Science.gov

Sample records for increased genetic risk

  1. Environmental Adversity Increases Genetic Risk for Externalizing Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Brian M.; South, Susan C.; DiRago, Ana C.; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Background Studies of gene-environment (G-E) interplay in the development of psychiatric and substance use disorders are rapidly accumulating. However, few attempts have been made to integrate findings and articulate general mechanisms of G-E influence in the emergence of psychopathology. Objective Identify patterns of G-E interplay between externalizing (EXT; antisocial behavior and substance use) disorders and several environmental risk factors. Design We used quantitative genetic models to examine how genetic and environmental risk for EXT disorders changes as a function of environmental context. Setting Participants were recruited from the community and took part in a day-long assessment at a university laboratory. Participants The sample consisted of 1315 male and female twin pairs participating in the age 17 assessment of the Minnesota Twin Family Study. Main Outcome Measures Multiple measures and informants were employed to construct a composite of EXT disorders and composite measures of 6 environmental risk factors including academic achievement and engagement, antisocial and prosocial peer affiliation, mother-child and father-child relationship problems, and stressful life events. Results A significant G × E interaction was detected between each environmental risk factor and EXT such that greater environmental adversity was associated with increased genetic risk in EXT. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that in the context of environmental adversity, genetic factors become more important in the etiology of EXT disorders. The consistency of the results further suggests a general mechanism of environmental influence on EXT disorders regardless of the specific form of the environmental risk. PMID:19487629

  2. Increased genetic risk for obesity in premature coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Christopher B; Nikpay, Majid; Stewart, Alexandre FR; McPherson, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    There is ongoing controversy as to whether obesity confers risk for CAD independently of associated risk factors including diabetes mellitus. We have carried out a Mendelian randomization study using a genetic risk score (GRS) for body mass index (BMI) based on 35 risk alleles to investigate this question in a population of 5831 early onset CAD cases without diabetes mellitus and 3832 elderly healthy control subjects, all of strictly European ancestry, with adjustment for traditional risk factors (TRFs). We then estimated the genetic correlation between these BMI and CAD (rg) by relating the pairwise genetic similarity matrix to a phenotypic covariance matrix between these two traits. GRSBMI significantly (P=2.12 × 10−12) associated with CAD status in a multivariate model adjusted for TRFs, with a per allele odds ratio (OR) of 1.06 (95% CI 1.042–1.076). The addition of GRSBMI to TRFs explained 0.75% of CAD variance and yielded a continuous net recombination index of 16.54% (95% CI=11.82–21.26%, P<0.0001). To test whether GRSBMI explained CAD status when adjusted for measured BMI, separate models were constructed in which the score and BMI were either included as covariates or not. The addition of BMI explained ~1.9% of CAD variance and GRSBMI plus BMI explained 2.65% of CAD variance. Finally, using bivariate restricted maximum likelihood analysis, we provide strong evidence of genome-wide pleiotropy between obesity and CAD. This analysis supports the hypothesis that obesity is a causal risk factor for CAD. PMID:26220701

  3. MTHFR genetic polymorphism increases the risk of preterm delivery

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Yanrong; Li, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    Aims: This study aimed to investigate the association between the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene C677T and A1298C polymorphisms and premature delivery susceptibility. Methods: With matched age and gender, 108 premature delivery pregnant women as cases and 108 healthy pregnant women as controls were recruited in this case-control study. The cases and controls had same gestational weeks. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method was adopted to analyze C677T and A1298C polymorphisms of the participants. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) and haplotype analysis were conducted by Haploview software. The differences for frequencies of gene type, allele and haplotypes in cases and controls were tested by chi-square test. The relevant risk of premature delivery was represented by odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Results: TT gene type frequency of C677T polymorphsim was higher in cases than the controls (P=0.004, OR=3.077, 95% CI=1.469-6.447), so was allele T (P=0.002, OR=1.853, 95% CI=1.265-2.716). Whereas, CC gene type of A1298C polymorphism had a lower distribution in cases than the controls (P=0.008, OR=0.095, 95% CI=0.012-0.775), so was allele C (P=0.047, OR=0.610, 95% CI=0.384-0.970). Haplotype analysis and linkage disequilibrium test conducted on the alleles of two polymorphisms in MTHFR gene, we discovered that haplotype T-A had a higher distribution in cases, which indicated that susceptible haplotype T-A was the candidate factor for premature delivery. Conclusions: Gene type TT of MTHFR C677T polymorphism might make premature delivery risk rise while gene type CC of A1298C polymorphism might have protective influence on premature delivery. PMID:26261642

  4. Common genetic variation associated with increased susceptibility to prostate cancer does not increase risk of radiotherapy toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mahbubl; Dorling, Leila; Kerns, Sarah; Fachal, Laura; Elliott, Rebecca; Partliament, Matt; Rosenstein, Barry S; Vega, Ana; Gómez-Caamaño, Antonio; Barnett, Gill; Dearnaley, David P; Hall, Emma; Sydes, Matt; Burnet, Neil; Pharoah, Paul D P; Eeles, Ros; West, Catharine M L

    2016-01-01

    Background: Numerous germline single-nucleotide polymorphisms increase susceptibility to prostate cancer, some lying near genes involved in cellular radiation response. This study investigated whether prostate cancer patients with a high genetic risk have increased toxicity following radiotherapy. Methods: The study included 1560 prostate cancer patients from four radiotherapy cohorts: RAPPER (n=533), RADIOGEN (n=597), GenePARE (n=290) and CCI (n=150). Data from genome-wide association studies were imputed with the 1000 Genomes reference panel. Individuals were genetically similar with a European ancestry based on principal component analysis. Genetic risks were quantified using polygenic risk scores. Regression models tested associations between risk scores and 2-year toxicity (overall, urinary frequency, decreased stream, rectal bleeding). Results were combined across studies using standard inverse-variance fixed effects meta-analysis methods. Results: A total of 75 variants were genotyped/imputed successfully. Neither non-weighted nor weighted polygenic risk scores were associated with late radiation toxicity in individual studies (P>0.11) or after meta-analysis (P>0.24). No individual variant was associated with 2-year toxicity. Conclusion: Patients with a high polygenic susceptibility for prostate cancer have no increased risk for developing late radiotherapy toxicity. These findings suggest that patients with a genetic predisposition for prostate cancer, inferred by common variants, can be safely treated using current standard radiotherapy regimens. PMID:27070714

  5. Genetic Variants Associated with Increased Risk of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma: A Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Matullo, Giuseppe; Guarrera, Simonetta; Betti, Marta; Fiorito, Giovanni; Ferrante, Daniela; Voglino, Floriana; Cadby, Gemma; Di Gaetano, Cornelia; Rosa, Fabio; Russo, Alessia; Hirvonen, Ari; Casalone, Elisabetta; Tunesi, Sara; Padoan, Marina; Giordano, Mara; Aspesi, Anna; Casadio, Caterina; Ardissone, Francesco; Ruffini, Enrico; Betta, Pier Giacomo; Libener, Roberta; Guaschino, Roberto; Piccolini, Ezio; Neri, Monica; Musk, Arthur W. B.; de Klerk, Nicholas H.; Hui, Jennie; Beilby, John; James, Alan L.; Creaney, Jenette; Robinson, Bruce W.; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Palmer, Lyle J.; Mirabelli, Dario; Ugolini, Donatella; Bonassi, Stefano; Magnani, Corrado; Dianzani, Irma

    2013-01-01

    Asbestos exposure is the main risk factor for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), a rare aggressive tumor. Nevertheless, only 5–17% of those exposed to asbestos develop MPM, suggesting the involvement of other environmental and genetic risk factors. To identify the genetic risk factors that may contribute to the development of MPM, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS; 370,000 genotyped SNPs, 5 million imputed SNPs) in Italy, among 407 MPM cases and 389 controls with a complete history of asbestos exposure. A replication study was also undertaken and included 428 MPM cases and 1269 controls from Australia. Although no single marker reached the genome-wide significance threshold, several associations were supported by haplotype-, chromosomal region-, gene- and gene-ontology process-based analyses. Most of these SNPs were located in regions reported to harbor aberrant alterations in mesothelioma (SLC7A14, THRB, CEBP350, ADAMTS2, ETV1, PVT1 and MMP14 genes), causing at most a 2–3-fold increase in MPM risk. The Australian replication study showed significant associations in five of these chromosomal regions (3q26.2, 4q32.1, 7p22.2, 14q11.2, 15q14). Multivariate analysis suggested an independent contribution of 10 genetic variants, with an Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) of 0.76 when only exposure and covariates were included in the model, and of 0.86 when the genetic component was also included, with a substantial increase of asbestos exposure risk estimation (odds ratio, OR: 45.28, 95% confidence interval, CI: 21.52–95.28). These results showed that genetic risk factors may play an additional role in the development of MPM, and that these should be taken into account to better estimate individual MPM risk in individuals who have been exposed to asbestos. PMID:23626673

  6. Genetic variants associated with increased risk of malignant pleural mesothelioma: a genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Matullo, Giuseppe; Guarrera, Simonetta; Betti, Marta; Fiorito, Giovanni; Ferrante, Daniela; Voglino, Floriana; Cadby, Gemma; Di Gaetano, Cornelia; Rosa, Fabio; Russo, Alessia; Hirvonen, Ari; Casalone, Elisabetta; Tunesi, Sara; Padoan, Marina; Giordano, Mara; Aspesi, Anna; Casadio, Caterina; Ardissone, Francesco; Ruffini, Enrico; Betta, Pier Giacomo; Libener, Roberta; Guaschino, Roberto; Piccolini, Ezio; Neri, Monica; Musk, Arthur W B; de Klerk, Nicholas H; Hui, Jennie; Beilby, John; James, Alan L; Creaney, Jenette; Robinson, Bruce W; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Palmer, Lyle J; Mirabelli, Dario; Ugolini, Donatella; Bonassi, Stefano; Magnani, Corrado; Dianzani, Irma

    2013-01-01

    Asbestos exposure is the main risk factor for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), a rare aggressive tumor. Nevertheless, only 5-17% of those exposed to asbestos develop MPM, suggesting the involvement of other environmental and genetic risk factors. To identify the genetic risk factors that may contribute to the development of MPM, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS; 370,000 genotyped SNPs, 5 million imputed SNPs) in Italy, among 407 MPM cases and 389 controls with a complete history of asbestos exposure. A replication study was also undertaken and included 428 MPM cases and 1269 controls from Australia. Although no single marker reached the genome-wide significance threshold, several associations were supported by haplotype-, chromosomal region-, gene- and gene-ontology process-based analyses. Most of these SNPs were located in regions reported to harbor aberrant alterations in mesothelioma (SLC7A14, THRB, CEBP350, ADAMTS2, ETV1, PVT1 and MMP14 genes), causing at most a 2-3-fold increase in MPM risk. The Australian replication study showed significant associations in five of these chromosomal regions (3q26.2, 4q32.1, 7p22.2, 14q11.2, 15q14). Multivariate analysis suggested an independent contribution of 10 genetic variants, with an Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) of 0.76 when only exposure and covariates were included in the model, and of 0.86 when the genetic component was also included, with a substantial increase of asbestos exposure risk estimation (odds ratio, OR: 45.28, 95% confidence interval, CI: 21.52-95.28). These results showed that genetic risk factors may play an additional role in the development of MPM, and that these should be taken into account to better estimate individual MPM risk in individuals who have been exposed to asbestos. PMID:23626673

  7. Genetically Determined Amerindian Ancestry Correlates with Increased Frequency of Risk Alleles for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, E; Webb, R; Rasmussen, A.; Kelly, J.A; Riba, L.; Kaufman, K.M.; Garcia-de la Torre, I.; Moctezuma, J.F.; Maradiaga-Ceceña, M.A.; Cardiel, M.; Acevedo, E.; Cucho-Venegas, M.; Garcia, M.A.; Gamron, S.; Pons-Estel, B.A.; Vasconcelos, C.; Martin, J.; Tusié-Luna, T.; Harley, J.B.; Richardson, B.; Sawalha, A.H.; Alarcón-Riquelme, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To analyze if genetically determined Amerindian ancestry predicts the increased presence of risk alleles of known susceptibility genes for systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods Single nucleotide polymorphisms within 16 confirmed genetic susceptibility loci for SLE were genotyped in a set of 804 Mestizo lupus patients and 667 Mestizo normal healthy controls. In addition, 347 admixture informative markers were genotyped. Individual ancestry proportions were determined using STRUCTURE. Association analysis was performed using PLINK, and correlation of the presence of risk alleles with ancestry was done using linear regression. Results A meta-analysis of the genetic association of the 16 SNPs across populations showed that TNFSF4, STAT4, PDCD1, ITGAM, and IRF5 were associated with lupus in a Hispanic-Mestizo cohort enriched for European and Amerindian ancestry. In addition, two SNPs within the MHC region, previously associated in a genome-wide association study in Europeans, were also associated in Mestizos. Using linear regression we predict an average increase of 2.34 risk alleles when comparing a lupus patient with 100% Amerindian ancestry to an SLE patient with 0% American Indian Ancestry (p<0.0001). SLE patients with 43% more Amerindian ancestry are predicted to carry one additional risk allele. Conclusion Amerindian ancestry increased the number of risk alleles for lupus. PMID:20848568

  8. Placental genetic variations in circadian clock-related genes increase the risk of placental abruption

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Chunfang; Gelaye, Bizu; Denis, Marie; Tadesse, Mahlet G; Enquobahrie, Daniel A; Ananth, Cande V; Pacora, Percy N; Salazar, Manuel; Sanchez, Sixto E; Williams, Michelle A

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of placental abruption (PA) remains poorly understood. We examined variations in SNPs of circadian clock-related genes in placenta with PA risk. We also explored placental and maternal genomic contributions to PA risk. Placental genomic DNA samples were isolated from 280 PA cases and 244 controls. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina Cardio-MetaboChip. We examined 116 SNPs in 13 genes known to moderate circadian rhythms. Logistic regression models were fit to estimate odds ratios (ORs). The combined effect of multiple SNPs on PA risk was estimated using a weighted genetic risk score. We examined independent and joint associations of wGRS derived from placental and maternal genomes with PA. Seven SNPs in five genes (ARNTL2, CRY2, DEC1, PER3 and RORA), in the placental genome, were associated with PA risk. Each copy of the minor allele (G) of a SNP in the RORA gene (rs2899663) was associated with a 30% reduced odds of PA (95% CI 0.52-0.95). The odds of PA increased with increasing placental-wGRS (Ptrend<0.001). The ORs were 1.00, 2.16, 3.24 and 4.48 across quartiles. Associations persisted after the maternal-wGRS was included in the model. There was evidence of an additive contribution of placental and maternal genetic contributions to PA risk. Participants with placental- and maternal-wGRS in the highest quartile, compared with those in the lowest quartile, had a 15.57-fold (95% CI 3.34-72.60) increased odds of PA. Placental variants in circadian clock-related genes are associated with PA risk; and the association persists after control of genetic variants in the maternal genome. PMID:27186326

  9. Genetically predicted longer telomere length is associated with increased risk of B-cell lymphoma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Machiela, Mitchell J; Lan, Qing; Slager, Susan L; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Teras, Lauren R; Camp, Nicola J; Cerhan, James R; Spinelli, John J; Wang, Sophia S; Nieters, Alexandra; Vijai, Joseph; Yeager, Meredith; Wang, Zhaoming; Ghesquières, Hervé; McKay, James; Conde, Lucia; de Bakker, Paul I W; Cox, David G; Burdett, Laurie; Monnereau, Alain; Flowers, Christopher R; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Giles, Graham G; Melbye, Mads; Gu, Jian; Jackson, Rebecca D; Kane, Eleanor; Purdue, Mark P; Vajdic, Claire M; Albanes, Demetrius; Kelly, Rachel S; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lawrence, Charles; Hutchinson, Amy; Zhi, Degui; Habermann, Thomas M; Link, Brian K; Novak, Anne J; Dogan, Ahmet; Asmann, Yan W; Liebow, Mark; Thompson, Carrie A; Ansell, Stephen M; Witzig, Thomas E; Tilly, Hervé; Haioun, Corinne; Molina, Thierry J; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Glimelius, Bengt; Adami, Hans-Olov; Roos, Göran; Bracci, Paige M; Riby, Jacques; Smith, Martyn T; Holly, Elizabeth A; Cozen, Wendy; Hartge, Patricia; Morton, Lindsay M; Severson, Richard K; Tinker, Lesley F; North, Kari E; Becker, Nikolaus; Benavente, Yolanda; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; Staines, Anthony; Lightfoot, Tracy; Crouch, Simon; Smith, Alex; Roman, Eve; Diver, W Ryan; Offit, Kenneth; Zelenetz, Andrew; Klein, Robert J; Villano, Danylo J; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zhang, Yawei; Holford, Theodore R; Turner, Jenny; Southey, Melissa C; Clavel, Jacqueline; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolph; Boeing, Heiner; Tjønneland, Anne; Angelucci, Emanuele; Di Lollo, Simonetta; Rais, Marco; De Vivo, Immaculata; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Huang, Jinyan; Ma, Baoshan; Ye, Yuanqing; Chiu, Brian C H; Liang, Liming; Park, Ju-Hyun; Chung, Charles C; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Salles, Gilles; Glenn, Martha; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Curtin, Karen; Wu, Xifeng; Smedby, Karin E; de Sanjose, Silvia; Skibola, Christine F; Berndt, Sonja I; Birmann, Brenda M; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2016-04-15

    Evidence from a small number of studies suggests that longer telomere length measured in peripheral leukocytes is associated with an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). However, these studies may be biased by reverse causation, confounded by unmeasured environmental exposures and might miss time points for which prospective telomere measurement would best reveal a relationship between telomere length and NHL risk. We performed an analysis of genetically inferred telomere length and NHL risk in a study of 10 102 NHL cases of the four most common B-cell histologic types and 9562 controls using a genetic risk score (GRS) comprising nine telomere length-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms. This approach uses existing genotype data and estimates telomere length by weighing the number of telomere length-associated variant alleles an individual carries with the published change in kb of telomere length. The analysis of the telomere length GRS resulted in an association between longer telomere length and increased NHL risk [four B-cell histologic types combined; odds ratio (OR) = 1.49, 95% CI 1.22-1.82,P-value = 8.5 × 10(-5)]. Subtype-specific analyses indicated that chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL) was the principal NHL subtype contributing to this association (OR = 2.60, 95% CI 1.93-3.51,P-value = 4.0 × 10(-10)). Significant interactions were observed across strata of sex for CLL/SLL and marginal zone lymphoma subtypes as well as age for the follicular lymphoma subtype. Our results indicate that a genetic background that favors longer telomere length may increase NHL risk, particularly risk of CLL/SLL, and are consistent with earlier studies relating longer telomere length with increased NHL risk. PMID:27008888

  10. The effect of increased genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease on hippocampal and amygdala volume.

    PubMed

    Lupton, Michelle K; Strike, Lachlan; Hansell, Narelle K; Wen, Wei; Mather, Karen A; Armstrong, Nicola J; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Assareh, Amelia A; Simmons, Andrew; Proitsi, Petroula; Powell, John F; Montgomery, Grant W; Hibar, Derrek P; Westman, Eric; Tsolaki, Magda; Kloszewska, Iwona; Soininen, Hilkka; Mecocci, Patrizia; Velas, Bruno; Lovestone, Simon; Brodaty, Henry; Ames, David; Trollor, Julian N; Martin, Nicholas G; Thompson, Paul M; Sachdev, Perminder S; Wright, Margaret J

    2016-04-01

    Reduction in hippocampal and amygdala volume measured via structural magnetic resonance imaging is an early marker of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whether genetic risk factors for AD exert an effect on these subcortical structures independent of clinical status has not been fully investigated. We examine whether increased genetic risk for AD influences hippocampal and amygdala volumes in case-control and population cohorts at different ages, in 1674 older (aged >53 years; 17% AD, 39% mild cognitive impairment [MCI]) and 467 young (16-30 years) adults. An AD polygenic risk score combining common risk variants excluding apolipoprotein E (APOE), and a single nucleotide polymorphism in TREM2, were both associated with reduced hippocampal volume in healthy older adults and those with MCI. APOE ε4 was associated with hippocampal and amygdala volume in those with AD and MCI but was not associated in healthy older adults. No associations were found in young adults. Genetic risk for AD affects the hippocampus before the clinical symptoms of AD, reflecting a neurodegenerative effect before clinical manifestations in older adults. PMID:26973105

  11. Genetic Variation in NFKBIE Is Associated With Increased Risk of Pneumococcal Meningitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lundbo, Lene F.; Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Clausen, Louise N.; Hollegaard, Mads V.; Sørensen, Henrik T.; Hougaard, David M.; Konradsen, Helle B.; Nørgaard, Mette; Benfield, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis are frequent pathogens in life-threatening infections. Genetic variation in the immune system may predispose to these infections. Nuclear factor-κB is a key component of the TLR-pathway, controlled by inhibitors, encoded by the genes NFKBIA, NFKBIE and NFKBIZ. We aimed to replicate previous findings of genetic variation associated with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), and to assess whether similar associations could be found in invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). Methods Cases with IPD and IMD and controls were identified by linking Danish national registries. DNA was obtained from the Danish Neonatal Screening Biobank. The association between SNPs and susceptibility to IPD and IMD, mortality and pneumococcal serotypes was investigated. Results 372 children with pneumococcal meningitis, 907 with pneumococcal bacteremia and 1273 controls were included. We included 406 cases with meningococcal meningitis, 272 with meningococcal bacteremia, and 672 controls. The NFKBIE SNP was associated with increased risk of pneumococcal meningitis (aOR 1.68; 95% CI: 1.20–2.36), but not bacteremia (aOR 1.08; 95% CI: 0.86–1.35). The remaining SNPs were not associated with susceptibility to invasive disease. None of the SNPs were associated with risk of IMD or mortality. Conclusions A NFKBIE polymorphism was associated with increased risk of pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:26870821

  12. A Twelve-SNP Genetic Risk Score Identifies Individuals at Increased Risk for Future Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. Gustav; Sjögren, Marketa; Lubitz, Steven A.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Louie, Judy Z.; Catanese, Joseph J.; Engström, Gunnar; Devlin, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Atrial fibrillation (AF) is prevalent and there is a clinical need for biomarkers to identify individuals at higher risk for AF. Fixed throughout a life course and assayable early in life, genetic biomarkers may meet this need. Here, we investigate whether multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) together as an AF genetic risk score (AF-GRS) can improve prediction of one's risk for AF. Methods In 27,471 participants of the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study, a prospective, community-based cohort, we used Cox models that adjusted for established AF risk factors to assess the association of AF-GRS with incident AF and ischemic stroke. Median follow-up was 14.4 years for incident AF and 14.5 years for ischemic stroke. The AF-GRS comprised 12 SNPs that had been previously shown to be associated with AF at genome-wide significance. Results During follow-up, 2,160 participants experienced a first AF event and 1,495 had a first ischemic stroke event. Participants in the top AF-GRS quintile were at increased risk for incident AF (HR = 2.00; 95%CI = 1.73 to 2.31; P=2.7×10−21) and ischemic stroke (HR = 1.23; 95%CI = 1.04 to 1.46; P=0.02) when compared with the bottom quintile. Addition of the AF-GRS to established AF risk factors modestly improved both discrimination and reclassification (P<0.0001 for both). Conclusions An AF-GRS can identify 20% of individuals who are at approximately two-fold increased risk for incident AF and at 23% increased risk for ischemic stroke. Targeting diagnostic or therapeutic interventions to this subset may prove clinically useful. PMID:25123217

  13. The complex SNP and CNV genetic architecture of the increased risk of congenital heart defects in Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sailani, M. Reza; Makrythanasis, Periklis; Valsesia, Armand; Santoni, Federico A.; Deutsch, Samuel; Popadin, Konstantin; Borel, Christelle; Migliavacca, Eugenia; Sharp, Andrew J.; Duriaux Sail, Genevieve; Falconnet, Emilie; Rabionet, Kelly; Serra-Juhé, Clara; Vicari, Stefano; Laux, Daniela; Grattau, Yann; Dembour, Guy; Megarbane, Andre; Touraine, Renaud; Stora, Samantha; Kitsiou, Sofia; Fryssira, Helena; Chatzisevastou-Loukidou, Chariklia; Kanavakis, Emmanouel; Merla, Giuseppe; Bonnet, Damien; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A.; Estivill, Xavier; Delabar, Jean M.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart defect (CHD) occurs in 40% of Down syndrome (DS) cases. While carrying three copies of chromosome 21 increases the risk for CHD, trisomy 21 itself is not sufficient to cause CHD. Thus, additional genetic variation and/or environmental factors could contribute to the CHD risk. Here we report genomic variations that in concert with trisomy 21, determine the risk for CHD in DS. This case-control GWAS includes 187 DS with CHD (AVSD = 69, ASD = 53, VSD = 65) as cases, and 151 DS without CHD as controls. Chromosome 21–specific association studies revealed rs2832616 and rs1943950 as CHD risk alleles (adjusted genotypic P-values <0.05). These signals were confirmed in a replication cohort of 92 DS-CHD cases and 80 DS-without CHD (nominal P-value 0.0022). Furthermore, CNV analyses using a customized chromosome 21 aCGH of 135K probes in 55 DS-AVSD and 53 DS-without CHD revealed three CNV regions associated with AVSD risk (FDR ≤ 0.05). Two of these regions that are located within the previously identified CHD region on chromosome 21 were further confirmed in a replication study of 49 DS-AVSD and 45 DS- without CHD (FDR ≤ 0.05). One of these CNVs maps near the RIPK4 gene, and the second includes the ZBTB21 (previously ZNF295) gene, highlighting the potential role of these genes in the pathogenesis of CHD in DS. We propose that the genetic architecture of the CHD risk of DS is complex and includes trisomy 21, and SNP and CNV variations in chromosome 21. In addition, a yet-unidentified genetic variation in the rest of the genome may contribute to this complex genetic architecture. PMID:23783273

  14. Genetic Polymorphisms Associated to Folate Transport as Predictors of Increased Risk for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Mexican Children

    PubMed Central

    Zaruma-Torres, Fausto; Lares-Asseff, Ismael; Lima, Aurea; Reyes-Espinoza, Aarón; Loera-Castañeda, Verónica; Sosa-Macías, Martha; Galaviz-Hernández, Carlos; Arias-Peláez, María C.; Reyes-López, Miguel A.; Quiñones, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a frequent neoplasia occurring in children. The most commonly used drug for the treatment of ALL is methotrexate (MTX), an anti-folate agent. Previous studies suggest that folate transporters play a role in ALL prognosis and that genetic polymorphism of genes encoding folate transporters may increase the risk of ALL. Therefore, the main goal of this study was to determine the associations among six genetic polymorphisms in four genes related with the folate transporter pathway to determine a relationship with the occurrence of ALL in Mexican children. A case-control study was performed in 73 ALL children and 133 healthy children from Northern and Northwestern Mexico. COL18A1 (rs2274808), SLC19A1 (rs2838956), ABCB1 (rs1045642 and rs1128503), and ABCC5 (rs9838667 and rs3792585). Polymorphisms were assayed through qPCR. Our results showed an increased ALL risk in children carrying CT genotype (OR = 2.55, CI 95% 1.11–5.83, p = 0.0001) and TT genotype (OR = 21.05, CI 95% 5.62–78.87, p < 0.0001) of COL18A1 rs2274808; in SLC19A1 rs2838956 AG carriers (OR = 44.69, CI 95% 10.42–191.63, p = 0.0001); in ABCB1 rs1045642 TT carriers (OR = 13.76, CI 95% 5.94–31.88, p = 0.0001); in ABCC5 rs9838667 AC carriers (OR = 2.61, CI 95% 1.05–6.48, p < 0.05); and in ABCC5 rs3792585 CC carriers (OR = 9.99, CI 95% 3.19–31.28, p = 0.004). Moreover, several combinations of genetic polymorphisms were found to be significantly associated with a risk for ALL. Finally, two combinations of ABCC5 polymorphisms resulted in protection from this neoplasia. In conclusion, certain genetic polymorphisms related to the folate transport pathway, particularly COL18A1 rs2274808, SLC19A1 rs2838956, ABCB1 rs1045642, and ABCC5 rs3792585, were associated with an increased risk for ALL in Mexican children. PMID:27547186

  15. Genetic Polymorphisms Associated to Folate Transport as Predictors of Increased Risk for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Mexican Children.

    PubMed

    Zaruma-Torres, Fausto; Lares-Asseff, Ismael; Lima, Aurea; Reyes-Espinoza, Aarón; Loera-Castañeda, Verónica; Sosa-Macías, Martha; Galaviz-Hernández, Carlos; Arias-Peláez, María C; Reyes-López, Miguel A; Quiñones, Luis A

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a frequent neoplasia occurring in children. The most commonly used drug for the treatment of ALL is methotrexate (MTX), an anti-folate agent. Previous studies suggest that folate transporters play a role in ALL prognosis and that genetic polymorphism of genes encoding folate transporters may increase the risk of ALL. Therefore, the main goal of this study was to determine the associations among six genetic polymorphisms in four genes related with the folate transporter pathway to determine a relationship with the occurrence of ALL in Mexican children. A case-control study was performed in 73 ALL children and 133 healthy children from Northern and Northwestern Mexico. COL18A1 (rs2274808), SLC19A1 (rs2838956), ABCB1 (rs1045642 and rs1128503), and ABCC5 (rs9838667 and rs3792585). Polymorphisms were assayed through qPCR. Our results showed an increased ALL risk in children carrying CT genotype (OR = 2.55, CI 95% 1.11-5.83, p = 0.0001) and TT genotype (OR = 21.05, CI 95% 5.62-78.87, p < 0.0001) of COL18A1 rs2274808; in SLC19A1 rs2838956 AG carriers (OR = 44.69, CI 95% 10.42-191.63, p = 0.0001); in ABCB1 rs1045642 TT carriers (OR = 13.76, CI 95% 5.94-31.88, p = 0.0001); in ABCC5 rs9838667 AC carriers (OR = 2.61, CI 95% 1.05-6.48, p < 0.05); and in ABCC5 rs3792585 CC carriers (OR = 9.99, CI 95% 3.19-31.28, p = 0.004). Moreover, several combinations of genetic polymorphisms were found to be significantly associated with a risk for ALL. Finally, two combinations of ABCC5 polymorphisms resulted in protection from this neoplasia. In conclusion, certain genetic polymorphisms related to the folate transport pathway, particularly COL18A1 rs2274808, SLC19A1 rs2838956, ABCB1 rs1045642, and ABCC5 rs3792585, were associated with an increased risk for ALL in Mexican children. PMID:27547186

  16. Genetic Predisposition to Increased Blood Cholesterol and Triglyceride Lipid Levels and Risk of Alzheimer Disease: A Mendelian Randomization Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Proitsi, Petroula; Lupton, Michelle K.; Velayudhan, Latha; Newhouse, Stephen; Fogh, Isabella; Tsolaki, Magda; Daniilidou, Makrina; Pritchard, Megan; Kloszewska, Iwona; Soininen, Hilkka; Mecocci, Patrizia; Vellas, Bruno; Williams, Julie; Stewart, Robert; Sham, Pak; Lovestone, Simon; Powell, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although altered lipid metabolism has been extensively implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) through cell biological, epidemiological, and genetic studies, the molecular mechanisms linking cholesterol and AD pathology are still not well understood and contradictory results have been reported. We have used a Mendelian randomization approach to dissect the causal nature of the association between circulating lipid levels and late onset AD (LOAD) and test the hypothesis that genetically raised lipid levels increase the risk of LOAD. Methods and Findings We included 3,914 patients with LOAD, 1,675 older individuals without LOAD, and 4,989 individuals from the general population from six genome wide studies drawn from a white population (total n = 10,578). We constructed weighted genotype risk scores (GRSs) for four blood lipid phenotypes (high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-c], low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-c], triglycerides, and total cholesterol) using well-established SNPs in 157 loci for blood lipids reported by Willer and colleagues (2013). Both full GRSs using all SNPs associated with each trait at p<5×10−8 and trait specific scores using SNPs associated exclusively with each trait at p<5×10−8 were developed. We used logistic regression to investigate whether the GRSs were associated with LOAD in each study and results were combined together by meta-analysis. We found no association between any of the full GRSs and LOAD (meta-analysis results: odds ratio [OR] = 1.005, 95% CI 0.82–1.24, p = 0.962 per 1 unit increase in HDL-c; OR = 0.901, 95% CI 0.65–1.25, p = 0.530 per 1 unit increase in LDL-c; OR = 1.104, 95% CI 0.89–1.37, p = 0.362 per 1 unit increase in triglycerides; and OR = 0.954, 95% CI 0.76–1.21, p = 0.688 per 1 unit increase in total cholesterol). Results for the trait specific scores were similar; however, the trait specific scores explained much smaller

  17. Exposure and genetics increase risk of beryllium sensitisation and chronic beryllium disease in the nuclear weapons industry

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, M. V.; Martyny, John W.; Mroz, M. M.; Silveira, L. J.; Strand, M.; Cragle, D. L.; Tankersley, W. G.; Wells, S. M.; Newman, L. S.; Maier, L. A.

    2011-04-02

    Beryllium sensitisation (BeS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) are caused by exposure to beryllium with susceptibility affected by at least one well-studied genetic host factor, a glutamic acid residue at position 69 (E69) of the HLA-DPb chain (DPbE69). However, the nature of the relationship between exposure and carriage of the DPbE69 genotype has not been well studied. The goal of this study was to determine the relationship between DP{beta}E69 and exposure in BeS and CBD. Current and former workers (n=181) from a US nuclear weapons production facility, the Y-12 National Security Complex (Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA), were enrolled in a case-control study including 35 individuals with BeS and 19 with CBD. HLA-DPB1 genotypes were determined by PCR-SSP. Beryllium exposures were assessed through worker interviews and industrial hygiene assessment of work tasks. After removing the confounding effect of potential beryllium exposure at another facility, multivariate models showed a sixfold (OR 6.06, 95% CI 1.96 to 18.7) increased odds for BeS and CBD combined among DP{beta}E69 carriers and a fourfold (OR 3.98, 95% CI 1.43 to 11.0) increased odds for those exposed over an assigned lifetime-weighted average exposure of 0.1 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. Those with both risk factors had higher increased odds (OR 24.1, 95% CI 4.77 to 122). DP{beta}E69 carriage and high exposure to beryllium appear to contribute individually to the development of BeS and CBD. Among workers at a beryllium-using facility, the magnitude of risk associated with either elevated beryllium exposure or carriage of DP{beta}E69 alone appears to be similar.

  18. Genetic factors associated with population size may increase extinction risks and decrease colonization potential in a keystone tropical pine

    PubMed Central

    del Castillo, Rafael F; Trujillo-Argueta, Sonia; Sánchez-Vargas, Nahúm; Newton, Adrian C

    2011-01-01

    Pioneer species are essential for forest regeneration and ecosystem resilience. Pinus chiapensis is an endangered pioneer key species for tropical montane cloud forest regeneration in Mesoamerica. Human activities have severely reduced some P. chiapensis populations, which exhibited a small or null colonization potential suggesting the involvement of genetic factors associated with small populations. We explored the relationships between (i) population genetic diversity (allozymes) and population size, including sampling size effects, (ii) fitness estimates associated with colonization potential (seed viability and seedling performance) in a common environment and population size, and (iii) fitness estimates and observed heterozygosity in populations with sizes spanning five orders of magnitude. All the estimates of genetic diversity and fitness increased significantly with population size. Low fitness was detected in progenies of small populations of disturbed and undisturbed habitats. Progenies with the lowest observed heterozygosity displayed the lowest fitness estimates, which, in turn, increased with heterozygosity, but seed viability peaked at intermediate heterozygosity values suggesting inbreeding and outbreeding depression. Inbreeding depression appears to be the most immediate genetic factor in population decline. Conservation efforts should try to maintain large and genetically diverse populations, enhance gene flow by restoring connectivity between adjacent populations, and avoid genetically distant individuals. PMID:25568006

  19. Genetic risks and genetic model specification.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Gang; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Jinfeng; Yuan, Ao; Li, Qizhai; Gastwirth, Joseph L

    2016-08-21

    Genetic risks and genetic models are often used in design and analysis of genetic epidemiology studies. A genetic model is defined in terms of two genetic risk measures: genotype relative risk and odds ratio. The impacts of choosing a risk measure on the resulting genetic models are studied in the power to detect association and deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in cases using genetic relative risk. Extensive simulations demonstrate that the power of a study to detect associations using odds ratio is lower than that using relative risk with the same value when other parameters are fixed. When the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium holds in the general population, the genetic model can be inferred by the deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in only cases. Furthermore, it is more efficient than that based on the deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in all cases and controls. PMID:27181372

  20. Increased risk of stroke in oral contraceptive users carried replicated genetic variants: a population-based case-control study in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun; Li, Ying; Li, Huiqiao; Sun, Tao; Jin, Guangfu; Sun, Zhiming; Zhou, Jian; Ba, Lei; Huang, Zhizheng; Bai, Jianling

    2012-08-01

    Combined oral contraceptives (COC) use is a unique risk factor for stroke in women, and may modify the associations between genetic polymorphisms and stroke. To investigate whether the genetic variants identified in a recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) could be replicated in Chinese women, as well as, whether related risk was different in COC users, 451 stroke cases and 831 age- and region-matched controls were recruited from our cohort. Genotyping of 3 SNPs (rs700651, rs10958409, and rs1333040) was performed by the polymerase chain reaction assay with TaqMan probes. The history of contraceptive use and relevant information were obtained from a face-to-face interview. Odds ratios (OR) with 95 % confidence interval (CI) were estimated under conditional logistic regression model after adjustment for cardiovascular covariates. Our study replicated the associations of rs10958409 and rs1333040, with the risk of stroke, especially hemorrhagic subtype, but failed to confirm association of rs700651. COC use was associated with a 1.56-fold (OR 1.56, 95 % CI 1.21-2.01) increased risk of stroke. COC users with rs10958409 GA/AA or rs1333040 CT/TT genotypes had an increased risk of overall stroke by 1.59-fold (OR 2.59, 95 % CI 1.59-4.19) and 3.24-fold (OR 4.24, 95 % CI 1.71-10.49), respectively, compared with the non-users with wild-type genotypes. Moreover, the risk of hemorrhagic stroke increased by 4.81- and 15.06-fold when risk allele carriers of rs10958409 or rs1333040 who took COC. Our results confirmed the associations of two GWAS SNPs, also suggested combination effects of these genetic variants and COC use on stroke risk. PMID:22476622

  1. Interpreting genetic risks.

    PubMed

    Pearn, J

    2016-01-01

    Prof. Peter Beighton has given a professional lifetime to helping patients and their families who have been afflicted by inherited disease. His clinical skills have brought certainty, confidence and support to those confronted with some of the most difficult decisions in life's progress. Prof. Beighton's research has led to the discovery of new syndromes and the elucidation of accurate genetic risks in many diseases. This in turn has empowered patients and their families to make informed decisions and has provided doctors with the scientific knowledge to help patients. On the occasion of this festschrift, I join with so many members of Peter's international professional family to pay tribute to his leadership and service - not only in medical genetics - but also in the broadest domains of healthcare. PMID:27245536

  2. From observation to intervention: development of a psychoeducational intervention to increase uptake of BRCA genetic counseling among high-risk breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Vadaparampil, Susan T; Malo, Teri L; Nam, Kelli M; Nelson, Alison; de la Cruz, Cara Z; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2014-12-01

    We describe the development of a psychoeducational intervention (PEI) to increase uptake of genetic counseling targeted to high-risk breast cancer survivors. Based on previous research, scientific literature, and a review of cancer education websites, we identified potential PEI content. We then assessed the initial acceptability and preference of two booklets of identical content but different layouts, by presenting the booklets to individuals with a personal or family history of breast cancer (n = 57). The preferred booklet was evaluated by two focus groups of ten breast cancer patients who had not attended genetic counseling. The booklet was refined based on participants' feedback at each stage. Focus group participants generally found the booklet visually appealing, informative, and helpful, but some thought that it was too long. Final changes were made based on learner verification principles of attraction, comprehension, cultural acceptability, and persuasion. This project produced an interventional tool to present key constructs that may facilitate decision making about risk-appropriate genetic counseling uptake among high-risk breast cancer survivors. The process described for creating, testing, and adapting materials from a patient perspective can be used for developing other PEIs. This newly developed, unique PEI can be used in many clinical settings. PMID:24706196

  3. Genetic Risk Score Modelling for Disease Progression in New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Patients: Increased Genetic Load of Islet-Expressed and Cytokine-Regulated Candidate Genes Predicts Poorer Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Brorsson, Caroline A; Nielsen, Lotte B; Andersen, Marie Louise; Kaur, Simranjeet; Bergholdt, Regine; Hansen, Lars; Mortensen, Henrik B; Pociot, Flemming; Størling, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified over 40 type 1 diabetes risk loci. The clinical impact of these loci on β-cell function during disease progression is unknown. We aimed at testing whether a genetic risk score could predict glycemic control and residual β-cell function in type 1 diabetes (T1D). As gene expression may represent an intermediate phenotype between genetic variation and disease, we hypothesized that genes within T1D loci which are expressed in islets and transcriptionally regulated by proinflammatory cytokines would be the best predictors of disease progression. Two-thirds of 46 GWAS candidate genes examined were expressed in human islets, and 11 of these significantly changed expression levels following exposure to proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β + IFNγ + TNFα) for 48 h. Using the GWAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from each locus, we constructed a genetic risk score based on the cumulative number of risk alleles carried in children with newly diagnosed T1D. With each additional risk allele carried, HbA1c levels increased significantly within first year after diagnosis. Network and gene ontology (GO) analyses revealed that several of the 11 candidate genes have overlapping biological functions and interact in a common network. Our results may help predict disease progression in newly diagnosed children with T1D which can be exploited for optimizing treatment. PMID:26904692

  4. Genetic heterogeneity of primary open angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension: linkage to GLC1A associated with an increased risk of severe glaucomatous optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Brézin, A P; Béchetoille, A; Hamard, P; Valtot, F; Berkani, M; Belmouden, A; Adam, M F; Dupont de Dinechin, S; Bach, J F; Garchon, H J

    1997-01-01

    The GLC1A locus for autosomal dominant juvenile and middle age onset primary open angle glaucoma (OAG) has been mapped to chromosome 1q21-q31. OAG, however, is a heterogeneous disease. We tested linkage of OAG and ocular hypertension (OHT), a major risk factor for OAG, to GLC1A in eight French families with multiple cases of juvenile and middle age onset OAG. There was strong evidence of genetic heterogeneity, four families being linked to GLC1A and two or three others being unlinked, depending on whether the complete OAG phenotype was analysed alone or jointly with OHT. Peak intraocular pressure (IOP) did not differ significantly between the two groups of families, while linkage to GLC1A conferred a highly increased risk of developing OAG and of having severe glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Testing linkage of familial OAG to GLC1A may therefore have prognostic value too. PMID:9222961

  5. Increased Risk of Genetic and Epigenetic Instability in Human Embryonic Stem Cells Associated with Specific Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Garitaonandia, Ibon; Amir, Hadar; Boscolo, Francesca Sesillo; Wambua, Gerald K.; Schultheisz, Heather L.; Sabatini, Karen; Morey, Robert; Waltz, Shannon; Wang, Yu-Chieh; Tran, Ha; Leonardo, Trevor R.; Nazor, Kristopher; Slavin, Ileana; Lynch, Candace; Li, Yingchun; Coleman, Ronald; Gallego Romero, Irene; Altun, Gulsah; Reynolds, David; Dalton, Stephen; Parast, Mana; Loring, Jeanne F.; Laurent, Louise C.

    2015-01-01

    The self-renewal and differentiation capacities of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) make them a promising source of material for cell transplantation therapy, drug development, and studies of cellular differentiation and development. However, the large numbers of cells necessary for many of these applications require extensive expansion of hPSC cultures, a process that has been associated with genetic and epigenetic alterations. We have performed a combinatorial study on both hESCs and hiPSCs to compare the effects of enzymatic vs. mechanical passaging, and feeder-free vs. mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder substrate, on the genetic and epigenetic stability and the phenotypic characteristics of hPSCs. In extensive experiments involving over 100 continuous passages, we observed that both enzymatic passaging and feeder-free culture were associated with genetic instability, higher rates of cell proliferation, and persistence of OCT4/POU5F1-positive cells in teratomas, with enzymatic passaging having the stronger effect. In all combinations of culture conditions except for mechanical passaging on feeder layers, we noted recurrent deletions in the genomic region containing the tumor suppressor gene TP53, which was associated with decreased mRNA expression of TP53, as well as alterations in the expression of several downstream genes consistent with a decrease in the activity of the TP53 pathway. Among the hESC cultures, we also observed culture-associated variations in global gene expression and DNA methylation. The effects of enzymatic passaging and feeder-free conditions were also observed in hiPSC cultures. Our results highlight the need for careful assessment of the effects of culture conditions on cells intended for clinical therapies. PMID:25714340

  6. Healthy Chilean Adolescents with HOMA-IR ≥ 2.6 Have Increased Cardiometabolic Risk: Association with Genetic, Biological, and Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, R.; Correa-Burrows, P.; Reyes, M.; Blanco, E.; Albala, C.; Gahagan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine the optimal cutoff of the homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) for diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in adolescents and examine whether insulin resistance (IR), determined by this method, was related to genetic, biological, and environmental factors. Methods. In 667 adolescents (16.8 ± 0.3 y), BMI, waist circumference, glucose, insulin, adiponectin, diet, and physical activity were measured. Fat and fat-free mass were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Family history of type 2 diabetes (FHDM) was reported. We determined the optimal cutoff of HOMA-IR to diagnose MetS (IDF criteria) using ROC analysis. IR was defined as HOMA-IR values above the cutoff. We tested the influence of genetic, biological, and environmental factors on IR using logistic regression analyses. Results. Of the participants, 16% were obese and 9.4 % met criteria for MetS. The optimal cutoff for MetS diagnosis was a HOMA-IR value of 2.6. Based on this value, 16.3% of participants had IR. Adolescents with IR had a significantly higher prevalence of obesity, abdominal obesity, fasting hyperglycemia, and MetS compared to those who were not IR. FHDM, sarcopenia, obesity, and low adiponectin significantly increased the risk of IR. Conclusions. In adolescents, HOMA-IR ≥ 2.6 was associated with greater cardiometabolic risk. PMID:26273675

  7. Acceptance of, inclination for, and barriers in genetic testing for gene mutations that increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancers among female residents of Warsaw

    PubMed Central

    Dera, Paulina; Religioni, Urszula; Duda-Zalewska, Aneta; Deptała, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study To check the degree of acceptance of, inclination for, and barriers in genetic testing for gene mutations that increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancers among female residents of Warsaw Material and methods This study involved 562 women between 20 and 77 years of age, all of whom were patients visiting gynaecologists practising in clinics in the City of Warsaw. The studied population was divided into six age categories. The study method was a diagnostic poll conducted with the use of an original questionnaire containing 10 multiple-choice questions. Results Nearly 70% of the women showed an interest in taking a test to detect predispositions to develop breast and ovarian cancer. More than 10% did not want to take such a test, while every fifth women was undecided. No statistically significant differences between the respondents’ willingness to pay and education were found (p = 0.05). The most frequent answer given by women in all groups was that the amount to pay was too high. Such an answer was given by 52.17% of women with primary education, 65.22% of women with vocational education, 58.61% of women with secondary education, and 41.62% of women with higher education. Conclusions Women with a confirmed increased risk of developing breast and/or ovarian cancer due to inter alia the presence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations should pay particular attention to 1st and 2nd level prophylaxis. PMID:27095945

  8. Impact of NGS in the medical sciences: Genetic syndromes with an increased risk of developing cancer as an example of the use of new technologies.

    PubMed

    Lapunzina, Pablo; López, Rocío Ortiz; Rodríguez-Laguna, Lara; García-Miguel, Purificación; Martínez, Augusto Rojas; Martínez-Glez, Víctor

    2014-03-01

    The increased speed and decreasing cost of sequencing, along with an understanding of the clinical relevance of emerging information for patient management, has led to an explosion of potential applications in healthcare. Currently, SNP arrays and Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies are relatively new techniques used to scan genomes for gains and losses, losses of heterozygosity (LOH), SNPs, and indel variants as well as to perform complete sequencing of a panel of candidate genes, the entire exome (whole exome sequencing) or even the whole genome. As a result, these new high-throughput technologies have facilitated progress in the understanding and diagnosis of genetic syndromes and cancers, two disorders traditionally considered to be separate diseases but that can share causal genetic alterations in a group of developmental disorders associated with congenital malformations and cancer risk. The purpose of this work is to review these syndromes as an example of a group of disorders that has been included in a panel of genes for NGS analysis. We also highlight the relationship between development and cancer and underline the connections between these syndromes. PMID:24764758

  9. Impact of NGS in the medical sciences: Genetic syndromes with an increased risk of developing cancer as an example of the use of new technologies

    PubMed Central

    Lapunzina, Pablo; López, Rocío Ortiz; Rodríguez-Laguna, Lara; García-Miguel, Purificación; Martínez, Augusto Rojas; Martínez-Glez, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    The increased speed and decreasing cost of sequencing, along with an understanding of the clinical relevance of emerging information for patient management, has led to an explosion of potential applications in healthcare. Currently, SNP arrays and Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies are relatively new techniques used to scan genomes for gains and losses, losses of heterozygosity (LOH), SNPs, and indel variants as well as to perform complete sequencing of a panel of candidate genes, the entire exome (whole exome sequencing) or even the whole genome. As a result, these new high-throughput technologies have facilitated progress in the understanding and diagnosis of genetic syndromes and cancers, two disorders traditionally considered to be separate diseases but that can share causal genetic alterations in a group of developmental disorders associated with congenital malformations and cancer risk. The purpose of this work is to review these syndromes as an example of a group of disorders that has been included in a panel of genes for NGS analysis. We also highlight the relationship between development and cancer and underline the connections between these syndromes. PMID:24764758

  10. Genetic Research on Biospecimens Poses Minimal Risk

    PubMed Central

    Wendler, David S.; Rid, Annette

    2014-01-01

    Genetic research on human biospecimens is increasingly common. Yet, debate continues over the level of risk that this research poses to sample donors. Some argue that genetic research on biospecimens poses minimal risk; others argue that it poses greater than minimal risk and therefore needs additional requirements and limitations. This debate raises concern that some donors are not receiving appropriate protection or, conversely, that valuable research is being subject to unnecessary requirements and limitations. The present paper attempts to address this concern using the widely-endorsed ‘risks of daily life’ standard. The three extant versions of this standard all suggest that, with proper measures in place to protect donor confidentiality, most genetic research on human biospecimens poses minimal risk to donors. PMID:25530152

  11. Genetic research on biospecimens poses minimal risk.

    PubMed

    Wendler, David S; Rid, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Genetic research on human biospecimens is increasingly common. However, debate continues over the level of risk that this research poses to sample donors. Some argue that genetic research on biospecimens poses minimal risk; others argue that it poses greater than minimal risk and therefore needs additional requirements and limitations. This debate raises concern that some donors are not receiving appropriate protection or, conversely, that valuable research is being subject to unnecessary requirements and limitations. The present paper attempts to resolve this debate using the widely-endorsed 'risks of daily life' standard. The three extant versions of this standard all suggest that, with proper measures in place to protect confidentiality, most genetic research on human biospecimens poses minimal risk to donors. PMID:25530152

  12. Increased rodenticide exposure rate and risk of toxicosis in barn owls (Tyto alba) from southwestern Canada and linkage with demographic but not genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Andrew C; Elliott, John E; Hindmarch, Sofi; Lee, Sandi L; Maisonneuve, France; Bowes, Victoria; Cheng, Kimberly M; Martin, Kathy

    2016-08-01

    Among many anthropogenic drivers of population decline, continual rapid urbanization and industrialization pose major challenges for the survival of wildlife species. Barn owls (Tyto alba) in southwestern British Columbia (BC) face a multitude of threats ranging from habitat fragmentation to vehicle strikes. They are also at risk from secondary poisoning of second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides (SGARs), a suite of toxic compounds which at high doses results in a depletion of blood clotting factors leading to internal bleeding and death. Here, using long-term data (N = 119) for the hepatic residue levels of SGAR, we assessed the risk of toxicosis from SGAR for the BC barn owl population over the past two decades. We also investigated whether sensitivity to SGAR is associated with genetic factors, namely Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) found in the CYP2C45 gene of barn owls. We found that residue concentration for total SGAR was significantly higher in 2006-2013 (141 ng/g) relative to 1992-2003 (57 ng/g). The proportion of owls exposed to multiple SGAR types was also significantly higher in 2006-2013. Those measures accordingly translate directly into an increase in toxicosis risk level. We also detected demographic differences, where adult females showed on average lower concentration of total SGAR (64 ng/g) when compared to adult males (106 ng/g). Juveniles were overall more likely to show signs of toxicosis than adults (33.3 and 6.9 %, respectively), and those symptoms were positively predicted by SGAR concentrations. We found no evidence that SNPs in the CYP2C45 gene of barn owls were associated with intraspecific variation in SGAR sensitivity. We recommend several preventative measures be taken to minimize wildlife exposure to SGAR. PMID:27151403

  13. Genetic testing for cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Ponder, B

    1997-11-01

    Genetic testing for cancer susceptibility is already part of the clinical management of families with some of the well-defined (but uncommon) inherited cancer syndromes. In cases where the risks associated with a predisposing mutation are less certain, or where there is no clearly effective intervention to offer those with a positive result, its use is more controversial. Careful evaluation of costs and benefits, and of the efficacy of interventions in those found to be at risk, is essential and is only just beginning. An immediate challenge is to ensure that both health professionals and the public understand clearly the issues involved. PMID:9353178

  14. Responding to the increased genetic risk associated with customary consanguineous marriage among minority ethnic populations: lessons from local innovations in England.

    PubMed

    Salway, Sarah; Ali, Parveen; Ratcliffe, Giles; Such, Elizabeth; Khan, Nasaim; Kingston, Helen; Quarrell, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    Populations practising customary consanguineous marriage have a higher incidence of autosomal recessive genetic disorders than those in which reproductive partners are usually unrelated. In the absence of any national-level response, English service developments to address the additional needs of families living with or at risk of such disorders have been locally led. These interventions remain in their infancy here, as elsewhere in Europe, and important questions remain regarding how appropriate, effective and sustainable responses can be operationalised in practice. This formative service review employed four local case studies together with wider consultation exercises over a 4-year period (2011-2015) to document recent responses to this area of need, issues arising and lessons to inform future work. Service components included the following: enhancements to genetic services to provide family-centred, culturally competent approaches to counselling and testing; community genetic literacy approaches; and capacity development among health professionals. Local approaches were, however, very varied in their detail, scope, level of investment and longevity. The provisions of culturally competent genetic counselling services and community-level genetic literacy interventions were generally well received by those who accessed them. Coordinated action across all service components appeared important for an effective service, but healthcare professionals, particularly general practitioners, were often difficult to engage in this agenda. An evaluative culture and engagement in a wider community of practice had supported service development across sites. However, sustaining investment was challenging, particularly where new services were not well integrated into core provision and where commissioning was driven by expectations of short-term reductions in infant mortality and disability. PMID:27311843

  15. [Quantification of radiation-induced genetic risk].

    PubMed

    Ehling, U H

    1987-05-01

    Associated with technical advances of our civilization is a radiation- and chemically-induced increase in the germ cell mutation rate in man. This would result in an increase in the frequency of genetic diseases and would be detrimental to future generations. It is the duty of our generation to keep this risk as low as possible. The estimation of the radiation-induced genetic risk of human populations is based on the extrapolation of results from animal experiments. Radiation-induced mutations are stochastic events. The probability of the event depends on the dose; the degree of the damage does not. The different methods to estimate the radiation-induced genetic risk will be discussed. The accuracy of the predicted results will be evaluated by a comparison with the observed incidence of dominant mutations in offspring born to radiation exposed survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings. These methods will be used to predict the genetic damage from the fallout of the reactor accident at Chernobyl. For the exposure dose we used the upper limits of the mean effective life time equivalent dose from the fallout values in the Munich region. According to the direct method for the risk estimation we will expect for each 100 to 500 spontaneous dominant mutations one radiation-induced mutation in the first generation. With the indirect method we estimate a ratio of 100 dominant spontaneous mutations to one radiation-induced dominant mutation. The possibilities and the limitations of the different methods to estimate the genetic risk will be discussed. The discrepancy between the high safety standards for radiation protection and the low level of knowledge for the toxicological evaluation of chemical mutagens will be emphasized. PMID:3589954

  16. A randomized trial to increase colonoscopy screening in members of high risk families in the Colorectal Cancer Family Registry and Cancer Genetics Network

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, Jan T; Horick, Nora; Kinney, Anita Y; Finkelstein, Dianne M; Garrett, Kathleen; Haile, Robert W; Lindor, Noralane M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Sandler, Robert S.; Burke, Carol; Hill, Deirdre A.; Ahnen, Dennis J

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with a strong family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) have significant risk for CRC, though adherence to colonoscopy screening in these groups remains low. This study assessed whether a tailored, telephone counseling intervention can increase adherence to colonoscopy in members of high risk families in a randomized, controlled trial. Methods Eligible participants were recruited from two national cancer registries if they had a first-degree relative with CRC under age 60 or multiple affected family members, which included families that met Amsterdam criteria for Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colon Cancer, and if they were due for colonoscopy within 24-months. Participants were randomized to receive a tailored, telephone intervention grounded in behavioral theory or a mailed packet with general information about screening. Colonoscopy status was assessed through follow-up surveys and endoscopy reports. Cox-proportional hazards models were used to assess intervention effect. Results Of the 632 participants (aged 25–80), 60% were female, the majority were White, non-Hispanic, educated and had health insurance. Colonoscopy adherence increased 11 percentage points in the tailored, telephone intervention group, compared to no significant change in the mailed group. The telephone intervention was associated with a 32% increase in screening adherence compared to the mailed intervention (Hazard Ratio=1.32; p=0.01). Conclusions A tailored, telephone intervention can effectively increase colonoscopy adherence in high risk persons. This intervention has the potential for broad dissemination to health-care organizations or other high risk populations. Impact Increasing adherence to colonoscopy among persons with increased CRC risk could effectively reduce incidence and mortality from this disease. PMID:24501379

  17. The genetics of cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Pomerantz, Mark M; Freedman, Matthew L

    2011-01-01

    One hundred years ago, decades before the discovery of the structure of DNA, debate raged regarding how human traits were passed from one generation to the next. Phenotypes, including risk of disease, had long been recognized as having a familial component. Yet it was difficult to reconcile genetic segregation as described by Mendel with observations exhaustively documented by Karl Pearson and others regarding the normal distribution of human characteristics. In 1918, R. A. Fisher published his landmark article, "The Correlation Between Relatives on the Supposition of Mendelian Inheritance," bridging this divide and demonstrating that multiple alleles, all individually obeying Mendel's laws, account for the phenotypic variation observed in nature.Since that time, geneticists have sought to identify the link between genotype and phenotype. Trait-associated alleles vary in their frequency and degree of penetrance. Some minor alleles may approach a frequency of 50% in the human population, whereas others are present within only a few individuals. The spectrum for penetrance is similarly wide. These characteristics jointly determine the segregation pattern of a given trait, which, in turn, determine the method used to map the trait. Until recently, identification of rare, highly penetrant alleles was most practical. Revolutionary studies in genomics reported over the past decade have made interrogation of most of the spectrum of genetic variation feasible.The following article reviews recent discoveries in the genetic basis of inherited cancer risk and how these discoveries inform cancer biology and patient management. Although this article focuses on prostate cancer, the principles are generic for any cancer and, indeed, for any trait. PMID:22157285

  18. Genetic variants associated with longer telomere length are associated with increased lung cancer risk among never-smoking women in Asia: a report from the female lung cancer consortium in Asia.

    PubMed

    Machiela, Mitchell J; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Seow, Wei Jie; Wang, Zhaoming; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hong, Yun-Chul; Seow, Adeline; Wu, Chen; Hosgood, H Dean; Chen, Kexin; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wen, Wanqing; Cawthon, Richard; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Hu, Wei; Caporaso, Neil E; Park, Jae Yong; Chen, Chien-Jen; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Landi, Maria Teresa; Shen, Hongbing; Lawrence, Charles; Burdett, Laurie; Yeager, Meredith; Chang, I-Shou; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Kim, Hee Nam; Chang, Gee-Chen; Bassig, Bryan A; Tucker, Margaret; Wei, Fusheng; Yin, Zhihua; An, She-Juan; Qian, Biyun; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Lu, Daru; Liu, Jianjun; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Sung, Jae Sook; Kim, Jin Hee; Gao, Yu-Tang; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Jung, Yoo Jin; Guo, Huan; Hu, Zhibin; Hutchinson, Amy; Wang, Wen-Chang; Klein, Robert J; Chung, Charles C; Oh, In-Jae; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Berndt, Sonja I; Wu, Wei; Chang, Jiang; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Zheng, Hong; Wang, Junwen; Zhao, Xueying; Li, Yuqing; Choi, Jin Eun; Su, Wu-Chou; Park, Kyong Hwa; Sung, Sook Whan; Chen, Yuh-Min; Liu, Li; Kang, Chang Hyun; Hu, Lingmin; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Pao, William; Kim, Young-Chul; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Xu, Jun; Guan, Peng; Tan, Wen; Su, Jian; Wang, Chih-Liang; Li, Haixin; Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon; Zhao, Zhenhong; Chen, Ying; Choi, Yi Young; Hung, Jen-Yu; Kim, Jun Suk; Yoon, Ho-Il; Cai, Qiuyin; Lin, Chien-Chung; Park, In Kyu; Xu, Ping; Dong, Jing; Kim, Christopher; He, Qincheng; Perng, Reury-Perng; Kohno, Takashi; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Chen, Chih-Yi; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Wu, Junjie; Lim, Wei-Yen; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Chow, Wong-Ho; Ji, Bu-Tian; Chan, John K C; Chu, Minjie; Li, Yao-Jen; Yokota, Jun; Li, Jihua; Chen, Hongyan; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yu, Chong-Jen; Kunitoh, Hideo; Wu, Guoping; Jin, Li; Lo, Yen-Li; Shiraishi, Kouya; Chen, Ying-Hsiang; Lin, Hsien-Chih; Wu, Tangchun; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Yi-Long; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Zhou, Baosen; Shin, Min-Ho; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Dongxin; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2015-07-15

    Recent evidence from several relatively small nested case-control studies in prospective cohorts shows an association between longer telomere length measured phenotypically in peripheral white blood cell (WBC) DNA and increased lung cancer risk. We sought to further explore this relationship by examining a panel of seven telomere-length associated genetic variants in a large study of 5,457 never-smoking female Asian lung cancer cases and 4,493 never-smoking female Asian controls using data from a previously reported genome-wide association study. Using a group of 1,536 individuals with phenotypically measured telomere length in WBCs in the prospective Shanghai Women's Health study, we demonstrated the utility of a genetic risk score (GRS) of seven telomere-length associated variants to predict telomere length in an Asian population. We then found that GRSs used as instrumental variables to predict longer telomere length were associated with increased lung cancer risk (OR = 1.51 (95% CI = 1.34-1.69) for upper vs. lower quartile of the weighted GRS, p value = 4.54 × 10(-14) ) even after removing rs2736100 (p value = 4.81 × 10(-3) ), a SNP in the TERT locus robustly associated with lung cancer risk in prior association studies. Stratified analyses suggested the effect of the telomere-associated GRS is strongest among younger individuals. We found no difference in GRS effect between adenocarcinoma and squamous cell subtypes. Our results indicate that a genetic background that favors longer telomere length may increase lung cancer risk, which is consistent with earlier prospective studies relating longer telomere length with increased lung cancer risk. PMID:25516442

  19. Genetic variants associated with longer telomere length are associated with increased lung cancer risk among never-smoking women in Asia: A report from the Female Lung Cancer Consortium in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Machiela, Mitchell J; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Seow, Wei Jie; Wang, Zhaoming; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hong, Yun-Chul; Seow, Adeline; Wu, Chen; Hosgood, H Dean; Chen, Kexin; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wen, Wanqing; Cawthon, Richard; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Hu, Wei; Caporaso, Neil E; Park, Jae Yong; Chen, Chien-Jen; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Landi, Maria Teresa; Shen, Hongbing; Lawrence, Charles; Burdett, Laurie; Yeager, Meredith; Chang, I-Shou; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Kim, Hee Nam; Chang, Gee-Chen; Bassig, Bryan A; Tucker, Margaret; Wei, Fusheng; Yin, Zhihua; An, She-Juan; Qian, Biyun; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Lu, Daru; Liu, Jianjun; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Sung, Jae Sook; Kim, Jin Hee; Gao, Yu-Tang; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Jung, Yoo Jin; Guo, Huan; Hu, Zhibin; Hutchinson, Amy; Wang, Wen-Chang; Klein, Robert J; Chung, Charles C; Oh, In-Jae; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Berndt, Sonja I; Wu, Wei; Chang, Jiang; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Zheng, Hong; Wang, Junwen; Zhao, Xueying; Li, Yuqing; Choi, Jin Eun; Su, Wu-Chou; Park, Kyong Hwa; Sung, Sook Whan; Chen, Yuh-Min; Liu, Li; Kang, Chang Hyun; Hu, Lingmin; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Pao, William; Kim, Young-Chul; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Xu, Jun; Guan, Peng; Tan, Wen; Su, Jian; Wang, Chih-Liang; Li, Haixin; Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon; Zhao, Zhenhong; Chen, Ying; Choi, Yi Young; Hung, Jen-Yu; Kim, Jun Suk; Yoon, Ho-Il; Cai, Qiuyin; Lin, Chien-Chung; Park, In Kyu; Xu, Ping; Dong, Jing; Kim, Christopher; He, Qincheng; Perng, Reury-Perng; Kohno, Takashi; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Chen, Chih-Yi; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Wu, Junjie; Lim, Wei-Yen; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Chow, Wong-Ho; Ji, Bu-Tian; Chan, John K C; Chu, Minjie; Li, Yao-Jen; Yokota, Jun; Li, Jihua; Chen, Hongyan; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yu, Chong-Jen; Kunitoh, Hideo; Wu, Guoping; Jin, Li; Lo, Yen-Li; Shiraishi, Kouya; Chen, Ying-Hsiang; Lin, Hsien-Chih; Wu, Tangchun; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Yi-Long; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Zhou, Baosen; Shin, Min-Ho; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Dongxin; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence from several relatively small nested case-control studies in prospective cohorts shows an association between longer telomere length measured phenotypically in peripheral white blood cell (WBC) DNA and increased lung cancer risk. We sought to further explore this relationship by examining a panel of 7 telomere-length associated genetic variants in a large study of 5,457 never-smoking female Asian lung cancer cases and 4,493 never-smoking female Asian controls using data from a previously reported genome-wide association study. Using a group of 1,536 individuals with phenotypically measured telomere length in WBCs in the prospective Shanghai Women’s Health study, we demonstrated the utility of a genetic risk score (GRS) of 7 telomere-length associated variants to predict telomere length in an Asian population. We then found that GRSs used as instrumental variables to predict longer telomere length were associated with increased lung cancer risk (OR = 1.51 (95% CI=1.34–1.69) for upper vs. lower quartile of the weighted GRS, P-value=4.54×10−14) even after removing rs2736100 (P-value=4.81×10−3), a SNP in the TERT locus robustly associated with lung cancer risk in prior association studies. Stratified analyses suggested the effect of the telomere-associated GRS is strongest among younger individuals. We found no difference in GRS effect between adenocarcinoma and squamous cell subtypes. Our results indicate that a genetic background that favors longer telomere length may increase lung cancer risk, which is consistent with earlier prospective studies relating longer telomere length with increased lung cancer risk. PMID:25516442

  20. Explanatory Models of Genetics and Genetic Risk among a Selected Group of Students.

    PubMed

    Goltz, Heather Honoré; Bergman, Margo; Goodson, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    This exploratory qualitative study focuses on how college students conceptualize genetics and genetic risk, concepts essential for genetic literacy (GL) and genetic numeracy (GN), components of overall health literacy (HL). HL is dependent on both the background knowledge and culture of a patient, and lower HL is linked to increased morbidity and mortality for a number of chronic health conditions (e.g., diabetes and cancer). A purposive sample of 86 students from three Southwestern universities participated in eight focus groups. The sample ranged in age from 18 to 54 years, and comprised primarily of female (67.4%), single (74.4%), and non-White (57%) participants, none of whom were genetics/biology majors. A holistic-content approach revealed broad categories concerning participants' explanatory models (EMs) of genetics and genetic risk. Participants' EMs were grounded in highly contextualized narratives that only partially overlapped with biomedical models. While higher education levels should be associated with predominately knowledge-based EM of genetic risk, this study shows that even in well-educated populations cultural factors can dominate. Study findings reveal gaps in how this sample of young adults obtains, processes, and understands genetic/genomic concepts. Future studies should assess how individuals with low GL and GN obtain and process genetics and genetic risk information and incorporate this information into health decision making. Future work should also address the interaction of communication between health educators, providers, and genetic counselors, to increase patient understanding of genetic risk. PMID:27376052

  1. Explanatory Models of Genetics and Genetic Risk among a Selected Group of Students

    PubMed Central

    Goltz, Heather Honoré; Bergman, Margo; Goodson, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    This exploratory qualitative study focuses on how college students conceptualize genetics and genetic risk, concepts essential for genetic literacy (GL) and genetic numeracy (GN), components of overall health literacy (HL). HL is dependent on both the background knowledge and culture of a patient, and lower HL is linked to increased morbidity and mortality for a number of chronic health conditions (e.g., diabetes and cancer). A purposive sample of 86 students from three Southwestern universities participated in eight focus groups. The sample ranged in age from 18 to 54 years, and comprised primarily of female (67.4%), single (74.4%), and non-White (57%) participants, none of whom were genetics/biology majors. A holistic-content approach revealed broad categories concerning participants’ explanatory models (EMs) of genetics and genetic risk. Participants’ EMs were grounded in highly contextualized narratives that only partially overlapped with biomedical models. While higher education levels should be associated with predominately knowledge-based EM of genetic risk, this study shows that even in well-educated populations cultural factors can dominate. Study findings reveal gaps in how this sample of young adults obtains, processes, and understands genetic/genomic concepts. Future studies should assess how individuals with low GL and GN obtain and process genetics and genetic risk information and incorporate this information into health decision making. Future work should also address the interaction of communication between health educators, providers, and genetic counselors, to increase patient understanding of genetic risk. PMID:27376052

  2. Genetic testing and your cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000842.htm Genetic testing and your cancer risk To use the ... before you get tested. Which Cancers May Be Genetic Today, we know specific gene mutations that can ...

  3. Body Mass Index Genetic Risk Score and Endometrial Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Jennifer; Setiawan, Veronica W.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Schumacher, Fredrick; Yu, Herbert; Delahanty, Ryan; Bernstein, Leslie; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chen, Chu; Cook, Linda S.; Friedenreich, Christine; Garcia-Closas, Monserrat; Haiman, Christopher A.; Le Marchand, Loic; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Olson, Sara H.; Risch, Harvey A.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Ursin, Giske; Yang, Hannah P.; Kraft, Peter; De Vivo, Immaculata

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified common variants that predispose individuals to a higher body mass index (BMI), an independent risk factor for endometrial cancer. Composite genotype risk scores (GRS) based on the joint effect of published BMI risk loci were used to explore whether endometrial cancer shares a genetic background with obesity. Genotype and risk factor data were available on 3,376 endometrial cancer case and 3,867 control participants of European ancestry from the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium GWAS. A BMI GRS was calculated by summing the number of BMI risk alleles at 97 independent loci. For exploratory analyses, additional GRSs were based on subsets of risk loci within putative etiologic BMI pathways. The BMI GRS was statistically significantly associated with endometrial cancer risk (P = 0.002). For every 10 BMI risk alleles a woman had a 13% increased endometrial cancer risk (95% CI: 4%, 22%). However, after adjusting for BMI, the BMI GRS was no longer associated with risk (per 10 BMI risk alleles OR = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.91, 1.07; P = 0.78). Heterogeneity by BMI did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.06), and no effect modification was noted by age, GWAS Stage, study design or between studies (P≥0.58). In exploratory analyses, the GRS defined by variants at loci containing monogenic obesity syndrome genes was associated with reduced endometrial cancer risk independent of BMI (per BMI risk allele OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.88, 0.96; P = 2.1 x 10−5). Possessing a large number of BMI risk alleles does not increase endometrial cancer risk above that conferred by excess body weight among women of European descent. Thus, the GRS based on all current established BMI loci does not provide added value independent of BMI. Future studies are required to validate the unexpected observed relation between monogenic obesity syndrome genetic variants and endometrial cancer risk. PMID:26606540

  4. What Are the Risks and Limitations of Genetic Testing?

    MedlinePlus

    ... testing? What are the risks and limitations of genetic testing? The physical risks associated with most genetic ... more information about the risks and limitations of genetic testing: The American College of Medical Genetics and ...

