spectra have been measured in wurtzite In{sub x}Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1-x-y}N (x{approx}0.06, 0.02beam epitaxy. Photoluminescence spectra show both an enhancement of the integrated intensity and an increasing Stokes shift with the Al content. Both effects arise from an Al-enhanced exciton localization revealed by the S- and W-shaped temperature dependences of the photoluminescence emission energy and bandwidth, respectively. Present results point to these materials as a promising choice for the active region in efficient light emitters. An In-related bowing parameter of 1.6 eV was derived from optical absorption data.

  5. Strict X-ray beam collimation for facial bones examination can increase lens exposure

    PubMed Central

    Powys, R; Robinson, J; Kench, P L; Ryan, J; Brennan, P C

    2012-01-01

    Objectives It is well accepted that collimation is a cost-effective dose-reducing tool for X-ray examinations. This phantom-based study investigated the impact of X-ray beam collimation on radiation dose to the lenses of the eyes and thyroid along with the effect on image quality in facial bone radiography. Methods A three-view series (occipitomental, occipitomental 30 and lateral) was investigated, and radiation doses to the lenses and thyroid were measured using an Unfors dosemeter. Images were assessed by six experienced observers using a visual grading analysis and a total of 5400 observations were made. Results Strict collimation significantly (p<0.0001) reduced the radiation dose to the lenses of the eyes and thyroid when using a fixed projection-specific exposure. With a variable exposure technique (fixed exit dose, to simulate the behaviour of an automatic exposure control), while strict collimation was again shown to reduce thyroid dose, higher lens doses were demonstrated when compared with larger fields of exposure. Image quality was found to significantly improve using strict collimation, with observer preference being demonstrated using visual grading characteristic curves. Conclusion The complexities of optimising radiographic techniques have been shown and the data presented emphasise the importance of examining dose-reducing strategies in a comprehensive way. PMID:22374279

  6. Electron-Cloud Effects on Heavy-Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, T; Friedman, A; Cohen, R; Vay, J

    2004-03-29

    Stray electrons can be introduced in positive-charge accelerators for heavy ion fusion (or other applications) as a result of ionization of ambient gas or gas released from walls due to halo-ion impact, or as a result of secondary-electron emission. We are developing a capability for self-consistent simulation of ion beams with the electron clouds they produce. We report on an ingredient in this capability, the effect of specified electron cloud distributions on the dynamics of a coasting ion beam. We consider here electron distributions with axially varying density, centroid location, or radial shape, and examine both random and sinusoidally varying perturbations. We find that amplitude variations are most effective in spoiling ion beam quality, though for sinusoidal variations which match the natural ion beam centroid oscillation or breathing mode frequencies, the centroid and shape perturbations can also be effective. We identify a possible instability associated with resonance with the beam-envelope ''breathing'' mode. One conclusion from this study is that heavy-ion beams are surprisingly robust to electron clouds, compared to a priori expectations.

  7. Effect of Backscattered Electrons on Electron Beam Focus

    SciTech Connect

    Falabella, S; Chen, Y-J; Houck, T; McCarrick, J; Sampayan, S; Weir, J

    2000-08-10

    Using an induction linac, ETA-II, we are studying the interaction of a 2 kA, 6 MeV electron beam focused to a <2 mm diameter spot on high-Z foils. A focus shift was noticed when changing from 5 mil to 40 mil tantalum foil targets. This shift was subsequently attributed to the effect of a substantial fraction of the incident electron beam backscattering from the target, reducing the net beam current. This fraction varies with the thickness and density of the target. The presence and magnitude of the backscattered component was confirmed using Faraday cup collectors and beam current monitors. Calculations confirm the magnitude of the focus shift is consistent with the observed backscattered fraction.

  8. Increasing Use of Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiation Therapy for Men With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Mitra, Nandita; Woo, Kaitlin; Smaldone, Marc; Uzzo, Robert; Bekelman, Justin E.

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To examine recent practice patterns, using a large national cancer registry, to understand the extent to which dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) has been incorporated into routine clinical practice for men with prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective observational cohort study using the National Cancer Data Base, a nationwide oncology outcomes database in the United States. We identified 98,755 men diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer between 2006 and 2011 who received definitive EBRT and classified patients into National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk groups. We defined dose-escalated EBRT as total prescribed dose of ≥75.6 Gy. Using multivariable logistic regression, we examined the association of patient, clinical, and demographic characteristics with the use of dose-escalated EBRT. Results: Overall, 81.6% of men received dose-escalated EBRT during the study period. The use of dose-escalated EBRT did not vary substantially by NCCN risk group. Use of dose-escalated EBRT increased from 70.7% of patients receiving treatment in 2006 to 89.8% of patients receiving treatment in 2011. On multivariable analysis, year of diagnosis and use of intensity modulated radiation therapy were significantly associated with receipt of dose-escalated EBRT. Conclusions: Our study results indicate that dose-escalated EBRT has been widely adopted by radiation oncologists treating prostate cancer in the United States. The proportion of patients receiving dose-escalated EBRT increased nearly 20% between 2006 and 2011. We observed high utilization rates of dose-escalated EBRT within all disease risk groups. Adoption of intensity modulated radiation therapy was strongly associated with use of dose-escalated treatment.

  9. Synergetic effects of dual-beam implantation on the microstructural development in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuna, F.; Borodin, V. A.; Ruault, M.-O.; Oliviero, E.; Kirk, M. A.

    2011-10-01

    We report a synergy effect on the microstructural development of silicon specimens as a result of dual-beam high temperature irradiation/implantation. In situ transmission electron microscopy experiments using two different experimental setups have been used, where the primary 50 keV Co+ ion implantation beam was supplemented with either a 300 keV electron beam or a 500 keV Si+ ion beam. In both cases, the secondary beam intensity was such that both beams created comparable overall primary damage. Completely different microstructural response has been found in these two cases. An intensive electron irradiation was found to sharply accelerate the evolution of dislocation structure, only weakly affecting the disilicide kinetics. On the contrary, the Si ion beam weakly affected the kinetics of either dislocation loops or coherent CoSi2 precipitates, but drastically increased the number density of thermodynamically unstable semicoherent precipitates. Possible microstructural reasons for the observed effects and the implications for both dislocation loop and cobalt disilicide nucleation mechanisms in high-temperature implanted TEM samples are discussed and supported by detailed molecular dynamics calculations of annealing of cascade remnants produced by the energetic silicon recoils.

  10. Interactive effects of pests increase seed yield.

    PubMed

    Gagic, Vesna; Riggi, Laura Ga; Ekbom, Barbara; Malsher, Gerard; Rusch, Adrien; Bommarco, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    Loss in seed yield and therefore decrease in plant fitness due to simultaneous attacks by multiple herbivores is not necessarily additive, as demonstrated in evolutionary studies on wild plants. However, it is not clear how this transfers to crop plants that grow in very different conditions compared to wild plants. Nevertheless, loss in crop seed yield caused by any single pest is most often studied in isolation although crop plants are attacked by many pests that can cause substantial yield losses. This is especially important for crops able to compensate and even overcompensate for the damage. We investigated the interactive impacts on crop yield of four insect pests attacking different plant parts at different times during the cropping season. In 15 oilseed rape fields in Sweden, we estimated the damage caused by seed and stem weevils, pollen beetles, and pod midges. Pest pressure varied drastically among fields with very low correlation among pests, allowing us to explore interactive impacts on yield from attacks by multiple species. The plant damage caused by each pest species individually had, as expected, either no, or a negative impact on seed yield and the strongest negative effect was caused by pollen beetles. However, seed yield increased when plant damage caused by both seed and stem weevils was high, presumably due to the joint plant compensatory reaction to insect attack leading to overcompensation. Hence, attacks by several pests can change the impact on yield of individual pest species. Economic thresholds based on single species, on which pest management decisions currently rely, may therefore result in economically suboptimal choices being made and unnecessary excessive use of insecticides. PMID:27099712

  11. Exergames: Increasing Physical Activity through Effective Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudella, Jennifer L.; Butz, Jennifer V.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the growing obesity epidemic in the United States, educators must consider new ways to increase physical activity in an effort to address obesity. There are a variety of ways educators can increase physical activity in the classroom, and exergames--video games that require physical movement in order to play--are a modern-day approach to…

  12. Injected-charge-driven increase in electro-optic effect of KTN crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoda, Seiji; Imai, Tadayuki; Miyazu, Jun; Okabe, Yuichi; Ueno, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Junya

    2014-05-15

    We report a significant increase in the electro-optic (EO) effect of KTa{sub x}Nb{sub 1-x}O{sub 3} (KTN) crystals that we achieved by injecting carriers into them. The dielectric constant of KTN was increased approximately twofold by carrier injection. The EO beam scanning performance was effectively improved by the increase in the EO effect resulting from the increased dielectric constant. The estimated densities of the trapped electrons were as small as 5.8 × 10{sup 20}m{sup -3}. The very small quantity of injected electrons greatly affected the dielectric constant and EO effect of the KTN crystals.

  13. Irradiation Effects on RIA Fragmentation CU Beam Dump

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Boles, J L; Ahle, L E; Stein, W; Wirth, B D

    2005-05-09

    Within the scope of conceptual research and development (R&D) activities in support of the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility, high priority is given to the development of high-power fragmentation beam dumps. A pre-study was made of a static water-cooled Cu beam dump that can meet requirements for a 400 MeV/u uranium beam. The issue of beam sputtering was addressed and found to be insignificant. Preliminary radiation transport simulations show significant damage (in displacements per atom, DPA) in the vicinity of the Bragg peak of the uranium ions. Experimental data show that defects in Cu following neutron or high-energy particle irradiation tend to saturate at doses between 1 and 5 DPA, and this saturation in defect density also results in saturation of mechanical property degradation. However, effects of swift heavy ion irradiation and the production of gaseous and solid transmutant elements still need to be addressed. Initial calculations indicate that He concentrations on the order of 400 appm are produced in the beam dump after several weeks of continuous operation and He embrittlement may be a concern. Recommendations are made for further investigation of Cu irradiation effects for RIA-relevant conditions.

  14. Irradiation Effects on RIA Fragmentation CU Beam Dump

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Boles, J L; Ahle, L E; Stein, W; Wirth, B D

    2005-05-20

    Within the scope of conceptual research and development (R&D) activities in support of the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility, high priority is given to the development of high-power fragmentation beam dumps. A pre-study was made of a static water-cooled Cu beam dump that can meet requirements for a 400 MeV/u uranium beam. The issue of beam sputtering was addressed and found to be insignificant. Preliminary radiation transport simulations show significant damage (in displacements per atom, DPA) in the vicinity of the Bragg peak of the uranium ions. Experimental data show that defects in Cu following neutron or high-energy particle irradiation tend to saturate at doses between 1 and 5 DPA, and this saturation in defect density also results in saturation of mechanical property degradation. However, effects of swift heavy ion irradiation and the production of gaseous and solid transmutant elements still need to be addressed. Initial calculations indicate that He concentrations on the order of 400 appm are produced in the beam dump after several weeks of continuous operation and He embrittlement may be a concern. Recommendations are made for further investigation of Cu irradiation effects for RIA-relevant conditions.

  15. Calculation of effective doses for broad parallel photon beams.

    PubMed

    Kim, C H; Reece, W D; Poston, J W

    1999-02-01

    Values of effective dose (E) were calculated for the entire range of incident directions of broad parallel photon beams for selected photon energies using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code with a hermaphroditic phantom. The calculated results are presented in terms of conversion coefficients transforming air kerma to effective dose. This study also compared the numerical values of E and H(E) over the entire range of incident beam directions. E was always less than H(E) considering all beam directions and photon energies, but the differences were not significant except when a photon beam approaches some specific directions (overhead and underfoot). This result suggests that the current H(E) values can be directly interpreted as E or, at least, as a conservative value of E without knowing the details of irradiation geometries. Finally, based on the distributions of H(E) and E over the beam directions, this study proposes ideal angular response factors for personal dosimeters that can be used to improve the angular response properties of personal dosimeters for off-normal incident photons. PMID:9929126

  16. Effective parameters in beam acoustic metamaterials based on energy band structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Li; Wu, Jiu Hui; Guan, Dong; Hou, Mingming; Kuan, Lu; Shen, Li

    2016-07-01

    We present a method to calculate the effective material parameters of beam acoustic metamaterials. The effective material parameters of a periodic beam are calculated as an example. The dispersion relations and energy band structures of this beam are calculated. Subsequently, the effective material parameters of the beam are investigated by using the energy band structures. Then, the modal analysis and transmission properties of the beams with finite cells are simulated in order to confirm the correctness of effective approximation. The results show that the periodic beam can be equivalent to the homogeneous beam with dynamic effective material parameters in passband.

  17. Investigation of Beam Loading Effects for the Neutrino Factory Muon Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    J. Pozimski,M. Aslaninejad,C. Bontoiu,S. Berg,Alex Bogacz

    2010-05-01

    The International design study (IDS) study showed that a Neutrino Factory [1] seems to be the most promising candidate for the next phase of high precision neutrino oscillation experiments. One part of the increased precision is due to the fact that in a Neutrino Factory the decay of muons produces a neutrino beam with narrow energy distribution and divergence. The effect of beam loading on the energy distribution of the muon beam in the Neutrino Factory decay rings has been investigated numerically. The simulations have been performed using the baseline accelerator design including cavities for different number of bunch trains and bunch train timing. A detailed analysis of the beam energy distribution expected is given together with a discussion of the energy spread produced by the gutter acceleration in the FFAG and the implications for the neutrino oscillation experiments will be presented.

  18. Simulation Of Electron Cloud Effects On Electron Beam At ERL With Pipelined QuickPIC

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, B.; Muggli, P.; Huang, C.; Decyk, V.; Mori, W. B.; Hoffstaetter, G. H.; Katsouleas, T.

    2009-01-22

    With the successful implementation of pipelining algorithm to the QuickPIC code, the number of processors used is increased by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude, and the speed of the simulation is improved by a similar factor. The pipelined QuickPIC is used to simulate the electron cloud effect on electron beam in the Cornell Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) due to extremely small emittance and high peak currents anticipated in the machine. A tune shift is found due to electron cloud on electron beams, which is of equal magnitude to that on positron beams but in an opposite direction; however, emittance growth of the electron beam in an electron cloud is not observed for ERL parameters.

  19. Effect of Beam-Beam Interactions on Stability of Coherent Oscillations in a Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; Ohmi, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2012-05-01

    In order to achieve peak luminosity of a muon collider in the 10{sup 34}/cm{sup 2}/s range the number of muons per bunch should be of the order of a few units of 10{sup 12} rendering the beam-beam parameter as high as 0.1 per IP. Such strong beam-beam interaction can be a source of instability if the working point is chosen close to a coherent beam-beam resonance. On the other hand, the beam-beam tunespread can provide a mechanism of suppression of the beam-wall driven instabilities. In this report the coherent instabilities driven by beam-beam and beam-wall interactions are studied with the help of BBSS code for the case of 1.5 TeV c.o.m muon collider.

  20. Effect of electron beam irradiation on the viscosity of carboxymethylcellulose solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jong-il; Lee, Hee-Sub; Kim, Jae-Hun; Lee, Kwang-Won; Chung, Young-Jin; Byun, Myung-Woo; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2008-12-01

    In this study, the effects of an electron beam irradiation on the viscosity of a carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) solution were investigated. The viscosity of the CMC solution was decreased with an increase in the irradiation dose. Interestingly, the extent of the degradation of the CMC was found to decrease with an increase of the CMC concentration in the solution. The change of the average molar mass confirmed the decrease in the viscosity due to the degradation of the polymer. The energy of the electron beam also affected the degradation of the CMC. Lower degradation of the CMC was obtained with a decreasing electron beam energy due to its lower penetration. Addition of vitamin C as a radical scavenger to the solution and an irradiation at -70 °C were shown to be moderately effective in preventing a decrease in the viscosity of the solution by irradiation.

  1. Surface-active element effects on the shape of GTA, laser, and electron-beam welds

    SciTech Connect

    Heiple, C.R.; Roper, J.R.; Stagner, R.T.; Aden, R.J.

    1983-03-01

    Laser and electron-beam welds were passed across selenium-doped zones in 21-6-9 stainless steel. The depth/width (d/w) ratio of a defocused laser weld with a weld pool shape similar to a GTA weld increased by over 200% in a zone where 66 ppm selenium had been added. Smaller increases were observed in selenium-doped zones for a moderately defocused electron beam weld with a higher d/w ratio in undoped base metal. When laser or electron beam weld penetration was by a keyhole mechanism, no change in d/w ratio occurred in selenium-doped zones. The results confirm the surface-tension-driven fluid-flow model for the effect of minor elements on GTA weld pool shape. Other experimental evidence bearing on the effect of minor elements on GTA weld penetration is summarized.

  2. Thermal effects in high power cavities for photoneutralization of D{sup −} beams in future neutral beam injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorucci, Donatella; Feng, Jiatai; Pichot, Mikhaël; Chaibi, Walid

    2015-04-08

    Photoneutralization may represent a key issue in the neutral beam injectors for future fusion reactors. In fact, photodetachment based neutralization combined with an energy recovery system increase the injector overall efficiency up to 60%. This is the SIPHORE injector concept in which photoneutralization is realized in a refolded cavity [1]. However, about 1 W of the several megaWatts intracavity power is absorbed by the mirrors coatings and gives rise to important thermoelastic distortions. This is expected to change the optical behavior of the mirrors and reduce the enhancement factor of the cavity. In this paper, we estimate these effects and we propose a thermal system to compensate it.

  3. Acceleration of positrons by a relativistic electron beam in the presence of quantum effects

    SciTech Connect

    Niknam, A. R.; Aki, H.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M.

    2013-09-15

    Using the quantum magnetohydrodynamic model and obtaining the dispersion relation of the Cherenkov and cyclotron waves, the acceleration of positrons by a relativistic electron beam is investigated. The Cherenkov and cyclotron acceleration mechanisms of positrons are compared together. It is shown that growth rate and, therefore, the acceleration of positrons can be increased in the presence of quantum effects.

