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Sample records for increased sperm production

  1. Females become infertile as the stored sperm's oxygen radicals increase

    PubMed Central

    Reinhardt, Klaus; Ribou, Anne-Cecile

    2013-01-01

    Predicting infertility is central to reproductive biology, medicine and evolutionary biology. In-vitro studies suggest that oxidative sperm damage causes infertility. Oxidative sperm damage can be reduced via two fundamental pathways: the removal of oxygen radicals by antioxidants, or the interference with cell metabolism to reduce the formation of oxygen radicals. Oxidative damage protection of spermatozoa should evolve frequently, especially during female sperm storage. However, in-vivo evidence linking oxidative protection and fertility is rare. We show that the intra-sperm production rate of oxygen radicals and the sperm metabolic rate were reduced in female bedbugs, Cimex lectularius, compared to males, and females laid fertile eggs. Females became infertile when sperm oxygen radicals and sperm metabolic rate increased to male levels. Our results link female fitness to sublethal sperm damage, imply adaptive benefits of interfering with sperm metabolism and offer the hypothesis that polyandry may serve to replace low-quality sperm.

  2. Saccharin consumption increases sperm DNA fragmentation and apoptosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Rahimipour, Marzieh; Talebi, Ali Reza; Anvari, Morteza; Abbasi Sarcheshmeh, Abolghasem; Omidi, Marjan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Saccharin is an artificial non-caloric sweetener that used to sweeten products such as drinks, candies, medicines, and toothpaste, but our bodies cannot metabolize it. Sodium saccharin is considered as an important factor in tumor promotion in male rats but not in humans. Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of saccharin consumption on sperm parameters and apoptosis in adult mice. Materials and Methods: Totally 14 adult male mice were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 served as control fed on basal diet and group 2 or experimental animals received distilled water containing saccharin (0.2% w/v) for 35 days. After that, the left cauda epididymis of each mouse was cut and placed in Hams F10. Swimmed-out spermatozoa were used to analyze count, motility, morphology (Pap-staining) and viability (eosin-Y staining). Sperm DNA integrity, as an indicator of apoptosis, was assessed by SCD (sperm chromatin dispersion) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TUNEL) assay. Results: Following saccharin consumption, we had a reduction in sperm motility with respect to control animals (p=0.000). In addition, the sperm count diminished (17.701.11 in controls vs. 12.802.79 in case group, p=0.003) and the rate of sperm normal morphology decreased from 77.006.40 in control animals into 63.856.81 in saccharin-treated mice (p=0.001). Also, we saw a statistically significant increase in rates of sperm DNA damage and apoptosis in experimental group when compared to control one (p=0.001, p=0.002 respectively). Conclusion: Saccharin consumption may have negative effects on sperm parameters, and increases the rate of sperm DNA fragmentation and apoptosis in mice. PMID:25031574

  3. A cost for high levels of sperm competition in rodents: increased sperm DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    delBarco-Trillo, Javier; García-Álvarez, Olga; Soler, Ana Josefa; Tourmente, Maximiliano; Garde, José Julián; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2016-03-16

    Sperm competition, a prevalent evolutionary process in which the spermatozoa of two or more males compete for the fertilization of the same ovum, leads to morphological and physiological adaptations, including increases in energetic metabolism that may serve to propel sperm faster but that may have negative effects on DNA integrity. Sperm DNA damage is associated with reduced rates of fertilization, embryo and fetal loss, offspring mortality, and mutations leading to genetic disease. We tested whether high levels of sperm competition affect sperm DNA integrity. We evaluated sperm DNA integrity in 18 species of rodents that differ in their levels of sperm competition using the sperm chromatin structure assay. DNA integrity was assessed upon sperm collection, in response to incubation under capacitating or non-capacitating conditions, and after exposure to physical and chemical stressors. Sperm DNA was very resistant to physical and chemical stressors, whereas incubation in non-capacitating and capacitating conditions resulted in only a small increase in sperm DNA damage. Importantly, levels of sperm competition were positively associated with sperm DNA fragmentation across rodent species. This is the first evidence showing that high levels of sperm competition lead to an important cost in the form of increased sperm DNA damage. PMID:26936246

  4. Male body size and condition affects sperm number and production rates in mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki.

    PubMed

    O'Dea, R E; Jennions, M D; Head, M L

    2014-12-01

    Sperm number is an important predictor of paternity when there is sperm competition. Sperm number is often measured as maximum sperm reserves, but in species where mating is frequent, males will often be replenishing their reserves. Thus, variation in how quickly males can produce sperm is likely to be important in determining male success in sperm competition. Despite this, little is known about how male size, body condition or diet affects sperm production rates. We counted sperm number in large and small Gambusia holbrooki (eastern mosquitofish) after 3 weeks on either a high or low food diet. Sperm number was significantly higher in both larger males and in well-fed males. We then stripped ejaculates again either 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 days later to investigate subsequent sperm production. The rate of sperm replenishment was influenced by an interaction between size and diet. Large, well-fed males had consistently high levels of sperm available over the 5 days (i.e. rapid replenishment), whereas small poorly fed males showed consistently low levels of sperm availability over the 5 days (i.e. slow replenishment). In contrast, large, poorly fed and small, well-fed males increased their sperm numbers over the first 3 days (i.e. intermediate replenishment). Our study highlights that when mating is frequent and sperm competition is high, size and condition dependence of maximal sperm number and of sperm production rate might both contribute to variation in male reproductive success. PMID:25403851

  5. Phenotypic engineering of sperm-production rate confirms evolutionary predictions of sperm competition theory

    PubMed Central

    Sekii, Kiyono; Vizoso, Dita B.; Kuales, Georg; De Mulder, Katrien; Ladurner, Peter; Schrer, Lukas

    2013-01-01

    Sperm production is a key male reproductive trait and an important parameter in sperm competition theory. Under sperm competition, paternity success is predicted to depend strongly on male allocation to sperm production. Furthermore, because sperm production is inherently costly, individuals should economize in sperm expenditure, and conditional adjustment of the copulation frequency according to their sperm availability may be expected. However, experimental studies showing effects of sperm production on mating behaviour and paternity success have so far been scarce, mainly because sperm production is difficult to manipulate directly in animals. Here, we used phenotypic engineering to manipulate sperm-production rate, by employing dose-dependent RNA interference (RNAi) of a spermatogenesis-specific gene, macbol1, in the free-living flatworm Macrostomum lignano. We demonstrate (i) that our novel dose-dependent RNAi approach allows us to induce high variability in sperm-production rate; (ii) that a reduced sperm-production rate is associated with a decreased copulation frequency, suggesting conditional adjustment of mating behaviour; and (iii) that both sperm production and copulation frequency are important determinants of paternity success in a competitive situation, as predicted by sperm competition theory. Our study clearly documents the potential of phenotypic engineering via dose-dependent RNAi to test quantitative predictions of evolutionary theory. PMID:23446521

  6. Phenotypic engineering of sperm-production rate confirms evolutionary predictions of sperm competition theory.

    PubMed

    Sekii, Kiyono; Vizoso, Dita B; Kuales, Georg; De Mulder, Katrien; Ladurner, Peter; Schrer, Lukas

    2013-04-22

    Sperm production is a key male reproductive trait and an important parameter in sperm competition theory. Under sperm competition, paternity success is predicted to depend strongly on male allocation to sperm production. Furthermore, because sperm production is inherently costly, individuals should economize in sperm expenditure, and conditional adjustment of the copulation frequency according to their sperm availability may be expected. However, experimental studies showing effects of sperm production on mating behaviour and paternity success have so far been scarce, mainly because sperm production is difficult to manipulate directly in animals. Here, we used phenotypic engineering to manipulate sperm-production rate, by employing dose-dependent RNA interference (RNAi) of a spermatogenesis-specific gene, macbol1, in the free-living flatworm Macrostomum lignano. We demonstrate (i) that our novel dose-dependent RNAi approach allows us to induce high variability in sperm-production rate; (ii) that a reduced sperm-production rate is associated with a decreased copulation frequency, suggesting conditional adjustment of mating behaviour; and (iii) that both sperm production and copulation frequency are important determinants of paternity success in a competitive situation, as predicted by sperm competition theory. Our study clearly documents the potential of phenotypic engineering via dose-dependent RNAi to test quantitative predictions of evolutionary theory. PMID:23446521

  7. Production of live foals via intracytoplasmic injection of lyophilized sperm and sperm extract in the horse.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y H; Varner, D D; Love, C C; Hartman, D L; Hinrichs, K

    2011-10-01

    Work with lyophilized sperm helps delineate the factors required for successful fertilization. We investigated the use of lyophilized sperm in equine embryo production. In Experiment 1, sperm DNA fragmentation index was not affected by three freeze/thaw or lyophilization cycles. In Experiment 2, oocytes injected with lyophilized sperm or with sperm from a treatment in which lyophilized sperm were suspended in sperm cytoplasmic extract (SE) yielded blastocyst development rates of 0 and 28% respectively (P < 0.05). In Experiment 3, blastocyst development rate was 6-11% after injection of sperm lyophilized from fresh or frozen-thawed semen, suspended in SE. In Experiment 4, sperm lyophilized 3.5 months or 1 week previously, suspended in SE, yielded similar blastocyst rates (6 and 3% respectively). Rates of normal pregnancy after transfer were 7/10 and 5/7 for embryos from control and lyophilized sperm treatments respectively. Three pregnancies from the lyophilized sperm treatments were not terminated, resulting in two healthy foals. Parentage testing determined that one foal originated from the lyophilized sperm; the other was the offspring of the stallion providing the sperm extract. Further testing indicated that two of five additional embryos in the lyophilized sperm treatment originated from the stallion providing the sperm extract. We conclude that both lyophilized stallion sperm and stallion sperm processed by multiple unprotected freeze-thaw cycles (as for sperm extract) can support production of viable foals. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on production of live offspring by fertilization with lyophilized sperm in a non-laboratory animal species. PMID:21846810

  8. Inhibition of Mitochondrial Complex I Leads to Decreased Motility and Membrane Integrity Related to Increased Hydrogen Peroxide and Reduced ATP Production, while the Inhibition of Glycolysis Has Less Impact on Sperm Motility

    PubMed Central

    Plaza Davila, María; Martin Muñoz, Patricia; Tapia, Jose A.; Ortega Ferrusola, Cristina; Balao da Silva C, Carolina; Peña, Fernando J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria have been proposed as the major source of reactive oxygen species in somatic cells and human spermatozoa. However, no data regarding the role of mitochondrial ROS production in stallion spermatozoa are available. To shed light on the role of the mitochondrial electron transport chain in the origin of oxidative stress in stallion spermatozoa, specific inhibitors of complex I (rotenone) and III (antimycin-A) were used. Ejaculates from seven Andalusian stallions were collected and incubated in BWW media at 37°C in the presence of rotenone, antimycin-A or control vehicle. Incubation in the presence of these inhibitors reduced sperm motility and velocity (CASA analysis) (p<0.01), but the effect was more evident in the presence of rotenone (a complex I inhibitor). These inhibitors also decreased ATP content. The inhibition of complexes I and III decreased the production of reactive oxygen species (p<0.01) as assessed by flow cytometry after staining with CellRox deep red. This observation suggests that the CellRox probe mainly identifies superoxide and that superoxide production may reflect intense mitochondrial activity rather than oxidative stress. The inhibition of complex I resulted in increased hydrogen peroxide production (p<0.01). The inhibition of glycolysis resulted in reduced sperm velocities (p<0.01) without an effect on the percentage of total motile sperm. Weak and moderate (but statistically significant) positive correlations were observed between sperm motility, velocity and membrane integrity and the production of reactive oxygen species. These results indicate that stallion sperm rely heavily on oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for the production of ATP for motility but also require glycolysis to maintain high velocities. These data also indicate that increased hydrogen peroxide originating in the mitochondria is a mechanism involved in stallion sperm senescence. PMID:26407142

  9. Mass-Specific Metabolic Rate Influences Sperm Performance through Energy Production in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Tourmente, Maximiliano; Roldan, Eduardo R. S.

    2015-01-01

    Mass-specific metabolic rate, the rate at which organisms consume energy per gram of body weight, is negatively associated with body size in metazoans. As a consequence, small species have higher cellular metabolic rates and are able to process resources at a faster rate than large species. Since mass-specific metabolic rate has been shown to constrain evolution of sperm traits, and most of the metabolic activity of sperm cells relates to ATP production for sperm motility, we hypothesized that mass-specific metabolic rate could influence sperm energetic metabolism at the cellular level if sperm cells maintain the metabolic rate of organisms that generate them. We compared data on sperm straight-line velocity, mass-specific metabolic rate, and sperm ATP content from 40 mammalian species and found that the mass-specific metabolic rate positively influences sperm swimming velocity by (a) an indirect effect of sperm as the result of an increased sperm length, and (b) a direct effect independent of sperm length. In addition, our analyses show that species with higher mass-specific metabolic rate have higher ATP content per sperm and higher concentration of ATP per μm of sperm length, which are positively associated with sperm velocity. In conclusion, our results suggest that species with high mass-specific metabolic rate have been able to evolve both long and fast sperm. Moreover, independently of its effect on the production of larger sperm, the mass-specific metabolic rate is able to influence sperm velocity by increasing sperm ATP content in mammals. PMID:26371474

  10. Sperm nuclear transfer and transgenic production in the fish medaka.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongming; Liu, Ling; Wei, Qiwei; Hong, Yunhan

    2011-01-01

    Sperm nuclear transfer or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) is a powerful assisted reproductive technology (ART) for treating human male infertility. Controversial reports of increased birth defects have raised concerns about the ART's safety. The cause for birth defects, however, has remained elusive for analysis in human because of the sample size, male infertility genetics, physiological heterogeneity and associated procedures such as embryo manipulations. Animal models are required to evaluate factors leading to the increased birth defects. Here we report the establishment of medakafish model for ICSI and transgenic production. This small laboratory fish has high fecundity and easy embryology. We show that ICSI produced a 5% high percentage of fertile animals that exhibited both paternal and maternal contribution as evidenced by the pigmentation marker. Furthermore, when sperm were pre-incubated with a plasmid ubiquitously expressing RFP and subjected to ICSI, 50% of sperm nuclear transplants showed germline transmission. We conclude that medaka is an excellent model for ICSI to evaluate birth defects and that sperm nuclear transfer can mediate stable gene transfer at high efficiency. Although more demanding for experimentation, sperm-mediated transgenesis should be particularly applicable for aquaculture species with a lengthy generation time and/or a large adult body size. PMID:21547064

  11. Sound production in neonate sperm whales (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, P. T.; Carder, D. A.; Au, W. W. L.; Nachtigall, P. E.; Møhl, B.; Ridgway, S. H.

