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Sample records for increased electrical resistivity

  1. A study of the deposition of carbide coatings on graphite fibers. [to increase electrical resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suplinskas, R. J.; Henze, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition of boron carbide and silicon carbide on graphite fibers to increase their electrical resistance was studied. Silicon carbide coatings were applied without degradation of the mechanical properties of the filaments. These coatings typically added 1000 ohms to the resistance of a filament as measured between two mercury pools. When SiC-coated filaments were oxidized by refluxing in boiling phosphoric acid, average resistance increased by an additional 1000 ohms; in addition resistance increases as high as 150 K ohms and breakdown voltages as high as 17 volts were noted. Data on boron carbide coatings indicated that such coatings would not be effective in increasing resistance, and would degrade the mechanical properties.

  2. Fluoride-added Pr-Fe-B die-upset magnets with increased electrical resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Marinescu, M.; Liu, J. F.; Gabay, A. M.; Hadjipanayis, G. C.

    2009-04-01

    This work reports the effect of NdF{sub 3}, DyF{sub 3}, and CaF{sub 2} additions on the electrical resistivity and magnetic properties of Pr-Fe-B hot-pressed and die-upset permanent magnets. Composite magnets were synthesized from ground Pr{sub 14.5}Fe{sub 79.5}B{sub 6} melt-spun ribbons blended with 5 wt % of fluoride fine powders and consolidated by hot pressing at 650 deg. C, followed by die upsetting at 800 deg. C. While CaF{sub 2} is stable at the processing temperatures, the rare earth atoms separate from their fluorides to a certain degree with the assistance of the Pr-rich phase from the magnet matrix. Addition of fluorides increased the resistivity of the hot-pressed specimens by more than 200%. The resistivity of the die-upset specimens measured perpendicularly to the direction of the applied pressure, which is also the direction of magnetization, is, however, only slightly increased compared to the magnet counterparts without the fluoride addition. The intrinsic coercivity of Pr{sub 14.5}Fe{sub 79.5}B{sub 6} die-upset specimens is increased from 14.5 kOe to 15.3, 17.1, and 17.7 kOe for the addition of CaF{sub 2}, DyF{sub 3}, and NdF{sub 3}, respectively, at a slight expense of the residual flux.

  3. Variations of electric resistance and H2 and Rn emissions of concrete blocks under increasing uniaxial compression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, C.-Y.; Luo, G.

    1990-01-01

    Electric resistance and emissions of hydrogen and radon isotopes of concrete (which is somewhat similar to fault-zone materials) under increasing uniaxial compression were continuously monitored to check whether they show any pre- and post-failure changes that may correspond to similar changes reported for earthquakes. The results show that all these parameters generally begin to increase when the applied stresses reach 20% to 90% of the corresponding failure stresses, probably due to the occurrence and growth of dilatant microcracks in the specimens. The prefailure changes have different patterns for different specimens, probably because of differences in spatial and temporal distributions of the microcracks. The resistance shows large co-failure increases, and the gas emissions show large post-failure increases. The post-failure increase of radon persists longer and stays at a higher level than that of hydrogen, suggesting a difference in the emission mechanisms for these two kinds of gases. The H2 increase may be mainly due to chemical reaction at the crack surfaces while they are fresh, whereas the Rn increases may be mainly the result of the increased emanation area of such surfaces. The results suggest that monitoring of resistivity and gas emissions may be useful for predicting earthquakes and failures of concrete structures. ?? 1990 Birkha??user Verlag.

  4. The use of an electric field in increasing the resistance of plants to the action of unfavorable space flight factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechitailo, G.; Gordeev, A.

    The key role in increasing the resistance of plants to unfavorable space flight factors is assigned to biomembranes of root cells. It is these biomembranes on which numerous biochemical and biophysical processes determining the adaptive capacity of plant organisms occur. In the initial period of exposure to unfavorable space flight factors the adaptational reactions of the plant organism undoubtedly increase its resistance. But the intensification of removal of H+ ions through the plasmalemma with an increase of the external influence sharply raises the quantity of cations leaving the cell, which leads to the accumu lation of a considerable quantity of intracellular negative charges. These charges together with negative charges built in the membrane force protons to concentrate on the external surface of the membrane. Since protons have a very strong electric field, they form such a charge of which the electric field is about from several to hundreds of V/cm. The concentration of positive charges of protons entails the formation of a double electric field which extremely impedes the diffusion of other ions. Thus, a proton barrier is formed. Its length can be very considerable due to which the whole process of transmembrane energy and mass-transfer is disturbed. The proton barrier is easily destroyed by a weak electric field created in the root zone. In experiment on electrostimulation of different plants under space flight conditions at the orbital station MIR the absorption of nutrient elements by the root system increased to the optimal level, the ratio of physiologically active substances in the rhizosphere was normalized, the content of chlorophyll, carotin, and ascorbic acid in leaves corresponded to the ground-based control. Understanding of the mechanism of formation of a proton barrier on the plasmalemma of root cells as a result of the response of plants to the negative action of external factors (microgravity) is of great importance. It allows the

  5. The use of an electric field in increasing the resistance of plants to the action of unfavorable space flight factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechitailo, G.; Gordeev, A.

    2004-01-01

    The key role in increasing the resistance of plants to unfavorable space flight factors is assigned to biomembranes of root cells. It is these biomembranes in which numerous biochemical and biophysical processes determining the adaptive capacity of plant organisms occur. In the initial period of exposure to unfavorable space flight factors the adaptation reactions of the plant organism undoubtedly increase its resistance. But the intensification of removal of H + ions through the plasmalemma with an increase of the external influence sharply raises the quantity of cations leaving the cell, which leads to the accumulation of a considerable quantity of intracellular negative charges. These charges together with negative charges built in the membrane force protons to concentrate on the external surface of the membrane. Since protons have a very strong electric field, they form such a charge of which the electric field is about from several to hundreds of V/cm. The concentration of positive charges of protons entails the formation of a double electric field which extremely impedes the diffusion of other ions. Thus, a proton barrier is formed. Its length can be very considerable due to which the whole process of transmembrane energy and mass-transfer is disturbed. The proton barrier is easily destroyed by a weak electric field created in the root zone. In experiments on electrostimulation of different plants under space flight conditions at the orbital station MIR the absorption of nutrient elements by the root system increased to the optimal level, the ratio of physiologically active substances in the rhizosphere was normalized, the content of chlorophyll, carotin, and ascorbic acid in leaves corresponded to the ground-based control. Understanding of the mechanism of formation of a proton barrier on the plasmalemma of root cells as a result of the response of plants to the negative action of external factors (microgravity) is of great importance. It allows the

  6. Water increases the fluidity of intercellular membranes of stratum corneum: correlation with water permeability, elastic, and electrical resistance properties.

    PubMed

    Alonso, A; Meirelles, N C; Yushmanov, V E; Tabak, M

    1996-05-01

    We used the spin label electron spin resonance technique to monitor the hydration effect on the molecular dynamics of lipids at C-5, C-12, and C-16 positions of the alkyl chain. Increase in water content of neonatal rat SC leads to an increase in membrane fluidity, especially in the region near the membrane-water interface. The effect is less pronounced deeper inside the hydrophobic core. The reorientational correlation time at the C-16 position of hydrocarbon chains showed a higher change up to approximately 18% (w/w) of water content. This behavior was accompanied by an exponential decay both in elastic modulus and electrical resistance with water content. On the contrary, the segmental motion at C-5 and C-12 positions of the chain and the permeability constant increased in the range of around 18% w/w) up to the fully hydrated condition (58 +/- 7%). Our results give a better characterization of the fluidity of SC and show that it is the principal parameter involved in the mechanism of the permeability of different compounds through skin. PMID:8618039

  7. Electrically Variable Resistive Memory Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Shangqing; Wu, Nai-Juan; Ignatiev, Alex; Charlson, E. J.

    2010-01-01

    Nonvolatile electronic memory devices that store data in the form of electrical- resistance values, and memory circuits based on such devices, have been invented. These devices and circuits exploit an electrically-variable-resistance phenomenon that occurs in thin films of certain oxides that exhibit the colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) effect. It is worth emphasizing that, as stated in the immediately preceding article, these devices function at room temperature and do not depend on externally applied magnetic fields. A device of this type is basically a thin film resistor: it consists of a thin film of a CMR material located between, and in contact with, two electrical conductors. The application of a short-duration, low-voltage current pulse via the terminals changes the electrical resistance of the film. The amount of the change in resistance depends on the size of the pulse. The direction of change (increase or decrease of resistance) depends on the polarity of the pulse. Hence, a datum can be written (or a prior datum overwritten) in the memory device by applying a pulse of size and polarity tailored to set the resistance at a value that represents a specific numerical value. To read the datum, one applies a smaller pulse - one that is large enough to enable accurate measurement of resistance, but small enough so as not to change the resistance. In writing, the resistance can be set to any value within the dynamic range of the CMR film. Typically, the value would be one of several discrete resistance values that represent logic levels or digits. Because the number of levels can exceed 2, a memory device of this type is not limited to binary data. Like other memory devices, devices of this type can be incorporated into a memory integrated circuit by laying them out on a substrate in rows and columns, along with row and column conductors for electrically addressing them individually or collectively.

  8. Electrical Resistivity Imaging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) is a geophysical method originally developed within the mining industry where it has been used for decades to explore for and characterize subsurface mineral deposits. It is one of the oldest geophysical methods with the first documented usag...

  9. Electrical resistivity probes

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Solbau, Ray D.

    2003-10-21

    A miniaturized electrical resistivity (ER) probe based on a known current-voltage (I-V) electrode structure, the Wenner array, is designed for local (point) measurement. A pair of voltage measuring electrodes are positioned between a pair of current carrying electrodes. The electrodes are typically about 1 cm long, separated by 1 cm, so the probe is only about 1 inch long. The electrodes are mounted to a rigid tube with electrical wires in the tube and a sand bag may be placed around the electrodes to protect the electrodes. The probes can be positioned in a borehole or on the surface. The electrodes make contact with the surrounding medium. In a dual mode system, individual probes of a plurality of spaced probes can be used to measure local resistance, i.e. point measurements, but the system can select different probes to make interval measurements between probes and between boreholes.

  10. Alternating current impedance imaging of high-resistance membrane pores using a scanning electrochemical microscope. Application of membrane electrical shunts to increase measurement sensitivity and image contrast.

    PubMed

    Ervin, Eric Nathan; White, Henry S; Baker, Lane A; Martin, Charles R

    2006-09-15

    Whether an individual pore in a porous membrane can be imaged using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), operated in ac impedance mode, is determined by the magnitude of the change in the total impedance of the imaging system as the SECM tip is scanned over the pore. In instances when the SECM tip resistance is small relative to the internal pore resistance, the total impedance changes by a negligible amount, rendering the pore invisible during impedance imaging. A simple solution to this problem is to introduce a low-impedance electrical shunt (i.e., a salt bridge) across the membrane. This principle is demonstrated by imaging polycarbonate membranes (6-12-microm thickness) containing between 1 and 2000 conical-shaped pores (60-nm- and 2.5-microm-diameter openings) using an approximately 1-microm-radius Pt tip. Theory and experiments show that image contrast (the change in ac current measured as the probe is scanned over the pore) is inversely proportional to the total resistance of the membrane and can be increased by a factor of approximately 50x by introducing a low-resistance electrical shunt across the membrane. Remarkably, SECM images of membranes containing a single high-resistance (approximately 1 G Omega) pore can only be imaged by short-circuiting the membrane. Image contrast also becomes independent of membrane resistance when an electrical shunt is used, allowing for more quantitative comparisons of the features in ac impedance images of different membranes. PMID:16970331

  11. Electrical resistivity of composite superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. H.; Lee, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    In addition to its superconducting properties, a superconductor is usually characterized by poor thermal conductivity and relatively high electrical resistivity in the normal state. To remedy this situation a study of superconducting properties of Cu-rich CU-Nb wires prepared by directionally solidified and cold-rolled technique was conducted. Some of the specimens were prepared by melting, directional solidification and diffusing in Tin. A total of 12 wire specimens was tested. Each specimen was analyzed by plotting experimental data into the following curves: the graph of the residual resistivity as a function of the specimen current at 4.3 K; and the graph of the electrical resistivity as a function of the temperature at a constant current.

  12. Pulsed electric field increases reproduction.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Dimitris J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study the effect of pulsed electric field - applied in corona discharge photography - on Drosophila melanogaster reproduction, possible induction of DNA fragmentation, and morphological alterations in the gonads. Materials and methods Animals were exposed to different field intensities (100, 200, 300, and 400 kV/m) during the first 2-5 days of their adult lives, and the effect on reproductive capacity was assessed. DNA fragmentation during early- and mid-oogenesis was investigated by application of the TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotide transferase dUTP Nick End Labeling) assay. Sections of follicles after fixation and embedding in resins were observed for possible morphological/developmental abnormalities. Results The field increased reproduction by up to 30% by increasing reproductive capacity in both sexes. The effect increased with increasing field intensities. The rate of increase diminished at the strongest intensities. Slight induction of DNA fragmentation was observed exclusively in the nurse (predominantly) and follicle cells, and exclusively at the two most sensitive developmental stages, i.e., germarium and predominantly stage 7-8. Sections of follicles from exposed females at stages of early and mid-oogennesis other than germarium and stages 7-8 did not reveal abnormalities. Conclusions (1) The specific type of electric field may represent a mild stress factor, inducing DNA fragmentation and cell death in a small percentage of gametes, triggering the reaction of the animal's reproductive system to increase the rate of gametogenesis in order to compensate the loss of a small number of gametes. (2) The nurse cells are the most sensitive from all three types of egg chamber cells. (3) The mid-oogenesis checkpoint (stage 7-8) is more sensitive to this field than the early oogenesis one (germarium) in contrast to microwave exposure. (4) Possible therapeutic applications, or applications in increasing fertility, should be investigated. PMID:26651869

  13. Release Resistant Electrical Interconnections For Mems Devices

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Garrett, Stephen E.; Reber, Cathleen A.

    2005-02-22

    A release resistant electrical interconnection comprising a gold-based electrical conductor compression bonded directly to a highly-doped polysilicon bonding pad in a MEMS, IMEMS, or MOEMS device, without using any intermediate layers of aluminum, titanium, solder, or conductive adhesive disposed in-between the conductor and polysilicon pad. After the initial compression bond has been formed, subsequent heat treatment of the joint above 363 C creates a liquid eutectic phase at the bondline comprising gold plus approximately 3 wt % silicon, which, upon re-solidification, significantly improves the bond strength by reforming and enhancing the initial bond. This type of electrical interconnection is resistant to chemical attack from acids used for releasing MEMS elements (HF, HCL), thereby enabling the use of a "package-first, release-second" sequence for fabricating MEMS devices. Likewise, the bond strength of an Au--Ge compression bond may be increased by forming a transient liquid eutectic phase comprising Au-12 wt % Ge.

  14. Determination of electrical resistivity of dry coke beds

    SciTech Connect

    Eidem, P.A.; Tangstad, M.; Bakken, J.A.

    2008-02-15

    The electrical resistivity of the coke bed is of great importance when producing FeMn, SiMn, and FeCr in a submerged arc furnace. In these processes, a coke bed is situated below and around the electrode tip and consists of metallurgical coke, slag, gas, and metal droplets. Since the basic mechanisms determining the electrical resistivity of a coke bed is not yet fully understood, this investigation is focused on the resistivity of dry coke beds consisting of different carbonaceous materials, i.e., coke beds containing no slag or metal. A method that reliably compares the electrical bulk resistivity of different metallurgical cokes at 1500{sup o} C to 1600{sup o}C is developed. The apparatus is dimensioned for industrial sized materials, and the electrical resistivity of anthracite, charcoal, petroleum coke, and metallurgical coke has been measured. The resistivity at high temperatures of the Magnitogorsk coke, which has the highest resistivity of the metallurgical cokes investigated, is twice the resistivity of the Corus coke, which has the lowest electrical resistivity. Zdzieszowice and SSAB coke sort in between with decreasing resistivities in the respective order. The electrical resistivity of anthracite, charcoal, and petroleum coke is generally higher than the resistivity of the metallurgical cokes, ranging from about two to about eight times the resistivity of the Corus coke at 1450{sup o}C. The general trend is that the bulk resistivity of carbon materials decreases with increasing temperature and increasing particle size.

  15. Electrical Resistivity Imaging to Quantify Spatial Soil Heterogeneit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electrical resistivity (ER) sounding is increasingly being used as non-invasive technique to reveal and map soil heterogeneity. The objective of this work was to evaluate effects of soil properties on the electric resistivity and to observe these effects in spatial context in coarse-textured soil. T...

  16. Rational Experimental Design for Electrical Resistivity Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, V.; Pidlisecky, A.; Knight, R.

    2008-12-01

    Over the past several decades advances in the acquisition and processing of electrical resistivity data, through multi-channel acquisition systems and new inversion algorithms, have greatly increased the value of these data to near-surface environmental and hydrological problems. There has, however, been relatively little advancement in the design of actual surveys. Data acquisition still typically involves using a small number of traditional arrays (e.g. Wenner, Schlumberger) despite a demonstrated improvement in data quality from the use of non-standard arrays. While optimized experimental design has been widely studied in applied mathematics and the physical and biological sciences, it is rarely implemented for non-linear problems, such as electrical resistivity imaging (ERI). We focus specifically on using ERI in the field for monitoring changes in the subsurface electrical resistivity structure. For this application we seek an experimental design method that can be used in the field to modify the data acquisition scheme (spatial and temporal sampling) based on prior knowledge of the site and/or knowledge gained during the imaging experiment. Some recent studies have investigated optimized design of electrical resistivity surveys by linearizing the problem or with computationally-intensive search algorithms. We propose a method for rational experimental design based on the concept of informed imaging, the use of prior information regarding subsurface properties and processes to develop problem-specific data acquisition and inversion schemes. Specifically, we use realistic subsurface resistivity models to aid in choosing source configurations that maximize the information content of our data. Our approach is based on first assessing the current density within a region of interest, in order to provide sufficient energy to the region of interest to overcome a noise threshold, and then evaluating the direction of current vectors, in order to maximize the

  17. Complex Electrical Resistivity for Monitoring DNAPL Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen R. Brown; David Lesmes; John Fourkas

    2003-09-12

    Nearly all Department of Energy (DOE) facilities have landfills and buried waste areas. Of the various contaminants present at these sites, dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) are particularly hard to locate and remove. There is an increasing need for external or non-invasive sensing techniques to locate DNAPLs in the subsurface and to track their spread and monitor their breakdown or removal by natural or engineered means. G. Olhoeft and colleagues have published several reports based on laboratory studies using the complex resistivity method which indicate that organic solvents, notably toluene, PCE, and TCE, residing in clay-bearing soils have distinctive electrical signatures. These results have suggested to many researchers the basis of an ideal new measurement technique for geophysical characterization of DNAPL pollution. Encouraged by these results we proposed to bring the field measurement of complex resistivity as a means of pollution characterization from the conceptual stage to practice. We planned to document the detectability of clay-organic solvent interactions with geophysical measurements in the laboratory, develop further understanding of the underlying physical and chemical mechanisms, and then apply these observations to develop field techniques. As with any new research endeavor we note the extreme importance of trying to reproduce the work of previous researchers to ensure that any effects observed are due to the physical phenomena occurring in the specimen and not due to the particular experimental apparatus or method used. To this end, we independently designed and built a laboratory system, including a sample holder, electrodes, electronics, and data analysis software, for the measurement of the complex electrical resistivity properties of soil contaminated with organic solvents. The capabilities and reliability of this technique were documented. Using various standards we performed measurement accuracy, repeatability, and noise immunity

  18. Theoretical relationship between elastic wave velocity and electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Sub; Yoon, Hyung-Koo

    2015-05-01

    Elastic wave velocity and electrical resistivity have been commonly applied to estimate stratum structures and obtain subsurface soil design parameters. Both elastic wave velocity and electrical resistivity are related to the void ratio; the objective of this study is therefore to suggest a theoretical relationship between the two physical parameters. Gassmann theory and Archie's equation are applied to propose a new theoretical equation, which relates the compressional wave velocity to shear wave velocity and electrical resistivity. The piezo disk element (PDE) and bender element (BE) are used to measure the compressional and shear wave velocities, respectively. In addition, the electrical resistivity is obtained by using the electrical resistivity probe (ERP). The elastic wave velocity and electrical resistivity are recorded in several types of soils including sand, silty sand, silty clay, silt, and clay-sand mixture. The appropriate input parameters are determined based on the error norm in order to increase the reliability of the proposed relationship. The predicted compressional wave velocities from the shear wave velocity and electrical resistivity are similar to the measured compressional velocities. This study demonstrates that the new theoretical relationship may be effectively used to predict the unknown geophysical property from the measured values.

  19. Electro-dewatering of activated sludge: Electrical resistance analysis.

    PubMed

    Conrardy, Jean-Baptiste; Vaxelaire, Jean; Olivier, Jérémy

    2016-09-01

    The significant risk of ohmic heating and the high electric energy consumption at terminal stages of the dewatering are two problems that hamper the development of the electro-dewatering (EDW) technology. In the future prospect of studying these two issues, it is important to provide and analyse quantitative data relative to the behavior of the electric resistance in EDW. It was the main goal of this study. It showed that the electric resistance of the complete system (cake + filter cloth) depended on the cake dryness. It increased sharply when the solids content exceeded around 45%.The solids loading also influenced the apparent resistance at the beginning of the process. The electric resistance of the filter cloth represented about 20% of the total resistance. It remained relatively constant over the process except at the terminal stage where it generally increased sharply. The use of conductive filter, such as metallic cloth, enabled to decrease the electric resistance and reduce the energy consumption of the process. The electric resistance decreased across the cake from the anode to the cathode. This behavior may be explained by several phenomena such as the ions migration and their interaction with the solid, the decrease of dry solids content from the anode to the cathode and the gas presence at the anode (due to electrolysis reaction). PMID:27192354

  20. Increasing Ceftriaxone Resistance in Salmonellae, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Su, Lin-Hui; Teng, Wen-Shin; Chen, Chyi-Liang; Lee, Hao-Yuan; Li, Hsin-Chieh; Wu, Tsu-Lan

    2011-01-01

    In Taiwan, despite a substantial decline of Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis infections, strains resistant to ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone persist. A self-transferable blaCMY-2-harboring IncI1 plasmid was identified in S. enterica serotypes Choleraesuis, Typhimurium, Agona, and Enteritidis and contributed to the overall increase of ceftriaxone resistance in salmonellae. PMID:21749777

  1. Increase in Pneumococcus Macrolide Resistance, United States

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, David J.

    2009-01-01

    During year 6 (2005–2006) of the Prospective Resistant Organism Tracking and Epidemiology for the Ketolide Telithromycin surveillance study, 6,747 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates were collected at 119 centers. The susceptibility of these isolates to macrolides was compared with data from previous years. Macrolide resistance increased significantly in year 6 (35.3%) from the stable rate of ≈30% for the previous 3 years (p<0.0001). Macrolide resistance increased in all regions of the United States and for all patient age groups. Rates were highest in the south and for children 0–2 years of age. Lower-level efflux [mef(A)]–mediated macrolide resistance decreased in prevalence to ≈50%, and highly resistant [erm(B) + mef(A)] strains increased to 25%. Telithromycin and levofloxacin susceptibility rates were >99% and >98%, respectively, irrespective of genotype. Pneumococcal macrolide resistance in the United States showed its first significant increase since 2000. High-level macrolide resistance is also increasing. PMID:19751588

  2. Ethanologenic bacteria with increased resistance to furfural

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Elliot Norman; Jarboe, Laura R.; Yomano, Lorraine P.; York, Sean W.; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal

    2015-10-06

    The invention relates to bacterium that have increased resistance to furfural and methods of preparation. The invention also relates to methods of producing ethanol using the bacterium and corresponding kits.

  3. Electrical resistivity of coal-bearing rocks under high temperature and the detection of coal fires using electrical resistance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Zhenlu; Wang, Deming; Wang, Yanming; Zhong, Xiaoxing; Tang, Xiaofei; Xi, Dongdong

    2016-02-01

    Coal fires are severe hazards to environment, health and safety throughout the world. Efficient and economical extinguishing of these fires requires that the extent of the subsurface coal fires should be delineated. Electrical and electromagnetic methods have been used to detect coal fires in recent years. However, the resistivity change of coal-bearing rocks at high temperature is rarely investigated. The resistivity characteristics of coal fires at different temperatures and depths are seldomly researched as well. In this paper, we present the results of measurements of several coal-bearing rocks' resistivity and permeability under high temperature. Two major causes for the change in resistivity with increasing temperature are recognized, there are the increase of charge carriers and thermal fracturing, of which the first one is probably the dominant cause. A set of 2-D simulations is carried out to compare the relation of resolution and efficiency of coal fires detection to temperature and depth when adopting the electrical resistance tomography. The simulation results show that the resolution and efficiency decrease with the decrease of temperature and the increase of depth. Finally, the electrical resistance tomography is used to delineate coal fires in the Anjialing Open Pit Mine. Most low-resistivity regions are verified as coal-fire areas according to the long-term monitoring of borehole temperature. The results indicate that the electrical resistance tomography can be used as a tool for the detection of coal fires.

  4. Slime thickness evaluation of bored piles by electrical resistivity probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Ok-Hyun; Yoon, Hyung-Koo; Park, Min-Chul; Lee, Jong-Sub

    2014-09-01

    The bottoms of bored piles are generally stacked with soil particles, both while boreholes are being drilled, and afterward. The stacked soils are called slime, and when loads are applied on the pile, increase the pile settlement. Thus to guarantee the end bearing capacity of bored piles, the slime thickness should be precisely detected. The objective of this study is to suggest a new method for evaluating the slime thickness, using temperature compensated electrical resistivity. Laboratory studies are performed in advance, to estimate and compare the resolution of the electrical resistivity probe (ERP) and time domain reflectometry (TDR). The electrical properties of the ERP and TDR are measured using coaxial type electrodes and parallel type two-wire electrodes, respectively. Penetration tests, conducted in the fully saturated sand-clay mixtures, demonstrate that the ERP produces a better resolution of layer detection than TDR. Thus, field application tests using the ERP with a diameter of 35.7 mm are conducted for the investigation of slime thickness in large diameter bored piles. Field tests show that the slime layers are clearly identified by the ERP: the electrical resistivity dramatically increases at the interface between the slurry and slime layer. The electrical resistivity in the slurry layer inversely correlates with the amount of circulated water. This study suggests that the new electrical resistivity method may be a useful method for the investigation of the slime thickness in bored piles.

  5. Electrical Resistive Heaters for Magnetically Sensitive Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatowicz, Michael

    2014-05-01

    US Patent 8,138,760 ``Temperature System with Magnetic Field Suppression'' describes design concepts and examples for development of electrical resistive heaters and temperature detectors suitable for temperature control of the alkali vapor cells of magnetically sensitive atomic instruments such as spin-exchange relaxation free (SERF) magnetometers. This is achieved through careful manipulation of electromagnetic multi-pole moments in the design of these resistive heaters for substantial self-cancellation of electrically generated magnetic fields. The magnetic performance of electrical resistive heaters produced according to these design principles and directly attached to a rubidium vapor cell has been demonstrated to cause no measurable degradation of the performance of a SERF magnetometer exhibiting noise below 2 femto-Tesla per square root Hz.

  6. Resistance after firing protected electric match

    DOEpatents

    Montoya, Arsenio P.

    1981-11-10

    An electric match having electrical leads embedded in flame-producing compound is protected against an accidental resistance across the leads after firing by a length of heat-shrinkable tubing encircling the match body and having a skirt portion extending beyond the leads. The heat of the burning match and an adjacent thermal battery causes the tubing to fold over the end of the match body, covering the ends of the leads and protecting them from molten pieces of the battery.

  7. Pedotransfer functions in soil electrical resistivity estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is recognized as a powerful non-invasive soil survey and monitoring method. Relationships between ER and soil water contents that are needed to infer the spatial distribution of soil moisture from the ERT results, are known to reflect soil properties. ...

  8. Temperature dependent electrical resistivity of liquid Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, A. V.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Patel, H. P.; Thakor, P. B.

    2016-05-01

    The present paper deals with the effect of temperature variation on the electrical resistivity (ρ) of liquid Sn(Tin). We have used a new parameter free pseudopotential along with screening Taylor et al and Farid et al local field correction functions. The Percus-Yevick Hard Sphere (PYHS) reference system is used to describe structural information. Zeeman formula has been used for finding resistivity with the variation of temperature. The balanced harmonies between present data and experimental data have been achieved with a minimal deviation. So, we concluded that our newly constructed model potential is an effective one to produce the data of electrical resistivity of liquid Sn(Tin) as a function of temperature.

  9. On equivalent resistance of electrical circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    While the standard (introductory physics) way of computing the equivalent resistance of nontrivial electrical circuits is based on Kirchhoff's rules, there is a mathematically and conceptually simpler approach, called the method of nodal potentials, whose basic variables are the values of the electric potential at the circuit's nodes. In this paper, we review the method of nodal potentials and illustrate it using the Wheatstone bridge as an example. We then derive a closed-form expression for the equivalent resistance of a generic circuit, which we apply to a few sample circuits. The result unveils a curious interplay between electrical circuits, matrix algebra, and graph theory and its applications to computer science. The paper is written at a level accessible by undergraduate students who are familiar with matrix arithmetic. Additional proofs and technical details are provided in appendices.

  10. Electrical resistance tomography for imaging concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Buettner, M.; Ramirez, A.; Daily, W.

    1995-11-08

    Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) has been used to non-destructively examine the interior of reinforced concrete pillars in the laboratory during a water infiltration experiment. ERT is a technique for determining the electrical resistivity distribution within a volume from measurement of injected currents and the resulting electrical potential distribution on the surface. The transfer resistance (ratio of potential to injected current) data are inverted using an algorithm based on a finite element forward solution which is iteratively adjusted in a least squares sense until the measured and calculated transfer resistances agree to within some predetermined value. Laboratory specimens of concrete pillars, 61.0 cm (24 in) in length and 20.3 cm (8 in) on a side, were prepared with various combinations of steel reinforcing bars and voids (1.27 cm diameter) which ran along the length of the pillars. An array of electrodes was placed around the pillar to allow for injecting current and measuring the resulting potentials. After the baseline resistivity distribution was determined, water was added to a void near one comer of the pillar. ERT was used to determine the resistivity distribution of the pillar at regular time intervals as water was added. The ERT images show very clearly that the water was gradually imbibed into the concrete pillar during the course of the experiment. The resistivity decreased by nearly an order of magnitude near the point of water addition in the first hour, and by nearly two orders of magnitude by the end of the experiment. Other applications for this technology include monitoring of curing in concrete structures, detecting cracks in concrete structures, detecting rebar location and corrosion state, monitoring slope stability and the stability of footings, detecting and monitoring leaks from storage tanks, monitoring thermal processes during environmental remediation, and for detecting and monitoring contaminants in soil and groundwater.

  11. Electrical resistivity study of Magnetite under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Takaki; Struzhkin, Viktor; Gasparov, Lev

    2014-03-01

    Magnetite is known as one of the oldest magnetic materials and crystallizes in the inversed spinel structure. At about 120 K magnetite undergoes a structural phase transition called Verway transition where electrical resistivity abruptly increases with decreasing temperature. Pressure effects of Verway transition studied by magnetic susceptibility and electrical resistivity by several groups revealed Verway transition decreased with pressure and the precise pressure effects depend on the pressure condition i.e., pressure transmitting media. In this work, electrical resistivity measurements were made to revisit the property of magnetite under pressure. Both metallization observed in precedent work using cubic anvil press and the higher pressure properties beyond metallization are examined by diamond anvil cell.

  12. Electrical Resistivity Imaging and Depression Focused Recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, L. R.; Hayashi, M.; Berthold, S.

    2003-12-01

    Seasonal wetlands and small depressions play a fundamental role in recharging regional aquifers in the northern glaciated planes. Water from snowmelt collects in the depressions in the spring and infiltrates into the ground after the soil unfreezes. Infiltrating water leaches salts from the soil beneath depressions. The majority of the infiltrating water moves to the local uplands where it leaves the ground through ET leaving behind zones of evaporitically concentrated salts. A small percentage infiltrates down to the regional aquifer. Leaching and concentrating salts effect the electrical resistivity distribution of the subsurface. Three-dimensional electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) was combined with groundwater and soil measurements to generate a conceptual model of three dimensional fluid flow at San Denis, Saskatchewan. Water chemistry was used to generate a conceptual model of different geochemical zones which could be distinguished by the electrical conductivity of pore water. The Waxman-Smits equation was used to link groundwater electrical conductivity to in situ bulk resistivity. Electrical resisistivity from ERI was then used to map geochemical zones in the subsurface. ERI and chemistry show that infiltrating water reaches a regional aquifer at 20 meters depth. Seasonal wetlands have large zones of high resistivity that reach to the regional water table indicating that salts have been leached out of the tills to the depth of the regional aquifer. Small local depressions also have zones of leached soil beneath them indicating that they contribute to regional groundwater recharge. Since there are millions of small depressions, they may play a fundamental role in groundwater recharge and must be considered in land management. The images show a complex distribution of salts. Most of the salt is located in the upper weathered zone in the glacial tills and the horizontal distribution is controled by the locations of wetlands, steepness of slopes and the

  13. Electrical resistivity of Au-ZnO nanocomposite films

    SciTech Connect

    Argibay, N.; Goeke, R. S.; Dugger, M. T.; Rodriguez, M. A.; Michael, J. R.; Prasad, S. V.

    2013-04-14

    The electrical resistivity of electron beam codeposited gold and zinc oxide (Au-ZnO) films was investigated over the full composition range. The electrical resistivity was shown to increase monotonically with increasing ZnO content, with three characteristic regimes of behavior associated primarily with (1) grain boundary electron scattering due to grain refinement at ZnO volume fractions below 0.3, (2) percolation theory for ZnO volume fractions at and above the percolation threshold (f{sub c} = 0.85), and (3) a transition region between these where it was proposed that resistivity was influenced by the formation of Au-Zn complexes due to an oxygen deficiency in the deposited ZnO. The electrical resistivity of the composite films remained below 100 {mu}{Omega} cm for ZnO volume fractions below 0.5. A model combining the general effective media equation and Mayadas-Shatzkes grain boundary electron scattering model was shown to generally describe the composition dependence of electrical resistivity for the investigated oxide dispersion hardened metal-matrix composite thin films.

  14. Influence of Electrical Resistivity and Machining Parameters on Electrical Discharge Machining Performance of Engineering Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Renjie; Liu, Yonghong; Diao, Ruiqiang; Xu, Chenchen; Li, Xiaopeng; Cai, Baoping; Zhang, Yanzhen

    2014-01-01

    Engineering ceramics have been widely used in modern industry for their excellent physical and mechanical properties, and they are difficult to machine owing to their high hardness and brittleness. Electrical discharge machining (EDM) is the appropriate process for machining engineering ceramics provided they are electrically conducting. However, the electrical resistivity of the popular engineering ceramics is higher, and there has been no research on the relationship between the EDM parameters and the electrical resistivity of the engineering ceramics. This paper investigates the effects of the electrical resistivity and EDM parameters such as tool polarity, pulse interval, and electrode material, on the ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic's EDM performance, in terms of the material removal rate (MRR), electrode wear ratio (EWR), and surface roughness (SR). The results show that the electrical resistivity and the EDM parameters have the great influence on the EDM performance. The ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic with the electrical resistivity up to 3410 Ω·cm can be effectively machined by EDM with the copper electrode, the negative tool polarity, and the shorter pulse interval. Under most machining conditions, the MRR increases, and the SR decreases with the decrease of electrical resistivity. Moreover, the tool polarity, and pulse interval affect the EWR, respectively, and the electrical resistivity and electrode material have a combined effect on the EWR. Furthermore, the EDM performance of ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic with the electrical resistivity higher than 687 Ω·cm is obviously different from that with the electrical resistivity lower than 687 Ω·cm, when the electrode material changes. The microstructure character analysis of the machined ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic surface shows that the ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic is removed by melting, evaporation and thermal spalling, and the material from the working fluid and the graphite electrode can transfer to the workpiece surface during electrical discharge

  15. Influence of electrical resistivity and machining parameters on electrical discharge machining performance of engineering ceramics.

    PubMed

    Ji, Renjie; Liu, Yonghong; Diao, Ruiqiang; Xu, Chenchen; Li, Xiaopeng; Cai, Baoping; Zhang, Yanzhen

    2014-01-01

    Engineering ceramics have been widely used in modern industry for their excellent physical and mechanical properties, and they are difficult to machine owing to their high hardness and brittleness. Electrical discharge machining (EDM) is the appropriate process for machining engineering ceramics provided they are electrically conducting. However, the electrical resistivity of the popular engineering ceramics is higher, and there has been no research on the relationship between the EDM parameters and the electrical resistivity of the engineering ceramics. This paper investigates the effects of the electrical resistivity and EDM parameters such as tool polarity, pulse interval, and electrode material, on the ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic's EDM performance, in terms of the material removal rate (MRR), electrode wear ratio (EWR), and surface roughness (SR). The results show that the electrical resistivity and the EDM parameters have the great influence on the EDM performance. The ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic with the electrical resistivity up to 3410 Ω·cm can be effectively machined by EDM with the copper electrode, the negative tool polarity, and the shorter pulse interval. Under most machining conditions, the MRR increases, and the SR decreases with the decrease of electrical resistivity. Moreover, the tool polarity, and pulse interval affect the EWR, respectively, and the electrical resistivity and electrode material have a combined effect on the EWR. Furthermore, the EDM performance of ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic with the electrical resistivity higher than 687 Ω·cm is obviously different from that with the electrical resistivity lower than 687 Ω·cm, when the electrode material changes. The microstructure character analysis of the machined ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic surface shows that the ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic is removed by melting, evaporation and thermal spalling, and the material from the working fluid and the graphite electrode can transfer to the workpiece surface during electrical discharge

  16. Nondestructive evaluation of composite materials by electrical resistance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Zhen

    This dissertation investigates electrical resistance measurement for nondestructive evaluation of carbon fiber (CF) reinforced polymer matrix composites. The method involves measuring the DC electrical resistance in either the longitudinal or through thickness direction. The thermal history and thermal properties of thermoplastic/CF composites were studied by longitudinal and through-thickness resistance measurements. The resistance results were consistent with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermomechanical analysis (TMA) results. The resistance measurements gave more information on the melting of the polymer matrix than TMA. They were more sensitive to the glass transition of the polymer matrix than DSC. The through-thickness resistance decreased as autohesion progressed. The activation energy of autohesion was 21.2 kJ/mol for both nylon-6 and polyphenylene sulfide (PPS)/CF composites. Adhesive bonding and debonding were monitored in real-time by measurement of the through-thickness resistance between the adherends in an adhesive joint during heating and subsequent cooling. Debonding occurred during cooling when the pressure or temperature during prior bonding was not sufficiently high. A long heating time below the melting temperature (T m) was found to be detrimental to subsequent PPS adhesive joint development above Tm, due to curing reactions below Tm and consequent reduced mass flow response above Tm. A high heating rate (small heating time) enhanced the bonding more than a high pressure. The longitudinal resistance measurement was used to investigate the effects of temperature and stress on the interface between a concrete substrate and its epoxy/CF composite retrofit. The resistance of the retrofit was increased by bond degradation, whether the degradation was due to heat or stress. The degradation was reversible. Irreversible disturbance in the fiber arrangement occurred slightly as thermal or load cycling occurred, as indicated by the

  17. Electrical resistance tomography of concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; Binley, A.; Henry-Poulter, S.

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine the feasibility of using Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to nondestructively examine the interior of concrete structures such as bridge pillars and roadways. We report the results of experiments wherein ERT is used to image the two concrete specimens in the laboratory. Each specimen is 5 inches square and 12 inches long and contained steel reinforcing rods along its length. Twenty electrodes were placed on each sample and an-image of electrical resistivity distribution was generated from current and voltage measurements. We found that the images show the general location of the reinforcing steel and, what`s more important, delineate the absence of the steel. The method may therefore be useful for determining if such steel has been destroyed by corrosion, however to make it useful, the technique must have better resolution so that individual reinforcing steel units are resolved.

  18. Soil Identification using Field Electrical Resistivity Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Rosli, S.; Chitral, W. D.; Fauziah, A.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Aziman, M.; Ismail, B.

    2015-06-01

    Geotechnical site investigation with particular reference to soil identification was important in civil engineering works since it reports the soil condition in order to relate the design and construction of the proposed works. In the past, electrical resistivity method (ERM) has widely being used in soil characterization but experienced several black boxes which related to its results and interpretations. Hence, this study performed a field electrical resistivity method (ERM) using ABEM SAS (4000) at two different types of soils (Gravelly SAND and Silty SAND) in order to discover the behavior of electrical resistivity values (ERV) with type of soils studied. Soil basic physical properties was determine thru density (p), moisture content (w) and particle size distribution (d) in order to verify the ERV obtained from each type of soil investigated. It was found that the ERV of Gravelly SAND (278 Ωm & 285 Ωm) was slightly higher than SiltySAND (223 Ωm & 199 Ωm) due to the uncertainties nature of soils. This finding has showed that the results obtained from ERM need to be interpreted based on strong supported findings such as using direct test from soil laboratory data. Furthermore, this study was able to prove that the ERM can be established as an alternative tool in soil identification provided it was being verified thru other relevance information such as using geotechnical properties.

  19. Delineation of graves using electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nero, Callistus; Aning, Akwasi Acheampong; Danuor, Sylvester K.; Noye, Reginald M.

    2016-03-01

    A suspected old royal cemetery has been surveyed at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) campus, Kumasi, Ghana using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) with the objective of detecting graves in order to make informed decisions with regard to the future use of the area. The survey was conducted on a 10,000 m2 area. Continuous Vertical Electrical Sounding (CVES) was combined with the roll along technique for 51 profiles with 1 m probe separation separated by 2 m. Inverted data results indicated wide resistivity variations ranging between 9.34 Ωm and 600 Ωm in the near surface. Such heterogeneity suggests a disturbance of the soil at this level. Both high (≥ 600 Ωm) and low resistivity (≤ 74.7 Ωm) anomalies, relative to background levels, were identified within the first 4 m of the subsurface. These were suspected to be burial tombs because of their rectangular geometries and resistivity contrasts. The results were validated with forward numerical modeling results. The study area is therefore an old cemetery and should be preserved as a cultural heritage site.

  20. Electrical resistance tomography from measurements inside a steel cased borehole

    DOEpatents

    Daily, William D.; Schenkel, Clifford; Ramirez, Abelardo L.

    2000-01-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) produced from measurements taken inside a steel cased borehole. A tomographic inversion of electrical resistance measurements made within a steel casing was then made for the purpose of imaging the electrical resistivity distribution in the formation remotely from the borehole. The ERT method involves combining electrical resistance measurements made inside a steel casing of a borehole to determine the electrical resistivity in the formation adjacent to the borehole; and the inversion of electrical resistance measurements made from a borehole not cased with an electrically conducting casing to determine the electrical resistivity distribution remotely from a borehole. It has been demonstrated that by using these combined techniques, highly accurate current injection and voltage measurements, made at appropriate points within the casing, can be tomographically inverted to yield useful information outside the borehole casing.

  1. Cone-based electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pidlisecky, Adam

    Determining the 3-D spatial distribution of subsurface properties is a critical part of managing the clean-up of contaminated sites. Most standard hydrologic methods sample small regions immediately adjacent to wells or testing devices. This provides data which are not representative of the entire region of interest. Furthermore, at many contaminated sites invasive methods are not acceptable, due to the risks associated with contacting and spreading the contaminants. To address these issues, I have developed a minimally invasive technology that provides information about the 3-D distribution of electrical conductivity. This new technique, cone-based electrical resistivity tomography (C-bert), integrates the existing technologies of resistivity cone penetration testing (RCPT) with electrical resistivity tomography. Development of this tool included the creation of new software and modeling algorithms, the design of field equipment, field testing, and processing and interpretation of the resulting data. I present a 2.5-D forward modeling algorithm that incorporates an effective correction for the errors caused by boundary effects and source singularities. The algorithm includes an optimization technique for acquiring the Fourier coefficients required for the solution. A 3-D inversion algorithm is presented that has two major improvements over existing algorithms. First, it includes a 3-D version of the boundary correction/source singularity correction developed for the 2.5-D problem. Second, the algorithm can handle any type of acquisition geometry; this was a requirement for the development of C-bert. C-bert involves placing several permanent current electrodes in the subsurface and using electrodes mounted on a cone penetrometer and at the surface to measure the resultant potential field. In addition to these measurements, we obtain the standard suite of RCPT data, including high resolution resistivity logs. The RCPT data can be used to generate a realistic

  2. Discontinuities detection using transmission electrical resistivity imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesparre, Nolwenn; Cabrera, Justo; Boyle, Alistair; Grychtol, Bartłomiej; Adler, Andy

    2015-04-01

    In the context of nuclear waste storage, low permeability clays are investigated as potential geological barrier. Discontinuities in such formations might facilitate the radionuclide transport to the environment. The underground platform of Tournemire (Aveyron, France) presents the opportunity to perform in-situ experiments to evaluate the potential of geophysical methods to detect and characterize the presence of discontinuities in the sub-surface. In this work, we apply transmission electrical resistivity tomography to image the medium surrounding a regional fault. A specific array of electrodes were set up, adapted for the characterization of the fault. Electrodes were placed along the tunnel as well as at the surface above the tunnel on both sides of the fault. The objective of a such geometry is to acquire data in transmission across the massif in addition to classical protocol such as Schlumberger or dipole-dipole in order to better cover the sounded medium. 3D models considering the gallery geometry, the topography and the injection of current in transmission through the massif were developed for the analysis of such particular data sets. For the reconstruction of the medium electrical resistivity, the parametrization of the inverse problem was adapted to the geometry of the experience in a scope to reduce the inversion under-determination. The resulting image obtained with classical protocols and transmission current injection is compared to an image obtained using only classical protocols to better highlight the interest of a transmission experiment in terms of resolution and penetration depth. The addition of protocols in transmission allows a better coverage of the sounded medium so the resulting image presents a better resolution at higher depths than the image resulting from a single profile of electrodes. The proposed configuration of electrical resistivity measurements in transmission is then promising for hydrogeophysical studies, in particular for

  3. Electrical Resistance Tomography imaging of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Karhunen, Kimmo; Seppaenen, Aku; Lehikoinen, Anssi; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.; Kaipio, Jari P.

    2010-01-15

    We apply Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) for three dimensional imaging of concrete. In ERT, alternating currents are injected into the target using an array of electrodes attached to the target surface, and the resulting voltages are measured using the same electrodes. These boundary measurements are used for reconstructing the internal (3D) conductivity distribution of the target. In reinforced concrete, the metallic phases (reinforcing bars and fibers), cracks and air voids, moisture gradients, and the chloride distribution in the matrix carry contrast with respect to conductivity. While electrical measurements have been widely used to characterize the properties of concrete, only preliminary results of applying ERT to concrete imaging have been published so far. The aim of this paper is to carry out a feasibility evaluation with specifically cast samples. The results indicate that ERT may be a feasible modality for non-destructive evaluation of concrete.

  4. Tank leak detection using electrical resistance methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.; Daily, W.; Binley, A.; LaBrecque, D.

    1996-01-01

    Large volumes of hazardous liquids and high-level radioactive wastes are stored worldwide in surface and underground tanks. Frequently these tanks are found to leak, thereby resulting in not only a loss of stored inventory, but in contamination to soils and groundwater. It is important to develop a reliable method of detecting leaks before large quantities are emitted into the environment surround the tanks. Two field experiments were performed to evaluate the performance of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) as a leak detection method under metal underground storage tanks (UST). This paper provides a summary of the field experiments performed under a 15 m diameter steel tank mockup located at the Hanford Reservation.

  5. Electrically resistive coating for remediation (regeneration) of a diesel particulate filter and method

    DOEpatents

    Phelps, Amanda C.; Kirby, Kevin K.; Gregoire, Daniel J.

    2012-02-14

    A resistively heated diesel particulate filter (DPF). The resistively heated DPF includes a DPF having an inlet surface and at least one resistive coating on the inlet surface. The at least one resistive coating is configured to substantially maintain its resistance in an operating range of the DPF. The at least one resistive coating has a first terminal and a second terminal for applying electrical power to resistively heat up the at least one resistive coating in order to increase the temperature of the DPF to a regeneration temperature. The at least one resistive coating includes metal and semiconductor constituents.

  6. Temperature and mixing effects on electrical resistivity of carbon fiber enhanced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Christiana; Song, Gangbing; Gao, Di; Mo, Y. L.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, the effect of temperature and mixing procedure on the electrical resistivity of carbon fiber enhanced concrete is investigated. Different compositions of concrete containing varying concentrations of carbon fiber into normal and self-consolidating concrete (SCC) were tested under DC electrical loading over the temperature range -10 to 20 °C. The electrical resistivity of the bulk samples was calculated and compared against temperature. It was observed that there is an inverse exponential relationship between resistivity and temperature which follows the Arrhenius relationship. The bulk resistivity decreased with increasing fiber concentration, though data from SCC indicates a saturation limit beyond which electrical resistivity begins to drop. The activation energy of the bulk electrically conductive concrete was calculated and compared. While SCC exhibited the lowest observed electrical resistance, the activation energy was similar amongst SCC and surfactant enhanced concrete, both of which were lower than fiber dispersed in normal concrete.

  7. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917-derived factors reduce cell death and late apoptosis and increase transepithelial electrical resistance in a model of 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal epithelial cell damage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hanru; Bastian, Susan EP; Cheah, Ker Y; Lawrence, Andrew; Howarth, Gordon S

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the capacity for supernatants (SNs) derived from Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN), cultured under different growth conditions, to prevent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal epithelial cell damage. EcN was cultured in: Luria Bertani (LB) broth, tryptone soya broth (TSB), de Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS) broth, and M17 broth supplemented with 10% (v/v) lactose solution (M17). Intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) were treated with the following EcN SNs: LB+, TSB+, MRS+, and M17+ in the presence and absence of 5-FU (1.5 or 5 μM). Cell viability, apoptotic activity and cell monolayer permeability were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), flow cytometry, and transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) assays, respectively. 5-FU significantly reduced cell viability (P < 0.05) at both 24 and 48 h. However, only EcN SN produced from LB and M17 growth media significantly decreased cell death induced by 5-FU (by approximately 10% after 24 and 48 h; and 10% after 24 h, respectively [P < 0.05]). When measured by flow cytometry all EcN SNs in the presence of 5-FU increased the proportion of viable cells (by 3–5% for 24 h, 3–7% for 48 h, P < 0.05) and reduced late-apoptotic cells after 24 and 48 h, compared with 5-FU control. Moreover, all EcN SNs significantly reduced the disruption of IEC-6 cell barrier function induced by 5-FU by 7–10% (P < 0.05), compared with DMEM control. We conclude that EcN derived factors could potentially reduce the severity of intestinal mucositis. PMID:24556751

  8. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917-derived factors reduce cell death and late apoptosis and increase transepithelial electrical resistance in a model of 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal epithelial cell damage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanru; Bastian, Susan E P; Cheah, Ker Y; Lawrence, Andrew; Howarth, Gordon S

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the capacity for supernatants (SNs) derived from Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN), cultured under different growth conditions, to prevent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal epithelial cell damage. EcN was cultured in: Luria Bertani (LB) broth, tryptone soya broth (TSB), de Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS) broth, and M17 broth supplemented with 10% (v/v) lactose solution (M17). Intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) were treated with the following EcN SNs: LB(+), TSB(+), MRS(+), and M17(+) in the presence and absence of 5-FU (1.5 or 5 μM). Cell viability, apoptotic activity and cell monolayer permeability were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), flow cytometry, and transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) assays, respectively. 5-FU significantly reduced cell viability (P<0.05) at both 24 and 48 h. However, only EcN SN produced from LB and M17 growth media significantly decreased cell death induced by 5-FU (by approximately 10% after 24 and 48 h; and 10% after 24 h, respectively [P<0.05]). When measured by flow cytometry all EcN SNs in the presence of 5-FU increased the proportion of viable cells (by 3-5% for 24 h, 3-7% for 48 h, P<0.05) and reduced late-apoptotic cells after 24 and 48 h, compared with 5-FU control. Moreover, all EcN SNs significantly reduced the disruption of IEC-6 cell barrier function induced by 5-FU by 7-10% (P<0.05), compared with DMEM control. We conclude that EcN derived factors could potentially reduce the severity of intestinal mucositis. PMID:24556751

  9. Electrical resistivity characterization of anisotropy in the Biscayne Aquifer.

    PubMed

    Yeboah-Forson, Albert; Whitman, Dean

    2014-01-01

    Electrical anisotropy occurs when electric current flow varies with azimuth. In porous media, this may correspond to anisotropy in the hydraulic conductivity resulting from sedimentary fabric, fractures, or dissolution. In this study, a 28-electrode resistivity imaging system was used to investigate electrical anisotropy at 13 sites in the Biscayne Aquifer of SE Florida using the rotated square array method. The measured coefficient of electrical anisotropy generally ranged from 1.01 to 1.12 with values as high as 1.36 found at one site. The observed electrical anisotropy was used to estimate hydraulic anisotropy (ratio of maximum to minimum hydraulic conductivity) which ranged from 1.18 to 2.83. The largest values generally were located on the Atlantic Coastal Ridge while the lowest values were in low elevation areas on the margin of the Everglades to the west. The higher values of anisotropy found on the ridge may be due to increased dissolution rates of the oolitic facies of the Miami formation limestone compared with the bryozoan facies to the west. The predominate trend of minimum resistivity and maximum hydraulic conductivity was E-W/SE-NW beneath the ridge and E-W/SW-NE farther west. The anisotropy directions are similar to the predevelopment groundwater flow direction as indicated in published studies. This suggests that the observed anisotropy is related to the paleo-groundwater flow in the Biscayne Aquifer. PMID:24033332

  10. TUTORIAL: Electrical resistance: an atomistic view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Supriyo

    2004-07-01

    This tutorial article presents a 'bottom-up' view of electrical resistance starting from something really small, like a molecule, and then discussing the issues that arise as we move to bigger conductors. Remarkably, no serious quantum mechanics is needed to understand electrical conduction through something really small, except for unusual things like the Kondo effect that are seen only for a special range of parameters. This article starts with energy level diagrams (section 2), shows that the broadening that accompanies coupling limits the conductance to a maximum of q2/h per level (sections 3, 4), describes how a change in the shape of the self-consistent potential profile can turn a symmetric current-voltage characteristic into a rectifying one (sections 5, 6), shows that many interesting effects in molecular electronics can be understood in terms of a simple model (section 7), introduces the non-equilibrium Green function (NEGF) formalism as a sophisticated version of this simple model with ordinary numbers replaced by appropriate matrices (section 8) and ends with a personal view of unsolved problems in the field of nanoscale electron transport (section 9). Appendix A discusses the Coulomb blockade regime of transport, while appendix B presents a formal derivation of the NEGF equations. MATLAB codes for numerical examples are listed in appendix C. (The appendices are available in the online version only.)

  11. The electrical resistivity method in cased boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, C.J.

    1991-05-01

    The use of downhole current sources in resistivity mapping can greatly enhance the detection and delineation of subsurface features. The purpose of this work is to examine the resistivity method for current sources in wells cased with steel. The resistivity method in cased boreholes with downhole current sources is investigated using the integral equation (IE) technique. The casing and other bodies are characterized as conductivity inhomogeneities in a half-space. For sources located along the casing axis, an axially symmetric Green's function is used to formulate the surface potential and electric field (E-field) volume integral equations. The situations involving off-axis current sources and three-dimensional (3-D) bodies is formulated using the surface potential IE method. The solution of the 3-D Green's function is presented in cylindrical and Cartesian coordinate systems. The methods of moments is used to solve the Fredholm integral equation of the second kind for the response due to the casing and other bodies. The numerical analysis revealed that the current in the casing can be approximated by its vertical component except near the source and the axial symmetric approximation of the casing is valid even for the 3-D problem. The E-field volume IE method is an effective and efficient technique to simulate the response of the casing in a half-space, whereas the surface potential approach is computationally better when multiple bodies are involved. Analyzing several configurations of the current source indicated that the casing response is influenced by four characteristic factors: conduction length, current source depth,casing depth, and casing length. 85 refs., 133 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. High electrical resistivity carbon/graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, F. L.; Forsman, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    Carbon/graphite fibers were chemically oxidized in the liquid phase to fibers of graphite oxide. Resistivity increases as high as 10,000 times were obtained, the oxidized fiber decomposed on exposure to atmosphere. A factor of 1,000 remained as a stable increment. The largest change observed was 1,000,000 times. Best results were obtained on the most highly graphitized fibers. Electrochemical oxidation yielded a lower increase--about 10 times, but provided a controllable method of synthesis and insight to the mechanism of reaction. Tensile tests indicated that the strength of the fiber on oxidation was decreased by no more than 25 percent.

  13. Detecting Damage in Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Electrical Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig E.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The majority of damage in SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites subjected to monotonic tensile loads is in the form of distributed matrix cracks. These cracks initiate near stress concentrations, such as 90 deg fiber tows or large matrix pores and continue to accumulate with additional stress until matrix crack saturation is achieved. Such damage is difficult to detect with conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques (immersion ultrasonics, x-ray, etc.). Monitoring a specimen.s electrical resistance change provides an indirect approach for monitoring matrix crack density. Sylramic-iBN fiber- reinforced SiC composites with a melt infiltrated (MI) matrix were tensile tested at room temperature. Results showed an increase in resistance of more than 500% prior to fracture, which can be detected either in situ or post-damage. A relationship between resistance change and matrix crack density was also determined.

  14. Detecting Cracks in Ceramic Matrix Composites by Electrical Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig; Gyekenyesi, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The majority of damage in SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites subjected to monotonic tensile loads is in the form of distributed matrix cracks. These cracks initiate near stress concentrations, such as 90o fiber tows or large matrix pores and continue to accumulate with additional stress until matrix crack saturation is achieved. Such damage is difficult to detect with conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques (immersion ultrasonics, x-ray, etc.). Monitoring a specimen.s electrical resistance change provides an indirect approach for monitoring matrix crack density. Sylramic-iBN fiber- reinforced SiC composites with a melt infiltrated (MI) matrix were tensile tested at room temperature. Results showed an increase in resistance of more than 500% prior to fracture, which can be detected either in situ or post-damage. A relationship between resistance change and matrix crack density was also determined.

  15. Soil spatial heterogeneity effect on soil electrical resistivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electrical resistivity (ER) is growing in popularity due to its ease of use and because of its non-invasive techniques, which are used to reveal and map soil heterogeneity. The objective of this work was to evaluate how differing soil properties affect the electric resistivity and to observe these e...

  16. Electrical resistivity tomography to delineate greenhouse soil variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, R.; Amato, M.; Bitella, G.; Bochicchio, R.

    2013-03-01

    Appropriate management of soil spatial variability is an important tool for optimizing farming inputs, with the result of yield increase and reduction of the environmental impact in field crops. Under greenhouses, several factors such as non-uniform irrigation and localized soil compaction can severely affect yield and quality. Additionally, if soil spatial variability is not taken into account, yield deficiencies are often compensated by extra-volumes of crop inputs; as a result, over-irrigation and overfertilization in some parts of the field may occur. Technology for spatially sound management of greenhouse crops is therefore needed to increase yield and quality and to address sustainability. In this experiment, 2D-electrical resistivity tomography was used as an exploratory tool to characterize greenhouse soil variability and its relations to wild rocket yield. Soil resistivity well matched biomass variation (R2=0.70), and was linked to differences in soil bulk density (R2=0.90), and clay content (R2=0.77). Electrical resistivity tomography shows a great potential in horticulture where there is a growing demand of sustainability coupled with the necessity of stabilizing yield and product quality.

  17. Increasing Importance of Material Electrical Interaction with the Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Vaughn, Jason

    2000-01-01

    The electrical properties of materials have always been important for spacecraft in charging environments. However, in recent years consideration of interactions of materials and systems with the plasma environment has become more and more important in spacecraft design. This has primarily been driven by independent factors including increase in power and high voltage power systems, operation of tethered satellites, and science requirements for electrostatic clean spacecraft. Increased need for power has led to increased operating voltages for spacecraft. The Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) was one of the first to operate at near 100 V solar array potential and demonstrate that the spacecraft floated nearly the entire voltage negative of the ionospheric plasma. The high voltage, 160 V, of the solar arrays on the International Space Station (ISS) led to the requirement to have a plasma contactor to control structure potential relative to the local plasma. Issues such as sputtering, dielectric breakdown, capacitive energy storage in the structure, space debris impact induced arcs and other arcing mechanisms had to be addressed. Recently commercial satellites, driven to higher voltages for efficiency, have experienced arcing problems which led to severe, permanent power degradation. The first tethered satellite, Tethered Satellite System (TSS), was deployed from the Space Shuttle. A conductive coating was developed which provided a low resistivity and also the required solar absorptivity and emittance. Other tether systems are being designed which will have similar requirements but also long life and "bare tether" designs are also being built for flight experiments. The wire requires an electrically conductive coating with proper thermal control properties, which a bare wire doesn't possess. Increasing sophistication of scientific instruments and measurements which scientists want to make have led to increasing requirements for conducting thermal control

  18. Using electrical resistance probes for moisture determination in switchgrass windrows

    SciTech Connect

    Chesser Jr., G. D.; Davis, J. D.; Purswell, J. L.; Lemus, R.

    2011-08-01

    Determining moisture levels in windrowed biomass is important for both forage producers and researchers. Energy crops such as switchgrass have been troublesome when using the standard methods set for electrical resistance meters. The objectives of this study were to i) develop the methodologies needed to measure MC in switchgrass using electrical resistance meters, ii) to determine the effects of pressure and probe orientation on MC measurement and iii) to generate MC calibration equations for electrical resistance meters using switchgrass in the senescence growth stage. Two meters (Meter 1, Farmex HT-PRO; Meter 2, Delmhorst F-2000) were selected based on commercial availability. A forage compression apparatus was designed and constructed with on-farm materials and methods to provide a simple system of applying pressure achievable by any forage producer or researcher in the field. Two trials were performed to test four levels of moisture contents (10, 20, 30, and 40%), five pressures (0, 1.68, 3.11, 4.55, 6.22 kN/m 2; 0, 35, 65, 95, 130 lb/ft 2), and two probe orientations (axial and transverse) in a 4x5x2 factorial design. Results indicated that meter accuracy increased as pressure increased. Regression models accounted for 91% and 81% of the variation for Meter 1 and Meter 2 at a pressure of 4.55 kN/m 2 (95 lb/ft 2) and a transverse probe orientation. Calibration equations were developed for both meters to improve moisture measurement accuracy for farmers and researchers in the field.

  19. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Deevi, S.C.; Fleischhauer, G.S.; Hajaligol, M.R.; Lilly, A.C. Jr.

    1999-11-02

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, {le}1% Cr and either {ge}0.05% Zr or ZrO{sub 2} stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or {ge}0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14--32% Al, {le}2% Ti, {le}2% Mo, {le}1% Zr, {le}1% C, {le}0.1% B, {le}30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, {le}1% rare earth metal, {le}1% oxygen, {le}3% Cu, balance Fe.

  20. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  1. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    1997-01-01

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  2. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, V.K.; Deevi, S.C.; Fleischhauer, G.S.; Hajaligol, M.R.; Lilly, A.C. Jr.

    1997-04-15

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, {<=}1% Cr and either {>=}0.05% Zr or ZrO{sub 2} stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or {>=}0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, {<=}2% Ti, {<=}2% Mo, {<=}1% Zr, {<=}1% C, {<=}0.1% B, {<=}30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, {<=}1% rare earth metal, {<=}1% oxygen, {<=}3% Cu, balance Fe. 64 figs.

  3. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  4. Mapping Contaminant Remediation with Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, J.; Power, C.; Tsourlos, P.; Karaoulis, M.; Giannopoulos, A.; Soupios, P. M.; Simyrdanis, K.

    2014-12-01

    The remediation of sites contaminated with industrial chemicals - specifically dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) like coal tar and chlorinated solvents - represents a major geoenvironmental challenge. Remediation activities would benefit from a non-destructive technique to map the evolution of DNAPL mass in space and time. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has long-standing potential in this context but has not yet become a common tool at DNAPL sites. This work evaluated the potential of time-lapse ERT for mapping DNAPL mass reduction in real time during remediation. Initially, a coupled DNAPL-ERT numerical model was developed for exploring this potential at the field scale, generating realistic DNAPL scenarios and predicting the response of an ERT survey. Also, new four-dimensional (4D) inversion algorithms were integrated for tracking DNAPL removal over time. 4D ERT applied at the surface for mapping an evolving DNAPL distribution was first demonstrated in a laboratory experiment. Independent simulation of the experiment demonstrated the reliability of the DNAPL-ERT model for simulating real systems. The model was then used to explore the 4D ERT approach at the field scale for a range of realistic DNAPL remediation scenarios. The approach showed excellent potential for mapping shallow DNAPL changes. However, remediation at depth was not as well resolved. To overcome this limitation, a new surface-to-horizontal borehole (S2HB) ERT configuration is proposed. A second laboratory experiment was conducted that demonstrated that S2HB ERT does better resolve changes in DNAPL distribution relative to surface ERT, particularly at depth. The DNAPL-ERT model was also used to demonstrate the improved mapping of S2HB ERT for field scale DNAPL scenarios. Overall, this work demonstrates that, with these innovations, ERT exhibits significant potential as a real time, non-destructive geoenvironmental remediation site monitoring tool.

  5. Correlating electrical resistance to growth conditions for multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Chun; Amama, Placidus B.; Fisher, Timothy S.; Reifenberger, Ronald G.

    2007-08-27

    A correlation between growth temperature and electrical resistance of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) has been established by measuring the resistance of individual MWNTs grown by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at 800, 900, and 950 deg. C. The lowest resistances were obtained mainly from MWNTs grown at 900 deg. C. The MWNT resistance is larger on average at lower (800 deg. C) and higher (950 deg. C) growth temperatures. The resistance of MWNTs correlated well with other MWNT quality indices obtained from Raman spectra. This study identifies a temperature window for growing higher-quality MWNTs with fewer defects and lower resistance by PECVD.

  6. Correlating electrical resistance to growth conditions for multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chun; Amama, Placidus B.; Fisher, Timothy S.; Reifenberger, Ronald G.

    2007-08-01

    A correlation between growth temperature and electrical resistance of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) has been established by measuring the resistance of individual MWNTs grown by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at 800, 900, and 950°C. The lowest resistances were obtained mainly from MWNTs grown at 900°C. The MWNT resistance is larger on average at lower (800°C) and higher (950°C) growth temperatures. The resistance of MWNTs correlated well with other MWNT quality indices obtained from Raman spectra. This study identifies a temperature window for growing higher-quality MWNTs with fewer defects and lower resistance by PECVD.