  4. Effective shielding to measure beam current from an ion source.

    PubMed

    Bayle, H; Delferrière, O; Gobin, R; Harrault, F; Marroncle, J; Senée, F; Simon, C; Tuske, O

    2014-02-01

    To avoid saturation, beam current transformers must be shielded from solenoid, quad, and RFQ high stray fields. Good understanding of field distribution, shielding materials, and techniques is required. Space availability imposes compact shields along the beam pipe. This paper describes compact effective concatenated magnetic shields for IFMIF-EVEDA LIPAc LEBT and MEBT and for FAIR Proton Linac injector. They protect the ACCT Current Transformers beyond 37 mT radial external fields. Measurements made at Saclay on the SILHI source are presented. PMID:24593447

  5. Increasing Student Success at Minority-Serving Institutions: Findings from the BEAMS Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Rios, Melissa; Leegwater, Lacey

    2008-01-01

    This monograph details the process Building Engagement and Attainment for Minority Students (BEAMS) institutions used to craft data-driven action plans to improve student success. More than 100 four-year Historically Black, Hispanic-Serving, and Tribal colleges and universities participated in the five-year program that produced best practices…

  6. Increasing Sense of Effectiveness through Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Robert A.

    1969-01-01

    Essay which discusses the effects of media and the changes in people media may produce and which emphasizes that media should always be "the servant of change and the servant of our humanness rather than vice versa. (Author/LS)

  7. Experimental and numerical study of gas dynamic window for electron beam transport into the space with increased pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skovorodko, P. A.; Sharafutdinov, R. G.

    2014-12-01

    The paper is devoted to experimental and numerical study of the gas jet technical device for obtaining axisymmetric flow with low pressure in its near axis region. The studied geometry of the device is typical of that used in the plasma generator consisting of an electron gun with a hollow (plasma) cathode and a double supersonic ring nozzle. The geometry of the nozzles as well as the relation between the gas flow rates through the nozzles providing the electron beam extraction into the region with increased pressure are tested both experimentally and numerically. The maximum external pressure of about 0.25 bar that does not disturb the electron beam is achieved.

  8. Experimental and numerical study of gas dynamic window for electron beam transport into the space with increased pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Skovorodko, P. A.; Sharafutdinov, R. G.

    2014-12-09

    The paper is devoted to experimental and numerical study of the gas jet technical device for obtaining axisymmetric flow with low pressure in its near axis region. The studied geometry of the device is typical of that used in the plasma generator consisting of an electron gun with a hollow (plasma) cathode and a double supersonic ring nozzle. The geometry of the nozzles as well as the relation between the gas flow rates through the nozzles providing the electron beam extraction into the region with increased pressure are tested both experimentally and numerically. The maximum external pressure of about 0.25 bar that does not disturb the electron beam is achieved.

  9. TU-A-BRE-01: The Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton Beams Relative to Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Paganetti, H; Stewart, R; Carabe-Fernandez, A

    2014-06-15

    Proton therapy patients receive a 10% lower physical dose than the dose administered using photons, i.e. the proton relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is 1.1 in comparison to high-energy photons. The use of a generic, spatially invariant RBE within tumor targets and normal tissue structures disregards a large body of evidence indicating that proton RBE tends to increase with increasing linear energy transfer (LET). Because the doseaveraged proton LET in the distal edge of a spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) is larger than the LET in the plateau region or proximal edge of a SOBP, the use of a spatially invariant RBE is not well justified from a mechanistic point of view. On the other hand, the available clinical data on local tumor control rates and early or late side effects do not provide strong evidence against the continued use of a constant and spatially invariant clinical RBE. The only potential downside to the ongoing use of a constant RBE of 1.1 seems to be that we are missing a potential opportunity to enhance the therapeutic ratio, i.e., design proton therapy treatments in ways that exploit, rather than mitigate, spatial variations in proton RBE. Speakers in this symposium will: 1-review the laboratory and clinical evidence for and against the continued use of a spatially invariant RBE of 1.1, 2-examine some of the putative mechanisms connecting spatial variations in particle LET to estimates of the proton RBE at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels 3-assess the possible clinical significance of incorporating models for spatial variations in proton RBE into treatment planning systems. 4-discuss treatment planning and delivery techniques that will exploit the spatial variations of RBE within proton beams. Learning Objectives: To review laboratory and clinical evidence for and against the continued use of a constant RBE of 1.1 To understand major mechanisms connecting proton LET to RBE at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels. To quantify the

  10. Review of Surface Roughness Effect on Beam Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Alesini, D.

    2003-12-01

    In recent years a strong attention arose around the problem of the e.m. interaction of an ultra-relativistic beam with the residual roughness inside a beam tube, in particular in the framework of future 4th generation coherent light sources. The main concern was the effect of the wake-fields on the relative energy spread of the beam which has to be of the order of 10-4, as for example in the LCLS and TESLA case. Although the real roughness has a stochastic feature, most studies dealt with periodic structure, or dielectric-equivalent layer which are considered to be conservative with respect the stochastic case. In this paper we will review the main theoretical models, and the most significant measurements trying to provide to the reader a complete picture of the present status of understanding.

  11. Beam Effects During AES and XPS Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Donald R.; Gaspar, Dan J.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Lea, Alan S.

    2003-09-15

    It is important to realize that any surface analysis method may alter the specimen in some way. Alterations that complicate the ability to collect the desired information are usually considered damage. Damage (like beauty) is in the eye of the beholder. In some cases, analysis-induced changes to a sample will have little or no impact on the information sought. In other cases, similar changes will be totally unacceptable and considered information-destroying damage. The analyst must therefore be able to recognize damage in all its various forms, understand its origins, and be able to compensate for, or limit, its effects on the analysis.

  12. Protective effects of shikonin on brain injury induced by carbon ion beam irradiation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lu; Wang, Zhen Hua; Zhang, Hong; Zhou, Rong; Sun, Chao; Liu, Yang; Si, Jing; Liu, Yuan Yuan; Wang, Zhen Guo

    2015-02-01

    Radiation encephalopathy is the main complication of cranial radiotherapy. It can cause necrosis of brain tissue and cognitive dysfunction. Our previous work had proved that a natural antioxidant shikonin possessed protective effect on cerebral ischemic injury. Here we investigated the effects of shikonin on carbon ion beam induced radiation brain injury in mice. Pretreatment with shikonin significantly increased the SOD and CAT activities and the ratio of GSH/GSSG in mouse brain tissues compared with irradiated group (P<0.01), while obviously reduced the MDA and PCO contents and the ROS levels derived from of the brain mitochondria. The shikonin also noticeably improved the spatial memory deficits caused by carbon ion beam irradiation. All results demonstrated that shikonin could improve the irradiated brain injury which might resulted from its modulation effects on the oxidative stress induced by the 12C6+ ion beam. PMID:25716567

  13. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Sekine, Megumi; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface. PMID:24593624

  14. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Sekine, Megumi; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.

  15. Increasing Instructional Effectiveness: Reducing Classroom Apprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishii, Satoshi; Klopf, Donald

    Research shows that a very large percentage of Japanese university students are apprehensive about communicating orally, to the degree that their fear may be debilitating, weakening their effectiveness as oral interactants in social and classroom situations. This uneasiness with speech has been culturally ingrained for centuries. Children are…

  16. Effect of plasma rotation on sawtooth stabilization by beam ions

    SciTech Connect

    N. N. Gorelenkov; M. F. F. Nave; R. Budny; C. Z. Cheng; G. Y. Fu; J. Hastie; J. Manickam; W. Park

    2000-06-23

    The sawtooth period in JET ELM-free H-Mode plasmas is increasing with Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) power. For injected power PNBI 12MW no large sawtooth crash is observed during the ELM-free period. However, as the edge stability is improved and external kink modes and ELMs are delayed, a possible sawtooth crash at a high plasma beta becomes a concern. In JET DT experiments, delaying sawteeth was found to be crucial in the quest for high fusion power. Fast particles are known to provide stabilizing effect on sawteeth, however, sawtooth stabilization by NBI ions is not clearly understood, since NBI ions are usually not ''fast'' enough to stabilize the m/n = 1/1 internal kink mode which is believed to cause the crash. In order to understand the observed sawteeth stabilization in tokamak experiments with NBI heating, the internal kink m/n = 1/1 mode stability of JET plasmas was modeled using the NOVA-K code, which is also benchmarked with the nonperturbative version of NOVA and the M3D code. Comparison of m/n = 1/1 mode stabilization by NBI ions in JET and TFTR and application of the nonlinear stabilization criteria is given.

  17. Beam loss and radiation effects in the SSC lattice elements

    SciTech Connect

    Baishev, I.S.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Mokhov, N.V. |

    1990-11-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is designed to be an advanced machine with relatively low beam loss-induced radiation levels. However, a fraction of the beam lost in the lattice due to pp-collisions at the interaction points, beam-gas scattering, bearn-halo scraping, various instabilities and errors will result in the irradiation of conventional and superconducting components of the accelerator and experimental apparatus. The level of the beam loss and its distribution along the machine structure has impact on all of the three crucial radiation effects at the SSC: quenching of the superconducting magnets, survivability of the accelerator and detectors components in the near-beam regions, and influence to the environment. This paper, based on the full-scale Monte Carlo simulation, will explore all major sources of beam loss in the Collider and measures to reduce the irradiation of the accelerator components. Basic parameters of the Super Collider accepted throughout this report are as follows: Proton energy E{sub 0} = 20 TeV, injection energy is 2 TeV, number of protons circulating in each of the collider rings is N = 1.3 {times} 10{sup 14}, circumference is 87.12 km, the transverse normalized emittance {var_epsilon}{sub N}({sigma}) = 1 {pi} mm-mrad, for the regular lattice ({beta} = 305 m) the beam R.M.S. sizes are {sigma} = 0.12 mm at 20 TEV and {sigma} = 0.38 mm at the injection energy. The dipole length is 15.815 m with the effective field length of 15.165 m. The magnetic field map for B{sub 0} = 6.5999 T has been calculated with the POISSON program by Greg Snitchler. The turn angle of each dipole is {alpha} = 1.50027 mrad. The dipole aperture is 50 mm. The two beam pipe diameters are studied 33 and 40 mm. The operating temperature is T{sub 0} = 4.35 K.

  18. Modeling of astigmatic-elliptical beam shaping during fs-laser waveguide writing including beam truncation and diffraction effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz De la Cruz, A.; Ferrer, A.; del Hoyo, J.; Siegel, J.; Solis, J.

    2011-08-01

    In this work, we report a model for accurately calculating the focal volumes corresponding to astigmatic elliptical beams used in fs-laser waveguide writing. The model is based on the use of the ABCD matrix formalism for the propagation of a Gaussian beam. The code includes the effects of propagation on the astigmatic elliptical beam, and the effects of beam truncation and diffraction at the entrance pupil of the focusing objective due to beam clipping when overfilling the pupil. The results predict that for a given astigmatism value and propagation distance it is possible to efficiently suppress the astigmatic focus closer to the surface. This explains previous experimental results where single structure waveguides with controllable aspect-ratio were fabricated using astigmatic-elliptical beams. Furthermore, we investigate the respective roles of astigmatism and beam propagation, as well as the strong impact of truncation and diffraction effects caused by clipping the beam at the pupil of the focusing optics. Finally, based on the results from our model, we present some practical considerations in terms of beam propagation and phase wrapping constraints.

  19. Cost-Effectiveness of Proton Beam Therapy for Intraocular Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Moriarty, James P.; Borah, Bijan J.; Foote, Robert L.; Pulido, Jose S.; Shah, Nilay D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Proton beam therapy is a commonly accepted treatment for intraocular melanomas, but the literature is lacking in descriptions of patient preferences of clinical outcomes and economic impact. In addition, no economic evaluations have been published regarding the incremental cost-effectiveness of proton beam therapy compared with enucleation or plaque brachytherapy, typical alternative treatments. We, therefore, conducted a cost-utility analysis of these three approaches for the treatment of intraocular melanomas. Materials and Methods A Markov model was constructed. Model parameters were identified from the published literature and publicly available data sources. Cost-effectiveness of each treatment was calculated in 2011 US Dollars per quality-adjusted life-year. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated assuming enucleation as reference. One-way sensitivity analyses were conducted on all model parameters. A decision threshold of $50,000/quality-adjusted life-year was used to determine cost-effectiveness. Results Enucleation had the lowest costs and quality-adjusted life-years, and plaque brachytherapy had the highest costs and quality-adjusted life-years. Compared with enucleation, the base-case incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for plaque brachytherapy and proton beam therapy were $77,500/quality-adjusted life-year and $106,100/quality-adjusted life-year, respectively. Results were highly sensitive to multiple parameters. All three treatments were considered optimal, and even dominant, depending on the values used for sensitive parameters. Conclusion Base-case analysis results suggest enucleation to be optimal. However, the optimal choice was not robust to sensitivity analyses and, depending on the assumption, both plaque brachytherapy and proton beam therapy could be considered cost-effective. Future clinical studies should focus on generating further evidence with the greatest parameter uncertainty to inform future cost-effectiveness

  20. Focused Ion Beam Induced Effects on MOS Transistor Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Abramo, Marsha T.; Antoniou, Nicholas; Campbell, Ann N.; Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Hembree, Charles E.; Jessing, Jeffrey R.; Soden, Jerry M.; Swanson, Scot E.; Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Vanderlinde, William E.

    1999-07-28

    We report on recent studies of the effects of 50 keV focused ion beam (FIB) exposure on MOS transistors. We demonstrate that the changes in value of transistor parameters (such as threshold voltage, V{sub t}) are essentially the same for exposure to a Ga+ ion beam at 30 and 50 keV under the same exposure conditions. We characterize the effects of FIB exposure on test transistors fabricated in both 0.5 {micro}m and 0.225 {micro}m technologies from two different vendors. We report on the effectiveness of overlying metal layers in screening MOS transistors from FIB-induced damage and examine the importance of ion dose rate and the physical dimensions of the exposed area.

  1. Effects of high source flow and high pumping speed on gas source molecular beam epitaxy / chemical beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollum, M. J.; Jackson, S. L.; Szafranek, I.; Stillman, G. E.

    1990-10-01

    We report the growth of GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), gas source molecular beam epitaxy (GSMBE), and chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) in an epitaxial III-V reactor which features high pumping speed. The system is comprised of a modified Perkin-Elmer 430P molecular beam epitaxy system and a custom gas source panel from Emcore. The growth chamber is pumped with a 7000 1/s (He) diffusion pump (Varian VHS-10 with Monsanto Santovac 5 oil). The gas source panel includes pressure based flow controllers (MKS 1150) allowing triethylaluminum (TEA), triethylgallium (TEG), and trimethylindium (TMI) to be supplied without the use of hydrogen. All source lines, including arsine and phosphine, are maintained below atmospheric pressure. The high pumping speed allows total system flow rates as high as 100 SCCM and V/III ratios as high as 100. The purity of GaAs grown by MBE in this system increases with pumping speed. GaAs layers grown by GSMBE with arsine flows of 10 and 20 SCCM have electron concentrations of 1 × 10 15 cm -3 (μ 77=48,000 cm 2/V·) and 2 × 10 14 cm -3 (μ 77=78,000 cm 2/V·s) respectively. El ectron concentration varies with hydride injector temperature such that the minimum in electron concentration occurs for less than complete cracking. The effect of V/III ratio and the use of a metal eutectic bubbler on residual carrier concentration in GaAs grown by CBE is presented. Intentional Si and Be doping of CBE grown GaAs is demonstrated at a high growth rate of 5.4 μm/h.

  2. Mass spectrometer with electron source for reducing space charge effects in sample beam

    DOEpatents

    Houk, Robert S.; Praphairaksit, Narong

    2003-10-14

    A mass spectrometer includes an ion source which generates a beam including positive ions, a sampling interface which extracts a portion of the beam from the ion source to form a sample beam that travels along a path and has an excess of positive ions over at least part of the path, thereby causing space charge effects to occur in the sample beam due to the excess of positive ions in the sample beam, an electron source which adds electrons to the sample beam to reduce space charge repulsion between the positive ions in the sample beam, thereby reducing the space charge effects in the sample beam and producing a sample beam having reduced space charge effects, and a mass analyzer which analyzes the sample beam having reduced space charge effects.

  3. Effect of electron beam parameters on simulated CBED patterns from edge-on grain boundaries.

    PubMed

    Bokel, R M; Tichelaar, F D; Schapink, F W

    2000-01-01

    Convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) at vertical grain boundaries (parallel to the electron beam) can be applied to determine the symmetry of bicrystals. It can also be used to investigate the structure of the boundary region itself when subnanometre probe sizes are employed. In this paper it is shown that (sub)nanometre-probe CBED patterns are largely influenced by the electron-beam geometry. In particular, simulations of coherent CBED patterns based on the multislice algorithm show that the CBED pattern of an edge-on interface depends on the defocus distance between the probe position and the specimen midplane, the probe size and the beam-convergence angle. The pattern symmetry may be lower than the theoretically predicted symmetry in case of large spherical aberration. This effect increases with smaller accelerating voltages. An increase in the beam-convergence angle also increases the possibility of a non-optimum symmetry due to spherical aberration of a coherent probe. Thus, for the determination of an interface structure using subnanometre (coherent) probes, the imaging conditions play an important role. PMID:10620148

  4. Effect of particle size distribution and chlorophyll content on beam attenuation spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitchen, J. C.; Zaneveld, J. R. V.; Pak, H.

    1982-01-01

    The relationships between beam attenuation spectra, chlorophyll and pheophytin pigment concentrations, and particle size distributions are examined for a coastal region believed to have negligible concentrations of terrestrially derived dissolved organic compounds but large quantities of phytoplankton and resuspended sediments. It was found that the slope of the beam attenuation spectra increases when the hyperbolic slope of the size distribution increases. The magnitude of this increase in slope was consistent with calculations based on a range of particle diameters from 0.5 to 30 microns so that it would be possible to predict the slope of the particle size distribution if the slope of the beam attenuation spectra is known. The ratio of chlorophyll and pheophytin pigments to suspended volume concentrations affected the beam attenuation spectra to a lesser degree and in a more complex manner. Because of the strong effect of slope, it was concluded that the chlorophyll and pheophytin pigment content of suspended particles could not be efficiently predicted by means of beam attenuation measurements.

  5. Radiobiological effects of altering dose rate in filter-free photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karan, T.; Moiseenko, V.; Gill, B.; Horwood, R.; Kyle, A.; Minchinton, A. I.