    2003-06-01

    Acoustic data from two sperm whale neonates (Physeter macrocephalus) in rehabilitation are presented and implications for sound production and function are discussed. The clicks of neonate sperm whale are very different from usual clicks of adult specimens in that neonate clicks are of low directionality [SL anomaly (0°-90°) <8 dB], long duration (2-12 ms), and low frequency (centroid frequency between 300 and 1700 Hz) with estimated SLs between 140 and 162 dB//1 μPa (rms). Such neonate clicks are unsuited for biosonar, but can potentially convey homing information between calves and submerged conspecifics in open ocean waters at ranges of some 2 km. Moreover, it is demonstrated that sperm whale clicks are produced at the anterior placed monkey lips, thereby substantiating a key point in the modified Norris and Harvey theory and supporting the unifying theory of sound production in odontocetes.

  12. Sperm cells as vectors in the production of transgenic animals

    SciTech Connect

    Prince, R.M.

    1993-04-28

    Transgenic animals are used in industry and in biomedical research in order to provide in vivo experimental model systems. Sperm cells have been reported used as vectors in the production of transgenic animals before, however no approach has of yet proven to be successful. Fertilizing eggs with genetically modified sperm would be advantageous in that sperm are readily accessible and stable, and eggs can be fertilized by modified sperm cells in vivo. Recent elucidations regarding the unique manner of DNA packaging in sperm chromatin by protamines has provided us with the insight for developing a method of introducing foreign DNA into sperm which is likely to succeed where others have failed. We have developed a method for mimicking the in vivo system of sperm chromatin toroid subunits in vitro, concentrating these toroids, and fluorescent visualization. Our present work concerns development of a method to successfully deliver DNA across the cell membranes and into the nucleus.

  13. Sperm Pretreatment with Dithiothreitol Increases Male Pronucleus Formation Rates After Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI) in Swamp Buffalo Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    CHANKITISAKUL, Vibuntita; AM-IN, Nutthee; THARASANIT, Theerawat; SOMFAI, Tamas; NAGAI, Takashi; TECHAKUMPHU, Mongkol

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Failure of male pronucleus formation has hampered the success of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) in swamp buffalo. The aim of the present study was to improve male pronucleus formation by pretreating sperm with various chemicals before ICSI. In Experiments1 and 2, sperm were treated according to one of the following protocols: (1) 0.1% Triton-X 100 (TX) for 1 min, (2) 10 M calcium ionophore (CaI) for 20 min, (3) freezing and thawing (FT) without any cryoprotectant, or (4) no treatment (control). These sperm treatment groups then either did or did not receive additional sperm treatment with 5 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) for 20 min. Acrosomal integrity (Experiment 1) and DNA fragmentation (Experiment 2) were evaluated in the sperm before ICSI. In Experiment 3, oocytes matured in vitro were subjected to ICSI using pretreated sperm as described above and then were cultured either with or without activation. The TX- and CaI-treated sperm caused an increase in the number of acrosome-loss sperm, whereas the FT treatment and control increased the proportion of acrosome-reacted sperm (P<0.05). The DNA fragmentation did not differ among treatments (P>0.05). At 18 h post-ICSI, pronucleus (PN) formation was found only in activated oocytes. The majority of the activated ICSI oocytes contained intact sperm heads. Normal fertilization was observed in the CaI and FT treatment groups and control group when sperm were treated with DTT before ICSI. In conclusion, DTT treatment of sperm with reacted acrosomes before ICSI together with activation of the ICSI oocytes is important for successful male pronucleus formation. PMID:23132520

  14. Sperm Competition, Sperm Numbers and Sperm Quality in Muroid Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Montoto, Laura; Magaña, Concepción; Tourmente, Maximiliano; Martín-Coello, Juan; Crespo, Cristina; Luque-Larena, Juan José

    2011-01-01

    Sperm competition favors increases in relative testes mass and production efficiency, and changes in sperm phenotype that result in faster swimming speeds. However, little is known about its effects on traits that contribute to determine the quality of a whole ejaculate (i.e., proportion of motile, viable, morphologically normal and acrosome intact sperm) and that are key determinants of fertilization success. Two competing hypotheses lead to alternative predictions: (a) sperm quantity and quality traits co-evolve under sperm competition because they play complementary roles in determining ejaculate's competitive ability, or (b) energetic constraints force trade-offs between traits depending on their relevance in providing a competitive advantage. We examined relationships between sperm competition levels, sperm quantity, and traits that determine ejaculate quality, in a comparative study of 18 rodent species using phylogenetically controlled analyses. Total sperm numbers were positively correlated to proportions of normal sperm, acrosome integrity and motile sperm; the latter three were also significantly related among themselves, suggesting no trade-offs between traits. In addition, testes mass corrected for body mass (i.e., relative testes mass), showed a strong association with sperm numbers, and positive significant associations with all sperm traits that determine ejaculate quality with the exception of live sperm. An “overall sperm quality” parameter obtained by principal component analysis (which explained 85% of the variance) was more strongly associated with relative testes mass than any individual quality trait. Overall sperm quality was as strongly associated with relative testes mass as sperm numbers. Thus, sperm quality traits improve under sperm competition in an integrated manner suggesting that a combination of all traits is what makes ejaculates more competitive. In evolutionary terms this implies that a complex network of genetic and developmental pathways underlying processes of sperm formation, maturation, transport in the female reproductive tract, and preparation for fertilization must all evolve in concert. PMID:21464956

  15. Reactive oxygen species production and antioxidant enzyme activity during epididymal sperm maturation in Corynorhinus mexicanus bats.

    PubMed

    Edith, Arenas-Ríos; Adolfo, Rosado García; Edith, Cortés-Barberena; Mina, Königsberg; Marcela, Arteaga-Silva; Ahiezer, Rodríguez-Tobón; Gisela, Fuentes-Mascorro; Angel, León-Galván Miguel

    2016-03-01

    Prolonged sperm storage in the epididymis of Corynorhinus mexicanus bats after testicular regression has been associated with epididymal sperm maturation in the caudal region, although the precise factors linked with this phenomenon are unknown. The aim of this work is to determine the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and changes in antioxidant enzymatic activity occurring in the spermatozoa and epididymal fluid over time, in sperm maturation and storage in the caput, corpus and cauda of the bat epididymis. Our data showed that an increment in ROS production coincided with an increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in epididymal fluid and with a decrease in glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity in the spermatozoa in at different time points and epididymal regions. The increase in ROS production was not associated with oxidative damage measured by lipid peroxidation. The results of the current study suggest the existence of a shift in the redox balance, which might be associated with sperm maturation and storage. PMID:26952757

  16. Reduction of centrifugation force in discontinuous percoll gradients increases in vitro fertilization rates without reducing bovine sperm recovery.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, A C G; Leivas, F G; Santos, F W; Schwengber, E B; Giotto, A B; Machado, C I U; Gonçalves, C G M; Folchini, N P; Brum, D S

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of different centrifugation forces in bovine sperm separation by discontinuous Percoll gradients for in vitro fertilization IVF. The semen samples from each bull were pooled or each bull were centrifuged separately and centrifuged in discontinuous Percoll gradients (30, 60 and 90%) at different forces: F1 (9000×g), F2 (6500×g), F3 (4500×g) and F4 (2200×g), according experiment. The sperm samples were evaluated to determine the concentration, motility, vigor, morphology, reactive oxygen species (ROS), integrity of the plasma membrane, lipid peroxidation, antioxidants and embryo development were also evaluated. No difference was observed in the concentration of sperm submitted to different centrifugation forces. The total percentage of motile sperm was increased after centrifugation at F3 and F4, and the ROS production at F1 was greater than the other forces. When the bulls semen were processed individually, no significant differences were observed for the sperm quality parameters between F1 and F4, including lipid peroxidation, antioxidants, cleavage rate and average time to the first cleavage. This work demonstrated for the first time that centrifugation at 2200×g enhanced the sperm penetration and fertilization rates without reducing sperm recovery compared to the typical centrifugation force (9000×g) currently used by the commercial bovine IVF industry. PMID:24646635

  17. Antlers honestly advertise sperm production and quality

    PubMed Central

    Malo, Aurelio F.; Roldan, Eduardo R. S.; Garde, Julian; Soler, Ana J.; Gomendio, Montserrat

    2005-01-01

    Evolutionary theory proposes that exaggerated male traits have evolved via sexual selection, either through female mate choice or malemale competition. While female preferences for ornamented males have been amply demonstrated in other taxa, among mammals sexual characters are commonly regarded as weapons whose main function is to enhance male competitiveness in agonistic encounters. One particularly controversial hypothesis to explain the function of male sexual characters proposes that they advertise male fertility. We test this hypothesis in red deer (Cervus elaphus), a species where sexual characters (antlers) reach an extreme degree of elaboration. We find that a global measure of relative antler size and complexity is associated with relative testes size and sperm velocity. Our results exclude the possibility that condition dependence, age or time of culling, drive these associations. Red deer antlers could signal male fertility to females, the ability to avoid sperm depletion throughout the reproductive season and/or the competitive ability of ejaculates. By contrast, male antlers could also signal to other males not only their competitive ability at the behavioural level (fighting ability) but also at the physiological level (sperm competition). PMID:15695205

  18. Bower-building behaviour is associated with increased sperm longevity in Tanganyikan cichlids.

    PubMed

    Morita, M; Awata, S; Yorifuji, M; Ota, K; Kohda, M; Ochi, H

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the evolutionary relationship between spawning behaviour and sperm motility traits among Tanganyikan mouth-brooding cichlid species that have developed diverse mating behaviours and male sexual traits. Mouth-brooding behaviour is common among these fish, but different species demonstrate a range of spawning behaviours, bower construction, male sexual traits and timing of gamete release. We observed spawning behaviours and compared sperm motility traits of 28 Tanganyikan mouth-brooding cichlids to elucidate the evolutionary correlations between these traits. Sperm longevity was considerably longer in bower-building species that construct crater-shaped spawning sites compared with species that do not build bowers. Male bower builders released sperm in the pit of the bower prior to spawning, and the time from ejaculation to fertilization was longer. Conversely, most mouth-brooding cichlids deposited semen directly into the female buccal cavity, and spawned eggs were immediately picked up to be placed inside the cavity; thus, the time from ejaculation to fertilization was short. These observations suggest that increased sperm longevity is favoured in bower builders. Comparative phylogenetic analyses suggested that bower-building behaviour and greater time from ejaculation to fertilization are associated with the extension of sperm longevity, whereas sperm competition rank does not play a major role. In addition, bower-building behaviour preceded the emergence of increased sperm longevity. These results indicate that the extension of sperm longevity as a result of the emergence of bower builders may have acted as an evolutionary attractor for sperm longevity. PMID:25330280

  19. Effect of Purine Nucleoside Analogue-Acyclovir on The Sperm Parameters and Testosterone Production in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Movahed, Elham; Sadrkhanlou, Rajabali; Ahmadi, Abbas; Nejati, Vahid; Zamani, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Background: Acyclovir (ACV), a synthetic purine nucleoside analogue derived from guanosine, is known to be toxic to gonads and the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ACV on the sperm parameters and testosterone production in rat. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, forty adult male Wistar rats (220 ± 20 g) were randomly divided into five groups (n=8 for each group). One group served as control and one group served as sham control [distilled water was intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected]. ACV was administered intraperitoneally in the drug treatment groups (4, 16 and 48 mg/kg/day) for 15 days. Eighteen days after the last injection, rats were sacrificed by CO2 inhalation. After that, cauda epididymides were removed surgically. At the end, sperm concentrations in the cauda epididymis, sperm motility, morphology, viability, chromatin quality and DNA integrity were analyzed. Serum testosterone concentrations were determined. Results: The results showed that ACV did not affect sperm count, but decreased sperm motility and sperm viability at 16 and 48 mg/kg dose-levels. Sperm abnormalities increased at 48 mg/kg dose-level of ACV. Further, ACV significantly increases DNA damage at 16 and 48 mg/kg dose-levels and chromatin abnormality at all doses. Besides, a significant decrease in serum testosterone concentrations was observed at 16 and 48 mg/ kg doses. Conclusion: The present results highly support the idea that ACV induces testicular toxicity by adverse effects on the sperm parameters and serum level of testosterone in male rats. PMID:24520464

  20. Click production during breathing in a sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus).

    PubMed

    Wahlberg, Magnus; Frantzis, Alexandros; Alexiadou, Paraskevi; Madsen, Peter T; Mhl, Bertel

    2005-12-01

    A sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) was observed at the surface with above- and underwater video and synchronized underwater sound recordings. During seven instances the whale ventilated its lungs while clicking. From this observation it is inferred that click production is achieved by pressurizing air in the right nasal passage, pneumatically disconnected from the lungs and the left nasal passage, and that air flows anterior through the phonic lips into the distal air sac. The capability of breathing and clicking at the same time is unique among studied odontocetes and relates to the extreme asymmetry of the sperm whale sound-producing forehead. PMID:16419786

  1. Click production during breathing in a sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlberg, Magnus; Frantzis, Alexandros; Alexiadou, Paraskevi; Madsen, Peter T.; Møhl, Bertel

    2005-12-01

    A sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) was observed at the surface with above- and underwater video and synchronized underwater sound recordings. During seven instances the whale ventilated its lungs while clicking. From this observation it is inferred that click production is achieved by pressurizing air in the right nasal passage, pneumatically disconnected from the lungs and the left nasal passage, and that air flows anterior through the phonic lips into the distal air sac. The capability of breathing and clicking at the same time is unique among studied odontocetes and relates to the extreme asymmetry of the sperm whale sound-producing forehead.

  2. SPERM PRODUCTION IN TARNISHED PLANT BUGS, IRRADIATED AND UNIRRADIATED

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With recent advances that allow their mass rearing, tarnished plant bugs (TPB), Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois) are being considered as subjects for mass sterilization and release. Because sperm production in sterile insects has been cited as an important component of competitiveness, it was ...