  7. State Waste Discharge Permit Application: Electric resistance tomography testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This permit application documentation is for a State Waste Discharge Permit issued in accordance with requirements of Washington Administrative Code 173-216. The activity being permitted is a technology test using electrical resistance tomography. The electrical resistance tomography technology was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and has been used at other waste sites to track underground contamination plumes. The electrical resistance tomography technology measures soil electrical resistance between two electrodes. If a fluid contaminated with electrolytes is introduced into the soil, the soil resistance is expected to drop. By using an array of measurement electrodes in several boreholes, the areal extent of contamination can be estimated. At the Hanford Site, the purpose of the testing is to determine if the electrical resistance tomography technology can be used in the vicinity of large underground metal tanks without the metal tank interfering with the test. It is anticipated that the electrical resistance tomography technology will provide a method for accurately detecting leaks from the bottom of underground tanks, such as the Hanford Site single-shell tanks.

  8. 18 CFR 2.18 - Phased electric rate increase filings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Phased electric rate increase filings. 2.18 Section 2.18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... Policy and Interpretations Under the Federal Power Act § 2.18 Phased electric rate increase filings....

  9. Building Better Electrodes for Electrical Resistivity and Induced Polarization Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, P. L.; La Brecque, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    In the third year of a project to understand and mitigate the systematic noise in resistivity and induced polarization measurements, we put a significant effort into understanding and developing better electrodes. The simple metal electrodes commonly used for both transmitting and receiving of electrical geophysical data are likely the Achilles" heal of the resistivity method. Even stainless steel, a commonly used electrode material because of its durability, showed only average results in laboratory tests for electrode noise. Better results have been found with non-polarizing metal-metal salt electrodes, which are widely used as surface electrodes and in IP surveys. But although they produce small measurement errors, they are not durable enough for in-situ borehole resistivity surveys, and often contain compounds that are toxic to the environment. They are also very seldom used as transmitters. In laboratory studies, we are exploring other materials and configurations for low-noise compound electrodes that will be nontoxic, inexpensive, and durable and can be used as both transmitters and receivers. Testing of the electrical noise levels of electrodes is an arduous task involving repeated measurements under varying conditions at field scales. Thus it is important to find methods of sorting out likely candidates from the mass of possible electrode configurations and construction methods. Testing of electrode impedance versus current density appears to provide simple criteria for predicting the suitability of electrodes. The best electrodes show relatively low overall contact impedance, relatively small changes in impedance with increased current density, and relatively small changes in impedance with time. Furthermore it can be shown that resistivity and induced polarization performance of electrodes is strongly correlated, so that methods of finding electrodes with low impedance and good direct current performance usually provide better quality induced

  10. Electrical resistance tomography using steel cased boreholes as electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Daily, W.D.; Ramirez, A.L.

    1999-06-22

    An electrical resistance tomography method is described which uses steel cased boreholes as electrodes. The method enables mapping the electrical resistivity distribution in the subsurface from measurements of electrical potential caused by electrical currents injected into an array of electrodes in the subsurface. By use of current injection and potential measurement electrodes to generate data about the subsurface resistivity distribution, which data is then used in an inverse calculation, a model of the electrical resistivity distribution can be obtained. The inverse model may be constrained by independent data to better define an inverse solution. The method utilizes pairs of electrically conductive (steel) borehole casings as current injection electrodes and as potential measurement electrodes. The greater the number of steel cased boreholes in an array, the greater the amount of data is obtained. The steel cased boreholes may be utilized for either current injection or potential measurement electrodes. The subsurface model produced by this method can be 2 or 3 dimensional in resistivity depending on the detail desired in the calculated resistivity distribution and the amount of data to constrain the models. 2 figs.

  11. Electrical resistance tomography using steel cased boreholes as electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Daily, William D.; Ramirez, Abelardo L.

    1999-01-01

    An electrical resistance tomography method using steel cased boreholes as electrodes. The method enables mapping the electrical resistivity distribution in the subsurface from measurements of electrical potential caused by electrical currents injected into an array of electrodes in the subsurface. By use of current injection and potential measurement electrodes to generate data about the subsurface resistivity distribution, which data is then used in an inverse calculation, a model of the electrical resistivity distribution can be obtained. The inverse model may be constrained by independent data to better define an inverse solution. The method utilizes pairs of electrically conductive (steel) borehole casings as current injection electrodes and as potential measurement electrodes. The greater the number of steel cased boreholes in an array, the greater the amount of data is obtained. The steel cased boreholes may be utilized for either current injection or potential measurement electrodes. The subsurface model produced by this method can be 2 or 3 dimensional in resistivity depending on the detail desired in the calculated resistivity distribution and the amount of data to constain the models.

  12. Marine permafrost detection using galvanic electrical resistivity methods

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, R.F.

    1983-05-01

    Because of the high electrical resistivity contrast between ice-bonded sediments (permafrost) and the same sediments in an unfrozen state, galvanic (direct-current) electrical resistivity measurements are capable of determining the depth below the sea floor of marine permafrost layers. Unlike the seismic refraction method usually used for offshore permafrost surveying, resistivity measurements can determine the thickness as well as the depth of a permafrost layer. Also, the resistivity method is usable in acoustic anomaly areas where seismic data cannot be obtained and in shallow water where air gun sources are not effective. Marine resistivity measurements may be made through the sea ice in the winter or from a stationary or moving boat in the summer. The results of field trials conducted in the Prudhoe Bay area indicated that marine permafrost depths and thicknesses determined from resistivity measurements agreed well with those obtained from borehole data.

  13. COMPLEX ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY FOR MONITORING DNAPL CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose to develop new practical complex resistivity field measurement techniques for pollution characterization and monitoring. For this purpose we will document the detectability of clay-organic interactions with geophysical measurements in the laboratory, develop further un...

  14. Electrical contact resistance degradation of a hot-switched simulated metal MEMS contact.

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, Michael Thomas; Dickrell, Daniel John, III

    2005-03-01

    Electrical contact resistance testing was performed by hot-switching a simulated gold-platinum metal microelectromechanical systems contact. The experimental objective was to determine the sensitivity of the contact resistance degradation to current level and environment. The contact resistance increased sharply after 100 hot-switched cycles in air. Hot-switching at a reduced current and in nitrogen atmosphere curtailed contact resistance degradation by several orders of magnitude. The mechanism responsible for the resistance degradation was found to be arc-induced decomposition of adsorbed surface contaminants.

  15. THE VARIATION OF ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE WITH APPLIED POTENTIAL

    PubMed Central

    Blinks, L. R.

    1930-01-01

    Electrical resistance and polarization were measured during the passage of direct current across a single layer of protoplasm in the cells of Valonia ventricosa impaled upon capillaries. These were correlated with five stages of the P.D. existing naturally across the protoplasm, as follows: 1. A stage of shock after impalement, when the P.D. drops from 5 mv. to zero and then slowly recovers. There is very little effective resistance in the protoplasm, and polarization is slight. 2. The stage of recovery and normal P.D., with values from 8 to 25 mv. (inside positive). The average is 15 mv. At first there is little or no polarization when small potentials are applied in either direction across the protoplasm, nor when very large currents pass outward (from sap to sea water). But when the positive current passes inward there is a sudden response at a critical applied potential ranging from 0.5 to 2.0 volts. The resistance then apparently rises as much as 10,000 ohms in some cases, and the rise occurs more quickly in succeeding applications after the first. When the potential is removed there is a back E.M.F. displayed. Later there is also an effect of such inward currents which persists into the first succeeding outward flow, causing a brief polarization at the first application of the reverse potential. Still later this polarization occurs at every exposure, and at increasingly lower values of applied potentials. Finally there is a "constant" state reached in which the polarization occurs with currents of either direction, and the apparent resistance is nearly uniform over a considerable range of applied potential. 3. A state of increased P.D.; to 100 mv. (inside positive) in artificial sap; and to 35 or 40 mv. in dilute sea water or 0.6 M MgSO4. The polarization response and apparent resistance are at first about as in sea water, but later decrease. 4. A reversed P.D., to 50 mv. (outside positive) produced by a variety of causes, especially by dilute sea water, and

  16. Electrical resistivity imaging study of near-surface infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampousis, Angelos

    High resolution electrical resistivity images (ERI method) were obtained during vadose zone infiltration experiments on agricultural soils in cooperation with Cornell University's Agricultural Stewardship Program, Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County, Extension Education Center, Riverhead, New York [ as well as Cornell University's Long Island Horticultural Research & Extension Center (LIHREC) in Riverhead, New York]. One natural soil was also studied. Infiltration was monitored by means of image analysis of two-dimensional array resistivity generated by a Syscal Kid Switch resistivity system (Griffiths et al., 1990). The data was inverted with the computer program RES2DINV (Loke, 2004). The agricultural soils considered were Riverhead sandy loam (RdA), Haven loam (HaA), and Bridgehampton silt loam (BgA). The natural site was located in the Catskill Mountains of New York State. The soils there are classified as Schoharie silty clay loam. The electrical images of the three sites were compared against established soil properties, including particle size distribution, available water capacity, and soluble salts (from the literature), as well as against site-specific soil samples and penetrometer data, which were collected along with the geophysical measurements. This research evaluates the potential of acquiring high resolution, non-destructive measurements of infiltration in the uppermost 1.5 meter of the vadose zone. The results demonstrate that resistivity differences can detect infiltration in soils typical of the north-eastern United States. Temporal and spatial variations of soil water content in the upper 1.5 meters (relevant to agriculture) of the subsurface can be monitored successfully and non-destructively with ERI. The sensitivity of the method is higher in subsurface environments that demonstrate high overall apparent resistivity values (e.g. high sand content). Under conditions of increased soil heterogeneity, instead of the formation of a continuous

  17. Relating permeability and electrical resistivity in fractures using random resistor network models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, Alison; Heinson, Graham; Krieger, Lars

    2016-03-01

    We use random resistor network models to explore the relationship between electrical resistivity and permeability in a fracture filled with an electrically conductive fluid. Fluid flow and current are controlled by both the distribution and the volume of pore space. Therefore, the aperture distribution of fractures must be accurately modeled in order to realistically represent their hydraulic and electrical properties. We have constructed fracture surface pairs based on characteristics measured on rock samples. We use these to construct resistor networks with variable hydraulic and electrical resistance in order to investigate the changes in both properties as a fault is opened. At small apertures, electrical conductivity and permeability increase moderately with aperture until the fault reaches its percolation threshold. Above this point, the permeability increases by 4 orders of magnitude over a change in mean aperture of less than 0.1 mm, while the resistivity decreases by up to a factor of 10 over this aperture change. Because permeability increases at a greater rate than matrix to fracture resistivity ratio, the percolation threshold can also be defined in terms of the matrix to fracture resistivity ratio, M. The value of M at the percolation threshold, MPT, varies with the ratio of rock to fluid resistivity, the fault spacing, and the fault offset. However, MPT is almost always less than 10. Greater M values are associated with fractures above their percolation threshold. Therefore, if such M values are observed over fluid-filled fractures, it is likely that they are open for fluid flow.

  18. Simultaneous electrical resistivity and mass uptake measurements in bromine intercalated fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Changes in mass and electrical resistivity of several types of pitch-based and vapor-grown graphite fibers were monitored during reaction with bromine. The observed threshold pressure dependent reaction suggested that the fibers were intercalated. In the fully brominated compound, the mass was increased by 44 percent and the resistivity was improved by a factor of 17. In the residue compound, the mass was increased by 22 percent and the resistivity was improved by a factor of 5. Fibers possessing different degrees of graphitization had surprisingly similar changes in both mass and resistivity.

  19. Biodiversity increases the resistance of ecosystem productivity to climate extremes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It remains unclear whether biodiversity buffers ecosystems against extreme climate events, which are becoming increasingly frequent worldwide. Although early results suggested that biodiversity might provide both resistance and resilience (sensu rapid recovery) of ecosystem productivity to drought, ...

  20. Investigations of discontinuous permafrost using electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewkowicz, Antoni

    2016-04-01

    We have used electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) extensively over the past five years to examine frozen ground characteristics at natural and disturbed sites within the discontinuous permafrost zones of northern Canada. Examples of pure research include investigations to delimit permafrost patch size, to examine changes in permafrost conditions at altitudinal treeline, and to assess permafrost thickness in palsa bogs. Applied research has included hazard mapping where ERT, in association with boreholes, has been used to characterize permafrost conditions in different terrain units at Yukon communities as part of planning for climate change adaptation. ERT has also been used to examine temporal change through repeated surveys at sites equipped with permanent arrays. Rapid change is occurring at sites which were subject to recent forest fire in the Northwest Territories. Gradual reductions in average resistivity at sites along the Alaska Highway in Yukon and northern British Columbia indicate progressive increases in unfrozen moisture while ground temperatures at the same sites have increased only very slightly. We conclude that ERT should become a standard technique for the investigation of discontinuous permafrost sites and should be incorporated as a monitoring technique within international programs such as the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost.

  1. Observation of infiltration experiments with time lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noell, Ursula; Ganz, Christina; Altfelder, Sven; Günther, Thomas; Duijnisveld, Wilhelmus; Grissemann, Christoph

    2010-05-01

    analysed quantitatively. For the first experiment this calculation shows one day after the infiltration about 40% of the infiltrated water being lost to the groundwater. For the second experiment the quantitative interpretation takes into account the increased conductivity of the infiltrating tracer solution compared to the pore water of the vadose zone before infiltration. Another infiltration experiment is done on Loess. Due to the low infiltration rate only about 9l of water could be infiltrated within about 3 h (38mm/h). The time lapse ERT clearly reveals the water remaining close to surface and no sign of resistivity change due to the infiltration is observed to penetrate deeper than 30cm. At this depth the plough pan seems to inhibit the infiltration. The analysis shows the high sensitivity of the ERT method. Although the original water content is quite high and therefore the resistivity changes due to water content changes are small (the flat part of the Archie function) the time lapse ERT inversion depicts the changes of resistivity quite clearly. The experiments show the advantages of ERT measurements to observe the infiltration process in real time. However, the interpretation of such measurements still poses difficulties mainly due to the limited resolution and the ill posedness of the inversion problem of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). These problems are investigated further in order to advance the applicability of the method to infiltration problems showing signs of preferential flow.

  2. Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter spp.: Increasingly Problematic Nosocomial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungwon; Yong, Dongeun; Jeong, Seok Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria have increasingly been resisting to antimicrobial therapy. Recently, resistance problem has been relatively much worsened in Gram-negative bacilli. Acinetobacter spp. are typical nosocomial pathogens causing infections and high mortality, almost exclusively in compromised hospital patients. Acinetobacter spp. are intrinsically less susceptible to antibiotics than Enterobacteriaceae, and have propensity to acquire resistance. A surveillance study in Korea in 2009 showed that resistance rates of Acinetobacter spp. were very high: to fluoroquinolone 67%, to amikacin 48%, to ceftazidime 66% and to imipenem 51%. Carbapenem resistance was mostly due to OXA type carbapenemase production in A. baumannii isolates, whereas it was due to metallo-β-lactamase production in non-baumannii Acinetobacter isolates. Colistin-resistant isolates were rare but started to be isolated in Korea. Currently, the infection caused by multidrug-resistant A. baumannii is among the most difficult ones to treat. Analysis at tertiary care hospital in 2010 showed that among the 1,085 isolates of Acinetobacter spp., 14.9% and 41.8% were resistant to seven, and to all eight antimicrobial agents tested, respectively. It is known to be difficult to prevent Acinetobacter spp. infection in hospitalized patients, because the organisms are ubiquitous in hospital environment. Efforts to control resistant bacteria in Korea by hospitals, relevant scientific societies and government agencies have only partially been successful. We need concerted multidisciplinary efforts to preserve the efficacy of currently available antimicrobial agents, by following the principles of antimicrobial stewardship. PMID:22028150

  3. Change Of Electrical Resistivity Depending On Water Saturation Of The Concrete Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbaǧ, Nevbahar; Uyanık, Osman

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the changes of electrical apparent resistivity values depending on the water saturation of cubic concrete samples which designed according to different strength were investigated. For this purpose, 3 different concrete design as poor, middle and good strength 150x150x150mm dimensions 9 for each design cubic samples were prepared. After measuring the weight of the prepared samples, in oven were dried at 105 ° C for 24 hours and then the dry weights were measured. Then the samples were placed into the curing pool and saturated weight of the samples were measured in specific time periods during the 90 day take out from the curing pool and the water content were calculated at each stage of these processes. The water content of the samples were obtained during 90 days specific points in time and as well as electrical apparent resistivity method of the different surfaces of the samples the potential difference measurements made by electrical resistivity method and electrical apparent resistivity values of the samples were calculated. Depending on time obtained from this study with respect to time curves of the water content and the apparent resistivity values were constructed. Results showed that the electrical apparent resistivity values increased depends on the water content. This study was supported with OYP05277-DR-14 Project No. by SDU and State Hydraulic Works 13th Regional/2012-01 Project No. Keywords: Concrete, cubic sample, Resistivity, water content, time

  4. Electrical Resistivity of Liquid Alkali Na-based Binary Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, Aditya M.

    2007-11-01

    The study of the electrical resistivity rL of alkali Na-based binary alloys Na1-xLix, Na1-xKx, Na1-xRbx and Na1-xCsx have been made by well-recognized model potential of Gajjar et al. The most recent exchange and correlation functions due to Farid et al (F) and Sarkar et al (S) are used for the first time in the study of electrical resistivity of liquid binary mixtures and found suitable for such study. The results, due to the inclusion of Sarkar et al's local field correction function, are found superior to those obtained due to Farid et al's local field correction function. Electrical resistivity of Na-based binary alloys compare well with the experimental data available in the literature.

  5. Electrical resistivity borehole measurements: application to an urban tunnel site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, A.; Marache, A.; Obellianne, T.; Breysse, D.

    2002-06-01

    This paper shows how it is possible to use wells drilled during geotechnical pre-investigation of a tunneling site to obtain a 2-D image of the resistivity close to a tunnel boring machine. An experimental apparatus is presented which makes it possible to perform single and borehole-to-borehole electrical measurements independent of the geological and hydrogeological context, which can be activated at any moment during the building of the tunnel. This apparatus is first demonstrated through its use on a test site. Numerical simulations and data inversion are used to analyse the experimental results. Finally, electrical resistivity tomography and single-borehole measurements on a tunneling site are presented. Experimental results show the viability of the apparatus and the efficiency of the inverse algorithm, and also highlight the limitations of the electrical resistivity tomography as a tool for geotechnical investigation in urban areas.

  6. Advances in the application of in situ electrical resistance heating

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Gregory J.; Beyke, Gregory

    2007-07-01

    Electrical Resistance Heating (ERH) is an aggressive in situ thermal remediation technology that was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy from the original oil production technology to enhance vapor extraction remediation technologies in low permeability soils. Soil and groundwater are heated by the passage of electrical current through saturated and unsaturated soil between electrodes, not by the electrodes themselves. It is the resistance to the flow of electrical current that results in increased subsurface temperatures, and this is typically applied to the boiling point of water. It is estimated that more than 75 ERH applications have been performed. Capacity to perform these projects has increased over the years, and as many as 15 to 20 of these applications now being performed at any given time, mainly in North America, with some European applications. While the main focus has been to vaporize volatile organic compounds, as one would expect other semi-volatile and non-volatile organic compounds have also been encountered, resulting in observations of chemical and physical reactions that have not been normally incorporated into environmental restoration projects. One such reaction is hydrolysis, which is slow under normal groundwater temperatures, becomes very rapid under temperatures that can easily be achieved using ERH. As a result, these chemical and physical reactions are increasing the applicability of ERH in environmental restoration projects, treating a wider variety of compounds and utilizing biotic and abiotic mechanisms to reduce energy costs. For the treatment of oil and coal tar residues from manufactured gas plants, a process TRS has called steam bubble floatation is used to physically remove the coal and oil tar from the soils for collection using conventional multi-phase collection methods. Heat-enhanced hydrolysis has been used to remediate dichloromethane from soils and groundwater at a site in Illinois, while heat-enhanced biotic and

  7. Biodiversity increases the resistance of ecosystem productivity to climate extremes.

    PubMed

    Isbell, Forest; Craven, Dylan; Connolly, John; Loreau, Michel; Schmid, Bernhard; Beierkuhnlein, Carl; Bezemer, T Martijn; Bonin, Catherine; Bruelheide, Helge; de Luca, Enrica; Ebeling, Anne; Griffin, John N; Guo, Qinfeng; Hautier, Yann; Hector, Andy; Jentsch, Anke; Kreyling, Jürgen; Lanta, Vojtěch; Manning, Pete; Meyer, Sebastian T; Mori, Akira S; Naeem, Shahid; Niklaus, Pascal A; Polley, H Wayne; Reich, Peter B; Roscher, Christiane; Seabloom, Eric W; Smith, Melinda D; Thakur, Madhav P; Tilman, David; Tracy, Benjamin F; van der Putten, Wim H; van Ruijven, Jasper; Weigelt, Alexandra; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Wilsey, Brian; Eisenhauer, Nico

    2015-10-22

    It remains unclear whether biodiversity buffers ecosystems against climate extremes, which are becoming increasingly frequent worldwide. Early results suggested that the ecosystem productivity of diverse grassland plant communities was more resistant, changing less during drought, and more resilient, recovering more quickly after drought, than that of depauperate communities. However, subsequent experimental tests produced mixed results. Here we use data from 46 experiments that manipulated grassland plant diversity to test whether biodiversity provides resistance during and resilience after climate events. We show that biodiversity increased ecosystem resistance for a broad range of climate events, including wet or dry, moderate or extreme, and brief or prolonged events. Across all studies and climate events, the productivity of low-diversity communities with one or two species changed by approximately 50% during climate events, whereas that of high-diversity communities with 16-32 species was more resistant, changing by only approximately 25%. By a year after each climate event, ecosystem productivity had often fully recovered, or overshot, normal levels of productivity in both high- and low-diversity communities, leading to no detectable dependence of ecosystem resilience on biodiversity. Our results suggest that biodiversity mainly stabilizes ecosystem productivity, and productivity-dependent ecosystem services, by increasing resistance to climate events. Anthropogenic environmental changes that drive biodiversity loss thus seem likely to decrease ecosystem stability, and restoration of biodiversity to increase it, mainly by changing the resistance of ecosystem productivity to climate events. PMID:26466564

  8. Biodiversity increases the resistance of ecosystem productivity to climate extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isbell, Forest; Craven, Dylan; Connolly, John; Loreau, Michel; Schmid, Bernhard; Beierkuhnlein, Carl; Bezemer, T. Martijn; Bonin, Catherine; Bruelheide, Helge; de Luca, Enrica; Ebeling, Anne; Griffin, John N.; Guo, Qinfeng; Hautier, Yann; Hector, Andy; Jentsch, Anke; Kreyling, Jürgen; Lanta, Vojtěch; Manning, Pete; Meyer, Sebastian T.; Mori, Akira S.; Naeem, Shahid; Niklaus, Pascal A.; Polley, H. Wayne; Reich, Peter B.; Roscher, Christiane; Seabloom, Eric W.; Smith, Melinda D.; Thakur, Madhav P.; Tilman, David; Tracy, Benjamin F.; van der Putten, Wim H.; van Ruijven, Jasper; Weigelt, Alexandra; Weisser, Wolfgang W.; Wilsey, Brian; Eisenhauer, Nico

    2015-10-01

    It remains unclear whether biodiversity buffers ecosystems against climate extremes, which are becoming increasingly frequent worldwide. Early results suggested that the ecosystem productivity of diverse grassland plant communities was more resistant, changing less during drought, and more resilient, recovering more quickly after drought, than that of depauperate communities. However, subsequent experimental tests produced mixed results. Here we use data from 46 experiments that manipulated grassland plant diversity to test whether biodiversity provides resistance during and resilience after climate events. We show that biodiversity increased ecosystem resistance for a broad range of climate events, including wet or dry, moderate or extreme, and brief or prolonged events. Across all studies and climate events, the productivity of low-diversity communities with one or two species changed by approximately 50% during climate events, whereas that of high-diversity communities with 16-32 species was more resistant, changing by only approximately 25%. By a year after each climate event, ecosystem productivity had often fully recovered, or overshot, normal levels of productivity in both high- and low-diversity communities, leading to no detectable dependence of ecosystem resilience on biodiversity. Our results suggest that biodiversity mainly stabilizes ecosystem productivity, and productivity-dependent ecosystem services, by increasing resistance to climate events. Anthropogenic environmental changes that drive biodiversity loss thus seem likely to decrease ecosystem stability, and restoration of biodiversity to increase it, mainly by changing the resistance of ecosystem productivity to climate events.

  9. Impact of increased electric vehicle use on battery recycling infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Vimmerstedt, L.; Hammel, C.; Jungst, R.

    1996-12-01

    State and Federal regulations have been implemented that are intended to encourage more widespread use of low-emission vehicles. These regulations include requirements of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and regulations pursuant to the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and the Energy Policy Act. If the market share of electric vehicles increases in response to these initiatives, corresponding growth will occur in quantities of spent electric vehicle batteries for disposal. Electric vehicle battery recycling infrastructure must be adequate to support collection, transportation, recovery, and disposal stages of waste battery handling. For some battery types, such as lead-acid, a recycling infrastructure is well established; for others, little exists. This paper examines implications of increasing electric vehicle use for lead recovery infrastructure. Secondary lead recovery facilities can be expected to have adequate capacity to accommodate lead-acid electric vehicle battery recycling. However, they face stringent environmental constraints that may curtail capacity use or new capacity installation. Advanced technologies help address these environmental constraints. For example, this paper describes using backup power to avoid air emissions that could occur if electric utility power outages disable emissions control equipment. This approach has been implemented by GNB Technologies, a major manufacturer and recycler of lead-acid batteries. Secondary lead recovery facilities appear to have adequate capacity to accommodate lead waste from electric vehicles, but growth in that capacity could be constrained by environmental regulations. Advances in lead recovery technologies may alleviate possible environmental constraints on capacity growth.

  10. Resistivity of flame plasma in an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuta, Kazunari

    1989-03-01

    A generalized Ohm's law is obtained for a flame plasma in an electric field for the study of arc resistivity in an electromagnetic launcher (EML). The resistivity of flame plasma is reduced by the particle source, which suggests the injection of premixed combustible fuel into the arc plasma as the particle source in order to reduce the arc voltage. Reduction of the voltage in the arc is desirable to reduce the damage of electrodes in EML since the electric field in the arc plasma energizes charged particles which can bombard the electrodes.

  11. Using electrical resistance tomography to map subsurface temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Ramirez, A.L.; Chesnut, D.A.; Daily, W.D.

    1994-09-13

    A method is provided for measuring subsurface soil or rock temperatures remotely using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Electrical resistivity measurements are made using electrodes implanted in boreholes driven into the soil and/or at the ground surface. The measurements are repeated as some process changes the temperatures of the soil mass/rock mass. Tomographs of electrical resistivity are calculated based on the measurements using Poisson's equation. Changes in the soil/rock resistivity can be related to changes in soil/rock temperatures when: (1) the electrical conductivity of the fluid trapped in the soil's pore space is low, (2) the soil/rock has a high cation exchange capacity and (3) the temperature changes are sufficiently high. When these three conditions exist the resistivity changes observed in the ERT tomographs can be directly attributed to changes in soil/rock temperatures. This method provides a way of mapping temperature changes in subsurface soils remotely. Distances over which the ERT method can be used to monitor changes in soil temperature range from tens to hundreds of meters from the electrode locations. 1 fig.

  12. Using electrical resistance tomography to map subsurface temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Ramirez, Abelardo L.; Chesnut, Dwayne A.; Daily, William D.

    1994-01-01

    A method is provided for measuring subsurface soil or rock temperatures remotely using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Electrical resistivity measurements are made using electrodes implanted in boreholes driven into the soil and/or at the ground surface. The measurements are repeated as some process changes the temperatures of the soil mass/rock mass. Tomographs of electrical resistivity are calculated based on the measurements using Poisson's equation. Changes in the soil/rock resistivity can be related to changes in soil/rock temperatures when: (1) the electrical conductivity of the fluid trapped in the soil's pore space is low, (2) the soil/rock has a high cation exchange capacity and (3) the temperature changes are sufficiently high. When these three conditions exist the resistivity changes observed in the ERT tomographs can be directly attributed to changes in soil/rock temperatures. This method provides a way of mapping temperature changes in subsurface soils remotely. Distances over which the ERT method can be used to monitor changes in soil temperature range from tens to hundreds of meters from the electrode locations.

  13. Modeling the Electrical Contact Resistance at Steel-Carbon Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimmo, Ayoola T.; Hassan, Mohamed I.

    2016-01-01

    In the aluminum smelting industry, electrical contact resistance at the stub-carbon (steel-carbon) interface has been recurrently reported to be of magnitudes that legitimately necessitate concern. Mitigating this via finite element modeling has been the focus of a number of investigations, with the pressure- and temperature-dependent contact resistance relation frequently cited as a factor that limits the accuracy of such models. In this study, pressure- and temperature-dependent relations are derived from the most extensively cited works that have experimentally characterized the electrical contact resistance at these contacts. These relations are applied in a validated thermo-electro-mechanical finite element model used to estimate the voltage drop across a steel-carbon laboratory setup. By comparing the models' estimate of the contact electrical resistance with experimental measurements, we deduce the applicability of the different relations over a range of temperatures. The ultimate goal of this study is to apply mathematical modeling in providing pressure- and temperature-dependent relations that best describe the steel-carbon electrical contact resistance and identify the best fit relation at specific thermodynamic conditions.

  14. Resistivity of flame plasma in an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuta, Kazunari

    1989-01-01

    A generalized Ohm's law is obtained for a flame plasma in an electric field for the study of arc resistivity in an electromagnetic launcher (EML). The effective resistivity of flame plasma is reduced by the source, which suggests the injection of premixed combustible fuel into the arc plasma in EML in order to reduce the electron energy of the arc. The reduction of electron energy in the arc is desirable to minimize the damage of electrodes in EML.

  15. Electrical resistivity measurements in the Neillsville area, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spicer, H. Cecil; Edwards, George J.

    1955-01-01

    Sixty-eight electrical depth profiles were completed in the vicinity of Neillsville, Wis. to obtain information on the water-bearing beds in the glacial moraine and consolidated sedimentary rocks in the area. No productive aquifers were found but the best areas for test drilling are described. The basic theory and interpretation procedures, together with a short description of field methods on electrical resistivity measurements are also presented.

  16. Resistance after firing protected electric match. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Montoya, A.P.

    1980-03-20

    An electric match having electrical leads embedded in flame-producing compound is protected against an accidental resistance across the leads after firing by a length of heat-shrinkable tubing encircling the match body and having a skirt portion extending beyond the leads. The heat of the burning match and an adjacent thermal battery causes the tubing to fold over the end of the match body, covering the ends of the leads and protecting them from molten pieces of the battery.

  17. Equivalent Electrical Circuit Representations of AC Quantized Hall Resistance Standards

    PubMed Central

    Cage, M. E.; Jeffery, A.; Matthews, J.

    1999-01-01

    We use equivalent electrical circuits to analyze the effects of large parasitic impedances existing in all sample probes on four-terminal-pair measurements of the ac quantized Hall resistance RH. The circuit components include the externally measurable parasitic capacitances, inductances, lead resistances, and leakage resistances of ac quantized Hall resistance standards, as well as components that represent the electrical characteristics of the quantum Hall effect device (QHE). Two kinds of electrical circuit connections to the QHE are described and considered: single-series “offset” and quadruple-series. (We eliminated other connections in earlier analyses because they did not provide the desired accuracy with all sample probe leads attached at the device.) Exact, but complicated, algebraic equations are derived for the currents and measured quantized Hall voltages for these two circuits. Only the quadruple-series connection circuit meets our desired goal of measuring RH for both ac and dc currents with a one-standard-deviation uncertainty of 10−8 RH or less during the same cool-down with all leads attached at the device. The single-series “offset” connection circuit meets our other desired goal of also measuring the longitudinal resistance Rx for both ac and dc currents during that same cool-down. We will use these predictions to apply small measurable corrections, and uncertainties of the corrections, to ac measurements of RH in order to realize an intrinsic ac quantized Hall resistance standard of 10−8 RH uncertainty or less.

  18. Influence of Ultraviolet/Ozonolysis Treatment of Nanocarbon Filler on the Electrical Resistivity of Epoxy Composites.

    PubMed

    Perets, Yulia; Matzui, Lyudmila; Vovchenko, Lyudmila; Ovsiienko, Irina; Yakovenko, Olena; Lazarenko, Oleksandra; Zhuravkov, Alexander; Brusylovets, Oleksii

    2016-12-01

    In the present work, we have investigated concentration and temperature dependences of electrical conductivity of graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy resin composites. The content of nanocarbon filler is varied from 0.01 to 0.05 volume fraction. Before incorporation into the epoxy resin, the graphite nanoplatelets were subjected to ultraviolet ozone treatment at 20-min ultraviolet exposure. The electric resistance of the samples was measured by two- or four-probe method and teraohmmeter E6-13. Several characterization techniques were employed to identify the mechanisms behind the improvements in the electrical properties, including SEM and FTIR spectrum analysis.It is established that the changes of the relative intensities of the bands in FTIR spectra indicate the destruction of the carboxyl group -COOH and group -OH. Electrical conductivity of composites has percolation character and graphite nanoplatelets (ultraviolet ozone treatment for 20 min) addition which leads to a decrease of percolation threshold 0.005 volume fraction and increase values of electrical conductivity (by 2-3 orders of magnitude) above the percolation threshold in comparison with composite materials-graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy resin. The changes of the value and behavior of temperature dependences of the electrical resistivity of epoxy composites with ultraviolet/ozone-treated graphite nanoparticles have been analyzed within the model of effective electrical conductivity. The model takes into account the own electrical conductivity of the filler and the value of contact electric resistance between the filler particles of the formation of continuous conductive pathways. PMID:27550050

  19. Can we quantify local groundwater recharge using electrical resistivity tomography?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noell, U.; Günther, T.; Ganz, C.; Lamparter, A.

    2012-04-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has become a common tool to observe flow processes within the saturated/unsaturated zones. While it is still doubtful whether the method can reliably yield quantitative results the qualitative success has been shown in "numerous" examples. To quantify the rate of rainfall which reaches the groundwater table is still a problematic venture due to a sad combination of several physical and mathematical obstacles that may lead to huge errors. In 2007 an infiltration experiment was performed and observed using 3D array ERT. The site is located close to Hannover, Germany, on a well studied sandy soil. The groundwater table at this site was at a depth of about 1.3 m. The inversion results of the ERT data yield reliably looking pictures of the infiltration process. Later experiments nearby using tracer fluid and combined TDR and resistivity measurements in the subsurface strongly supported the assumption that the resistivity pictures indeed depict the water distributions during infiltration reliably. The quantitative interpretation shows that two days after infiltration about 40% of the water has reached the groundwater. However, the question remains how reliable this quantitative interpretation actually is. The first obstacle: The inversion of the ERT data gives one possible resistivity distribution within the subsurface that can explain the data. It is not necessarily the right one and the result depends on the error model and the inversion parameters and method. For these measurements we assume the same error for every single quadrupole (3%), applied the Gauss-Newton method and minimum length constraints in order to reduce the smoothing to a minimum (very small lambda). Numerical experiments showed little smoothing using this approach, and smoothing must be suppressed if preferential flow is to be seen. The inversion showed artefacts of minor amplitude compared with other inversion parameter settings. The second obstacle: The

  20. Electrical Resistivity Imaging to Quantify Spatial Soil Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guber, A. K.; Hadzick, Z. L.; Garzio, A.; Pachepsky, Y. A.; Hill, R. L.; Rowland, R. A.; Golovko, L. A.

    2008-12-01

    Electrical resistivity (ER) sounding is increasingly being used as non-invasive technique to reveal and map soil heterogeneity. The objective of this work was to evaluate effects of soil properties on the electric resistivity and to observe these effects in spatial context in coarse-textured soil. The studied soil had the sandy loam texture. The 20x20-m study plot was located at the ARS Beltsville OPE3 site. Relationship between ER, bulk density, and soil water contents was first studied in disturbed 80-cm3 soil samples taken at 10 depths with 20 cm increment. Soil water contents were brought to 6 predefined levels in each sample and were in the range from air dry to 0.27g g-1. Soil bulk density varied in the range from 1.28 to 1.45 g cm-3. The ER in soil samples decreased as the gravimetric water content increased. The ER decrease became more pronounced as bulk density decreased. Next, soil samples were taken at field water contents from 10 depths at 12 locations. Particle size distributions, pH, water content and ER were measured in each sample. Bulk density values in part of the soil profiles below 80 cm ranged from 1.5 to 1.8 g cm- 3 and no dependence between ER and water content could be established in this soil layer where the lowest values of ER were recorded. The increased conductivity of the soil solid phase could be a possible reason for that since soil in this part of the profile had pH values two or more units less than in the upper part. The lowest sand contents corresponded to highest ER values in this soil layer. Finally, the vertical electrical sounding (LandMapper ERM-02) was used to infer spatial distribution of soil resistivity along a 9-m transect for different dates when soil was dry and when it was relatively uniformly wetted with long low- intensity rain. The Wenner-Shlumberger array with 31-electrodes spaced 30-cm apart was used. Soil temperature and water content with multisensor capacitance probes (SENTEC) were monitored at 10 depths down

  1. Resistance of a pulsed electrical breakdown channel in ionic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punanov, I. F.; Emlin, R. V.; Kulikov, V. D.; Cholakh, S. O.

    2014-04-01

    A technique for estimating the resistance of the electrical breakdown channel in ionic crystals is proposed. This technique is based on measuring the channel velocity in a sample when a ballast resistor is connected to the circuit of a needle anode and on using the theoretical dependence of the channel velocity on the channel conductivity. The breakdown channel resistance at a voltage of 140 kV is about 6.5 kΩ in KCl and about 6.1 kΩ in KBr. These resistances are shown to characterize a gas phase. The gas-phase resistance is found to be nonuniform along the breakdown channel. The head part ˜1 mm long has the maximum resistance. This head region is concluded to contain dielectric substance clusters, which then decompose into metal and halogen ions. The cluster lifetime is ˜10-9 s.

  2. Research on nonlinear feature of electrical resistance of acupuncture points.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jianzi; Mao, Huijuan; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Lina; Liu, Sheng; Shen, Xueyong

    2012-01-01

    A highly sensitive volt-ampere characteristics detecting system was applied to measure the volt-ampere curves of nine acupuncture points, LU9, HT7, LI4, PC6, ST36, SP6, KI3, LR3, and SP3, and corresponding nonacupuncture points bilaterally from 42 healthy volunteers. Electric currents intensity was increased from 0 μA to 20 μA and then returned to 0 μA again. The results showed that the volt-ampere curves of acupuncture points had nonlinear property and magnetic hysteresis-like feature. On all acupuncture point spots, the volt-ampere areas of the increasing phase were significantly larger than that of the decreasing phase (P < 0.01). The volt-ampere areas of ten acupuncture point spots were significantly smaller than those of the corresponding nonacupuncture point spots when intensity was increase (P < 0.05 ~ P < 0.001). And when intensity was decrease, eleven acupuncture point spots showed the same property as above (P < 0.05 ~ P < 0.001), while two acupuncture point spots showed opposite phenomenon in which the areas of two acupuncture point spots were larger than those of the corresponding nonacupuncture point spots (P < 0.05 ~ P < 0.01). These results show that the phenomenon of low skin resistance does not exist to all acupuncture points. PMID:23346191

  3. Image-guided inversion of electrical resistivity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J.; Revil, A.; Karaoulis, M.; Hale, D.; Doetsch, J.; Cuttler, S.

    2014-04-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is based on solving a Poisson equation for the electrical potential and is characterized by a good sensitivity only in the vicinity of the electrodes used to gather the data. To provide more information to ERT, we propose an image-guided or structure-constrained inversion of the apparent resistivity data. This approach uses structural information obtained directly from a guiding image. This guiding image can be drawn from a high resolution geophysical method based on the propagation equation (e.g. migrated seismic or ground penetrating radar images) or possibly from a geological cross-section of the subsurface based on some prior geological expertise. The locations and orientations of the structural features can be extracted by image processing methods to determine the structure tensor and the semblances of the guiding image at a set of pixel. Then, we introduce these structural constraints into the inversion of the apparent resistivity data by weighting the four-direction smoothing matrix to smooth along, but not across, structural features. This approach allows preserving both discontinuities and coherences in the inversion of the resistivity data. The image-guided inversion is also combined with an image-guided interpolation approach used to focus a smooth resistivity image. This yields structurally-appealing resistivity tomograms, while the whole process remains computationally efficient. Such a procedure generates a more realistic resistivity distribution (closer to the true ones), which can be, in turn, used quantitatively using appropriate petrophysical transforms, to obtain parameters of interest such as porosity and saturation. We check the validity of this approach using two synthetic case studies as well as two real datasets. For the field data, the image used to guide the inversion of the electrical resistivity data is a GPR section in the first case and a combination of seismic and structural information in the

  4. Estimation of tree root distribution using electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmaltz, Elmar; Uhlemann, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Trees influence soil-mantled slopes mechanically by anchoring in the soil with coarse roots. Forest-stands play an important role in mechanical reinforcement to reduce the susceptibility to slope failures. However, the effect of stabilisation of roots is connected with the distribution of roots in the ground. The architecture and distribution of tree roots is diverse and strongly dependent on species, plant age, stand density, relief, nutrient supply as well as climatic and pedologic conditions. Particularly trees growing on inclined slopes show shape-shifting root systems. Geophysical techniques are commonly used to non-invasively study hydrological and geomorphological subsurface properties, by imaging contrasting physical properties of the ground. This also poses the challenge for geophysical imaging of root systems, as properties, such as electrical resistivity, of dry and wet roots fall within the range of soils. The objective of this study is whether electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) allows a reliable reproduction of root systems of alone-standing trees on diverse inclined slopes. In this regard, we set the focus on the branching of secondary roots of two common walnut trees (Juglans regia L.) that were not disturbed in the adjacencies and thus expected to develop their root systems unhindered. Walnuts show a taproot-cordate root system with a strong tap-root in juvenile age and a rising cordate rooting with increasing age. Hence, mature walnuts can exhibit a root system that appears to be deformed or shifted respectively when growing at hillslope locations. We employed 3D ERT centred on the tree stem, comprising dipole-dipole measurements on a 12-by-41 electrode grid with 0.5 m and 1.0m electrode spacing in x- and y-direction respectively. Data were inverted using a 3D smoothness constrained non-linear least-squares algorithm. First results show that the general root distribution can be estimated from the resistivity models and that shape

  5. Electrical resistance sensors for soil water tension estimates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter, in a book to be published by the International Atomic Energy Agency/FAO Joint Division, provides detailed information on how to sense soil water tension with electrical resistance sensors. It provides insight into problems commonly encountered in using these sensors. Guidance on data r...

  6. Electrical Resistivity Changes in Saturated Rock under Stress.

    PubMed

    Brace, W F; Orange, A S

    1966-09-23

    Electrical resistivity of water-saturated crystalline rock such as granite, diabase, dunite, or quartzite changes by an order of magnitude prior to fracture of the rock in compression. The effect observed even under high confining pressure is due to formation of open cracks which first appear at one-third to two-thirds the fracture stress. PMID:17749731

  7. Using electrical resistance probes for moisture determination in switchgrass windrows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determining moisture levels in windrowed biomass is important for both forage producers and researchers. Energy crops such as switchgrass have been troublesome when using the standard methods set for electrical resistance meters. The objectives of this study were to i) develop the methodologies need...

  8. Atrial natriuretic peptide increases resistance to venous return in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Y.W.; Frohlich, E.D.; Trippodo, N.C.

    1987-05-01

    To examine mechanisms by which administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) decreases venous return, the authors compared the hemodynamic effects of ANP furosemide (FU), and hexamethonium (HEX) with those of vehicle (VE) in anesthetized rats. Compared with VE, ANP reduced mean arterial pressure, central venous pressure, and cardiac index and increased calculated resistance to venous return. /sup 141/Ce-labeled microspheres were used to determine cardiac output. Mean circulatory filling pressure, distribution of blood flow between splanchnic organs and skeletal muscles, and total peripheral resistance remained unchanged. FU increased urine output similar to that of ANP, yet produced no hemodynamic changes, dissociating diuresis, and decreased cardiac output. HEX lowered arterial pressure through a reduction in total peripheral resistance without altering cardiac output or resistance to venous return. The results confirm previous findings that ANP decreases cardiac output through a reduction in venous return and suggest that this results partly from increased resistance to venous return and not from venodilation or distribution of blood flow.

  9. Rolling resistance of electric-vehicle tires from track tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dustin, M.O.; Slavik, R.J.

    1982-06-01

    Two sets of low-rolling-resistance tires were track tested to obtain realistic tire characteristics for use in programming the Road Load Simulator, a special dynamometer facility located at the NASA Lewis Research Center. One set was specially made by Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company for DOE's ETV-1 electric vehicle, and the other was a set of standard commercial automotive tires. The tests were conducted over an ambient temperature range of 15/sup 0/ to 32/sup 0/C (59/sup 0/ to 89/sup 0/F) and with tire pressures of 207 and 276 kPa (30 and 40 psi). Both sets of tires had very low rolling resistance. The commercial tires, which were manufactured approximately 3 years after the electric vehicle tires, exhibited lower rolling resistance than the electric vehicle tires. This is a result of the continuing effort by the tire manufacturers to reduce rolling resistance in order to improve fuel economy. At a contained-air temperature of 38/sup 0/C (100/sup 0/F) and a pressure of 207 kPa (30 psi), the resistance of the electric vehicle tires was 0.0102 kilogram per kilogram of vehicle weight and the resistance of the commercial tires was 0.0088 kilogram per kilogram of vehicle weight. At a contained-air temperature of 38/sup 0/C (100/sup 0/F) and a pressure of 276 kPa (40 psi), the resistance of the electric vehicle tires was 0.009 kilogram per kilogram of vehicle weight and the resistance of the commercial tires was 0.0074 kilogram per kilogram of vehicle weight. The average time for the tires to reach an equilibrium temperature after startup was 20 minutes for the constant-speed tests regardless of vehicle speed and 27 minutes for the SAE J227a Schedule D driving cycle tests. The average change in rolling resistance from startup to final equilibrium value was 5% for all tests. There was very little heating of the tires from velocity-dependent losses. The predominant heating source for these tires was radiation heating from the Sun.

  10. Predicting and tracking spatiotemporal moments in electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, W. O. C.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Chambers, J.; Bai, L.

    2015-12-01

    Visualisation is an invaluable tool in the study of near sub-surface processes, whether by mathematical modelling or by geophysical imaging. Quantitative analysis can further assist interpretation of the ongoing physical processes, and it is clear that any reliable model should take direct observations into account. Using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), localised areas can be surveyed to produce 2-D and 3-D time-lapse images. This study investigates combining quantitative results obtained via ERT with spatio-temporal motion models in tracer experiments to interpret and predict fluid flow. As with any indirect imaging technique, ERT suffers specific issues with resolution and smoothness as a result of its inversion process. In addition, artefacts are typical in the resulting volumes. Mathematical models are also a source of uncertainty - and in combining these with ERT images, a trade-off must be made between the theoretical and the observed. Using computational imaging, distinct regions of stable resistivity can be directly extracted from a time-slice of an ERT volume. The automated nature, as well the potential for more than one region-of-interest, means that multiple regions can be detected. Using Kalman filters, it is possible to convert the detections into a process state, taking into account pre-defined models and predicting progression. In consecutive time-steps, newly detected features are assigned, where possible, to existing predictions to create tracks that match the tracer model. Preliminary studies looked at a simple motion model, tracking the centre of mass of a tracer plume with assumed constant velocity and mean resistivity. Extending the model to factor in spatial distribution of the plume, an oriented semi-axis is used to represent the centralised second-order moment, with an increasing factor of magnitude to represent the plume dispersion. Initial results demonstrate the efficacy of the approach, significantly improving reliability as the

  11. 18 CFR 2.18 - Phased electric rate increase filings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Phased electric rate increase filings. 2.18 Section 2.18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES GENERAL POLICY AND INTERPRETATIONS Statements of...

  12. Experimental determination of the electrical resistivity of iron at Earth’s core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Kenji; Kuwayama, Yasuhiro; Hirose, Kei; Shimizu, Katsuya; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    Earth continuously generates a dipole magnetic field in its convecting liquid outer core by a self-sustained dynamo action. Metallic iron is a dominant component of the outer core, so its electrical and thermal conductivity controls the dynamics and thermal evolution of Earth’s core. However, in spite of extensive research, the transport properties of iron under core conditions are still controversial. Since free electrons are a primary carrier of both electric current and heat, the electron scattering mechanism in iron under high pressure and temperature holds the key to understanding the transport properties of planetary cores. Here we measure the electrical resistivity (the reciprocal of electrical conductivity) of iron at the high temperatures (up to 4,500 kelvin) and pressures (megabars) of Earth’s core in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The value measured for the resistivity of iron is even lower than the value extrapolated from high-pressure, low-temperature data using the Bloch–Grüneisen law, which considers only the electron–phonon scattering. This shows that the iron resistivity is strongly suppressed by the resistivity saturation effect at high temperatures. The low electrical resistivity of iron indicates the high thermal conductivity of Earth’s core, suggesting rapid core cooling and a young inner core less than 0.7 billion years old. Therefore, an abrupt increase in palaeomagnetic field intensity around 1.3 billion years ago may not be related to the birth of the inner core.

  13. Experimental determination of the electrical resistivity of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Kenji; Kuwayama, Yasuhiro; Hirose, Kei; Shimizu, Katsuya; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    Earth continuously generates a dipole magnetic field in its convecting liquid outer core by a self-sustained dynamo action. Metallic iron is a dominant component of the outer core, so its electrical and thermal conductivity controls the dynamics and thermal evolution of Earth's core. However, in spite of extensive research, the transport properties of iron under core conditions are still controversial. Since free electrons are a primary carrier of both electric current and heat, the electron scattering mechanism in iron under high pressure and temperature holds the key to understanding the transport properties of planetary cores. Here we measure the electrical resistivity (the reciprocal of electrical conductivity) of iron at the high temperatures (up to 4,500 kelvin) and pressures (megabars) of Earth's core in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The value measured for the resistivity of iron is even lower than the value extrapolated from high-pressure, low-temperature data using the Bloch-Grüneisen law, which considers only the electron-phonon scattering. This shows that the iron resistivity is strongly suppressed by the resistivity saturation effect at high temperatures. The low electrical resistivity of iron indicates the high thermal conductivity of Earth's core, suggesting rapid core cooling and a young inner core less than 0.7 billion years old. Therefore, an abrupt increase in palaeomagnetic field intensity around 1.3 billion years ago may not be related to the birth of the inner core. PMID:27251282

  14. Determinants that increase the serum resistance of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, P W; Robinson, M K

    1980-01-01

    The rfb locus, determining biosynthesis of O8-specific lipopolysaccharide side chains, was transferred to a rough mutant of Escherichia coli; recombinants producing a complete lipopolysaccharide were more resistant to the complement-mediated bactericidal action of human serum than the rough recipient. Inheritance of the his-linked genes for K27 antigen production did not alter the response to serum. The serum resistance of strains carrying O8 side chains, but not of strains with incomplete lipopolysaccharides, was further increased by inheritance of plasmids R1 and NR1.20 PMID:6995340

  15. Recent Advances in Electrical Resistance Preheating of Aluminum Reduction Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mohamed Mahmoud; Kvande, Halvor

    2016-06-01

    ABSTRACT There are two mainpreheating methods that are used nowadays for aluminum reduction cells. One is based on electrical resistance preheating with a thin bed of small coke and/or graphite particles between the anodes and the cathode carbon blocks. The other is flame preheating, where two or more gas or oil burners are used. Electrical resistance preheating is the oldest method, but is still frequently used by different aluminum producers. Many improvements have been made to this method by different companies over the last decade. In this paper, important points pertaining to the preparation and preheating of these cells, as well as measurements made during the preheating process and evaluation of the performance of the preheating, are illustrated. The preheating times of these cells were found to be between 36 h and 96 h for cell currents between 176 kA and 406 kA, while the resistance bed thickness was between 13 mm and 60 mm. The average cathode surface temperature at the end of the preheating was usually between 800°C and 950°C. The effect of the preheating methods on cell life is unclear and no quantifiable conclusions can be drawn. Some works carried out in the mathematical modeling area are also discussed. It is concluded that there is a need for more studies with real situations for preheated cells on the basis of actual measurements. The expected development in electrical resistance preheating of aluminum reduction cells is also summarized.

  16. Electrical Resistance Technique to Monitor SiC Composite Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig; Morscher, Gregory; Xia, Zhenhai

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are suitable for high temperature structural applications such as turbine airfoils and hypersonic thermal protection systems. The employment of these materials in such applications is limited by the ability to process components reliable and to accurately monitor and predict damage evolution that leads to failure under stressed-oxidation conditions. Current nondestructive methods such as ultrasound, x-ray, and thermal imaging are limited in their ability to quantify small scale, transverse, in-plane, matrix cracks developed over long-time creep and fatigue conditions. Electrical resistance of SiC/SiC composites is one technique that shows special promise towards this end. Since both the matrix and the fibers are conductive, changes in matrix or fiber properties should relate to changes in electrical conductivity along the length of a specimen or part. The effect of matrix cracking on electrical resistivity for several composite systems will be presented and some initial measurements performed at elevated temperatures under stress-rupture conditions. The implications towards electrical resistance as a technique applied to composite processing, damage detection (health monitoring), and life-modeling will be discussed.

  17. Electrical resistivity sounding to study water content distribution in heterogeneous soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electrical resistivity (ER) sounding is increasingly being used as non-invasive technique to reveal and map soil heterogeneity. The objective of this work was to assess ER sounding applicability to study soil water distribution in spatially heterogeneous soils. The 30x30-m study plot was located at ...

  18. Electrical resistivity response due to elastic-plastic deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    The electrical resistivity of many materials is sensitive to changes in the electronic band configurations surrounding the atoms, changes in the electron-phonon interaction cross-sections, and changes in the density of intrinsic defect structures. These changes are most directly dependent on interatomic measures of relative deformation. For this reason, a model for resistivity response is developed in terms of interatomic measures of relative deformation. The relative deformation consists of two terms, a continuous function to describe the recoverable displacement between two atoms in the atomic lattice structure and a functional to describe the nonrecoverable displacement between two atoms as a result of interatomic discontinuities from dislocation kinetics. This model for resistivity extends the classical piezoresistance representation and relates electric resistance change directly to physical mechanisms. An analysis for the resistivity change of a thin foil ideally embedded in a material that undergoes elastic-plastic deformation is presented. For the case of elastic deformations, stress information in the material surrounding the thin foil is inferred for the cases of pure strain coupling boundary conditions, pure stress coupling boundary conditions, and a combination of stress-strain coupling boundary conditions. 42 refs., 4 figs.

  19. An electrically resistive sheet of glial cells for amplifying signals of neuronal extracellular recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Niwano, M.; Hirano-Iwata, A.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical signals of neuronal cells can be recorded non-invasively and with a high degree of temporal resolution using multielectrode arrays (MEAs). However, signals that are recorded with these devices are small, usually 0.01%-0.1% of intracellular recordings. Here, we show that the amplitude of neuronal signals recorded with MEA devices can be amplified by covering neuronal networks with an electrically resistive sheet. The resistive sheet used in this study is a monolayer of glial cells, supportive cells in the brain. The glial cells were grown on a collagen-gel film that is permeable to oxygen and other nutrients. The impedance of the glial sheet was measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and equivalent circuit simulations were performed to theoretically investigate the effect of covering the neurons with such a resistive sheet. Finally, the effect of the resistive glial sheet was confirmed experimentally, showing a 6-fold increase in neuronal signals. This technique feasibly amplifies signals of MEA recordings.

  20. Electrical Resistivity Monitoring of Voids: Results of Dynamic Modeling Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, J. W.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.

    2006-05-01

    Remote, non-invasive detection of voids is a challenging problem for environmental and engineering investigations in karst terrain. Many geophysical methods including gravity, electrical, electromagnetic, magnetic, and seismic have potential to detect voids in the subsurface; lithologic heterogeneity and method- specific sources of noise, however, can mask the geophysical signatures of voids. New developments in automated, autonomous geophysical monitoring technology now allow for void detection using differential geophysics. We propose automated collection of electrical resistivity measurements over time. This dynamic approach exploits changes in subsurface electrical properties related to void growth or water-table fluctuation in order to detect voids that would be difficult or impossible to detect using static imaging approaches. We use a series of synthetic modeling experiments to demonstrate the potential of difference electrical resistivity tomography for finding (1) voids that develop vertically upward under a survey line (e.g., an incipient sinkhole); (2) voids that develop horizontally toward a survey line (e.g., a tunnel); and (3) voids that are influenced by changing hydrologic conditions (e.g., void saturation and draining). Synthetic datasets are simulated with a 3D finite-element model, but the inversion assumes a 2D forward model to mimic conventional practice. The results of the synthetic modeling experiments provide insights useful for planning and implementing field-scale monitoring experiments using electrical methods.

  1. Electrical resistance sensors record spring flow timing, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, E.A.; Monroe, S.A.; Springer, A.E.; Blasch, K.W.; Bills, D.J.

    2006-01-01

    Springs along the south rim of the Grand Canyon, Arizona, are important ecological and cultural resources in Grand Canyon National Park and are discharge points for regional and local aquifers of the Coconino Plateau. This study evaluated the applicability of electrical resistance (ER) sensors for measuring diffuse, low-stage (<1.0 cm) intermittent and ephemeral flow in the steep, rocky spring-fed tributaries of the south rim. ER sensors were used to conduct a baseline survey of spring flow timing at eight sites in three spring-fed tributaries in Grand Canyon. Sensors were attached to a nearly vertical rock wall at a spring outlet and were installed in alluvial and bedrock channels. Spring flow timing data inferred by the ER sensors were consistent with observations during site visits, with flow events recorded with collocated streamflow gauging stations and with local precipitation gauges. ER sensors were able to distinguish the presence of flow along nearly vertical rock surfaces with flow depths between 0.3 and 1.0 cm. Laboratory experiments confirmed the ability of the sensors to monitor the timing of diffuse flow on impervious surfaces. A comparison of flow patterns along the stream reaches and at springs identified the timing and location of perennial and intermittent flow, and periods of increased evapotranspiration.

  2. Electrical resistance sensors record spring flow timing, Grand Canyon, Arizona.

    PubMed

    Adams, Eric A; Monroe, Stephen A; Springer, Abraham E; Blasch, Kyle W; Bills, Donald J

    2006-01-01

    Springs along the south rim of the Grand Canyon, Arizona, are important ecological and cultural resources in Grand Canyon National Park and are discharge points for regional and local aquifers of the Coconino Plateau. This study evaluated the applicability of electrical resistance (ER) sensors for measuring diffuse, low-stage (<1.0 cm) intermittent and ephemeral flow in the steep, rocky spring-fed tributaries of the south rim. ER sensors were used to conduct a baseline survey of spring flow timing at eight sites in three spring-fed tributaries in Grand Canyon. Sensors were attached to a nearly vertical rock wall at a spring outlet and were installed in alluvial and bedrock channels. Spring flow timing data inferred by the ER sensors were consistent with observations during site visits, with flow events recorded with collocated streamflow gauging stations and with local precipitation gauges. ER sensors were able to distinguish the presence of flow along nearly vertical rock surfaces with flow depths between 0.3 and 1.0 cm. Laboratory experiments confirmed the ability of the sensors to monitor the timing of diffuse flow on impervious surfaces. A comparison of flow patterns along the stream reaches and at springs identified the timing and location of perennial and intermittent flow, and periods of increased evapotranspiration. PMID:16961484

  3. Development of a Landslide Monitoring System using Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hen-Jones, R. M.; Hughes, P. N.; Glendinning, S.; Gunn, D.; Chambers, J.; Stirling, R.

    2015-12-01

    Current assessments of slope stability rely on the use of point sensors, the results of which are often difficult to interpret, have relatively high associated installation and maintenance costs, and do not provide large-area coverage. A new system is currently under development, based on the use of integrated geophysical - geotechnical sensors to monitor ground water conditions via electrical resistivity tomography. This study presents the results of an in-situ electrical resistivity tomography survey, gathered over a two year investigation period at a full-scale clay test embankment in Northumberland, UK. The 3D resistivity array comprised 288 electrodes, at 0.7m grid spacing, covering an area of approximately 90 m2. The first year of investigation involved baseline data collection, followed by a second year which saw a series of deliberate interventions targeted at weakening the slope, to determine whether corresponding geotechnical property changes would be reflected in resistivity images derived from ERT. These interventions included the manual extension of four tension cracks already present in the slope, and the installation of a sprinkler system, eight months later. Laboratory methods were employed to derive a system of equations for relating resistivity to geotechnical parameters more directly relevant to slope stability, including moisture content, suction and shear strength. These equations were then applied to resistivity data gathered over the baseline and intervention periods, yielding geotechnical images of the subsurface which compared well with in-situ geotechnical point sensors. During the intervention period, no slope movement was recorded, however, tensiometers at 0.5 m and 1.0 m depths showed elevated pore pressures, with positive pressures being recorded at depths less than 0.5 m. Resistivity images were successful in capturing the extension of the tension cracks, and in identifying the development of a potential shear failure plane as water

  4. Electrical resistivity of K-based liquid binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, A. M.

    2006-08-01

    The study of the electrical resistivity of alkali K-based liquid binaries, viz, K 1-x Na x, K 1-x Rb x, and K 1-x Cs x have been made by well recognized model potential. The most recent local field correction functions due to Farid et al. (F) and Sarkar et al. (S) are used for the first time in the study of electrical resistivity of liquid binary mixtures and found suitable for such study. The results due to the inclusion of Sarkar et al.’s local field correction function are found superior to those obtained due to Farid et al.’s local field correction function. The present results compare well the experimental data.

  5. Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J. C. Y.; Fortini, A.

    1971-01-01

    Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous materials, including 304L stainless steel Rigimesh, 304L stainless steel sintered spherical powders, and OFHC sintered spherical powders at different porosities and temperatures are reported and correlated. It was found that the thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity can be related to the solid material properties and the porosity of the porous matrix regardless of the matrix structure. It was also found that the Wiedermann-Franz-Lorenz relationship is valid for the porous materials under consideration. For high conductivity materials, the Lorenz constant and the lattice component of conductivity depend on the material and are independent of the porosity. For low conductivity, the lattice component depends on the porosity as well.

  6. Electrical resistivity of V-Cr-Ti alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Gubbi, A.N.; Eatherly, W.S.

    1997-04-01

    Room temperature electrical resistivity measurements have been performed on vanadium alloys containing 3-6%Cr and 3-6%Ti in order to evaluate the microstructural stability of these alloys. A nonlinear dependence on Cr and Ti concentration was observed, which suggests that either short range ordering or solute precipitation (perhaps in concert with interstitial solute clustering) has occurred in V-6Cr-6Ti.

  7. Negative differential electrical resistance of a rotational organic nanomotor

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Hatef; Sangtarash, Sara; Al-Galiby, Qusiy; Sparks, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Summary A robust, nanoelectromechanical switch is proposed based upon an asymmetric pendant moiety anchored to an organic backbone between two C60 fullerenes, which in turn are connected to gold electrodes. Ab initio density functional calculations are used to demonstrate that an electric field induces rotation of the pendant group, leading to a nonlinear current–voltage relation. The nonlinearity is strong enough to lead to negative differential resistance at modest source–drain voltages. PMID:26734524

  8. Evaluation of physico-mechanical properties of clayey soils using electrical resistivity imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibria, Golam

    Resistivity imaging (RI) is a promising approach to obtaining continuous profile of soil subsurface. This method offers simple technique to identify moisture variation and heterogeneity of the investigated area. However, at present, only qualitative information of subsurface can be obtained using RI. A study on the quantification of geotechnical properties has become important for rigorous use of this method in the evaluation of geohazard potential and construction quality control of landfill liner system. Several studies have been performed to describe electrical resistivity of soil as a function of pore fluid conductivity and surface conductance. However, characterization tests on pore water and surface charge are not typically performed in a conventional geotechnical investigation. The overall objective of this study is to develop correlations between geotechnical parameters and electrical resistivity of soil, which would provide a mean to estimate geotechnical properties from RI. As a part of the study, multiple regression analyses were conducted to develop practically applicable models correlating resistivity with influential geotechnical parameters. The soil samples considered in this study were classified as highly plastic clay (CH) and low plasticity clay (CL) according to Unified Soil Classification System (USCS). Based on the physical tests, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis, kaolinite was identified as the dominant mineral with some traces of magnesium, calcium, potassium, and iron. Electrical resistivity tests were conducted on compacted clays and undisturbed samples under varied geotechnical conditions. The experimental results indicated that the degree of saturation substantially influenced electrical resistivity. Electrical resistivity decreased as much as 11 times from initial value for the increase of degree of saturation from 23 to 100% in the laboratory tests on compacted clays. In case of

  9. Uncertainty analysis for common Seebeck and electrical resistivity measurement systems.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Jon; Dynys, Frederick; Sehirlioglu, Alp

    2014-08-01

    This work establishes the level of uncertainty for electrical measurements commonly made on thermoelectric samples. The analysis targets measurement systems based on the four probe method. Sources of uncertainty for both electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient were identified and evaluated. Included are reasonable estimates on the magnitude of each source, and cumulative propagation of error. Uncertainty for the Seebeck coefficient includes the cold-finger effect which has been quantified with thermal finite element analysis. The cold-finger effect, which is a result of parasitic heat transfer down the thermocouple probes, leads to an asymmetric over-estimation of the Seebeck coefficient. A silicon germanium thermoelectric sample has been characterized to provide an understanding of the total measurement uncertainty. The electrical resistivity was determined to contain uncertainty of ±7.0% across any measurement temperature. The Seebeck coefficient of the system is +1.0%/-13.1% at high temperature and ±1.0% near room temperature. The power factor has a combined uncertainty of +7.3%/-27.0% at high temperature and ±7.5% near room temperature. These ranges are calculated to be typical values for a general four probe Seebeck and resistivity measurement configuration. PMID:25173324

  10. Complex electrical resistance tomography of a subsurface PCE plume

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.; Daily, W,; LeBrecque, D.

    1996-01-01

    A controlled experiment was conducted to evaluate the performance of complex electrical resistivity tomography (CERT) for detecting and delineating free product dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) in the subsurface. One hundred ninety liters of PCE were released at a rate of 2 liters per hour from a point 0.5 m below ground surface. The spill was conducted within a double walled tank where saturated layers of sand, bentonite and a sand/bentonite mixture were installed. Complex electrical resistance measurements were performed. Data were taken before the release, several times during, and then after the PCE was released. Magnitude and phase were measured at 1 and 64 Hz. Data from before the release were compared with those during the release for the purpose of imaging the changes in conductivity resulting from the plume. Conductivity difference tomographs showed a decrease in electrical conductivity as the DNAPL penetrated the soil. A pancake-shaped anomaly developed on the top of a bentonite layer at 2 m depth. The anomaly grew in magnitude and extent during the release and borehole television surveys data confirmed the anomaly to be free-product PCE whose downward migration was stopped by the low permeability clay. The tomographs clearly delineated the plume as a resistive anomaly.

  11. High pressure and temperature electrical resistivity of iron and implications for planetary cores (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, L.; Seagle, C. T.; Fei, Y.; Shahar, A.