    2013-02-01

    To validate that altering radiotherapy dose rate through either changing pulse repetition frequency or instantaneous dose rate does not have an effect on cell survival, two human carcinoma and a hamster lung cell line were irradiated with various beam settings. Varian TrueBeam linac with a flattening filter free mode of operation was used for all experiments. The results obtained indicate that either method of changing dose rate has no effect on cell survival in the three cell lines studied. Filtered and filter free modes were also compared in treatments with protracted dose delivery which significantly increases overall treatment time. Cell survival indicated no difference between filter and filter free beam delivery in any of the protraction schemes. An increase in survival was seen in both modes upon protracting dose delivery to 15, 30 or 60 min rather than delivering acutely. Further, analysis of induced DNA double-strand breaks via the γH2AX assay showed no difference between filtered and unfiltered beams. The following study suggests that increasing dose rate is an acceptable manner of decreasing radiotherapy treatment time that does not have any detrimental effects on in vitro cell eradication.

  6. Radiobiological effects of altering dose rate in filter-free photon beams.

    PubMed

    Karan, T; Moiseenko, V; Gill, B; Horwood, R; Kyle, A; Minchinton, A I

    2013-02-21

    To validate that altering radiotherapy dose rate through either changing pulse repetition frequency or instantaneous dose rate does not have an effect on cell survival, two human carcinoma and a hamster lung cell line were irradiated with various beam settings. Varian TrueBeam linac with a flattening filter free mode of operation was used for all experiments. The results obtained indicate that either method of changing dose rate has no effect on cell survival in the three cell lines studied. Filtered and filter free modes were also compared in treatments with protracted dose delivery which significantly increases overall treatment time. Cell survival indicated no difference between filter and filter free beam delivery in any of the protraction schemes. An increase in survival was seen in both modes upon protracting dose delivery to 15, 30 or 60 min rather than delivering acutely. Further, analysis of induced DNA double-strand breaks via the γH2AX assay showed no difference between filtered and unfiltered beams. The following study suggests that increasing dose rate is an acceptable manner of decreasing radiotherapy treatment time that does not have any detrimental effects on in vitro cell eradication. PMID:23363688

  7. An integrating matrix formulation for buckling of rotating beams including the effects of concentrated masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakin, William D.; Kvaternik, Raymond G.

    1989-01-01

    The integrating matrix technique of computational mechanics is extended to include the effects of concentrated masses. The stability of a flexible rotating beam with discrete masses is analyzed to determine the critical rotational speeds for buckling in the inplane and out-of-plane directions. In this problem, the beam is subjected to compressive centrifugal forces arising from steady rotation about an axis which does not pass through the clamped end of the beam. To determine the eigenvalues from which stability is assessed, the differential equations of motion are solved numerically by combining the extended integrating matrix method with an eigenanalysis. Stability boundaries for a discrete mass representation of a uniform beam are shown to asymptotically approach the stability boundaries for the corresponding continuous mass beam as the number of concentrated masses is increased. An error in the literature is also noted for the discrete mass problem concerning the behavior of the critical rotational speed for inplane buckling as the radius of rotation of the clamped end of the beam is reduced.

  8. Effect of cumulated dose on hydrogen emission from polyethylene irradiated under oxidative atmosphere using gamma rays and ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, M.; Pellizzi, E.; Boughattas, I.; Fromentin, E.; Dauvois, V.; de Combarieu, G.; Coignet, P.; Cochin, F.; Ngono-Ravache, Y.; Balanzat, E.; Esnouf, S.

    2016-01-01

    This work reports the effect of very high doses, up to 10 MGy, on the H2 emission from high density polyethylene (HDPE) irradiated with gamma rays and ion beams, in the presence of oxygen. This was obtained through a two-step procedure. First, HDPE films were pre-aged, at different doses, using either gamma rays or ion beams. In the second step, the pre-aged samples were irradiated in closed glass ampoules for gas quantification, using the same beam type as for pre-ageing. The hydrogen emission rate decreases when dose increases for both gamma rays and ion beams. However, the decreasing rate appears higher under gamma rays than under ion beam irradiations and this is assigned to a lesser oxidation level under the latter. Herein, we show the effectiveness of the radiation-induced defects scavenging effect under oxidative atmosphere, under low and high excitation densities.

  9. Effect of electron beam misalignments on the gyrotron efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Dumbrajs, O.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    2013-07-15

    The theory describing the operation of gyrotrons with tilted and shifted electron beams has been developed. Effects of the tilt and shift are studied for a 1 MW, 170 GHz gyrotron, which is presently under development in Europe for electron cyclotron resonance plasma heating and current drive in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. It is shown that one should expect significant deterioration of gyrotron operation in such gyrotrons when the tilt angle exceeds 0.4°–0.5° and the parallel shift of the beam axis with respect to the axis of a microwave circuit is larger than 0.4–0.5 mm. At the same time, simultaneous tilting and shifting in a proper manner can mitigate this deteriorating effect.

  10. Effects of non-Kolmogorov turbulence on the orbital angular momentum of Hankel-Bessel-Schell beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Mingjian; Zhang, Yixin; Zhu, Yun; Gao, Jie; Dan, Weiyi; Hu, Zhengda; Zhao, Fengsheng

    2015-04-01

    We model the effects of the turbulence on the spread and crosstalk of the spiral spectrum of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) states for Hankel-Bessel-Schell (HBS) beams in paraxial and weak non-Kolmogorov turbulence channel. Our results show that HBS beam is a better light source which has the ability to weaken turbulence spreading of the beams and can mitigate the effects of turbulence on the detection probability of the signal OAM state due to its nondiffraction property. The detection probability of the signal OAM state for HBS beams in the non-Kolmogorov turbulence decreases with the increase of propagation distance, the generalized refractive-index structure parameters, OAM quantum number and non-Kolmogorov turbulence-parameters and with the decrease of the source spatial coherence and the wavelength of the beams. The crosstalk probability is symmetrical and has an opposite trend of the detection probability of the signal OAM state for HBS beams, and the spatial incoherence of the source increases the crosstalk effect of atmospheric turbulence among the OAM states and the spread of the spiral spectrum. Our results also show that increasing the values of non-Kolmogorov parameter and quantum number l0, will increase the spread of the spiral spectrum of the OAM states for HBS beams.

  11. Effect of scanning beam size on the lateral resolution of mouse retinal imaging with SLO

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengfei; Goswami, Mayank; Zam, Azhar; Pugh, Edward N.; Zawadzki, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) employs the eye’s optics as a microscope objective for retinal imaging in vivo. The mouse retina has become an increasingly important object for investigation of ocular disease and physiology with optogenetic probes. SLO imaging of the mouse eye, in principle, can achieve submicron lateral resolution thanks to a numerical aperture (NA) of ~0.5, about 2.5 times larger than that of the human eye. In the absence of adaptive optics, however, natural ocular aberrations limit the available optical resolution. The use of a contact lens, in principle, can correct many aberrations, permitting the use of a wider scanning beam and, thus, achieving greater resolution then would otherwise be possible. In this Letter, using an SLO equipped with a rigid contact lens, we report the effect of scanning beam size on the lateral resolution of mouse retinal imaging. Theory predicts that the maximum beam size full width at half-maximum (FWHM) that can be used without any deteriorating effects of aberrations is ~0.6 mm. However, increasing the beam size up to the diameter of the dilated pupil is predicted to improve lateral resolution, though not to the diffraction limit. To test these predictions, the dendrites of a retinal ganglion cell expressing YFP were imaged, and transverse scans were analyzed to quantify the SLO system resolution. The results confirmed that lateral resolution increases with the beam size as predicted. With a 1.3 mm scanning beam and no high-order aberration correction, the lateral resolution is ~1.15 μm, superior to that achievable by most human AO-SLO systems. Advantages of this approach include stabilization of the mouse eye and simplified optical design. PMID:26670523

  12. Effect of scanning beam size on the lateral resolution of mouse retinal imaging with SLO.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengfei; Goswami, Mayank; Zam, Azhar; Pugh, Edward N; Zawadzki, Robert J

    2015-12-15

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) employs the eye's optics as a microscope objective for retinal imaging in vivo. The mouse retina has become an increasingly important object for investigation of ocular disease and physiology with optogenetic probes. SLO imaging of the mouse eye, in principle, can achieve submicron lateral resolution thanks to a numerical aperture (NA) of ∼0.5, about 2.5 times larger than that of the human eye. In the absence of adaptive optics, however, natural ocular aberrations limit the available optical resolution. The use of a contact lens, in principle, can correct many aberrations, permitting the use of a wider scanning beam and, thus, achieving greater resolution then would otherwise be possible. In this Letter, using an SLO equipped with a rigid contact lens, we report the effect of scanning beam size on the lateral resolution of mouse retinal imaging. Theory predicts that the maximum beam size full width at half-maximum (FWHM) that can be used without any deteriorating effects of aberrations is ∼0.6  mm. However, increasing the beam size up to the diameter of the dilated pupil is predicted to improve lateral resolution, though not to the diffraction limit. To test these predictions, the dendrites of a retinal ganglion cell expressing YFP were imaged, and transverse scans were analyzed to quantify the SLO system resolution. The results confirmed that lateral resolution increases with the beam size as predicted. With a 1.3 mm scanning beam and no high-order aberration correction, the lateral resolution is ∼1.15  μm, superior to that achievable by most human AO-SLO systems. Advantages of this approach include stabilization of the mouse eye and simplified optical design. PMID:26670523

  13. Implementing the complete beam hardening effect of the bowtie filter versus scaling beam intensities: effects on dosimetric applications in computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rendon, Xochitl; Zhang, Guozhi; Bosmans, Hilde; Oyen, Raymond; Zanca, Federica

    2014-10-01

    The bowtie filter is an essential element of computed tomography scanners. Implementation of this filter in a Monte Carlo dosimetry platform can be based on Turner's method, which describes how to measure the filter thickness and relate the x-ray beam as a function of bowtie angle to the central beam. In that application, the beam hardening is accounted for by means of weighting factors that are associated to the photons according to their position (fan angle) and energy. We assessed an alternative approximation in which the photon spectrum is given a fan angle-dependent scaling factor. The aim of our investigation was to evaluate the effects on dose accuracy estimation when using the gold standard bowtie filter method versus a beam scaling approximation method. In particular, we wanted to assess the percentage dose differences between the two methods for several water thicknesses representative for different patients of different body mass index. The largest percentage differences were found for the thickest part of the bowtie filter and increased with patient size. PMID:26158059

  14. Resistive-wall wake effect in the beam delivery system

    SciTech Connect

    J.R. Delayen; Juhao Wu; T.O. Raubenheimer; Jiunn-Ming Wang

    2004-08-16

    General formulae for resistive-wall induced beam dilution are presented and then applied to the final beam delivery system of linear colliders. Criteria for the design of final beam delivery systems are discussed.

  15. Investigation of nonthermal particle effects on ionization dynamics in high current density ion beam transport experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, H. K.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Wang, P.; Moses, G. A.; Bailey, J. E.; Olson, C. L.; Welch, D. R.

    1997-01-01

    Light ion inertial fusion experiments require the presence of a moderate density background gas in the transport region to provide charge and current neutralization for a high current density ion beam. In this article, we investigate the effects of nonthermal particles such as beam ions or non-Maxwellian electron distributions on the ionization dynamics of the background gas. In particular, we focus on the case of Li beams being transported in an argon gas. Nonthermal particles as well as thermal electrons are included in time-dependent collisional-radiative calculations to determine time-dependent atomic level populations and charge state distributions in a beam-produced plasma. We also briefly discuss the effects of beam ions and energetic electrons on the visible and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral regions. It is found that the mean charge state of the gas, and hence the electron density, is significantly increased by collisions with energetic particles. This higher ionization significantly impacts the VUV spectral region, where numerous resonance lines occur. On the other hand, the visible spectrum tends to be less affected because the closely spaced excited states are populated by lower energy thermal electrons.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of neutron noise effects on beam position determination at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awwal, Abdul A. S.; Leach, Richard R.; Datte, Philip; Manuel, Anastacia

    2013-09-01

    Images obtained through charged coupled device (CCD) cameras in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are crucial to precise alignment of the 192 laser beams to the NIF target-chamber center (TCC). Cameras in and around the target chamber are increasingly exposed to the effects of neutron radiation as the laser power is increased for high energy fusion experiments. NIF was carefully designed to operate under these conditions. The present work examines the degradation of the measured TCC camera position accuracy resulting from the effects of neutron radiation on the sensor and verifies operation within design specifications. Both synthetic and real beam images are used for measuring position degradation. Monte Carlo simulations based on camera performance models are used to create images with added neutron noise. These models predict neutron induced camera noise based on exposure estimates of the cumulative single-shot fluence in the NIF environment. The neutron induced noise images are used to measure beam positions on a target calculated from the alignment images with the added noise. The effects of this noise are also determined using noise artifacts from real camera images viewing TCC to estimate beam position uncertainty.

  17. Effects of modulated electron beams and cavities on reditrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Davis, H.A.; Fulton, R.D.; Sherwood, E.G.

    1988-01-01

    The virtual cathode, when formed in a cavity, can generate microwaves at different cavity modes depending on the geometry of the cavity. We found that the formation and the oscillation frequency of the virtual cathode in a reditron can be significantly influenced by cavity designs. The length of a cavity can play a role in frequency and mode selection. Our simulations showed that TM/sub 012/ and TM/sub 033/ were excited for cavity lengths of 15.0 cm and 22.5 cm, respectively. In addition to the cavity effects on reditrons, we discovered that highly modulated electron beams can be produced in reditrons. Full modulation (100/percent/) of the transmitted electron beam current has been confirmed in our simulations. We further showed that incorporation of an inverse diode configuration can achieve microwave production efficiency of 26/percent/. 11 refs., 8 figs.

  18. The Stern-Gerlach Effect for Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwendiman, J. J.; Batelaan, H.; Gay, T. J.

    1997-04-01

    It is generally accepted that it is impossible to separate an electron beam according to spin using macroscopic electromagnetic fields because of effects related to the Uncertainty Principle. This idea was first put forth by Mott and Pauli (see, e. g., Handbuch der Physik V. 5 pt. 1, ed. S. Flugge, Berlin, Göttingen, Heidelberg, Springer, Section 23, p. 165, (1958)), but was attributed by them to Bohr. We performed a semi-classical computer simulation (including the Uncertainty Principle heuristically) to obtain insight into this claim. The results of our simulation are in agreement with Bohr's assertion for the case of transverse splitting with a Stern-Gerlach magnet in its standard geometry. However, we provide a counterexample that demonstrates that a longitudinal separation of the spin components of an electron beam is possible using an inhomogeneous magnetic field.

  19. Attosecond Lighthouse Effect: from tilted waves to isolated harmonic beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Jonathan; Borot, Antonin; Vincenti, Henri; Monchoce, Sylvain; Ricci, Aurelien; Jullien, Aurelie; Malvache, Arnaud; Quere, Fabien; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo

    2012-06-01

    Spatio-temporal coupling (STC) within a laser pulse is normally a negative feature to be avoided as it leads to non-uniform pulse characteristics and reduced intensity at focus. In this study, STC is purposefully introduced into the laser pulse leading to wavefront rotation at the focus. When such a modified focus is applied to plasma mirror harmonic generation, each harmonic pulse produced from cycle to cycle has a shifted propagation direction. Dependant on the degree of wavefront rotation introduced, this can lead from tilted harmonic spectra due to small displacements of the overlapping beams to fully isolated, individual pulses arising from each cycle of the driving laser pulse, the so-called Attosecond Lighthouse effect. This work discusses the recently measured results of spatially-separated, single harmonic beams from a solid target source obtained with 1kHz, CEP-locked, 800nm laser pulses of both 25 and 5 fs duration.

  20. Beam Echo Effect for Generation of Short-Wavelength Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2009-12-09

    The Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation (EEHG) FEL uses two modulators in combination with two dispersion sections to generate a high-harmonic density modulation starting with a relatively small initial energy modulation of the beam. After presenting the concept of the EEHG, we address several practically important issues, such as the effect of coherent and incoherent synchrotron radiation in the dispersion sections. Using a representative realistic set of beam parameters, we show how the EEHG scheme enhances the FEL performance and allows one to generate a fully (both longitudinally and transversely) coherent radiation. We then discuss application of the echo modulation for generation of attosecond pulses of radiation, and also using echo for generation of terahertz radiation. We present main parameters of a proof-of-principle experiment currently being planned at SLAC for demonstration of the echo modulation mechanism.

  1. Effects of modulated electron beams and cavities on reditrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, T. J. T.; Davis, H. A.; Fulton, R. D.; Sherwood, E. G.

    The virtual cathode, when formed in a cavity, can generate microwaves at different cavity modes depending on the geometry of the cavity. We found that the formation and the oscillation frequency of the virtual cathode in a reditron can be significantly influenced by cavity designs. The length of a cavity can play a role in frequency and mode selection. Our simulations showed that TM sub 012 and TM sub 033 were excited for cavity lengths of 15.0 cm and 22.5 cm, respectively. In addition to the cavity effects on reditrons, we discovered that highly modulated electron beams can be produced in reditrons. Full modulation (100 percent) of the transmitted electron beam current has been confirmed in our simulations. We further showed that incorporation of an inverse diode configuration can achieve microwave production efficiency of 26 percent.

  2. Modeling of dynamic effects of a low power laser beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, George N.; Scholl, Marija S.; Khatib, AL

    1988-01-01

    Methods of modeling some of the dynamic effects involved in laser beam propagation through the atmosphere are addressed with emphasis on the development of simple but accurate models which are readily implemented in a physical optics code. A space relay system with a ground based laser facility is considered as an example. The modeling of such characteristic phenomena as laser output distribution, flat and curved mirrors, diffraction propagation, atmospheric effects (aberration and wind shear), adaptive mirrors, jitter, and time integration of power on target, is discussed.

  3. Increasing the upper-limit intensity and temperature range for thermal self-focusing of a laser beam by using plasma density ramp-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokaei, B.; Niknam, A. R.

    2014-03-01

    This work is devoted to improving relativistic and ponderomotive thermal self-focusing of the intense laser beam in an underdense plasma. It is shown that the ponderomotive nonlinearity induces a saturation mechanism for thermal self-focusing. Therefore, in addition to the well-known lower-limit critical intensity, there is an upper-limit intensity for thermal self-focusing above which the laser beam starts to experience ponderomotive defocusing. It is indicated that the upper-limit intensity value is dependent on plasma and laser parameters such as the plasma electron temperature, plasma density, and laser spot size. Furthermore, the effect of the upward plasma density ramp profile on the thermal self-focusing is studied. Results show that by using the plasma density ramp-up, the upper-limit intensity increases and the self-focusing temperature range expands.