  5. Reflections on the Field of Human Genetics: A Call for Increased Disease Genetics Theory

    PubMed Central

    Schrodi, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Development of human genetics theoretical models and the integration of those models with experiment and statistical evaluation are critical for scientific progress. This perspective argues that increased effort in disease genetics theory, complementing experimental, and statistical efforts, will escalate the unraveling of molecular etiologies of complex diseases. In particular, the development of new, realistic disease genetics models will help elucidate complex disease pathogenesis, and the predicted patterns in genetic data made by these models will enable the concurrent, more comprehensive statistical testing of multiple aspects of disease genetics predictions, thereby better identifying disease loci. By theoretical human genetics, I intend to encompass all investigations devoted to modeling the heritable architecture underlying disease traits and studies of the resulting principles and dynamics of such models. Hence, the scope of theoretical disease genetics work includes construction and analysis of models describing how disease-predisposing alleles (1) arise, (2) are transmitted across families and populations, and (3) interact with other risk and protective alleles across both the genome and environmental factors to produce disease states. Theoretical work improves insight into viable genetic models of diseases consistent with empirical results from linkage, transmission, and association studies as well as population genetics. Furthermore, understanding the patterns of genetic data expected under realistic disease models will enable more powerful approaches to discover disease-predisposing alleles and additional heritable factors important in common diseases. In spite of the pivotal role of disease genetics theory, such investigation is not particularly vibrant. PMID:27375680

  6. Reflections on the Field of Human Genetics: A Call for Increased Disease Genetics Theory.

    PubMed

    Schrodi, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Development of human genetics theoretical models and the integration of those models with experiment and statistical evaluation are critical for scientific progress. This perspective argues that increased effort in disease genetics theory, complementing experimental, and statistical efforts, will escalate the unraveling of molecular etiologies of complex diseases. In particular, the development of new, realistic disease genetics models will help elucidate complex disease pathogenesis, and the predicted patterns in genetic data made by these models will enable the concurrent, more comprehensive statistical testing of multiple aspects of disease genetics predictions, thereby better identifying disease loci. By theoretical human genetics, I intend to encompass all investigations devoted to modeling the heritable architecture underlying disease traits and studies of the resulting principles and dynamics of such models. Hence, the scope of theoretical disease genetics work includes construction and analysis of models describing how disease-predisposing alleles (1) arise, (2) are transmitted across families and populations, and (3) interact with other risk and protective alleles across both the genome and environmental factors to produce disease states. Theoretical work improves insight into viable genetic models of diseases consistent with empirical results from linkage, transmission, and association studies as well as population genetics. Furthermore, understanding the patterns of genetic data expected under realistic disease models will enable more powerful approaches to discover disease-predisposing alleles and additional heritable factors important in common diseases. In spite of the pivotal role of disease genetics theory, such investigation is not particularly vibrant. PMID:27375680

  7. Genetic polymorphisms and esophageal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Hiyama, Toru; Yoshihara, Masaharu; Tanaka, Shinji; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2007-10-15

    The aim of this paper is to review and evaluate, in a comprehensive manner, the published data regarding the contribution of genetic polymorphisms to risk of esophageal cancer, including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma, in humans. All relevant studies available in MEDLINE and published before February 2007 were identified. Studies carried out in humans and that compared esophageal cancer patients with at least 1 standard control group were considered for analysis. One-hundred studies and 3 meta-analyses were identified. Eighty (80%) studies were conducted in Asian countries, particularly China including Taiwan (60 (60%) studies). The most intensively examined genes were those encoding carcinogen metabolic enzymes. The most widely studied gene was GSTM1 (15 studies), followed by ALDH2 (11 studies). ALDH2, MTHFR C677T, CYP1A1 Ile/Val, CYP1A1MspI, CYP2E1, GSTP1, GSTM1 and GSTT1 were examined by meta-analyses and significant relations were found between ALDH2*1*2 and the CYP1A1 Val allele and increased risk of esophageal cancer. In addition, increased risk of esophageal SCC was consistently associated with the ADH2*1*2 and the p53 codon 72 Pro/Pro genotypes. Cohort studies that simultaneously consider multiple genetic and environmental factors possibly involved in esophageal carcinogenesis are needed to ascertain not only the relative contribution of these factors to tumor development but also the contributions of their putative interactions. PMID:17674367

  8. Genetic predisposition, non-genetic risk factors and coronary infarct

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Using a genetic predisposition score (GPS), additively integrating the associations of 11 polymorphisms with coronary heart disease (CHD), we examined the consequences of joint presence of high GPS and non-genetic CHD risk factors. Methods: Within the European Prospective Investigation i...

  9. Genetic risk factors in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, L; Morgan, K; Kalsheker, N

    1998-01-01

    Following a brief introduction and discussion of the pathological features of Alzheimer's disease, the main emphasis of this review article will be the genetic factors that have been implicated in this disease. These can be divided into two main categories. First, the three genes in which mutations are known to result in early onset autosomal dominant familial Alzheimer's disease will be discussed. These are well characterised but account for only a small proportion of Alzheimer's disease cases. Late onset, sporadic Alzheimer's disease is more common and evidence suggests that there is a genetic component to this type of disease. A number of genetic risk factors have been implicated that might increase the risk of developing sporadic disease. Many of these are controversial and studies have shown conflicting results, which are discussed in this section. Finally, a brief discussion of some of the mechanisms suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is included. It is hoped that this will show why particular genes have been implicated in Alzheimer's disease and how they might be able to influence the development of the disease. PMID:10193509

  10. Genetic risk, risk perception, and decision making

    SciTech Connect

    Evers-Kiebooms, G.; Cassiman, J.J.; VanDenBerghe, H.; D'Ydewalle, G. )

    1987-01-01

    This book covers the proceedings of a conference held by March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation. Topics presented include: Diagnosis of Genetic disease by linkage analysis and DNA diagnosis of autosomal dominant and recessive diseases.

  11. Integrating Genetics and Social Science: Genetic Risk Scores

    PubMed Central

    Belsky, Daniel W.; Israel, Salomon

    2014-01-01

    The sequencing of the human genome and the advent of low-cost genome-wide assays that generate millions of observations of individual genomes in a matter of hours constitute a disruptive innovation for social science. Many public-use social science datasets have or will soon add genome-wide genetic data. With these new data come technical challenges, but also new possibilities. Among these, the lowest hanging fruit and the most potentially disruptive to existing research programs is the ability to measure previously invisible contours of health and disease risk within populations. In this article, we outline why now is the time for social scientists to bring genetics into their research programs. We discuss how to select genetic variants to study. We explain how the polygenic architecture of complex traits and the low penetrance of individual genetic loci pose challenges to research integrating genetics and social science. We introduce genetic risk scores as a method of addressing these challenges and provide guidance on how genetic risk scores can be constructed. We conclude by outlining research questions that are ripe for social science inquiry. PMID:25343363

  12. Non-disclosure of genetic risks

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In ABC v. St Georges Healthcare NHS Trust, the High Court of England and Wales rejected the argument that doctors have a legal duty to disclose actionable genetic risks to a patient’s relatives. This article reconsiders the concept of a duty to disclose actionable genetic risks in the context of widening perceptions of legal harm and developing professional and public perceptions of corresponding wrongs.

  13. Environmental chemical mutagens and genetic risks: Lessons from radiation genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaranarayanan, K.

    1996-12-31

    The last three decades have witnessed substantial progress in the development and use of a variety of in vitro and in vivo assay systems for the testing of environmental chemicals which may pose a mutagenic hazard to humans. This is also true of basic studies in chemical mutagenesis on mechanisms, DNA repair, molecular dosimetry, structure-activity relationships, etc. However, the field of quantitative evaluation of genetic risks of environmental chemicals to humans is still in it infancy. This commentary addresses the question of how our experience in estimating genetic risks of exposure to ionizing radiation can be helpful in similar endeavors with environmental chemical mutagens. 24 refs., 3 tabs.

  14. Genetic predisposition to schizophrenia associated with increased use of cannabis

    PubMed Central

    Power, Robert A.; Verweij, Karin J.H.; Zuhair, Mohamed; Montgomery, Grant W.; Henders, Anjali K.; Heath, Andrew C.; Madden, Pamela A.F.; Medland, Sarah E.; Wray, Naomi R.; Martin, Nicholas G.

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis is the most commonly used illicit drug worldwide. With debate surrounding the legalization and control of use, investigating its health risks has become a pressing area of research. One established association is that between cannabis use and schizophrenia, a debilitating psychiatric disorder affecting approximately 1% of the population over their lifetime. Although considerable evidence implicates cannabis use as a component cause of schizophrenia, it remains unclear whether this is entirely due to cannabis directly raising risk of psychosis, or whether the same genes that increases psychosis risk may also increase risk of cannabis use. In a sample of 2,082 healthy individuals, we show an association between an individual’s burden of schizophrenia risk alleles and use of cannabis. This was significant both for comparing those who have ever vs. never used cannabis (p=2.6×10−4), and for quantity of use within users (p=3.0×10−3). While directly predicting only a small amount of the variance in cannabis use, these findings suggest that part of the association between schizophrenia and cannabis is due to a shared genetic aetiology. This form of gene-environment correlation is an important consideration when calculating the impact of environmental risk factors, including cannabis use. PMID:24957864

  15. Healthy Living May Offset Genetic Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159053.html Healthy Living May Offset Genetic Breast Cancer Risk Lifestyle may matter even more ... be especially powerful for women at relatively high genetic risk of breast cancer, researchers found. "Those genetic ...

  16. Genetic tests to identify risk for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Julie; Venne, Vickie; Berse, Brygida

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To describe the currently available genetic tests that identify hereditary risk for breast cancer. Data sources Systematic review of scientific literature, clinical practice guidelines, and data published by test manufacturers. Conclusion Changes in gene patent laws and advances in sequencing technologies have resulted in rapid expansion of genetic testing. While BRCA1/2 are the most recognized genes linked to breast cancer, several laboratories now offer multi-gene panels to detect many risk-related mutations. Implication for Nursing Practice Genetic testing will be increasingly important in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer. Oncology and advanced practice nurses need to understand risk factors, significance of various genetic tests, and patient counseling. PMID:25951739

  17. Genetic Variation in the REL Gene Increases Risk of Behcet’s Disease in a Chinese Han Population but That of PRKCQ Does Not

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feilan; Xu, Lei; Zhao, Tingting; Xiao, Xiang; Pan, Yongquan; Hou, Shengping

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and candidate gene studies have identified the REL and PRKCQ genes as risk loci for various autoimmune diseases. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the association of the REL and PRKCQ genes with Behcet’s disease (BD) in a Chinese Han population. A case-control study was conducted on three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs13031237, rs702873, and rs842647 of the REL gene and three SNPs (rs4750316, rs11258747, and rs947474) of the PRKCQ gene using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) in a total of 623 BD patients and 1,074 healthy controls. Multiple variables were assessed, including age, sex distribution, and extra-ocular findings. In the present study, the frequencies of rs842647 GG genotypes and rs842647 G alleles were significantly higher in patients than in controls and those of the rs842647 AG genotypes were lower in patients than in controls [GG genotype: Bonferroni corrected P-value for gender adjustment (Pca) = 0.0074, odds ratio (OR) = 1.63; G allele: Pca = 0.0072, OR = 1.57; AG genotype: Pca = 0.024, OR = 0.63, respectively]. No statistically significant differences in the frequencies of rs702873, rs13031237, rs4750316, rs11258747, and rs947474 between BD patients and controls were observed. Stratification analysis indicated that the REL rs842647 polymorphism was associated with BD patients with skin lesions. No significant association of the other five SNPs between BD patients with other extra-ocular findings, including genital ulcer, arthritis, and positive pathergy test results was found. The REL rs842647 polymorphism may be a susceptibility factor for BD pathogenesis and skin lesions, which indicate that c-Rel may be involved in the pathogenesis and skin lesions of BD through the NF-κB pathway. PMID:26784953

  18. Genetic Insights into Cardiometabolic Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, John B

    2014-01-01

    Many biochemical traits are recognised as risk factors, which contribute to or predict the development of disease. Only a few are in widespread use, usually to assist with treatment decisions and motivate behavioural change. The greatest effort has gone into evaluation of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes, with substantial overlap as ‘cardiometabolic’ risk. Over the past few years many genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have sought to account for variation in risk factors, with the expectation that identifying relevant polymorphisms would improve our understanding or prediction of disease; others have taken the direct approach of genomic case-control studies for the corresponding diseases. Large GWAS have been published for coronary heart disease and Type 2 diabetes, and also for associated biomarkers or risk factors including body mass index, lipids, C-reactive protein, urate, liver function tests, glucose and insulin. Results are not encouraging for personal risk prediction based on genotyping, mainly because known risk loci only account for a small proportion of risk. Overlap of allelic associations between disease and marker, as found for low density lipoprotein cholesterol and heart disease, supports a causal association, but in other cases genetic studies have cast doubt on accepted risk factors. Some loci show unexpected effects on multiple markers or diseases. An intriguing feature of risk factors is the blurring of categories shown by the correlation between them and the genetic overlap between diseases previously thought of as distinct. GWAS can provide insight into relationships between risk factors, biomarkers and diseases, with potential for new approaches to disease classification. PMID:24659834

  19. Telomere shortening as genetic risk factor of liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Carulli, Lucia

    2015-01-14

    Cirrhosis is the main complication of chronic liver disease, leads to progressive liver function impairment and is the main risk factor for the development of liver cancer. Liver failure at endstage cirrhosis is associated with increased mortality with liver transplantation as the only possible treatment at this stage. The pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis is not completely elucidated. Although the common factors leading to liver injury, such as viral hepatitis, alcohol consume or fatty liver disease can be identified in the majority of patients a small percentage of patients have no apparent risk factors. Moreover given the same risk factors, some patients progress to cirrhosis whereas others have a benign course, the reason remains unclear. In order to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic tools, it is s essential to understand the pathogenesis of cirrhosis. The identification of genetic risk factors associated with cirrhosis is one of the possible approach to achieve these goal. In the past years several studies have supported the role of telomere shortening and cirrhosis. In the recent year several studies on the relation between several single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) and cirrhosis have been published; it has been proposed also a cirrhosis risk score based on seven SNPs. Also epidemiological studies on identical twins and in different ethnic groups have been supporting the importance of the role of genetic risk factors. Finally in the very recent years it has been suggested that telomere shortening may represent a genetic risk factor for the development of cirrhosis. PMID:25593453

  20. Genetic Variants Related to Height and Risk of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Michael A.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Siscovick, David S.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Mukamal, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Increased height is a known independent risk factor for atrial fibrillation (AF). However, whether genetic determinants of height influence risk is uncertain. In this candidate gene study, we examined the association of 209 height-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with incident AF in 3,309 persons of European descent from the Cardiovascular Health Study, a prospective cohort study of older adults (aged ≥65 years) enrolled in 1989–1990. After a median follow-up period of 13.2 years, 879 participants developed incident AF. The height-associated SNPs together explained approximately 10% of the variation in height (P = 6.0 × 10−8). Using an unweighted genetic height score, we found a nonsignificant association with risk of AF (per allele, hazard ratio = 1.01, 95% confidence interval: 1.00, 1.02; P = 0.06). In weighted analyses, we found that genetically predicted height was strongly associated with AF risk (per 10 cm, hazard ratio = 1.30, 95% confidence interval: 1.03, 1.64; P = 0.03). Importantly, for all models, the inclusion of actual height completely attenuated the genetic height effect. Finally, we identified 1 nonsynonymous SNP (rs1046934) that was independently associated with AF and may warrant future study. In conclusion, we found that genetic determinants of height appear to increase the risk of AF, primarily via height itself. This approach of examining SNPs associated with an intermediate phenotype should be considered as a method for identifying novel genetic targets. PMID:24944287

  1. The increased risk of predation enhances cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Krams, Indrikis; Bērziņš, Arnis; Krama, Tatjana; Wheatcroft, David; Igaune, Kristīne; Rantala, Markus J.

    2010-01-01

    Theory predicts that animals in adverse conditions can decrease individual risks and increase long-term benefits by cooperating with neighbours. However, some empirical studies suggest that animals often focus on short-term benefits, which can reduce the likelihood that they will cooperate with others. In this experimental study, we tested between these two alternatives by evaluating whether increased predation risk (as a correlate of environmental adversity) enhances or diminishes the occurrence of cooperation in mobbing, a common anti-predator behaviour, among breeding pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca. We tested whether birds would join their mobbing neighbours more often and harass a stuffed predator placed near their neighbours' nests more intensely in areas with a higher perceived risk of predation. Our results show that birds attended mobs initiated by their neighbours more often, approached the stuffed predator significantly more closely, and mobbed it at a higher intensity in areas where the perceived risk of predation was experimentally increased. In such high-risk areas, birds also were more often involved in between-pair cooperation. This study demonstrates the positive impact of predation risk on cooperation in breeding songbirds, which might help in explaining the emergence and evolution of cooperation. PMID:19846454

  2. [Environmental and genetic risk factors for endometrial carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Sénéchal, Claire; Cottereau, Edouard; de Pauw, Antoine; Elan, Camille; Dagousset, Isabelle; Fourchotte, Virginie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Lae, Marick; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    In France, endometrial cancer is at the first rank of gynecological cancers for cancer incidence, before ovarian and cervical cancers. In fact, the number of incident cases has been estimated to 7275 for the year 2012; the number of death due to endometrial cancer to 2025. This cancer is hormone-dependent and endogenous (reproductive factors) or exogenous (oral combined contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy) causes of exposition to estrogens are the major environmental risk factors for both types of endometrial cancers: type I or well-differentiated endometrioid adenocarcinomas; and type II including all other histological types: papillary serous adenocarcinomas, clear cell adenocarcinomas and carcinosarcomas, also known as malignant mixed Mullerian tumor, MMMT. Obesity, diabetes mellitus and adjuvant treatment of breast cancer with tamoxifen are also associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer. Genetic factors may also be implicated in the pathogenesis of endometrial cancer either as "minor genetic factors" (susceptibility factors), which remain largely unknown and are responsible for the increased observed risk in relatives of women affected with endometrial cancer; or as major genetic factors responsible for hereditary forms and namely for Lynch syndrome whose genetic transmission is of autosomic dominant type. The appropriate recognition of Lynch syndrome is of critical importance because affected patients and their relatives should benefit from specific care. The aims of this review is to describe major environmental and genetic risk factors for endometrial cancer with specific attention to most recent advances in this field and to describe recommendations for care of at-risk women. PMID:25725922

  3. An animal model of differential genetic risk for methamphetamine intake

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Tamara J.; Shabani, Shkelzen

    2015-01-01

    The question of whether genetic factors contribute to risk for methamphetamine (MA) use and dependence has not been intensively investigated. Compared to human populations, genetic animal models offer the advantages of control over genetic family history and drug exposure. Using selective breeding, we created lines of mice that differ in genetic risk for voluntary MA intake and identified the chromosomal addresses of contributory genes. A quantitative trait locus was identified on chromosome 10 that accounts for more than 50% of the genetic variance in MA intake in the selected mouse lines. In addition, behavioral and physiological screening identified differences corresponding with risk for MA intake that have generated hypotheses that are testable in humans. Heightened sensitivity to aversive and certain physiological effects of MA, such as MA-induced reduction in body temperature, are hallmarks of mice bred for low MA intake. Furthermore, unlike MA-avoiding mice, MA-preferring mice are sensitive to rewarding and reinforcing MA effects, and to MA-induced increases in brain extracellular dopamine levels. Gene expression analyses implicate the importance of a network enriched in transcription factor genes, some of which regulate the mu opioid receptor gene, Oprm1, in risk for MA use. Neuroimmune factors appear to play a role in differential response to MA between the mice bred for high and low intake. In addition, chromosome 10 candidate gene studies provide strong support for a trace amine-associated receptor 1 gene, Taar1, polymorphism in risk for MA intake. MA is a trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) agonist, and a non-functional Taar1 allele segregates with high MA consumption. Thus, reduced TAAR1 function has the potential to increase risk for MA use. Overall, existing findings support the MA drinking lines as a powerful model for identifying genetic factors involved in determining risk for harmful MA use. Future directions include the development of a

  4. Genetic Diversity Increases Insect Herbivory on Oak Saplings

    PubMed Central

    Castagneyrol, Bastien; Lagache, Lélia; Giffard, Brice; Kremer, Antoine; Jactel, Hervé

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of evidence from community genetics studies suggests that ecosystem functions supported by plant species richness can also be provided by genetic diversity within plant species. This is not yet true for the diversity-resistance relationship as it is still unclear whether damage by insect herbivores responds to genetic diversity in host plant populations. We developed a manipulative field experiment based on a synthetic community approach, with 15 mixtures of one to four oak (Quercus robur) half-sib families. We quantified genetic diversity at the plot level by genotyping all oak saplings and assessed overall damage caused by ectophagous and endophagous herbivores along a gradient of increasing genetic diversity. Damage due to ectophagous herbivores increased with the genetic diversity in oak sapling populations as a result of higher levels of damage in mixtures than in monocultures for all families (complementarity effect) rather than because of the presence of more susceptible oak genotypes in mixtures (selection effect). Assemblages of different oak genotypes would benefit polyphagous herbivores via improved host patch location, spill over among neighbouring saplings and diet mixing. By contrast, genetic diversity was a poor predictor of the abundance of endophagous herbivores, which increased with individual sapling apparency. Plant genetic diversity may not provide sufficient functional contrast to prevent tree sapling colonization by specialist herbivores while enhancing the foraging of generalist herbivores. Long term studies are nevertheless required to test whether the effect of genetic diversity on herbivory change with the ontogeny of trees and local adaptation of specialist herbivores. PMID:22937168

  5. Preferences for Genetic and Behavioral Health Information: The Impact of Risk Factors and Disease Attributions

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Suzanne C.; McBride, Colleen M.; Alford, Sharon Hensley; Kaphingst, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Increased availability of genetic risk information may lead the public to give precedence to genetic causation over behavioral/environmental factors, decreasing behavior change motivation. Few population-based data inform these concerns. Purpose We assess the association of family history, behavioral risks, and causal attributions for diseases and the perceived value of pursuing information emphasizing health habits or genes. Method 1959 healthy adults completed a survey that assessed behavioral risk factors, family history, causal attributions of eight diseases, and health information preferences. Results Participants’ causal beliefs favored health behaviors over genetics. Interest in behavioral information was higher than in genetic information. As behavioral risk factors increased, inclination toward genetic explanations increased; interest in how health habits affect disease risk decreased. Conclusions Those at greatest need for behavior change may hold attributions that diminish interest in behavior change information. Enhancing understanding of gene-environment influences could be explored to increase engagement with health information. PMID:20532842

  6. Multi-locus genetic risk score predicts risk for Crohn’s disease in Slovenian population

    PubMed Central

    Zupančič, Katarina; Skok, Kristijan; Repnik, Katja; Weersma, Rinse K; Potočnik, Uroš; Skok, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To develop a risk model for Crohn’s disease (CD) based on homogeneous population. METHODS: In our study were included 160 CD patients and 209 healthy individuals from Slovenia. The association study was performed for 112 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We generated genetic risk scores (GRS) based on the number of risk alleles using weighted additive model. Discriminatory accuracy was measured by area under ROC curve (AUC). For risk evaluation, we divided individuals according to positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR) of a test, with LR > 5 for high risk group and LR < 0.20 for low risk group. RESULTS: The highest accuracy, AUC of 0.78 was achieved with GRS combining 33 SNPs with optimal sensitivity and specificity of 75.0% and 72.7%, respectively. Individuals with the highest risk (GRS > 5.54) showed significantly increased odds of developing CD (OR = 26.65, 95%CI: 11.25-63.15) compared to the individuals with the lowest risk (GRS < 4.57) which is a considerably greater risk captured than in one SNP with the highest effect size (OR = 3.24). When more than 33 SNPs were included in GRS, discriminatory ability was not improved significantly; AUC of all 74 SNPs was 0.76. CONCLUSION: The authors proved the possibility of building accurate genetic risk score based on 33 risk variants on Slovenian CD patients which may serve as a screening tool in the targeted population. PMID:27076762

  7. Adiposity significantly modifies genetic risk for dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Cole, Christopher B; Nikpay, Majid; Lau, Paulina; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Davies, Robert W; Wells, George A; Dent, Robert; McPherson, Ruth

    2014-11-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified multiple loci robustly associated with plasma lipids, which also contribute to extreme lipid phenotypes. However, these common genetic variants explain <12% of variation in lipid traits. Adiposity is also an important determinant of plasma lipoproteins, particularly plasma TGs and HDL cholesterol (HDLc) concentrations. Thus, interactions between genes and clinical phenotypes may contribute to this unexplained heritability. We have applied a weighted genetic risk score (GRS) for both plasma TGs and HDLc in two large cohorts at the extremes of BMI. Both BMI and GRS were strongly associated with these lipid traits. A significant interaction between obese/lean status and GRS was noted for each of TG (P(Interaction) = 2.87 × 10(-4)) and HDLc (P(Interaction) = 1.05 × 10(-3)). These interactions were largely driven by SNPs tagging APOA5, glucokinase receptor (GCKR), and LPL for TG, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), GalNAc-transferase (GALNT2), endothelial lipase (LIPG), and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) for HDLc. In contrast, the GRSLDL cholesterol × adiposity interaction was not significant. Sexual dimorphism was evident for the GRSHDL on HDLc in obese (P(Interaction) = 0.016) but not lean subjects. SNP by BMI interactions may provide biological insight into specific genetic associations and missing heritability. PMID:25225679

  8. Identifying Common Genetic Risk Factors of Diabetic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Witzel, Ini-Isabée; Jelinek, Herbert F.; Khalaf, Kinda; Lee, Sungmun; Khandoker, Ahsan H.; Alsafar, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a global public health problem of epidemic proportions, with 60–70% of affected individuals suffering from associated neurovascular complications that act on multiple organ systems. The most common and clinically significant neuropathies of T2DM include uremic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, and cardiac autonomic neuropathy. These conditions seriously impact an individual’s quality of life and significantly increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. Although advances in gene sequencing technologies have identified several genetic variants that may regulate the development and progression of T2DM, little is known about whether or not the variants are involved in disease progression and how these genetic variants are associated with diabetic neuropathy specifically. Significant missing heritability data and complex disease etiologies remain to be explained. This article is the first to provide a review of the genetic risk variants implicated in the diabetic neuropathies and to highlight potential commonalities. We thereby aim to contribute to the creation of a genetic-metabolic model that will help to elucidate the cause of diabetic neuropathies, evaluate a patient’s risk profile, and ultimately facilitate preventative and targeted treatment for the individual. PMID:26074879

  9. Common Gene Variants Account for Most Genetic Risk for Autism

    MedlinePlus

    ... 20, 2014 Common gene variants account for most genetic risk for autism Roles of heritability, mutations, environment ... ASD) was traced to inherited variations in the genetic code shared by many people. These and other ( ...

  10. Polygenic risk score is associated with increased disease risk in 52 Finnish breast cancer families.

    PubMed

    Muranen, Taru A; Mavaddat, Nasim; Khan, Sofia; Fagerholm, Rainer; Pelttari, Liisa; Lee, Andrew; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Easton, Douglas F; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2016-08-01

    The risk of developing breast cancer is increased in women with family history of breast cancer and particularly in families with multiple cases of breast or ovarian cancer. Nevertheless, many women with a positive family history never develop the disease. Polygenic risk scores (PRSs) based on the risk effects of multiple common genetic variants have been proposed for individual risk assessment on a population level. We investigate the applicability of the PRS for risk prediction within breast cancer families. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and a PRS based on 75 common genetic variants in 52 Finnish breast cancer families including 427 genotyped women and pedigree information on ~4000 additional individuals by comparing the affected to healthy family members, as well as in a case-control dataset comprising 1272 healthy population controls and 1681 breast cancer cases with information on family history. Family structure was summarized using the BOADICEA risk prediction model. The PRS was associated with increased disease risk in women with family history of breast cancer as well as in women within the breast cancer families. The odds ratio (OR) for breast cancer within the family dataset was 1.55 [95 % CI 1.26-1.91] per unit increase in the PRS, similar to OR in unselected breast cancer cases of the case-control dataset (1.49 [1.38-1.62]). High PRS-values were informative for risk prediction in breast cancer families, whereas for the low PRS-categories the results were inconclusive. The PRS is informative in women with family history of breast cancer and should be incorporated within pedigree-based clinical risk assessment. PMID:27438779

  11. Genetic polymorphisms as a risk factor for dyslipidemia in children

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Izabela R.; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Sousa, Marinez O.; Ferreira, Cláudia N.; Gomes, Karina B.

    2013-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is an important etiological factor for development of cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of deaths in adults. Given the growing global epidemic of dyslipidemia, lipoprotein metabolism disorders have become an important health problem not only in adulthood, but have also emerged as an increasingly risk factor in childhood. Although several genome-wide association studies in multiple large population-based cohorts of adults and meta-analyses have identified susceptibility genes or loci, especially in lipid-related traits, it is of great importance to evaluate genetic predisposition at an early age. Recent findings suggest that the identification of polymorphisms in the metabolism of lipids in childhood may help fight subclinical atherosclerosis and its progression to cardiovascular complications in adulthood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to review genetic polymorphisms as risk factors associated with dyslipidemia in children and adolescents.

  12. Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Breast and Ovarian, Version 2.2015.

    PubMed

    Daly, Mary B; Pilarski, Robert; Axilbund, Jennifer E; Berry, Michael; Buys, Saundra S; Crawford, Beth; Farmer, Meagan; Friedman, Susan; Garber, Judy E; Khan, Seema; Klein, Catherine; Kohlmann, Wendy; Kurian, Allison; Litton, Jennifer K; Madlensky, Lisa; Marcom, P Kelly; Merajver, Sofia D; Offit, Kenneth; Pal, Tuya; Rana, Huma; Reiser, Gwen; Robson, Mark E; Shannon, Kristen Mahoney; Swisher, Elizabeth; Voian, Nicoleta C; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whelan, Alison; Wick, Myra J; Wiesner, Georgia L; Dwyer, Mary; Kumar, Rashmi; Darlow, Susan

    2016-02-01

    The NCCN Guidelines for Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Breast and Ovarian provide recommendations for genetic testing and counseling and risk assessment and management for hereditary cancer syndromes. Guidelines focus on syndromes associated with an increased risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer and are intended to assist with clinical and shared decision-making. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize major discussion points of the 2015 NCCN Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Breast and Ovarian panel meeting. Major discussion topics this year included multigene testing, risk management recommendations for less common genetic mutations, and salpingectomy for ovarian cancer risk reduction. The panel also discussed revisions to genetic testing criteria that take into account ovarian cancer histology and personal history of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26850485

  13. Environmental and genetic risk factors for eating disorders: What the clinician needs to know

    PubMed Central

    Mazzeo, Suzanne E.; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Patients and families are often aware of research on genetic factors influencing eating disorders. Accurate interpretations of research on environmental and genetic risk factors can be empowering to patients and families; however, misinterpretations could prove detrimental. The clinician who is not versed in genetic research may feel ill-prepared to discuss the nuances of genetic research with patients and families. In this paper the authors discuss what is known about genetic and environmental risk factors with an emphasis on gene-environment interplay in order to increase clinicians’ comfort level with discussing these complex issues with their patients. PMID:19014858

  14. Healthy Living May Offset Genetic Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159053.html Healthy Living May Offset Genetic Breast Cancer Risk Lifestyle may matter even more when your ... Women who carry common gene variants linked to breast cancer can still cut their risk of the disease ...

  15. Genetic risk factors and age-related macular degeneration (AMD)

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Maryam; Armstrong, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in individuals older than 65 years of age. It is a multifactorial disorder and identification of risk factors enables individuals to make lifestyle choices that may reduce the risk of disease. Collaboration between geneticists, ophthalmologists, and optometrists suggests that genetic risk factors play a more significant role in AMD than previously thought. The most important genes are associated with immune system modulation and the complement system, e.g., complement factor H (CFH), factor B (CFB), factor C3, and serpin peptidase inhibitor (SERPING1). Genes associated with membrane transport, e.g., ATP-binding cassette protein (ABCR) and voltage-dependent calcium channel gamma 3 (CACNG3), the vascular system, e.g., fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), fibulin-5, lysyl oxidase-like gene (LOXL1) and selectin-P (SELP), and with lipid metabolism, e.g., apolipoprotein E (APOE) and hepatic lipase (LIPC) have also been implicated. In addition, several other genes exhibit some statistical association with AMD, e.g., age-related maculopathy susceptibility protein 2 (ARMS2) and DNA excision repair protein gene (ERCC6) but more research is needed to establish their significance. Modifiable risk factors for AMD should be discussed with patients whose lifestyle and/or family history place them in an increased risk category. Furthermore, calculation of AMD risk using current models should be recommended as a tool for patient education. It is likely that AMD management in future will be increasingly influenced by assessment of genetic risk as such screening methods become more widely available.

  16. Genetic risks and familial associations of small bowel carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of small intestines (SBA) is a relatively rare malignancy with poor outcomes due to delayed diagnosis. Fifty percent of patients have metastases on presentation and therefore early detection and treatment offers the best long term outcomes. Certain genetic polyposis syndromes and familial diseases are associated with increased risks for SBA. These include familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), Lynch syndromes (LS), Juvenile polyposis syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Crohn’s disease (CD) and celiac disease. Mutations in APC gene, Mismatch repair genes, STK11 gene, and SMAD4 gene have been implicated for the genetic diseases respectively. While there are no specific inherited genetic mutations for CD, genome-wide association studies have established over 140 loci associated with CD. CpG island mutations with defects in mismatch repair genes have been identified in celiac disease. Significant diagnostic advances have occurred in the past decade and intuitively, it would seem beneficial to use these advanced modalities for surveillance of these patients. At present it is debatable and no clear data exists to support this approach except for established guidelines to diagnose duodenal polyps in FAP, and LS. Here we discuss the genetic alterations, cancer risks, signaling mechanisms and briefly touch the surveillance modalities available for these genetic and clinical syndromes. English language articles from PubMed/Medline and Embase was searched were collected using the phrases “small-bowel adenocarcinoma, genetics, surveillance, familial adenomatous polyposis, lynch syndromes, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenile polyposis syndrome, CD and celiac disease”. Figures, tables and schematic diagram to illustrate pathways are included in the review. PMID:27326320

  17. Genetic risks and familial associations of small bowel carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Santosh

    2016-06-15

    Adenocarcinoma of small intestines (SBA) is a relatively rare malignancy with poor outcomes due to delayed diagnosis. Fifty percent of patients have metastases on presentation and therefore early detection and treatment offers the best long term outcomes. Certain genetic polyposis syndromes and familial diseases are associated with increased risks for SBA. These include familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), Lynch syndromes (LS), Juvenile polyposis syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Crohn's disease (CD) and celiac disease. Mutations in APC gene, Mismatch repair genes, STK11 gene, and SMAD4 gene have been implicated for the genetic diseases respectively. While there are no specific inherited genetic mutations for CD, genome-wide association studies have established over 140 loci associated with CD. CpG island mutations with defects in mismatch repair genes have been identified in celiac disease. Significant diagnostic advances have occurred in the past decade and intuitively, it would seem beneficial to use these advanced modalities for surveillance of these patients. At present it is debatable and no clear data exists to support this approach except for established guidelines to diagnose duodenal polyps in FAP, and LS. Here we discuss the genetic alterations, cancer risks, signaling mechanisms and briefly touch the surveillance modalities available for these genetic and clinical syndromes. English language articles from PubMed/Medline and Embase was searched were collected using the phrases "small-bowel adenocarcinoma, genetics, surveillance, familial adenomatous polyposis, lynch syndromes, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenile polyposis syndrome, CD and celiac disease". Figures, tables and schematic diagram to illustrate pathways are included in the review. PMID:27326320

  18. Novel genetic predictors of venous thromboembolism risk in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Wenndy; Gamazon, Eric R.; Smithberger, Erin; O’Brien, Travis J.; Harralson, Arthur F.; Tuck, Matthew; Barbour, April; Kittles, Rick A.; Cavallari, Larisa H.

    2016-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the third most common life-threatening cardiovascular condition in the United States, with African Americans (AAs) having a 30% to 60% higher incidence compared with other ethnicities. The mechanisms underlying population differences in the risk of VTE are poorly understood. We conducted the first genome-wide association study in AAs, comprising 578 subjects, followed by replication of highly significant findings in an independent cohort of 159 AA subjects. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between genetic variants and VTE risk. Through bioinformatics analysis of the top signals, we identified expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) in whole blood and investigated the messenger RNA expression differences in VTE cases and controls. We identified and replicated single-nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 20 (rs2144940, rs2567617, and rs1998081) that increased risk of VTE by 2.3-fold (P < 6 × 10−7). These risk variants were found in higher frequency among populations of African descent (>20%) compared with other ethnic groups (<10%). We demonstrate that SNPs on chromosome 20 are cis-eQTLs for thrombomodulin (THBD), and the expression of THBD is lower among VTE cases compared with controls (P = 9.87 × 10−6). We have identified novel polymorphisms associated with increased risk of VTE in AAs. These polymorphisms are predominantly found among populations of African descent and are associated with THBD gene expression. Our findings provide new molecular insight into a mechanism regulating VTE susceptibility and identify common genetic variants that increase the risk of VTE in AAs, a population disproportionately affected by this disease. PMID:26888256

  19. Intuition versus cognition: a qualitative exploration of how women understand and manage their increased breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Heiniger, Louise; Butow, Phyllis N; Charles, Margaret; Price, Melanie A

    2015-10-01

    Risk comprehension in individuals at increased familial risk of cancer is suboptimal and little is known about how risk is understood and managed by at-risk individuals who do not undergo genetic testing. We qualitatively studied these issues in 36 unaffected women from high-risk breast cancer families, including both women who had and had not undergone genetic testing. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and data analysis was guided by Grounded Theory. Risk comprehension and risk management were largely influenced by the individual's experience of coming from a high-risk family, with both tested and untested women relying heavily on their intuition. Although women's cognitive understanding of their risk appeared generally accurate, this objective risk information was considered of secondary value. The findings could be used to guide the development and delivery of information about risk and risk management to genetically tested and untested individuals at increased risk of hereditary cancer. PMID:25820809

  20. Genetic 'risk carriers' and lifestyle 'risk takers'. Which risks deserve our legal protection in insurance?

    PubMed

    Van Hoyweghen, Ine; Horstman, Klasien; Schepers, Rita

    2007-09-01

    Over the past years, one of the most contentious topics in policy debates on genetics has been the use of genetic testing in insurance. In the rush to confront concerns about potential abuses of genetic information, most countries throughout Europe and the US have enacted genetics-specific legislation for insurance. Drawing on current debates on the pros and cons of a genetics-specific legislative approach, this article offers empirical insight into how such legislation works out in insurance practice. To this end, ethnographic fieldwork was done in the underwriting departments of Belgian insurance companies. Belgium was one of the first European countries introducing genetics-specific legislation in insurance. Although this approach does not allow us to speak in terms of ' the causal effects of the law', it enables us to point to some developments in insurance practice that are quite different than the law's original intentions. It will not only become clear that the Belgian genetics-specific legislation does not offer adequate solutions to the underlying issues it was intended for. We will also show that, while the legislation's focus has been on the inadmissibility of genetic discrimination, at the same time differences are made in the insurance appraisal within the group of the asymptomatic ill. In other words, by giving exclusive legal protection to the group of genetic risks, other non-genetic risk groups are unintendedly being under-protected. From a policy point of view, studying genetics-specific legislation is especially valuable because it forces us to return to first principles: Which risks deserve our legal protection in insurance? Who do we declare our solidarity with? PMID:17922196

  1. Disparities and genetic risk factors in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Katherine A; Patel, Sanjay R

    2016-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an increasingly prevalent condition. A growing body of literature supports substantial racial disparities in the prevalence, risk factors, presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of this disease. Craniofacial structure among Asians appears to confer an elevated risk of OSA despite lower rates of obesity. Among African Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanics, OSA prevalence is increased, likely due in part to obesity. The burden of symptoms, particularly excessive daytime sleepiness, is higher among African Americans, although Hispanics more often report snoring. Limited data suggest that African Americans may be more susceptible to hypertension in the setting of OSA. While differences in genetic risk factors may explain disparities in OSA burden, no definitive genetic differences have yet been identified. In addition to disparities in OSA development, disparities in OSA diagnosis and treatment have also been identified. Increased severity of disease at diagnosis among African Americans suggests a delay in diagnosis. Treatment outcomes are also suboptimal among African Americans. In children, tonsillectomy is less likely to cure OSA and more commonly associated with complications in this group. Among adults, adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is substantially lower in African Americans. The reasons for these disparities, particularly in outcomes, are not well understood and should be a research priority. PMID:26428843

  2. Puzzling role of genetic risk factors in human longevity: "risk alleles" as pro-longevity variants.

    PubMed

    Ukraintseva, Svetlana; Yashin, Anatoliy; Arbeev, Konstantin; Kulminski, Alexander; Akushevich, Igor; Wu, Deqing; Joshi, Gaurang; Land, Kenneth C; Stallard, Eric

    2016-02-01

    Complex diseases are major contributors to human mortality in old age. Paradoxically, many genetic variants that have been associated with increased risks of such diseases are found in genomes of long-lived people, and do not seem to compromise longevity. Here we argue that trade-off-like and conditional effects of genes can play central role in this phenomenon and in determining longevity. Such effects may occur as result of: (i) antagonistic influence of gene on the development of different health disorders; (ii) change in the effect of gene on vulnerability to death with age (especially, from "bad" to "good"); (iii) gene-gene interaction; and (iv) gene-environment interaction, among other factors. A review of current knowledge provides many examples of genetic factors that may increase the risk of one disease but reduce chances of developing another serious health condition, or improve survival from it. Factors that may increase risk of a major disease but attenuate manifestation of physical senescence are also discussed. Overall, available evidence suggests that the influence of a genetic variant on longevity may be negative, neutral or positive, depending on a delicate balance of the detrimental and beneficial effects of such variant on multiple health and aging related traits. This balance may change with age, internal and external environments, and depend on genetic surrounding. We conclude that trade-off-like and conditional genetic effects are very common and may result in situations when a disease "risk allele" can also be a pro-longevity variant, depending on context. We emphasize importance of considering such effects in both aging research and disease prevention. PMID:26306600

  3. Benefits and risks associated with genetically modified food products.

    PubMed

    Kramkowska, Marta; Grzelak, Teresa; Czyżewska, Krystyna

    2013-01-01

    Scientists employing methods of genetic engineering have developed a new group of living organisms, termed 'modified organisms', which found application in, among others, medicine, the pharmaceutical industry and food distribution. The introduction of transgenic products to the food market resulted in them becoming a controversial topic, with their proponents and contestants. The presented study aims to systematize objective data on the potential benefits and risks resulting from the consumption of transgenic food. Genetic modifications of plants and animals are justified by the potential for improvement of the food situation worldwide, an increase in yield crops, an increase in the nutritional value of food, and the development of pharmaceutical preparations of proven clinical significance. In the opinions of critics, however, transgenic food may unfavourably affect the health of consumers. Therefore, particular attention was devoted to the short- and long-lasting undesirable effects, such as alimentary allergies, synthesis of toxic agents or resistance to antibiotics. Examples arguing for the justified character of genetic modifications and cases proving that their use can be dangerous are innumerable. In view of the presented facts, however, complex studies are indispensable which, in a reliable way, evaluate effects linked to the consumption of food produced with the application of genetic engineering techniques. Whether one backs up or negates transgenic products, the choice between traditional and non-conventional food remains to be decided exclusively by the consumers. PMID:24069841

  4. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF RISK FACTORS FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE (CVD) IN GENETICALLY PREDISPOSED RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rodent CVD models are increasingly used for understanding individual differences in susceptibility to environmental stressors such as air pollution. We characterized pathologies and a number of known human risk factors of CVD in genetically predisposed, male young adult Spontaneo...

  5. Convergent synaptic and circuit substrates underlying autism genetic risks

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Aaron; Li, Guohui; Lu, Zhongming; Qiu, Shenfeng

    2014-01-01

    There has been a surge of diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) over the past decade. While large, high powered genome screening studies of children with ASD have identified numerous genetic risk factors, research efforts to understanding how each of these risk factors contributes to the development autism has met with limited success. Revealing the mechanisms by which these genetic risk factors affect brain development and predispose a child to autism requires mechanistic understanding of the neurobiological changes underlying this devastating group of developmental disorders at multifaceted molecular, cellular and system levels. It has been increasingly clear that the normal trajectory of neurodevelopment is compromised in autism, in multiple domains as much as aberrant neuronal production, growth, functional maturation, patterned connectivity, and balanced excitation and inhibition of brain networks. Many autism risk factors identified in humans have been now reconstituted in experimental mouse models to allow mechanistic interrogation of the biological role of the risk gene. Studies utilizing these mouse models have revealed that underlying the enormous heterogeneity of perturbed cellular events, mechanisms directing synaptic and circuit assembly may provide a unifying explanation for the pathophysiological changes and behavioral endophenotypes seen in autism, although synaptic perturbations are far from being the only alterations relevant for ASD. In this review, we discuss synaptic and circuit abnormalities obtained from several prevalent mouse models, particularly those reflecting syndromic forms of ASD that are caused by single gene perturbations. These compiled results reveal that ASD risk genes contribute to proper signaling of the developing gene networks that maintain synaptic and circuit homeostasis, which is fundamental to normal brain development. PMID:24999357

  6. Association between OPN genetic variations and nephrolithiasis risk

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xu; Dong, Zhenjia; Ye, Xianqing; Yan, Yao; Chen, Xuehua; Pan, Qin; Xie, Yongfeng; Xie, Jie; Wang, Qiangdong; Yuan, Qinbo

    2016-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) has an important role in urolithiasis. However, few studies have explored the association between OPN genetic variants and urolithiasis risk. In the present study, three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs28357094, rs11439060 and rs11730582) located on the promoter of OPN were genotyped in a total of 480 individuals, including 230 nephrolithiasis patients and 250 matched healthy controls, and the associations between these SNPs and nephrolithiasis risk in different genetic models was assessed. No significant differences were identified in the genotype and allele frequencies of OPN rs28357094 or rs11730582 (P=0.805 for rs28357094; P=0.577 for rs11730582, respectively). However, carriers with the OPN rs11439060 insertion (ins) types (ins/deletion and ins/ins) were overrepresented in urolithiasis patients compared with the controls [odds ratio (OR), 1.55; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.08–2.22]. In the stratified analysis, the increased risk was more evident among younger subjects (adjusted OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.01–2.81), females (2.15; 1.14–4.08), overweight subjects (1.80; 1.07–3.05), normotensive subjects (2.48; 1.02–6.00), abnormal blood sugar subjects (1.58; 1.08–2.30), smokers (1.63; 1.02–2.60), and ever-drinkers (1.98; 1.10–3.60).. These findings revealed that the OPN rs11439060 polymorphism may act as genetic biomarker for the detection of high-risk nephrolithiasis patients. PMID:27602211

  7. Genetic/familial high-risk assessment: breast and ovarian, version 1.2014.

    PubMed

    Daly, Mary B; Pilarski, Robert; Axilbund, Jennifer E; Buys, Saundra S; Crawford, Beth; Friedman, Susan; Garber, Judy E; Horton, Carolyn; Kaklamani, Virginia; Klein, Catherine; Kohlmann, Wendy; Kurian, Allison; Litton, Jennifer; Madlensky, Lisa; Marcom, P Kelly; Merajver, Sofia D; Offit, Kenneth; Pal, Tuya; Pasche, Boris; Reiser, Gwen; Shannon, Kristen Mahoney; Swisher, Elizabeth; Voian, Nicoleta C; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whelan, Alison; Wiesner, Georgia L; Dwyer, Mary A; Kumar, Rashmi

    2014-09-01

    During the past few years, several genetic aberrations that may contribute to increased risks for development of breast and/or ovarian cancers have been identified. The NCCN Guidelines for Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Breast and Ovarian focus specifically on the assessment of genetic mutations in BRCA1/BRCA2, TP53, and PTEN, and recommend approaches to genetic testing/counseling and management strategies in individuals with these mutations. This portion of the NCCN Guidelines includes recommendations regarding diagnostic criteria and management of patients with Cowden Syndrome/PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome. PMID:25190698

  8. The increasing role of genetics and genomics in women's health.

    PubMed

    Klein, Elisabeth Lisa Z

    2014-01-01

    Genetic and genomic testing are a clinical reality in health care today. Persons at risk for disease or who are simply curious about their genomes can have them analyzed. An individual's genome is a function of ancestry, family history and personal health and environmental exposures. Clinical and pharmacologic information can be obtained through genomic analysis. Genomic testing can be done by health care providers but some results can now be obtained through direct-to-consumer tests. Many ethical questions are being raised regarding genomic testing. Nurses can provide more optimal care by understanding the process of genomic testing as well as the implications of the results. PMID:24750654

  9. The Effect of Genetic Risk Information and Health Risk Assessment on Compliance with Preventive Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamberg, Richard; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Results from a study of 82 males provide no statistical support and limited encouragement that genetic risk information may motivate persons to make positive changes in preventive health behaviors. Health risk assessments were used to identify subjects at risk for coronary heart disease or lung cancer because of genetic factors. (IAH)

  10. What risk assessments of genetically modified organisms can learn from institutional analyses of public health risks.

    PubMed

    Rajan, S Ravi; Letourneau, Deborah K

    2012-01-01

    The risks of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are evaluated traditionally by combining hazard identification and exposure estimates to provide decision support for regulatory agencies. We question the utility of the classical risk paradigm and discuss its evolution in GMO risk assessment. First, we consider the problem of uncertainty, by comparing risk assessment for environmental toxins in the public health domain with genetically modified organisms in the environment; we use the specific comparison of an insecticide to a transgenic, insecticidal food crop. Next, we examine normal accident theory (NAT) as a heuristic to consider runaway effects of GMOs, such as negative community level consequences of gene flow from transgenic, insecticidal crops. These examples illustrate how risk assessments are made more complex and contentious by both their inherent uncertainty and the inevitability of failure beyond expectation in complex systems. We emphasize the value of conducting decision-support research, embracing uncertainty, increasing transparency, and building interdisciplinary institutions that can address the complex interactions between ecosystems and society. In particular, we argue against black boxing risk analysis, and for a program to educate policy makers about uncertainty and complexity, so that eventually, decision making is not the burden that falls upon scientists but is assumed by the public at large. PMID:23193357

  11. What Risk Assessments of Genetically Modified Organisms Can Learn from Institutional Analyses of Public Health Risks

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, S. Ravi; Letourneau, Deborah K.

    2012-01-01

    The risks of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are evaluated traditionally by combining hazard identification and exposure estimates to provide decision support for regulatory agencies. We question the utility of the classical risk paradigm and discuss its evolution in GMO risk assessment. First, we consider the problem of uncertainty, by comparing risk assessment for environmental toxins in the public health domain with genetically modified organisms in the environment; we use the specific comparison of an insecticide to a transgenic, insecticidal food crop. Next, we examine normal accident theory (NAT) as a heuristic to consider runaway effects of GMOs, such as negative community level consequences of gene flow from transgenic, insecticidal crops. These examples illustrate how risk assessments are made more complex and contentious by both their inherent uncertainty and the inevitability of failure beyond expectation in complex systems. We emphasize the value of conducting decision-support research, embracing uncertainty, increasing transparency, and building interdisciplinary institutions that can address the complex interactions between ecosystems and society. In particular, we argue against black boxing risk analysis, and for a program to educate policy makers about uncertainty and complexity, so that eventually, decision making is not the burden that falls upon scientists but is assumed by the public at large. PMID:23193357

  12. Ethnic Differences in Knowledge and Attitudes about BRCA1 Testing in Women at Increased Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Chanita; Gomez-Caminero, Andres; Benkendorf, Judith; Kerner, Jon; Isaacs, Claudine; Barter, James; Lerman, Caryn

    1997-01-01

    Knowledge about the inheritance of breast cancer and attitudes about genetic testing for breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility in women at increased risk were studied in Caucasian and African-American women (N=407). Participants had at least one first-degree relative with cancer. Differences in knowledge and attitudes toward risk may be attributed…

  13. A developmental behavior-genetic perspective on alcoholism risk.

    PubMed

    Rose, R J

    1998-01-01

    Although behavioral problems associated with abuse of alcohol emerge during late adolescence and adulthood, some behavioral characteristics indicative of an increased risk of alcoholism may already be obvious during early childhood. Studies in several countries have demonstrated that children with high levels of novelty-seeking behavior and low levels of harm-avoidance behavior are more likely to develop alcohol-related problems during adolescence. Moreover, as early as age 3, children at high risk of future alcoholism because of a family history are more active, more impatient, and more aggressive than matched controls of low-risk children. Causal influences on the initiation of drinking must be distinguished from those that affect patterns of consumption once drinking is initiated. Studies of adolescent twins have demonstrated that initiation of drinking is primarily influenced by the drinking status of parents, siblings, and friends and by socioregional differences in the environments within which adolescent twins reside. The influence of genetic factors is negligible. Conversely, once initiated, differences in frequency and quantity of drinking are strongly influenced by genetic factors. However, these influences, too, are modulated by sibling and peer effects and by regional environmental variation. PMID:15706788

  14. Multi-locus models of genetic risk of disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Evidence for genetic contribution to complex diseases is described by recurrence risks to relatives of diseased individuals. Genome-wide association studies allow a description of the genetics of the same diseases in terms of risk loci, their effects and allele frequencies. To reconcile the two descriptions requires a model of how risks from individual loci combine to determine an individual's overall risk. Methods We derive predictions of risk to relatives from risks at individual loci under a number of models and compare them with published data on disease risk. Results The model in which risks are multiplicative on the risk scale implies equality between the recurrence risk to monozygotic twins and the square of the recurrence risk to sibs, a relationship often not observed, especially for low prevalence diseases. We show that this theoretical equality is achieved by allowing impossible probabilities of disease. Other models, in which probabilities of disease are constrained to a maximum of one, generate results more consistent with empirical estimates for a range of diseases. Conclusions The unconstrained multiplicative model, often used in theoretical studies because of its mathematical tractability, is not a realistic model. We find three models, the constrained multiplicative, Odds (or Logit) and Probit (or liability threshold) models, all fit the data on risk to relatives. Currently, in practice it would be difficult to differentiate between these models, but this may become possible if genetic variants that explain the majority of the genetic variance are identified. PMID:20181060

  15. Increased leukemia risk in Chernobyl cleanup workers

    Cancer.gov

    A new study found a significantly elevated risk for chronic lymphocytic leukemia among workers who were engaged in recovery and clean-up activities following the Chernobyl power plant accident in 1986.

  16. Analysis of genetics and risk factors of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Panpalli Ates, M; Karaman, Y; Guntekin, S; Ergun, M A

    2016-06-14

    Alzheimer's Disease is the leading neurodegenerative cause of dementia. The pathogenesis is not clearly understood yet, is believed to be the complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Consequently vascular risk factors and Apolipoprotein E genotyping are increasingly gaining importance. This study aimed at assessing the relationships between Alzheimer's Disease and Apolipoprotein E phenotype and vascular risk factors. Patients diagnosed with "possible Alzheimer's Disease" in the Gazi University, Department of Neurology, were included in the study and age-matched volunteer patients who attended the polyclinic were included as a control group. In this study, the risk factors including low education level, smoking, hyperlipidemia, higher serum total cholesterol levels, and hyperhomocysteinemia were found to be statistically significantly more common in the Alzheimer's Disease group in comparison to the Control Group, while all Apolipoprotein E ε4/ε4 genotypes were found in the Alzheimer's Disease group. The presence of the Apolipoprotein E ε4 allele is believed to increase vascular risk factors as well as to affect Alzheimer's Disease directly. The biological indicators which are used in identifying the patients' genes will be probably used in the treatment plan of the patients in the future. PMID:27026590

  17. Possible Risk Factors for Increased Suicide Following Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, James E.; Crosby, Ross; de Zwaan, Martina; Engel, Scott; Roerig, James; Steffen, Kristine; Gordon, Kathryn H.; Karr, Trisha; Lavender, Jason; Wonderlich, Steve

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing research literature suggesting that there may be elevated risk of suicide following bariatric surgery. Most of the data reported thus far has been cross-sectional and observational, and very little is known about the possible specific causal variables involved. The purpose of this report is to review this literature and to review possible risk factors for increased suicidal risk following bariatric surgery, in order to delineate future research directions. First a variety of medical, biological, and genetic factors, including the persistence of recurrence of medical comorbidities after bariatric surgery, the disinhibition and impulsivity secondary to changes in the absorption of alcohol, hypoglycemia, as well as pharmacokinetic changes that may affect the absorption of various medications including antidepressant medications are reviewed. Also reviewed are possible mediating factors involving changes in various peptidergic systems such as GLP-1 and Ghrelin. A number of psychosocial issues that might be involved are discussed, including lack of improvement in quality of life after surgery, continued or recurrent physical mobility restrictions, persistence or recurrence of sexual dysfunction and relationship problems, low self-esteem, and a history of child maltreatment. Inadequate weight loss or weight regain are also discussed. Possible theoretical models involved and directions for research are suggested. PMID:23404774

  18. Disclosing genetic risk for coronary heart disease: effects on perceived personal control and genetic counseling satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Robinson, C L; Jouni, H; Kruisselbrink, T M; Austin, E E; Christensen, K D; Green, R C; Kullo, I J

    2016-02-01

    We investigated whether disclosure of coronary heart disease (CHD) genetic risk influences perceived personal control (PPC) and genetic counseling satisfaction (GCS). Participants (n = 207, age: 45-65 years) were randomized to receive estimated 10-year risk of CHD based on a conventional risk score (CRS) with or without a genetic risk score (GRS). Risk estimates were disclosed by a genetic counselor who also reviewed how GRS altered risk in those randomized to CRS+GRS. Each participant subsequently met with a physician and then completed surveys to assess PPC and GCS. Participants who received CRS+GRS had higher PPC than those who received CRS alone although the absolute difference was small (25.2 ± 2.7 vs 24.1 ± 3.8, p = 0.04). A greater proportion of CRS+GRS participants had higher GCS scores (17.3 ± 5.3 vs 15.9 ± 6.3, p = 0.06). In the CRS+GRS group, PPC and GCS scores were not correlated with GRS. Within both groups, PPC and GCS scores were similar in patients with or without family history (p = NS). In conclusion, patients who received their genetic risk of CHD had higher PPC and tended to have higher GCS. Our findings suggest that disclosure of genetic risk of CHD together with conventional risk estimates is appreciated by patients. Whether this results in improved outcomes needs additional investigation. PMID:25708169

  19. Increasing global participation in genetics research through DNA barcoding.

    PubMed

    Adamowicz, Sarah J; Steinke, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    DNA barcoding--the sequencing of short, standardized DNA regions for specimen identification and species discovery--has promised to facilitate rapid access to biodiversity knowledge by diverse users. Here, we advance our opinion that increased global participation in genetics research is beneficial, both to scientists and for science, and explore the premise that DNA barcoding can help to democratize participation in genetics research. We examine publication patterns (2003-2014) in the DNA barcoding literature and compare trends with those in the broader, related domain of genomics. While genomics is the older and much larger field, the number of nations contributing to the published literature is similar between disciplines. Meanwhile, DNA barcoding exhibits a higher pace of growth in the number of publications as well as greater evenness among nations in their proportional contribution to total authorships. This exploration revealed DNA barcoding to be a highly international discipline, with growing participation by researchers in especially biodiverse nations. We briefly consider several of the challenges that may hinder further participation in genetics research, including access to training and molecular facilities as well as policy relating to the movement of genetic resources. PMID:26642251

  20. Development and Evaluation of a Genetic Risk Score for Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Belsky, Daniel W.; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Sugden, Karen; Williams, Benjamin; Houts, Renate; McCarthy, Jeanette; Caspi, Avshalom

    2013-01-01

    Background Results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) represent a potential resource for etiological and treatment research. GWAS of obesity-related phenotypes have been especially successful. To translate this success into a research tool, we developed and tested a “genetic risk score” (GRS) that summarizes an individual’s genetic predisposition to obesity. Methods Different GWAS of obesity-related phenotypes report different sets of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as the best genomic markers of obesity risk. Therefore, we applied a 3-stage approach that pooled results from multiple GWAS to select SNPs to include in our GRS: The 3 stages are (1) Extraction. SNPs with evidence of association are compiled from published GWAS; (2) Clustering. SNPs are grouped according to patterns of linkage disequilibrium; (3) Selection. Tag SNPs are selected from clusters that meet specific criteria. We applied this 3-stage approach to results from 16 GWAS of obesity-related phenotypes in European-descent samples to create a GRS. We then tested the GRS in the Atherosclerosis Risk in the Communities (ARIC) Study cohort (N=10,745, 55% female, 77% white, 23% African American). Results Our 32-locus GRS was a statistically significant predictor of body mass index (BMI) and obesity among ARIC whites (for BMI, r=0.13, p<1×10−30; for obesity, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC)=0.57 [95% CI 0.55–0.58]). The GRS improved prediction of obesity (as measured by delta-AUC and integrated discrimination index) when added to models that included demographic and geographic information. FTO- and MC4R-linked SNPs, and a non-genetic risk assessment consisting of a socioeconomic index (p<0.01 for all comparisons). The GRS also predicted increased mortality risk over 17 years of follow-up. The GRS performed less well among African Americans. Conclusions The obesity GRS derived using our 3-stage approach is not useful for clinical risk prediction, but

  1. The Childhood Incidents That Increase Later Suicide Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Incidents That Increase Later Suicide Risk Exposure to domestic violence, abuse cast a long shadow, study finds To ... 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adults who witnessed parental domestic violence in childhood are at increased risk for suicide ...

  2. Bullying increased suicide risk: prospective study of Korean adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Shin; Leventhal, Bennett L; Koh, Yun-Joo; Boyce, W Thomas

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the independent impact of bullying on suicide risk. Bullying was assessed by peer nomination in a prospective study of 1,655 7th and 8th grade Korean students, and suicide by youth self-report. Odds Ratios (ORs) of bullying for suicidal risks were computed, controlling for other suicide risk factors. Victim-Perpetrators and female Victims at baseline showed increased risk for persistent suicidality (OR: 2.4-9.8). Male Incident Victims exhibited increased risk for suicidal behaviors and ideations (OR = 4.4, 3.6). Female Persistent Perpetrators exhibited increased risks for suicidal behaviors; male Incident Perpetrators had increased risk for suicidal ideations (OR = 2.7, 2.3). Baseline-only male Victim-Perpetrators showed increased risk for suicidal ideations. (OR = 6.4). Bullying independently increased suicide risks. PMID:19123106

  3. Cumulative genetic risk and prefrontal activity in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Walton, Esther; Turner, Jessica; Gollub, Randy L; Manoach, Dara S; Yendiki, Anastasia; Ho, Beng-Choon; Sponheim, Scott R; Calhoun, Vince D; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2013-05-01

    The lack of consistency of genetic associations in highly heritable mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia, remains a challenge in molecular psychiatry. Because clinical phenotypes for psychiatric disorders are often ill defined, considerable effort has been made to relate genetic polymorphisms to underlying physiological aspects of schizophrenia (so called intermediate phenotypes), that may be more reliable. Given the polygenic etiology of schizophrenia, the aim of this work was to form a measure of cumulative genetic risk and study its effect on neural activity during working memory (WM) using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Neural activity during the Sternberg Item Recognition Paradigm was measured in 79 schizophrenia patients and 99 healthy controls. Participants were genotyped, and a genetic risk score (GRS), which combined the additive effects of 41 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 34 risk genes for schizophrenia, was calculated. These risk SNPs were chosen according to the continuously updated meta-analysis of genetic studies on schizophrenia available at www.schizophreniaresearchforum.org. We found a positive relationship between GRS and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex inefficiency during WM processing. GRS was not correlated with age, performance, intelligence, or medication effects and did not differ between acquisition sites, gender, or diagnostic groups. Our study suggests that cumulative genetic risk, combining the impact of many genes with small effects, is associated with a known brain-based intermediate phenotype for schizophrenia. The GRS approach could provide an advantage over studying single genes in studies focusing on the genetic basis of polygenic conditions such as neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:22267534

  4. Adaptive genetic variation and heart disease risk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose of review: Obesity, dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease are complex and determined by both genetic and environmental factors and their interrelationships. Many associations from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and candidate gene approaches have described a multitude of polymorphis...

  5. Genetic instability in epithelial tissues at risk for cancer.

    PubMed

    Hittelman, W N

    2001-12-01

    Epithelial tumors develop through a multistep process driven by genomic instability frequently associated with etiologic agents such as prolonged tobacco smoke exposure or human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. The purpose of the studies reported here was to examine the nature of genomic instability in epithelial tissues at cancer risk in order to identify tissue genetic biomarkers that might be used to assess an individual's cancer risk and response to chemopreventive intervention. As part of several chemoprevention trials, biopsies were obtained from risk tissues (i.e., bronchial biopsies from chronic smokers, oral or laryngeal biopsies from individuals with premalignancy) and examined for chromosome instability using in situ hybridization. Nearly all biopsy specimens show evidence for chromosome instability throughout the exposed tissue. Increased chromosome instability was observed with histologic progression in the normal to tumor transition of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Chromosome instability was also seen in premalignant head and neck lesions, and high levels were associated with subsequent tumor development. In bronchial biopsies of current smokers, the level of ongoing chromosome instability correlated with smoking intensity (e.g., packs/day), whereas the chromosome index (average number of chromosome copies per cell) correlated with cumulative tobacco exposure (i.e., pack-years). Spatial chromosome analyses of the epithelium demonstrated multifocal clonal outgrowths. In former smokers, random chromosome instability was reduced; however, clonal populations appeared to persist for many years, perhaps accounting for continued lung cancer risk following smoking cessation. PMID:11795428

  6. Does Migraine Increase the Risk of Glaucoma?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated whether migraine influences the risk of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG) in Taiwan. We retrieved the data analyzed in this study from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We included 17,606 newly diagnosed migraine patients without preexisting glaucoma and randomly selected and matched 70,423 subjects without migraine as the comparison cohort. The same exclusion criteria were also applied to comparison subjects. Multivariate Cox proportion-hazards regression model was used to assess the effects of migraines on the risk of glaucoma after adjusting for demographic characteristics and comorbidities. The cumulative incidence of POAG was higher in the migraine cohort than that in the comparison cohort (log-rank P = 0.04). The overall incidence of POAG (per 10,000 person-years) was 9.62 and 7.69, respectively, for migraine cohort and nonmigraine cohort (crude hazard ratio [HR] = 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01–1.54). After adjusting the covariates, the risk of POAG was not significantly higher in the migraine cohort than in the comparison cohort (adjusted HR [aHR] = 1.15, 95% CI = 0.93–1.42). The cumulative incidence of PACG did not differ between the migraine cohort and the comparison cohort (log-rank test P = 0.53). The overall incidence of PACG was not significantly higher in the migraine cohort than that in the comparison cohort (7.42 vs 6.84 per 10,000 person-years), with an aHR of 1.04 (95% CI = 0.82–1.32). This study shows that migraines are not associated with a higher risk either in POAG or in PACG. PMID:27175700

  7. Breast cancer risk assessment using genetic variants and risk factors in a Singapore Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Genetic variants for breast cancer risk identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in Western populations require further testing in Asian populations. A risk assessment model incorporating both validated genetic variants and established risk factors may improve its performance in risk prediction of Asian women. Methods A nested case-control study of female breast cancer (411 cases and 1,212 controls) within the Singapore Chinese Health Study was conducted to investigate the effects of 51 genetic variants identified in previous GWAS on breast cancer risk. The independent effect of these genetic variants was assessed by creating a summed genetic risk score (GRS) after adjustment for body mass index and the Gail model risk factors for breast cancer. Results The GRS was an independent predictor of breast cancer risk in Chinese women. The multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of breast cancer for the second, third, and fourth quartiles of the GRS were 1.26 (0.90 to 1.76), 1.47 (1.06 to 2.04) and 1.75 (1.27 to 2.41) respectively (P for trend <0.001). In addition to established risk factors, the GRS improved the classification of 6.2% of women for their absolute risk of breast cancer in the next five years. Conclusions Genetic variants on top of conventional risk factors can improve the risk prediction of breast cancer in Chinese women. PMID:24941967

  8. Pathways and barriers to genetic testing and screening: Molecular genetics meets the high-risk family. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Duster, T.

    1998-11-01

    The proliferation of genetic screening and testing is requiring increasing numbers of Americans to integrate genetic knowledge and interventions into their family life and personal experience. This study examines the social processes that occur as families at risk for two of the most common autosomal recessive diseases, sickle cell disease (SC) and cystic fibrosis (CF), encounter genetic testing. Each of these diseases is found primarily in a different ethnic/racial group (CF in Americans of North European descent and SC in Americans of West African descent). This has permitted them to have a certain additional lens on the role of culture in integrating genetic testing into family life and reproductive planning. A third type of genetic disorder, the thalassemias was added to the sample in order to extent the comparative frame and to include other ethnic and racial groups.

  9. Association of genetic and non-genetic risk factors with the development of prostate cancer in Malaysian men.

    PubMed

    Munretnam, Khamsigan; Alex, Livy; Ramzi, Nurul Hanis; Chahil, Jagdish Kaur; Kavitha, I S; Hashim, Nikman Adli Nor; Lye, Say Hean; Velapasamy, Sharmila; Ler, Lian Wee

    2014-01-01

    There is growing global interest to stratify men into different levels of risk to developing prostate cancer, thus it is important to identify common genetic variants that confer the risk. Although many studies have identified more than a dozen common genetic variants which are highly associated with prostate cancer, none have been done in Malaysian population. To determine the association of such variants in Malaysian men with prostate cancer, we evaluated a panel of 768 SNPs found previously associated with various cancers which also included the prostate specific SNPs in a population based case control study (51 case subjects with prostate cancer and 51 control subjects) in Malaysian men of Malay, Chinese and Indian ethnicity. We identified 21 SNPs significantly associated with prostate cancer. Among these, 12 SNPs were strongly associated with increased risk of prostate cancer while remaining nine SNPs were associated with reduced risk. However, data analysis based on ethnic stratification led to only five SNPs in Malays and 3 SNPs in Chinese which remained significant. This could be due to small sample size in each ethnic group. Significant non-genetic risk factors were also identified for their association with prostate cancer. Our study is the first to investigate the involvement of multiple variants towards susceptibility for PC in Malaysian men using genotyping approach. Identified SNPs and non-genetic risk factors have a significant association with prostate cancer. PMID:24443231

  10. Occupational and genetic risk factors for osteoarthritis: A review

    PubMed Central

    Yucesoy, Berran; Charles, Luenda E.; Baker, Brent; Burchfiel, Cecil M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial disease with strong genetic and occupational components. Although published studies have described several risk factors for OA, very few studies have investigated the occupational and genetic factors that contribute to this debilitating condition. OBJECTIVE To describe occupational and genetic factors that may contribute to the risk of developing (OA). METHODS A literature search was conducted in PubMed using the search terms osteoarthritis, occupation, work, and genetics. RESULTS Heavy physical work load was the most common occupational risk factor for OA in several anatomical locations. Other factors include kneeling and regular stair climbing, crawling, bending and whole body vibration, and repetitive movements. Numerous studies have also shown the influence of genetic variability in the pathogenesis of OA. Genetic variants of several groups of genes e.g., cartilage extracellular matrix structural genes and the genes related to bone density have been implicated in disease pathogenesis. CONCLUSION This review shows that occupational factors were extensively studied in knee OA unlike OA of other anatomical regions. Although genetic association studies performed to date identified a number of risk variants, some of these associations have not been consistently replicated across different studies and populations. Therefore, more research is needed. PMID:24004806

  11. Applying Personal Genetic Data to Injury Risk Assessment in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Goodlin, Gabrielle T.; Roos, Andrew K.; Roos, Thomas R.; Hawkins, Claire; Beache, Sydney; Baur, Stephen; Kim, Stuart K.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have identified genetic markers associated with risk for certain sports-related injuries and performance-related conditions, with the hope that these markers could be used by individual athletes to personalize their training and diet regimens. We found that we could greatly expand the knowledge base of sports genetic information by using published data originally found in health and disease studies. For example, the results from large genome-wide association studies for low bone mineral density in elderly women can be re-purposed for low bone mineral density in young endurance athletes. In total, we found 124 single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with: anterior cruciate ligament tear, Achilles tendon injury, low bone mineral density and stress fracture, osteoarthritis, vitamin/mineral deficiencies, and sickle cell trait. Of these single nucleotide polymorphisms, 91% have not previously been used in sports genetics. We conducted a pilot program on fourteen triathletes using this expanded knowledge base of genetic variants associated with sports injury. These athletes were genotyped and educated about how their individual genetic make-up affected their personal risk profile during an hour-long personal consultation. Overall, participants were favorable of the program, found it informative, and most acted upon their genetic results. This pilot program shows that recent genetic research provides valuable information to help reduce sports injuries and to optimize nutrition. There are many genetic studies for health and disease that can be mined to provide useful information to athletes about their individual risk for relevant injuries. PMID:25919592

  12. Loss of Genetic Diversity and Increased Subdivision in an Endemic Alpine Stonefly Threatened by Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Steve; Giersch, J. Joseph; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Hotaling, Scott; Fanning, Liz; Tappenbeck, Tyler H.; Luikart, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Much remains unknown about the genetic status and population connectivity of high-elevation and high-latitude freshwater invertebrates, which often persist near snow and ice masses that are disappearing due to climate change. Here we report on the conservation genetics of the meltwater stonefly Lednia tumana (Ricker) of Montana, USA, a cold-water obligate species. We sequenced 1530 bp of mtDNA from 116 L. tumana individuals representing “historic” (>10 yr old) and 2010 populations. The dominant haplotype was common in both time periods, while the second-most-common haplotype was found only in historic samples, having been lost in the interim. The 2010 populations also showed reduced gene and nucleotide diversity and increased genetic isolation. We found lower genetic diversity in L. tumana compared to two other North American stonefly species, Amphinemura linda (Ricker) and Pteronarcys californica Newport. Our results imply small effective sizes, increased fragmentation, limited gene flow, and loss of genetic variation among contemporary L. tumana populations, which can lead to reduced adaptive capacity and increased extinction risk. This study reinforces concerns that ongoing glacier loss threatens the persistence of L. tumana, and provides baseline data and analysis of how future environmental change could impact populations of similar organisms. PMID:27348125

  13. Loss of Genetic Diversity and Increased Subdivision in an Endemic Alpine Stonefly Threatened by Climate Change.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Steve; Giersch, J Joseph; Muhlfeld, Clint C; Hotaling, Scott; Fanning, Liz; Tappenbeck, Tyler H; Luikart, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Much remains unknown about the genetic status and population connectivity of high-elevation and high-latitude freshwater invertebrates, which often persist near snow and ice masses that are disappearing due to climate change. Here we report on the conservation genetics of the meltwater stonefly Lednia tumana (Ricker) of Montana, USA, a cold-water obligate species. We sequenced 1530 bp of mtDNA from 116 L. tumana individuals representing "historic" (>10 yr old) and 2010 populations. The dominant haplotype was common in both time periods, while the second-most-common haplotype was found only in historic samples, having been lost in the interim. The 2010 populations also showed reduced gene and nucleotide diversity and increased genetic isolation. We found lower genetic diversity in L. tumana compared to two other North American stonefly species, Amphinemura linda (Ricker) and Pteronarcys californica Newport. Our results imply small effective sizes, increased fragmentation, limited gene flow, and loss of genetic variation among contemporary L. tumana populations, which can lead to reduced adaptive capacity and increased extinction risk. This study reinforces concerns that ongoing glacier loss threatens the persistence of L. tumana, and provides baseline data and analysis of how future environmental change could impact populations of similar organisms. PMID:27348125

  14. Bridge: a GUI package for genetic risk prediction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Risk prediction models capitalizing on genetic and environmental information hold great promise for individualized disease prediction and prevention. Nevertheless, linking the genetic and environmental risk predictors into a useful risk prediction model remains a great challenge. To facilitate risk prediction analyses, we have developed a graphical user interface package, Bridge. Results The package is built for both designing and analyzing a risk prediction model. In the design stage, it provides an estimated classification accuracy of the model using essential genetic and environmental information gained from public resources and/or previous studies, and determines the sample size required to verify this accuracy. In the analysis stage, it adopts a robust and powerful algorithm to form the risk prediction model. Conclusions The package is developed based on the optimality theory of the likelihood ratio and therefore theoretically could form a model with high performance. It can be used to handle a relatively large number of genetic and environmental predictors, with consideration of their possible interactions, and so is particularly useful for studying risk prediction models for common complex diseases. PMID:24359333

  15. The Association between Infants' Attention Control and Social Inhibition Is Moderated by Genetic and Environmental Risk for Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooker, Rebecca J.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Leve, Leslie D.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Reiss, David

    2011-01-01

    Infant social inhibition is associated with increased risk for anxiety later in life. Although both genetic and environmental factors are associated with anxiety, little empirical work has addressed how developing regulatory abilities work with genetic and environmental risk to exacerbate or mitigate problem behaviors. The current study was aimed…

  16. Genetic predisposition to coronary heart disease and stroke using an additive genetic risk score: a population-based study in Greece

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To determine the extent to which the risk for incident coronary heart disease (CHD) increases in relation to a genetic risk score (GRS) that additively integrates the influence of high-risk alleles in nine documented single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for CHD, and to examine whether t...