    2013-12-01

    Electrical resistivity measurements of polycrystalline iron have been performed at 5, 7 and 15 GPa and in the temperature range 293-2200 K by employing a four-wired method. The kinks in electrical resistivity associated with solid iron phase transitions and the solid to liquid transition were clearly observed upon increasing temperature. Geometry corrections due to volume variations with pressure and temperature were applied to the entire data set. High pressure and temperature thermal conductivity were calculated by fitting resistivity data through the Wiedemann-Franz law. The temperature dependences of electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity for α, γ and ɛ solid iron have been determined at high pressure conditions. Our study provides the first experimental constraint on the heat flux conducted at Mercury's outmost core, estimated to be 0.29-0.36 TW, assuming an adiabatic core. Extrapolations of our data to Martian outer core conditions yield a series of heat transport parameters (eg. electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and heat flux), which are in reasonable comparison with various geophysical estimates.

  12. Electrical resistivity tomography investigations on a paleoseismological trenching study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, Meriç Aziz

    2014-10-01

    Two-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) investigation was performed in a paleoseismological trenching study. Data acquisition strategies such as the selection of electrode configuration and electrode intervals of ERT application were investigated in this paper. The ERT results showed that the Wenner and Wenner-Schlumberger arrays yielded similar results for subsurface characteristics whereas the DD array provided slightly different results. The combined usage of these arrays produced satisfactory images of the subsurface resistivity distribution. In addition, the electrode spacing tests revealed that a suitable interpretation of subsurface geology can be obtained from a 5 m electrode interval. However, a suitable trenching location defined by successful 2D resistivity models was obtained for 1 m electrode spacing. Therefore, the comparison of the trench and ERT results was also possible. The results of trenching and ERT studies substantially support each other.

  13. Rolling resistance of electric vehicle tires from track tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dustin, M. O.; Slavik, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Special low-rolling-resistance tires were made for DOE's ETV-1 electric vehicle. Tests were conducted on these tires and on a set of standard commercial automotive tires to determine the rolling resistance as a function of time during both constant-speed tires and SAE J227a driving cycle tests. The tests were conducted on a test track at ambient temperatures that ranged from 15 to 32 C (59 to 89 F) and with tire pressures of 207 to 276 kPa (30 to 40 psi). At a contained-air temperature of 38 C (100 F) and a pressure of 207 kPa (30 psi) the rolling resistances of the electric vehicle tires and the standard commercial tires, respectively, were 0.0102 and 0.0088 kilogram per kilogram of vehicle weight. At a contained-air temperature of 38 C (100 F) and a pressure of 276 kPa (40 psi) the rolling resistances were 0.009 and 0.0074 kilogram per kilogram of vehicle weight, respectively.

  14. In Vitro Assessment of Electric Currents Increasing the Effectiveness of Vancomycin Against Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Peter A; Mah, Thien-Fah; Mussivand, Tofy

    2016-08-01

    Biofilms are communities of bacteria that can cause infections which are resistant to the immune system and antimicrobial treatments, posing a significant threat for patients with implantable and indwelling medical devices. The purpose of our research was to determine if utilizing specific parameters for electric currents in conjunction with antibiotics could effectively treat a highly resistant biofilm. Our study evaluated the impact of 16 μg/mL of vancomycin with or without 22 or 333 μA of direct electric current (DC) generated by stainless steel electrodes against 24-, 48-, and 72-h-old Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms formed on titanium coupons. An increase in effectiveness of vancomycin was observed with the combination of 333 μA of electric current against 48-h-old biofilms (P value = 0.01) as well as in combination with 22 μA of electric current against 72-h-old biofilms (P value = 0.04); 333 μA of electric current showed the most significant impact on the effectiveness of vancomycin against S. epidermidis biofilms demonstrating a bioelectric effect previously not observed against this strain of bacteria. PMID:26713750

  15. Acidic Barren Slope Profiling using Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI) at Ayer Hitam area Johor, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhar, A. T. S.; Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Aziman, M.; Haimi, D. S.; Hafiz, Z. M.

    2016-04-01

    Recently, non-destructive method such as the electrical resistivity technique has become increasingly popular in engineering, environmental, mining and archeological studies nowadays. This method was popular in subsurface profiling due to its ability to replicate the images of the subsurface indirectly. The soil slope found in Batu Pahat, specifically in Ayer Hitam, is known to be problematic due to its barren condition. This location is believed to contain futile soil due to its difficulty in supporting the growth of vegetations. In the past, acidic barren slope assessment using non-destructive method was rarely being used due to several reasons related to the equipment and knowledge constraints. Hence, this study performed an electrical resistivity imaging using ABEM Terrameter LS in order to investigate the acidic barren slope conditions. Field data acquisition was based on Schlumberger and Wenner arrays while RES2DINV software was used to analyze and generate a 2-D model of the problematic subsurface profile. Based on electrical resistivity results, it was found that the acidic barren slope studied consists of two main zones representing residual soil (electrical resistivity value = 10 - 600 Ωm) and shale (electrical resistivity value = 20 - 2000 Ωm). The results of resistivity value were correlated with the physical mapping and the in situ mackintosh probe test for verification purposes. It was found that the maximum depth of the mackintosh probe test was 1.8 m due to its ground penetration limitation. However, the results of the resistivity section managed to achieve greater depth up to 40 m. Hence, the correlation between electrical resistivity and mackintosh probe results can only be performed at certain depth of the acidic barren slope profile in contrast with the physical mapping which able to define the whole section of the barren soil slope structure. Finally, a good match of electrical resistivity results calibrated with mackintosh and physical

  16. Electrical resistivity imaging for unknown bridge foundation depth determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjwech, Rungroj

    Unknown bridge foundations pose a significant safety risk due to stream scour and erosion. Records from older structures may be non-existent, incomplete, or incorrect. Nondestructive and inexpensive geophysical methods have been identified as suitable to investigate unknown bridge foundations. The objective of the present study is to apply advanced 2D electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) in order to identify depth of unknown bridge foundations. A survey procedure is carried out in mixed terrain water and land environments with rough topography. A conventional resistivity survey procedure is used with the electrodes installed on the stream banks. However, some electrodes must be adapted for underwater use. Tests were conducted in one laboratory experimentation and at five field experimentations located at three roadway bridges, a geotechnical test site, and a railway bridge. The first experimentation was at the bridges with the smallest foundations, later working up in size to larger drilled shafts and spread footings. Both known to unknown foundations were investigated. The geotechnical test site is used as an experimental site for 2D and 3D ERI. The data acquisition is carried out along 2D profile with a linear array in the dipole-dipole configuration. The data collections have been carried out using electrodes deployed directly across smaller foundations. Electrodes are deployed in proximity to larger foundations to image them from the side. The 2D ERI can detect the presence of a bridge foundation but is unable to resolve its precise shape and depth. Increasing the spatial extent of the foundation permits better image of its shape and depth. Using electrode < 1 m to detect a slender foundation < 1 m in diameter is not feasible. The 2D ERI method that has been widely used for land surface surveys presently can be adapted effectively in water-covered environments. The method is the most appropriate geophysical method for determination of unknown bridge foundations

  17. Electrical resistance response of polyaniline films to water, ethanol, and nitric acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hong-Xing; Li, Meng-Meng; Yang, H.; Long, Yun-Ze; Sun, Xin

    2010-08-01

    This paper reports on electrical resistance vs. aging time for the response of polyaniline films under exposure to water, ethanol and nitric acid (HNO3) solution. Camphor sulfonic acid-doped polyaniline films were prepared by a “doping-dedoping-redoping" method, the morphology and microstructures of the films were characterized by a scanning electron microscope and an x-ray diffractometer, the electrical resistance was measured by a four-probe method. It was found that a lower amount of water molecules infiltrating the film can decrease the film's resistance possibly due to an enhancement of charge carrier transfer between polyaniline chains, whereas excessive water molecules can swell inter-chain distances and result in a quick increase of resistance. The resistance of the film under exposure to ethanol increases and becomes much larger than the original value. However, HNO3 solution can decrease the film's resistance sharply possibly owing to doping effect of protonic acid. These results can help to understand the conduction mechanism in polyaniline films, and also indicate that the films have potential application in chemical sensors.

  18. Connection equation and shaly-sand correction for electrical resistivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2011-01-01

    Estimating the amount of conductive and nonconductive constituents in the pore space of sediments by using electrical resistivity logs generally loses accuracy where clays are present in the reservoir. Many different methods and clay models have been proposed to account for the conductivity of clay (termed the shaly-sand correction). In this study, the connectivity equation (CE), which is a new approach to model non-Archie rocks, is used to correct for the clay effect and is compared with results using the Waxman and Smits method. The CE presented here requires no parameters other than an adjustable constant, which can be derived from the resistivity of water-saturated sediments. The new approach was applied to estimate water saturation of laboratory data and to estimate gas hydrate saturations at the Mount Elbert well on the Alaska North Slope. Although not as accurate as the Waxman and Smits method to estimate water saturations for the laboratory measurements, gas hydrate saturations estimated at the Mount Elbert well using the proposed CE are comparable to estimates from the Waxman and Smits method. Considering its simplicity, it has high potential to be used to account for the clay effect on electrical resistivity measurement in other systems.

  19. Electrical resistance and transport numbers of ion-exchange membranes used in electrodialytic soil remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, H.K.; Ottosen, L.M.; Villumsen, A.

    1999-08-01

    Electrodialytic soil remediation is a recently developed method to decontaminate heavy metal polluted soil using ion-exchange membranes. In this method one side of the ion-exchange membrane is in direct contact with the polluted soil. It is of great importance to known if this contact with the soil causes damage to the membrane. This work presents the result of transport number and electrical resistance measurements done on four sets of ion-exchange membranes (Ionics, Inc CR67 HMR412 cation-exchange membranes and Ionics, Inc AR204 SXZR anion-exchange membranes), which have been used in four different electrodialytic soil remediation experiments. The experiments showed that after the use in electrodialytic soil remediation, the ion-exchange membranes had transport numbers in the same magnitude as new membranes. The electrical resistance for six membranes did not differ from that of new membranes, whereas two membranes showed a slightly increased resistance.

  20. Advanced Wear-resistant Nanocomposites for Increased Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, B. A.; Harringa, J. L.; Russel, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    This report summarizes the work performed by an Ames-led project team under a 4-year DOE-ITP sponsored project titled, 'Advanced Wear-resistant Nanocomposites for Increased Energy Efficiency.' The Report serves as the project deliverable for the CPS agreement number 15015. The purpose of this project was to develop and commercialize a family of lightweight, bulk composite materials that are highly resistant to degradation by erosive and abrasive wear. These materials, based on AlMgB{sub 14}, are projected to save over 30 TBtu of energy per year when fully implemented in industrial applications, with the associated environmental benefits of eliminating the burning of 1.5 M tons/yr of coal and averting the release of 4.2 M tons/yr of CO{sub 2} into the air. This program targeted applications in the mining, drilling, machining, and dry erosion applications as key platforms for initial commercialization, which includes some of the most severe wear conditions in industry. Production-scale manufacturing of this technology has begun through a start-up company, NewTech Ceramics (NTC). This project included providing technical support to NTC in order to facilitate cost-effective mass production of the wear-resistant boride components. Resolution of issues related to processing scale-up, reduction in energy intensity during processing, and improving the quality and performance of the composites, without adding to the cost of processing were among the primary technical focus areas of this program. Compositional refinements were also investigated in order to achieve the maximum wear resistance. In addition, synthesis of large-scale, single-phase AlMgB{sub 14} powder was conducted for use as PVD sputtering targets for nanocoating applications.

  1. Time lapse electrical resistivity and induced polarization monitoring of near-surface CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allègre, V.; Kremer, T.; Williard, E.; Schmutz, M.; Maineult, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Field experiments were carried out to investigate the efficiency and the reliability of electrical geophysical methods to detect and monitor CO2 leakages at field scale. Each test consisted of injecting CO2 for approximately four hours at five meters depth, corresponding to a cumulative mass of gas of around six kilograms. Electrical resistivity tomography and temporal induced polarization were acquired at the surface before, during and after injections along profiles centered to the injection well. Time lapse measurements were compared to a reference acquisition performed before the injection. We observe that both methods are sensitive to variations in terms of gas saturation, the chargeability measurements being more sensitive to the presence of CO2 than electrical resistivity. During the injection, an increase of chargeability and a decrease of the measured resistivity are observed at depth in the vinicity of the injection well. Afterwards, the medium equilibrates and retrieves its original state, corresponding to the reference acquisition. The temporal variations of electrical resistivity and induced polarization responses are interpreted in terms of gas dissolution and water/gas saturation.

  2. Reservoir characterization combining elastic velocities and electrical resistivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Carmen Teresa

    2009-12-01

    The elastic and electric parameters of rocks that can be obtained from seismic and electromagnetic data depend on porosity, texture, mineralogy, and fluid. However, seismic data seldom allow us to accurately quantify hydrocarbon saturation. On the other hand, in the case of common reservoir rocks (i.e., sandstones and carbonates), resistivity strongly depends on porosity and saturation. Therefore, the recent progress of controlled-source-electromagnetic (CSEM) methods opens new possibilities in identifying and quantifying potential hydrocarbon reservoirs, although its resolution is much lower than that of seismic data. Hence, a combination of seismic and CSEM data arguably offers a powerful means of finally resolving the problem of remote sensing of saturation. The question is how to combine the two data sources (elastic data and electrical resistivity data) to better characterize a reservoir. To address this question, we introduce the concept of P-wave impedance and resistivity templates as a tool to estimate porosity and saturation from well log data. Adequate elastic and resistivity models, according to the lithology, cementation, fluid properties must be chosen to construct these templates. These templates can be upscaled to seismic and CSEM scale using Backus average for seismic data, and total resistance for CSEM data. We also measured velocity and resistivity in Fontainebleau samples in the laboratory. Fontainebleau formation corresponds to clean sandstones (i.e., low clay content). We derived an empirical relation between these P-wave velocity and resistivity at 40MPa effective pressure, which is around 3 km depth at normal pressure gradients. We were not able to test if this relation could be used at well or field data scales (once appropriate upscaling was applied), since we did not have a field dataset over a stiff sandstone reservoir. A relationship between velocity and resistivity laboratory data was also found for a set of carbonates. This expression

  3. A fully automated precise electrical resistance measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Marhas, M.K.; Balakrishnan, K.; Ganesan, V.; Srinivasan, R.

    1996-08-01

    A fully automated precise electrical resistance measurement system for more than one sample has been constructed. Conventional four-probe measurements with van der Pauw and Montgomery configurations are possible with this system. Resistance measurements in the range of a few {mu}{Omega} to a few G{Omega} are possible for six samples at a time from room temperature down to liquid-helium or liquid-nitrogen temperatures with a temperature control accuracy of better than 10 mK. The design features of the system with special reference to the low-noise switching methods of currents and voltages are described in detail. Precision of the results thus obtained using this system are highlighted for a few superconducting and semiconducting samples. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance Bragg reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, K.L.

    1996-10-22

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method are disclosed. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors. 16 figs.

  5. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance bragg reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, Kevin L.

    1996-01-01

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors.

  6. Electrical Resistivity and Negative Magnetoresistance in (SNBry)x Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneto, Keiichi; Sasa, Shigehiko; Yoshino, Katsumi; Inuishi, Yoshio

    1980-11-01

    Electrical resistivity, magnetoresistance and their temperature dependences in (SNBry)x are measured for various quantity of y. By bromination, negative magnetoresistance is enhanced at 4.2 K and also appears even at 77 K, at which temperature negative magnetoresistance is not observed in undoped (SN)x. These features are remarkable for the samples heavily doped and just after doping, and are abated by pumping bromine from (SNBry)x for a few days. The possible origins for the anomalous negative magnetoresistance are discussed taking the surface state of fiber bundles or crystal due to adsorped bromine into consideration.

  7. An Ultra-Precise System for Electrical Resistivity Tomography Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    LaBrecque, Douglas J; Adkins, Paula L

    2008-12-09

    The objective of this research was to determine the feasibility of building and operating an ERT system that will allow measurement precision that is an order of magnitude better than existing systems on the market today and in particular if this can be done without significantly greater manufacturing or operating costs than existing commercial systems. Under this proposal, we performed an estimation of measurement errors in galvanic resistivity data that arise as a consequence of the type of electrode material used to make the measurements. In our laboratory, measurement errors for both magnitude and induced polarization (IP) were estimated using the reciprocity of data from an array of electrodes as might be used for electrical resistance tomography using 14 different metals as well as one non-metal - carbon. In a second phase of this study, using archival data from two long-term ERT surveys, we examined long-term survivability of electrodes over periods of several years. The survey sites were: the Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (which was sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy as part of the civilian radioactive waste management program), and a water infiltration test at a site adjacent to the New Mexico Institute of Mines and Technology in Socorro, New Mexico (sponsored by the Sandia/Tech vadose program). This enabled us to compare recent values with historical values and determine electrode performance over the long-term as well as the percentage of electrodes that have failed entirely. We have constructed a prototype receiver system, made modifications and revised the receiver design. The revised prototype uses a new 24 bit analog to digital converter from Linear Technologies with amplifier chips from Texas Instruments. The input impedance of the system will be increased from 107 Ohms to approximately 1010 Ohms. The input noise level of the system has been decreased to approximately 10 Nanovolts and system resolution to about 1 Nanovolt at

  8. Modeling of field- and time-dependent resistance change phenomena under electrical stresses in Fe-O films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriguchi, Koji; Wei, Zhiqiang; Takagi, Takeshi; Ono, Kouichi

    2010-01-01

    An electrical stress-induced resistance change in an Fe-O film was studied in detail. Under constant voltage stress (CVS) and constant current injection, the resistance of the Fe-O film abruptly increased. The observed time-to-resistance increase (tr) was found to depend on the applied voltage as well as on the injected current density. The total input energy until tr also depended on the applied voltage. From these observations, the mechanisms of resistance change are considered to obey a field-enhanced reaction, and this resistance increase is attributed to a high-resistive Fe-O layer formation at the interface between the anode electrode and the low-resistive Fe-O layer. We proposed a simplified two-step model for the time evolution of the current under CVS [ICVS(t)]. The predicted ICVS(t) showed a good agreement with experimental results. The model also explained the field dependence of tr.

  9. Using electrical resistivity imaging to understand surface coal mine hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, E. T.; Greer, B. M.; Burbey, T. J.; Zipper, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the hydrology of disturbed lands is important given the increasing human footprint on earth. Surface coal mining has caused significant land-use change in central Appalachia in the past few decades. The mining process breaks up overburden rock above coal seams, and then replaces that material at the mine location and in adjacent unmined valleys (valley fills). The freshly exposed rock surfaces undergo weathering which often alters water quality and ultimately aquatic communities in effluent streams. One of the most common water quality effects is increased total dissolved solids (TDS), which is usually measured via its surrogate, specific conductance (SC). The SC of valley fill effluent is a function of fill construction methods, materials, and age. Yet hydrologic studies that relate these variables to water quality are sparse due to the difficulty of implementing traditional hydrologic measurements in fill material. We tested the effectiveness of electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) to monitor subsurface geologic patterns and hydrologic flow paths in a test-case valley fill. We paired ERI with artificial rainfall experiments to track infiltrated water as it moved through the valley fill material. Results indicate that ERI can be used to identify the subsurface geologic structure and track advancing wetting fronts or preferential flow paths. We observed that the upper portion of the fill profile contains significant fines, while the deeper profile is primarily composed of large rocks and void spaces. The artificial rainfall experiments revealed that water ponded on the surface of compacted areas until it reached preferential flow paths, where it infiltrated quickly and deeply. We observed water moving from the surface down to >10 m depth within 75 minutes. In sum, vertical and lateral preferential flow paths were evident at both shallow (through compacted layers) and deep (among boulders) locations. Such extensive preferential flow suggests that a

  10. Fracture network characterisation of a landslide by electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalai, S.; Szokoli, K.; Novák, A.; Tóth, Á.; Metwaly, M.; Prácser, E.

    2014-06-01

    In contrary to most of the landslide studies which concentrate to the sliding surface in this paper the fracture system of a loess landslide is investigated. The continuity and geometry, orientation and dip of the major fractures are crucial parameters for assessing rock stability and landslide evolution. Rain infiltrating moreover easily into the rock mass through fractures providing lubrication for the material to slide, and increases the self-mass of the material increasing the slumping rate. Fracture maps enable beside of the characterisation of the fractured area the delineation of the endangered area of slow-moving landslides in due time and getting information about its inner structure. For constructing such maps Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) measurements have been carried out using different geoelectric configurations. In spite of the high density of the fractures and their changing physical parameters in function of their water content - which make the interpretation rather difficult - a number of fractures have been detected and more or less well localised. On the basis of the present research the application of the Schlumberger and the Pole-Dipole arrays is recommended to fulfil the aim of the study. The optimised Stummer array is at the same time the only array which presents conductive anomalies (supposedly water filled fractures), as well, and indicates that fractures elongate deep downwards. Because these features seem to be realistic based on field observations or theoretical considerations the Stummer array may be a very good tool for completing e.g. P-Dp measurements. The study area could have been divided by all arrays into differently fractured zones, which assists a lot in understanding the landslide structure and evolution. It was shown, moreover, that in the still passive area there are thick fractures, too, verifying its dangerousness, as well. The ERT results enabled localising the rupture surfaces of future slumps which proved to

  11. Thermal treatment of low permeability soils using electrical resistance heating

    SciTech Connect

    Udell, K.S.

    1996-08-01

    The acceleration of recovery rates of second phase liquid contaminants from the subsurface during gas or water pumping operations is realized by increasing the soil and ground water temperature. Electrical heating with AC current is one method of increasing the soil and groundwater temperature and has particular applicability to low permeability soils. Several mechanisms have been identified that account for the enhanced removal of the contaminants during electrical heating. These are vaporization of liquid contaminants with low boiling points, temperature-enhanced evaporation rates of semi-volatile components, and removal of residual contaminants by the boiling of residual water. Field scale studies of electrical heating and fluid extraction show the effectiveness of this technique and its applicability to contaminants found both above and below the water table and within low permeability soils. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Electric-field-driven resistive switching in dissipative Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiajun; Aron, Camille; Kotliar, Gabriel; Han, Jong

    Understanding of solids driven out of equilibrium by external fields has been one of the central goals in condensed matter physics for the past century and is relevant to nanotechnology applications such as resistive transitions. We study how strongly correlated electrons on a dissipative lattice evolve from equilibrium when driven by a constant electric field, focusing on the extent of the linear regime and hysteretic non-linear effects at higher fields. We access the non-equilibrium steady states, non-perturbatively in both the field and the electronic interactions, by means of a non-equilibrium dynamical mean-field theory in the Coulomb gauge. The linear response regime is limited by Joule heating effects and breaks down at fields orders of magnitude smaller than the quasi-particle energy scale. For large electronic interactions, strong but experimentally accessible electric fields can induce a resistive switching by driving the strongly correlated metal into a Mott insulator. Hysteretic I- V curves suggest that the non-equilibrium current is carried through a spatially inhomogeneous metal-insulator mixed state.

  13. Electrical Resistivity of natural Marcasite at High-pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Gopalakrishnarao

    2013-06-01

    Marcasite is considered to be a common iron sulfide in reducing Martian sediments and may enclose microbial remains during growth and hence study of marcasite may have significance in the search for fossil life on Mars. The high-pressure phase stability investigations of marcasite are useful in understanding the sulfide mineralogy of Martian surface, affected by meteorite impacts. The sulfides were characterized by electron microprobe micro analyses (EPMA), powder X-ray diffraction, DTA, and FTIR spectroscopic measurements. The samples were powdered using a porcelain mortar and pestle. The chemical composition of the sample was determined by an electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA). High-pressure electrical resistivity measurements were carried out on natural marcasite, and marcasite rich samples (Marcasite 95 mol % pyrite 5 mol %) up to 7 GPa. Marcasite sample shows a discontinuous decrease in the electrical resistivity at 5. 2 (+/- 0.5) GPa indicating a first order phase transition. The Differential thermal analyses and the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic measurements on the pressure quenched sample shows the characteristics of pyrite, indicating the pressure induced marcasite-to -pyrite transition of the natural marcasite at 5. 2 (+/- 0.5) GPa. The observation of marcasite to pyrite phase transition may be useful in estimating the pressure experienced by shock events on the Martian surface as well as the meteorites where marcasite- pyrite phases coexist. Financial support from CSIR-SHORE-PSC0205.

  14. Fast Reactor Subassembly Design Modifications for Increasing Electricity Generation Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    R. Wigeland; K. Hamman

    2009-09-01

    Suggested for Track 7: Advances in Reactor Core Design and In-Core Management _____________________________________________________________________________________ Fast Reactor Subassembly Design Modifications for Increasing Electricity Generation Efficiency R. Wigeland and K. Hamman Idaho National Laboratory Given the ability of fast reactors to effectively transmute the transuranic elements as are present in spent nuclear fuel, fast reactors are being considered as one element of future nuclear power systems to enable continued use and growth of nuclear power by limiting high-level waste generation. However, a key issue for fast reactors is higher electricity cost relative to other forms of nuclear energy generation. The economics of the fast reactor are affected by the amount of electric power that can be produced from a reactor, i.e., the thermal efficiency for electricity generation. The present study is examining the potential for fast reactor subassembly design changes to improve the thermal efficiency by increasing the average coolant outlet temperature without increasing peak temperatures within the subassembly, i.e., to make better use of current technology. Sodium-cooled fast reactors operate at temperatures far below the coolant boiling point, so that the maximum coolant outlet temperature is limited by the acceptable peak temperatures for the reactor fuel and cladding. Fast reactor fuel subassemblies have historically been constructed using a large number of small diameter fuel pins contained within a tube of hexagonal cross-section, or hexcan. Due to this design, there is a larger coolant flow area next to the hexcan wall as compared to flow area in the interior of the subassembly. This results in a higher flow rate near the hexcan wall, overcooling the fuel pins next to the wall, and a non-uniform coolant temperature distribution. It has been recognized for many years that this difference in sodium coolant temperature was detrimental to achieving

  15. Monitoring radio-frequency heating of contaminated soils using electrical resistance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.L.; Daily, W.D.

    1993-09-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) was used to monitor a radio-frequency heating process for the insitu remediation of volatile organic compounds from subsurface water and soil at the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, South Carolina. A dipole antenna located in a horizontal well in the unsaturated zone was used to heat a contaminated clay layer. The heat-induced changes were tomographically imaged by their effects on the formation electrical resistivity. The resistivity changes observed appear to be related to heating and vaporization of the pore water, formation of steam condensate, and infiltration of rainwater through the heated zones and adjacent areas. There is a clear asymmetry downward in the resistivity decreases associated with the heating process. The resistivity decreases observed in the vicinity of the heating well are believed to be caused by the heating and downward migration of warm water originally located within a radius of a few feet around the heating well; the magnitude of the change is between 10--20%. The decreasing resistivity implies an increasing rate of radio wave attenuation as heating progressed; therefore, the rate of energy deposition around the heating well increased while the penetration distance of the radio waves decreased. Saturation changes in the clay near the antenna during heating were estimated to be 50--55% based on the observed resistivity decreases. Resistivity changes observed at distances greater than 3 meters to one side of the antenna appear to be related to rainwater infiltration. We propose that gaps in near surface clay layers allow rainwater to migrate downward and reach the top of clay rich zone penetrated by the antenna borehole. The water may then accumulate along the top of the clay.

  16. Monitoring six-phase ohmic heating of contaminated soils using electrical resistance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.L.; Daily, W.D.

    1994-09-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) was used to monitor six-phase ohmic heating used for the insitu remediation of volatile organic compounds from subsurface water and soil at the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, South Carolina. The changes in electrical conductivity caused by six-phase ohmic-heating in a clay layer located in the vadose zone were monitored during a period of approximately 2 months, before, during and after heating. From an array of electrodes located in 4 boreholes, we collected electrical resistivity data between five pairs of adjacent holes pairs. This data was used to calculate tomographs which showed the electrical conductivity changes along five vertical planes. The difference tomographs show the combined effects of moisture redistribution and heating caused by six-phase heating and vapor extraction. The tomographs show that most of the clay layer increased in electrical conductivity during the first 3 weeks of the 4 week long heating phase. At this time, the electrical conductivities near the center of the heating array were twice as large as the pre-heat conductivities. Then the electrical conductivity started to decrease for portions of the clay layer closest to the vapor extraction well. We propose that the conductivity decreases are due to the removal of moisture by the heating and vacuum extraction. Parts of the clay layer near the extraction well reached electrical conductivities as low as 40% of the pre-heating values. We propose that these regions of lower than ambient electrical conductivities are indicators of regions where the vapor removal by vacuum extraction was most effective. At the end of the heating phase, our estimates suggest that the clay saturation may have dropped to as low as 10% based on the observed conductivity changes.

  17. 30 CFR 7.407 - Test for flame resistance of electric cables and cable splices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) at an ambient temperature of 104 °F (40 °C). (8) Monitor the electric current through the power... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of electric cables... Electric Cables, Signaling Cables, and Cable Splice Kits § 7.407 Test for flame resistance of...

  18. 30 CFR 7.407 - Test for flame resistance of electric cables and cable splices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) at an ambient temperature of 104 °F (40 °C). (8) Monitor the electric current through the power... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of electric cables... Electric Cables, Signaling Cables, and Cable Splice Kits § 7.407 Test for flame resistance of...

  19. 30 CFR 7.407 - Test for flame resistance of electric cables and cable splices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) at an ambient temperature of 104 °F (40 °C). (8) Monitor the electric current through the power... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of electric cables... Electric Cables, Signaling Cables, and Cable Splice Kits § 7.407 Test for flame resistance of...

  20. 30 CFR 7.407 - Test for flame resistance of electric cables and cable splices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) at an ambient temperature of 104 °F (40 °C). (8) Monitor the electric current through the power... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of electric cables... Electric Cables, Signaling Cables, and Cable Splice Kits § 7.407 Test for flame resistance of...

  1. 30 CFR 7.407 - Test for flame resistance of electric cables and cable splices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) at an ambient temperature of 104 °F (40 °C). (8) Monitor the electric current through the power... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of electric cables... Electric Cables, Signaling Cables, and Cable Splice Kits § 7.407 Test for flame resistance of...

  2. Monitoring Damage Accumulation in Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Electrical Resistivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig E.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Xia, Zhenhai H.

    2008-01-01

    The electric resistance of woven SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites were measured under tensile loading conditions. The results show that the electrical resistance is closely related to damage and that real-time information about the damage state can be obtained through monitoring of the resistance. Such self-sensing capability provides the possibility of on-board/in-situ damage detection and accurate life prediction for high-temperature ceramic matrix composites. Woven silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (SiC/SiC) ceramic matrix composites (CMC) possess unique properties such as high thermal conductivity, excellent creep resistance, improved toughness, and good environmental stability (oxidation resistance), making them particularly suitable for hot structure applications. In specific, CMCs could be applied to hot section components of gas turbines [1], aerojet engines [2], thermal protection systems [3], and hot control surfaces [4]. The benefits of implementing these materials include reduced cooling air requirements, lower weight, simpler component design, longer service life, and higher thrust [5]. It has been identified in NASA High Speed Research (HSR) program that the SiC/SiC CMC has the most promise for high temperature, high oxidation applications [6]. One of the critical issues in the successful application of CMCs is on-board or insitu assessment of the damage state and an accurate prediction of the remaining service life of a particular component. This is of great concern, since most CMC components envisioned for aerospace applications will be exposed to harsh environments and play a key role in the vehicle s safety. On-line health monitoring can enable prediction of remaining life; thus resulting in improved safety and reliability of structural components. Monitoring can also allow for appropriate corrections to be made in real time, therefore leading to the prevention of catastrophic failures. Most conventional nondestructive

  3. Potato tuber herbivory increases resistance to aboveground lepidopteran herbivores.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pavan; Ortiz, Erandi Vargas; Garrido, Etzel; Poveda, Katja; Jander, Georg

    2016-09-01

    Plants mediate interactions between aboveground and belowground herbivores. Although effects of root herbivory on foliar herbivores have been documented in several plant species, interactions between tuber-feeding herbivores and foliar herbivores are rarely investigated. We report that localized tuber damage by Tecia solanivora (Guatemalan tuber moth) larvae reduced aboveground Spodoptera exigua (beet armyworm) and Spodoptera frugiperda (fall armyworm) performance on Solanum tuberosum (potato). Conversely, S. exigua leaf damage had no noticeable effect on belowground T. solanivora performance. Tuber infestation by T. solanivora induced systemic plant defenses and elevated resistance to aboveground herbivores. Lipoxygenase 3 (Lox3), which contributes to the synthesis of plant defense signaling molecules, had higher transcript abundance in T. solanivora-infested leaves and tubers than in equivalent control samples. Foliar expression of the hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HQT) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase I (HMGR1) genes, which are involved in chlorogenic acid and steroidal glycoalkaloid biosynthesis, respectively, also increased in response to tuber herbivory. Leaf metabolite profiling demonstrated the accumulation of unknown metabolites as well as the known potato defense compounds chlorogenic acid, α-solanine, and α-chaconine. When added to insect diet at concentrations similar to those found in potato leaves, chlorogenic acid, α-solanine, and α-chaconine all reduced S. exigua larval growth. Thus, despite the fact that tubers are a metabolic sink tissue, T. solanivora feeding elicits a systemic signal that induces aboveground resistance against S. exigua and S. frugiperda by increasing foliar abundance of defensive metabolites. PMID:27147449

  4. Fabrication of an Electrically-Resistive, Varistor-Polymer Composite

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Fatehi, Asma; Zakaria, Azmi; Mahmud, Shahrom; Mohammadi, Sanaz A.

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the fabrication and electrical characterization of a polymer composite based on nano-sized varistor powder. The polymer composite was fabricated by the melt-blending method. The developed nano-composite was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FeSEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX). The XRD pattern revealed the crystallinity of the composite. The XRD study also showed the presence of secondary phases due to the substitution of zinc by other cations, such as bismuth and manganese. The TEM picture of the sample revealed the distribution of the spherical, nano-sized, filler particles throughout the matrix, which were in the 10–50 nm range with an average of approximately 11 nm. The presence of a bismuth-rich phase and a ZnO matrix phase in the ZnO-based varistor powder was confirmed by FeSEM images and EDX spectra. From the current-voltage curves, the non-linear coefficient of the varistor polymer composite with 70 wt% of nano filler was 3.57, and its electrical resistivity after the onset point was 861 KΩ. The non-linear coefficient was 1.11 in the sample with 100 wt% polymer content. Thus, it was concluded that the composites established a better electrical non-linearity at higher filler amounts due to the nano-metric structure and closer particle linkages. PMID:23443085

  5. Electrical resistivity and porosity structure of the upper Biscayne Aquifer in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, Dean; Yeboah-Forson, Albert

    2015-12-01

    Square array electrical soundings were made at 13 sites in the Biscayne Aquifer distributed between 1 and 20 km from the shoreline. These soundings were modeled to investigate how resistivity varies spatially and with depth in the upper 15 m of the aquifer. Porosity was estimated from the modeled formation resistivity and observed pore fluid resistivity with Archie's Law. The models were used to interpolate resistivity and porosity surfaces at -2, -5, -8, and -15 m elevations. Modeled resistivity in the unsaturated zone is generally higher than 300 Ω m with the resistivity at sites with thick unsaturated zones greater than 1000 Ω m. Resistivity in the saturated zone ranges from 30 to 320 Ω m. At many sites in the western portions of the study area, resistivity is constant or increases with depth whereas sites in the center of the Atlantic Coastal Ridge exhibit a distinct low resistivity zone (ρ < 45 Ω m) at elevations ranging between -5 and -10 m. At one site near the shore of Biscayne Bay, the resistivity is less than 10 Ω m at -5 m elevation reflecting the presence of salt water in the aquifer. The estimated porosity ranges between 14% and 71% with modal values near 25%. The porosity structure varies both with depth and spatially. Western sites exhibit a high porosity zone at shallow depths best expressed in a NE-SW trending zone of 40-50% porosity situated near the western margin of the Atlantic Coastal Ridge. This zone roughly corresponds in depth with the Q5 chronostratigraphic unit of the Miami Fm. which constitutes the upper flow unit of the Biscayne Aquifer. The highest porosity (>50%) is seen at elevations below -5 m at sites in the center of the Atlantic Coastal Ridge and likely corresponds to solution features. The general NE-SW trend of the resistivity and porosity structure suggests a causal connection with the Pleistocene paleogeography and sedimentary environments.

  6. Effects of boiling on electrical resistivity of microporous rocks from the Geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.; Duba, A.; Bonner, B.; Kasameyer, P.

    1997-12-31

    In a laboratory study of cores from borehole SB-15-D in The Geysers geothermal area, we measured the electrical resistivity of metashale with and without pore-pressure control, with confining pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures between 20 and 150{degrees}C, to determine how the pore-size distribution and capillarity affected boiling. We observed a gradual increase in resistivity when the downstream pore pressure or confining pressure decreased below the phase boundary of free water. For the conditions of this experiment, boiling, as indicated by an increase in resistivity, is initiated at pore pressures of approximately 0.5 to 1 bar (0.05 to 0.1 MPa) below the free-water boiling curve, and it continues to increase gradually as pressure is lowered to atmospheric. A simple model of the effects of capillarity suggests that at 145{degrees}C, less than 15% of the pore water can boil in these rocks. If subsequent experiments bear out these preliminary observations, then boiling within a geothermal reservoir is controlled not just by pressure and temperature but also by pore-size distribution. Thus, it may be possible to determine reservoir characteristics by monitoring changes in electrical resistivity as reservoir conditions change.

  7. Electrical Resistivity Imaging for Studying Dynamics of Vadose Zone Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, V.; Pidlisecky, A.; Knight, R. J.

    2010-12-01

    Determining the spatial distribution of subsurface hydrologic properties is critical to developing efficient groundwater management strategies. Electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) provides continuous maps of the subsurface electrical conductivity, which can be related to water content, making it particularly useful to groundwater studies. We present an application of ERI to monitoring infiltration in the top 20 m of the subsurface at the Harkins Slough Recharge Pond, located in an agricultural region on the northern California coast. The purpose of the recharge pond is two-fold: to store diverted storm-flow run-off to meet groundwater delivery demands and to replenish underlying aquifers, which have been overdrawn for several decades, allowing saltwater intrusion. Operators of the pond have rights to divert 2.5e6 m3 of surface water to the pond each year, but decreasing infiltration rates during diversion reduces the operational efficiency, only allowing infiltration of ~1e6 m3 each year. It is hypothesized that deposition of fine-sediments from diverted water, run-off from adjacent fields, and/or microbial activity reduce the hydraulic conductivity over time by clogging pore spaces. As part of an effort to better understand the hydrologic processes controlling infiltration to improve operational efficiency of the recharge pond we conducted time-lapse ERI experiments to monitor infiltration processes beneath the pond during the winters of 2008-2009 and 2009-2010. Each year measurements were made using four 3-m long permanent probes installed in the base of the pond in a T-shape configuration, with 20 m between each probe. The probes allow for monitoring of the conductivity profile to a depth of 2 m; the top meter of each probe monitors bulk conductivity of the pond water. In addition, a number of surface electrodes were laid out in lines between the four probes. In 2008-2009, 20-m lines were used. In 2009-2010, three lines of lengths 10 m, 65 m, and 75 m were

  8. Modeling and analysis of direct-current electrical resistivity in the Durham Triassic basin, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, C. Erwin

    1987-01-01

    Sixty-two Schlumberger electrical soundings were made in the Durham Triassic basin in an effort to determine basin structural geometry, depth of the sedimentary layers, and spatial distribution of individual rock facies. A digital computer program was used to invert the sounding curves of apparent resistivity versus distance to apparent resistivity versus depth. The apparent-resistivity-versus-depth data from the computer-modeling program were used to construct a geoelectric model of the basin that is believed to accurately represent the subsurface geology of the basin. The largest depth to basement in the basin along a resistivity profile (geoelectric section) was determined to be 1,800 m. A resistivity decrease was observed on certain soundings from depths of 100 to 1,000 m; below a 1,000-m depth, apparent resistivity increased to the bottom of the basin. Resistivity values for basement rocks were greater than 1,000 ohm-m and less than 350 ohm-m for the sedimentary layers in the basin. The data suggest that the basin contains a system of step faults near its eastern boundary. ?? 1987.

  9. Resistive graphene humidity sensors with rapid and direct electrical readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Anderson D.; Elgammal, Karim; Niklaus, Frank; Delin, Anna; Fischer, Andreas C.; Vaziri, Sam; Forsberg, Fredrik; Råsander, Mikael; Hugosson, Håkan; Bergqvist, Lars; Schröder, Stephan; Kataria, Satender; Östling, Mikael; Lemme, Max C.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate humidity sensing using a change of the electrical resistance of single-layer chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene that is placed on top of a SiO2 layer on a Si wafer. To investigate the selectivity of the sensor towards the most common constituents in air, its signal response was characterized individually for water vapor (H2O), nitrogen (N2), oxygen (O2), and argon (Ar). In order to assess the humidity sensing effect for a range from 1% relative humidity (RH) to 96% RH, the devices were characterized both in a vacuum chamber and in a humidity chamber at atmospheric pressure. The measured response and recovery times of the graphene humidity sensors are on the order of several hundred milliseconds. Density functional theory simulations are employed to further investigate the sensitivity of the graphene devices towards water vapor. The interaction between the electrostatic dipole moment of the water and the impurity bands in the SiO2 substrate leads to electrostatic doping of the graphene layer. The proposed graphene sensor provides rapid response direct electrical readout and is compatible with back end of the line (BEOL) integration on top of CMOS-based integrated circuits.We demonstrate humidity sensing using a change of the electrical resistance of single-layer chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene that is placed on top of a SiO2 layer on a Si wafer. To investigate the selectivity of the sensor towards the most common constituents in air, its signal response was characterized individually for water vapor (H2O), nitrogen (N2), oxygen (O2), and argon (Ar). In order to assess the humidity sensing effect for a range from 1% relative humidity (RH) to 96% RH, the devices were characterized both in a vacuum chamber and in a humidity chamber at atmospheric pressure. The measured response and recovery times of the graphene humidity sensors are on the order of several hundred milliseconds. Density functional theory simulations are employed to further

  10. Specific heat and electrical resistivity of niobium measured by subsecond calorimetric technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maglić, K. D.; Perović, N. Lj.; Vuković, G. S.; Zeković, Lj. P.

    1994-09-01

    This paper presents results of measurements of specific heat and electrical resistivity of niobium from ambient temperature to the experimental limit of the equipment which is close to 2500 K. The study used a contact thermometry variant of the millisecond resolution pulse calorimetry developed at the Institute of Nuclear Sciences VINČA. In the experiments exceeding 1000 K, thermocouple thermometry was supplemented with parallel pyrometric temperature measurements. This, together with application of tungsten; rhenium thermocouple thermometry, increased the temperature range of measurements to 2500 K. In the range where two thermometries overlap, data on the specimen emittance were also generated. Novelties in the method, the results on electrical resistivity. specific heat, hemispherical total emittance and normal spectral emittance of niobium, and accuracies attained in different property measurements are discussed.

  11. Effect of high pressure on the electrical resistivity of Ge−Te−In glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, K. N. N.; Varma, G. Sreevidya; Asokan, S.; Rukmani, K.

    2015-06-24

    The variation in the electrical resistivity of the chalcogenide glasses Ge{sub 15}Te{sub 85-x}In{sub x} has been studied as a function of high pressure for pressures up to 8.5GPa. All the samples studied undergo a semi-conductor to metallic transition in a continuous manner at pressures between 1.5-2.5GPa. The transition pressure at which the samples turn metallic increases with increase in percentage of Indium. This increase is a direct consequence of the increase in network rigidity with the addition of Indium. At a constant pressure of 0.5GPa, the normalized resistivity shows some signature of the existence of the intermediate phase. Samples recovered after a pressure cycle remain amorphous suggesting that the semi-conductor to metallic transition arises from a reduction of the band gap due to pressure or the movement of the Fermi level into the conduction or valence band.

  12. Effect of high pressure on the electrical resistivity of Ge-Te-In glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, K. N. N.; Varma, G. Sreevidya; Rukmani, K.; Asokan, S.

    2015-06-01

    The variation in the electrical resistivity of the chalcogenide glasses Ge15Te85-xInx has been studied as a function of high pressure for pressures up to 8.5GPa. All the samples studied undergo a semi-conductor to metallic transition in a continuous manner at pressures between 1.5-2.5GPa. The transition pressure at which the samples turn metallic increases with increase in percentage of Indium. This increase is a direct consequence of the increase in network rigidity with the addition of Indium. At a constant pressure of 0.5GPa, the normalized resistivity shows some signature of the existence of the intermediate phase. Samples recovered after a pressure cycle remain amorphous suggesting that the semi-conductor to metallic transition arises from a reduction of the band gap due to pressure or the movement of the Fermi level into the conduction or valence band.

  13. Material morphology and electrical resistivity differences in EPDM rubbers.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Domeier, Linda A.

    2008-03-01

    Electrical resistance anomalies noted in EPDM gaskets have been attributed to zinc-enriched surface sublayers, about 10-{micro}m thick, in the sulfur cured rubber material. Gasket over-compression provided the necessary connector pin contact and was also found to cause surprising morphological changes on the gasket surfaces. These included distributions of zinc oxide whiskers in high pressure gasket areas and cone-shaped features rich in zinc, oxygen, and sulfur primarily in low pressure protruding gasket areas. Such whiskers and cones were only found on the pin side of the gaskets in contact with a molded plastic surface and not on the back side in contact with an aluminum surface. The mechanisms by which such features are formed have not yet been defined.

  14. Reduced electrical resistivity in TiO2:Nb/ZnO:Ga film by thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yasuji; Funaki, Shuhei; Ichiyanagi, Seiji; Kikuchi, Hiroki; Inoue, Sota

    2014-01-01

    Layered films consisting of transparent conducting oxides, Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) and Nb-doped TiO2 (TNO), were fabricated on glass substrates and their electrical properties were investigated. As-deposited TNO/GZO films showed the mean resistivity of TNO and GZO films. Thermal annealing reduced the resistivity of these films; however, TNO/GZO films exhibited the lowest value among them. The carrier concentration and Hall mobility of TNO/GZO films increased with the reduction in electrical resistivity. The thickness dependence, annealing temperature dependence, and crystalline orientation of the TNO and GZO layers in TNO/GZO films indicated that the improvement of the electrical properties of the GZO underlayer contributed to the resistivity reduction behavior of TNO/GZO films induced by thermal annealing.

  15. 76 FR 17577 - Increased Scope of Coverage for Electric Motors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-30

    ... current energy conservation standards for electric motors. On September 28, 2010, DOE published a notice... using in its evaluation. 75 FR 59657. DOE must publish a final rule determining whether to amend the electric motors standards by December 19, 2012. (42 U.S.C. 6313(b)(4)(B)). The current energy...

  16. Infiltration front monitoring using 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxarango, Laurent; Audebert, Marine; Guyard, Helene; Clement, Remi

    2016-04-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) geophysical method is commonly used to identify the spatial distribution of electrical resisitivity in the soil at the field scale. Recent progress in commercial acquisition systems allows repeating fast acquisitions (10 min) in order to monitor a 3D dynamic phenomenon. Since the ERT method is sensitive to moisture content variations, it can thus be used to delineate the infiltration shape during water infiltration. In heterogeneous conditions, the 3D infiltration shape is a crucial information because it could differ significantly from the homogeneous behavior. In a first step, the ERT method is validated at small scale (<1m) studying a suction infiltrometer test. The experiment is carried out in a pit filled with a homogenous silty-sandy soil. It is instrumented by 17 resistivity probes and 3 commercial capacitive moisture content probes to provide local measurements of the moisture content variation. The Multiple Inversion and Clustering Strategy (MICS) (Audebert et al 2014) is used to delineate the infiltration patern. A satisfying agreement between infiltration delineation and sensor measurements is obtained with a few centimeter accuracy on the moisture front location. In a second step, the same methodology is applied at a larger scale (> 10m). Two examples of leachate injection monitoring in municipal solid waste landfills are used to put forward benefits and limitations of the ERT-MICS method. Effective infiltration porosities in a range between 3% and 8% support the assumption of a flow in heterogeneous media. Audebert, M., R. Clément, N. Touze-Foltz, T. Günther, S. Moreau, and C. Duquennoi (2014), Time-lapse ERT interpretation methodology for leachate injection monitoring based on multiple inversions and a clustering strategy (MICS), Journal of Applied Geophysics, 111, 320-333. Keywords: ERT, infiltration front, field survey

  17. Temperature and volumetric water content petrophysical relationships in municipal solid waste for the interpretation of bulk electrical resistivity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilawski, Tamara; Dumont, Gaël; Nguyen, Frédéric

    2015-04-01

    Landfills pose major environmental issues including long-term methane emissions, and local pollution of soil and aquifers but can also be seen as potential energy resources and mining opportunities. Water content in landfills determine whether solid fractions can be separated and recycled, and controls the existence and efficiency of natural or enhanced biodegradation. Geophysical techniques, such as electrical and electromagnetic methods have proven successful in the detection and qualitative investigation of sanitary landfills. However, their interpretation in terms of quantitative water content estimates makes it more challenging due to the influence of parameters such as temperature, compaction, waste composition or pore fluid. To improve the confidence given to bulk electrical resistivity data and to their interpretation, we established temperature and volumetric water content petrophysical relationships that we tested on field and laboratory electrical resistivity measurements. We carried out two laboratory experiments on leachates and waste samples from a landfill located in Mont-Saint-Guibert, Belgium. We determined a first relationship between temperature and electrical resistivity with pure and diluted leachates by progressively increasing the temperature from 5°C to 65°C, and then cooling down to 5°C. The second relationship was obtained by measuring electrical resistivity on waste samples of different volumetric water contents. First, we used the correlations obtained from the experiments to compare electrical resistivity measurements performed in a landfill borehole and on reworked waste samples excavated at different depths. Electrical resistivities were measured every 20cm with an electromagnetic logging device (EM39) while a temperature profile was acquired with optic fibres. Waste samples were excavated every 2m in the same borehole. We filled experimental columns with these samples and measured electrical resistivities at laboratory temperature

  18. Low-thermal-resistance, high-electrical-isolation heat intercept connection

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.; Gonczy, J.D.; Nicol, T.H.

    1993-07-01

    A method for providing a low-thermal-resistance, high-electrical-isolation heat intercept connection is presented. Electrical conductors often require the removal of heat produced from their normal operation. The heat can be removed by mechanical connection to a refrigeration source. Such connections require both effective heat removal (low thermal resistance) and effective electrical isolation (high electrical resistance and high dielectric strength). Such connections should be straightforward to fabricate and provide reliable performance that is independent of operating temperature. The connection method described here involves clamping, by thermal interference fit, an electrically insulating cylinder between an outer metallic ring and an inner metallic disk.

  19. Low-thermal-resistance, high-electrical-isolation heat intercept connection

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.; Gonczy, J.D. ); Nicol, T.H. )

    1993-01-01

    A method for providing a low-thermal-resistance, high-electrical-isolation heat intercept connection is presented. Electrical conductors often require the removal of heat produced from their normal operation. The heat can be removed by mechanical connection to a refrigeration source. Such connections require both effective heat removal (low thermal resistance) and effective electrical isolation (high electrical resistance and high dielectric strength). Such connections should be straightforward to fabricate and provide reliable performance that is independent of operating temperature. The connection method described here involves clamping, by thermal interference fit, an electrically insulating cylinder between an outer metallic ring and an inner metallic disk.

  20. Monitoring Permeable Reactive Barriers using Electrical Resistance Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A; Bratton, W; Maresca, J; Daily, W; Dickerson, W

    2003-12-08

    An electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method is being evaluated as a measurement tool to determine the integrity of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) during and after construction of the barrier and as a monitoring tool to determine the long-term operational health of the barrier. The method is novel because it inserts the electrodes directly into the barrier itself. Numerical modeling calculations indicate that the ERT method can detect flaws (voids) in the barrier as small as 0.11 m{sup 2} (0.33 m x 0.33 m) when the aspect ratio of the electrodes are 2:1. Laboratory measurements indicate that the change in resistance over time of the iron-filling mixture used to create the PRB is sufficient for ERT to monitor the long-term health of the barrier. The use of this ERT method allows for the cost-effective installation of the barrier, especially when the vadose zone is large, because borehole installation methods, rather than trenching methods, can be used.

  1. Electrical resistivity tomography study of Taal volcano hydrothermal system, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fikos, I.; Vargemezis, G.; Zlotnicki, J.; Puertollano, J. R.; Alanis, P. B.; Pigtain, R. C.; Villacorte, E. U.; Malipot, G. A.; Sasai, Y.

    2012-10-01

    Taal volcano (311 m in altitude) is located in The Philippines (14°N, 121°E) and since 1572 has erupted 33 times, causing more than 2,000 casualties during the most violent eruptions. In March 2010, the shallow structures in areas where present-day surface activity takes place were investigated by DC resistivity surveys. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) lines were performed above the two identified hydrothermal areas located on the northern flank of the volcano and in the Main Crater, respectively. Due to rough topography, deep valleys, and dense vegetation, most measurements were collected using a remote method based on a laboratory-made equipment. This allowed retrieval of information down to a depth of 250 m. ERTs results detail the outlines of the two geothermal fields defined by previous self-potential, CO2 soil degassing, ground temperature, and magnetic mapping (Harada et al. Japan Acad Sci 81:261-266, 2005; Zlotnicki et al. Bull Volcanol 71:29-49, 2009a, Phys Chem Earth 34:294-408, 2009b). Hydrothermal fluids originate mainly from inside the northern part of the Main Crater at a depth greater than the bottom of the Crater Lake, and flow upward to the ground surface. Furthermore, water from the Main Crater Lake infiltrates inside the surrounding geological formations. The hydrothermal fluids, outlined by gas releases and high temperatures, cross the crater rim and interact with the northern geothermal field located outside the Main Crater.

  2. Applications of electrical resistance tomography to subsurface environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.L.; Daily, W.D.

    1994-11-15

    We are developing a new imaging technique, Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT), to map subsurface liquids as flow occurs during natural or clean-up processes and to map geologic structure. Natural processes (such as surface water infiltrating the vadose zone) and man-induced processes (such as tank leaks and clean-up processes such as steam injection), can create changes in a soil`s electrical properties that are readily measured. We have conducted laboratory and a variety of field experiments to investigate the capabilities and limitations of ERT for imaging underground structures and processes. In the last four years we have used ERT to successfully monitor several field processes including: a subsurface steam injection process (for VOC removal), an air injection process (below the water table) for VOC removal, water infiltration through the vadose zone, radio-frequency heating, ohmic heating, and tank and pond leaks. The information derived from ERT can be used by remediation projects to: detect and locate leaks, determine the effectiveness of clean-up processes, select appropriate clean-up alternatives, and to verify the installation and performance of subsurface barriers.

  3. Electrical resistivity measurements of brine saturated porous media near reservoir conditions: Awibengkok preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, B; Duba, A; Roberts, J

    1999-06-28

    Laboratory measurements of the electrical resistivity of rocks and synthetic rocks with confining pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures between 20 and 211 C were performed to further investigate how the pore-size distribution and capillarity affects boiling in porous media. Similar to previous measurements on samples from The Geysers, CA, we observed a gradual increase in resistivity when pore pressure was decreased below the phase-boundary pressure of free water, an indication that boiling is controlled not only by temperature and pressure, but also by pore size distribution. Other important phenomena observed were strong resistance fluctuations during boiling that may be chaotic, and salt deposition that caused sample cracking. If confirmed in further experiments, these results may lead to a new geophysical diagnostic for locating boiling in high permeability areas of geothermal reservoirs and for methods of permeability alteration.

  4. Removal of oxides from alkali metal melts by reductive titration to electrical resistance-change end points

    DOEpatents

    Tsang, Floris Y.

    1980-01-01

    Alkali metal oxides dissolved in alkali metal melts are reduced with soluble metals which are converted to insoluble oxides. The end points of the reduction is detected as an increase in electrical resistance across an alkali metal ion-conductive membrane interposed between the oxide-containing melt and a material capable of accepting the alkali metal ions from the membrane when a difference in electrical potential, of the appropriate polarity, is established across it. The resistance increase results from blocking of the membrane face by ions of the excess reductant metal, to which the membrane is essentially non-conductive.

  5. [Childhhood obesity, insulin resistance and increased cardiovascular risk].

    PubMed

    Carlone, Angela; Venditti, Chiara; Cipolloni, Laura; Zampetti, Simona; Spoletini, Marialuisa; Capizzi, Marco; Leto, Gaetano; Buzzetti, Raffaella

    2012-10-01

    Excess fat is one of the major risk factors for insulin resistance predisposing to the development of cardiovascular diseases in western countries. We know that obese patients are strongly at risk of cardiovascular diseases, like myocardial infarction or stroke. These diseases are the most frequent cause of death in the adult population, representing a social and economic problem. Today there are not available and useful markers for screening and diagnosis of insulin- resistance in young people. "Easy-to-detect" clinical markers must be found to identify young subjects at risk of cardiovascular diseases. Very interesting the relationship between wrist circumference, its bone composition and insulin resistance. PMID:23114400

  6. Electric resistance welded pipe for use in chemical plants and petroleum refineries

    SciTech Connect

    Isfeld, B.

    1984-02-01

    Cost effective material has been and will continue to be of increasing importance in the design and construction of chemical plants and petroleum refineries. A large percentage of the cost incurred in such projects may be attributed to the pipe required to transport numerous liquids and gases at a variety of temperatures and pressures. Pipe was first manufactured with a longitudinal seam some 150 years ago. Since then, the processes employed have progressed to the point where high frequency electric resistance welding has proved the most effective in the manufacture of pipe suitable for oil and gas transmission. To more readily understand the suitability and reliability of electric resistance welded pipe, a discussion relating to the processes involved in its manufacture was presented. Attention was focussed on the weld seam and inspections performed to confirm its integrity. Mechanical properties of the weld seam were compared to those of the pipe body. Using high frequency electric resistance welding and modern inspection techniques, it is possible to produce pipe with a longitudinal weld seam that is virtuously indistinguishable from the parent metal chemically, mechanically, and visually. Furthermore, ASME/ANSI B31.3 Chemical Plant and Petroleum Refinery Piping approves the use of ERW pipe for a variety of applications at temperatures up to and including 593 degrees Celsius.

  7. Electrical Resistance Tomography Field Trials to Image CO2 Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newmark, R.

    2003-12-01

    , telluric noise can be comparable to the signal levels during periods of geomagnetic activity. Finally, instrumentation stability over long periods is necessary to follow trends in reservoir behavior for several years. Solutions to these and other problems will be presented along with results from the first two years of work at a producing field undergoing CO2 flood. If electrical resistance tomography (ERT) imaging can be performed using existing well casings as long electrodes, it will substantially reduce the cost to monitor CO2 sequestration. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  8. Monitoring crack development in fiber concrete beam by using electrical resistivity imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiwattanachang, N.; Giao, P. H.

    2011-10-01

    Accurate detection of damaged concrete zones plays an important role in selecting the proper remedial technique. This study presents results from an application of the electrical imaging method to monitor the development of cracks in fiber concrete beams. The study showed that resistivity measurements on the concrete specimens were able to detect the increase of concrete resistivity with the curing time that reached about 65 Ωm after 28 days of curing. A similar development trend of concrete compressive strength was also found. Two types of cracks were investigated, i.e., artificial cracks made of plastic sheets inserted in concrete and cracks developed during a four-step loading test. A mini-electric imaging survey with Wenner array was conducted on the tension face of the beams. To deal with the effect of the beam size new procedures to correct resistivity measurements before inversion were proposed and successfully applied in this study. The results indicated that both crack direction and depth could be accurately determined in the inverted resistivity sections.

  9. Corrosion resistance and electrical properties of carbon/chromium-titanium-nitride multilayer coatings on stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Kai; Li, Zhuguo; Lu, Fenggui; Huang, Jian; Cai, Xun; Wu, Yixiong

    2014-03-01

    High electrical conductivity and corrosion resistance are central to advances in wider application of metallic bipolar plates in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). In this study, C/Cr-Ti-N multilayer coatings are deposited by physical vapor deposition and the effect of Cr:Ti ratio on the corrosion resistance and interfacial contact resistance (ICR) are systematically investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) result shows that the carbon layer is compact and uniform. Excellent corrosion resistance of 0.127 μA cm-2 current density at operating voltage in PEMFC cathode environment and low ICR of 2.03 mΩ-cm2 at compaction force of 150 N cm-2 are achieved when Cr:Ti ratio is 2:4 and 3:3, respectively. The significant enhancement in surface conductivity is probably because that the current comes from carbon paper is homogenized by two electrically conductive layers and flows to the passive film with much more contact area. After polarization, ICR increase to 3.07 mΩ-cm2 and 3.02 mΩ-cm2 in the simulated PEMFC cathode and anode environment, respectively. However, the Raman spectroscopy results disclose that the bonding type of top carbon film before and after polarization shows little difference. The results indicate that C/Cr-Ti-N multilayer coating with Cr:Ti ratio of 2:4 achieves the optimal composition.

  10. Increased Red Blood Cell Stiffness Increases Pulmonary Vascular Resistance and Pulmonary Arterial Pressure.

    PubMed

    Schreier, David A; Forouzan, Omid; Hacker, Timothy A; Sheehan, John; Chesler, Naomi

    2016-02-01

    Patients with sickle cell anemia (SCD) and pulmonary hypertension (PH) have a significantly increased risk of sudden death compared to patients with SCD alone. Sickled red blood cells (RBCs) are stiffer, more dense, more frequently undergo hemolysis, and have a sixfold shorter lifespan compared to normal RBCs. Here, we sought to investigate the impact of increased RBC stiffness, independent of other SCD-related biological and mechanical RBC abnormalities, on the hemodynamic changes that ultimately cause PH and increase mortality in SCD. To do so, pulmonary vascular impedance (PVZ) measures were recorded in control C57BL6 mice before and after ∼50 μl of blood (Hct = 45%) was extracted and replaced with an equal volume of blood containing either untreated RBCs or RBCs chemically stiffened with glutaraldehyde (Hct = 45%). Chemically stiffened RBCs increased mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) (13.5 ± 0.6 mmHg at baseline to 23.2 ± 0.7 mmHg after the third injection), pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) (1.23 ± 0.11 mmHg*min/ml at baseline to 2.24 ± 0.14 mmHg*min/ml after the third injection), and wave reflections (0.31 ± 0.02 at baseline to 0.43 ± 0.03 after the third injection). Chemically stiffened RBCs also decreased cardiac output, but did not change hematocrit, blood viscosity, pulmonary arterial compliance, or heart rate. The main finding of this study is that increased RBC stiffness alone affects pulmonary pulsatile hemodynamics, which suggests that RBC stiffness plays an important role in the development of PH in patients with SCD. PMID:26638883

  11. Interplay between interaction and chiral anomaly: Anisotropy in the electrical resistivity of interacting Weyl metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jho, Yong-Soo; Kim, Ki-Seok

    2013-05-01

    We predict that long-range interactions give rise to anisotropy in the electrical resistivity of Weyl metals at low temperatures, where the electrical resistivity becomes much reduced when electric fields are applied to the direction of the momentum vector to connect two paired Weyl points. Performing the renormalization group analysis, we find that the distance between two Weyl points becomes enhanced logarithmically at low temperatures although the coupling constant of such interactions vanishes inverse-logarithmically. Considering the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly, scattering between these two Weyl points becomes suppressed to increase electrical conductivity in the “longitudinal” direction, counter intuitive in the respect that interactions are expected to reduce metallicity. We also propose that the anomalous contribution in the Hall effect shows the logarithmic enhancement as a function of temperature, originating from the fact that the anomalous Hall coefficient turns out to be proportional to the distance between two paired Weyl points. Correlations with topological constraints allow unexpected and exotic transport properties.

  12. Modeling and analysis of electrical-resistivity soundings made in Jurassic-Triassic basins of the eastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    Electrical-resistivity soundings obtained with a Schlumberger field array were used to define the structure, stratigraphy, and depth to basement in the Durham-Wadesboro, Dan River, Richmond, Culpeper, and Newark-Gettysburg Jurassic-Triassic basins in the eastern United States. Geoelectric cross sections constructed from field data processed by computer show that depth to basement rocks and stratigraphic layers differ significantly within and among basins. The cross sections show that resistivities of the intrabasin sedimentary rocks tend to increase with depth, indicating a general decrease in porosity or clay content with depth. Shale layers were found to have 2 to 5 times lower resistivity than sandstone, conglomerate, and limestone. Very massive sedimentary layers have characteristically higher resistivity than thin interbedded layers. Some limestones have resistivities as high as 2200 ohm-meters. Lateral discontinuities, such as faults and facies changes, are inferred where electrical-resistivity soundings were made at close spacing to permit detailed mapping. The sounding data were interpreted by a computer-based model that automatically inverts the sounding curve into layer thicknesses and average layer resistivities. Electrical-resistivity modeling is very useful in understanding subsurface conditions in a variety of geologic environments.

  13. Optimization of Iron Cobalt-based Nanocomposite Alloys for High Induction and Increased Resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Shen

    FeCo-based nanocrystalline soft magnetic materials are promising to provide high saturation induction, high Curie temperature and excellent soft magnetic properties for electric vehicle and high frequency power conversion applications. The increasing operation frequency of various inductive applications requires nanocomposite alloys with higher resistivity to suppress power losses. In this thesis, the method of measuring as-cast and annealed resistivity of melt-spun ribbon alloys by obtaining alloy densities was established. Archimedes method with deionized water as a medium was used to determine the density of crystalline alloys. A gas pycnometer using dry Helium gas as the medium exhibited improved accuracy in measuring the density of amorphous ribbon alloys compared to the conventional Archimedes method using a liquid medium. This method was applied to previously developed HITPERM (FeCoZrBCu) and HTX002 (FeCoBSiCu) type of alloys as well as carbon-containing (FeCoBCCu) alloys to guide composition adjustments pursuing for improved magnetic properties. In the HITPERM type of alloys, the composition dependence of as-cast resistivity was studied and simulated by Mott's two-current model with a rigid-band assumption which provided guidance for further adjusting alloy composition looking for higher resistivity. An alloy designed with the Fe:Co ratio for maximum as-cast resistivity and Hf as glass former exhibits low power loss values being approximately 1/4 of those measured on the alloy with the original HITPERM composition for a range of frequencies. The Al and Si additions were found effective to achieve a high resistivity of 151.9 muO·cm in the as-cast alloys but also lead to embrittlement of melt-spun ribbons. Composition adjustments on the HTX002 type of alloys which are castable in air and available for larger-scale production were also explored. Increasing the ferromagnetic late transition metal content by reducing glass formers was found effective to achieve

  14. Microstructures, mechanical properties, and electrical resistivity of rapidly quenched Fe-Cr-Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naohara, T.; Inoue, A.; Minemura, T.; Masumoto, T.; Kumada, K.