  4. Increasing the upper-limit intensity and temperature range for thermal self-focusing of a laser beam by using plasma density ramp-up

    SciTech Connect

    Bokaei, B.; Niknam, A. R.

    2014-03-15

    This work is devoted to improving relativistic and ponderomotive thermal self-focusing of the intense laser beam in an underdense plasma. It is shown that the ponderomotive nonlinearity induces a saturation mechanism for thermal self-focusing. Therefore, in addition to the well-known lower-limit critical intensity, there is an upper-limit intensity for thermal self-focusing above which the laser beam starts to experience ponderomotive defocusing. It is indicated that the upper-limit intensity value is dependent on plasma and laser parameters such as the plasma electron temperature, plasma density, and laser spot size. Furthermore, the effect of the upward plasma density ramp profile on the thermal self-focusing is studied. Results show that by using the plasma density ramp-up, the upper-limit intensity increases and the self-focusing temperature range expands.

  5. Intensity Effects of the FACET Beam in the SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.-J.; Lipkowitz, N.; Sheppard, J.; White, G.R.; Wienands, U.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    The beam for FACET (Facility for Advanced aCcelerator Experimental Tests) at SLAC requires an energy-time correlation ('chirp') along the linac, so it can be compressed in two chicanes, one at the midpoint in sector 10 and one W-shaped chicane just before the FACET experimental area. The induced correlation has the opposite sign to the typical used for BNS damping, and therefore any orbit variations away from the center kick the tail of the beam more than the head, causing a shear in the beam and emittance growth. Any dispersion created along the linac has similar effects due to the high (>1.2% rms) energy spread necessary for compression. The initial huge emittances could be reduced by a factor of 10, but were still bigger than expected by a factor of 2-3. Normalized emittance of 3 {micro}m-rad in Sector 2 blew up to 150 {micro}m-rad in Sector 11 but could be reduced to about 6-12 {micro}m-rad, for the vertical plane although the results were not very stable. Investigating possible root causes for this, we found locations where up to 10 mm dispersion was created along the linac, which were finally verified with strong steering and up to 7 mm settling of the linac accelerator at these locations.

  6. Beam-shape effects in nonlinear Compton and Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Heinzl, T.; Seipt, D.; Kaempfer, B.

    2010-02-15

    We discuss intensity effects in collisions between beams of optical photons from a high-power laser and relativistic electrons. Our main focus is on the modifications of the emission spectra due to realistic finite-beam geometries. By carefully analyzing the classical limit we precisely quantify the distinction between strong-field QED Compton scattering and classical Thomson scattering. A purely classical, but fully covariant, calculation of the bremsstrahlung emitted by an electron in a plane-wave laser field yields radiation into harmonics, as expected. This result is generalized to pulses of finite duration and explains the appearance of line broadening and harmonic substructure as an interference phenomenon. The ensuing numerical treatment confirms that strong focusing of the laser leads to a broad continuum while higher harmonics become visible only at moderate focusing, and hence lower intensity. We present a scaling law for the backscattered photon spectral density which facilitates averaging over electron beam phase space. Finally, we propose a set of realistic parameters such that the observation of intensity-induced spectral red shift, higher harmonics, and their substructure becomes feasible.

  7. Self-effect in expanding electron beam plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M

    1999-05-07

    An analytical model of plasma flow from a metal plate hit by an intense, pulsed, electron beam aims to bridge the gap between radiation-hydrodynamics simulations and experiments, and to quantify the self-effect of the electron beam penetrating the flow. Does the flow disrupt the tight focus of the initial electron bunch, or later pulses in a train? This work aims to model the spatial distribution of plasma speed, density, degree of ionization, and magnetization to inquire. The initial solid density, several eV plasma expands to 1 cm and 10{sup {minus}4} relative density by 2 {micro}s, beyond which numerical simulations are imprecise. Yet, a Faraday cup detector at the ETA-II facility is at 25 cm from the target and observes the flow after 50 {micro}s. The model helps bridge this gap. The expansion of the target plasma into vacuum is so rapid that the ionized portion of the flow departs from local thermodynamic equilibrium. When the temperature (in eV) in a parcel of fluid drops below V{sub i} x [(2{gamma} - 2)/(5{gamma} + 17)], where V{sub i} is the ionization potential of the target metal (7.8 eV for tantalum), and {gamma} is the ratio of specific heats (5/3 for atoms), then the fractional ionization and electron temperature in that parcel remain fixed during subsequent expansion. The freezing temperature as defined here is V{sub i}/19. The balance between the self-pinching force and the space charge repulsion of an electron beam changes on penetrating a flow: (i) the target plasma cancels the space-charge field, (ii) internal eddy currents arise to counter the magnetization of relativistic electrons, and (iii) electron beam heating alters the flow magnetization by changing the plasma density gradient and the magnitude of the conductivity.

  8. Reduction of metal artifacts: beam hardening and photon starvation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadava, Girijesh K.; Pal, Debashish; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-03-01

    The presence of metal-artifacts in CT imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and interfere with disease diagnosis. The cause and occurrence of metal-artifacts are primarily due to beam hardening, scatter, partial volume and photon starvation; however, the contribution to the artifacts from each of them depends on the type of hardware. A comparison of CT images obtained with different metallic hardware in various applications, along with acquisition and reconstruction parameters, helps understand methods for reducing or overcoming such artifacts. In this work, a metal beam hardening correction (BHC) and a projection-completion based metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithms were developed, and applied on phantom and clinical CT scans with various metallic implants. Stainless-steel and Titanium were used to model and correct for metal beam hardening effect. In the MAR algorithm, the corrupted projection samples are replaced by the combination of original projections and in-painted data obtained by forward projecting a prior image. The data included spine fixation screws, hip-implants, dental-filling, and body extremity fixations, covering range of clinically used metal implants. Comparison of BHC and MAR on different metallic implants was used to characterize dominant source of the artifacts, and conceivable methods to overcome those. Results of the study indicate that beam hardening could be a dominant source of artifact in many spine and extremity fixations, whereas dental and hip implants could be dominant source of photon starvation. The BHC algorithm could significantly improve image quality in CT scans with metallic screws, whereas MAR algorithm could alleviate artifacts in hip-implants and dentalfillings.

  9. The effect of electron beams on cyclotron maser emission excited by lower-energy cutoffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G. Q.; Feng, H. Q.; Wu, D. J.

    2016-05-01

    Electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) is one of the most important emission mechanisms in astrophysics and can be excited efficiently by lower-energy cutoffs of power-law electrons. These non-thermal electrons probably propagate as a directed collimated beam along ambient magnetic fields. This paper investigates the ECM, in which the effect of electron beams is emphasized. Results show the dependence of emission properties of the ECM on the beam feature. The maximum growth rate of the extraordinary mode (X2) rapidly decreases as the beam momentum increases, while the growth rate of the ordinary mode (O1) changes slightly. In particular, the ordinary mode can overcome the extraordinary mode and becomes the fastest growth mode once the beam momentum is large enough. This research presents an extension of the conventional studies on ECM driven by lower-energy cutoffs and may be helpful to understand better the emission process of solar type I radio bursts, which are dominated by the ordinary mode emission.

  10. Effects of anisotropic turbulence on average polarizability of Gaussian Schell-model quantized beams through ocean link.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Zhang, Yixin; Zhu, Yun; Chen, Minyu

    2016-07-01

    Based on the spatial power spectrum of the refractive index of anisotropic turbulence, the average polarizability of the Gaussian Schell-model quantized beams and lateral coherence length of the spherical wave propagating through the ocean water channel are derived. Numerical results show that, in strong temperature fluctuation, the depolarization effects of anisotropic turbulence are inferior to isotropic turbulence, as the other parameters of two links are the same. The depolarization effects of salinity fluctuation are less than the effects of the temperature fluctuation; the average polarizability of beams increases when increasing the inner scale of turbulence and the source's transverse size; and the larger rate of dissipation of kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid enhances the average polarizability of beams. The region of the receiving radius is smaller than the characteristic radius and the average polarizability of beams in isotropy turbulence is smaller than that of beams in anisotropy turbulence. However, the receiving radius region is larger than a characteristic radius and the average polarizability of beams in isotropy turbulence is larger than that of beams in anisotropy turbulence. PMID:27409215

  11. Fundamental edge broadening effects during focused electron beam induced nanosynthesis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schmied, Roland; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Winkler, Robert; Rack, Phillip D.; Plank, Harald

    2015-02-16

    In this study, we explore lateral broadening effects of 3D structures fabricated through focused electron beam induced deposition using MeCpPt(IV)Me3 precursor. In particular, the scaling behavior of proximity effects as a function of the primary electron energy and the deposit height is investigated through experiments and validated through simulations. Correlated Kelvin force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy measurements identified conductive and non-conductive proximity regions. It was determined that the highest primary electron energies enable the highest edge sharpness while lower energies contain a complex convolution of broadening effects. In addition, it is demonstrated that intermediate energies lead to evenmore » more complex proximity effects that significantly reduce lateral edge sharpness and thus should be avoided if desiring high lateral resolution.« less

  12. Fundamental edge broadening effects during focused electron beam induced nanosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Schmied, Roland; Fowlkes, Jason D; Winkler, Robert; Rack, Phillip D

    2015-01-01

    Summary The present study explores lateral broadening effects of 3D structures fabricated through focused electron beam induced deposition using MeCpPt(IV)Me3 precursor. In particular, the scaling behavior of proximity effects as a function of the primary electron energy and the deposit height is investigated through experiments and validated through simulations. Correlated Kelvin force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy measurements identified conductive and non-conductive proximity regions. It was determined that the highest primary electron energies enable the highest edge sharpness while lower energies contain a complex convolution of broadening effects. Moreover, it is demonstrated that intermediate energies lead to even more complex proximity effects that significantly reduce lateral edge sharpness and thus should be avoided if desiring high lateral resolution. PMID:25821687

  13. Fundamental edge broadening effects during focused electron beam induced nanosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Schmied, Roland; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Winkler, Robert; Rack, Phillip D.; Plank, Harald

    2015-02-16

    In this study, we explore lateral broadening effects of 3D structures fabricated through focused electron beam induced deposition using MeCpPt(IV)Me3 precursor. In particular, the scaling behavior of proximity effects as a function of the primary electron energy and the deposit height is investigated through experiments and validated through simulations. Correlated Kelvin force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy measurements identified conductive and non-conductive proximity regions. It was determined that the highest primary electron energies enable the highest edge sharpness while lower energies contain a complex convolution of broadening effects. In addition, it is demonstrated that intermediate energies lead to even more complex proximity effects that significantly reduce lateral edge sharpness and thus should be avoided if desiring high lateral resolution.

  14. The effects of magnetic fringe fields on beam dynamics in a beam transport line of a terahertz FEL source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Han; Xiong, Yongqian; Pei, Yuanji

    2014-11-01

    The transport line used in a terahertz FEL device has to transport electron beam through the entire system efficiently and meet the requirements of the beam parameters at the undulator entrance. Due to space limitations, the size of the magnets (five quadrupoles and two bending magnets) employed in the transport line was limited, and some devices were densely packed. In this paper, analyses of the effect of fringe fields and magnetic interference of magnets are presented. 3D models of these magnets are built and their linear optical properties are compared with those obtained by hard edge models. The results indicated that the effects of these factors are significant and they would cause a mismatch of the beam at the exit of the transport line under the preliminary lattice design. To solve this problem, the beam was re-matched using the particle swarm optimization algorithm.

  15. Improved Performance of GaInNAs Solar Cells Grown by Molecular-Beam Epitaxy Using Increased Growth Rate Instead of Surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Ptak, A. J.; France, R.; Jiang, C. S.; Romero, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    GaInNAs is potentially useful for increasing the conversion efficiency of multijunction solar cells if low photocurrents and photovoltages can be increased. Wide-depletion width devices generate significant photocurrents using an n-i-p structure grown by molecular-beam epitaxy, but these wide depletion widths are only realized in a region of parameter space that leads to rough surface morphologies. Surfactants are effective at reducing the surface roughness, but lead to increased defect densities and changes in the net acceptor or donor concentration. Here, we show that increasing the growth rate of GaInNAs solar cells leads to smooth surfaces without the use of a surfactant, even at high In compositions and substrate temperatures. No degradation in material quality is observed when increasing the growth rate from 1.5 to 3.0 {micro}m/h, but a shunt resistance does appear for the high-growth-rate samples. This shunt is attributed to increased spitting of the Ga cell, leading to an increase in the oval defect density, at the higher effusion cell temperatures used to achieve high growth rates. As with the case of Bi in GaInNAs, increased growth rates also appear to increase the net donor concentration, but it is not clear if these effects have the same cause.

  16. Cloud Cover Increase with Increasing Aerosol Absorptivity: A Counterexample to the Conventional Semidirect Aerosol Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlwitz, Jan; Miller, Ron L.

    2010-01-01

    We reexamine the aerosol semidirect effect using a general circulation model and four cases of the single-scattering albedo of dust aerosols. Contrary to the expected decrease in low cloud cover due to heating by tropospheric aerosols, we find a significant increase with increasing absorptivity of soil dust particles in regions with high dust load, except during Northern Hemisphere winter. The strongest sensitivity of cloud cover to dust absorption is found over land during Northern Hemisphere summer. Here even medium and high cloud cover increase where the dust load is highest. The cloud cover change is directly linked to the change in relative humidity in the troposphere as a result of contrasting changes in specific humidity and temperature. More absorption by aerosols leads to larger diabatic heating and increased warming of the column, decreasing relative humidity. However, a corresponding increase in the specific humidity exceeds the temperature effect on relative humidity. The net effect is more low cloud cover with increasing aerosol absorption. The higher specific humidity where cloud cover strongly increases is attributed to an enhanced convergence of moisture driven by dust radiative heating. Although in some areas our model exhibits a reduction of low cloud cover due to aerosol heating consistent with the conventional description of the semidirect effect, we conclude that the link between aerosols and clouds is more varied, depending also on changes in the atmospheric circulation and the specific humidity induced by the aerosols. Other absorbing aerosols such as black carbon are expected to have a similar effect.

  17. Effects of Electron Beam and Microwave Irradiation on Human Blood Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Diana I.; Craciun, Gabriela D.; Manaila, Elena N.; Ighigeanu, Daniel I.; Iacob, Nicusor I.; Oproiu, Constantin V.; Stan, Dana E.; Radu, Roxana R.; Margaritescu, Irina D.; Chirita, Doru I.

    2007-04-23

    The effects of separated and combined accelerated electron beam (EB) of 6.23 MeV and microwave (MW) of 2.45GHz irradiation on proteins in samples of human serum, human plasma and human integral blood are presented. Also, it was studied the effect of separate and combined EB and MW irradiation on proteins irradiated in samples of human integral blood, without and in the presence of a synthetic compound solution (S.C.S.) which is expected to exhibit various biological actions, such as to diminish or to increase the irradiation effects.

  18. Acoustic beam splitting in two-dimensional phononic crystals using self-collimation effect

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jing; Wu, Fugen Zhong, Huilin; Yao, Yuanwei; Zhang, Xin

    2015-10-14

    We propose two models of self-collimation-based beam splitters in phononic crystals. The finite element method is used to investigate the propagation properties of acoustic waves in two-dimensional phononic crystals. The calculated results show that the efficiency of the beam splitter can be controlled systematically by varying the radius of the rods or by changing the orientation of the square rods in the line defect. The effect of changing the side length of the square rods on acoustic wave propagation is discussed. The results show that the total transmission/reflection range decreases/increases as the side length increases. We also find that the relationship between the orientation of the transflective point and the side length of the square rods is quasi-linear.

  19. Acoustic beam splitting in two-dimensional phononic crystals using self-collimation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Wu, Fugen; Zhong, Huilin; Yao, Yuanwei; Zhang, Xin

    2015-10-01

    We propose two models of self-collimation-based beam splitters in phononic crystals. The finite element method is used to investigate the propagation properties of acoustic waves in two-dimensional phononic crystals. The calculated results show that the efficiency of the beam splitter can be controlled systematically by varying the radius of the rods or by changing the orientation of the square rods in the line defect. The effect of changing the side length of the square rods on acoustic wave propagation is discussed. The results show that the total transmission/reflection range decreases/increases as the side length increases. We also find that the relationship between the orientation of the transflective point and the side length of the square rods is quasi-linear.

  20. Effects of gamma and electron beam irradiation on the properties of calendered cord fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aytaç, Ayşe; Deniz, Veli; Şen, Murat; Hegazy, El-Sayed; Güven, Olgun

    2010-03-01

    The effects of gamma and e-beam irradiation on mechanical and structural properties of nylon 66 (Ny 66), nylon 6 (Ny 6) and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fabrics used in tyres were investigated. The untreated (greige), treated cords and calendered fabrics were irradiated at different doses. It is found that the effects of high energy irradiation on greige, treated cords and calendered fabrics are similar. No protective effect of compounds used in calendering was observed against radiation-induced oxidative degradation. The deterioration effect of gamma irradiation on mechanical properties is much higher than that of e-beam irradiation for all types of samples. Limiting viscosity numbers of both gamma and e-beam irradiated nylon 6 and nylon 66 cords were found to decrease with increasing dose. It is concluded that PET calendered fabric has higher resistance to ionizing radiation. Ny 6 and Ny 66 calendered fabrics are more sensitive even at low doses. Therefore, the effects of high energy irradiation on tyre cords have to be taken into consideration during tyre design reinforced with particularly Ny fabrics if pre-vulcanization with high energy radiation is to be applied.

  1. Beam-beam interaction in P-P colliding accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Parzen, G.

    1982-08-01

    One model for beam growth due to the beam-beam interaction in P-P colliding accelerators is that it is due to the presence of non-linear forces generated by the fields produced by the beam plus some radomizing effect like noise, or a tune modulation. According to this model, to limit beam-beam effects, one should try to limit the size of the non-linear forces and the sources of noise or tune modulation. This model can also be used to compare the severity of beam-beam effects in two situations by comparing the size of the non-linear forces. In this paper, this approach will be used to study three problems: to compare the effects of beam-beam non-linear resonances in the ISR with those in ISABELLE; to estimate the strength of a spectrometer magnet that may be placed at one of the beam crossing points, without appreciably increasing the beam-beam effects; and to compare the beam-beam interaction for colliding beam accelerators with different crossing-angles and different ..beta../sub x/ and ..beta../sub y/ at the crossing points.