  17. NEURAL PLASTICITY, HUMAN GENETICS, AND RISK FOR ALCOHOL DEPENDENCE

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Shirley Y.

    2013-01-01

    Opportunities for advances in the neurobiology of alcohol dependence have been facilitated by the development of sophisticated neurophysiological and neuroimaging techniques that allow us to have a window on developmental changes in brain structure and function. The search for genes that may increase susceptibility to alcohol dependence has been greatly facilitated by the recognition that intermediate phenotypes, sometimes referred to as endophenotypes. may be closer to the genetic variation than is the more complex alcohol dependence phenotype. This chapter will review the evidence that the brain is highly plastic, exhibiting major postnatal changes, especially during adolescence, in neural circuits that appear to influence addiction susceptibility. This chapter will suggest that heritable aspects of brain structure and function that are seen developmentally may be an important endophenotypic characteristic associated with familial risk for developing alcohol dependence. Finally, a review of studies showing associations between brain structural and functional characteristics and specific genes will be offered. PMID:20813240

  18. Quantification of the genetic risk of environmental mutagens

    SciTech Connect

    Ehling, U.H.

    1988-03-01

    Screening methods are used for hazard identification. Assays for heritable mutations in mammals are used for the confirmation of short-term test results and for the quantification of the genetic risk. There are two main approaches in making genetic risk estimates. One of these, termed the direct method, expresses risk in terms of the expected frequency of genetic changes induced per unit. The other, referred to as the doubling dose method or the indirect method, expresses risk in relation to the observed incidence of genetic disorders now present in man. The indirect method uses experimental data only for the calculation of the doubling dose. The quality of the risk estimation depends on the assumption of persistence of the induced mutations and the ability to determine the current incidence of genetic diseases. The difficulties of improving the estimates of current incidences of genetic diseases or the persistence of the genes in the population led them to the development of an alternative method, the direct estimation of the genetic risk. The direct estimation uses experimental data for the induced frequency for dominant mutations in mice. For the verification of these quantifications one can use the data of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. According to the estimation with the direct method, one would expect less than 1 radiation-induced dominant cataract in 19,000 children with one or both parents exposed. The expected overall frequency of dominant mutations in the first generation would be 20-25, based on radiation-induced dominant cataract mutations. It is estimated that 10 times more recessive than dominant mutations are induced. The same approaches can be used to determine the impact of chemical mutagens.

  19. Do Environmental Factors Modify the Genetic Risk of Prostate Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Stacy; Peskoe, Sarah B.; Joshu, Corinne E.; Huang, Wen-Yi; Hayes, Richard B.; Carter, H. Ballentine; Isaacs, William B.; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many SNPs influence prostate cancer risk. To what extent genetic risk can be reduced by environmental factors is unknown. Methods We evaluated effect modification by environmental factors of the association between susceptibility SNPs and prostate cancer in 1,230 incident prostate cancer cases and 1,361 controls, all white and similar ages, nested in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Trial. Genetic risk scores were calculated as number of risk alleles for 20 validated SNPs. We estimated the association between higher genetic risk (≥ 12 SNPs) and prostate cancer within environmental factor strata and tested for interaction. Results Men with ≥12 risk alleles had 1.98, 2.04, and 1.91 times the odds of total, advanced, and nonadvanced prostate cancer, respectively. These associations were attenuated with the use of selenium supplements, aspirin, ibuprofen, and higher vegetable intake. For selenium, the attenuation was most striking for advanced prostate cancer: compared with <12 alleles and no selenium, the OR for ≥12 alleles was 2.06 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.67–2.55] in nonusers and 0.99 (0.38–2.58) in users (Pinteraction = 0.031). Aspirin had the most marked attenuation for nonadvanced prostate cancer: compared with <12 alleles and nonusers, the OR for ≥12 alleles was 2.25 (1.69–3.00) in nonusers and 1.70 (1.25–2.32) in users (Pinteraction = 0.009). This pattern was similar for ibuprofen (Pinteraction = 0.023) and vegetables (Pinteraction = 0.010). Conclusions This study suggests that selenium supplements may reduce genetic risk of advanced prostate cancer, whereas aspirin, ibuprofen, and vegetables may reduce genetic risk of nonadvanced prostate cancer. PMID:25342390

  20. Genetic risk factors of cisplatin induced ototoxicity in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Talach, T; Rottenberg, J; Gal, B; Kostrica, R; Jurajda, M; Kocak, I; Lakomy, R; Vogazianos, E

    2016-01-01

    Ototoxicity is an important adverse effect of using Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum) (CDDP) as a form of chemotherapy. The clinical picture of CDDP induced ototoxicity includes perceptive hearing impairment (reversible or permanent) and tinnitus. Ototoxicity manifests with considerable variability between patients. The objective of this prospective study was to investigate a possible genetic background to this variability. We assessed ototoxicity induced by therapeutic doses of CDDP in adult patients with germinative testicular tumors, or other tumors treated with an identical CDDP dosage scheme. Audiological examination before, during and after the treatment has shown deterioration in hearing; first in the high-frequencies and with increased CDDP cumulative doses, impairment in other frequencies as well. Occurrence of tinnitus was not dependent on the administered dose of CDDP, or the other risk factors examined in this study. The association of CDDP induced ototoxicity with genetic polymorphisms in candidate genes was examined. Our study has demonstrated an association of early onset of CDDP induced ototoxicity with the presence of two copies of GSTT1 gene (p=0,009) and with T allele of rs9332377 polymorphism in COMT gene (p=0,001). PMID:26774148

  1. Health risks from increases in methylmercury exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Mottet, N K; Shaw, C M; Burbacher, T M

    1985-01-01

    Our present knowledge of the human health effects of methylmercury exposure is derived from study of major outbreaks of human poisonings in Japan and Iraq and experimental studies on primates. Methylmercury readily passes through such physiological barriers as the blood-brain barrier, blood-testes barrier, and the placenta. Its major pathological effects are on the nervous and reproductive systems and the developing embryo/fetus. The neurotoxicity of methylmercury is well established in both humans and non-human primates. Lesions in the cerebral and cerebellar gray matter consist of necrosis and lysis of neurons, phagocytosis and gliosis. The changes are most prominent in the deep sulci and may have a vascular component. A late effect is cerebral atrophy. At high dose levels the liver, kidneys, and other organs may also have degenerative changes. Although not yet described in humans, a major effect of exposure of female primates is an adverse effect on pregnancy. Maternal female M. fascicularis blood mercury levels above 1 ppm are associated with a decreased pregnancy rate and increased abortion rate. To date our experimental data lack sufficient numbers to detect infrequent pregnancy effects below 1 ppm. Preliminary studies also reveal that methylmercury may also decrease the number and function (swim speed) of sperm. Both human and primate studies demonstrate deleterious effects of methylmercury on the developing embryo/fetus. Autopsies on human and primate infants reveal retarded brain development and the occurrence of a cerebral palsy-like behavior in the newborns, whereas the mother may be free of signs and symptoms of methylmercury toxicity. The fetal blood level of mercury is higher than the maternal level.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 5. PMID:3908085

  2. Electrophysiological markers of genetic risk for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tye, Charlotte; McLoughlin, Gráinne; Kuntsi, Jonna; Asherson, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is an ideal neuroscientific approach, providing a direct measurement of neural activity that demonstrates reliability, developmental stability and high heritability. This systematic review of a subset of domains evaluates the utility of electrophysiological measures as potential intermediate phenotypes for ADHD in the domains of quantitative EEG indices of arousal and intra-individual variability, and functional investigations of inhibitory and error processing using the event-related potential (ERP) technique. Each domain demonstrates consistent and meaningful associations with ADHD, a degree of genetic overlap with ADHD and potential links to specific genetic variants. Investigations of the genetic and environmental contributions to EEG/ERP and shared genetic overlap with ADHD may enhance molecular genetic studies and provide novel insights into aetiology. Such research will aid in the precise characterisation of the clinical deficits seen in ADHD and guide the development of novel intervention and prevention strategies for those at risk. PMID:21426626

  3. Disparities in Cancer Genetic Risk Assessment and Testing.

    PubMed

    Underhill, Meghan L; Jones, Tarsha; Habin, Karleen

    2016-07-01

    Scientific and technologic advances in genomics have revolutionized genetic counseling and testing, targeted therapy, and cancer screening and prevention. Among younger women, African American and Hispanic women have a higher rate of cancers that are associated with hereditary cancer risk, such as triple-negative breast cancer, which is linked to poorer outcomes. Therefore, genetic testing is particularly important in diverse populations. Unfortunately, all races and ethnic groups are not well represented in current genetic testing practices, leading to disparities in cancer prevention and early detection. PMID:27314195

  4. Relation of the multilocus genetic composite reflecting high dopamine signaling capacity to future increases in BMI☆

    PubMed Central

    Yokum, Sonja; Marti, C. Nathan; Smolen, Andrew; Stice, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Because food intake exerts its rewarding effect by increasing dopamine (DA) signaling in reward circuitry, it theoretically follows that individuals with a greater number of genotypes putatively associated with high DA signaling capacity are at increased risk for overeating and subsequent weight gain. We tested the association between the multilocus genetic composite risk score, defined by the total number of genotypes putatively associated with greater DA signaling capacity (i.e. TaqIA A2 allele, DRD2-141C Ins/Del and Del/Del genotypes, DRD4-S allele, DAT1-S allele, and COMT Val/Val genotype), and future increases in Body Mass Index (BMI) in three prospective studies. Participants in Study 1 (N = 30; M age = 15.2; M baseline BMI = 26.9), Study 2 (N = 34; M age = 20.9; M baseline BMI = 28.2), and Study 3 (N = 162; M age = 15.3, M baseline BMI = 20.8) provided saliva samples from which epithelial cells were collected, permitting DNA extraction. The multilocus genetic composite risk score was associated with future increases in BMI in all three studies (Study 1, r = 0.37; Study 2, r = 0.22; Study 3, r = 0.14) and the overall sample (r = 0.19). DRD4-S was associated with increases in BMI in Study 1 (r = 0.42), Study 2 (r = 0.27), and in the overall sample (r = 0.17). DAT1-S was associated with increases in BMI in Study 3 (r = 0.17) and in the overall sample (r = 0.12). There were no associations between the other genotypes (TaqIA, COMT, and DRD2-141C) and change in BMI over 2-year follow-up. Data suggest that individuals with a genetic propensity for greater DA signaling capacity are at risk for future weight gain and that combining alleles that theoretically have a similar function may provide a more reliable method of modeling genetic risk associated with future weight gain than individual genotypes. PMID:25523644

  5. Genetic risk profiles for cancer susceptibility and therapy response.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Helmut; Dally, Heike; Popanda, Odilia; Risch, Angela; Schmezer, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Cells in the body are permanently attacked by DNA-reactive species, both from intracellular and environmental sources. Inherited and acquired deficiencies in host defense mechanisms against DNA damage (metabolic and DNA repair enzymes) can modify cancer susceptibility as well as therapy response. Genetic profiles should help to identify high-risk individuals who subsequently can be enrolled in preventive measures or treated by tailored therapy regimens. Some of our attempts to define such risk profiles are presented. Cancer susceptibility: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in metabolic and repair genes were investigated in a hospital-based lung cancer case-control study. When evaluating the risk associated with different genotypes for N-acetyltransferases (Wikman et al. 2001) and glutathione-S-transferases (Risch et al. 2001), it is mandatory to distinguish between the three major histological subtypes of lung tumors. A promoter polymorphism of the myeloperoxidase gene MPO was shown to decrease lung cancer susceptibility mainly in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) (Dally et al. 2002). The CYP3A4*1B allele was also linked to an increased SCLC risk and in smoking women increased the risk of lung cancer eightfold (Dally et al. 2003b). Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes were shown to modulate lung cancer risk in smokers, and reduced DNA repair capacity elevated the disease risk (Rajaee-Behbahani et al. 2001). Investigations of several DNA repair gene variants revealed that lung cancer risk was only moderately affected by a single variant but was enhanced up to approximately threefold by specific risk allele combinations (Popanda et al. 2004). Therapy response: Inter-individual differences in therapy response are consistently observed with cancer chemotherapeutic agents. Initial results from ongoing studies showed that certain polymorphisms in drug transporter genes (ABCB1) differentially affect response outcome in histological subgroups of lung cancer. Stronger

  6. Genetic, nongenetic and epigenetic risk determinants in developmental programming of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vaag, Allan; Brøns, Charlotte; Gillberg, Linn; Hansen, Ninna S; Hjort, Line; Arora, Geeti P; Thomas, Nihal; Broholm, Christa; Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus; Grunnet, Louise G

    2014-11-01

    Low birthweight (LBW) individuals and offspring of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) exhibit increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D) and associated cardiometabolic traits in adulthood, which for both groups may be mediated by adverse events and developmental changes in fetal life. T2D is a multifactorial disease occurring as a result of complicated interplay between genetic and both prenatal and postnatal nongenetic factors, and it remains unknown to what extent the increased risk of T2D associated with LBW or GDM in the mother may be due to, or confounded by, genetic factors. Indeed, it has been shown that genetic changes influencing risk of diabetes may also be associated with reduced fetal growth as a result of reduced insulin secretion and/or action. Similarly, increased risk of T2D among offspring could be explained by T2D susceptibility genes shared between the mother and her offspring. Epigenetic mechanisms may explain the link between factors operating in fetal life and later risk of developing T2D, but so far convincing evidence is lacking for epigenetic changes as a prime and direct cause of T2D. This review addresses recent literature on the early origins of adult disease hypothesis, with a special emphasis on the role of genetic compared with nongenetic and epigenetic risk determinants and disease mechanisms. PMID:25179736

  7. Increasing Genetic Variance of Body Mass Index during the Swedish Obesity Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Rokholm, Benjamin; Silventoinen, Karri; Tynelius, Per; Gamborg, Michael; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Rasmussen, Finn

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is no doubt that the dramatic worldwide increase in obesity prevalence is due to changes in environmental factors. However, twin and family studies suggest that genetic differences are responsible for the major part of the variation in adiposity within populations. Recent studies show that the genetic effects on body mass index (BMI) may be stronger when combined with presumed risk factors for obesity. We tested the hypothesis that the genetic variance of BMI has increased during the obesity epidemic. Methods The data comprised height and weight measurements of 1,474,065 Swedish conscripts at age 18–19 y born between 1951 and 1983. The data were linked to the Swedish Multi-Generation Register and the Swedish Twin Register from which 264,796 full-brother pairs, 1,736 monozygotic (MZ) and 1,961 dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs were identified. The twin pairs were analysed to identify the most parsimonious model for the genetic and environmental contribution to BMI variance. The full-brother pairs were subsequently divided into subgroups by year of birth to investigate trends in the genetic variance of BMI. Results The twin analysis showed that BMI variation could be explained by additive genetic and environmental factors not shared by co-twins. On the basis of the analyses of the full-siblings, the additive genetic variance of BMI increased from 4.3 [95% CI 4.04–4.53] to 7.9 [95% CI 7.28–8.54] within the study period, as did the unique environmental variance, which increased from 1.4 [95% CI 1.32–1.48] to 2.0 [95% CI 1.89–2.22]. The BMI heritability increased from 75% to 78.8%. Conclusion The results confirm the hypothesis that the additive genetic variance of BMI has increased strongly during the obesity epidemic. This suggests that the obesogenic environment has enhanced the influence of adiposity related genes. PMID:22087252

  8. Neuroimaging and Genetic Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease and Addiction-Related Degenerative Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jahanshad, Neda; Leonardo, Cassandra D.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging offers a powerful means to assess the trajectory of brain degeneration in a variety of disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here we describe how multimodal imaging can be used to study the changing brain during the different stages of AD. We integrate findings from a range of studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Neuroimaging reveals how risk genes for degenerative disorders affect the brain, including several recently discovered genetic variants that may disrupt brain connectivity. We review some recent neuroimaging studies of genetic polymorphisms associated with increased risk for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD). Some genetic variants that increase risk for drug addiction may overlap with those associated with degenerative brain disorders. These common associations offer new insight into mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration and addictive behaviors, and may offer new leads for treating them before severe and irreversible neurological symptoms appear. PMID:24142306

  9. Cost sharing and hereditary cancer risk: predictors of willingness-to-pay for genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Matro, Jennifer M; Ruth, Karen J; Wong, Yu-Ning; McCully, Katen C; Rybak, Christina M; Meropol, Neal J; Hall, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    Increasing use of predictive genetic testing to gauge hereditary cancer risk has been paralleled by rising cost-sharing practices. Little is known about how demographic and psychosocial factors may influence individuals' willingness-to-pay for genetic testing. The Gastrointestinal Tumor Risk Assessment Program Registry includes individuals presenting for genetic risk assessment based on personal/family cancer history. Participants complete a baseline survey assessing cancer history and psychosocial items. Willingness-to-pay items include intention for: genetic testing only if paid by insurance; testing with self-pay; and amount willing-to-pay ($25-$2,000). Multivariable models examined predictors of willingness-to-pay out-of-pocket (versus only if paid by insurance) and willingness-to-pay a smaller versus larger sum (≤$200 vs. ≥$500). All statistical tests are two-sided (α = 0.05). Of 385 evaluable participants, a minority (42%) had a personal cancer history, while 56% had ≥1 first-degree relative with colorectal cancer. Overall, 21.3% were willing to have testing only if paid by insurance, and 78.7% were willing-to-pay. Predictors of willingness-to-pay were: 1) concern for positive result; 2) confidence to control cancer risk; 3) fewer perceived barriers to colorectal cancer screening; 4) benefit of testing to guide screening (all p < 0.05). Subjects willing-to-pay a higher amount were male, more educated, had greater cancer worry, fewer relatives with colorectal cancer, and more positive attitudes toward genetic testing (all p < 0.05). Individuals seeking risk assessment are willing-to-pay out-of-pocket for genetic testing, and anticipate benefits to reducing cancer risk. Identifying factors associated with willingness-to-pay for genetic services is increasingly important as testing is integrated into routine cancer care. PMID:24794065

  10. Physical activity reduces hippocampal atrophy in elders at genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. Carson; Nielson, Kristy A.; Woodard, John L.; Seidenberg, Michael; Durgerian, Sally; Hazlett, Kathleen E.; Figueroa, Christina M.; Kandah, Cassandra C.; Kay, Christina D.; Matthews, Monica A.; Rao, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the impact of physical activity (PA) on longitudinal change in hippocampal volume in cognitively intact older adults at varying genetic risk for the sporadic form of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Hippocampal volume was measured from structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans administered at baseline and at an 18-month follow-up in 97 healthy, cognitively intact older adults. Participants were classified as High or Low PA based on a self-report questionnaire of frequency and intensity of exercise. Risk status was defined by the presence or absence of the apolipoprotein E-epsilon 4 (APOE-ε4) allele. Four subgroups were studied: Low Risk/High PA (n = 24), Low Risk/Low PA (n = 34), High Risk/High PA (n = 22), and High Risk/Low PA (n = 17). Over the 18 month follow-up interval, hippocampal volume decreased by 3% in the High Risk/Low PA group, but remained stable in the three remaining groups. No main effects or interactions between genetic risk and PA were observed in control brain regions, including the caudate, amygdala, thalamus, pre-central gyrus, caudal middle frontal gyrus, cortical white matter (WM), and total gray matter (GM). These findings suggest that PA may help to preserve hippocampal volume in individuals at increased genetic risk for AD. The protective effects of PA on hippocampal atrophy were not observed in individuals at low risk for AD. These data suggest that individuals at genetic risk for AD should be targeted for increased levels of PA as a means of reducing atrophy in a brain region critical for the formation of episodic memories. PMID:24795624

  11. [Recommendations for genetic testing and management of individuals genetically at-risk of cutaneous melanoma].

    PubMed

    Avril, M-F; Bahadoran, P; Cabaret, O; Caron, O; de la Fouchardière, A; Demenais, F; Desjardins, L; Frébourg, T; Hammel, P; Leccia, M-T; Lesueur, F; Mahé, E; Martin, L; Maubec, E; Remenieras, A; Richard, S; Robert, C; Soufir, N; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D; Thomas, L; Vabres, P; Bressac-de Paillerets, B

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a multifactorial disease resulting from both environmental and genetic factors. Five susceptibility genes have been identified over the past years, comprising high-risk susceptibility genes (CDKN2A, CDK4, and BAP1 genes) and intermediate-risk susceptibility genes (MITF, and MC1R genes). The aim of this expert consensus was to define clinical contexts justifying genetic analyses, to describe the conduct of these analyses, and to propose surveillance recommendations. Given the regulatory constraints, it is recommended that dermatologists work in tandem with a geneticist. Genetic analysis may be prescribed when at least two episodes of histologically proven invasive cutaneous melanoma have been diagnosed before the age of 75 years in two 1st or 2nd degree relatives or in the same individual. The occurrence in the same individual or in a relative of invasive cutaneous melanoma with ocular melanoma, pancreatic cancer, renal cancer, mesothelioma or a central nervous system tumour are also indications for genetic testing. Management is based upon properly managed photoprotection and dermatological monitoring according to genetic status. Finally, depending on the mutated gene and the familial history, associated tumour risks require specific management (e.g. ocular melanoma, pancreatic cancer). Due to the rapid progress in genetics, these recommendations will need to be updated regularly. PMID:25600792

  12. Multiple trait genomic selection methods increase genetic value prediction accuracy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic selection predicts genetic values with genome-wide markers. It is rapidly emerging in plant breeding and is widely implemented in animal breeding. Genetic correlations between quantitative traits are pervasive in many breeding programs. These correlations indicate that measurements of one tr...

  13. Autism spectrum disorders: perceptions of genetic etiology and recurrence risk among Taiwanese parents of affected children.

    PubMed

    Chen, L S; Li, C; Wang, C H; Amuta, A; Li, M; Huang, T Y; Dhar, S U; Talwar, D; Jung, E

    2015-08-01

    In Taiwan, autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are an emerging public health concern. The ongoing scientific progress for understanding the genetic etiology of ASD makes it increasingly important to examine how parents of children with ASD perceive the causes and recurrence risk of having another child with ASD. These perceptions may influence their family planning, attitudes toward genetic services, and willingness to take their children for ASD genetic testing. However, previous studies addressing this issue were conducted primarily in Western countries. As culture might shape an individual's views of genetic/genomic disorders, this first-of-its-kind study examined the perceptions of the genetic etiology for ASD and the recurrence risk among Taiwanese parents of children affected with ASD. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted among 39 parents having at least one child with ASD. Although the majority of participants believed that ASD has a genetic link, less than half perceived genetic factors as the cause of their own child's ASD. Moreover, most participants articulated their recurrence risk incorrectly. Some parents were concerned about their doctors' limited genomic competencies. To provide parents with better education, counseling, and support for making reproductive decisions, ASD-related genomic education among Taiwanese physicians is needed. PMID:25267333

  14. Developmental course of subclinical positive and negative psychotic symptoms and their associations with genetic risk status and impairment.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Mayke; Boyette, Lindy-Lou; Heering, Henriëtte D; Bartels-Velthuis, Agna A; Lataster, Tineke

    2016-07-01

    The proneness-persistence-impairment (PPI) model states that psychotic experiences are more likely to lead to impairment if their expression becomes persistent. Higher genetic risk for psychosis is known to affect proneness and persistence of subclinical positive symptoms. Less is known about potential effects of genetic risk on the course of subclinical negative symptoms, impairment, and their subsequent associations. The current study examined these issues in a large sample (n=1131), consisting of individuals with higher genetic risk (siblings of patients with psychotic disorders, n=703) and lower genetic risk (controls without a family member with lifetime psychosis, n=428). Psychotic experiences were assessed with the CAPE questionnaire, at two time points three years apart. Participants were allocated to one of four groups representing developmental course: stable low, decreasing, increasing or persisting subclinical positive/negative symptoms. Lifetime clinical psychosis was an exclusion criterion at baseline. Higher genetic risk status was found to be associated with a persisting course of both subclinical positive and negative symptoms, symptom-related distress and functional impairment. There is no evidence for an effect of genetic risk status on the association between developmental course and impairment. The results of the current study underline the importance of assessing psychotic experiences in the context of genetic risk, multidimensional and over time. Additionally, the current findings both underscore and contribute to the PPI model: psychotic experiences are more likely to lead to impairment if their expression becomes persistent, both in individuals with higher and lower genetic risk for psychosis. PMID:27157801

  15. Impact of genetic risk assessment on nutrition-related lifestyle behaviours

    PubMed Central

    Vernarelli, Jacqueline A.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility testing for common complex disease is a practice that is currently in clinical use. There are two types of gene mutations, and therefore, two varieties of genotype testing: deterministic and susceptibility. As the term suggests, deterministic genes determine whether or not a person will develop a given trait in Mendelian fashion, such as Huntington’s disease. Genotype screening for such deterministic mutations has existed for decades, and is commonly used in routine medical practice. In recent years, the sequencing of the human genome has identified several ‘susceptibility genes’ or genes with incomplete penetrance. Mutations in these genes may increase disease susceptibility, but are not causative for disease. Genetic susceptibility testing allows unaffected individuals to obtain risk information for a variety of common complex diseases and health conditions including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), CVD, cancer and diabetes. The availability of genetic susceptibility testing has increased over the past decade, and several studies are now focusing on the impact that genetic testing has on health and other lifestyle behaviours related to nutrition. The aim of this paper is to review the literature and evaluate what, if any, impact genetic risk assessment has on behaviours related to nutrition and physical activity. This paper summarises seven clinical studies that evaluated the impact of disclosing genetic risk information for disease on nutrition-related health behaviour changes. Of these seven studies, only three studies reported that health behaviour change was influenced by genotype disclosure. PMID:23095764

  16. Does using marijuana increase the risk for developing schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Evins, A Eden; Green, Alan I; Kane, John M; Murray, Robin M

    2013-04-01

    As more US states and other countries consider legalizing marijuana, clinicians need to know the possible effects of this drug. Research has shown a connection between marijuana use and an increased risk for schizophrenia in young people who are vulnerable to developing psychosis. An international panel of experts addresses topics such as risk factors for schizophrenia, the potency and effects of cannabis use on adolescents, the effects of concurrent drug use with cannabis on schizophrenia risk, and current attitudes toward marijuana. PMID:23656852

  17. Assessment of the value of a genetic risk score in improving the estimation of coronary risk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The American Heart Association has established criteria for the evaluation of novel markers of cardiovascular risk. In accordance with these criteria, we assessed the association between a multi-locus genetic risk score (GRS) and incident coronary heart disease (CHD), and evaluated whether this GRS ...

  18. Aquaculture: Incorporating risk assessment and risk management into public policies on genetically modified finfish and shellfish

    SciTech Connect

    Hallerman, E.M.; Kapuscinski, A.R.

    1995-12-31

    Genetically modified finfish and shellfish pose economic benefits to aquaculture, but also pose ecological and genetic risks to ecosystems receiving such organisms. Realization of benefits with minimization of risks posed by a new technology can be addressed through the processes of risk assessment and risk management. Public policies adopted by individual countries will reflect differences in the outocme of risk assessment and risk management processes resulting from differences among the receiving ecosystems and sets of human values at issue. A number of countries and international institutions have begun development of policies for oversight of genetically modified aquatic organisms. In the United States, a working group commissioned by the U.S. Department of Agriculture incorporated risk assessment and risk management principles into draft performance standards for safely conducting research with genetically modified finfish and shellfish. The performance standards address research with a broad range of aquatic GMO`s and compliance is intended to be voluntary. In contrast, the Canadian policy mandates adherence to specified guidelines for experiments with transgenic aquatic organisms; establishment as national policy is expended soon.

  19. Bevacizumab Increases Risk for Severe Proteinuria in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Christi; Baer, Lea; Zhu, Xiaolei

    2010-01-01

    Treatment with the chemotherapeutic agent bevacizumab, a humanized mAb that neutralizes vascular endothelial growth factor, can lead to proteinuria and renal damage. The risk factors and clinical outcomes of renal adverse events are not well understood. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of published randomized, controlled trials to assess the overall risk for severe proteinuria with bevacizumab. We analyzed data from 16 studies comprising 12,268 patients with a variety of tumors. The incidence of high-grade (grade 3 or 4) proteinuria with bevacizumab was 2.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2 to 4.3%). Compared with chemotherapy alone, bevacizumab combined with chemotherapy significantly increased the risk for high-grade proteinuria (relative risk 4.79; 95% CI 2.71 to 8.46) and nephrotic syndrome (relative risk 7.78; 95% CI 1.80 to 33.62); higher dosages of bevacizumab associated with increased risk for proteinuria. Regarding tumor type, renal cell carcinoma associated with the highest risk (cumulative incidence 10.2%). We did not detect a significant difference between platinum- and non–platinum-based concurrent chemotherapy with regard to risk for high-grade proteinuria (P = 0.39). In conclusion, the addition of bevacizumab to chemotherapy significantly increases the risk for high-grade proteinuria and nephrotic syndrome. PMID:20538785

  20. Environmental risk assessment for medicinal products containing genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Anliker, B; Longhurst, S; Buchholz, C J

    2010-01-01

    Many gene therapy medicinal products and also some vaccines consist of, or contain, genetically modified organisms (GMOs), which require specific consideration in the environmental risk assessment (ERA) before marketing authorisation or clinical trial applications. The ERA is performed in order to identify the potential risks for public health and the environment, which may arise due to the clinical use of these medicinal products. If such environmental risks are identified and considered as not acceptable, the ERA should go on to propose appropriate risk management strategies capable to reduce these risks. This article will provide an overview of the legal basis and requirements for the ERA of GMO-containing medicinal products in the context of marketing authorisation in the EU and clinical trials in Germany. Furthermore, the scientific principles and methodology that generally need to be followed when preparing an ERA for GMOs are discussed. PMID:19940966

  1. Clinical and Genetic Determinants of Cardiomyopathy Risk among Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Survivors.

    PubMed

    Leger, Kasey J; Cushing-Haugen, Kara; Hansen, John A; Fan, Wenhong; Leisenring, Wendy M; Martin, Paul J; Zhao, Lue Ping; Chow, Eric J

    2016-06-01

    Cardiomyopathy has been recognized as a complication after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Using a nested case-cohort design, we examined the relationships between demographic, therapeutic, and selected cardiovascular disease risk factors among ≥1-year HCT survivors who developed cardiomyopathy before (n = 43) or after (n = 89) 1 year from HCT as compared to a randomly selected subcohort of survivors without cardiomyopathy (n = 444). Genomic data were available for 79 cases and 267 noncases. Clinical and genetic covariates were examined for association with the risk of early or late cardiomyopathy. Clinical risk factors associated with both early- and late-onset cardiomyopathy included anthracycline exposure ≥250 mg/m(2) and pre-existing hypertension. Among late-onset cardiomyopathy cases, the development of diabetes and ischemic heart disease further increased risk. We replicated several previously reported genetic associations among early-onset cardiomyopathy cases, including rs1786814 in CELF4, rs2232228 in HAS3, and rs17863783 in UGT1A6. None of these markers were associated with risk of late-onset cardiomyopathy. A combination of demographic, treatment, and clinical covariates predicted early-onset cardiomyopathy with reasonable accuracy (area under the curve [AUC], .76; 95% confidence interval [CI], .68 to .83), but prediction of late cardiomyopathy was poor (AUC, .59; 95% CI .53 to .67). The addition of genetic polymorphisms with marginal associations (odds ratios ≥1.3) did not enhance prediction for either early- or late-onset cardiomyopathy. Conventional cardiovascular risk factors influence the risk of both early- and late-onset cardiomyopathy in HCT survivors. Although certain genetic markers may influence the risk of early-onset disease, further work is required to validate previously reported findings and to determine how genetic information should be incorporated into clinically useful risk prediction models. PMID:26968791

  2. Estimating interaction between genetic and environmental risk factors efficiency of sampling designs within a cohort

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large prospective cohorts originally assembled to study environmental risk factors are increasingly exploited to study gene-environment interactions. Given the cost of genetic studies in large numbers of subjects, being able to select a sub-sample for genotyping that contains most of the information...

  3. Shared Genetic Factors Influence Amygdala Volumes and Risk for Alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Dager, Alecia D; McKay, D Reese; Kent, Jack W; Curran, Joanne E; Knowles, Emma; Sprooten, Emma; Göring, Harald HH; Dyer, Thomas D; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Olvera, Rene L; Fox, Peter T; Lovallo, William R; Duggirala, Ravi; Almasy, Laura; Blangero, John; Glahn, David C

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse and dependence (alcohol use disorders, AUDs) are associated with brain shrinkage. Subcortical structures including the amygdala, hippocampus, ventral striatum, dorsal striatum, and thalamus subserve reward functioning and may be particularly vulnerable to alcohol-related damage. These structures may also show pre-existing deficits impacting the development and maintenance of AUD. It remains unclear whether there are common genetic features underlying both subcortical volumes and AUD. In this study, structural brain images were acquired from 872 Mexican-American individuals from extended pedigrees. Subcortical volumes were obtained using FreeSurfer, and quantitative genetic analyses were performed in SOLAR. We hypothesized the following: (1) reduced subcortical volumes in individuals with lifetime AUD relative to unrelated controls; (2) reduced subcortical volumes in individuals with current relative to past AUD; (3) in non-AUD individuals, reduced subcortical volumes in those with a family history of AUD compared to those without; and (4) evidence for common genetic underpinnings (pleiotropy) between AUD risk and subcortical volumes. Results showed that individuals with lifetime AUD showed larger ventricular and smaller amygdala volumes compared to non-AUD individuals. For the amygdala, there were no differences in volume between current vs past AUD, and non-AUD individuals with a family history of AUD demonstrated reductions compared to those with no such family history. Finally, amygdala volume was genetically correlated with the risk for AUD. Together, these results suggest that reduced amygdala volume reflects a pre-existing difference rather than alcohol-induced neurotoxic damage. Our genetic correlation analysis provides evidence for a common genetic factor underlying both reduced amygdala volumes and AUD risk. PMID:25079289

  4. Genetics of Type 2 Diabetes: It Matters From Which Parent We Inherit the Risk.

    PubMed

    Lyssenko, Valeriya; Groop, Leif; Prasad, Rashmi B

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) results from a co-occurrence of genes and environmental factors. There are more than 120 genetic loci suggested to be associated with T2D, or with glucose and insulin levels in European and multi-ethnic populations. Risk of T2D is higher in the offspring if the mother rather than the father has T2D. Genetically, this can be associated with a unique parent-of-origin (PoO) transmission of risk alleles, and it relates to genetic programming during the intrauterine period, resulting in the inability to increase insulin secretion in response to increased demands imposed by insulin resistance later in life. Such PoO transmission is seen for variants in the KLF14, KCNQ1, GRB10, TCF7L2, THADA, and PEG3 genes. Here we describe T2D susceptibility genes associated with defects in insulin secretion, and thereby risk of overt T2D. This review emphasizes the need to consider distorted parental transmission of risk alleles by exploring the genetic risk of T2D. PMID:27111116

  5. Who Is at Increased Risk of Health Problems during Pregnancy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... obese mothers also have an increased risk of neural tube defects (NTDs), stillbirth, and being large for ... Reviewed: 07/15/2013 Related A-Z Topics Neural Tube Defects (NTDs) Preeclampsia and Eclampsia Pregnancy All ...

  6. People with Increased Risk of Eye Damage from UV Light

    MedlinePlus

    ... With Increased Risk of Eye Damage from UV Light Written by: Shirley Dang Apr. 30, 2014 Everyone ... photosensitivity, though the reaction is rare. People with light-colored eyes Have blue or green eyes? Cover ...

  7. Genetic and environmental determinants of risk for cholangiocarcinoma in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Masanao; Honjo, Satoshi; You, Gyokukou; Tanaka, Masakazu; Uchida, Kazuhiko; Srivatanakul, Petcharin; Khuhaprema, Thiravud; Loilome, Watcharin; Techasen, Anchalee; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Limpaiboon, Temduang; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Wongkham, Sopit

    2014-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a difficult cancer to diagnose in the early stage and to treat by curative resection. The incidence of CCA in the northeast of Thailand is the highest in the world. To make progress in detecting a high risk group and in the prevention and detection of CCA, we have been analyzing the risk factors for CCA. Although liver fluke infection is known to be a risk factor, there are patients who are not infected with the liver fluke and not all people infected with the liver fluke will suffer from the disease. Therefore, it is of the utmost importance to analyze the risk factors and the mechanism to prevent the disease and also to detect the disease in its early stage to save patients’ lives. Through collaboration among Thai and Japanese researchers, we analyzed the genetic and environmental determinants of risks for CCA. Also, we have been trying to develop methods to detect the disease in a non-invasive way. Without repeating findings reported in various reviews on CCA, we will first discuss the environmental and genetic determinants of the risks for CCA. Second, we will discuss the properties of CCA, including the etiological agents and the mechanism of cholangiocarcinogenesis, and finally, we will discuss future approaches to prevent and cure CCA from the standpoint of evidence-based medicine. We will discuss these points by including the data from our laboratories. We would like to emphasize the importance of the genetic data, especially whole genome approaches, to understand the properties of CCA, to find a high risk population for CCA and to develop effective preventative methods to stop the carcinogenic steps toward CCA in the near future. In addition, it is of the upmost importance to develop a non-invasive, specific and sensitive method to detect CCA in its early stage for the application of modern medical approaches to help patients with CCA. PMID:25401000

  8. Can shrub cover increase predation risk for a desert rodent?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schooley, R.L.; Sharpe, Peter B.

    1996-01-01

    Previous research indicates that predation risk may influence activity patterns, habitat partitioning, and community structure of nocturnal desert rodents. Shrub microhabitat is typically considered safer than open microhabitat for these small mammals. We investigated predation risk for Townsend's ground squirrels (Spermophilus townsendii), which are diurnal desert rodents that detect predators visually and use burrows for refuge. Our results suggested that shrub cover may increase risk for these squirrels by decreasing their ability to escape from predators. Our field experiment indicated that running speeds of juvenile squirrels were lower in shrub (Ceratoides lanata) habitat than in open areas. Shrub cover was also associated with shorter predator-detection distances (mammalian and avian) and fewer refuges (burrow entrances per hectare) than in open areas in one year but not in another. Our study demonstrated that the visual and locomotive obstruction of vegetative cover may increase predation risk for diurnal desert rodents and that elements of habitat-dependent risk may be temporally dynamic.

  9. Epigenomic strategies at the interface of genetic and environmental risk factors for autism

    PubMed Central

    LaSalle, Janine M.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders have been increasing in prevalence over the past two decades, primarily because of increased awareness and diagnosis. However, autism is clearly a complex human genetic disorder that involves interactions between genes and environment. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation act at the interface of genetic and environmental risk and protective factors. Advancements in genome-wide sequencing has broadened the view of the human methylome and revealed the organization of the human genome into large-scale methylation domains that footprint over neurologically important genes involved in embryonic development. Future integrative epigenomic analyses of genetic risk factors with environmental exposures and methylome analyses are expected to be important for understanding the complex etiology of autism spectrum disorders. PMID:23677056

  10. KCNJ11: Genetic Polymorphisms and Risk of Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Haghvirdizadeh, Polin; Mohamed, Zahurin; Abdullah, Nor Azizan; Haghvirdizadeh, Pantea; Haerian, Monir Sadat; Haerian, Batoul Sadat

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major worldwide health problem and its prevalence has been rapidly increasing in the last century. It is caused by defects in insulin secretion or insulin action or both, leading to hyperglycemia. Of the various types of DM, type 2 occurs most frequently. Multiple genes and their interactions are involved in the insulin secretion pathway. Insulin secretion is mediated through the ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel in pancreatic beta cells. This channel is a heteromeric protein, composed of four inward-rectifier potassium ion channel (Kir6.2) tetramers, which form the pore of the KATP channel, as well as sulfonylurea receptor 1 subunits surrounding the pore. Kir6.2 is encoded by the potassium inwardly rectifying channel, subfamily J, member 11 (KCNJ11) gene, a member of the potassium channel genes. Numerous studies have reported the involvement of single nucleotide polymorphisms of the KCNJ11 gene and their interactions in the susceptibility to DM. This review discusses the current evidence for the contribution of common KCNJ11 genetic variants to the development of DM. Future studies should concentrate on understanding the exact role played by these risk variants in the development of DM. PMID:26448950

  11. Meat, vegetables and genetic polymorphisms and the risk of colorectal carcinomas and adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Skjelbred, Camilla F; Sæbø, Mona; Hjartåker, Anette; Grotmol, Tom; Hansteen, Inger-Lise; Tveit, Kjell M; Hoff, Geir; Kure, Elin H

    2007-01-01

    Background The risk of sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) is mainly associated with lifestyle factors, particularly dietary factors. Diets high in red meat and fat and low in fruit and vegetables are associated with an increased risk of CRC. The dietary effects may be modulated by genetic polymorphisms in biotransformation genes. In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of dietary factors in combination with genetic factors in the different stages of colorectal carcinogenesis in a Norwegian population. Methods We used a case-control study design (234 carcinomas, 229 high-risk adenomas, 762 low-risk adenomas and 400 controls) to test the association between dietary factors (meat versus fruit, berries and vegetables) genetic polymorphisms in biotransformation genes (GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1 Ile105Val, EPHX1 Tyr113His and EPHX1 His139Arg), and risk of colorectal carcinomas and adenomas. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were estimated by binary logistic regression. Results A higher ratio of total meat to total fruit, berry and vegetable intake was positively associated with both high and low-risk adenomas, with approximately twice the higher risk in the 2nd quartile compared to the lowest quartile. For the high-risk adenomas this positive association was more obvious for the common allele (Tyr allele) of the EPHX1 codon 113 polymorphism. An association was also observed for the EPHX1 codon 113 polymorphism in the low-risk adenomas, although not as obvious. Conclusion Although, the majority of the comparison groups are not significant, our results suggest an increased risk of colorectal adenomas in individuals for some of the higher ratios of total meat to total fruit, berry and vegetable intake. In addition the study supports the notion that the biotransformation enzymes GSTM1, GSTP1 and EPHX1 may modify the effect of dietary factors on the risk of developing colorectal carcinoma and adenoma. PMID:18093316

  12. A KRAS-variant in ovarian cancer acts as a genetic marker of cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Ratner, Elena; Lu, Lingeng; Boeke, Marta; Barnett, Rachel; Nallur, Sunitha; Chin, Lena J; Pelletier, Cory; Blitzblau, Rachel; Tassi, Renata; Paranjape, Trupti; Hui, Pei; Godwin, Andrew K; Yu, Herbert; Risch, Harvey; Rutherford, Thomas; Schwartz, Peter; Santin, Alessandro; Matloff, Ellen; Zelterman, Daniel; Slack, Frank J; Weidhaas, Joanne B

    2010-08-15

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the single most deadly form of women's cancer, typically presenting as an advanced disease at diagnosis in part due to a lack of known risk factors or genetic markers of risk. The KRAS oncogene and altered levels of the microRNA (miRNA) let-7 are associated with an increased risk of developing solid tumors. In this study, we investigated a hypothesized association between an increased risk of OC and a variant allele of KRAS at rs61764370, referred to as the KRAS-variant, which disrupts a let-7 miRNA binding site in this oncogene. Specimens obtained were tested for the presence of the KRAS-variant from nonselected OC patients in three independent cohorts, two independent ovarian case-control studies, and OC patients with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) as well as their family members. Our results indicate that the KRAS-variant is associated with more than 25% of nonselected OC cases. Further, we found that it is a marker for a significant increased risk of developing OC, as confirmed by two independent case-control analyses. Lastly, we determined that the KRAS-variant was present in 61% of HBOC patients without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, previously considered uninformative, as well as in their family members with cancer. Our findings strongly support the hypothesis that the KRAS-variant is a genetic marker for increased risk of developing OC, and they suggest that the KRAS-variant may be a new genetic marker of cancer risk for HBOC families without other known genetic abnormalities. PMID:20647319

  13. Rapid range expansion increases genetic differentiation while causing limited reduction in genetic diversity in a damselfly

    PubMed Central

    Swaegers, J; Mergeay, J; Therry, L; Larmuseau, M H D; Bonte, D; Stoks, R

    2013-01-01

    Many ectothermic species are currently expanding their geographic range due to global warming. This can modify the population genetic diversity and structure of these species because of genetic drift during the colonization of new areas. Although the genetic signatures of historical range expansions have been investigated in an array of species, the genetic consequences of natural, contemporary range expansions have received little attention, with the only studies available focusing on range expansions along a narrow front. We investigate the genetic consequences of a natural range expansion in the Mediterranean damselfly Coenagrion scitulum, which is currently rapidly expanding along a broad front in different directions. We assessed genetic diversity and genetic structure using 12 microsatellite markers in five centrally located populations and five recently established populations at the edge of the geographic distribution. Our results suggest that, although a marginal significant decrease in the allelic richness was found in the edge populations, genetic diversity has been preserved during the range expansion of this species. Nevertheless, edge populations were genetically more differentiated compared with core populations, suggesting genetic drift during the range expansion. The smaller effective population sizes of the edge populations compared with central populations also suggest a contribution of genetic drift after colonization. We argue and document that range expansion along multiple axes of a broad expansion front generates little reduction in genetic diversity, yet stronger differentiation of the edge populations. PMID:23820582

  14. Rapid range expansion increases genetic differentiation while causing limited reduction in genetic diversity in a damselfly.

    PubMed

    Swaegers, J; Mergeay, J; Therry, L; Larmuseau, M H D; Bonte, D; Stoks, R

    2013-11-01

    Many ectothermic species are currently expanding their geographic range due to global warming. This can modify the population genetic diversity and structure of these species because of genetic drift during the colonization of new areas. Although the genetic signatures of historical range expansions have been investigated in an array of species, the genetic consequences of natural, contemporary range expansions have received little attention, with the only studies available focusing on range expansions along a narrow front. We investigate the genetic consequences of a natural range expansion in the Mediterranean damselfly Coenagrion scitulum, which is currently rapidly expanding along a broad front in different directions. We assessed genetic diversity and genetic structure using 12 microsatellite markers in five centrally located populations and five recently established populations at the edge of the geographic distribution. Our results suggest that, although a marginal significant decrease in the allelic richness was found in the edge populations, genetic diversity has been preserved during the range expansion of this species. Nevertheless, edge populations were genetically more differentiated compared with core populations, suggesting genetic drift during the range expansion. The smaller effective population sizes of the edge populations compared with central populations also suggest a contribution of genetic drift after colonization. We argue and document that range expansion along multiple axes of a broad expansion front generates little reduction in genetic diversity, yet stronger differentiation of the edge populations. PMID:23820582

  15. Risk estimations, risk factors, and genetic variants associated with Alzheimer's disease in selected publications from the Framingham Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Galit; Wolf, Philip A; Beiser, Alexa S; Au, Rhoda; Seshadri, Sudha

    2013-01-01

    The study of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the Framingham Heart Study (FHS), a multi-generational, community-based population study, began nearly four decades ago. In this overview, we highlight findings from seven prior publications that examined lifetime risk estimates for AD, environmental risk factors for AD, circulating and imaging markers of aging-related brain injury, and explorations on the genetics underlying AD. First, we describe estimations of the lifetime risk of AD. These estimates are distinguished from other measures of disease burden and have substantial public health implications. We then describe prospective studies of environmental AD risk factors: one examined the association between plasma levels of omega-3 fatty-acid and risk of incident AD, the other explored the association of diabetes to this risk in subsamples with specific characteristics. With evidence of inflammation as an underlying mechanism, we also describe findings from a study that compared the effects of serum cytokines and spontaneous production of peripheral blood mononuclear cell cytokines on AD risk. Investigating AD related endophenotypes increases sensitivity in identifying risk factors and can be used to explore pathophysiologic pathways between a risk factor and the disease. We describe findings of an association between large volume of white matter hyperintensities and a specific pattern of cognitive deficits in non-demented participants. Finally, we summarize our findings from two genetic studies: The first used genome-wide association (GWA) and family-based association methods to explore the genetic basis of cognitive and structural brain traits. The second is a large meta-analysis GWA study of AD, in which novel loci of AD susceptibility were found. Together, these findings demonstrate the FHS multi-directional efforts in investigating dementia and AD. PMID:22796871

  16. Continued Increases in the Relative Risk of Death From Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We examined changes in the relative risk of death among current and former smokers over recent decades in the United States. Methods. Data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were linked to subsequent deaths. We calculated age-standardized death rates by gender and smoking status, and estimated multivariate discrete time logit regression models. Results. The risk of death for a smoker compared with that for a never-smoker increased by 25.4% from 1987 to 2006 based on NHIS data. Analysis of NHANES data from 1971 to 2006 showed an even faster annual increase in the relative risk of death for current smokers. Former smokers also showed an increasing relative risk of death, although the increase was slower than that among current smokers and not always statistically significant. These trends were not related to increasing educational selectivity of smokers or increased smoking intensity or duration among current smokers. Smokers may have become more adversely selected on other health-related variables. Conclusions. A continuing increase in the relative risk of death for current and former smokers suggests that the contribution of smoking to national mortality patterns is not decreasing as rapidly as would be implied by the decreasing prevalence of smoking among Americans. PMID:23050582

  17. Creating a genetic risk score for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Dandona, Sonny; Roberts, Robert

    2009-05-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) and its sequelae represent a significant health burden. Over the past two decades, numerous studies have attempted to link DNA sequence variation with the risk of CAD and related phenotypes. There has been significant evolution in technology from the early linkage studies within kindreds, and now we are able to use high-density genotyping to facilitate large-scale genome-wide association studies. The first novel genetic risk factor for CAD, 9p21.3, has been confirmed, and other loci are awaiting replication studies. The relative importance of each locus from a global standpoint and the incremental information conferred by testing for genetic variants remain to be determined. PMID:19361348

  18. Increased Risk of Stroke in Patients With Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chun-Hung; Chen, Jiunn-Horng; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Lin, Ming-Chia; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neuropsychiatric diseases might enhance stroke development, possibly through inflammation and atherosclerosis. Approximately 25% to 40% of patients with stroke, largely younger patients, are not associated with any conventional stroke risk factors. In this research, we explored whether fibromyalgia (FM), a neuropsychosomatic disorder, increases stroke risk. From a claims dataset with one million enrollees sourced of the Taiwan National Health Insurance database, we selected 47,279 patients with FM and randomly selected 189,112 age- and sex-matched controls within a 3-year period from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2002. Stroke risk was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Comorbidities associated with increased stroke risk, such as hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, coronary heart disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and interstitial cystitis, were more prevalent in patients with FM and high stroke risk than in the controls. The overall stroke risk was 1.25-fold (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.21–1.30) higher in the FM group than in the non-FM group. Even without comorbidities, stroke risk was higher in patients with FM than in the controls (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 1.44, 95% CI: 1.35–1.53, P < 0.001). The relative risk of stroke was 2.26-fold between FM and non-FM groups in younger patients (age <35 years, 95% CI: 1.86–2.75). This is the first investigation associating FM with an increased risk of stroke development. The outcomes imply that FM is a significant risk factor for stroke and that patients with FM, particularly younger patients, require close attention and rigorous measures for preventing stroke. PMID:26937918

  19. APOL1 Kidney Risk Alleles: Population Genetics and Disease Associations

    PubMed Central

    Limou, Sophie; Nelson, George W.; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Winkler, Cheryl A.

    2014-01-01

    APOL1 kidney disease is a unique case in the field of the genetics of common disease: 2 variants (termed G1 and G2) with high population frequency have been repeatedly associated with nondiabetic CKDs, with very strong effect size (odds ratios 3–29) in populations of sub-Saharan African descent. This review provides an update on the spectrum of APOL1 kidney disease and on the worldwide distribution of these kidney risk variants. We also summarize the proper way to run a recessive analysis on joint and independent effects of APOL1 G1 and G2 kidney risk variants. PMID:25168832

  20. Genetic variants related to height and risk of atrial fibrillation: the cardiovascular health study.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Michael A; Kaplan, Robert C; Siscovick, David S; Psaty, Bruce M; Heckbert, Susan R; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Mukamal, Kenneth J

    2014-07-15

    Increased height is a known independent risk factor for atrial fibrillation (AF). However, whether genetic determinants of height influence risk is uncertain. In this candidate gene study, we examined the association of 209 height-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with incident AF in 3,309 persons of European descent from the Cardiovascular Health Study, a prospective cohort study of older adults (aged ≥ 65 years) enrolled in 1989-1990. After a median follow-up period of 13.2 years, 879 participants developed incident AF. The height-associated SNPs together explained approximately 10% of the variation in height (P = 6.0 × 10(-8)). Using an unweighted genetic height score, we found a nonsignificant association with risk of AF (per allele, hazard ratio = 1.01, 95% confidence interval: 1.00, 1.02; P = 0.06). In weighted analyses, we found that genetically predicted height was strongly associated with AF risk (per 10 cm, hazard ratio = 1.30, 95% confidence interval: 1.03, 1.64; P = 0.03). Importantly, for all models, the inclusion of actual height completely attenuated the genetic height effect. Finally, we identified 1 nonsynonymous SNP (rs1046934) that was independently associated with AF and may warrant future study. In conclusion, we found that genetic determinants of height appear to increase the risk of AF, primarily via height itself. This approach of examining SNPs associated with an intermediate phenotype should be considered as a method for identifying novel genetic targets. PMID:24944287

  1. A Family-Centered Model for Sharing Genetic Risk.

    PubMed

    Daly, Mary B

    2015-01-01

    The successes of the Human Genome Project have ushered in a new era of genomic science. To effectively translate these discoveries, it will be critical to improve the communication of genetic risk within families. This will require a systematic approach that accounts for the nature of family relationships and sociocultural beliefs. This paper proposes the application of the Family Systems Illness Model, used in the setting of cancer care, to the evolving field of genomics. PMID:26479564

  2. Prenatal smoking and genetic risk: examining the childhood origins of externalizing behavioral problems.

    PubMed

    Petkovsek, Melissa A; Boutwell, Brian B; Beaver, Kevin M; Barnes, J C

    2014-06-01

    An ever-growing body of research has begun to focus closely on the role of prenatal smoke exposure in the development of conduct problems in children. To this point, there appears to be a correlation between prenatal nicotine exposure and behavioral problems. We build on this prior research by examining the coalescence of prenatal smoke exposure and genetic risk factors in the prediction of behavior problems. Specifically, the current study analyzed data from a nationally representative sample of twin pairs collected during early childhood. Our findings suggested that an interaction existed between prenatal smoke exposure and genetic risk factors which corresponded to increased risk of behavior problems. These findings provide evidence of a gene-environment interaction, in that prenatal smoke exposure conditioned the influence of genetic risk factors in the prediction of aggressive behavior. Interestingly, the association between genetic risk and prenatal smoking was sex-specific, and only reached statistical significance in females. Given the nature of our findings, it may shed light on why heterogeneity exists concerning the relationship between prenatal smoke exposure and externalizing behavioral problems in children. PMID:24739935

  3. Ethnic Background and Genetic Variation in the Evaluation of Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Lijun; Su, Li; Ring, Brian Z.

    2014-01-01

    The clinical use of genetic variation in the evaluation of cancer risk is expanding, and thus understanding how determinants of cancer susceptibility identified in one population can be applied to another is of growing importance. However there is considerable debate on the relevance of ethnic background in clinical genetics, reflecting both the significance and complexity of genetic heritage. We address this via a systematic review of reported associations with cancer risk for 82 markers in 68 studies across six different cancer types, comparing association results between ethnic groups and examining linkage disequilibrium between risk alleles and nearby genetic loci. We find that the relevance of ethnic background depends on the question. If asked whether the association of variants with disease risk is conserved across ethnic boundaries, we find that the answer is yes, the majority of markers show insignificant variability in association with cancer risk across ethnic groups. However if the question is whether a significant association between a variant and cancer risk is likely to reproduce, the answer is no, most markers do not validate in an ethnic group other than the discovery cohort’s ancestry. This lack of reproducibility is not attributable to studies being inadequately populated due to low allele frequency in other ethnic groups. Instead, differences in local genomic structure between ethnic groups are associated with the strength of association with cancer risk and therefore confound interpretation of the implied physiologic association tracked by the disease allele. This suggest that a biological association for cancer risk alleles may be broadly consistent across ethnic boundaries, but reproduction of a clinical study in another ethnic group is uncommon, in part due to confounding genomic architecture. As clinical studies are increasingly performed globally this has important implications for how cancer risk stratifiers should be studied and

  4. Genetic determinants of telomere length and risk of common cancers: a Mendelian randomization study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chenan; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Burgess, Stephen; Hung, Rayjean J.; Lindström, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Gong, Jian; Amos, Christopher I.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Bickeböller, Heike; Risch, Angela; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James D.; Houlston, Richard S.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Timofeeva, Maria N.; Wang, Yufei; Heinrich, Joachim; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Muir, Ken; Wiklund, Fredrik; Grönberg, Henrik; Berndt, Sonja I.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Andrulis, Irene L.; Hopper, John L.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; John, Esther M.; Malone, Kathleen E.; Gammon, Marilie D.; Ursin, Giske; Whittemore, Alice S.; Hunter, David J.; Gruber, Stephen B.; Knight, Julia A.; Hou, Lifang; Le Marchand, Loic; Newcomb, Polly A.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Chan, Andrew T.; Li, Li; Woods, Michael O.; Ahsan, Habibul; Pierce, Brandon L.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported inconsistent associations between telomere length (TL) and risk for various cancers. These inconsistencies are likely attributable, in part, to biases that arise due to post-diagnostic and post-treatment TL measurement. To avoid such biases, we used a Mendelian randomization approach and estimated associations between nine TL-associated SNPs and risk for five common cancer types (breast, lung, colorectal, ovarian and prostate cancer, including subtypes) using data on 51 725 cases and 62 035 controls. We then used an inverse-variance weighted average of the SNP-specific associations to estimate the association between a genetic score representing long TL and cancer risk. The long TL genetic score was significantly associated with increased risk of lung adenocarcinoma (P = 6.3 × 10−15), even after exclusion of a SNP residing in a known lung cancer susceptibility region (TERT-CLPTM1L) P = 6.6 × 10−6). Under Mendelian randomization assumptions, the association estimate [odds ratio (OR) = 2.78] is interpreted as the OR for lung adenocarcinoma corresponding to a 1000 bp increase in TL. The weighted TL SNP score was not associated with other cancer types or subtypes. Our finding that genetic determinants of long TL increase lung adenocarcinoma risk avoids issues with reverse causality and residual confounding that arise in observational studies of TL and disease risk. Under Mendelian randomization assumptions, our finding suggests that longer TL increases lung adenocarcinoma risk. However, caution regarding this causal interpretation is warranted in light of the potential issue of pleiotropy, and a more general interpretation is that SNPs influencing telomere biology are also implicated in lung adenocarcinoma risk. PMID:26138067

  5. Genetic determinants of telomere length and risk of common cancers: a Mendelian randomization study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenan; Doherty, Jennifer A; Burgess, Stephen; Hung, Rayjean J; Lindström, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Gong, Jian; Amos, Christopher I; Sellers, Thomas A; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Bickeböller, Heike; Risch, Angela; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James D; Houlston, Richard S; Landi, Maria Teresa; Timofeeva, Maria N; Wang, Yufei; Heinrich, Joachim; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Eeles, Rosalind A; Muir, Ken; Wiklund, Fredrik; Grönberg, Henrik; Berndt, Sonja I; Chanock, Stephen J; Schumacher, Fredrick; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Andrulis, Irene L; Hopper, John L; Chang-Claude, Jenny; John, Esther M; Malone, Kathleen E; Gammon, Marilie D; Ursin, Giske; Whittemore, Alice S; Hunter, David J; Gruber, Stephen B; Knight, Julia A; Hou, Lifang; Le Marchand, Loic; Newcomb, Polly A; Hudson, Thomas J; Chan, Andrew T; Li, Li; Woods, Michael O; Ahsan, Habibul; Pierce, Brandon L

    2015-09-15

    Epidemiological studies have reported inconsistent associations between telomere length (TL) and risk for various cancers. These inconsistencies are likely attributable, in part, to biases that arise due to post-diagnostic and post-treatment TL measurement. To avoid such biases, we used a Mendelian randomization approach and estimated associations between nine TL-associated SNPs and risk for five common cancer types (breast, lung, colorectal, ovarian and prostate cancer, including subtypes) using data on 51 725 cases and 62 035 controls. We then used an inverse-variance weighted average of the SNP-specific associations to estimate the association between a genetic score representing long TL and cancer risk. The long TL genetic score was significantly associated with increased risk of lung adenocarcinoma (P = 6.3 × 10(-15)), even after exclusion of a SNP residing in a known lung cancer susceptibility region (TERT-CLPTM1L) P = 6.6 × 10(-6)). Under Mendelian randomization assumptions, the association estimate [odds ratio (OR) = 2.78] is interpreted as the OR for lung adenocarcinoma corresponding to a 1000 bp increase in TL. The weighted TL SNP score was not associated with other cancer types or subtypes. Our finding that genetic determinants of long TL increase lung adenocarcinoma risk avoids issues with reverse causality and residual confounding that arise in observational studies of TL and disease risk. Under Mendelian randomization assumptions, our finding suggests that longer TL increases lung adenocarcinoma risk. However, caution regarding this causal interpretation is warranted in light of the potential issue of pleiotropy, and a more general interpretation is that SNPs influencing telomere biology are also implicated in lung adenocarcinoma risk. PMID:26138067

  6. Smoking and Diabetes: Does the Increased Risk Ever Go Away?

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Juhua; Rossouw, Jacques; Tong, Elisa; Giovino, Gary A.; Lee, Cathy C.; Chen, Chu; Ockene, Judith K.; Qi, Lihong; Margolis, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies reported that smoking cessation leads to higher short-term risk of type 2 diabetes than continuing to smoke. However, the duration of increased diabetes risk following smoking cessation needs further investigation. We followed 135,906 postmenopausal women aged 50–79 years enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative between September 1, 1993, and December 31, 1998, over an average of 11 years to examine the association between smoking cessation and risk of diabetes using Cox proportional hazard multivariable-adjusted regression models. Compared with that for never smokers, the risk for diabetes was significantly elevated in current smokers (hazard ratio = 1.28, 95% confidence interval: 1.20, 1.36) but was even higher in women who quit smoking during the first 3 years of follow-up (hazard ratio = 1.43, 95% confidence interval: 1.26, 1.63). Among former smokers, the risk of diabetes decreased significantly as the time since quitting increased and was equal to that of never smokers following a cessation period of 10 years. In new quitters with low cumulative exposure (<20 pack-years), diabetes risk was not elevated following smoking cessation. In conclusion, the risk of diabetes in former smokers returns to that in never smokers 10 years after quitting, and even more quickly in lighter smokers. PMID:23817918

  7. DYT1 dystonia increases risk taking in humans.

    PubMed

    Arkadir, David; Radulescu, Angela; Raymond, Deborah; Lubarr, Naomi; Bressman, Susan B; Mazzoni, Pietro; Niv, Yael

    2016-01-01

    It has been difficult to link synaptic modification to overt behavioral changes. Rodent models of DYT1 dystonia, a motor disorder caused by a single gene mutation, demonstrate increased long-term potentiation and decreased long-term depression in corticostriatal synapses. Computationally, such asymmetric learning predicts risk taking in probabilistic tasks. Here we demonstrate abnormal risk taking in DYT1 dystonia patients, which is correlated with disease severity, thereby supporting striatal plasticity in shaping choice behavior in humans. PMID:27249418

  8. The increasing risk of Lyme disease in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Catherine; Leonard, Erin; Koffi, Jules Konan; Pelcat, Yann; Peregrine, Andrew; Chilton, Neil; Rochon, Kateryn; Lysyk, Tim; Lindsay, L. Robbin; Ogden, Nicholas Hume

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing risk of Lyme disease in Canada due to range expansion of the tick vector, Ixodes scapularis. The objectives of this article are to i) raise public awareness with the help of veterinarians on the emerging and expanding risk of Lyme disease across Canada, ii) review the key clinical features of Lyme disease in dogs, and iii) provide recommendations for veterinarians on the management of Lyme disease in dogs. PMID:26130829

  9. Increasing stress on disaster risk finance due to large floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongman, Brenden; Hochrainer-Stigler, Stefan; Feyen, Luc; Aerts, Jeroen; Mechler, Reinhard; Botzen, Wouter; Bouwer, Laurens; Pflug, Georg; Rojas, Rodrigo; Ward, Philip

    2014-05-01

    Recent major flood disasters have shown that single extreme events can affect multiple countries simultaneously, which puts high pressure on trans-national risk reduction and risk transfer mechanisms. To date, little is known about such flood hazard interdependencies across regions, and the corresponding joint risks at regional to continental scales. Reliable information on correlated loss probabilities is crucial for developing robust insurance schemes and public adaptation funds, and for enhancing our understanding of climate change impacts. Here we show that extreme discharges are strongly correlated across European river basins and that these correlations can, or should, be used in national to continental scale risk assessment. We present probabilistic trends in continental flood risk, and demonstrate that currently observed extreme flood losses could more than double in frequency by 2050 under future climate change and socioeconomic development. The results demonstrate that accounting for tail dependencies leads to higher estimates of extreme losses than estimates based on the traditional assumption of independence between basins. We suggest that risk management for these increasing losses is largely feasible, and we demonstrate that risk can be shared by expanding risk transfer financing, reduced by investing in flood protection, or absorbed by enhanced solidarity between countries. We conclude that these measures have vastly different efficiency, equity and acceptability implications, which need to be taken into account in broader consultation, for which our analysis provides a basis.

  10. Performance of an Adipokine Pathway-Based Multilocus Genetic Risk Score for Prostate Cancer Risk Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Ricardo J. T.; Monteiro, Cátia P. D.; Azevedo, Andreia S. M.; Cunha, Virgínia F. M.; Ramanakumar, Agnihotram V.; Fraga, Avelino M.; Pina, Francisco M.; Lopes, Carlos M. S.; Medeiros, Rui M.; Franco, Eduardo L.