    1982-03-01

    By the rapid quenching technique, ductile supersaturated ferrite solid solution with high hardness and strength as well as unusual electrical properties has been found in Fe-Cr-Al ternary system. This formation range is limited to less than about 35 at. pct Cr and 23 at. pct Al. The ferrite phase has fine grains of about 10 μm in diameter. Their hardness, yield strength, and tensile fracture strength increase with increase in the amounts of chromium and aluminum, and the highest values reach about 290 DPN, 720 MPa, and 740 MPa. These alloys are so ductile that no cracks are observed even after closely contacted bending test. The good strength and ductility remain almost unchanged on tempering for one hour until heated to about 923 K where a large amount of Cr2Al compound begins to precipitate preferentially along the grain boundaries of the ferrite phase. The room-temperature resistivity increases with increasing chromium and aluminum contents and reaches as high as 1.86 μ Ώ m for Fe50Cr30Al20 alloy. Also, the temperature coefficient of resistivity in the temperature range between room temperature and 773 K decreases with increasing chromium and aluminum contents and becomes zero in the vicinity of 20 to 30 at. pct Cr and 15 at. pct Al. Thus, the present alloys may be attractive as fine gauge high-resistance and/or standard-resistance wires and plates because of the unusual electrical properties combined with high strength and good ductility.

  15. Increasing antimicrobial resistance among uropathogens: Is fosfomycin the answer?

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Asfia; Rizvi, Meher; Khan, Fatima; Sami, Hiba; Shukla, Indu; Khan, Haris M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common infectious diseases in clinical practice. The choice of antibiotics for the treatment of UTI is limited by the rising rates of antibiotic resistance. There is an urgent need to discover new effective treatment solutions. Fosfomycin may be an interesting alternative to the currently used treatments of UTIs. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted over 6 months period (January to June 2013) in Department of Microbiology, JNMCH, AMU, Aligarh. A total of 1840 urine samples were submitted. Culture and sensitivity was done as per standard microbiological procedures. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), high-level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR), extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL), AmpC and metallo-beta-lactamases (MBL) production was detected. Results: Culture was positive in 504 (27.4%) cases. Gram-negative etiology was identified in 390 (73%) cases. ESBL production was detected in 154 (37.1%) while 82 (21.6%) were Amp C. No, MBL was detected. Among Gram-positive bacteria, 68 (51.5%) were MRSA, while 4 (13.3%) were vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE). HLAR was seen in 53.3% of enterococci. Fosfomycin was effective in 100% of MRSA, VRE, ESBL, HLAR, and overall, susceptibility to fosfomycin in AmpC producers was extremely high (99%). Norfloxacin and cotrimoxazole were not proved effective as only three isolates were sensitive to norfloxacin, while all Gram-negative isolates were resistant to cotrimoxazole. Pseudomonas species showed 65% and 75% susceptibility to colistin and polymixin B, respectively. Conclusion: Fosfomycin has emerged as a promising option, especially in cases involving multi-drug-resistant pathogens in which previous antibiotics have failed to cure the infection. PMID:25657539

  16. Electrical resistivity imaging in transmission between surface and underground tunnel for fault characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesparre, N.; Boyle, A.; Grychtol, B.; Cabrera, J.; Marteau, J.; Adler, A.

    2016-05-01

    Electrical resistivity images supply information on sub-surface structures and are classically performed to characterize faults geometry. Here we use the presence of a tunnel intersecting a regional fault to inject electrical currents between surface and the tunnel to improve the image resolution at depth. We apply an original methodology for defining the inversion parametrization based on pilot points to better deal with the heterogeneous sounding of the medium. An increased region of high spatial resolution is shown by analysis of point spread functions as well as inversion of synthetics. Such evaluations highlight the advantages of using transmission measurements by transferring a few electrodes from the main profile to increase the sounding depth. Based on the resulting image we propose a revised structure for the medium surrounding the Cernon fault supported by geological observations and muon flux measurements.

  17. INCREASING INFORMATION WITH MULTIPLE SOIL ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY DATASETS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maps of apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) of the soil profile are widely used in precision agriculture practice and research. Because ECa is often strongly related to clay content, soil water holding capacity, and other soil physical properties that also relate to crop productivity, ECa maps ca...

  18. Increased use of reject heat from electric generation

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, R.W.; Piraino, M.

    1994-02-01

    This study aims to determine existing barriers to greater use of reject heat by electric power producers, including utilities and cogenerators. It includes analytical studies of the technical and economic issues and a survey of several electric power producers. The core analytic findings of the study are that although electric utility- based, cogenerated district heating is sometimes cost competitive with currently common furnaces and boilers, it is not clearly less expensive, and is often more expensive. Since market penetration by a new technology depends on strong perceived advantages, district heating will remain at a disadvantage unless its benefits, such as lowered emissions and decreased reliance on foreign oil, are given overt financial form through subsidies or tax incentives. The central finding from the survey was that electric utilities have arrived at the same conclusion by their own routes; we present a substantial list of their reasons for not engaging in district heating or for not pursuing it more vigorously, and many of them can be summarized as the lack of a clear cost advantage for district heat. We also note that small-scale district heating systems, based on diesel generators and located near the thermal load center, show very clear cost advantages over individual furnaces. This cost advantage is consistent with the explosive growth currently observed in private cogeneration systems.

  19. Stable hole doping of graphene for low electrical resistance and high optical transparency.

    PubMed

    Tongay, S; Berke, K; Lemaitre, M; Nasrollahi, Z; Tanner, D B; Hebard, A F; Appleton, B R

    2011-10-21

    We report on the p doping of graphene with the polymer TFSA ((CF(3)SO(2))(2)NH). Modification of graphene with TFSA decreases the graphene sheet resistance by 70%. Through such modification, we report sheet resistance values as low as 129 Ω, thus attaining values comparable to those of indium-tin oxide (ITO), while displaying superior environmental stability and preserving electrical properties over extended time scales. Electrical transport measurements reveal that, after doping, the carrier density of holes increases, consistent with the acceptor nature of TFSA, and the mobility decreases due to enhanced short-range scattering. The Drude formula predicts that competition between these two effects yields an overall increase in conductivity. We confirm changes in the carrier density and Fermi level of graphene through changes in the Raman G and 2D peak positions. Doped graphene samples display high transmittance in the visible and near-infrared spectrum, preserving graphene's optical properties without any significant reduction in transparency, and are therefore superior to ITO films in the near infrared. The presented results allow integration of doped graphene sheets into optoelectronics, solar cells, and thermoelectric solar cells as well as engineering of the electrical characteristics of various devices by tuning the Fermi level of graphene. PMID:21934196

  20. Influence of N+ ions on bandgap and electrical resistivity of TiN thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Omveer; Dahiya, Raj P.; Malik, Hitendra K.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, nitrogen ions are embedded into Ti thin films (200 nm) using low energy ion beam implantation (70 keV) by varying ions fluence from 4×1015 ions/cm2 to 2×1016 ions/cm2. For this, Ti films were grown using DC magnetron sputtering in Ar environment (power 200 W). TiN films were then characterized using versatile techniques for estimating the band gap and electrical resistivity. X-ray diffraction pattern shows shift in peaks towards higher angle with increase in nitrogen fluence that confirms the introduction of strain in Ti films. UV-Vis spectra show that band gap is reduced from 3.75 eV to 1.7 eV with increase in fluence from 4×1015 ions/cm2 to 2×1016 ions/cm2. Furthermore, electrical resistivity also decreases from 2.67×10-4 Ω.cm to 2.31×10-4 Ωcm with nitrogen ion fluence. Based on these results, it can be inferred that ion implantation is an effective approach for uniform distribution of N ions in host matrix and tuning of optical and electrical properties.

  1. Electric-field-modulated nonvolatile resistance switching in VO₂/PMN-PT(111) heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Bowen; Gao, Guanyin; Xu, Haoran; Chen, Feng; Tan, Xuelian; Chen, Pingfan; Wang, Lingfei; Wu, Wenbin

    2014-04-01

    The electric-field-modulated resistance switching in VO2 thin films grown on piezoelectric (111)-0.68Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.32PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) substrates has been investigated. Large relative change in resistance (10.7%) was observed in VO2/PMN-PT(111) hererostructures at room temperature. For a substrate with a given polarization direction, stable resistive states of VO2 films can be realized even when the applied electric fields are removed from the heterostructures. By sweeping electric fields across the heterostructure appropriately, multiple resistive states can be achieved. These stable resistive states result from the different stable remnant strain states of substrate, which is related to the rearrangements of ferroelectric domain structures in PMN-PT(111) substrate. The resistance switching tuned by electric field in our work may have potential applications for novel electronic devices. PMID:24634978

  2. The role of depressed metabolism in increased radio resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.

    1972-01-01

    Studies are presented of the physiology of depressed metabolism, radio-resistance in depressed metabolic states, comparative aspects of depressed metabolism, and gastrointestinal responses to ionizing radiation. Specific data cover helium-cold induced hypothermia in white rats and hamsters, and radiation responses and intestinal absorption in the gerbil.

  3. Increasing the frost resistance of facade glazed tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Egerev, V.M.; Zotov, S.N.; Romanova, G.P.

    1986-09-01

    The authors investigate the protective properties of a coating of boron oxides and zirconium oxides applied as a glaze to ceramic tiles by conducting a series of tests to determine the frost resistance, the propensity to absorb water, the moisture expansion coefficient, the fracture behavior, and the effect of thermal cycling on the oxides. Results are graphed and tabulated.

  4. Measuring turbulence in a flotation cell using electrical resistance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jun; Xie, Weiguo; Runge, Kym; Bradshaw, Dee

    2015-11-01

    Measuring turbulence in an industrial flotation environment has long been problematic due to the opaque, aggressive, and abrasive three-phase environment in a flotation cell. One of the promising measurement techniques is electrical resistance tomography (ERT). By measuring the conductivity distribution across a measurement area, ERT has been adopted by many researchers to monitor and investigate many processes involving multiphase flows. In the research outlined in this paper, a compact ERT probe was built and then used to measure the conductivity distribution within a 60 l flotation cell operated with water and air. Two approaches were then developed to process the ERT data and estimate turbulence-related parameters. One is a conductivity variance method and the other is based on the Green-Kubo relations. Both rely on and use the fluctuation in the ERT measurement caused by bubbles moving through the measurement area changing the density of the fluid. The results from both approaches were validated by comparing the results produced by the ERT probe in a 60l flotation cell operated at different air rates and impeller speeds to that measured using an alternative turbulence measurement device. The second approach is considered superior to the first as the first requires the development of auxiliary information which would not usually be known for a new system.

  5. Visualizing Moisture Storage in Basin Lysimeters Using Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, W.; Munk, J.; Lee, W.

    2010-12-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was utilized to evaluate soil moisture in two large (10m x 20m x 2m) basin lysimeters over a four-year period in Anchorage, Alaska. The lysimeters were intended to test the efficacy of two competing landfill cover designs, thus water balance information was collected over the entire experimental period. The first lysimeter contained a thin (0.5m) layer of compacted soil within its 2m depth and was planted with local grasses. The second lysimeter contained no compacted soil layer and was planted with deep-rooting woody vegetation to maximize moisture removal via evapotranspiration. After four years of observation, 291mm of moisture percolated through the compacted soil lysimeter compared to 201mm in the evapotranspiration lysimeter. This presentation describes the observed water balance results, discusses efficacy of utilizing compacted soils versus evapotranspiration as the primary means of minimizing infiltration into engineered soil systems, and demonstrates the use of ERT as a technique for visualizing soil moisture storage.

  6. Sinkhole detection using electrical resistivity tomography in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, Ahmed M.; El-Kaliouby, Hesham; Zabramawi, Yasser A.

    2012-12-01

    Karst phenomena exist in different areas in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, causing serious environmental problems that affect urban development and infrastructure (buildings, roads and highways). One of the most important problems are sinkholes, which most of the time consist of unfilled voids. These sinkholes are formed as a result of the chemical leaching of carbonate and evaporite formations by percolating water. Field investigations show that there are many surface expressions of sinkholes in the area; some appear on the ground surface and others are hidden in the subsurface. Geophysical data were collected at the study area using two-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) with different electrode spacings to delineate buried sinkholes and associated subsurface cavities. Our findings indicated that the dipole-dipole method using an electrode spacing of 1 m was successful in detecting a known subsurface sinkhole. According to the ERT method the detected sinkhole depth ranges from 2 to 4 m, its height ranges from 2 to 4 m, and its width ranges from 5 to 7 m. Field observation has verified the geophysical data, especially along the profile A-A\\. Finally, closely spaced ERT profiles were successful in determining the three-dimensional volume of the subsurface sinkhole.

  7. Rainfall infiltration process in mountain headwater region using electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, M.; Yamamiya, K.; Shimada, J.

    2008-12-01

    Many researchers have studied about the hydrological process, especially rainfall-runoff process, in the headwater region using multi hydrometric methods. Since the possibility has been recognized that bedrock groundwater has important role to play in the rainfall-runoff process, it is important to comprehend the rainfall infiltration process within fluctuations of bedrock groundwater. However, we would need many hydrological instruments to understand this process precisely. So we have applied electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method to understand rainfall infiltration process in the area that is estimated the contribution of bedrock groundwater for rainfall-runoff processes. Resistivity changes with the saturation rate of the pore fluid in the subsurface material. So it is possible to estimate spatial and temporal distribution of subsurface water by using ERT. In this study, we will estimate rainfall infiltration process in mountain headwater region using resistivity method. The study area is the Mamushi-dani watershed in Shiranui, Kumamoto, Japan. We described the bedrock groundwater storage systems using resistivity method in this watershed previously. Resistivity has been observed at 2 measurement lines in slope areas of this watershed. Both measurement lines have 47m in length, 1m electrode spacing and 48 electrodes. We used the multi-electrode system, NEXT-400(Kowa Co. Ltd., Japan) for measuring apparent resistivity and the application software, E-tomo (Diaconsultant Co. Ltd., Japan) for inversion of apparent resistivity data. The observed resistivity data were compared with water head observed at borehole and specific discharge observed at foot of the watershed. Inverted resistivity profiles and observed hydrological data showed the interface between saturated and unsaturated zone. During rainfall occurs, resistivity in surface area gets lower than that before the rainfall and resistivity in some part of unsaturated area shows increasing tendency. Both

  8. Carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites for electrical-resistance-based sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Daojun

    This dissertation has advanced the science and technology of electrical-resistance-based sensing of strain/stress and damage using continuous carbon fiber epoxy-matrix composites, which are widely used for aircraft structures. In particular, it has extended the technology of self-sensing of carbon fiber polymer-matrix composites from uniaxial longitudinal loading and flexural loading to uniaxial through-thickness loading and has extended the technology from structural composite self-sensing to the use of the composite (specifically a one-lamina composite) as an attached sensor. Through-thickness compression is encountered in the joining of composite components by fastening. Uniaxial through-thickness compression results in strain-induced reversible decreases in the through-thickness and longitudinal volume resistivities, due to increase in the fiber-fiber contact in the through-thickness direction, and minor-damage-induced irreversible changes in these resistivities. The Poisson effect plays a minor role. The effects in the longitudinal resistivity are small compared to those in the through-thickness direction, but longitudinal resistance measurement is more amenable to practical implementation in structures than through-thickness resistance measurement. The irreversible effects are associated with an increase in the through-thickness resistivity and a decrease in the longitudinal resistivity. The through-thickness gage factor is up to 5.1 and decreases with increasing compressive strain above 0.2%. The reversible fractional change in through-thickness resistivity per through-thickness strain is up to 4.0 and decreases with increasing compressive strain. The irreversible fractional change in through-thickness resistivity per unit through-thickness strain is around -1.1 and is independent of the strain. The sensing is feasible by measuring the resistance away from the stressed region, though the effectiveness is less than that at the stressed region. A one

  9. The model of electrophysical processes increasing effectiveness of electric power technology based on electron beams *

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazmin, B. N.; Trifanov, I. V.; Ryzhov, D. R.; Savelyeva, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    The research focuses on electrophysical model of processes increasing energy efficiency of electric power technology based on electron beams that are generated by crossed electric field. The energy of beams is transformed with compression and simultaneous deceleration with crossed electric field into electric power to transfer into users’ electric power grid. We perform computer modeling of the processes to confirm the energy efficiency of the proposed model.

  10. The Behaviour of Laboratory Soil Electrical Resistivity Value under Basic Soil Properties Influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Aziman, M.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Chitral, W. D.; Fauziah, A.; Rosli, S.

    2015-01-01

    Electrical resistivity method (ERM) was a popular indirect geophysical tools adopted in engineering, environmental and archaeological studies. In the past, results of the electrical resistivity value (ERV) were always subjected to a long discussion and debate among the related parties such as an engineers, geophysicists and geologists due to its lack of clarification and evidences in quantitative point of view. Most of the results produced in the past was always been justified using qualitative ways which difficult to be accept by certain parties. In order to reduce the knowledge gap between those parties, this study has performed a laboratory experiment of soil box resistivity test which supported by an additional basic geotechnical test as referred to particle size distribution test (d), moisture content test (w), density test (ρbulk) and Atterberg limit test (LL, PL and PI). The test was performed to establish a series of electrical resistivity value with different quantity of water content for Clayey SILT and Silty SAND soil. It was found that the ERV of Silty SAND (600 - 7300 Ωm) was higher than Clayey SILT (13 - 7700 Ωm) due to the different quantity of basic soil properties value obtained from the basic geotechnical test. This study was successfully demonstrated that the fluctuation of ERV has greatly influenced by the variations of the soil physical properties (d, w, ρbulk, LL, PL and PI). Hence, the confidence level of ERV interpretation will be increasingly meaningful since it able to be proved by others parameter generated by laboratory direct test.

  11. Staphylococci in community-acquired infections: Increased resistance to penicillin.

    PubMed

    Hughes, G B; Chidi, C C; Macon, W L

    1976-04-01

    One hundred patients with community-acquired staphylococcal infections of the skin and soft tissues were treated in the Emergency Ward of Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital from June to October of 1974. Each staphylococcal infection was considered community-acquired if, within two weeks prior to being treated for the first time, the patient had not received antibiotics, had not been hospitalized, and had not been in contact with other recently hospitalized persons. Of 100 community-acquired staphylococcal infections, 85 were resistant to penicillin. Almost no resistance to other tested antibiotics was observed. Unless indicated otherwise by bacteriologic testing, penicillin is a poor drug of choice in those skin and soft tissue infections suspected of harboring staphylococci. PMID:1267491

  12. Investigation of degree of saturation in landfill liners using electrical resistivity imaging.

    PubMed

    Kibria, Golam; Hossain, Md Sahadat

    2015-05-01

    During construction of compacted clay liners and evapotranspiration (ET) covers, quality control involves laboratory and field tests in individual lifts. However, the available methods may be inadequate to determine non-uniform compaction conditions, poor bonding of lifts, and/or variable soil composition. Moreover, the applicability of the available methods is restricted, in many instances, when spatial variability of the subsurface is expected. Resistivity Imaging (RI) is a geophysical method employed to investigate a large area in a rapid and non-destructive way. High resistivity of clay liner soil is an indication of a low degree of saturation, high air-filled voids, and poor lift bonding. To utilize RI as a quality control tool in a landfill liner, it is important to determine the saturation condition of the compacted soils because compaction and permeability of liner soil are functions of degrees of saturation. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the degree of saturation of a municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill liner, using RI. Electrical resistivity tests were performed in the laboratory, at varied moisture contents and dry unit weights, on four types of soil samples, i.e., highly plastic clay (CH), low plastic clay (CL), Ca-bentonite, and kaolinite. According to the experimental results, electrical resistivity of the specimens decreased as much as 15.3 times of initial value with increase in the degrees of saturation from 23% to 100%. In addition, cation exchange capacity (CEC) substantially affected resistivity. A multiple linear regression (MLR) model was developed to correlate electrical resistivity with degree of saturation and CEC using experimental results. Additionally, RI tests were conducted on compacted clay liners to determine the degrees of saturation, and predicted degrees of saturation were compared with the in-situ density tests. The study results indicated that the developed model can be utilized for liner soils having CEC

  13. Electrochemical Reduction of Silver Vanadium Phosphorous Oxide, Ag2VO2PO4: Silver Metal Deposition and Associated Increase in Electrical Conductivity

    PubMed Central

    Marschilok, Amy C.; Kozarsky, Eric S.; Tanzil, Kevin; Zhu, Shali; Takeuchi, Kenneth J.; Takeuchi, Esther S.

    2010-01-01

    This report details the chemical and associated electrical resistance changes of silver vanadium phosphorous oxide (Ag2VO2PO4, SVPO) incurred during electrochemical reduction in a lithium based electrochemical cell over the range of 0 to 4 electrons per formula unit. Specifically the cathode electrical conductivities and associated cell DC resistance and cell AC impedance values vary with the level of reduction, due the changes of the SVPO cathode. Initially, Ag+ is reduced to Ag0 (2 electrons per formula unit, or 50% of the calculated theoretical value of 4 electrons per formula unit), accompanied by significant decreases in the cathode electrical resistance, consistent with the formation of an electrically conductive silver metal matrix within the SVPO cathode. As Ag+ reduction progresses, V5+ reduction initiates; once the SVPO reduction process progresses to where the reduction of V5+ to V4+ is the dominant process, both the cell and cathode electrical resistances then begin to increase. If the discharge then continues to where the dominant cathode reduction process is the reduction of V4+ to V3+, the cathode and cell electrical resistances then begin to decrease. The complex cathode electrical resistance pattern exhibited during full cell discharge is an important subject of this study. PMID:20657813

  14. Time-lapse electrical resistivity investigations for imaging the grouting injection in shallow subsurface cavities.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Muhammad; Park, Samgyu; Kim, Jung Ho; Song, Young Soo; Amjad Sabir, Mohammad; Umar, Muhammad; Tariq, Mohammad; Muhammad, Said

    2014-01-01

    The highway of Yongweol-ri, Muan-gun, south-western part of the South Korean Peninsula, is underlain by the abandoned of subsurface cavities, which were discovered in 2005. These cavities lie at shallow depths with the range of 5∼15 meters below the ground surface. Numerous subsidence events have repeatedly occurred in the past few years, damaging infrastructure and highway. As a result of continuing subsidence issues, the Korean Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) was requested by local administration to resolve the issue. The KIGAM used geophysical methods to delineate subsurface cavities and improve more refined understanding of the cavities network in the study area. Cement based grouting has been widely employed in the construction industry to reinforce subsurface ground. In this research work, time-lapse electrical resistivity surveys were accomplished to monitor the grouting injection in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway, which have provided a quasi-real-time monitoring for modifying the subsurface cavities related to ground reinforcement, which would be difficult with direct methods. The results obtained from time-lapse electrical resistivity technique have satisfactory imaged the grouting injection experiment in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway. Furthermore, the borehole camera confirmed the presence of grouting material in the subsurface cavities, and hence this procedure increases the mechanical resistance of subsurface cavities below the highway. PMID:24578621

  15. Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Investigations for Imaging the Grouting Injection in Shallow Subsurface Cavities

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Muhammad; Kim, Jung Ho; Song, Young Soo; Amjad Sabir, Mohammad; Umar, Muhammad; Tariq, Mohammad; Muhammad, Said

    2014-01-01

    The highway of Yongweol-ri, Muan-gun, south-western part of the South Korean Peninsula, is underlain by the abandoned of subsurface cavities, which were discovered in 2005. These cavities lie at shallow depths with the range of 5∼15 meters below the ground surface. Numerous subsidence events have repeatedly occurred in the past few years, damaging infrastructure and highway. As a result of continuing subsidence issues, the Korean Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) was requested by local administration to resolve the issue. The KIGAM used geophysical methods to delineate subsurface cavities and improve more refined understanding of the cavities network in the study area. Cement based grouting has been widely employed in the construction industry to reinforce subsurface ground. In this research work, time-lapse electrical resistivity surveys were accomplished to monitor the grouting injection in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway, which have provided a quasi-real-time monitoring for modifying the subsurface cavities related to ground reinforcement, which would be difficult with direct methods. The results obtained from time-lapse electrical resistivity technique have satisfactory imaged the grouting injection experiment in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway. Furthermore, the borehole camera confirmed the presence of grouting material in the subsurface cavities, and hence this procedure increases the mechanical resistance of subsurface cavities below the highway. PMID:24578621

  16. A one-dimensional model of solid-earth electrical resistivity beneath Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blum, Cletus; Love, Jeffrey J.; Pedrie, Kolby; Bedrosian, Paul A.; Rigler, E. Joshua

    2015-01-01

    An estimated one-dimensional layered model of electrical resistivity beneath Florida was developed from published geological and geophysical information. The resistivity of each layer is represented by plausible upper and lower bounds as well as a geometric mean resistivity. Corresponding impedance transfer functions, Schmucker-Weidelt transfer functions, apparent resistivity, and phase responses are calculated for inducing geomagnetic frequencies ranging from 10−5 to 100 hertz. The resulting one-dimensional model and response functions can be used to make general estimates of time-varying electric fields associated with geomagnetic storms such as might represent induction hazards for electric-power grid operation. The plausible upper- and lower-bound resistivity structures show the uncertainty, giving a wide range of plausible time-varying electric fields.

  17. Electrical resistivity of polypyrrole nanotube measured by conductive scanning probe microscope: The role of contact force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. G.; Lee, S. H.; Kim, B.; Park, Y. W.

    2002-12-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) nanotubes were synthesized using the pores of track-etched polycarbonate membrane as a template. Its size depends on the pore diameter of template, range from 50 to 200 nm. Direct I-V measurements of PPy nanotube (diameter of 120 nm) deposited on Au were done using a metal-coated tapping-mode atomic-force-microscope tip. Linear I-V characteristics are observed, and the resistance is decreased as the contact force is increased. Using the Hertz model, the elastic modulus E and electrical resistivity ρ are estimated to be E˜1 GPa and ρ˜1 Ωcm. These values are consistent with those obtained in bulk PPy film.

  18. Damage Characterization in SiC/SiC Composites using Electrical Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig E.; Xia, Zhenhai

    2011-01-01

    SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) under creep-rupture loading accumulate damage by means of local matrix cracks that typically form near a stress concentration, such as a 90o fiber tow or large matrix pore, and grow over time. Such damage is difficult to detect through conventional techniques. Electrical resistance changes can be correlated with matrix cracking to provide a means of damage detection. Sylramic-iBN fiber-reinforced SiC composites with both melt infiltrated (MI) and chemical vapor infiltrated (CVI) matrix types are compared here. Results for both systems exhibit an increase in resistance prior to fracture, which can be detected either in situ or post-damage.

  19. Thermal Expansion and Electrical Resistivity Studies of Nickel and ARMCO Iron at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchaev, D. K.; Murlieva, Zh. Kh.; Gadzhimagomedov, S. H.; Iskhakov, M. E.; Rabadanov, M. Kh.; Abdulagatov, I. M.

    2015-11-01

    The electrical resistance, ρ (T), and thermal expansion coefficient, β (T), of nickel and ARMCO iron have been simultaneously measured over a wide temperature range from (300 to 1100) K. The well-known standard four-probe potentiometric method was used for measurements of the electrical resistance. The thermal expansion coefficient was measured using the quartz dilatometer technique. Both techniques were combined in the same apparatus for simultaneous measurements of the electrical resistance and TEC for the same specimen. The combined expanded uncertainty of the electrical resistance and thermal expansion coefficient measurements at the 95 % confidence level with a coverage factor of k = 2 is estimated to be 0.5 % and (1.5 to 4.0) %, respectively. The distinct ρ (T) scattering contribution (phonon ρ _{ph}, magnetic ρ m, and residual ρ S) terms were separated and extracted from the measured total resistivity. The physical nature and details of the temperature dependence of the electrical resistance of solid materials and correct estimations of the contributions of various scattering mechanisms to the measured total resistivity were discussed in terms of the anharmonic effect. We experimentally found simple, universal, physically based, semiempirical linear correlations between the kinetic coefficient (electrical resistance) and a thermodynamic (equilibrium) property, the thermal expansion coefficient, of solid materials. The developed, physically based, correlation model has been successfully applied for nanoscale materials (ferromagnetic nickel nanowire). A new s-d-exchange interaction energy determination technique has been proposed.

  20. Molecular and physiological strategies to increase aluminum resistance in plants.

    PubMed

    Inostroza-Blancheteau, Claudio; Rengel, Zed; Alberdi, Miren; de la Luz Mora, María; Aquea, Felipe; Arce-Johnson, Patricio; Reyes-Díaz, Marjorie

    2012-03-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is a primary limitation to plant growth on acid soils. Root meristems are the first site for toxic Al accumulation, and therefore inhibition of root elongation is the most evident physiological manifestation of Al toxicity. Plants may resist Al toxicity by avoidance (Al exclusion) and/or tolerance mechanisms (detoxification of Al inside the cells). The Al exclusion involves the exudation of organic acid anions from the root apices, whereas tolerance mechanisms comprise internal Al detoxification by organic acid anions and enhanced scavenging of free oxygen radicals. One of the most important advances in understanding the molecular events associated with the Al exclusion mechanism was the identification of the ALMT1 gene (Al-activated malate transporter) in Triticum aestivum root cells, which codes for a plasma membrane anion channel that allows efflux of organic acid anions, such as malate, citrate or oxalate. On the other hand, the scavenging of free radicals is dependent on the expression of genes involved in antioxidant defenses, such as peroxidases (e.g. in Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum), catalases (e.g. in Capsicum annuum), and the gene WMnSOD1 from T. aestivum. However, other recent findings show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced stress may be due to acidic (low pH) conditions rather than to Al stress. In this review, we summarize recent findings regarding molecular and physiological mechanisms of Al toxicity and resistance in higher plants. Advances have been made in understanding some of the underlying strategies that plants use to cope with Al toxicity. Furthermore, we discuss the physiological and molecular responses to Al toxicity, including genes involved in Al resistance that have been identified and characterized in several plant species. The better understanding of these strategies and mechanisms is essential for improving plant performance in acidic, Al-toxic soils. PMID:21660471

  1. Electrical Properties of Materials for Elevated Temperature Resistance Strain Gage Application. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen

    1987-01-01

    The objective was to study the electrical resistances of materials that are potentially useful as resistance strain gages at 1000 C. Transition metal carbides and nitrides, boron carbide and silicon carbide were selected for the experimental phase of this research. Due to their low temperature coefficient of resistance and good stability, TiC, ZrC, B sub 4 C and beta-SiC are suggested as good candidates for high temperature resistance strain gage applications.

  2. Corrosion-resistant, electrically-conductive plate for use in a fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Carter, J. David; Mawdsley, Jennifer R.; Niyogi, Suhas; Wang, Xiaoping; Cruse, Terry; Santos, Lilia

    2010-04-20

    A corrosion resistant, electrically-conductive, durable plate at least partially coated with an anchor coating and a corrosion resistant coating. The corrosion resistant coating made of at least a polymer and a plurality of corrosion resistant particles each having a surface area between about 1-20 m.sup.2/g and a diameter less than about 10 microns. Preferably, the plate is used as a bipolar plate in a proton exchange membrane (PEMFC) fuel cell stack.

  3. Electrical resistivity of some Zintl phase and the precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, L.

    1990-09-21

    Resistivity measurements have been performed for electric characterization of the compounds Ba{sub 5}Sb{sub 3} and Ba{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}Cl, both with the Mn{sub 5}Si{sub 3} structure type, along with Ca{sub 5}Bi{sub 3} and Ca{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}F, both with the {beta}-Yb{sub 5}Sb{sub 3} structure type. These measurements were taken as a function of temperature using the four probe method on pressed polycrystalline pellets of the compounds. A sealed apparatus was developed for containing these air-sensitive compounds throughout the experiments. By a simple electron count, one extra electron in both Ba{sub 5}Sb{sub 3} and Ca{sub 5}Bi{sub 3} should occupy a conduction band, giving these compounds a metallic character. In the cases of Ba{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}Cl and Ca{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}F, the extra electron should bond to the halide, both filling the valence band and giving rise to semiconducting character. Ca{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}, Ca{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}F, and Ba{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}Cl were found to comply with the electron count prediction. Ba{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}, however, was found to be a semiconductor (E{sub g} = 0.30 eV) with a larger band gap than its corresponding chloride (E{sub g} = 0.09 eV).

  4. Increasing corrosion resistance of carbon steels by surface laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polsky, V. I.; Yakushin, V. L.; Dzhumaev, P. S.; Petrovsky, V. N.; Safonov, D. V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents results of investigation of the microstructure, elemental composition and corrosion resistance of the samples of low-alloy steel widely used in the engineering, after the application of laser cladding. The level of corrosion damage and the corrosion mechanism of cladded steel samples were established. The corrosion rate and installed discharge observed at the total destruction of cladding were obtained. The regularities of structure formation in the application of different powder compositions were obtained. The optimal powder composition that prevents corrosion of samples of low-carbon low-alloy steel was established.

  5. Increasing spectrum in antimicrobial resistance of Shigella isolates in Bangladesh: resistance to azithromycin and ceftriaxone and decreased susceptibility to ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mahbubur; Shoma, Shereen; Rashid, Harunur; El Arifeen, Shams; Baqui, A H; Siddique, A K; Nair, G B; Sack, D A

    2007-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of Shigella isolates in Bangladesh, during 2001-2002, was studied and compared with that of 1991-1992 to identify the changes in resistance patterns and trends. A significant increase in resistance to trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole (from 52% to 72%, p < 0.01) and nalidixic acid (from 19% to 51%, p < 0.01) was detected. High, but unchanged, resistance to tetracycline, ampicillin, and chloramphenicol, low resistance to mecillinam (resistance 3%, intermediate 3%), and to emergence of resistance to azithromycin (resistance 16%, intermediate 62%) and ceftriaxone/cefixime (2%) were detected in 2001-2002. Of 266 recent isolates, 63% were resistant to > or =3 anti-Shigella drugs (multidrug-resistant [MDR]) compared to 52% of 369 strains (p < 0.007) in 1991-1992. Of 154 isolates tested by E-test in 2001-2002, 71% were nalidixic acid-resistant (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] > or =32 microg/mL) and had 10-fold higher MIC90 (0.25 microg/mL) to ciprofloxacin than that of nalidixic acid-susceptible strains exhibiting decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility, which were detected as ciprofloxacin-susceptible and nalidixic acid-resistant by the disc-diffusion method. These strains were frequently associated with MDR traits. High modal MICs were observed to azithromycin (MIC 6 microg/mL) and nalidixic acid (MIC 128 micdrog/mL) and low to ceftriaxone (MIC 0.023 microg/mL). Conjugative R-plasmids-encoded extended-spectrum beta-lactamase was responsible for resistance to ceftriaxone/cefixime. The growing antimicrobial resistance of Shigella is worrying and mandates monitoring of resistance. Pivmecillinam or ciprofloxacin might be considered for treating shigellosis with caution. PMID:17985817

  6. Increasing Spectrum in Antimicrobial Resistance of Shigella Isolates in Bangladesh: Resistance to Azithromycin and Ceftriaxone and Decreased Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Mahbubur, Rahman; Shoma, Shereen; Rashid, Harunur; Arifeen, Shams El; Baqui, A.H.; Siddique, A.K.; Nair, G.B.; Sack, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of Shigella isolates in Bangladesh, during 2001-2002, was studied and compared with that of 1991-1992 to identify the changes in resistance patterns and trends. A significant increase in resistance to trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole (from 52% to 72%, p<0.01) and nalidixic acid (from 19% to 51%, p<0.01) was detected. High, but unchanged, resistance to tetracycline, ampicillin, and chloramphenicol, low resistance to mecillinam (resistance 3%, intermediate 3%), and to emergence of resistance to azithromycin (resistance 16%, intermediate 62%) and ceftriaxone/cefixime (2%) were detected in 2001-2002. Of 266 recent isolates, 63% were resistant to ≥3 anti-Shigella drugs (multidrug-resistant [MDR]) compared to 52% of 369 strains (p<0.007) in 1991-1992. Of 154 isolates tested by E-test in 2001-2002, 71% were nalidixic acid-resistant (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] ≥32 μg/mL) and had 10-fold higher MIC90 (0.25 μg/mL) to ciprofloxacin than that of nalidixic acid-susceptible strains exhibiting decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility, which were detected as ciprofloxacin-susceptible and nalidixic acid-resistant by the disc-diffusion method. These strains were frequently associated with MDR traits. High modal MICs were observed to azithromycin (MIC 6 μg/mL) and nalidixic acid (MIC 128 μg/mL) and low to ceftriaxone (MIC 0.023 μg/mL). Conjugative R-plasmids-encoded extended-spectrum ß-lactamase was responsible for resistance to ceftriaxone/cefixime. The growing antimicrobial resistance of Shigella is worrying and mandates monitoring of resistance. Pivmecillinam or ciprofloxacin might be considered for treating shigellosis with caution. PMID:17985817

  7. Measurement and modelling of moisture-electrical resistivity relationship of fine-grained unsaturated soils and electrical anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, A. J.; Chambers, J. E.; Wilkinson, P. B.; West, L. J.; Murphy, W.; Gunn, D.; Uhlemann, S.

    2016-01-01

    A methodology for developing resistivity-moisture content relationships of materials associated with a clayey landslide is presented. Key elements of the methodology include sample selection and preparation, laboratory measurement of resistivity with changing moisture content, and the derivation of models describing the relationship between resistivity and moisture content. Laboratory resistivity measurements show that the techniques utilised (samples and square array) have considerable potential as a means of electropetrophysical calibration of engineering soils and weak rock. Experimental electrical resistivity results show a hierarchy of values dependent on sample lithology, with silty clay exhibiting the lowest resistivities, followed by siltstones and sands, which return the highest resistivities. In addition, finer grained samples show a greater degree of anisotropy between measurement orientations than coarser grained samples. However, suitability of results in light of issues such as sample cracking and electrical conduction must be identified and accounted for if the results are to be accurately up-scaled to inverted model resistivity results. The existence of directional anisotropy makes model calibration curve selection more difficult due to variability in the range of measured laboratory resistances. The use of larger measurement array size means that experimental data will be more representative of bulk lithological properties. In addition, use of electrodes with a relatively high surface area (wide diameter) help maintain low contact resistances and repeat measurement error, relative to narrow electrodes. Variation exists between the fit of experimental data and petrophysical models. Model fit is best for clay-dominated samples but fits less well for sand-dominated samples. Waxman-Smits equation is appropriately applied in this investigation as all samples have considerable clay mineral content, as is shown in non-negligible CEC results. The

  8. Experimental and numerical modeling study of the electrical resistance of gas diffusion layer-less polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shiro; Shudo, Toshio

    2015-03-01

    The gas diffusion layer (GDL)-less fuel cell composed of a corrugated-mesh shows low flooding performance even in the high current density region, since the gases are supplied more uniformly to the catalyst layer (CL) compared with the conventional fuel cells that utilize GDLs. On the other hand, the internal electrical resistance of the GDL-less fuel cell is higher than that of the conventional fuel cell, because the corrugated-mesh and the underlying microporous layer (MPL) have a low contact area with point contacts. This can greatly increase the resistance at the interface between the corrugated-mesh and MPL as well as that between the MPL and CL, compared to the conventional fuel cell where GDL can make a good contact with the MPL. In this study, the conductivities and the contact resistances of each material in the GDL-less fuel cell were measured under various mechanical compression pressures, and a coupled mechanical-electric-electrochemical model was developed to investigate the effect of electrical resistance on the fuel cell performance. We found that our model can simulate the GDL-less fuel cell well and the electric resistance contributes significantly to the polarization performance in the GDL-less fuel cell.

  9. Novel experimental design for high pressure-high temperature electrical resistance measurements in a "Paris-Edinburgh" large volume press.

    PubMed

    Matityahu, Shlomi; Emuna, Moran; Yahel, Eyal; Makov, Guy; Greenberg, Yaron

    2015-04-01

    We present a novel experimental design for high sensitivity measurements of the electrical resistance of samples at high pressures (0-6 GPa) and high temperatures (300-1000 K) in a "Paris-Edinburgh" type large volume press. Uniquely, the electrical measurements are carried out directly on a small sample, thus greatly increasing the sensitivity of the measurement. The sensitivity to even minor changes in electrical resistance can be used to clearly identify phase transitions in material samples. Electrical resistance measurements are relatively simple and rapid to execute and the efficacy of the present experimental design is demonstrated by measuring the electrical resistance of Pb, Sn, and Bi across a wide domain of temperature-pressure phase space and employing it to identify the loci of phase transitions. Based on these results, the phase diagrams of these elements are reconstructed to high accuracy and found to be in excellent agreement with previous studies. In particular, by mapping the locations of several well-studied reference points in the phase diagram of Sn and Bi, it is demonstrated that a standard calibration exists for the temperature and pressure, thus eliminating the need for direct or indirect temperature and pressure measurements. The present technique will allow simple and accurate mapping of phase diagrams under extreme conditions and may be of particular importance in advancing studies of liquid state anomalies. PMID:25933866

  10. Novel experimental design for high pressure-high temperature electrical resistance measurements in a "Paris-Edinburgh" large volume press

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matityahu, Shlomi; Emuna, Moran; Yahel, Eyal; Makov, Guy; Greenberg, Yaron

    2015-04-01

    We present a novel experimental design for high sensitivity measurements of the electrical resistance of samples at high pressures (0-6 GPa) and high temperatures (300-1000 K) in a "Paris-Edinburgh" type large volume press. Uniquely, the electrical measurements are carried out directly on a small sample, thus greatly increasing the sensitivity of the measurement. The sensitivity to even minor changes in electrical resistance can be used to clearly identify phase transitions in material samples. Electrical resistance measurements are relatively simple and rapid to execute and the efficacy of the present experimental design is demonstrated by measuring the electrical resistance of Pb, Sn, and Bi across a wide domain of temperature-pressure phase space and employing it to identify the loci of phase transitions. Based on these results, the phase diagrams of these elements are reconstructed to high accuracy and found to be in excellent agreement with previous studies. In particular, by mapping the locations of several well-studied reference points in the phase diagram of Sn and Bi, it is demonstrated that a standard calibration exists for the temperature and pressure, thus eliminating the need for direct or indirect temperature and pressure measurements. The present technique will allow simple and accurate mapping of phase diagrams under extreme conditions and may be of particular importance in advancing studies of liquid state anomalies.

  11. Fabrication of intermetallic coatings for electrical insulation and corrosion resistance on high-temperature alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.-H.; Cho, W.D.

    1996-11-01

    Several intermetallic films were applied to high-temperature alloys (V alloys and 304, 316 stainless steels) to provide electrical insulation and corrosion resistance. Alloy grain growth at 1000 C for the V-5Cr-5Ti alloy was investigated to determine stability of the alloy substrate during coating formation by CVD or metallic vapor processes at 800-850 C. Film layers were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy and by electron-energy-dispersive and XRD analysis; they were also tested for electrical resistivity and corrosion resistance. Results elucidated the nature of the coatings, which provided both electrical insulation and high-temperature corrosion protection.

  12. Resistive memory effects in BiFeO3 single crystals controlled by transverse electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawachi, S.; Kuroe, H.; Ito, T.; Miyake, A.; Tokunaga, M.

    2016-04-01

    The effects of electric fields perpendicular to the c-axis of the trigonal cell in single crystals of BiFeO3 are investigated through magnetization and resistance measurements. Magnetization and resistance exhibit hysteretic changes under applied electric fields, which can be ascribed to the reorientation of the magnetoelectric domains. Samples are repetitively switched between high- and low-resistance states by changing the polarity of the applied electric fields over 20 000 cycles at room temperature. These results demonstrate the potential of BiFeO3 for use in non-volatile memory devices.

  13. Electrical Stimulation Improves Microbial Salinity Resistance and Organofluorine Removal in Bioelectrochemical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Huajun; Zhang, Xueqin; Guo, Kun; Vaiopoulou, Eleni; Shen, Dongsheng; Long, Yuyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Fed batch bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) based on electrical stimulation were used to treat p-fluoronitrobenzene (p-FNB) wastewater at high salinities. At a NaCl concentration of 40 g/liter, p-FNB was removed 100% in 96 h in the BES, whereas in the biotic control (BC) (absence of current), p-FNB removal was only 10%. By increasing NaCl concentrations from 0 g/liter to 40 g/liter, defluorination efficiency decreased around 40% in the BES, and in the BC it was completely ceased. p-FNB was mineralized by 30% in the BES and hardly in the BC. Microorganisms were able to store 3.8 and 0.7 times more K+ and Na+ intracellularly in the BES than in the BC. Following the same trend, the ratio of protein to soluble polysaccharide increased from 3.1 to 7.8 as the NaCl increased from 0 to 40 g/liter. Both trends raise speculation that an electrical stimulation drives microbial preference toward K+ and protein accumulation to tolerate salinity. These findings are in accordance with an enrichment of halophilic organisms in the BES. Halobacterium dominated in the BES by 56.8% at a NaCl concentration of 40 g/liter, while its abundance was found as low as 17.5% in the BC. These findings propose a new method of electrical stimulation to improve microbial salinity resistance. PMID:25819966

  14. Saturation of electrical resistivity of solid iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Pozzo, Monica; Alfè, Dario

    2016-01-01

    We report on the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity of solid iron at high pressure, up to and including conditions likely to be found at the centre of the Earth. We have extended some of the calculations of the resistivities of pure solid iron we recently performed at Earth's core conditions (Pozzo et al. in Earth Planet Sci Lett 393:159-164, 2014) to lower temperature. We show that at low temperature the resistivity increases linearly with temperature, and saturates at high temperature. This saturation effect is well known as the Mott-Ioffe-Regel limit in metals, but has been largely ignored to estimate the resistivity of iron at Earth's core conditions. Recent experiments (Gomi et al. in Phys Earth Planet Int 224:88-103, 2013) coupled new high pressure data and saturation to predict the resitivity of iron and iron alloys at Earth's core conditions, and reported values up to three times lower than previous estimates, confirming recent first principles calculations (de Koker et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci 109:4070-4073, 2012; Pozzo et al. in Nature 485:355-358, 2012, Phys Rev B 87:014110-10, 2013, Earth Planet Sci Lett 393:159-164, 2014; Davies et al. in Nat Geosci 8:678-685, 2015). The present results support the saturation effect idea. PMID:27026948

  15. A numerical study of the influence of interconnected conductive paths in electrically resistive rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandolesi, E.; Moorkamp, M.; Jones, A. G.

    2013-12-01

    Several electromagnetic (EM) geophysical methods focus on the EM properties of rocks and sediments to determine a reliable image of the subsurface, while the same electromagnetic properties are measured in the laboratory with a wide range of instruments and techniques. None of these measurements return an unequivocal result. The hypothesis related to the presence of interconnected pathways of electrically conductive materials in resistive hosts has been studied with increasing interest in recent years, and the comprehension of phenomena that scale from the microstructures of the rocks up to field electrical conductivity measurements represents the boundary that prevents the direct comparison between laboratory data and field data. In recent years some numerical approaches have been investigated to understand the effects of interconnected pathways of conductors on field measurements, usually restricting the studies to direct current (DC) sources. Bearing in mind the time-variating nature of natural electromagnetic sources that take a role in field measurements, we numerically simulated the effects of such EM sources on the conductivity measured on the surface of a three-dimensional realistic body embedded in an uniform host by using electromagnetic induction equations. Since most real rocks are poor conductors, we modeled a two-phase mixture of rock and interconnected conductive elements (representing melts, saline fluids, sulphidic, carbonitic, or metallic sediments, etc.), randomly generated within the background host. We compared the electrical conductivity measured from a sample of randomly generated models with the electrical conductivity limits predicted by Hashin-Shtrikman bounds.

  16. Electrical Resistivity and Seismic Characterization of Submarine Groundwater Discharge in Long Bay, SC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viso, R. F.; McCoy, C.; Quafisi, D.; Gayes, P. T.

    2007-12-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) has been identified as a significant contributor of dissolved nutrients and contaminants to near-shore waters. Little is known, however, about geologic controls on the spatial distribution of SGD seeps. Discharge estimates are typically derived from geochemical tracers such as Rn-222. Such estimates of total fluxes over a given area do not consider the potential for spatial variability in discharge rates. Higher fluxes of chemically distinct SGD over smaller areas could have complex effects on localized water masses, ecosystems, and geological features. In an effort to assess the distribution of SGD, electrical resistivity and seismic surveys were conducted along the inner shelf of Long Bay, South Carolina during a series of cruises between October, 2005 and November 2006. In addition, basic bottom water quality parameters including dissolved oxygen, temperature, salinity, and pH were measured. Preliminary submarine groundwater flux estimates for northern Long Bay were also generated from measurements of Rn-222. The resistivity signal is highly variable along shore with several instances of elevated values suggesting presence of relatively fresher pore waters. In some cases, elevated resistivity measurements were spatially co-registered with seismically defined paleochannels extending across the shelf. Other areas of elevated resistivity values correlate with smaller discontinuities in seismic reflectors. A third category of resistivity anomalies does not correlate with seismically defined features. Overall, anomaly frequency and intensity decrease rapidly with increasing distance from shore. At distances > 1 km from shore, the resistivity signal is uniform in space and low in magnitude, implying less of a fresh water contribution. Water quality parameters are variable along shore and may reflect the influence of SGD. Rn-derived fluxes suggest SGD equivalent to as much as 50% of riverine discharge into Long Bay. Ongoing work is

  17. Use of alveolar cell monolayers of varying electrical resistance to measure pulmonary peptide transport.

    PubMed

    Dodoo, A N; Bansal, S S; Barlow, D J; Bennet, F; Hider, R C; Lansley, A B; Lawrence, M J; Marriott, C

    2000-02-01

    The apparent permeability coefficient (P(app)) of two fluorescently tagged model hydrophilic peptides, acXASNH(2) and acXAS(GAS)(7)NH(2), and (14)C-mannitol across monolayers of cultured rat alveolar epithelial cells of varying transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) has been examined. In line with their design features, the peptides were not degraded under the conditions of the test. Furthermore, no concentration dependence of transport of the tripeptide acXASNH(2) was observed over the concentration range studied, nor was any directional transport seen for either of the model peptides, indicating that under the conditions of the test they were not substrates for any transporters or efflux pumps. From the hydrophilic nature of the peptides (as assessed by their log P), and their inverse dependence of transport with molecular weight and TER, it was assumed that the peptides were transported across the cell monolayer passively via the paracellular route. The observed P(app) for the transport of (14)C-mannitol and the peptides across rat alveolar epithelial cell monolayers were found to be inversely (though not linearly) related to the measured TER and could be well-modeled assuming the presence of two populations of "pores" in the cell monolayer, namely, cylindrical pores of diameter 1.5 nm and large pores of diameter 20 nm. The relative populations of the two types of pores varied with the TER of the monolayer, with the number of large pores decreasing with an increase in TER (and the number of small pores taken as fixed). These results suggest that if the cell monolayer is well characterized with respect to the passage of a range of probe molecules across monolayers of varying electrical resistance, it should be possible to predict the P(app) of any hydrophilic peptide or drug crossing the membrane by the paracellular route at any desired TER using a monolayer of any electrical resistance, above a minimum value. PMID:10688751

  18. Fitness Cost of Resistance to Bt Cotton Linked with Increased Gossypol Content in Pink Bollworm Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jennifer L.; Ellers-Kirk, Christa; Orth, Robert G.; Gassmann, Aaron J.; Head, Graham; Tabashnik, Bruce E.; Carrière, Yves

    2011-01-01

    Fitness costs of resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crops occur in the absence of Bt toxins, when individuals with resistance alleles are less fit than individuals without resistance alleles. As costs of Bt resistance are common, refuges of non-Bt host plants can delay resistance not only by providing susceptible individuals to mate with resistant individuals, but also by selecting against resistance. Because costs typically vary across host plants, refuges with host plants that magnify costs or make them less recessive could enhance resistance management. Limited understanding of the physiological mechanisms causing fitness costs, however, hampers attempts to increase costs. In several major cotton pests including pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella), resistance to Cry1Ac cotton is associated with mutations altering cadherin proteins that bind this toxin in susceptible larvae. Here we report that the concentration of gossypol, a cotton defensive chemical, was higher in pink bollworm larvae with cadherin resistance alleles than in larvae lacking such alleles. Adding gossypol to the larval diet decreased larval weight and survival, and increased the fitness cost affecting larval growth, but not survival. Across cadherin genotypes, the cost affecting larval growth increased as the gossypol concentration of larvae increased. These results suggest that increased accumulation of plant defensive chemicals may contribute to fitness costs associated with resistance to Bt toxins. PMID:21738799

  19. Engineering of Bacillus subtilis 168 for increased nisin resistance.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Mette E; Wangari, Romilda; Hansen, Egon B; Mijakovic, Ivan; Jensen, Peter R

    2009-11-01

    Nisin is a natural bacteriocin produced commercially by Lactococcus lactis and widely used in the food industry as a preservative because of its broad host spectrum. Despite the low productivity and troublesome fermentation of L. lactis, no alternative cost-effective host has yet been found. Bacillus subtilis had been suggested as a potential host for the biosynthesis of nisin but was discarded due to its sensitivity to the lethal action of nisin. In this study, we have reevaluated the potential of B. subtilis as a host organism for the heterologous production of nisin. We applied transcriptome and proteome analyses of B. subtilis and identified eight genes upregulated in the presence of nisin. We demonstrated that the overexpression of some of these genes boosts the natural defenses of B. subtilis, which allows it to sustain higher levels of nisin in the medium. We also attempted to overcome the nisin sensitivity of B. subtilis by introducing the nisin resistance genes nisFEG and nisI from L. lactis under the control of a synthetic promoter library. PMID:19749059

  20. Composite Materials with Distinctive Behaviors under High Electric Fields: I - Material Switches to 'High Resistive' State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javadi, H.

    1994-01-01

    Electrically conductive silver filled epoxy ECF-563 preform, sandwiched between gold contact pads exhibits intermittent current-voltage characteristics with switching to 'high resistive' state under applied bias voltage.

  1. Temperature dependence of electrical resistivity measurements: A useful infiltration tracer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pidlisecky, A.; Knight, R.

    2008-12-01

    As part of an ongoing monitoring project, three resistivity probes were installed to a depth of 2m below a seasonal infiltration pond on the central coast of California. The probes were instrumented with 35 resistivity electrodes and 5 temperature loggers. They were designed to monitor the change in bulk resistivity beneath the pond during infiltration. The pond was filled in January 2008 and resistivity measurements were made on each probe every hour for a period of 4 months. In addition to changes in bulk resistivity, we observed diurnal fluctuations in the apparent resistivity signal due to the temperature dependence of in-situ resistivity. By processing the resistivity data, using a band pass filter, we can recover a time-depth section of pseudo- temperature data. We refer to these data as pseudo-temperature because they can be treated as a surrogate for temperature in terms of phase but not amplitude. These pseudo-temperature sections can be used as a tracer to calculate 1D infiltration rates. When compared with in-situ temperature loggers, we see good agreement. Moreover, we note that the resistivity fluctuations correspond to temperature variations that are less than one degree Celsius. The use of the temperature dependence of measured resistivity is a promising field technique. The pseudo-temperature data may prove more robust than using traditional temperature probes given that the larger sampling volume of the resistivity measurement will limit the influence local flow path perturbations caused by probe installation. Future research will involve extending this approach to 2D tomography in hopes of providing us with a technique for obtaining spatially exhaustive estimates of near-surface infiltration rates.

  2. Modelling the electrical resistivity response to CO2 plumes generated in a laboratory, cylindrical sandbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, T.; Maineult, A. J.; Binley, A.; Vieira, C.; Zamora, M.

    2012-12-01

    CO2 capture and storage into deep geological formations is one of the main solutions proposed to reduce the concentration of anthropic CO2 in the atmosphere. The monitoring of injection sites is a crucial issue to assess for the long term viability of CO2 storage. With the intention of detecting potential leakages, we are investigating the possibility of using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) techniques to detect CO2 transfers in the shallow sub-surface. ERT measurements were performed during a CO2 injection in a cylindrical tank filled with Fontainebleau sand and saturated with water. Several measurements protocols were tested. The inversion of the resistances measured with the software R3T (Binley and Kemna (2005)) clearly showed that the CO2 injection induces significant changes in the resistivity distribution of the medium, and that ERT has a promising potential for the detection and survey of CO2 transfers through unconsolidated saturated media. We modeled this experiment using Matlab by building a 3D cellular automaton that describes the CO2 spreading, following the geometric and stochastic approach described by Selker et al. (2007). The CO2 circulation is described as independents, circular and continuous gas channels whose horizontal spread depends on a Gaussian probability law. From the channel distribution we define the corresponding gas concentration distribution and calculate the resistivity of the medium by applying Archie's law for unsaturated conditions. The forward modelling was performed with the software R3T to convert the resistivity distribution into resistances values, each corresponding to one of the electrode arrays used in the experimental measurements. Modelled and measured resistances show a good correlation, except for the electrode arrays located at the top or the bottom of the tank. We improved the precision of the model by considering the effects due to CO2 dissolution in the water which increases the conductivity of the

  3. Effects of Contact Resistance on Electrical Conductivity Measurements of SiC-Based Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, Gerald E.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Henager, Charles H.

    2012-04-17

    A combination 2/4-probe method was used to measure electrical resistances across a pure, monolithic CVD-SiC disc sample with contact resistance at the SiC/metallic electrode interfaces. By comparison of the almost simultaneous 2/4-probe measurements, the specific contact resistance and its temperature dependence were determined for two types (sputtered gold and porous nickel) electrodes from RT to ~700°C. The specific contact resistance values (Rc) behaved similarly for each type of metallic electrode: Rc >~1000 Ω-cm2 at RT, decreasing continuously to ~1-10 Ω-cm2 at 700°C. The temperature dependence of the inverse Rc indicated thermally activated electrical conduction across the SiC/metallic interface with an apparent activation energy of ~0.3 eV. For the flow channel insert application in a fusion reactor blanket, contact resistance potentially could reduce the transverse electrical conductivity by ~1/2.

  4. Modeling the electrical resistivity of deformation processed metal-metal composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Liang; Anderson, Iver; Riedemann, Trevor; Russell, Alan

    2014-09-01

    Deformation processed metal–metal (matrix–reinforcement) composites (DMMCs) are high-strength, high-conductivity in situ composites produced by severe plastic deformation. The electrical resistivity of DMMCs is rarely investigated mechanistically and tends to be slightly higher than the rule-of-mixtures prediction. In this paper, we analyze several possible physical mechanisms (i.e. phonons, interfaces, mutual solution, grain boundaries, dislocations) responsible for the electrical resistivity of DMMC systems and how these mechanisms could be affected by processing conditions (i.e. temperature, deformation processing). As an innovation, we identified and assembled the major scattering mechanisms for specific DMMC systems and modeled their electrical resistivity in combination. From this analysis, it appears that filament coarsening rather than dislocation annihilation is primarily responsible for the resistivity drop observed in these materials after annealing and that grain boundary scattering contributes to the resistivity at least at the same magnitude as does interface scattering.

  5. Melatonin overcomes resistance to clofarabine in two leukemic cell lines by increased expression of deoxycytidine kinase.

    PubMed

    Yamanishi, Miho; Narazaki, Hidehiko; Asano, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    Drug resistance remains a serious problem in leukemia therapy. Among newly developed nucleoside antimetabolites, clofarabine has broad cytotoxic activity showing therapeutic promise and is currently approved for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. To investigate the mechanisms responsible for clofarabine resistance, we established two clofarabine-resistant lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines from parental lines. To elucidate the mechanisms against clofarabine resistance in two newly established clofarabine-resistant cell lines, we measured the expression of export pumps multidrug resistance protein 1, multidrug resistance-associated protein 1, and ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2. There were no differences in the expression between clofarabine-sensitive and -resistant cell lines. Next, we determined expression of deoxycytidine kinase (dCK), which phosphorylates clofarabine to exert cytotoxicity, in clofarabine-sensitive and -resistant cells. Clofarabine-resistant cells showed significantly decreased expression of dCK RNA when compared with sensitive cells. To elucidate the mechanisms of decreased dCK expression in clofarabine-resistant cells, we analyzed the methylation status of CpG islands of the dCK promoter and found no differences in methylation status between clofarabine-sensitive and -resistant cells. Next, we measured the acetylation status of histone and found that total histone acetylation, and histone H3 and H4 acetylation on chromatin immunoprecipitation assay were significantly decreased in resistant cells. Melatonin is an indolamine that functions in the regulation of chronobiological rhythms to exert cytotoxic effects. We examined the effects of melatonin in clofarabine-resistant cells and found that melatonin treatment led to significantly increased cytotoxicity with clofarabine in resistant cells via increased acetylation. Melatonin may be a useful candidate for overcoming clofarabine resistance in two newly established clofarabine

  6. Detection of Underground Cavities in a Karst Area using an Electrical Resistivity Tomography Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, M.; Park, S.; Kim, C.

    2012-12-01

    The construction of large-scale facilities is inevitably increasing in the areas with weak rock mass, such as karst areas due to rapidly growing needs in modern cities for infrastructure projects. Surface geophysical methods and boring method usually carry out the investigation of the spatial distribution and shapes of underground cavities formed in the karst subsidence area, but they have some restrictions in areas where buildings and facilities are already situated. Therefore, the application of other geophysical techniques with higher resolution and precise images is required. The study area, located in Muan-gun, Jeollanam-do in the south-western part of Korea, is a karst area where ground subsidence caused by limestone cavities frequently occurs. In addition, the Kwangju fault passes through this area with many fault-fractured zones is developed. These fault-fractured zones produce clay and cause limestone dissolution due to groundwater flow within the limestone formation, resulting in developing limestone cavities. More reliable geophysical method to investigate the underground structures is necessary to apply. Recently, the electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) technique has been increasingly applied to the underground cavity detection filled with groundwater and/or clays. In this study, we conducted an electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in order to investigate the spatial distribution and shapes of underground cavities developed in the karst area. First, we conducting a numerical modeling of ERT for various electrical arrays on two models with similar to the field survey conditions. The first numerical model is a sinkhole-type structure such as collapse of upper layer with weak zones, and the second model is a platy vein-type structure with clustered cavity of low resistivity such as inclined fault fractures. The electrical arrays used in the numerical modeling include pole-pole, dipole-dipole, pole-dipole, and dipole-pole arrays. The results of the

  7. Specific features in the change of electrical resistivity of carbon nanocomposites based on nanodiamonds under neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeev, S. K.; Konopleva, R. F.; Chekanov, V. A.; Korchagina, S. B.; Belyaev, S. P.; Golosovskii, I. V.; Denisov, I. A.; Belobrov, P. I.

    2013-07-01

    The physical properties of bulk composite materials consisting of nanodiamond, pyrolytic carbon, and nanopores were investigated. Samples were irradiated in a channel of the reactor by fast neutrons ( E > 0.5MeV) in ampoules with helium and in an aqueous medium. The dependences of the electrical transport properties of materials with different compositions on the dose of irradiation with fast neutrons were studied. A nonmonotonic change in the electrical resistivity with an increase in the neutron fluence was revealed. Possible explanations were offered for the observed dependence of the electrical resistivity on the neutron fluence, in particular, those related to the physical processes occurring in surface states of the three-phase system of the nanocomposite.

  8. Electrical resistivity of CuAlMo thin films grown at room temperature by dc magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkett, Martin; Penlington, Roger

    2016-07-01

    We report on the thickness dependence of electrical resistivity of CuAlMo films grown by dc magnetron sputtering on glass substrates at room temperature. The electrical resistance of the films was monitored in situ during their growth in the thickness range 10–1000 nm. By theoretically modelling the evolution of resistivity during growth we were able to gain an insight into the dominant electrical conduction mechanisms with increasing film thickness. For thicknesses in the range 10–25 nm the electrical resistivity is found to be a function of the film surface roughness and is well described by Namba’s model. For thicknesses of 25–40 nm the experimental data was most accurately fitted using the Mayadas and Shatkes model which accounts for grain boundary scattering of the conduction electrons. Beyond 40 nm, the thickness of the film was found to be the controlling factor and the Fuchs–Sonheimer (FS) model was used to fit the experimental data, with diffuse scattering of the conduction electrons at the two film surfaces. By combining the Fuchs and Namba (FN) models a suitable correlation between theoretical and experimental resistivity can be achieved across the full CuAlMo film thickness range of 10–1000 nm. The irreversibility of resistance for films of thickness >200 nm, which demonstrated bulk conductivity, was measured to be less than 0.03% following subjection to temperature cycles of ‑55 and +125 °C and the temperature co-efficient of resistance was less than ±15 ppm °C‑1.

  9. Composites for Increased Wear Resistance: Current Achievements and Future Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    The various ways in which reductions in wear and/or friction can be achieved by the use of composite materials are reviewed. Reinforced plastics are emphasized and it is shown that fillers and fibers reduce wear via several mechanisms additional to their role of increasing overall mechanical strength, preferential transfer, counter face abrasion, preferential load support, or third-body formation on either the composite or its counterface. Examples are given from recent work on thin layer composites of the type widely used as dry bearings in aircraft flight control mechanisms. Developments in metal based composites and carbon-carbon composites for high energy brakes are discussed. The aspects which could benefit by increased fundamental understanding identified and the types of composites which appear to have greatest potential for further growth are indicated.

  10. Research on change of phase transformation temperatures and electrical resistance triggered by heat treatment of alloy from Cu-Mn system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakaya, N.; Aldirmaz, E.

    2016-05-01

    This paper is aimed at studying influence of various heat treatments on transformation temperatures and electrical resistance properties of alloys from binary Cu-Mn system. It was noticed that with an increase in sample's grain size, transformation temperatures also increased. The activation energies of samples were calculated according to Kissinger and Augis-Bennett. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis measurements were used to investigate phase transformations and kinetic parameters. The electrical values of resistance of alloy were investigated at different temperatures. The resistance as a function of quenching temperature showed a decrease. Depending on quenching techniques, Cu-Mn alloy can display different product phases such as parent phase and precipitation.

  11. Electrical Resistivity of Natural Diamond and Diamond Films Between Room Temperature and 1200 C: Status Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, Jan W.; Zoltan, L. D.

    1993-01-01

    The electrical resistivity of diamond films has been measured between room temperature and 1200 C. The films were grown by either microwave Plasma CVD or combustion flame at three different places. The resistivities of the current films are compared to those measured for both natural IIa diamond and films grown only one to two years ago.

  12. Silicone oil contamination and electrical contact resistance degradation of low-force gold contacts.

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, Michael Thomas; Dickrell, Daniel John, III

    2006-02-01

    Hot-switched low-force gold electrical contact testing was performed using a nanomechanical test apparatus to ascertain the sensitivity of simulated microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) contact to silicone oil contamination. The observed cyclic contact resistance degradation was dependent on both closure rate and noncontact applied voltage. The decomposition of silicone oil from electrical arcing was hypothesized as the degradation mechanism.