  2. Effect of electron beam irradiation sterilization on the biomedical poly (octene-co-ethylene)/polypropylene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Shifang; Shi, Hengchong; Yao, Zhanhai; Wang, Jianwei; Song, Yongxian; Yin, Jinghua

    2010-05-01

    The effect of electron beam irradiation with the dose ranging from 15 to 40 kGy on poly (octene-co-ethylene) (POE)/polypropylene (PP) films was investigated. Wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), yellowness index testing and mechanical performance measurement were applied to characterize the films. It demonstrated that crystalline structure exhibited little change, and degree of crystallinity slightly change under the irradiation treatment. Irradiation brought about oxidation of the films, forming hydroxyl groups of the peroxides and carbonyl groups. Tensile properties become worse as irradiation dose increased. Electron beam irradiation with the dose of 15-40 kGy has little effect on crystalline performance and a little influence for the POE/PP films, indicating a good irradiation resistance.

  3. Comparative study on the effect of electron beam irradiation on the physical properties of ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bibo; Hong, Ningning; Shi, Yongqian; Wang, Biao; Sheng, Haibo; Song, Lei; Tang, Qinbo; Hu, Yuan

    2014-04-01

    Ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) flame retarded by a combination of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) microencapsulated ammonium polyphosphate (MCAPP) and polyamide-6 (PA-6) have been crosslinked by high energy electron beam irradiation. The effect of high energy electron beam irradiation on the crosslinking degree, mechanical, electrical and thermal properties of EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 cable material was studied by gel content, heat extention test, mechanical test, dynamic mechanical analysis, high-insulation resistance meter and thermogravimetric analysis. The gel content and heat extention test results showed that the EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 composites can be easily crosslinked by electron beam irradiation. The tensile strength of EVA composites was drastically increased from 16.2 to maximum 26.2 MPa as the electron beam irradiation dose increases from 0 to 160 kGy. The volatilized products of EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 composites were analyzed and compared by thermogravimetric analysis/infrared spectrometry (TG-FTIR).

  4. The effect of exit beam phase aberrations on parallel beam coherent x-ray reconstructions

    SciTech Connect

    Hruszkewycz, S. O.; Fuoss, P. H.; Harder, R.; Xiao, X.

    2010-12-15

    Diffraction artifacts from imperfect x-ray windows near the sample are an important consideration in the design of coherent x-ray diffraction measurements. In this study, we used simulated and experimental diffraction patterns in two and three dimensions to explore the effect of phase imperfections in a beryllium window (such as a void or inclusion) on the convergence behavior of phasing algorithms and on the ultimate reconstruction. A predictive relationship between beam wavelength, sample size, and window position was derived to explain the dependence of reconstruction quality on beryllium defect size. Defects corresponding to this prediction cause the most damage to the sample exit wave and induce signature error oscillations during phasing that can be used as a fingerprint of experimental x-ray window artifacts. The relationship between x-ray window imperfection size and coherent x-ray diffractive imaging reconstruction quality explored in this work can play an important role in designing high-resolution in situ coherent imaging instrumentation and will help interpret the phasing behavior of coherent diffraction measured in these in situ environments.

  5. The effect of exit beam phase aberrations on parallel beam coherent x-ray reconstructions.

    SciTech Connect

    Hruszkewycz, S. O.; Harder, R.; Xiao, X.; Fuoss, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    Diffraction artifacts from imperfect x-ray windows near the sample are an important consideration in the design of coherent x-ray diffraction measurements. In this study, we used simulated and experimental diffraction patterns in two and three dimensions to explore the effect of phase imperfections in a beryllium window (such as a void or inclusion) on the convergence behavior of phasing algorithms and on the ultimate reconstruction. A predictive relationship between beam wavelength, sample size, and window position was derived to explain the dependence of reconstruction quality on beryllium defect size. Defects corresponding to this prediction cause the most damage to the sample exit wave and induce signature error oscillations during phasing that can be used as a fingerprint of experimental x-ray window artifacts. The relationship between x-ray window imperfection size and coherent x-ray diffractive imaging reconstruction quality explored in this work can play an important role in designing high-resolution in situ coherent imaging instrumentation and will help interpret the phasing behavior of coherent diffraction measured in these in situ environments.

  6. Degradation and decoloration of textiles wastewater by electron beam irradiation: Effect of energy, current and absorbed dose

    SciTech Connect

    Bakar, Khomsaton Abu; Zulkafli,; Hashim, Siti A'aisah; Ahmad, Pauzi

    2014-09-03

    In this study, electron beam accelerator (EB) was used to treat textiles wastewater from Rawang Industrial Park, Selangor. The objectives were to determine effective energy, beam current and absorbed dose required for decoloration and degradation of the textiles effluent. The textiles effluent was irradiated in a batch with various energy of 1MeV to 3MeV at constant beam current of 30mA. It was observed that removal of color and COD increases with higher beam energy. The EB energy of 1MeV effectively to removed 58% color and 19% COD. For textile effluent sample irradiated at fix energy of 1MeV and 3Mev but at different beam current 10mA, 20mA and 30mA. It was observed that removal of color and COD increases with the increased of beam current at each energy. However removal of color was significantly better at 1Mev as compared to 3Mev. In the case of textiles effluent, irradiated at doses of 17, 20,25,30, 35, 100 and 200kGy using 30 kW power of EB (1Mev, 30mA), results shows removal of BOD{sub 5}, COD and color were in the range 9%-33%, 14%-38% and 43%-78% respectively.

  7. Effect of crossed beams irradiation on parametric instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Labaune, C., Ecole Polytechnique, France

    1998-04-27

    Modification of the growth of scattering processes in the case of multiple beam irradiation compared to single beam irradiation has been investigated in a preformed plasma using Thomson scattrering of a short wavelength probe beam, and spectral and temporal analysis of reflected and transmitted light. First observations of the reduction of the amplitude of ion acoustic waves associated with stimulated Brillouin scattering, amplification of the amplitude of electron plasma waves associated with stimulated Raman scattering, and transfer of energy between crqssing beams with same frequency in a flowing plasma under crossed beam irradiation are reported.

  8. Ion beam induced effects on the ferromagnetism in Pd nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kulriya, P. K.; Mehta, B. R.; Agarwal, D. C.; Agarwal, Kanika; Kumar, Praveen; Shivaprasad, S. M.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2012-06-05

    Present study demonstrates the role of metal-insulator interface and ion irradiation induced defects on the ferromagnetic properties of the non-magnetic materials. Magnetic properties of the Pd nanoparticles(NPs) embedded in the a-silica matrix synthesized using atom beam sputtering technique, were determined using SQUID magnetometry measurements which showed that ferromagnetic response of Pd increased by 3.5 times on swift heavy ion(SHI) irradiation. The ferromagnetic behavior of the as-deposited Pd NPs is due to strain induced by the surrounding matrix and modification in the electronic structure at the Pd-silica interface as revealed by insitu XRD and XPS investigations, respectively. The defects created by the SHI bombardment are responsible for enhancement of the magnetization in the Pd NPs.

  9. Plasma effects on fast pair beams. III. Oblique electrostatic growth rates for perpendicular Maxwellian pair beams

    SciTech Connect

    Supsar, Markus; Schlickeiser, Reinhard E-mail: rsch@tp4.rub.de

    2014-03-10

    The distant universe is opaque to γ radiation from blazars due to gamma-gamma attenuation with extragalactic background light. This process produces electron-positron pair beams that interact with the intergalactic medium and are unstable to linear instabilities, particularly the electrostatic and Weibel instabilities. The electrostatic instability grows faster and so determines the dissipation of the free energy of the beam. Here, we generalize the calculation of the electrostatic growth rate to a beam plasma system with a Maxwellian perpendicular momentum spread and allow for oblique propagation directions. We show that the growth rate for the oblique electrostatic mode has a maximum value that is even higher than for a cold beam or for one with a constant perpendicular momentum spread.

  10. Beam manipulation techniques, nonlinear beam dynamics, and space charge effect in high energy high power accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.

    2014-04-07

    We had carried out a design of an ultimate storage ring with beam emittance less than 10 picometer for the feasibility of coherent light source at X-ray wavelength. The accelerator has an inherent small dynamic aperture. We study method to improve the dynamic aperture and collective instability for an ultimate storage ring. Beam measurement and accelerator modeling are an integral part of accelerator physics. We develop the independent component analysis (ICA) and the orbit response matrix method for improving accelerator reliability and performance. In collaboration with scientists in National Laboratories, we also carry out experimental and theoretical studies on beam dynamics. Our proposed research topics are relevant to nuclear and particle physics using high brightness particle and photon beams.

  11. Thermomechanical assessment of the effects of a jaw-beam angle during beam impact on Large Hadron Collider collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauchi, Marija; Assmann, R. W.; Bertarelli, A.; Carra, F.; Lari, L.; Rossi, A.; Mollicone, P.; Sammut, N.

    2015-02-01

    The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely and successfully operate high-energy particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). However, the requirements to handle high-intensity beams can be demanding, and accident scenarios must be well studied in order to assess if the collimator design is robust against possible error scenarios. One of the catastrophic, though not very probable, accident scenarios identified within the LHC is an asynchronous beam dump. In this case, one (or more) of the 15 precharged kicker circuits fires out of time with the abort gap, spraying beam pulses onto LHC machine elements before the machine protection system can fire the remaining kicker circuits and bring the beam to the dump. If a proton bunch directly hits a collimator during such an event, severe beam-induced damage such as magnet quenches and other equipment damage might result, with consequent downtime for the machine. This study investigates a number of newly defined jaw error cases, which include angular misalignment errors of the collimator jaw. A numerical finite element method approach is presented in order to precisely evaluate the thermomechanical response of tertiary collimators to beam impact. We identify the most critical and interesting cases, and show that a tilt of the jaw can actually mitigate the effect of an asynchronous dump on the collimators. Relevant collimator damage limits are taken into account, with the aim to identify optimal operational conditions for the LHC.

  12. Effect of reactive ion beam etching on the photoluminescence of CdTe epitaxial layers

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Pastor, J.; Fuster, D.; Abellan, M.; Anguita, J.; Sochinskii, N. V.

    2008-03-01

    We demonstrated the effect of reactive ion beam etching (RIBE) process on the PL properties of CdTe/sapphire metal organic vapor phase epitaxy layers. At optimum conditions, the RIBE attack does not make significant morphological changes but it results in an increase of the concentration of acceptor impurities. This was revealed by an increase of the overall photoluminescence (PL) intensity and, simultaneously, a decrease of the PL decay time, more important on the low energy side of PL spectrum due to the recombination of carriers in acceptor pairs.

  13. Advanced computations of multi-physics, multi-scale effects in beam dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, J.F.; Macridin, A.; Spentzouris, P.; Stern, E.G.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art beam dynamics simulations include multiple physical effects and multiple physical length and/or time scales. We present recent developments in Synergia2, an accelerator modeling framework designed for multi-physics, multi-scale simulations. We summarize recent several recent results in multi-physics beam dynamics, including simulations of three Fermilab accelerators: the Tevatron, the Main Injector and the Debuncher. Early accelerator simulations focused on single-particle dynamics. To a first approximation, the forces on the particles in an accelerator beam are dominated by the external fields due to magnets, RF cavities, etc., so the single-particle dynamics are the leading physical effects. Detailed simulations of accelerators must include collective effects such as the space-charge repulsion of the beam particles, the effects of wake fields in the beam pipe walls and beam-beam interactions in colliders. These simulations require the sort of massively parallel computers that have only become available in recent times. We give an overview of the accelerator framework Synergia2, which was designed to take advantage of the capabilities of modern computational resources and enable simulations of multiple physical effects. We also summarize some recent results utilizing Synergia2 and BeamBeam3d, a tool specialized for beam-beam simulations.

  14. Thermal effects on the Ga+ ion beam induced structural modification of a-SiC:H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkova, T.; Wright, C. D.; Craciun, M. F.; Bischoff, L.; Angelov, O.; Dimova-Malinovska, D.

    2012-12-01

    The effects of implantation temperature and post-implantation thermal annealing on the Ga+ ion beam induced optical contrast formation in hydrogenated silicon-carbon alloy (a-SiC:H) films and underlying structural modifications have been studied. The optical contrast formed (between implanted and unimplanted regions of the film material) has been made use of in the form of optical pattern formation by computer-operated Ga+-focused ion beam. Possible applications of this effect in the area of submicron lithography and high-density optical data storage have been suggested with regard to the most widely spread focused micro-beam systems based on Ga+ liquid metal ion sources. The implanted samples were structurally analysed using vibrational spectroscopies, like Raman and infra-red (IR) spectroscopy, to define optimum implantation conditions. The precise role of implantation temperature effects, i.e. the target temperature during Ga+ ion irradiation, on the structural modification obtainable has been therefore a key part of this study. Appropriate post-implantation annealing treatments were also studied, since these are expected to offer further benefits in reducing the required ion dose and enhancing the optical contrast, thus increasing the cost-effectiveness of the method.

  15. Beam profile measurements for dental phototherapy: the effect of distance, wavelength and tissue thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palin, William M.; Hadis, Mohammed A.; Milward, Michael R.; Carroll, James D.; Cooper, Paul R.

    2015-03-01

    Light delivery for potential bacterial disinfection (UV/blue) and photobiomodulation (near-IR) requires specific, concentrated and controllable local irradiance and dose. Dental targets for light irradiation involve dentine, which scatters, absorbs and reflects light, reducing local irradiance. This study compared the effectiveness of LEDs (400-900nm) and lasers (660nm and 810nm) to penetrate dentine. Caries-free wisdom teeth were sectioned through the Pulpchamber by either cutting perpendicular to the crown, the buccal aspect or obliquely. Specimens were wet-polished to 1, 2 or 3mm thicknesses to expose the dentine on opposing surfaces. The beam profile of the LEDs/lasers were measured through dentine specimens (n=5) to obtain beam width following optical calibration, and spatial irradiance distribution following photodiode power calibration. There were no significant differences in the percentage power and irradiance transmitted through different dentine specimens between LEDs and lasers (P>0.05). However, light penetration through tissue was wavelength dependent and highest for red and near-IR wavelengths (P<0.05) for specimens cut perpendicular to the crown compared with buccal and oblique specimens. The beam diameters increased and irradiance decreased significantly (P<0.05) with increasing specimen thickness/distance for both LEDs and lasers. There was a noticeable shift in beam position for all light sources in buccal and oblique specimens. Data indicated that dentine tubule orientation may alter the direction of light through the tissue. Optimal light penetration and distribution through dentine at specific distance is best achieved with a flat-top beam distribution vertically through the crown of the tooth.

  16. Effects of evolving surface morphology on yield during focused ion beam milling of carbon.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Thomas Michael; Adams, David Price; Archuleta, Kim M.; Vasile, Michael J.

    2005-07-01

    We investigate evolving surface morphology during focused ion beam bombardment of C and determine its effects on sputter yield over a large range of ion dose (10{sup 17}-10{sup 19} ions/cm{sup 2}) and incidence angles ({Theta} = 0-80{sup o}). Carbon bombarded by 20 keV Ga{sup +} either retains a smooth sputtered surface or develops one of two rough surface morphologies (sinusoidal ripples or steps/terraces) depending on the angle of ion incidence. For conditions that lead to smooth sputter-eroded surfaces there is no change in yield with ion dose after erosion of the solid commences. However, for all conditions that lead to surface roughening we observe coarsening of morphology with increased ion dose and a concomitant decrease in yield. A decrease in yield occurs as surface ripples increase wavelength and, for large {Theta}, as step/terrace morphologies evolve. The yield also decreases with dose as rippled surfaces transition to have steps and terraces at {Theta} = 75{sup o}. Similar trends of decreasing yield are found for H{sub 2}O-assisted focused ion beam milling. The effects of changing surface morphology on yield are explained by the varying incidence angles exposed to the high-energy beam.

  17. Precessed electron beam electron energy loss spectroscopy of graphene: Beyond channelling effects

    SciTech Connect

    Yedra, Ll.; Estradé, S.; Torruella, P.; Eljarrat, A.; Peiró, F.; Darbal, A. D.; Weiss, J. K.

    2014-08-04

    The effects of beam precession on the Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) signal of the carbon K edge in a 2 monolayer graphene sheet are studied. In a previous work, we demonstrated the use of precession to compensate for the channeling-induced reduction of EELS signal when in zone axis. In the case of graphene, no enhancement of EELS signal is found in the usual experimental conditions, as graphene is not thick enough to present channeling effects. Interestingly, though it is found that precession makes it possible to increase the collection angle, and, thus, the overall signal, without a loss of signal-to-background ratio.

  18. Numerical Simulation of the Self-Heating Effect Induced by Electron Beam Plasma in Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yongfeng; Tan, Chang; Han, Xianwei; Tan, Yonghua

    2012-02-01

    For exploiting advantages of electron beam air plasma in some unusual applications, a Monte Carlo (MC) model coupled with heat transfer model is established to simulate the characteristics of electron beam air plasma by considering the self-heating effect. Based on the model, the electron beam induced temperature field and the related plasma properties are investigated. The results indicate that a nonuniform temperature field is formed in the electron beam plasma region and the average temperature is of the order of 600 K. Moreover, much larger volume pear-shaped electron beam plasma is produced in hot state rather than in cold state. The beam ranges can, with beam energies of 75 keV and 80 keV, exceed 1.0 m and 1.2 m in air at pressure of 100 torr, respectively. Finally, a well verified formula is obtained for calculating the range of high energy electron beam in atmosphere.

  19. Elastic-plastic deformations of a beam with the SD-effect

    SciTech Connect

    Pavilaynen, Galina V.

    2015-03-10

    The results for the bending of a cantilever beam with the SD-effect under a concentrated load are discussed. To solve this problem, the standard Bernoulli-Euler hypotheses for beams and the Ilyushin model of perfect plasticity are used. The problem is solved analytically for structural steel A40X. The SD-effect for elastic-plastic deformations is studied. The solutions for beam made of isotropic material and material with the SD-effect are compared.