  3. Production of transgenic rabbit embryos through intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiuyan; Hou, Jian; Wang, Sheng; Chen, Yongfu; An, Xiao-Rong

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this study was to test if intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)-mediated gene transfer was an effective method in the production of transgenic rabbit embryos. Rabbit sperm diluted in different media with various pH were treated by freezing without cryoprotectant, and their ability for DNA uptake was determined. In these experiments using production of transgenic rabbit embryos by ICSI, exogenous genes at three concentrations and of two conformation types were used. The rate of DNA association to the sperm seen by rhodamine-tagged DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was 90.0%, 92.7%, 91.0%, 91.7%, and 92.3%, respectively in TCM199, DM, DPBS, CZB, and HCZB media. The DNA attachment to sperm was not affected by media pH within the range of 5.4-9.4 (p > 0.05). Expression of GFP first occurred at the 2-cell stage and continued to blastocyst formation. DNA concentration (between 5, 10, and 20 ng/?l) or conformation (linear and circular) had no effect on the production rate of transgenic embryos. These results indicated that genetically modified rabbit blastocysts can be efficiently produced by ICSI technique. PMID:20663236

  4. Predictive factors for an increased risk of sperm aneuploidies in oligo-astheno-teratozoospermic males.

    PubMed

    Faure, A K; Aknin-Seifer, I; Frrot, G; Pelletier, R; De Robertis, C; Cans, C; Levy, R; Jimenez, C; Lejeune, H; Terrier, N; Bergues, U; Hennebicq, S; Rousseaux, S

    2007-06-01

    Patients with severe spermatogenesis impairment can now successfully father a child thanks to the use of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). In oligozoospermic patients, many studies have reported significantly higher sperm aneuploidy rates and therefore an increased risk of transmitting a chromosomal abnormality via the injection of abnormal spermatozoa. However, the frequency of aneuploidy is highly variable between patients. The aim of the present work was to identify clinical and biological factors, which, together with non-obstructive oligozoospermia, could be predictive of elevated sperm aneuploidies. The sperm aneuploidy rates for chromosomes X, Y, 13, 18 and 21 were assessed in 31 infertile men with well-characterized spermatogenesis impairment, and in a population of control men with proven fertility. The frequency of sperm aneuploidy was compared between several patient subgroups according to their clinical and biological factors. Nearly half of the oligozoospermic males (15/31) had a significantly increased disomy rate for at least one of the five chromosomes compared with that observed in the control population (mean disomy rates + 1.96 standard deviation). Factors significantly associated with higher numbers of aneuploid sperm were cigarette smoking, an elevated follicle-stimulating hormone level, a sperm concentration less than 1 m/mL, and a severe teratozoospermia. Hence, several factors predictive of an increased risk of sperm aneuploidy rates were identified in ICSI male candidates with a non-obstructive oligozoospermia. PMID:17239087

  5. Validation of a spectrophotometer-based method for estimating daily sperm production and deferent duct transit.

    PubMed

    Froman, D P; Rhoads, D D

    2012-10-01

    The objectives of the present work were 3-fold. First, a new method for estimating daily sperm production was validated. This method, in turn, was used to evaluate testis output as well as deferent duct throughput. Next, this analytical approach was evaluated in 2 experiments. The first experiment compared left and right reproductive tracts within roosters. The second experiment compared reproductive tract throughput in roosters from low and high sperm mobility lines. Standard curves were constructed from which unknown concentrations of sperm cells and sperm nuclei could be predicted from observed absorbance. In each case, the independent variable was based upon hemacytometer counts, and absorbance was a linear function of concentration. Reproductive tracts were excised, semen recovered from each duct, and the extragonadal sperm reserve determined by multiplying volume by sperm cell concentration. Testicular sperm nuclei were procured by homogenization of a whole testis, overlaying a 20-mL volume of homogenate upon 15% (wt/vol) Accudenz (Accurate Chemical and Scientific Corporation, Westbury, NY), and then washing nuclei by centrifugation through the Accudenz layer. Daily sperm production was determined by dividing the predicted number of sperm nuclei within the homogenate by 4.5 d (i.e., the time sperm with elongated nuclei spend within the testis). Sperm transit through the deferent duct was estimated by dividing the extragonadal reserve by daily sperm production. Neither the efficiency of sperm production (sperm per gram of testicular parenchyma per day) nor deferent duct transit differed between left and right reproductive tracts (P > 0.05). Whereas efficiency of sperm production did not differ (P > 0.05) between low and high sperm mobility lines, deferent duct transit differed between lines (P < 0.001). On average, this process required 2.2 and 1.0 d for low and high lines, respectively. In summary, we developed and then tested a method for quantifying male reproductive tract throughput. This method makes the study of semen production amenable to systems biology. PMID:22991549

  6. Sperm Competition Selects for Sperm Quantity and Quality in the Australian Maluridae

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Melissah; Pruett-Jones, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    When ejaculates from rival males compete for fertilization, there is strong selection for sperm traits that enhance fertilization success. Sperm quantity is one such trait, and numerous studies have demonstrated a positive association between sperm competition and both testes size and the number of sperm available for copulations. Sperm competition is also thought to favor increases in sperm quality and changes in testicular morphology that lead to increased sperm production. However, in contrast to sperm quantity, these hypotheses have received considerably less empirical support and remain somewhat controversial. In a comparative study using the Australian Maluridae (fairy-wrens, emu-wrens, grasswrens), we tested whether increasing levels of sperm competition were associated with increases in both sperm quantity and quality, as well as an increase in the relative amount of seminiferous tubule tissue contained within the testes. After controlling for phylogeny, we found positive associations between sperm competition and sperm numbers, both in sperm reserves and in ejaculate samples. Additionally, as sperm competition level increased, the proportion of testicular spermatogenic tissue also increased, suggesting that sperm competition selects for greater sperm production per unit of testicular tissue. Finally, we also found that sperm competition level was positively associated with multiple sperm quality traits, including the proportion of motile sperm in ejaculates and the proportion of both viable and morphologically normal sperm in sperm reserves. These results suggest multiple ejaculate traits, as well as aspects of testicular morphology, have evolved in response to sperm competition in the Australian Maluridae. Furthermore, our findings emphasize the importance of post-copulatory sexual selection as an evolutionary force shaping macroevolutionary differences in sperm phenotype. PMID:21283577

  7. Partial and total fish meal replacement by agricultural products in the diets improve sperm quality in African catfish (Clarias gariepinus).

    PubMed

    Nyina-Wamwiza, L; Milla, S; Pierrard, M-A; Rurangwa, E; Mandiki, S N M; Van Look, K J W; Kestemont, P

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the long-term effects of total and partial replacement of dietary fish meal (FM) by a mixture of agricultural products on sperm quality of African catfish Clarias gariepinus. Four isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets were formulated containing graded levels of either 50% FM and maize meal (diet 1); 25% FM mixed with crude sunflower oil cake (SFOC) and bean meal (BM) (diet 2); 12.5% FM mixed with sunflower oil cake, BM and ground nut oil cake (GOC) (diet 3) and 0% FM mixed with de-hulled sunflower oil cake (SFOCD), BM and ground nut oil cake (diet 4). Gonadosomatic index (GSI), sperm quality, plasma sex steroids (11-keto testosterone [11-KT]; testosterone [T]; estradiol-17beta [E2]) were evaluated on 10 to 24 fish fed on each diet. Sperm quality was assessed using computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA). Total replacement of fish meal by plant products markedly increased sperm volume, spermatocrit, spermatozoa integrity, and sperm motility. Fish fed diet 3 (12.5% fish meal) provided intermediate results on sperm quality whereas the lowest values were obtained in fish fed diets 1 and 2. In fish fed 0% fish meal (diet 4), androgen levels were higher and estrogen levels were lower than in fish fed fish meal diets. Based on dietary lipid and fatty acid analyses, these results suggest a positive impact of short chain n-6 fatty acids on androgen synthesis and sperm quality. In conclusion, a combination of ground nut oil cake, bean meal and sunflower oil cake (preferably when the sunflower is dehulled) in African catfish diet improves the sperm quality. PMID:22015161

  8. Reduced metabolic rate and oxygen radicals production in stored insect sperm.

    PubMed

    Ribou, Anne-Cécile; Reinhardt, Klaus

    2012-06-01

    Females of internally fertilizing species can significantly extend sperm lifespan and functionality during sperm storage. The mechanisms for such delayed cellular senescence remain unknown. Here, we apply current hypotheses of cellular senescence developed for diploid cells to sperm cells, and empirically test opposing predictions on the relationship between sperm metabolic rate and oxygen radical production in an insect model, the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Using time-resolved microfluorimetry, we found a negative correlation between metabolic rate (proportion of protein-bound NAD[P]H) and in situ intracellular oxygen radicals production in freshly ejaculated sperm. In contrast, sperm stored by females for periods of 1 h to 26 days showed a positive correlation between metabolic rate and oxygen radicals production. At the same time, stored sperm showed a 37 per cent reduced metabolic rate, and 42 per cent reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, compared with freshly ejaculated sperm. Rank differences between males in ROS production and metabolic rate observed in ejaculated sperm did not predict rank differences in stored sperm. Our method of simultaneously measuring ROS production and metabolic rate of the same sample has the advantage of providing data that are independent of sperm density and any extracellular antioxidants that are proteins. Our method also excludes effects owing to accumulated hydrogen peroxide. Our results unify aspects of competing theories of cellular ageing and suggest that reducing metabolic rate may be an important means of extending stored sperm lifespan and functionality in crickets. Our data also provide a possible explanation for why traits of ejaculates sampled from the male may be rather poor predictors of paternity in sexual selection studies and likelihood of pregnancy in reproductive medicine. PMID:22279170

  9. Flow cytometric sexing of spider sperm reveals an equal sperm production ratio in a female-biased species

    PubMed Central

    Vanthournout, B.; Deswarte, K.; Hammad, H.; Bilde, T.; Lambrecht, B.; Hendrickx, F.

    2014-01-01

    Producing equal amounts of male and female offspring has long been considered an evolutionarily stable strategy. Nevertheless, exceptions to this general rule (i.e. male and female biases) are documented in many taxa, making sex allocation an important domain in current evolutionary biology research. Pinpointing the underlying mechanism of sex ratio bias is challenging owing to the multitude of potential sex ratio-biasing factors. In the dwarf spider, Oedothorax gibbosus, infection with the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia results in a female bias. However, pedigree analysis reveals that other factors influence sex ratio variation. In this paper, we investigate whether this additional variation can be explained by the unequal production of male- and female-determining sperm cells during sperm production. Using flow cytometry, we show that males produce equal amounts of male- and female-determining sperm cells; thus bias in sperm production does not contribute to the sex ratio bias observed in this species. This demonstrates that other factors such as parental genes suppressing endosymbiont effects and cryptic female choice might play a role in sex allocation in this species. PMID:24850893

  10. Less NO production and better motion parameter in human sperm by swim-up processing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gwo-Jang; Ding, Dah-Ching; Chen, I-Gin; Huang, Yi-Chun

    2004-01-01

    Fifteen semen specimens were obtained from men for semen analysis; each was divided into two aliquots for prepararation. The motile sperm recovery rate, percentage motility, and motion parameters were measured for each semen specimen (n = 15) before and after preparation with the use of the two methods, and cultured with different time courses (1 hr, 3 hr, and 6 hr). Nitric oxide (NO) was measured using the chemiluminscence method after centrifugation. Recovery rate of motile cell was significantly higher in direct swim-up method (69.5 +/- 42.4% versus 49.3 +/- 29.3%, p < 0.05). In motility, direct swim-up method in the different time courses was significantly better than IxaPrep method. (1 hr: 91.1 +/- 5.2% vs 65.6 +/- 16.4%, 3 hr: 87.2 +/- 7.9% vs 65.2 +/- 16.5%, 6 hr: 86.1 +/- 7.5% vs 60.8 +/- 17.6% and prewash: 61.6 +/- 16.2%, p < 0.05). In VAP and VSL, the sperm prepared by the above two methods all improved compared to pre-wash sperm (p < 0.05), but there was no statistical significance between the two methods. NO production in the direct swim-up group was significantly lower than IxaPrep group in the first hour of culture (0.09 +/- 0.09 uM vs 0.15 +/- 0.09 uM, p < 0.05). NO production increased as the culture time increased in swim-up group, but conversed in IxaPrep group. The lower level of NO produced in the swim-up group may suggest that better sperm quality achieved is due to the decreased NO production. PMID:15551752

  11. A Specific Transitory Increase in Intracellular Calcium Induced by Progesterone Promotes Acrosomal Exocytosis in Mouse Sperm.

    PubMed

    Romarowski, Ana; Sánchez-Cárdenas, Claudia; Ramírez-Gómez, Héctor V; Puga Molina, Lis Del C; Treviño, Claudia L; Hernández-Cruz, Arturo; Darszon, Alberto; Buffone, Mariano G

    2016-03-01

    During capacitation, sperm acquire the ability to undergo the acrosome reaction (AR), an essential step in fertilization. Progesterone produced by cumulus cells has been associated with various physiological processes in sperm, including stimulation of AR. An increase in intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) is necessary for AR to occur. In this study, we investigated the spatiotemporal correlation between the changes in [Ca(2+)]i and AR in single mouse spermatozoa in response to progesterone. We found that progesterone stimulates an [Ca(2+)]i increase in five different patterns: gradual increase, oscillatory, late transitory, immediate transitory, and sustained. We also observed that the [Ca(2+)]i increase promoted by progesterone starts at either the flagellum or the head. We validated the use of FM4-64 as an indicator for the occurrence of the AR by simultaneously detecting its fluorescence increase and the loss of EGFP in transgenic EGFPAcr sperm. For the first time, we have simultaneously visualized the rise in [Ca(2+)]i and the process of exocytosis in response to progesterone and found that only a specific transitory increase in [Ca(2+)]i originating in the sperm head promotes the initiation of AR. PMID:26819478

  12. Disruption of Maternal DNA Repair Increases Sperm-DerivedChromosomal Aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Essers, Jeroun; Kanaar, Roland; Wyrobek,Andrew J.

    2007-02-07

    The final weeks of male germ cell differentiation occur in aDNA repair-deficient environment and normal development depends on theability of the egg to repair DNA damage in the fertilizing sperm. Geneticdisruption of maternal DNA double-strand break repair pathways in micesignificantly increased the frequency of zygotes with chromosomalstructural aberrations after paternal exposure to ionizing radiation.These findings demonstrate that radiation-induced DNA sperm lesions arerepaired after fertilization by maternal factors and suggest that geneticvariation in maternal DNA repair can modulate the risk of early pregnancylosses and of children with chromosomal aberrations of paternalorigin.

  13. Sperm competition and the evolution of precopulatory weapons: Increasing male density promotes sperm competition and reduces selection on arm strength in a chorusing frog.