    2012-01-01

    Few biomarkers are available to predict prostate cancer risk. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tend to have weak individual effects but, in combination, they have stronger predictive value. Adipokine pathways have been implicated in the pathogenesis. We used a candidate pathway approach to investigate 29 functional SNPs in key genes from relevant adipokine pathways in a sample of 1006 men eligible for prostate biopsy. We used stepwise multivariate logistic regression and bootstrapping to develop a multilocus genetic risk score by weighting each risk SNP empirically based on its association with disease. Seven common functional polymorphisms were associated with overall and high-grade prostate cancer (Gleason≥7), whereas three variants were associated with high metastatic-risk prostate cancer (PSA≥20 ng/mL and/or Gleason≥8). The addition of genetic variants to age and PSA improved the predictive accuracy for overall and high-grade prostate cancer, using either the area under the receiver-operating characteristics curves (P<0.02), the net reclassification improvement (P<0.001) and integrated discrimination improvement (P<0.001) measures. These results suggest that functional polymorphisms in adipokine pathways may act individually and cumulatively to affect risk and severity of prostate cancer, supporting the influence of adipokine pathways in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer. Use of such adipokine multilocus genetic risk score can enhance the predictive value of PSA and age in estimating absolute risk, which supports further evaluation of its clinical significance. PMID:22792137

  11. Integration of genetic and clinical risk factors improves prognostication in relapsed childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Irving, Julie A E; Enshaei, Amir; Parker, Catriona A; Sutton, Rosemary; Kuiper, Roland P; Erhorn, Amy; Minto, Lynne; Venn, Nicola C; Law, Tamara; Yu, Jiangyan; Schwab, Claire; Davies, Rosanna; Matheson, Elizabeth; Davies, Alysia; Sonneveld, Edwin; den Boer, Monique L; Love, Sharon B; Harrison, Christine J; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M; Revesz, Tamas; Saha, Vaskar; Moorman, Anthony V

    2016-08-18

    Somatic genetic abnormalities are initiators and drivers of disease and have proven clinical utility at initial diagnosis. However, the genetic landscape and its clinical utility at relapse are less well understood and have not been studied comprehensively. We analyzed cytogenetic data from 427 children with relapsed B-cell precursor ALL treated on the international trial, ALLR3. Also we screened 238 patients with a marrow relapse for selected copy number alterations (CNAs) and mutations. Cytogenetic risk groups were predictive of outcome postrelapse and survival rates at 5 years for patients with good, intermediate-, and high-risk cytogenetics were 68%, 47%, and 26%, respectively (P < .001). TP53 alterations and NR3C1/BTG1 deletions were associated with a higher risk of progression: hazard ratio 2.36 (95% confidence interval, 1.51-3.70, P < .001) and 2.15 (1.32-3.48, P = .002). NRAS mutations were associated with an increased risk of progression among standard-risk patients with high hyperdiploidy: 3.17 (1.15-8.71, P = .026). Patients classified clinically as standard and high risk had distinct genetic profiles. The outcome of clinical standard-risk patients with high-risk cytogenetics was equivalent to clinical high-risk patients. Screening patients at relapse for key genetic abnormalities will enable the integration of genetic and clinical risk factors to improve patient stratification and outcome. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.org as #ISCRTN45724312. PMID:27229005

  12. A comparison of genetic risk score with family history for estimating prostate cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Helfand, Brian T

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) testing is recommended by most authoritative groups for high-risk men including those with a family history of the disease. However, family history information is often limited by patient knowledge and clinician intake, and thus, many men are incorrectly assigned to different risk groups. Alternate methods to assess PCa risk are required. In this review, we discuss how genetic variants, referred to as PCa-risk single-nucleotide polymorphisms, can be used to calculate a genetic risk score (GRS). GRS assigns a relatively unique value to all men based on the number of PCa-risk SNPs that an individual carries. This GRS value can provide a more precise estimate of a man's PCa risk. This is particularly relevant in situations when an individual is unaware of his family history. In addition, GRS has utility and can provide a more precise estimate of risk even among men with a positive family history. It can even distinguish risk among relatives with the same degree of family relationships. Taken together, this review serves to provide support for the clinical utility of GRS as an independent test to provide supplemental information to family history. As such, GRS can serve as a platform to help guide-shared decision-making processes regarding the timing and frequency of PCa testing and biopsies. PMID:27004541

  13. Circadian misalignment increases cardiovascular disease risk factors in humans

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Christopher J.; Purvis, Taylor E.; Hu, Kun; Scheer, Frank A. J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Shift work is a risk factor for hypertension, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease. This increased risk cannot be fully explained by classic risk factors. One of the key features of shift workers is that their behavioral and environmental cycles are typically misaligned relative to their endogenous circadian system. However, there is little information on the impact of acute circadian misalignment on cardiovascular disease risk in humans. Here we show—by using two 8-d laboratory protocols—that short-term circadian misalignment (12-h inverted behavioral and environmental cycles for three days) adversely affects cardiovascular risk factors in healthy adults. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) by 3.0 mmHg and 1.5 mmHg, respectively. These results were primarily explained by an increase in blood pressure during sleep opportunities (SBP, +5.6 mmHg; DBP, +1.9 mmHg) and, to a lesser extent, by raised blood pressure during wake periods (SBP, +1.6 mmHg; DBP, +1.4 mmHg). Circadian misalignment decreased wake cardiac vagal modulation by 8–15%, as determined by heart rate variability analysis, and decreased 24-h urinary epinephrine excretion rate by 7%, without a significant effect on 24-h urinary norepinephrine excretion rate. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h serum interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, resistin, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels by 3–29%. We demonstrate that circadian misalignment per se increases blood pressure and inflammatory markers. Our findings may help explain why shift work increases hypertension, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:26858430

  14. Increasing resilience through participative flood risk map design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Sven; Spira, Yvonne; Stickler, Therese

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of flood hazards has shown to the European Commission and the Member States of the European Union the importance of flood risk management strategies in order to reduce losses and to protect the environment and the citizens. Exposure to floods as well as flood vulnerability might increase across Europe due to the ongoing economic development in many EU countries. Thus even without taking climate change into account an increase of flood disasters in Europe might be foreseeable. These circumstances have produced a reaction in the European Commission, and a Directive on the Assessment and Management of Flood Risks was issued as one of the three components of the European Action Programme on Flood Risk Management. Floods have the potential to jeopardise economic development, above all due to an increase of human activities in floodplains and the reduction of natural water retention by land use activities. As a result, an increase in the likelihood and adverse impacts of flood events is expected. Therefore, concentrated action is needed at the European level to avoid severe impacts on human life and property. In order to have an effective tool available for gathering information, as well as a valuable basis for priority setting and further technical, financial and political decisions regarding flood risk mitigation and management, it is necessary to provide for the establishment of flood risk maps which show the potential adverse consequences associated with different flood scenarios. So far, hazard and risk maps are compiled in terms of a top-down linear approach: planning authorities take the responsibility to create and implement these maps on different national and local scales, and the general public will only be informed about the outcomes (EU Floods Directive, Article 10). For the flood risk management plans, however, an "active involvement of interested parties" is required, which means at least some kind of multilateral

  15. Acute Stress Increases Sex Differences in Risk Seeking in the Balloon Analogue Risk Task

    PubMed Central

    Lighthall, Nichole R.; Mather, Mara; Gorlick, Marissa A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Decisions involving risk often must be made under stressful circumstances. Research on behavioral and brain differences in stress responses suggest that stress might have different effects on risk taking in males and females. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, participants played a computer game designed to measure risk taking (the Balloon Analogue Risk Task) fifteen minutes after completing a stress challenge or control task. Stress increased risk taking among men but decreased it among women. Conclusions/Significance Acute stress amplifies sex differences in risk seeking; making women more risk avoidant and men more risk seeking. Evolutionary principles may explain these stress-induced sex differences in risk taking behavior. PMID:19568417

  16. Assessing the benefits and risks of translocations in changing environments: a genetic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, Andrew R; Sgro, Carla M; Young, Andrew G; Frankham, Richard; Mitchell, Nicki J; Miller, Kim A; Byrne, Margaret; Coates, David J; Eldridge, Mark D B; Sunnucks, Paul; Breed, Martin F; James, Elizabeth A; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2011-01-01

    Translocations are being increasingly proposed as a way of conserving biodiversity, particularly in the management of threatened and keystone species, with the aims of maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function under the combined pressures of habitat fragmentation and climate change. Evolutionary genetic considerations should be an important part of translocation strategies, but there is often confusion about concepts and goals. Here, we provide a classification of translocations based on specific genetic goals for both threatened species and ecological restoration, separating targets based on ‘genetic rescue’ of current population fitness from those focused on maintaining adaptive potential. We then provide a framework for assessing the genetic benefits and risks associated with translocations and provide guidelines for managers focused on conserving biodiversity and evolutionary processes. Case studies are developed to illustrate the framework. PMID:22287981

  17. Psychosocial and ethical implications of defining genetic risk for cancers.

    PubMed

    Kash, K M

    1995-09-30

    In summary, we need to provide fully informed consent regarding the hazards and the benefits of genetic testing and defining risk. This reflects the first ethical principle of autonomy. It is the responsibility of the counseling team to make sure that the individual is psychologically equipped to deal with the emotional distress that may result from testing. An undue burden must not be placed on someone and harm must not be inflicted. This is the second ethical principle of beneficence. Third, awareness of the potential problems of testing is extremely important. These issues are those of disclosure, insurance problems, and employment problems--the third ethical principle of confidentiality. Recommendations for screening guidelines, regardless of testing results, should be provided. It is important for women who are not gene carriers to know that they still need to go for screening. Lastly, we need to find ways to help individuals cope with their risk status, whether it is actual high risk or perceived high risk. Helping women to develop positive coping strategies and to adhere to screening is extremely important. As the Huntington's data indicated, over time, regardless of their risk levels, individuals do learn how to cope and adapt with the outcome of testing. Women and men need to learn how to live with their risk status so that the negative psychological sequelae will be minimized. PMID:8526383

  18. A signal detection analysis of gist-based discrimination of genetic breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Christopher R.; Reyna, Valerie F.; Widmer, Colin L.; Cedillos, Elizabeth M.; Brust-Renck, Priscilla G.

    2013-01-01

    Pervasive biases in probability judgment render the probability scale a poor response mode for assessing risk judgments. By applying fuzzy trace theory, we used ordinal gist categories as a response mode, coupled with a signal detection model to assess risk judgments. The signal detection model is an extension of the familiar model used in binary choice paradigms. It provides three measures of discriminability—low versus medium risk, medium versus high risk, and low versus high risk—and two measures of response bias. We used the model to assess the effectiveness of BRCA Gist, an intelligent tutoring system designed to improve women’s judgments and understanding of genetic risk for breast cancer. Participants were randomly assigned to the BRCA Gist intelligent tutoring system, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Web pages, or a control group, and then they rated cases that had been developed using the Pedigree Assessment Tool and also vetted by medical experts. BRCA Gist participants demonstrated increased discriminability for all three risk categories, relative to the control group; the NCI group showed increased discriminability for two of the three levels. This result suggests that BRCA Gist best improved discriminability among genetic risk categories, and both BRCA Gist and the NCI website improved participants’ ability to discriminate, rather than simply shifting their decision criterion. A spreadsheet that fits the model and compares parameters across the conditions can be downloaded from the Behavior Research Methods website and used in any research involving categorical responses. PMID:23784010

  19. SNCA variants are associated with increased risk for multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Sonja W; Houlden, Henry; Schulte, Claudia; Sharma, Manu; Li, Abi; Berg, Daniela; Melchers, Anna; Paudel, Reema; Gibbs, J Raphael; Simon-Sanchez, Javier; Paisan-Ruiz, Coro; Bras, Jose; Ding, Jinhui; Chen, Honglei; Traynor, Bryan J; Arepalli, Sampath; Zonozi, Ryan R; Revesz, Tamas; Holton, Janice; Wood, Nick; Lees, Andrew; Oertel, Wolfgang; Wüllner, Ullrich; Goldwurm, Stefano; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa; Illig, Thomas; Riess, Olaf; Fernandez, Hubert H; Rodriguez, Ramon L; Okun, Michael S; Poewe, Werner; Wenning, Gregor K; Hardy, John A; Singleton, Andrew B; Del Sorbo, Francesca; Schneider, Susanne; Bhatia, Kailash P; Gasser, Thomas

    2009-05-01

    To test whether the synucleinopathies Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy (MSA) share a common genetic etiology, we performed a candidate single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) association study of the 384 most associated SNPs in a genome-wide association study of Parkinson's disease in 413 MSA cases and 3,974 control subjects. The 10 most significant SNPs were then replicated in additional 108 MSA cases and 537 controls. SNPs at the SNCA locus were significantly associated with risk for increased risk for the development of MSA (combined p = 5.5 x 10(-12); odds ratio 6.2) [corrected]. PMID:19475667

  20. Assessing genetic risks: Implications for health and social policy. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, L.B.; Fullarton, J.E.; Holtzman, N.A.; Motulsky, A.G.

    1994-12-31

    The last decade has seen remarkable growth in the understanding of genetics as applied to medicine. In addition, the technology for the detection of genetic diseases has developed rapidly, and testing for genetic diseases with DNA techniques has become increasingly possible. The last few years have also seen the initiation of the Human Genome Project, the aim of which is mapping and ultimately sequencing all human genes--giving special attention to genes that cause or may predispose to disease. As part of this ambitious project, and for the first time in the history of science, a special effort is being made as part of a large research project to explore its broader social implications. Three to five percent of the funding available for the Human Genome Project has been set aside to study the many social, ethical, and legal implications that will result from better understanding of human heredity and its impact on disease. Since assessment of genetic risks by genetic testing is expanding rapidly, the Institute of medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences undertook this study to assess the current status and future implications of such testing. This study deals with some of the scientific aspects of genetic risk assessment as well as the many societal problems that have already arisen and are likely to be posed by future developments.

  1. Genetic variations in the osteopontin promoters T-443C and G-156GG increase carotid intima–media thickness

    PubMed Central

    Yueniwati, Yuyun; Yurina, Valentina; Sobah, Nurus; Rahayu, Endang

    2016-01-01

    Carotid intima–media thickness (CIMT) is a clear predictor of atherosclerosis. The increase of CIMT is affected by mutations in the osteopontin (OPN) promoters. The purpose of this study was to examine genetic variations in OPN promoters T-443C and G-156GG, identified in Javanese children with ischemic stroke parents, and to investigate their relationship with the increase of CIMT. A case–control analytic study was performed on 20 case and 12 control samples. Case samples were Javanese children aged between 10 to 21 years with ischemic stroke parents. Control samples were children with healthy parents. Mutations of T-443C and G-156GG were determined by employing polymerase chain reaction. Results of sequencing were analyzed using CLC Main Workbench 6.0. CIMT was defined using ultrasound. Genetic variations of T-443C were identified in six samples. Likewise, genetic variations of G-156GG were identified in six samples. Genetic variations in the OPN promoters T-443C and G-156GG were not potential risk factors in an increase of CIMT (P=0.654 and P=0.654). This study proves that genetic variations could be identified at the points of T-443C and G-156GG in children with ischemic stroke parents. Although statistically insignificant, the tendency to increase CIMT occurs in children with genetic variations. Children with ischemic stroke parents have thicker CIMT than children of healthy parents. PMID:27274305

  2. Predicting the Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Its Age of Onset through Modelling Genetic Risk Variants with Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Ian C.; Seegobin, Seth D.; Steer, Sophia; Tan, Rachael; Forabosco, Paola; Hinks, Anne; Eyre, Stephen; Morgan, Ann W.; Wilson, Anthony G.; Hocking, Lynne J.; Wordsworth, Paul; Barton, Anne; Worthington, Jane; Cope, Andrew P.; Lewis, Cathryn M.

    2013-01-01

    The improved characterisation of risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) suggests they could be combined to identify individuals at increased disease risks in whom preventive strategies may be evaluated. We aimed to develop an RA prediction model capable of generating clinically relevant predictive data and to determine if it better predicted younger onset RA (YORA). Our novel modelling approach combined odds ratios for 15 four-digit/10 two-digit HLA-DRB1 alleles, 31 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and ever-smoking status in males to determine risk using computer simulation and confidence interval based risk categorisation. Only males were evaluated in our models incorporating smoking as ever-smoking is a significant risk factor for RA in men but not women. We developed multiple models to evaluate each risk factor's impact on prediction. Each model's ability to discriminate anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA)-positive RA from controls was evaluated in two cohorts: Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC: 1,516 cases; 1,647 controls); UK RA Genetics Group Consortium (UKRAGG: 2,623 cases; 1,500 controls). HLA and smoking provided strongest prediction with good discrimination evidenced by an HLA-smoking model area under the curve (AUC) value of 0.813 in both WTCCC and UKRAGG. SNPs provided minimal prediction (AUC 0.660 WTCCC/0.617 UKRAGG). Whilst high individual risks were identified, with some cases having estimated lifetime risks of 86%, only a minority overall had substantially increased odds for RA. High risks from the HLA model were associated with YORA (P<0.0001); ever-smoking associated with older onset disease. This latter finding suggests smoking's impact on RA risk manifests later in life. Our modelling demonstrates that combining risk factors provides clinically informative RA prediction; additionally HLA and smoking status can be used to predict the risk of younger and older onset RA, respectively. PMID:24068971

  3. Genetic Associations With White Matter Hyperintensities Confer Risk of Lacunar Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rutten-Jacobs, Loes C.A.; Thijs, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Levi, Chris; Bevan, Steve; Malik, Rainer; Boncoraglio, Giorgio; Sudlow, Cathie; Rothwell, Peter M.; Dichgans, Martin; Markus, Hugh S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— White matter hyperintensities (WMH) are increased in patients with lacunar stroke. Whether this is because of shared pathogenesis remains unknown. Using genetic data, we evaluated whether WMH-associated genetic susceptibility factors confer risk of lacunar stroke, and therefore whether they share pathogenesis. Methods— We used a genetic risk score approach to test whether single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with WMH in community populations were associated with magnetic resonance imaging–confirmed lacunar stroke (n=1,373), as well as cardioembolic (n=1,331) and large vessel (n=1,472) Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment subtypes, against 9,053 controls. Second, we separated lacunar strokes into those with WMH (n=568) and those without (n=787) and tested for association with the risk score in these 2 groups. In addition, we evaluated whether WMH-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms are associated with lacunar stroke, or in the 2 groups. Results— The WMH genetic risk score was associated with lacunar stroke (odds ratio [OR; 95% confidence interval [CI

  4. Potential Genetic Risk Factors for Chronic TMD: Genetic Associations from the OPPERA Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Shad B.; Maixner, Dylan; Greenspan, Joel; Dubner, Ron; Fillingim, Roger; Ohrbach, Richard; Knott, Charles; Slade, Gary; Bair, Eric; Gibson, Dustin G.; Zaykin, Dmitri V.; Weir, Bruce; Maixner, William; Diatchenko, Luda

    2011-01-01

    Genetic factors play a role in the etiology of persistent pain conditions, putatively by modulating underlying processes such as nociceptive sensitivity, psychological well-being, inflammation, and autonomic response. However, to date, only a few genes have been associated with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). This study evaluated 358 genes involved in pain processes, comparing allelic frequencies between 166 cases with chronic TMD and 1442 controls enrolled in the OPPERA (Orofacial Pain: Prospective Evaluation and Risk Assessment) study cooperative agreement. To enhance statistical power, 182 TMD cases and 170 controls from a similar study were included in the analysis. Genotyping was performed using the Pain Research Panel, an Affymetrix gene chip representing 3295 single nucleotide polymorphisms, including ancestry-informative markers that were used to adjust for population stratification. Adjusted associations between genetic markers and TMD case status were evaluated using logistic regression. The OPPERA findings provided evidence supporting previously-reported associations between TMD and two genes: HTR2A and COMT. Other genes were revealed as potential new genetic risk factors for TMD, including NR3C1, CAMK4, CHRM2, IFRD1, and GRK5. While these findings need to be replicated in independent cohorts, the genes potentially represent important markers of risk for TMD and they identify potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22074755

  5. CHRONIC CIGARETTE SMOKING IS ASSOCIATED WITH DIMINISHED FOLATE STATUS, ALTERED FOLATE FORM DISTRIBUTION, AND INCREASED GENETIC DAMAGE IN THE BUCCAL MUCOSA OF HEALTHY ADULTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Smoking causes genetic damage in buccal cells and increases the risk of oral cancer. Since folate is instrumental in DNA synthesis and repair, it is a determinant of genetic stability and therefore might attenuate the genotoxic effects of smoking. Objective: To compare folate metabolites...

  6. Increasing risk of great floods in a changing climate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milly, P.C.D.; Wetherald, R.T.; Dunne, K.A.; Delworth, T.L.

    2002-01-01

    Radiative effects of anthropogenic changes in atmospheric composition are expected to cause climate changes, in particular an intensification of the global water cycle with a consequent increase in flood risk. But the detection of anthropogenically forced changes in flooding is difficult because of the substantial natural variability; the dependence of streamflow trends on flow regime further complicates the issue. Here we investigate the changes in risk of great floods - that is, floods with discharges exceeding 100-year levels from basins larger than 200,000 km2 - using both streamflow measurements and numerical simulations of the anthropogenic climate change associated with greenhouse gases and direct radiative effects of sulphate aerosols. We find that the frequency of great floods increased substantially during the twentieth century. The recent emergence of a statistically significant positive trend in risk of great floods is consistent with results from the climate model, and the model suggests that the trend will continue.

  7. Withdrawal of hormone therapy and increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Pines, A

    2016-06-01

    Many menopause specialists follow the principle of prescribing postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) for the shortest duration needed, in order to decrease the risk of some related serious adverse effects, such as breast cancer. Based on several large studies, it seems, however, that withdrawal of HT may be associated with immediate, though small increased risk of coronary heart disease and stroke. Cessation of HT correlates with increased risk of fractures as well. This information should be relayed to hormone users while discussing the continuation of HT with their health-care provider, but, since the potential cardiovascular harm is actually very small, it should not deter symptomatic women from using HT when needed. PMID:27075839

  8. Does Iron Increase the Risk of Malaria in Pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Moya-Alvarez, Violeta; Cottrell, Gilles; Ouédraogo, Smaila; Accrombessi, Manfred; Massougbodgi, Achille; Cot, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Background.  Pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) remains a significant health concern in sub-Saharan Africa. Cross-sectional studies report that iron might be associated with increased malaria morbidity, raising fears that current iron supplementation policies will cause harm in the present context of increasing resistance against intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp). Therefore, it is necessary to assess the relation of iron levels with malaria risk during the entire pregnancy. Methods.  To investigate the association of maternal iron levels on malaria risk in the context of an IPTp clinical trial, 1005 human immunodeficiency virus-negative, pregnant Beninese women were monitored throughout their pregnancy between January 2010 and May 2011. Multilevel models with random intercept at the individual levels and random slope for gestational age were used to analyze the factors associated with increased risk of a positive blood smear and increased Plasmodium falciparum density. Results.  During the follow-up, 29% of the women had at least 1 episode of malaria. On average, women had 0.52 positive smears (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.44-0.60). High iron levels (measured by the log10 of ferritin corrected on inflammation) were significantly associated with increased risk of a positive blood smear (adjusted odds ratio = 1.75; 95% CI, 1.46-2.11; P < .001) and high P falciparum density (beta estimate = 0.22; 95% CI, 0.18-0.27; P < .001) during the follow-up period adjusted on pregnancy parameters, comorbidities, environmental and socioeconomic indicators, and IPTp regime. Furthermore, iron-deficient women were significantly less likely to have a positive blood smear and high P falciparum density (P < .001 in both cases). Conclusions.  Iron levels were positively associated with increased PAM during pregnancy in the context of IPTp. Supplementary interventional studies are needed to determine the benefits and risks of differently dosed iron and

  9. Does Childhood Disability Increase Risk for Child Abuse and Neglect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeb, Rebecca T.; Bitsko, Rebecca H.; Merrick, Melissa T.; Armour, Brian S.

    2012-01-01

    In this article we review the empirical evidence for the presumptions that children with disabilities are at increased risk for child maltreatment, and parents with disabilities are more likely to perpetrate child abuse and neglect. Challenges to the epidemiological examination of the prevalence of child maltreatment and disabilities are…

  10. Rare disaster information can increase risk-taking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, Ben R.; Rakow, Tim; Yechiam, Eldad; Sambur, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The recent increase in the frequency and impact of natural disasters highlights the need to provide the public with accurate information concerning disaster prevalence. Most approaches to this problem assume that providing summaries of the nature and scale of disasters will lead people to reduce their exposure to risk. Here we present experimental evidence that such ex post `news reports’ of disaster occurrences can increase the tolerance for risk-taking (which implies that rare events are underweighted). This result is robust across several hundred rounds of choices in a simulated microworld, persists even when the long-run expected value of risky choices is substantially lower than safe choices, and is contingent on providing risk information about disasters that have been (personally) experienced and those that have been avoided (`forgone’ outcomes). The results suggest that augmenting personal experience with information summaries of the number of adverse events (for example, storms, floods) in different regions may, paradoxically, increase the appeal of a disaster-prone region. This finding implies a need to communicate long-term trends in severe climatic events, thereby reinforcing the accumulation of events, and the increase in their associated risks, across time.

  11. Charter Schools and the Risk of Increased Segregation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotberg, Iris C.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines a wide array of research on the link between school choice programs and student segregation and draws implications for the Obama Administration's policy promoting the national expansion of charter schools. The research demonstrates how the proliferation of charter schools risks increasing current levels of segregation…

  12. Increasing Risk Awareness: The Coastal Community Resilience Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Jody A.; Sempier, Tracie; Swann, LaDon

    2012-01-01

    As the number of people moving to the Gulf Coast increases, so does the risk of exposure to floods, hurricanes, and other storm-related events. In an effort to assist communities in preparing for future storm events, the Coastal Community Resilience Index was created. The end result is for communities to take actions to address the weaknesses they…

  13. Cancer Genetics Risk Assessment and Counseling (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary in which cancer risk perception, risk communication, and risk counseling are discussed. The summary also contains information about recording and analyzing a family history of cancer and factors to consider when offering genetic testing.

  14. Nutrition deficiency increases the risk of stomach cancer mortality

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study is to determine whether exposure to malnutrition during early life is associated with increased risk of stomach cancer in later life. Methods The design protocol included analyzing the trend of gastric cancer mortality and nutrition and evaluating the association between nutrient deficiency in early life and the risk of gastric cancer by hierarchical age–period–birth cohort (APC) analysis using general log-linear Poisson models and to compare the difference between birth cohorts who were exposed to the 1959–1961 Chinese famine and those who were not exposed to the famine. Data on stomach cancer mortality from 1970 to 2009 and the dietary patterns from 1955 to 1985 which included the 1959–1961 Chinese famine period in the Zhaoyuan County population were obtained. The nutrition information was collected 15 years prior to the mortality data as based on the latest reference of disease incubation. Results APC analysis revealed that severe nutrition deficiency during early life may increase the risk of stomach cancer. Compared with the 1960–1964 birth cohort, the risk for stomach cancer in all birth cohorts from 1900 to 1959 significantly increased; compared with the 1970–1974 cohort, the risk for stomach cancer in the 1975–1979 cohort significantly increased, whereas the others had a steadily decreased risk; compared with 85–89 age group in the 2005–2009 death survey, the ORs decreased with younger age and reached significant levels for the 50–54 age group after adjusting the confounding factors. The 1930 to 1964 group (exposed to famine) had a higher mortality rate than the 1965 to 1999 group (not exposed to famine). For males, the relative risk (RR) was 2.39 and the 95% confidence interval (CI) was 1.51 to 3.77. For females, RR was 1.64 and 95% CI was 1.02 to 2.62. Conclusion The results of the present study suggested that prolonged malnutrition during early life may increase the risk of stomach cancer

  15. Class II HLA interactions modulate genetic risk for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dilthey, Alexander T; Xifara, Dionysia K; Ban, Maria; Shah, Tejas S; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A; Alfredsson, Lars; Anderson, Carl A; Attfield, Katherine E; Baranzini, Sergio E; Barrett, Jeffrey; Binder, Thomas M C; Booth, David; Buck, Dorothea; Celius, Elisabeth G; Cotsapas, Chris; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Dendrou, Calliope A; Donnelly, Peter; Dubois, Bénédicte; Fontaine, Bertrand; Fugger, Lars; Goris, An; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Graetz, Christiane; Hemmer, Bernhard; Hillert, Jan; Kockum, Ingrid; Leslie, Stephen; Lill, Christina M; Martinelli-Boneschi, Filippo; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Olsson, Tomas; Oturai, Annette; Saarela, Janna; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Spurkland, Anne; Taylor, Bruce; Winkelmann, Juliane; Zipp, Frauke; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Spencer, Chris C A; Stewart, Graeme; Hafler, David A; Ivinson, Adrian J; Harbo, Hanne F; Hauser, Stephen L; De Jager, Philip L; Compston, Alastair; McCauley, Jacob L; Sawcer, Stephen; McVean, Gil

    2016-01-01

    Association studies have greatly refined the understanding of how variation within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes influences risk of multiple sclerosis. However, the extent to which major effects are modulated by interactions is poorly characterized. We analyzed high-density SNP data on 17,465 cases and 30,385 controls from 11 cohorts of European ancestry, in combination with imputation of classical HLA alleles, to build a high-resolution map of HLA genetic risk and assess the evidence for interactions involving classical HLA alleles. Among new and previously identified class II risk alleles (HLA-DRB1*15:01, HLA-DRB1*13:03, HLA-DRB1*03:01, HLA-DRB1*08:01 and HLA-DQB1*03:02) and class I protective alleles (HLA-A*02:01, HLA-B*44:02, HLA-B*38:01 and HLA-B*55:01), we find evidence for two interactions involving pairs of class II alleles: HLA-DQA1*01:01–HLA-DRB1*15:01 and HLA-DQB1*03:01–HLA-DQB1*03:02. We find no evidence for interactions between classical HLA alleles and non-HLA risk-associated variants and estimate a minimal effect of polygenic epistasis in modulating major risk alleles. PMID:26343388

  16. Increased risk of revision of acetabular cups coated with hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Lazarinis, Stergios; Kärrholm, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Background Hydroxyapatite (HA) is the main inorganic component of bone, and HA coating is widely used on acetabular cups in hip arthroplasty. It has been suggested that this surface finish improves cup survival. Methods All patients registered in the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register between 1992 and 2007 with an uncemented acetabular implant that was available either with or without HA coating were identified. 8,043 total hip arthroplasties (THAs) with the most common cup types (Harris-Galante, Romanus, and Trilogy) were investigated. A Cox regression model including type of coating, age, sex, primary diagnosis, cup type, and type of stem fixation was used to calculate adjusted risk ratios (RRs) for the risk of revision. Results HA coating was a risk factor for cup revision due to aseptic loosening (adjusted RR 1.7; 95% CI: 1.3–2). Age at primary arthroplasty of < 50 years, a diagnosis of pediatric hip disease, the use of a cemented stem, and the Romanus and Harris-Galante cup types were also associated with statistically significantly increased risk of cup revision due to aseptic loosening. Interpretation Our findings question the routine use of HA-coated cups in primary total hip arthroplasty. With some designs, this practice may even increase the risk of loosening—resulting in revision surgery. PMID:19968603

  17. Simplifying clinical use of the genetic risk prediction model BRCAPRO.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Swati; Atienza, Philamer; Chipman, Jonathan; Hughes, Kevin; Barrera, Angelica M Gutierrez; Amos, Christopher I; Arun, Banu; Parmigiani, Giovanni

    2013-06-01

    Health care providers need simple tools to identify patients at genetic risk of breast and ovarian cancers. Genetic risk prediction models such as BRCAPRO could fill this gap if incorporated into Electronic Medical Records or other Health Information Technology solutions. However, BRCAPRO requires potentially extensive information on the counselee and her family history. Thus, it may be useful to provide simplified version(s) of BRCAPRO for use in settings that do not require exhaustive genetic counseling. We explore four simplified versions of BRCAPRO, each using less complete information than the original model. BRCAPROLYTE uses information on affected relatives only up to second degree. It is in clinical use but has not been evaluated. BRCAPROLYTE-Plus extends BRCAPROLYTE by imputing the ages of unaffected relatives. BRCAPROLYTE-Simple reduces the data collection burden associated with BRCAPROLYTE and BRCAPROLYTE-Plus by not collecting the family structure. BRCAPRO-1Degree only uses first-degree affected relatives. We use data on 2,713 individuals from seven sites of the Cancer Genetics Network and MD Anderson Cancer Center to compare these simplified tools with the Family History Assessment Tool (FHAT) and BRCAPRO, with the latter serving as the benchmark. BRCAPROLYTE retains high discrimination; however, because it ignores information on unaffected relatives, it overestimates carrier probabilities. BRCAPROLYTE-Plus and BRCAPROLYTE-Simple provide better calibration than BRCAPROLYTE, so they have higher specificity for similar values of sensitivity. BRCAPROLYTE-Plus performs slightly better than BRCAPROLYTE-Simple. The Areas Under the ROC curve are 0.783 (BRCAPRO), 0.763 (BRCAPROLYTE), 0.772 (BRCAPROLYTE-Plus), 0.773 (BRCAPROLYTE-Simple), 0.728 (BRCAPRO-1Degree), and 0.745 (FHAT). The simpler versions, especially BRCAPROLYTE-Plus and BRCAPROLYTE-Simple, lead to only modest loss in overall discrimination compared to BRCAPRO in this dataset. Thus, we conclude that

  18. Increased Risk of Dementia Among Sleep-Related Movement Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun-Chieh; Chou, Chung-Hsing; Fan, Yu-Ming; Yin, Jiu-Haw; Chung, Chi-Hsiang; Chien, Wu-Chien; Sung, Yueh-Feng; Tsai, Chia-Kuang; Lin, Guan-Yu; Lin, Yu-Kai; Lee, Jiunn-Tay

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sleep-related movement disorders (SRMD) are sleep disorders. As poor sleep quality is associated with cognitive impairment, we hypothesized that SRMD patients were exposed to a great risk for developing dementia. The present study was aimed to retrospectively examine the association of SRMD and dementia risk. A retrospective longitudinal study was conducted using the data obtained from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database (LHID) in Taiwan. The study cohort enrolled 604 patients with SRMD who were initially diagnosed and 2416 patients who were randomly selected and age/gender matched with the study group. SRMD, dementia, and other confounding factors were defined according to International Classification of Diseases Clinical Modification Codes. Cox proportional-hazards regressions were employed to examine adjusted hazard ratios (HR) after adjusting with confounding factors. Our data revealed that patients with SRMD had a 3.952 times (95% CI = 1.124–4.767) higher risk to develop all-cause dementia compared with individuals without SRMD. The results showed that SRMD patients aged 45 to 64 exhibited highest risk of developing all-cause dementia (HR: 5.320, 95% CI = 1.770–5.991), followed by patients age ≥65 (HR: 4.123, 95% CI = 2.066–6.972) and <45 (HR: 3.170, 95% CI = 1.050–4.128), respectively. Females with SRMD were at greater risk to develop all-cause dementia (HR: 4.372, 95% CI = 1.175–5.624). The impact of SRMD on dementia risk was progressively increased by various follow-up time intervals (<1 year, 1–2 years, and ≥2 years). The results suggest that SRMD is linked to an increased risk for dementia with gender-dependent and time-dependent characteristics. PMID:26705224

  19. Increased risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma among upstream petroleum workers

    PubMed Central

    Kirkeleit, Jorunn; Riise, Trond; Bjørge, Tone; Moen, Bente E; Bråtveit, Magne; Christiani, David C

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate cancer risk, particularly oesophageal cancer, among male upstream petroleum workers offshore potentially exposed to various carcinogenic agents. Methods Using the Norwegian Registry of Employers and Employees, 24 765 male offshore workers registered from 1981 to 2003 was compared with 283 002 male referents from the general working population matched by age and community of residence. The historical cohort was linked to the Cancer Registry of Norway and the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry. Results Male offshore workers had excess risk of oesophageal cancer (RR 2.6, 95% CI 1.4 to 4.8) compared with the reference population. Only the adenocarcinoma type had a significantly increased risk (RR 2.7, 95% CI 1.0 to 7.0), mainly because of an increased risk among upstream operators (RR 4.3, 95% CI 1.3 to 14.5). Upstream operators did not have significant excess of respiratory system or colon cancer or mortality from any other lifestyle-related diseases investigated. Conclusion We found a fourfold excess risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma among male workers assumed to have had the most extensive contact with crude oil. Due to the small number of cases, and a lack of detailed data on occupational exposure and lifestyle factors associated with oesophageal adenocarcinoma, the results must be interpreted with caution. Nevertheless, given the low risk of lifestyle-related cancers and causes of death in this working group, the results add to the observations in other low-powered studies on oesophageal cancer, further suggesting that factors related to the petroleum stream or carcinogenic agents used in the production process might be associated with risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:19858535

  20. Increased Risk of Restless Legs Syndrome in Patients With Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fu-Chi; Lin, Te-Yu; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Lin, Chun-Chieh; Huang, Wen-Yen; Chen, Hsin-Hung; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies suggest that an association between restless legs syndrome (RLS) and migraine exists. However, population-based data are unavailable in Asian cohorts. Our study thus aims to evaluate the association between migraine and RLS in a nationwide, population-based cohort in Taiwan and to examine the effects of age, sex, migraine subtype, and comorbidities on RLS development. Data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database were used. Patients aged 20 years or older with newly diagnosed migraine from 2000 to 2008 were included; 23,641 patients with newly diagnosed migraine and 94,564 subjects without migraine were randomly selected and followed until RLS development, withdrawal from the National Health Insurance, or until the end of 2011. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to explore the risk of RLS in patients with migraine after adjustment for demographic characteristics and comorbidities. Both cohorts were followed for a mean of 7.38 years. After adjustment for covariates, the risk of RLS was 1.42-fold higher (95% confidence interval = 1.13–1.79) in the migraine cohort than in the nonmigraine cohort (7.19 versus 3.42 years per 10,000 person-years). The increased risk was more prominent in males in the migraine cohort (1.87-fold increased risk, 95% confidence interval 1.22–2.85). Neither comorbidity status nor migraine subtype influenced the RLS risk. This population-based study demonstrated that migraine is associated with an increased risk of RLS compared with those without migraine, particularly in male patients with migraine and regardless of the comorbidity status. PMID:26844484

  1. Increased Extinction Potential of Insular Fish Populations with Reduced Life History Variation and Low Genetic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Hellmair, Michael; Kinziger, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical work has shown that reduced phenotypic heterogeneity leads to population instability and can increase extinction potential, yet few examples exist of natural populations that illustrate how varying levels expressed diversity may influence population persistence, particularly during periods of stochastic environmental fluctuation. In this study, we assess levels of expressed variation and genetic diversity among demographically independent populations of tidewater goby (Eucyclogobius newberryi), show that reductions in both factors typically coincide, and describe how low levels of diversity contribute to the extinction risk of these isolated populations. We illustrate that, for this annual species, continuous reproduction is a safeguard against reproductive failure by any one population segment, as natural, stochastically driven salinity increases frequently result in high mortality among juvenile individuals. Several study populations deviated from the natural pattern of year-round reproduction typical for the species, rendering those with severely truncated reproductive periods vulnerable to extinction in the event of environmental fluctuation. In contrast, demographically diverse populations are more likely to persist through such periods through the continuous presence of adults with broader physiological tolerance to abrupt salinity changes. Notably, we found a significant correlation between genetic diversity and demographic variation in the study populations, which could be the result of population stressors that restrict both of these diversity measures simultaneously, or suggestive of a causative relationship between these population characteristics. These findings demonstrate the importance of biocomplexity at the population level, and assert that the maintenance of diversity contributes to population resilience and conservation of this endangered species. PMID:25409501

  2. Increased extinction potential of insular fish populations with reduced life history variation and low genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Hellmair, Michael; Kinziger, Andrew P

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical work has shown that reduced phenotypic heterogeneity leads to population instability and can increase extinction potential, yet few examples exist of natural populations that illustrate how varying levels expressed diversity may influence population persistence, particularly during periods of stochastic environmental fluctuation. In this study, we assess levels of expressed variation and genetic diversity among demographically independent populations of tidewater goby (Eucyclogobius newberryi), show that reductions in both factors typically coincide, and describe how low levels of diversity contribute to the extinction risk of these isolated populations. We illustrate that, for this annual species, continuous reproduction is a safeguard against reproductive failure by any one population segment, as natural, stochastically driven salinity increases frequently result in high mortality among juvenile individuals. Several study populations deviated from the natural pattern of year-round reproduction typical for the species, rendering those with severely truncated reproductive periods vulnerable to extinction in the event of environmental fluctuation. In contrast, demographically diverse populations are more likely to persist through such periods through the continuous presence of adults with broader physiological tolerance to abrupt salinity changes. Notably, we found a significant correlation between genetic diversity and demographic variation in the study populations, which could be the result of population stressors that restrict both of these diversity measures simultaneously, or suggestive of a causative relationship between these population characteristics. These findings demonstrate the importance of biocomplexity at the population level, and assert that the maintenance of diversity contributes to population resilience and conservation of this endangered species. PMID:25409501

  3. DYT1 dystonia increases risk taking in humans

    PubMed Central

    Arkadir, David; Radulescu, Angela; Raymond, Deborah; Lubarr, Naomi; Bressman, Susan B; Mazzoni, Pietro; Niv, Yael

    2016-01-01

    It has been difficult to link synaptic modification to overt behavioral changes. Rodent models of DYT1 dystonia, a motor disorder caused by a single gene mutation, demonstrate increased long-term potentiation and decreased long-term depression in corticostriatal synapses. Computationally, such asymmetric learning predicts risk taking in probabilistic tasks. Here we demonstrate abnormal risk taking in DYT1 dystonia patients, which is correlated with disease severity, thereby supporting striatal plasticity in shaping choice behavior in humans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14155.001 PMID:27249418

  4. Increasing flood exposure in the Netherlands: implications for risk financing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongman, B.; Koks, E. E.; Husby, T. G.; Ward, P. J.

    2014-05-01

    The effectiveness of disaster risk management and financing mechanisms depends on an accurate assessment of current and future hazard exposure. The increasing availability of detailed data offers policy makers and the insurance sector new opportunities to understand trends in risk, and to make informed decisions on ways to deal with these trends. In this paper we show how comprehensive property level information can be used for the assessment of exposure to flooding on a national scale, and how this information provides valuable input to discussions on possible risk financing practices. The case study used is the Netherlands, which is one of the countries most exposed to flooding globally, and which is currently undergoing a debate on strategies for the compensation of potential losses. Our results show that flood exposure has increased rapidly between 1960 and 2012, and that the growth of the building stock and its economic value in flood-prone areas has been higher than in non-flood-prone areas. We also find that property values in flood-prone areas are lower than those in non-flood-prone areas. We argue that the increase in the share of economic value located in potential flood-prone areas can have a negative effect on the feasibility of private insurance schemes in the Netherlands. The methodologies and results presented in this study are relevant for many regions around the world where the effects of rising flood exposure create a challenge for risk financing.

  5. Financing increasing flood risk: evidence from millions of buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongman, B.; Koks, E. E.; Husby, T. G.; Ward, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of disaster risk management and financing mechanisms depends on the accurate assessment of current and future hazard exposure. The increasing availability of detailed data offers policy makers and the insurance sector new opportunities to understand trends in risk, and to make informed decisions on the ways to deal with these trends. In this paper we show how comprehensive property level information can be used for the assessment of exposure to flooding on a national scale, and how this information can contribute to discussions on possible risk financing practices. The case-study used is the Netherlands, which is one of the countries most exposed to flooding globally, and which is currently undergoing a debate on strategies for the compensation of potential losses. Our results show that flood exposure has increased rapidly between 1960 and 2012, and that the growth of the building stock and its economic value in flood prone areas has been higher than in not flood prone areas. We also find that property values in flood prone areas are lower than those in not flood prone areas. We argue that the increase in the share of economic value located in potential flood prone areas can have a negative effect on the feasibility of private insurance schemes in the Netherlands. The methodologies and results presented in this study are relevant for many regions around the world where the effects of rising flood exposure create a challenge for risk financing.

  6. Increasing resilience through participative flood risk map design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Sven; Spira, Yvonne; Stickler, Therese

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of flood hazards has shown to the European Commission and the Member States of the European Union the importance of flood risk management strategies in order to reduce losses and to protect the environment and the citizens. Exposure to floods as well as flood vulnerability might increase across Europe due to the ongoing economic development in many EU countries. Thus even without taking climate change into account an increase of flood disasters in Europe might be foreseeable. These circumstances have produced a reaction in the European Commission, and a Directive on the Assessment and Management of Flood Risks was issued as one of the three components of the European Action Programme on Flood Risk Management. Floods have the potential to jeopardise economic development, above all due to an increase of human activities in floodplains and the reduction of natural water retention by land use activities. As a result, an increase in the likelihood and adverse impacts of flood events is expected. Therefore, concentrated action is needed at the European level to avoid severe impacts on human life and property. In order to have an effective tool available for gathering information, as well as a valuable basis for priority setting and further technical, financial and political decisions regarding flood risk mitigation and management, it is necessary to provide for the establishment of flood risk maps which show the potential adverse consequences associated with different flood scenarios. So far, hazard and risk maps are compiled in terms of a top-down linear approach: planning authorities take the responsibility to create and implement these maps on different national and local scales, and the general public will only be informed about the outcomes (EU Floods Directive, Article 10). For the flood risk management plans, however, an "active involvement of interested parties" is required, which means at least some kind of multilateral

  7. Acrolein Exposure Is Associated With Increased Cardiovascular Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    DeJarnett, Natasha; Conklin, Daniel J.; Riggs, Daniel W.; Myers, John A.; O'Toole, Timothy E.; Hamzeh, Ihab; Wagner, Stephen; Chugh, Atul; Ramos, Kenneth S.; Srivastava, Sanjay; Higdon, Deirdre; Tollerud, David J.; DeFilippis, Andrew; Becher, Carrie; Wyatt, Brad; McCracken, James; Abplanalp, Wes; Rai, Shesh N.; Ciszewski, Tiffany; Xie, Zhengzhi; Yeager, Ray; Prabhu, Sumanth D.; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2014-01-01

    Background Acrolein is a reactive aldehyde present in high amounts in coal, wood, paper, and tobacco smoke. It is also generated endogenously by lipid peroxidation and the oxidation of amino acids by myeloperoxidase. In animals, acrolein exposure is associated with the suppression of circulating progenitor cells and increases in thrombosis and atherogenesis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether acrolein exposure in humans is also associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Methods and Results Acrolein exposure was assessed in 211 participants of the Louisville Healthy Heart Study with moderate to high (CVD) risk by measuring the urinary levels of the major acrolein metabolite—3‐hydroxypropylmercapturic acid (3‐HPMA). Generalized linear models were used to assess the association between acrolein exposure and parameters of CVD risk, and adjusted for potential demographic confounders. Urinary 3‐HPMA levels were higher in smokers than nonsmokers and were positively correlated with urinary cotinine levels. Urinary 3‐HPMA levels were inversely related to levels of both early (AC133+) and late (AC133−) circulating angiogenic cells. In smokers as well as nonsmokers, 3‐HPMA levels were positively associated with both increased levels of platelet–leukocyte aggregates and the Framingham Risk Score. No association was observed between 3‐HPMA and plasma fibrinogen. Levels of C‐reactive protein were associated with 3‐HPMA levels in nonsmokers only. Conclusions Regardless of its source, acrolein exposure is associated with platelet activation and suppression of circulating angiogenic cell levels, as well as increased CVD risk. PMID:25099132

  8. [Epidemiology of schizophrenic disorders, genetic and environmental risk factors].

    PubMed

    Szoke, Andrei

    2013-03-01

    Schizophrenia is a relatively common pathology with onset at adolescence or early adulthood, more frequent in men than women. By describing distribution of cases in different populations and the factors that influence this distribution, epidemiology contributes to our understanding of the disease. Several risk factors for schizophrenia have been uncovered both genetic and environmental. The environmental factors can act at individual level (obstetric complications, season of birth, urbanicity, childhood trauma, cannabis, migration) or at population/area levels (socio-economic level, social fragmentation and social capital, ethnic density, etc.). An integrative and dynamic model based on the "vulnerability-persistence-impairment" paradigm is useful in integrating the findings about the risk factors and their complex relationships. PMID:23687754

  9. Risk assessment of genetically modified crops for nutrition and health.

    PubMed

    Magaña-Gómez, Javier A; de la Barca, Ana M Calderón

    2009-01-01

    The risk assessment of genetically modified (GM) crops for human nutrition and health has not been systematic. Evaluations for each GM crop or trait have been conducted using different feeding periods, animal models, and parameters. The most common result is that GM and conventional sources induce similar nutritional performance and growth in animals. However, adverse microscopic and molecular effects of some GM foods in different organs or tissues have been reported. Diversity among the methods and results of the risk assessments reflects the complexity of the subject. While there are currently no standardized methods to evaluate the safety of GM foods, attempts towards harmonization are on the way. More scientific effort is necessary in order to build confidence in the evaluation and acceptance of GM foods. PMID:19146501

  10. Structured Parenting of Toddlers at High versus Low Genetic Risk: Two Pathways to Child Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leve, Leslie D.; Harold, Gordon T.; Ge, Xiaojia; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Shaw, Daniel; Scaramella, Laura V.; Reiss, David

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about how parenting might offset genetic risk to prevent the onset of child problems during toddlerhood. We used a prospective adoption design to separate genetic and environmental influences and test whether associations between structured parenting and toddler behavior problems were conditioned by genetic risk for…

  11. Genetic risk variants in African Americans with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Isobe, Noriko; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Harbo, Hanne F.; Caillier, Stacy J.; Santaniello, Adam; Khankhanian, Pouya; Maiers, Martin; Spellman, Stephen; Cereb, Nezih; Yang, SooYoung; Pando, Marcelo J.; Piccio, Laura; Cross, Anne H.; De Jager, Philip L.; Cree, Bruce A.C.; Hauser, Stephen L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the association of established multiple sclerosis (MS) risk variants in 3,254 African Americans (1,162 cases and 2,092 controls). Methods: Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1, HLA-DQB1, and HLA-A alleles were typed by molecular techniques. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping was conducted for 76 MS-associated SNPs and 52 ancestry informative marker SNPs selected throughout the genome. Self-declared ancestry was refined by principal component analysis of the ancestry informative marker SNPs. An ancestry-adjusted multivariate model was applied to assess genetic associations. Results: The following major histocompatibility complex risk alleles were replicated: HLA-DRB1*15:01 (odds ratio [OR] = 2.02 [95% confidence interval: 1.54–2.63], p = 2.50e-07), HLA-DRB1*03:01 (OR = 1.58 [1.29–1.94], p = 1.11e-05), as well as HLA-DRB1*04:05 (OR = 2.35 [1.26–4.37], p = 0.007) and the African-specific risk allele of HLA-DRB1*15:03 (OR = 1.26 [1.05–1.51], p = 0.012). The protective association of HLA-A*02:01 was confirmed (OR = 0.72 [0.55–0.93], p = 0.013). None of the HLA-DQB1 alleles were associated with MS. Using a significance threshold of p < 0.01, outside the major histocompatibility complex region, 8 MS SNPs were also found to be associated with MS in African Americans. Conclusion: MS genetic risk in African Americans only partially overlaps with that of Europeans and could explain the difference of MS prevalence between populations. PMID:23771490

  12. Significantly increased risk of carotid atherosclerosis with arsenic exposure and polymorphisms in arsenic metabolism genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Lien, Li-Ming; Chung, Wen-Ting; Hsieh, Fang-I; Hsieh, Pei-Fan; Wu, Meei-Maan; Tseng, Hung-Pin; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2011-08-15

    Individual susceptibility to arsenic-induced carotid atherosclerosis might be associated with genetic variations in arsenic metabolism. The purpose of this study is to explore the interaction effect on risk of carotid atherosclerosis between arsenic exposure and risk genotypes of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP), arsenic (+3) methyltransferase (As3MT), and glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1) and omega 2 (GSTO2). A community-based case-control study was conducted in northeastern Taiwan to investigate the arsenic metabolic-related genetic susceptibility to carotid atherosclerosis. In total, 863 subjects, who had been genotyped and for whom the severity of carotid atherosclerosis had been determined, were included in the present study. Individual well water was collected and arsenic concentration determined using hydride generation combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The result showed that a significant dose-response trend (P=0.04) of carotid atherosclerosis risk associated with increasing arsenic concentration. Non-significant association between genetic polymorphisms of PNP Gly51Ser, Pro57Pro, As3MT Met287Thr, GSTO1 Ala140Asp, and GSTO2 A-183G and the risk for development of carotid atherosclerosis were observed. However, the significant interaction effect on carotid atherosclerosis risk was found for arsenic exposure (>50 {mu}g/l) and the haplotypes of PNP (p=0.0115). A marked elevated risk of carotid atherosclerosis was observed in subjects with arsenic exposure of >50 {mu}g/l in drinking water and those who carried the PNP A-T haplotype and at least either of the As3MT risk polymorphism or GSTO risk haplotypes (OR, 6.43; 95% CI, 1.79-23.19). In conclusion, arsenic metabolic genes, PNP, As3MT, and GSTO, may exacerbate the formation of atherosclerosis in individuals with high levels of arsenic concentration in well water (>50 {mu}g/l). - Highlights: {yields}Arsenic metabolic genes might be associated with carotid atherosclerosis. {yields

  13. Family history of esophageal cancer increases the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tiantian; Cheng, Hongwei; Chen, Xingdong; Yuan, Ziyu; Yang, Xiaorong; Zhuang, Maoqiang; Lu, Ming; Jin, Li; Ye, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    A population-based case-control was performed to explore familial aggregation of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Family history of cancer was assessed by a structured questionnaire, and from which 2 cohorts of relatives of cases and controls were reconstructed. Unconditional logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards regression were applied for case-control design and reconstructed cohort design, respectively. We observed a close to doubled risk of ESCC associated with a positive family history of esophageal cancer among first degree relatives (odds ratio [OR] = 1.85, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.42-2.41), after adjusting age, sex, family size and other confounders. The excess risks of ESCC increased with the increasing of first-degree relatives affected by esophageal cancer (p < 0.001). In particular, those individuals whose both parents with esophageal cancer had an 8-fold excess risk of ESCC (95% CI: 1.74-36.32). The reconstructed cohort analysis showed that the cumulative risk of esophageal cancer to age 75 was 12.2% in the first-degree relatives of cases and 7.0% in those of controls (hazard ratio = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.54-2.37). Our results suggest family history of esophageal cancer significantly increases the risk for ESCC. Future studies are needed to understand how the shared genetic susceptibility and/or environmental exposures contribute to the observed excess risk. PMID:26526791

  14. A Genetic Risk Score Combining Ten Psoriasis Risk Loci Improves Disease Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haoyan; Poon, Annie; Yeung, Celestine; Helms, Cynthia; Pons, Jennifer; Bowcock, Anne M.; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Liao, Wilson

    2011-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated skin disease affecting 2–3% of Caucasians. Recent genetic association studies have identified multiple psoriasis risk loci; however, most of these loci contribute only modestly to disease risk. In this study, we investigated whether a genetic risk score (GRS) combining multiple loci could improve psoriasis prediction. Two approaches were used: a simple risk alleles count (cGRS) and a weighted (wGRS) approach. Ten psoriasis risk SNPs were genotyped in 2815 case-control samples and 858 family samples. We found that the total number of risk alleles in the cases was significantly higher than in controls, mean 13.16 (SD 1.7) versus 12.09 (SD 1.8), p = 4.577×10−40. The wGRS captured considerably more risk than any SNP considered alone, with a psoriasis OR for high-low wGRS quartiles of 10.55 (95% CI 7.63–14.57), p = 2.010×10−65. To compare the discriminatory ability of the GRS models, receiver operating characteristic curves were used to calculate the area under the curve (AUC). The AUC for wGRS was significantly greater than for cGRS (72.0% versus 66.5%, p = 2.13×10−8). Additionally, the AUC for HLA-C alone (rs10484554) was equivalent to the AUC for all nine other risk loci combined (66.2% versus 63.8%, p = 0.18), highlighting the dominance of HLA-C as a risk locus. Logistic regression revealed that the wGRS was significantly associated with two subphenotypes of psoriasis, age of onset (p = 4.91×10−6) and family history (p = 0.020). Using a liability threshold model, we estimated that the 10 risk loci account for only11.6% of the genetic variance in psoriasis. In summary, we found that a GRS combining 10 psoriasis risk loci captured significantly more risk than any individual SNP and was associated with early onset of disease and a positive family history. Notably, only a small fraction of psoriasis heritability is captured by the common risk variants identified to date. PMID:21559375

  15. Germline BRCA1 mutations increase prostate cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Leongamornlert, D; Mahmud, N; Tymrakiewicz, M; Saunders, E; Dadaev, T; Castro, E; Goh, C; Govindasami, K; Guy, M; O'Brien, L; Sawyer, E; Hall, A; Wilkinson, R; Easton, D; Goldgar, D; Eeles, R; Kote-Jarai, Z

    2012-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer (PrCa) is one of the most common cancers affecting men but its aetiology is poorly understood. Family history of PrCa, particularly at a young age, is a strong risk factor. There have been previous reports of increased PrCa risk in male BRCA1 mutation carriers in female breast cancer families, but there is a controversy as to whether this risk is substantiated. We sought to evaluate the role of germline BRCA1 mutations in PrCa predisposition by performing a candidate gene study in a large UK population sample set. Methods: We screened 913 cases aged 36–86 years for germline BRCA1 mutation, with the study enriched for cases with an early age of onset. We analysed the entire coding region of the BRCA1 gene using Sanger sequencing. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was also used to assess the frequency of large rearrangements in 460 cases. Results: We identified 4 deleterious mutations and 45 unclassified variants (UV). The frequency of deleterious BRCA1 mutation in this study is 0.45% three of the mutation carriers were affected at age ⩽65 years and one developed PrCa at 69 years. Using previously estimated population carrier frequencies, deleterious BRCA1 mutations confer a relative risk of PrCa of ∼3.75-fold, (95% confidence interval 1.02–9.6) translating to a 8.6% cumulative risk by age 65. Conclusion This study shows evidence for an increased risk of PrCa in men who harbour germline mutations in BRCA1. This could have a significant impact on possible screening strategies and targeted treatments. PMID:22516946

  16. Increased Risk of Herpes Zoster Following Dermatomyositis and Polymyositis

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shin-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Wong, Ying-Chi; Yang, Tse-Yen; Kuo, Chien-Feng; Cheng, Jiung-Mou; Wang, Jyh-Seng; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study explored the possible association between dermatomyositis or polymyositis (DM or PM) and the subsequent risk of herpes zoster (HZ). We used data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance (NHI) system to address the research topic. The exposure cohort comprised 2023 patients with new diagnoses of DM or PM. Each patient was frequency matched according to age, sex, index year, and comorbidities including diabetes, renal disease, obesity, malignancy, rheumatoid arthritis, immunodeficiency virus infection, autoimmune disease not elsewhere classified, mixed connective tissue disease, or vasculitis with 4 participants from the general population who did not have a history of HZ (control cohort). Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to estimate the relationship between DM or PM and the risk of subsequent HZ. The incidence of HZ in the exposure and control cohorts was 35.8 and 7.01 per 1000 person-years, respectively. The exposure cohort had a significantly higher overall risk of subsequent HZ than did the control cohort (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 3.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.18–4.77). The risk of HZ in patients with DM or PM in whichever stratification (including sex, age, and comorbidity) was also higher than that of the control cohort. The findings from this population-based retrospective cohort study suggest that DM or PM is associated with an increased risk of subsequent HZ. A synergistic effect was observed between DM or PM and one of the comorbidities. PMID:26181551

  17. Herpes zoster infection increases the risk of peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Te-Yu; Yang, Fu-Chi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung; Lo, Hsin-Yi; Yang, Tse-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Varicella-zoster virus infection can cause meningoencephalitis, myelitis, ocular disorders, and vasculopathy. However, no study has investigated the association between herpes zoster (HZ) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD). We identified newly diagnosed HZ from the Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database recorded during 2000 to 2010, with a follow-up period extending until December 31, 2011. In addition, we included a comparison cohort that was randomly frequency-matched with the HZ cohort according to age, sex, and index year. We analyzed the risk of PAD with respect to sex, age, and comorbidities by using Cox proportional-hazards regression models. In total, 35,391 HZ patients and 141,556 controls were enrolled in this study. The risk of PAD was 13% increased in the HZ cohort than in the comparison cohort after adjustment for age, sex, and comorbidities. The Kaplan–Meier survival curve showed that the risk of PAD was significantly higher in the HZ cohort than in the non-HZ cohort (P < 0.001). This nationwide population-based cohort study revealed a higher risk of PAD in patients with HZ infection than in those without the infection. Careful follow-up and aggressive treatment is recommended for patients with HZ to reduce the risk of PAD. PMID:27583856

  18. Increased Risk Taking in Relation to Chronic Stress in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ceccato, Smarandita; Kudielka, Brigitte M.; Schwieren, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress is a public health problem that affects a significant part of the population. While the physiological damage it causes is under ongoing scrutiny, its behavioral effects have been overlooked. This is one of the first studies to examine the relation between chronic stress and decision-making, using a standard lottery paradigm. We measured risk taking in the gain domain through binary choices between financially incentivized lotteries. We then measured self-reported chronic stress with the Trier Inventory for the Assessment of Chronic Stress (TICS). We additionally collected hair samples in a subsample of volunteers, in order to quantify accumulation of the stress hormone cortisol. We discovered a significant positive, though modest, correlation between self-reported chronic stress and risk taking that is stronger for women than for men. This confirms part of the findings in acute stress research that show a connection between higher stress and increased risk taking. However, unlike the biologically-based results from acute stress research, we did not identify a significant relation between hair cortisol and behavior. In line with previous literature, we found a clear gender difference in risk taking and self-reports: women generally take less risk and report slightly higher stress levels than men. We conclude that perceived chronic stress can impact behavior in risky situations. PMID:26858663

  19. Increased risk of ischemic heart disease among subjects with cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei-Syun; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chang, Shih-Sheng; Chen, Ming-Fong; Chang, Kuan-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Association between cataract and the risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) development is not completely clear. Purpose: The primary aim of the study was to evaluate the association between cataract and the risk of incident IHD. The secondary aim was to investigate the subsequent IHD risk of patients with cataracts undergoing cataract surgery. Methods: Retrospective data from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 (LHID2000) was analyzed. Study participants were composed of patients with cataracts (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] code 366) (n = 32,456), and a comparison cohort without the cataracts (n = 32,456) from 2000 to 2010. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to address the hazard ratio (HR) of IHD associated with cataract. Results: Within 12 years of follow up, the overall incidence rates of IHD were 24.2 per 1000 person-years in the cataract cohort and 18.2 per 1000 person-years in the noncataract cohort with an adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of 1.35 (95% CI = 1.29–1.41; P < 0.001). Furthermore, the cataract patients undergoing cataract surgery were associated with a higher risk of IHD compared with those cataract patients without surgery (aHR = 1.07, 95% CI: 1.01–1.14; P < 0.05). Conclusions: Our finding suggested that patients with cataracts are at an increased risk of subsequent IHD development. PMID:27428198

  20. Increased Risk of Second Primary Cancers After a Diagnosis of Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Porcia T.; Michal Freedman, D.; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Tucker, Margaret A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To quantify the risk of subsequent primary cancers among patients with primary cutaneous malignant melanoma. Design Population-based registry study. Setting We evaluated data from 9 cancer registries of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program from 1973–2006. Participants We included 89 515 patients who survived at least 2 months after their initial melanoma diagnosis. Results Of the patients with melanoma, 10 857 (12.1%) developed 1 or more subsequent primary cancers. The overall risk of a subsequent primary cancer increased by 28% (observed to expected [O:E] ratio=1.28). One quarter of the cancers were subsequent primary melanomas (O:E=8.61). Women with head and neck melanoma and patients younger than 30 had markedly increased risks (O:E=13.22 and 13.40, respectively) of developing a subsequent melanoma. Second melanomas were more likely to be thin than were the first of multiple primary melanomas (thickness at diagnosis <1.00mm, 77.9% vs 70.3%, respectively; P<.001). Melanoma survivors had increased risk of developing several cancers; the most common cancers with elevated risks were breast, prostate, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (O:E=1.10, 1.15, and 1.25, respectively). Conclusions Melanoma survivors have an approximately 9-fold increased risk of developing subsequent melanoma compared with the general population. The risk remains elevated more than 20 years after the initial melanoma diagnosis. This increased risk may be owing to behavioral factors, genetic susceptibility, or medical surveillance. Although the percentage of subsequent primary melanomas thicker than 1 mm is lower than for the first of multiple primary melanomas, it is still substantial. Melanoma survivors should remain under surveillance not only for recurrence but also for future primary melanomas and other cancers. PMID:20231496

  1. Metabolic syndrome is associated with increased risk of Barrett esophagus

    PubMed Central

    He, Qiong; Li, Jian-dong; Huang, Wei; Zhu, Wen-chang; Yang, Jian-quan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Barrett esophagus (BE) is considered precursor condition of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Its incidence and prevalence are increasing in general population. Studies reported that metabolic syndrome (MS) or diabetes mellitus (DM) is related to increased risk of BE. Current study was to assess and better understand the relationship between MS /DM and BE. Methods: Electronic search was conducted in the database Pubmed/Medline (-December, 2015), Embase (-December, 2015), Cochrane Library (-December, 2015), and Web of Knowledge (-December, 2015). Studies included were assessed with summary odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and compared exposure group with control group. The heterogeneity was examined by the funnel plot and the Egger's test. Subgroup analyses and sensitive analyses were performed for the detection of possible heterogeneity and impact on stability of analysis results. Results: Twelve publications met the criteria and included 355,311 subjects were analyzed. The pooled results showed MS was closely associated with increased risk of BE (OR = 1.23; 95%CI 1.03–1.47; P = 0.024), and yet DM did not significantly increase the risk of BE (OR = 1.07; 95%CI 0.82–1.38; P = 0.627). Substantial heterogeneities were detected. No significant publication bias was detected by Egger's test (P = 0.23). Conclusions: Based on the results of current meta-analysis, MS is associated with increased risk of BE. Further long-term follow-up prospective study needs to verify the current results, and definite pathophysiological mechanism needs to be further investigated and clearly elucidated. PMID:27495039

  2. Target cell frequency is a genetically determined risk factor in radiation leukaemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jawad, M; Giotopoulos, G; Cole, C; Plumb, M

    2007-09-01

    Whole body exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (r-AML). r-AML is the result of the accumulation of mutations in a single haemopoietic stem cell, so risk is therefore a function of the number of mutations required to transform the stem cell and the mutation rate. There is a genetic component to the risk of AML within the general population, and low penetrance variant alleles encoding DNA repair enzymes have been genetically implicated in therapy-related AML susceptibility. However, what is largely ignored is that target cell number, which defines the number of genomes at risk from DNA damaging agents, is also part of the equation that defines risk. We will review the evidence from genetic studies of inbred mouse models that target cell frequency is a risk factor in radiation leukaemogenesis. Inbred mouse strains that differ in their susceptibility to radiation-induced r-AML and thymic lymphoma (r-TL), spontaneous TL and pristane-induced plasmacytoma (PCT) have been exploited to identify susceptibility loci. The target cell in AML is the haemopoietic stem cell, whereas TLs and PCT arise from more mature lymphoid progenitor cells. Inbred mice also differ significantly in all aspects of haemopoiesis, and these differences have been used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) that determine the frequency of specific haemopoietic stem, progenitor or mature blood cells. The co-localization of QTL that determine risk and target cell frequency in all three haemopoietic malignancies is strong evidence that target cell frequency is a risk factor in radiation leukaemogenesis. PMID:17704327

  3. Extreme Geohazards: Reducing the Disaster Risk and Increasing Resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plag, Hans-Peter; Stein, Seth; Brocklebank, Sean; Jules-Plag, Shelley; Marsh, Stuart; Campus, Paola

    2013-04-01

    Extreme geohazards have the potential to escalate the global sustainability crisis and put us close to the boundaries of the safe operating space for humanity. Exposure of human assets to geohazards has increased dramatically in recent decades, and the sensitivity of the built environment and the embedded socio-economic fabric have changed. We are putting the urban environment, including megacities, in harm's way. Paradoxically, innovation during recent decades, in particular, urban innovation, has increased the disaster risk and coupled this risk to the sustainability crisis. Only more innovation can reduce disaster risk and lead us out of the sustainability crisis. Extreme geohazards (volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, tsunamis) that occurred regularly throughout the last few millennia mostly did not cause major disasters because population density was low and the built environment was not sprawling into hazardous areas to the same extent as today. Similar extreme events today would cause unparalleled damage on a global scale and could worsen the sustainability crisis. Simulation of these extreme hazards under present conditions can help to assess the disaster risk. The Geohazards Community of Practice of the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) with support from the European Science Foundation is preparing a white paper assessing the contemporary disaster risks associated with extreme geohazards and developing a vision for science and society to engage in deliberations addressing this risk (see http://www.geohazcop.org/projects/extgeowp). Risk awareness and monitoring is highly uneven across the world, and this creates two kinds of problems. Firstly, potential hazards are much more closely monitored in wealthy countries than in the developing world. But the largest hazards are global in nature, and it is critical to get as much forewarning as possible to develop an effective response. The disasters and near-misses of the past show that adherence to scientific

  4. Prenatal and postnatal factors increase risk of severe ROP.

    PubMed

    Anaya-Alaminos, Roberto; García-Serrano, José Luis; Cantero-Hinojosa, Jesús

    2014-04-01

    To determine that slower weight premature twins have more risk to develop severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) than the higher weight twins. We know that the lower weight twins had less optimal intra-uterine environments than their higher weight twins. We screened 94 consecutive premature twins for ROP. We compared the lower weight twins (n = 47) against their higher weight twins (n = 47). The risk of severe ROP (ROP stage 3 or greater) was significantly higher in the lower weight twin group (p < 0.006). In the same way, in the lower weight twin group the non-perfused area of the temporal retinal artery was higher than that of the other group (an average of 1.2 diameters of the optic nerve head), in the 4-6 postnatal weeks (p < 0.004). The lower weight twin group have an increased risk of severe ROP associated with bacteremia (p = 0.045), or a weight gain less than 7 g per day in the 4-6 postnatal weeks (p = 0.013) or a supplementary postnatal oxygen >4 days (p = 0.007) compared to the higher weight twin group. We confirm Dr. Lee's work that less optimal prenatal factors, in preterm twins, increase the risk of severe ROP. PMID:23796013

  5. The RAG Model: A New Paradigm for Genetic Risk Stratification in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Prideaux, Steven M.; Conway O'Brien, Emma; Chevassut, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular studies have shown that multiple myeloma is a highly genetically heterogonous disease which may manifest itself as any number of diverse subtypes each with variable clinicopathological features and outcomes. Given this genetic heterogeneity, a universal approach to treatment of myeloma is unlikely to be successful for all patients and instead we should strive for the goal of personalised therapy using rationally informed targeted strategies. Current DNA sequencing technologies allow for whole genome and exome analysis of patient myeloma samples that yield vast amounts of genetic data and provide a mutational overview of the disease. However, the clinical utility of this information currently lags far behind the sequencing technology which is increasingly being incorporated into clinical practice. This paper attempts to address this shortcoming by proposing a novel genetically based “traffic-light” risk stratification system for myeloma, termed the RAG (Red, Amber, Green) model, which represents a simplified concept of how complex genetic data may be compressed into an aggregate risk score. The model aims to incorporate all known clinically important trisomies, translocations, and mutations in myeloma and utilise these to produce a score between 1.0 and 3.0 that can be incorporated into diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment algorithms for the patient. PMID:25295194

  6. The RAG Model: A New Paradigm for Genetic Risk Stratification in Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Prideaux, Steven M; Conway O'Brien, Emma; Chevassut, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Molecular studies have shown that multiple myeloma is a highly genetically heterogonous disease which may manifest itself as any number of diverse subtypes each with variable clinicopathological features and outcomes. Given this genetic heterogeneity, a universal approach to treatment of myeloma is unlikely to be successful for all patients and instead we should strive for the goal of personalised therapy using rationally informed targeted strategies. Current DNA sequencing technologies allow for whole genome and exome analysis of patient myeloma samples that yield vast amounts of genetic data and provide a mutational overview of the disease. However, the clinical utility of this information currently lags far behind the sequencing technology which is increasingly being incorporated into clinical practice. This paper attempts to address this shortcoming by proposing a novel genetically based "traffic-light" risk stratification system for myeloma, termed the RAG (Red, Amber, Green) model, which represents a simplified concept of how complex genetic data may be compressed into an aggregate risk score. The model aims to incorporate all known clinically important trisomies, translocations, and mutations in myeloma and utilise these to produce a score between 1.0 and 3.0 that can be incorporated into diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment algorithms for the patient. PMID:25295194

  7. Recent Enhancements to the Genetic Risk Prediction Model BRCAPRO

    PubMed Central

    Mazzola, Emanuele; Blackford, Amanda; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Biswas, Swati

    2015-01-01

    BRCAPRO is a widely used model for genetic risk prediction of breast cancer. It is a function within the R package BayesMendel and is used to calculate the probabilities of being a carrier of a deleterious mutation in one or both of the BRCA genes, as well as the probability of being affected with breast and ovarian cancer within a defined time window. Both predictions are based on information contained in the counselee’s family history of cancer. During the last decade, BRCAPRO has undergone several rounds of successive refinements: the current version is part of release 2.1 of BayesMendel. In this review, we showcase some of the most notable features of the software resulting from these recent changes. We provide examples highlighting each feature, using artificial pedigrees motivated by complex clinical examples. We illustrate how BRCAPRO is a comprehensive software for genetic risk prediction with many useful features that allow users the flexibility to incorporate varying amounts of available information. PMID:25983549

  8. Increasing Prevalence, Changes in Diagnostic Criteria, and Nutritional Risk Factors for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Neggers, Yasmin H.