  13. Electrical resistance of human soft tissue sarcomas: an ex vivo study on surgical specimens.

    PubMed

    Campana, L G; Cesari, M; Dughiero, F; Forzan, M; Rastrelli, M; Rossi, C R; Sieni, E; Tosi, A L

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a study about electrical resistance, which using fixed electrode geometry could be correlated to the tissue resistivity, of different histological types of human soft tissue sarcomas measured during electroporation. The same voltage pulse sequence was applied to the tumor mass shortly after surgical resection by means of a voltage pulse generator currently used in clinical practice for electrochemotherapy that uses reversible electroporation. The voltage pulses were applied by means of a standard hexagonal electrode composed by seven, 20-mm-long equispaced needles. Irrespective of tumor size, the electrode applies electric pulses to the same volume of tissue. The resistance value was computed from the voltage and current recorded by the pulse generator, and it was correlated with the histological characteristics of the tumor tissue which was assessed by a dedicated pathologist. Some differences in resistance values, which could be correlated to a difference in tissue resistivity, were noticed according to sarcoma histotype. Lipomatous tumors (i.e., those rich in adipose tissue) displayed the highest resistance values (up to 1700 Ω), whereas in the other soft tissue sarcomas, such as those originating from muscle, nerve sheath, or fibrous tissue, the electrical resistance measured was between 40 and 110 Ω. A variability in resistance was found also within the same histotype. Among lipomatous tumors, the presence of myxoid tissue between adipocytes reduced the electrical resistance (e.g., 50-100 Ω). This work represents the first step in order to explore the difference in tissue electrical properties of STS. These results may be used to verify whether tuning electric field intensity according to the specific STS histotype could improve tissue electroporation and ultimately treatment efficacy. PMID:26324245

  14. Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques

    DOEpatents

    Daily, W.D.; Laine, D.L.; Laine, E.F.

    1997-08-26

    Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid though the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution. 6 figs.

  15. Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques

    DOEpatents

    Daily, William D.; Laine, Daren L.; Laine, Edwin F.

    2001-01-01

    Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner or between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid through the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution.

  16. Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques

    DOEpatents

    Daily, William D.; Laine, Daren L.; Laine, Edwin F.

    1997-01-01

    Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid though the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution.

  17. Modeling the electrical resistance of gold film conductors on uniaxially stretched elastomeric substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenzhe; Görrn, Patrick; Wagner, Sigurd

    2011-05-01

    The electrical resistance of gold film conductors on polydimethyl siloxane substrates at stages of uniaxial stretching is measured and modeled. The surface area of a gold conductor is assumed constant during stretching so that the exposed substrate takes up all strain. Sheet resistances are calculated from frames of scanning electron micrographs by numerically solving for the electrical potentials of all pixels in a frame. These sheet resistances agree sufficiently well with values measured on the same conductors to give credence to the model of a stretchable network of gold links defined by microcracks.

  18. Percolation of gallium dominates the electrical resistance of focused ion beam deposited metals

    SciTech Connect

    Faraby, H.; DiBattista, M.; Bandaru, P. R.

    2014-04-28

    Metal deposition through focused ion beam (FIB) based systems is thought to result in material composed of the primary metal from the metallo-organic precursor in addition to carbon, oxygen, and gallium. We determined, through electrical resistance and chemical composition measurements on a wide range of FIB deposited platinum and tungsten lines, that the gallium ion (Ga{sup +}) concentration in the metal lines plays the dominant role in controlling the electrical resistivity. Effective medium theory, based on McLachlan's formalisms, was used to describe the relationship between the Ga{sup +} concentration and the corresponding resistivity.

  19. Electrical Resistance of Ceramic Matrix Composites for Damage Detection and Life-Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig; Morscher, Gregory N.; Xia, Zhenhai

    2008-01-01

    The electric resistance of woven SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites were measured under tensile loading conditions. The results show that the electrical resistance is closely related to damage and that real-time information about the damage state can be obtained through monitoring of the resistance. Such self-sensing capability provides the possibility of on-board/in-situ damage detection or inspection of a component during "down time". The correlation of damage with appropriate failure mechanism can then be applied to accurate life prediction for high-temperature ceramic matrix composites.

  20. Oxidation Resistant, Cr Retaining, Electrically Conductive Coatings on Metallic Alloys for SOFC Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Gorokhovsky

    2008-03-31

    This report describes significant results from an on-going, collaborative effort to enable the use of inexpensive metallic alloys as interconnects in planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) through the use of advanced coating technologies. Arcomac Surface Engineering, LLC, under the leadership of Dr. Vladimir Gorokhovsky, is investigating filtered-arc and filtered-arc plasma-assisted hybrid coating deposition technologies to promote oxidation resistance, eliminate Cr volatility, and stabilize the electrical conductivity of both standard and specialty steel alloys of interest for SOFC metallic interconnect (IC) applications. Arcomac has successfully developed technologies and processes to deposit coatings with excellent adhesion, which have demonstrated a substantial increase in high temperature oxidation resistance, stabilization of low Area Specific Resistance values and significantly decrease Cr volatility. An extensive matrix of deposition processes, coating compositions and architectures was evaluated. Technical performance of coated and uncoated sample coupons during exposures to SOFC interconnect-relevant conditions is discussed, and promising future directions are considered. Cost analyses have been prepared based on assessment of plasma processing parameters, which demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed surface engineering process for SOFC metallic IC applications.

  1. Electrical resistance tomography for monitoring the infiltration of water into a pavement section

    SciTech Connect

    Buettner, M.; Daily, B.; Ramirez, A.

    1997-07-03

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) was used to follow the infiltration of water into pavement section at the UC Berkeley Richmond Field Station. A volume of pavement 1m square and 1.29 m deep was sampled by an ERT array consisting of electrodes in 9 drilled holes plus 8 surface electrodes. The data were collected using a computer controlled data acquisition system capable of collecting a full data set in under 1 hour, allowing for nearly real time sampling of the infiltration. The infiltration was conducted in two phases. During the first phase, water was introduced into the asphalt-concrete (AC) layers at a slow rate of about 8 ml per hour for a period of about 6 days. In the second phase, water was introduced into the asphalt-treated-permeable base (ATPB) layer at a more rapid rate of about 100 ml/h for about 2 days. The ERT images show that water introduced into the upper AC layers shows up as a decrease in resistivity which grows with time. The images also appear to show that when water moves into the layers below the ATPB, the resistivity increases; an unexpected result. There are some indications that the water moved laterally as well as down into the deeper ATPB and the aggregate base. The images also show that when water is introduced directly into the ATPB and aggregate layer, the water moves into the the underlying materials much more quickly.

  2. Resistance and internal electric field in cloud-to-ground lightning channel

    SciTech Connect

    Cen, Jianyong; Yuan, Ping Xue, Simin; Wang, Xuejuan

    2015-02-02

    Cloud-to-ground lightning with six return strokes has been recorded by slitless spectrograph and the system of fast antenna and slow antenna. The physical parameters of the discharge channel have been obtained based on the combination of spectra and synchronous radiated electric field. The resistance and internal electric field of the channel are studied as the focus in this paper. The results show that the resistances per unit length of the lightning channel are in the order of 10{sup −2}–10{sup −1 }Ω/m and the internal electric field strengths are in the order of 10{sup 3 }V/m.

  3. Electrical resistance of CNT-PEEK composites under compression at different temperatures

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Electrically conductive polymers reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have generated a great deal of scientific and industrial interest in the last few years. Advanced thermoplastic composites made of three different weight percentages (8%, 9%, and 10%) of multiwalled CNTs and polyether ether ketone (PEEK) were prepared by shear mixing process. The temperature- and pressure-dependent electrical resistance of these CNT-PEEK composites have been studied and presented in this paper. It has been found that electrical resistance decreases significantly with the application of heat and pressure. PMID:21711952

  4. Effect of fast neutrons on the electric resistivity of porcelain for application in fast-neutron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Fadel, M.A.; Abdel-Fattah, W.I.; Abdulla, A.A.; Kadum, A.A.

    1982-11-01

    The electric resistivity (rho) of quartz and alumina porcelain was measured before and after irradiation with different fluences (phi) of fission neutrons in the range of 10/sup 7/-10/sup 12/ n/cm/sup 2/ and at different temperatures in the range of 20-90/sup 0/C. The results showed that the activation energy (..delta..E) for quartz porcelain decreased progressively with the increase of phi, while it remained approximately constant for alumina porcelain. Moreover, the electric resistivity of alumina porcelain decreased with the increase of phi. However, there were no measureable effects of /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. doses up to 0.6 Mrad on the electric resistivities of the samples. An empirical formula for calculating phi from the measured value of ..delta..E for quartz porcelain was achieved. A semiempirical formula for calculating phi for the resistivity data for the alumina porcelain is given. The effect of neutron energies on the induced changes in (rho) for the alumina porcelain was investigated. Additionally, the effect of storage at 50/sup 0/C for periods up to 3 weeks on these changes were also measured.

  5. Assessment of contamination by intensive cattle activity through electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainato, Claudia M.; Losinno, Beatriz N.; Malleville, Horacio J.

    2012-01-01

    The intensive animal production is considered highly risky for groundwater and soil because of high mobility of some contaminants from animal wastes. The aim of this work was to obtain an electrical conductivity image of unsaturated and saturated zones at a feedlot (cattle feeding field) at the surroundings of Buenos Aires city (Argentina) in order to detect the most critical sectors of the field, with regard to contamination by animal wastes. Dipole-dipole electrical soundings (electrical resistivity tomography) were performed at the corral zone and the surroundings. 2D and 3D models of conductivity were obtained. Even if there is a calcareous plate below some parts of the corrals and soil compaction is high, vertical infiltration or subsurface runoff may have occurred since these sites, with high animal charge, show soil conductivities higher than the surroundings. The models showed higher conductivities of saturated zone increasing in the direction of groundwater flow. These results were taken into account for further designs of soil and groundwater sampling. Groundwater conductivity was three times greater downgradient from the corrals with high concentrations of nitrates and phosphorous. A zone of high conductivity was found below a small channel of effluents from the corrals.

  6. Cross-section electrical resistance tomography of La Soufrière of Guadeloupe lava dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesparre, Nolwenn; Grychtol, Bartłomiej; Gibert, Dominique; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Adler, Andy

    2014-06-01

    The electrical resistivity distribution at the base of La Soufrière of Guadeloupe lava dome is reconstructed by using transmission electrical resistivity data obtained by injecting an electrical current between two electrodes located on opposite sides of the volcano. Several pairs of injection electrodes are used in order to constitute a data set spanning the whole range of azimuths, and the electrical potential is measured along a cable covering an angular sector of ≈120° along the basis of the dome. The data are inverted to perform a slice electrical resistivity tomography (SERT) with specific functions implemented in the EIDORS open source package dedicated to electrical impedance tomography applied to medicine and geophysics. The resulting image shows the presence of highly conductive regions separated by resistive ridges. The conductive regions correspond to unconsolidated material saturated by hydrothermal fluids. Two of them are associated with partial flank collapses and may represent large reservoirs that could have played an important role during past eruptive events. The resistive ridges may represent massive andesite and are expected to constitute hydraulic barriers.

  7. Electrical resistivity tomography at the search of groundwater near Anapa town in the south of Russia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvon, Dina; Vladimir, Shevnin; Boris, Nikulin; Albert, Ryjov; Alexey, Skobelev

    2013-04-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography at the search of groundwater near Anapa town in the south of Russia. Kvon D. A.(1)*, Shevnin V.A.(1), Nikulin B. A.(1), Ryjov A. A.(2), Skobelev A. O.(1) (1)Geophysical dept., Faculty of Geology, Moscow state university; (2)VSEGINGEO Due to acute shortage of fresh drinking water near Anapa town (not far from the Black Sea), geophysical investigations were performed for searching and mapping aquifers in the area, where, according to rare wells exist probability to find fresh underground water. Geophysical explorations were carried out by Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method and water resistivity measurements. The resistivity of fresh groundwater is 15 Ohm.m, its salinity is 0.4 g/l. The structure of the area has been obtained by previous geological and hydrogeological studies and boreholes drilling. Geological structure of the area consists of two parts: the upper part of cross-section presented by loose lacustrine-alluvial sediments of Upper Pleistocene - Holocene, the lower part presented by hard rocs of carbonate-flysch formation of Upper Cretaceous age consisted of marl and limestone. Prospective areas to find underground water are: water-bearing horizon of upper Pleistocene-Holocene sediments, which is presented by gravel layer (base layer of modern lacustrine-alluvial sediments), and fractured zones in hard rocks of the carbonate-flysch formation of Maastricht age (Supseh formation). Analysis of rocks' resistivity obtained from Electrical resistivity tomography followed by calculation of rock resistivity on known petrophysical parameters (in Petrowin program created by A. A. Ryjov) [Shevnin et al., 2007]. The calculation showed that there is low clay content in carbonate rocks of the studied area, and the rock is limestone, not marl. Measurement of rock samples with X-ray radiometric method showed high calcium content (30-35%) or 75-87.5% limestone. This fact shows that flysch formation of the area is mainly

  8. Design and performance of low-thermal-resistance, high-electrical-isolation heat intercept connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, R. C.; Gonczy, J. D.; Phelan, P. E.; Nicol, T. H.

    Electrical conductors often require the removal of heat produced by normal operation. The heat can be removed by mechanical connection of the conductor to a refrigeration source. Such connections require both effective heat removal (low thermal resistance) and effective electrical isolation (high electrical resistance and high dielectric strength). Fabrication of these connections should be straightforward, and performance must be reliable and independent of operating temperature. The connection method described here involves clamping (by thermal interference fit) an electrically insulating cylinder between an outer metallic ring and an inner metallic disc. Material candidates for insulating cylinders include composites, e.g. epoxy/fibreglass, and ceramics, e.g. alumina. Design factors, including geometry, materials and thermal contact resistance are discussed. The design, construction experience and performance measurements of a heat intercept connection in a high-temperature superconducting lead assembly is presented.

  9. Monitoring Soil Hydraulic and Thermal Properties using Coupled Inversion of Time-lapse Temperature and Electrical Resistance Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, A. P.; Dafflon, B.; Hubbard, S. S.; Kowalsky, M. B.; Tokunaga, T. K.; Faybishenko, B.; Long, P.

    2014-12-01

    Evaluation of spatiotemporal dynamics of heat transport and water flow in terrestrial environments is essential for understanding hydrological and biogeochemical processes. Electrical resistance tomography has been increasingly well used for monitoring subsurface hydrological processes and estimating soil hydraulic properties through coupled hydrogeophysical inversion. However, electrical resistivity depends on a variety of factors such as temperature, which may limit the accuracy of hydrogeophysical inversion. The main objective of this study is to develop a hydrogeophysical inversion framework to enable the incorporation of nonisothermal processes into the hydrogeophysical inversion procedure, and use of this procedure to investigate the effect of hydrological controls on biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial environments. We developed the coupled hydro-thermal-geophysical inversion approach, using the iTOUGH2 framework. In this framework, the heat transport and water flow are simultaneously modeled with TOUGH2 code, which effectively accounts for the multiphase, multi-component and nonisothermal flow in porous media. A flexible approach is used to incorporate petrophysical relationships and uncertainty to link soil moisture and temperature with the electrical resistivity. The developed approach was applied to both synthetic and field case studies. At the DOE subsurface biogeochemistry field site located near Rifle CO, seasonal snowmelt delivers a hydrological pulse to the system, which in turn influences the cycles of nitrogen, carbon and other critical elements. Using the new approach, we carried out numerical inversion of electrical resistance data collected along a 100 m transect at the Rifle site, and compared the results with field investigations of the soil, vadose zone, including the capillary fringe, and groundwater, as well as temperature and tensiometer measurements. Preliminary results show the importance of accounting for nonisothermal conditions to

  10. Results of Electrical Resistivity Data Collected near the Town of Guernsey, Platte County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDougal, Robert R.; Abraham, Jared D.; Bisdorf, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a study to investigate subsurface geologic conditions as they relate to ground-water flow in an abandoned landfill near the town of Guernsey, Wyoming, geophysical direct current (DC) resistivity data were collected. Eight vertical resistivity soundings and eight horizontal resistivity profiles were made using single channel and multi-channel DC instruments. Data collected in the field were converted from apparent resistivity to inverted resistivity with depth using a numerical inversion of the data. Results of the inverted resistivity data are presented as horizontal profiles and as profiles derived from the combined horizontal profile and vertical sounding data. The data sets collected using the single-channel and multi-channel DC systems provided for the resistivity investigation to extend to greater depth. Similarity of the electrical properties of the bedrock formations made interpretation of the resistivity profiles more difficult. High resistivity anomalies seen in the profiles are interpreted as quartzite lenses and as limestone or metadolomite structures in the eastern part of the study area. Terrace gravels were mapped as resistive where dry and less resistive in the saturated zone. The DC resistivity methods used in this study illustrate that multi-electrode DC resistivity surveying and more traditional methodologies can be merged and used to efficiently map anomalies of hydrologic interest in geologically complex terrain.

  11. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation–Induced Resistance Training After SCI: A Review of the Dudley Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Yarar-Fisher, Ceren; Mahoney, Edward T.; McCully, Kevin K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), often referred to as functional electrical stimulation (FES), has been used to activate paralyzed skeletal muscle in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). The goal of NMES has been to reverse some of the dramatic losses in skeletal muscle mass, to stimulate functional improvements in people with incomplete paralysis, and to produce some of the health benefits associated with exercise. Objective: The purpose of this brief review is to describe a quantifiable resistance training form of NMES developed by Gary A. Dudley. Methods: People with motor complete SCI were first tested to confirm that an NMES-induced muscle contraction of the quadriceps muscle could be achieved. The contraction stimulus consisted of biphasic pulses at 35 Hz performed with increasing current up to what was needed to produce full knee extension. Four sets of 10 knee extensions were elicited, if possible. Training occurred biweekly for 3 to 6 months, with ankle weights being increased up to an added weight of 9.1 kg if the 40 repetitions could be performed successfully for 2 sessions. Results: Many participants have performed this protocol without adverse events, and all participants showed progression in the number of repetitions and/or the amount of weight lifted. Large increases in muscle mass occur, averaging 30% to 40%. Additional physiological adaptations to stimulated muscle have also been reported. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that the affected skeletal muscle after SCI responds robustly to progressive resistance training many years after injury. Future work with NMES should determine whether gains in lean mass translate to improved health, function, and quality of life. PMID:26689694

  12. Interstitial space, electrical resistance and ion concentrations during hypotonia of rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed Central

    Chebabo, S R; Hester, M A; Jing, J; Aitken, P G; Somjen, G G

    1995-01-01

    1. The degree to which mammalian brain cells swell in hypotonic environments has not previously been determined. We exposed hippocampal tissue slices prepared from anaesthetized rats to artificial cerebrospinal fluid from which varying amounts of NaCl had been deleted. Interstitial volume (ISV) change was determined from the volume of dilution of the marker ions tetramethylammonium (TMA+) or tetraethylammonium (TEA+). Tissue electrical resistance was measured as the voltage generated by constant current pulses. 2. ISV decreased as a function of lowered extracellular osmolality (osmotic pressure, pi o), indicating cell swelling. After reaching a minimum, ISV recovered partially, suggesting regulatory volume decrease of cells. After restoring normal pi o the ISV expanded, indicating post-hypotonic cell shrinkage. The electrical resistance of the tissue (Ro) increased when pi o was lowered, due to the reduced ionic strength, as well as restricted ISV. 3. To control for low NaCl concentration, reduced NaCl was replaced by mannitol or fructose. In isosmotic, NaCl-deficient solution, ISV showed inconsistent change, and Ro corrected for ionic strength tended to decrease. 4. Extracellular K+ concentration decreased slightly in low pi o except when spreading depression caused it to increase. Extracellular Ca2+ concentration decreased substantially, consistently and reversibly. Administration of isosmotic low-NaCl concentration solutions caused a similar decrease in extracellular Ca2+ concentrations. We propose that low Na+ concentration in extracellular fluid impaired the extrusion of Ca2+. 5. In severely hypotonic solution, ISV was reduced to 25% of its control volume, corresponding to a mean cell volume increase of at least 11%, probably more. From plotting relative changes in ISV against osmolarity we concluded that, within the range tested, hypotonic cell swelling was not opposed by the close approach of plasma membranes of neighbouring cells. PMID:8544131

  13. High definition cross-well electrical resistivity imaging using seismoelectric focusing and image-guided inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sava, P.; Revil, A.; Karaoulis, M.

    2014-08-01

    We propose a new, simple and efficient method to image electrical resistivity between a set of wells. Our procedure consists of two steps: first, we map the interfaces between various subsurface formations using seismoelectric conversions; second, we derive the formation resistivity using image-guided cross-well electric tomography. In the first step, we focus seismic energy at a set of points located on a regular grid between wells, which enables us to map the geological formations in terms of heterogeneities in electrical, hydraulic and/or seismic properties. The density of the scanning points (i.e. the seismoelectric image resolution) is related to the wavelength of the seismic impulse used to scan the formations. Each time the seismic energy is focused at a point, the resulting electrical potential burst (equivalent to the one generated by a volumetric seismic source) is recorded remotely at a set of electrodes positioned in wells (the reference electrode can be located on the ground surface or far enough to be considered at infinity). We construct a high-resolution `seismoelectric' image by assigning the electrical potential simulated at these fixed electrodes to the location of the seismic focus. In a follow-up step, the structure of this image is used in image-guided inversion to improve electrical resistivity tomography between the two wells. The structural information from the seismoelectric image is used to impose constraints on the model covariance matrix used in the inversion of the electrical resistivity data. This approach offers new perspectives in recovering fine structure of resistivity (high definition resistivity tomography) between the wells, which cannot be resolved through conventional cross-well resistivity or from seismic tomography alone.

  14. Inter-electrode tissue resistance is not affected by tissue oedema when electrically stimulating the lower limb of sepsis patients.

    PubMed

    Durfee, William K; Young, Joseph R; Ginz, Hans F

    2014-05-01

    ICU patients typically are given large amounts of fluid and often develop oedema. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the oedema would change inter-electrode resistance and, thus, require a different approach to using non-invasive electrical stimulation of nerves to assess muscle force. Inter-electrode tissue resistance in the lower leg was measured by applying a 300 µs constant current pulse and measuring the current through and voltage across the stimulating electrodes. The protocol was administered to nine ICU patients with oedema, eight surgical patients without oedema and eight healthy controls. No significant difference in inter-electrode resistance was found between the three groups. For all groups, resistance decreased as stimulation current increased. In conclusion, inter-electrode resistance in ICU patients with severe oedema is the same as the resistance in regular surgical patients and healthy controls. This means that non-invasive nerve stimulation devices do not need to be designed to accommodate different resistances when used with oedema patients; however, surface stimulation does require higher current levels with oedema patients because of the increased distance between the skin surface and the targeted nerve or muscle. PMID:24758395

  15. Role of electrical resistance of electrodes in modeling of discharging and charging of flooded lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, K. S.

    2015-03-01

    Electrical resistance of both the electrodes of a lead-acid battery increases during discharge due to formation of lead sulfate, an insulator. Work of Metzendorf [1] shows that resistance increases sharply at about 65% conversion of active materials, and battery stops discharging once this critical conversion is reached. However, these aspects are not incorporated into existing mathematical models. Present work uses the results of Metzendorf [1], and develops a model that includes the effect of variable resistance. Further, it uses a reasonable expression to account for the decrease in active area during discharge instead of the empirical equations of previous work. The model's predictions are compared with observations of Cugnet et al. [2]. The model is as successful as the non-mechanistic models existing in literature. Inclusion of variation in resistance of electrodes in the model is important if one of the electrodes is a limiting reactant. If active materials are stoichiometrically balanced, resistance of electrodes can be very large at the end of discharge but has only a minor effect on charging of batteries. The model points to the significance of electrical conductivity of electrodes in the charging of deep discharged batteries.

  16. Unconventional drop in the electrical resistance of chromium metal thin films at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, M.; Ohashi, K.; Sawabu, M.; Miyagawa, M.; Kubota, T.; Takanashi, K.

    2016-09-01

    We studied the electrical resistance of single-crystal and polycrystalline chromium films. The ρ (T) curve of single-crystal films decrease with decreasing temperature and show humps at around 300 K consistent with the bulk chromium being an itinerant antiferromagnet. In the polycrystalline films, on the other hand, the ρ (T) curves deviate from those of the bulk chromium. Moreover, we observed sudden decrease in the resistance around 1.5 K. Although previous studies suggested that chromium films become superconductive (Schmidt et al. (1972) [12]), it is difficult to conclude whether a superconducting transition occurs because the electrical resistivity is not zero in all films. No anomaly was detected by resistance measurements around room temperature, and the sudden decrease in the resistance at low temperature may be attributed to the suppression of antiferromagnetic interaction by thinning down the chromium element.

  17. Chitosan Microparticles Exert Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Activity against Antibiotic-Resistant Micro-organisms without Increasing Resistance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhengxin; Kim, Donghyeon; Adesogan, Adegbola T; Ko, Sanghoon; Galvao, Klibs; Jeong, Kwangcheol Casey

    2016-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance is growing exponentially, increasing public health concerns for humans and animals. In the current study, we investigated the antimicrobial features of chitosan microparticles (CM), engineered from chitosan by ion gelation, seeking potential application for treating infectious disease caused by multidrug resistant microorganisms. CM showed excellent antimicrobial activity against a wide range of microorganisms, including clinically important antibiotic-resistant pathogens without raising resistant mutants in serial passage assays over a period of 15 days, which is a significantly long passage compared to tested antibiotics used in human and veterinary medicine. In addition, CM treatment did not cause cross-resistance, which is frequently observed with other antibiotics and triggers multidrug resistance. Furthermore, CM activity was examined in simulated gastrointestinal fluids that CM encounter when orally administered. Antimicrobial activity of CM was exceptionally strong to eliminate pathogens completely. CM at a concentration of 0.1 μg/mL killed E. coli O157:H7 (5 × 10(8) CFU/mL) completely in synthetic gastric fluid within 20 min. Risk assessment of CM, in an in vitro animal model, revealed that CM did not disrupt the digestibility, pH or total volatile fatty acid production, indicating that CM likely do not affect the functionality of the rumen. Given all the advantages, CM can serve as a great candidate to treat infectious disease, especially those caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens without adverse side effects. PMID:27057922

  18. Electrical resistivity surveys in Prospect Gulch, San Juan County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDougal, Robert R.

    2006-01-01

    Prospect Gulch is a major source of naturally occurring and mining related metals to Cement Creek, a tributary of the upper Animas River in southwestern Colorado. Efforts to improve water quality in the watershed have focused on Prospect Gulch because many of its abandoned mines and are located on federal lands. Information on sources and pathways of metals, and related ground-water flow, will be useful to help prioritize and develop remediation strategies. It has been shown that the occurrence of sulfate, aluminum, iron, zinc and other metals associated with historical mining and the natural weathering of pyritic rock is substantial. In this study, direct current resistivity surveys were conducted to determine the subsurface resistivity distribution and to identify faults and fractures that may act as ground-water conduits or barriers to flow. Five lines of resistivity data were collected in the vicinity of Prospect Gulch, and cross-section profiles were constructed from the field data using a two-dimensional inversion algorithm. The conductive anomalies in the profiles are most likely caused by wet or saturated rocks and sediments, clay rich deposits, or high TDS ground water. Resistive anomalies are likely bedrock, dry surficial and sub-surface deposits, or deposits of ferricrete.

  19. Utilization of stiff culm trait of rice smos1 mutant for increased lodging resistance.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Ko; Okuno, Ayako; Hobo, Tokunori; Ordonio, Reynante; Shinozaki, Yusuke; Asano, Kenji; Kitano, Hidemi; Matsuoka, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Although the introduction of semi-dwarf trait into rice has led to improved lodging resistance making it capable of supporting high grain yield, lodging still remains a concern when attempting to further increase the grain yield of rice. However, improving the lodging resistance in rice by depending on the semi-dwarf trait alone is possible only up to a certain limit, beyond which other traits may be needed for reinforcement. To search for alternative traits relating to high lodging resistance, we identified 9 rice mutant lines possessing improved culm strength. To evaluate whether such lines can be useful for breeding lodging resistant rice, small organ size1 (smos1) mutant having increased lodging resistance but low tiller number and low grain yield, was chosen as a representative for a breeding trial. smos1 was crossed with ST-4 (from the Stock rice collection of Nagoya University Togo field #4), a cultivar with high tiller number and high grain yield, and from their progeny, LRC1 (lodging resistance candidate-1) was selected. Although the low tiller number trait of smos1 was not fully reversed in LRC1, this was compensated by an increase in grain weight per panicle, thereby resulting in high grain yield per plant. This important attribute of LRC1 was further enhanced by the improved lodging resistance trait inherited from smos1. Such improved lodging resistance in LRC1 and smos1 was revealed to be mainly due to increased culm diameter and culm thickness, which led to a high section modulus (SM) value, a parameter defining the physical strength of the culm. Since smos1 possesses high breaking-type lodging resistance which is different from semi-dwarf plants with high bending-type lodging resistance, an alternative approach of using thick culm lines for the creation of rice with increased lodging resistance is hereby proposed. PMID:24987959

  20. The combined effect of electrical stimulation and resistance isometric contraction on muscle atrophy in rat tibialis anterior muscle.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Naoto; Murakami, Shinichiro; Arakawa, Takamitsu; Miki, Akinori; Fujino, Hidemi

    2011-05-01

    Electrical stimulation has been used to prevent muscle atrophy, but this method is different in many previous studies, appropriate stimulation protocol is still not decided. Although resistance exercise has also been shown to be an effective countermeasure on muscle atrophy, almost previous studies carried out an electrical stimulation without resistance. It was hypothesized that electrical stimulation without resistance is insufficient to contract skeletal muscle forcefully, and the combination of electrical stimulation and forceful resistance contraction is more effective than electrical stimulation without resistance to attenuate muscle atrophy. This study investigated the combined effects of electrical stimulation and resistance isometric contraction on muscle atrophy in the rat tibialis anterior muscle. The animals were divided into control, hindlimb unloading (HU), hindlimb unloading plus electrical stimulation (ES), and hindlimb unloading plus the combination of electrical stimulation and resistance isometric contraction (ES+IC). Electrical stimulation was applied to the tibialis anterior muscle percutaneously for total 240 sec per day. In the ES+IC group, the ankle joint was fixed to produce resistance isometric contraction during electrical stimulation. After 7 days, the cross-sectional areas of each muscle fiber type in the HU group decreased. Those were prevented in the ES+IC group rather than the ES group. The expression of heat shock protein 72 was enhanced in the ES and ES+IC groups. These results indicated that although electrical stimulation is effective to prevent muscle atrophy, the combination of electrical stimulation and isometric contraction have further effect. PMID:21619551

  1. Surface-roughness contributions to the electrical resistivity of polycrystalline metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, U.; Vancea, J.; Hoffmann, H.

    1990-06-01

    The influence of surface roughness on the electrical conductivity of polycrystalline metal films has to be considered at two different length scales. The large-scale surface roughness due to the granular arrangement of these films gives rise to a fluctuating film cross section. One-dimensional models of these fluctuations lead to roughness values consistent with scanning-tunneling-microscopy images of film surfaces. The microscopic surface roughness, mainly given by atomic steps on the crystallite surfaces, represents centers for surface scattering of conduction electrons. With this concept we were able to describe not only the thickness-dependent conductivity of films with natural (as-deposited) surface roughness, but also the increase in the resistance during subsequent coating with adatoms at 80 K owing to an artificial microscopic roughening of their surfaces.

  2. Focusing Sources on Induced Polarization and Electrical Resistivity Method Applied to Soil Pollution Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejero, A.; Lopez, A.; Induced Polarization Team

    2013-05-01

    In recent years the problems of soil contamination have been increasing and geophysical methods, particularly electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) have struggled to find and monitor cases of contamination. Moreover, Induced Polarization (IP) has shown promise in mapping contaminant plumes, although both techniques (ERT and IP) have problems like noise, inductive coupling, effects of electrodes, etc. limiting the precision and accuracy of the data. To overcome these problems, this paper introduces a novel technique of focusing sources. This technique reduces the effects of adjacent vertical formations and contacts due to the flowing of current in a vertical way at the zone where the electrode potentials have been deployed. This fact allows obtaining cleaner data of ERT and IP. In order to introduce the proposed technique a vertical contact synthetic model is studied and after to a cultivar area in Hidalgo State, México which presents different types of

  3. Three-dimensional electrical resistivity model of a nuclear waste disposal site

    SciTech Connect

    Rucker, Dale F.; Levitt, Marc T.; Greenwood, William J.

    2009-12-11

    A three-dimensional (3D) modeling study was completed on a very large electrical resistivity survey conducted at a nuclear waste site in eastern Washington. The acquisition included 47 pole-pole two dimensional (2D) resistivity profiles collected along parallel and orthogonal lines over an area of 850 m×570 m. The data were geo-referenced and inverted using EarthImager3D (EI3D). EI3D runs on a Microsoft 32-bit operating system (e.g. WIN-2K, XP) with a maximum usable memory of 2 GB. The memory limits the size of the domain for the inversion model to 200 m×200 m, based on the survey electrode density. Therefore, a series of increasing overlapping models were run to evaluate the effectiveness of dividing the survey area into smaller subdomains. The results of the smaller subdomains were compared to the inversion results of a single domain over a larger area using an upgraded form of EI3D that incorporates multi-processing capabilities and 32 GB of RAM memory. The contours from the smaller subdomains showed discontinuity at the boundaries between the adjacent models, which do not match the hydrogeologic expectations given the nature of disposal at the site. At several boundaries, the contours of the low resistivity areas close, leaving the appearance of disconnected plumes or open contours at boundaries are not met with a continuance of the low resistivity plume into the adjacent subdomain. The model results of the single large domain show a continuous monolithic plume within the central and western portion of the site, directly beneath the elongated trenches. It is recommended that where possible, the domain not be subdivided, but instead include as much of the domain as possible given the memory of available computing resources.

  4. Assessment of groundwater vulnerability to leachate infiltration using electrical resistivity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosuro, G. O.; Omosanya, K. O.; Bayewu, O. O.; Oloruntola, M. O.; Laniyan, T. A.; Atobi, O.; Okubena, M.; Popoola, E.; Adekoya, F.

    2016-02-01

    This aim of this work is to assess the degree of leachate infiltration at a dumpsite in Agbara industrial estate, Southwestern Nigeria using electrical resistivity techniques. Around the dumpsite were 45 vertical electrical sounding (VES) stations and 3 electrical resistivity tomography profiles. Current electrode spread varied from 300 to 600 m for the electrical sounding. Electrode configuration includes Schlumberger and Wenner array for sounding and profiling. The state of leachate contamination was tested using parameters such as aquifer vulnerability index, overburden protective capacity and longitudinal unit conductance (Si) derived from the apparent resistivity values. Four principal geoelectric layers inferred from the VES data include the topsoil, sand, clayey sand, and clay/shale. Resistivity values for these layers vary from 3 to 1688, 203 to 3642 123 to 388, and 67 to 2201 Ω m with corresponding thickness of 0.8-2.4, 2.5-140, 3-26 m and infinity, respectively. The leachate plume occurs at a maximum depth of 10 m on the 2-D inverse models of real electrical resistivity with an average depth of infiltration being 6 m in the study area. The correlation between longitudinal conductance and overburden protective capacity show that aquifers around the dumpsite have poor protective capacity and are vulnerable to leachate contamination. Leachate infiltration is favored by the absence of lithological barriers such as clay which in the study area are either mixed with sand or positioned away from the aquifer.

  5. Mixed-Methods Resistance Training Increases Power and Strength of Young and Older Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Robert U.; Hakkinen, Keijo; Hakkinen, Arja; McCormick, Matt; Volek, Jeff; Kraemer, William J.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effects of a 10-week, mixed-methods resistance training program on young and older men. Although results confirmed some age-related reductions in muscle strength and power, the older men demonstrated similar capacity to the younger men for increases in muscle strength and power via an appropriate, periodized resistance training…

  6. Decline in Decreased Cephalosporin Susceptibility and Increase in Azithromycin Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Sawatzky, P.; Liu, G.; Allen, V; Lefebvre, B.; Hoang, L.; Drews, S.; Horsman, G.; Wylie, J.; Haldane, D.; Garceau, R.; Ratnam, S.; Wong, T.; Archibald, C.; Mulvey, M.R.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance profiles were determined for Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains isolated in Canada during 2010–2014. The proportion of isolates with decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins declined significantly between 2011 and 2014, whereas azithromycin resistance increased significantly during that period. Continued surveillance of antimicrobial drug susceptibilities is imperative to inform treatment guidelines. PMID:26689114

  7. Physical Modelling on Detecting Buried Object Using Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Nizam, Z. M.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Aziman, M.; Shaylinda, M. Z. N.

    2016-07-01

    This study focused on the evaluation of electrical resistivity method (ERM) for buried object detection and its relationship due to the different stiffness of material. In the past, the conventional method to detect the buried structure was face some limitation due to the time and cost. For example, previous approach related to the trial and error excavation has always expose to some risky outcome due to the uncertainties of the buried object location. Hence, this study introduced an alternative technique with particular reference to resistivity method to detect and evaluate the buried object with different strength of stiffness. The experiment was performed based on field miniature model (small scale study) using soil trial embankment made by lateritic soil and various concrete cube strengths (grade 20, 25 and 30) representing buried object with different conditions. 2D electrical resistivity test (electrical resistivity imaging) was perform using ABEM Terrameter SAS4000 during the data acquisition while the raw data was process using RES2DINV software. It was found that the electrical resistivity method was able to detect the buried concrete structures targeted based on the contrast of the electrical resistivity image produced. Moreover, three different strength of concrete cube were able to be differentiated based on the electrical resistivity values (ERV) obtained. This study found that the ERV of concrete cube for grade 20, 25 and 30 were 170 Ωm, 227 Ωm and 503 Ωm, respectively. Hence, this study shows that the ERV has a strong relationship with different stiffness of material thus applicable to be a useful alternative tool in underground structure detection.

  8. Electric-field-induced magnetization switching in CoFeB/MgO magnetic tunnel junctions with high junction resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, S.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2016-05-01

    We show the electric-field induced magnetization switching for CoFeB/MgO magnetic tunnel junctions with thick MgO barrier layer of 2.8 nm, whose resistance-area product is 176 kΩ μm2, and achieve the small switching energy of 6.3 fJ/bit. The increase of the junction resistance is expected to suppress the energy consumption due to the Joule heating during the switching; however, the energy is still dominated by the Joule energy rather than the charging energy. This is because the junction resistance decreases more rapidly for junctions with thicker MgO as bias voltage increases.

  9. INORGANIC PLUME DELINEATION USING SURFACE HIGH RESOLUTION ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY AT THE BC CRIBS & TRENCHES SITE HANFORD

    SciTech Connect

    BENECKE, M.W.

    2007-05-29

    A surface resistivity survey was conducted on the Hanford Site over a waste disposal trench that received a large volume of liquid inorganic waste. The objective of the survey was to map the extent of the plume that resulted from the disposal activities approximately 50 years earlier. The survey included six resistivity transects of at least 200m, where each transect provided two-dimensional profile information of subsurface electrical properties. The results of the survey indicated that a low resistivity plume resides at a depth of approximately 25-44 m below ground surface. The target depth was calibrated with borehole data of pore-water electrical conductivity. Due to the high correlation of the pore-water electrical conductivity to nitrate concentration and the high correlation of measured apparent resistivity to pore-water electrical conductivity, inferences were made that proposed the spatial distribution of the apparent resistivity was due to the distribution of nitrate. Therefore, apparent resistivities were related to nitrate, which was subsequently rendered in three dimensions to show that the nitrate likely did not reach the water table and the bounds of the highest concentrations are directly beneath the collection of waste sites.

  10. Permanent electrical resistivity measurements for monitoring water circulation in clayey landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gance, J.; Malet, J.-P.; Supper, R.; Sailhac, P.; Ottowitz, D.; Jochum, B.

    2016-03-01

    Landslides developed on clay-rich slopes are controlled by the soil water regime and the groundwater circulation. Spatially-distributed and high frequency observations of these hydrological processes are important for improving our understanding and prediction of landslide triggering. This work presents observed changes in electrical resistivity monitored at the Super-Sauze clayey landslide with the GEOMON 4D resistivity instrument installed permanently on-site for a period of one year. A methodological framework for processing the raw measurement is proposed. It includes the filtering of the resistivity dataset, the correction of the effects of non-hydrological factors (sensitivity of the device, sensitivity to soil temperature and fluid conductivity, presence of fissures in the topsoil) on the filtered resistivity values. The interpretation is based on a statistical analysis to define possible relationships between the rainfall characteristics, the soil hydrological observations and the soil electrical resistivity response. During the monitoring period, no significant relationships between the electrical response and the measured hydrological parameters are evidenced. We discuss the limitations of the method due to the effect of heat exchange between the groundwater, the vadose zone water and the rainwater that hides the variations of resistivity due to variations of the soil water content. We demonstrate that despite the absence of hydrogeophysical information for the vadose zone, the sensitivity of electrical resistivity monitoring to temperature variations allows imaging water fluxes in the saturated zone and highlighting the existence of matrix and preferential flows that does not occur at the same time and for the same duration. We conclude on the necessity to combine electrical resistivity measurements with distributed soil temperature measurements.

  11. Eradication of multidrug-resistant pseudomonas biofilm with pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saiqa I; Blumrosen, Gaddi; Vecchio, Daniela; Golberg, Alexander; McCormack, Michael C; Yarmush, Martin L; Hamblin, Michael R; Austen, William G

    2016-03-01

    Biofilm formation is a significant problem, accounting for over eighty percent of microbial infections in the body. Biofilm eradication is problematic due to increased resistance to antibiotics and antimicrobials as compared to planktonic cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF) on biofilm-infected mesh. Prolene mesh was infected with bioluminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa and treated with PEF using a concentric electrode system to derive, in a single experiment, the critical electric field strength needed to kill bacteria. The effect of the electric field strength and the number of pulses (with a fixed pulse length duration and frequency) on bacterial eradication was investigated. For all experiments, biofilm formation and disruption were confirmed with bioluminescent imaging and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Computation and statistical methods were used to analyze treatment efficiency and to compare it to existing theoretical models. In all experiments 1500 V are applied through a central electrode, with pulse duration of 50 μs, and pulse delivery frequency of 2 Hz. We found that the critical electric field strength (Ecr) needed to eradicate 100-80% of bacteria in the treated area was 121 ± 14 V/mm when 300 pulses were applied, and 235 ± 6.1 V/mm when 150 pulses were applied. The area at which 100-80% of bacteria were eradicated was 50.5 ± 9.9 mm(2) for 300 pulses, and 13.4 ± 0.65 mm(2) for 150 pulses. 80% threshold eradication was not achieved with 100 pulses. The results indicate that increased efficacy of treatment is due to increased number of pulses delivered. In addition, we that showed the bacterial death rate as a function of the electrical field follows the statistical Weibull model for 150 and 300 pulses. We hypothesize that in the clinical setting, combining systemic antibacterial therapy with PEF will yield a synergistic effect leading to improved

  12. Increased Mitochondrial DNA Induces Acquired Docetaxel Resistance in Head and Neck Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mizumachi, T; Suzuki, S; Naito, A; Carcel-Trullols, J; Evans, TT; Spring, PM; Oridate, N; Furuta, Y; Fukuda, S; Higuchi, M

    2008-01-01

    Docetaxel is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents against cancer; nevertheless, some patients develop resistance. Unfortunately, their causes and mechanisms remain unknown. We created docetaxel-resistant DRHEp2 from human laryngeal cancer HEp2 and investigated the roles of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and ROS on docetaxel resistance. DRHEp2 had greatly increased mtDNA content. Reduction of mtDNA content in DRHEp2 by ethidium bromide treatment reduced the resistance. These results indicate the possible roles of mtDNA-coded enzymes in mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) in resistant mechanisms. Oligomycin A, an Fo-ATPase inhibitor, eliminated docetaxel resistance in DRHEp2. In contrast, inhibitors of other MRC did not. RNA interference targeted to Fo-ATPase d-subunit restored docetaxel-induced cytotoxicity to DRHEp2. These results indicate the roles of Fo-ATPase for resistant mechanisms. Docetaxel induced ROS generation in HEp2 but not in DRHEp2 and antioxidant pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate eliminated docetaxel-induced cytotoxicity, suggesting roles of ROS in docetaxel-induced cell death. Furthermore, inhibition of Fo-ATPase by Oligomycin A induced docetaxel–mediated ROS generation in DRHEp2. Taken together, DRHEp2 acquired docetaxel resistance through increasing Fo-ATPase, which led to diminish docetaxel-induced ROS generation and subsequently inhibited cell death. In conclusion, mtDNA plays an important role in developing docetaxel resistance through the reduction of ROS generation by regulating Fo-ATPase. PMID:17637738

  13. Increase in isolation of extended spectrum beta lactamase producing multidrug resistant non typhoidal Salmonellae in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Increasing resistance to quinolones and ceftriaxone in non typhoidal Salmonellae is a global concern. Resistance to quinolone and 3rd generation cephalosporin amongst non typhoidal Salmonellae (NTS) from Pakistan has been reported in this study. Methods Retrospective analysis of laboratory data was conducted (1990-2006). NTS were isolated and identified from clinical samples using standard microbiological techniques. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby Bauer. Extended spectrum beta lactamase production (ESBL) was detected using combined disc method. Ciprofloxacin sensitivity was detected by nalidixic acid screening method. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ciprofloxacin was determined by agar dilution method. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 13. Results Analysis of 1967 NTS isolates showed a significant increase in ciprofloxacin resistance from 23% in 2002 to 50.5% in 2006, with increased mean MIC values from 0.6 to 1.3 ug/mL. Ceftriaxone resistant NTS also increased and ESBL production was seen in 98.7% isolates. These isolates exhibited high resistance against amoxicillin clavulanic acid (57%), gentamicin (69%), amikacin (44%) and piperacillin tazobactam (30%). No resistance to carbapenem was seen. Ceftriaxone resistance was significantly higher in children <1 year, in invasive isolates and in Salmonella Typhimurium. Conclusions Increase in quinolone and ceftriaxone NTS is a serious threat to public health requiring continuous surveillance and use of appropriate screening tests for laboratory detection. PMID:20409348

  14. Method and apparatus for increasing resistance of bipolar buried layer integrated circuit devices to single-event upsets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, John A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Bipolar transistors fabricated in separate buried layers of an integrated circuit chip are electrically isolated with a built-in potential barrier established by doping the buried layer with a polarity opposite doping in the chip substrate. To increase the resistance of the bipolar transistors to single-event upsets due to ionized particle radiation, the substrate is biased relative to the buried layer with an external bias voltage selected to offset the built-in potential just enough (typically between about +0.1 to +0.2 volt) to prevent an accumulation of charge in the buried-layer-substrate junction.

  15. Patients with sleep apnoea and resistant hypertension at increased risk of heart disease.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    People with resistant hypertension are more likely to experience sleep apnoea than those with nonresistant hypertension, increasing the risk of ischaemic heart events and congestive heart failure, new study results suggests. PMID:27484541

  16. Fabrication of intermetallic coatings for electrical and corrosion resistance on high-temperature alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Cho, W.D.

    1994-10-01

    Several intermetallic films were fabricated to high-temperature alloys (V-alloys and 304 and 316 stainless steels) to provide electrical insulation and corrosion resistance. Alloy grain-growth behavior at 1000{degrees}C for the V-5Cr-5Ti was investigated to determine the stability of alloy substrate during coating formation by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or metallic vapor processes at 800-850{degrees}C. Film layers were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy and by electron-energy-dispersive and X-ray diffraction analysis and tested for electrical resistivity and corrosion resistance. The results elucidated the nature of the coatings, which provided both electrical insulation and high-temperature corrosion protection.

  17. Understanding Electrical Conduction States in WO3 Thin Films Applied for Resistive Random-Access Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, Thi Kieu Hanh; Pham, Kim Ngoc; Dao, Thi Bang Tam; Tran, Dai Lam; Phan, Bach Thang

    2016-05-01

    The electrical conduction and associated resistance switching mechanism of top electrode/WO3/bottom electrode devices [top electrode (TE): Ag, Ti; bottom electrode (BE): Pt, fluorine-doped tin oxide] have been investigated. The direction of switching and switching ability depended on both the top and bottom electrode material. Multiple electrical conduction mechanisms control the leakage current of such switching devices, including trap-controlled space-charge, ballistic, Ohmic, and Fowler-Nordheim tunneling effects. The transition between electrical conduction states is also linked to the switching (SET-RESET) process. This is the first report of ballistic conduction in research into resistive random-access memory. The associated resistive switching mechanisms are also discussed.

  18. MWNT-Doped Epoxy Matrix for Detecting Impact Damages in Fiber Reinforced Composites by Electrical Resistance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, Marco; Natali, Maurizio; Kenny, Josè M.; Torre, Luigi

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, we report the development of a glass fiber reinforced composite based on a MWNT-doped epoxy matrix. The intrinsic electrical conductivity of carbon nanotubes has allowed the production of a nanocomposite with enhanced electrical properties, respect the neat matrix. Due to the high aspect ratio of carbon nanotubes, very small amounts of these particles were enough for modifying the electrical properties of the obtained glass fiber composites. A low-velocity impact was created on the surface of the laminate, in order to produce a damage, which not involved the catastrophic failure of the sample. In order to evaluate the damage level, a mechanical characterization was performed on pristine samples, on one hand, and impacted The measurement of the electrical resistance, before and after the impact, was exploited as a way for detecting the presence of the damage produced. The results have shown that it is possible to associate the increase in electrical resistance of the composite with the formation of a damage due to an impact.

  19. Delineating the Groundwater Recharge Zone in the Pingtung Plan , Taiwan with Electrical Resistivity Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Chang, P.; Chang, L.; Chen, J.; Huang, C.

    2012-12-01

    In this study we used the two-dimensional electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) method, as well as the core records of monitoring wells to help determine the groundwater recharge zone in Pingtung plain in southwestern Taiwan. Pingtung fluvial plain is one of the major groundwater resources in Taiwan which is composed of several alluvial fans deriving from the uplifted mountain area to the east and north of the plain. The thick gravel layer constitutes the main recharge area of the upper alluvial fans and the conductive clay sediments dominate most of the lower fans. With the core records, we found that, the gravel layers have higher resistivity (mostly over 200 Ohm-m) and the resistivities of the clayey layers are low (about 1~10 Ohm-m). Therefore with the resistivity surveys we can have more confidences for determining the boundary of the groundwater recharge area in the area in-between the monitoring wells. In the past two years, we have finished 24 two-dimensional electrical resistivity imaging profile lines from Meinong to Fangliao, the lines are oriented in the east-west direction, and each line was about 400 meters long. With the inverted results, we are able to characterize two major alluvial systems and their recharge zones in the Pingtung fluvial plain. The resistivities we measured almost are consistent to the core records of monitoring wells except for the Wanluan site, which shows thick gravel layer in the drilling records but has low resistivity in the nearby resistivity survey. A reasonable explanation is that the electrical resistivity is sensitive to clayey materials with lower resistivities. The intercalated clay within the gravel layers is not shown in the churn drilling records.

  20. Electrical resistivity investigations at Memphis, and Bolivar, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spicer, H. Cecil

    1948-01-01

    This geophysical investigation was undertaken upon request of Elliott M. Cushing of the Ground Water Division Office at Memphis, Tennessee. The field work was performed during the period March 13 to 28, 1947; the apparent resistivity curves were interpreted during November and December; and the report was written subsequent to the interpretation of the curves. The writer is grateful to Elliott M. Cushing and his staff for the splendid cooperation and generous assistance extended to him in obtaining the measurements. It is also a pleasure to acknowledge the assistance of George J. Edwards in obtaining the field measurements.

  1. Fracture Surface Area Effects on Fluid Extraction and the Electrical Resistivity of Geothermal Reservoir Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J J; Detwiler, R L; Ralph, W; Bonner, B

    2002-05-09

    Laboratory measurements of the electrical resistivity of fractured analogue geothermal reservoir rocks were performed to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to determine the effects of variable fracture dimensions and surface area on water extraction. Experiments were performed at confining pressures up to 10 h4Pa (100 bars) and temperatures to 170 C. Fractured samples show a larger resistivity change at the onset of boiling than intact samples. Monitoring the resistivity of fractured samples as they equilibrate to imposed pressure and temperature conditions provides an estimate of fluid migration into and out of the matrix. Measurements presented are an important step toward using field electrical methods to quantitatively search for fractures, infer saturation, and track fluid migration in geothermal reservoirs.

  2. Stochastic Inversion of Electrical Resistivity Changes Using a Markov Chain, Monte Carlo Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A; Nitao, J; Hanley, W; Aines, R; Glaser, R; Sengupta, S; Dyer, K; Hickling, T; Daily, W

    2004-09-21

    We describe a stochastic inversion method for mapping subsurface regions where the electrical resistivity is changing. The technique combines prior information, electrical resistance data and forward models to produce subsurface resistivity models that are most consistent with all available data. Bayesian inference and a Metropolis simulation algorithm form the basis for this approach. Attractive features include its ability to: (1) provide quantitative measures of the uncertainty of a generated estimate and, (2) allow alternative model estimates to be identified, compared and ranked. Methods that monitor convergence and summarize important trends of the posterior distribution are introduced. Results from a physical model test and a field experiment were used to assess performance. The stochastic inversions presented provide useful estimates of the most probable location, shape, and volume of the changing region, and the most likely resistivity change. The proposed method is computationally expensive, requiring the use of extensive computational resources to make its application practical.

  3. Investigations of temperature dependences of electrical resistivity and specific heat capacity of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eser, Erhan; Koç, Hüseyin

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we calculated the electrical resistivity and heat capacities of some ideal metals (Cu, Pt, and Pd) using a method that it employs the statistical model and Debye functions. The method is used to provide a simple and reliable analytical procedure for wide temperature range. The results obtained for the electrical resistivity and heat capacity have been compared with the results in literature. The results obtained at low temperature are in excellent agreement with experimental and theoretical results. Finally the used approximation and analytical method are a useful approach to calculate thermophysical properties of metals.

  4. Temperature dependent electrical resistivity of gallium and antimony in a liquid form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, A. V.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Thakor, P. B.

    2016-05-01

    Present paper deals with the effects of temperature variation on the electrical resistivity (Ω) of liquid Gallium (Ga), and Antimony (Sb). We have used a new parameter free pseudopotential with a Zeeman formula for finding it. To see the effects of screening Farid et al local field correction function is used with the Charged Hard Sphere (CHS) reference system. Analysis and comparison between the plotted graphs, based on present computed data and other experimental data defines and conclude that our newly constructed model potential is an effective one to produce the data for the temperature dependent electrical resistivity of some liquid semiconductors.

  5. Electrical resistivity well-logging system with solid-state electronic circuitry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, James Henry; Farstad, Arnold J.

    1977-01-01

    An improved 4-channel electrical resistivity well-logging system for use with a passive probe with electrodes arranged in the 'normal' configuration has been designed and fabricated by Westinghouse Electric Corporation to meet technical specifications developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. Salient features of the system include solid-state switching and current regulation in the transmitter circuit to produce a constant-current source square wave, and synchronous solid-state switching and sampling of the potential waveform in the receiver circuit to provide an analog dc voltage proportions to the measured resistivity. Technical specifications and design details are included in this report.

  6. Thermo-Electromotive Force and Electrical Resistivity of Hydrogenated VT1-0 Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lider, A.; Larionov, V.; Kroening, M.; Kudiiarov, V.

    2016-06-01

    The method for measuring the structure transition of hydrogenated titanium from one state to another is suggested. The method is based on the comparison of thermo-electromotive force (thermo-emf), DC electrical resistance and the results of X-ray diffraction analysis. X-ray diffraction analysis is applied for identifying the quantity of defects in titanium structure. The authors have also identified the identical dependence of thermo-electromotive force and electrical resistivity on hydrogen concentration in titanium. The effect can be used for hydrogenated titanium structure control.

  7. Electrical resistivity and specific heat of La 2-XSr XNiO 4+δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Akiyuki; Matsumoto, Takehiko; Takayanagi, Shigeru; Mōri, Nobuo

    1990-08-01

    Specific heat and electrical resistivity were measured on La 2-XSr XNiO 4+δ with various Sr concentrations as a function of temerature. The behaviors of electrical resistivity and lattice constants show a marked change at X⋃0.5 (Xc). The specific heat shows a hump at about 6K in C/T vs. T 2 plot for all of samples annealed in air. For the samples annealed in hydrogen no hump is observed. The relationship between Xc and interstitial oxygen defect is discussed.

  8. Thermal conductivity, electrical resistivity, and thermopower of aerospace alloys from 4 to 300 K.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hust, J. G.; Weitzel, D. H.; Powell, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    Measurement of thermal conductivity, electrical resistivity, and thermopower for several aerospace alloys: titanium alloy A110-AT, aluminum alloy 7039, Inconel 718, and Hastelloy X. Tables and graphs of the measured properties and Lorenz ratio are presented over the range from 4 to 300 K. Comparisons to other measurements and theoretical analysis of the data are included. The uncertainties of the property data are estimated as 0.7 to 2.5% for thermal conductivity, 0.25% in electrical resistivity, and about 0.1 microvolt/K in thermopower.

  9. The correlation between extracellular resistance by electrical biopsy and the ratio of optical low staining area in irradiated intestinal tissues of rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Electrical biopsy illustrates a tissue’s electrical properties by electrical impedance spectroscopy. However, electrical biopsy parameters are different from conventional morphological-based examinations. The correlation between electrical biopsy and the morphological observation has not been checked. Considering the tissue responses to injury, extracellular resistance should be most sensitive with the accumulation of fluid in tissue, and it is expected to increase the ratio of optical low staining area on histological images. In this study, we calculated the ratio of optical low staining area of sampled histological images and compared with the results of electrical biopsy to verify the hypothesis of that the extracellular resistance of electrical biopsy most highly correlates with the ratio of optical low staining area on histological images. Methods The irradiated intestinal tissues of rats after different latent period were used for study. The sampled tissues were measured by electrical impedance spectroscopy for electrical biopsy and the microscopic images were acquired. The sampled histological images were transformed into the Hue-Saturation-Density (HSD) colour model to decouple the stain density. The ratio of optical low staining area on histological images was computed to quantify the morphological changes. The results were related to the parameters from electrical biopsy according to three element circuit model by Spearman’s rank correlation test. Results The ratio of optical low staining area varied as well as the tissue’s electrical parameters. The extracellular resistance (Re) and intracellular resistance (Ri) by electrical biopsy tended to increase with the ratio of low staining area decreasing. The membrane capacitance (Cm) by electrical biopsy tended to increase with the ratio of optical low staining area increasing. The extracellular resistance (Re) of electrical biopsy was the parameter most highly correlated with the ratio of

  10. Sensing of retained martensite during thermal cycling of shape memory alloy wires via electrical resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Christopher B.

    2013-04-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) remain one of the most commercially viable active materials, thanks to a high specific work and the wide availability of high quality material. Still, significant challenges remain in predicting the degradation of SMA actuators during thermal cycling. One challenges in both the motivation and verification of degradation models is the measurement of retained martensite fraction during cycling. Direct measurement via diffraction is difficult to perform in situ, impossible for thin wires, (< 0.5mm) and prohibitively difficult for lengthy studies. As an alternative, the temperature coefficient of electrical resistivity (TCR) is used as an indicator of martensite phase fraction during thermal cycling of SMA wires. We investigate this technique with an example cycling experiment, using the TCR to successfully measure a 20% increase in retained martensite fraction over 80000 thermal cycles. As SMA wire temperature is difficult to measure directly during resistive heating, we also introduce a method to infer temperature to within 5 °C by integrating the lumped heat equation.

  11. Changes in the electric resistivity of CrN subsequent to oxygen dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, Shinobu; Suzuki, Kazuma; Sato, Aoi; Suzuki, Tsuneo; Nakayama, Tadachika; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Niihara, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Single-phase epitaxial chromium oxynitride thin films containing 11 to 45 mol % oxygen were successfully synthesized on MgO(100) substrates by pulsed laser deposition at 773 K while controlling the ambient oxygen partial pressure. The film compositions were subsequently analyzed by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy, while crystal phases were identified by X-ray diffractometry using the Bragg-Brentano and glancing incidence configurations and by in-plane φ scanning. The microstructures were observed by transmission electron microscopy. The electrical resistance of the films was determined by either the two- or four-probe method. The Cr(N,O) thin film having 11 mol % oxygen exhibited a metallic temperature dependence. In contrast, the films containing oxygen of 13 mol % or higher showed a semiconducting (or insulating) temperature dependence. This resistivity change is believed to result from enhanced electron correlation brought about by increases in oxygen content, sufficient to transform the Cr(N,O) thin film into a Mott insulator.

  12. Distribution-based fuzzy clustering of electrical resistivity tomography images for interface detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, W. O. C.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Chambers, J. E.; Oxby, L. S.; Bai, L.

    2014-04-01

    A novel method for the effective identification of bedrock subsurface elevation from electrical resistivity tomography images is described. Identifying subsurface boundaries in the topographic data can be difficult due to smoothness constraints used in inversion, so a statistical population-based approach is used that extends previous work in calculating isoresistivity surfaces. The analysis framework involves a procedure for guiding a clustering approach based on the fuzzy c-means algorithm. An approximation of resistivity distributions, found using kernel density estimation, was utilized as a means of guiding the cluster centroids used to classify data. A fuzzy method was chosen over hard clustering due to uncertainty in hard edges in the topography data, and a measure of clustering uncertainty was identified based on the reciprocal of cluster membership. The algorithm was validated using a direct comparison of known observed bedrock depths at two 3-D survey sites, using real-time GPS information of exposed bedrock by quarrying on one site, and borehole logs at the other. Results show similarly accurate detection as a leading isosurface estimation method, and the proposed algorithm requires significantly less user input and prior site knowledge. Furthermore, the method is effectively dimension-independent and will scale to data of increased spatial dimensions without a significant effect on the runtime. A discussion on the results by automated versus supervised analysis is also presented.

  13. Electrical Resistivity Study of a Pleistocene Riverbed in Saltville, VA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, R. B.; Whisonant, R. C.

    2008-05-01

    A shallow capacitively coupled resistivity survey was performed in Saltville, VA, in an area of suspected buried Pleistocene river deposits. Previous excavations in the sediments beneath the Saltville valley floor had been performed to recover late Pleistocene megafaunal remains and possible Clovis-age human artifacts. These digs encountered a zone, one to two meters deep, of gravel-sized rock fragments, including some boulders up to 75 cm. in diameter. These large clasts are rounded, show some imbrication (shingle-like overlapping indicative of current flow), and have been interpreted as river channel deposits. Carbon 14 dates from the megafaunal bones within and just above the gravel bed yielded dates of 14,500 years BP. Resistivity signals in a number of locations were consistent with cobbles and boulders deposited in a river channel. These signals are generally bowl- shaped areas with large circular (2-d scans) anomalies near the center, and smaller circular anomalies tapering out towards both sides. The bowl-shaped anomalies are within 3 meters of the surface. With several lines imaged in this survey a rough path of the riverbed, along with a number of branchings is traceable in the survey area. An exploratory hole confirmed the presence of a layer of rounded cobbles and boulders 1.3 meters deep beneath one of the survey lines.

  14. Degree of dispersion of latex particles in cement paste, as assessed by electrical resistivity measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, X.; Chung, D.D.L.

    1996-12-31

    The degree of dispersion of latex particles in latex-modified cement paste was assessed by measurement of the volume electrical resistivity and modeling this resistivity in terms of latex and cement phases that are partly in series and partly in parallel. The assessment was best at low values of the latex-cement ratio; it underestimated the degree of latex dispersion when the latex/cement ratio was high, especially > 0.2.

  15. Electron Acceleration by Cascading Reconnection in the Solar Corona. II. Resistive Electric Field Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Büchner, J.; Bárta, M.; Gan, W.; Liu, S.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate electron acceleration by electric fields induced by cascading reconnections in current sheets trailing coronal mass ejections via a test particle approach in the framework of the guiding-center approximation. Although the resistive electric field is much weaker than the inductive electric field, the electron acceleration is still dominated by the former. Anomalous resistivity η is switched on only in regions where the current carrier’s drift velocity is large enough. As a consequence, electron acceleration is very sensitive to the spatial distribution of the resistive electric fields, and electrons accelerated in different segments of the current sheet have different characteristics. Due to the geometry of the 2.5-dimensional electromagnetic fields and strong resistive electric field accelerations, accelerated high-energy electrons can be trapped in the corona, precipitating into the chromosphere or escaping into interplanetary space. The trapped and precipitating electrons can reach a few MeV within 1 s and have a very hard energy distribution. Spatial structure of the acceleration sites may also introduce breaks in the electron energy distribution. Most of the interplanetary electrons reach hundreds of keV with a softer distribution. To compare with observations of solar flares and electrons in solar energetic particle events, we derive hard X-ray spectra produced by the trapped and precipitating electrons, fluxes of the precipitating and interplanetary electrons, and electron spatial distributions.

  16. Examining diel patterns of soil and xylem moisture using electrical resistivity imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mares, Rachel; Barnard, Holly R.; Mao, Deqiang; Revil, André; Singha, Kamini

    2016-05-01

    The feedbacks among forest transpiration, soil moisture, and subsurface flowpaths are poorly understood. We investigate how soil moisture is affected by daily transpiration using time-lapse electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) on a highly instrumented ponderosa pine and the surrounding soil throughout the growing season. By comparing sap flow measurements to the ERI data, we find that periods of high sap flow within the diel cycle are aligned with decreases in ground electrical conductivity and soil moisture due to drying of the soil during moisture uptake. As sap flow decreases during the night, the ground conductivity increases as the soil moisture is replenished. The mean and variance of the ground conductivity decreases into the summer dry season, indicating drier soil and smaller diel fluctuations in soil moisture as the summer progresses. Sap flow did not significantly decrease through the summer suggesting use of a water source deeper than 60 cm to maintain transpiration during times of shallow soil moisture depletion. ERI captured spatiotemporal variability of soil moisture on daily and seasonal timescales. ERI data on the tree showed a diel cycle of conductivity, interpreted as changes in water content due to transpiration, but changes in sap flow throughout the season could not be interpreted from ERI inversions alone due to daily temperature changes.

  17. Instrument for evaluating the electrical resistance and wavelength-resolved transparency of stretchable electronics during strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azar, A. D.; Finley, E.; Harris, K. D.

    2015-01-01

    A complete analysis of strain tolerance in a stretchable transparent conductor (TC) should include tracking of both electrical conductivity and transparency during strain; however, transparency is generally neglected in contemporary analyses. In this paper, we describe an apparatus that tracks both parameters while TCs of arbitrary composition are deformed under stretching-mode strain. We demonstrate the tool by recording the electrical resistance and light transmission spectra for indium tin oxide-coated plastic substrates under both linearly increasing strain and complex cyclic strain processes. The optics are sensitive across the visible spectrum and into the near-infrared region (˜400-900 nm), and without specifically optimizing for sampling speed, we achieve a time resolution of ˜200 ms. In our automated analysis routine, we include a calculation of a common TC figure of merit (FOM), and because solar cell electrodes represent a key TC application, we also weigh both our transparency and FOM results against the solar power spectrum to determine "solar transparency" and "solar FOM." Finally, we demonstrate how the apparatus may be adapted to measure the basic performance metrics for complete solar cells under uniaxial strain.

  18. Instrument for evaluating the electrical resistance and wavelength-resolved transparency of stretchable electronics during strain

    SciTech Connect

    Azar, A. D.; Finley, E.; Harris, K. D.