    PubMed

    Buzatto, Bruno A; Roberts, J Dale; Simmons, Leigh W

    2015-10-01

    Sperm competition theory assumes a trade-off between precopulatory traits that increase mating success and postcopulatory traits that increase fertilization success. Predictions for how sperm competition might affect male expenditure on these traits depend on the number of competing males, the advantage gained from expenditure on weapons, and the level of sperm competition. However, empirical tests of sperm competition theory rarely examine precopulatory male expenditure. We investigated how variation in male density affects precopulatory sexual selection on male weaponry and the level of sperm competition in the chorusing frog Crinia georgiana, where males use their arms as weapons in male-male combat. We measured body size and arm girth of 439 males, and recorded their mating success in the field. We found density-dependent selection acting on arm girth. Arm girth was positively associated with mating success, but only at low population densities. Increased male density was associated with higher risk and intensity of sperm competition arising from multimale amplexus, and a reversal in the direction of selection on arm girth. Opposing patterns of pre- and postcopulatory selection may account for the negative covariation between arm girth and testes across populations of this species. PMID:26375605

  14. Size dependence in non-sperm ejaculate production is reflected in daily energy expenditure and resting metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    Friesen, Christopher R; Powers, Donald R; Copenhaver, Paige E; Mason, Robert T

    2015-05-01

    The non-sperm components of an ejaculate, such as copulatory plugs, can be essential to male reproductive success. But the costs of these ejaculate components are often considered trivial. In polyandrous species, males are predicted to increase energy allocation to the production of non-sperm components, but this allocation is often condition dependent and the energetic costs of their production have never been quantified. Red-sided garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis) are an excellent model with which to quantify the energetic costs of non-sperm components of the ejaculate as they exhibit a dissociated reproductive pattern in which sperm production is temporally disjunct from copulatory plug production, mating and plug deposition. We estimated the daily energy expenditure and resting metabolic rate of males after courtship and mating, and used bomb calorimetry to estimate the energy content of copulatory plugs. We found that both daily energy expenditure and resting metabolic rate were significantly higher in small mating males than in courting males, and a single copulatory plug without sperm constitutes 5-18% of daily energy expenditure. To our knowledge, this is the first study to quantify the energetic expense of size-dependent ejaculate strategies in any species. PMID:25954044

  15. Relationships among scrotal and testicular characteristics, sperm production, and seminal quality in 129 beef bulls.

    PubMed Central

    Kastelic, J P; Cook, R B; Pierson, R A; Coulter, G H

    2001-01-01

    Standard breeding soundness examinations plus measurement of scrotal surface temperature (SST), internal/scrotal testicular temperatures, testicular ultrasonographic echotexture, daily sperm production, and epididymal sperm reserves were conducted on 129, 16-month-old crossbred beef bulls. There were significant positive linear correlations between SST and internal scrotal/testicular temperatures, a positive linear regression (P < 0.06) of bottom SST with the incidence of secondary sperm defects, but a negative linear regression (P < 0.01) with the incidence of primary sperm defects. Testicular echotexture had a positive linear regression with daily sperm production (P < 0.002) and testicular tone had a negative linear regression (P < 0.008) with epididymal sperm reserves. Scrotal circumference had a positive linear regression (P < 0.04) with the percentage of progressively motile sperm, a negative linear regression (P < 0.1) with the incidence of primary sperm defects, and a positive linear regression (P < 0.0001) with epididymal sperm reserves. In addition to seminal quality and scrotal circumference, testicular ultrasonographic echotexture has considerable promise for augmenting breeding soundness examinations of bulls. PMID:11346255

  16. Decreased activity of superoxide dismutase in the seminal plasma of infertile men correlates with increased sperm deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation during the first hours after sperm donation.

    PubMed

    Wdowiak, Artur; Bakalczuk, Szymon; Bakalczuk, Grzegorz

    2015-07-01

    Sperm DNA fragmentation varies between individuals and is more pronounced with increased patient age and time after sperm donation. The intensification of DNA fragmentation depends on the balance of the oxidoreductive system, which is regulated mainly by two enzymes - superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between sperm DNA fragmentation dynamics, fertility and seminal SOD and catalase activity. The study was conducted in 2013 and 2014 at the Non-Public Health Care Unit 'Ovum Reproduction and Andrology' in Lublin, Lublin, Poland, and covered 218 men aged 25-35 (85 fertile and 133 patients treated for infertility). Percentage of fragmented DNA was measured in a modified chromatin dispersion test at four time points after sperm donation (t = 0, 3, 6, 12 h). SOD and catalase activities were determined spectrophotometrically. We confirmed that the activity of SOD in the seminal plasma of men with reproductive disorders was lower compared with fertile men. Conversely, no significant correlations were found between fertility and catalase activity. Sperm DNA of infertile males was initially more fragmented than fertile male sperm DNA. SOD and catalase activity did not correlate with the degree of DNA fragmentation in fertile men. In men with reproductive disorders, the rate of DNA fragmentation was slow within first 3 h after sperm donation and then increased between 6 and 12 h. In this group of infertile men, those with higher SOD activity had a lower DNA fragmentation index (DFI) after 12 h, and a reduced rate of intensity of fragmentation from 6 to 12 h. Alternatively, higher catalase activity among men treated for infertility was accompanied by higher initial DFI and higher rate of DNA fragmentation from 6 to 12 h. These results highlight the importance of determining a proper time window between sperm donation and procedures of assisted reproductive technology. PMID:26198800

  17. Defective Human Sperm Cells Are Associated with Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Oxidant Production.

    PubMed

    Cassina, Adriana; Silveira, Patricia; Cantu, Lidia; Montes, Jose Maria; Radi, Rafael; Sapiro, Rossana

    2015-11-01

    Infertility affects about 15% of couples of reproductive age. The male factor is involved in nearly 50% of infertility cases. Defective human sperm function has been associated with evidence of high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a resultant loss of fertilizing potential in vivo and in vitro. Analogous to what has been observed in somatic cells, mitochondria are likely the major sources of ROS in sperm cells. In this study, we analyzed mitochondrial function using high-resolution respirometry, ROS production, and footprints of oxidative and nitrative stress processes in intact human sperm cells. We showed that mitochondrial dysfunction (measured through the respiratory control ratio) was correlated with a decrease in human sperm motility. The samples analyzed presented nitro-oxidative modifications of proteins, such as protein 3-nitrotyrosine, that were observed mainly in the mid-piece (where mitochondria are localized) and in the sperm head. Semen samples presenting lower percentage of motile sperm showed higher amounts of nitro-oxidative protein modifications than those with larger quantities of motile sperm. When spermatozoa were exposed to inhibitors of the respiratory mitochondrial function, in the presence of a nitric oxide flux, sperm produced potent nitro-oxidative species (i.e., peroxynitrite). This effect was observed in more than 90% of intact living sperm cells and in sperm mitochondrial fractions. These data suggest that dysfunctional mitochondria in sperm cells produce oxidants that may contribute to male infertility. These data provide the rationale for testing the potential of compounds that improve sperm mitochondrial function to treat male infertility. PMID:26447142

  18. Sperm-mediated gene transfer: effect on bovine in vitro embryo production.

    PubMed

    Simes, Renata; Nicacio, Alessandra Corallo; Binelli, Mario; de Paula-Lopes, Fabiola Freitas; Milazzotto, Marcella Pecora; Visintin, Jos Antonio; D'vila Assumpo, Mayra Elena Ortiz

    2013-11-01

    The technique of sperm-mediated gene transfer (SMGT) can be used to delivery exogenous DNA into the oocyte. However, it has low repeatability and produces inconsistent results. In order to optimize this technique, it is necessary to study the mechanism by which DNA enters the sperm cell and integrates in the sperm genome. Furthermore, studies must focus in the maintenance of sperm cell viability and function. The aim of this study was to evaluate different SMGT protocols of sperm electroporation or capacitation (CaI) aiming to maintain sperm viability in the production of bovine embryos in vitro. Frozen-thawed semen was divided in two experimental groups (electroporation or CaI) and one control group (non-treated cells). For the electroporation method, five different voltages (100, 500, 750, 1000 or 1500 V) with 25 ?F capacitance were used. For CaI treatment, combinations of two CaI concentrations (250 nM or 500 nM), two incubation periods of sperm cells with CaI (1 or 5 min) and two incubation periods that mimicked time of sperm cell interaction with exogenous DNA molecules (1 or 2 h) were evaluated. According to our data, electroporation and CaI treatments do not prevent sperm penetration and oocyte fertilization and can be an alternative method to achieve satisfactory DNA delivery in SMGT protocols. PMID:22805109

  19. Production of transgenic pigs mediated by pseudotyped lentivirus and sperm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongliang; Xi, Qianyun; Ding, Jinghua; Cai, Weiguang; Meng, Fanmin; Zhou, Junyun; Li, Hongyi; Jiang, Qingyan; Shu, Gang; Wang, Songbo; Zhu, Xiaotong; Gao, Ping; Wu, Zhenfang

    2012-01-01

    Sperm-mediated gene transfer can be a very efficient method to produce transgenic pigs, however, the results from different laboratories had not been widely repeated. Genomic integration of transgene by injection of pseudotyped lentivirus to the perivitelline space has been proved to be a reliable route to generate transgenic animals. To test whether transgene in the lentivirus can be delivered by sperm, we studied incubation of pseudotyped lentiviruses and sperm before insemination. After incubation with pig spermatozoa, 623 lentiviral particles were detected per 100 sperm cells using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. The association of lentivirus with sperm was further confirmed by electron microscopy. The sperm incubated with lentiviral particles were artificially inseminated into pigs. Of the 59 piglets born from inseminated 5 sows, 6 piglets (10.17%) carried the transgene based on the PCR identification. Foreign gene and EGFP was successfully detected in ear tissue biopsies from two PCR-positive pigs, revealed via in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Offspring of one PCR-positive boar with normal sows showed PCR-positive. Two PCR-positive founders and offsprings of PCR-positive boar were further identified by Southern-blot analysis, out of which the two founders and two offsprings were positive in Southern blotting, strongly indicating integration of foreign gene into genome. The results indicate that incubation of sperm with pseudotyped lentiviruses can incorporated with sperm-mediated gene transfer to produce transgenic pigs with improved efficiency. PMID:22536374

  20. Production of Transgenic Pigs Mediated by Pseudotyped Lentivirus and Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongliang; Xi, Qianyun; Ding, Jinghua; Cai, Weiguang; Meng, Fanmin; Zhou, Junyun; Li, Hongyi; Jiang, Qingyan; Shu, Gang; Wang, Songbo; Zhu, Xiaotong; Gao, Ping; Wu, Zhenfang

    2012-01-01

    Sperm-mediated gene transfer can be a very efficient method to produce transgenic pigs, however, the results from different laboratories had not been widely repeated. Genomic integration of transgene by injection of pseudotyped lentivirus to the perivitelline space has been proved to be a reliable route to generate transgenic animals. To test whether transgene in the lentivirus can be delivered by sperm, we studied incubation of pseudotyped lentiviruses and sperm before insemination. After incubation with pig spermatozoa, 62±3 lentiviral particles were detected per 100 sperm cells using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. The association of lentivirus with sperm was further confirmed by electron microscopy. The sperm incubated with lentiviral particles were artificially inseminated into pigs. Of the 59 piglets born from inseminated 5 sows, 6 piglets (10.17%) carried the transgene based on the PCR identification. Foreign gene and EGFP was successfully detected in ear tissue biopsies from two PCR-positive pigs, revealed via in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Offspring of one PCR-positive boar with normal sows showed PCR-positive. Two PCR-positive founders and offsprings of PCR-positive boar were further identified by Southern-blot analysis, out of which the two founders and two offsprings were positive in Southern blotting, strongly indicating integration of foreign gene into genome. The results indicate that incubation of sperm with pseudotyped lentiviruses can incorporated with sperm-mediated gene transfer to produce transgenic pigs with improved efficiency. PMID:22536374

  1. Increasing productivity: Another approach

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, F.J.

    1996-06-10

    An engineering information (EI) and information technology (IT) organization that must improve its productivity should work to further its business goals. This paper explores a comprehensive model for increasing EI/IT productivity by supporting organizational objectives.

  2. Testes mass, but not sperm length, increases with higher levels of polyandry in an ancient sex model.

    PubMed

    Vrech, David E; Olivero, Paola A; Mattoni, Camilo I; Peretti, Alfredo V

    2014-01-01

    There is strong evidence that polyandrous taxa have evolved relatively larger testes than monogamous relatives. Sperm size may either increase or decrease across species with the risk or intensity of sperm competition. Scorpions represent an ancient direct mode with spermatophore-mediated sperm transfer and are particularly well suited for studies in sperm competition. This work aims to analyze for the first time the variables affecting testes mass, ejaculate volume and sperm length, according with their levels of polyandry, in species belonging to the Neotropical family Bothriuridae. Variables influencing testes mass and sperm length were obtained by model selection analysis using corrected Akaike Information Criterion. Testes mass varied greatly among the seven species analyzed, ranging from 1.6 1.1 mg in Timogenes dorbignyi to 16.3 4.5 mg in Brachistosternus pentheri with an average of 8.4 5.0 mg in all the species. The relationship between testes mass and body mass was not significant. Body allocation in testes mass, taken as Gonadosomatic Index, was high in Bothriurus cordubensis and Brachistosternus ferrugineus and low in Timogenes species. The best-fitting model for testes mass considered only polyandry as predictor with a positive influence. Model selection showed that body mass influenced sperm length negatively but after correcting for body mass, none of the variables analyzed explained sperm length. Both body mass and testes mass influenced spermatophore volume positively. There was a strong phylogenetic effect on the model containing testes mass. As predicted by the sperm competition theory and according to what happens in other arthropods, testes mass increased in species with higher levels of sperm competition, and influenced positively spermatophore volume, but data was not conclusive for sperm length. PMID:24736525

  3. Testes Mass, but Not Sperm Length, Increases with Higher Levels of Polyandry in an Ancient Sex Model

    PubMed Central

    Vrech, David E.; Olivero, Paola A.; Mattoni, Camilo I.; Peretti, Alfredo V.