  20. The damaging effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on upland cotton ( Gossypium hirsutum L.) pollen grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yanjie; Wu, Lijun; Wu, Yuejin; Wang, Qingya; Tang, Canming

    2008-09-01

    With the aim to study the effects of an ion beam on plant cells, upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cultivar "Sumian 22" pollen grains were irradiated in vacuum (7.8 × 10-3 Pa) by low-energy nitrogen ions with an energy of 20 keV at various fluences ranging from 0.26 × 1016 to 0.78 × 1016 N+/cm2. The irradiation effects on pollen grains were tested, considering the ultrastructural changes in the exine and interior walls of pollen grains, their germination rate, the growth speed of the pollen tubes in the style, fertilization and boll development after the pistils were pollinated by the pollen grains which had been implanted with nitrogen ions. Nitrogen ions entered the pollen grains by etching and penetrating the exine and interior walls and destroying cell structures. A greater percentage of the pollen grains were destroyed as the fluence of N+ ions increased. Obviously, the nitrogen ion beam penetrated the exine and interior walls of the pollen grains and produced holes of different sizes. As the ion fluence increased, the amount and the density of pollen grain inclusions decreased and the size of the lacuna and starch granules increased. Pollen grain germination rates decreased with increasing ion fluence. The number of pollen tubes in the style declined with increased ion implantation into pollen grains, but the growth speed of the tubes did not change. All of the pollen tubes reached the end of the style at 13 h after pollination. This result was consistent with that of the control. Also, the weight and the diameter of the ovary decreased and shortened with increased ion beam implantation fluence. No evident change in the fecundation time of the ovule was observed. These results indicate that nitrogen ions can enter pollen grains and cause a series of biological changes in pollen grains of upland cotton.

  1. Altering Instructional Delivery Options to Improve Intervention Outcomes: Does Increased Instructional Intensity Also Increase Instructional Effectiveness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begeny, John C.; Hawkins, Amy Lynn; Krouse, Hailey E.; Laugle, Kelly M.

    2011-01-01

    With limited educational resources and numerous other variables that complicate effective teaching, educators need to think prudently about how to allocate resources. In essence, teachers must allocate resources in ways that will best maximize student learning. However, minimal research has systematically evaluated whether increased instructional…

  2. How increasing CO2 leads to an increased negative greenhouse effect in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmithüsen, Holger; Notholt, Justus; König-Langlo, Gert; Lemke, Peter; Jung, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    CO2 is the strongest anthropogenic forcing agent for climate change since preindustrial times. Like other greenhouse gases, CO2 absorbs terrestrial surface radiation and causes emission from the atmosphere to space. As the surface is generally warmer than the atmosphere, the total long-wave emission to space is commonly less than the surface emission. However, this does not hold true for the high elevated areas of central Antarctica. For this region, the emission to space is higher than the surface emission; and the greenhouse effect of CO2 is around zero or even negative, which has not been discussed so far. We investigated this in detail and show that for central Antarctica an increase in CO2 concentration leads to an increased long-wave energy loss to space, which cools the Earth-atmosphere system. These findings for central Antarctica are in contrast to the general warming effect of increasing CO2.

  3. The thermal effects on high-frequency vibration of beams using energy flow analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenbo; Chen, Hualing; Zhu, Danhui; Kong, Xiangjie

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, the energy flow analysis (EFA) method is developed to predict the high-frequency response of beams in a thermal environment, which is a topic of concern in aerospace and automotive industries. The temperature load applied on the structures can generate thermal stresses and change material properties. The wavenumber and group velocity associated with the in-plane axial force arising from thermal stresses are included in the derivation of the governing energy equation, and the input power is obtained from the derived effective bending stiffness. In addition, effect of temperature-dependent material properties is considered in the EFA model. To verify the proposed formulation, numerical simulations are performed for a pinned-pinned beam in a uniform thermal environment. The EFA results are compared with the modal solutions for various frequencies and damping loss factors, and good correlations are observed. The results show that the spatial distributions and levels of energy density can be affected by the thermal effects, and the vibration response of beams increases with temperature.

  4. Comparison of radiobiological effective depths in 65-MeV modulated proton beams.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, J. T.; Inoue, T.; Inoue, T.; Yamazaki, H.; Fukushima, S.; Fournier-Bidoz, N.; Koizumi, M.; Ozeki, S.; Hatanaka, K.

    1997-01-01

    To assess the achievement of uniformity of radiobiological effectiveness at different depths in the proton spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP), Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were exposed to 65-MeV modulated proton beams at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP) of Osaka University. We selected four different irradiation positions: 2 mm depth, corresponding to the entrance, and 10, 18 and 23 mm depths, corresponding to different positions in the SOBP. Cell survival curves were generated with the in vitro colony formation method and fitted to the linear-quadratic model. With 137Cs gamma-rays as the reference irradiation, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for a surviving fraction (SF) level of 0.1 are 1.05, 1.10, 1.12 and 1.19 for depths of 2, 10, 18 and 23 mm respectively. A significant difference was found between the survival curves at 10 and 23 mm (P < 0.05), but not between 18 and 10 mm or between 18 and 23 mm. There was a significant dependence of RBE on depths in modulated proton beams at the 0.1 surviving fraction level (P < 0.05). Moreover, the rise of RBEs significantly depended on increasing SF level or decreased approximately in correspondence with irradiation dose (P = 0.0001). To maintain uniformity of radiobiological effectiveness for the target volume, careful attention should be paid to the influence of depth of beam and irradiation dose. PMID:9231922

  5. eRHIC ring-ring design with head-on beam-beam compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Montag,C.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Pozdeyev, E.; Fischer, W.; MacKay, W. W.

    2009-05-04

    The luminosity of the eRHIC ring-ring design is limited by the beam-beam effect exerted on the electron beam. Recent simulation studies have shown that the beam-beam limit can be increased by means of an electron lens that compensates the beam-beam effect experienced by the electron beam. This scheme requires proper design of the electron ring, providing the correct betatron phase advance between interaction point and electron lens. We review the performance of the eRHIC ring-ring version and discuss various parameter sets, based on different cooling schemes for the proton/ion beam.

  6. The effect of an increase in chain length on the mechanical properties of polyethylene glycols.

    PubMed

    Al-Nasassrah, M A; Podczeck, F; Newton, J M

    1998-07-01

    The mechanical properties of different molecular weights of polyethylene glycol (PEG) have been determined by formation of compacted tablets and beams, which were subjected to diametral compression and 3-point bending, respectively. From diametral compression, the tensile strength for the different grades of PEG was determined. Flat beams made from powder by compaction were used to determine Young's modulus of elasticity. Beams into which a notch had been introduced after formation allowed the fracture mechanical parameters of critical stress intensity factor, K(IC), and fracture toughness, R, to be determined. Evaluation of these parameters as a function of compact porosity allowed extrapolation to values at zero porosity, providing an estimate of the material properties. The increase in chain length of the PEG was found to have a non-linear effect on tensile strength and Young's modulus. The ductility of the polymer increased proportionally to the increase in chain length, reflected by the linear relationship between K(IC) and the molecular weight. Young's modulus and critical stress intensity factor allowed the estimation of the strain energy release rate, G(IC), which is the driving force in crack propagation. Consequently, the tensile strength at zero porosity was found to be predictable from the values of G(IC) and the molecular weight of the different grades of PEG. PMID:9700020

  7. Transient Beam Loading Effects in Gas-filled RF Cavities for a Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, M.; Tollestrup, A.; Yonehara, K.; Freemire, B.

    2013-06-01

    A gas-filled RF cavity can be an effective solution for the development of a compact muon ionization cooling channel. One possible problem expected in this type of cavity is the dissipation of significant RF power through the beam-induced plasmas accumulated inside the cavity (plasma loading). In addition, for the higher muon beam intensity, the effects of the beam itself on the cavity accelerating mode are non-negligible (beam loading). These beam- cavity interactions induce a transient phase which may be very harmful to the beam quality [1]. In this study, we estimate the transient voltage in a gas-filled RF cavity with both the plasma and conventional beam loading and discuss their compensation methods.

  8. Geometrical correction of the e-beam proximity effect for raster scan systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belic, Nikola; Eisenmann, Hans; Hartmann, Hans; Waas, Thomas

    1999-06-01

    Increasing demands on pattern fidelity and CD accuracy in e- beam lithography require a correction of the e-beam proximity effect. The new needs are mainly coming from OPC at mask level and x-ray lithography. The e-beam proximity limits the achievable resolution and affects neighboring structures causing under- or over-exposion depending on the local pattern densities and process settings. Methods to compensate for this unequilibrated does distribution usually use a dose modulation or multiple passes. In general raster scan systems are not able to apply variable doses in order to compensate for the proximity effect. For system of this kind a geometrical modulation of the original pattern offers a solution for compensation of line edge deviations due to the proximity effect. In this paper a new method for the fast correction of the e-beam proximity effect via geometrical pattern optimization is described. The method consists of two steps. In a first step the pattern dependent dose distribution caused by back scattering is calculated by convolution of the pattern with the long range part of the proximity function. The restriction to the long range part result in a quadratic sped gain in computing time for the transformation. The influence of the short range part coming from forward scattering is not pattern dependent and can therefore be determined separately in a second step. The second calculation yields the dose curve at the border of a written structure. The finite gradient of this curve leads to an edge displacement depending on the amount of underground dosage at the observed position which was previously determined in the pattern dependent step. This unintended edge displacement is corrected by splitting the line into segments and shifting them by multiples of the writers address grid to the opposite direction.

  9. Increased efficiency of short-pulse laser-generated proton beams from novel flat-top cone targetsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flippo, K. A.; d'Humières, E.; Gaillard, S. A.; Rassuchine, J.; Gautier, D. C.; Schollmeier, M.; Nürnberg, F.; Kline, J. L.; Adams, J.; Albright, B.; Bakeman, M.; Harres, K.; Johnson, R. P.; Korgan, G.; Letzring, S.; Malekos, S.; Renard-LeGalloudec, N.; Sentoku, Y.; Shimada, T.; Roth, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Fernández, J. C.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2008-05-01

    Ion-driven fast ignition (IFI) may have significant advantages over electron-driven FI due to the potentially large reduction in the amount of energy required for the ignition beam and the laser driver. Recent experiments at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Trident facility employing novel Au flat-top cone targets have produced a fourfold increase in laser-energy to ion-energy efficiency, a 13-fold increase in the number of ions above 10MeV, and a few times increase in the maximum ion energy compared to Au flat-foil targets. Compared to recently published scaling laws, these gains are even greater. If the efficiency scales with intensity in accordance to flat-foil scaling, then, with little modification, these targets can be used to generate the pulse of ions needed to ignite thermonuclear fusion in the fast ignitor scheme. A proton energy of at least 30MeV was measured from the flat-top cone targets, and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations show that the maximum cutoff energy may be as high as 40-45MeV at modest intensity of 1×1019W/cm2 with 20J in 600fs. Simulations indicate that the observed energy and efficiency increase can be attributed to the cone target's ability to guide laser light into the neck to produce hot electrons and transport these electrons to the flat-top of the cone where they can be heated to much higher temperatures, creating a hotter, denser sheath. The PIC simulations also elucidate the critical parameters for obtaining superior proton acceleration such as the dependence on laser contrast/plasma prefill, as well as longitudinal and transverse laser pointing, and cone geometry. These novel cones have the potential to revolutionize inertial confinement fusion target design and fabrication via their ability to be mass produced. In addition, they could have an impact on the general physics community studying basic electron and radiation transport phenomena or as better sources of particle beams to study equations of state and warm dense

  10. The effect of object shape and laser beam shape on lidar system resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hongchang; Wang, Jingyi; Ke, Jun

    2016-06-01

    In a LIDAR system, a pulsed laser beam is propagated to a scene, and then reflected back by objects. Ideally if the beam diameter and the pulse width are close to zero, then the reflected beam in time domain is similar to a delta function, which can accurately locate an object's position. However, in a practical system, the beam has finite size. Therefore, even if the pulse width is small, an object shape will make the reflected beam stretched along the time axis, then affect system resolution. In this paper, we assume the beam with Gaussian shape. The beam can be formulated as a delta function convolved with a shape function, such as a rectangular function, in time domain. Then the reflected beam can be defined as a system response function convolved with the shape function. We use symmetric objects to analyze the reflected beam. Corn, sphere, and cylinder objects are used to find a LIDAR system's response function. The case for large beam size is discussed. We assume the beam shape is similar to a plane wave. With this assumption, we get the simplified LIDAR system response functions for the three kinds of objects. Then we use tiny spheres to emulate an arbitrary object, and study its effect to the returned beam.

  11. Effect of CFRC layers on the electrical properties and failure mode of RC beams strengthened with CFRC composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sigang; Dai, Hongzhe; Wang, Wei

    2007-12-01

    This paper designs an innovative reinforced concrete (RC) beam strengthened with carbon fiber reinforced concrete (CFRC) composites. Six groups of test beams, five with different degrees of strengthening, achieved by changing the location and the thickness of the CFRC layer, and one virgin RC beam, were tested in four-point bending over a span of 3000 mm. We investigate the effect of the CFRC layer on the flexural performance and the electrical properties of the designed beams. The test results indicate that the CFRC strengthened RC beam exhibits improved electrical properties as well as better mechanical performance. Also, the location and the thickness of the CFRC layer affect the initial electrical resistance and other electrical properties of the beam. Relationships between electrical resistance, loading, deflection and cracks show that the increase in the electrical resistance can be used to monitor the extent of damage to the designed beam. Based on this discovery, a new health monitoring technique for RC structures is produced by means of electrical resistance measurements.

  12. Carbon-Ion Beam Irradiation Effectively Suppresses Migration and Invasion of Human Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Akino, Yuichi; Teshima, Teruki Kihara, Ayaka; Kodera-Suzumoto, Yuko; Inaoka, Miho; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Matsuura, Nariaki

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: Control of cancer metastasis is one of the most important issues in cancer treatment. We previously demonstrated that carbon particle irradiation suppresses the metastatic potential of cancer cells, and many studies have reported that photon irradiation promotes it. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of carbon beam on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell aggressiveness and gene expression. Methods and Materials: A549 (lung adenocarcinoma) and EBC-1 (lung squamous cell carcinoma) cells were treated with 290 MeV/nucleon carbon ion beam at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba or with 4-MV X-ray at Osaka University. We tested proliferative, migratory, and invasive activities by cell proliferation assay, Boyden chamber assay, and Matrigel chemoinvasion assay, respectively. cDNA microarray and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were also performed to assess mRNA expression alteration. Results: X-irradiation increased cell proliferation of A549 cells at 0.5 Gy, whereas high-dose X-ray reduced migration and invasion of A549 cells. By contrast, carbon beam irradiation did not enhance proliferation, and it reduced the migration and invasion capabilities of both A549 and EBC-1 cells more effectively than did X-irradiation. Carbon beam irradiation induced alteration of various gene expression profiles differently from X-ray irradiation. mRNA expression of ANLN, a homologue of anillin, was suppressed to 60% levels of basal expression in carbon beam-irradiated A549 cells after 12 h. Conclusion: Carbon beam effectively suppresses the metastatic potential of A549 and EBC-1 cells. Carbon beam also has different effects on gene expressions, and downregulation of ANLN was induced only by carbon beam irradiation.

  13. Investigation of the effect of low energy ion beam irradiation on mono-layer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yijun; II. Physikalisches Institut, Universität Göttingen, Friedrich- Hund- Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen; State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 ; Zhang, Kun; Brüsewitz, Christoph; Hofsäss, Hans Christian; Wu, Xuemei; State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050

    2013-07-15

    In this paper, the effect of low energy irradiation on mono-layer graphene was studied. Mono-layer graphene films were irradiated with B, N and F ions at different energy and fluence. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that foreign ions implanted at ion energies below 35 eV could dope into the graphene lattice and form new chemical bonds with carbon atoms. The results of Raman measurement indicate that ion beam irradiation causes defects and disorder to the graphene crystal structure, and the level of defects increases with increasing of ion energy and fluence. Surface morphology images also prove that ion beam irradiation creates damages to graphene film. The experiment results suggest that low-energy irradiation with energies of about 30 eV and fluences up to 5·10{sup 14} cm{sup −2} could realize small amount of doping, while introducing weak damage to graphene. Low energy ion beam irradiation, provides a promising approach for controlled doping of graphene.

  14. H{sup -} beam extraction from a cesium seeded field effect transistor based radio frequency negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, A.; Matsuno, T.; Funaoi, T.; Tanaka, N.; Tsumori, K.; Takeiri, Y.

    2012-02-15

    H{sup -} beam was successfully extracted from a cesium seeded ion source operated using a field effect transistor inverter power supply as a radio frequency (RF) wave source. High density hydrogen plasma more than 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} was obtained using an external type antenna with RF frequency of lower than 0.5 MHz. The source was isolated by an isolation transformer and H{sup -} ion beam was extracted from a single aperture. Acceleration current and extraction current increased with the increase of extraction voltage. Addition of a small amount of cesium vapor into the source enhanced the currents.

  15. EFFECT OF SOLENOID FIELD ERRORS ON ELECTRON BEAM TEMPERATURES IN THE RHIC ELECTRON COOLER.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.KEWISCH,J.

    2003-05-12

    As part of a future upgrade to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), electron cooling is foreseen to decrease ion beam emittances. Within the electron cooling section, the ''hot'' ion beam is immersed in a ''cold'' electron beam. The cooling effect is further enhanced by a solenoid field in the cooling section, which forces the electrons to spiral around the field lines with a (Larmor) radius of 10 micrometers, reducing the effective transverse temperature by orders of magnitude. Studies of the effect of solenoid field errors on electron beam temperatures are reported.