    2014-01-01

    The frequency of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) diagnoses has been increasing for decades, but researchers cannot agree on whether the trend is a result of increased awareness, improved detection, expanding definition, or an actual increase in incidence or a combination of these factors. Though both genetic and multiple environmental risk factors have been studied extensively, many potentially modifiable risk factors including nutritional and immune function related risk factors such as vitamin D, folic acid, and metabolic syndrome have not received sufficient attention. Several recent studies have put forward hypotheses to explain the mechanism of association between both folic acid and vitamin D and autism. A continuous rise in the prevalence of autism in the USA has coincided with a significant enhancement of maternal folate status with FDA mandated folic acid fortification of certain foods starting in 1998. There is also a growing body of research that suggests that vitamin D status either in utero or early in life may be a risk for autism. In this communication, controversies regarding increase in estimate of prevalence, implications of changes in definition, and possible association between some modifiable nutritional risk factors such as folic acid and vitamin D and ASD will be discussed. PMID:24967269

  9. Genetic variation modifies risk for neurodegeneration based on biomarker status

    PubMed Central

    Hohman, Timothy J.; Koran, Mary Ellen I.; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: While a great deal of work has gone into understanding the relationship between Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, brain atrophy, and disease progression, less work has attempted to investigate how genetic variation modifies these relationships. The goal of this study was two-fold. First, we sought to identify high-risk vs. low-risk individuals based on their CSF tau and Aβ load and characterize these individuals with regard to brain atrophy in an AD-relevant region of interest. Next, we sought to identify genetic variants that modified the relationship between biomarker classification and neurodegeneration. Methods: Participants were categorized based on established cut-points for biomarker positivity. Mixed model regression was used to quantify longitudinal change in the left inferior lateral ventricle. Interaction analyses between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and biomarker group status were performed using a genome wide association study (GWAS) approach. Correction for multiple comparisons was performed using the Bonferroni procedure. Results: One intergenic SNP (rs4866650) and one SNP within the SPTLC1 gene (rs7849530) modified the association between amyloid positivity and neurodegeneration. A transcript variant of WDR11-AS1 gene (rs12261764) modified the association between tau positivity and neurodegeneration. These effects were consistent across the two sub-datasets and explained approximately 3% of variance in ventricular dilation. One additional SNP (rs6887649) modified the association between amyloid positivity and baseline ventricular volume, but was not observed consistently across the sub-datasets. Conclusions: Genetic variation modifies the association between AD biomarkers and neurodegeneration. Genes that regulate the molecular response in the brain to oxidative stress may be particularly relevant to neural vulnerability to the damaging effects of amyloid-β. PMID:25140149

  10. Genetic scores based on risk-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can reveal inherited risk of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haitao; Lin, Xiaolin; Yu, Yang; Gou, Yuancheng; Hou, Jiangang; Jiang, Deke; Na, Rong; Wang, Xiang; Ding, Qiang; Xu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether renal cell carcinoma (RCC) risk-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could reflect the individual inherited risks of RCC. A total of 346 RCC patients and 1,130 controls were recruited in this case-control study. Genetic scores were calculated for each individual based on the odds ratios and frequencies of risk-associated SNPs. Four SNPs were significantly associated with RCC in Chinese population. Two genetic score models were established, genetic score 1 (rs10054504, rs7023329 and rs718314) and genetic score 2 (rs10054504, rs7023329 and rs1049380). For genetic score 1, the individual likelihood of RCC with low (<0.8), medium (0.8-1.2) and high (≥1.2) genetic score 1 was 15.61%, 22.25% and 33.92% respectively (P-trend=6.88×10−7). For genetic score 2, individual with low (<0.8), medium (0.8-1.2) and high (≥1.2) genetic score 2 would have likelihood of RCC as 14.39%, 24.54% and 36.48%, respectively (P-trend=1.27×10−10). The area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) of genetic score 1 was 0.626, and AUC of genetic score 2 was 0.658. We concluded that genetic score can reveal personal risk and inherited risk of RCC, especially when family history is not available. PMID:27229762

  11. Irritable Bowel Syndrome Increases the Risk of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Hua; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract An abnormal interaction in the brain–gut axis is regarded as the cause of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We attempted to determine the association between IBS and subsequent development of epilepsy. A total of 32,122 patients diagnosed with IBS between 2000 and 2011 were identified from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database as the study cohort, and 63,295 controls were randomly selected from the insurants without IBS and frequency-matched according to age, sex, and index year as the comparison cohort. Both cohorts were followed up until the end of 2011 to measure the incidence of epilepsy. We analyzed the risks of epilepsy using Cox proportional hazards regression models. The IBS patients had greater cumulative incidence of epilepsy than the cohort without IBS (log-rank test, P < 0.001 and 2.54 versus 1.86 per 1000 person-years). The IBS cohort had a higher risk of epilepsy after adjusting for age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, stroke, coronary artery disease, head injury, depression, systemic lupus erythematosus, brain tumor, and antidepressants usage (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]: 1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17–1.45). Stratified by the presence of other risk factors, the relative risk was also greater for patients with (aHR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.10–1.41) or without other risk factors (aHR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.35–2.10) in the IBS cohort than for those in the non-IBS cohort. The age-specific relative risk of epilepsy in the IBS cohort was greater than that in the non-IBS cohort for both 35 to 49 age group and 50 to 64 age group (age ≤ 34, aHR:1.31, 95% CI: 0.93–1.85; age 35–49, aHR: 1.43, 95% CI: 1.12–1.83; age 50–64, aHR: 1.56, 95% CI: 1.27–1.91). However, there was no difference between patients > 65 years with IBS and those without IBS (aHR: 1.11, 95% CI: 0.94–1.31). This population-based cohort study revealed that IBS increases the risk of developing epilepsy. However, IBS may be less influential than other risk factors

  12. Disclosing Pleiotropic Effects during Genetic Risk Assessment for Alzheimer’s Disease: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Kurt D.; Roberts, J. Scott; Whitehouse, Peter J.; Royal, Charmaine D. M.; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Vernarelli, Jacqueline A.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Linnenbringer, Erin; Butson, Melissa B.; Fasaye, Grace-Ann; Uhlmann, Wendy R.; Hiraki, Susan; Wang, Na; Cook-Deegan, Robert; Green, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing use of genetic testing raises questions about disclosing secondary findings, including pleiotropic information. Objective To determine the safety and behavioral impact of disclosing modest associations between APOE genotype and coronary artery disease (CAD) risk during APOE-based genetic risk assessments for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Design Randomized, multicenter equivalence clinical trial Setting Four teaching hospitals Participants 257 asymptomatic adults enrolled, 69% with one AD-affected first degree relative Intervention Disclosing AD and CAD genetic risk information (AD+CAD) versus disclosing only AD genetic risk (AD-only) Measurements Co-primary outcomes were Beck Anxiety Index (BAI) and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) scores at 12 months. Secondary outcomes included test-related distress at 12 months, all measures at 6 weeks and 6 months, and health behavior changes at 12 months. Results 12 months after disclosure, mean BAI scores were 3.5 and 3.5 in AD-only and AD+CAD arms (Δ=0.0, 95%CI: −1.0 to 1.0), and mean CES-D scores were 6.4 and 7.1 in AD-only and AD+CAD arms (Δ=0.7, 95%CI: −1.0 to 2.4). Both confidence bounds fell within the equivalence margin of +/−5 points. Among ε4-positive participants, distress was lower in AD+CAD arms than AD-only arms (Δ=−4.8, 95%CI: −8.6 to −1.0) (p=0.031 for disclosure arm x APOE genotype). AD+CAD participants also reported more health behavior changes, regardless of APOE genotype. Limitations Outcomes were self-reported from volunteers without severe anxiety, severe depression, or cognitive problems. Analyses omitted 33 randomized participants. Conclusion Disclosing pleiotropic information did not increase anxiety or depression, and may have decreased distress among those at increased risk for two conditions. Providing risk modification information regarding CAD improved health behaviors. Findings highlight potential benefits of secondary genetic findings

  13. Clothing increases the risk of indirect ballistic fractures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Current literature has shown the mechanism of how indirect fractures occur but has not determined what factors increase the risks of such fractures. The objective of this study is thus to determine the effect of clothing and soft tissue thickness on the risk of indirect fracture formation. Methods Twenty-five fresh red deer femora embedded in ballistic gelatine were shot with varying distances off their medial cortex with a 5.56 × 45 mm North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) bullet while being filmed with a slow-motion video. We compared the effect of two different gelatine depths and the effect of denim cloth laid onto the impact surface of the moulds. Results Bullet passage in thinner moulds failed to cause fracture because the bullet exited the mould before a large expanding temporary cavity was produced. Clothing dramatically altered the size and depth of the expanding cavity, as well as increased lateral pressures, resulting in more severe fractures with greater bullet distances from the bone that can cause fracture. Conclusions Clothing increases the risk of indirect fracture and results in larger, more superficial temporary cavities, with greater lateral pressures than are seen in unclothed specimens, resulting in more comminuted fractures. Greater tissue depth affords the 5.56 × 45 mm NATO a chance to yaw and thus develop an enlarging temporary cavity that is sufficient to cause fracture. PMID:24267379

  14. Modeling Linkage Disequilibrium Increases Accuracy of Polygenic Risk Scores.

    PubMed

    Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J; Yang, Jian; Finucane, Hilary K; Gusev, Alexander; Lindström, Sara; Ripke, Stephan; Genovese, Giulio; Loh, Po-Ru; Bhatia, Gaurav; Do, Ron; Hayeck, Tristan; Won, Hong-Hee; Kathiresan, Sekar; Pato, Michele; Pato, Carlos; Tamimi, Rulla; Stahl, Eli; Zaitlen, Noah; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Belbin, Gillian; Kenny, Eimear E; Schierup, Mikkel H; De Jager, Philip; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A; McCarroll, Steve; Daly, Mark; Purcell, Shaun; Chasman, Daniel; Neale, Benjamin; Goddard, Michael; Visscher, Peter M; Kraft, Peter; Patterson, Nick; Price, Alkes L

    2015-10-01

    Polygenic risk scores have shown great promise in predicting complex disease risk and will become more accurate as training sample sizes increase. The standard approach for calculating risk scores involves linkage disequilibrium (LD)-based marker pruning and applying a p value threshold to association statistics, but this discards information and can reduce predictive accuracy. We introduce LDpred, a method that infers the posterior mean effect size of each marker by using a prior on effect sizes and LD information from an external reference panel. Theory and simulations show that LDpred outperforms the approach of pruning followed by thresholding, particularly at large sample sizes. Accordingly, predicted R(2) increased from 20.1% to 25.3% in a large schizophrenia dataset and from 9.8% to 12.0% in a large multiple sclerosis dataset. A similar relative improvement in accuracy was observed for three additional large disease datasets and for non-European schizophrenia samples. The advantage of LDpred over existing methods will grow as sample sizes increase. PMID:26430803

  15. Modeling Linkage Disequilibrium Increases Accuracy of Polygenic Risk Scores

    PubMed Central

    Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J.; Yang, Jian; Finucane, Hilary K.; Gusev, Alexander; Lindström, Sara; Ripke, Stephan; Genovese, Giulio; Loh, Po-Ru; Bhatia, Gaurav; Do, Ron; Hayeck, Tristan; Won, Hong-Hee; Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M.; Corvin, Aiden; Walters, James T.R.; Farh, Kai-How; Holmans, Peter A.; Lee, Phil; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Collier, David A.; Huang, Hailiang; Pers, Tune H.; Agartz, Ingrid; Agerbo, Esben; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amin, Farooq; Bacanu, Silviu A.; Begemann, Martin; Belliveau, Richard A.; Bene, Judit; Bergen, Sarah E.; Bevilacqua, Elizabeth; Bigdeli, Tim B.; Black, Donald W.; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Byerley, William; Cahn, Wiepke; Cai, Guiqing; Campion, Dominique; Cantor, Rita M.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Carrera, Noa; Catts, Stanley V.; Chambert, Kimberly D.; Chan, Raymond C.K.; Chen, Ronald Y.L.; Chen, Eric Y.H.; Cheng, Wei; Cheung, Eric F.C.; Chong, Siow Ann; Cloninger, C. Robert; Cohen, David; Cohen, Nadine; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nick; Crowley, James J.; Curtis, David; Davidson, Michael; Davis, Kenneth L.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Del Favero, Jurgen; DeLisi, Lynn E.; Demontis, Ditte; Dikeos, Dimitris; Dinan, Timothy; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drapeau, Elodie; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Durmishi, Naser; Eichhammer, Peter; Eriksson, Johan; Escott-Price, Valentina; Essioux, Laurent; Fanous, Ayman H.; Farrell, Martilias S.; Frank, Josef; Franke, Lude; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Friedl, Marion; Friedman, Joseph I.; Fromer, Menachem; Genovese, Giulio; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S.; Giegling, Ina; Giusti-Rodrguez, Paola; Godard, Stephanie; Goldstein, Jacqueline I.; Golimbet, Vera; Gopal, Srihari; Gratten, Jacob; Grove, Jakob; de Haan, Lieuwe; Hammer, Christian; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Haroutunian, Vahram; Hartmann, Annette M.; Henskens, Frans A.; Herms, Stefan; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hoffmann, Per; Hofman, Andrea; Hollegaard, Mads V.; Hougaard, David M.; Ikeda, Masashi; Joa, Inge; Julia, Antonio; Kahn, Rene S.; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Karachanak-Yankova, Sena; Karjalainen, Juha; Kavanagh, David; Keller, Matthew C.; Kelly, Brian J.; Kennedy, James L.; Khrunin, Andrey; Kim, Yunjung; Klovins, Janis; Knowles, James A.; Konte, Bettina; Kucinskas, Vaidutis; Kucinskiene, Zita Ausrele; Kuzelova-Ptackova, Hana; Kahler, Anna K.; Laurent, Claudine; Keong, Jimmy Lee Chee; Lee, S. Hong; Legge, Sophie E.; Lerer, Bernard; Li, Miaoxin; Li, Tao; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Limborska, Svetlana; Loughland, Carmel M.; Lubinski, Jan; Lnnqvist, Jouko; Macek, Milan; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Maher, Brion S.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Marsal, Sara; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarley, Robert W.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Meier, Sandra; Meijer, Carin J.; Melegh, Bela; Melle, Ingrid; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I.; Metspalu, Andres; Michie, Patricia T.; Milani, Lili; Milanova, Vihra; Mokrab, Younes; Morris, Derek W.; Mors, Ole; Mortensen, Preben B.; Murphy, Kieran C.; Murray, Robin M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Mller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nelis, Mari; Nenadic, Igor; Nertney, Deborah A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Nicodemus, Kristin K.; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Nisenbaum, Laura; Nordin, Annelie; O’Callaghan, Eadbhard; O’Dushlaine, Colm; O’Neill, F. Anthony; Oh, Sang-Yun; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; Van Os, Jim; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George N.; Papiol, Sergi; Parkhomenko, Elena; Pato, Michele T.; Paunio, Tiina; Pejovic-Milovancevic, Milica; Perkins, Diana O.; Pietilinen, Olli; Pimm, Jonathan; Pocklington, Andrew J.; Powell, John; Price, Alkes; Pulver, Ann E.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Quested, Digby; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Reichenberg, Abraham; Reimers, Mark A.; Richards, Alexander L.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Roussos, Panos; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Schall, Ulrich; Schubert, Christian R.; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Scolnick, Edward M.; Scott, Rodney J.; Seidman, Larry J.; Shi, Jianxin; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Silagadze, Teimuraz; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Sim, Kang; Slominsky, Petr; Smoller, Jordan W.; So, Hon-Cheong; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Stahl, Eli A.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Stogmann, Elisabeth; Straub, Richard E.; Strengman, Eric; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Subramaniam, Mythily; Suvisaari, Jaana; Svrakic, Dragan M.; Szatkiewicz, Jin P.; Sderman, Erik; Thirumalai, Srinivas; Toncheva, Draga; Tooney, Paul A.; Tosato, Sarah; Veijola, Juha; Waddington, John; Walsh, Dermot; Wang, Dai; Wang, Qiang; Webb, Bradley T.; Weiser, Mark; Wildenauer, Dieter B.; Williams, Nigel M.; Williams, Stephanie; Witt, Stephanie H.; Wolen, Aaron R.; Wong, Emily H.M.; Wormley, Brandon K.; Wu, Jing Qin; Xi, Hualin Simon; Zai, Clement C.; Zheng, Xuebin; Zimprich, Fritz; Wray, Naomi R.; Stefansson, Kari; Visscher, Peter M.; Adolfsson, Rolf; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blackwood, Douglas H.R.; Bramon, Elvira; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Børglum, Anders D.; Cichon, Sven; Darvasi, Ariel; Domenici, Enrico; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Esko, Tonu; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gill, Michael; Gurling, Hugh; Hultman, Christina M.; Iwata, Nakao; Jablensky, Assen V.; Jonsson, Erik G.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Kirov, George; Knight, Jo; Lencz, Todd; Levinson, Douglas F.; Li, Qingqin S.; Liu, Jianjun; Malhotra, Anil K.; McCarroll, Steven A.; McQuillin, Andrew; Moran, Jennifer L.; Mortensen, Preben B.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Nthen, Markus M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Owen, Michael J.; Palotie, Aarno; Pato, Carlos N.; Petryshen, Tracey L.; Posthuma, Danielle; Rietschel, Marcella; Riley, Brien P.; Rujescu, Dan; Sham, Pak C.; Sklar, Pamela; St. Clair, David; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Wendland, Jens R.; Werge, Thomas; Daly, Mark J.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David J.; Adank, Muriel; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Baglietto, Laura; Berndt, Sonja; Blomquist, Carl; Canzian, Federico; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Crisponi, Laura; Czene, Kamila; Dahmen, Norbert; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Easton, Douglas; Eliassen, A. Heather; Figueroa, Jonine; Fletcher, Olivia; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gibson, Lorna; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hall, Per; Hazra, Aditi; Hein, Rebecca; Henderson, Brian E.; Hofman, Albert; Hopper, John L.; Irwanto, Astrid; Johansson, Mattias; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Lichtner, Peter; Lindström, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Meindl, Alfons; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Muranen, Taru A.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Peeters, Petra H.; Peto, Julian; Prentice, Ross L.; Rahman, Nazneen; Sánchez, María José; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Southey, Melissa C.; Tamimi, Rulla; Travis, Ruth; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wang, Zhaoming; Whittemore, Alice S.; Yang, Rose; Zheng, Wei; Kathiresan, Sekar; Pato, Michele; Pato, Carlos; Tamimi, Rulla; Stahl, Eli; Zaitlen, Noah; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Belbin, Gillian; Kenny, Eimear E.; Schierup, Mikkel H.; De Jager, Philip; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A.; McCarroll, Steve; Daly, Mark; Purcell, Shaun; Chasman, Daniel; Neale, Benjamin; Goddard, Michael; Visscher, Peter M.; Kraft, Peter; Patterson, Nick; Price, Alkes L.

    2015-01-01

    Polygenic risk scores have shown great promise in predicting complex disease risk and will become more accurate as training sample sizes increase. The standard approach for calculating risk scores involves linkage disequilibrium (LD)-based marker pruning and applying a p value threshold to association statistics, but this discards information and can reduce predictive accuracy. We introduce LDpred, a method that infers the posterior mean effect size of each marker by using a prior on effect sizes and LD information from an external reference panel. Theory and simulations show that LDpred outperforms the approach of pruning followed by thresholding, particularly at large sample sizes. Accordingly, predicted R2 increased from 20.1% to 25.3% in a large schizophrenia dataset and from 9.8% to 12.0% in a large multiple sclerosis dataset. A similar relative improvement in accuracy was observed for three additional large disease datasets and for non-European schizophrenia samples. The advantage of LDpred over existing methods will grow as sample sizes increase. PMID:26430803

  16. Genetic Profiling to Determine Risk of Relapse Free Survival in High-risk Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Christine M.; Heinrich, Michael C.; Lim, Jeong; Nelson, Dylan; Beadling, Carol; Warrick, Andrea; Neff, Tanaya; Higano, Celestia S.; Garzotto, Mark; Qian, David; Corless, Christopher L.; Thomas, George V.; Beer, Tomasz M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The characterization of actionable mutations in human tumors is a prerequisite for the development of individualized, targeted therapy. We examined the prevalence of potentially therapeutically actionable mutations in patients with high risk clinically localized prostate cancer. Experimental Design 48 samples of formalin fixed paraffin embedded prostatectomy tissue from a neoadjuvant chemotherapy trial were analyzed. DNA extracted from microdissected tumor was analyzed for 643 common solid tumor mutations in 53 genes using mass spectroscopy based sequencing. In addition, PTEN loss and ERG translocations were examined using immunohistochemistry in associated tissue microarrays. Association with relapse during 5 years of follow-up was examined in exploratory analyses of the potential clinical relevance of the genetic alterations. Results Of the 40 tumors evaluable for mutations, 10% had point mutations in potentially actionable cancer genes. Of the 47 tumors evaluable for IHC, 36% had PTEN loss and 40% had ERG rearrangement. Individual mutations were not frequent enough to determine associations with relapse. Using Kaplan-Meier analysis with a log-rank test, the 16 patients who had PTEN loss had a significantly shorter median relapse free survival, 19 vs. 106 months (p = .01). Conclusions This study confirms that point mutations in the most common cancer regulatory genes in prostate cancer are rare. However, the PIK3CA/AKT pathway was mutated in 10% of our samples. While point mutations alone did not have a statistically significant association with relapse, PTEN loss was associated with an increased relapse in high risk prostate cancer treated with chemotherapy followed by surgery. PMID:24352642

  17. Does Iron Increase the Risk of Malaria in Pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Moya-Alvarez, Violeta; Cottrell, Gilles; Ouédraogo, Smaila; Accrombessi, Manfred; Massougbodgi, Achille; Cot, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background. Pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) remains a significant health concern in sub-Saharan Africa. Cross-sectional studies report that iron might be associated with increased malaria morbidity, raising fears that current iron supplementation policies will cause harm in the present context of increasing resistance against intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp). Therefore, it is necessary to assess the relation of iron levels with malaria risk during the entire pregnancy. Methods. To investigate the association of maternal iron levels on malaria risk in the context of an IPTp clinical trial, 1005 human immunodeficiency virus-negative, pregnant Beninese women were monitored throughout their pregnancy between January 2010 and May 2011. Multilevel models with random intercept at the individual levels and random slope for gestational age were used to analyze the factors associated with increased risk of a positive blood smear and increased Plasmodium falciparum density. Results. During the follow-up, 29% of the women had at least 1 episode of malaria. On average, women had 0.52 positive smears (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.44–0.60). High iron levels (measured by the log10 of ferritin corrected on inflammation) were significantly associated with increased risk of a positive blood smear (adjusted odds ratio = 1.75; 95% CI, 1.46–2.11; P < .001) and high P falciparum density (beta estimate = 0.22; 95% CI, 0.18–0.27; P < .001) during the follow-up period adjusted on pregnancy parameters, comorbidities, environmental and socioeconomic indicators, and IPTp regime. Furthermore, iron-deficient women were significantly less likely to have a positive blood smear and high P falciparum density (P < .001 in both cases). Conclusions. Iron levels were positively associated with increased PAM during pregnancy in the context of IPTp. Supplementary interventional studies are needed to determine the benefits and risks of differently dosed iron and

  18. Common Genetic Polymorphisms within NFκB-Related Genes and the Risk of Developing Invasive Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Lupiañez, Carmen B.; Villaescusa, María T.; Carvalho, Agostinho; Springer, Jan; Lackner, Michaela; Sánchez-Maldonado, José M.; Canet, Luz M.; Cunha, Cristina; Segura-Catena, Juana; Alcazar-Fuoli, Laura; Solano, Carlos; Fianchi, Luana; Pagano, Livio; Potenza, Leonardo; Aguado, José M.; Luppi, Mario; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Einsele, Hermann; Vázquez, Lourdes; Ríos-Tamayo, Rafael; Loeffler, Jurgen; Jurado, Manuel; Sainz, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Invasive Aspergillosis (IA) is an opportunistic infection caused by Aspergillus, a ubiquitously present airborne pathogenic mold. A growing number of studies suggest a major host genetic component in disease susceptibility. Here, we evaluated whether 14 single-nucleotide polymorphisms within NFκB1, NFκB2, RelA, RelB, Rel, and IRF4 genes influence the risk of IA in a population of 834 high-risk patients (157 IA and 677 non-IA) recruited through a collaborative effort involving the aspBIOmics consortium and four European clinical institutions. No significant overall associations between selected SNPs and the risk of IA were found in this large cohort. Although a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT)-stratified analysis revealed that carriers of the IRF4rs12203592T/T genotype had a six-fold increased risk of developing the infection when compared with those carrying the C allele (ORREC = 6.24, 95%CI 1.25–31.2, P = 0.026), the association of this variant with IA risk did not reach significance at experiment-wide significant threshold. In addition, we found an association of the IRF4AATC and IRF4GGTC haplotypes (not including the IRF4rs12203592T risk allele) with a decreased risk of IA but the magnitude of the association was similar to the one observed in the single-SNP analysis, which indicated that the haplotypic effect on IA risk was likely due to the IRF4rs12203592 SNP. Finally, no evidence of significant interactions among the genetic markers tested and the risk of IA was found. These results suggest that the SNPs on the studied genes do not have a clinically relevant impact on the risk of developing IA. PMID:27570521

  19. Hodgkin Lymphoma Risk: Role of Genetic Polymorphisms and Gene-Gene Interactions in DNA repair pathways

    PubMed Central

    Monroy, Claudia M.; Cortes, Andrea C.; Lopez, Mirtha; Rourke, Elizabeth; Etzel, Carol J.; Younes, Anas; Strom, Sara S.; El-Zein, Randa

    2011-01-01

    DNA repair variants may play a potentially important role in an individual’s susceptibility to developing cancer. Numerous studies have reported the association between genetic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA repair genes and different types of hematologic cancers. However, to date, the effects of such SNPs on modulating Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) risk have not yet been investigated. We hypothesized that gene-gene interaction between candidate genes in Direct Reversal, Nucleotide excision repair (NER), Base excision repair (BER) and Double strand break (DSB) pathways may contribute to susceptibility to HL. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a study on 200 HL cases and 220 controls to assess associations between HL risk and 21 functional SNPs in DNA repair genes. We evaluated potential gene-gene interactions and the association of multiple polymorphisms in a chromosome region using a multi-analytic strategy combining logistic regression, multi-factor dimensionality reduction and classification and regression tree approaches. We observed that, in combination, allelic variants in the XPC Ala499Val, NBN Glu185Gln, XRCC3 Thr241Me, XRCC1 Arg194Trp and XRCC1 399Gln polymorphisms modify the risk for developing HL. Moreover, the cumulative genetic risk score revealed a significant trend where the risk for developing HL increases as the number of adverse alleles in BER and DSB genes increase. These findings suggest that DNA repair variants in BER and DSB pathways may play an important role in the development of HL. PMID:21374732

  20. Genetic polymorphisms in the vitamin D pathway in relation to lung cancer risk and survival

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jinyu; Xu, Fangxiu; Qu, Jinli; Wang, Yu; Gao, Ming; Yu, Herbert; Qian, Biyun

    2015-01-01

    Studies have suggested that vitamin D may have protective effects against cancer development or tumor progression. To search for additional evidence, we investigated the role of genetic polymorphisms involved in the vitamin D pathway in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We evaluated common genetic polymorphisms associated with the vitamin D pathway in relation to NSCLC in a case-control study of 603 newly diagnosed NSCLC patients and 661 matched healthy controls. Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped, the expression of CYP27B1 and CYP24A1 were measured in 153 tumor samples and their associations with genotypes and patient survival were also analyzed. In the case-control comparison, we found SNP rs3782130 (CYP27B1), rs7041 (GC), rs6068816 and rs4809957 (CYP24A1) associated with NSCLC risk. The risk of NSCLC was increased with the number of risk alleles. CYP27B1 and CYP24A1 expression were significantly different between tumor and normal tissues in NSCLC. High CYP27B1 expression was associated with better overall survival, and the expression was different by the rs3782130 genotype. The study suggests that some genetic polymorphisms involved in the vitamin D pathway may associate with NSCLC risk, and one of the polymorphisms (rs3782130) may affect gene expression and patient survival. PMID:25544771

  1. Linking Genetic Counseling Content to Short-Term Outcomes in Individuals at Elevated Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Ellington, Lee; Schoenberg, Nancy; Agarwal, Parul; Jackson, Thomas; Dickinson, Stephanie; Abraham, Jame; Paskett, Electra D.; Leventhal, Howard; Andrykowski, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have linked actual genetic counseling content to short-term outcomes. Using the Self-regulation Model, the impact of cognitive and affective content in genetic counseling on short-term outcomes was studied in individuals at elevated risk of familial breast-ovarian cancer. Surveys assessed dependent variables: distress, perceived risk, and 6 knowledge measures (Meaning of Positive Test; Meaning of Negative Test; Personal Behavior; Practitioner Knowledge; Mechanisms of Cancer Inheritance; Frequency of Inherited Cancer) measured at pre- and post-counseling. Proportion of participant cognitive and affective and counselor cognitive and affective content during sessions (using LIWC software) were predictors in regressions. Knowledge increased for 5 measures and decreased for Personal Behavior, Distress and Perceived Risk. Controlling for age and education, results were significant/marginally significant for three measures. More counselor content was associated with decreases in knowledge of Personal Behavior. More participant and less counselor affective content was associated with gains in Practitioner Knowledge. More counselor cognitive, and interaction of counselor cognitive and affective content, were associated with higher perceived risk. Genetic counselors dominate the content of counseling sessions. Therefore, their content is tied more closely to short term outcomes than participant content. A lack of patient communication in sessions may pose problems for understanding of complex concepts. PMID:24671341

  2. Increased Cardiometabolic Risk and Worsening Hypoxemia at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Miele, Catherine H; Schwartz, Alan R; Gilman, Robert H; Pham, Luu; Wise, Robert A; Davila-Roman, Victor G; Jun, Jonathan C; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y; Miranda, J Jaime; Leon-Velarde, Fabiola; Checkley, William

    2016-06-01

    Miele, Catherine H., Alan R. Schwartz, Robert H. Gilman, Luu Pham, Robert A. Wise, Victor G. Davila-Roman, Jonathan C. Jun, Vsevolod Y. Polotsky, J. Jaime Miranda, Fabiola Leon-Velarde, and William Checkley. Increased cardiometabolic risk and worsening hypoxemia at high altitude. High Alt Med Biol. 17:93-100, 2016.-Metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, diabetes, and dyslipidemia are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. While excessive erythrocytosis is associated with cardiovascular complications, it is unclear how worsening hypoxemia of any degree affects cardiometabolic risk factors in high-altitude populations. We studied the relationship between daytime resting oxyhemoglobin saturation and cardiometabolic risk factors in adult participants living in Puno, Peru (3825 m above sea level). We used multivariable logistic regression models to study the relationship between having a lower oxyhemoglobin saturation and markers of cardiometabolic risk. Nine hundred and fifty-four participants (mean age 55 years, 52% male) had information available on pulse oximetry and markers of cardiometabolic risk. Average oxyhemoglobin saturation was 90% (interquartile range 88%-92%) and 43 (4.5%) had excessive erythrocytosis. Older age, decreased height-adjusted lung function, and higher body mass index (BMI) were associated with having an oxyhemoglobin saturation ≤85%. When adjusting for age, sex, socioeconomic status, having excessive erythrocytosis, and site, we found that each 5% decrease in oxyhemoglobin saturation was associated with a higher adjusted odds of metabolic syndrome (OR = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.07-1.72, p < 0.04), insulin resistance as defined by homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) >2 mass units (OR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.00-1.67, p < 0.05), hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5% (OR = 1.66, 95% CI: 1.09-2.51, p < 0.04), and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) ≥3 mg/L (OR = 1.46, 95% CI: 1.09-1.96, p

  3. Enterovirus Encephalitis Increases the Risk of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chou, I-Ching; Lin, Che-Chen; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Enterovirus (EV) infection is a major public health issue throughout the world with potential neurological complications. This study evaluated the relationship between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and EV encephalitis in children. Data of reimbursement claims from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan were used in a population-based case–control design. The study comprised 2646 children with ADHD who were matched according to sex, age, urbanization level of residence, parental occupation, and baseline year, to people without ADHD at a ratio of 1:10. The index date of the ADHD group was the ADHD date of diagnosis. Histories of EV infections before the index dates were collected and recategorized according to the severity of infection. Compared with children without EV infection, the children with mild EV infection had a 1.16-fold increased risk of ADHD (odds ratio [OR] = 1.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.07–1.26), and the children with severe EV infection had a greater risk of ADHD (OR = 2.82, 95% CI = 1.05–7.57). The results also revealed a significant correlation between ADHD and the severity of EV infection (P for trend = 0.0001). Patients with EV encephalitis have an increased risk of developing ADHD. Although most EV encephalitis in children has a favorable prognosis, it may be associated with significant long-term neurological sequelae, even in children considered fully recovered at discharge. Neuropsychological testing should be recommended for survivors of childhood EV encephalitis. The causative factors between EV encephalitis and the increased risk of ADHD require further investigation. PMID:25906098

  4. Increased Long-Term Cardiovascular Risk After Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Max; Rysinska, Agata; Garland, Anne; Rolfson, Ola; Aspberg, Sara; Eisler, Thomas; Garellick, Göran; Stark, André; Hailer, Nils P.; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Total hip arthroplasty is a common and important treatment for osteoarthritis patients. Long-term cardiovascular effects elicited by osteoarthritis or the implant itself remain unknown. The purpose of the present study was to determine if there is an increased risk of late cardiovascular mortality and morbidity after total hip arthroplasty surgery. A nationwide matched cohort study with data on 91,527 osteoarthritis patients operated on, obtained from the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register. A control cohort (n = 270,688) from the general Swedish population was matched 1:3 to each case by sex, age, and residence. Mean follow-up time was 10 years (range, 7–21). The exposure was presence of a hip replacement for more than 5 years. The primary outcome was cardiovascular mortality after 5 years. Secondary outcomes were total mortality and re-admissions due to cardiovascular events. During the first 5 to 9 years, the arthroplasty cohort had a lower cardiovascular mortality risk compared with the control cohort. However, the risk in the arthroplasty cohort increased over time and was higher than in controls after 8.8 years (95% confidence interval [CI] 7.0–10.5). Between 9 and 13 years postoperatively, the hazard ratio was 1.11 (95% CI 1.05–1.17). Arthroplasty patients were also more frequently admitted to hospital for cardiovascular reasons compared with controls, with a rate ratio of 1.08 (95% CI 1.06–1.11). Patients with surgically treated osteoarthritis of the hip have an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality many years after the operation when compared with controls. PMID:26871792

  5. PKCα is genetically linked to memory capacity in healthy subjects and to risk for posttraumatic stress disorder in genocide survivors

    PubMed Central

    de Quervain, Dominique J.-F.; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Ackermann, Sandra; Aerni, Amanda; Boesiger, Peter; Demougin, Philippe; Elbert, Thomas; Ertl, Verena; Gschwind, Leo; Hadziselimovic, Nils; Hanser, Edveena; Heck, Angela; Hieber, Petra; Huynh, Kim-Dung; Klarhöfer, Markus; Luechinger, Roger; Rasch, Björn; Scheffler, Klaus; Spalek, Klara; Stippich, Christoph; Vogler, Christian; Vukojevic, Vanja; Stetak, Attila; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Strong memory of a traumatic event is thought to contribute to the development and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Therefore, a genetic predisposition to build strong memories could lead to increased risk for PTSD after a traumatic event. Here we show that genetic variability of the gene encoding PKCα (PRKCA) was associated with memory capacity—including aversive memory—in nontraumatized subjects of European descent. This finding was replicated in an independent sample of nontraumatized subjects, who additionally underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). fMRI analysis revealed PRKCA genotype-dependent brain activation differences during successful encoding of aversive information. Further, the identified genetic variant was also related to traumatic memory and to the risk for PTSD in heavily traumatized survivors of the Rwandan genocide. Our results indicate a role for PKCα in memory and suggest a genetic link between memory and the risk for PTSD. PMID:22586106

  6. PKCα is genetically linked to memory capacity in healthy subjects and to risk for posttraumatic stress disorder in genocide survivors.

    PubMed

    de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Ackermann, Sandra; Aerni, Amanda; Boesiger, Peter; Demougin, Philippe; Elbert, Thomas; Ertl, Verena; Gschwind, Leo; Hadziselimovic, Nils; Hanser, Edveena; Heck, Angela; Hieber, Petra; Huynh, Kim-Dung; Klarhöfer, Markus; Luechinger, Roger; Rasch, Björn; Scheffler, Klaus; Spalek, Klara; Stippich, Christoph; Vogler, Christian; Vukojevic, Vanja; Stetak, Attila; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2012-05-29

    Strong memory of a traumatic event is thought to contribute to the development and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Therefore, a genetic predisposition to build strong memories could lead to increased risk for PTSD after a traumatic event. Here we show that genetic variability of the gene encoding PKCα (PRKCA) was associated with memory capacity--including aversive memory--in nontraumatized subjects of European descent. This finding was replicated in an independent sample of nontraumatized subjects, who additionally underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). fMRI analysis revealed PRKCA genotype-dependent brain activation differences during successful encoding of aversive information. Further, the identified genetic variant was also related to traumatic memory and to the risk for PTSD in heavily traumatized survivors of the Rwandan genocide. Our results indicate a role for PKCα in memory and suggest a genetic link between memory and the risk for PTSD. PMID:22586106

  7. Increased Genetic Vulnerability to Smoking at CHRNA5 in Early-Onset Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Hartz, Sarah M.; Short, Susan E.; Saccone, Nancy L.; Culverhouse, Robert; Chen, LiShiun; Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Coon, Hilary; Han, Younghun; Stephens, Sarah H.; Sun, Juzhong; Chen, Xiangning; Ducci, Francesca; Dueker, Nicole; Franceschini, Nora; Frank, Josef; Geller, Frank; Guđbjartsson, Daniel; Hansel, Nadia N.; Jiang, Chenhui; Keskitalo-Vuokko, Kaisu; Liu, Zhen; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Michel, Martha; Rawal, Rajesh; Hum, Sc; Rosenberger, Albert; Scheet, Paul; Shaffer, John R.; Teumer, Alexander; Thompson, John R.; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Wenzlaff, Angela S.; Wheeler, William; Xiao, Xiangjun; Yang, Bao-Zhu; Aggen, Steven H.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Beaty, Terri; Bennett, Siiri; Bergen, Andrew W.; Boyd, Heather A.; Broms, Ulla; Campbell, Harry; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Chen, Jingchun; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Cichon, Sven; Couper, David; Cucca, Francesco; Dick, Danielle M.; Foroud, Tatiana; Furberg, Helena; Giegling, Ina; Gu, Fangyi; Hall, Alistair S.; Hällfors, Jenni; Han, Shizhong; Hartmann, Annette M.; Hayward, Caroline; Heikkilä, Kauko; Lic, Phil; Hewitt, John K.; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Jensen, Majken K.; Jousilahti, Pekka; Kaakinen, Marika; Kittner, Steven J.; Konte, Bettina; Korhonen, Tellervo; Landi, Maria-Teresa; Laatikainen, Tiina; Leppert, Mark; Levy, Steven M.; Mathias, Rasika A.; McNeil, Daniel W.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Muley, Thomas; Murray, Tanda; Nauck, Matthias; North, Kari; Pergadia, Michele; Polasek, Ozren; Ramos, Erin M.; Ripatti, Samuli; Risch, Angela; Ruczinski, Ingo; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Schlessinger, David; Styrkársdóttir, Unnur; Terracciano, Antonio; Uda, Manuela; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wu, Xifeng; Abecasis, Goncalo; Barnes, Kathleen; Bickeböller, Heike; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caporaso, Neil; Duan, Jubao; Edenberg, Howard J.; Francks, Clyde; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gelernter, Joel; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Hops, Hyman; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Viikari, Jorma; Kähönen, Mika; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Levinson, Douglas F.; Marazita, Mary L.; Marchini, Jonathan; Melbye, Mads; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Raitakari, Olli; Rietschel, Marcella; Rujescu, Dan; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sanders, Alan R.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Shete, Sanjay; Shi, Jianxin; Spitz, Margaret; Stefansson, Kari; Swan, Gary E.; Thorgeirsson, Thorgeir; Völzke, Henry; Wei, Qingyi; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Amos, Christopher I.; Breslau, Naomi; Cannon, Dale S.; Ehringer, Marissa; Grucza, Richard; Hatsukami, Dorothy; Heath, Andrew; Johnson, Eric O.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Madden, Pamela; Martin, Nicholas G.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stitzel, Jerry A.; Weiss, Robert B.; Kraft, Peter; Bierut, Laura J.

    2012-01-01

    Context Recent studies have shown an association between cigarettes per day (CPD) and a nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism in CHRNA5, rs16969968. Objective To determine whether the association between rs16969968 and smoking is modified by age at onset of regular smoking. Data Sources Primary data. Study Selection Available genetic studies containing measures of CPD and the genotype of rs16969968 or its proxy. Data Extraction Uniform statistical analysis scripts were run locally. Starting with 94 050 ever-smokers from 43 studies, we extracted the heavy smokers (CPD >20) and light smokers (CPD ≤10) with age-at-onset information, reducing the sample size to 33 348. Each study was stratified into early-onset smokers (age at onset ≤16 years) and late-onset smokers (age at onset >16 years), and a logistic regression of heavy vs light smoking with the rs16969968 genotype was computed for each stratum. Meta-analysis was performed within each age-at-onset stratum. Data Synthesis Individuals with 1 risk allele at rs16969968 who were early-onset smokers were significantly more likely to be heavy smokers in adulthood (odds ratio [OR]=1.45; 95% CI, 1.36–1.55; n=13 843) than were carriers of the risk allele who were late-onset smokers (OR = 1.27; 95% CI, 1.21–1.33, n = 19 505) (P = .01). Conclusion These results highlight an increased genetic vulnerability to smoking in early-onset smokers. PMID:22868939

  8. Physical Activity and Brain Function in Older Adults at Increased Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. Carson; Nielson, Kristy A.; Woodard, John L.; Seidenberg, Michael; Rao, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Leisure-time physical activity (PA) and exercise training are known to help maintain cognitive function in healthy older adults. However, relatively little is known about the effects of PA on cognitive function or brain function in those at increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease through the presence of the apolipoproteinE epsilon4 (APOE-ε4) allele, diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or the presence of metabolic disease. Here, we examine the question of whether PA and exercise interventions may differentially impact cognitive trajectory, clinical outcomes, and brain structure and function among individuals at the greatest risk for AD. The literature suggests that the protective effects of PA on risk for future dementia appear to be larger in those at increased genetic risk for AD. Exercise training is also effective at helping to promote stable cognitive function in MCI patients, and greater cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with greater brain volume in early-stage AD patients. In APOE-ε4 allele carriers compared to non-carriers, greater levels of PA may be more effective in reducing amyloid burden and are associated with greater activation of semantic memory-related neural circuits. A greater research emphasis should be placed on randomized clinical trials for exercise, with clinical, behavioral, and neuroimaging outcomes in people at increased risk for AD. PMID:24961307

  9. An Increase in the Omega-6/Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratio Increases the Risk for Obesity.

    PubMed

    Simopoulos, Artemis P

    2016-01-01

    In the past three decades, total fat and saturated fat intake as a percentage of total calories has continuously decreased in Western diets, while the intake of omega-6 fatty acid increased and the omega-3 fatty acid decreased, resulting in a large increase in the omega-6/omega-3 ratio from 1:1 during evolution to 20:1 today or even higher. This change in the composition of fatty acids parallels a significant increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity. Experimental studies have suggested that omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids elicit divergent effects on body fat gain through mechanisms of adipogenesis, browning of adipose tissue, lipid homeostasis, brain-gut-adipose tissue axis, and most importantly systemic inflammation. Prospective studies clearly show an increase in the risk of obesity as the level of omega-6 fatty acids and the omega-6/omega-3 ratio increase in red blood cell (RBC) membrane phospholipids, whereas high omega-3 RBC membrane phospholipids decrease the risk of obesity. Recent studies in humans show that in addition to absolute amounts of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acid intake, the omega-6/omega-3 ratio plays an important role in increasing the development of obesity via both AA eicosanoid metabolites and hyperactivity of the cannabinoid system, which can be reversed with increased intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). A balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio is important for health and in the prevention and management of obesity. PMID:26950145

  10. An Increase in the Omega-6/Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratio Increases the Risk for Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Simopoulos, Artemis P.

    2016-01-01

    In the past three decades, total fat and saturated fat intake as a percentage of total calories has continuously decreased in Western diets, while the intake of omega-6 fatty acid increased and the omega-3 fatty acid decreased, resulting in a large increase in the omega-6/omega-3 ratio from 1:1 during evolution to 20:1 today or even higher. This change in the composition of fatty acids parallels a significant increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity. Experimental studies have suggested that omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids elicit divergent effects on body fat gain through mechanisms of adipogenesis, browning of adipose tissue, lipid homeostasis, brain-gut-adipose tissue axis, and most importantly systemic inflammation. Prospective studies clearly show an increase in the risk of obesity as the level of omega-6 fatty acids and the omega-6/omega-3 ratio increase in red blood cell (RBC) membrane phospholipids, whereas high omega-3 RBC membrane phospholipids decrease the risk of obesity. Recent studies in humans show that in addition to absolute amounts of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acid intake, the omega-6/omega-3 ratio plays an important role in increasing the development of obesity via both AA eicosanoid metabolites and hyperactivity of the cannabinoid system, which can be reversed with increased intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). A balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio is important for health and in the prevention and management of obesity. PMID:26950145

  11. Hair keratin mutations in tooth enamel increase dental decay risk

    PubMed Central

    Duverger, Olivier; Ohara, Takahiro; Shaffer, John R.; Donahue, Danielle; Zerfas, Patricia; Dullnig, Andrew; Crecelius, Christopher; Beniash, Elia; Marazita, Mary L.; Morasso, Maria I.

    2014-01-01

    Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body and has a unique combination of hardness and fracture toughness that protects teeth from dental caries, the most common chronic disease worldwide. In addition to a high mineral content, tooth enamel comprises organic material that is important for mechanical performance and influences the initiation and progression of caries; however, the protein composition of tooth enamel has not been fully characterized. Here, we determined that epithelial hair keratins, which are crucial for maintaining the integrity of the sheaths that support the hair shaft, are expressed in the enamel organ and are essential organic components of mature enamel. Using genetic and intraoral examination data from 386 children and 706 adults, we found that individuals harboring known hair disorder–associated polymorphisms in the gene encoding keratin 75 (KRT75), KRT75A161T and KRT75E337K, are prone to increased dental caries. Analysis of teeth from individuals carrying the KRT75A161T variant revealed an altered enamel structure and a marked reduction of enamel hardness, suggesting that a functional keratin network is required for the mechanical stability of tooth enamel. Taken together, our results identify a genetic locus that influences enamel structure and establish a connection between hair disorders and susceptibility to dental caries. PMID:25347471

  12. Hair keratin mutations in tooth enamel increase dental decay risk.

    PubMed

    Duverger, Olivier; Ohara, Takahiro; Shaffer, John R; Donahue, Danielle; Zerfas, Patricia; Dullnig, Andrew; Crecelius, Christopher; Beniash, Elia; Marazita, Mary L; Morasso, Maria I

    2014-12-01

    Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body and has a unique combination of hardness and fracture toughness that protects teeth from dental caries, the most common chronic disease worldwide. In addition to a high mineral content, tooth enamel comprises organic material that is important for mechanical performance and influences the initiation and progression of caries; however, the protein composition of tooth enamel has not been fully characterized. Here, we determined that epithelial hair keratins, which are crucial for maintaining the integrity of the sheaths that support the hair shaft, are expressed in the enamel organ and are essential organic components of mature enamel. Using genetic and intraoral examination data from 386 children and 706 adults, we found that individuals harboring known hair disorder-associated polymorphisms in the gene encoding keratin 75 (KRT75), KRT75(A161T) and KRT75(E337K), are prone to increased dental caries. Analysis of teeth from individuals carrying the KRT75(A161T) variant revealed an altered enamel structure and a marked reduction of enamel hardness, suggesting that a functional keratin network is required for the mechanical stability of tooth enamel. Taken together, our results identify a genetic locus that influences enamel structure and establish a connection between hair disorders and susceptibility to dental caries. PMID:25347471

  13. Protein interaction network of alternatively spliced isoforms from brain links genetic risk factors for autism

    PubMed Central

    Corominas, Roser; Yang, Xinping; Lin, Guan Ning; Kang, Shuli; Shen, Yun; Ghamsari, Lila; Broly, Martin; Rodriguez, Maria; Tam, Stanley; Trigg, Shelly A.; Fan, Changyu; Yi, Song; Tasan, Murat; Lemmens, Irma; Kuang, Xingyan; Zhao, Nan; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Michaelson, Jacob J.; Vacic, Vladimir; Calderwood, Michael A.; Roth, Frederick P.; Tavernier, Jan; Horvath, Steve; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Korkin, Dmitry; Sebat, Jonathan; Hill, David E.; Hao, Tong; Vidal, Marc; Iakoucheva, Lilia M.

    2014-01-01

    Increased risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is attributed to hundreds of genetic loci. The convergence of ASD variants have been investigated using various approaches, including protein interactions extracted from the published literature. However, these datasets are frequently incomplete, carry biases and are limited to interactions of a single splicing isoform, which may not be expressed in the disease-relevant tissue. Here we introduce a new interactome mapping approach by experimentally identifying interactions between brain-expressed alternatively spliced variants of ASD risk factors. The Autism Spliceform Interaction Network reveals that almost half of the detected interactions and about 30% of the newly identified interacting partners represent contribution from splicing variants, emphasizing the importance of isoform networks. Isoform interactions greatly contribute to establishing direct physical connections between proteins from the de novo autism CNVs. Our findings demonstrate the critical role of spliceform networks for translating genetic knowledge into a better understanding of human diseases. PMID:24722188

  14. Do Child Abuse and Maltreatment Increase Risk of Schizophrenia?

    PubMed Central

    Sideli, Lucia; Mule, Alice; La Barbera, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    Introduction IntroductionaaAlthough childhood abuse is a recognised risk factor for depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and substance misuse, its role in the aetiology of psychotic disorder remained controversial. This is in part because the putative effect of childhood trauma on psychosis has been mostly evaluated by small, cross sectional, uncontrolled studies that raised methodological issues. Methods Papers concerning the association between childhood trauma and psychotic disorders (to November, 2011) were identified using a comprehensive search of PubMed, Psychinfo, and Scopus and analysing reference list of relevant papers. A narrative synthesis was used to summarise results. Results An association between childhood abuse and psychotic symptoms was consistently reported by large cross sectional surveys with an effect ranging from 1.7 to 15. However, we cannot conclude that the relationship is causal as lack of longitudinal studies prevent us from fully excluding alternative explanations such as reverse causality. Gender, cannabis use, and depressive and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms appear to moderate the effect of childhood trauma on psychotic disorders. However, specificity of childhood abuse in psychotic disorders and, particularly, in schizophrenia has not been demonstrated. Conclusion Although the association between childhood abuse and psychosis has been replicated, the etiological role of such early adversity has yet to be fully clarified. So far none of the studies reported support the hypothesis that childhood abuse is either sufficient or necessary to develop a psychotic disorder. It seems likely that any effect of childhood abuse on schizophrenia needs to be understood in terms of genetic susceptibility and interaction with other environmental risk factors. PMID:22707958

  15. Lupus Risk Variant Increases pSTAT1 Binding and Decreases ETS1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoming; Zoller, Erin E.; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Wu, Zhiguo; Namjou, Bahram; Williams, Adrienne H.; Ziegler, Julie T.; Comeau, Mary E.; Marion, Miranda C.; Glenn, Stuart B.; Adler, Adam; Shen, Nan; Nath, Swapan K.; Stevens, Anne M.; Freedman, Barry I.; Tsao, Betty P.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Kamen, Diane L.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Reveille, John D.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; James, Judith A.; Sivils, Kathy L.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Vilá, Luis M.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Petri, Michelle; Scofield, R. Hal; Kimberly, Robert P.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Joo, Young Bin; Choi, Jeongim; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Boackle, Susan A.; Graham, Deborah Cunninghame; Vyse, Timothy J.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Greis, Kenneth D.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Harley, John B.; Kottyan, Leah C.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variants at chromosomal region 11q23.3, near the gene ETS1, have been associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), or lupus, in independent cohorts of Asian ancestry. Several recent studies have implicated ETS1 as a critical driver of immune cell function and differentiation, and mice deficient in ETS1 develop an SLE-like autoimmunity. We performed a fine-mapping study of 14,551 subjects from multi-ancestral cohorts by starting with genotyped variants and imputing to all common variants spanning ETS1. By constructing genetic models via frequentist and Bayesian association methods, we identified 16 variants that are statistically likely to be causal. We functionally assessed each of these variants on the basis of their likelihood of affecting transcription factor binding, miRNA binding, or chromatin state. Of the four variants that we experimentally examined, only rs6590330 differentially binds lysate from B cells. Using mass spectrometry, we found more binding of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) to DNA near the risk allele of rs6590330 than near the non-risk allele. Immunoblot analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation of pSTAT1 in B cells heterozygous for rs6590330 confirmed that the risk allele increased binding to the active form of STAT1. Analysis with expression quantitative trait loci indicated that the risk allele of rs6590330 is associated with decreased ETS1 expression in Han Chinese, but not other ancestral cohorts. We propose a model in which the risk allele of rs6590330 is associated with decreased ETS1 expression and increases SLE risk by enhancing the binding of pSTAT1. PMID:25865496

  16. Fine-mapping in the MHC region accounts for 18% additional genetic risk for celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Pulit, Sara L.; Trynka, Gosia; Hunt, Karen A.; Romanos, Jihane; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; van Heel, David A.; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Bakker, Paul I.W.

    2015-01-01

    Although dietary gluten is the trigger, celiac disease risk is strongly influenced by genetic variation in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region. We fine-mapped the MHC association signal to identify additional risk factors independent of the HLA-DQ alleles and observed five novel associations that account for 18% of the genetic risk. Together with the 57 known non-MHC loci, genetic variation can now explain up to 48% of celiac disease heritability. PMID:25894500

  17. A TLR6 polymorphism is associated with increased risk of Legionnaires' disease.

    PubMed

    Misch, E A; Verbon, A; Prins, J M; Skerrett, S J; Hawn, T R

    2013-10-01

    Legionella pneumophila (Lp), the etiologic agent of Legionnaires' disease (LD), is an important cause of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. However, the host immune and genetic determinants of human susceptibility to Lp are poorly understood. Here we show that both TLR6 and TLR1 cooperate with TLR2 to recognize Lp in transfected HEK293 cells. We also perform a human genetic association study of 14 candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms in Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 1, 2 and 6 in 98 LD cases and 268 controls from the Netherlands. No polymorphisms in TLR1 or TLR2 were associated with LD. A TLR6 polymorphism, 359T>C (rs5743808), was associated with an elevated risk of LD in genotypic and dominant (odds ratio (OR) 5.83, P=7.9 × 10(-5)) models. The increased risk in persons with 359 TC or CC genotypes was further enhanced among smokers. In a multivariate model, 359T>C was associated with a higher risk of LD (OR 4.24, P=0.04), than any other variable, including age and smoking. Together, these data suggest that the human TLR6 variant, 359T>C, is an independent risk factor for LD. PMID:23823019

  18. A TLR6 polymorphism is associated with increased risk of Legionnaires’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Misch, Elizabeth Ann; Verbon, Annelies; Prins, Jan M.; Skerrett, Shawn J.; Hawn, Thomas Richard

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila (Lp), the etiologic agent of Legionnaires’ Disease (LD), is an important cause of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. However, the host immune and genetic determinants of human susceptibility to Lp are poorly understood. Here we show that both TLR6 and TLR1 cooperate with TLR2 to recognize Lp in transfected HEK293 cells. We also perform a human genetic association study of 14 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms in Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 1, 2, and 6 in 98 LD cases and 268 controls from the Netherlands. No polymorphisms in TLR1 or TLR2 were associated with LD. A TLR6 polymorphism, 359T>C (rs5743808), was associated with an elevated risk of LD in genotypic and dominant (OR 5.83, p=7.9×10−5) models. The increased risk in persons with 359 TC or CC genotypes was further enhanced among smokers. In a multivariate model, 359T>C was associated with a higher risk of LD (OR 4.24, p=0.04), than any other variable, including age and smoking. Together, these data suggest that the human TLR6 variant, 359T>C, is an independent risk factor for LD. PMID:23823019

  19. Schooling Increases Risk Exposure for Fish Navigating Past Artificial Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Lemasson, Bertrand H.; Haefner, James W.; Bowen, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Artificial barriers have become ubiquitous features in freshwater ecosystems and they can significantly impact a region's biodiversity. Assessing the risk faced by fish forced to navigate their way around artificial barriers is largely based on assays of individual swimming behavior. However, social interactions can significantly influence fish movement patterns and alter their risk exposure. Using an experimental flume, we assessed the effects of social interactions on the amount of time required for juvenile palmetto bass (Morone chrysops × M. saxatilis) to navigate downstream past an artificial barrier. Fish were released either individually or in groups into the flume using flow conditions that approached the limit of their expected swimming stamina. We compared fish swimming behaviors under solitary and schooling conditions and measured risk as the time individuals spent exposed to the barrier. Solitary fish generally turned with the current and moved quickly downstream past the barrier, while fish in groups swam against the current and displayed a 23-fold increase in exposure time. Solitary individuals also showed greater signs of skittish behavior than those released in groups, which was reflected by larger changes in their accelerations and turning profiles. While groups displayed fission-fusion dynamics, inter-individual positions were highly structured and remained steady over time. These spatial patterns align with theoretical positions necessary to reduce swimming exertion through either wake capturing or velocity sheltering, but diverge from any potential gains from channeling effects between adjacent neighbors. We conclude that isolated performance trials and projections based on individual behaviors can lead to erroneous predictions of risk exposure along engineered structures. Our results also suggest that risk perception and behavior may be more important than a fish's swimming stamina in artificially modified systems. PMID:25268736

  20. Risk factors increasing health hazards after air dives.

    PubMed

    Kaczerska, Dorota; Pleskacz, Katarzyna; Siermontowski, Piotr; Olszański, Romuald; Krefft, Karolina

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of postprandial hypertriglyceridemia on the risk of decompression stress following hyperbaric air exposures. The study involved 55 male individuals aged 20-48 years (31.47 ± 5.49 years), body mass index 20.3-33.2 kg/m2 (25.5 ± 2.58 kg/m2). Blood was sampled two hours after a meal each participant had in accordance with individual dietary preferences to determine the following parameters: blood cell counts, activity of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine ammotransterase (ALT), concentrations of total cholesterol and triglycerides. After each hyperbaric exposure, the presence and intensity of decompression stress were assessed using the Doppler method. Decompression stress was found in 30 individuals. Postprandial hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia increased the risk of decompression stress after hyperbaric air exposures. PMID:26742256

  1. Increased Risk of Dementia in Patients With Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-Ming; Shen, Yuan-Chi; Weng, Shih-Feng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Tien, Kai-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a well-known predictor for future cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. However, the relationship between ED and dementia has rarely been examined. This study investigates the longitudinal risk for Alzheimer's disease and non-Alzheimer dementia in patients with ED. We collected a random sample of 1,000,000 individuals from Taiwan's National Health Insurance database. From this sample, we identified 4153 patients with newly diagnosed ED between 2000 and 2009 and compared them with a matched cohort of 20,765 patients without ED. All patients were tracked for 7 years from the index date to identify which of them subsequently developed dementia. During the 7-year follow-up period, the incidence rate of dementia in the ED cohort was 35.33 per 10,000 person-years. In the comparison groups, it was 21.67 per 10,000 person-years. After adjustment for patients characteristics and comorbidities, patients with ED were 1.68-times more likely to develop dementia than patients without ED (95% CI = 1.34–2.10, P < 0.0001). In addition, older patients and those with diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, stroke, depression, and anxiety were found to be at increased risk for dementia. Analyzing the data by dementia type, we found the hazard risk for Alzheimer's disease and non-Alzheimer dementia to be greater in patients with ED (adjusted HR 1.68, 95% CI = 1.31–2.16, P < 0.0001 and 1.63, 95% CI = 1.02–2.62, P = 0.0429, respectively). Log-rank test revealed that patients with ED had significantly higher cumulative incidence rates of dementia than those without (P < 0.0001). Patients with ED are at an increased risk for dementia later in life.

  2. Increased Risk of Dementia in Patients With Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-Ming; Shen, Yuan-Chi; Weng, Shih-Feng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Tien, Kai-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a well-known predictor for future cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. However, the relationship between ED and dementia has rarely been examined. This study investigates the longitudinal risk for Alzheimer's disease and non-Alzheimer dementia in patients with ED. We collected a random sample of 1,000,000 individuals from Taiwan's National Health Insurance database. From this sample, we identified 4153 patients with newly diagnosed ED between 2000 and 2009 and compared them with a matched cohort of 20,765 patients without ED. All patients were tracked for 7 years from the index date to identify which of them subsequently developed dementia. During the 7-year follow-up period, the incidence rate of dementia in the ED cohort was 35.33 per 10,000 person-years. In the comparison groups, it was 21.67 per 10,000 person-years. After adjustment for patients characteristics and comorbidities, patients with ED were 1.68-times more likely to develop dementia than patients without ED (95% CI = 1.34–2.10, P < 0.0001). In addition, older patients and those with diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, stroke, depression, and anxiety were found to be at increased risk for dementia. Analyzing the data by dementia type, we found the hazard risk for Alzheimer's disease and non-Alzheimer dementia to be greater in patients with ED (adjusted HR 1.68, 95% CI = 1.31–2.16, P < 0.0001 and 1.63, 95% CI = 1.02–2.62, P = 0.0429, respectively). Log-rank test revealed that patients with ED had significantly higher cumulative incidence rates of dementia than those without (P < 0.0001). Patients with ED are at an increased risk for dementia later in life. PMID:26091478

  3. Challenges in testing genetically modified crops for potential increases in endogenous allergen expression for safety.

    PubMed

    Panda, R; Ariyarathna, H; Amnuaycheewa, P; Tetteh, A; Pramod, S N; Taylor, S L; Ballmer-Weber, B K; Goodman, R E

    2013-02-01

    Premarket, genetically modified (GM) plants are assessed for potential risks of food allergy. The major risk would be transfer of a gene encoding an allergen or protein nearly identical to an allergen into a different food source, which can be assessed by specific serum testing. The potential that a newly expressed protein might become an allergen is evaluated based on resistance to digestion in pepsin and abundance in food fractions. If the modified plant is a common allergenic source (e.g. soybean), regulatory guidelines suggest testing for increases in the expression of endogenous allergens. Some regulators request evaluating endogenous allergens for rarely allergenic plants (e.g. maize and rice). Since allergic individuals must avoid foods containing their allergen (e.g. peanut, soybean, maize, or rice), the relevance of the tests is unclear. Furthermore, no acceptance criteria are established and little is known about the natural variation in allergen concentrations in these crops. Our results demonstrate a 15-fold difference in the major maize allergen, lipid transfer protein between nine varieties, and complex variation in IgE binding to various soybean varieties. We question the value of evaluating endogenous allergens in GM plants unless the intent of the modification was production of a hypoallergenic crop. PMID:23205714

  4. Genetic risk prediction and neurobiological understanding of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Levey, D F; Le-Niculescu, H; Frank, J; Ayalew, M; Jain, N; Kirlin, B; Learman, R; Winiger, E; Rodd, Z; Shekhar, A; Schork, N; Kiefer, F; Kiefe, F; Wodarz, N; Müller-Myhsok, B; Dahmen, N; Nöthen, M; Sherva, R; Farrer, L; Smith, A H; Kranzler, H R; Rietschel, M; Gelernter, J; Niculescu, A B

    2014-01-01

    We have used a translational Convergent Functional Genomics (CFG) approach to discover genes involved in alcoholism, by gene-level integration of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from a German alcohol dependence cohort with other genetic and gene expression data, from human and animal model studies, similar to our previous work in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. A panel of all the nominally significant P-value SNPs in the top candidate genes discovered by CFG  (n=135 genes, 713 SNPs) was used to generate a genetic  risk prediction score (GRPS), which showed a trend towards significance (P=0.053) in separating  alcohol dependent individuals from controls in an independent German test cohort. We then validated and prioritized our top findings from this discovery work, and subsequently tested them in three independent cohorts, from two continents. A panel of all the nominally significant P-value single-nucleotide length polymorphisms (SNPs) in the top candidate genes discovered by CFG (n=135 genes, 713 SNPs) were used to generate a Genetic Risk Prediction Score (GRPS), which showed a trend towards significance (P=0.053) in separating alcohol-dependent individuals from controls in an independent German test cohort. In order to validate and prioritize the key genes that drive behavior without some of the pleiotropic environmental confounds present in humans, we used a stress-reactive animal model of alcoholism developed by our group, the D-box binding protein (DBP) knockout mouse, consistent with the surfeit of stress theory of addiction proposed by Koob and colleagues. A much smaller panel (n=11 genes, 66 SNPs) of the top CFG-discovered genes for alcoholism, cross-validated and prioritized by this stress-reactive animal model showed better predictive ability in the independent German test cohort (P=0.041). The top CFG scoring gene for alcoholism from the initial discovery step, synuclein alpha (SNCA) remained the top gene after the stress

  5. Dopamine and serotonin genetic risk scores predicting substance and nicotine use in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Groenman, Annabeth P; Greven, Corina U; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; Schellekens, Arnt; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Rommelse, Nanda; Hartman, Catharina A; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Luman, Marjolein; Franke, Barbara; Faraone, Stephen V; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Buitelaar, Jan K

    2016-07-01

    Individuals with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at increased risk of developing substance use disorders (SUDs) and nicotine dependence. The co-occurrence of ADHD and SUDs/nicotine dependence may in part be mediated by shared genetic liability. Several neurobiological pathways have been implicated in both ADHD and SUDs, including dopamine and serotonin pathways. We hypothesized that variations in dopamine and serotonin neurotransmission genes were involved in the genetic liability to develop SUDs/nicotine dependence in ADHD. The current study included participants with ADHD (n = 280) who were originally part of the Dutch International Multicenter ADHD Genetics study. Participants were aged 5-15 years and attending outpatient clinics at enrollment in the study. Diagnoses of ADHD, SUDs, nicotine dependence, age of first nicotine and substance use, and alcohol use severity were based on semi-structured interviews and questionnaires. Genetic risk scores were created for both serotonergic and dopaminergic risk genes previously shown to be associated with ADHD and SUDs and/or nicotine dependence. The serotonin genetic risk score significantly predicted alcohol use severity. No significant serotonin × dopamine risk score or effect of stimulant medication was found. The current study adds to the literature by providing insight into genetic underpinnings of the co-morbidity of ADHD and SUDs. While the focus of the literature so far has been mostly on dopamine, our study suggests that serotonin may also play a role in the relationship between these disorders. PMID:25752199

  6. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis and rational choice under risk or uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Zuradzki, Tomasz

    2014-11-01

    In this paper I present an argument in favour of a parental duty to use preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). I argue that if embryos created in vitro were able to decide for themselves in a rational manner, they would sometimes choose PGD as a method of selection. Couples, therefore, should respect their hypothetical choices on a principle similar to that of patient autonomy. My thesis shows that no matter which moral doctrine couples subscribe to, they ought to conduct the PGD procedure in the situations when it is impossible to implant all of the created embryos and if there is a significant risk for giving birth to a child with a serious condition. PMID:24835332

  7. Genetic variation in the progesterone receptor gene and risk of endometrial cancer: a haplotype-based approach

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunjung; Hsu, Chris; Haiman, Christopher A.; Razavi, Pedram; Horn-Ross, Pamela L.; Van Den Berg, David; Bernstein, Leslie; Le Marchand, Loic; Henderson, Brian E.; Setiawan, V. Wendy; Ursin, Giske

    2010-01-01

    Background: It is well established that estrogen increases endometrial cancer risk, whereas progesterone opposes the estrogen effects. The PROGINS allele of the progesterone receptor (PGR) gene reduces the function of PGR and has been associated with increased risk of the endometrioid type ovarian cancer. We investigated whether genetic variation in PGR is also associated with endometrial cancer risk using a haplotype-based approach. Methods: We pooled data from two endometrial cancer case–control studies that were nested within two prospective cohorts, the Multiethnic Cohort Study and the California Teachers Study. Seventeen haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across four linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks spanning the PGR locus were genotyped in 583 incident cases and 1936 control women. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) associated with each haplotype were estimated using conditional logistic regression, stratified by age and ethnicity. Results: Genetic variation in LD block 3 of the PGR locus was associated with endometrial cancer risk (Pglobal test = 0.002), with haplotypes 3C, 3D and 3F associated with 31–34% increased risk. Among whites (383 cases/840 controls), genetic variation in all four blocks was associated with increased endometrial cancer risk (Pglobal test = 0.010, 0.013, 0.005 and 0.020). Haplotypes containing the PROGINS allele and several haplotypes in blocks 1, 3 and 4 were associated with 34–77% increased risk among whites. SNP analyses for whites suggested that rs608995, partially linked to the PROGINS allele (r2 = 0.6), was associated with increased risk (OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.06–1.59). Conclusions: Our results suggest that genetic variation in the PGR region is associated with endometrial cancer risk. PMID:20547493

  8. A genomewide association study of autism using the Simons Simplex Collection: Does reducing phenotypic heterogeneity in autism increase genetic homogeneity?