    2014-01-01

    There is strong evidence that polyandrous taxa have evolved relatively larger testes than monogamous relatives. Sperm size may either increase or decrease across species with the risk or intensity of sperm competition. Scorpions represent an ancient direct mode with spermatophore-mediated sperm transfer and are particularly well suited for studies in sperm competition. This work aims to analyze for the first time the variables affecting testes mass, ejaculate volume and sperm length, according with their levels of polyandry, in species belonging to the Neotropical family Bothriuridae. Variables influencing testes mass and sperm length were obtained by model selection analysis using corrected Akaike Information Criterion. Testes mass varied greatly among the seven species analyzed, ranging from 1.61.1 mg in Timogenes dorbignyi to 16.34.5 mg in Brachistosternus pentheri with an average of 8.45.0 mg in all the species. The relationship between testes mass and body mass was not significant. Body allocation in testes mass, taken as Gonadosomatic Index, was high in Bothriurus cordubensis and Brachistosternus ferrugineus and low in Timogenes species. The best-fitting model for testes mass considered only polyandry as predictor with a positive influence. Model selection showed that body mass influenced sperm length negatively but after correcting for body mass, none of the variables analyzed explained sperm length. Both body mass and testes mass influenced spermatophore volume positively. There was a strong phylogenetic effect on the model containing testes mass. As predicted by the sperm competition theory and according to what happens in other arthropods, testes mass increased in species with higher levels of sperm competition, and influenced positively spermatophore volume, but data was not conclusive for sperm length. PMID:24736525

  4. Production of female bovine embryos with sex-sorted sperm using intracytoplasmic sperm injection: efficiency and in vitro developmental competence.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hyun-Tae; Bang, Jae-Il; Kim, Seong-Su; Choi, Byung-Hyun; Jin, Jong-In; Kim, Heyng-Lyool; Jung, In-Suk; Suh, Tae-Kwang; Ghanem, Nasser; Wang, Zhongde; Kong, Il-Keun

    2014-03-15

    The production of embryos with a preselected sex sperm is important in the livestock industry. In this study, we examined the efficiency of producing female embryos by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) with flow cytometry sorted (ssICSI) and unsorted (usICSI) bovine sperm, and their developmental competence in vitro. For comparison, bovine embryos were also produced by in vitro fertilization (IVF) with sorted (ssIVF) and unsorted (usIVF) bovine sperm. The semen used in this study was from a bull selected for its high fertility and blastocyst developmental competence among four bulls. We first examined and compared pronuclear (PN) formation and cleavage rates of the produced embryos among the treatment groups. Our results demonstrated that PN formation rates (judged by two pronucleus [2PN]) and cleavage rates in ssIVF group (23.1% and 43.6%) were lower than those in the usIVF (71.1% and 71.6%), usICSI (73.1% and 92.8%) and ssICSI (75% and 79.1%) groups, respectively (P < 0.05). Moreover, the blastocyst formation rate in the ssIVF group was less than those in the usIVF, usICSI, and ssICSI groups (2.7% vs. 30.2%, 28.7% and 24.7%, respectively; P < 0.05). Importantly, we reported that the blastocyst formation rate in the ssICSI group was similar to that in the usICSI group, which indicated that ICSI can rescue the damage introduced to sperm by flow cytometry-mediated sex-sorting. Of note, we achieved a blastocyst formation rate in the ssICSI group to be comparable with the usIVF group. We then examined embryo quality by counting the number of normal and apoptotic cells in blastocysts. It was found that, despite the fact that blastocyst formation rate in the ssIVF group was significantly lower than those in the usIVF, usICSI and ssICSI groups, there was no difference in total and apoptotic cell numbers among these groups (P > 0.05). Finally, karyotyping analysis demonstrated that the proportion of female embryos in the ssICSI and ssIVF groups was 100%, whereas it was 58.8% and 57.8% in the usIVF and usICSI groups, respectively. In conclusion, ICSI with flow cytometry sorted bovine sperm provides an alternative approach to produce embryos with predetermined sex. PMID:24360289

  5. Gamete evolution and sperm numbers: sperm competition versus sperm limitation

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Geoff A.; Lehtonen, Jussi

    2014-01-01

    Both gamete competition and gamete limitation can generate anisogamy from ancestral isogamy, and both sperm competition (SC) and sperm limitation (SL) can increase sperm numbers. Here, we compare the marginal benefits due to these two components at any given population level of sperm production using the risk and intensity models in sperm economics. We show quite generally for the intensity model (where N males compete for each set of eggs) that however severe the degree of SL, if there is at least one competitor for fertilization (N ? 1 ? 1), the marginal gains through SC exceed those for SL, provided that the relationship between the probability of fertilization (F) and increasing sperm numbers (x) is a concave function. In the risk model, as fertility F increases from 0 to 1.0, the threshold SC risk (the probability q that two males compete for fertilization) for SC to be the dominant force drops from 1.0 to 0. The gamete competition and gamete limitation theories for the evolution of anisogamy rely on very similar considerations: our results imply that gamete limitation could dominate only if ancestral reproduction took place in highly isolated, small spawning groups. PMID:25100694

  6. Sexing sperm of domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cervantes, Román; Córdova-Izquierdo, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    The ability to preselect or predetermine the sex of offspring prior to conception is a highly desired technological tool for assisted female breeding programs specifically for milk production, and in males, for meat production and increasing livestock numbers. The current technology is based on the well-known differences in X- and Y-sperm in the amount of DNA. The technology uses modified flow cytometric instrumentation for sorting X- and Y-bearing sperm. The method can be validated on the basis of live births, laboratory reanalysis of sorted sperm for DNA content, and embryo biopsy for sex determination. Currently, the sex of animals has been predetermined with 90 % accuracy by sexing spermatozoa. In the bovine breeding industry, flow cytometric sperm sexing has not fulfilled its original promise. Sexed sperm doses are too expensive for widespread application while the fertility of sexed sperm doses is lower than unsexed ones. Essentially all bovine sexed semen is frozen and then applied through artificial insemination (AI) or in vitro fertilization. There is still a need in the animal breeding industry to develop a technique for sperm sexing that provides sufficient spermatozoa for AI doses, does not compromise sperm fertility, and is widely applicable to a range of species. In this review, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art in sex preselection in domestic animals and some wildlife species using flow cytometric sperm-sorting of X from Y sperm based on DNA differences. PMID:22829354

  7. Mitochondria functionality and sperm quality.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Alexandra; Lourenço, Bárbara; Marques, Mónica; Ramalho-Santos, João

    2013-01-01

    Although mitochondria are best known for being the eukaryotic cell powerhouses, these organelles participate in various cellular functions besides ATP production, such as calcium homoeostasis, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and steroid hormone biosynthesis. The aim of this review was to discuss the putative roles of mitochondria in mammalian sperm function and how they may relate to sperm quality and fertilisation ability, particularly in humans. Although paternal mitochondria are degraded inside the zygote, sperm mitochondrial functionality seems to be critical for fertilisation. Indeed, changes in mitochondrial integrity/functionality, namely defects in mitochondrial ultrastructure or in the mitochondrial genome, transcriptome or proteome, as well as low mitochondrial membrane potential or altered oxygen consumption, have been correlated with loss of sperm function (particularly with decreased motility). Results from genetically engineered mouse models also confirmed this trend. On the other hand, increasing evidence suggests that mitochondria derived ATP is not crucial for sperm motility and that glycolysis may be the main ATP supplier for this particular aspect of sperm function. However, there are contradictory data in the literature regarding sperm bioenergetics. The relevance of sperm mitochondria may thus be associated with their role in other physiological features, particularly with the production of ROS, which in controlled levels are needed for proper sperm function. Sperm mitochondria may also serve as intracellular Ca²⁺ stores, although their role in signalling is still unclear. PMID:23901129

  8. A Review of New Technologies that may Become Useful for in vitro Production of Boar Sperm.

    PubMed

    Gadella, B M; Ferraz, M A

    2015-07-01

    Making sperm cells outside the original testicular environment in a culture dish has been considered for a long time as impossible due to the very complicated process of spermatogenesis and sperm maturation, which altogether, encompasses a 2-month period. However, new approaches in complex three-dimensional co-cell cultures, micro-perfusion and micro-fluidics technologies, new knowledge in the functioning, culturing and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSC) and their precursor cells have revolutionized this field. Furthermore, the use of better molecular markers as well as stimulatory factors has led to successful invitro culture of stem cells either derived from germ line stem cells, from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) or from embryonic stem cells (ESC). These stem cells when placed into small seminiferous tubule fragments are able to become SSC. The SSC beyond self-renewal can also be induced into haploid sperm-like cells under invitro conditions. In mouse, this invitro produced sperm can be injected into a mature oocyte and allow post-fertilization development into an early embryo invitro. After transferring such obtained embryos into the uterus of a recipient mouse, they can further develop into healthy offspring. Recently, a similar approach has been performed with combining selected cells from testicular cell suspensions followed by a complete invitro culture of seminiferous cords producing sperm-like cells. However, most of the techniques developed are laborious, time-consuming and have low efficiency, placing questionable that it will become useful used for setting up an efficient invitro sperm production system for the boar. The benefits and drawbacks as well as the likeliness of invitro pig sperm production to become applied in assisted technologies for swine reproduction are critically discussed. In this contribution, also the process of sperm production in the testis and sperm maturation is reviewed. PMID:26174921

  9. Increasing Public Library Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuelson, Howard

    1981-01-01

    Suggests ways of improving productivity for public libraries faced with increased accountability, dwindling revenues, and continuing inflation. Techniques described include work simplification, work analysis, improved management, and employee motivation. (RAA)

  10. Progesterone induces Ca++-dependent 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate increase in human sperm.

    PubMed

    Parinaud, J; Milhet, P

    1996-04-01

    Progesterone (P) has been reported to modulate numerous sperm functions through the binding of P to plasma membrane. One of the effects is an increase in sperm hyperactivation, which is known to be cAMP-dependent. To evaluate the effect of P on cAMP levels, human spermatozoa were incubated 2 h with increasing P concentrations. P significantly induced cAMP increase in a dose-dependent manner, reaching a 3-fold increase at 100 micromol/L (P < 0.01). During the study of the kinetics of P effect, two cAMP peaks were observed: one occurring after a 30-min incubation, with a 1.5-fold increase (P < 0.05), and the second one after a 120-min incubation, with a 2.5-fold increase (P < 0.01). These effects of P on cAMP levels correlated with significant rises in the percentage of hyperactivated spermatozoa, occurring at the same times as those of cAMP. To evaluate the Ca++-dependence of these P effects, the experiments were performed in the presence of and in the absence of Ca++ in the incubation medium. The effects of P at the 30th min and the 120th min were completely abolished in the absence of Ca++. Moreover, calcium ionophore A23187, after a 30-min incubation, induced an increase in cAMP levels identical to that obtained with P. The effect of P was partially reproduced by gamma-amino-butiric acid (GABA) and inhibited by GABA antagonist picrotoxin. It was also inhibited by tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein but not by RU486. Based on these findings, we conclude that P induces Ca++-dependent cAMP increase in human sperm, that this effect is likely caused by the influx of Ca++ (previously reported), and that the effect partially involves GABA(A)-like receptors. PMID:8636333

  11. Bupropion treatment increases epididymal contractility and impairs sperm quality with no effects on the epididymal sperm transit time of male rats.

    PubMed

    Cavariani, Marilia Martins; de Almeida Kiguti, Luiz Ricardo; de Lima Rosa, Josiane; de Arajo Leite, Gabriel Adan; Silva, Patrcia Villela E; Pupo, Andr Sampaio; De Grava Kempinas, Wilma

    2015-09-01

    Bupropion is a dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) reuptake inhibitor used as smoking cessation and antidepressant drug with a lower incidence of male sexual dysfunction. We showed previously that sibutramine, a norepinephrine/serotonine reuptake inhibitor, reduced male rat fertility. As there are no studies evaluating the impact of bupropion treatment on spermatic parameters and male fertility, we evaluated the effects of bupropion treatment (15 and 30?mg?kg(-1), 30?days) on sexual behavior, spermatic parameters and fertility of male Wistar rats and on the epididymal duct in vitro contractility. Bupropion 15?mg?kg(-1) increased the serum luteinizing hormone level and the epididymal duct contractility, but the sperm quality was not affected. At 30?mg?kg(-1) bupropion impaired sperm quality increasing the incidence of non-progressive sperm. The male sexual behavior and fertility were not modified at both bupropion doses. These results, in rats, suggest the importance of studies evaluating the effects of bupropion on the human male sperm quality. PMID:25645087

  12. Fate of superfluous sperm products after vasectomy and in the normal male tract of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Barratt, C L; Cohen, J

    1986-09-01

    The progression of 3H-labelled spermatozoa (thymidine or arginine) was followed through the tracts of unilaterally vasectomized, bilaterally vasectomized, oligozoospermic (t6/tw5) and normal mice; the regional lymph nodes were also investigated. The same rate of sperm production and transport was found in normal and in vasectomized tracts, down to the corpus epididymidis; there was some delay in spermatozoa entering the cauda in the vasectomized tracts. In the mouse, therefore, vasectomy does not affect the rates of sperm production or transport until just before the blockage in the swollen cauda epididymidis. Radioactivity appeared in the caudal and 'para-aortic' lymph nodes as the radioactive spermatozoa passed from the corpus, showing that this is one route of disposal of spermatozoa, or of sperm products, after vasectomy. Naturally oligozoospermic and normal mice gave similar results; again the caudal, iliac and renal lymph nodes received radioactive spermatozoa/sperm products. Some loss of (by definition) superfluous spermatozoa in the normal male tract therefore occurs naturally by this route, and we suggest that vasectomy further exploits this physiological pathway. This would account for the finding that many males do not make antisperm antibodies after vasectomy, just as normal males do not, even though their lymph nodes normally receive spermatozoa/sperm products. PMID:3761259

  13. Reinitiation of sperm production in gonadotropin-suppressed normal men by administration of follicle-stimulating hormone

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Alvin M.; Karpas, Anthony E.; Paulsen, C. Alvin; Bremner, William J.

    1983-01-01

    The specific roles of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in controlling human spermatogenesis are poorly understood. We studied the effect of an experimentally induced, selective LH deficiency on sperm production in normal men. After a 3-mo control period, five men received 200 mg testosterone enanthate (T) i.m./wk to suppress LH, FSH, and sperm counts. Then, while continuing T at the same dosage, human FSH (hFSH) was administered simultaneously to replace FSH activity, leaving LH activity suppressed. Four men received 100 IU hFSH s.c. daily plus T (high dosage hFSH) for 13-14 wk, while one man received 50 IU hFSH s.c. daily plus T (low dosage hFSH) for 5 mo. The effect on sperm production of the selective LH deficiency produced by hFSH plus T administration was assessed. In the four men who received the high dosage hFSH regimen, sperm counts were markedly suppressed during T administration alone (0.30.2 million/cm3, meanSE, compared with 9412 million/cm3 during the control period). Serum LH bioactivity (determined by in vitro mouse Leydig cell assay) was suppressd (1407 ng/ml compared with 37565 ng/ml during control period) and FSH levels (by radioimmunoassay) were reduced to undetectable levels (<25 ng/ml, compared with 9821 ng/ml during control period) during T alone. With the addition of 100 IU hFSH s.c. daily to T, sperm counts increased significantly in all subjects (337 million/cm3, P < 0.02 compared with T alone). However, no subject consistently achieved sperm counts within his control range. Sperm morphology and motility were normal in all four men and in vitro sperm penetration of hamster ova was normal in the two men tested during the hFSH-plus-T period. During high-dosage hFSH administration, serum FSH levels increased to 27344 ng/ml (just above the normal range for FSH, 30-230 ng/ml). Serum LH bioactivity was not significantly changed compared with the T-alone period (1479 ng/ml). After the hFSH-plus-T period, all four men continued to receive T alone after hFSH was stopped. Sperm counts were again severely suppressed (0.20.1 million/cm3), demonstrating the dependence of sperm production on hFSH administration. Serum T and estradiol (E2) levels increased two- to threefold during T administration alone compared with the control period. Both T and E2 levels remained unchanged with the addition of hFSH to T, confirming the lack of significant LH activity in the hFSH preparation. In the one man who received low dosage hFSH treatment, sperm counts were reduced to severely oligospermic levels, serum FSH was suppressed to undetectable levels, and serum LH bioactivity was markedly lowered during the T-alone period. With the addition of 50 IU hFSH s.c. daily to T, sperm counts increased, to a mean of 113 million/cm3. During this period, serum FSH levels increased to a mean of 10511 ng/ml (slightly above this man's control range and within the normal adult range), while LH bioactivity remain suppressed. After hFSH was stopped and T alone was continued, sperm counts were again severely reduced to azoospermic levels. We conclude that FSH alone is sufficient to reinitiate sperm production in man during gonadotropin suppression induced by exogenous T administration. FSH may stimulate sperm production in this setting by increasing intratesticular T through androgenbinding protein production or by increasing the sensitivity of the spermatogenic response to the intratesticular T present during exogenous T administration. PMID:6411766

  14. Anopheles arabiensis sperm production after genetic manipulation, dieldrin treatment, and irradiation.

    PubMed

    Damiens, D; Vreysen, M J B; Gilles, J R L

    2013-03-01

    The use of the sterile insect technique relies on the release of sterilized mass-reared male insects which, before field releases, endure several unnatural treatments. In the case of Anopheles arabiensis (Patton) sterile insect technique program in Sudan, the genetic background of the original strain was first changed to create a genetic sexing strain that is based on a dieldrin-resistant mutation. Secondly, the eggs of the genetic sexing strain require treatment with dieldrin to allow complete elimination of female L1 larvae to enable the release of males only. Finally, male mosquitoes receive an irradiation dose of 70 Gy as pupae for sterilization. The effects of these treatments on sperm production were tested separately and in combination. Irradiation alone significantly decreased the initial sperm number and prevented new sperm production. However, the dieldrin treatment, aimed at eliminating females, appears to have an unexpected radioprotectant effect. PMID:23540119

  15. Zebrafish Reproduction: Revisiting In Vitro Fertilization to Increase Sperm Cryopreservation Success

    PubMed Central

    Hagedorn, Mary; Carter, Virginia L.