  16. The Effect of Tuition Increases on Business Student Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godek, John; Murray, Kyle B.; Karns, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Tuition increases have become all too common as states have cut spending to public institutions and private schools face declining enrollments. As such, understanding the effects of various methods of framing tuition increases is an important, but infrequently researched topic. The authors examine different ways to frame tuition increases…

  17. Study of the beam loading effect in the CSNS/RCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yao-Shuo; Li, Kai-Wei; Wang, Na; Yoshiro, Irie; Wang, Sheng

    2015-04-01

    The China Spallation Neutron Source/Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (CSNS/RCS) accelerates a high-intensity proton beam from 80 MeV to 1.6 GeV. Since the beam current and beam power is high, the beam loading is a severe problem for the stability of the circulating beam in the RCS. To study the beam loading effect in the CSNS/RCS theoretically, the RLC circuit model of the rf cavity, the method of Fast Fourier Transform and the method of Laplace transform have been employed to obtain the impedance of the rf system, the beam spectrum and the beam-induced voltage, respectively. Based on these physical models, the beam dynamics equations have been revised and a beam loading model has been constructed in the simulation code ORIENT. By using the code, the beam loading effect on the rf system of the CSNS/RCS has been investigated. Some simulation results have been obtained and conclusions have been drawn. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175193)

  18. Increased Efficiency of Short-Pulse Laser Generated Proton Beams from Novel Flat-Top Cone Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flippo, Kirk

    2007-11-01

    Ion-driven Fast Ignition (IFI) may have significant advantages over electron-driven FI (EFI) due to a large reduction in the ignitor beam and laser driver energy requirements. Recent experiments at the LANL Trident facility, using novel flat-top cones made by Nanolabz in Reno Nevada, have yielded a 4 fold increase in laser-ion conversion efficiency, a 13 fold increase in the number of ions above 10 MeV, and a two fold increase in the maximum proton energy as compared to Au flat-foil targets. If efficiencies scale with intensity, in accordance with flat-foils, then IFI would have an even bigger advantage over EFI. At a modest intensity of 10^19 W/cm^2 with 20 Joules in 600 fs protons with at least 30 MeV were observed from the cone targets. Particle in Cell (PIC) simulations show that the maximum cutoff energy could have been as high as 40 MeV. The simulations indicate that the observed energy and efficiency increase can be attributed to the cone's ability guide and focus the laser, allowing more laser-light to be absorbed into the electrons. The cone's geometry then funnels the electrons to the flat-top. The small size also limits the number of electrons, allowing more to be heated to high temperatures, creating a hotter, denser sheath. The PIC simulations elucidate the critical parameters in obtaining superior proton acceleration such as the dependence on laser contrast/preplasma-fill and longitudinal and transverse laser pointing. In addition, these cones have the potential to revolutionize ICF target design and fabrication via mass production.

  19. Increasing Organizational Effectiveness through Better Human Resource Planning and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schein, Edgar H.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the increasing importance of human resource planning and development for organizational effectiveness, and examines how the major components of a human resource planning and development system should be coordinated for maximum effectiveness. Available from Alfred P. Sloan School of Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,…

  20. The lensing effect of trapped particles in a dual-beam optical trap.

    PubMed

    Grosser, Steffen; Fritsch, Anatol W; Kiessling, Tobias R; Stange, Roland; Käs, Josef A

    2015-02-23

    In dual-beam optical traps, two counterpropagating, divergent laser beams emitted from opposing laser fibers trap and manipulate dielectric particles. We investigate the lensing effect that trapped particles have on the beams. Our approach makes use of the intrinsic coupling of a beam to the opposing fiber after having passed the trapped particle. We present measurements of this coupling signal for PDMS particles, as well as a model for its dependence on size and refractive index of the trapped particle. As a more complex sample, the coupling of inhomogeneous biological cells is measured and discussed. We show that the lensing effect is well captured by the simple ray optics approximation. The measurements reveal intricate details, such as the thermal lens effect of the beam propagation in a dual-beam trap. For a particle of known size, the model further allows to infer its refractive index simply from the coupling signal. PMID:25836555

  1. The effects of the RHIC E-lenses magnetic structure layout on the proton beam trajectory

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Pikin, A.; Luo, Y.; Okamura, M.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hock, J.; Raparia, D.

    2011-03-28

    We are designing two electron lenses (E-lens) to compensate for the large beam-beam tune spread from proton-proton interactions at IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). They will be installed in RHIC IR10. First, the layout of these two E-lenses is introduced. Then the effects of e-lenses on proton beam are discussed. For example, the transverse fields of the e-lens bending solenoids and the fringe field of the main solenoids will shift the proton beam. For the effects of the e-lens on proton beam trajectory, we calculate the transverse kicks that the proton beam receives in the electron lens via Opera at first. Then, after incorporating the simplified E-lens lattice in the RHIC lattice, we obtain the closed orbit effect with the Simtrack Code.

  2. NOTE: Breathing interplay effects during proton beam scanning: simulation and statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco, Joao; Robertson, Daniel; Trofimov, Alexei; Paganetti, Harald

    2009-07-01

    Treatment delivery with active beam scanning in proton radiation therapy introduces the problem of interplay effects when pencil beam motion occurs on a similar time scale as intra-fractional tumor motion. In situations where fractionation may not provide enough repetition to blur the effects of interplay, repeated delivery or 'repainting' of each field several times within a fraction has been suggested. The purpose of this work was to investigate the effectiveness of different repainting strategies in proton beam scanning. To assess the dosimetric impact of interplay effects, we performed a series of simulations considering the following parameters: tumor motion amplitude, breathing period, asymmetry in the motion trajectory for the target and time required to change the beam energy for the delivery system. Several repainting strategies were compared in terms of potential vulnerability to a dose delivery error. Breathing motion perpendicular to the beam direction (representing superior-inferior type tumor motion in patients) was considered and modeled as an asymmetric sine function with a peak-to-peak amplitude of between 10 and 30 mm. The results show that motion effects cause a narrowing of the high-dose profile and widening of the penumbra. The 90% isodose area was reduced significantly when considering a large motion amplitude of 3 cm. The broadening of the penumbra appears to depend only on the amplitude of tumor motion (assuming harmonic motion). The delivered dose exhibits a shift of 10-15% of the tumor amplitude (or 1-5 mm) in the caudal direction due to breathing asymmetry observed for both sin4(x) and sin6(x) motion. Of the five repainting techniques studied, so-called 'breath sampling' turned out to be most effective in reducing dose errors with a minimal increase in treatment time. In this method, each energy level is repainted at several evenly spaced times within one breathing period. To keep dose delivery errors below 5% while minimizing treatment

  3. Increasing 'ease of sliding' also increases friction: when is a lubricant effective?

    PubMed

    Annunziata, M A; Baldassarri, A; Dalton, F; Petri, A; Pontuale, G

    2016-04-01

    We investigate experimentally the effective Coulomb friction exerted by a granular medium on a shearing plate, varying the medium depth. The plate is driven by a spring connected to a motor turning at a constant speed and, depending on the system configuration, performs continuous sliding or stick and slip in different proportions. We introduce an order parameter which discriminates between the different regimes expressing the fraction of time spent in slipping. At low driving speed, starting from zero layers of interstitial granular material, the average friction coefficient decreases when a few layers are added, while the order parameter stays close to zero. By further increasing the granular depth, the friction undergoes a sudden increase but the order parameter does not change notably. At an intermediate driving speed, however, both the friction and the order parameter undergo a sudden increase, which for the order parameter amounts to several orders of magnitude, indicating that the plate is more braked but nevertheless keeps sliding more easily. For medium-high driving speeds, full sliding is obtained for only one layer of interstitial matter, where friction has a minimum, and is maintained for all increasing depths while friction increases. These observations show that the ease of slipping is not determined by friction alone, rather by the highly complex interplay between driving velocity, friction, and the depth of the medium. PMID:26931379

  4. Increasing ‘ease of sliding’ also increases friction: when is a lubricant effective?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annunziata, M. A.; Baldassarri, A.; Dalton, F.; Petri, A.; Pontuale, G.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate experimentally the effective Coulomb friction exerted by a granular medium on a shearing plate, varying the medium depth. The plate is driven by a spring connected to a motor turning at a constant speed and, depending on the system configuration, performs continuous sliding or stick and slip in different proportions. We introduce an order parameter which discriminates between the different regimes expressing the fraction of time spent in slipping. At low driving speed, starting from zero layers of interstitial granular material, the average friction coefficient decreases when a few layers are added, while the order parameter stays close to zero. By further increasing the granular depth, the friction undergoes a sudden increase but the order parameter does not change notably. At an intermediate driving speed, however, both the friction and the order parameter undergo a sudden increase, which for the order parameter amounts to several orders of magnitude, indicating that the plate is more braked but nevertheless keeps sliding more easily. For medium-high driving speeds, full sliding is obtained for only one layer of interstitial matter, where friction has a minimum, and is maintained for all increasing depths while friction increases. These observations show that the ease of slipping is not determined by friction alone, rather by the highly complex interplay between driving velocity, friction, and the depth of the medium.

  5. Effects of nonlinear damping on random response of beams to acoustic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, C.; Prasad, C. B.

    1986-01-01

    Effects of both nonlinear damping and large-deflection are included in the theoretical analysis in an attempt to explain the experimental phenomena of aircraft panels excited at high sound pressure levels; that is the broadening of the strain response peak and the increase of the modal frequency. Two nonlinear damping models are considered in the analysis using a single-mode approach. Mean square maximum deflection, mean square maximum strain, and spectral density function of maximum strain for simply supported and clamped beams are obtained. It is demonstrated that nonlinear damping contributes significantly to the broadening of the response peak and to the mean square maximum deflection and strain.

  6. Performance effects of tie-truss modifications for a 70-meter centerline beam waveguide antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucchissi, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    The elevation-axis tie truss of the 70-m antennas would have to be modified to accommodate a centerline beam waveguide. To accomplish this, the center section of the tie truss has to be altered, causing a change in the tie-truss compliance and affecting structural performance. Even with the center section completely removed, the worst-case rms pathlength error due to gravity load is increased from 0.025 to only 0.030 inches. Using a simple postprocessor technique, the effects of modifying the compliance can be predicted without resorting to multiple and costly re-analyses of large finite-element models on a mainframe computer.

  7. Lattices with minimal space charge effects for crystalline beams

    SciTech Connect

    Channell, P.J.; Neri, F.R.

    1995-12-31

    There are numerous techniques for cooling beams of charged particles including stochastic cooling, electron beam cooling, ionization (foil) cooling (for lepton beams only), and laser cooling which works only with ions with some electrons still attached. The successful implementation of laser cooling at Aarhus, has led to interest in crystalline beams, and it certainly seems that crystallization of small numbers of stored particles should be possible. There are limits, however, that may restrict the total number of charged particles stored; these include the limit on the space-charge tune shift, {vert_bar}{triangle}{nu}{vert_bar} < 0.25 (though the precise number is subject to debate) and intrabeam scattering. In this paper we will be concerned with the possibility of intense crystalline beams; for simplicity we treat only the nonrelativistic case, though the relativistic case is a simple extension of this work. In the next section we review the limits on the number of particles stored and observe that the beam size scaling with beam temperature is the important dependence that determines the limits on the stored current as a function of beam temperature. In section 3 we use a general formalism to determine the beam size scaling and apply it to various kinds of focusing lattices and determine the relevant limits. In section 4 we use simulations that include lattice elements, a cooling model, and an N-body space-charge model to confirm the predictions of section 3 and to explore the details of various schemes. In the final section we summarize and discuss our results.

  8. Multiple Beam Effects on Backscatter and its Saturation in Experiments with Conditions Relevant to Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkwood, Robert

    2010-11-01

    The amplification of light when obliquely intersected by laser beams in a plasma has been analyzed for its relevance to the amplification of backscatter in ignition targets. In the targets for the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) where the amplification of forward going beams is now well known and controlled [1], a linear model of the 23 quads of beams that intersect the light scattered from a single quad in the interior of the hohlraum has shown that backscatter re-amplification with additional gain exponents as high as 8 can be produced in some targets designs. This could lead to un-acceptable energy coupling if not mitigated by wave saturation or careful target design. A series of experiments [2], and 2D VPIC and fluid simulations [3] have been carried out to demonstrate the following key aspects of the model. Re-amplification of light with wavelengths corresponding to SRS from individual beams, by a single pump beam has been demonstrated in normalized plasma conditions similar to some ignition target designs. Saturation of this re-amplification has been observed to be in good agreement with 2D PIC models of non-linear kinetic effects such as trapping and subsequent wave front bowing, which limits the scattered energy to ˜1% of the pump energy in the cases studied. Re-amplification of light with wavelengths corresponding to SBS by two pumps is shown experimentally to lead to scattered energy that is well above that of a single pump as expected. SRS scatter in ignition scale hohlraums is shown to increase with increased density in the beam crossing region. The relevance of the work to ignition targets will also be discussed. [4pt] [1] P. Michel et al., Physics of Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010) [0pt] [2] R. K. Kirkwood et al., submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett. and in preparation. [0pt] [3] Y. Lin L. Yin, B. J. Albright, K. J. Bowers, W. Daughton, and H. A. Rose, Phys. Plasmas, 15, 013109 (2008). and in preparation.

  9. Calculating Variations in Biological Effectiveness for a 62 MeV Proton Beam

    PubMed Central

    Carante, Mario Pietro; Ballarini, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    A biophysical model of radiation-induced cell death and chromosome aberrations [called BIophysical ANalysis of Cell death and chromosome Aberrations (BIANCA)] was further developed and applied to therapeutic protons. The model assumes a pivotal role of DNA cluster damage, which can lead to clonogenic cell death following three main steps: (i) a DNA “cluster lesion” (CL) produces two independent chromosome fragments; (ii) fragment mis-rejoining within a threshold distance d gives rise to chromosome aberrations; (iii) certain aberration types (dicentrics, rings, and large deletions) lead to clonogenic inactivation. The yield of CLs and the probability, f, that a chromosome fragment remains un-rejoined even if other fragment(s) are present within d, were adjustable parameters. The model, implemented as a MC code providing simulated dose–responses directly comparable with experimental data, was applied to pristine and modulated Bragg peaks of the proton beam used to treat eye melanoma at INFN-LNS in Catania, Italy. Experimental survival curves for AG01522 cells exposed to the Catania beam were reproduced, supporting the model assumptions. Furthermore, cell death and chromosome aberrations at different depths along a spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) dose profile were predicted. Both endpoints showed an increase along the plateau, and high levels of damage were found also beyond the distal dose fall-off, due to low-energy protons. Cell death and chromosome aberrations were also predicted for V79 cells, in the same irradiation scenario as that used for AG01522 cells. In line with other studies, this work indicated that assuming a constant relative biological effectiveness (RBE) along a proton SOBP may be sub-optimal. Furthermore, it provided qualitative and quantitative evaluations of the dependence of the beam effectiveness on the considered endpoint and dose. More generally, this work represents an example of therapeutic beam characterization avoiding the use of

  10. Calculating Variations in Biological Effectiveness for a 62 MeV Proton Beam.

    PubMed

    Carante, Mario Pietro; Ballarini, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    A biophysical model of radiation-induced cell death and chromosome aberrations [called BIophysical ANalysis of Cell death and chromosome Aberrations (BIANCA)] was further developed and applied to therapeutic protons. The model assumes a pivotal role of DNA cluster damage, which can lead to clonogenic cell death following three main steps: (i) a DNA "cluster lesion" (CL) produces two independent chromosome fragments; (ii) fragment mis-rejoining within a threshold distance d gives rise to chromosome aberrations; (iii) certain aberration types (dicentrics, rings, and large deletions) lead to clonogenic inactivation. The yield of CLs and the probability, f, that a chromosome fragment remains un-rejoined even if other fragment(s) are present within d, were adjustable parameters. The model, implemented as a MC code providing simulated dose-responses directly comparable with experimental data, was applied to pristine and modulated Bragg peaks of the proton beam used to treat eye melanoma at INFN-LNS in Catania, Italy. Experimental survival curves for AG01522 cells exposed to the Catania beam were reproduced, supporting the model assumptions. Furthermore, cell death and chromosome aberrations at different depths along a spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) dose profile were predicted. Both endpoints showed an increase along the plateau, and high levels of damage were found also beyond the distal dose fall-off, due to low-energy protons. Cell death and chromosome aberrations were also predicted for V79 cells, in the same irradiation scenario as that used for AG01522 cells. In line with other studies, this work indicated that assuming a constant relative biological effectiveness (RBE) along a proton SOBP may be sub-optimal. Furthermore, it provided qualitative and quantitative evaluations of the dependence of the beam effectiveness on the considered endpoint and dose. More generally, this work represents an example of therapeutic beam characterization avoiding the use of

  11. Effects of MHD instabilities on neutral beam current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Podestà, M.; Gorelenkova, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gerhardt, S. P.; White, R. B.

    2015-04-17

    One of the primary tools foreseen for heating, current drive (CD) and q-profile control in future fusion reactors such as ITER and a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility is the neutral beam injection (NBI). However, fast ions from NBI may also provide the drive for energetic particle-driven instabilities (e.g. Alfvénic modes (AEs)), which in turn redistribute fast ions in both space and energy, thus hampering the control capabilities and overall efficiency of NB-driven current. Based on experiments on the NSTX tokamak (M. Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557), the effects of AEs and other low-frequency magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities on NB-CD efficiency are investigated. When looking at the new fast ion transport model, which accounts for particle transport in phase space as required for resonant AE perturbations, is utilized to obtain consistent simulations of NB-CD through the tokamak transport code TRANSP. It is found that instabilities do indeed reduce the NB-driven current density over most of the plasma radius by up to ~50%. Moreover, the details of the current profile evolution are sensitive to the specific model used to mimic the interaction between NB ions and instabilities. Finally, implications for fast ion transport modeling in integrated tokamak simulations are briefly discussed.

  12. Effects of MHD instabilities on neutral beam current drive

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Podestà, M.; Gorelenkova, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gerhardt, S. P.; White, R. B.

    2015-04-17

    One of the primary tools foreseen for heating, current drive (CD) and q-profile control in future fusion reactors such as ITER and a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility is the neutral beam injection (NBI). However, fast ions from NBI may also provide the drive for energetic particle-driven instabilities (e.g. Alfvénic modes (AEs)), which in turn redistribute fast ions in both space and energy, thus hampering the control capabilities and overall efficiency of NB-driven current. Based on experiments on the NSTX tokamak (M. Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557), the effects of AEs and other low-frequency magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities on NB-CDmore » efficiency are investigated. When looking at the new fast ion transport model, which accounts for particle transport in phase space as required for resonant AE perturbations, is utilized to obtain consistent simulations of NB-CD through the tokamak transport code TRANSP. It is found that instabilities do indeed reduce the NB-driven current density over most of the plasma radius by up to ~50%. Moreover, the details of the current profile evolution are sensitive to the specific model used to mimic the interaction between NB ions and instabilities. Finally, implications for fast ion transport modeling in integrated tokamak simulations are briefly discussed.« less

  13. Effective dose span of ten different cone beam CT devices

    PubMed Central

    Rottke, D; Patzelt, S; Poxleitner, P; Schulze, D

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Evaluation and reduction of dose are important issues. Since cone beam CT (CBCT) has been established now not just in dentistry, the number of acquired examinations continues to rise. Unfortunately, it is very difficult to compare the doses of available devices on the market owing to different exposition parameters, volumes and geometries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spans of effective doses (EDs) of ten different CBCT devices. Methods: 48 thermoluminescent dosemeters were placed in 24 sites in a RANDO® head phantom. Protocols with lowest exposition parameters and protocols with highest exposition parameters were performed for each of the ten devices. The ED was calculated from the measured energy doses according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection 2007 recommendations for each protocol and device, and the statistical values were evaluated afterwards. Results: The calculation of the ED resulted in values between 17.2 µSv and 396 µSv for the ten devices. The mean values for protocols with lowest and highest exposition parameters were 31.6 µSv and 209 µSv, respectively. Conclusions: It was not the aim of this study to evaluate the image quality depending on different exposition parameters but to define the spans of EDs in which different CBCT devices work. There is a wide span of ED for different CBCT devices depending on the selected exposition parameters, required spatial resolution and many other factors. PMID:23584925

  14. Effects of laser beam shapes on depths of penetration in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghafi, S.; Withford, M.; Farhadi, M.; Ghaderi, R.; Granmayeh, A.; Ghoranneviss, Z.; Moravej, F.