    2015-01-15

    A complete analysis of strain tolerance in a stretchable transparent conductor (TC) should include tracking of both electrical conductivity and transparency during strain; however, transparency is generally neglected in contemporary analyses. In this paper, we describe an apparatus that tracks both parameters while TCs of arbitrary composition are deformed under stretching-mode strain. We demonstrate the tool by recording the electrical resistance and light transmission spectra for indium tin oxide-coated plastic substrates under both linearly increasing strain and complex cyclic strain processes. The optics are sensitive across the visible spectrum and into the near-infrared region (∼400-900 nm), and without specifically optimizing for sampling speed, we achieve a time resolution of ∼200 ms. In our automated analysis routine, we include a calculation of a common TC figure of merit (FOM), and because solar cell electrodes represent a key TC application, we also weigh both our transparency and FOM results against the solar power spectrum to determine “solar transparency” and “solar FOM.” Finally, we demonstrate how the apparatus may be adapted to measure the basic performance metrics for complete solar cells under uniaxial strain.

  19. Characterization of Contact and Bulk Thermal Resistance of Laminations for Electric Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Cousineau, J. Emily; Bennion, Kevin; DeVoto, Doug; Mihalic, Mark; Narumanchi, Sreekant

    2015-06-30

    The ability to remove heat from an electric machine depends on the passive stack thermal resistances within the machine and the convective cooling performance of the selected cooling technology. This report focuses on the passive thermal design, specifically properties of the stator and rotor lamination stacks. Orthotropic thermal conductivity, specific heat, and density are reported. Four materials commonly used in electric machines were tested, including M19 (29 and 26 gauge), HF10, and Arnon 7 materials.

  20. On the Modeling of Electrical Effects Experienced by Space Explorers During Extra Vehicular Activities: Intracorporal Currents, Resistances, and Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cela, Carlos J.; Loizos, Kyle; Lazzi, Gianluca; Hamilton, Douglas; Lee, Raphael C.

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has shown that space explorers engaged in Extra Vehicular Activities (EVAs) may be exposed, under certain conditions, to undesired electrical currents. This work focuses on determining whether these undesired induced electrical currents could be responsible for involuntary neuromuscular activity in the subjects, possibly caused by either large diameter peripheral nerve activation or reflex activity from cutaneous afferent stimulation. An efficient multiresolution variant of the admittance method along with a millimeter-resolution model of a male human body were used to calculate induced electric fields, resistance between contact electrodes used to simulate the potential exposure condition, and currents induced in the human body model. Results show that, under realistic exposure conditions using a 15V source, current density magnitudes and total current injected are well above previously reported startle reaction thresholds. This indicates that, under the considered conditions, the subjects could experience involuntary motor response.

  1. The effect of temperature and moisture on electrical resistance, strain sensitivity and crack sensitivity of steel fiber reinforced smart cement composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teomete, Egemen

    2016-07-01

    Earthquakes, material degradations and other environmental factors necessitate structural health monitoring (SHM). Metal foil strain gages used for SHM have low durability and low sensitivity. These factors motivated researchers to work on cement based strain sensors. In this study, the effects of temperature and moisture on electrical resistance, compressive and tensile strain gage factors (strain sensitivity) and crack sensitivity were determined for steel fiber reinforced cement based composite. A rapid increase of electrical resistance at 200 °C was observed due to damage occurring between cement paste, aggregates and steel fibers. The moisture—electrical resistance relationship was investigated. The specimens taken out of the cure were saturated with water and had a moisture content of 9.49%. The minimum electrical resistance was obtained at 9% moisture at which fiber–fiber and fiber–matrix contact was maximum and the water in micro voids was acting as an electrolyte, conducting electrons. The variation of compressive and tensile strain gage factors (strain sensitivities) and crack sensitivity were investigated by conducting compression, split tensile and notched bending tests with different moisture contents. The highest gage factor for the compression test was obtained at optimal moisture content, at which electrical resistance was minimum. The tensile strain gage factor for split tensile test and crack sensitivity increased by decreasing moisture content. The mechanisms between moisture content, electrical resistance, gage factors and crack sensitivity were elucidated. The relations of moisture content with electrical resistance, gage factors and crack sensitivities have been presented for the first time in this study for steel fiber reinforced cement based composites. The results are important for the development of self sensing cement based smart materials.

  2. Increased survival of experimentally evolved antimicrobial peptide-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an animal host

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Adam J; Purves, Joanne; Rolff, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been proposed as new class of antimicrobial drugs, following the increasing prevalence of bacteria resistant to antibiotics. Synthetic AMPs are functional analogues of highly evolutionarily conserved immune effectors in animals and plants, produced in response to microbial infection. Therefore, the proposed therapeutic use of AMPs bears the risk of ‘arming the enemy’: bacteria that evolve resistance to AMPs may be cross-resistant to immune effectors (AMPs) in their hosts. We used a panel of populations of Staphylococcus aureus that were experimentally selected for resistance to a suite of individual AMPs and antibiotics to investigate the ‘arming the enemy’ hypothesis. We tested whether the selected strains showed higher survival in an insect model (Tenebrio molitor) and cross-resistance against other antimicrobials in vitro. A population selected for resistance to the antimicrobial peptide iseganan showed increased in vivo survival, but was not more virulent. We suggest that increased survival of AMP-resistant bacteria almost certainly poses problems to immune-compromised hosts. PMID:25469169

  3. Mechanical flexible and electric fatigue resistant behavior of relaxor ferroelectric terpolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fei; Yang, Wei; Yang, Wen

    2009-08-01

    Uniaxial tension and polarization evolution under cyclic electric field are investigated for poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluorethylene-chlorofluoroethylene) terpolymer films prepared by different annealing conditions. The stress-strain behavior of the terpolymer film exhibits that of polymeric elastomers, with its fracture strain reaching 680%. Structure analysis demonstrates that the polymer chains undergo reorientation, and conformational change from nonpolar to polar phase takes place during uniaxial tension. Under cyclic electric field, the terpolymer film exhibits a narrow polarization loop typical of a ferroelectric relaxor. Conformational change from nonpolar to polar phase also occurs upon the electric field, and it reverses to the nonpolar phase when the field is removed. As the cycle number accumulates, the terpolymer film demonstrates excellent resistance to electric fatigue. Compared to the film annealed at 115 °C, the terpolymer film annealed at 100 °C has a larger volume fraction of crystallite/amorphous interfaces and shows better mechanical flexibility as well as electric fatigue resistance. The mechanical flexible and electric fatigue resistant terpolymer films hold promises for many applications, ranging from embedded sensors and actuators to flexible memory devices.

  4. Increasing ciprofloxacin resistance among prevalent urinary tract bacterial isolates in Gaza Strip, Palestine.

    PubMed

    El Astal, Zakaria

    2005-01-01

    This article presents the incidence of ciprofloxacin resistance among 480 clinical isolates obtained from patients with urinary tract infection (UTI) during January to June 2004 in Gaza Strip, Palestine. The resistance rates observed were 15.0% to ciprofloxacin, 82.5% to amoxycillin, 64.4% to cotrimoxazole, 63.1% to doxycycline, 32.5% to cephalexin, 31.9% to nalidixic acid, and 10.0% to amikacin. High resistance to ciprofloxacin was detected among Acinetobacter haemolyticus (28.6%), Staphylococcus saprophyticus (25.0%),Pseudomonas aeruginosa (20.0%), Klebsiella pneumonia (17.6%), and Escherichia coli (12.0%). Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ciprofloxacin evenly ranged from 4 to 32 mu g/mL with a mean of 25.0 mu g/mL. This study indicates emerging ciprofloxacin resistance among urinary tract infection isolates. Increasing resistance against ciprofloxacin demands coordinated monitoring of its activity and rational use of the antibiotics. PMID:16192681

  5. A New Concept for Non-Volatile Memory: The Electric-Pulse Induced Resistive Change Effect in Colossal Magnetoresistive Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, S. Q.; Wu, N. J.; Ignatiev, A.

    2001-01-01

    A novel electric pulse-induced resistive change (EPIR) effect has been found in thin film colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) materials, and has shown promise for the development of resistive, nonvolatile memory. The EPIR effect is induced by the application of low voltage (< 4 V) and short duration (< 20 ns) electrical pulses across a thin film sample of a CMR material at room temperature and under no applied magnetic field. The pulse can directly either increase or decrease the resistance of the thin film sample depending on pulse polarity. The sample resistance change has been shown to be over two orders of magnitude, and is nonvolatile after pulsing. The sample resistance can also be changed through multiple levels - as many as 50 have been shown. Such a device can provide a way for the development of a new kind of nonvolatile multiple-valued memory with high density, fast write/read speed, low power-consumption, and potential high radiation-hardness.

  6. Electric field-induced coexistence of nonvolatile resistive and magnetization switching in Pt/NiO/Nb:SrTiO3 heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Meng; Zhu, Yongdan; Wang, Qiangwen; Wei, Maocai; Liu, Xiaolian; Zhang, Feng; Hu, Cheng; Zhang, Tingting; Qiu, Da; Li, Meiya; Xiong, Rui

    2016-07-01

    We report the coexistence of nonvolatile resistive and magnetization switching in Pt/NiO/Nb:SrTiO3 heterostructures. These structures exhibit bipolar resistive switching (RS) behavior with multilevel RS characteristics, a maximum RS ratio of 105, and stable endurance properties. Under simple application of voltage pulses, the saturation magnetization of the NiO layer increases by up to three times in the different resistance states. This electrical modulation of both the resistive and magnetization switching properties is attributed to the migration of oxygen vacancies and charge trapping and detrapping at the heterojunction interface. Our results provide a pathway towards the electrical switching of both resistance and magnetization, which is likely to be useful for RS and magnetic multifunctional device applications.

  7. A theoretical study of electrical and thermal response in resistance spot welding

    SciTech Connect

    Na, S.J.; Park, S.W.

    1996-08-01

    The effect of contact resistance including constriction and contamination resistance has been a major hurdle for the thermoelectrical analysis of the resistance spot welding process. In this paper, a simple model was suggested and used for calculating the electrical and thermal response of the resistance spot welding process to investigate the influence of contacting forces on the formation of weld nuggets. The electrode surface of the contact interface was assumed to be axisymmetric and its microasperities to have a trapezoidal cross-section. These microasperities were considered as the one-dimensional contact resistance elements in the finite element formulation. The contamination film was assumed to be a nonconducting oxide layer, which is very brittle, so that it is broken to some number of pieces when a contacting pressure is being applied. The crushed films were assumed to be distributed at regular intervals and to conserve their size and number during the welding process. The simulation results revealed that the proposed model can be successfully used to predict the effect of the contact resistance on the electrical and thermal response of the resistance spot welding process.

  8. Application of electrical resistivity tomography technique for investigation of landslides: a case from Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drahor, Mahmut G.; Göktürkler, Gökhan; Berge, Meriç A.; Kurtulmuş, T. Özgür

    2006-05-01

    Electrical resistivity imaging is a widely used tool in near surface geophysical surveys for investigation of various geological, environmental and engineering problems including landslide. In this study, an electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) survey was conducted in a landslide area, located in the Söke district of Aydın, Turkey. In 2003, the Neogene-aged units on the slope next to a newly built school building became unstable due to an excavation work and moved after a heavy rainfall. The resulting landslide partly covered the school. The authors carried out a 2-D resistivity survey along three profiles over the landslide mass using a Wenner configuration. It yielded useful information about the geometry and characteristics of the landslide. In addition, a 2-D synthetic resistivity modelling study was carried out to understand the response of the resistivity method to a landslide problem before the field surveys. Eight boreholes were also drilled in the landslide area. Both the drilling and resistivity results indicated the presence of a fault in the site. Also, the resistivity data from the line measured along the axis of the landslide revealed the surface of rupture.

  9. Electrical Resistivity Tomography in the characterisation of wetting patterns of historical masonry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-González, Laura; Gomez-Heras, Miguel; Ortiz de Cosca, Raquel Otero; García-Morales, Soledad

    2016-04-01

    Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) is a geophysical technique widely used to identify subsurface structures based on electrical resistivity measurements made at the surface. In recent years this technique has been used for surveying historic buildings and characterise the subsurface of walls by using non-invasive EKG electrodes. This methods is used to locate wet areas based on the lower electrical resistivity wet materials have in relation to dry ones. A good knowledge of the wetting patterns of historic buildings during, for example, rainfalls is crucial to understand the decay processes that take place in the building and plan interventions. This paper presents results of transects of Electric Resistivity Tomography of walls of the Monastery of Santa Maria de Mave (Palencia, Spain), a 9th century Romanesque building, during rainfall. ERT transects were performed with a GeoTom device (Geolog2000) in areas with and without buttresses to understand how this architectural detail affected the wetting dynamics of the building. The ERT results were integrated with other resistivity-based techniques and Thermohygrometric survey in a GIS and showed how lower resistivity surface measurements ERT correspond with areas of higher humidity. Resistivity-based techniques measured and evaporation focal points take in the interior of the building mark the outer ground level. The highest moisture content measurements do not always correspond to the visibly most damaged areas of the wall. The consecutive ERT transects show the wall getting wetter as rainfall progresses. The comparison of the measurements obtained of a wall affected by water obtained with GIS mapping, allowed to quickly studying the development of moisture in the wall over time, which is essential for a correct diagnosis of the building. Research funded by Madrid's Regional Government project Geomateriales 2 S2013/MIT-2914

  10. Electrical resistivity image of the South Atlantic continental margin derived from onshore and offshore magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapinos, G.; Weckmann, U.; Jegen-Kulcsar, M.; Meqbel, N.; Neska, A.; Katjiuongua, T. T.; Hoelz, S.; Ritter, O.

    2016-01-01

    We present a deep electrical resistivity image from the passive continental margin in Namibia. The approximately 700 km long magnetotelluric profile follows the Walvis Ridge offshore, continues onshore across the Kaoko Mobile Belt and reaches onto the Congo Craton. Two-dimensional inversion reveals moderately resistive material offshore, atypically low for oceanic lithosphere, reaching depths of 15-20 km. Such moderate resistivities are consistent with seismic P wave velocity models, which suggest up to 35 km thick crust. The Neoproterozoic rocks of the Kaoko Mobile Belt are resistive, but NNW-striking major shear-zones are imaged as subvertical, conductive structures in the upper and middle crust. Since the geophysical imprint of the shear zones is intact, opening of the South Atlantic in the Cretaceous did not alter the middle crust. The transition into the cratonic region coincides with a deepening of the high-resistive material to depths of more than 60 km.

  11. Abnormal drop in electrical resistivity with impurity doping of single-crystal Ag

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Young; Oh, Min-Wook; Lee, Seunghun; Cho, Yong Chan; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Lee, Geun Woo; Cho, Chae-Ryong; Park, Chul Hong; Jeong, Se-Young

    2014-01-01

    Resistivity is an intrinsic feature that specifies the electrical properties of a material and depends on electron-phonon scattering near room temperature. Reducing the resistivity of a metal to its potentially lowest value requires eliminating grain boundaries and impurities, but to date few studies have focused on reducing the intrinsic resistivity of a pure metal itself. We could reduce the intrinsic resistivity of single-crystal Ag, which has an almost perfect structure, by impurity doping it with Cu. This paper presents our results: resistivity was reduced to 1.35 μΩ·cm at room temperature after 3 mol% Cu-doping of single-crystal Ag. Various mechanisms were examined in an attempt to explain the abnormal behavior. PMID:24965478

  12. Activated Protein C Resistance Does Not Increase Risk for Recurrent Stroke or Death in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Christoph; Sonntag, Natalie; Schleef, Michael; Rondak, Ina-Christine; Poppert, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Background Activated protein C (APC) resistance is the most common inherited prothrombotic disorder. The role of APC resistance in ischemic stroke is controversially discussed. Objectives The aim of this single center follow up study was to investigate the effect of APC resistance on stroke recurrence and survival in stroke patients. Patients/Methods We retrospectively identified 966 patients who had had an ischemic stroke or transitory ischemic attack (TIA) and in whom laboratory tests for APC resistance had been conducted. These patients were contacted to determine the primary outcomes of recurrent ischemic stroke or death. Results A total of 858 patients with an average follow up time of 8.48 years were included. APC resistance did not influence cumulative incidence functions for stroke free and total survival. In multivariate analyses, crude and adjusted hazard ratios for recurrent stroke as well as for death where not significantly increased in patients with APC resistance. This also applies to the subgroups of young patients, patients with cryptogenic stroke and patients with atrial fibrillation. Conclusion APC-resistance is not a risk factor for subsequent stroke or death in patients with a first ischemic stroke or TIA. Testing for APC-resistance in stroke patients therefore cannot be routinely recommended. PMID:27508300

  13. Demonstration of Combined Zero-Valent Iron and Electrical Resistance Heating for In Situ Trichloroethene Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Macbeth, Tamzen; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Mackley, Rob D.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Sandberg, Greg; Powell, Thomas; Powers, Jeff; Pitre, Emile; Michalsen, Mandy M.; Ballock-Dixon, Sage; Zhong, Lirong; Oostrom, Martinus

    2011-06-27

    The effectiveness of in situ treatment using zero-valent iron to remediate sites with non-aqueous phase or significant sediment-associated contaminant mass can be limited by relatively low rates of mass transfer to bring contaminants in contact with the reactive media. For a field test in a trichloroethene source area, combining moderate-temperature (maximum 50oC) subsurface electrical resistance heating with in situ ZVI treatment was shown to accelerate dechlorination and dissolution rates by a factor of 4 to 6 based on organic daughter products and a factor 8-16 using a chloride concentrations. A mass-discharge-based analysis was used to evaluate reaction, dissolution, and volatilization at ambient groundwater temperature (~10oC) and as temperature was increased up to about 50oC. Increased reaction and contaminant dissolution were observed with increased temperature, but volatilization was minimal during the test because in situ reactions maintained low aqueous-phase TCE concentrations.

  14. GM trees with increased resistance to herbivores: trait efficiency and their potential to promote tree growth

    PubMed Central

    Hjältén, Joakim; Axelsson, E. Petter

    2015-01-01

    Climate change, as well as a more intensive forestry, is expected to increase the risk of damage by pests and pathogens on trees, which can already be a severe problem in tree plantations. Recent development of biotechnology theoretically allows for resistance enhancement that could help reduce these risks but we still lack a comprehensive understanding of benefits and tradeoffs with pest resistant GM (genetically modified) trees. We synthesized the current knowledge on the effectiveness of GM forest trees with increased resistance to herbivores. There is ample evidence that induction of exogenous Bacillus thuringiensis genes reduce performance of target pests whereas upregulation of endogenous resistance traits e.g., phenolics, generates variable results. Our review identified very few studies estimating the realized benefits in tree growth of GM trees in the field. This is concerning as the realized benefit with insect resistant GM plants seems to be context-dependent and likely manifested only if herbivore pressure is sufficiently high. Future studies of secondary pest species and resistance evolution in pest to GM trees should be prioritized. But most importantly we need more long-term field tests to evaluate the benefits and risks with pest resistant GM trees. PMID:25983736

  15. Upper mantle electrical resistivity structure beneath back-arc spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seama, N.; Shibata, Y.; Kimura, M.; Shindo, H.; Matsuno, T.; Nogi, Y.; Okino, K.

    2011-12-01

    We compare four electrical resistivity structure images of the upper mantle across back-arc spreading centers (Mariana Trough at 18 N and 13 N, and the Eastern Lau at 19.7 S and 21.3 S) to provide geophysical constraints on issues of mantle dynamics beneath the back-arc spreading system related to the subducting slab. The central Mariana Trough at 18 N has the full spreading rate of 25 km/Myr, and shows characteristic slow-spreading features; existence of median valley neovolcanic zone and "Bull's eyes" mantle Bouguer anomaly (MBA) along the axes. On the other hand, the southern Mariana Trough at 13 N shows an EPR type axial relief in morphology and lower MBA than that in the central Mariana Trough (Kitada et al., 2006), suggesting abundance of magma supply, even though the full spreading rate is 35 km/Myr that is categorized as a slow spreading ridge. At the Eastern Lau spreading center, crustal thickness and morphology vary systematically with arc proximity and shows the opposed trends against spreading rate: The full spreading rate increases from 65 km/Myr at 21.3 S to 85 km/Myr at 19.7 S, while the crustal thicknesses decrease together with morphology transitions from shallow peaked volcanic highs to a deeper flat axis (Martinez et al., 2006). Matsuno et al. (2010) provides a resistivity structure image of the upper mantle across the central Mariana subduction system, which contains several key features: There is an uppermost resistive layer with a thickness of 80-100 km beneath the central Mariana Trough, suggesting dry residual from the plate accretion process. But there is no evidence for a conductive feature beneath the back-arc spreading center at 18 N, and this feature is clearly independent from the conductive region beneath the volcanic arc below 60 km depth that reflects melting and hydration driven by water release from the subducting slab. The resultant upper mantle resistivity structure well support that the melt supply is not abundant, resulting in

  16. Aerodynamic resistance reduction of electric and hybrid vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The generation of an EHV aerodynamic data base was initiated by conducting full-scale wind tunnel tests on 16 vehicles. Zero-yaw drag coefficients ranged from a high of 0.58 for a boxey delivery van and an open roadster to a low of about 0.34 for a current 4-passenger prototype automobile which was designed with aerodynamics as an integrated parameter. Characteristic effects of aspect ratio or fineness ratio which might appear if electric vehicle shape proportions were to vary significantly from current automobiles were identified. Some preliminary results indicate a 5 to 10% variation in drag over the range of interest. Effective drag coefficient wind-weighting factors over J227a driving cycles in the presence of annual mean wind fields were identified. Such coefficients, when properly weighted, were found to be from 5 to 65% greater than the zero-yaw drag coefficient in the cases presented. A vehicle aerodynamics bibliography of over 160 entries, in six general categories is included.

  17. Increased water activity reduces the thermal resistance of Salmonella enterica in peanut butter.

    PubMed

    He, Yingshu; Li, Ye; Salazar, Joelle K; Yang, Jingyun; Tortorello, Mary Lou; Zhang, Wei

    2013-08-01

    Increased water activity in peanut butter significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the heat resistance of desiccation-stressed Salmonella enterica serotypes treated at 90 °C. The difference in thermal resistance was less notable when strains were treated at 126 °C. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed minor morphological changes of S. enterica cells resulting from desiccation and rehydration processes in peanut oil. PMID:23728806

  18. Sympathetic vasomotor outflow and blood pressure increase during exercise with expiratory resistance.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Keisho; Itoh, Yuka; Saito, Mitsuru; Koike, Teruhiko; Ishida, Koji

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the effect of increasing expiratory muscle work on sympathetic vasoconstrictor outflow and arterial blood pressure (BP) during dynamic exercise. We hypothesized that expiratory muscle fatigue would elicit increases in sympathetic vasomotor outflow and BP during submaximal exercise. The subjects performed four submaximal exercise tests; two were maximal expiratory pressure (PE max) tests and two were muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) tests. In each test, the subjects performed two 10-min exercises at 40% peak oxygen uptake using a cycle ergometer in a semirecumbent position [spontaneous breathing for 5 min and voluntary hyperpnoea with and without expiratory resistive breathing for 5 min (breathing frequency: 60 breaths/min, inspiratory and expiratory times were set at 0.5 sec)]. PE max was estimated before and immediately after exercises. MSNA was recorded via microneurography of the right median nerve at the elbow. PE max decreased following exercise with expiratory resistive breathing, while no change was found without resistance. A progressive increase in MSNA burst frequency (BF) appeared during exercise with expiratory resistance (MSNA BF, without resistance: +22 ± 5%, with resistance: +44 ± 8%, P < 0.05), accompanied by an augmentation of BP (mean BP, without resistance: +5 ± 2%, with resistance: +29 ± 5%, P < 0.05). These results suggest that an enhancement of expiratory muscle activity leads to increases in sympathetic vasomotor outflow and BP during dynamic leg exercise. PMID:26019293

  19. Sympathetic vasomotor outflow and blood pressure increase during exercise with expiratory resistance

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Keisho; Itoh, Yuka; Saito, Mitsuru; Koike, Teruhiko; Ishida, Koji

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the effect of increasing expiratory muscle work on sympathetic vasoconstrictor outflow and arterial blood pressure (BP) during dynamic exercise. We hypothesized that expiratory muscle fatigue would elicit increases in sympathetic vasomotor outflow and BP during submaximal exercise. The subjects performed four submaximal exercise tests; two were maximal expiratory pressure (PEmax) tests and two were muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) tests. In each test, the subjects performed two 10-min exercises at 40% peak oxygen uptake using a cycle ergometer in a semirecumbent position [spontaneous breathing for 5 min and voluntary hyperpnoea with and without expiratory resistive breathing for 5 min (breathing frequency: 60 breaths/min, inspiratory and expiratory times were set at 0.5 sec)]. PEmax was estimated before and immediately after exercises. MSNA was recorded via microneurography of the right median nerve at the elbow. PEmax decreased following exercise with expiratory resistive breathing, while no change was found without resistance. A progressive increase in MSNA burst frequency (BF) appeared during exercise with expiratory resistance (MSNA BF, without resistance: +22 ± 5%, with resistance: +44 ± 8%, P < 0.05), accompanied by an augmentation of BP (mean BP, without resistance: +5 ± 2%, with resistance: +29 ± 5%, P < 0.05). These results suggest that an enhancement of expiratory muscle activity leads to increases in sympathetic vasomotor outflow and BP during dynamic leg exercise. PMID:26019293

  20. Electrical resistivity characterization and defect detection on a geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) on an experimental site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirieix, C.; Fernández Martínez, J. L.; Riss, J.; Genelle, F.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we analyze the onsite characterization of a geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) that serves to ensure the impermeability of a landfill cap by DC electrical methods. The imaging of the GCL geoelectrical properties is a challenging problem because it is a very thin (between 4 and 7 mm thick) and resistive layer (from 100,000 to 2,000,000 Ω·m) depending on meteorological conditions and aging. We compare results obtained using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) using two different kinds of arrays (dipole-dipole DD and Wenner-Schlumberger) on an experimental site with engineered defects. To confirm these results and to find the real onsite GCL resistivity we have performed sampling of the posterior distribution of this parameter using vertical electrical sounding (VES) inversions. Different VES methods were extracted from ERT with DD array and converted into a Schlumberger array. As a main conclusion the dipole-dipole array provides a better resistivity resolution of the defects than the Wenner-Schlumberger array. On ERT images, the defect detection seems to be impossible if the GCL has very high resistivity, as it happened when it was put in place. Taking into account the equivalence rules, the inversions are in both cases (ERT and VES) compatible. The GCL resistivity estimated from PSO (particle swarm optimization) varies from 3.0 105 to 1.106 Ω·m depending on saturation conditions during the twenty first months of its placing. Then, the resistivity dropped to 4.104-9.104 Ω·m, indicating a probable chemical damage of the GCL due to aging. Finally the fact that the VES inversions are solved via PSO sampling allows for the detection of a very thin and resistive layer and opens the possibility of performing micro VES surveys along the landfill to detect possible GCL defects.

  1. Ion Permeability of Artificial Membranes Evaluated by Diffusion Potential and Electrical Resistance Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shlyonsky, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    In the present article, a novel model of artificial membranes that provides efficient assistance in teaching the origins of diffusion potentials is proposed. These membranes are made of polycarbonate filters fixed to 12-mm plastic rings and then saturated with a mixture of creosol and "n"-decane. The electrical resistance and potential…

  2. High School Students' Understanding of Resistance in Simple Series Electric Circuits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liegeois, Laurent; Mullet, Etienne

    2002-01-01

    Studies the understanding that 8-12 grade high school students were able to develop with regard to the interrelationships between resistance, potential difference, and current concepts (Ohm's law). Explores the immediate effects of exposure to electricity courses on the intuitive mastery of these relationships. (Contains 32 references.)…

  3. Electrical resistance determination of actual contact area of cold welded metal joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hordon, M. J.

    1970-01-01

    Method measures the area of the bonded zone of a compression weld by observing the electrical resistance of the weld zone while the load changes from full compression until the joint ruptures under tension. The ratio of bonding force to maximum tensile load varies considerably.

  4. Concerning Proposed Superconducting Fluctuations in the Electrical Resistivity of Bulk Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, B. R.; Bass, J.; Caplin, A. D.; Dalimin, M. N. B.

    1980-03-01

    Bulk superconducting fluctuation contributions to rounding of the electrical resistivity of Al just above Tc are demonstrated to be at least 5 to 10 times smaller than claimed recently by Sinvani, Levy, and Greenfield. Metallurgical artifacts provide a more plausible explanation for all of the measured rounding.

  5. Salicylic acid biosynthesis is enhanced and contributes to increased biotrophic pathogen resistance in Arabidopsis hybrids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Li, Bosheng; Zheng, Xiao-yu; Li, Jigang; Yang, Mei; Dong, Xinnian; He, Guangming; An, Chengcai; Deng, Xing Wang

    2015-01-01

    Heterosis, the phenotypic superiority of a hybrid over its parents, has been demonstrated for many traits in Arabidopsis thaliana, but its effect on defence remains largely unexplored. Here, we show that hybrids between some A. thaliana accessions show increased resistance to the biotrophic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000. Comparisons of transcriptomes between these hybrids and their parents after inoculation reveal that several key salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis genes are significantly upregulated in hybrids. Moreover, SA levels are higher in hybrids than in either parent. Increased resistance to Pst DC3000 is significantly compromised in hybrids of pad4 mutants in which the SA biosynthesis pathway is blocked. Finally, increased histone H3 acetylation of key SA biosynthesis genes correlates with their upregulation in infected hybrids. Our data demonstrate that enhanced activation of SA biosynthesis in A. thaliana hybrids may contribute to their increased resistance to a biotrophic bacterial pathogen. PMID:26065719

  6. Salicylic acid biosynthesis is enhanced and contributes to increased biotrophic pathogen resistance in Arabidopsis hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Li, Bosheng; Zheng, Xiao-yu; Li, Jigang; Yang, Mei; Dong, Xinnian; He, Guangming; An, Chengcai; Deng, Xing Wang

    2015-01-01

    Heterosis, the phenotypic superiority of a hybrid over its parents, has been demonstrated for many traits in Arabidopsis thaliana, but its effect on defence remains largely unexplored. Here, we show that hybrids between some A. thaliana accessions show increased resistance to the biotrophic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000. Comparisons of transcriptomes between these hybrids and their parents after inoculation reveal that several key salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis genes are significantly upregulated in hybrids. Moreover, SA levels are higher in hybrids than in either parent. Increased resistance to Pst DC3000 is significantly compromised in hybrids of pad4 mutants in which the SA biosynthesis pathway is blocked. Finally, increased histone H3 acetylation of key SA biosynthesis genes correlates with their upregulation in infected hybrids. Our data demonstrate that enhanced activation of SA biosynthesis in A. thaliana hybrids may contribute to their increased resistance to a biotrophic bacterial pathogen. PMID:26065719

  7. Application of electrical resistivity tomography to map lithological differences and subsurface structures (Eastern Sudetes, Czech Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, Dominika; Stan-Kłeczek, Iwona

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the subsurface lithological variability and thickness of each metamorphic rocks unit by means of geophysical methods, which were presented within the framework of SEDIBUD. Research was performed on the ridge and the steep eastern slope of the Orlik massif (1204 m) in the Hrubý Jesenik range of the Eastern Sudetes, the Czech Republic. To obtain a spatial image of a geological rock mass, the non-invasive and relatively rapid method of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was used, which resulted in the creation of six profiles using the Dipole-Dipole and Wenner-Schlumberger arrays. As complementary methods, vertical electrical sounding (VES) and seismic refraction tomography were chosen. Fifteen measuring points along two profiles obtained by vertical electrical sounding allowed the determination of the following in the vertical section layers of different resistivity and thickness at direct points in contact primarily with Devonian quartzite rocks and weathered covers. In a series of field studies, a four-layered rock mass was examined in which the first layer is of fine-grained materials with medium- and large-size clasts, the second layer is quartzite, the third is gneiss and the fourth is phyllite. The five profiles measured by seismic refraction tomography made it possible to draw the boundary between the studied phyllites, gneisses and quartzites. In addition, geophysical surveys and the results of mineralogical composition analysis allowed us to determine the nature and thickness of the weathered layers present on the massif area, which, in the upper sections, are predominantly a clayey loam partially covered with blocks. The inclination of the slope is associated with an increase in the fraction of coarse material. The majority of the thickness of these layers is related to the local flattened surfaces and the presence of numerous streams, which contributed to the accumulation of the sediments that were also

  8. Chemical bonding, optical constants, and electrical resistivity of sputter-deposited gallium oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ramana, C. V. Rubio, E. J.; Barraza, C. D.; Miranda Gallardo, A.; McPeak, Samantha; Kotru, Sushma; Grant, J. T.

    2014-01-28

    Gallium oxide (Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin films were made by sputter deposition employing a Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic target for sputtering. The depositions were made over a wide range of substrate temperatures (T{sub s}), from 25 to 600 °C. The effect of T{sub s} on the chemical bonding, surface morphological characteristics, optical constants, and electrical properties of the grown films was evaluated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), and four-point probe measurements. XPS analyses indicate the binding energies (BE) of the Ga 2p doublet, i.e., the Ga 2p{sub 3/2} and Ga 2p{sub 1/2} peaks, are located at 1118.0 and 1145.0 eV, respectively, characterizing gallium in its highest chemical oxidation state (Ga{sup 3+}) in the grown films. The core level XPS spectra of O 1s indicate that the peak is centered at a BE ∼ 531 eV, which is also characteristic of Ga-O bonds in the Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase. The granular morphology of the nanocrystalline Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films was evident from AFM measurements, which also indicate that the surface roughness of the films increases from 0.5 nm to 3.0 nm with increasing T{sub s}. The SE analyses indicate that the index of refraction (n) of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films increases with increasing T{sub s} due to improved structural quality and packing density of the films. The n(λ) of all the Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films follows the Cauchy's dispersion relation. The room temperature electrical resistivity was high (∼200 Ω-cm) for amorphous Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films grown at T{sub s} = RT-300 °C and decreased to ∼1 Ω-cm for nanocrystalline Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films grown at T{sub s} ≥ 500–600 °C. A correlation between growth conditions, microstructure, optical constants, and electrical properties of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films is derived.

  9. Characterization and monitoring of subsurface processes using parallel computing and electrical resistivity imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Truex, Michael J.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Marble, Justin

    2011-12-01

    This newsletter discusses recent advancement in subsurface resistivity characterization and monitoring capabilities. The BC Cribs field desiccation treatability test resistivity monitoring data is use an example to demonstrate near-real time 3D subsurface imaging capabilities. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a method of imaging the electrical resistivity distribution of the subsurface. An ERT data collection system consists of an array of electrodes, deployed on the ground surface or within boreholes, that are connected to a control unit which can access each electrode independently (Figure 1). A single measurement is collected by injecting current across a pair of current injection electrodes (source and sink), and measuring the resulting potential generated across a pair of potential measurement electrodes (positive and negative). An ERT data set is generated by collecting many such measurements using strategically selected current and potential electrode pairs. This data set is then processed using an inversion algorithm, which reconstructs an estimate (or image) of the electrical conductivity (i.e. the inverse of resistivity) distribution that gave rise to the measured data.

  10. An experimentally validated contactless acoustic energy transfer model with resistive-reactive electrical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, S.; Gray, M.; Erturk, A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper investigates analytical modeling and experimental validation of Ultrasonic Acoustic Energy Transfer (UAET) for low-power electricity transfer to exploit in wireless applications ranging from medical implants to underwater sensor systems. A piezoelectric receiver bar is excited by incident acoustic waves originating from a source of known strength located at a specific distance from the receiver. The receiver is a free-free piezoelectric cylinder operating in the 33- mode of piezoelectricity with a fundamental resonance frequency above the audible frequency range. In order to extract the electrical power output, the piezoelectric receiver bar is shunted to a generalized resistive-reactive circuit. The goal is to quantify the electrical power delivered to the load (connected to the receiver) in terms of the source strength. Experimental validations are presented along with parameter optimization studies. Sensitivity of the electrical power output to the excitation frequency in the neighborhood of the receiver's underwater resonance frequency, source-to-receiver distance, and source-strength level are reported. Resistive and resistive-reactive electrical loading cases are discussed for performance enhancement and frequency-wise robustness. Simulations and experiments reveal that the presented multiphysics analytical model for UAET can be used to predict the coupled system dynamics with very good accuracy.

  11. Leishmania amazonensis: Increase in ecto-ATPase activity and parasite burden of vinblastine-resistant protozoa.

    PubMed

    Giarola, Naira Lígia Lima; Silveira, Thaís Souza; Inacio, Job Domingos Filho; Vieira, Lisvane Paes; Almeida-Amaral, Elmo Eduardo; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2014-11-01

    Leishmania amazonensis is a protozoan parasite that induces mucocutaneous and diffuse cutaneous lesions upon infection. An important component in treatment failure is the emergence of drug-resistant parasites. It is necessary to clarify the mechanism of resistance that occurs in these parasites to develop effective drugs for leishmaniasis treatment. Promastigote forms of L. amazonensis were selected by gradually increasing concentrations of vinblastine and were maintained under continuous drug pressure (resistant cells). Vinblastine-resistant L. amazonensis proliferated similarly to control parasites. However, resistant cells showed changes in the cell shape, irregular flagella and a decrease in rhodamine 123 accumulation, which are factors associated with the development of resistance, suggesting the MDR phenotype. The Mg-dependent-ecto-ATPase, an enzyme located on cell surface of Leishmania parasites, is involved in the acquisition of purine and participates in the adhesion and infectivity process. We compared control and resistant L. amazonensis ecto-enzymatic activities. The control and resistant Leishmania ecto-ATPase activities were 16.0 ± 1.5 nmol Pi × h(-1) × 10(-7) cells and 40.0 ± 4.4 nmol Pi × h(-1) × 10(-7)cells, respectively. Interestingly, the activity of other ecto-enzymes present on the L. amazonensis cell surface, the ecto-5' and 3'-nucleotidases and ecto-phosphatase, did not increase. The level of ecto-ATPase modulation is related to the degree of resistance of the cell. Cells resistant to 10 μM and 60 μM of vinblastine have ecto-ATPase activities of 22.7 ± 0.4 nmol Pi × h(-1) × 10(-7) cells and 33.8 ± 0.8 nmol Pi × h(-1) × 10(-7)cells, respectively. In vivo experiments showed that both lesion size and parasite burden in mice infected with resistant parasites are greater than those of L. amazonensis control cells. Furthermore, our data established a relationship between the increase in ecto-ATPase activity and greater infectivity and

  12. Uncertainty quantification of CO₂ saturation estimated from electrical resistance tomography data at the Cranfield site

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Xianjin; Chen, Xiao; Carrigan, Charles R.; Ramirez, Abelardo L.

    2014-06-03

    A parametric bootstrap approach is presented for uncertainty quantification (UQ) of CO₂ saturation derived from electrical resistance tomography (ERT) data collected at the Cranfield, Mississippi (USA) carbon sequestration site. There are many sources of uncertainty in ERT-derived CO₂ saturation, but we focus on how the ERT observation errors propagate to the estimated CO₂ saturation in a nonlinear inversion process. Our UQ approach consists of three steps. We first estimated the observational errors from a large number of reciprocal ERT measurements. The second step was to invert the pre-injection baseline data and the resulting resistivity tomograph was used as the priormore » information for nonlinear inversion of time-lapse data. We assigned a 3% random noise to the baseline model. Finally, we used a parametric bootstrap method to obtain bootstrap CO₂ saturation samples by deterministically solving a nonlinear inverse problem many times with resampled data and resampled baseline models. Then the mean and standard deviation of CO₂ saturation were calculated from the bootstrap samples. We found that the maximum standard deviation of CO₂ saturation was around 6% with a corresponding maximum saturation of 30% for a data set collected 100 days after injection began. There was no apparent spatial correlation between the mean and standard deviation of CO₂ saturation but the standard deviation values increased with time as the saturation increased. The uncertainty in CO₂ saturation also depends on the ERT reciprocal error threshold used to identify and remove noisy data and inversion constraints such as temporal roughness. Five hundred realizations requiring 3.5 h on a single 12-core node were needed for the nonlinear Monte Carlo inversion to arrive at stationary variances while the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) stochastic inverse approach may expend days for a global search. This indicates that UQ of 2D or 3D ERT inverse problems can be performed

  13. Uncertainty quantification of CO₂ saturation estimated from electrical resistance tomography data at the Cranfield site

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xianjin; Chen, Xiao; Carrigan, Charles R.; Ramirez, Abelardo L.

    2014-06-03

    A parametric bootstrap approach is presented for uncertainty quantification (UQ) of CO₂ saturation derived from electrical resistance tomography (ERT) data collected at the Cranfield, Mississippi (USA) carbon sequestration site. There are many sources of uncertainty in ERT-derived CO₂ saturation, but we focus on how the ERT observation errors propagate to the estimated CO₂ saturation in a nonlinear inversion process. Our UQ approach consists of three steps. We first estimated the observational errors from a large number of reciprocal ERT measurements. The second step was to invert the pre-injection baseline data and the resulting resistivity tomograph was used as the prior information for nonlinear inversion of time-lapse data. We assigned a 3% random noise to the baseline model. Finally, we used a parametric bootstrap method to obtain bootstrap CO₂ saturation samples by deterministically solving a nonlinear inverse problem many times with resampled data and resampled baseline models. Then the mean and standard deviation of CO₂ saturation were calculated from the bootstrap samples. We found that the maximum standard deviation of CO₂ saturation was around 6% with a corresponding maximum saturation of 30% for a data set collected 100 days after injection began. There was no apparent spatial correlation between the mean and standard deviation of CO₂ saturation but the standard deviation values increased with time as the saturation increased. The uncertainty in CO₂ saturation also depends on the ERT reciprocal error threshold used to identify and remove noisy data and inversion constraints such as temporal roughness. Five hundred realizations requiring 3.5 h on a single 12-core node were needed for the nonlinear Monte Carlo inversion to arrive at stationary variances while the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) stochastic inverse approach may expend days for a global search. This indicates that UQ of 2D or 3D ERT inverse problems can be performed on a

  14. Post-remediation evaluation of a LNAPL site using electrical resistivity imaging.

    PubMed

    Halihan, Todd; Paxton, Stanley; Graham, Ivy; Fenstemaker, Thomas; Riley, Matt

    2005-04-01

    Present understanding of the earth's subsurface is most often derived from samples at discrete points (wells) and interpolations or models that interpret the space between these points. Electrical resistivity imaging techniques have produced an improved capability to map contaminants (especially NAPLs--NonAqueous Phase Liquids) away from traditional wells using actual field data. Electrical resistivity image data, confirmed by drilling, have demonstrated that LNAPL (Light NAPL--less dense than water, such as gasoline) contaminants exist outside of a delineated and remediated area in Golden, Oklahoma. The data also demonstrate that LNAPL exists between monitoring and remediation wells which indicate low contaminant levels when sampled. Additionally, the electrical images provided the drilling location with the highest concentration of hydrocarbon ever found on the site, even after two phases of remediation work had been performed, although the sampling protocols varied. The results indicate that current methods of post-remediation site characterization are inadequate for complete site characterization. PMID:15798793

  15. Structure-property relationships in Waspaloy via small angle scattering and electrical resistivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Whelchel, R.; Gerhardt, Dr. Rosario; Littrell, Ken

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties in superalloys are controlled by the distribution of the {gamma}{prime} precipitate phase. Electrical measurements have been shown to be sensitive to certain aspects of the precipitation process and show promise for predicting the evolving microstructural state in superalloys. Aging experiments were conducted on Waspaloy samples for temperatures between 600 and 950 C for times ranging from 2min to 500h. Particle size distributions were obtained by modeling of small angle scattering (SAS) data, whereas, small precipitate size information, strain, and lattice mismatch data were obtained from X-ray diffraction. The microstructural information was then used to create a figure of merit of electron scattering intended to correlate electrical properties to the precipitate microstructure. The proposed figure of merit shows an empirical correlation with the electrical resistivity data, demonstrating the sensitivity of the resistivity measurements to the precipitation process and coarsening behavior.

  16. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography: a powerful tool for landslide monitoring?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, A.

    2011-12-01

    The extreme rainfall events and the quick snowmelt occurrences play an important role in the triggering of the landslides. The occurrence of one of these factors can determine the variation of water content in the first layers of the subsoil and as a consequence a quick soil saturation inducing both an increase in pore-water pressures and the overloaded of the slopes progressively collapsing. The electrical resistivity, self-potential, electromagnetic induction and GPR methods can be considered as the most appropriate for assessing the presence of water in the underground. Such methods allow us to study the behavior of water content over much wider and deeper areas than those offered by traditional methods (thermo-gravimetric, tensiometric, TDR, etc) based on spot measures and concerning small volumes. In particular, the Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), which has already proved to be a powerful tool both for the geometrical reconstruction of a landslide body (location of sliding surface, estimation of the thickness of the slide material) and the individuation of high water content areas, can be considered as an alternative tool to be employed for a qualitative and quantitative water content monitoring in the first layers of the subsoil. Indeed, time-lapse 2D ERT can be tested in order to gather information on the temporal and spatial patterns of water infiltration processes and water content variation. This work reports the preliminary results from a new prototype system planned to obtain time-lapse 2D ERTs, TDR and precipitation measurements in two landslide areas located in the Southern Apennine chain (Italy). The system was planned with the aim to estimate the variation of the resistivity parameter on a long period considering the water content variation, the rain water infiltration and the seasonal changes. The prototype system, linked to a pc used for storing data and managing the time interval acquisition, consists of: a resistivimeter connected to a

  17. Subsurface electrical resistivity structure around the Noubi fault system, central Japan, by MT survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omura, K.; Matsuda, T.; Yamada, R.

    2009-12-01

    Subsurface electrical resistivity around active faults is an important property to investigate the position and the geometry of the faults, the scale of the fracture zones related to the fault activity, and the amount of water and/or clay minerals in fault zones. We performed MT (magnetotelluric) surveys with remote reference method across the Noubi active fault system, central Japan, in order to image the electrical resistivity structure in and around the faults, and to obtain fundamental information on the earthquake generation mechanism. The Noubi fault system, about 80 km long, activated at 1891 Noubi Earthquake, consisting of the Nukumi, the Neodani, and the Umehara faults, which slipped left laterally by 1 - 7 m at the 1891 earthquake. Seismological and geomorphologic studies revealed different features between these three faults; the amount of lateral slip of the Neodani fault was larger than those of the Nukumi and the Umehara fault at 1891 Noubi earthquake (Matsuda, 1974; Mikumo and Ando, 1976); the average recurrence intervals of activation of the Nukumi and the Neodani fault were shorter than that of the Umehara fault (The Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion, 2005). Survey areas are mainly covered by the Mino sedimentary complex formed in the Jurassic - Cretaceous period that consists of mudstone, sandstone, limestone, basalt, chart, and siliceous mudstone. But the Hida belt that consists of metamorphic and granitic rocks covers northeast area of the Nukumi fault. Three survey lines of about 20 km length were set crossing normal to the surface fault traces of the Nukumi, Neodani and Umehara faults. And 10 - 12 MT measurement sites were arranged with the same interval on the survey lines. We measured two components of electric field and three components of magnetic field by a 'MTU-5' system made by Phoenix Geophysics Ltd. at three different sampling frequencies to cover frequency bands of 0.0003 - 317 Hz of electric and magnetic field. Applying

  18. Effect of argon gas pressure on residual stress, microstructure evolution and electrical resistivity of beryllium films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Bing-Chi; Li, Kai; Zhang, Ji-Qiang; Luo, Jiang-Shan; Wu, Wei-Dong; Tang, Yong-Jian

    2016-02-01

    The residual stress in beryllium films fabricated on K9 substrates by using magnetron sputtering deposition is measured by using a curvature method and is theoretically estimated by using the Nix and Clemens (NC) model. The experimental results indicate that the 1.3-μm-thick film is always in a tensile state for pressure variations in the range from 0.4 to 1.2 Pa. When the sputtering gas pressure is increased, the average stress increases at first, after which it decreases by a remarkable amount. The observed descending trend of the tensile stress when the sputtering gas pressure is beyond 0.6 Pa is mainly attributed to the grain size in the film being larger than that in the film when the pressure is below 0.6 Pa. The maximal residual stress of 552 MPa at a sputtering gas pressure of 0.6 Pa is close to the tensile strength (550 MPa) of the corresponding beryllium bulk material and is about 8 times smaller than that calculated by using the N-C model. In addition, the surface morphologies of the as-fabricated films reveal fibrous grains while the cross-sectional morphologies are characterized by a coarsening of columnar grains. The measured electric resistivity of each film strongly depends on its porosity and the sizes of its grains.

  19. Relationships among low frequency (2 Hz) electrical resistivity, porosity, clay content and permeability in reservoir sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tongcheng; Best, Angus I.; Sothcott, Jeremy; North, Laurence J.; MacGregor, Lucy M.

    2015-01-01

    The improved interpretation of marine controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data requires knowledge of the inter-relationships between reservoir parameters and low frequency electrical resistivity. Hence, the electrical resistivities of 67 brine (35 g/l) saturated sandstone samples with a range of petrophysical properties (porosity from 2% to 29%, permeability from 0.0001 mD to 997.49 mD and volumetric clay content from 0 to 28%) were measured in the laboratory at a frequency of 2 Hz using a four-electrode circumferential resistivity method with an accuracy of ± 2%. The results show that sandstones with porosity higher than 9% and volumetric clay content up to 22% behave like clean sandstones and follow Archie's law for a brine concentration of 35 g/l. By contrast, at this brine salinity, sandstones with porosity less than 9% and volumetric clay content above 10% behave like shaly sandstones with non-negligible grain surface conductivity. A negative, linear correlation was found between electrical resistivity and hydraulic permeability on a logarithmic scale. We also found good agreement between our experimental results and a clay pore blocking model based on pore-filling and load-bearing clay in a sand/clay mixture, variable (non-clay) cement fraction and a shaly sandstone resistivity model. The model results indicate a general transition in shaly sandstones from clay-controlled resistivity to sand-controlled resistivity at about 9% porosity. At such high brine concentrations, no discernible clay conduction effect was observed above 9% porosity.

  20. New treatment options for infections caused by increasingly antimicrobial-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyukmin; Lee, Kyungwon; Chong, Yunsop

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of high-level resistance to ceftriaxone is giving rise to serious concern about absence of effective treatment options to cure gonococcal infections. Increasing the dosage regimen can be applied to ceftriaxone and azithromycin, but the emergence of high-level resistance has already been reported. Spectinomycin is another active drug but has low efficacy in the treatment of pharyngeal gonorrhoea. Conventional antibiotics could be introduced for gonococcal treatment, but they have some limitations, such as the absence of clinical trials and breakpoint. Combining antibiotics is another promising method to cure patients and to prevent the emergence of resistance. The most important strategy to maintain the efficacy of antibiotics is rapid detection and dissemination control of novel resistant isolate. PMID:26690658

  1. Grain size effect on electrical resistivity of bulk nanograined Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} material

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Oleg Maradudina, Oxana; Lyubushkin, Roman

    2015-01-15

    The bulk nanograined Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} material with various mean grain sizes changing from ~ 97 nm to ~ 51 nm was prepared by microwave assisted solvothermal method and hot pseudo-isostatic pressure. It was found that the specific electrical resistivity of the material increases as mean grain size decreases. Such kind of the grain effect on the resistivity can be attributed to enhanced electron scattering at the grain boundaries. The Mayadas–Shatzkes model was applied to explain experimental results. In this model the grain boundaries are regarded as potential barriers which have to be overcome by the electrons. The reflectivity R of the grain boundaries for the material under study was estimated to be equal to ~ 0.7. - Highlights: • The bulk nanograined Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} material with various mean grain sizes was prepared. • It was found that the electrical resistivity of the material increases as grain size decreases. • The Mayadas–Shatzkes model was applied to explain experimental results. • The reflectivity R of the grain boundaries was estimated to be equal to ~ 0.7.

  2. Study of electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity into neutral plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, G. Rout, R. K.

    2015-07-31

    The major portion of the bulk plasma in magnetospheric space, interplanetary plasma belts and the solar winds contain neutral particles. Evidently these neutral particles undergo binary collisions with the charged particles and among themselves so as to contribute significantly to the transport and diffusion process in a singly charged electron – ion magnetoplasma. The effects of the neutral particles collisions on various diffusion transport coefficients are studied for magnetised electron-ion plasma and appropriately modified coefficients are derived analytically. The results reveal that these coefficients increase significantly owing to the effect of the charge -neutral and neutral-neutral collisions.

  3. Study of electric susceptibility, electrical resistivity and energy loss functions of carbon-nickel composite films at different annealing temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalouji, V.; Elahi, S. M.; Saadi Alecasir, M.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, the optical and electrical properties of carbon-nickel films annealed at different temperatures (300-1000 °C) were investigated. The obtained data of the refractive index n using the Swanepoel’s method can be analyzed to obtain the high-frequency dielectric constant which describes the free carriers and the lattice vibration modes of dispersion. The lattice dielectric constant ɛL and the plasma frequency ωp at 500 °C have maximum values 4.95 and 40.02 × 106 Hz, respectively. The free carrier electric susceptibility measurements in wavelength range (300-1000 nm) are discussed according to the Spitzer-Fan model. It is shown that the electric susceptibility at 500 °C has maximum value and with increasing wavelength it increases. It is also shown that the waste of electrical energy as heat at 500 °C has maximum value and with increasing wavelength it increases. It is found that energy loss by the free charge carriers when traversing the bulk and surface of films at 800 °C has a minimum value and it is approximately constant with wavelength. It is shown that optical properties were consistent with electrical properties of films annealed at different temperatures in temperature range (15-500 K).

  4. Duplication and amplification of antibiotic resistance genes enable increased resistance in isolates of multidrug-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During normal bacterial DNA replication, gene duplication and amplification (GDA) events occur randomly at a low frequency in the genome throughout a population. In the absence of selection, GDA events that increase the number of copies of a bacterial gene (or a set of genes) are lost. Antibiotic ...

  5. What explains the increased utilization of Powder River Basin coal in electric power generation?

    SciTech Connect

    Gerking, S.; Hamilton, S.F.

    2008-11-15

    This article examines possible explanations for increased utilization of Powder River Basin (PRB) coal in electric power generation that occurred over the last two decades. Did more stringent environmental policy motivate electric power plants to switch to less polluting fuels? Or, did greater use of PRB coal occur because relative price changes altered input markets in favor of this fuel. A key finding is that factors other than environmental policy such as the decline in railroad freight rates together with elastic demand by power plants were major contributors to the increased utilization of this fuel.

  6. Effects of borehole design on complex electrical resistivity measurements: laboratory validation and numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treichel, A.; Huisman, J. A.; Zhao, Y.; Zimmermann, E.; Esser, O.; Kemna, A.; Vereecken, H.

    2012-12-01

    Geophysical measurements within a borehole are typically affected by the presence of the borehole. The focus of the current study is to quantify the effect of borehole design on broadband electrical impedance tomography (EIT) measurements within boreholes. Previous studies have shown that effects on the real part of the electrical resistivity are largest for boreholes with large diameters and for materials with a large formation factor. However, these studies have not considered the effect of the well casing and the filter gravel on the measurement of the real part of the electrical resistivity. In addition, the effect of borehole design on the imaginary part of the electrical resistivity has not been investigated yet. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the effect of borehole design on the complex electrical resistivity using laboratory measurements and numerical simulations. In order to do so, we developed a high resolution two dimensional axisymmetric finite element model (FE) that enables us to simulate the effects of several key borehole design parameters (e.g. borehole diameter, thickness of PVC well casing) on the measurement process. For the material surrounding the borehole, realistic values for complex resistivity were obtained from a database of laboratory measurements of complex resistivity from the test site Krauthausen (Germany). The slotted PVC well casing is represented by an effective resistivity calculated from the water-filled slot volume and the PVC volume. Measurements with and without PVC well casing were made with a four-electrode EIT logging tool in a water-filled rain barrel. The initial comparison for the case that the logging tool was inserted in the PVC well casing showed a considerable mismatch between measured and modeled values. It was required to consider a complete electrode model instead of point electrodes to remove this mismatch. This validated model was used to investigate in detail how complex resistivity

  7. Some considerations on electrical resistivity imaging for characterization of waterbed sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, Luciana

    2013-08-01

    The paper focuses on defining the performance and limits of ERI in the detection and sedimentary characterization of near-bottom thin layers. The analysis of the resolution of floating and submerged cables, and the effect of the accuracy of a priori information (resistivity and thickness) in the data inversion, is based on theory, models and actual data. Theoretical models show that the actual reconstruction of the near water-bottom sediments, in terms of geometry and resistivity, can be obtained only with the submerged cable, however, the data, unlike that acquired with the floating cable, require a priori information on water resistivity and thickness for the data inversion. Theoretical forward models based on wrong a priori water thickness and resistivity information influence the inverted model in different ways, depending on the under- and over-estimation of water resistivity and thickness, and the resistivity contrast of the water-solid layer; however a water-solid resistivity contrast of less than 2 and within 10% of error in water resistivity has no effect. Overestimating water resistivity depicts a ground similar to the actual ground in terms of resistivity, more so than the underestimation of water resistivity. Moreover, the data inversion is less influenced by water parameter error in the case of low resistivity contrast in the water-solid layer, than it is for high resistivity contrast. Wenner and Schlumberger arrays give comparable results, while a dipole-dipole array seems to be more sensitive to the accuracy of apparent resistivity measurements and a priori information on water. The theoretical considerations were validated by actual data acquired with a submerged cable on the Tiber River. The study has shown that if highly accurate measurements are made of water thickness and resistivity, then electrical resistivity imaging from the submerged cable can be used in addition to, or even to substitute, seismic data for the reconstruction of the features

  8. Experimental elimination of parasites in nature leads to the evolution of increased resistance in hosts

    PubMed Central

    Dargent, Felipe; Scott, Marilyn E.; Hendry, Andrew P.; Fussmann, Gregor F.

    2013-01-01

    A reduction in the strength of selection is expected to cause the evolution of reduced trait expression. Elimination of a parasite should thus cause the evolution of reduced resistance to that parasite. To test this prediction in nature, we studied the fourth- and eighth-generation descendants of guppies (Poecilia reticulata) introduced into four natural streams following experimental elimination of a common and deleterious parasite (Gyrodactylus spp.). After two generations of laboratory rearing to control for plasticity and maternal effects, we infected individual fish to assess their resistance to the parasite. Contrary to theoretical expectations, the introduced guppy populations had rapidly and repeatably evolved increased resistance to the now-absent parasite. This evolution was not owing to a resistance-tolerance trade-off, nor to differences in productivity among the sites. Instead, a leading candidate hypothesis is that the rapid life-history evolution typical in such introductions pleiotropically increases parasite resistance. Our study adds a new dimension to the growing evidence for contemporary evolution in the wild, and also points to the need for a re-consideration of simple expectations from host–parasite theory. In particular, our results highlight the need for increased consideration of multiple sources of selection and pleiotropy when studying evolution in natural contexts. PMID:24197417

  9. A Lipid Transfer Protein Increases the Glutathione Content and Enhances Arabidopsis Resistance to a Trichothecene Mycotoxin.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, John E; Bin-Umer, Mohamed Anwar; Widiez, Thomas; Finn, Daniel; McCormick, Susan; Tumer, Nilgun E

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) or scab is one of the most important plant diseases worldwide, affecting wheat, barley and other small grains. Trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON) accumulate in the grain, presenting a food safety risk and health hazard to humans and animals. Despite considerable breeding efforts, highly resistant wheat or barley cultivars are not available. We screened an activation tagged Arabidopsis thaliana population for resistance to trichothecin (Tcin), a type B trichothecene in the same class as DON. Here we show that one of the resistant lines identified, trichothecene resistant 1 (trr1) contains a T-DNA insertion upstream of two nonspecific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP) genes, AtLTP4.4 and AtLTP4.5. Expression of both nsLTP genes was induced in trr1 over 10-fold relative to wild type. Overexpression of AtLTP4.4 provided greater resistance to Tcin than AtLTP4.5 in Arabidopsis thaliana and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae relative to wild type or vector transformed lines, suggesting a conserved protection mechanism. Tcin treatment increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in Arabidopsis and ROS stain was associated with the chloroplast, the cell wall and the apoplast. ROS levels were attenuated in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls. Exogenous addition of glutathione and other antioxidants enhanced resistance of Arabidopsis to Tcin while the addition of buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, increased sensitivity, suggesting that resistance was mediated by glutathione. Total glutathione content was significantly higher in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls, highlighting the importance of AtLTP4.4 in maintaining the redox state. These results demonstrate that trichothecenes cause ROS accumulation and overexpression of AtLTP4.4 protects against trichothecene-induced oxidative stress by increasing the glutathione

  10. A Lipid Transfer Protein Increases the Glutathione Content and Enhances Arabidopsis Resistance to a Trichothecene Mycotoxin

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, John E.; Bin-Umer, Mohamed Anwar; Widiez, Thomas; Finn, Daniel; McCormick, Susan; Tumer, Nilgun E.

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) or scab is one of the most important plant diseases worldwide, affecting wheat, barley and other small grains. Trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON) accumulate in the grain, presenting a food safety risk and health hazard to humans and animals. Despite considerable breeding efforts, highly resistant wheat or barley cultivars are not available. We screened an activation tagged Arabidopsis thaliana population for resistance to trichothecin (Tcin), a type B trichothecene in the same class as DON. Here we show that one of the resistant lines identified, trichothecene resistant 1 (trr1) contains a T-DNA insertion upstream of two nonspecific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP) genes, AtLTP4.4 and AtLTP4.5. Expression of both nsLTP genes was induced in trr1 over 10-fold relative to wild type. Overexpression of AtLTP4.4 provided greater resistance to Tcin than AtLTP4.5 in Arabidopsis thaliana and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae relative to wild type or vector transformed lines, suggesting a conserved protection mechanism. Tcin treatment increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in Arabidopsis and ROS stain was associated with the chloroplast, the cell wall and the apoplast. ROS levels were attenuated in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls. Exogenous addition of glutathione and other antioxidants enhanced resistance of Arabidopsis to Tcin while the addition of buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, increased sensitivity, suggesting that resistance was mediated by glutathione. Total glutathione content was significantly higher in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls, highlighting the importance of AtLTP4.4 in maintaining the redox state. These results demonstrate that trichothecenes cause ROS accumulation and overexpression of AtLTP4.4 protects against trichothecene-induced oxidative stress by increasing the glutathione

  11. Electrical Stimulation of Schwann Cells Promotes Sustained Increases in Neurite Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Koppes, Abigail N.; Nordberg, Andrea L.; Paolillo, Gina M.; Goodsell, Nicole M.; Darwish, Haley A.; Zhang, Linxia

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous electric fields are instructive during embryogenesis by acting to direct cell migration, and postnatally, they can promote axonal growth after injury (McCaig 1991, Al-Majed 2000). However, the mechanisms for these changes are not well understood. Application of an appropriate electrical stimulus may increase the rate and success of nerve repair by directly promoting axonal growth. Previously, DC electrical stimulation at 50 mV/mm (1 mA, 8 h duration) was shown to promote neurite outgrowth and a more pronounced effect was observed if both peripheral glia (Schwann cells) and neurons were co-stimulated. If electrical stimulation is delivered to an injury site, both the neurons and all resident non-neuronal cells [e.g., Schwann cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts] will be treated and this biophysical stimuli can influence axonal growth directly or indirectly via changes to the resident, non-neuronal cells. In this work, non-neuronal cells were electrically stimulated, and changes in morphology and neuro-supportive cells were evaluated. Schwann cell response (morphology and orientation) was examined after an 8 h stimulation over a range of DC fields (0–200 mV/mm, DC 1 mA), and changes in orientation were observed. Electrically prestimulating Schwann cells (50 mV/mm) promoted 30% more neurite outgrowth relative to co-stimulating both Schwann cells with neurons, suggesting that electrical stimulation modifies Schwann cell phenotype. Conditioned medium from the electrically prestimulated Schwann cells promoted a 20% increase in total neurite outgrowth and was sustained for 72 h poststimulation. An 11-fold increase in nerve growth factor but not brain-derived neurotrophic factor or glial-derived growth factor was found in the electrically prestimulated Schwann cell-conditioned medium. No significant changes in fibroblast or endothelial morphology and neuro-supportive behavior were observed poststimulation. Electrical stimulation is widely used in

  12. Effects of contact resistance on electrical conductivity measurements of SiC-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, G. E.; Thomsen, E. C.; Henager, C. H.

    2013-11-01

    A combination 2/4-probe method was used to measure electrical resistances across a pure, monolithic CVD-SiC disc sample with contact resistance at the SiC/metallic electrode interfaces. By comparison of the almost simultaneous 2/4-probe measurements, the specific contact resistance (Rc) and its temperature dependence were determined for two types (sputtered gold and porous nickel) electrodes from room temperature (RT) to ~973 K. The Rc-values behaved similarly for each type of metallic electrode: Rc > ~1000 Ω cm2 at RT, decreasing continuously to ~1–10 Ω cm2 at 973 K. The temperature dependence of the inverse Rc indicated thermally activated electrical conduction across the SiC/metallic interface with an apparent activation energy of ~0.3 eV. Finally, for the flow channel insert application in a fusion reactor blanket, contact resistance potentially could reduce the transverse electrical conductivity by about 50%.

  13. Long-term electrical resistivity monitoring of recharge-induced contaminant plume behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasperikova, Erika; Hubbard, Susan S.; Watson, David B.; Baker, Gregory S.; Peterson, John E.; Kowalsky, Michael B.; Smith, Meagan; Brooks, Scott

    2012-11-01

    Geophysical measurements, and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data in particular, are sensitive to properties that are related (directly or indirectly) to hydrological processes. The challenge is in extracting information from geophysical data at a relevant scale that can be used to gain insight about subsurface behavior and to parameterize or validate flow and transport models. Here, we consider the use of ERT data for examining the impact of recharge on subsurface contamination at the S-3 ponds of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Tennessee. A large dataset of time-lapse cross-well and surface ERT data, collected at the site over a period of 12 months, is used to study time variations in resistivity due to changes in total dissolved solids (primarily nitrate). The electrical resistivity distributions recovered from cross-well and surface ERT data agrees well, and both of these datasets can be used to interpret spatiotemporal variations in subsurface nitrate concentrations due to rainfall, although the sensitivity of the electrical resistivity response to dilution varies with nitrate concentration. Using the time-lapse surface ERT data interpreted in terms of nitrate concentrations, we find that the subsurface nitrate concentration at this site varies as a function of spatial position, episodic heavy rainstorms (versus seasonal and annual fluctuations), and antecedent rainfall history. These results suggest that the surface ERT monitoring approach is potentially useful for examining subsurface plume responses to recharge over field-relevant scales.

  14. Rough surface electrical contact resistance considering scale dependent properties and quantum effects

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Robert L.; Crandall, Erika R.; Bozack, Michael J.

    2015-05-21

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the effect of scale dependent mechanical and electrical properties on electrical contact resistance (ECR) between rough surfaces. This work attempts to build on existing ECR models that neglect potentially important quantum- and size-dependent contact and electrical conduction mechanisms present due to the asperity sizes on typical surfaces. The electrical conductance at small scales can quantize or show a stepping trend as the contact area is varied in the range of the free electron Fermi wavelength squared. This work then evaluates if these effects remain important for the interface between rough surfaces, which may include many small scale contacts of varying sizes. The results suggest that these effects may be significant in some cases, while insignificant for others. It depends on the load and the multiscale structure of the surface roughness.