    2011-01-01

    Although conventional cryopreservation is a proven method for long-term, safe storage of genetic material, protocols used by the zebrafish community are not standardized and yield inconsistent results, thereby putting the security of many genotypes in individual laboratories and stock centers at risk. An important challenge for a successful zebrafish sperm cryopreservation program is the large variability in the post-thaw in vitro fertilization success (0 to 80%). But how much of this variability was due to the reproductive traits of the in vitro fertilization process, and not due to the cryopreservation process? These experiments only assessed the in vitro process with fresh sperm, but yielded the basic metrics needed for successful in vitro fertilization using cryopreserved sperm, as well. We analyzed the reproductive traits for zebrafish males with a strict body condition range. It did not correlate with sperm volume, or motility (P>0.05), but it did correlate with sperm concentration. Younger males produced more concentrated sperm (P<0.05). To minimize the wastage of sperm during the in vitro fertilization process, 106 cells/ml was the minimum sperm concentration needed to achieve an in vitro fertilization success of ? 70%. During the in vitro process, pooling sperm did not reduce fertilization success (P>0.05), but pooling eggs reduced it by approximately 30 to 50% (P<0.05). This reduction in fertilization success was due not to the pooling of the females' eggs, but to the type of tools used to handle the eggs. Recommendations to enhance the in vitro process for zebrafish include: 1) using males of a body condition closer to 1.5 for maximal sperm concentration; 2) minimizing sperm wastage by using a working sperm concentration of 106 motile cells/ml for in vitro fertilization; and 3) never using metal or sharp-edged tools to handle eggs prior to fertilization. PMID:21698162

  16. Effects of increased paternal age on sperm quality, reproductive outcome and associated epigenetic risks to offspring.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rakesh; Agarwal, Ashok; Rohra, Vikram K; Assidi, Mourad; Abu-Elmagd, Muhammad; Turki, Rola F

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a significant increase in average paternal age when the first child is conceived, either due to increased life expectancy, widespread use of contraception, late marriages and other factors. While the effect of maternal ageing on fertilization and reproduction is well known and several studies have shown that women over 35 years have a higher risk of infertility, pregnancy complications, spontaneous abortion, congenital anomalies, and perinatal complications. The effect of paternal age on semen quality and reproductive function is controversial for several reasons. First, there is no universal definition for advanced paternal ageing. Secondly, the literature is full of studies with conflicting results, especially for the most common parameters tested. Advancing paternal age also has been associated with increased risk of genetic disease. Our exhaustive literature review has demonstrated negative effects on sperm quality and testicular functions with increasing paternal age. Epigenetics changes, DNA mutations along with chromosomal aneuploidies have been associated with increasing paternal age. In addition to increased risk of male infertility, paternal age has also been demonstrated to impact reproductive and fertility outcomes including a decrease in IVF/ICSI success rate and increasing rate of preterm birth. Increasing paternal age has shown to increase the incidence of different types of disorders like autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorders, and childhood leukemia in the progeny. It is thereby essential to educate the infertile couples on the disturbing links between increased paternal age and rising disorders in their offspring, to better counsel them during their reproductive years. PMID:25928123

  17. SPERM PRODUCTION IN TARNISHED PLANT BUGS, LYGUS LINEOLARIS (PALISOT DE BEAUVOIS), FOLLOWING IRRADIATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With recent advances that allow their mass rearing, tarnished plant bugs (TPB), Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois) are being considered as subjects for mass sterilization and release. Because sperm production in sterile insects has been cited as an important component of competitiveness, it was ...

  18. Gamete Therapeutics: Recombinant Protein Adsorption by Sperm for Increasing Fertility via Artificial Insemination

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Gallardo, Horacio; Kjelland, Michael E.; Moreno, Juan F.; Welsh, Thomas H.; Randel, Ronald D.; Lammoglia, Miguel A.; Prez-Martnez, Mario; Lara-Sagahn, Alma V.; Espern-Sumano, A. Enrique; Romo, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    A decrease in fertility can have a negative economic impact, both locally and over a broader geographical scope, and this is especially the case with regard to the cattle industry. Therefore, much interest exists in evaluating proteins that might be able to increase the fertility of sperm. Heparin binding proteins (HBPs), specifically the fertility associated antigen (FAA) and the Type-2 tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-2), act to favor the capacitation and acrosome reaction and perhaps even modulate the immune systems response toward the sperm. The objective of this research was to determine the effect on fertility of adding recombinant FAA (rFAA) and recombinant TIMP-2 (rTIMP-2) to bovine semen before cryopreservation for use in an artificial insemination (AI) program in a tropical environment. For this experiment, 100 crossbred (Bos taurus x Bos indicus) heifers were selected based on their estrus cycle, body condition score (BCS), of 4 to 6 on a scale of 1 to 9, and adequate anatomical conformation evaluated by pelvic and genital (normal) measurements. Heifers were synchronized using estradiol benzoate (EB), Celosil (PGF2?) (Shering-Plough) and a controlled internal drug release (CIDR) device was inserted that contained progesterone. Inseminations were performed in two groups at random, 50 animals per group. The control group was inseminated with conventional semen. The treatment group was inseminated with semen containing rFAA (25 g/mL) and rTIMP-2 (25 g/mL). In the control group a 16% pregnancy rate was obtained versus a 40% pregnancy rate for the HBP treatment group, resulting in a significant difference (P?=?0.0037). Given the results herein, one may conclude that the HBPs can increase fertility and could be an option for cattle in tropical conditions; however, one needs to consider the environment, nutrition, and the genetic interaction affecting the final result in whatever reproductive program that is implemented. PMID:23762288

  19. The role of mitochondria in energy production for human sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Piomboni, P; Focarelli, R; Stendardi, A; Ferramosca, A; Zara, V

    2012-04-01

    Mitochondria of spermatozoa are different from the corresponding organelles of somatic cells, in both their morphology and biochemistry. The biochemical differences are essentially related to the existence of specific enzyme isoforms, which are characterized by peculiar kinetic and regulatory properties. As mitochondrial energy metabolism is a key factor supporting several sperm functions, these organelles host critical metabolic pathways during germ cell development and fertilization. Furthermore, spermatozoa can use different substrates, and therefore activate different metabolic pathways, depending on the available substrates and the physico-chemical conditions in which they operate. This versatility is critical to ensure fertilization success. However, the most valuable aspect of mitochondria function in all types of cells is the production of chemical energy in the form of ATP which can be used, in the case of spermatozoa, for sustaining sperm motility. The latter, on the other hand, represents one of the major determinants of male fertility. Accordingly, the presence of structural and functional alterations in mitochondria from asthenozoospermic subjects confirms the important role played by these organelles in energy maintenance of sperm motility. The present study gives an overview of the current knowledge on the energy-producing metabolic pathways operating inside human sperm mitochondria and critically analyse the differences with respect to somatic mitochondria. Such a comparison has also been carried out between the functional characteristics of human sperm mitochondria and those of other mammalian species. A deeper understanding of mitochondrial energy metabolism could open up new avenues of investigation in bioenergetics of human sperm mitochondria, both in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:21950496

  20. SIGNIFICANCE OF INCORPORATING MEASURES OF SPERM PRODUCTION AND FUNCTION INTO RAT TOXICOLOGY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rat is the preferred species for reproductive toxicity testing. The inclusion of measures of rat sperm quality, such as motility and morphology, into reproductive test protocols often increases the sensitivity of the test to detect effects, and provides the toxicologist and ...

  1. Sperm release pathway

    MedlinePLUS

    ... called seminiferous tubules, which are the sites of sperm production. The structure on top of the seminiferous tubules in the testes is the epididymis. The sperm migrate from of the seminiferous tubules to the ...

  2. Effects of thymoquinone on testicular structure and sperm production in male obese rats.

    PubMed

    Tfek, Nur Hande; Altunkaynak, Muhammad Eyp; Altunkaynak, Berrin Zuhal; Kaplan, Sleyman

    2015-01-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ) is a phytochemical compound found in the plant Nigella sativa. It has antioxidant and anti-cancer effects. This study investigated the effects of TQ on obesity and testicular structure of high-fat-diet (HFD) fed rats. Obese control (OC) and obese thymoquinone (OT) groups were fed a special diet containing 40% of total calories from fat. Non-obese control (NC) and non-thymoquinone (NT) groups were fed a standard diet for nine weeks. Then, intraperitoneal TQ injections were carried out to the OT and NT groups for six weeks and testes were removed. Catalase and myeloperoxidase activity were determined in rat testis tissue. Stereological, histopathological, and immunohistochemical changes were evaluated in the testes of the rats. In stereological studies, mean volumes of testis and seminiferous tubules, the number of spermatogenic cells and also Leydig cells in the OC group were reduced, but these values significantly increased in the OT group. Apoptotic cells were observed in the OC group in comparison to the OT group. The number of healthy sperms were reduced in the OC group, whereas the majority showed anomalies in the head, neck, and tail. The number of healthy sperm was increased and the anomalies significantly reduced by using TQ in both the NT, and especially the OT group. TQ like antioxidants may improve fertility by means of increasing the healthy sperm number and preventing sperm anomalies. PMID:26043060

  3. Direct action of endocrine disrupting chemicals on human sperm

    PubMed Central

    Schiffer, Christian; Mller, Astrid; Egeberg, Dorte L; Alvarez, Luis; Brenker, Christoph; Rehfeld, Anders; Frederiksen, Hanne; Wschle, Benjamin; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Balbach, Melanie; Wachten, Dagmar; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Almstrup, Kristian; Strnker, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), omnipresent in food, household, and personal care products, have been implicated in adverse trends in human reproduction, including infertility and increasing demand for assisted reproduction. Here, we study the action of 96 ubiquitous EDCs on human sperm. We show that structurally diverse EDCs activate the sperm-specific CatSper channel and, thereby, evoke an intracellular Ca2+ increase, a motility response, and acrosomal exocytosis. Moreover, EDCs desensitize sperm for physiological CatSper ligands and cooperate in low-dose mixtures to elevate Ca2+ levels in sperm. We conclude that EDCs interfere with various sperm functions and, thereby, might impair human fertilization. PMID:24820036

  4. Production of transgenic piglets using ICSI-sperm-mediated gene transfer in combination with recombinase RecA.

    PubMed

    Garca-Vzquez, Francisco A; Ruiz, Salvador; Mats, Carmen; Izquierdo-Rico, M Jos; Grulln, Luis A; De Ondiz, Aitor; Vieira, Luis; Avils-Lpez, Karen; Gutirrez-Adn, Alfonso; Gadea, Joaqun

    2010-08-01

    Sperm-mediated gene transfer (SMGT) is a method for the production of transgenic animals based on the intrinsic ability of sperm cells to bind and internalize exogenous DNA molecules and to transfer them into the oocyte at fertilization. Recombinase-A (RecA) protein-coated exogenous DNA has been used previously in pronuclear injection systems increasing integration into goat and pig genomes. However, there are no data regarding transgene expression after ICSI. Here, we set out to investigate whether the expression of transgenic DNA in porcine embryos is improved by recombinase-mediated DNA transfer and if it is possible to generate transgenic animals using this methodology. Different factors which could affect the performance of this transgenic methodology were analyzed by studying 1) the effect of the presence of exogenous DNA and RecA protein on boar sperm functionality; 2) the effect of recombinase RecA on in vitro enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing embryos produced by ICSI or IVF; and 3) the efficiency of generation of transgenic piglets by RecA-mediated ICSI. Our results suggested that 1) the presence of exogenous DNA and RecA-DNA complexes at 5 microg/ml did not affect sperm functionality in terms of motility, viability, membrane lipid disorder, or reactive oxygen species generation; 2) EGFP-expressing embryos were obtained with a high efficiency using the SMGT-ICSI technique in combination with recombinase; however, the use of IVF system did not result in any fluorescent embryos; and 3) transgenic piglets were produced by this methodology. To our knowledge, this is the first time that transgenic pigs have been produced by ICSI-SGMT and a recombinase. PMID:20501790

  5. Single and double donor sperm intrauterine insemination cycles: Does double IUI increase clinical pregnancy rates?

    PubMed Central

    Zarek, Shvetha M.; Hill, Micah J.; Richter, Kevin S.; Wu, Mae; DeCherney, Alan H.; Osheroff, Joseph E.; Levens, Eric D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the pregnancy outcomes in the setting of a single versus double donor sperm intrauterine insemination (IUI) treatment cycle. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Large private assisted reproductive technology practice. Patients Donor sperm IUI recipients. Interventions None. Main outcome measures Clinical pregnancy. Results There were 2,486 double and 673 single donor sperm IUI cycles. The two groups were similar for age, body mass index, and the number of prior cycles. The clinical pregnancy rates were similar between the two groups (single: 16.4% versus double: 13.6%). In univariate regression analysis, age, total motile sperm (TMS), and diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) were associated with pregnancy Generalized estimating equation models accounting for repeated measures and age, DOR and TMS and the interactions of these factors demonstrated that single and double IUI had similar odds of pregnancy (OR 1.12, 95%CI 0.961.44). Pregnancy rates remained similar between the two groups in matched comparison and other subgroup analyses. Conclusion Single and double donor IUI cycles had similar clinical pregnancy rates. This large data set did not demonstrate a benefit to routine double IUI in donor sperm cycles. PMID:24934490