    2006-04-01

    For many medical laser applications, a particular beam shape is required. The output beam of a laser can be approximated by a Gaussian, higher-order Gaussian, annular or a flat-top (uniform) distribution. Here, we investigate, analytically and experimentally, the effects of laser beam shapes on the depths of penetration in treatments of any types of vascular malformation. In order to do this, the physical and optical parameters of the skin must be known and measured correctly. Using the Monte-Carlo method for seven layers of skin, a software predicting the beam propagation and intensity distribution inside of tissue has been developed in our centre. In this paper, a 15 watts copper vapour laser producing (511nm and 578 nm) for treatments of patients having PWS (Port Wine Stains) of different sizes is employed. The output beam of this laser was Gaussian. We have designed a beam homogenizer converting a Gaussian beam into flat-top distribution. Therefore, the effects of the laser irradiance beam shape (before and after beam shaping) on the depth of penetration have been investigated before people's treatments. Initially, two laser beams having Gaussian output distribution of the same power are considered. The diameter of one beam is 5mm and the other one is 10 mm. The intensity distribution of these beam inside of similar tissues are predicted and it is concluded that for deep but small size PWS the Gaussian beam having smaller beam diameter is more suitable than the larger spot size. Then, the beam intensity distribution inside of the same tissue (similar parameters) for two flat-top beams of the same power but different diameters (one is 5mm and the other is 10 mm) is calculated. It can be seen that the flat top beam of bigger spot-size has smaller penetration depth but it illuminates a larger area uniformly (suitable for large but not deep area). The depth of penetration of flat-top beam with smaller spot size is deeper but it illuminates a smaller area uniformly

  15. Quasideuteron effect with a polarized {gamma}{searrow}-ray beam

    SciTech Connect

    Babusci, D.; Bellini, V.; Capogni, M.; Casano, L.; Curro Dossi, B.; DAngelo, A.; De Lima, D.A.; Ghio, F.; Girolami, B.; Hu, L.; Leidemann, W.; Lugaresi, F.; Moricciani, D.; Orlandini, G.; Picozza, P.; Schaerf, C.

    1996-10-01

    The {sup 28}Si({gamma}{searrow},{ital np}){ital X} reaction has been studied using the Ladon polarized and tagged {gamma}-ray beam, in the energy region between 50 and 75 MeV. The data have been compared with the {ital quasideuteron} mechanism. At the highest photon energy the applied model leads to a satisfactory description of both the unpolarized cross section and beam polarization asymmetry. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  16. Permeability-increasing effects of low-power light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemtsev, Igor Z.; Koudryavtsev, N. N.

    1996-01-01

    The actions of physico-chemical mechanisms of low power light, applied in medicine are discussed. The investigations were prepared both in experiment on laboratory animals and in emergency-care clinics, where I worked with physicians as the theory-investigator. In this message I propose the theory of permeability increasing effects of low power light. Proton- permeability increasing effects on membranes go to the bioenergetic mechanism of low power light action. Sodium-permeability increasing effects on excitable membranes go to the reflex mechanism of low power light action. We suppose the medical mechanism of laser irradiation effects on the blood to be connected with water-permeability increasing effects because of blood cell membrane depolarization and shaking. We measured the dependence of red blood cell membrane water-permeability coefficient upon the low power light irradiation wavelength in the range 625 - 645 nm. So it was proved that He-Ne laser irradiation with 633 nm wavelength excites dissolved molecular oxygen from the ground triplet state to the singlet state. Fast relaxation of singlet oxygen to triplet state in water medium near membrane with the time 10-6 sec go to the membrane purification mechanism of low power light action.

  17. The effect of price increases on contraceptive sales in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ciszewski, R L; Harvey, P D

    1994-01-01

    In April 1990, the prices of five brands of contraceptives in the Bangladesh social marketing project were increased, by an average of 60%. The impact on condom sales was immediate and severe, with sales for the following 12 months dropping by 46% from the average during the preceding 12 months. The effect on oral contraceptive sales was less dramatic: average sales in the year following the increases dropped slightly despite a previously established pattern of rapidly rising sales. There appears no reasonable combination of events other than the price increase itself to explain most of the difference. PMID:8200877

  18. Economic Effects of Increased Control Zone Sizes in Conflict Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Koushik

    1998-01-01

    A methodology for estimating the economic effects of different control zone sizes used in conflict resolutions between aircraft is presented in this paper. The methodology is based on estimating the difference in flight times of aircraft with and without the control zone, and converting the difference into a direct operating cost. Using this methodology the effects of increased lateral and vertical control zone sizes are evaluated.

  19. Effect of secondary ions on the electron beam optics in the Recycler Electron Cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Shemyakin, A.; Prost, L.; Saewert, G.

    2010-05-01

    Antiprotons in Fermilab's Recycler ring are cooled by a 4.3 MeV, 0.1-0.5 A DC electron beam (as well as by a stochastic cooling system). The unique combination of the relativistic energy ({gamma} = 9.49), an Ampere-range DC beam, and a relatively weak focusing makes the cooling efficiency particularly sensitive to ion neutralization. A capability to clear ions was recently implemented by way of interrupting the electron beam for 1-30 {micro}s with a repetition rate of up to 40 Hz. The cooling properties of the electron beam were analyzed with drag rate measurements and showed that accumulated ions significantly affect the beam optics. For a beam current of 0.3 A, the longitudinal cooling rate was increased by factor of {approx}2 when ions were removed.

  20. Radiation transport effects in heavy-ion beam--target interaction studies: Measurement of target opacity and beam conversion efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Tahir, N. A.; Arnold, R. C.

    1989-07-01

    In this paper detailed simulations are presented of radiation-hydrodynamicresponse of gaseous cylindrical targets irradiated with heavy-ion beams thatwill be produced at the Gesellschaft f/umlt u/r Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt,using a heavy-ion synchrotron (SIS) (/ital Heavy/ /ital Ion//usion/, AIP Conference Proceedings No. 152 (AIP, NewYork, 1986), p. 23). The purpose of this work is to explore material conditionsfor which the thermal radiation effects can be maximized. This is desirable inorder to study a number of interesting and important effects includingmaximization of conversion efficiency of the ion beam energy to thermalradiation and measurement of the target opacity in the SIS experiments. It isexpected that the SIS beams will produce a specific deposition power of 10 TW/g.The simulations in this paper show that a temperature of the order of 10 eVcould be achieved by the SIS beams using homogeneous, cylindrical Xe targets. Ithas been shown that with the help of these computer simulations one should beable to measure the target opacity in these experiments within a factor of 3.Also these calculations show that in the SIS experiments one should be able tohave a 50% conversion efficiency using a Xe target under optimum conditions. Ithas been found that the radiation effects will be optimized in the SISexperiments if the initial target density is of the order of 10/sup /minus/3/ g/cm/sup 3/.If the initial density is too high (of the order of 10/sup /minus/1/ g/cm/sup 3/ or more),hydrodynamic effects will dominate, while, on the other hand, if the initialdensity is too low (of the order of 10/sup /minus/4/ g/cm/sup 3/ or less), the electronthermal conductivity will take over.

  1. Dynamic Characteristics of Micro-Beams Considering the Effect of Flexible Supports

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zuo-Yang; Zhang, Wen-Ming; Meng, Guang

    2013-01-01

    Normally, the boundaries are assumed to allow small deflections and moments for MEMS beams with flexible supports. The non-ideal boundary conditions have a significant effect on the qualitative dynamical behavior. In this paper, by employing the principle of energy equivalence, rigorous theoretical solutions of the tangential and rotational equivalent stiffness are derived based on the Boussinesq's and Cerruti's displacement equations. The non-dimensional differential partial equation of the motion, as well as coupled boundary conditions, are solved analytically using the method of multiple time scales. The closed-form solution provides a direct insight into the relationship between the boundary conditions and vibration characteristics of the dynamic system, in which resonance frequencies increase with the nonlinear mechanical spring effect but decrease with the effect of flexible supports. The obtained results of frequencies and mode shapes are compared with the cases of ideal boundary conditions, and the differences between them are contrasted on frequency response curves. The influences of the support material property on the equivalent stiffness and resonance frequency shift are also discussed. It is demonstrated that the proposed model with the flexible supports boundary conditions has significant effect on the rigorous quantitative dynamical analysis of the MEMS beams. Moreover, the proposed analytical solutions are in good agreement with those obtained from finite element analyses.

  2. Study on elucidation of bactericidal effects induced by laser beam irradiation Measurement of dynamic stress on laser irradiated surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furumoto, Tatsuaki; Kasai, Atsushi; Tachiya, Hiroshi; Hosokawa, Akira; Ueda, Takashi

    2010-09-01

    In dental treatment, many types of laser beams have been used for various surgical treatments, and the influences of laser beam irradiation on bactericidal effect have been investigated. However, most of the work has been performed by irradiating to an agar plate with the colony of bacteria, and very few studies have been reported on the physical mechanism of bactericidal effects induced by laser beam irradiation. This paper deals with the measurement of dynamic stress induced in extracted human enamel by irradiation with Nd:YAG laser beams. Laser beams can be delivered to the enamel surface through a quartz optical fiber. Dynamic stress induced in the specimen using elastic wave propagation in a cylindrical long bar made of aluminum alloy is measured. Laser induced stress intensity is evaluated from dynamic strain measured by small semiconductor strain gauges. Carbon powder and titanium dioxide powder were applied to the human enamel surface as absorbents. Additionally, the phenomenon of laser beam irradiation to the human enamel surface was observed with an ultrahigh speed video camera. Results showed that a plasma was generated on the enamel surface during laser beam irradiation, and the melted tissues were scattered in the vertical direction against the enamel surface with a mushroom-like wave. Averaged scattering velocity of the melted tissues was 25.2 m/s. Induced dynamic stress on the enamel surface increased with increasing laser energy in each absorbent. Induced dynamic stresses with titanium dioxide powder were superior to those with carbon powder. Induced dynamic stress was related to volume of prepared cavity, and induced stress for the removal of unit volume of human enamel was 0.03 Pa/mm 3.

  3. Maximizing the biological effect of proton dose delivered with scanned beams via inhomogeneous daily dose distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Chuan; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Goldberg, Saveli; Niemierko, Andrzej; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Trofimov, Alexei

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Biological effect of radiation can be enhanced with hypofractionation, localized dose escalation, and, in particle therapy, with optimized distribution of linear energy transfer (LET). The authors describe a method to construct inhomogeneous fractional dose (IFD) distributions, and evaluate the potential gain in the therapeutic effect from their delivery in proton therapy delivered by pencil beam scanning. Methods: For 13 cases of prostate cancer, the authors considered hypofractionated courses of 60 Gy delivered in 20 fractions. (All doses denoted in Gy include the proton's mean relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1.) Two types of plans were optimized using two opposed lateral beams to deliver a uniform dose of 3 Gy per fraction to the target by scanning: (1) in conventional full-target plans (FTP), each beam irradiated the entire gland, (2) in split-target plans (STP), beams irradiated only the respective proximal hemispheres (prostate split sagittally). Inverse planning yielded intensity maps, in which discrete position control points of the scanned beam (spots) were assigned optimized intensity values. FTP plans preferentially required a higher intensity of spots in the distal part of the target, while STP, by design, employed proximal spots. To evaluate the utility of IFD delivery, IFD plans were generated by rearranging the spot intensities from FTP or STP intensity maps, separately as well as combined using a variety of mixing weights. IFD courses were designed so that, in alternating fractions, one of the hemispheres of the prostate would receive a dose boost and the other receive a lower dose, while the total physical dose from the IFD course was roughly uniform across the prostate. IFD plans were normalized so that the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of rectum and bladder did not increase, compared to the baseline FTP plan, which irradiated the prostate uniformly in every fraction. An EUD-based model was then applied to estimate tumor

  4. The effect of Ar neutral beam treatment of screen-printed carbon nanotubes for enhanced field emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kyung, Se Jin; Park, Jae Beom; Park, Byung Jae; Min, Kyung Seok; Lee, June Hee; Yeom, Geun Young; Shin, Yong Sook; Park, Chong Yun

    2007-04-15

    This study examined the effectiveness of an Ar neutral beam as a surface treatment for improving the field emission properties of screen-printed carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A short period of the neutral beam treatment on tape-activated CNTs enhanced the emission properties of the CNTs, showing a decrease in the turn-on field and an increase in the number of emission sites. The neutral beam treatment appeared to render the CNT surfaces more actively by exposing more CNTs from the CNT paste without cutting or kinking the already exposed long CNT emitters. The treated CNTs emitted more electrons than the CNTs treated using other methods. When the field emission properties were measured after the neutral beam treatment, the turn-on field decreased from 1.65 to 0.60 V/{mu}m and the emission field at 1 mA/cm{sup 2} decreased from 3.10 to 2.41 V/{mu}m. After the neutral beam treatment for 10 s, there was an improvement in the stability of the emission current at a constant electric field. It is expected that the neutral beam treatment introduced in this study will provide an easy way of improving the emission intensity and stability of screen-printed CNT emitters.

  5. Increasing the Effective Number of Neutrinos with Decaying Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Nakayama, Kazunori; Senami, Masato; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2007-11-01

    We present a model of decaying particles to increase the effective number of neutrinos Nν after big bang nucleosynthesis but before the structure formation begins. We point out that our scenario solves the discrepancy between the constraints on Nν from these two epochs, As an example, we consider saxion decay into two axions.

  6. Increasing the Effective Number of Neutrinos with Decaying Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Nakayama, Kazunori; Senami, Masato; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2007-11-20

    We present a model of decaying particles to increase the effective number of neutrinos N{sub {nu}} after big bang nucleosynthesis but before the structure formation begins. We point out that our scenario solves the discrepancy between the constraints on N{sub {nu}} from these two epochs, As an example, we consider saxion decay into two axions.

  7. Improving the Odds: Increasing the Effectiveness of Publicly Funded Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnow, Burt S., Ed.; King, Christopher T., Ed.

    This book, which is intended for policymakers, administrators, and researchers, contains 13 research papers and reviews of the literature on increasing the effectiveness of publicly funded training. The following papers are included: "Publicly Funded Training in a Changing Labor Market" (Burt S. Barnow, Christopher T. King); "The Economic,…

  8. Effect of basic physical parameters to control plasma meniscus and beam halo formation in negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, K.; Okuda, S.; Nishioka, S.; Hatayama, A.

    2013-09-14

    Our previous study shows that the curvature of the plasma meniscus causes the beam halo in the negative ion sources: the negative ions extracted from the periphery of the meniscus are over-focused in the extractor due to the electrostatic lens effect, and consequently become the beam halo. In this article, the detail physics of the plasma meniscus and beam halo formation is investigated with two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. It is shown that the basic physical parameters such as the H{sup −} extraction voltage and the effective electron confinement time significantly affect the formation of the plasma meniscus and the resultant beam halo since the penetration of electric field for negative ion extraction depends on these physical parameters. Especially, the electron confinement time depends on the characteristic time of electron escape along the magnetic field as well as the characteristic time of electron diffusion across the magnetic field. The plasma meniscus penetrates deeply into the source plasma region when the effective electron confinement time is short. In this case, the curvature of the plasma meniscus becomes large, and consequently the fraction of the beam halo increases.

  9. Effect of femtosecond laser beam angle on bond strength of zirconia-resin cement.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Yusuf Z; Kepceoglu, Abdullah; Yavuz, Tevfik; Aslan, Muhammed A; Demirtag, Zulfikar; Kılıc, Hamdi S; Usumez, Aslihan

    2015-11-01

    Yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) ceramic is widely used as an all-ceramic core material because of its enhanced mechanical and aesthetic properties. The bond strength of Y-TZP restorations affects long-term success; hence, surface treatment is required on ceramic boundaries. This study evaluated the effect of different laser beam angles on Y-TZP-resin cement shear bond strength (SBS). Forty plates of Y-TZP ceramics were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 10). A femtosecond amplifier laser pulse was applied on Y-TZP surface with different incidence angles (90°, 75°, 60°, 45°). The resin cement was adhered onto the zirconia surfaces. The SBS of each sample was measured using universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The SBS was analyzed through one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA)/Tukey tests. The results showed that the degree of laser beam angle affects the SBS of resin cement to Y-TZP. The laser beam was applied to a surface with a 45° angle which resulted in significantly higher SBS (18.2 ± 1.43 MPa) than other groups (at 90° angulation (10.79 ± 1.8 MPa), at 75° (13.48 ± 1.2 MPa) and at 60° (15.85 ± 0.81 MPa); p < 0.001). This study shows that decreasing of the angle between the ceramic surface and the laser beam increased the SBS between the resin cement and the ceramic material, as well as the orifice. PMID:25958172

  10. Polyamide-6: The effects on mechanical and physicochemical properties by electron beam irradiation at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adem, E.; Burillo, G.; del Castillo, L. F.; Vásquez, M.; Avalos-Borja, M.; Marcos-Fernández, A.

    2014-04-01

    The electron beam irradiation of polyamide-6 (PA-6) films was carried out in air over a range of 50-1000 kGy at varying temperatures and a dose rate of 5.1 kGy min-1. The effects of the irradiation at temperatures above and below the glass transition temperature (Tg) on the thermal and mechanical properties were studied. Melting and crystallization temperatures decreased significantly with the increase in irradiation dose, whereas percent of crystallinity varied only slightly and Tg slightly increased for irradiated samples respect to non irradiated one with no significant effect of the dose. Mechanical properties were affected by irradiation. The material became more rigid with a direct relationship between the mechanical properties and the irradiation dose. The irradiation above Tg led to a larger variation in the thermal and mechanical properties respect to the irradiation below Tg. The changes in properties were related to the crosslinking produced in the amorphous part of the polymer by the electron beam irradiation.