  15. Aging Effect on Oxygen-Sensitive Electrical Resistance of SrTiO3 Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Toru; Ishiguro, Takashi; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2011-06-01

    Our previous studies showed that SrTiO3-based thin films can be used to detect trace amounts of oxygen. The sensitivity to oxygen of the films was attributed to the polaronic nature of SrTiO3. In this study, it was observed that the application of an electric field resulted in a decrease in electrical resistance (hereafter, the aging effect) possibly in the same way as a dc electrical degradation in ceramic capacitors, which is due to the demixing of the oxygen vacancies (the electrical migration of oxygen vacancies leading to their pileup at the interface between SrTiO3 and electrodes). The sensitivity to oxygen of the films was maintained even after aging.

  16. Temperature dependence of the electrical resistance of sound and carious teeth.

    PubMed

    Huysmans, M C; Longbottom, C; Christie, A M; Bruce, P G; Shellis, R P

    2000-07-01

    Temperature variations are expected to influence measurement error in electrical resistance of teeth. It was the aim of this study to determine the changes in electrical behavior of extracted human teeth due to temperature changes in the range of room temperature to intra-oral temperature. Nine extracted teeth were selected, and the occlusal or an approximal surface was chosen for measurement. Carious involvement of the surfaces ranged from sound to cavitated. Electrical impedance spectroscopy sweeps in a frequency range of about 100 kHz to 10 Hz were completed at selected temperatures between 22 degrees C and 40 degrees C. After fitting the data to equivalent circuits that yielded parameter values for components of the equivalent circuit, we calculated the dc bulk resistance (Rh). The temperature dependence of Rb of the surfaces with different carious involvement was very similar, and the mean drop of Rb from 20 to 35 degrees C was 45% (SD 2%). It was concluded that the electrical resistance of sound and carious tooth surfaces is inversely related to temperature. PMID:11005729

  17. Increasing throughput of multiplexed electrical bus in pipe-lined architecture

    DOEpatents

    Asaad, Sameh; Brezzo, Bernard V; Kapur, Mohit

    2014-05-27

    Techniques are disclosed for increasing the throughput of a multiplexed electrical bus by exploiting available pipeline stages of a computer or other system. For example, a method for increasing a throughput of an electrical bus that connects at least two devices in a system comprises introducing at least one signal hold stage in a signal-receiving one of the two devices, such that a maximum frequency at which the two devices are operated is not limited by a number of cycles of an operating frequency of the electrical bus needed for a signal to propagate from a signal-transmitting one of the two devices to the signal-receiving one of the two devices. Preferably, the signal hold stage introduced in the signal-receiving one of the two devices is a pipeline stage re-allocated from the signal-transmitting one of the two devices.

  18. Using Electrical Resistivity Tomography for Constraining a Hydrogeological Model in a Data Sparse Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, S.; Allen, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Geological and hydrogeological data are often spatially limited in mountainous regions. In these settings, geophysical techniques can be used to constrain hydrogeological models by providing insight into the hydrostratigraphy and the continuity of units in the subsurface. This study we used electrical resistivity tomography coupled with a priori geological data from residential water wells to improve the accuracy and confidence of a hydrogeological model. The study area is situated within the mountainous Cowichan watershed in British Columbia, Canada. Throughout the watershed, unconsolidated deposits of variable thickness overlie bedrock. Based on available water well information, at high elevation, sediment thickness is on the order of a few metres, but within the valley bottom, sediment thickness can be up to 300 m. The unconsolidated deposits are heterogeneous due to a complex depositional environment that was controlled by glacial advances and recessions, most notably during the Fraser Glaciation. Six electrical resistivity transects of various lengths spanning 135 to 830 metres were conducted in an area of the watershed that is particularly data poor. The electrical resistivity transects were strategically placed, first, to make use of available lithology information from existing water wells in order to constrain the geophysical interpretation, and second, to contribute data to areas that lack subsurface lithological records. Electrical resistivity was measured using a AGI SuperSting R1 system, and data were processed using robust inversion software to identify stark geophysical contacts. The technique successfully delineated zones of conductive and resistive units that have been interpreted as aquitards (clay and till formations), aquifers (water bearing sand and gravel lenses), and bedrock based on dielectric contrast. Available surficial geology and bedrock geology maps, coupled with residential well drilling records, further assisted in mapping the

  19. Cisplatin-resistant cells express increased levels of a factor that recognizes damaged DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, G.; Chang, E. )

    1990-05-01

    Cancer treatment with the drug cisplatin is often thwarted by the emergence of drug-resistant cells. To study this phenomenon, the authors identified two independent cellular factors that recognize cisplatin-damaged DNA. One of the two factors, designated XPE binding factor, is deficient in complementation group E of xeroderma pigmentosum, an inherited disease characterized by defective repair of DNA damaged by ultraviolet radiation, cisplatin, and other agents. Human tumor cell lines selected for resistance to cisplatin showed more efficient DNA repair and increased expression of XPE binding factor. These results suggest that XPE binding factor may be responsible, at least in part, for the development of cisplatin resistance in human tumors and that the mechanism may be increased DNA repair.

  20. Challenges and opportunities for fractured rock imaging using 3D cross-borehole electrical resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Judith; Johnson, Timothy C.; Slater, Lee D.

    2015-02-02

    There is an increasing need to characterize discrete fractures away from boreholes to better define fracture distributions and monitor solute transport. We performed a 3D evaluation of static and time-lapse cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data sets from a limestone quarry in which flow and transport are controlled by a bedding-plane feature. Ten boreholes were discretized using an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, and 2D panel measurements were inverted for a 3D distribution of conductivity. We evaluated the benefits of 3D versus 2.5D inversion of ERT data in fractured rock while including the use of borehole regularization disconnects (BRDs) and borehole conductivity constraints. High-conductivity halos (inversion artifacts) surrounding boreholes were removed in static images when BRDs and borehole conductivity constraints were implemented. Furthermore, applying these constraints focused transient changes in conductivity resulting from solute transport on the bedding plane, providing a more physically reasonable model for conductivity changes associated with solute transport at this fractured rock site. Assuming bedding-plane continuity between fractures identified in borehole televiewer data, we discretized a planar region between six boreholes and applied a fracture regularization disconnect (FRD). Although the FRD appropriately focused conductivity changes on the bedding plane, the conductivity distribution within the discretized fracture was nonunique and dependent on the starting homogeneous model conductivity. Synthetic studies performed to better explain field observations showed that inaccurate electrode locations in boreholes resulted in low-conductivity halos surrounding borehole locations. These synthetic studies also showed that the recovery of the true conductivity within an FRD depended on the conductivity contrast between the host rock and fractures. Our findings revealed that the potential exists to improve imaging of fractured

  1. Applying petrophysical models to radar travel time and electrical resistivity tomograms: Resolution-dependent limitations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.; Binley, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Geophysical imaging has traditionally provided qualitative information about geologic structure; however, there is increasing interest in using petrophysical models to convert tomograms to quantitative estimates of hydrogeologic, mechanical, or geochemical parameters of interest (e.g., permeability, porosity, water content, and salinity). Unfortunately, petrophysical estimation based on tomograms is complicated by limited and variable image resolution, which depends on (1) measurement physics (e.g., electrical conduction or electromagnetic wave propagation), (2) parameterization and regularization, (3) measurement error, and (4) spatial variability. We present a framework to predict how core-scale relations between geophysical properties and hydrologic parameters are altered by the inversion, which produces smoothly varying pixel-scale estimates. We refer to this loss of information as "correlation loss." Our approach upscales the core-scale relation to the pixel scale using the model resolution matrix from the inversion, random field averaging, and spatial statistics of the geophysical property. Synthetic examples evaluate the utility of radar travel time tomography (RTT) and electrical-resistivity tomography (ERT) for estimating water content. This work provides (1) a framework to assess tomograms for geologic parameter estimation and (2) insights into the different patterns of correlation loss for ERT and RTT. Whereas ERT generally performs better near boreholes, RTT performs better in the interwell region. Application of petrophysical models to the tomograms in our examples would yield misleading estimates of water content. Although the examples presented illustrate the problem of correlation loss in the context of near-surface geophysical imaging, our results have clear implications for quantitative analysis of tomograms for diverse geoscience applications. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Increased resistance to a generalist herbivore in a salinity-stressed non-halophytic plant

    PubMed Central

    Renault, Sylvie; Wolfe, Scott; Markham, John; Avila-Sakar, Germán

    2016-01-01

    Plants often grow under the combined stress of several factors. Salinity and herbivory, separately, can severely hinder plant growth and reproduction, but the combined effects of both factors are still not clearly understood. Salinity is known to reduce plant tissue nitrogen content and growth rates. Since herbivores prefer tissues with high N content, and biochemical pathways leading to resistance are commonly elicited by salt-stress, we hypothesized that plants growing in saline conditions would have enhanced resistance against herbivores. The non-halophyte, Brassica juncea, and the generalist herbivore Trichoplusia ni were used to test the prediction that plants subjected to salinity stress would be both more resistant and more tolerant to herbivory than those growing without salt stress. Plants were grown under different NaCl levels, and either exposed to herbivores and followed by removal of half of their leaves, or left intact. Plants were left to grow and reproduce until senescence. Tissue quality was assessed, seeds were counted and biomass of different organs measured. Plants exposed to salinity grew less, had reduced tissue nitrogen, protein and chlorophyll content, although proline levels increased. Specific leaf area, leaf water content, transpiration and root:shoot ratio remained unaffected. Plants growing under saline condition had greater constitutive resistance than unstressed plants. However, induced resistance and tolerance were not affected by salinity. These results support the hypothesis that plants growing under salt-stress are better defended against herbivores, although in B. juncea this may be mostly through resistance, and less through tolerance. PMID:27169610

  3. Increased resistance to a generalist herbivore in a salinity-stressed non-halophytic plant.

    PubMed

    Renault, Sylvie; Wolfe, Scott; Markham, John; Avila-Sakar, Germán

    2016-01-01

    Plants often grow under the combined stress of several factors. Salinity and herbivory, separately, can severely hinder plant growth and reproduction, but the combined effects of both factors are still not clearly understood. Salinity is known to reduce plant tissue nitrogen content and growth rates. Since herbivores prefer tissues with high N content, and biochemical pathways leading to resistance are commonly elicited by salt-stress, we hypothesized that plants growing in saline conditions would have enhanced resistance against herbivores. The non-halophyte, Brassica juncea, and the generalist herbivore Trichoplusia ni were used to test the prediction that plants subjected to salinity stress would be both more resistant and more tolerant to herbivory than those growing without salt stress. Plants were grown under different NaCl levels, and either exposed to herbivores and followed by removal of half of their leaves, or left intact. Plants were left to grow and reproduce until senescence. Tissue quality was assessed, seeds were counted and biomass of different organs measured. Plants exposed to salinity grew less, had reduced tissue nitrogen, protein and chlorophyll content, although proline levels increased. Specific leaf area, leaf water content, transpiration and root:shoot ratio remained unaffected. Plants growing under saline condition had greater constitutive resistance than unstressed plants. However, induced resistance and tolerance were not affected by salinity. These results support the hypothesis that plants growing under salt-stress are better defended against herbivores, although in B. juncea this may be mostly through resistance, and less through tolerance. PMID:27169610

  4. Selection for pro-inflammatory mediators yields chickens with increased resistance against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Swaggerty, Christina L; Pevzner, Igal Y; Kogut, Michael H

    2014-03-01

    Salmonella is a leading cause of foodborne illness and can be transmitted through consumption of contaminated poultry; therefore, increasing a flock's natural resistance to Salmonella could improve food safety. Previously, we characterized the heterophil-mediated innate immune response of 2 parental broiler lines and F1 reciprocal crosses and showed that increased heterophil function and expression of pro-inflammatory mediators corresponds with increased resistance against diverse pathogens. A preliminary selection trial showed that individual sires had varying inherent levels of pro-inflammatory mediators and selection based on a high or low phenotype was passed onto progeny. Based on these results, we hypothesized selection of broilers for higher levels of the pro-inflammatory mediators IL-6, CXCLi2, and CCLi2 would produce progeny with increased resistance against Salmonella Enteritidis. Peripheral blood leukocytes were isolated from 75 commercial broiler sires, screened, and 10 naturally high and low expressing sires were selected and mated to randomly selected dams to produce the first generation of "high" and "low" progeny. The mRNA expression of CXCLi2 and CCLi2 were significantly (P ≤ 0.02) higher in the high progeny and were more resistant to liver and spleen organ invasion by Salmonella Enteritidis compared with low progeny. Production of the second generation yielded progeny that had differences (P ≤ 0.03) in all 3 mediators and further improved resistance against Salmonella Enteritidis. Feed conversion ratio and percent breast meat yield were calculated and were equal, whereas the high birds weighed slightly, but significantly, less than the low birds. These data clearly demonstrate that selection based on a higher phenotype of key pro-inflammatory mediators is a novel means to produce broilers that are naturally more resistant to Salmonella, one of the most important foodborne pathogens affecting the poultry industry. PMID:24604845

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF LEAKS USING TIME LAPSED LONG ELECTRODE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS DA; RUCKER DF; FINK JB; LOKE MH

    2009-12-16

    Highly industrialized areas pose challenges for surface electrical resistivity characterization due to metallic infrastructure. The infrastructure is typically more conductive than the desired targets and will mask the deeper subsurface information. These challenges may be minimized if steel-cased wells are used as long electrodes in the area near the target. We demonstrate a method of using long electrodes to electrically monitor a simulated leak from an underground storage tank with both synthetic examples and a field demonstration. The synthetic examples place a simple target of varying electrical properties beneath a very low resistivity layer. The layer is meant to replicate the effects of infrastructure. Both surface and long electrodes are tested on the synthetic domain. The leak demonstration for the field experiment is simulated by injecting a high conductivity fluid in a perforated well within the S tank farm at Hanford, and the resistivity measurements are made before and after the leak test. All data are processed in four dimensions, where a regularization procedure is applied in both the time and space domains. The synthetic test case shows that the long electrode ERM could detect relative changes in resistivity that are commensurate with the differing target properties. The surface electrodes, on the other hand, had a more difficult time matching the original target's footprint. The field results shows a lowered resistivity feature develop south of the injection site after cessation of the injections. The time lapsed regularization parameter has a strong influence on the differences in inverted resistivity between the pre and post injection datasets, but the interpretation of the target is consistent across all values of the parameter. The long electrode ERM method may provide a tool for near real-time monitoring of leaking underground storage tanks.

  6. Monitoring of olive oil mills' wastes using electrical resistivity tomography techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simyrdanis, Kleanthis; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Kirkou, Stella; Sarris, Apostolos; Tsourlos, Panagiotis

    2014-08-01

    Olive oil mills' wastes (OOMW) are one of the byproducts of the oil production that can lead to serious environmental pollution when they are deposited in ponds dug on the ground surface. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) method can provide a valuable tool in order to monitor through time the physical flow of the wastes into the subsurface. ERT could potentially locate the electrical signature due to lower resistivity values resulting from the leakage of OOMW to the subsurface. For this purpose, two vertical boreholes were installed (12m depth, 9 m apart) in the vicinity of an existing pond which is filled with OOMW during the oil production period. The test site is situated in Saint Andreas village about 15km south of the city of Rethymno (Crete, Greece). Surface ERT measurements were collected along multiple lines in order to reconstruct the subsurface resistivity models. Data acquisition was performed with standard and optimized electrode configuration protocols. The monitoring survey includes the ERT data collection for a period of time. The study was initiated before the OOMW were deposited in the pond, so resistivity fluctuations are expected due to the flow of OOMW in the porous subsurface media through time. Preliminary results show the good correlation of the ERT images with the drilled geological formations and the identification of low resistivity subsurface zone that could be attributed to the flow of the wastes within the porous layers.

  7. Influence of plant roots on electrical resistivity measurements of cultivated soil columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloteau, Sophie; Blanchy, Guillaume; Javaux, Mathieu; Garré, Sarah

    2016-04-01

    Electrical resistivity methods have been widely used for the last 40 years in many fields: groundwater investigation, soil and water pollution, engineering application for subsurface surveys, etc. Many factors can influence the electrical resistivity of a media, and thus influence the ERT measurements. Among those factors, it is known that plant roots affect bulk electrical resistivity. However, this impact is not yet well understood. The goals of this experiment are to quantify the effect of plant roots on electrical resistivity of the soil subsurface and to map a plant roots system in space and time with ERT technique in a soil column. For this research, it is assumed that roots system affect the electrical properties of the rhizosphere. Indeed the root activity (by transporting ions, releasing exudates, changing the soil structure,…) will modify the rhizosphere electrical conductivity (Lobet G. et al, 2013). This experiment is included in a bigger research project about the influence of roots system on geophysics measurements. Measurements are made on cylinders of 45 cm high and a diameter of 20 cm, filled with saturated loam on which seeds of Brachypodium distachyon (L.) Beauv. are sowed. Columns are equipped with electrodes, TDR probes and temperature sensors. Experiments are conducted at Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, in a growing chamber with controlled conditions: temperature of the air is fixed to 20° C, photoperiod is equal to 14 hours, photosynthetically active radiation is equal to 200 μmol m‑2s‑1, and air relative humidity is fixed to 80 %. Columns are fully saturated the first day of the measurements duration then no more irrigation is done till the end of the experiment. The poster will report the first results analysis of the electrical resistivity distribution in the soil columns through space and time. These results will be discussed according to the plant development and other controlled factors. Water content of the soil will also be detailed

  8. Traveling wire electrode increases productivity of Electrical Discharge Machining /EDM/ equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotora, J., Jr.; Smith, S. V.

    1967-01-01

    Traveling wire electrode on electrical discharge machining /EDM/ equipment reduces the time requirements for precision cutting. This device enables cutting with a minimum of lost material and without inducing stress beyond that inherent in the material. The use of wire increases accuracy and enables tighter tolerances to be maintained.

  9. Monitoring of vulcanization process using measurement of electrical properties during linear increasing temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliga, E.; Bošák, O.; Koštial, P.; Dvořák, Z.; Kubliha, M.; Minárik, S.; Labaš, V.

    2015-04-01

    The article presents the possibilities of diagnostics of irreversible chemical reaction - vulcanization in case of laboratory prepared rubber mixture based on styrene - butadiene (SBR) using measurements of selected physical parameters. Our work is focused on the measurement of current rheologic parameters (torque at defined shear deformation) and selected electrical parameters (DC conductivity) during linear increasing temperature. The individual steps of vulcanization are well identified by means of measurements of rheologic parameters, while significantly affecting the value of the electrical conductivity. The value of the electrical conductivity increases with the increasing of rate of the crossbridging reactions during vulcanization. The rate of the heating affects both types of measurements. When the rate of the heating is increasing the temperature of the beginning of networking step of reactions and also the rate of vulcanization grow. The sensitivity of the both types of measurements allows a good mathematical description of the temperature dependence of the torque and the electric conductivity during the vulcanization of rubber mixtures based on SBR.

  10. Silymarin Induces Insulin Resistance through an Increase of Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kai-Chun; Asakawa, Akihiro; Li, Ying-Xiao; Chung, Hsien-Hui; Amitani, Haruka; Ueki, Takatoshi; Cheng, Juei-Tang; Inui, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a phosphoinositide phosphatase that regulates crucial cellular functions, including insulin signaling, lipid and glucose metabolism, as well as survival and apoptosis. Silymarin is the active ingredient in milk thistle and exerts numerous effects through the activation of PTEN. However, the effect of silymarin on the development of insulin resistance remains unknown. Methods Wistar rats fed fructose-rich chow or normal chow were administered oral silymarin to identify the development of insulin resistance using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemic- euglycemic clamping. Changes in PTEN expression in skeletal muscle and liver were compared using western blotting analysis. Further investigation was performed in L6 cells to check the expression of PTEN and insulin-related signals. PTEN deletion in L6 cells was achieved by small interfering ribonucleic acid transfection. Results Oral administration of silymarin at a dose of 200 mg/kg once daily induced insulin resistance in normal rats and enhanced insulin resistance in fructose-rich chow-fed rats. An increase of PTEN expression was observed in the skeletal muscle and liver of rats with insulin resistance. A decrease in the phosphorylation of Akt in L6 myotube cells, which was maintained in a high-glucose condition, was also observed. Treatment with silymarin aggravated high-glucose-induced insulin resistance. Deletion of PTEN in L6 cells reversed silymarin-induced impaired insulin signaling and glucose uptake. Conclusions Silymarin has the ability to disrupt insulin signaling through increased PTEN expression. Therefore, silymarin should be used carefully in type-2 diabetic patients. PMID:24404172

  11. Streptomycin use in apple orchards did not increase abundance of mobile resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Brion; Holliger, Eduard; Walsh, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    Streptomycin is used as a first-line defense and tetracycline as a second-line defense, in the fight against fire blight disease in apple and pear orchards. We have performed the first study to quantitatively analyze the influence of streptomycin use in agriculture on the abundance of streptomycin and tetracycline resistance genes in apple orchards. Flowers, leaves, and soil were collected from three orchard sites in 2010, 2011, and 2012. Gene abundance distribution was analyzed using two-way anova and principal component analysis to investigate relationships between gene abundance data over time and treatment. The mobile antibiotic resistance genes, strA, strB, tetB, tetM, tetW, and the insertion sequence IS1133, were detected prior to streptomycin treatment in almost all samples, indicating the natural presence of these resistance genes in nature. Statistically significant increases in the resistance gene abundances were occasional, inconsistent, and not reproducible from one year to the next. We conclude that the application of streptomycin in these orchards was not associated with sustained increases in streptomycin or tetracycline resistance gene abundances. PMID:24164283

  12. Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottle, Dan; Marshall, Rick

    2016-09-01

    A simple ‘hands on’ physical model is described which displays analogous behaviour to some aspects of the free electron theory of metals. Using it students can get a real feel for what is going on inside a metallic conductor. Ohms Law, the temperature dependence of resistivity, the dependence of resistance on geometry, how the conduction electrons respond to a potential difference and the concepts of mean free path and drift speed of the conduction electrons can all be explored. Some quantitative results obtained by using the model are compared with the predictions of Drude’s free electron theory of electrical conduction.

  13. Discontinuation of Reflex Testing of Stool Samples for Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci Resulted in Increased Prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Bodily, Mandy; McMullen, Kathleen M.; Russo, Anthony J.; Kittur, Nupur D.; Hoppe-Bauer, Joan; Warren, David K.

    2015-01-01

    Discontinuation of reflex testing stool submitted for Clostridium difficile testing for vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) led to an increase of patients with healthcare-associated VRE bacteremia and bacteriuria (2.1 versus 3.6 per 10,000 patient days; p<0.01 ). Cost-benefit analysis showed reflex screening and isolation of VRE reduced hospital costs. PMID:23838226

  14. Increased risk for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in migratory workers, Armenia.

    PubMed

    Truzyan, Nune; Crape, Byron; Grigoryan, Ruzanna; Martirosyan, Hripsime; Petrosyan, Varduhi

    2015-03-01

    To understand use of tuberculosis (TB) services for migrant workers, we conducted a cross-sectional census of 95 migrant workers with TB from Armenia by using medical record reviews and face-to-face interviews. Prolonged time between diagnosis and treatment, treatment interruption, and treatment defaults caused by migrant work might increase the risk for multidrug-resistant TB. PMID:25695488

  15. Overexpression of a citrus NDR1 ortholog increases disease resistance in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emerging devastating diseases, such as Huanglongbing (HLB) and citrus canker, have caused tremendous losses to the citrus industry worldwide. Genetic engineering is a powerful approach that could allow us to increase citrus resistance against these diseases. The key to the success of this approach r...

  16. Increased Risk for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Migratory Workers, Armenia

    PubMed Central

    Crape, Byron; Grigoryan, Ruzanna; Martirosyan, Hripsime; Petrosyan, Varduhi

    2015-01-01

    To understand use of tuberculosis (TB) services for migrant workers, we conducted a cross-sectional census of 95 migrant workers with TB from Armenia by using medical record reviews and face-to-face interviews. Prolonged time between diagnosis and treatment, treatment interruption, and treatment defaults caused by migrant work might increase the risk for multidrug-resistant TB. PMID:25695488

  17. Selection for pro-inflammatory mediators yields chickens with increased resistance against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella are a leading cause of foodborne illness and can be transmitted through consumption of contaminated poultry; therefore, increasing a flocks’ natural resistance to Salmonella could improve food safety. Previously, we characterized the heterophil-mediated innate immune response of two pare...

  18. Characterization of Contact and Bulk Thermal Resistance of Laminations for Electric Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Cousineau, Emily; Bennion, Kevin; Devoto, Douglas; Naramanchi, Sreekant

    2015-07-06

    Thermal management for electric motors is important as the automotive industry continues to transition to more electrically dominant vehicle propulsion systems. The transition to more electrically dominant propulsion systems leads to higher-power duty cycles for electric-drive systems. Thermal constraints place significant limitations on how electric motors ultimately perform. As thermal management improves, there will be a direct trade-off among motor performance, efficiency, cost, and the sizing of electric motors to operate within the thermal constraints. During the development of thermal finite element analysis models and computational fluid dynamics models for electric motors, it was found that there was a lack of open literature detailing the thermal properties of key materials common in electric motors that are significant in terms of heat removal. The lack of available literature, coupled with the strong interest from industry in the passive-stack thermal measurement results, led to experiments to characterize the thermal contact resistance between motor laminations. We examined four lamination materials, including the commonly used 26 gauge and 29 gauge M19 materials, the HF10 and Arnon 7 materials. These latter two materials are thinner and reduce eddy currents responsible for core losses. We measured the thermal conductivity of the lamination materials and the thermal contact resistance between laminations in a stack, as well as investigated factors affecting contact resistance between laminations such as the contact pressure and surface finish. Lamination property data will be provided and we also develop a model to estimate the through-stack thermal conductivity for materials beyond those that were directly tested in this work. For example, at a clamping pressure of 138 kPa, the 29 gauge M19 material has a through-stack thermal conductivity of 1.68 W/m-K, and the contact resistance between laminations was measured to be 193 mm^2-K/W. The measured bulk

  19. Structural transition in the humic matrix of soil gels and the electrical resistivity of soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotov, G. N.; Shoba, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    The structural organization of the organic matrix of humic substances in soils has been analyzed, and the conclusion has been drawn that the existence of humic matrix is determined by contacts between the hydrophilic sites of humic particles in dry soils and between their hydrophobic sites in wet soils. It follows from the advanced supposition that the wetting-drying process should cause a structural transition (reorganization of the humic matrix), which should affect the properties of soils. To verify this supposition, the effect of soil moisture on the electrical resistivity of soil-water extracts, suspensions, and pastes has been studied. It follows from the studies performed that soil electrolytes are fixed in dry soils during drying and are gradually released into solution. However, beginning from a specific soil water content, the release of electrolytes occurs almost immediately after their contact with water. The obtained data suggest that an energy barrier should be overcome for the release of electrolytes from the soils with water content below the specific limit. There is no energy barrier for the soils with water content higher than this limit. The existence of structural transition in the humic matrix of soil gels well explains these results. The effect of energetic impacts on the structural transition has been studied. It has been shown that the study of structural transition should avoid operations that increase the number and amplitude of energy fluctuations in the systems.

  20. Comparison of measuring strategies for the 3-D electrical resistivity imaging of tumuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsourlos, Panagiotis; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Yi, Myeong-Jong; Kim, Jung-Ho; Tsokas, Gregory

    2014-02-01

    Artificial erected hills like tumuli, mounds, barrows and kurgans comprise monuments of the past human activity and offer opportunities to reconstruct habitation models regarding the life and customs during their building period. These structures also host features of archeological significance like architectural relics, graves or chamber tombs. Tumulus exploration is a challenging geophysical problem due to the complex distribution of the subsurface physical properties, the size and burial depth of potential relics and the uneven topographical terrain. Geoelectrical methods by means of three-dimensional (3-D) inversion are increasingly popular for tumulus investigation. Typically data are obtained by establishing a regular rectangular grid and assembling the data collected by parallel two-dimensional (2-D) tomographies. In this work the application of radial 3-D mode is studied, which is considered as the assembly of data collected by radially positioned Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) lines. The relative advantages and disadvantages of this measuring mode over the regular grid measurements were investigated and optimum ways to perform 3-D ERT surveys for tumuli investigations were proposed. Comparative test was performed by means of synthetic examples as well as by tests with field data. Overall all tested models verified the superiority of the radial mode in delineating bodies positioned at the central part of the tumulus while regular measuring mode proved superior in recovering bodies positioned away from the center of the tumulus. The combined use of radial and regular modes seems to produce superior results in the expense of time required for data acquisition and processing.

  1. Dissolved gas exsolution to enhance gas production and transport during bench-scale electrical resistance heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegele, P. R.; Mumford, K. G.

    2015-05-01

    Condensation of volatile organic compounds in colder zones can be detrimental to the performance of an in situ thermal treatment application for the remediation of chlorinated solvent source zones. A novel method to increase gas production and limit convective heat loss in more permeable, potentially colder, zones involves the injection and liberation of dissolved gas from solution during heating. Bench-scale electrical resistance heating experiments were performed with a dissolved carbon dioxide and sodium chloride solution to investigate exsolved gas saturations and transport regimes at elevated, but sub-boiling, temperatures. At sub-boiling temperatures, maximum exsolved gas saturations of Sg = 0.12 were attained, and could be sustained when the carbon dioxide solution was injected during heating rather than emplaced prior to heating. This gas saturation was estimated to decrease groundwater relative permeability to krw = 0.64. Discontinuous gas transport was observed above saturations of Sg = 0.07, demonstrating the potential of exsolved CO2 to bridge vertical gas transport through colder zones.

  2. Optimum electrode configuration selection for electrical resistance change based damage detection in composites using an effective independence measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escalona, Luis; Díaz-Montiel, Paulina; Venkataraman, Satchi

    2016-04-01

    Laminated carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite materials are increasingly used in aerospace structures due to their superior mechanical properties and reduced weight. Assessing the health and integrity of these structures requires non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to detect and measure interlaminar delamination and intralaminar matrix cracking damage. The electrical resistance change (ERC) based NDE technique uses the inherent changes in conductive properties of the composite to characterize internal damage. Several works that have explored the ERC technique have been limited to thin cross-ply laminates with simple linear or circular electrode arrangements. This paper investigates a method of optimum selection of electrode configurations for delamination detection in thick cross-ply laminates using ERC. Inverse identification of damage requires numerical optimization of the measured response with a model predicted response. Here, the electrical voltage field in the CFRP composite laminate is calculated using finite element analysis (FEA) models for different specified delamination size and locations, and location of ground and current electrodes. Reducing the number of sensor locations and measurements is needed to reduce hardware requirements, and computational effort needed for inverse identification. This paper explores the use of effective independence (EI) measure originally proposed for sensor location optimization in experimental vibration modal analysis. The EI measure is used for selecting the minimum set of resistance measurements among all possible combinations of selecting a pair of electrodes among the n electrodes. To enable use of EI to ERC required, it is proposed in this research a singular value decomposition SVD to obtain a spectral representation of the resistance measurements in the laminate. The effectiveness of EI measure in eliminating redundant electrode pairs is demonstrated by performing inverse identification of

  3. Drought increases the freezing resistance of high-elevation plants of the Central Chilean Andes.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Almeida, Angela; Reyes-Bahamonde, Claudia; Cavieres, Lohengrin A

    2016-08-01

    Freezing temperatures and summer droughts shape plant life in Mediterranean high-elevation habitats. Thus, the impacts of climate change on plant survival for these species could be quite different to those from mesic mountains. We exposed 12 alpine species to experimental irrigation and warming in the Central Chilean Andes to assess whether irrigation decreases freezing resistance, irrigation influences freezing resistance when plants are exposed to warming, and to assess the relative importance of irrigation and temperature in controlling plant freezing resistance. Freezing resistance was determined as the freezing temperature that produced 50 % photoinactivation [lethal temperature (LT50)] and the freezing point (FP). In seven out of 12 high-Andean species, LT50 of drought-exposed plants was on average 3.5 K lower than that of irrigated plants. In contrast, most species did not show differences in FP. Warming changed the effect of irrigation on LT50. Depending on species, warming was found to have (1) no effect, (2) to increase, or (3) to decrease the irrigation effect on LT50. However, the effect size of irrigation on LT50 was greater than that of warming for almost all species. The effect of irrigation on FP was slightly changed by warming and was sometimes in disagreement with LT50 responses. Our data show that drought increases the freezing resistance of high-Andean plant species as a general plant response. Although freezing resistance increases depended on species-specific traits, our results show that warmer and moister growing seasons due to climate change will seriously threaten plant survival and persistence of these and other alpine species in dry mountains. PMID:27053321

  4. Glucose modulation induces reactive oxygen species and increases P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance to chemotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Seebacher, N A; Richardson, D R; Jansson, P J

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cancer cells develop resistance to stress induced by chemotherapy. In tumours, a considerable glucose gradient exists, resulting in stress. Notably, hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a redox-sensitive transcription factor that regulates P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a crucial drug-efflux transporter involved in multidrug resistance (MDR). Here, we investigated how glucose levels regulate Pgp-mediated drug transport and resistance. Experimental Approach Human tumour cells (KB31, KBV1, A549 and DMS-53) were incubated under glucose starvation to hyperglycaemic conditions. Flow cytometry assessed reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and Pgp activity. HIF-1α, NF-κB and Pgp expression were assessed by reverse transcriptase-PCR and Western blotting. Fluorescence microscopy examined p65 distribution and a luciferase-reporter assay assessed HIF-1 promoter-binding activity. The effect of glucose-induced stress on Pgp-mediated drug resistance was examined after incubating cells with the chemotherapeutic and Pgp substrate, doxorubicin (DOX), and performing MTT assays validated by viable cell counts. Key Results Changes in glucose levels markedly enhanced cellular ROS and conferred Pgp-mediated drug resistance. Low and high glucose levels increased (i) ROS generation via NADPH oxidase 4 and mitochondrial membrane destabilization; (ii) HIF-1 activity; (iii) nuclear translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit; and (iv) HIF-1α mRNA and protein levels. Increased HIF-1α could also be due to decreased prolyl hydroxylase protein under these conditions. The HIF-1α target, Pgp, was up-regulated at low and high glucose levels, which led to lower cellular accumulation of Pgp substrate, rhodamine123, and greater resistance to DOX. Conclusions and Implications As tumour cells become glucose-deprived or exposed to high glucose levels, this increases stress, leading to a more aggressive MDR phenotype via up-regulation of Pgp. PMID:25586174

  5. Increase in Phi X174 DNA radiation sensitivity due to electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    McCormack, Percival D.; Swenberg, Charles E.

    1985-01-01

    The object of this research was to establish whether or not orientation of DNA in electric fields would result in a significant increase in its sensitivity to damage by ionizing radiation. The application of an external electric field simultaneously with gamma irradiation to an aqueous suspension of Phi X 174 (in the RFI form) is shown to increase significantly the number of strand breaks. Tritiated DNA allowed the number of single-strand breaks to be estimated from changes in the scintillation of electrophoretic gel band associated with the fastest mobility moiety. At 400 V ( approx. 2400 V/cm) the corrected increase (corrected for phoresis of DNA on the stainless steel plates) in the G-value yield is 38%. The increase in damage with field strength appears to follow the increase in reduced dichroism. Dichroism results correspond at 400 V to approximately 10% of the maximum orientation. These results support the conjecture that this significant increase in DNA-radiation interaction with an electric field is due to field-induced conformation changes in the molecule. Keywords: Polyelectrolytes, Polynucleotides, Polypeptides, Birefringence, Dipole, and Moments.

  6. Evolution of Wholesale Electricity Market Design with Increasing Levels of Renewable Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; Bloom, A.; Botterud, A.; Townsend, A.; Levin, T.

    2014-09-01

    Variable generation such as wind and photovoltaic solar power has increased substantially in recent years. Variable generation has unique characteristics compared to the traditional technologies that supply energy in the wholesale electricity markets. These characteristics create unique challenges in planning and operating the power system, and they can also influence the performance and outcomes from electricity markets. This report focuses on two particular issues related to market design: revenue sufficiency for long-term reliability and incentivizing flexibility in short-term operations. The report provides an overview of current design and some designs that have been proposed by industry or researchers.

  7. NREL Works to Increase Electric Vehicle Efficiency Through Enhanced Thermal Management (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-06-01

    Researchers at NREL are providing new insight into how heating and cooling systems affect the distance that electric vehicles can travel on a single charge. Electric vehicle range can be reduced by as much as 68% per charge because of climate-control demands. NREL engineers are investigating opportunities to change this dynamic and increase driving range by improving vehicle thermal management. NREL experts are collaborating with automotive industry partners to investigate promising thermal management technologies and strategies, including zone-based cabin temperature controls, advanced heating and air conditioning controls, seat-based climate controls, vehicle thermal preconditioning, and thermal load reduction technologies.

  8. Increased Expression of Several Collagen Genes is Associated with Drug Resistance in Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Januchowski, Radosław; Świerczewska, Monika; Sterzyńska, Karolina; Wojtowicz, Karolina; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynaecological cancer. The main reason for the high mortality among ovarian cancer patients is the development of drug resistance. The expression of collagen genes by cancer cells can increase drug resistance by inhibiting the penetration of the drug into the cancer tissue as well as increase apoptosis resistance. In this study, we present data that shows differential expression levels of collagen genes and proteins in cisplatin- (CIS), paclitaxel- (PAC), doxorubicin- (DOX), topotecan- (TOP), vincristine- (VIN) and methotrexate- (MTX) resistant ovarian cancer cell lines. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions were performed to determine the mRNA levels. Protein expression was detected using Western blot and immunocytochemistry assays. In the drug resistant cell lines, we observed the upregulation of eight collagen genes at the mRNA level and based on these expression levels, we divided the collagen genes into the following three groups: 1. Genes with less than a 50-fold increase in expression: COL1A1, COL5A2, COL12A1 and COL17A1. 2. Genes with greater than a 50-fold increase in expression: COL1A2, COL15A1 and COL21A1. 3. Gene with a very high level of expression: COL3A1. Expression of collagen (COL) proteins from groups 2 and 3 were also confirmed using immunocytochemistry. Western blot analysis showed very high expression levels of COL3A1 protein, and immunocytochemistry analysis showed the presence of extracellular COL3A1 in the W1TR cell line. The cells mainly responsible for the extracellular COL3A1 production are aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1A1) positive cells. All correlations between the types of cytostatic drugs and the expression levels of different COL genes were studied, and our results suggest that the expression of fibrillar collagens may be involved in the TOP and PAC resistance of the ovarian cancer cells. The expression pattern of COL genes provide a preliminary view into the role of these proteins in

  9. Increased Expression of Several Collagen Genes is Associated with Drug Resistance in Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Januchowski, Radosław; Świerczewska, Monika; Sterzyńska, Karolina; Wojtowicz, Karolina; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynaecological cancer. The main reason for the high mortality among ovarian cancer patients is the development of drug resistance. The expression of collagen genes by cancer cells can increase drug resistance by inhibiting the penetration of the drug into the cancer tissue as well as increase apoptosis resistance. In this study, we present data that shows differential expression levels of collagen genes and proteins in cisplatin- (CIS), paclitaxel- (PAC), doxorubicin- (DOX), topotecan- (TOP), vincristine- (VIN) and methotrexate- (MTX) resistant ovarian cancer cell lines. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions were performed to determine the mRNA levels. Protein expression was detected using Western blot and immunocytochemistry assays. In the drug resistant cell lines, we observed the upregulation of eight collagen genes at the mRNA level and based on these expression levels, we divided the collagen genes into the following three groups: 1. Genes with less than a 50-fold increase in expression: COL1A1, COL5A2, COL12A1 and COL17A1. 2. Genes with greater than a 50-fold increase in expression: COL1A2, COL15A1 and COL21A1. 3. Gene with a very high level of expression: COL3A1. Expression of collagen (COL) proteins from groups 2 and 3 were also confirmed using immunocytochemistry. Western blot analysis showed very high expression levels of COL3A1 protein, and immunocytochemistry analysis showed the presence of extracellular COL3A1 in the W1TR cell line. The cells mainly responsible for the extracellular COL3A1 production are aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1A1) positive cells. All correlations between the types of cytostatic drugs and the expression levels of different COL genes were studied, and our results suggest that the expression of fibrillar collagens may be involved in the TOP and PAC resistance of the ovarian cancer cells. The expression pattern of COL genes provide a preliminary view into the role of these proteins in

  10. Evaluation of changes in microstructure and mechanical performance of metals via electrical resistivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omari, Mohammad Ahmad

    This work focuses on experimental study of cross-property connections that link up effective linear elastic and electrical conductive properties of heterogeneous materials. Such connections are especially useful when one property (electrical conductivity) is easier to measure than the other (elastic constants). Also, take advantages from the easy of measure electrical resistance to study the microstructural changes, and then compare results with different methods like microscopy and other published methods. Mechanical and electrical properties of different specimens under both fatigue and quasi-static loading were investigated, combined with the analysis of microstructural changes produced by such loading. Two different types of metals (stainless steel 304 and Titanium CP-2) have been cut from sheets and then subjected to two different type of loading: cyclic loading (up to 80000 cycles) at several values of maximal stress sigmamax and then quasi-static loading. At low values of sigmamax as well as at the low number of cycles no significant changes in mechanical properties and mild decrease in electrical conductivity (approximately uniform over the specimen) have been observed. The latter can be explained by generation cluster of new dislocations that can be seen in photo images in the form of black dots. As the number of cycles and sigmamax grow up, reduction in Young's modulus and in ultimate strength of the specimens take place. This reduction is accompanied by local decrease in electrical conductivity due to formation of the microcracks. Changes in Young's modulus and electrical conductivity at high values of sigma max. (higher than the yield limit) follow the theoretically predicted cross-property connection for microcracked materials. Qualitative correlation between strength reduction and maximum value of local resistivity across the specimen has been observed at qualitative level.

  11. Laboratory measurements of basalts electrical resistivity under deep oceanic crustal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violay, M. E.; Gibert, B.; Azais, P.; Pezard, P. A.; Flovenz, O. G.; Asmundsson, R.

    2009-12-01

    For sixty years, electrical resistivity soundings have been used to explore geothermal resources in Iceland. They have generally revealed two zones of high electrical conductivity, one at shallow depths (Flovenz et al., 1985) and another at 10-30 km depth (Beblo and Björnsson, 1978). The interpretation of these conductive zones in terms of composition and in-situ physical conditions is often ambiguous, as various parameters can explain these observations like temperature, partial melting, change in minerals and type of pore fluid. Accurate interpretations of resistivity data needed for geothermal exploration require laboratory measurements of electrical conductivities performed on rock samples at different conditions. We present here a method to measure electrical conductivity of rocks under deep crustal conditions for oceanic crustal rock, i.e. at temperatures up to 600°C, confining pressures up to 200 MPa and pore fluid pressures up to 50 MPa. The method has been developed in a internally heated, gas pressure apparatus (Paterson press). Electrical conductivity is measured on large cylindrical samples (15 to 22 mm in diameter and 10 to 15 mm in length) in a two parallel electrodes geometry. Such experiments require that the fluid saturated sample is sleeved in an impermeable and deformable jacket serving to separate the confining pressure medium (high pressure argon) from the pore fluid saturated sample. At temperature above 200°C a metal sleeve must be used, although it induces high leakage currents that could affect electrical measurements. The leakage currents are reduced using addition of 2 guard-ring parallel electrodes (Glover, 1995). The electrical impedance of basalt has been measured over a frequency range from 10 -1 to 106 Hertz. Five different types of low porosity basalts were selected to cover a range in alteration grade, from albitic to granulite facies. Application of this method will provide data on electrical conductivity of fresh and altered

  12. Electrical resistivity measurements of the chalcogenide spinel, CuIr2S4, under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanni, Mark

    2006-10-01

    Electrical resistivity as a function of pressure will be investigated for the thiospinel compound, CuIr2S4, which exhibits a metal to insulator transition at high pressures. This study will corroborate existing experimental and theoretical work and is the first of its kind to perform high pressure electrical conductivity and insulating phase optical studies in the range of room temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature. In addition, the transport properties of adamantine semiconductors will be studied at high pressure. The resistivity measurements will be made using a pseudo four-wire probing technique, using an AC constant current source, to eliminate thermal noise in the connections, and a nanovoltmeter. The study is currently ongoing and results are still pending. Improvements made to a stepper motor control program and changes to the system used for optical studies will be presented.

  13. Electron scattering characteristics of polycrystalline metal transition films by in-situ electrical resistance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trindade, I. G.; Leitão, D.; Fermento, R.; Pogorelev, Y.; Sousa, J. B.

    2009-08-01

    In-situ electrical resistance measurements were performed to obtain the scattering characteristics of very thin polycrystalline metal transition magnetic alloys grown by ion beam deposition (IBD) on specific underlayers. The experimental curves show size effects at small film thicknesses and important differences between Co 85Fe 15 and Ni 81Fe 19 thin layers grown on identical underlayers of Ta70 Å/Ru13 Å. The largest difference was observed in Ni 81Fe 19 films grown on underlayers of amorphous Ta70 Å. The experimental curves of electrical resistivity/conductivity variation with layer thickness were well fit within the Mayadas and Shatzkes (M-S) model, assuming specific formulations for grain growth with layer thickness.

  14. Resistance oscillations of two-dimensional electrons in crossed electric and tilted magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, William; Vitkalov, Sergey; Bykov, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of dc electric field on transport of highly mobile two-dimensional electrons is studied in wide GaAs single quantum wells placed in titled magnetic fields. The study shows that in perpendicular magnetic field resistance oscillates due to electric-field induced Landau-Zener transitions between quantum levels that correspond to geometric resonances between cyclotron orbits and periodic modulation of electron density of states. Magnetic field tilt inverts these oscillations. Surprisingly the strongest inverted oscillations are observed at a tilt corresponding to nearly absent modulation of the electron density of states in regime of magnetic breakdown of semiclassical electron orbits. This phenomenon establishes an example of quantum resistance oscillations due to Landau quantization, which occur in electron systems with a constant density of states.

  15. Increase in whole-body peripheral vascular resistance during three hours of air or oxygen prebreathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, J. M.; Horrigan, D. J., Jr.; Conkin, J.; Dierlam, J. J.; Stanford, J., Jr.; Riddle, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Male and female subjects prebreathed air or 100% oxygen through a mask for 3.0 hours while comfortably reclined. Blood pressures, heart rate, and cardiac output were collected before and after the prebreathe. Peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) was calculated from these parameters and increased by 29% during oxygen prebreathing and 15% during air prebreathing. The oxygen contributed substantially to the increase in PVR. Diastolic blood pressure increased by 18% during the oxygen prebreathe while stystolic blood pressure showed no change under either procedure. The increase in PVR during air prebreathing was attributed to procedural stress common to air and oxygen prebreathing.

  16. Enlargement of the lateral pharyngeal fat pad space in pigs increases upper airway resistance.

    PubMed

    Winter, W C; Gampper, T; Gay, S B; Suratt, P M

    1995-09-01

    Because the upper airway is partially enclosed in a rigid boundary, enlargement of soft tissue structures within this boundary could narrow the airway. The purpose of this study was to determine whether enlargement of the soft tissue space in the region of the lateral pharyngeal fat pad would increase pharyngeal resistance and narrow the retropalateal upper airway. In five young male anesthetized pigs, we inserted balloon occlusion catheters in the lateral pharyngeal fat pad under computerized tomographic scan guidance. We measured pharyngeal resistance with a pharyngeal catheter and a tightly fitting face mask before and after inflation of the balloons. We also measured pharyngeal airway cross-sectional area before and after inflation of the balloons. In all pigs, balloon inflation significantly increased pharyngeal resistance and significantly decreased the area of the retropalateal airway. We conclude that enlargement of the soft tissue space in the region of the lateral pharyngeal fat pad increases pharyngeal resistance and narrows the retropalateal airway in anesthetized pigs. PMID:8567510

  17. Galanin antagonist increases insulin resistance by reducing glucose transporter 4 effect in adipocytes of rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lili; Shi, Mingyi; Zhang, Ling; Li, Guangzhi; Zhang, Lingxiang; Shao, Hu; Fang, Penghua; Ma, Yingping; Li, Jian; Shi, Qiaojia; Sui, Yumei

    2011-08-01

    Seeing that galanin increases animal body weight on the conditions of inhibiting insulin secretion and animals with metabolic disorder of galanin easily suffer from diabetes, we postulate that endogenous galanin is necessary to reduce insulin resistance in adipocytes. To test this hypothesis, we compared four groups of rats to examine whether an increase in galanin secretion stimulated by swimming may reduce insulin resistance. The rats from sedentary and trained drug groups were injected by M35, a galanin antagonist. The rats from trained control and trained drug groups swam after each injection for four weeks. We found that exercise significantly elevated plasma galanin contents and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) mRNA levels in adipocytes. Meanwhile, M35 treatment reduced GLUT4 and GLUT4 mRNA levels, and glucose infusing rates in euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp tests. The ratios of GLUT4 concentrations at plasma membranes to total cell membranes in both drug groups were lower compared with each control group, respectively. These observations suggest that endogenous galanin reduces insulin resistance by increasing GLUT4 contents and promoting GLUT4 transportation from intracellular membranes to plasma membranes in adipocytes. Galanin is an important hormone to reduce insulin resistance in rats. PMID:21664358

  18. Momentum is increasing towards a flexible electricity system based on renewables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Catherine

    2016-02-01

    Total global energy use is rising, and remains based on fossil fuels. Yet, the challenge of climate change requires a deep decarbonization of our energy system. Here I argue that the global energy policy discourse is moving rapidly towards one of renewable, energy-efficient and flexible electricity systems. This is primarily because of a rapid take-up within a few countries of variable renewable electricity sources over the past decade, resulting from falling renewable electricity prices, new and more economic means of flexible system operation, and changing social preferences. This in turn has led to widespread and supportive public policy announcements. I also argue that a ‘no-regrets’ energy policy is one that increases the energy system flexibility. Although the changing discourse is welcome, it is not to say that the challenge of climate change has been met. Policy statements must be backed up by more effective governance support and pressure to speed up change.

  19. Electrical Resistivity Investigations of the Kurşunlu (Manisa/Turkey) Geothermal Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarı, Coşkun; Timur, Emre

    2016-04-01

    It is of considerable importance to explore the geological structure around active faults, especially near-surface unconsolidated layers, to estimate the faults' activity. There are numerous case studies to investigate geothermal reservoirs and surrounding active faults using geophysical exploration methods; however, only a few cases have been verified in detail by comparison with other geological information. Electrical resistivity data provide a substantial contribution to the geophysical mapping and monitoring of geothermal reservoirs. We applied electrical methods, which can be effective for exploring to several hundred meters depth, to reveal geological structures covered by thick Quaternary alluvium formations. Geothermal activity around city of Manisa in Gediz Graben (Western Turkey) has been investigated by many researchers and many geothermal boreholes were drilled in order to produce electricity and for heating purposes. The Kurşunlu geothermal area is with the southern side of the Gediz Graben in 2 km west of Salihli, Manisa, Turkey. According to rising demand on thermal water around Salihli, geophysical studies were performed using the Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) measurements at 16 stations around the area of Kurşunlu hot springs, and they were interpreted using both one and two-dimensional modelling. Vertical and horizontal resistivity sections were mapped, and it was determined that two low-resistivity layers exist both in the North (stations 1,2 and 4) and the South (stations 6 and 10) part of the survey area. As a result of the studies, the boundaries of the low-resistivity layer were mapped and test drilling locations were recommended.

  20. Electrical resistivity variations associated with earthquakes on the san andreas fault.

    PubMed

    Mazzella, A; Morrison, H F

    1974-09-01

    A 24 percent precursory change in apparent electrical resistivity was observed before a magnitude 3.9 earthquake of strike-slip nature on the San Andreas fault in central California. The experimental configuration and numerical calculations suggest that the change is associated with a volume at depth rather than some near-surface phenomenon. The character and duration of the precursor period agree well with those of other earthquake studies and support a dilatant earthquake mechanism model. PMID:17833697

  1. [Testing the electric resistance as an objective diagnostic test in dental pulp diseases].

    PubMed

    Constantin, I; Severineanu, V; Tudose, N

    1976-01-01

    The authors test by means of a measuring device of high precision the resistence of health or sick human pulpa, comparing it to them of gums, excluding in the same time the sensibility of the patient in question. The authors corroborate the obtained dates with clinical symptomatology and the histopathological photos, discussing the possibility of objective electrical test as an expedient in the diagnosis of pulpa-affections. PMID:137616

  2. Modification of multilayer mirror top-layer design for increased laser damage resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiltz, D.; Patel, D.; Emmert, L.; Baumgarten, C.; Reagan, B.; Rudolph, W.; Rocca, J. J.; Menoni, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    This work focuses on the optimization of a high reflector design for operation at 1 μm wavelength to achieve a high laser damage threshold when tested at pulse durations of 0.19 and 4 ns. Different designs that modify the standing wave electric field distribution of a quarter wave Ta2O5/SiO2 multilayer dielectric coating are considered. It is found that the addition of an extra SiO2 quarter wave to reduce the peak electric field in the coating, increases the 50% damage probability by over 100% at both pulse durations.

  3. Azetidine-2-carboxylic acid resistant mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with increased salt tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Lehle, F.R.; Murphy, M.A.; Khan, R.A. )

    1989-04-01

    Nineteen mutant Arabidopsis families resistant to the proline analog azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (ACA) were characterized in terms of NaCl tolerance and proline content. Mutants were selected from about 64,000 progeny of about 16,000 self-pollinated Columbia parents which had been mutated with ethyl methane sulfonate during seed imbibition. Selections were performed during seed germination on aseptic agar medium containing 0.2 to 0.25 mM ACA. Nineteen mutant families, 12 clearly independent, retained resistance to ACA in the M{sub 4} generation. Based on germination on 150 mM NaCl, 13 of the mutant families were more tolerant than the wild type. Two mutants of intermediate resistance to ACA were markedly more salt tolerant than the others. Four mutant families appeared to overproduce proline. Of these, only 3 showed slight increases in salt tolerance.

  4. Transpulmonary pressure gradient verifies pulmonary hypertension is initiated by increased arterial resistance in broilers.

    PubMed

    Lorenzoni, A G; Anthony, N B; Wideman, R F

    2008-01-01

    Previous hemodynamic evaluations demonstrated that pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) is higher in broilers that are susceptible to pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS, ascites) than in broilers that are resistant to PHS. We compared key pulmonary hemodynamic parameters in broilers from PHS-susceptible and PHS-resistant lines (selected for 12 generations under hypobaric hypoxia) and in broilers from a relaxed (control) line. In experiment 1 the PAP was measured in male broilers in which a flow probe positioned on one pulmonary artery permitted the determination of cardiac output and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). The PAP and relative PVR were higher in susceptible broilers than in relaxed and resistant broilers, whereas absolute and relative cardiac output did not differ between lines. In experiment 2 male and female broilers from the 3 lines were catheterized to measure pressures in the wing vein, right atrium, right ventricle, pulmonary artery, and pulmonary veins (WP, wedge pressure). The transpulmonary pressure gradient (TPG) was calculated as (PAP-WP), with PAP quantifying precapillary pressure and WP approximating postcapillary pulmonary venous pressure. When compared with resistant and relaxed broilers, PAP values in susceptible broilers were > or =10 mmHg higher, TPG values were > or =8 mmHg higher, and WP values were < or =2 mmHg higher, regardless of sex. The combined hemodynamic criteria (elevated PAP and PVR combined with a proportionally elevated TPG) demonstrate that susceptibility to PHS can be attributed primarily to pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with increased precapillary (arteriole) resistance rather than to pulmonary venous hypertension caused by elevated postcapillary (venous and left atrial) resistance. PMID:18079461

  5. Imaging Rainfall Infiltration Processes with the Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Imaging Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Gui-Bin; Chen, Chien-chih; Chang, Ping-Yu; Wang, Tzu-Pin; Yen, Horng-Yuan; Dong, Jia-Jyun; Ni, Chuen-Fa; Chen, Su-Chin; Chen, Chao-Wei; Jia, Zheng-yuan

    2016-02-01

    Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI) was carried out continuously for 10 days to map the subsurface resistivity distribution along a potentially hazardous hillslope at the Jieshou Junior High School in Taoyuan, Taiwan. The reliability of the inverted resistivity structures down to about 25 m depth was examined with synthetic modeling using the same electrode arrangements installed on land surface as in field surveys, together with a DOI (depth-of-investigation) index calculated from the ERI data. The subsurface resistivity distribution is consistent with results from well logging. These ERI recordings were taken daily and provided highly resolved imagery of the resistivity distribution underground and illustrated the dynamical fluid-flow behavior due to heavy rainfall infiltration. Using Archie's law, the resistivity distribution was transformed into a map of relative water saturation (RWS), which is strongly correlated with the rainfall infiltration process. We then found that the averaged RWS is significantly correlated with daily precipitation. Our observations indicate that time-lapse ERI is effective in monitoring subterraneous rainfall infiltration; moreover, the preferential flow paths can be delineated according to the changes in averaged RWS derived from the ERI data.

  6. Electrical resistance tomography of unsaturated flow and transport in Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Buettner, H M; Bussod, G; Daily, W; Ramirez, A

    1998-12-28

    Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT), a new geophysical imaging technique, was used to study the movement of a tracer through the test block at the Unsaturated Zone Transport Test (UZTT) at Busted Butte, Nevada. Data were collected four times starting in July and ending in early September, 1998. ERT baseline images show a resistivity structure which is consistent with the known lithology in the rear part of the test block. There appears to be a low resistivity region in the front half of the block, particularly near the bottom. Difference images from August 19 and September 9 show clear and consistent resistivity decreases in the region near injection holes 18, 20, and 21 which can be associated with the injection of conductive water. The images show very little effect in the region around the other injection holes, 23, and 24 through 27 where far less water was injected. Difference images from August 19 and September 9 show resistivity decreases which could be interpreted as water moving down into the block. This is the same region which has an anomalously low resistivity in the baseline image. These results should be considered preliminary, and are subject to further interpretation.

  7. Imaging Rainfall Infiltration Processes with the Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Imaging Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Gui-Bin; Chen, Chien-chih; Chang, Ping-Yu; Wang, Tzu-Pin; Yen, Horng-Yuan; Dong, Jia-Jyun; Ni, Chuen-Fa; Chen, Su-Chin; Chen, Chao-Wei; Jia, Zheng-yuan

    2016-06-01

    Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI) was carried out continuously for 10 days to map the subsurface resistivity distribution along a potentially hazardous hillslope at the Jieshou Junior High School in Taoyuan, Taiwan. The reliability of the inverted resistivity structures down to about 25 m depth was examined with synthetic modeling using the same electrode arrangements installed on land surface as in field surveys, together with a DOI (depth-of-investigation) index calculated from the ERI data. The subsurface resistivity distribution is consistent with results from well logging. These ERI recordings were taken daily and provided highly resolved imagery of the resistivity distribution underground and illustrated the dynamical fluid-flow behavior due to heavy rainfall infiltration. Using Archie's law, the resistivity distribution was transformed into a map of relative water saturation (RWS), which is strongly correlated with the rainfall infiltration process. We then found that the averaged RWS is significantly correlated with daily precipitation. Our observations indicate that time-lapse ERI is effective in monitoring subterraneous rainfall infiltration; moreover, the preferential flow paths can be delineated according to the changes in averaged RWS derived from the ERI data.

  8. Characterization of subsurface stratigraphy along the lower American River floodplain using electrical resistivity, Sacramento, California, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, Bethany L.; Powers, Michael H.; Ball, Lyndsay B.

    2014-01-01

    In July 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, completed a geophysical survey using electrical resistivity along an approximately 6-mile reach of the lower American River in Sacramento, California, to map near-surface lithological variations. This survey is a part of a manifold and comprehensive study of river-flow dynamics and geologic boundary-property knowledge necessary to estimate scour potential and levee erosion risk. Data were acquired on the left (south or west) bank between river mile 5 and 10.7 as well as a short section on the right bank from river mile 5.4 to 6. Thirteen direct-current resistivity profiles and approximately 8.3 miles of capacitively coupled resisistivity data were acquired along accessible areas of the floodplain between the levee and river bank. Capacitively coupled resistivity was used as a reconnaissance tool, because it allowed for greater spatial coverage of data but with lower resolution and depth of investigation than the DC resistivity method. The study area contains Pleistocene-age alluvial deposits, dominated by gravels, sands, silts, and clays, that vary in both lateral extent and depth. Several generations of lithologic logs were used to help interpret resistivity variations observed in the resistivity models.

  9. Joining characteristics of beta-titanium wires with electrical resistance welding.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Masahiro; Brantley, William A; Yuasa, Toshihiro; Kawashima, Isao; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2008-05-01

    The goal of this research was to investigate the effects of different conditions for electrical resistance welding of beta-titanium orthodontic wires. Three electrode types were used with a range of power settings on an electrical resistance welding machine to join beta-titanium wires (Resolve, GAC International). Forces that caused bond failures for joined specimens were obtained with tensile loading, and the values were compared using one-way ANOVA and the Tukey test (alpha = 0.05). Metallurgical phases in the joint region were determined by micro-X-ray diffraction. Mean tensile forces for bond failure ranged from 5 to 20 kgf for the eight specimen groups and were dependent on electrode type and power setting. All X-ray diffraction peaks in the joint region were indexed to beta-titanium. Superior bond strength was achieved with the use of wide electrodes. The absence of phases other than beta-titanium in the joint area suggests that the electrical resistance welding may not adversely affect clinically important mechanical properties. Scanning microscope observations indicated that the localized permanent deformation and the formation of an undesirable equiaxed grain structure occurred with the use of narrow electrodes. PMID:17937410

  10. Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Dunbar, John

    2012-12-31

    Electrical methods offer a geophysical approach for determining the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate in deep marine environments. Methane hydrate is essentially non-conductive. Hence, sediments containing hydrate are more resistive than sediments without hydrates. To date, the controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) method has been used in marine hydrates studies. This project evaluated an alternative electrical method, direct current resistivity (DCR), for detecting marine hydrates. DCR involves the injection of direct current between two source electrodes and the simultaneous measurement of the electric potential (voltage) between multiple receiver electrodes. The DCR method provides subsurface information comparable to that produced by the CSEM method, but with less sophisticated instrumentation. Because the receivers are simple electrodes, large numbers can be deployed to achieve higher spatial resolution. In this project a prototype seafloor DCR system was developed and used to conduct a reconnaissance survey at a site of known hydrate occurrence in Mississippi Canyon Block 118. The resulting images of sub-bottom resistivities indicate that high-concentration hydrates at the site occur only in the upper 50 m, where deep-seated faults intersect the seafloor. Overall, there was evidence for much less hydrate at the site than previously thought based on available seismic and CSEM data alone.

  11. Electrical resistivity tomography, VES and magnetic surveys for dam site characterization, Wukro, Northern Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haile, Tigistu; Atsbaha, Solomun

    2014-09-01

    Geophysical surveys involving the techniques of electrical resistivity imaging, electrical sounding and magnetics were employed to characterize the ground conditions at a proposed dam site at Hizaeti-Afras, Wukro, North Ethiopia. The techniques were utilized to map the depth to the competent formations, their relative suitability for foundation work and the presence and extent of weak zones in the subsurface. The work has mapped the different lithologic units of the subsurface and determined the depth to the basement rocks in the area. Through correlation of the inverse model resistivity sections of the imaging surveys, the geoelectric section of the sounding survey and the magnetic profile plots with available borehole lithologic logs, it is shown that the results very well supplement the geotechnical point data in addition to providing a wider coverage in mapping areas of weak ground that could otherwise be missed with widely spaced borehole information. The combined results of the survey show the proposed dam axis to be unsuitable. The power of the electrical resistivity imaging technique and its potential to map the shallow subsurface with adequate resolution are illustrated. The result is a strong suggestion that geophysical techniques can be used to assist and extrapolate borehole geotechnical data especially when large area is to be used for development of large infrastructure.

  12. Correlation between index properties and electrical resistivity of hydrocarbon contaminated periodic marine clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, P.; Shah, M. V.

    2015-09-01

    Hydrocarbon contamination is a measure issue of concern as it adversely affects the soil inherent properties viz. index properties and strength properties.The main objective of this research work is to determine Electrical resistivity to study and correlate with soil index properties and engineering propertiescontaminated with hydrocarbon at the rate of 3%, 6% and 9% for the period of 15, 30 45 and 60 days and compare it with the results obtained for non-contaminated marine clay. Electrical resistivity of virgin marine clay (bentonite which is expansive in nature) and hydrocarbon contaminated clay for each percent of contamination is obtained in the laboratory for each period and its co-relation with index properties and engineering properties is proposed. CEC, EDAX tests were performed to evaluate the effect of ions of montmorillonite clays and their penetrability into hydrocarbon- clay matrix. The correlations at the end of each period for each percentage of contamination thus enabled to integrate index properties of non-contaminated and hydrocarbon contaminated marine clays with Electrical resistivity.