  6. Effects of dietary energy on scrotal surface temperature, seminal quality, and sperm production in young beef bulls.

    PubMed

    Coulter, G H; Cook, R B; Kastelic, J P

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of dietary energy, breed (British vs Continental x British crosses), and their interactions on scrotal surface temperature (SST), seminal quality, and sperm production in bulls. This experiment, replicated over 2 yr, included 72 Angus, Angus x Simmental, or Hereford x Simmental bulls fed either a moderate- (100% forage) or high-energy (80% grain, 20% forage) diet for 168 d after weaning. At the end of the feeding period, SST was determined by infrared thermography, seminal samples (two ejaculates) were collected by electroejaculation, and reproductive tracts were collected at slaughter. Bulls fed the high-energy diet were heavier (P < .0001; diet x time interaction), had thicker backfat (P < .05; diet x line x time interaction), and had a larger scrotal circumference (P < .05). Testicular tone decreased over time (P < .0001) with a diet x time interaction (P < .05). There was no significant effect of diet on top, bottom, or average SST. However, bulls fed the moderate-energy diet had a larger (P < .02) SST gradient (3.9 vs. 3.4 degrees C). Bulls fed the moderate-energy diet had more (P < .01) morphologically normal spermatozoa (68.8 +/- 2.1 vs 62.5 +/- 2.5%) and a higher proportion (P < .006) of progressively motile spermatozoa (53.4 +/- 2.1 vs 44.5 +/- 2.4%). No effects (P > .05) of dietary energy on epididymal sperm reserves or daily sperm production were detected. Increased dietary energy may affect scrotal or testicular thermoregulation by reducing the amount of heat that can be radiated from the scrotal neck, thereby increasing the temperature of the testes and scrotum. PMID:9110219

  7. Small testicles with impaired production of sperm in adult male survivors of childhood malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Siimes, M.A.; Rautonen, J. )

    1990-03-15

    Testicular size has been studied in 66 adult men who survived leukemia (n = 14) or cancer (n = 52) in childhood. Mean follow-up time was 14.5 years. The testicular size was measured as the length and breadth in mm; testicular volume index was calculated. Serum concentrations of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, and prolactin were measured. A sperm sample was obtained from 46 men. The patients had smaller testicles than healthy medical students; 51 had small testicles. The size was the smallest in patients who survived leukemia. Multivariate analysis showed that the variables with independent effects on testicular size were cranial and testicular irradiation and therapy with cyclophosphamide. Sperm production was dependent on testicular size. We conclude that determination of serum FSH combined with testicular size may offer a practical approach for predicting the subsequent testicular damage in boys with malignancies.

  8. Performance of Rodent Spermatozoa Over Time Is Enhanced by Increased ATP Concentrations: The Role of Sperm Competition.

    PubMed

    Tourmente, Maximiliano; Villar-Moya, Pilar; Varea-Snchez, Mara; Luque-Larena, Juan J; Rial, Eduardo; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2015-09-01

    Sperm viability, acrosome integrity, motility, and swimming velocity are determinants of male fertility and exhibit an extreme degree of variation among closely related species. Many of these sperm parameters are associated with sperm ATP content, which has led to predictions of trade-offs between ATP content and sperm motility and velocity. Selective pressures imposed by sperm competition have been proposed as evolutionary causes of this pattern of diversity in sperm traits. Here, we examine variation in sperm viability, acrosome integrity, motility, swimming velocity, and ATP content over time, among 18 species of closely related muroid rodents, to address the following questions: (a) Do sperm from closely related species vary in ATP content after a period of incubation? (b) Are these differences in ATP levels related to differences in other sperm traits? (c) Are differences in ATP content and sperm performance over time explained by the levels of sperm competition in these species? Our results revealed a high degree of interspecific variability in changes in sperm ATP content, acrosome integrity, sperm motility and swimming velocity over time. Additionally, species with high sperm competition levels were able to maintain higher levels of sperm motility and faster sperm swimming velocity when they were incubated under conditions that support sperm survival. Furthermore, we show that the maintenance of such levels of sperm performance is correlated with the ability of sperm to sustain high concentrations of intracellular ATP over time. Thus, sperm competition may have an important role maximizing sperm metabolism and performance and, ultimately, the fertilizing capacity of spermatozoa. PMID:26157072

  9. Offspring production with cryopreserved sperm from a live-bearing fish Xiphophorus maculatus and implications for female fecundity✰

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huiping; Savage, Markita G.; Hazlewood, Leona; Walter, Ronald B.; Tiersch, Terrence R.

    2011-01-01

    Xiphophorus fishes are well-established models for biomedical research of spontaneous or induced tumors, and their use in research dates back to the 1930’s. Currently, 58 well-pedigreed lines exist among 24 Xiphophorus species housed as live animals at the Xiphophorus Genetic Stock Center. The technique of sperm cryopreservation has been applied to preserve these valuable genetic resources, and production of offspring has been reported with cryopreserved sperm in two species (X. helleri and X. couchianus). The goal of this research was to establish protocols for sperm cryopreservation and artificial insemination that yield live young in X. maculatus, a widely used research species. The objectives were to: 1) collect basic biological characteristics of males, and quantify the sperm production yield after crushing of dissected testis; 2) cryopreserve sperm from X. maculatus by adapting as necessary the protocols for sperm cryopreservation of X. helleri and X. couchianus; 3) use cryopreserved sperm to inseminate virgin females of X maculatus and other species (X. helleri and X. couchianus), and 4) compare experimental trials over a 3-year period to identify opportunities for improving female fecundity. In total, 117 males were used in this study with a standard length of 2.5 ± 0.3 cm (mean ± SD), body weight of 0.474 ± 0.149 g, and dissected testis weight of 7.1 ± 3.7 mg. Calculation of sperm availability showed 5.9 ± 2.8 × 106 sperm cells per mg of testis weight. Offspring were produced from cryopreserved sperm. Male-to-male variation (1-70%) was observed in post-thaw motility despite little variation in motility before freezing (60-90%) or genetic variation (~100 generations of sib-mating). Comparisons of biological factors of males did not have significant correlations with the production of live young, and the influence of females on production of young were identified from the comparison of artificial insemination over the 3 yr. Overall, this study describes offspring production from cryopreserved sperm in a third species of Xiphophorus fishes, and identifies the opportunities for improving female fecundity which is essential for establishment of germplasm repositories for Xiphophorus fishes. PMID:21616165

  10. Offspring production with sperm grown in vitro from cryopreserved testis tissues.

    PubMed

    Yokonishi, Tetsuhiro; Sato, Takuya; Komeya, Mitsuru; Katagiri, Kumiko; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Hata, Kenichiro; Inoue, Kimiko; Ogonuki, Narumi; Ogura, Atsuo; Ogawa, Takehiko

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing cure rate of paediatric cancers, infertility, as one of the adverse effects of treatments, has become an important concern for patients and their families. Since semen cryopreservation is applicable only for post-pubertal patients, alternative pre-pubertal measures are necessary. Here we demonstrate that testis tissue cryopreservation is a realistic measure for preserving the fertility of an individual. Testis tissues of neonatal mice were cryopreserved either by slow freezing or by vitrification. After thawing, they were cultured on agarose gel and showed spermatogenesis up to sperm formation. Microinsemination was performed with round spermatids and sperm, leading to eight offspring in total. They grew healthily and produced progeny upon natural mating between them. This strategy, the cryopreservation of testis tissues followed by in vitro spermatogenesis, is promising to preserve the fertility of male paediatric cancer patients in the future. PMID:24984101

  11. Sperm competition and the evolution of sperm design in mammals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The influence of sperm competition upon sperm size has been a controversial issue during the last 20 years which remains unresolved for mammals. The hypothesis that, when ejaculates compete with rival males, an increase in sperm size would make sperm more competitive because it would increase sperm swimming speed, has generated contradictory results from both theoretical and empirical studies. In addition, the debate has extended to which sperm components should increase in size: the midpiece to accommodate more mitochondria and produce more energy to fuel motility, or the principal piece to generate greater propulsion forces. Results In this study we examined the influence of sperm competition upon sperm design in mammals using a much larger data set (226 species) than in previous analyses, and we corrected for phylogenetic effects by using a more complete and resolved phylogeny, and more robust phylogenetic control methods. Our results show that, as sperm competition increases, all sperm components increase in an integrated manner and sperm heads become more elongated. The increase in sperm length was found to be associated with enhanced swimming velocity, an adaptive trait under sperm competition. Conclusions We conclude that sperm competition has played an important role in the evolution of sperm design in mammals, and discuss why previous studies have failed to detect it. PMID:21232104

  12. Application of a microfluidic sperm sorter to in vitro production of dairy cattle sex-sorted embryos.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingchun; Zhu, Sibing; He, Xianjing; Sun, Rui; He, Qianyu; Gan, Yi; Liu, Shengjun; Funahashi, Hiroaki; Li, Yanbing

    2016-04-15

    Viable sperm from sex-sorted semen without centrifugal treatment was separated by a microfluidic sperm sorter (MFSS) for IVF to improve in vitro embryo production of dairy cattle. The MFSS was originally developed to isolate motile human sperm by two laminar flows in the micro-channel (there are four chambers in an MFSS. Chamber A is the inlet for semen, chamber B is the inlet for the medium, chamber C is the exit chamber for motile sperm, and chamber D is the outlet for nonmotile sperm). Sex-sorted sperm were adjusted to 1 × 10(7) spermatozoa/mL (2 million cells/dose, sperm motility was 30% above after thawing). In a first experiment, diluted sex-sorted semen was mixed with modified Medium199(mM199) containing 5-mM caffeine for 5 minutes, resulting in variations in sperm concentration and quality parameters at chambers A, C, and D. In a second experiment, medium containing sperm from three MFSS chambers was collected and mitochondrial activity of the sperm was determined by flow cytometry, the relative activity of sperm mitochondria in chamber C (1.56 ± 0.03) was the highest in three observation areas (P < 0.05). Thus, sperm motility and mitochondrial activity of sperm was high in chamber C. In a third experiment, different concentrations of sperm were added to chamber A and dairy cattle IVM oocytes were placed in chamber C, where motile spermatozoa will accumulate, with mM199 containing 5-mM caffeine for 5 minutes, and then cultured in caffeine-free mM199 for 8 hours. The results showed that sperm penetration rate, the monospermic penetration rate, and blastocyst rate of the 10 × 10(6) group (10 × 10(6) sperm/mL) were higher than in the 1 × 10(6) and 5 × 10(6) groups (P < 0.05). In the last experiment, we compared sperm penetration in the MFSS-IVF system with a modified standard IVF method (cocultured in droplets for 8 hours). The normal fertilization index (the ratio of monospermic oocytes to the number of oocytes examined) 8 hours after insemination was higher in the MFSS-IVF system than the modified standard IVF system (P < 0.05). Developmental competence of fertilized oocytes to the blastocyst stage was also higher in the MFSS-IVF system (40.12% ± 2.61%) than the modified standard IVF technique (24.55% ± 4.54%). These results demonstrate that a short coculture of dairy cattle oocytes with isolated motile sex-sorted spermatozoa gradually accumulated in the MFSS device improves the efficiencies of normally produced fertilized embryos and blastocyst formation. PMID:26768540

  13. Methods for evaluating the effects of environmental chemicals on human sperm production

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.

    1982-04-20

    Sperm tests provide a direct and effective way of identifying chemical agents that induce spermatogenic damage in man. Four human sperm tests are available: sperm count, motility, morphology (seminal cytology), and the Y-body test. These sperm tests have numerous advantages over other approaches for assessing spermatogenic damage, and they have already been used to assess the effects of at least 85 different occupational, envionmental, and drug-related chemical exposures. When carefully controlled, seminal cytology appears to be statistically more sensitive than the other human sperm tests and should be considered an integral part of semen analysis when assessing induced spermatogenic damage.

  14. Defining the mechanisms by which the reactive oxygen species by-product, 4-hydroxynonenal, affects human sperm cell function.

    PubMed

    Baker, Mark A; Weinberg, Anita; Hetherington, Louise; Villaverde, Ana-Izabel; Velkov, Tony; Baell, Jonathan; Gordon, Christopher P

    2015-04-01

    Lipid peroxidation products such as the naturally occurring aldehyde 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) are known to be cytotoxic toward different cell types, including spermatozoa. In order to understand this at the molecular level, we have employed a proteomic approach to characterize direct 4-HNE adducts on human spermatozoa. Several proteins were identified to be of particular interest, including aldehyde labeling of histone methyltransferase and dynein heavy chain. In addition, we found that 4-HNE bound to part of the activation segment, cysteine residue 199, of protein kinase A (PKA). Interestingly, at low levels, addition of 4-HNE had a stimulatory effect on PKA. However, this did not correlate to increased phosphotyrosine levels during capacitation. This data explains the link between reactive oxygen species and sperm toxicity. Given that epigenetic regulation is likely affected in oxidative-stressed spermatozoa, this data show that spermatozoa appear to shut down under these conditions before reaching the egg. PMID:25673561

  15. Processive Pulses of Retinoic Acid Propel Asynchronous and Continuous Murine Sperm Production1

    PubMed Central

    Hogarth, Cathryn A.; Arnold, Samuel; Kent, Travis; Mitchell, Debra; Isoherranen, Nina; Griswold, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The asynchronous cyclic nature of spermatogenesis is essential for continual sperm production and is one of the hallmarks of mammalian male fertility. While various mRNA and protein localization studies have indirectly implicated changing retinoid levels along testis tubules, no quantitative evidence for these changes across the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium currently exists. This study utilized a unique mouse model of induced synchronous spermatogenesis, localization of the retinoid-signaling marker STRA8, and sensitive quantification of retinoic acid concentrations to determine whether there are fluctuations in retinoid levels at each of the individual stages of germ cell differentiation and maturation to sperm. These data show that processive pulses of retinoic acid are generated during spermatogonial differentiation and are the likely trigger for cyclic spermatogenesis and allow us, for the first time, to understand how the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium is generated and maintained. In addition, this study represents the first direct quantification of a retinoid gradient controlling cellular differentiation in a postnatal tissue. PMID:25519186

  16. Why mammalian lineages respond differently to sexual selection: metabolic rate constrains the evolution of sperm size

    PubMed Central

    Gomendio, Montserrat; Tourmente, Maximiliano; Roldan, Eduardo R. S.