    PubMed Central

    Chaste, Pauline; Klei, Lambertus; Sanders, Stephan J.; Hus, Vanessa; Murtha, Michael T.; Lowe, Jennifer K.; Willsey, A. Jeremy; Moreno-De-Luca, Daniel; Yu, Timothy W.; Fombonne, Eric; Geschwind, Daniel; Grice, Dorothy E.; Ledbetter, David H.; Mane, Shrikant M.; Martin, Donna M.; Morrow, Eric M.; Walsh, Christopher A.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Martin, Christa Lese; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Lord, Catherine; State, Matthew W.; Cook, Edwin H.; Devlin, Bernie

    2014-01-01

    Background Phenotypic heterogeneity in autism has long been conjectured to be a major hindrance to the discovery of genetic risk factors, leading to numerous attempts to stratify children based on phenotype to increase power of discovery studies. This approach, however, is based on the hypothesis that phenotypic heterogeneity closely maps to genetic variation, which has not been tested. Our study examines the impact of sub-phenotyping of a well-characterized ASD sample on genetic homogeneity and the ability to discover common genetic variants conferring liability to ASD. Methods Genome-wide genotypic data of 2576 families from the Simons Simplex Collection (SSC) were analyzed in the overall sample and phenotypic subgroups defined on the basis of diagnosis, IQ, and symptom profiles. We conducted a family-based association study as well as estimating heritability and evaluating allele scores for each phenotypic subgroup. Results Association analyses revealed no genome-wide significant association signal. Sub-phenotyping did not increase power substantially. Moreover, allele scores built from the most associated SNPs, based on the odds ratio in the full sample, predicted case status in subsets of the sample equally well and heritability estimates were very similar for all subgroups. Conclusions In genome-wide association analysis of the SSC sample, reducing phenotypic heterogeneity had at most a modest impact on genetic homogeneity. Our results are based on a relatively small sample, one with greater homogeneity than the entire population; if they apply more broadly, they imply that analysis of sub-phenotypes is not a productive path forward for discovering genetic risk variants in ASD. PMID:25534755

  9. Most genetic risk for autism resides with common variation

    PubMed Central

    Gaugler, Trent; Klei, Lambertus; Sanders, Stephan J.; Bodea, Corneliu A.; Goldberg, Arthur P.; Lee, Ann B.; Mahajan, Milind; Manaa, Dina; Pawitan, Yudi; Reichert, Jennifer; Ripke, Stephan; Sandin, Sven; Sklar, Pamela; Svantesson, Oscar; Reichenberg, Abraham; Hultman, Christina M.; Devlin, Bernie

    2014-01-01

    A key component of genetic architecture is the allelic spectrum influencing trait variability. For autism spectrum disorder (henceforth autism) the nature of its allelic spectrum is uncertain. Individual risk genes have been identified from rare variation, especially de novo mutations1–8. From this evidence one might conclude that rare variation dominates its allelic spectrum, yet recent studies show that common variation, individually of small effect, has substantial impact en masse9,10. At issue is how much of an impact relative to rare variation. Using a unique epidemiological sample from Sweden, novel methods that distinguish total narrow-sense heritability from that due to common variation, and by synthesizing results from other studies, we reach several conclusions about autism’s genetic architecture: its narrow-sense heritability is ≈54% and most traces to common variation; rare de novo mutations contribute substantially to individuals’ liability; still their contribution to variance in liability, 2.6%, is modest compared to heritable variation. PMID:25038753

  10. Most genetic risk for autism resides with common variation.

    PubMed

    Gaugler, Trent; Klei, Lambertus; Sanders, Stephan J; Bodea, Corneliu A; Goldberg, Arthur P; Lee, Ann B; Mahajan, Milind; Manaa, Dina; Pawitan, Yudi; Reichert, Jennifer; Ripke, Stephan; Sandin, Sven; Sklar, Pamela; Svantesson, Oscar; Reichenberg, Abraham; Hultman, Christina M; Devlin, Bernie; Roeder, Kathryn; Buxbaum, Joseph D

    2014-08-01

    A key component of genetic architecture is the allelic spectrum influencing trait variability. For autism spectrum disorder (herein termed autism), the nature of the allelic spectrum is uncertain. Individual risk-associated genes have been identified from rare variation, especially de novo mutations. From this evidence, one might conclude that rare variation dominates the allelic spectrum in autism, yet recent studies show that common variation, individually of small effect, has substantial impact en masse. At issue is how much of an impact relative to rare variation this common variation has. Using a unique epidemiological sample from Sweden, new methods that distinguish total narrow-sense heritability from that due to common variation and synthesis of results from other studies, we reach several conclusions about autism's genetic architecture: its narrow-sense heritability is ∼52.4%, with most due to common variation, and rare de novo mutations contribute substantially to individual liability, yet their contribution to variance in liability, 2.6%, is modest compared to that for heritable variation. PMID:25038753

  11. BRCA genetic counseling among at-risk Latinas in New York City: new beliefs shape new generation.

    PubMed

    Sussner, Katarina M; Edwards, Tiffany; Villagra, Cristina; Rodriguez, M Carina; Thompson, Hayley S; Jandorf, Lina; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis B

    2015-02-01

    Despite the life-saving information that genetic counseling can provide for women at hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer (HBOC) risk, Latinas disproportionately underuse such services. Understanding Latinas' beliefs and attitudes about BRCA genetic counseling may be the key to better health promotion within this underserved, at-risk group. We conducted 12 focus groups (N = 54) with at-risk Latina women in New York City, followed by 30 in-depth interviews among a subset of the focus group women. Both were professionally transcribed, translated where applicable and data analysis was completed by two coders trained in qualitative methods. Results revealed personal and community knowledge about BRCA genetic counseling was relatively low, although women felt largely positive about counseling. The main motivator to undergo genetic counseling was concerns about learning family members' cancer status, while the main barrier was competing demands. Generational differences were apparent, with younger women (approximately <55 years) reporting that they were more interested in educating themselves about counseling and other ways to prevent cancer. Younger women were also less likely to ascribe to traditionally Latino-centered cultural beliefs which could serve as barriers (e.g. machismo, fatalismo, destino) to undergoing genetic counseling. Participants were largely enthusiastic about educational efforts to increase awareness of genetic counseling among Latinos. Revealing the beliefs and attitudes of underserved Latinas may help shape culturally appropriate educational materials and promotion programs to increase BRCA genetic counseling uptake within this underrepresented community. PMID:25120034

  12. BRCA Genetic Counseling Among At-Risk Latinas in New York City: New Beliefs Shape New Generation

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Tiffany; Villagra, Cristina; Rodriguez, M. Carina; Thompson, Hayley S.; Jandorf, Lina; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis B.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the life-saving information that genetic counseling can provide for women at hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer (HBOC) risk, Latinas disproportionately underuse such services. Understanding Latinas’ beliefs and attitudes about BRCA genetic counseling may be the key to better health promotion within this underserved, at-risk group. We conducted 12 focus groups (N=54) with at-risk Latina women in New York City, followed by 30 in-depth interviews among a subset of the focus group women. Both were professionally transcribed, translated where applicable and data analysis was completed by two coders trained in qualitative methods. Results revealed personal and community knowledge about BRCA genetic counseling was relatively low, although women felt largely positive about counseling. The main motivator to undergo genetic counseling was concerns about learning family members’ cancer status, while the main barrier was competing demands. Generational differences were apparent, with younger women (approximately <55 years) reporting that they were more interested in educating themselves about counseling and other ways to prevent cancer. Younger women were also less likely to ascribe to traditionally Latino-centered cultural beliefs which could serve as barriers (e.g. machismo, fatalismo, destino) to undergoing genetic counseling. Participants were largely enthusiastic about educational efforts to increase awareness of genetic counseling among Latinos. Revealing the beliefs and attitudes of underserved Latinas may help shape culturally appropriate educational materials and promotion programs to increase BRCA genetic counseling uptake within this under-represented community. PMID:25120034

  13. Experimental separation of genetic and demographic factors on extinction risk in wild populations.

    PubMed

    Wootton, J Timothy; Pfister, Catherine A

    2013-10-01

    When populations reach small size, an extinction risk vortex may arise from genetic (inbreeding depression, genetic drift) and ecological (demographic stochasticity, Allee effects, environmental fluctuation) processes. The relative contribution of these processes to extinction in wild populations is unknown, but important for conserving endangered species. In experimental field populations of a harvested kelp (Postelsia palmaeformis), in which we independently varied initial genetic diversity (completely inbred, control, outbred) and population size, ecological processes dominated the risk of extinction, whereas the contribution of genetic diversity was slight. Our results match theoretical predictions that demographic processes will generally doom small populations to extinction before genetic effects act strongly, prioritize detailed ecological analysis over descriptions of genetic structure in assessing conservation of at-risk species, and highlight the need for field experiments manipulating both demographics and genetic structure on long-term extinction risk. PMID:24358695

  14. Genetic evidence that culling increases badger movement: implications for the spread of bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pope, Lisa C; Butlin, Roger K; Wilson, Gavin J; Woodroffe, Rosie; Erven, Kristien; Conyers, Chris M; Franklin, Tanya; Delahay, Richard J; Cheeseman, Chris L; Burke, Terry

    2007-12-01

    The Eurasian badger (Meles meles) has been implicated in the transmission of bovine tuberculosis (TB, caused by Mycobacterium bovis) to cattle. However, evidence suggests that attempts to reduce the spread of TB among cattle in Britain by culling badgers have mixed effects. A large-scale field experiment (the randomized badger culling trial, RBCT) showed that widespread proactive badger culling reduced the incidence of TB in cattle within culled areas but that TB incidence increased in adjoining areas. Additionally, localized reactive badger culling increased the incidence of TB in cattle. It has been suggested that culling-induced perturbation of badger social structure may increase individual movements and elevate the risk of disease transmission between badgers and cattle. Field studies support this hypothesis, by demonstrating increases in badger group ranges and the prevalence of TB infection in badgers following culling. However, more evidence on the effect of culling on badger movements is needed in order to predict the epidemiological consequences of this control strategy. Here, analysis of the genetic signatures of badger populations in the RBCT revealed increased dispersal following culling. While standard tests provided evidence for greater dispersal after culling, a novel method indicated that this was due to medium- and long-distance dispersal, in addition to previously reported increases in home-range size. Our results also indicated that, on average, badgers infected with M. bovis moved significantly farther than did uninfected badgers. A disease control strategy that included culling would need to take account of the potentially negative epidemiological consequences of increased badger dispersal. PMID:17944854

  15. Low serum testosterone increases mortality risk among male dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Carrero, Juan Jesús; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Parini, Paolo; Arver, Stefan; Lindholm, Bengt; Bárány, Peter; Heimbürger, Olof; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2009-03-01

    Men treated with hemodialysis (HD) have a very poor prognosis and an elevated risk of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD). In the general population, associations between low testosterone concentrations and cardiovascular risk have been suggested. We performed a prospective observational study involving a well characterized cohort of 126 men treated with HD to examine the relationship between testosterone concentration and subsequent mortality during a mean follow-up period of 41 mo. Independent of age, serum creatinine, and sexual hormone binding globulin (SHBG), testosterone levels inversely and strongly associated with the inflammatory markers IL-6 and CRP. Patients with a clinical history of CVD had significantly lower testosterone levels. During follow up, 65 deaths occurred, 58% of which were a result of CVD. Men with testosterone values in the lowest tertile had increased all-cause and CVD mortality (crude hazard ratios [HRs] 2.03 [95% CI 1.24 to 3.31] and 3.19 [1.49 to 6.83], respectively), which persisted after adjustment for age, SHBG, previous CVD, diabetes, ACEi/ARB treatment, albumin, and inflammatory markers, but was lost after adjustment for creatinine. In summary, among men treated with HD, testosterone concentrations inversely correlate with all-cause and CVD-related mortality, as well as with markers of inflammation. Hypogonadism may be an additional treatable risk factor for patients with chronic kidney disease. PMID:19144759

  16. Joint Analysis of Psychiatric Disorders Increases Accuracy of Risk Prediction for Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, and Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Robert; Moser, Gerhard; Chen, Guo-Bo; Ripke, Stephan; Absher, Devin; Agartz, Ingrid; Akil, Huda; Amin, Farooq; Andreassen, Ole A.; Anjorin, Adebayo; Anney, Richard; Arking, Dan E.; Asherson, Philip; Azevedo, Maria H.; Backlund, Lena; Badner, Judith A.; Bailey, Anthony J.; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barchas, Jack D.; Barnes, Michael R.; Barrett, Thomas B.; Bass, Nicholas; Battaglia, Agatino; Bauer, Michael; Bayés, Mònica; Bellivier, Frank; Bergen, Sarah E.; Berrettini, Wade; Betancur, Catalina; Bettecken, Thomas; Biederman, Joseph; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Black, Donald W.; Blackwood, Douglas H.R.; Bloss, Cinnamon S.; Boehnke, Michael; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Breen, Gerome; Breuer, René; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Bunney, William E.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Byerley, William F.; Caesar, Sian; Cahn, Wiepke; Cantor, Rita M.; Casas, Miguel; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambert, Kimberly; Choudhury, Khalid; Cichon, Sven; Cloninger, C. Robert; Collier, David A.; Cook, Edwin H.; Coon, Hilary; Cormand, Bru; Cormican, Paul; Corvin, Aiden; Coryell, William H.; Craddock, Nicholas; Craig, David W.; Craig, Ian W.; Crosbie, Jennifer; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Curtis, David; Czamara, Darina; Daly, Mark J.; Datta, Susmita; Dawson, Geraldine; Day, Richard; De Geus, Eco J.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Devlin, Bernie; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary J.; Doyle, Alysa E.; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Duketis, Eftichia; Ebstein, Richard P.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Elia, Josephine; Ennis, Sean; Etain, Bruno; Fanous, Ayman; Faraone, Stephen V.; Farmer, Anne E.; Ferrier, I. Nicol; Flickinger, Matthew; Fombonne, Eric; Foroud, Tatiana; Frank, Josef; Franke, Barbara; Fraser, Christine; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Freitag, Christine M.; Friedl, Marion; Frisén, Louise; Gallagher, Louise; Gejman, Pablo V.; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Giegling, Ina; Gill, Michael; Gordon, Scott D.; Gordon-Smith, Katherine; Green, Elaine K.; Greenwood, Tiffany A.; Grice, Dorothy E.; Gross, Magdalena; Grozeva, Detelina; Guan, Weihua; Gurling, Hugh; De Haan, Lieuwe; Haines, Jonathan L.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hallmayer, Joachim; Hamilton, Steven P.; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Thomas F.; Hartmann, Annette M.; Hautzinger, Martin; Heath, Andrew C.; Henders, Anjali K.; Herms, Stefan; Hickie, Ian B.; Hipolito, Maria; Hoefels, Susanne; Holmans, Peter A.; Holsboer, Florian; Hoogendijk, Witte J.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hultman, Christina M.; Hus, Vanessa; Ingason, Andrés; Ising, Marcus; Jamain, Stéphane; Jones, Ian; Jones, Lisa; Kähler, Anna K.; Kahn, René S.; Kandaswamy, Radhika; Keller, Matthew C.; Kelsoe, John R.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Kennedy, James L.; Kenny, Elaine; Kent, Lindsey; Kim, Yunjung; Kirov, George K.; Klauck, Sabine M.; Klei, Lambertus; Knowles, James A.; Kohli, Martin A.; Koller, Daniel L.; Konte, Bettina; Korszun, Ania; Krabbendam, Lydia; Krasucki, Robert; Kuntsi, Jonna; Kwan, Phoenix; Landén, Mikael; Långström, Niklas; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Jacob; Lawson, William B.; Leboyer, Marion; Ledbetter, David H.; Lee, Phil H.; Lencz, Todd; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Levinson, Douglas F.; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Li, Jun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Lin, Dan-Yu; Linszen, Don H.; Liu, Chunyu; Lohoff, Falk W.; Loo, Sandra K.; Lord, Catherine; Lowe, Jennifer K.; Lucae, Susanne; MacIntyre, Donald J.; Madden, Pamela A.F.; Maestrini, Elena; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Mahon, Pamela B.; Maier, Wolfgang; Malhotra, Anil K.; Mane, Shrikant M.; Martin, Christa L.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Matthews, Keith; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarroll, Steven A.; McGhee, Kevin A.; McGough, James J.; McGrath, Patrick J.; McGuffin, Peter; McInnis, Melvin G.; McIntosh, Andrew; McKinney, Rebecca; McLean, Alan W.; McMahon, Francis J.; McMahon, William M.; McQuillin, Andrew; Medeiros, Helena; Medland, Sarah E.; Meier, Sandra; Melle, Ingrid; Meng, Fan; Meyer, Jobst; Middeldorp, Christel M.; Middleton, Lefkos; Milanova, Vihra; Miranda, Ana; Monaco, Anthony P.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Moran, Jennifer L.; Moreno-De-Luca, Daniel; Morken, Gunnar; Morris, Derek W.; Morrow, Eric M.; Moskvina, Valentina; Mowry, Bryan J.; Muglia, Pierandrea; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Murtha, Michael; Myers, Richard M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Neale, Benjamin M.; Nelson, Stan F.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Nikolov, Ivan; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit; Nolen, Willem A.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Nurnberger, John I.; Nwulia, Evaristus A.; Nyholt, Dale R.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; O’Dushlaine, Colm; Oades, Robert D.; Olincy, Ann; Oliveira, Guiomar; Olsen, Line; Ophoff, Roel A.; Osby, Urban; Owen, Michael J.; Palotie, Aarno; Parr, Jeremy R.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Pato, Carlos N.; Pato, Michele T.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Pergadia, Michele L.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Perlis, Roy H.; Pickard, Benjamin S.; Pimm, Jonathan; Piven, Joseph; Posthuma, Danielle; Potash, James B.; Poustka, Fritz; Propping, Peter; Purcell, Shaun M.; Puri, Vinay; Quested, Digby J.; Quinn, Emma M.; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep Antoni; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rehnström, Karola; Reif, Andreas; Ribasés, Marta; Rice, John P.; Rietschel, Marcella; Ripke, Stephan; Roeder, Kathryn; Roeyers, Herbert; Rossin, Lizzy; Rothenberger, Aribert; Rouleau, Guy; Ruderfer, Douglas; Rujescu, Dan; Sanders, Alan R.; Sanders, Stephan J.; Santangelo, Susan L.; Schachar, Russell; Schalling, Martin; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Scheftner, William A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schumacher, Johannes; Schwarz, Markus; Scolnick, Edward; Scott, Laura J.; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Shi, Jianxin; Shilling, Paul D.; Shyn, Stanley I.; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Sklar, Pamela; Slager, Susan L.; Smalley, Susan L.; Smit, Johannes H.; Smith, Erin N.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J.S.; St Clair, David; State, Matthew; Steffens, Michael; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Strauss, John S.; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Sutcliffe, James; Szatmari, Peter; Szelinger, Szabocls; Thapar, Anita; Thirumalai, Srinivasa; Thompson, Robert C.; Todorov, Alexandre A.; Tozzi, Federica; Treutlein, Jens; Tzeng, Jung-Ying; Uhr, Manfred; van den Oord, Edwin J.C.G.; Van Grootheest, Gerard; Van Os, Jim; Vicente, Astrid M.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Vincent, John B.; Visscher, Peter M.; Walsh, Christopher A.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Watson, Stanley J.; Weiss, Lauren A.; Weissman, Myrna M.; Werge, Thomas; Wienker, Thomas F.; Wiersma, Durk; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Williams, Nigel; Willsey, A. Jeremy; Witt, Stephanie H.; Wray, Naomi R.; Xu, Wei; Young, Allan H.; Yu, Timothy W.; Zammit, Stanley; Zandi, Peter P.; Zhang, Peng; Zitman, Frans G.; Zöllner, Sebastian; Coryell, William; Potash, James B.; Scheftner, William A.; Shi, Jianxin; Weissman, Myrna M.; Hultman, Christina M.; Landén, Mikael; Levinson, Douglas F.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Wray, Naomi R.; Lee, S. Hong

    2015-01-01

    Genetic risk prediction has several potential applications in medical research and clinical practice and could be used, for example, to stratify a heterogeneous population of patients by their predicted genetic risk. However, for polygenic traits, such as psychiatric disorders, the accuracy of risk prediction is low. Here we use a multivariate linear mixed model and apply multi-trait genomic best linear unbiased prediction for genetic risk prediction. This method exploits correlations between disorders and simultaneously evaluates individual risk for each disorder. We show that the multivariate approach significantly increases the prediction accuracy for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder in the discovery as well as in independent validation datasets. By grouping SNPs based on genome annotation and fitting multiple random effects, we show that the prediction accuracy could be further improved. The gain in prediction accuracy of the multivariate approach is equivalent to an increase in sample size of 34% for schizophrenia, 68% for bipolar disorder, and 76% for major depressive disorders using single trait models. Because our approach can be readily applied to any number of GWAS datasets of correlated traits, it is a flexible and powerful tool to maximize prediction accuracy. With current sample size, risk predictors are not useful in a clinical setting but already are a valuable research tool, for example in experimental designs comparing cases with high and low polygenic risk. PMID:25640677

  17. Joint analysis of psychiatric disorders increases accuracy of risk prediction for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Maier, Robert; Moser, Gerhard; Chen, Guo-Bo; Ripke, Stephan; Coryell, William; Potash, James B; Scheftner, William A; Shi, Jianxin; Weissman, Myrna M; Hultman, Christina M; Landén, Mikael; Levinson, Douglas F; Kendler, Kenneth S; Smoller, Jordan W; Wray, Naomi R; Lee, S Hong

    2015-02-01

    Genetic risk prediction has several potential applications in medical research and clinical practice and could be used, for example, to stratify a heterogeneous population of patients by their predicted genetic risk. However, for polygenic traits, such as psychiatric disorders, the accuracy of risk prediction is low. Here we use a multivariate linear mixed model and apply multi-trait genomic best linear unbiased prediction for genetic risk prediction. This method exploits correlations between disorders and simultaneously evaluates individual risk for each disorder. We show that the multivariate approach significantly increases the prediction accuracy for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder in the discovery as well as in independent validation datasets. By grouping SNPs based on genome annotation and fitting multiple random effects, we show that the prediction accuracy could be further improved. The gain in prediction accuracy of the multivariate approach is equivalent to an increase in sample size of 34% for schizophrenia, 68% for bipolar disorder, and 76% for major depressive disorders using single trait models. Because our approach can be readily applied to any number of GWAS datasets of correlated traits, it is a flexible and powerful tool to maximize prediction accuracy. With current sample size, risk predictors are not useful in a clinical setting but already are a valuable research tool, for example in experimental designs comparing cases with high and low polygenic risk. PMID:25640677

  18. Alcohol Use Disorder Increases the Risk of Irritable Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Tai-Yi; He, Guan-Yi; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Chen, Chih-Yu; Wang, Shih-Hao; Chen, Wei-Kung; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is considered a possible risk factor for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); however, previous studies investigating the association between AUD and IBS have yielded inconsistent results. The study investigated whether AUD increases the risk of IBS by using a population-based database in Taiwan. This retrospective matched-cohort study included the health insurance claims data of 56,355 AUD inpatients and 225,420 randomly selected controls by frequency-matched for sex, age, and index year. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to measure the risk of IBS among AUD patients compared with non-AUD patients. During the follow-up period, the incidence rate ratio (IRR) of IBS had 12.3-fold (95% CI: 11.9–12.7) in the AUD patients than non-AUD patients and the adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) for IBS in the AUD patients was 5.51 (95% CI: 4.36–6.96). For several comorbidities, the risk of IBS was significantly higher in the AUD patients than in non-AUD patients, with aHRs of 2.14 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19–3.84), 2.05 (95% CI: 1.06–3.96), and 2.91 (95% CI: 1.26–6.72) for sleep disorders, acute pancreatitis, and hepatitis B, respectively. When we stratified the severity of AUD according to the length of hospital stay, the aHRs exhibited a significant correlation (P < 0.001) with severity, yielding aHRs of 3.24 (95% CI: 2.49–4.22), 11.9 (95% CI: 8.96–15.9), and 26.1 (95% CI: 19.4–35.2) for mild, moderate, and severe AUD, respectively. The risk of IBS was higher among AUD patients, and increased with the length of hospital stay. PMID:26705226

  19. Pneumoconiosis increases the risk of congestive heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Chia-Ming; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Chen, Huei-Yong; Lu, Nan-Han; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of the study was to determine the relationship between pneumoconiosis and congestive heart failure (CHF). We collected data from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. The study sample comprised 8923 patients with pneumoconiosis and 35,692 nonpneumoconiosis controls enrolled from 2000 to 2011. Patients were followed up until the end of 2011 to evaluate the incidence of CHF. The risk of CHF was analyzed using Cox proportional hazard regression models, and the analysis accounted for factors such as sex, age, comorbidities, and air pollutants (μg/m3). The overall incidence of CHF was higher in the pneumoconiosis cohort (15.7 per 1000 person-y) than in the nonpneumoconiosis cohort (11.2 per 1000 person-y), with a crude hazard ratio (HR) of 1.40 (P < 0.001). The HR for CHF was 1.38-fold greater in the pneumoconiosis cohort than in the nonpneumoconiosis cohort (P < 0.001) after the model was adjusted for age, sex, various comorbidities, and air pollutants (μg/m3). The relative risk for CHF in the sex-specific pneumoconiosis cohort compared with the nonpneumoconiosis cohort was significant for men (adjusted HR = 1.40, 95% confidence interval = 1.21–1.62, P < 0.001). The incidence density rates of CHF increased with age; pneumoconiosis patients had a higher relative risk of CHF for all age group. Patients with pneumoconiosis were at higher risk for developing CHF than patients in the nonpneumoconiosis cohort, particularly in cases with coexisting coronary artery disease, hypertension, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:27336897

  20. Nocturnal indicators of increased cardiovascular risk in depressed adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Waloszek, Joanna M; Woods, Michael J; Byrne, Michelle L; Nicholas, Christian L; Bei, Bei; Murray, Greg; Raniti, Monika; Allen, Nicholas B; Trinder, John

    2016-04-01

    Depression is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease in adults, and recent literature suggests preclinical signs of cardiovascular risk are also present in depressed adolescents. No study has examined the effect of clinical depression on cardiovascular factors during sleep. This study examined the relationship between clinical depression and nocturnal indicators of cardiovascular risk in depressed adolescent girls from the general community (13-18 years old; 11 clinically depressed, eight healthy control). Continuous beat-to-beat finger arterial blood pressure and heart rate were monitored via Portapres and electrocardiogram, respectively. Cardiovascular data were averaged over each hour for the first 6 h of sleep, as well as in 2-min epochs of stable sleep that were then averaged within sleep stages. Data were also averaged across 2-min epochs of pre-sleep wakefulness and the first 5 min of continuous non-rapid eye movement sleep to investigate the blood pressure dipping response over the sleep-onset period. Compared with controls, depressed adolescents displayed a similar but significantly elevated blood pressure profile across sleep. Depressed adolescents had significantly higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressures across the entire night (P < 0.01), as well as during all sleep stages (P < 0.001). Depressed adolescents also had higher blood pressure across the sleep-onset period, but the groups did not differ in the rate of decline across the period. Higher blood pressure during sleep in depressed adolescent females suggests that depression has a significant association with cardiovascular functioning during sleep in adolescent females, which may increase risk for future cardiovascular pathology. PMID:26543013

  1. Genetic variants in lncRNA SRA and risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Rui; Wang, Kaijuan; Peng, Rui; Wang, Shuaibing; Cao, Jingjing; Wang, Peng; Song, Chunhua

    2016-04-19

    Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA) has been identified to activate steroid receptor transcriptional activity and participate in tumor pathogenesis. This case-control study evaluated the association between two haplotype tagging SNPs (htSNPs) (rs10463297, rs801460) of the whole SRA sequence and breast cancer risk. We found that rs10463297 TC genotype significantly increased BC risk compared with CC genotype in both the codominant (TC vs. TT: OR=1.43, 95 % CI=1.02-2.00) and recessive (TC+CC vs. TT: OR=1.39, 95 % CI=1.01-1.92) genetic models. Both TC, TC + CC genotypes of rs10463297 and GA, AA, GA+AA genotypes of rs801460 were significantly associated with estrogen receptor (ER) positivity status. rs10463297 TC (2.09 ± 0.41), CC (2.42 ± 0.51) and TC + CC (2.20 ± 0.47) genotypes were associated with higher blood plasma SRA mRNA levels compared with the TT genotype (1.45 ± 0.34). Gene-reproductive interaction analysis presented a best model consisted of four factors (rs10463297, age, post-menopausal, No. of pregnancy), which could increase the BC risk with 1.58-fold (OR=1.58, 95 % CI=1.23-2.03). These findings suggest that SRA genetic variants may contribute to BC risk and have apparent interaction with reproductive factors in BC progression. PMID:26967566

  2. Genetically modified foods: safety, risks and public concerns-a review.

    PubMed

    Bawa, A S; Anilakumar, K R

    2013-12-01

    Genetic modification is a special set of gene technology that alters the genetic machinery of such living organisms as animals, plants or microorganisms. Combining genes from different organisms is known as recombinant DNA technology and the resulting organism is said to be 'Genetically modified (GM)', 'Genetically engineered' or 'Transgenic'. The principal transgenic crops grown commercially in field are herbicide and insecticide resistant soybeans, corn, cotton and canola. Other crops grown commercially and/or field-tested are sweet potato resistant to a virus that could destroy most of the African harvest, rice with increased iron and vitamins that may alleviate chronic malnutrition in Asian countries and a variety of plants that are able to survive weather extremes. There are bananas that produce human vaccines against infectious diseases such as hepatitis B, fish that mature more quickly, fruit and nut trees that yield years earlier and plants that produce new plastics with unique properties. Technologies for genetically modifying foods offer dramatic promise for meeting some areas of greatest challenge for the 21st century. Like all new technologies, they also pose some risks, both known and unknown. Controversies and public concern surrounding GM foods and crops commonly focus on human and environmental safety, labelling and consumer choice, intellectual property rights, ethics, food security, poverty reduction and environmental conservation. With this new technology on gene manipulation what are the risks of "tampering with Mother Nature"?, what effects will this have on the environment?, what are the health concerns that consumers should be aware of? and is recombinant technology really beneficial? This review will also address some major concerns about the safety, environmental and ecological risks and health hazards involved with GM foods and recombinant technology. PMID:24426015

  3. Genetic Factors That Increase Male Facial Masculinity Decrease Facial Attractiveness of Female Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anthony J.; Mitchem, Dorian G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Keller, Matthew C.; Zietsch, Brendan P.

    2014-01-01

    For women, choosing a facially masculine man as a mate is thought to confer genetic benefits to offspring. Crucial assumptions of this hypothesis have not been adequately tested. It has been assumed that variation in facial masculinity is due to genetic variation and that genetic factors that increase male facial masculinity do not increase facial masculinity in female relatives. We objectively quantified the facial masculinity in photos of identical (n = 411) and nonidentical (n = 782) twins and their siblings (n = 106). Using biometrical modeling, we found that much of the variation in male and female facial masculinity is genetic. However, we also found that masculinity of male faces is unrelated to their attractiveness and that facially masculine men tend to have facially masculine, less-attractive sisters. These findings challenge the idea that facially masculine men provide net genetic benefits to offspring and call into question this popular theoretical framework. PMID:24379153

  4. Genetic Risk for Aortic Aneurysm in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Gabe; Alvarado, David M.; Willing, Marcia C.; Braverman, Alan C.; Bridwell, Keith H.; Kelly, Michael; Lenke, Lawrence G.; Luhmann, Scott J.; Gurnett, Christina A.; Dobbs, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Scoliosis is a feature of several genetic disorders that are also associated with aortic aneurysm, including Marfan syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, and type-IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Life-threatening complications of aortic aneurysm can be decreased through early diagnosis. Genetic screening for mutations in populations at risk, such as patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, may improve recognition of these disorders. Methods: The coding regions of five clinically actionable genes associated with scoliosis (COL3A1, FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, and SMAD3) and aortic aneurysm were sequenced in 343 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis cases. Gene variants that had minor allele frequencies of <0.0001 or were present in human disease mutation databases were identified. Variants were classified as pathogenic, likely pathogenic, or variants of unknown significance. Results: Pathogenic or likely pathogenic mutations were identified in 0.9% (three) of 343 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis cases. Two patients had pathogenic SMAD3 nonsense mutations consistent with type-III Loeys-Dietz syndrome and one patient had a pathogenic FBN1 mutation with subsequent confirmation of Marfan syndrome. Variants of unknown significance in COL3A1 and FBN1 were identified in 5.0% (seventeen) of 343 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis cases. Six FBN1 variants were previously reported in patients with Marfan syndrome, yet were considered variants of unknown significance based on the level of evidence. Variants of unknown significance occurred most frequently in FBN1 and were associated with greater curve severity, systemic features of Marfan syndrome, and joint hypermobility. Conclusions: Clinically actionable pathogenic mutations in genes associated with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and aortic aneurysm are rare in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis who are not suspected of having these disorders, although variants of unknown significance are relatively common. Clinical

  5. Genetic polymorphisms of human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) genes and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dong Gui; Mackenzie, Peter I; McKinnon, Ross A; Meech, Robyn

    2016-01-01

    Identification of genetic polymorphisms that contribute to the risk of developing cancers is important for cancer prevention. The most recent human genome GRCh38/hg38 assembly (2013) reveals thousands of genetic polymorphisms in human uridine diphosphoglucuronosyltransferase (UGT) genes. Among these, a large number of polymorphisms at the UGT1A and UGT2B genes have been shown to modulate UGT gene promoter activity or enzymatic activity. Glucuronidation plays an important role in the metabolism and clearance of endogenous and exogenous carcinogenic compounds, and this reaction is primarily catalyzed by the UGT1A and UGT2B enzymes. Therefore, it has long been hypothesized that UGT polymorphisms that reduce the capacity to glucuronidate carcinogens and other types of cancer-promoting molecules (e.g. sex hormones) are associated with an increased risk of developing cancers. A large number of case-control studies have investigated this hypothesis and these studies identified numerous UGT polymorphisms in UGT1A and UGT2B genes as genetic risk factors for a wide variety of cancers, including bladder, breast, colorectal, endometrial, esophageal, head and neck, liver, lung, prostate, and thyroid. These UGT polymorphisms may be cancer causative polymorphisms, or be linked to as yet undefined causative polymorphisms, either in UGT genes or neighboring genes. This article presents a comprehensive review of these case-control studies, discusses current areas of uncertainty, and highlights future research directions in this field. PMID:26828111

  6. Preoperative weight gain might increase risk of gastric bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Istfan, Nawfal W.; Anderson, Wendy A.; Apovian, Caroline M.; Hess, Donald T.; Forse, Armour R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Weight loss improves the cardiovascular and metabolic risk associated with obesity. However, insufficient data are available about the health effects of weight gain, separate from the obesity itself. We sought to determine whether the changes in body weight before open gastric bypass surgery (OGB) would have a significant effect on the immediate perioperative hospital course. Methods A retrospective chart review of 100 consecutive patients was performed to examine the effects of co-morbidities and body weight changes in the immediate preoperative period on the hospital length of stay and the rate of admission to the surgical intensive care unit (SICU). Results Of our class III obese patients undergoing OGB, 95% had ≥1 co-morbid condition and an overall SICU admission rate of 18%. Compared with the patients with no perioperative SICU admission, the patients admitted to the SICU had a greater degree of insulin resistance (homeostatic model analysis–insulin resistance 10.8 ± 1.3 versus 5.9 ± 0.5, P = .001), greater serum triglyceride levels (225 ± 47 versus 143 ± 8 mg/dL, P = .003), and had gained more weight preoperatively (.52 ± .13 versus .06 ± .06 lb/wk, P = .003). The multivariate analyses showed that preoperative weight gain was a risk factor for a longer length of stay and more SICU admissions lasting ≥3 days, as were a diagnosis of sleep apnea and an elevated serum triglyceride concentration. Conclusion The results of the present retrospective study suggest that weight gain increases the risk of perioperative SICU admission associated with OGB, independent of the body mass index. Sleep apnea and elevated serum triglyceride levels were also important determinants of perioperative morbidity. In view of the increasing epidemic of obesity and the popularity of bariatric surgical procedures, we propose that additional clinical and metabolic research focusing on the understanding of the complex relationship among obesity, positive energy

  7. Tutorial dialogues and gist explanations of genetic breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Colin L; Wolfe, Christopher R; Reyna, Valerie F; Cedillos-Whynott, Elizabeth M; Brust-Renck, Priscila G; Weil, Audrey M

    2015-09-01

    The intelligent tutoring system (ITS) BRCA Gist is a Web-based tutor developed using the Shareable Knowledge Objects (SKO) platform that uses latent semantic analysis to engage women in natural-language dialogues to teach about breast cancer risk. BRCA Gist appears to be the first ITS designed to assist patients' health decision making. Two studies provide fine-grained analyses of the verbal interactions between BRCA Gist and women responding to five questions pertaining to breast cancer and genetic risk. We examined how "gist explanations" generated by participants during natural-language dialogues related to outcomes. Using reliable rubrics, scripts of the participants' verbal interactions with BRCA Gist were rated for content and for the appropriateness of the tutor's responses. Human researchers' scores for the content covered by the participants were strongly correlated with the coverage scores generated by BRCA Gist, indicating that BRCA Gist accurately assesses the extent to which people respond appropriately. In Study 1, participants' performance during the dialogues was consistently associated with learning outcomes about breast cancer risk. Study 2 was a field study with a more diverse population. Participants with an undergraduate degree or less education who were randomly assigned to BRCA Gist scored higher on tests of knowledge than those assigned to the National Cancer Institute website or than a control group. We replicated findings that the more expected content that participants included in their gist explanations, the better they performed on outcome measures. As fuzzy-trace theory suggests, encouraging people to develop and elaborate upon gist explanations appears to improve learning, comprehension, and decision making. PMID:25921818

  8. Common genetic variants associated with telomere length confer risk for neuroblastoma and other childhood cancers.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kyle M; Whitehead, Todd P; de Smith, Adam J; Smirnov, Ivan V; Park, Minsun; Endicott, Alyson A; Francis, Stephen S; Codd, Veryan; Samani, Nilesh J; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2016-06-01

    Aberrant telomere lengthening is an important feature of cancer cells in adults and children. In addition to somatic mutations, germline polymorphisms in telomere maintenance genes impact telomere length. Whether these telomere-associated polymorphisms affect risk of childhood malignancies remains largely unexplored. We collected genome-wide data from three groups with pediatric malignancies [neuroblastoma (N = 1516), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (N = 958) and osteosarcoma (N = 660)] and three control populations (N = 6892). Using case-control comparisons, we analyzed eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes definitively associated with interindividual variation in leukocyte telomere length (LTL) in prior genome-wide association studies: ACYP2, TERC, NAF1, TERT, OBFC1, CTC1, ZNF208 and RTEL1 Six of these SNPs were associated (P < 0.05) with neuroblastoma risk, one with leukemia risk and one with osteosarcoma risk. The allele associated with longer LTL increased cancer risk for all these significantly associated SNPs. Using a weighted linear combination of the eight LTL-associated SNPs, we observed that neuroblastoma patients were predisposed to longer LTL than controls, with each standard deviation increase in genotypically estimated LTL associated with a 1.15-fold increased odds of neuroblastoma (95%CI = 1.09-1.22; P = 7.9×10(-7)). This effect was more pronounced in adolescent-onset neuroblastoma patients (OR = 1.46; 95%CI = 1.03-2.08). A one standard deviation increase in genotypically estimated LTL was more weakly associated with osteosarcoma risk (OR = 1.10; 95%CI = 1.01-1.19; P = 0.017) and leukemia risk (OR = 1.07; 95%CI = 1.00-1.14; P = 0.044), specifically for leukemia patients who relapsed (OR = 1.19; 95%CI = 1.01-1.40; P = 0.043). These results indicate that genetic predisposition to longer LTL is a newly identified risk factor for neuroblastoma and potentially for other cancers of childhood. PMID:27207662

  9. Extinction risk and eco-evolutionary dynamics in a variable environment with increasing frequency of extreme events.

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, Simone

    2014-08-01

    One of the most dramatic consequences of climate change will be the intensification and increased frequency of extreme events. I used numerical simulations to understand and predict the consequences of directional trend (i.e. mean state) and increased variability of a climate variable (e.g. temperature), increased probability of occurrence of point extreme events (e.g. floods), selection pressure and effect size of mutations on a quantitative trait determining individual fitness, as well as the their effects on the population and genetic dynamics of a population of moderate size. The interaction among climate trend, variability and probability of point extremes had a minor effect on risk of extinction, time to extinction and distribution of the trait after accounting for their independent effects. The survival chances of a population strongly and linearly decreased with increasing strength of selection, as well as with increasing climate trend and variability. Mutation amplitude had no effects on extinction risk, time to extinction or genetic adaptation to the new climate. Climate trend and strength of selection largely determined the shift of the mean phenotype in the population. The extinction or persistence of the populations in an 'extinction window' of 10 years was well predicted by a simple model including mean population size and mean genetic variance over a 10-year time frame preceding the 'extinction window', although genetic variance had a smaller role than population size in predicting contemporary risk of extinction. PMID:24920116

  10. Contralateral Risk-Reducing Mastectomy in Young Breast Cancer Patients with and without Genetic Cancer Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Phuong L.; Lagos, Veronica I.; Palomares, Melanie R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.

    2010-01-01

    Background Decisions regarding contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy (CRRM) among women diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer can potentially be influenced by age at diagnosis and other factors. In this study, we examined the use of CRRM before versus after genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA) in women diagnosed with breast cancer before age 50. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of women with invasive breast cancer diagnosed before age 50 who were seen for GCRA between October 1996 and March 2005. Associations between the presence of generally accepted indications for risk-reducing surgery among women who had CRRM and the timing of GCRA were examined. Results The cohort included 378 women, of whom 57 had CRRM pre-GCRA and 45 had CRRM post-GCRA after a median follow-up of 26 months. Women who had CRRM pre-GCRA were more likely to not have a generally accepted indication for the procedure than those who did after GCRA (odds ratio [OR] 5.3, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.6–17.8, P = .007). Women diagnosed with breast cancer before BRCA genetic testing became clinically available (1997) were more likely to have had CRRM pre-GCRA than those who were diagnosed more recently (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.6–5.2, P = .0003). Conclusion When personal and family history was carefully examined, a substantial proportion of women seen in our clinic did not have a clear indication for CRRM. Decreased use of empiric CRRM among women diagnosed after 1997 may indicate increased awareness and use of GCRA. Thus, judicious application of GCRA may help focus use of surgical risk reduction measures to the most risk-appropriate patients. PMID:18836779

  11. Genetic polymorphisms in the cytokine genes and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in low-risk non-Asians of USA

    PubMed Central

    Ognjanovic, Simona; Yuan, Jian-Min; Chaptman, Ann K.; Fan, Yunhua; Yu, Mimi C.

    2009-01-01

    Polymorphisms in cytokine genes responsible for inflammatory and immune responses are associated with risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in high-risk Chinese population. Similar data in low-risk populations are lacking. A population-based case–control study of HCC was conducted including 120 HCC patients and 230 matched control subjects of non-Asian residents in Los Angeles County, California. Genetic variants in the interferon γ (IFNγ), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and IL-18 genes were determined by Taqman assays. The logistic regression method was used to analyze the data. For T helper (Th) 1 genes (IFNγ, IL-6 and IL-12), relative to the putative high-activity genotypes, individual low-activity genotypes were associated with statistically non-significant increases in HCC risk. The odds ratio (OR) was 1.53 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.53–4.39] for three versus zero low-activity genotypes. For Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10), low- versus high-activity genotypes were associated with statistically non-significant decreases in HCC risk. The OR was 0.64 (95% CI = 0.27–1.55) for two versus zero low-activity genotypes. When the Th1 and Th2 genotypes were examined simultaneously, the highest level of risk was observed in individuals jointly possessing the highest number of low-activity Th1 genotypes and the lowest number of low-activity Th2 genotypes. There was a roughly doubling of risk between these two extreme genetic profiles, which did not reach statistical significance (OR = 1.98, 95% CI = 0.50–7.84, P = 0.08). In contrast to high-risk Chinese, Th1 and Th2 genotypes did not impact in a major way on risk of HCC in USA non-Asians. PMID:19126646

  12. Genetics, Genomics and Cancer Risk Assessment: State of the art and future directions in the era of personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; MacDonald, Deborah J.; Culver, Julie O.; Offit, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Scientific and technologic advances are revolutionizing our approach to genetic cancer risk assessment, cancer screening and prevention, and targeted therapy, fulfilling the promise of personalized medicine. In this monograph we review the evolution of scientific discovery in cancer genetics and genomics, and describe current approaches, benefits and barriers to the translation of this information to the practice of preventive medicine. Summaries of known hereditary cancer syndromes and highly penetrant genes are provided and contrasted with recently-discovered genomic variants associated with modest increases in cancer risk. We describe the scope of knowledge, tools, and expertise required for the translation of complex genetic and genomic test information into clinical practice. The challenges of genomic counseling include the need for genetics and genomics professional education and multidisciplinary team training, the need for evidence-based information regarding the clinical utility of testing for genomic variants, the potential dangers posed by premature marketing of first-generation genomic profiles, and the need for new clinical models to improve access to and responsible communication of complex disease-risk information. We conclude that given the experiences and lessons learned in the genetics era, the multidisciplinary model of genetic cancer risk assessment and management will serve as a solid foundation to support the integration of personalized genomic information into the practice of cancer medicine. PMID:21858794

  13. Calcium intake increases risk of prostate cancer among Singapore Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Lesley M.; Wong, Alvin S.; Koh, Woon-Puay; Wang, Renwei; Yuan, Jian-Min; Yu, Mimi C.

    2010-01-01

    Consumption of dairy products, the primary source of calcium in Western diets, has been found to be positively associated with prostate cancer. In an Asian diet, non-dairy foods are the major contributors of calcium. Thus, a study of dietary calcium and prostate cancer in Asians can better inform on whether calcium, as opposed to other dairy components is responsible for the dairy foods-prostate cancer association. We examined calcium intake and prostate cancer risk among 27,293 men of the Singapore Chinese Health Study that was established between 1993 and 1998. As of December 31, 2007, 298 incident prostate cancer cases had been diagnosed among the cohort members. Diet was assessed at baseline with a validated 165-item food frequency questionnaire. It is hypothesized that there is greater net absorption of calcium in smaller individuals. Therefore, the calcium-prostate cancer association was also assessed in stratified analyses by median body mass index (BMI). Vegetables were the largest contributor of daily calcium intake in the study population. Overall, we observed a modest, statistically nonsignificant 25% increase in prostate cancer risk for the 4th (median = 659 mg/day) versus 1st (median=211 mg/day) quartiles of calcium intake after adjustment for potential confounders. The association became considerably stronger and achieved statistical significance (hazard ratio=2.03; 95% confidence interval: 1.23, 3.34; P for trend=0.01) for men with below median (22.9 kg/m2) BMI. Dietary calcium may be a risk factor for prostate cancer even at relatively low intake. PMID:20516117

  14. Managing patients at genetic risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pederson, Holly J; Padia, Shilpa A; May, Maureen; Grobmyer, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    Hereditary syndromes that increase the risk of breast cancer are not common, but it is critical to recognize and manage them appropriately. This paper reviews the management of patients with the most common hereditary breast cancer syndromes, ie, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, hereditary diffuse gastric cancer, Cowden syndrome (PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome. PMID:26974991

  15. Genetic Risk by Experience Interaction for Childhood Internalizing Problems: Converging Evidence across Multiple Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vendlinski, Matthew K.; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Essex, Marilyn J.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2011-01-01

    Background: Identifying how genetic risk interacts with experience to predict psychopathology is an important step toward understanding the etiology of mental health problems. Few studies have examined genetic risk by experience interaction (GxE) in the development of childhood psychopathology. Methods: We used both co-twin and parent mental…

  16. Increasing oxidative stress with molsidomine increases blood pressure in genetically hypertensive rats but not normotensive controls.

    PubMed

    Fortepiani, Lourdes A; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2005-09-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) have a higher level of oxidative stress and exhibit a greater depressor response to a superoxide scavenger, tempol, than normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). This study determined whether an increase in oxidative stress with a superoxide/NO donor, molsidomine, would amplify the blood pressure in SHR. Male SHR and WKY were given molsidomine (30 mg.kg(-1).day(-1)) or vehicle (0.01% ethanol) for 1 wk, and blood pressure, renal hemodynamics, nitrate and nitrite excretion (NOx), renal superoxide production, and expression of renal antioxidant enzymes, Mn- and Cu,Zn-SOD, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), were measured. Renal superoxide and NOx were higher in control SHR than in WKY. Molsidomine increased superoxide by approximately 35% and NOx by 250% in both SHR and WKY. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was also higher in control SHR than WKY. Molsidomine increased MAP by 14% and caused renal vasoconstriction in SHR but reduced MAP by 16%, with no effect on renal hemodynamics, in WKY. Renal expression of Mn- and Cu,Zn-SOD was not different between SHR and WKY, but expression of catalase and GPx were approximately 30% lower in kidney of SHR than WKY. The levels of Mn- and Cu,Zn-SOD were not increased with molsidomine in either WKY or SHR. Renal catalase and GPx expression was increased by 300-400% with molsidomine in WKY, but there was no effect in SHR. Increasing oxidative stress elevated blood pressure further in SHR but not WKY. WKY are likely protected because of higher bioavailable levels of NO and the ability to upregulate catalase and GPx. PMID:15905221

  17. Toenail iron, genetic determinants of iron status and the risk of glioma

    PubMed Central

    Anic, Gabriella M.; Madden, Melissa H.; Thompson, Reid C.; Nabors, L. Burton; Olson, Jeffrey J.; LaRocca, Renato V.; Browning, James E.; Brockman, John D.; Forsyth, Peter A.; Egan, Kathleen M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Iron is essential for oxygen transport and oxidative metabolism; however, elevated iron stores can trigger overproduction of reactive oxygen species and induce DNA damage. Little is known about the association between body iron stores and glioma risk. This study examined associations of iron levels measured in toenails and genetic variants linked to body iron stores with risk of glioma in a clinic-based case-control study. Methods Samples were collected a median of 24 days following glioma diagnosis in the cases (10th-90th percentile range: 10-44 days). Nail iron levels were measured in 300 cases and 300 controls using neutron-activation analysis. A total of 24 genetic variants associated with iron status were genotyped in 622 cases and 628 controls. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for glioma risk according to toenail iron and the examined genotypes. Results No association was observed between toenail iron and glioma risk when restricting to cases with nails collected within ~3 weeks of diagnosis (OR=0.93; 95% CI: 0.46, 1.87 comparing those with high (≥ 14 μg/g) versus low (<6 μg/g) iron levels). In contrast, an inverse association with increasing iron was observed after restricting to cases with a delay of 3 weeks or greater (OR=0.42; 95% CI: 0.19, 0.95) reflecting potentially insidious effects of advancing disease on iron levels among the cases. No associations were observed for any of the examined genetic variants. Conclusion The results do not support a role for body iron stores as a determinant of glioma risk. PMID:23996192

  18. Plant genetic resources: what can they contribute toward increased crop productivity?

    PubMed

    Hoisington, D; Khairallah, M; Reeves, T; Ribaut, J M; Skovmand, B; Taba, S; Warburton, M

    1999-05-25

    To feed a world population growing by up to 160 people per minute, with >90% of them in developing countries, will require an astonishing increase in food production. Forecasts call for wheat to become the most important cereal in the world, with maize close behind; together, these crops will account for approximately 80% of developing countries' cereal import requirements. Access to a range of genetic diversity is critical to the success of breeding programs. The global effort to assemble, document, and utilize these resources is enormous, and the genetic diversity in the collections is critical to the world's fight against hunger. The introgression of genes that reduced plant height and increased disease and viral resistance in wheat provided the foundation for the "Green Revolution" and demonstrated the tremendous impact that genetic resources can have on production. Wheat hybrids and synthetics may provide the yield increases needed in the future. A wild relative of maize, Tripsacum, represents an untapped genetic resource for abiotic and biotic stress resistance and for apomixis, a trait that could provide developing world farmers access to hybrid technology. Ownership of genetic resources and genes must be resolved to ensure global access to these critical resources. The application of molecular and genetic engineering technologies enhances the use of genetic resources. The effective and complementary use of all of our technological tools and resources will be required for meeting the challenge posed by the world's expanding demand for food. PMID:10339521

  19. Genetic variants primarily associated with type 2 diabetes are related to coronary artery disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Henning; Loley, Christina; Lieb, Wolfgang; Pencina, Michael J; Nelson, Christopher P; Kathiresan, Sekar; Peloso, Gina M; Voight, Benjamin F; Reilly, Muredach P; Assimes, Themistocles L; Boerwinkle, Eric; Hengstenberg, Christian; Laaksonen, Reijo; McPherson, Ruth; Roberts, Robert; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Rawal, Rajesh; Thompson, John R; König, Inke R; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J; Schunkert, Heribert

    2015-01-01

    Background The mechanisms underlying the association between diabetes and coronary artery disease (CAD) risk are unclear. We aimed to assess this association by studying genetic variants that have been shown to associate with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). If the association between diabetes and CAD is causal, we expected to observe an association of these variants with CAD as well. Methods and Results We studied all genetic variants currently known to be associated with T2DM at a genome-wide significant level (p<5*10−8) in CARDIoGRAM, a genome-wide data-set of CAD including 22,233 CAD cases and 64,762 controls. Out of the 44 published T2DM SNPs 10 were significantly associated with CAD in CARDIoGRAM (OR>1, p<0.05), more than expected by chance (p=5.0*10−5). Considering all 44 SNPs, the average CAD risk observed per individual T2DM risk allele was 1.0076 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.9973–1.0180). Such average risk increase was significantly lower than the increase expected based on i) the published effects of the SNPs on T2DM risk and ii) the effect of T2DM on CAD risk as observed in the Framingham Heart Study, which suggested a risk of 1.067 per allele (p=7.2*10−10 vs. the observed effect). Studying two risk scores based on risk alleles of the diabetes SNPs, one score using individual level data in 9856 subjects, and the second score on average effects of reported beta-coefficients from the entire CARDIoGRAM data-set, we again observed a significant - yet smaller than expected - association with CAD. Conclusions Our data indicate that an association between type 2 diabetes related SNPs and CAD exists. However, the effects on CAD risk appear to be by far lower than what would be expected based on the effects of risk alleles on T2DM and the effect of T2DM on CAD in the epidemiological setting. PMID:26074316

  20. Familial skin cancer syndromes: Increased risk of nonmelanotic skin cancers and extracutaneous tumors.

    PubMed

    Jaju, Prajakta D; Ransohoff, Katherine J; Tang, Jean Y; Sarin, Kavita Y

    2016-03-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) represent the most common malignancies worldwide, with reported incidence rising each year. Both cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), as well as other NMSCs, represent complex diseases with a combination of environmental and genetic risk factors. In general, hereditary cancer syndromes that increase the risk of NMSC fall under several broad categories: those associated with immunodeficiencies, those that affect skin pigmentation, and those that perturb key molecular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of NMSCs. Many of the syndromes are also associated with extracutaneous manifestations, including internal malignancies; therefore, most require a multidisciplinary management approach with a medical geneticist. Finally, dermatologists play a critical role in the diagnosis and management of these conditions, because cutaneous findings are often the presenting manifestations of disease. PMID:26892653

  1. Risk Factors Associated with Increased Morbidity in Living Liver Donation

    PubMed Central

    Candido, Helry L.; da Fonseca, Eduardo A.; Feier, Flávia H.; Pugliese, Renata; Benavides, Marcel A.; Silva, Enis D.; Gordon, Karina; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama; Canet, Jaume; Chapchap, Paulo; Neto, Joao Seda

    2015-01-01

    Living donor liver donation (LDLD) is an alternative to cadaveric liver donation. We aimed at identifying risk factors and developing a score for prediction of postoperative complications (POCs) after LDLD in donors. This is a retrospective cohort study in 688 donors between June 1995 and February 2014 at Hospital Sírio-Libanês and A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, in São Paulo, Brazil. Primary outcome was POC graded ≥III according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Left lateral segment (LLS), left lobe (LL), and right lobe resections (RL) were conducted in 492 (71.4%), 109 (15.8%), and 87 (12.6%) donors, respectively. In total, 43 (6.2%) developed POCs, which were more common after RL than LLS and LL (14/87 (16.1%) versus 23/492 (4.5%) and 6/109 (5.5%), resp., p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that RL resection (OR: 2.81, 95% CI: 1.32 to 3.01; p = 0.008), smoking status (OR: 3.2, 95% CI: 1.35 to 7.56; p = 0.012), and blood transfusion (OR: 3.15, 95% CI: 1.45 to 6.84; p = 0.004) were independently associated with POCs. RL resection, intraoperative blood transfusion, and smoking were associated with increased risk for POCs in donors. PMID:26788361

  2. Intakes of red meat, processed meat, and meat-mutagens increase lung cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Tram Kim; Cross, Amanda J.; Consonni, Dario; Randi, Giorgia; Bagnardi, Vincenzo; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Caporaso, Neil E.; Sinha, Rashmi; Subar, Amy F.; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2009-01-01

    Red and processed meat intake may increase lung cancer risk. However, the epidemiologic evidence is inconsistent and few studies have evaluated the role of meat-mutagens formed during high cooking temperatures. We investigated the association of red meat, processed meat, and meat-mutagen intake with lung cancer risk in Environment And Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology (EAGLE), a population-based case-control study. Primary lung cancer cases (n=2101) were recruited from 13 hospitals within the Lombardy region of Italy examining ~80% of the cases from the area. Non-cancer population controls (n=2120), matched to cases on gender, residence, and age, were randomly selected from the same catchment area. Diet was assessed in 1903 cases and 2073 controls, and used in conjunction with a meat-mutagen database to estimate intake of heterocyclic amines and benzo[a]pyrene. Multivariable odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for sex-specific tertiles of intake were calculated using unconditional logistic regression. Red and processed meat were positively associated with lung cancer risk (highest-versus-lowest tertile: OR=1.8; 95% CI=1.5–2.2; p-trend<0.001 and OR=1.7; 95% CI=1.4–2.1; p-trend<0.001, respectively); the risks were strongest among never smokers (OR=2.4, 95% CI=1.4–4.0, p-trend=0.001 and OR=2.5, 95% CI=1.5–4.2, p-trend=0.001, respectively). Heterocyclic amines and benzo[a]pyrene were significantly associated with increased risk of lung cancer. When separated by histology, significant positive associations for both meat groups were restricted to adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, but not small cell carcinoma of the lung. In summary, red meat, processed meat, and meat-mutagens were independently associated with increased risk of lung cancer. PMID:19141639

  3. Ecogenetics of mercury: from genetic polymorphisms and epigenetics to risk assessment and decision-making.

    PubMed

    Basu, Niladri; Goodrich, Jaclyn M; Head, Jessica

    2014-06-01

    The risk assessment of mercury (Hg), in both humans and wildlife, is made challenging by great variability in exposure and health effects. Although disease risk arises following complex interactions between genetic ("nature") and environmental ("nurture") factors, most Hg studies thus far have focused solely on environmental factors. In recent years, ecogenetic-based studies have emerged and have started to document genetic and epigenetic factors that may indeed influence the toxicokinetics or toxicodynamics of Hg. The present study reviews these studies and discusses their utility in terms of Hg risk assessment, management, and policy and offers perspectives on fruitful areas for future research. In brief, epidemiological studies on populations exposed to inorganic Hg (e.g., dentists and miners) or methylmercury (e.g., fish consumers) are showing that polymorphisms in a number of environmentally responsive genes can explain variations in Hg biomarker values and health outcomes. Studies on mammals (wildlife, humans, rodents) are showing Hg exposures to be related to epigenetic marks such as DNA methylation. Such findings are beginning to increase understanding of the mechanisms of action of Hg, and in doing so they may help identify candidate biomarkers and pinpoint susceptible groups or life stages. Furthermore, they may help refine uncertainty factors and thus lead to more accurate risk assessments and improved decision-making. PMID:24038486

  4. Increased Melatonin Signaling Is a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Nagorny, Cecilia L F; Singh, Pratibha; Bennet, Hedvig; Yu, Qian; Alenkvist, Ida; Isomaa, Bo; Östman, Bjarne; Söderström, Johan; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Martikainen, Silja; Räikkönen, Katri; Forsén, Tom; Hakaste, Liisa; Almgren, Peter; Storm, Petter; Asplund, Olof; Shcherbina, Liliya; Fex, Malin; Fadista, João; Tengholm, Anders; Wierup, Nils; Groop, Leif; Mulder, Hindrik

    2016-06-14

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a global pandemic. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified >100 genetic variants associated with the disease, including a common variant in the melatonin receptor 1 b gene (MTNR1B). Here, we demonstrate increased MTNR1B expression in human islets from risk G-allele carriers, which likely leads to a reduction in insulin release, increasing T2D risk. Accordingly, in insulin-secreting cells, melatonin reduced cAMP levels, and MTNR1B overexpression exaggerated the inhibition of insulin release exerted by melatonin. Conversely, mice with a disruption of the receptor secreted more insulin. Melatonin treatment in a human recall-by-genotype study reduced insulin secretion and raised glucose levels more extensively in risk G-allele carriers. Thus, our data support a model where enhanced melatonin signaling in islets reduces insulin secretion, leading to hyperglycemia and greater future risk of T2D. The findings also imply that melatonin physiologically serves to inhibit nocturnal insulin release. PMID:27185156

  5. Hypermobility syndrome increases the risk for low bone mass.

    PubMed

    Gulbahar, Selmin; Sahin, Ebru; Baydar, Meltem; Bircan, Ciğdem; Kizil, Ramazan; Manisali, Metin; Akalin, Elif; Peker, Ozlen

    2006-07-01

    Few studies on the benign joint hypermobility syndrome suggest a tendency toward osteopenia, but there are conflicting results. We assessed bone mineral density in pre-menopausal women with hypermobility. Twenty-five consecutive Caucasian women diagnosed with benign hypermobility syndrome by Beighton score and 23 age- and sex-matched controls were included in the study. Age, menarch age, number of pregnancies, duration of lactation, physical activity and calcium intake were questioned according to European Vertebral Osteoporosis Study Group (EVOS) form. All subjects were pre-menopausal and none of them were on treatment with any drugs effecting bone metabolism or had any other systemic disease. No statistically significant difference was found for body mass index, menarch age, number of pregnancies, duration of lactation, calcium intake, calcium score and physical activity score between the two groups. Total femoral and trochanteric bone mineral density and t and z scores were significantly lower in hypermobile patients compared to the control group. Ward's triangle and femoral neck z scores were also found to be significantly low in hypermobile patients (p<0.05). Significant negative correlations were found between the Beighton scores and trochanteric BMD, t and z scores (r=-0.29, r=-0.30, and r=-0.32) in hypermobility patients. Low bone mass was more frequently found among subjects with hypermobility (p=0.03). Hypermobility was found to increase the risk for low bone mass by 1.8 times (95% confidence interval 1.01-3.38). Our study suggests that pre-menopausal women with joint hypermobility have lower bone mineral density when compared to the controls and hypermobility increases the risk for low bone mass. PMID:16311714

  6. Risk factors for increased BTEX exposure in four Australian cities.

    PubMed

    Hinwood, Andrea L; Rodriguez, Clemencia; Runnion, Tina; Farrar, Drew; Murray, Frank; Horton, Anthony; Glass, Deborah; Sheppeard, Vicky; Edwards, John W; Denison, Lynnette; Whitworth, Tom; Eiser, Chris; Bulsara, Max; Gillett, Rob W; Powell, Jenny; Lawson, S; Weeks, Ian; Galbally, Ian

    2007-01-01

    Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) are common volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in urban airsheds. Elevated levels of VOCs have been reported in many airsheds at many locations, particularly those associated with industrial activity, wood heater use and heavy traffic. Exposure to some VOCs has been associated with health risks. There have been limited investigations into community exposures to BTEX using personal monitoring to elucidate the concentrations to which members of the community may be exposed and the main contributors to that exposure. In this cross sectional study we investigated BTEX exposure of 204 non-smoking, non-occupationally exposed people from four Australian cities. Each participant wore a passive BTEX sampler over 24h on five consecutive days in both winter and summer and completed an exposure source questionnaire for each season and a diary for each day of monitoring. The geometric mean (GM) and range of daily BTEX concentrations recorded for the study population were benzene 0.80 (0.04-23.8 ppb); toluene 2.83 (0.03-2120 ppb); ethylbenzene 0.49 (0.03-119 ppb); and xylenes 2.36 (0.04-697 ppb). A generalised linear model was used to investigate significant risk factors for increased BTEX exposure. Activities and locations found to increase personal exposure included vehicle repair and machinery use, refuelling of motor vehicles, being in an enclosed car park and time spent undertaking arts and crafts. A highly significant difference was found between the mean exposures in each of the four cities, which may be explained by differences in fuel composition, differences in the mix and density of industry, density of motor vehicles and air pollution meteorology. PMID:16837022

  7. Increased Risk of Postthoracotomy Pain Syndrome in Patients with Prolonged Hospitalization and Increased Postoperative Opioid Use

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Adam K.; Passe, Melissa A.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Postthoracotomy pain syndrome (PTPS) is unfortunately very common following thoracotomy and results in decreased quality of life. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine perioperative patient, surgical, and analgesic characteristics associated with the development of PTPS. Methods. Sixty-six patients who presented to the Mayo Clinic Rochester Pain Clinic were diagnosed with PTPS 2 months or more after thoracotomy with postoperative epidural analgesia. These patients were matched with sixty-six control patients who underwent thoracotomy with postoperative epidural analgesia and were never diagnosed with PTPS. Results. Median (IQR) hospital stay was significantly different between control patients (5 days (4, 6)) compared with PTPS patients (6 days (5, 8)), P < 0.02. The total opioid equivalent utilized in oral morphine equivalents in milligrams for the first three days postoperatively was significantly different between control patients and PTPS patients. The median (IQR) total opioid equivalent utilized was 237 (73, 508) for controls and 366 (116, 874) for PTPS patients (P < 0.005). Conclusion. Patients with a prolonged hospital stay after thoracotomy were at an increased risk of developing PTPS, and this is a novel finding. Patients who utilize higher oral morphine equivalents for the first 3 days were also at increased risk for PTPS. PMID:27340565

  8. Increased Risk of Postthoracotomy Pain Syndrome in Patients with Prolonged Hospitalization and Increased Postoperative Opioid Use.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Michelle A O; Jacob, Adam K; Passe, Melissa A; Mantilla, Carlos B

    2016-01-01

    Background. Postthoracotomy pain syndrome (PTPS) is unfortunately very common following thoracotomy and results in decreased quality of life. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine perioperative patient, surgical, and analgesic characteristics associated with the development of PTPS. Methods. Sixty-six patients who presented to the Mayo Clinic Rochester Pain Clinic were diagnosed with PTPS 2 months or more after thoracotomy with postoperative epidural analgesia. These patients were matched with sixty-six control patients who underwent thoracotomy with postoperative epidural analgesia and were never diagnosed with PTPS. Results. Median (IQR) hospital stay was significantly different between control patients (5 days (4, 6)) compared with PTPS patients (6 days (5, 8)), P < 0.02. The total opioid equivalent utilized in oral morphine equivalents in milligrams for the first three days postoperatively was significantly different between control patients and PTPS patients. The median (IQR) total opioid equivalent utilized was 237 (73, 508) for controls and 366 (116, 874) for PTPS patients (P < 0.005). Conclusion. Patients with a prolonged hospital stay after thoracotomy were at an increased risk of developing PTPS, and this is a novel finding. Patients who utilize higher oral morphine equivalents for the first 3 days were also at increased risk for PTPS. PMID:27340565

  9. An Alzheimer's Disease Genetic Risk Score Predicts Longitudinal Thinning of Hippocampal Complex Subregions in Healthy Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Theresa M; Mahmood, Zanjbeel; Lau, Edward P; Karacozoff, Alexandra M; Burggren, Alison C; Small, Gary W; Bookheimer, Susan Y

    2016-01-01

    Variants at 21 genetic loci have been associated with an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). An important unresolved question is whether multiple genetic risk factors can be combined to increase the power to detect changes in neuroimaging biomarkers for AD. We acquired high-resolution structural images of the hippocampus in 66 healthy, older human subjects. For 45 of these subjects, longitudinal 2-year follow-up data were also available. We calculated an additive AD genetic risk score for each participant and contrasted this with a weighted risk score (WRS) approach. Each score included APOE (apolipoprotein E), CLU (clusterin), PICALM (phosphatidylinositol binding clathrin assembly protein), and family history of AD. Both unweighted risk score (URS) and WRS correlated strongly with the percentage change in thickness across the whole hippocampal complex (URS: r = -0.40; p = 0.003; WRS: r = -0.25, p = 0.048), driven by a strong relationship to entorhinal cortex thinning (URS: r = -0.35; p = 0.009; WRS: r = -0.35, p = 0.009). By contrast, at baseline the risk scores showed no relationship to thickness in any hippocampal complex subregion. These results provide compelling evidence that polygenic AD risk scores may be especially sensitive to structural change over time in regions affected early in AD, like the hippocampus and adjacent entorhinal cortex. This work also supports the paradigm of studying genetic risk for disease in healthy volunteers. Together, these findings will inform clinical trial design by supporting the idea that genetic prescreening in healthy control subjects can be useful to maximize the ability to detect an effect on a longitudinal neuroimaging endpoint, like hippocampal complex cortical thickness. PMID:27482534

  10. An Alzheimer’s Disease Genetic Risk Score Predicts Longitudinal Thinning of Hippocampal Complex Subregions in Healthy Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Zanjbeel; Lau, Edward P.; Karacozoff, Alexandra M.; Small, Gary W.; Bookheimer, Susan Y.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Variants at 21 genetic loci have been associated with an increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). An important unresolved question is whether multiple genetic risk factors can be combined to increase the power to detect changes in neuroimaging biomarkers for AD. We acquired high-resolution structural images of the hippocampus in 66 healthy, older human subjects. For 45 of these subjects, longitudinal 2-year follow-up data were also available. We calculated an additive AD genetic risk score for each participant and contrasted this with a weighted risk score (WRS) approach. Each score included APOE (apolipoprotein E), CLU (clusterin), PICALM (phosphatidylinositol binding clathrin assembly protein), and family history of AD. Both unweighted risk score (URS) and WRS correlated strongly with the percentage change in thickness across the whole hippocampal complex (URS: r = −0.40; p = 0.003; WRS: r = −0.25, p = 0.048), driven by a strong relationship to entorhinal cortex thinning (URS: r = −0.35; p = 0.009; WRS: r = −0.35, p = 0.009). By contrast, at baseline the risk scores showed no relationship to thickness in any hippocampal complex subregion. These results provide compelling evidence that polygenic AD risk scores may be especially sensitive to structural change over time in regions affected early in AD, like the hippocampus and adjacent entorhinal cortex. This work also supports the paradigm of studying genetic risk for disease in healthy volunteers. Together, these findings will inform clinical trial design by supporting the idea that genetic prescreening in healthy control subjects can be useful to maximize the ability to detect an effect on a longitudinal neuroimaging endpoint, like hippocampal complex cortical thickness. PMID:27482534

  11. Prediction of Breast Cancer Risk Based on Profiling With Common Genetic Variants

    PubMed Central

    Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan; Brook, Mark N.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dudbridge, Frank; Johnson, Nichola; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Brinton, Louise; Lissowska, Jolanta; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lambrechts, Diether; Wildiers, Hans; Van Ongeval, Chantal; van Limbergen, Erik; Kristensen, Vessela; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe; Nord, Silje; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fasching, Peter A.; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly; Titus, Linda; Egan, Kathleen M.; Hunter, David J.; Lindstrom, Sara; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Kraft, Peter; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Benitez, Javier; Pilar Zamora, M.; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Dörk, Thilo; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofyeva, Darya; Takhirova, Zalina; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Sutter, Christian; Yang, Rongxi; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Christiansen, Hans; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Sanchez, Marie; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Hopper, John L.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Sigurdson, Alice J.; Doody, Michele M.; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Försti, Asta; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Marie Mulligan, Anna; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Balleine, Rosemary; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Koppert, Linetta B.; Carpenter, Jane; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Karina Dieffenbach, Aida; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Offit, Kenneth; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Dwek, Miriam; Swann, Ruth; Annie Perkins, Katherine; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Eccles, Diana M.; Tapper, William J.; Rafiq, Sajjad; John, Esther M.; Whittemore, Alice S.; Slager, Susan; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Toland, Amanda E.; Yao, Song; Zheng, Wei; Halverson, Sandra L.; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Rosario Alonso, M.; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S.; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is lacking. Methods: We investigated the value of using 77 breast cancer-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for risk stratification, in a study of 33 673 breast cancer cases and 33 381 control women of European origin. We tested all possible pair-wise multiplicative interactions and constructed a 77-SNP polygenic risk score (PRS) for breast cancer overall and by estrogen receptor (ER) status. Absolute risks of breast cancer by PRS were derived from relative risk estimates and UK incidence and mortality rates. Results: There was no strong evidence for departure from a multiplicative model for any SNP pair. Women in the highest 1% of the PRS had a three-fold increased risk of developing breast cancer compared with women in the middle quintile (odds ratio [OR] = 3.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.95 to 3.83). The ORs for ER-positive and ER-negative disease were 3.73 (95% CI = 3.24 to 4.30) and 2.80 (95% CI = 2.26 to 3.46), respectively. Lifetime risk of breast cancer for women in the lowest and highest quintiles of the PRS were 5.2% and 16.6% for a woman without family history, and 8.6% and 24.4% for a woman with a first-degree family history of breast cancer. Conclusions: The PRS stratifies breast cancer risk in women both with and without a family history of breast cancer. The observed level of risk discrimination could inform targeted screening and prevention strategies. Further discrimination may be achievable through combining the PRS with lifestyle/environmental factors, although these were not considered in this report. PMID:25855707

  12. Additive genetic variation and evolvability of a multivariate trait can be increased by epistatic gene action.

    PubMed

    Griswold, Cortland K

    2015-12-21

    Epistatic gene action occurs when mutations or alleles interact to produce a phenotype. Theoretically and empirically it is of interest to know whether gene interactions can facilitate the evolution of diversity. In this paper, we explore how epistatic gene action affects the additive genetic component or heritable component of multivariate trait variation, as well as how epistatic gene action affects the evolvability of multivariate traits. The analysis involves a sexually reproducing and recombining population. Our results indicate that under stabilizing selection conditions a population with a mixed additive and epistatic genetic architecture can have greater multivariate additive genetic variation and evolvability than a population with a purely additive genetic architecture. That greater multivariate additive genetic variation can occur with epistasis is in contrast to previous theory that indicated univariate additive genetic variation is decreased with epistasis under stabilizing selection conditions. In a multivariate setting, epistasis leads to less relative covariance among individuals in their genotypic, as well as their breeding values, which facilitates the maintenance of additive genetic variation and increases a population׳s evolvability. Our analysis involves linking the combinatorial nature of epistatic genetic effects to the ancestral graph structure of a population to provide insight into the consequences of epistasis on multivariate trait variation and evolution. PMID:26431770

  13. Fractal and Transgenerational Genetic Effects on Phenotypic Variation and Disease Risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Joe

    To understand human biology and to manage heritable diseases, a complete picture of the genetic basis for phenotypic variation and disease risk is needed. Unexpectedly however, most of these genetic variants, even for highly heritable traits, continue to elude discovery for poorly understood reasons. The genetics community is actively exploring the usual explanations for missing heritability. But given the extraordinary work that has already been done and the exceptional magnitude of the problem, it seems likely that unconventional genetic properties are involved.

  14. Framing recommendations to promote prevention behaviors among people at high risk: A simulation study of responses to melanoma genetic test reporting.

    PubMed

    Taber, Jennifer M; Aspinwall, Lisa G

    2015-10-01

    A CDKN2A/p16 mutation confers 76 % lifetime risk of developing melanoma to US residents, and high-risk individuals are counseled to use sunscreen. Generally, for patients at population risk, gain framing more effectively promotes prevention behaviors; however, it is unknown whether loss frames might more effectively promote behavioral intentions and perceived control over disease risk among high-risk patients. Undergraduates (N = 146) underwent a simulated genetic counseling and test reporting session for hereditary melanoma. Participants watched a video of a genetic counselor providing information in which genetic risk of melanoma (Low: 15 %; High: 76 %) and framed recommendations to use sunscreen (Loss: Risk may increase by 15 % if don't use sunscreen; Gain: Risk may decrease by 15 % if use sunscreen) were manipulated. Controlling for baseline sunscreen use, high-risk participants given loss frames reported greater beliefs that sunscreen would reduce risk than high-risk participants given gain frames. Further, high-risk participants with fair skin tended to report greater intentions to use sunscreen when given loss frames versus gain frames. Perceived control over risk mediated the effect of message frame and disease risk on intentions to use sunscreen. When counseling patients with elevated cancer risk, genetic counselors may consider framing prevention behavioral recommendations in terms of potential losses. PMID:25582532

  15. Increased Flooding Risk - Accelerating Threat and Stakeholder Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, L. P.; Ezer, T.; De Young, R.; McShane, M. K.; McFarlane, B.

    2012-12-01

    projects, and "…subsidence …. is not well-documented". Studies sponsored by the City of Norfolk for example suggest massive tidal barriers. Flood insurance - Flood insurance is available only from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), not from private insurers. NFIP has a current deficit of about 18B, which is estimated to increase by about 2B annually. The rates are subsidized and do not reflect the true risk of coastal flooding and do not incorporate the likelihood of future sea-level rise. In effect, the subsidy promotes increased building on the coast, leading to increased deficits in the tax-payer financed program. Risk-based flood insurance pricing would lead to less coastal development, therefore decreasing the tax base of the community. Stakeholder needs - Planning for increased flooding due to sea level rise extends 50 to 100 years given the lifetime of infrastructure. Planners need guidance and error estimates. To make adequate predictions for users we must understand the various components of sea level rise including subsidence, global sea level rise and regional and local dynamic sea level rise. Predictions of regional sea level rise will be presented in the context of existing infrastructure such as NASA research facilities and the city of Norfolk, Virginia.