  13. Antibiotic-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Increasing Success Remains a Challenge as a Nosocomial Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Villoria, Ana Maria; Valverde-Garduno, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant infectious bacteria currently imply a high risk and therefore constitute a strong challenge when treating patients in hospital settings. Characterization of these species and of particular strains is a priority for the establishment of diagnostic tests and preventive procedures. The relevance of Acinetobacter baumannii as a problematic microorganism in inpatient facilities, particularly intensive care units, has increased over time. This review aims to draw attention to (i) the historical emergence of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, (ii) the current status of surveillance needs in Latin America, and (iii) recent data suggesting that A. baumannii continues to spread and evolve in hospital settings. First, we present synopsis of the series of events leading to the discovery and precise identification of this microorganism in hospital settings. Then key events in the acquisition of antibiotic-resistant genes by this microorganism are summarized, highlighting the race between new antibiotic generation and emergence of A. baumannii resistant strains. Here we review the historical development of this species as an infectious threat, the current state of its distribution, and antibiotic resistance characteristics, and we discuss future prospects for its control. PMID:26966582

  14. Systematic review of antibiotic resistance in acne: an increasing topical and oral threat.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Timothy R; Efthimiou, John; Dréno, Brigitte

    2016-03-01

    Topical and oral antibiotics are routinely used to treat acne. However, antibiotic resistance is increasing, with many countries reporting that more than 50% of Propionibacterium acnes strains are resistant to topical macrolides, making them less effective. We reviewed the current scientific literature to enable proposal of recommendations for antibiotic use in acne treatment. References were identified through PubMed searches for articles published from January, 1954, to March 7, 2015, using four multiword searches. Ideally, benzoyl peroxide in combination with a topical retinoid should be used instead of a topical antibiotic to minimise the impact of resistance. Oral antibiotics still have a role in the treatment of moderate-to-severe acne, but only with a topical retinoid, benzoyl peroxide, or their combination, and ideally for no longer than 3 months. To limit resistance, it is recommended that benzoyl peroxide should always be added when long-term oral antibiotic use is deemed necessary. The benefit-to-risk ratio of long-term antibiotic use should be carefully considered and, in particular, use alone avoided where possible. There is a need to treat acne with effective alternatives to antibiotics to reduce the likelihood of resistance. PMID:26852728

  15. Increased fitness and realized heritability in emamectin benzoate-resistant Chrysoperla carnea (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

    PubMed

    Mansoor, Muhammad Mudassir; Abbas, Naeem; Shad, Sarfraz Ali; Pathan, Attaullah Khan; Razaq, Muhammad

    2013-10-01

    The common green lacewing Chrysoperla carnea is a key biological control agent employed in integrated pest management (IPM) programs for managing various insect pests. A field collected population of C. carnea was selected for emamectin benzoate resistance in the laboratory and fitness costs and realized heritability were investigated. After five generations of selection with emamectin benzoate, C. carnea developed a 318-fold resistance to the insecticide. The resistant population had a relative fitness of 1.49, with substantially higher emergence rate of healthy adults, fecundity and hatchability and shorter larval duration, pupal duration, and development time compared to the susceptible population. Mean population growth rates; such as the intrinsic rate of natural population increase and biotic potential were higher for the emamectin benzoate selected population compared to the susceptible population. The realized heritability (h(2)) value of emamectin benzoate resistance was 0.34 in emamectin benzoate selected population of C. carnea. Chrysoperla species which show resistance to insecticides makes them compatible with those IPM systems where emamectin benzoate is employed. PMID:23975538

  16. Increasing antibiotic resistance in preservative-tolerant bacterial strains isolated from cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Orús, Pilar; Gomez-Perez, Laura; Leranoz, Sonia; Berlanga, Mercedes

    2015-03-01

    To ensure the microbiological quality, consumer safety and organoleptic properties of cosmetic products, manufacturers need to comply with defined standards using several preservatives and disinfectants. A drawback regarding the use of these preservatives is the possibility of generating cross-insusceptibility to other disinfectants or preservatives, as well as cross resistance to antibiotics. Therefore, the objective of this study was to understand the adaptive mechanisms of Enterobacter gergoviae, Pseudomonas putida and Burkholderia cepacia that are involved in recurrent contamination in cosmetic products containing preservatives. Diminished susceptibility to formaldehyde-donors was detected in isolates but not to other preservatives commonly used in the cosmetics industry, although increasing resistance to different antibiotics (β-lactams, quinolones, rifampicin, and tetracycline) was demonstrated in these strains when compared with the wild-type strain. The outer membrane protein modifications and efflux mechanism activities responsible for the resistance trait were evaluated. The development of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms due to the selective pressure from preservatives included in cosmetic products could be a risk for the emergence and spread of bacterial resistance in the environment. Nevertheless, the large contribution of disinfection and preservation cannot be denied in cosmetic products. PMID:26415667

  17. Trophic compensation reinforces resistance: herbivory absorbs the increasing effects of multiple disturbances.

    PubMed

    Ghedini, Giulia; Russell, Bayden D; Connell, Sean D

    2015-02-01

    Disturbance often results in small changes in community structure, but the probability of transitioning to contrasting states increases when multiple disturbances combine. Nevertheless, we have limited insights into the mechanisms that stabilise communities, particularly how perturbations can be absorbed without restructuring (i.e. resistance). Here, we expand the concept of compensatory dynamics to include countervailing mechanisms that absorb disturbances through trophic interactions. By definition, 'compensation' occurs if a specific disturbance stimulates a proportional countervailing response that eliminates its otherwise unchecked effect. We show that the compounding effects of disturbances from local to global scales (i.e. local canopy-loss, eutrophication, ocean acidification) increasingly promote the expansion of weedy species, but that this response is countered by a proportional increase in grazing. Finally, we explore the relatively unrecognised role of compensatory effects, which are likely to maintain the resistance of communities to disturbance more deeply than current thinking allows. PMID:25581377

  18. Chemical Changes Associated with Increased Acid Resistance of Er:YAG Laser Irradiated Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Olea-Mejía, Oscar Fernando; García-Fabila, María Magdalena; Rodríguez-Vilchis, Laura Emma; Sánchez-Flores, Ignacio; Centeno-Pedraza, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Background. An increase in the acid resistance of dental enamel, as well as morphological and structural changes produced by Er:YAG laser irradiation, has been reported. Purpose. To evaluate the chemical changes associated with acid resistance of enamel treated with Er:YAG laser. Methods. Forty-eight enamel samples were divided into 4 groups (n = 12). Group I (control); Groups II, III, and IV were irradiated with Er:YAG at 100 mJ (12.7 J/cm2), 200 mJ (25.5 J/cm2), and 300 mJ (38.2 J/cm2), respectively. Results. There were significant differences in composition of irradiated groups (with the exception of chlorine) and in the amount of calcium released. Conclusions. Chemical changes associated with an increase in acid resistance of enamel treated with Er:YAG laser showed a clear postirradiation pattern characterized by a decrease in C at.% and an increase in O, P, and Ca at.% and no changes in Cl at.%. An increased Ca/P ratio after Er:YAG laser irradiation was associated with the use of higher laser energy densities. Chemical changes produced by acid dissolution showed a similar trend among experimental groups. Stable or increased Ca/P ratio after acid dissolution was observed in the irradiated groups, with reduction of Ca released into the acid solution. PMID:24600327

  19. Acne: risk indicator for increased body mass index and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bodo C; John, Swen Malte; Plewig, Gerd

    2013-11-01

    Acne appears to represent a visible indicator disease of over-activated mTORC1 signalling, an unfavour-able metabolic deviation on the road to serious common Western diseases of civilisation associated with increased body mass index and insulin resistance. Exaggerated mTORC1 signalling by Western diet explains the association of acne with increased body mass index, insulin resistance, and early onset of menarche. Both, a high glycaemic load and increased consumption of milk and milk products, staples of Western diet, aggravate mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 signalling. This review of the literature summarises present evidence for an association between acne, increased body mass index, insulin resistance and Western diet. By dietary intervention with a Palaeolithic-type diet, the dermatologist has the chance to attenuate patients' increased mTORC1 signalling by reducing glycaemic load and milk consumption, which may not only improve acne but may delay the march to more serious mTORC1-driven diseases of civilisation. PMID:23975508

  20. A method to investigate the electron scattering characteristics of ultrathin metallic films by in situ electrical resistance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Trindade, I. G.; Sousa, J. B.; Fermento, R.; Leitao, D.

    2009-07-15

    In this article, a method to measure the electrical resistivity/conductivity of metallic thin films during layer growth on specific underlayers is described. The in situ monitoring of an underlayer electrical resistance, its change upon the incoming of new material atoms/molecules, and the growth of a new layer are presented. The method is easy to implement and allows obtaining in situ experimental curves of electrical resistivity dependence upon film thickness with a subatomic resolution, providing insight in film growth microstructure characteristics, specular/diffuse electron scattering surfaces, and optimum film thicknesses.

  1. Electrical stimulation increases phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase in superior cervical ganglion of rat.

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, A L; Perlman, R L

    1984-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the superior cervical ganglion of the rat increased the phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase (tyrosine 3-monooxygenase, EC 1.14.16.2) in this tissue. Ganglia were incubated with [32P]Pi for 90 min and were then electrically stimulated via the preganglionic nerve. Tyrosine hydroxylase was isolated from homogenates of the ganglia by immunoprecipitation followed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. 32P-labeled tyrosine hydroxylase was visualized by radioautography, and the incorporation of 32P into the enzyme was quantitated by densitometry of the radioautograms. Stimulation of ganglia at 20 Hz for 5 min increased the incorporation of 32P into tyrosine hydroxylase to a level 5-fold that found in unstimulated control ganglia. The increase in phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase was dependent on the duration and frequency of stimulation. Preganglionic stimulation did not increase the phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase in a medium that contained low Ca2+ and high Mg2+. Increases in phosphorylation were reversible; within 30 min after the cessation of stimulation, the incorporation of 32P into tyrosine hydroxylase decreased to the level found in unstimulated ganglia. The nicotinic antagonist hexamethonium reduced the increase in 32P incorporation into tyrosine hydroxylase by about 50%, while the muscarinic antagonist atropine had no effect. Thus, preganglionic stimulation appeared to increase the phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase in part by a nicotinic mechanism and in part by a noncholinergic mechanism. Antidromic stimulation of ganglia also increased the phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that electrical stimulation also increased the incorporation of 32P into at least six other phosphoproteins in the ganglion. Images PMID:6150485

  2. Electrical Resistivity Tomography Monitoring of Soil Remediation for a Garbage Dump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    shi, X.; Luo, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Fu, Q.; Xu, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) survey was firstly used to investigate the distribution of contaminated soil in a garbage dump area, Wuhan city, China. The result shows that sulfated soil resistivity is about 4 to 7 ohm-m, which is relatively lower than normal soil resistivity of about 15 to 25 ohm-m. The distribution of contaminated soil was delineated using ERT images. Then, ERT survey was carried out in this area for monitoring of remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater. Werner measurements with 60 electrodes of 1 m spacing were taken during the 9-well oxygen injection and nutrition liquid injection period. The difference of apparent resistivity between before gas injection and after gas injection was used to delineate the channel of gas and the trace of gas migration in the porous garbage dump. The electrical resitivity changes between before and after nutrition liquid injection were used to analyze the liquid migration and distribution. The dynamic procedures of gas and water migration are outlined. The results suggest that ERT is a powerful technique for monitoring of soil remediation.

  3. Measurement of the electrical resistivity profile in the Madison Symmetric Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jay K.

    A two dimensional, toroidal equilibrium reconstruction code has been developed for the reversed field pinch. The parallel current density profile has been measured by incorporating several diagnostics into the code. A new fitting technique of derivatives of magnetic signals has been developed to determine the inductive electric field profile. During periods of low MHD activity, Ohm's law obeys its simplest form and the ratio of measured E and J profiles determines the plasma electrical resistivity profile. Presented is an upper bound of Zeff through spectroscopic measurements of bremsstrahlung and several pollutants in the near infrared wavelength region. This enables a comparison of the measured resistivity with Spitzer and neoclassical models. The computed resistivity profile is consistent with the Spitzer model and there is no need to invoke an anomaly factor when describing the resistivity in the reversed field pinch. The second primary result is that a bremsstrahlung measurement in MST is not feasible over the majority of MST operating conditions. An overwhelming emission continuum due to neutral particles and wall recycling complicates extraction of the relatively dim bremsstrahlung contribution. The standard definition of Zeff = SsnsZ 2sne is not sufficient to describe collisionality in the edge of MST due to the effects of non-fully stripped impurity ions.

  4. Noncontact technique for measuring the electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility of electrostatically levitated materials.

    PubMed

    Rustan, G E; Spyrison, N S; Kreyssig, A; Prozorov, R; Goldman, A I

    2012-10-01

    We describe the development of a new method for measuring the electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility of high temperature liquids and solids. The technique combines a tunnel diode oscillator with an electrostatic levitation furnace to perform noncontact measurements on spherical samples 2-3 mm in diameter. The tank circuit of the oscillator is inductively coupled to the sample, and measurements of the oscillator frequency as a function of sample temperature can be translated into changes in the sample's electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility. Particular emphasis is given on the need to improve the positional stability of the levitated samples, as well as the need to stabilize the temperature of the measurement coil. To demonstrate the validity of the technique, measurements have been performed on solid spheres of pure zirconium and low-carbon steel. In the case of zirconium, while absolute values of the resistivity were not determined, the temperature dependence of the resistivity was measured over the range of 640-1770 K and found to be in good agreement with literature data. In the case of low-carbon steel, the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition was clearly observable and, when combined with thermal data, appears to occur simultaneously with the solid-solid structural transition. PMID:23126782

  5. The data preprocessing in apparent resistivity pesudo-section construction of two-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Although three-dimensional (3-D) electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) survey has become a popular practice in the site characterization and process monitoring, the two-dimensional (2-D) ERT survey is still often used in the field. This is because that the 2-D ERT survey is relatively easy to do and the focus of site characterization is on the information of 2-D cross section, not necessarily of the 3-D subsurface structure. Examples of such practice include tunnel line and crossing fault survey. In these cases, depending on the property of surface soil to be surveyed, the 2-D ERT survey with pole-pole array may occasionally make us obtain quality good data, however it often gives us a suit of data set both with real and erroneous ones that incorporated the effects of electrode contact and not far enough far electrodes. Without preprocessing, the apparent resistivity pseudo-section constructed from this kind of data set may quite deviate from the real one and the information obtained from it may be misleading and even completely incorrect. In this study, we developed a method of far electrode dynamic correction that is appropriate for raw data preprocessing from 2-D pole-pole array ERT survey. Based on this method, we not only can find and delete the abnormal data points easily, but also can position the coordinates of far electrodes actually working in the field, thus delete the far electrode effects and make best use of the looked strange data points. The method also makes us to be able to judge the effects of electrode contact and avoid using such data points in the following apparent resistivity pseudo-section construction. With this preprocessing to the data set, the constructed apparent resistivity pseudo-section is demonstrated to be more approximate to the real one. This makes the following reversion calculation more robust. We'll introduce this far electrode dynamic correction method and show application examples in the meeting.

  6. Kondo Effect in CeXc (Xc = S, Se, Te) Studied by Electrical Resistivity Measurements under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Yuya; Takai, Shun; Matsumura, Takeshi; Tanida, Hiroshi; Sera, Masafumi; Matsubayashi, Kazuyuki; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Ochiai, Akira

    2016-03-01

    We have measured the electrical resistivity of cerium monochalcogenides, CeS, CeSe, and CeTe, under high pressures of up to 8 GPa. The pressure dependences of the antiferromagnetic ordering temperature TN, crystal field splitting, and the ln T anomaly of the Kondo effect have been studied to cover the entire region from the magnetic ordering regime at low pressure to the Fermi liquid regime at high pressure. TN initially increases with increasing pressure, and starts to decrease at high pressure as expected from Doniach’s diagram. Simultaneously, the ln T behavior in the resistivity is enhanced, indicating the enhancement of the Kondo effect by pressure. It is also characteristic of CeXc that the crystal field splitting rapidly decreases at a common rate of -12.2 K/GPa. This leads to the increase in the degeneracy of the f state and the further enhancement of the Kondo effect. It is shown that the pressure-dependent degeneracy of the f state is a key factor for understanding the pressure dependence of TN, the Kondo effect, magnetoresistance, and the peak structure in the temperature dependence of resistivity.

  7. Electrical conduction in low-resistivity (quasiamorphous) Ag1-xCux alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vancea, J.; Pukowietz, S.; Reiss, G.; Hoffmann, H.

    1987-06-01

    UHV-evaporated Ag1-xCux alloy films show a strong dependence of the crystallite sizes on the composition: In the middle of the concentration range, the mean grain size is smaller than 2 nm. The resistivity, however, is much lower than expected for such extremely-fine-grained materials (ρ<9 μΩ cm). The electrical transport parameters for these films were obtained from the thickness dependence of the conductivity without any a priori assumptions. It will be shown that the electrical transport in these alloys can be well understood as a limit of the reflection model for the electrical conductivity in polycrystalline metals [G. Reiss, J. Vancea, and H. Hoffmann, Phys. Rev. Lett. 56, 2100 (1986)].

  8. A simple apparatus for measuring electrical resistance of materials at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, G.V.; Sastry, V.S.; Radhakrishnan, T.S.; Seshagiri, V.

    1996-01-01

    Electrical resistance measurements in a wide temperature range are very important for understanding the physical properties of materials. It is often difficult to carry out the measurements at high temperatures since taking electrical leads reliably from specimens is a nontrivial problem. In this note we describe in detail a simple apparatus which can be used for studying any foil or pellet-shaped sample at temperatures up to 800{degree}C in vacuum or in an inert atmosphere. The apparatus uses spring loaded pins for electrical contact, obviating the need for silver paint or spot welding, thus avoiding any possible change in the properties of the sample. The springs used for loading are far removed from the high temperature zone; the load, therefore, remains unchanged during the experiment and the contacts remain uniformly reliable. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Electrical carotid sinus stimulation: chances and challenges in the management of treatment resistant arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chobanyan-Jürgens, Kristine; Jordan, Jens

    2015-09-01

    Treatment resistant arterial hypertension is associated with excess cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Electrical carotid sinus stimulators engaging baroreflex afferent activity have been developed for such patients. Indeed, baroreflex mechanisms contribute to long-term blood pressure control by governing efferent sympathetic and parasympathetic activity. The first-generation carotid sinus stimulator applying bilateral bipolar stimulation reduced blood pressure in a controlled clinical trial but nevertheless failed to meet the primary efficacy endpoint. The second-generation device utilizes smaller unilateral unipolar electrodes, thus decreasing invasiveness of the implantation while saving battery. An uncontrolled clinical study suggested improvement in blood pressure with the second-generation device. We hope that these findings as well as preliminary observations suggesting cardiovascular and renal organ protection with electrical carotid sinus stimulation will be confirmed in properly controlled clinical trials. Meanwhile, we should find ways to better identify patients who are most likely to benefit from electrical carotid sinus stimulation. PMID:26208917

  10. Electrical Resistivity Monitoring for Leachate Distribution at Two Foot-and-Mouth- Disease (FMD) Burial Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Kaown, D.; Lee, K.; Leem, K.; Ko, K.

    2011-12-01

    The main objective of this study was to provide the basic information on leachate distribution with time changes through the electrical resistivity monitoring for a certain period of time in the Foot-and-Mouth-Disease (FMD) burial facilities which is needed to prevent further soil and groundwater contamination and to build an effective plan for stabilization of the burial site. In this study, dipole-dipoles surveys were carried out around two FMD burial sites in Iceon-si, Gyeonggi-do. The FMD burial facility installed at Daewall-myeon is consists of one block but, at Yul-myeon, it is divided into 2 blocks named A and B blocks. Dipole-Dipole surveys with 8 lines at Yul-myeon and 3 lines at Daewall-myeon were carried out. The observed leachate distribution along survey lines was not clearly evident as time passes at Daewall-myeon site, but, at Yul-myeon site, the leachate distribution around the survey lines showed a decrease of resistivity around the burial facility. At and around A and B blocks of Yul-myeon site, interpretations of the survey data show low resistivity zones below 10 Ωm from a depth 3 m to 10 m and such low resistivity zones of the A block are thicker than the B block by about 5~10 m. From the geochemical data and resistivity survey at two FMD burial sites, it is inferred that the groundwater within a 50-meter radius around burial facilities of the Yul-myeon site are contaminated by leachate. The general resistivity distribution around the burial site is seemed affected by the leachate with high electrical conductivity. The detail distribution patterns can be explained by local distributions of soil and weathered rocks and associated leachate flow. This subject is supported by Brain Korea 21 and Korea Ministry of Environment as 'The GAIA Project (173-092-009)'.

  11. Determination of anisotropic karst features in the Biscayne Aquifer using multi electrical resistivity imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeboah-Forson, A.; Whitman, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Biscayne Aquifer of Southeast Florida is characterized by limestone cavities and solution hole features that are often beneath the surface and are difficult to detect and quantify accurately. Electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) is often used to image the subsurface for detection of cavities and other karst features. A recent regional study of electrical anisotropy derived from rotated square array measurements measured coefficients of anisotropy of 1.12 or less. At one particular site however, the coefficient of anisotropy was found to be as high as 1.36 with the average minimum resistivity direction trending 105°. The highest values of anisotropy are found at squares array sizes equivalent to effective depths of 4-9m. The cause of this higher anisotropy and its associated orientation was investigated using a combination of azimuthal 2-D profiles and a 3-D tomography survey using a mixed dipole gradient array. Results indicate a low resistivity zone at a depth of 5-10 m in the saturated zone (10-40Ωm) trending 109° in the 2-D profiles and the presence of low resistivity zone (14-43Ωm) trending 90-105° in the 3-D model. This observed lower resistivity zone is at least 50% lower than the surrounding resistivity. Although further geophysical studies are planned at the site, the primary analysis from these three contrasting ERI techniques indicates that the cause of higher anisotropy might be due to the presence of a solution cavity oriented in the E-SE direction.

  12. Volatiles produced by soil-borne endophytic bacteria increase plant pathogen resistance and affect tritrophic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ton, Jurriaan; Brandenburg, Anna; Karlen, Danielle; Zopfi, Jakob; Turlings, Ted C. J.

    2014-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by soil microorganisms influence plant growth and pathogen resistance. Yet, very little is known about their influence on herbivores and higher trophic levels. We studied the origin and role of a major bacterial VOC, 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD), on plant growth, pathogen and herbivore resistance, and the attraction of natural enemies in maize. One of the major contributors to 2,3-BD in the headspace of soil-grown maize seedlings was identified as Enterobacter aerogenes, an endophytic bacterium that colonizes the plants. The production of 2,3-BD by E. aerogenes rendered maize plants more resistant against the Northern corn leaf blight fungus Setosphaeria turcica. On the contrary, E. aerogenes-inoculated plants were less resistant against the caterpillar Spodoptera littoralis. The effect of 2,3-BD on the attraction of the parasitoid Cotesia marginiventris was more variable: 2,3-BD application to the headspace of the plants had no effect on the parasitoids, but application to the soil increased parasitoid attraction. Furthermore, inoculation of seeds with E. aerogenes decreased plant attractiveness, whereas inoculation of soil with a total extract of soil microbes increased parasitoid attraction, suggesting that the effect of 2,3-BD on the parasitoid is indirect and depends on the composition of the microbial community. PMID:24127750

  13. Evolution of a Heavy Metal Homeostasis/Resistance Island Reflects Increasing Copper Stress in Enterobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Staehlin, Benjamin M.; Gibbons, John G.; Rokas, Antonis; O’Halloran, Thomas V.; Slot, Jason C.

    2016-01-01

    Copper homeostasis in bacteria is challenged by periodic elevation of copper levels in the environment, arising from both natural sources and human inputs. Several mechanisms have evolved to efflux copper from bacterial cells, including the cus (copper sensing copper efflux system), and pco (plasmid-borne copper resistance system) systems. The genes belonging to these two systems can be physically clustered in a Copper Homeostasis and Silver Resistance Island (CHASRI) on both plasmids and chromosomes in Enterobacteria. Increasing use of copper in agricultural and industrial applications raises questions about the role of human activity in the evolution of novel copper resistance mechanisms. Here we present evidence that CHASRI emerged and diversified in response to copper deposition across aerobic and anaerobic environments. An analysis of diversification rates and a molecular clock model suggest that CHASRI experienced repeated episodes of elevated diversification that could correspond to peaks in human copper production. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that CHASRI originated in a relative of Enterobacter cloacae as the ultimate product of sequential assembly of several pre-existing two-gene modules. Once assembled, CHASRI dispersed via horizontal gene transfer within Enterobacteriaceae and also to certain members of Shewanellaceae, where the original pco module was replaced by a divergent pco homolog. Analyses of copper stress mitigation suggest that CHASRI confers increased resistance aerobically, anaerobically, and during shifts between aerobic and anaerobic environments, which could explain its persistence in facultative anaerobes and emergent enteric pathogens. PMID:26893455

  14. Volatiles produced by soil-borne endophytic bacteria increase plant pathogen resistance and affect tritrophic interactions.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Marco; Erb, Matthias; Ton, Jurriaan; Brandenburg, Anna; Karlen, Danielle; Zopfi, Jakob; Turlings, Ted C J

    2014-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by soil microorganisms influence plant growth and pathogen resistance. Yet, very little is known about their influence on herbivores and higher trophic levels. We studied the origin and role of a major bacterial VOC, 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD), on plant growth, pathogen and herbivore resistance, and the attraction of natural enemies in maize. One of the major contributors to 2,3-BD in the headspace of soil-grown maize seedlings was identified as Enterobacter aerogenes, an endophytic bacterium that colonizes the plants. The production of 2,3-BD by E. aerogenes rendered maize plants more resistant against the Northern corn leaf blight fungus Setosphaeria turcica. On the contrary, E. aerogenes-inoculated plants were less resistant against the caterpillar Spodoptera littoralis. The effect of 2,3-BD on the attraction of the parasitoid Cotesia marginiventris was more variable: 2,3-BD application to the headspace of the plants had no effect on the parasitoids, but application to the soil increased parasitoid attraction. Furthermore, inoculation of seeds with E. aerogenes decreased plant attractiveness, whereas inoculation of soil with a total extract of soil microbes increased parasitoid attraction, suggesting that the effect of 2,3-BD on the parasitoid is indirect and depends on the composition of the microbial community. PMID:24127750

  15. Evolution of a Heavy Metal Homeostasis/Resistance Island Reflects Increasing Copper Stress in Enterobacteria.

    PubMed

    Staehlin, Benjamin M; Gibbons, John G; Rokas, Antonis; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Slot, Jason C

    2016-03-01

    Copper homeostasis in bacteria is challenged by periodic elevation of copper levels in the environment, arising from both natural sources and human inputs. Several mechanisms have evolved to efflux copper from bacterial cells, including thecus(copper sensing copper efflux system), andpco(plasmid-borne copper resistance system) systems. The genes belonging to these two systems can be physically clustered in a Copper Homeostasis and Silver Resistance Island (CHASRI) on both plasmids and chromosomes in Enterobacteria. Increasing use of copper in agricultural and industrial applications raises questions about the role of human activity in the evolution of novel copper resistance mechanisms. Here we present evidence that CHASRI emerged and diversified in response to copper deposition across aerobic and anaerobic environments. An analysis of diversification rates and a molecular clock model suggest that CHASRI experienced repeated episodes of elevated diversification that could correspond to peaks in human copper production. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that CHASRI originated in a relative ofEnterobacter cloacaeas the ultimate product of sequential assembly of several pre-existing two-gene modules. Once assembled, CHASRI dispersed via horizontal gene transfer within Enterobacteriaceae and also to certain members of Shewanellaceae, where the originalpcomodule was replaced by a divergentpcohomolog. Analyses of copper stress mitigation suggest that CHASRI confers increased resistance aerobically, anaerobically, and during shifts between aerobic and anaerobic environments, which could explain its persistence in facultative anaerobes and emergent enteric pathogens. PMID:26893455

  16. Heterozygous caveolin-3 mice show increased susceptibility to palmitate-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Talukder, M A Hassan; Preda, Marilena; Ryzhova, Larisa; Prudovsky, Igor; Pinz, Ilka M

    2016-03-01

    Insulin resistance and diabetes are comorbidities of obesity and affect one in 10 adults in the United States. Despite the high prevalence, the mechanisms of cardiac insulin resistance in obesity are still unclear. We test the hypothesis that the insulin receptor localizes to caveolae and is regulated through binding to caveolin-3 (CAV3). We further test whether haploinsufficiency forCAV3 increases the susceptibility to high-fat-induced insulin resistance. We used in vivo and in vitro studies to determine the effect of palmitate exposure on global insulin resistance, contractile performance of the heart in vivo, glucose uptake in the heart, and on cellular signaling downstream of theIR We show that haploinsufficiency forCAV3 increases susceptibility to palmitate-induced global insulin resistance and causes cardiomyopathy. On the basis of fluorescence energy transfer (FRET) experiments, we show thatCAV3 andIRdirectly interact in cardiomyocytes. Palmitate impairs insulin signaling by a decrease in insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt that corresponds to an 87% decrease in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake inHL-1 cardiomyocytes. Despite loss of Akt phosphorylation and lower glucose uptake, palmitate increased insulin-independent serine phosphorylation ofIRS-1 by 35%. In addition, we found lipid induced downregulation ofCD36, the fatty acid transporter associated with caveolae. This may explain the problem the diabetic heart is facing with the simultaneous impairment of glucose uptake and lipid transport. Thus, these findings suggest that loss ofCAV3 interferes with downstream insulin signaling and lipid uptake, implicatingCAV3 as a regulator of theIRand regulator of lipid uptake in the heart. PMID:27033451

  17. Increased resistance of Bt aspens to Phratora vitellinae (Coleoptera) leads to increased plant growth under experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Hjältén, Joakim; Axelsson, E Petter; Whitham, Thomas G; LeRoy, Carri J; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Wennström, Anders; Pilate, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    One main aim with genetic modification (GM) of trees is to produce plants that are resistant to various types of pests. The effectiveness of GM-introduced toxins against specific pest species on trees has been shown in the laboratory. However, few attempts have been made to determine if the production of these toxins and reduced herbivory will translate into increased tree productivity. We established an experiment with two lines of potted aspens (Populus tremula×Populus tremuloides) which express Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) toxins and the isogenic wildtype (Wt) in the lab. The goal was to explore how experimentally controlled levels of a targeted leaf beetle Phratora vitellinae (Coleoptera; Chrysomelidae) influenced leaf damage severity, leaf beetle performance and the growth of aspen. Four patterns emerged. Firstly, we found clear evidence that Bt toxins reduce leaf damage. The damage on the Bt lines was significantly lower than for the Wt line in high and low herbivory treatment, respectively. Secondly, Bt toxins had a significant negative effect on leaf beetle survival. Thirdly, the significant decrease in height of the Wt line with increasing herbivory and the relative increase in height of one of the Bt lines compared with the Wt line in the presence of herbivores suggest that this also might translate into increased biomass production of Bt trees. This realized benefit was context-dependent and is likely to be manifested only if herbivore pressure is sufficiently high. However, these herbivore induced patterns did not translate into significant affect on biomass, instead one Bt line overall produced less biomass than the Wt. Fourthly, compiled results suggest that the growth reduction in one Bt line as indicated here is likely due to events in the transformation process and that a hypothesized cost of producing Bt toxins is of subordinate significance. PMID:22292004

  18. Combined analysis of 2-D electrical resistivity, seismic refraction and geotechnical investigations for Bukit Bunuh complex crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azwin, I. N.; Saad, Rosli; Saidin, Mokhtar; Nordiana, M. M.; Anderson Bery, Andy; Hidayah, I. N. E.

    2015-01-01

    Interest in studying impact crater on earth has increased tremendously due to its importance in geologic events, earth inhabitant history as well as economic value. The existences of few shock metamorphism and crater morphology evidences are discovered in Bukit Bunuh, Malaysia thus detailed studies are performed using geophysical and geotechnical methods to verify the type of the crater and characteristics accordingly. This paper presents the combined analysis of 2-D electrical resistivity, seismic refraction, geotechnical SPT N value, moisture content and RQD within the study area. Three stages of data acquisition are made starting with regional study followed by detailed study on West side and East side. Bulk resistivity and p-wave seismic velocity were digitized from 2-D resistivity and seismic sections at specific distance and depth for corresponding boreholes and samples taken. Generally, Bukit Bunuh shows the complex crater characteristics. Standard table of bulk resistivity and p-wave seismic velocity against SPT N value, moisture content and RQD are produce according to geological classifications of impact crater; inside crater, rim/slumped terrace and outside crater.

  19. Intermittent Hypoxia Selects for Genotypes and Phenotypes That Increase Survival, Invasion, and Therapy Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Verduzco, Daniel; Lloyd, Mark; Xu, Liping; Ibrahim-Hashim, Arig; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Gatenby, Robert A.; Gillies, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia in tumors correlates with greater risk of metastases, increased invasiveness, and resistance to systemic and radiation therapy. The evolutionary dynamics that links specific adaptations to hypoxia with these observed tumor properties have not been well investigated. While some tumor populations may experience fixed hypoxia, cyclical and stochastic transitions from normoxia to hypoxia are commonly observed in vivo. Although some phenotypic adaptations to this cyclic hypoxia are likely reversible, we hypothesize that some adaptations may become fixed through mutations promoted by hypoxia-induced genomic instability. Here we seek to identify genetic alterations and corresponding stable phenotypes that emerge following cyclic hypoxia. Although these changes may originate as adaptations to this specific environmental stress, their fixation in the tumor genome may result in their observation in tumors from regions of normoxia, a condition known as pseudohypoxia. We exposed several epithelial cell lines to 50 cycles of hypoxia-normoxia, followed by culture in normoxia over a period of several months. Molecular analyses demonstrated permanent changes in expression of several oncogenes and tumor-suppressors, including p53, E-cadherin, and Hif-1α. These changes were associated with increased resistance to multiple cytotoxins, increased survival in hypoxia and increased anchorage-independent growth. These results suggest cycles of hypoxia encountered in early cancers can select for specific and stable genotypic and phenotypic properties that persist even in normoxic conditions, which may promote tumor progression and resistance to therapy. PMID:25811878

  20. Resistance noise spectroscopy across the thermally and electrically driven metal-insulator transitions in VO2 nanobeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsaqqa, Ali; Kilcoyne, Colin; Singh, Sujay; Horrocks, Gregory; Marley, Peter; Banerjee, Sarbajit; Sambandamurthy, G.

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is a strongly correlated material that exhibits a sharp thermally driven metal-insulator transition at Tc ~ 340 K. The transition can also be triggered by a DC voltage in the insulating phase with a threshold (Vth) behavior. The mechanisms behind these transitions are hotly discussed and resistance noise spectroscopy is a suitable tool to delineate different transport mechanisms in correlated systems. We present results from a systematic study of the low frequency (1 mHz < f < 10 Hz) noise behavior in VO2 nanobeams across the thermally and electrically driven transitions. In the thermal transition, the power spectral density (PSD) of the resistance noise is unchanged as we approach Tc from 300 K and an abrupt drop in the magnitude is seen above Tc and it remains unchanged till 400 K. However, the noise behavior in the electrically driven case is distinctly different: as the voltage is ramped from zero, the PSD gradually increases by an order of magnitude before reaching Vth and an abrupt increase is seen at Vth. The noise magnitude decreases above Vth, approaching the V = 0 value. The individual roles of percolation, Joule heating and signatures of correlated behavior will be discussed. This work is supported by NSF DMR 0847324.

  1. Landform-derived placement of electrical resistivity prospecting for paleotopography reconstruction in the loess landforms of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Li-Yang; Tang, Guo-An; Zhu, A.-Xing; Li, Ji-Long; Duan, Jia-Zhen; Qian, Ye-Qing

    2016-08-01

    The paleotopography of loess landform represents the initial surface before the evolution of the Aeolian depositional process. This paleotopography served as an indicator of the paleo-geography and erosion base that restrained the evolution of the current landform. In this case study, a landform-derived placement method involving electrical resistivity prospecting is proposed for paleotopography reconstruction. The method consists of extracting terrain feature knowledge and terrain feature-based paleotopography prospecting and reconstruction. The field experiment is validated and used in three typical loess landform areas in the Chinese Loess Plateau. These typical loess landforms include loess hill, loess ridge, and loess tableland. Terrain features considered include peaks, saddles, ridges, and gullies. The results show significant electrical resistivity difference between the paleotopography and loess strata. The electrical resistivity method could effectively detect the paleotopography and different loess layers. The reconstructed paleotopography using the feature-based method could effectively represent the morphology of the paleosurface compared to the result of the interpolation method. The reconstructed paleotopography also appears as a coincident terrain relief compared to modern topography; such a relief demonstrates significant landform inheritance between modern terrain and paleotopography. In the loess hill and ridge landform areas, the relative elevation difference of paleotopography is approximately 50 m whereas that of the modern terrain is roughly 150 m, indicating that the loess deposition process increased the topographic relief from paleotopography to modern terrain by approximately 100 m. Similar altitude of the paleotopographic peaks (roughly 10 m height difference) appears in the two nearby loess ridge and hill areas. The results indicate that paleo-geography of this area should be a landform of peneplain and almost a planation surface.

  2. Neutron electric dipole moment and possibilities of increasing accuracy of experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Kolomenskiy, E. A.; Pirozhkov, A. N.; Krasnoshchekova, I. A.; Vasiliev, A. V.; Polyushkin, A. O.; Lasakov, M. S.; Murashkin, A. N.; Solovey, V. A.; Fomin, A. K.; Shoka, I. V.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Aleksandrov, E. B.; Dmitriev, S. P.; Dovator, N. A.; Geltenbort, P.; Ivanov, S. N.; Zimmer, O.

    2016-01-01

    The paper reports the results of an experiment on searching for the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM), performed on the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France). The double-chamber magnetic resonance spectrometer (Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI)) with prolonged holding of ultra cold neutrons has been used. Sources of possible systematic errors are analyzed, and their influence on the measurement results is estimated. The ways and prospects of increasing accuracy of the experiment are discussed.

  3. The `L' Array, a method to model 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez Segura, R. E.; Chavez-Hernandez, G.; Delgado, C.; Tejero-Andrade, A.

    2010-12-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a method designed to calculate the distribution of apparent electrical resistivities in the subsoil by means of a great number of observations with the aim of determining an electrical image displaying the distribution of true resistivities in the subsoil. Such process can be carried out to define 2D or 3D models of the subsurface. For a 3D ERT, usually, the electrodes are placed in a squared grid keeping the distance between adjacent electrodes constant in the x and y directions. Another design employed, consists of a series of parallel lines whose space inter-lines must be smaller or equal to four times the electrode separation. The most common electrode arrays frequently employed for this type of studies are the pole-pole, pole-dipole and dipole-dipole. Unfortunately, ERT surface sampling schemes are limited by physical conditions or obstacles, like buildings, highly populated urban zones, and geologic/topographic features, where the lines of electrodes cannot be set. However, it is always necessary to characterize the subsoil beneath such anthropogenic or natural features. The ‘L’ shaped array has the main purpose to overcome such difficulties by surrounding the study area with a square of electrode lines. The measurements are obtained by switching automatically current and potential electrodes from one line to the other. Each observation adds a level of information, from one profile to the other. Once the total levels of data are completed, the opposite ‘L’ array can be measured following the same process. The complete square is computed after the parallel profiles are observed as well. At the end, the computed resistivities are combined to form a 3D matrix of observations. Such set of data can be inverted to obtain the true resistivity distribution at depth in the form of a working cube, which can be interpreted. The method was tested with theoretical models, which included a set of two resistive cubes

  4. Three dimensional modeling and inversion of Borehole-surface Electrical Resistivity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Liu, D.; Liu, Y.; Qin, M.

    2013-12-01

    After a long time of exploration, many oil fields have stepped into the high water-cut period. It is sorely needed to determining the oil-water distribution and water flooding front. Borehole-surface electrical resistivity tomography (BSERT) system is a low-cost measurement with wide measuring scope and small influence on the reservoir. So it is gaining more and more application in detecting water flooding areas and evaluating residual oil distribution in oil fields. In BSERT system, current is connected with the steel casing of the observation well. The current flows along the long casing and transmits to the surface through inhomogeneous layers. Then received electric potential difference data on the surface can be used to inverse the deep subsurface resistivity distribution. This study presents the 3D modeling and inversion method of electrical resistivity data. In an extensive literature, the steel casing is treated as a transmission line current source with infinite small radius and constant current density. However, in practical multi-layered formations with different resistivity, the current density along the casing is not constant. In this study, the steel casing is modeled by a 2.5e-7 ohm-m physical volume that the casing occupies in the finite element mesh. Radius of the casing can be set to a little bigger than the true radius, and this helps reduce the element number and computation time. The current supply point is set on the center of the top surface of the physical volume. The homogeneous formation modeling result shows the same precision as the transmission line current source model. The multi-layered formation modeling result shows that the current density along the casing is high in the low-resistivity layer, and low in the high-resistivity layer. These results are more reasonable. Moreover, the deviated and horizontal well can be simulated as simple as the vertical well using this modeling method. Based on this forward modeling method, the

  5. Ascites Increases Expression/Function of Multidrug Resistance Proteins in Ovarian Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Mo, Lihong; Pospichalova, Vendula; Huang, Zhiqing; Murphy, Susan K; Payne, Sturgis; Wang, Fang; Kennedy, Margaret; Cianciolo, George J; Bryja, Vitezslav; Pizzo, Salvatore V; Bachelder, Robin E

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy resistance is the major reason for the failure of ovarian cancer treatment. One mechanism behind chemo-resistance involves the upregulation of multidrug resistance (MDR) genes (ABC transporters) that effectively transport (efflux) drugs out of the tumor cells. As a common symptom in stage III/IV ovarian cancer patients, ascites is associated with cancer progression. However, whether ascites drives multidrug resistance in ovarian cancer cells awaits elucidation. Here, we demonstrate that when cultured with ascites derived from ovarian cancer-bearing mice, a murine ovarian cancer cell line became less sensitive to paclitaxel, a first line chemotherapeutic agent for ovarian cancer patients. Moreover, incubation of murine ovarian cancer cells in vitro with ascites drives efflux function in these cells. Functional studies show ascites-driven efflux is suppressible by specific inhibitors of either of two ABC transporters [Multidrug Related Protein (MRP1); Breast Cancer Related Protein (BCRP)]. To demonstrate relevance of our findings to ovarian cancer patients, we studied relative efflux in human ovarian cancer cells obtained from either patient ascites or from primary tumor. Immortalized cell lines developed from human ascites show increased susceptibility to efflux inhibitors (MRP1, BCRP) compared to a cell line derived from a primary ovarian cancer, suggesting an association between ascites and efflux function in human ovarian cancer. Efflux in ascites-derived human ovarian cancer cells is associated with increased expression of ABC transporters compared to that in primary tumor-derived human ovarian cancer cells. Collectively, our findings identify a novel activity for ascites in promoting ovarian cancer multidrug resistance. PMID:26148191

  6. Increasing the efficiency of a targeted methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus screening program.

    PubMed

    Goldsack, Jennifer C; DeRitter, Christine; Power, Michelle; Spencer, Amy; Taylor, Cynthia L; Manta, Christine J; Kirk, Ryan; Drees, Marci L

    2016-01-01

    An interdisciplinary team implemented a screening program targeting patients with a history of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), to reduce unnecessary contact isolation. After converting from a 2-step culture-based protocol to single polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing, we increased the efficiency of the screening program from 77% to 100%. Despite the higher cost of PCR-based testing, this program remained cost-saving. PMID:26769283

  7. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 inhibits postischemic increases in splanchnic vascular resistance.

    PubMed

    Thomas, G R; Thibodaux, H

    1992-01-01

    Anesthesized male rabbits having a resting mean arterial pressure of 81 +/- 4 mm Hg and superior mesenteric artery blood flow of 91 +/- 7 mL min-1 were subjected to 60 min of splanchnic ischemia followed by 60 min of reperfusion. Upon reperfusion, mean arterial pressure fell. Splanchnic blood flow also decreased but not in parallel with blood pressure; consequently, vascular resistance was increased over the reperfusion period. This increase in splanchnic vascular resistance was not affected by intravenous t-PA (0.5 mg kg-1 + 5 mg kg-1 hr-1) for 30 min prior to and throughout the reperfusion period or by intravenous L-NAME (1 mg kg-1 x 2). However, intravenous infusions of TGF-beta (18 or 54 micrograms kg-1) at the time of reperfusion dose dependently attenuated the increases in vascular resistance (p < 0.05). This effect of TGF-beta was enhanced by coadministration of t-PA and inhibited by the coadministration of L-NAME. We propose that the effects of TGF-beta are ultimately mediated via nitric oxide release, and conclude that this may be useful therapy for the prevention of reperfusion-associated injury following surgery or as an adjunct to thrombolytic therapy. PMID:1303730

  8. Peptidoglycan synthesis and structure in Staphylococcus haemolyticus expressing increasing levels of resistance to glycopeptide antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Billot-Klein, D; Gutmann, L; Bryant, D; Bell, D; Van Heijenoort, J; Grewal, J; Shlaes, D M

    1996-01-01

    The structures of cytoplasmic peptidoglycan precursor and mature peptidoglycan of an isogenic series of Staphylococcus haemolyticus strains expressing increasing levels of resistance to the glycopeptide antibiotics teicoplanin and vancomycin (MICs, 8 to 32 and 4 to 16 microg/ml, respectively) were determined. High-performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, amino acid analysis, digestion by R39 D,D-carboxypeptidase, and N-terminal amino acid sequencing were utilized. UDP-muramyl-tetrapeptide-D-lactate constituted 1.7% of total cytoplasmic peptidoglycan precursors in the most resistant strain. It is not clear if this amount of depsipeptide precursor can account for the levels of resistance achieved by this strain. Detailed structural analysis of mature peptidoglycan, examined for the first time for this species, revealed that the peptidoglycan of these strains, like that of other staphylococci, is highly cross-linked and is composed of a lysine muropeptide acceptor containing a substitution at its epsilon-amino position of a glycine-containing cross bridge to the D-Ala 4 of the donor, with disaccharide-pentapeptide frequently serving as an acceptor for transpeptidation. The predominant cross bridges were found to be COOH-Gly-Gly-Ser-Gly-Gly-NH2 and COOH-Ala-Gly-Ser-Gly-Gly-NH2. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the peptidoglycan of resistant strains revealed polymeric muropeptides bearing cross bridges containing an additional serine in place of glycine (probable structures, COOH-Gly-Ser-Ser-Gly-Gly-NH2 and COOH-Ala-Gly-Ser-Ser-Gly-NH2). Muropeptides bearing an additional serine in their cross bridges are estimated to account for 13.6% of peptidoglycan analyzed from resistant strains of S. haemolyticus. A soluble glycopeptide target (L-Ala-gamma-D-iso-glutamyl-L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala) was able to more effectively compete for vancomycin when assayed in the presence of resistant cells than when assayed in the presence of susceptible cells

  9. Application of an extended Kalman filter approach to inversion of time-lapse electrical resistivity imaging data for monitoring recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenna, Vanessa; Pidlisecky, Adam; Knight, Rosemary

    2011-10-01

    We apply an extended Kalman filter (EKF) approach to inversion of time-lapse electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) field data. The EKF is a method of time series signal processing that incorporates both a state evolution model, describing changes in the physical system, and an observation model, incorporating the physics of the electrical resistivity measurement. We test the feasibility of using an EKF approach to inverting ERI data collected with 2-D surface array geometries. As a first test, we invert synthetic data generated using a simulated recharge event and water saturation distributions converted to electrical conductivity values using an Archie's law relationship. In the synthetic example we demonstrate the impact that the noise structure of the state evolution and the regularization weight have on EKF-estimated model parameters and errors. We then apply the method to inversion of field data collected to monitor changes in electrical conductivity beneath a recharge pond that is part of an aquifer storage and recovery project in northern California. Using lines of electrodes buried at a depth of 0.25 m when the base of the pond is dry, we monitor the wetting front associated with the diversion of stormflow runoff to the pond. Using field data, we demonstrate that by oversampling in time, we are able to apply the so-called random walk model for the state evolution and to build the model of observation noise directly from collected data. EKF-estimated values track changes in conductivity associated with both increasing water content in subsurface sediments and changes in the properties of the pore water, showing the method is a feasible approach for inversion of time-lapse ERI field data.

  10. Electric field increases the phase transition temperature in the bilayer membrane of phosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Antonov, V F; Smirnova EYu; Shevchenko, E V

    1990-02-01

    The effect of the electric field on the phase transition temperature (Tc) of acidic 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate (DPPA) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-thionphosphate (thion-DPPA) and zwitterion, i.e. 1,2-dipalmitoyl-rac-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-distearoyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC and DSPC), lipids has been investigated. The phase transition was detected using the jump-like increase effect in the conductance of the planar bilayer membrane. A voltage increase to 150 mV has been shown to increase the phase transition temperature in a bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) of phosphatidic acids (DPPA and thion-DPPA) by 8-12 degrees C while the transition temperature in the bilayer of zwitterion lipids (DPPC and DSPC) increases insignificantly. The increasing of Tt in BLM of acidic lipids is attributed to the voltage-induced changes in the molecule packing density. PMID:2340602

  11. Nano-Carbides and the Strength of Steels as Assessed by Electrical Resistivity Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D; Frommeyer, G; Sherby, O; Syn, C

    2006-01-29

    The work of Frommeyer on electrical conductivity measurements in pearlitic steels is reviewed to provide insight into microstructures developed during wi wire drawing. Electrical re conductivity measurements were made as a function of drawing strain (up to {var_epsilon} = 6.0) for wires with strength exceeding 3500MPa. The results show that electrical conductivity increases during wire wire-drawing to a maximum value, then decreases with further deformation finally reaching a steady state value that is equal to the original conductivity. The initial increase is the result of pearlite plate orientation in the direction of wire wire-drawing, which makes the path of conduction through the ferrite plates more accessible. At a critical strain the cementite plates begin to fragment and the electrical conductivity decreases to a steady state value that is the same as that observed prior to wire drawing. With increasing strain, the cementite particles are refined and the strength increases due to the reduction in inter inter-particle spacing. It is concluded that the electrical conductivity of the wires is solely dependent on the amount of iron carbides provided they are randomly distributed as plates or as particles. An estimate was made that indicates the carbide particle size is approximately 3-5 nm in the steady state range of electrical conductivity.

  12. At high cardiac output, diesel exhaust exposure increases pulmonary vascular resistance and decreases distensibility of pulmonary resistive vessels.

    PubMed

    Wauters, Aurélien; Vicenzi, Marco; De Becker, Benjamin; Riga, Jean-Philippe; Esmaeilzadeh, Fatemeh; Faoro, Vitalie; Vachiéry, Jean-Luc; van de Borne, Philippe; Argacha, Jean-François

    2015-12-15

    Air pollution has recently been associated with the development of acute decompensated heart failure, but the underlying biological mechanisms remain unclear. A pulmonary vasoconstrictor effect of air pollution, combined with its systemic effects, may precipitate decompensated heart failure. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acute exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) on pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) under resting and stress conditions but also to determine whether air pollution may potentiate acquired pulmonary hypertension. Eighteen healthy male volunteers were exposed to ambient air (AA) or dilute DE with a particulate matter of <2.5 μm concentration of 300 μg/m(3) for 2 h in a randomized, crossover study design. The effects of DE on PVR, on the coefficient of distensibilty of pulmonary vessels (α), and on right and left ventricular function were evaluated at rest (n = 18), during dobutamine stress echocardiography (n = 10), and during exercise stress echocardiography performed in hypoxia (n = 8). Serum endothelin-1 and fractional exhaled nitric oxide were also measured. At rest, exposure to DE did not affect PVR. During dobutamine stress, the slope of the mean pulmonary artery pressure-cardiac output relationship increased from 2.8 ± 0.5 mmHg · min · l (-1) in AA to 3.9 ± 0.5 mmHg · min · l (-1) in DE (P < 0.05) and the α coefficient decreased from 0.96 ± 0.15 to 0.64 ± 0.12%/mmHg (P < 0.01). DE did not further enhance the hypoxia-related upper shift of the mean pulmonary artery pressure-cardiac output relationship. Exposure to DE did not affect serum endothelin-1 concentration or fractional exhaled nitric oxide. In conclusion, acute exposure to DE increased pulmonary vasomotor tone by decreasing the distensibility of pulmonary resistive vessels at high cardiac output. PMID:26497960

  13. Potential Impact of Increased Use of Biocides in Consumer Products on Prevalence of Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Peter; McBain, Andrew J.

    2003-01-01

    There has recently been much controversy surrounding the increased use of antibacterial substances in a wide range of consumer products and the possibility that, as with antibiotics, indiscriminate use of biocides might contribute to the overall pattern of susceptibility in the general environment and in the clinic. Such speculation, based on the isolation of resistant mutants from in vitro monoculture experiments, is not reflected by an emergence of biocide-resistant strains in vivo. This review provides a broad coverage of the biocide and resistance literature and evaluates the potential risks, perceived from such laboratory monoculture experiments, against evidence gathered over 50 years of field studies. An explanation for the continued effectiveness of broad-spectrum biocidal agents against the decline in efficacy of therapeutic agents is provided based on the fitness costs of resistance and the ubiquity of naturally occurring substances that possess antibacterial effect. While we conclude from this review of the literature that the incorporation of antibacterial agents into a widening sphere of personal products has had little or no impact on the patterns of microbial susceptibility observed in the environment, the associated risks remain finite. The use of such products should therefore be associated with a clear demonstration of added value either to consumer health or to the product life. Hygienic products should therefore be targeted to applications for which the risks have been established. PMID:12692093

  14. Salivary testosterone and immunoglobulin A were increased by resistance training in adults with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fornieles, G; Rosety, M A; Elosegui, S; Rosety, J M; Alvero-Cruz, J R; Garcia, N; Rosety, M; Rodriguez-Pareja, T; Toro, R; Rosety-Rodriguez, M; Ordonez, F J; Rosety, I

    2014-04-01

    This study was designed to assess the influence of resistance training on salivary immunoglobulin A (IgA) levels and hormone profile in sedentary adults with Down syndrome (DS). A total of 40 male adults with DS were recruited for the trial through different community support groups for people with intellectual disabilities. All participants had medical approval for participation in physical activity. Twenty-four adults were randomly assigned to perform resistance training in a circuit with six stations, 3 days per week for 12 weeks. Training intensity was based on functioning in the eight-repetition maximum (8RM) test for each exercise. The control group included 16 age-, gender-, and BMI-matched adults with DS. Salivary IgA, testosterone, and cortisol levels were measured by ELISA. Work task performance was assessed using the repetitive weighted-box-stacking test. Resistance training significantly increased salivary IgA concentration (P=0.0120; d=0.94) and testosterone levels (P=0.0088; d=1.57) in the exercising group. Furthermore, it also improved work task performance. No changes were seen in the controls who had not exercised. In conclusion, a short-term resistance training protocol improved mucosal immunity response as well as salivary testosterone levels in sedentary adults with DS. PMID:24714816

  15. Electrical voltages and resistances measured to inspect metallic cased wells and pipelines

    DOEpatents

    Vail III, William Banning; Momii, Steven Thomas

    2003-06-10

    A cased well in the earth is electrically energized with A.C. current. Voltages are measured from three voltage measurement electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing while the casing is electrically energized. In a measurement mode, A.C. current is conducted from a first current carrying electrode within the cased well to a remote second current carrying electrode located on the surface of the earth. In a calibration mode, current is passed from the first current carrying electrode to a third current carrying electrode located vertically at a different position within the cased well, where the three voltage measurement electrodes are located vertically in between the first and third current carrying electrodes. Voltages along the casing and resistances along the casing are measured to determine wall thickness and the location of any casing collars present so as to electrically inspect the casing. Similar methods are employed to energize a pipeline to measure the wall thickness of the pipeline and the location of pipe joints to electrically inspect the pipeline.

  16. Electrical voltages and resistances measured to inspect metallic cased wells and pipelines

    DOEpatents

    Vail, III, William Banning; Momii, Steven Thomas

    2000-01-01

    A cased well in the earth is electrically energized with A.C. current. Voltages are measured from three voltage measurement electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing while the casing is electrically energized. In a measurement mode, A.C. current is conducted from a first current carrying electrode within the cased well to a remote second current carrying electrode located on the surface of the earth. In a calibration mode, current is passed from the first current carrying electrode to a third current carrying electrode located vertically at a different position within the cased well, where the three voltage measurement electrodes are located vertically in between the first and third current carrying electrodes. Voltages along the casing and resistances along the casing are measured to determine wall thickness and the location of any casing collars present so as to electrically inspect the casing. Similar methods are employed to energize a pipeline to measure the wall thickness of the pipeline and the location of pipe joints to electrically inspect the pipeline.

  17. Electrical voltages and resistances measured to inspect metallic cased wells and pipelines

    DOEpatents

    Vail, III, William Banning; Momii, Steven Thomas

    2001-01-01

    A cased well in the earth is electrically energized with A.C. current. Voltages are measured from three voltage measurement electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing while the casing is electrically energized. In a measurement mode, A.C. current is conducted from a first current carrying electrode within the cased well to a remote second current carrying electrode located on the surface of the earth. In a calibration mode, current is passed from the first current carrying electrode to a third current carrying electrode located vertically at a different position within the cased well, where the three voltage measurement electrodes are located vertically in between the first and third current carrying electrodes. Voltages along the casing and resistances along the casing are measured to determine wall thickness and the location of any casing collars present so as to electrically inspect the casing. Similar methods are employed to energize a pipeline to measure the wall thickness of the pipeline and the location of pipe joints to electrically inspect the pipeline.

  18. A method of Shaly sand correction for estimating gas hydrate saturations using downhole electrical resistivity log data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.; Collett, Timothy S.

    2006-01-01

    Estimation of the amount of nonconductive and conductive constituents in the pore space of sediments, using electrical resistivity logs, generally loses accuracy when clays are present in the reservoir. Many different methods and clay models have been proposed to account for the conductivity of clay (for example, the shaly sand correction). In this study, the Simandoux model is employed to correct for the clay effect in order to more accurately estimate gas hydrate saturations. This study utilizes the fact that the effect of clay on the resistivity of a sediment is manifested in the Archie constants a and m, values of which are generally a = 1 and m = 2 for clean-sand reservoirs. Results of the study indicate that as the clay content increases, a also increases whereas m decreases. On the basis of the relationship between the Archie constants a and m with respect to the clay amount, a method of correcting for the clay effect on the estimation of water saturation is proposed. This method works well if the relationship between porosity and resistivity on a log-log plot is approximately linear and if accurate Archie constants a and m for clean sand are known. However, because of the linearity condition, it is difficult to apply the method to low-porosity reservoirs. Gas-hydrate-bearing sediments generally have high porosities because of their shallow depth of occurrence, so the method can be effectively applied in estimating gas hydrate saturations.

  19. Electrical stimulation of the midbrain increases heart rate and arterial blood pressure in awake humans

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Judith M; Aziz, Tipu; Schlugman, David; Paterson, David J

    2002-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus, basal ganglia or pedunculopontine nucleus in decorticate animals results in locomotion and a cardiorespiratory response resembling that seen during exercise. This has led to the hypothesis that parallel activation of cardiorespiratory and locomotor systems from the midbrain could form part of the ‘central command’ mechanism of exercise. However, the degree to which subcortical structures play a role in cardiovascular activation in awake humans has not been established. We studied the effects on heart rate (HR) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) of electrically stimulating the thalamus and basal ganglia in awake humans undergoing neurosurgery for movement disorders (n = 13 Parkinson's disease, n = 1 myoclonic dystonia, n = 1 spasmodic torticollis). HR and MAP increased during high frequency (> 90 Hz) electrical stimulation of the thalamus (HR 5 ± 3 beats min−1, P = 0.002, MAP 4 ± 3 mmHg, P = 0.05, n = 9), subthalamic nucleus (HR 5 ± 3 beats min−1, P = 0.002, MAP 5 ± 3 mmHg, P = 0.006, n = 8) or substantia nigra (HR 6 ± 3 beats min−1, P = 0.001, MAP 5 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.005, n = 8). This was accompanied by the facilitation of movement, but without the movement itself. Stimulation of the internal globus pallidus did not increase cardiovascular variables but did facilitate movement. Low frequency (< 20 Hz) stimulation of any site did not affect cardiovascular variables or movement. Electrical stimulation of the midbrain in awake humans can cause a modest increase in cardiovascular variables that is not dependent on movement feedback from exercising muscles. The relationship between this type of response and that occurring during actual exercise is unclear, but it indicates that subcortical command could be involved in ‘parallel activation’ of the locomotor and cardiovascular systems and thus contribute to the neurocircuitry of ‘central command’. PMID:11882692

  20. Advances in the theory and application of BSF cells. [including electrical resistivity and photovoltaic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandelkorn, J.; Lamneck, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The characteristics and behavior of p(+), p solar cells were investigated. The p(+), p cells were made by the removal of the n(+) surface layers from n(+), p p(+), BSF cells followed by application of a suitable contact to the resultant p(+), p structures. The open circuit voltage of p(+), p cells was found to increase with increasing 'p' bulk resistivity. The measured open circuit velocity-temperature coefficients were positive and increased with increasing resistivity. An outline of prior limitations in solar cell design is presented, and the removal of these limitations through use of BSF effects is pointed out. The study of BSF effects made feasible production of very thin high efficiency silicon cells as well as high resistivity-high efficiency cells, two desirable types of silicon cells which were previously impossible to make.

  1. Electrical Resistivity Imaging of Subterranean Void Space for Assessment of Endangered Species Habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissling, B. P.; White, K.

    2007-12-01

    The challenge of identifying and delineating subterranean habitat for endangered species in karst environments has been addressed through the application of near-surface geophysical techniques. Electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) in both galvanic DC and capacitance-coupled modes has been applied to the problem of imaging subsurface voids, potentially conducive to karst invertebrate habitat, in two distinctly different geologic, geophysical, and environmental settings. Surveys were conducted in extrusive volcanic terrain on the south shore of Kauai, Hawaii, a site known for lava tube formation, and in limestone karst terrain in central Texas. The two study sites were distinctly different in their geophysical settings in terms of surface layer and subsurface background resistivities, values at the Kauai site ranging from 1000 - 5000 ohm-meters and at the Texas site 100 - 800 ohm-meters, values reflecting differing lithology, porosity, and pore fluid content. An Advanced Geosciences Inc. (AGI) Supersting R8 DC resistivity system was the primary instrumentation utilized for both surveys, with a capacitance-coupled Geometrics Inc. OhmMapper TR-2 system utilized on the Kauai site for reconnaissance profiles. Opportunities existed for direct comparisons of Supersting and OhmMapper pseudo- section profiles. Supersting lines were acquired with a mixed array combining the horizontal resolution sensitivity of the dipole-dipole array with the vertical resolution sensitivity of the Inverse Schlumberger array. At both sites, surveys were conducted over known and mapped cave passage for validation of the techniques. Forward simulation modeling was conducted to verify resistivity anomaly signatures of known void spaces. Results were highly encouraging and serve to reinforce the karst-imaging capabilities of electrical resistivity, especially when mixed array types are utilized.

  2. Influence of processing history on the mechanical properties and electrical resistivity of polycarbonate - multi-walled carbon nanotubes nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choong, Gabriel Y. H.; De Focatiis, Davide S. A.

    2015-05-01

    In this work we investigate the effects of compounding temperature and secondary melt processing on the mechanical response and electrical behaviour of polycarbonate filled with 3 wt% carbon nanotubes. The nanocomposites were melt compounded in an industrial setting at a range of temperatures, and subsequently injection moulded or compression moulded. The surface hardness, uniaxial tensile properties and electrical resistivity were measured. Secondary melt processing is found to be the dominant process in determining the final mechanical properties and resistivity of these materials.

  3. Re-Inversion of Surface Electrical Resistivity Tomography Data from the Hanford Site B-Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2013-05-01

    This report documents the three-dimensional (3D) inversion results of surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data collected over the Hanford Site B-Complex. The data were collected in order to image the subsurface distribution of electrically conductive vadose zone contamination resulting from both planned releases of contamination into subsurface infiltration galleries (cribs, trenches, and tile fields), as well as unplanned releases from the B, BX, and BY tank farms and/or associated facilities. Electrically conductive contaminants are those which increase the ionic strength of pore fluids compared to native conditions, which comprise most types of solutes released into the subsurface B-Complex. The ERT data were collected and originally inverted as described in detail in report RPP-34690 Rev 0., 2007, which readers should refer to for a detailed description of data collection and waste disposal history. Although the ERT imaging results presented in that report successfully delineated the footprint of vadose zone contamination in areas outside of the tank farms, imaging resolution was not optimized due to the inability of available inversion codes to optimally process the massive ERT data set collected at the site. Recognizing these limitations and the potential for enhanced ERT characterization and time-lapse imaging at contaminated sites, a joint effort was initiated in 2007 by the U.S. Department of Energy – Office of Science (DOE-SC), with later support by the Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), to develop a high-performance distributed memory parallel 3D ERT inversion code capable of optimally processing large ERT data sets. The culmination of this effort was the development of E4D (Johnson et al., 2010,2012) In 2012, under the Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI), the U.S. Department of Energy – Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation

  4. Novel laboratory methods for determining the fine scale electrical resistivity structure of core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslam, E. P.; Gunn, D. A.; Jackson, P. D.; Lovell, M. A.; Aydin, A.; Prance, R. J.; Watson, P.

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution electrical resistivity measurements are made on saturated rocks using novel laboratory instrumentation and multiple electrical voltage measurements involving in principle a four-point electrode measurement but with a single, moving electrode. Flat, rectangular core samples are scanned by varying the electrode position over a range of hundreds of millimetres with an accuracy of a tenth of a millimetre. Two approaches are tested involving a contact electrode and a non-contact electrode arrangement. The first galvanic method uses balanced cycle switching of a floating direct current (DC) source to minimise charge polarisation effects masking the resistivity distribution related to fine scale structure. These contacting electrode measurements are made with high common mode noise rejection via differential amplification with respect to a reference point within the current flow path. A computer based multifunction data acquisition system logs the current through the sample and voltages along equipotentials from which the resistivity measurements are derived. Multiple measurements are combined to create images of the surface resistivity structure, with variable spatial resolution controlled by the electrode spacing. Fine scale sedimentary features and open fractures in saturated rocks are interpreted from the measurements with reference to established relationships between electrical resistivity and porosity. Our results successfully characterise grainfall lamination and sandflow cross-stratification in a brine saturated, dune bedded core sample representative of a southern North Sea reservoir sandstone, studied using the system in constant current, variable voltage mode. In contrast, in a low porosity marble, identification of open fracture porosity against a background very low matrix porosity is achieved using the constant voltage, variable current mode. This new system is limited by the diameter of the electrode that for practical reasons can only be

  5. Increased Frequency of Pink Bollworm Resistance to Bt Toxin Cry1Ac in China

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Peng; Huang, Yunxin; Wu, Huaiheng; Huang, Minsong; Cong, Shengbo; Tabashnik, Bruce E.; Wu, Kongming

    2012-01-01

    Transgenic crops producing insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) kill some key insect pests, but evolution of resistance by pests can reduce their efficacy. The main approach for delaying pest adaptation to Bt crops uses non-Bt host plants as “refuges” to increase survival of susceptible pests. To delay evolution of pest resistance to transgenic cotton producing Bt toxin Cry1Ac, the United States and some other countries have required refuges of non-Bt cotton, while farmers in China have relied on “natural” refuges of non-Bt host plants other than cotton. The “natural” refuge strategy focuses on cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera), the primary target of Bt cotton in China that attacks many crops, but it does not apply to another major pest, pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella), which feeds almost entirely on cotton in China. Here we report data showing field-evolved resistance to Cry1Ac by pink bollworm in the Yangtze River Valley of China. Laboratory bioassay data from 51 field-derived strains show that the susceptibility to Cry1Ac was significantly lower during 2008 to 2010 than 2005 to 2007. The percentage of field populations yielding one or more survivors at a diagnostic concentration of Cry1Ac increased from 0% in 2005–2007 to 56% in 2008–2010. However, the median survival at the diagnostic concentration was only 1.6% from 2008 to 2010 and failure of Bt cotton to control pink bollworm has not been reported in China. The early detection of resistance reported here may promote proactive countermeasures, such as a switch to transgenic cotton producing toxins distinct from Cry1A toxins, increased planting of non-Bt cotton, and integration of other management tactics together with Bt cotton. PMID:22238687

  6. Increased corrosion resistance of the AZ80 magnesium alloy by rapid solidification.

    PubMed

    Aghion, E; Jan, L; Meshi, L; Goldman, J

    2015-11-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and Mg-alloys are being considered as implantable biometals. Despite their excellent biocompatibility and good mechanical properties, their rapid corrosion is a major impediment precluding their widespread acceptance as implantable biomaterials. Here, we investigate the potential for rapid solidification to increase the corrosion resistance of Mg alloys. To this end, the effect of rapid solidification on the environmental and stress corrosion behavior of the AZ80 Mg alloy vs. its conventionally cast counterpart was evaluated in simulated physiological electrolytes. The microstructural characteristics were examined by optical microscopy, SEM, TEM, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The corrosion behavior was evaluated by immersion, salt spraying, and potentiodynamic polarization. Stress cor