  16. Facial emotion perception differs in young persons at genetic and clinical high-risk for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Christian G; Richard, Jan A; Brensinger, Colleen M; Borgmann-Winter, Karin E; Conroy, Catherine G; Moberg, Paul J; Gur, Ruben C; Gur, Raquel E; Calkins, Monica E

    2014-05-15

    A large body of literature has documented facial emotion perception impairments in schizophrenia. More recently, emotion perception has been investigated in persons at genetic and clinical high-risk for psychosis. This study compared emotion perception abilities in groups of young persons with schizophrenia, clinical high-risk, genetic risk and healthy controls. Groups, ages 13-25, included 24 persons at clinical high-risk, 52 first-degree relatives at genetic risk, 91 persons with schizophrenia and 90 low risk persons who completed computerized testing of emotion recognition and differentiation. Groups differed by overall emotion recognition abilities and recognition of happy, sad, anger and fear expressions. Pairwise comparisons revealed comparable impairments in recognition of happy, angry, and fearful expressions for persons at clinical high-risk and schizophrenia, while genetic risk participants were less impaired, showing reduced recognition of fearful expressions. Groups also differed for differentiation of happy and sad expressions, but differences were mainly between schizophrenia and control groups. Emotion perception impairments are observable in young persons at-risk for psychosis. Preliminary results with clinical high-risk participants, when considered along findings in genetic risk relatives, suggest social cognition abilities to reflect pathophysiological processes involved in risk of schizophrenia. PMID:24582775

  17. The potential use of genetics to increase the effectiveness of treatment programs for criminal offenders.

    PubMed

    Beaver, Kevin M; Jackson, Dylan B; Flesher, Dillon

    2014-01-01

    During the past couple of decades, the amount of research examining the genetic underpinnings to antisocial behaviors, including crime, has exploded. Findings from this body of work have generated a great deal of information linking genetics to criminal involvement. As a partial result, there is now a considerable amount of interest in how these findings should be integrated into the criminal justice system. In the current paper, we outline the potential ways that genetic information can be used to increase the effectiveness of treatment programs designed to reduce recidivism among offenders. We conclude by drawing attention to how genetic information can be used by rehabilitation programs to increase program effectiveness, reduce offender recidivism rates, and enhance public safety. PMID:25860438

  18. Obesity increases tumor aggressiveness in a genetically engineered mouse model of serous ovarian cancer☆

    PubMed Central

    Makowski, Liza; Zhou, Chunxiao; Zhong, Yan; Kuan, Pei Fen; Fan, Cheng; Sampey, Brante P.; Difurio, Megan; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Obesity is associated with increased risk and worse outcomes for ovarian cancer. Thus, we examined the effects of obesity on ovarian cancer progression in a genetically engineered mouse model of serous ovarian cancer. Methods We utilized a unique serous ovarian cancer mouse model that specifically deletes the tumor suppressor genes, Brca1 and p53, and inactivates the retinoblastoma (Rb) proteins in adult ovarian surface epithelial cells, via injection of an adenoviral vector expressing Cre (AdCre) into the ovarian bursa cavity of adult female mice (KpB mouse model). KpB mice were subjected to a 60% calories-derived from fat in a high fat diet (HFD) versus 10% calories from fat in a low fat diet (LFD) to mimic diet-induced obesity. Tumors were isolated at 6 months after AdCre injection and evaluated histologically. Untargeted metabolomic and gene expression profiling was performed to assess differences in the ovarian tumors from obese versus non-obese KpB mice. Results At sacrifice, mice on the HFD (obese) were twice the weight of mice on the LFD (non-obese) (51 g versus 31 g, p = 0.0003). Ovarian tumors were significantly larger in the obese versus non-obese mice (3.7 cm2 versus 1.2 cm2, p = 0.0065). Gene expression and metabolomic profiling indicated statistically significant differences between the ovarian tumors from the obese versus non-obese mice, including metabolically relevant pathways. PMID:24680597

  19. Genetically at-risk status and individual agency. A qualitative study on asymptomatic women living with genetic risk of breast/ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Caiata-Zufferey, Maria

    2015-05-01

    For the last 20 years, genetic tests have allowed unaffected women to determine whether they are predisposed to developing breast/ovarian cancer due to BRCA1/2 gene mutations. In the event of adverse results, women receive a specific label associated with a set of medical recommendations: the genetically at-risk status. This qualitative study adopted a life-course perspective to understand the impact of this status on women's agency. Following a grounded theory design, retrospective biographical interviews were conducted in Switzerland between 2011 and 2013 with 32 unaffected women at risk of developing genetic breast/ovarian cancer and aware of their predisposition for at least three years. The results show that the genetically at-risk status conveys an invitation to transform health into a project, i.e., into a set of planned activities realized in collaboration with the medical system in order to reduce the risk of developing cancer. This health project shapes women's agency in three ways: it enhances, constrains and questions it, thus creating a sense of disorientation about what is considered rational and appropriate in terms of genetic risk management. Based on these findings, the paper concludes by stressing the paradoxes of the genetically at-risk status and the limits of the medical system in managing women designated with it. The paper also suggests that because of the disorientation intrinsic to their situation, genetically at-risk women have to reflexively construct their own health project from a range of available options in ways that are coherent and viable for themselves and their significant others. This process of reflexive construction may be called legitimation. PMID:25813728

  20. Extreme Geohazards: Reducing Disaster Risk and Increasing Resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plag, Hans-Peter; Stein, Seth; Brocklebank, Sean; Jules-Plag, Shelley; Campus, Paola

    2014-05-01

    Extreme natural hazards have the potential to cause global disasters and to lead to an escalation of the global sustainability crisis. Floods and droughts pose threats that could reach planetary extent, particularly through secondary economic and social impacts. Earthquakes and tsunamis cause disasters that could exceed the immediate coping capacity of the global economy, particularly in hazardous areas containing megacities, that can be particularly vulnerable to natural hazards if proper emergency protocols and infrastructures are not set in place. Recent events illustrate the destruction extreme hazards can inflict, both directly and indirectly, through domino effects resulting from the interaction with the built environment. Unfortunately, the more humanity learns to cope with relatively frequent (50 to 100 years) natural hazard events, the less concerns remain about the low-probability (one in a few hundred or more years) high-impact events. As a consequence, threats from low-probability extreme floods, droughts, and volcanic eruptions are not appropriately accounted for in Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) discussions. With the support of the European Science Foundation (ESF), the Geohazards Community of Practice (GHCP) of the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) has developed a White Paper (WP) on the risk associated with low-probability, high-impact geohazards. These events are insufficiently addressed in risk management, although their potential impacts are comparable to those of a large asteroid impact, a global pandemic, or an extreme drought. The WP aims to increase awareness of the risk associated with these events as a basis for a comprehensive risk management. Extreme geohazards have occurred regularly throughout the past, but mostly did not cause major disasters because the exposure of human assets to such hazards and the global population density were much lower than today. The most extreme events during the last 2,000 years would cause today unparalleled

  1. Genetic ancestry and risk of mortality among U.S. Latinas with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fejerman, Laura; Hu, Donglei; Huntsman, Scott; John, Esther M.; Stern, Mariana C.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.; Ziv, Elad

    2013-01-01

    Multiple studies have reported that Latina women in the U.S. are diagnosed with breast cancer at more advanced stages and have poorer survival than non-Latina White women. However, Latinas are a heterogeneous group with individuals having different proportions of European, Indigenous American and African genetic ancestry. In this study we evaluated the association between genetic ancestry and survival after breast cancer diagnosis among 899 Latina women from the San Francisco Bay Area. Genetic ancestry was estimated from single nucleotide polymorphisms from an Affymetrix 6.0 array and we used Cox proportional hazards models to evaluate the association between genetic ancestry and breast cancer-specific mortality (tests were two-sided). Women were followed for an average of 9 years during which 75 died from breast cancer. Our results showed that Individuals with higher Indigenous American ancestry had increased risk of breast cancer-specific mortality [hazard ratio (HR): 1.57 per 25% increase in Indigenous American ancestry; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08–2.29]. Adjustment for demographic factors, tumor characteristics, and some treatment information did not explain the observed association [HR: 1.75, 95%CI: 1.12–2.74]. In an analysis in which ancestry was dichotomized, the hazard of mortality showed a two-fold increase when comparing women with <50% Indigenous American ancestry to women with ≥50% [HR: 1.89, 95%CI: 1.10–3.24]. This was also reflected by Kaplan-Meier survival estimates (P for Log-Rank test of 0.003). Overall, results suggest that genetic factors and/or unmeasured differences in treatment or access to care should be further explored to understand and reduce ethnic disparities in breast cancer outcomes. PMID:24177181

  2. Genetic polymorphisms involved in folate metabolism and maternal risk for down syndrome: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Balduino Victorino, Daniella; de Godoy, Moacir Fernandes; Goloni-Bertollo, Eny Maria; Pavarino, Érika Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Inconclusive results of the association between genetic polymorphisms involved in folate metabolism and maternal risk for Down syndrome (DS) have been reported. Therefore, this meta-analysis was conducted. We searched electronic databases through May, 2014, for eligible studies. Pooled odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were used to assess the strength of the association, which was estimated by fixed or random effects models. Heterogeneity among studies was evaluated using Q-test and I (2) statistic. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses were also conducted. Publication bias was estimated using Begg's and Egger's tests. A total of 17 case-controls studies were included. There was evidence for an association between the MTRR c.66A>G (rs1801394) polymorphism and maternal risk for DS. In the subgroup analysis, increased maternal risk for DS was found in Caucasians. Additionally, the polymorphic heterozygote MTHFD1 1958GA genotype was associated significantly with maternal risk for DS, when we limit the analysis by studies conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Finally, considering MTR c.2756A>G (rs1805087), TC2 c.776C>G (rs1801198), and CBS c.844ins68, no significant associations have been found, neither in the overall analyses nor in the stratified analyses by ethnicity. In conclusion, our meta-analysis suggested that the MTRR c.66A>G (rs1801394) polymorphism and MTHFD1 c.1958G>A (rs2236225) were associated with increased maternal risk for DS. PMID:25544792

  3. Genetic Polymorphisms Involved in Folate Metabolism and Maternal Risk for Down Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Balduino Victorino, Daniella; de Godoy, Moacir Fernandes; Goloni-Bertollo, Eny Maria; Pavarino, Érika Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Inconclusive results of the association between genetic polymorphisms involved in folate metabolism and maternal risk for Down syndrome (DS) have been reported. Therefore, this meta-analysis was conducted. We searched electronic databases through May, 2014, for eligible studies. Pooled odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were used to assess the strength of the association, which was estimated by fixed or random effects models. Heterogeneity among studies was evaluated using Q-test and I2 statistic. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses were also conducted. Publication bias was estimated using Begg's and Egger's tests. A total of 17 case-controls studies were included. There was evidence for an association between the MTRR c.66A>G (rs1801394) polymorphism and maternal risk for DS. In the subgroup analysis, increased maternal risk for DS was found in Caucasians. Additionally, the polymorphic heterozygote MTHFD1 1958GA genotype was associated significantly with maternal risk for DS, when we limit the analysis by studies conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Finally, considering MTR c.2756A>G (rs1805087), TC2 c.776C>G (rs1801198), and CBS c.844ins68, no significant associations have been found, neither in the overall analyses nor in the stratified analyses by ethnicity. In conclusion, our meta-analysis suggested that the MTRR c.66A>G (rs1801394) polymorphism and MTHFD1 c.1958G>A (rs2236225) were associated with increased maternal risk for DS. PMID:25544792

  4. Relevance of Bt toxin interaction studies for environmental risk assessment of genetically modified crops.

    PubMed

    De Schrijver, Adinda; De Clercq, Patrick; de Maagd, Ruud A; van Frankenhuyzen, Kees

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, different Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin-encoding genes have been combined or 'stacked' in genetically modified (GM) crops. Synergism between Bt proteins may occur and thereby increase the impact of the stacked GM event on nontarget invertebrates compared to plants expressing a single Bt gene. On the basis of bioassay data available for Bt toxins alone or in combination, we argue that the current knowledge of Bt protein interactions is of limited relevance in environmental risk assessment (ERA). PMID:26032006

  5. Appendectomy correlates with increased risk of pyogenic liver abscess

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kuan-Fu; Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chien, Sou-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Little is known on the association between appendectomy and pyogenic liver abscess. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between appendectomy and the risk of pyogenic liver abscess in Taiwan. This population-based retrospective cohort study was conducted using the hospitalization dataset of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 212,530 subjects age 20 to 84 years with newly diagnosed appendectomy as the appendectomy group since 1998 to 2010, and 850,099 randomly selected subjects without appendectomy as the nonappendectomy group. Both appendectomy and nonappendectomy groups were matched with sex, age, comorbidities, and index year of diagnosing appendectomy. The incidence of pyogenic liver abscess at the end of 2011 was estimated in both groups. The multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was applied to investigate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for risk of pyogenic liver abscess associated with appendectomy and other comorbidities including alcoholism, biliary stone, chronic kidney disease, chronic liver diseases, and diabetes mellitus. The overall incidence of pyogenic liver abscess was 1.73-fold greater in the appendectomy group than that in the nonappendectomy group (3.85 vs 2.22 per 10,000 person-years, 95% CI 1.71, 1.76). The multivariable regression analysis disclosed that the adjusted HR of pyogenic liver abscess was 1.77 for the appendectomy group (95% CI 1.59, 1.97), when compared with the nonappendectomy group. Appendectomy is associated with increased hazard of pyogenic liver abscess. Further studies remain necessary to confirm our findings. PMID:27368018

  6. Acute Kidney Injury Increases Risk of ESRD among Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ishani, Areef; Xue, Jay L.; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Eggers, Paul W.; Kimmel, Paul L.; Molitoris, Bruce A.; Collins, Allan J.

    2009-01-01

    Risk for ESRD among elderly patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) has not been studied in a large, representative sample. This study aimed to determine incidence rates and hazard ratios for developing ESRD in elderly individuals, with and without chronic kidney disease (CKD), who had AKI. In the 2000 5% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries, clinical conditions were identified using Medicare claims; ESRD treatment information was obtained from ESRD registration during 2 yr of follow-up. Our cohort of 233,803 patients were hospitalized in 2000, were aged ≥67 yr on discharge, did not have previous ESRD or AKI, and were Medicare-entitled for ≥2 yr before discharge. In this cohort, 3.1% survived to discharge with a diagnosis of AKI, and 5.3 per 1000 developed ESRD. Among patients who received treatment for ESRD, 25.2% had a previous history of AKI. After adjustment for age, gender, race, diabetes, and hypertension, the hazard ratio for developing ESRD was 41.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 34.6 to 49.1) for patients with AKI and CKD relative to those without kidney disease, 13.0 (95% CI 10.6 to 16.0) for patients with AKI and without previous CKD, and 8.4 (95% CI 7.4 to 9.6) for patients with CKD and without AKI. In summary, elderly individuals with AKI, particularly those with previously diagnosed CKD, are at significantly increased risk for ESRD, suggesting that episodes of AKI may accelerate progression of renal disease. PMID:19020007

  7. Evidences of increasing risk of dirofilarioses in southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Giangaspero, A; Marangi, M; Latrofa, M S; Martinelli, D; Traversa, D; Otranto, D; Genchi, C

    2013-03-01

    Given the spread of Aedes albopictus from northern to southern Italy, and the lack of updated data on Dirofilaria infections, this study was carried out to assess the infection risk for dogs and cats in Apulia region. During a 2-year study, 175 A. albopictus female specimens and samples of blood from 427 dogs (309 privately owned dogs and 118 shelter dogs) and 12 cats were collected. All blood samples were subjected to a modified Knott method, to a test for the detection of circulating Dirofilaria immitis antigen, and to a Dirofilaria species-specific real-time PCR for the simultaneous detection of D. immitis and Dirofilaria repens, targeting on partial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 and internal transcribed spacer-2, respectively. Two abdomen and one thorax pools from A. albopictus were positive for D. immitis, with minimum infection rates of 1.14 and 0.51, respectively, and a probability of a single positive specimen to be infected of P = 0.6 % (95 % confidence interval (CI) = 0.12-1.73). Out of 439 examined subjects, 22 (5.0 %) tested positive for Dirofilaria spp. in at least one diagnostic test. A specific D. immitis infestation rate of 3.5 % was found among the privately owned dogs, while shelter dogs tested positive only for D. repens with a prevalence of 3.4 %; one cat tested molecularly positive for D. immitis. There was a significantly higher rate of positivity among guard dogs for D. immitis (odds ratio, 6.24, 95 % CI, 1.26-25.28; P < 0.05). The increasing risk of D. immitis infection in southern Italy is supported by the noteworthy positivity of A. albopictus populations and the cat. Our data highlight the usefulness to include filarioid infestation in routine diagnosis. PMID:23224639

  8. Genetic risks and environmental surveillance: epidemiological aspects of monitoring industrial populations for environmental mutagens

    SciTech Connect

    Buffler, P.A.; Aase, J.M.

    1982-04-01

    As industrial populations are exposed to new chemicals and other agents in their work environment, it becomes increasingly important to be able to ascertain any associated genetic risks. The characteristics of a desirable surveillance system for deleterious genetic effects are outlined and the existing or proposed surveillance systems for industrial populations are reviewed against these criteria. At present, monitoring for reproductive loss and infertility seems to be the technique best suited for surveillance of industrial populations. However, monitoring techniques based on these events do not directly assess mutagenicity. Since fetal death and infertility are strongly, but not exclusively, correlated with mutation, these methods can be considered as an early-warning system to indicate when and where more definitive studies are needed.

  9. Genetic Risk by Experience Interaction for Childhood Internalizing Problems: Converging Evidence across Multiple Methods

    PubMed Central

    Vendlinski, Matthew K.; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Essex, Marilyn J.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2010-01-01

    Background Identifying how genetic risk interacts with experience to predict psychopathology is an important step toward understanding the etiology of mental health problems. Few studies have examined genetic risk by experience interaction (GxE) in the development of childhood psychopathology. Methods We used both co-twin and parent mental health as markers of genetic risk to test whether GxE predicted internalizing problems in a sample of 8-year-old twins. Multi-instrument composites were used to characterize both parent and child psychopathology, and five experiential risk factors (socioeconomic status, single parent upbringing, negative parent-child interactions, number of negative life events, negative impact of negative life events) composed a cumulative risk index. Results We found consistent evidence for GxE for child internalizing problems, with significant interaction effects emerging both when genetic risk was indexed by co-twin mental health and when it was based on parent mental health. When co-twin mental health was used to estimate genetic risk, child internalizing problems were more heritable for children at low rather than high experiential risk. When parent mental health was used to estimate genetic risk, the association between genetic risk and internalizing problems was stronger for children at elevated experiential risk. Consideration of the interaction effect sizes helps to reconcile these findings. Conclusions Our results suggest that the processes involved in both diathesis-stress and bioecological models of development may operate for child internalizing problems. Effect sizes indicated that the main effects of genetic and experiential risk were much better predictors of child internalizing problems than was their interaction. PMID:21198591

  10. Increased Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) Is Associated With Increased Risk of Prostate Cancer in Jamaican Men

    PubMed Central

    Shivappa, Nitin; Jackson, Maria D.; Bennett, Franklyn; Hébert, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin malignancy; and it accounts for the most cancer deaths among Jamaican males. Diet has been implicated in the etiology of prostate cancer, including through its effects on inflammation. Method We examined the association between a newly developed dietary inflammatory index (DII) and prostate cancer in a case-control study of 40-80 year-old Jamaican males. A total of 229 incident cases and 250 controls attended the same urology out-patient clinics at 2 major hospitals and private practitioners in the Kingston, Jamaica Metropolitan area between March 2005 and July 2007. The DII was computed based on dietary intake assessed using a previously validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) that was expanded to assess diet and cancer in this Jamaican population. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios, with DII as continuous and expressed as quartiles. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, total energy intake, education, body mass index (BMI), smoking status, physical activity and family history of prostate cancer. Results Men in the highest quartile of the DII were at higher risk of prostate cancer [odds ratio (OR) = 2.39; 95% confidence interval (CI) =1.14–5.04 (Ptrend = 0.08)] compared to men in the lowest DII quartile. Conclusion These data suggest a pro-inflammatory diet, as indicated by increasing DII score, may be a risk factor for prostate cancer in Jamaican men. PMID:26226289

  11. Anthropogenic warming has increased drought risk in California.

    PubMed

    Diffenbaugh, Noah S; Swain, Daniel L; Touma, Danielle

    2015-03-31

    California is currently in the midst of a record-setting drought. The drought began in 2012 and now includes the lowest calendar-year and 12-mo precipitation, the highest annual temperature, and the most extreme drought indicators on record. The extremely warm and dry conditions have led to acute water shortages, groundwater overdraft, critically low streamflow, and enhanced wildfire risk. Analyzing historical climate observations from California, we find that precipitation deficits in California were more than twice as likely to yield drought years if they occurred when conditions were warm. We find that although there has not been a substantial change in the probability of either negative or moderately negative precipitation anomalies in recent decades, the occurrence of drought years has been greater in the past two decades than in the preceding century. In addition, the probability that precipitation deficits co-occur with warm conditions and the probability that precipitation deficits produce drought have both increased. Climate model experiments with and without anthropogenic forcings reveal that human activities have increased the probability that dry precipitation years are also warm. Further, a large ensemble of climate model realizations reveals that additional global warming over the next few decades is very likely to create ∼ 100% probability that any annual-scale dry period is also extremely warm. We therefore conclude that anthropogenic warming is increasing the probability of co-occurring warm-dry conditions like those that have created the acute human and ecosystem impacts associated with the "exceptional" 2012-2014 drought in California. PMID:25733875

  12. Anthropogenic Warming Has Increased Drought Risk In California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diffenbaugh, N. S.; Swain, D. L.; Touma, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    California is currently in the midst of a record-setting drought. The drought began in 2012 and now includes the lowest calendar-year and 12-mo precipitation, the highest annual temperature, and the most extreme drought indicators on record. The extremely warm and dry conditions have led to acute water shortages, groundwater overdraft, critically low streamflow, and enhanced wildfire risk. Analyzing historical climate observations from California, we find that precipitation deficits in California were more than twice as likely to yield drought years if they occurred when conditions were warm. We find that although there has not been a substantial change in the probability of either negative or moderately negative precipitation anomalies in recent decades, the occurrence of drought years has been greater in the past two decades than in the preceding century. In addition, the probability that precipitation deficits co-occur with warm conditions and the probability that precipitation deficits produce drought have both increased. Climate model experiments with and without anthropogenic forcings reveal that human activities have increased the probability that dry precipitation years are also warm. Further, a large ensemble of climate model realizations reveals that additional global warming over the next few decades is very likely to create ˜100% probability that any annual-scale dry period is also extremely warm. We therefore conclude that anthropogenic warming is increasing the probability of co-occurring warm-dry conditions like those that have created the acute human and ecosystem impacts associated with the "exceptional" 2012-2014 drought in California.

  13. Anthropogenic warming has increased drought risk in California

    PubMed Central

    Diffenbaugh, Noah S.; Swain, Daniel L.; Touma, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    California is currently in the midst of a record-setting drought. The drought began in 2012 and now includes the lowest calendar-year and 12-mo precipitation, the highest annual temperature, and the most extreme drought indicators on record. The extremely warm and dry conditions have led to acute water shortages, groundwater overdraft, critically low streamflow, and enhanced wildfire risk. Analyzing historical climate observations from California, we find that precipitation deficits in California were more than twice as likely to yield drought years if they occurred when conditions were warm. We find that although there has not been a substantial change in the probability of either negative or moderately negative precipitation anomalies in recent decades, the occurrence of drought years has been greater in the past two decades than in the preceding century. In addition, the probability that precipitation deficits co-occur with warm conditions and the probability that precipitation deficits produce drought have both increased. Climate model experiments with and without anthropogenic forcings reveal that human activities have increased the probability that dry precipitation years are also warm. Further, a large ensemble of climate model realizations reveals that additional global warming over the next few decades is very likely to create ∼100% probability that any annual-scale dry period is also extremely warm. We therefore conclude that anthropogenic warming is increasing the probability of co-occurring warm–dry conditions like those that have created the acute human and ecosystem impacts associated with the “exceptional” 2012–2014 drought in California. PMID:25733875

  14. Incorporating epistasis interaction of genetic susceptibility single nucleotide polymorphisms in a lung cancer risk prediction model.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Michael W; Raji, Olaide Y; Duffy, Stephen W; Young, Robert P; Hopkins, Raewyn J; Field, John K

    2016-07-01

    Incorporation of genetic variants such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) into risk prediction models may account for a substantial fraction of attributable disease risk. Genetic data, from 2385 subjects recruited into the Liverpool Lung Project (LLP) between 2000 and 2008, consisting of 20 SNPs independently validated in a candidate-gene discovery study was used. Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) and random forest (RF) were used to explore evidence of epistasis among 20 replicated SNPs. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify similar risk predictors for lung cancer in the LLP risk model for the epidemiological model and extended model with SNPs. Both models were internally validated using the bootstrap method and model performance was assessed using area under the curve (AUC) and net reclassification improvement (NRI). Using MDR and RF, the overall best classifier of lung cancer status were SNPs rs1799732 (DRD2), rs5744256 (IL-18), rs2306022 (ITGA11) with training accuracy of 0.6592 and a testing accuracy of 0.6572 and a cross-validation consistency of 10/10 with permutation testing P<0.0001. The apparent AUC of the epidemiological model was 0.75 (95% CI 0.73-0.77). When epistatic data were incorporated in the extended model, the AUC increased to 0.81 (95% CI 0.79-0.83) which corresponds to 8% increase in AUC (DeLong's test P=2.2e-16); 17.5% by NRI. After correction for optimism, the AUC was 0.73 for the epidemiological model and 0.79 for the extended model. Our results showed modest improvement in lung cancer risk prediction when the SNP epistasis factor was added. PMID:27121382

  15. Incorporating epistasis interaction of genetic susceptibility single nucleotide polymorphisms in a lung cancer risk prediction model

    PubMed Central

    MARCUS, MICHAEL W.; RAJI, OLAIDE Y.; DUFFY, STEPHEN W.; YOUNG, ROBERT P.; HOPKINS, RAEWYN J.; FIELD, JOHN K.

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of genetic variants such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) into risk prediction models may account for a substantial fraction of attributable disease risk. Genetic data, from 2385 subjects recruited into the Liverpool Lung Project (LLP) between 2000 and 2008, consisting of 20 SNPs independently validated in a candidate-gene discovery study was used. Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) and random forest (RF) were used to explore evidence of epistasis among 20 replicated SNPs. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify similar risk predictors for lung cancer in the LLP risk model for the epidemiological model and extended model with SNPs. Both models were internally validated using the bootstrap method and model performance was assessed using area under the curve (AUC) and net reclassification improvement (NRI). Using MDR and RF, the overall best classifier of lung cancer status were SNPs rs1799732 (DRD2), rs5744256 (IL-18), rs2306022 (ITGA11) with training accuracy of 0.6592 and a testing accuracy of 0.6572 and a cross-validation consistency of 10/10 with permutation testing P<0.0001. The apparent AUC of the epidemiological model was 0.75 (95% CI 0.73–0.77). When epistatic data were incorporated in the extended model, the AUC increased to 0.81 (95% CI 0.79–0.83) which corresponds to 8% increase in AUC (DeLong's test P=2.2e-16); 17.5% by NRI. After correction for optimism, the AUC was 0.73 for the epidemiological model and 0.79 for the extended model. Our results showed modest improvement in lung cancer risk prediction when the SNP epistasis factor was added. PMID:27121382

  16. CFH Variants Affect Structural and Functional Brain Changes and Genetic Risk of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Deng-Feng; Li, Jin; Wu, Huan; Cui, Yue; Bi, Rui; Zhou, He-Jiang; Wang, Hui-Zhen; Zhang, Chen; Wang, Dong; Kong, Qing-Peng; Li, Tao; Fang, Yiru; Jiang, Tianzi; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2016-03-01

    The immune response is highly active in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Identification of genetic risk contributed by immune genes to AD may provide essential insight for the prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment of this neurodegenerative disease. In this study, we performed a genetic screening for AD-related top immune genes identified in Europeans in a Chinese cohort, followed by a multiple-stage study focusing on Complement Factor H (CFH) gene. Effects of the risk SNPs on AD-related neuroimaging endophenotypes were evaluated through magnetic resonance imaging scan, and the effects on AD cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers (CSF) and CFH expression changes were measured in aged and AD brain tissues and AD cellular models. Our results showed that the AD-associated top immune genes reported in Europeans (CR1, CD33, CLU, and TREML2) have weak effects in Chinese, whereas CFH showed strong effects. In particular, rs1061170 (P(meta)=5.0 × 10(-4)) and rs800292 (P(meta)=1.3 × 10(-5)) showed robust associations with AD, which were confirmed in multiple world-wide sample sets (4317 cases and 16 795 controls). Rs1061170 (P=2.5 × 10(-3)) and rs800292 (P=4.7 × 10(-4)) risk-allele carriers have an increased entorhinal thickness in their young age and a higher atrophy rate as the disease progresses. Rs800292 risk-allele carriers have higher CSF tau and Aβ levels and severe cognitive decline. CFH expression level, which was affected by the risk-alleles, was increased in AD brains and cellular models. These comprehensive analyses suggested that CFH is an important immune factor in AD and affects multiple pathological changes in early life and during disease progress. PMID:26243271

  17. Effect of genetic variants associated with plasma homocysteine levels on stroke risk

    PubMed Central

    Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Malik, Rainer; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Ahmadi, Kourosh R; Pare, Guillaume; Psaty, Bruce M.; Fornage, Myriam; Hasan, Nazeeha; Rinne, Paul E.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Markus, Hugh S; Rosand, Jonathan; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Kittner, Steven J.; Meschia, James F.; van Meurs, Joyce BJ; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Worrall, Bradford B.; Dichgans, Martin; Sharma, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Elevated homocysteine (tHcy) levels are known to be associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke (IS). Given that both tHcy and IS are heritable traits, we investigated a potential genetic relationship between homocysteine levels and stroke risk by assessing 18 polymorphisms previously associated with tHcy levels for their association with IS and its subtypes. Methods Previous meta-analysis results from an international stroke collaborative network, METASTROKE, were utilized to assess association of the 18 tHcy associated SNPs in 12,389 IS cases and 62,004 controls. We also investigated the associations in regions located within 50kb from the 18 tHcy related SNPs, and the association of a genetic risk score including the 18 SNPs. Results One SNP located in the RASIP1 gene and a cluster of three SNPs located at and near SLC17A3 were significantly associated with IS (P<0.0003) after correcting for multiple testing. For stroke subtypes, the sentinel SNP located upstream of MUT was significantly associated with SVD (small vessel disease) (P=0.0022), while one SNP located in MTHFR was significantly associated with LVD (large vessel disease) (P=0.00019). A genetic risk score including the 18 SNPs did not show significant association with IS or its subtypes. Conclusions This study found several potential associations with IS and its subtypes: an association of an MUT variant with SVD, an MTHFR variant with LVD, and associations of RASIP1 and SLC17A3 variants with overall IS. PMID:24846872

  18. The decision-making process of genetically at-risk couples considering preimplantation genetic diagnosis: initial findings from a grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    Hershberger, Patricia E; Gallo, Agatha M; Kavanaugh, Karen; Olshansky, Ellen; Schwartz, Alan; Tur-Kaspa, Ilan

    2012-05-01

    Exponential growth in genomics has led to public and private initiatives worldwide that have dramatically increased the number of procreative couples who are aware of their ability to transmit genetic disorders to their future children. Understanding how couples process the meaning of being genetically at-risk for their procreative life lags far behind the advances in genomic and reproductive sciences. Moreover, society, policy makers, and clinicians are not aware of the experiences and nuances involved when modern couples are faced with using Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD). The purpose of this study was to discover the decision-making process of genetically at-risk couples as they decide whether to use PGD to prevent the transmission of known single-gene or sex-linked genetic disorders to their children. A qualitative, grounded theory design guided the study in which 22 couples (44 individual partners) from the USA, who were actively considering PGD, participated. Couples were recruited from June 2009 to May 2010 from the Internet and from a large PGD center and a patient newsletter. In-depth semi-structured interviews were completed with each individual partner within the couple dyad, separate from their respective partner. We discovered that couples move through four phases (Identify, Contemplate, Resolve, Engage) of a complex, dynamic, and iterative decision-making process where multiple, sequential decisions are made. In the Identify phase, couples acknowledge the meaning of their at-risk status. Parenthood and reproductive options are explored in the Contemplate phase, where 41% of couples remained for up to 36 months before moving into the Resolve phase. In Resolve, one of three decisions about PGD use is reached, including: Accepting, Declining, or Oscillating. Actualizing decisions occur in the Engage phase. Awareness of the decision-making process among genetically at-risk couples provides foundational work for understanding critical processes

  19. Hereditary breast cancer: an update on risk assessment and genetic testing in 2015.

    PubMed

    Stuckey, Ashley R; Onstad, Michaela A

    2015-08-01

    The last 5 years have brought significant innovation and advancement in the genetics of breast cancer. This clinical opinion aims to summarize and update current approaches to the care of women at risk for a hereditary predisposition to breast cancer. Implications of the BRCA mutation and several other hereditary syndromes will be discussed. Risk assessment and criteria for referral to cancer genetic professionals as well as high-risk screening and prophylactic options will be reviewed. Finally, the newly available genetic cancer panels and implications of mutations in some of these lesser known genes will be discussed. As the field of cancer genetics continues to evolve, the education of medical students, residents, and faculty will be paramount to identify appropriate candidates for genetic counseling and testing in conjunction with cancer genetic professionals. PMID:25747548

  20. RAGE Genetic Polymorphisms Are Associated with Risk, Chemotherapy Response and Prognosis in Patients with Advanced NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Feng; Wang, Bin; Mao, Wei; Feng, Xueren

    2012-01-01

    Aim To explore the association between genetic polymorphisms of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) and susceptibility, chemotherapy response rate and prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Method This is a prospective study in which 562 patients with NSCLC and 764 healthy controls were enrolled. Three RAGE genetic polymorphisms, namely, −429T/C, −374T/A and 82G/S were genotyped. Platinum-based chemotherapy was given to 432 subjects with advanced inoperable NSCLC and their responses to chemotherapy were evaluated. Results All the polymorphic genotypes of RAGE polymorphisms were associated with susceptibility for NSCLC. Only the 82G/S polymorphisms denoted a significant difference between responders and non-responders to chemotherapy. The 82SS genotype and 82S allele distribution not only increased the NSCLC risk, but also was associated with a lower chemotherapy response rate and poor prognosis, indicated by overall survival and progression free survival. Conclusion The 82G/S genetic polymorphism of RAGE gene might be used as a genetic marker to screen for patients sensitive to thermotherapy and to predict the prognosis of NSCLC. PMID:23071492

  1. Intracolonial genetic diversity in honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies increases pollen foraging efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple mating by honey bee queens results in colonies of genotypically diverse workers. Recent studies have demonstrated that increased genetic diversity within a honey bee colony increases the variation in the frequency of tasks performed by workers. We show that genotypically diverse colonies, ...

  2. Increased polysomy of chromosome 7 in bronchial epithelium from patients at high risk for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Belinsky, S.A.; Neft, R.E.; Lechner, J.F.

    1995-12-01

    Current models of carcinogenesis suggest that tissues progress through multiple genetic and epigenetic changes which ultimately lead to development of invasive cancer. Epidemiologic studies of Peto, R.R. and J.A. Doll indicate that the accumulation of these genetic changes over time, rather than any single unique genetic change, is probably responsible for development of the malignant phenotype. The bronchial epithelium of cigarette smokers is diffusely exposed to a broad spectrum of carcinogens, toxicants, and tumor promoters contained in tobacco smoke. This exposure increases the risk of developing multiple, independent premalignant foci throughout the lower respiratory tract that may contain independent gene aberrations. This {open_quotes}field cancerization{close_quotes} theory is supported by studies that have demonstrated progressive histologic changes distributed throughout the lower respiratory tract of smokers. A series of autopsy studies demonstrated that cigarette smokers exhibit premalignant histologic changes ranging from hyperplasia and metaplasia to severe dysplasia and carcinoma in situ diffusely throughout the bronchial mucosa. The proximal bronchi appear to exhibit the greatest number of changes, particularly at bifurcations. The results described are the first to quantitate the frequency for a chromosome aberration in {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} bronchial epithelial cells.

  3. Diabetes Pathology and Risk of Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma: Evaluating Causal Mechanisms by Using Genetic Information.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ling; Walter, Stefan; Melles, Ronald B; Glymour, M Maria; Jorgenson, Eric

    2016-01-15

    Although type 2 diabetes (T2D) predicts glaucoma, the potential for unmeasured confounding has hampered causal conclusions. We performed separate sample genetic instrumental variable analyses using the Genetic Epidemiology Research Study on Adult Health and Aging cohort (n = 69,685; 1995-2013) to estimate effects of T2D on primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG; 3,554 cases). Genetic instrumental variables for overall and mechanism-specific (i.e., linked to T2D via influences on adiposity, β-cell function, insulin regulation, or other metabolic processes) T2D risk were constructed by using 39 genetic polymorphisms established to predict T2D in other samples. Instrumental variable estimates indicated that T2D increased POAG risk (odds ratio = 2.53, 95% confidence interval: 1.04, 6.11). The instrumental variable for β-cell dysregulation also significantly predicted POAG (odds ratioβ-cell = 5.26, 95% confidence interval: 1.75, 15.85), even among individuals without diagnosed T2D, suggesting that metabolic dysregulation may increase POAG risk prior to T2D diagnosis. The T2D risk variant in the melatonin receptor 1B gene (MTNR1B) predicted risk of POAG independently of T2D status, indicating possible pleiotropic physiological functions of melatonin, but instrumental variable effect estimates were significant even excluding MTNR1B variants. To our knowledge, this is the first genetic instrumental variable study of T2D and glaucoma, providing a novel approach to evaluating this hypothesized relationship. Our findings substantially bolster observational evidence that T2D increases POAG risk. PMID:26608880

  4. Factors Predicting Adherence to Risk Management Behaviors of Women at Increased Risk for Developing Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Kerry A.; Miller, Suzanne M.; Roussi, Pagona; Taylor, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Lymphedema affects 20-30% of women following breast cancer treatment. However, even when women are informed, they do not necessarily adhere to recommended lymphedema self-management regimens. Utilizing the Cognitive-Social Health Information Processing framework, we assessed cognitive and emotional factors influencing adherence to lymphedema risk management. Methods Women with breast cancer who had undergone breast and lymph node surgery were recruited through the Fox Chase Cancer Centre breast clinic. Participants (N=103) completed measures of lymphedema-related perceived risk, beliefs and expectancies, distress, self-regulatory ability to manage distress, knowledge, and adherence to risk management behaviors. They then received the American Cancer Society publication “Lymphedema: What Every Woman with Breast Cancer Should Know”. Cognitive and affective variables were reassessed at 6- and 12-months post-baseline. Results Maximum likelihood multilevel model analyses indicated that overall adherence increased over time, with significant differences between baseline and 6- and 12- month assessments. Adherence to wearing gloves was significantly lower than that for all other behaviors except electric razor use. Distress significantly decreased, and knowledge significantly increased, over time. Greater knowledge, higher self-efficacy to enact behaviors, lower distress, and higher self-regulatory ability to manage distress were associated with increased adherence. Conclusions Women who understand lymphedema risk management and feel confident in managing this risk are more likely to adhere to recommended strategies. These factors should be rigorously assessed as part of routine care to ensure that women have the self-efficacy to seek treatment and the self-regulatory skills to manage distress, which may undermine attempts to seek medical assistance. PMID:24970542

  5. Who is at risk for compassion fatigue? An investigation of genetic counselor demographics, anxiety, compassion satisfaction, and burnout.

    PubMed

    Lee, Whiwon; Veach, Patricia McCarthy; MacFarlane, Ian M; LeRoy, Bonnie S

    2015-04-01

    Compassion fatigue is a state of detachment and isolation experienced when healthcare providers repeatedly engage with patients in distress. Compassion fatigue can hinder empathy and cause extreme tension. Prior research suggests 73.8 % of genetic counselors are at moderate to high risk for compassion fatigue and approximately 1 in 4 have considered leaving the field as a result Injeyan et al. (Journal of Genetic Counseling, 20, 526-540, 2011). Empirical data to establish a reliable profile of genetic counselors at risk for compassion fatigue are limited. Thus the purpose of this study was to establish a profile by assessing relationships between state and trait anxiety, burnout, compassion satisfaction, selected demographics and compassion fatigue risk in practicing genetic counselors. Practicing genetic counselors (n = 402) completed an anonymous, online survey containing demographic questions, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Professional Quality of Life scale. Multiple regression analysis yielded four significant predictors which increase compassion fatigue risk (accounting for 48 % of the variance): higher levels of trait anxiety, burnout, and compassion satisfaction, and ethnicity other than Caucasian. Additional findings, study limitations, practice implications, and research recommendations are provided. PMID:24781713

  6. Linking genetic and environmental factors in amphibian disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Anna E; Becker, Carlos G; Zamudio, Kelly R

    2015-01-01

    A central question in evolutionary biology is how interactions between organisms and the environment shape genetic differentiation. The pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has caused variable population declines in the lowland leopard frog (Lithobates yavapaiensis); thus, disease has potentially shaped, or been shaped by, host genetic diversity. Environmental factors can also influence both amphibian immunity and Bd virulence, confounding our ability to assess the genetic effects on disease dynamics. Here, we used genetics, pathogen dynamics, and environmental data to characterize L. yavapaiensis populations, estimate migration, and determine relative contributions of genetic and environmental factors in predicting Bd dynamics. We found that the two uninfected populations belonged to a single genetic deme, whereas each infected population was genetically unique. We detected an outlier locus that deviated from neutral expectations and was significantly correlated with mortality within populations. Across populations, only environmental variables predicted infection intensity, whereas environment and genetics predicted infection prevalence, and genetic diversity alone predicted mortality. At one locality with geothermally elevated water temperatures, migration estimates revealed source–sink dynamics that have likely prevented local adaptation. We conclude that integrating genetic and environmental variation among populations provides a better understanding of Bd spatial epidemiology, generating more effective conservation management strategies for mitigating amphibian declines. PMID:26136822

  7. Linking genetic and environmental factors in amphibian disease risk.

    PubMed

    Savage, Anna E; Becker, Carlos G; Zamudio, Kelly R

    2015-07-01

    A central question in evolutionary biology is how interactions between organisms and the environment shape genetic differentiation. The pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has caused variable population declines in the lowland leopard frog (Lithobates yavapaiensis); thus, disease has potentially shaped, or been shaped by, host genetic diversity. Environmental factors can also influence both amphibian immunity and Bd virulence, confounding our ability to assess the genetic effects on disease dynamics. Here, we used genetics, pathogen dynamics, and environmental data to characterize L. yavapaiensis populations, estimate migration, and determine relative contributions of genetic and environmental factors in predicting Bd dynamics. We found that the two uninfected populations belonged to a single genetic deme, whereas each infected population was genetically unique. We detected an outlier locus that deviated from neutral expectations and was significantly correlated with mortality within populations. Across populations, only environmental variables predicted infection intensity, whereas environment and genetics predicted infection prevalence, and genetic diversity alone predicted mortality. At one locality with geothermally elevated water temperatures, migration estimates revealed source-sink dynamics that have likely prevented local adaptation. We conclude that integrating genetic and environmental variation among populations provides a better understanding of Bd spatial epidemiology, generating more effective conservation management strategies for mitigating amphibian declines. PMID:26136822

  8. Acute Exercise Increases Sex Differences in Amateur Athletes' Risk Taking.

    PubMed

    Pighin, S; Savadori, L; Bonini, N; Andreozzi, L; Savoldelli, A; Schena, F

    2015-10-01

    The research presented here investigates the interaction between acute exercise, biological sex and risk-taking behavior. The study involved 20 amateur athletes (19-33 years old), 10 males and 10 females, who were asked to undergo subsequent experimental sessions designed to compare their risky behaviors on the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) 34 at rest and while exercising at moderate intensity (60% of their maximal aerobic power). Results showed that physical exercise affected male and female participants differently: Whereas males became more risk seeking, females became more risk averse during exercise. PMID:26090877

  9. Global risk of big earthquakes has not recently increased

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Peter M.; Stark, Philip B.

    2012-01-01

    The recent elevated rate of large earthquakes has fueled concern that the underlying global rate of earthquake activity has increased, which would have important implications for assessments of seismic hazard and our understanding of how faults interact. We examine the timing of large (magnitude M≥7) earthquakes from 1900 to the present, after removing local clustering related to aftershocks. The global rate of M≥8 earthquakes has been at a record high roughly since 2004, but rates have been almost as high before, and the rate of smaller earthquakes is close to its historical average. Some features of the global catalog are improbable in retrospect, but so are some features of most random sequences—if the features are selected after looking at the data. For a variety of magnitude cutoffs and three statistical tests, the global catalog, with local clusters removed, is not distinguishable from a homogeneous Poisson process. Moreover, no plausible physical mechanism predicts real changes in the underlying global rate of large events. Together these facts suggest that the global risk of large earthquakes is no higher today than it has been in the past. PMID:22184228

  10. IT security: developing a response to increasing risks.

    PubMed

    Waegemann, C P

    1996-10-01

    The move to computerization in health care requires attention to security issues because the risks to violate patients rights for privacy are dramatically increasing. As providers in many countries are moving toward computerization, it is important to understand the dangers of computerization. Unathorized users can access, copy, alter, delete, or distort hundreds or thousands of medical records within minutes. Information can be violated by individuals and by system failures. It is important to understand the potential harm to patients and to our society. The relationship between privacy rights, confidentiality measures, and system security measures must be addressed. It is dangerous to create computer systems in health care without establishing appropriate security measures. Special attention should be given to the weaknesses of the internet and the requirements of network security for a future 'global information infrastructure'. The internet is based on messaging as are many communication standards such as Edifact, HL7 etc. Messaging systems in general need to be examined with regard to security and accountability issues. PMID:8960915

  11. Smoking Increases Risk of Pain Chronification Through Shared Corticostriatal Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Petre, Bogdan; Torbey, Souraya; Griffith, James W.; De Oliveira, Gildasio; Herrmann, Kristine; Mansour, Ali; Baria, Alex T.; Baliki, Marwan N.; Schnitzer, Thomas J.; Apkarian, Apkar Vania

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is associated with increased incidence of chronic pain. However, the evidence is cross-sectional in nature, and underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In a longitudinal observational study, we examined the relationship between smoking, transition to chronic pain, and brain physiology. In 160 subjects with subacute back pain (SBP: back pain lasting 4–12 weeks, and no prior back pain [BP] for at least 1 year) pain characteristics, smoking status, and brain functional properties were measured repeatedly over 1 year. Sixty-eight completed the study, subdivided into recovering (SBPr, n = 31) and persisting (SBPp, n = 37), based on >20% decrease in BP over the year. Thirty-two chronic back pain (CBP: duration > 5 years) and 35 healthy controls were similarly monitored. Smoking prevalence was higher in SBP and CBP but not related to intensity of BP. In SBP, smoking status at baseline was predictive of persistence of BP 1 year from symptom onset (differentiating SBPp and SBPr with 0.62 accuracy). Smoking status combined with affective properties of pain and medication use improved prediction accuracy (0.82). Mediation analysis indicated the prediction of BP persistence by smoking was largely due to synchrony of fMRI activity between two brain areas (nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex, NAc-mPFC). In SBP or CBP who ceased smoking strength of NAc-mPFC decreased from precessation to postcessation of smoking. We conclude that smoking increases risk of transitioning to CBP, an effect mediated by corticostriatal circuitry involved in addictive behavior and motivated learning. PMID:25307796

  12. Placental Cadmium Levels Are Associated with Increased Preeclampsia Risk

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Jessica E.; Ray, Paul; Bodnar, Wanda; Cable, Peter H.; Boggess, Kim; Offenbacher, Steven; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental exposure to heavy metals is a potentially modifiable risk factor for preeclampsia (PE). Toxicologically, there are known interactions between the toxic metal cadmium (Cd) and essential metals such as selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn), as these metals can protect against the toxicity of Cd. As they relate to preeclampsia, the interaction between Cd and these essential metals is unknown. The aims of the present study were to measure placental levels of Cd, Se, and Zn in a cohort of 172 pregnant women from across the southeast US and to examine associations of metals levels with the odds of PE in a nested case-control design. Logistic regressions were performed to assess odds ratios (OR) for PE with exposure to Cd controlling for confounders, as well as interactive models with Se or Zn. The mean placental Cd level was 3.6 ng/g, ranging from 0.52 to 14.5 ng/g. There was an increased odds ratio for PE in relationship to placental levels of Cd (OR = 1.5; 95% CI: 1.1–2.2). The Cd-associated OR for PE increased when analyzed in relationship to lower placental Se levels (OR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.1–3.5) and decreased with higher placental Se levels (OR = 0.98; 95% CI: 0.5–1.9). Similarly, under conditions of lower placental Zn, the Cd-associated OR for PE was elevated (OR = 1.8; 95% CI: 0.8–3.9), whereas with higher placental Zn it was reduced (OR = 1.3; 95% CI: 0.8–2.0). Data from this pilot study suggest that essential metals may play an important role in reducing the odds of Cd-associated preeclampsia and that replication in a larger cohort is warranted. PMID:26422011

  13. Smoking increases risk of pain chronification through shared corticostriatal circuitry.

    PubMed

    Petre, Bogdan; Torbey, Souraya; Griffith, James W; De Oliveira, Gildasio; Herrmann, Kristine; Mansour, Ali; Baria, Alex T; Baliki, Marwan N; Schnitzer, Thomas J; Apkarian, Apkar Vania

    2015-02-01

    Smoking is associated with increased incidence of chronic pain. However, the evidence is cross-sectional in nature, and underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In a longitudinal observational study, we examined the relationship between smoking, transition to chronic pain, and brain physiology. In 160 subjects with subacute back pain (SBP: back pain lasting 4-12 weeks, and no prior back pain [BP] for at least 1 year) pain characteristics, smoking status, and brain functional properties were measured repeatedly over 1 year. Sixty-eight completed the study, subdivided into recovering (SBPr, n = 31) and persisting (SBPp, n = 37), based on >20% decrease in BP over the year. Thirty-two chronic back pain (CBP: duration > 5 years) and 35 healthy controls were similarly monitored. Smoking prevalence was higher in SBP and CBP but not related to intensity of BP. In SBP, smoking status at baseline was predictive of persistence of BP 1 year from symptom onset (differentiating SBPp and SBPr with 0.62 accuracy). Smoking status combined with affective properties of pain and medication use improved prediction accuracy (0.82). Mediation analysis indicated the prediction of BP persistence by smoking was largely due to synchrony of fMRI activity between two brain areas (nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex, NAc-mPFC). In SBP or CBP who ceased smoking strength of NAc-mPFC decreased from precessation to postcessation of smoking. We conclude that smoking increases risk of transitioning to CBP, an effect mediated by corticostriatal circuitry involved in addictive behavior and motivated learning. PMID:25307796

  14. An Unusual BRCA Mutation Distribution in a High Risk Cancer Genetics Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Nelson-Moseke, Anna C.; Jeter, Joanne M.; Cui, Haiyan; Roe, Denise J.; Chambers, Setsuko K.; Laukaitis, Christina M.

    2012-01-01

    The Database of Individuals at High Risk for Breast, Ovarian, or Other Hereditary Cancers at the Arizona Cancer Center in Tucson, Arizona, assesses cancer risk factors and outcomes in patients with a family history of cancer or a known genetic mutation. We analyzed the subset of clinic probands who carry deleterious BRCA gene mutations to identify factors that could explain why mutations in BRCA2 out number those in BRCA1. Medical, family, social, ethnic and genetic mutation histories were collected from consenting patients’ electronic medical records. Differences between BRCA1 and BRCA2 probands from this database were analyzed for statistical significance and compared to published analyses.. A significantly higher proportion of our clinic probands carry mutations in BRCA2 than BRCA1, compared with previous reports of mutation prevalence. This also holds true for the Hispanic sub-group. Probands with BRCA2 mutations were significantly more likely than their BRCA1 counterparts to present to the high risk clinic without adiagnosis of cancer. Other differences between the groups were not significant. Six previously unreported BRCA2 mutations appear in our clinic population. The increased proportion of probands carrying deleterious BRCA2 mutations is likely multifactorial, but may reflect aspects of Southern Arizona’s unique ethnic heritage. PMID:23179792

  15. Host Genetic Risk Factors for West Nile Virus Infection and Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Bigham, Abigail W.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Husain, Sofia; Emond, Mary J.; Bofferding, Kathryn M.; Gildersleeve, Heidi; Rutherford, Ann; Astakhova, Natalia M.; Perelygin, Andrey A.; Busch, Michael P.; Murray, Kristy O.; Sejvar, James J.; Green, Sharone; Kriesel, John; Brinton, Margo A.; Bamshad, Michael

    2011-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV), a category B pathogen endemic in parts of Africa, Asia and Europe, emerged in North America in 1999, and spread rapidly across the continental U.S. Outcomes of infection with WNV range from asymptomatic to severe neuroinvasive disease manifested as encephalitis, paralysis, and/or death. Neuroinvasive WNV disease occurs in less than one percent of cases, and although host genetic factors are thought to influence risk for symptomatic disease, the identity of these factors remains largely unknown. We tested 360 common haplotype tagging and/or functional SNPs in 86 genes that encode key regulators of immune function in 753 individuals infected with WNV including: 422 symptomatic WNV cases and 331 cases with asymptomatic infections. After applying a Bonferroni correction for multiple tests and controlling for population stratification, SNPs in IRF3 (OR 0.54, p = 0.035) and MX1, (OR 0.19, p = 0.014) were associated with symptomatic WNV infection and a single SNP in OAS1 (OR 9.79, p = 0.003) was associated with increased risk for West Nile encephalitis and paralysis (WNE/P). Together, these results suggest that genetic variation in the interferon response pathway is associated with both risk for symptomatic WNV infection and WNV disease progression. PMID:21935451

  16. Are proinflammatory cytokines involved in an increased risk for depression by unhealthy diets?

    PubMed

    Ekmekcioglu, Cem

    2012-02-01

    Depression is a highly prevalent mental illness, which is associated with substantial functional impairment. Many factors, like especially genetic risk and stressful life events, are being discussed to be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. There is also evidence that elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines, which are frequently found in depressed individuals, could contribute to the development of the disease. Patients with metabolic syndrome also show a chronic low grade of inflammation. In addition, epidemiological studies suggest that an unhealthy dietary eating pattern, consisting of high amounts of refined grains and softdrinks, red and processed meat, fatty dairy products, and little amounts of vegetables, fruits and fish is associated with higher levels of major inflammatory cytokines, like Interleukin-6, and the acute phase C-reactive protein, even after controlling for body mass index. Furthermore, several recent studies suggest that an unhealthy diet quality is associated with an increased risk of depression. Therefore the connection between regular consumption of unhealthy foods, chronic inflammation, and increased risk for depression seems plausible. PMID:22153575

  17. Increased Risk of Asthma in Children with ADHD: Role of Prematurity and Maternal Stress during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Grizenko, Natalie; Osmanlliu, Esli; Fortier, Marie-Ève; Joober, Ridha

    2015-01-01

    Objective: ADHD and asthma are prevalent conditions in childhood, with complex pathophysiology involving genetic-environmental interplay. The study objective is to examine the prevalence of asthma in our ADHD population and explore factors that may increase the risk of developing asthma in children with ADHD. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the presence of maternal stress during pregnancy and history of asthma in 201 children diagnosed with ADHD. Results: Chi-square analysis indicated significant higher presence of asthma in our ADHD sample compared to Quebec children, χ2(1, N = 201) = 15.37, P<0.001. Only prematurity and stress during pregnancy significantly predicted asthma in a logistic regression model, χ2(2)=23.70, P<0.001, with odds ratios of 10.6 (95% CI: 2.8–39.5) and 3.2 (95% CI: 1.4–7.3), respectively. Conclusion: Children with ADHD have a higher prevalence of asthma than the general Quebec pediatric population. Children with ADHD born prematurely and/or those whose mothers experienced stress during pregnancy have a significantly increased risk of developing asthma. The study highlights the importance of potentially offering social and psychological support to mothers who experienced stress during pregnancy and/or are at risk of delivering prematurely. PMID:26379722

  18. Perception of risks and benefits of in vitro fertilization, genetic engineering and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Macer, D R

    1994-01-01

    The use of new biotechnology in medicine has become an everyday experience, but many people still express concern about biotechnology. Concerns are evoked particularly by the phrases genetic engineering and in vitro fertilization (IVF), and these concerns persist despite more than a decade of their use in medicine. Mailed nationwide opinion surveys on attitudes to biotechnology were conducted in Japan, among samples of the public (N = 551), high school biology teachers (N = 228), scientists (N = 555) and nurses (N = 301). People do see more benefits coming from science than harm when balanced against the risks. There were especially mixed perceptions of benefit and risk about IVF and genetic engineering, and a relatively high degree of worry compared to other developments of science and technology. A discussion of assisted reproductive technologies and surrogacy in Japan is also made. The opinions of people in Japan were compared to the results of previous surveys conducted in Japan, and international surveys conducted in Australia, China, Europe, New Zealand, U.K. and U.S.A. Japanese have a very high awareness of biotechnology, 97% saying that they had heard of the word. They also have a high level of awareness of IVF and genetic engineering. Genetic engineering was said to be a worthwhile research area for Japan by 76%, while 58% perceived research on IVF as being worthwhile, however 61% were worried about research on IVF or genetic engineering. Japanese expressed more concern about IVF and genetic engineering than New Zealanders. The major reason cited for rejection of genetic manipulation research in Japan and New Zealand was that it was seen as interfering with nature, playing God or as unethical. The emotions concerning these technologies are complex, and we should avoid using simplistic public opinion data as measures of public perceptions. The level of concern expressed by scientists and teachers in Japan suggest that public education "technology promotion

  19. Genetic risk factors in two Utah pedigrees at high risk for suicide

    PubMed Central

    Coon, H; Darlington, T; Pimentel, R; Smith, K R; Huff, C D; Hu, H; Jerominski, L; Hansen, J; Klein, M; Callor, W B; Byrd, J; Bakian, A; Crowell, S E; McMahon, W M; Rajamanickam, V; Camp, N J; McGlade, E; Yurgelun-Todd, D; Grey, T; Gray, D

    2013-01-01

    We have used unique population-based data resources to identify 22 high-risk extended pedigrees that show clustering of suicide over twice that expected from demographically adjusted incidence rates. In this initial study of genetic risk factors, we focused on two high-risk pedigrees. In the first of these (pedigree 12), 10/19 (53%) of the related suicides were female, and the average age at death was 30.95. In the second (pedigree 5), 7/51 (14%) of the suicides were female and the average age at death was 36.90. Six decedents in pedigree 12 and nine in pedigree 5 were genotyped with the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip. Genotypes were analyzed using the Variant Annotation, Analysis, and Search program package that computes likelihoods of risk variants using the functional impact of the DNA variation, aggregative scoring of multiple variants across each gene and pedigree structure. We prioritized variants that were: (1) shared across pedigree members, (2) rare in other Utah suicides not related to these pedigrees, (3) ⩽ 5% in genotyping data from 398 other Utah population controls and (4) ⩽5% frequency in publicly available sequence data from 1358 controls and/or in dbSNP. Results included several membrane protein genes (ANO5, and TMEM141 for pedigree 12 and FAM38A and HRCT1 for pedigree 5). Other genes with known neuronal involvement and/or previous associations with psychiatric conditions were also identified, including NFKB1, CASP9, PLXNB1 and PDE11A in pedigree 12, and THOC1, and AUTS2 in pedigree 5. Although the study is limited to variants included on the HumanExome BeadChip, these findings warrant further exploration, and demonstrate the utility of this high-risk pedigree resource to identify potential genes or gene pathways for future development of targeted interventions. PMID:24252905

  20. Does breastfeeding increase risk of early childhood caries?

    PubMed

    Paglia, L

    2015-09-01

    According to the WHO, "breastfeeding is the normal way of providing young infants with the nutrients they need for healthy growth and development. Exclusive breastfeeding is recommended up to 6 months of age, with continued breastfeeding along with appropriate complementary foods up to two years of age or beyond". However, several studies have reported prolonged and unrestricted breastfeeding as a potential risk factor for primary tooth caries (ECC). On-demand breastfeeding, particularly while lying down at night, would seem to cause ECC because milk remains in the baby's mouth for long periods of time. There is lack of evidence that human milk is cariogenic; other factors, such as oral hygiene, may be more influential in caries development than on-demand breastfeeding. Moreover the biomechanics of breastfeeding differs from those of bottle feeding and milk is expressed into the soft palate and swallowed without remaining on teeth. Indeed we cannot forget that the main factor influencing caries development in infants is the presence of bacteria streptococcus mutans that thrives in a combination of sugars, small amounts of saliva and a low pH. Today the question is open and recently Chaffee, Felines, Vitolo et al. [2014] have found that breastfeeding for 24 months or longer increases the prevalence of severe early childhood caries in low-income families in Porto Alegre, Brazil. These results do not claim that prolonged breastfeeding is the cause of tooth decay; we can expect an association with food for infants often rich in refined sugars, which cause the reduction of the protective effect of saliva on the deciduous teeth enamel. In Japan, Kato, Yorifuji, Yamakawa et al. [2015] have found that infants who had been breastfed for at least 6 or 7 months, both exclusively and partially, were at elevated risk of dental caries at the age of 30 months compared with those who had been exclusively fed with formula. The authors themselves say, however, that further studies

  1. Did natural selection for increased cognitive ability in humans lead to an elevated risk of cancer?

    PubMed

    Arora, Gaurav; Polavarapu, Nalini; McDonald, John F

    2009-09-01

    Despite the overall genetic similarity that exists between humans and chimpanzees, the species are phenotypically distinct. Among the most notable distinctions are differences in brain size and cognitive abilities. Previous studies have shown that significant differences in gene expression exist between the human and chimpanzee brain. Integration of currently available gene expression data with known metabolic and signaling pathways indicates that the expression of genes involved in the programmed cell death of brain neurons is significantly different between humans and chimpanzees and predictive of a reduced level of neuron apoptosis in the human brain. This pattern of expression is generally maintained in other human organs suggesting that apoptosis is reduced in humans relative to chimpanzees. We propose that a decreased rate of programmed neuron death may have been a consequence of selection for increased cognitive ability in humans. Since reduced apoptotic function is associated with an increased risk of cancer and related diseases, we hypothesize that selection for increased cognitive ability in humans coincidently resulted in an increased risk of cancer and other diseases associated with reduced apoptotic function. PMID:19409719

  2. Do Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) Increase the Risk of Thyroid Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yawei; Guo, Grace L.; Han, Xuesong; Zhu, Cairong; Kilfoy, Briseis A.; Zhu, Yong; Boyle, Peter; Zheng, Tongzhang

    2008-01-01

    An increased incidence of thyroid cancer has been reported in many parts of the world including the United States during the past several decades. Recently emerging evidence has demonstrated that polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs), particularly polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), alter thyroid hormone homeostasis and cause thyroid dysfunction. However, few studies have been conducted to test whether exposure to PBDEs and other PHAHs increases the risk of thyroid cancer. Here, we hypothesize that elevated exposure to PHAHs, particularly PBDEs, increases the risk of thyroid cancer and may explain part of the increase in incidence of thyroid cancer during the past several decades. In addition, genetic and epigenetic variations in metabolic pathway genes may alter the expression and function of metabolic enzymes which are involved in the metabolism of endogenous thyroid hormones and the detoxification of PBDEs and other PHAHs. Such variation may result in different individual susceptibilities to PBDEs and other PHAHs and the subsequent development of thyroid cancer. The investigation of this hypothesis will lead to an improved understanding of the role of PBDEs and other PHAHs in thyroid tumorigenesis and may provide a real means to prevent this deadly disease. PMID:19122824

  3. Reducing the Risk, Increasing the Promise: Strategies for Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergmann, Sherrel; Brough, Judith Allen

    2012-01-01

    In their new book, Bergmann and Brough provide a clear path to follow for helping your at-risk students achieve success in and out of the classroom. Packed with classroom-tested, practical strategies and lesson plans for teaching respect, responsibility, resilience, reading, and other essential skills to at-risk students, this is a must-have book…

  4. Treatment Resistant Epilepsy in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Increased Risk for Females.

    PubMed

    Blackmon, Karen; Bluvstein, Judith; MacAllister, William S; Avallone, Jennifer; Misajon, Jade; Hedlund, Julie; Goldberg, Rina; Bojko, Aviva; Mitra, Nirmala; Giridharan, Radha; Sultan, Richard; Keller, Seth; Devinsky, Orrin

    2016-02-01

    The male:female ratio in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) averages greater than 4:1 while the male:female ratio of ASD with epilepsy averages less than 3:1. This indicates an elevated risk of epilepsy in females with ASD; yet, it is unknown whether phenotypic features of epilepsy and ASD differ between males and females with this comorbidity. The goal of this study is to investigate sex differences in phenotypic features of epilepsy and ASD in a prospective sample of 130 children and young adults with an initial ASD diagnosis and subsequent epilepsy diagnosis. All participants were characterized by standardized diagnostic inventories, parent/caregiver completed questionnaires, and medical/academic record review. Diagnostic classifications of epilepsy, ASD, and intellectual disability were performed by board certified neurologists and a pediatric neuropsychologist. Results demonstrated a lower male:female ratio (1.8:1) in individuals with ASD and treatment-resistant epilepsy relative to those with ASD and treatment-responsive epilepsy (4.9:1), indicating a higher risk of treatment-resistant epilepsy in females. Mild neuroimaging abnormalities were more common in females than males and this was associated with increased risk of treatment-resistance. In contrast, ASD symptom severity was lower in females compared with males. Findings distinguish females with ASD and epilepsy as a distinct subgroup at higher risk for a more severe epilepsy phenotype in the context of a less severe ASD phenotype. Increased risk of anti-epileptic treatment resistance in females with ASD and epilepsy suggests that comprehensive genetic, imaging, and neurologic screening and enhanced treatment monitoring may be indicated for this subgroup. Autism Res 2016, 9: 311-320. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26112160

  5. Increased risk of muscle tears below physiological temperature ranges

    PubMed Central

    Scott, E. E. F.; Hamilton, D. F.; Wallace, R. J.; Muir, A. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Temperature is known to influence muscle physiology, with the velocity of shortening, relaxation and propagation all increasing with temperature. Scant data are available, however, regarding thermal influences on energy required to induce muscle damage. Methods Gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were harvested from 36 male rat limbs and exposed to increasing impact energy in a mechanical test rig. Muscle temperature was varied in 5°C increments, from 17°C to 42°C (to encompass the in vivo range). The energy causing non-recoverable deformation was recorded for each temperature. A measure of tissue elasticity was determined via accelerometer data, smoothed by low-pass fifth order Butterworth filter (10 kHz). Data were analysed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and significance was accepted at p = 0.05. Results The energy required to induce muscle failure was significantly lower at muscle temperatures of 17°C to 32°C compared with muscle at core temperature, i.e., 37°C (p < 0.01). During low-energy impacts there were no differences in muscle elasticity between cold and warm muscles (p = 0.18). Differences in elasticity were, however, seen at higher impact energies (p < 0.02). Conclusion Our findings are of particular clinical relevance, as when muscle temperature drops below 32°C, less energy is required to cause muscle tears. Muscle temperatures of 32°C are reported in ambient conditions, suggesting that it would be beneficial, particularly in colder environments, to ensure that peripheral muscle temperature is raised close to core levels prior to high-velocity exercise. Thus, this work stresses the importance of not only ensuring that the muscle groups are well stretched, but also that all muscle groups are warmed to core temperature in pre-exercise routines. Cite this article: Professor A. H. R. W. Simpson. Increased risk of muscle tears below physiological temperature ranges. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:61–65. DOI: 10

  6. Air pollution and diabetes association: Modification by type 2 diabetes genetic risk score.

    PubMed

    Eze, Ikenna C; Imboden, Medea; Kumar, Ashish; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Stolz, Daiana; Gerbase, Margaret W; Künzli, Nino; Pons, Marco; Kronenberg, Florian; Schindler, Christian; Probst-Hensch, Nicole

    2016-09-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution (AP) exposure has been linked to type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk. Evidence on the impact of T2D genetic variants on AP susceptibility is lacking. Compared to single variants, joint genetic variants contribute substantially to disease risk. We investigated the modification of AP and diabetes association by a genetic risk score (GRS) covering 63 T2D genes in 1524 first follow-up participants of the Swiss cohort study on air pollution and lung and heart diseases in adults. Genome-wide data and covariates were available from a nested asthma case-control study design. AP was estimated as 10-year mean residential particulate matter <10μm (PM10). We computed count-GRS and weighted-GRS, and applied PM10 interaction terms in mixed logistic regressions, on odds of diabetes. Analyses were stratified by pathways of diabetes pathology and by asthma status. Diabetes prevalence was 4.6% and mean exposure to PM10 was 22μg/m(3). Odds of diabetes increased by 8% (95% confidence interval: 2, 14%) per T2D risk allele and by 35% (-8, 97%) per 10μg/m(3) exposure to PM10. We observed a positive interaction between PM10 and count-GRS on diabetes [ORinteraction=1.10 (1.01, 1.20)], associations being strongest among participants at the highest quartile of count-GRS [OR: 1.97 (1.00, 3.87)]. Stronger interactions were observed with variants of the GRS involved in insulin resistance [(ORinteraction=1.22 (1.00, 1.50)] than with variants related to beta-cell function. Interactions with count-GRS were stronger among asthma cases. We observed similar results with weighted-GRS. Five single variants near GRB14, UBE2E2, PTPRD, VPS26A and KCNQ1 showed nominally significant interactions with PM10 (P<0.05). Our results suggest that genetic risk for T2D may modify susceptibility to air pollution through alterations in insulin sensitivity. These results need confirmation in diabetes cohort consortia. PMID:27281273

  7. Genetic Differences in the Immediate Transcriptome Response to Stress Predict Risk-Related Brain Function and Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Arloth, Janine; Bogdan, Ryan; Weber, Peter; Frishman, Goar; Menke, Andreas; Wagner, Klaus V.; Balsevich, Georgia; Schmidt, Mathias V.; Karbalai, Nazanin; Czamara, Darina; Altmann, Andre; Trümbach, Dietrich; Wurst, Wolfgang; Mehta, Divya; Uhr, Manfred; Klengel, Torsten; Erhardt, Angelika; Carey, Caitlin E.; Conley, Emily Drabant; Ripke, Stephan; Wray, Naomi R.; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Weissman, Myrna M.; Breen, Gerome; Byrne, Enda M.; Blackwood, Douglas H.R.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Cichon, Sven; Heath, Andrew C.; Holsboer, Florian; Lucae, Susanne; Madden, Pamela A.F.; Martin, Nicholas G.; McGuffin, Peter; Muglia, Pierandrea; Noethen, Markus M.; Penninx, Brenda P.; Pergadia, Michele L.; Potash, James B.; Rietschel, Marcella; Lin, Danyu; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Shi, Jianxin; Steinberg, Stacy; Grabe, Hans J.; Lichtenstein, Paul; Magnusson, Patrik; Perlis, Roy H.; Preisig, Martin; Smoller, Jordan W.; Stefansson, Kari; Uher, Rudolf; Kutalik, Zoltan; Tansey, Katherine E.; Teumer, Alexander; Viktorin, Alexander; Barnes, Michael R.; Bettecken, Thomas; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Breuer, René; Castro, Victor M.; Churchill, Susanne E.; Coryell, William H.; Craddock, Nick; Craig, Ian W.; Czamara, Darina; De Geus, Eco J.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Farmer, Anne E.; Fava, Maurizio; Frank, Josef; Gainer, Vivian S.; Gallagher, Patience J.; Gordon, Scott D.; Goryachev, Sergey; Gross, Magdalena; Guipponi, Michel; Henders, Anjali K.; Herms, Stefan; Hickie, Ian B.; Hoefels, Susanne; Hoogendijk, Witte; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Iosifescu, Dan V.; Ising, Marcus; Jones, Ian; Jones, Lisa; Jung-Ying, Tzeng; Knowles, James A.; Kohane, Isaac S.; Kohli, Martin A.; Korszun, Ania; Landen, Mikael; Lawson, William B.; Lewis, Glyn; MacIntyre, Donald; Maier, Wolfgang; Mattheisen, Manuel; McGrath, Patrick J.; McIntosh, Andrew; McLean, Alan; Middeldorp, Christel M.; Middleton, Lefkos; Montgomery, Grant M.; Murphy, Shawn N.; Nauck, Matthias; Nolen, Willem A.; Nyholt, Dale R.; O’Donovan, Michael; Oskarsson, Högni; Pedersen, Nancy; Scheftner, William A.; Schulz, Andrea; Schulze, Thomas G.; Shyn, Stanley I.; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Slager, Susan L.; Smit, Johannes H.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steffens, Michael; Thorgeirsson, Thorgeir; Tozzi, Federica; Treutlein, Jens; Uhr, Manfred; van den Oord, Edwin J.C.G.; Van Grootheest, Gerard; Völzke, Henry; Weilburg, Jeffrey B.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Zitman, Frans G.; Neale, Benjamin; Daly, Mark; Levinson, Douglas F.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Ruepp, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Hariri, Ahmad R.; Binder, Elisabeth B.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Depression risk is exacerbated by genetic factors and stress exposure; however, the biological mechanisms through which these factors interact to confer depression risk are poorly understood. One putative biological mechanism implicates variability in the ability of cortisol, released in response to stress, to trigger a cascade of adaptive genomic and non-genomic processes through glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation. Here, we demonstrate that common genetic variants in long-range enhancer elements modulate the immediate transcriptional response to GR activation in human blood cells. These functional genetic variants increase risk for depression and co-heritable psychiatric disorders. Moreover, these risk variants are associated with inappropriate amygdala reactivity, a transdiagnostic psychiatric endophenotype and an important stress hormone response trigger. Network modeling and animal experiments suggest that these genetic differences in GR-induced transcriptional activation may mediate the risk for depression and other psychiatric disorders by altering a network of functionally related stress-sensitive genes in blood and brain. Video Abstract PMID:26050039

  8. Syndromes at risk of status epilepticus in children: genetic and pathophysiological issues.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Bernd A; Hahn, Andreas

    2014-10-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a medical emergency with increased risk of morbidity and mortality in all age groups. Recent research has identified a variety of new genes implicated in disorders with severe epilepsies as a prominent feature. Autoimmune mechanisms have also been recently recognised as a cause of epilepsies with SE as a characteristic symptom. Knowledge about the aetiology potentially underlying SE may help to guide diagnostics and eventually influence treatment decisions. This review recapitulates, in brief, the risk of SE in specific clinical settings, provides an overview of paediatric epilepsy syndromes more commonly, or by definition, associated with SE, and summarizes some recent research data on genetic defects and disease mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of epilepsies frequently accompanied by SE. PMID:25323303

  9. Genetic variations of the ADIPOQ gene and risk of prostate cancer in Chinese Han men

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Cheng-Yuan; Li, Qiao-Xin; Zhu, Yao; Wang, Meng-Yun; Shi, Ting-Yan; Yang, Ya-Yun; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Jin, Li; Wei, Qing-Yi; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Adiponectin secreted by adipose tissue has been implicated in prostate carcinogenesis. Genetic variations in ADIPOQ are thought to influence the activity of adiponectin, thus relating to cancer occurrence. In this hospital-based case-control study of 917 prostate cancer (PCa) cases and 1036 cancer-free controls, we evaluated the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in ADIPOQ with risk of PCa and adiponectin levels in Chinese Han men. Variants of ADIPOQ were genotyped by Taqman polymerase chain reaction method. The plasma adiponectin concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in a subset of cases and controls. We found that the ADIPOQ rs3774262 variant AA genotype was associated with both decreased PCa risk [adjusted odds ratio (OR): 0.66, 95% confidence interval (CI) =0.48–0.92] and increased plasma adiponectin levels (P = 0.036 and 0.043), with significant difference by tumor grade, clinical stage, and aggressiveness. A significant interaction between ADIPOQ rs3774262 and body mass index was observed in modifying the risk of PCa (P = 6.7 × 10−3). ADIPOQ rs266729 and rs182052 were not related to PCa risk or plasma adiponectin levels. Our data support that ADIPOQ rs3774262 may affect PCa risk in combination with plasma adiponectin levels in Chinese Han men. It may contribute to the molecular basis for the association between obesity and PCa. PMID:25038177

  10. Reduced Genetic Diversity and Increased Dispersal in Guigna (Leopardus guigna) in Chilean Fragmented Landscapes.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Constanza; Díaz, Diego; Sanderson, Jim; Johnson, Warren E; Ritland, Kermit; Ritland, Carol E; Poulin, Elie

    2015-01-01

    Landscape fragmentation is often a major cause of species extinction as it can affect a wide variety of ecological processes. The impact of fragmentation varies among species depending on many factors, including their life-history traits and dispersal abilities. Felids are one of the groups most threatened by fragmented landscapes because of their large home ranges, territorial behavior, and low population densities. Here, we model the impacts of habitat fragmentation on patterns of genetic diversity in the guigna (Leopardus guigna), a small felid that is closely associated with the heavily human-impacted temperate rainforests of southern South America. We assessed genetic variation in 1798 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA sequences, 15 microsatellite loci, and 2 sex chromosome genes and estimated genetic diversity, kinship, inbreeding, and dispersal in 38 individuals from landscapes with differing degrees of fragmentation on Chiloé Island in southern Chile. Increased fragmentation was associated with reduced genetic diversity, but not with increased kinship or inbreeding. However, in fragmented landscapes, there was a weaker negative correlation between pairwise kinship and geographic distance, suggesting increased dispersal distances. These results highlight the importance of biological corridors to maximize connectivity in fragmented landscapes and contribute to our understanding of the broader genetic consequences of habitat fragmentation, especially for forest-specialist carnivores. PMID:26245787

  11. IQ and Schizophrenia in a Swedish National Sample: Their Causal Relationship and the Interaction of IQ with Genetic Risk

    PubMed Central

    Kendler, Kenneth S.; Ohlsson, Henrik; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To clarify the relationship between IQ and subsequent risk for schizophrenia. Method IQ was assessed at ages 18-20 in 1,204,983 Swedish males born 1951-1975. Schizophrenia was assessed by hospital diagnosis through 2010. Results IQ had a monotonic relationship with schizophrenia risk across the IQ range with a mean change of 3.8% in risk per IQ point. This association, stronger in the lower versus higher IQ range, was similar if onsets within five years of testing were censored. No increased risk for schizophrenia was seen in those with highest intelligence. Co-relative control analyses showed a similar IQ-schizophrenia association in the general population and in cousin, half-sibling and full-sibling pairs. A robust interaction was seen between genetic liability to schizophrenia and IQ in predicting schizophrenia risk. Genetic susceptibility for schizophrenia had a much stronger impact on risk of illness for those with low versus high intelligence. The IQ-genetic liability interaction arose largely from IQ differences between close relatives. Conclusions IQ assessed in late adolescence is a robust risk factor for subsequent onset of schizophrenia. This association is not the result of a declining IQ associated with insidious onset. In this large, representative sample, we found no evidence for a link between genius and schizophrenia. Co-relative control analyses show that the association between lower IQ and schizophrenia is not the result of shared familial risk factors and may be causal. The strongest effect was seen with IQ differences within families. High intelligence substantially attenuates the impact of genetic liability on the risk for schizophrenia. PMID:25727538

  12. Genetic Association Between Angiotensinogen Polymorphisms and Lung Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Zhang, Kun; Qin, Haifeng; Yang, Lin; Zhang, Liyu; Cao, Yanyan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Earlier published studies investigating the association between polymorphisms in the angiotensinogen gene and lung cancer risk showed no consistent results. In this study, we have summarized all currently available data to examine the correlation by meta-analysis. Case–control studies addressing the association being examined were identified through Embase, the Cochrane Library, ISI Web of Science (Web of Knowledge), Google Scholar, PubMed, and CNKI databases. Risk of lung cancer (odds ratio [OR] and 95% confidence interval [CI]) was estimated with the fixed or the random effects model assuming homozygous, allele, heterozygous, dominant, and recessive models for all angiotensinogen polymorphisms. We identified a total of 10 articles in this meta-analysis, including 7 for Leu84Phe, 4 for Ile143Val, and 3 for Leu53Leu. In the meta-analysis of Leu84Phe polymorphism, the homozygous model provided an OR of 1.44 (Phe/Phe vs Ile/Ile: OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.04–1.99, P values for heterogeneity test (Q-test) [PHet] = 0.382). The significantly increased risk was similarly indicated in the recessive model (Phe/Phe vs Phe/Ile + Ile/Ile: OR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.02–1.95, PHet = 0.381). We also observed a positive association in the Caucasian subgroup. The heterozygous model and the dominant model tested for the Ile143Val polymorphism showed a marginally increased risk (Ile/Val vs Ile/Ile: OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.00–1.36, PHet = 0.323; Val/Val + Ile/Val vs Ile/Ile: OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 0.99–1.34, PHet = 0.253). These data suggest that Leu84Phe and Ile143Val polymorphisms in the angiotensinogen gene may be useful biomarkers for lung cancer in some specific populations. PMID:26376373

  13. Genetic Association Between Angiotensinogen Polymorphisms and Lung Cancer Risk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Zhang, Kun; Qin, Haifeng; Yang, Lin; Zhang, Liyu; Cao, Yanyan

    2015-09-01

    Earlier published studies investigating the association between polymorphisms in the angiotensinogen gene and lung cancer risk showed no consistent results. In this study, we have summarized all currently available data to examine the correlation by meta-analysis. Case-control studies addressing the association being examined were identified through Embase, the Cochrane Library, ISI Web of Science (Web of Knowledge), Google Scholar, PubMed, and CNKI databases. Risk of lung cancer (odds ratio [OR] and 95% confidence interval [CI]) was estimated with the fixed or the random effects model assuming homozygous, allele, heterozygous, dominant, and recessive models for all angiotensinogen polymorphisms. We identified a total of 10 articles in this meta-analysis, including 7 for Leu84Phe, 4 for Ile143Val, and 3 for Leu53Leu. In the meta-analysis of Leu84Phe polymorphism, the homozygous model provided an OR of 1.44 (Phe/Phe vs Ile/Ile: OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.04-1.99, P values for heterogeneity test (Q-test) [P(Het)] = 0.382). The significantly increased risk was similarly indicated in the recessive model (Phe/Phe vs Phe/Ile + Ile/Ile: OR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.02-1.95, P(Het) = 0.381). We also observed a positive association in the Caucasian subgroup. The heterozygous model and the dominant model tested for the Ile143Val polymorphism showed a marginally increased risk (Ile/Val vs Ile/Ile: OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.00-1.36, P(Het) = 0.323; Val/Val + Ile/Val vs Ile/Ile: OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 0.99-1.34, P(Het) = 0.253). These data suggest that Leu84Phe and Ile143Val polymorphisms in the angiotensinogen gene may be useful biomarkers for lung cancer in some specific populations. PMID:26376373

  14. Clinical validity and utility of genetic risk scores in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Helfand, Brian T; Kearns, James; Conran, Carly; Xu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Current issues related to prostate cancer (PCa) clinical care (e.g., over-screening, over-diagnosis, and over-treatment of nonaggressive PCa) call for risk assessment tools that can be combined with family history (FH) to stratify disease risk among men in the general population. Since 2007, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified more than 100 SNPs associated with PCa susceptibility. In this review, we discuss (1) the validity of these PCa risk-associated SNPs, individually and collectively; (2) the various methods used for measuring the cumulative effect of multiple SNPs, including genetic risk score (GRS); (3) the adequate number of SNPs needed for risk assessment; (4) reclassification of risk based on evolving numbers of SNPs used to calculate genetic risk, (5) risk assessment for men from various racial groups, and (6) the clinical utility of genetic risk assessment. In conclusion, data available to date support the clinical validity of PCa risk-associated SNPs and GRS in risk assessment among men with or without FH. PCa risk-associated SNPs are not intended for diagnostic use; rather, they should be used the same way as FH. Combining GRS and FH can significantly improve the performance of risk assessment. Improved risk assessment may have important clinical utility in targeted PCa testing. However, clinical trials are urgently needed to evaluate this clinical utility as well as the acceptance of GRS by patients and physicians. PMID:27297129

  15. Clinical validity and utility of genetic risk scores in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Helfand, Brian T; Kearns, James; Conran, Carly; Xu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Current issues related to prostate cancer (PCa) clinical care (e.g., over-screening, over-diagnosis, and over-treatment of nonaggressive PCa) call for risk assessment tools that can be combined with family history (FH) to stratify disease risk among men in the general population. Since 2007, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified more than 100 SNPs associated with PCa susceptibility. In this review, we discuss (1) the validity of these PCa risk-associated SNPs, individually and collectively; (2) the various methods used for measuring the cumulative effect of multiple SNPs, including genetic risk score (GRS); (3) the adequate number of SNPs needed for risk assessment; (4) reclassification of risk based on evolving numbers of SNPs used to calculate genetic risk, (5) risk assessment for men from various racial groups, and (6) the clinical utility of genetic risk assessment. In conclusion, data available to date support the clinical validity of PCa risk-associated SNPs and GRS in risk assessment among men with or without FH. PCa risk-associated SNPs are not intended for diagnostic use; rather, they should be used the same way as FH. Combining GRS and FH can significantly improve the performance of risk assessment. Improved risk assessment may have important clinical utility in targeted PCa testing. However, clinical trials are urgently needed to evaluate this clinical utility as well as the acceptance of GRS by patients and physicians. PMID:27297129

  16. Genetic variants in lncRNA SRA and risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Rui; Wang, Kaijuan; Peng, Rui; Wang, Shuaibing; Cao, Jingjing; Wang, Peng; Song, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA) has been identified to activate steroid receptor transcriptional activity and participate in tumor pathogenesis. This case-control study evaluated the association between two haplotype tagging SNPs (htSNPs) (rs10463297, rs801460) of the whole SRA sequence and breast cancer risk. We found that rs10463297 TC genotype significantly increased BC risk compared with CC genotype in both the codominant (TC vs. TT: OR=1.43, 95 % CI=1.02–2.00) and recessive (TC+CC vs. TT: OR=1.39, 95 % CI=1.01–1.92) genetic models. Both TC, TC + CC genotypes of rs10463297 and GA, AA, GA+AA genotypes of rs801460 were significantly associated with estrogen receptor (ER) positivity status. rs10463297 TC (2.09 ± 0.41), CC (2.42 ± 0.51) and TC + CC (2.20 ± 0.47) genotypes were associated with higher blood plasma SRA mRNA levels compared with the TT genotype(1.45 ± 0.34). Gene–reproductive interaction analysis presented a best model consisted of four factors (rs10463297, age, post-menopausal, No. of pregnancy), which could increase the BC risk with 1.58-fold (OR=1.58, 95 % CI=1.23–2.03). These findings suggest that SRA genetic variants may contribute to BC risk and have apparent interaction with reproductive factors in BC progression. PMID:26967566

  17. The LRP6 rs2302685 polymorphism is associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Abnormal lipids is one of the critical risk factors for myocardial infarction (MI), however the role of genetic variants in lipid metabolism-related genes on MI pathogenesis still requires further investigation. We herein genotyped three SNPs (LRP6 rs2302685, LDLRAP1 rs6687605, SOAT1 rs13306731) in lipid metabolism-related genes, aimed to shed light on the influence of these SNPs on individual susceptibility to MI. Methods Genotyping of the three SNPs (rs2302685, rs6687605 and rs13306731) was performed in 285 MI cases and 650 control subjects using polymerase chain reaction–ligation detection reaction (PCR–LDR) method. The association of these SNPs with MI and lipid profiles was performed with SPSS software. Results Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that C allele (OR = 1.62, P = 0.039) and the combined CT/CC genotype (OR = 1.67, P = 0.035) of LRP6 rs2302685 were associated with increased MI risk, while the other two SNPs had no significant effect. Further stratified analysis uncovered a more evident association with MI risk among younger subjects (≤60 years old). Fascinatingly, CT/CC genotype of rs2302685 conferred increased LDL-C levels compared to TT genotype (3.0 mmol/L vs 2.72 mmol/L) in younger subjects. Conclusions Our data provides the first evidence that LRP6 rs2302685 polymorphism is associated with an increased risk of MI in Chinese subjects, and the association is more evident among younger individuals, which probably due to the elevated LDL-C levels. PMID:24906453

  18. Parents' and children's communication about genetic risk: a qualitative study, learning from families' experiences

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, Alison; Plumridge, Gill; Coad, Jane; Shanks, Andrew; Gill, Paramjit

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about how parents explain to their children their risk of inheriting a gene that may cause disease in the child or in the child's future progeny. This study explored how genetic risk information is shared between family members and the factors affecting it, to ascertain the implications for children, young people and their parents to inform future service development and provision. A volunteer group of parents, children (8–11 years) and young people (12+ years) in families affected by or at risk of one of six inherited genetic conditions was interviewed. The semi-structured interviews explored the roles of family members, the language used and the self-reported psychological outcomes in a discussion on genetic risk information. The findings were analysed using grounded theory. A total of 33 families participated, which included 79 individuals. Parents often found discussing genetic risk information very difficult and emotionally painful. Discussions were not usually planned and often a major event prompted parents to finally explain genetic risks to their children; however, children usually preferred to learn about the genetic condition gradually throughout childhood. Parents identified a number of challenges they faced related to talking to children, and many thought health professionals should provide more advice to assist them in providing developmentally appropriate information. We therefore conclude that greater emphasis is required in supporting parents and children in discussing genetic risk information throughout their child's development. Open communication about genetic risks throughout childhood seemed to help children and parents cope better and come to terms with the implications of the genetic condition. PMID:21326287

  19. [Childhhood obesity, insulin resistance and increased cardiovascular risk].

    PubMed

    Carlone, Angela; Venditti, Chiara; Cipolloni, Laura; Zampetti, Simona; Spoletini, Marialuisa; Capizzi, Marco; Leto, Gaetano; Buzzetti, Raffaella

    2012-10-01

    Excess fat is one of the major risk factors for insulin resistance predisposing to the development of cardiovascular diseases in western countries. We know that obese patients are strongly at risk of cardiovascular diseases, like myocardial infarction or stroke. These diseases are the most frequent cause of death in the adult population, representing a social and economic problem. Today there are not available and useful markers for screening and diagnosis of insulin- resistance in young people. "Easy-to-detect" clinical markers must be found to identify young subjects at risk of cardiovascular diseases. Very interesting the relationship between wrist circumference, its bone composition and insulin resistance. PMID:23114400

  20. Reed bunting females increase fitness through extra-pair mating with genetically dissimilar males

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Stefan M; Keiser, Martin; Feignoux, Raoul; Meyer, Dietrich R

    2007-01-01

    Females of many socially monogamous species accept or even actively seek copulations outside the social pair bond. As females cannot increase the number of offspring with promiscuous behaviour, the question arises why they engage in extra-pair mating. We used microsatellite data to determine paternity, heterozygosity and genetic relatedness in the reed bunting (Emberiza schoeniclus), a species with high levels of extra-pair paternity (EPP). We found that extra-pair young (EPY) were more heterozygous than within-pair young (WPY). The high heterozygosity of the EPY resulted from a low genetic similarity between females and their extra-pair mates. EPY were heavier and larger when compared with their maternal half-siblings shortly before they left the nest. Recapture data indicated a higher fledgling survival of EPY compared with WPY. Our data suggest that reed bunting females increase the viability of their offspring and thus fitness through extra-pair mating with genetically dissimilar males. PMID:17785270

  1. Integration of genetic and epigenetic markers for risk stratification: opportunities and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Pashayan, Nora; Reisel, Daniel; Widschwendter, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Common genetic susceptibility variants could be used for risk stratification in risk-tailored cancer screening and prevention programmes. Combining genetic variants with environmental risk factors would improve risk stratification. Epigenetic changes are surrogate markers of environmental exposures during individual’s lifetime. Integrating epigenetic markers, in lieu of environmental exposure data, with genetic markers would potentially improve risk stratification. Epigenetic changes are reversible and acquired gradually, providing potentials for prevention and early detection strategies. The epigenetic changes are tissue-specific and stage-of-development-specific, raising challenges in choice of sample and timing for evaluation of cancer-associated changes. The Horizon 2020 funded research programme, FORECEE, using empirical data, will investigate the value of integration of epigenomics with genomics for risk prediction and prevention of women-specific cancers. PMID:27053939

  2. Comprehensive genetic counseling for families at risk for HNPCC: impact on distress and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Keller, M; Jost, R; Haunstetter, C Mastromarino; Kienle, P; Knaebel, H P; Gebert, J; Sutter, C; Knebel-Doeberitz, M v; Cremer, F; Mazitschek, U

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore distress and health beliefs before and after comprehensive interdisciplinary counseling in families at risk for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Results reported here were derived from a consecutive sample of 65 counselees [31 patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and 34 unaffected at-risk persons] who participated in interdisciplinary counseling provided by human geneticists, surgeons, and psycho-oncologists before genetic testing. Data were collected from self-administered questionnaires before, as well as 4-6 weeks after, counseling. Distress and perceptions specific to HNPCC were assessed at both timepoints using standardized as well as author-derived instruments. Distress declined after counseling, as did worries related to HNPCC. An increase was found in personal belief in control of cancer risk, for instance, in the perceived efficacy of early detection of CRC. We also observed a trend toward greater anticipated ability to cope with a positive gene test after counseling. Changes after counseling were generally more pronounced for persons at risk, as compared to patients with cancer. The decrease in distress was partly attributable to an increase in personal self-confidence. One-third of the sample reported enhanced communication specific to hereditary disease within the family after counseling. A substantial minority, however, said they experienced increased worry and physical symptoms after counseling. Overall, counselees demonstrated less stress and perceived cancer threat as well as enhanced beliefs regarding personal control over cancer, suggesting an overall beneficial impact of comprehensive counseling. Further research is needed to identify those individuals most at risk for increased fear and worry related to HNPCC so that they may be most appropriately counseled. PMID:12537653

  3. Study finds increases in risk of leukemias related to treatment

    Cancer.gov

    A new study describes the pattern of risk for chemotherapy-related acute myeloid leukemia among adult cancer survivors over the past three decades who have previously been treated with chemotherapy for other cancers. These patterns coincide with major shi

  4. Mixing Pot and Tobacco Increases Dependence Risk: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... July 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People who mix marijuana with tobacco are at greater risk for dependency ... likelihood that users become dependent, the researchers found. "Cannabis dependence and tobacco dependence manifest in similar ways, ...

  5. Experts Caution About Potential Increased Risks From Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-06-01

    The backdrop for a 4 June Space Weather Enterprise Forum included a May 2013 report by the insurance company Lloyd's, "Solar storm risk to the North American electric grid," which warns that a geomagnetic storm similar to a strong event in 1859 (the Carrington Event, named after British astronomer Richard Carrington, who observed it) could put 20-40 million Americans at risk of a power outage that could extend from a few days to several years, with enormous societal and economic impacts.

  6. An exposure-weighted score test for genetic associations integrating environmental risk factors.

    PubMed

    Han, Summer S; Rosenberg, Philip S; Ghosh, Arpita; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil E; Chatterjee, Nilanjan

    2015-09-01

    Current methods for detecting genetic associations lack full consideration of the background effects of environmental exposures. Recently proposed methods to account for environmental exposures have focused on logistic regressions with gene-environment interactions. In this report, we developed a test for genetic association, encompassing a broad range of risk models, including linear, logistic and probit, for specifying joint effects of genetic and environmental exposures. We obtained the test statistics by maximizing over a class of score tests, each of which involves modified standard tests of genetic association through a weight function. This weight function reflects the potential heterogeneity of the genetic effects by levels of environmental exposures under a particular model. Simulation studies demonstrate the robust power of these methods for detecting genetic associations under a wide range of scenarios. Applications of these methods are further illustrated using data from genome-wide association studies of type 2 diabetes with body mass index and of lung cancer risk with smoking. PMID:26134142

  7. Association between seven common OPG genetic polymorphisms and osteoporosis risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liang; Tang, Ke; Quan, Zhengxue; Zhao, Zenghui; Jiang, Dianming

    2014-01-01

    Functional polymorphisms of the osteoprotegerin (OPG) gene are known to be involved in bone mineral density and the development of osteoporosis; however, some conflicting results have been reported. The aim of this meta-analysis is to provide a relatively comprehensive assessment of the relationship between seven common OPG genetic polymorphisms (T149C, A163G, G209A, T245G, T950C, G1181C, and C1217T) and osteoporosis risk. A literature search for eligible studies published before August 1st, 2013 was conducted in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and CNKI (China National Knowledge Infrastructure) databases. Pooled odds ratios and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals were used to evaluate the strength of the association under fixed- or random-effect models according to a heterogeneity test. All analyses were performed using the STATA software, version 12.0. Fourteen case-control studies with a total of 2383 osteoporosis cases and 2280 healthy controls were included in this meta-analysis. Among the seven polymorphisms, A163G and G1181C revealed significant associations with osteoporosis risk. For A163G (rs3102735), the combined results showed that the G allele of the A163G polymorphism may be associated with an increased risk of osteoporosis. Stratified analyses showed that the magnitude of the effect was similar in Caucasian and postmenopausal woman subgroups. For G1181C (rs2073618), however, we found that individuals with the C allele of the G1181C polymorphism had a decreased risk of osteoporosis, especially in Asian and postmenopausal woman subgroups. In summary, this meta-analysis indicated that the G allele of the OPG A163G polymorphism might increase osteoporosis risk in Caucasians, whereas individuals with the C allele of the G1181C polymorphism had a decreased risk of osteoporosis, especially in Asians. Both of these effects were observed in postmenopausal women. These polymorphisms could probably be used with other genetic markers

  8. Parenting Moderates a Genetic Vulnerability Factor in Longitudinal Increases in Youths' Substance Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Gene H.; Beach, Steven R. H.; Philibert, Robert A.; Chen, Yi-fu; Lei, Man-Kit; Murry, Velma McBride; Brown, Anita C.

    2009-01-01

    The authors used a longitudinal, prospective design to investigate a moderation effect in the association between a genetic vulnerability factor, a variable nucleotide repeat polymorphism in the promoter region of "5HTT" (5-HTTLPR), and increases in youths' substance use. The primary study hypothesis predicted that involved-supportive parenting…

  9. Increased risk of pneumonia associated with angiotensin-converting enzyme (CD143) rs4340 polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaofang; Liu, Fangzhu

    2016-08-01

    The study aims to investigate the genetic association between rs4340 polymorphism at intron 16 of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (CD143) gene and pneumonia predisposition. Electronic database of PubMed, Embase, and CNKI (China National Knowledge Infrastructure) was searched for the studies addressing the association between CD143 rs4340 genotypes and pneumonia risk. The odds ratio (OR) with its 95 % confidence interval (CI) was employed to estimate the association. In total, ten case-control studies, including 1239 pneumonia cases and 2400 healthy controls, met the inclusion criteria. Our results showed a significant association between rs4340 SNP and pneumonia risk using the recessive model (OR 1.43, 95 % CI 1.20-1.70). A significantly increased risk was also indicated under the recessive model in Asian populations (OR 1.63, 95 % CI 1.16-2.30), Caucasian populations (OR 1.34, 95 % CI 1.09-1.65), community-acquired pneumonia (OR 1.42, 95 % CI 1.16-1.75) rather than nosocomial pneumonia (OR 1.47, 95 % CI 0.97-2.23). However, further studies with gene-gene and gene-environmental interactions should be considered to confirm this association. PMID:25982566

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF AQUATIC MODELS FOR TESTING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN GENETIC DIVERSITY AND POPULATION EXTINCTION RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between population adaptive potential and extinction risk in a changing environment is not well understood. Although the expectation is that genetic diversity is directly related to the capacity of populations to adapt, the statistical and predictive aspects of ...

  11. Functional FEN1 genetic variants and haplotypes are associated with glioma risk.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Dong; Zhang, Xiaojiao; Qiu, Xiao-Guang; Li, Jinpeng; Yuan, Qipeng; Jiang, Tao; Yang, Ming

    2013-01-01

    As a tumor suppressor, FEN1 plays an essential role in keeping genomic instability and preventing tumorigenesis. There are two functional genetic variants (-69G>A and 4150G>T) in the FEN1 gene, which have been associated with DNA damage levels in coke-oven workers as well as risks of lung cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, esophageal cancer, gastric cancer and colorectal cancer in general populations. However, it is still unknown how these polymorphisms and their haplotypes are associated with glioma risk. Therefore, we investigated the role of these polymorphisms in glioma development using a case-control design in a Chinese population. The impact of the haplotypes constructed by these two polymorphisms on glioma risk was also examined. It was observed that the FEN1-69GG or 4150GG genotype were significantly associated to increased glioma risk compared with the -69AA or 4150TT genotype [Odds ratios (OR) = 1.87, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.23-2.85, P = 0.003; or OR = 1.87, 95 % CI = 1.23-2.84, P = 0.003). The associations were more pronounced among female subjects (For -69AG or GG genotype: OR = 2.35, 95 % CI = 1.22-4.52; for 4150TG or GG genotype: OR = 2.33, 95 % CI = 1.21-4.48) and patients with grade 1 or 2 disease (For -69AG or GG genotype: OR = 2.21, 95 % CI = 1.20-4.05; for 4150TG or GG genotype: OR = 2.45, 95 % CI = 1.31-4.58). Additionally, the G(-69)G(4150) haplotype was also significantly associated with increased glioma risk compared with the A(-69)T(4150) haplotype. Our results suggest that FEN1 polymorphisms and haplotypes are associated with glioma risk. PMID:23184144

  12. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms increase risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Song, C; Xing, D; Tan, W; Wei, Q; Lin, D

    2001-04-15

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) plays a central role in folate metabolism that affects DNA methylation and synthesis. Because germ-line mutations at nucleotides 677 (C-->T) and 1298 (A-->C) in the MTHFR gene cause diminished enzyme activity, and aberrant DNA methylation is oncogenic, we examined the relationship between these two MTHFR polymorphisms and susceptibility to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in 240 ESCC cases and 360 age- and sex-matched controls in northern CHINA: We found that the allele frequency of MTHFR 677T was significantly higher among cases than among controls (63% versus 41%, P < 0.001). Subjects with the 677TT genotype had a more than 6-fold increased risk of developing ESCC [adjusted odds ratio (OR), 6.18; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.32-11.51] compared with those who had the 677CC genotype. Furthermore, the elevated ESCC risk associated with the 677 polymorphism was in an allele-dose relationship (trend test, P = 0.0001) with ORs of 1.00, 3.14 (95% CI, 1.94-5.08), and 6.18 (95% CI, 3.32-11.51) for the CC, CT, and TT genotype, respectively, after adjustment for age, sex, smoking status, and the MTHFR 1298 polymorphism. The allele frequency for the MTHFR 1298C was 14% among cases and 17% among controls. The 1298CC genotype was extremely rare in both controls (1.4%) and cases (2.9%) and was also associated with an elevated risk of ESCC (adjusted OR, 4.43; 95% CI, 1.23-16.02) compared with the 1298AA genotype, whereas the 1298AC genotype had no effect on the risk of ESCC. Thus, our findings support the hypothesis that genetic polymorphisms in the MTHFR gene may contribute to susceptibility to carcinogenesis of the esophagus in the at-risk Chinese population. PMID:11309278

  13. A Multistage Genetic Association Study Identifies Breast Cancer Risk Loci at 10q25 and 16q24

    PubMed Central

    Higginbotham, Kathryn S.; Breyer, Joan P.; McReynolds, Kate M.; Bradley, Kevin M.; Schuyler, Peggy A.; Plummer, W. Dale; Freudenthal, Marcia E.; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly A.; Parl, Fritz F.; Sanders, Melinda E.; Page, David L.; Egan, Kathleen M.; Dupont, William D.; Smith, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Heritable risk for breast cancer includes an increasing number of common, low effect risk variants. We conducted a multistage genetic association study in a series of independent epidemiologic breast cancer study populations to identify novel breast cancer risk variants. Methods We tested 1,162 SNPs of greatest nominal significance from stage I of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility breast cancer study (CGEMS; 1,145 cases, 1,142 controls) for evidence of replicated association with breast cancer in the Nashville Breast Cohort (NBC; 599 cases, 1,161 controls), the Collaborative Breast Cancer Study (CBCS; 1,552 cases, 1,185 controls), and BioVU Breast Cancer Study (BioVU; 1,172 cases, 1,172 controls). Results Among these SNPs, a series of validated breast cancer risk variants yielded expected associations in the study populations. In addition, we observed two previously unreported loci that were significantly associated with breast cancer risk in the CGEMS, NBC, and CBCS study populations and had a consistent, although not statistically significant, risk effect in the BioVU study population. These were rs1626678 at 10q25.3 near ENO4 and KIAA1598 (meta-analysis age-adjusted OR 1.13 [1.07–1.20], P = 5.6 × 10−5), and rs8046508 at 16q23.1 in the eighth intron of WWOX (meta-analysis age-adjusted OR = 1.20 [1.10–1.31], P = 3.5 × 10−5). Conclusions Our data supports the association of two novel loci, at 10q25.3 and 16q23.1, with risk of breast cancer. Impact The expanding compendium of known breast cancer genetic risk variants holds increasing power for clinical risk prediction models of breast cancer, improving upon the Gail model. PMID:22806168

  14. Adoption Does Not Increase the Risk of Mortality among Taiwanese Girls in a Longitudinal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mattison, Siobhán M.; Brown, Melissa J.; Floyd, Bruce; Feldman, Marcus W.

    2015-01-01

    Adopted children often experience health and well-being disadvantages compared to biological children remaining in their natal households. The degree of genetic relatedness is thought to mediate the level of parental investment in children, leading to poorer outcomes of biologically unrelated children. We explore whether mortality is related to adoption in a historical Taiwanese population where adoption rarely occurred among kin. Using Cox proportional hazards models in which adoption is included as a time-dependent covariate, we show that adoption of girls does not increase the risk of mortality, as previously suggested; in fact, it is either protective or neutral with respect to mortality. These results suggest that socio-structural variables may produce positive outcomes for adopted children, even compared to biological children who remain in the care of their parents. PMID:25923106

  15. Genetic epidemiology of cardiometabolic risk ractors and their clustering patterns in Mexican American children and adolescents: The SAFARI Study

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Sharon P.; Puppala, Sobha; Arya, Rector; Chittoor, Geetha; Farook, Vidya S.; Schneider, Jennifer; Resendez, Roy G.; Upadhayay, Ram Prasad; VandeBerg, Jane; Hunt, Kelly J.; Bradshaw, Benjamin; Cersosimo, Eugenio; VandeBerg, John L.; Almasy, Laura; Curran, Joanne E.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Lehman, Donna M.; Jenkinson, Christopher P.; Lynch, Jane L.; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Blangero, John; Hale, Daniel E.; Duggirala, Ravindranath

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric metabolic syndrome (MS) and its cardiometabolic components (MSCs) have become increasingly prevalent, yet little is known about the genetics underlying MS risk in children. We examined the prevalence and genetics of MS-related traits among 670 non-diabetic Mexican American (MA) children and adolescents, aged 6–17 years (49 % female), who were participants in the San Antonio Family Assessment of Metabolic Risk Indicators in Youth (SAFARI) study. These children are offspring or biological relatives of adult participants from three well-established Mexican American family studies in San Antonio, Texas, at increased risk of type 2 diabetes. MS was defined as ≥ 3 abnormalities among 6 MSC measures: waist circumference, systolic and/or diastolic blood pressure, fasting insulin, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, and fasting and/or 2-h OGTT glucose. Genetic analyses of MS, number of MSCs (MSC-N), MS factors, and bivariate MS traits were performed. Overweight/obesity (53 %), pre-diabetes (13 %), acanthosis nigricans (33 %), and MS (19 %) were strikingly prevalent, as were MS components, including abdominal adiposity (32 %) and low HDL-cholesterol (32 %). Factor analysis of MS traits yielded three constructs: adipo-insulin-lipid, blood pressure, and glucose factors, and their factor scores were highly heritable. MS itself exhibited 68 % heritability. MSC-N showed strong positive genetic correlations with obesity, insulin resistance, inflammation, and acanthosis nigricans, and negative genetic correlation with physical fitness. MS trait pairs exhibited strong genetic and/or environmental correlations. These findings highlight the complex genetic architecture of MS/MSCs in MA children, and underscore the need for early screening and intervention to prevent chronic sequelae in this vulnerable pediatric population. PMID:23736306

  16. Chronic Pancreatitis Correlates With Increased Risk of Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Tuck-Siu; Liao, Kuan-Fu; Lin, Chi-Ming; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lai, Shih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to explore whether there is a relationship between chronic pancreatitis and cerebrovascular disease in Taiwan. Using the claims data of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, we identified 16,672 subjects aged 20 to 84 years with a new diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis from 2000 to 2010 as the chronic pancreatitis group. We randomly selected 65,877 subjects aged 20 to 84 years without chronic pancreatitis as the nonchronic pancreatitis group. Both groups were matched by sex, age, comorbidities, and the index year of diagnosing chronic pancreatitis. The incidence of cerebrovascular disease at the end of 2011 was measured. The multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to measure the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for cerebrovascular disease risk associated with chronic pancreatitis and other comorbidities. The overall incidence of cerebrovascular disease was 1.24-fold greater in the chronic pancreatitis group than that in the nonchronic pancreatitis group (14.2 vs. 11.5 per 1000 person-years, 95% CI = 1.19–1.30). After controlling for confounding factors, the adjusted HR of cerebrovascular disease was 1.27 (95% CI = 1.19–1.36) for the chronic pancreatitis group as compared with the nonchronic pancreatitis group. Woman (adjusted HR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.31–1.51), age (every 1 year, HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.04–1.05), atrial fibrillation (adjusted HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.02–1.48), chronic kidney disease (adjusted HR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.31–1.67), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (adjusted HR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.16–1.40), diabetes mellitus (adjusted HR = 1.82, 95% CI = 1.72–1.92), hypertension (adjusted HR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.56–1.76), and peripheral atherosclerosis (adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.06–1.51) were other factors significantly associated with cerebrovascular disease. Chronic pancreatitis is

  17. Identical twins in forensic genetics - Epidemiology and risk based estimation of weight of evidence.

    PubMed

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Morling, Niels

    2015-12-01

    The increase in the number of forensic genetic loci used for identification purposes results in infinitesimal random match probabilities. These probabilities are computed under assumptions made for rather simple population genetic models. Often, the forensic expert reports likelihood ratios, where the alternative hypothesis is assumed not to encompass close relatives. However, this approach implies that important factors present in real human populations are discarded. This approach may be very unfavourable to the defendant. In this paper, we discuss some important aspects concerning the closest familial relationship, i.e., identical (monozygotic) twins, when reporting the weight of evidence. This can be done even when the suspect has no knowledge of an identical twin or when official records hold no twin information about the suspect. The derived expressions are not original as several authors previously have published results accounting for close familial relationships. However, we revisit the discussion to increase the awareness among forensic genetic practitioners and include new information on medical and societal factors to assess the risk of not considering a monozygotic twin as the true perpetrator. If accounting for a monozygotic twin in the weight of evidence, it implies that the likelihood ratio is truncated at a maximal value depending on the prevalence of monozygotic twins and the societal efficiency of recognising a monozygotic twin. If a monozygotic twin is considered as an alternative proposition, then data relevant for the Danish society suggests that the threshold of likelihood ratios should approximately be between 150,000 and 2,000,000 in order to take the risk of an unrecognised identical, monozygotic twin into consideration. In other societies, the threshold of the likelihood ratio in crime cases may reach other, often lower, values depending on the recognition of monozygotic twins and the age of the suspect. In general, more strictly kept

  18. Genetic Variation in Autophagy-Related Genes Influences the Risk and Phenotype of Buruli Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Capela, Carlos; Dossou, Ange Dodji; Silva-Gomes, Rita; Sopoh, Ghislain Emmanuel; Makoutode, Michel; Menino, João Filipe; Fraga, Alexandra Gabriel; Cunha, Cristina; Carvalho, Agostinho; Rodrigues, Fernando; Pedrosa, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Buruli ulcer (BU) is a severe necrotizing human skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Clinically, presentation is a sum of these diverse pathogenic hits subjected to critical immune-regulatory mechanisms. Among them, autophagy has been demonstrated as a cellular process of critical importance. Since microtubules and dynein are affected by mycolactone, the critical pathogenic exotoxin produced by M. ulcerans, cytoskeleton-related changes might potentially impair the autophagic process and impact the risk and progression of infection. Objective Genetic variants in the autophagy-related genes NOD2, PARK2 and ATG16L1 has been associated with susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases. Here, we investigated their association with BU risk, its severe phenotypes and its progression to an ulcerative form. Methods Genetic variants were genotyped using KASPar chemistry in 208 BU patients (70.2% with an ulcerative form and 28% in severe WHO category 3 phenotype) and 300 healthy endemic controls. Results The rs1333955 SNP in PARK2 was significantly associated with increased susceptibility to BU [odds ratio (OR), 1.43; P = 0.05]. In addition, both the rs9302752 and rs2066842 SNPs in NOD2 gee significantly increased the predisposition of patients to develop category 3 (OR, 2.23; P = 0.02; and OR 12.7; P = 0.03, respectively, whereas the rs2241880 SNP in ATG16L1 was found to significantly protect patients from presenting the ulcer phenotype (OR, 0.35; P = 0.02). Conclusion Our findings indicate that specific genetic variants in autophagy-related genes influence susceptibility to the development of BU and its progression to severe phenotypes. PMID:27128681

  19. Measurement and Associations of Pregnancy Risk Factors with Genetic Influences, Postnatal Environmental Influences, and Toddler Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marceau, Kristine; Hajal, Nastassia; Leve, Leslie D.; Reiss, David; Shaw, Daniel S.; Ganiban, Jody M.; Mayes, Linda C.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrates the unique contributions of perinatal risk and genetic and environmental influences on child behavior using data from 561 domestic US adoption triads (birth mothers, adopted child, and adoptive parents). Findings show distinct patterns of associations among genetic (birth mother psychopathology), prenatal (six maternal…

  20. The Application of Genetic Risk Scores in Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Cooke Bailey, Jessica N.; Hoffman, Joshua D.; Sardell, Rebecca J.; Scott, William K.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Haines, Jonathan L.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a highly prevalent and impactful disease of aging, is inarguably influenced by complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Various risk scores have been tested that assess measurable genetic and environmental contributions to disease. We herein summarize and review the ability and utility of these numerous models for prediction of AMD and suggest additional risk factors to be incorporated into clinically useful predictive models of AMD. PMID:26959068

  1. The Application of Genetic Risk Scores in Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Review.

    PubMed

    Cooke Bailey, Jessica N; Hoffman, Joshua D; Sardell, Rebecca J; Scott, William K; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Haines, Jonathan L

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a highly prevalent and impactful disease of aging, is inarguably influenced by complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Various risk scores have been tested that assess measurable genetic and environmental contributions to disease. We herein summarize and review the ability and utility of these numerous models for prediction of AMD and suggest additional risk factors to be incorporated into clinically useful predictive models of AMD. PMID:26959068

  2. Rural Mexican-Americans' perceptions of family health history, genetics, and disease risk: implications for disparities-focused research dissemination.

    PubMed

    Malen, Rachel; Knerr, Sarah; Delgado, Fernanda; Fullerton, Stephanie M; Thompson, Beti

    2016-01-01

    Disseminating the results of transdisciplinary health disparities research will increasingly involve discussing family health history and/or genetic information with study participants and their communities. Often, individuals' familiarity and comfort with these topics will be unclear. To inform the dissemination activities of a Center for Population Health and Health Disparities (CPHHD) studying multilevel determinants of breast cancer disparities in Latinas, we talked with Spanish-speaking Mexican-Americans from a rural agricultural community about family health history, genetics, and disease risk. We found that participants had limited genetic literacy but were familiar with some concepts related to family health history. Participants emphasized the role of individual behavior in shaping health and expressed a strong desire for health-related information. This included genetic information about future disease risk, which participants were previously unaware of but thought could be useful for disease prevention. These findings suggest that for research dissemination to facilitate health promotion, gaps in knowledge, particularly genetic knowledge, will need to be overcome. Outreach to underserved Latino communities should take advantage of this existing knowledge of family health history and strong desire for health information, but also take care to not overstate the significance of unreplicated or low-penetrance genetic associations. PMID:26141228

  3. Increased Risk of Osteoporosis in Patients With Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Tung, Yi-Ching; Chai, Chee-Yin; Lu, Ying-Yi; Su, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Tai-Hsin; Kuo, Keng-Liang; Lin, Chih-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate osteoporosis risk in patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD) using a nationwide population-based dataset. This Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) analysis included 27,132 patients aged 18 years and older who had been diagnosed with PUD (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] codes 531–534) during 1996 to 2010. The control group consisted of 27,132 randomly selected (age- and gender)-matched patients without PUD. The association between PUD and the risk of developing osteoporosis was estimated using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. During the follow-up period, osteoporosis was diagnosed in 2538 (9.35 %) patients in the PUD group and in 2259 (8.33 %) participants in the non-PUD group. After adjusting for covariates, osteoporosis risk was 1.85 times greater in the PUD group compared to the non-PUD group (13.99 vs 5.80 per 1000 person-years, respectively). Osteoporosis developed 1 year after PUD diagnosis. The 1-year follow-up period exhibited the highest significance between the 2 groups (hazard ratio [HR] = 63.44, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 28.19–142.74, P < 0.001). Osteoporosis risk was significantly higher in PUD patients with proton-pump-inhibitors (PPIs) use (HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.03–1.34) compared to PUD patients without PPIs use. This study revealed a significant association between PUD and subsequent risk of osteoporosis. Therefore, PUD patients, especially those treated with PPIs, should be evaluated for subsequent risk of osteoporosis to minimize the occurrence of adverse events. PMID:27100415

  4. Genetic Determinants of Risk, Severity, and Outcome in Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Guido J; Rosand, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous, nontraumatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the most severe manifestation of common forms of cerebral small vessel disease. Although ICH represents only 15% of all strokes, it accounts for a large proportion of stroke-related costs and mortality. Preventive and acute treatments remain limited. Because genetic variation contributes substantially to ICH, genomic analyses constitute a powerful tool to identify new biological mechanisms involved in its occurrence. Through translational research efforts, these newly identified mechanisms can become targets for innovative therapeutic interventions. Here, the authors summarize the most recent genetic discoveries for ICH. They also introduce the Platform for Accelerating Genetic Discovery for Cerebrovascular Disease, a newly created resource that aims to create a common workspace for genetic analyses that will bring together 100,000 stroke cases and suitable controls from numerous institutions in several countries. PMID:27214705

  5. The use of genetically modified mice in cancer risk assessment: Challenges and limitations*

    PubMed Central

    Eastmond, David A.; Vulimiri, Suryanarayana V.; French, John E.; Sonawane, Babasaheb

    2015-01-01

    The use of genetically modified (GM) mice to assess carcinogenicity is playing an increasingly important role in the safety evaluation of chemicals. While progress has been made in developing and evaluating mouse models such as the Trp53+/−, Tg.AC and the rasH2, the suitability of these models as replacements for the conventional rodent cancer bioassay and for assessing human health risks remains uncertain. The objective of this research was to evaluate the use of accelerated cancer bioassays with GM mice for assessing the potential health risks associated with exposure to carcinogenic agents. We compared the published results from the GM bioassays to those obtained in the National Toxicology Program’s conventional chronic mouse bioassay for their potential use in risk assessment. Our analysis indicates that the GM models are less efficient in detecting carcinogenic agents but more consistent in identifying non-carcinogenic agents. We identified several issues of concern related to the design of the accelerated bioassays (e.g., sample size, study duration, genetic stability and reproducibility) as well as pathway-dependency of effects, and different carcinogenic mechanisms operable in GM and non-GM mice. The use of the GM models for dose-response assessment is particularly problematic as these models are, at times, much more or less sensitive than the conventional rodent cancer bioassays. Thus, the existing GM mouse models may be useful for hazard identification, but will be of limited use for dose-response assessment. Hence, caution should be exercised when using GM mouse models to assess the carcinogenic risks of chemicals. PMID:23985072

  6. Breast Cancer Patients with High Density Mammograms Do Not Have Increased Risk of Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Releases News Release Thursday, September 6, 2012 Breast cancer patients with high density mammograms do not have ... is a marker of increased risk of developing breast cancer, does not seem to increase the risk of ...

  7. Pain, Epilepsy Drug Lyrica May Increase Birth Defects Risk, Study Suggests

    MedlinePlus

    ... 158906.html Pain, Epilepsy Drug Lyrica May Increase Birth Defects Risk, Study Suggests Expectant mothers should probably ... pregabalin (Lyrica) may slightly increase the risk for birth defects, a new study suggests. In a small ...

  8. Plasmids for Increased Efficiency of Vector Construction and Genetic Engineering in Filamentous Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Schoberle, Taylor J.; Nguyen-Coleman, C. Kim; May, Gregory S.

    2013-01-01

    Fungal species are continuously being studied to not only understand disease in humans and plants but also to identify novel antibiotics and other metabolites of industrial importance. Genetic manipulations, such as gene deletion, gene complementation, and gene over-expression, are common techniques to investigate fungal gene functions. Although advances in transformation efficiency and promoter usage have improved genetic studies, some basic steps in vector construction are still laborious and time-consuming. Gateway cloning technology solves this problem by increasing the efficiency of vector construction through the use of λ phage integrase proteins and att recombination sites. We developed a series of Gateway-compatible vectors for use in genetic studies in a range of fungal species. They contain nutritional and drug-resistance markers and can be utilized to manipulate different filamentous fungal genomes. PMID:23867711

  9. Genetic Vulnerability as a Distal Risk Factor for Suicidal Behaviour: Historical Perspective and Current Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    ANDRIESSEN, Karl; VIDETIC-PASKA, Alja

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Suicide is a multidimensional problem. Observations of family history of suicide suggest the existence of a genetic vulnerability to suicidal behaviour. Aim Starting with a historical perspective, the article reviews current knowledge of a genetic vulnerability to suicidal behaviour, distinct from the genetic vulnerability to psychiatric disorders, focused on clinical and population-based studies, and findings from recent molecular genetics association studies. Method The review includes peer-reviewed research articles and review papers from the professional literature in English language, retrieved from PubMed/Medline and PsycINFO. Results The research literature confirms a existence of a genetic vulnerability to suicidal behaviour. Even though the results of individual studies are difficult to compare, genetic influences could explain up to half of the variance of the occurrence of suicide. Conclusion Genetic vulnerability could be a distal risk factor for suicide, which helps us to understand the occurrence of suicide among vulnerable people. Ethical implications of such vulnerability are highlighted.

  10. Increased Risk of Injury in Children with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Li-Ching; Harrington, Rebecca A.; Chang, Jen Jen; Connors, Susan L.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine injury risk in children with autism, ADD/ADD, learning disability, psychopathology, or other medical conditions. Children aged 3-5 years who participated in the National Survey of Children's Health were included. Six study groups were analyzed in this report: autism (n=82), ADD/ADHD (n=191), learning…

  11. Are Adoptees at Increased Risk for Attempting Suicide?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feigelman, William

    2005-01-01

    This study addresses the controversy of whether adopted adolescents are at risk for more mental health problems than the nonadopted and specifically evaluates differences in suicide ideation and depression. Same gender comparisons were made between 346 adopted adolescents and nearly 14,000 others living with biological parents, with nationally…

  12. Starting Hormone Therapy at Menopause Increases Breast Cancer Risk

    Cancer.gov

    According to a January 28, 2011 article in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, women who start taking menopausal hormone therapy around the time of menopause have a higher risk of breast cancer than women who begin taking hormones a few years later.

  13. Drugged Driving: Increased Traffic Risks Involving Licit and Illicit Substances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilkinton, Melinda W.; Robertson, Angela; McCluskey, D. Lee

    2013-01-01

    Driving under the influence of drugs poses risks for traffic safety. Most research attention has been focused on the most prevalent drugs of abuse, such as alcohol, illegal drugs, and prescription drugs with high abuse potential. The objectives of this study were to determine the types of drugs used by convicted DUI offenders on the day of their…

  14. Do Chronic Conditions Increase Young Children's Risk of Being Maltreated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaudes, Paula Kienberger; Mackey-Bilaver, Lucy

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether and to what extent specific chronic health conditions place young children at risk of maltreatment. Methods: The study used a sample of Illinois children (born between January 1990 and March 1996) who were through age 3 continuously enrolled in Medicaid, a public health insurance program for low-income families. The…

  15. Genetic variants in novel pathways influence blood pressure and cardiovascular disease risk.

    PubMed

    Ehret, Georg B; Munroe, Patricia B; Rice, Kenneth M; Bochud, Murielle; Johnson, Andrew D; Chasman, Daniel I; Smith, Albert V; Tobin, Martin D; Verwoert, Germaine C; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Pihur, Vasyl; Vollenweider, Peter; O'Reilly, Paul F; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Teumer, Alexander; Glazer, Nicole L; Launer, Lenore; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aulchenko, Yurii; Heath, Simon; Sõber, Siim; Parsa, Afshin; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Dehghan, Abbas; Zhang, Feng; Lucas, Gavin; Hicks, Andrew A; Jackson, Anne U; Peden, John F; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wild, Sarah H; Rudan, Igor; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Parker, Alex N; Fava, Cristiano; Chambers, John C; Fox, Ervin R; Kumari, Meena; Go, Min Jin; van der Harst, Pim; Kao, Wen Hong Linda; Sjögren, Marketa; Vinay, D G; Alexander, Myriam; Tabara, Yasuharu; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Whincup, Peter H; Liu, Yongmei; Shi, Gang; Kuusisto, Johanna; Tayo, Bamidele; Seielstad, Mark; Sim, Xueling; Nguyen, Khanh-Dung Hoang; Lehtimäki, Terho; Matullo, Giuseppe; Wu, Ying; Gaunt, Tom R; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Cooper, Matthew N; Platou, Carl G P; Org, Elin; Hardy, Rebecca; Dahgam, Santosh; Palmen, Jutta; Vitart, Veronique; Braund, Peter S; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Palmas, Walter; Campbell, Harry; Ludwig, Barbara; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Palmer, Nicholette D; Aspelund, Thor; Garcia, Melissa; Chang, Yen-Pei C; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Steinle, Nanette I; Grobbee, Diederick E; Arking, Dan E; Kardia, Sharon L; Morrison, Alanna C; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer; McArdle, Wendy L; Hadley, David; Brown, Morris J; Connell, John M; Hingorani, Aroon D; Day, Ian N M; Lawlor, Debbie A; Beilby, John P; Lawrence, Robert W; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Ongen, Halit; Dreisbach, Albert W; Li, Yali; Young, J Hunter; Bis, Joshua C; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Adair, Linda S; Lee, Nanette R; Chen, Ming-Huei; Olden, Matthias; Pattaro, Cristian; Bolton, Judith A Hoffman; Köttgen, Anna; Bergmann, Sven; Mooser, Vincent; Chaturvedi, Nish; Frayling, Timothy M; Islam, Muhammad; Jafar, Tazeen H; Erdmann, Jeanette; Kulkarni, Smita R; Bornstein, Stefan R; Grässler, Jürgen; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F; Kettunen, Johannes; Howard, Philip; Taylor, Andrew; Guarrera, Simonetta; Ricceri, Fulvio; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Weder, Alan B; Hunt, Steven C; Sun, Yan V; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Scott, Laura J; Stringham, Heather M; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Vartiainen, Erkki; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Staessen, Jan A; Wang, Thomas J; Burton, Paul R; Soler Artigas, Maria; Dong, Yanbin; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhu, Haidong; Lohman, Kurt K; Rudock, Megan E; Heckbert, Susan R; Smith, Nicholas L; Wiggins, Kerri L; Doumatey, Ayo; Shriner, Daniel; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Kinra, Sanjay; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Tripathy, Vikal; Langefeld, Carl D; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; Forrester, Terrence; Hilton, Gina; McKenzie, Colin A; Salako, Tunde; Iwai, Naoharu; Kita, Yoshikuni; Ogihara, Toshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Umemura, Satoshi; Eyheramendy, Susana; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H-Erich; Cho, Yoon Shin; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Lee, Jong-Young; Scott, James; Sehmi, Joban S; Zhang, Weihua; Hedblad, Bo; Nilsson, Peter; Smith, George Davey; Wong, Andrew; Narisu, Narisu; Stančáková, Alena; Raffel, Leslie J; Yao, Jie; Kathiresan, Sekar; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Schwartz, Stephen M; Ikram, M Arfan; Longstreth, W T; Mosley, Thomas H; Seshadri, Sudha; Shrine, Nick R G; Wain, Louise V; Morken, Mario A; Swift, Amy J; Laitinen, Jaana; Prokopenko, Inga; Zitting, Paavo; Cooper, Jackie A; Humphries, Steve E; Danesh, John; Rasheed, Asif; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Watkins, Hugh; Bakker, Stephan J L; van Gilst, Wiek H; Janipalli, Charles S; Mani, K Radha; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Hofman, Albert; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U S; Oostra, Ben A; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Lakatta, Edward G; Orru, Marco; Scuteri, Angelo; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kangas, Antti J; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Soininen, Pasi; Tukiainen, Taru; Würtz, Peter; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Dörr, Marcus; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Deloukas, Panos; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D; Zhai, Guangju; Meschia, James F; Nalls, Michael A; Sharma, Pankaj; Terzic, Janos; Kumar, M V Kranthi; Denniff, Matthew; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Fowkes, F Gerald R; Charchar, Fadi J; Schwarz, Peter E H; Hayward, Caroline; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotimi, Charles; Bots, Michiel L; Brand, Eva; Samani, Nilesh J; Polasek, Ozren; Talmud, Philippa J; Nyberg, Fredrik; Kuh, Diana; Laan, Maris; Hveem, Kristian; Palmer, Lyle J; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Casas, Juan P; Mohlke, Karen L; Vineis, Paolo; Raitakari, Olli; Ganesh, Santhi K; Wong, Tien Y; Tai, E Shyong; Cooper, Richard S; Laakso, Markku; Rao, Dabeeru C; Harris, Tamara B; Morris, Richard W; Dominiczak, Anna F; Kivimaki, Mika; Marmot, Michael G; Miki, Tetsuro; Saleheen, Danish; Chandak, Giriraj R; Coresh, Josef; Navis, Gerjan; Salomaa, Veikko; Han, Bok-Ghee; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Kooner, Jaspal S; Melander, Olle; Ridker, Paul M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B; Wright, Alan F; Wilson, James F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Farrall, Martin; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pramstaller, Peter P; Elosua, Roberto; Soranzo, Nicole; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J F; Shuldiner, Alan R; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Rotter, Jerome I; Rettig, Rainer; Uda, Manuela; Strachan, David P; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Beckmann, Jacques S; Boerwinkle, Eric; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Boehnke, Michael; Larson, Martin G; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Psaty, Bruce M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Elliott, Paul; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Caulfield, Mark J; Johnson, Toby

    2011-10-01

    Blood pressure is a heritable trait influenced by several biological pathways and responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (≥140 mm Hg systolic blood pressure or  ≥90 mm Hg diastolic blood pressure). Even small increments in blood pressure are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. This genome-wide association study of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, which used a multi-stage design in 200,000 individuals of European descent, identified sixteen novel loci: six of these loci contain genes previously known or suspected to regulate blood pressure (GUCY1A3-GUCY1B3, NPR3-C5orf23, ADM, FURIN-FES, GOSR2, GNAS-EDN3); the other ten provide new clues to blood pressure physiology. A genetic risk score based on 29 genome-wide significant variants was associated with hypertension, left ventricular wall thickness, stroke and coronary artery disease, but not kidney disease or kidney function. We also observed associations with blood pressure in East Asian, South Asian and African ancestry individuals. Our findings provide new insights into the genetics and biology of blood pressure, and suggest potential novel therapeutic pathways for cardiovascular disease prevention. PMID:21909115

  16. Genetic Variants in Novel Pathways Influence Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable trait1 influenced by multiple biological pathways and is responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (BP ≥140 mm Hg systolic [SBP] or ≥90 mm Hg diastolic [DBP])2. Even small increments in BP are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events3. This genome-wide association study of SBP and DBP, which used a multi-stage design in 200,000 individuals of European descent, identified 16 novel loci: six of these loci contain genes previously known or suspected to regulate BP (GUCY1A3-GUCY1B3; NPR3-C5orf23; ADM; FURIN-FES; GOSR2; GNAS-EDN3); the other 10 provide new clues to BP physiology. A genetic risk score based on 29 genome-wide significant variants was associated with hypertension, left ventricular wall thickness, stroke, and coronary artery disease, but not kidney disease or kidney function. We also observed associations with BP in East Asian, South Asian, and African ancestry individuals. Our findings provide new insights into the genetics and biology of BP, and suggest novel potential therapeutic pathways for cardiovascular disease prevention. PMID:21909115

  17. Increased Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Young Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Chih; Su, Yu-Chieh; Ho, Hsu-Chueh; Hung, Shih-Kai; Lee, Moon-Sing; Chiou, Wen-Yen; Chou, Pesus; Huang, Yung-Sung

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation/chemoradiotherapy-induced carotid stenosis and cerebrovascular events in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) can cause severe disability and even death. This study aimed to estimate the risk of ischemic stroke in this patient population over more than 10 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: The study cohorts consisted of all patients hospitalized with a principal diagnosis of NPC (n = 1094), whereas patients hospitalized for an appendectomy during 1997 and 1998 (n = 4376) acted as the control group and surrogate for the general population. Cox proportional hazard model was performed as a means of comparing the stroke-free survival rate between the two cohorts after adjusting for possible confounding and risk factors. Results: Of the 292 patients with ischemic strokes, 62 (5.7%) were from the NPC cohort and 230 (5.3%) were from the control group. NPC patients ages 35-54 had a 1.66 times (95% CI, 1.16-2.86; p = 0.009) higher risk of ischemic stroke after adjusting for patient characteristics, comorbidities, geographic region, urbanization level of residence, and socioeconomic status. There was no statistical difference in ischemic stroke risk between the NPC patients and appendectomy patients ages 55-64 years (hazard ratio = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.56-1.33; p = 0.524) after adjusting for other factors. Conclusions: Young NPC patients carry a higher risk for ischemic stroke than the general population. Besides regular examinations of carotid duplex, different irradiation strategies or using new technique of radiotherapy, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy, should be considered in young NPC patients.

  18. Genetic risk signatures of opioid-induced respiratory depression following pediatric tonsillectomy

    PubMed Central

    Biesiada, Jacek; Chidambaran, Vidya; Wagner, Michael; Zhang, Xue; Martin, Lisa J; Meller, Jaroslaw; Sadhasivam, Senthilkumar

    2015-01-01

    Background Respiratory depression is a clinically and economically important but preventable complication of opioids. Genetic factors can help identify patients with high risk for respiratory depression. Methods In this prospective genotype blinded clinical study, we evaluated the effect of a panel of variants in candidate genes on opioid-related respiratory depression in 347 children following tonsillectomy. Results Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering and a combination of candidate genotypes and clinical variables, we identified several distinct clusters of patients at high risk (36–38%) and low risk (10–17%) of respiratory depression; the relative risk of respiratory depression for high versus low risk clusters was 2.1–3.8 (p = 0.003). Conclusion Genetic risk predictions (genetic signatures) along with clinical risk factors effectively identify children at higher and lower risks of opioid-induced respiratory depression. Genetic signatures of respiratory depression offer strategies for improved clinical decision support to guide clinicians to balance the risks of opioid adverse effects with analgesia. PMID:25493568

  19. Subjects At-Risk for Genetic Diseases in Portugal: Illness Representations.

    PubMed

    Leite, Ângela; Dinis, Maria Alzira P; Sequeiros, Jorge; Paúl, Constança

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates illness representations of subjects at-risk for 3 autosomal dominant late-onset disorders: Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy (FAP) TTR V30M, Huntington's disease (HD) and Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), comparing them with the illness representations of subjects at-risk for Hemochromatosis (HH). The present study included a clinical group that consisted of 213 subjects at genetic risk (FAP, HD and MJD), comprising 174 subjects at-risk for FAP, 34 subjects at-risk for HD and only 5 subjects at-risk for MJD; and the control group consisting of 31 subjects at genetic risk for HH. All subjects at-risk were undergoing the process of genetic counseling to learn their genetic status (carrier or non-carrier). Subjects were assessed through a semi-structured single interview, in order to obtain sociodemographic data and the answer to an open-ended question relating to the illness representation issue: "What does this illness mean to you?/ What is this disease to you?" It was in the subjects' metaphors that subjects best expressed what they felt regarding the disease and the situation of being at-risk for this disease. Family is their mirror and their source of learning and, therefore, it is inevitable that family is related to the meaning of the disease itself. PMID:25986962

  20. Genetic and environmental influences on the development of alcoholism: resilience vs. risk.

    PubMed

    Enoch, Mary-Anne

    2006-12-01

    The physiological changes of adolescence may promote risk-taking behaviors, including binge drinking. Approximately 40% of alcoholics were already drinking heavily in late adolescence. Most cases of alcoholism are established by the age of 30 years with the peak prevalence at 18-23 years of age. Therefore the key time frame for the development, and prevention, of alcoholism lies in adolescence and young adulthood. Severe childhood stressors have been associated with increased vulnerability to addiction, however, not all stress-exposed children go on to develop alcoholism. Origins of resilience can be both genetic (variation in alcohol-metabolizing genes, increased susceptibility to alcohol's sedative effects) and environmental (lack of alcohol availability, positive peer and parental support). Genetic vulnerability is likely to be conferred by multiple genes of small to modest effects, possibly only apparent in gene-environment interactions. For example, it has been shown that childhood maltreatment interacts with a monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene variant to predict antisocial behavior that is often associated with alcoholism, and an interaction between early life stress and a serotonin transporter promoter variant predicts alcohol abuse in nonhuman primates and depression in humans. In addition, a common Met158 variant in the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene can confer both risk and resilience to alcoholism in different drinking environments. It is likely that a complex mix of gene(s)-environment(s) interactions underlie addiction vulnerability and development. Risk-resilience factors can best be determined in longitudinal studies, preferably starting during pregnancy. This kind of research is important for planning future measures to prevent harmful drinking in adolescence. PMID:17347351

  1. Association between vitamin D status and age-related macular degeneration by genetic risk

    PubMed Central

    Millen, Amy E.; Meyers, Kristin J; Liu, Zhe; Engelman, Corinne D; Wallace, Robert B; LeBlanc, Erin S; Tinker, Lesley F.; Iyengar, Sudha K; Robinson, Jennifer; Sarto, Gloria E.; Mares, Julie A

    2016-01-01

    Importance Deficient 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations have been associated with increased odds of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Objective We examined 1) whether this association is modified by genetic risk for AMD and 2) if there is an association between AMD and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes involved in vitamin D transport, metabolism and genomic function. Design, Setting and Participants Women were postmenopausal and participants of the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study (CAREDS) (54 to <75 years) with available serum 25(OH)D concentrations (assessed from 1994–1998), genetic data, and measures of AMD (n=142) assessed at CAREDS baseline from 2001–2004 (n=913). Main Outcomes and Measures Prevalent early or late AMD was determined from graded, stereoscopic fundus photographs. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for AMD by the joint effects of 25(OH)D (<30, ≥30 to <50, ≥50 to <75, and ≥75 nmol/L) and risk genotype (noncarrier, one, or two risk alleles). The referent group was noncarriers with adequate vitamin D status (≥75 nmol/L). Joint effect ORs were adjusted for age, smoking, iris pigmentation, self-reported cardiovascular disease, self-reported diabetes status, and hormone use. Additive and multiplicative interactions were assessed using the Synergy Index (SI) and an interaction term, respectively. Results We observed a 6.7-fold increased odds of AMD (95% CI=1.6, 28.2) among women with deficient vitamin D status (25(OH)D<30 nmol/L) and two risk alleles for complement factor H (CFH) Y402H (SI for additive interaction=1.4, 95% CI=1.1, 1.7; p for multiplicative interaction=0.25,. A significant additive (SI=1.4, 95% CI=1.1, 1.7) and multiplicative interaction (p=0.02) was observed for deficient women with two high risk complement factor I (CFI) (rs10033900) alleles (OR=6.3, 95% CI=1.6, 24.2). The odds of AMD did not differ by genotype of candidate

  2. Arterial hypertension – prevalence of risk factors and morbide associations that increase cardiovascular risk

    PubMed Central

    Sur, G; Sur, M; Kudor-Szabadi, L; Sur, L; Sporis, D; Sur, D

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hypertension represents a serious problem in Romania, as there are over 3 million hypertensive people in our country. There is a high incidence of deaths caused by hypertension. We performed an analytical prospective study that aims to determine: prevalence of arterial hypertension in a population from Cluj county, distribution on age and gender, arterial hypertension severity, association of hypertension with other cardiovascular risk factors. Our study included 2266 patients, age 14 years old up to over 90 years old, both masculine and feminine gender, known with hypertension and new-diagnosed ones. Each subject was submitted to an interview based on a questionnaire. Diagnosis of arterial hypertension was established according to ESH criteria that consider as hypertension: values over 140/90 mmHg. Out of all subjects submitted to the study 647 (29.74%) were diagnosed with arterial hypertension and, from these, 102 (15.13%) were new-diagnosed patients. We found out a predominance of arterial hypertension at the age of 51-60 and over 60, an increased involvement of feminine sex; an association of hypertension with other major cardiovascular risk factors: obesity, diabetes, dislypidemia. Arterial hypertension represents an important health problem in Romania due to an increased prevalence, major impact on morbidity and mortality by cardiovascular and cerebro-vascular disease. These facts accentuate the necessity of an early diagnosis, of making people aware of the severity of the disease and it’s impact on their lifestyle. PMID:21977116

  3. Anticipating issues related to increasing preimplantation genetic diagnosis use: a research agenda.

    PubMed

    Klitzman, Robert; Appelbaum, Paul S; Chung, Wendy; Sauer, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Increasing use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) poses numerous clinical, social, psychological, ethical, legal and policy dilemmas, many of which have received little attention. Patients and providers are now considering and using PGD for a widening array of genetic disorders, and patients may increasingly seek 'designer babies.' In the USA, although governmental oversight policies have been discussed, few specific guidelines exist. Hence, increasingly, patients and providers will face challenging ethical and policy questions of when and for whom to use PGD, and how it should be financed. These issues should be better clarified and addressed through collection of data concerning the current use of PGD in the USA, including factors involved in decision making about PGD use, as well as the education of the various communities that are, and should be, involved in its implementation. Improved understanding of these issues will ultimately enhance the development and implementation of future clinical guidelines and policies. PMID:18644221

  4. Predicting alcohol consumption in adolescence from alcohol-specific and general externalizing genetic risk factors, key environmental exposures and their interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kendler, K. S.; Gardner, C.; Dick, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Alcohol consumption is influenced by specific genetic risk factors for alcohol use disorders (AUDs), non-specific genetic risk factors for externalizing behaviors and various environmental experiences. We have limited knowledge of how these risk factors inter-relate through development. Method Retrospective assessments in 1796 adult male twins using a life history calendar of key environmental exposures and alcohol consumption from early adolescence to mid-adulthood. Analysis by linear mixed models. Results The importance of non-specific genetic risk factors on maximal alcohol consumption rose rapidly in early to mid-adolescence, peaked at ages 15–17 years and then declined slowly. Alcohol-specific genetic risk factors increased slowly in influence through mid-adulthood. We detected robust evidence for environmental moderation of genetic effects on alcohol consumption that was more pronounced in early and mid-adolescence than in later periods. Alcohol availability, peer deviance and low prosocial behaviors showing the strongest moderation effects. More interactions with environmental risk factors were seen for the non-specific externalizing disorder risk than for specific genetic risk for AUDs. Conclusions The impact of specific and non-specific genetic influences on alcohol consumption have different development trajectories. Genetic effects on alcohol use are more pronounced when social constraints are minimized (e.g. low prosocial behaviors or parental monitoring) or when the environment permits easy access to alcohol and/or encourages its use (e.g. high alcohol availability or peer deviance). Gene–environment interactions influencing alcohol intake may be more robust at younger ages, indicating greater plasticity of genetic influences early in the development of drinking patterns. PMID:20942993

  5. Rapid increase in southern elephant seal genetic diversity after a founder event

    PubMed Central

    de Bruyn, Mark; Pinsky, Malin L.; Hall, Brenda; Koch, Paul; Baroni, Carlo; Hoelzel, A. Rus

    2014-01-01

    Genetic diversity provides the raw material for populations to respond to changing environmental conditions. The evolution of diversity within populations is based on the accumulation of mutations and their retention or loss through selection and genetic drift, while migration can also introduce new variation. However, the extent to which population growth and sustained large population size can lead to rapid and significant increases in diversity has not been widely investigated. Here, we assess this empirically by applying approximate Bayesian computation to a novel ancient DNA dataset that spans the life of a southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) population, from initial founding approximately 7000 years ago to eventual extinction within the past millennium. We find that rapid population growth and sustained large population size can explain substantial increases in population genetic diversity over a period of several hundred generations, subsequently lost when the population went to extinction. Results suggest that the impact of diversity introduced through migration was relatively minor. We thus demonstrate, by examining genetic diversity across the life of a population, that environmental change could generate the raw material for adaptive evolution over a very short evolutionary time scale through rapid establishment of a large, stable population. PMID:24478305

  6. Rapid increase in southern elephant seal genetic diversity after a founder event.

    PubMed

    de Bruyn, Mark; Pinsky, Malin L; Hall, Brenda; Koch, Paul; Baroni, Carlo; Hoelzel, A Rus

    2014-03-22

    Genetic diversity provides the raw material for populations to respond to changing environmental conditions. The evolution of diversity within populations is based on the accumulation of mutations and their retention or loss through selection and genetic drift, while migration can also introduce new variation. However, the extent to which population growth and sustained large population size can lead to rapid and significant increases in diversity has not been widely investigated. Here, we assess this empirically by applying approximate Bayesian computation to a novel ancient DNA dataset that spans the life of a southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) population, from initial founding approximately 7000 years ago to eventual extinction within the past millennium. We find that rapid population growth and sustained large population size can explain substantial increases in population genetic diversity over a period of several hundred generations, subsequently lost when the population went to extinction. Results suggest that the impact of diversity introduced through migration was relatively minor. We thus demonstrate, by examining genetic diversity across the life of a population, that environmental change could generate the raw material for adaptive evolution over a very short evolutionary time scale through rapid establishment of a large, stable population. PMID:24478305

  7. Increased risk of osteoporosis in patients with erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Lu, Ying-Yi; Chai, Chee-Yin; Su, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Tai-Hsin; Tsai, Feng-Ji; Lin, Chih-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we aimed to investigate the risk of osteoporosis in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) by analyzing data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). From the Taiwan NHIRD, we analyzed data on 4460 patients aged ≥40 years diagnosed with ED between 1996 and 2010. In total, 17,480 age-matched patients without ED in a 1:4 ratio were randomly selected as the non-ED group. The relationship between ED and the risk of osteoporosis was estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression models. During the follow-up period, 264 patients with ED (5.92%) and 651 patients without ED (3.65%) developed osteoporosis. The overall incidence of osteoporosis was 3.04-fold higher in the ED group than in the non-ED group (9.74 vs 2.47 per 1000 person-years) after controlling for covariates. Compared with patients without ED, patients with psychogenic and organic ED were 3.19- and 3.03-fold more likely to develop osteoporosis. Our results indicate that patients with a history of ED, particularly younger men, had a high risk of osteoporosis. Patients with ED should be examined for bone mineral density, and men with osteoporosis should be evaluated for ED. PMID:27368024

  8. Pneumoconiosis Increases the Risk of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chih-Hao; Lin, Te-Yu; Huang, Wen-Yen; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study was used to evaluate the association between pneumoconiosis and peripheral arterial disease (PAD). We identified 3374 patients with pneumoconiosis from the catastrophic illness registry who were newly diagnosed from 2000 to 2005; 13,496 patients without pneumoconiosis from Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 (LHID2000) were randomly frequency matc