    2011-01-01

    The hypothesis that sperm competition should favour increases in sperm size, because it results in faster swimming speeds, has received support from studies on many taxa, but remains contentious for mammals. We suggest that this may be because mammalian lineages respond differently to sexual selection, owing to major differences in body size, which are associated with differences in mass-specific metabolic rate. Recent evidence suggests that cellular metabolic rate also scales with body size, so that small mammals have cells that process energy and resources from the environment at a faster rate. We develop the ‘metabolic rate constraint hypothesis’ which proposes that low mass-specific metabolic rate among large mammals may limit their ability to respond to sexual selection by increasing sperm size, while this constraint does not exist among small mammals. Here we show that among rodents, which have high mass-specific metabolic rates, sperm size increases under sperm competition, reaching the longest sperm sizes found in eutherian mammals. By contrast, mammalian lineages with large body sizes have small sperm, and while metabolic rate (corrected for body size) influences sperm size, sperm competition levels do not. When all eutherian mammals are analysed jointly, our results suggest that as mass-specific metabolic rate increases, so does maximum sperm size. In addition, species with low mass-specific metabolic rates produce uniformly small sperm, while species with high mass-specific metabolic rates produce a wide range of sperm sizes. These findings support the hypothesis that mass-specific metabolic rates determine the budget available for sperm production: at high levels, sperm size increases in response to sexual selection, while low levels constrain the ability to respond to sexual selection by increasing sperm size. Thus, adaptive and costly traits, such as sperm size, may only evolve under sexual selection when metabolic rate does not constrain cellular budgets. PMID:21389027

  17. Methods for evaluating the effects of environmental chemicals on human sperm production.

    PubMed Central

    Wyrobek, A J

    1983-01-01

    Sperm tests provide a direct and effective way of identifying chemical agents that induce spermatogenic damage in man. Four human sperm tests are available: sperm count, motility, morphology (seminal cytology) and the Y-body test. These sperm tests have numerous advantages over other approaches for assessing spermatogenic damage, and they have already been used to assess the effects of at least 85 different occupational, environmental, and drug-related chemical exposures. When carefully controlled, seminal cytology appears to be statistically more sensitive than the other human sperm tests and should be considered an integral part of semen analysis when assessing induced spermatogenic damage. Human sperm studies have complex requirements and, before sampling, careful consideration should be given to exposure details, group size and makeup, as well as animal and human data that indicate spermatogenic effects. Several study designs are possible and should include questionnaires covering medical and reproductive histories as well as known confounding factors. Animal sperm tests, such as the mouse morphology test, may be used to identify the toxic components of a complex mixture. Animal tests may also help assess the chemical effects on fertility and reproductive outcome in cases when human data are incomplete. Further efforts are needed in these areas to develop improved human sperm tests sensitive to induced spermatogenic damage, to develop improved animal models of induced spermatogenic damage, to understand the relationships among sperm changes, fertility, and reproductive outcome, and to develop sperm tests with express mutational end points. PMID:6825635

  18. Production of F1 Offspring with Vitrified Sperm from a Live-Bearing Fish, the Green Swordtail Xiphophorus hellerii

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas-Uribe, Rafael; Yang, Huiping; Daly, Jonathan; Savage, Markita G.; Walter, Ronald B.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This study reports the first production of offspring with vitrified sperm from a live-bearing fish Xiphophorus hellerii. The overall goal of this study was to develop streamlined protocols for integration into a standardized approach for vitrification of aquatic species germplasm. The objectives were to (1) estimate acute toxicity of cryoprotectants, (2) evaluate vitrification solutions, (3) compare different thawing methods, (4) evaluate membrane integrity of post-thaw sperm vitrified in different cryoprotectants, and (5) evaluate the fertility of vitrified sperm. Nine cryoprotectants and two commercial vitrification additives were tested for acute toxicity and glass forming ability, alone and in combination. Two vitrification solutions, 40% glycerol (Gly) and 20% Gly+20% ethylene glycol (EG) in 500 mOsmol/kg Hanks' balanced salt solution (HBSS), were selected for vitrification of 10 μL sperm samples using inoculating loops plunged into liquid nitrogen. Samples were thawed at 24°C (one loop in 5 μL of HBSS or three loops in 500 μL of HBSS). Samples thawed in 500 μL were concentrated by centrifugation (1000 g for 5 min at 4°C) into 5 μL for artificial insemination. Offspring were produced from virgin females inseminated with sperm vitrified with 20% Gly+20% EG and concentrated by centrifugation. PMID:21883000

  19. Testis morphometry, seminiferous epithelium cycle length, and daily sperm production in domestic cats (Felis catus).

    PubMed

    Frana, Luiz R; Godinho, Christiane L

    2003-05-01

    There is very little information regarding the testis structure and function in domestic cats, mainly data related to the cycle of seminiferous epithelium and sperm production. The testis weight in cats investigated in the present study was 1.2 g. Compared with most mammalian species investigated, the value of 0.08% found for testes mass related to the body mass (gonadosomatic index) in cats is very low. The tunica albuginea volume density (%) in these animals was relatively high and comprised about 19% of the testis. Seminiferous tubule and Leydig cell volume density (%) in cats were approximately 90% and 6%, respectively. The mean tubular diameter was 220 microm, and 23 m of seminiferous tubule were found per testis and per gram of testis. The frequencies of the eight stages of the cycle, characterized according to the tubular morphology system, were as follows: stage 1, 24.9%; stage 2, 12.9%; stage 3, 7.7%; stage 4, 17.6%; stage 5, 7.2%; stage 6, 11.9%; stage 7, 6.8%; and stage 8, 11 %. The premeiotic and postmeiotic stage frequency was 46% and 37%, respectively. The duration of each cycle of seminiferous epithelium was 10.4 days and the total duration of spermatogenesis based on 4.5 cycles was 46.8 days. The number of round spermatids for each pachytene primary spermatocytes (meiotic index) was 2.8, meaning that significant cell loss (30%) occurred during the two meiotic divisions. The total number of germ cells and the number of round spermatids per each Sertoli cell nucleolus at stage 1 of the cycle were 9.8 and 5.1, respectively. The Leydig cell volume was approximately 2000 microm3 and the nucleus volume 260 microm3. Both Leydig and Sertoli cell numbers per gram of testis in cats were approximately 30 million. The daily sperm production per gram of testis in cats (efficiency of spermatogenesis) was approximately 16 million. To our knowledge, this is the first investigation to perform a more detailed and comprehensive study of the testis structure and function in domestic cats. Also, this is the first report in the literature showing Sertoli and Leydig cell number per gram of testis and the daily sperm production in any kind of feline species. In this regard, besides providing a background for comparative studies with other fields, the data obtained in the present work might be useful in future studies in which the domestic cat could be utilized as an appropriate receptor model for preservation of genetic stock from rare or endangered wild felines using the germ cell transplantation technique. PMID:12606460

  20. Procurement of exogenous ammonia by the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio polytes, for protein biosynthesis and sperm production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Keiichi; Takase, Hiroyuki; mura, Hisashi; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-09-01

    How to acquire sufficient quantity of nitrogen is a pivotal issue for herbivores, particularly for lepidopterans (butterflies and moths) of which diet quality greatly differs among their life stages. Male Lepidoptera often feed from mud puddles, dung, and carrion, a behavior known as puddling, which is thought to be supplementary feeding targeted chiefly at sodium. During copulation, males transfer a spermatophore to females that contains, besides sperm, nutrients (nuptial gifts) rich in sodium, proteins, and amino acids. However, it is still poorly understood how adults, mostly nectarivores, extract nitrogen from the environment. We examined the availability of two ubiquitous inorganic nitrogenous ions in nature, viz. ammonium (or ammonia) and nitrate ions, as nutrients in a butterfly, and show that exogenous ammonia ingested by adult males of the swallowtail, Papilio polytes, can serve as a resource for protein biosynthesis. Feeding experiments with 15N-labeled ammonium chloride revealed that nitrogen was incorporated into eupyrene spermatozoa, seminal protein, and thoracic muscle. Ammonia uptake by males significantly increased the number of eupyrene sperms in the reproductive tract tissues. The females also had the capacity to assimilate ammonia into egg protein. Consequently, it is evident that acquired ammonia is utilized for the replenishment of proteins allocable for reproduction and somatic maintenance. The active exploitation of exogenous ammonia as a nutrient by a butterfly would foster better understanding of the foraging and reproductive strategies in insects.

  1. Updates on sperm retrieval techniques

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Andrew; Mira, Jose

    2014-01-01

    In the most extreme form of male infertility, the male partner is azoospermic. The advent of in vitro fertilization (IVF)-intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has revolutionized our ability to treat azoospermia in both obstructive and non-obstructive cases. In obstructive azoospermia, it allows paternity without microsurgical reproductive tract reconstruction and also in cases where the reproductive tract is unreconstructable. In men with non-obstructive azoospermia, microdissection testicular sperm extraction (mTESE) has allowed us to retrieve sperm in men with exceedingly low sperm production. The introduction of microsurgery in sperm retrieval improves sperm yields and quality while minimizing the chance of surgical morbidity.

  2. Microinjection Manipulation Resulted in the Increased Apoptosis of Spermatocytes in Testes from Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI) Derived Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Zhuo; Chen, Wen; Tong, Man; Guo, Xuejiang; Wang, Liu; Liu, Jiayin; Zhou, Zuomin; Zhu, Hui; Zhou, Qi; Sha, Jiahao

    2011-01-01

    The invention of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has possibly been the most important development in reproductive medicine, one that has given hope to thousands of infertile couples worldwide. However, concerns remain regarding the safety of this method since it is a more invasive procedure than in vitro fertilization (IVF), since a spermatozoon is injected into the oocyte cytoplasm. Using mice derived from IVF technology as a control, we assessed the influence of invasive microinjection in the process of transferring sperm into oocyte cytoplasm in ICSI procedure on the development and physiologic function of resultant offspring. Our results demonstrated that mice produced from ICSI and IVF had no significant difference in phenotypic indices including body weight, forelimb physiology, and learning and memory ability. However, increased spermatocyte apoptosis was observed in the testis of adult ICSI mice, when compared with IVF mice. And, decreased testis weight and marked damage of spermatogenic epithelia were found in aged ICSI mice. Furthermore, proteomic analysis verified that most of the differentiated proteins in testes between adult ICSI and IVF mice were those involved in regulation of apoptosis pathways. Our results demonstrated that the microinjection manipulation used in the ICSI procedure might pose potential risks to the fertility of male offspring. The changed expression of a series of proteins relating to apoptosis or proliferation might contribute to it. Further studies are necessary to better understand all the risks of ICSI. PMID:21799787

  3. Redox regulation of mammalian sperm capacitation

    PubMed Central

    OFlaherty, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Capacitation is a series of morphological and metabolic changes necessary for the spermatozoon to achieve fertilizing ability. One of the earlier happenings during mammalian sperm capacitation is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that will trigger and regulate a series of events including protein phosphorylation, in a time-dependent fashion. The identity of the sperm oxidase responsible for the production of ROS involved in capacitation is still elusive, and several candidates are discussed in this review. Interestingly, ROS-induced ROS formation has been described during human sperm capacitation. Redox signaling during capacitation is associated with changes in thiol groups of proteins located on the plasma membrane and subcellular compartments of the spermatozoon. Both, oxidation of thiols forming disulfide bridges and the increase on thiol content are necessary to regulate different sperm proteins associated with capacitation. Reducing equivalents such as NADH and NADPH are necessary to support capacitation in many species including humans. Lactate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phospohate dehydrogenase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase are responsible in supplying NAD (P) H for sperm capacitation. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs) are newly described enzymes with antioxidant properties that can protect mammalian spermatozoa; however, they are also candidates for assuring the regulation of redox signaling required for sperm capacitation. The dysregulation of PRDXs and of enzymes needed for their reactivation such as thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase system and glutathione-S-transferases impairs sperm motility, capacitation, and promotes DNA damage in spermatozoa leading to male infertility. PMID:25926608

  4. [How to increase food production?].

    PubMed

    Gahamanyi, L

    1984-12-01

    Pressure of population on cultivable land, serious soil erosion, and low productivity due to scarcity of inputs have hampered efforts to provide an adequate diet for the population of Rwanda. Until the present, production has increased about as rapidly as population, but Rwanda is not totally self-sufficient in food, future climatic conditions may be less favorable than those of the past, technical and resource constraints are likely to increase, and little new land will be available for cultivation. Between 1970-80, hectares devoted to bananas and beans have increased considerably, but the marginal nature of much new land has seriously lowered productivity. Sweet potatoes are more extensively grown but their productivity is limited, and productivity of manioc has stagnated despite efforts to increase it. Peas are less frequently cultivated because the fallow land on they they are grown has almost disappeared due to population pressure. Agriculture in Rwanda has always been associated with herding, but population pressure is eliminating pastureland. Firewood for cooking is also becoming more scarce and reforestation is not proceeding rapidly enough to fill projected demand. Between 1978-80 and the year 2000, preliminary goals are to increase production in tons from 2,005,900 to 3,375,000 for bananas, from 177,400 to 330,000 for beans, from 15,200 to 45,500 for ground nuts, from 4000 to 25,000 for soybeans, from 174,800 to 288,000 for sorghum, from 81,300 to 250,000 for maize, from 3700 to 45,000 for rice, from 837,100 to 2,148,000 for sweet potatoes, from 506,600 to 1,200,000 for manioc, and from 216,000 to 600,000 for potatoes. Reaching these goals will require doubling of overall productivity per hectare. Different strategies will be required for increasing the yields of the principal crops. Priority should be given to developing strains of beans that will grow well in the poor soils, dry or cold regions, and acidic soils where they are usually planted in Rwanda. Beans requiring less labor-intensive cultivation and able to grow in association with other crops or under banana trees are needed. The new varieties should be resistent to disease and pests. Bananas, with an annual production of over 2 million tons, are the most important crop in Rwanda, but 80-90% is used for beer, an important indicator of family wealth and symbolic object in social relations. The average yield of bananas declined by 19% between 1970-80. 3 very productive varieties of table bananas have been introduced recently, but research is needed in different ecologic regions of Rwanda focusing on cultivation of bananas in association with other crops, improved varieties of bananas, and better cultivation methods. Research should also be directed toward developing the best varieties of high, medium, and low altitude sorghum, the traditional cereal crop, of maize and of sweet potatoes, the 2nd most important crop, as well as toward identifying the best cultivation methods for each. PMID:12267714

  5. A Quality Assurance Initiative for Commercial-Scale Production in High-Throughput Cryopreservation of Blue Catfish Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Hu, E; Liao, T. W.; Tiersch, T. R.

    2013-01-01

    Cryopreservation of fish sperm has been studied for decades at a laboratory (research) scale. However, high-throughput cryopreservation of fish sperm has recently been developed to enable industrial-scale production. This study treated blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) sperm high-throughput cryopreservation as a manufacturing production line and initiated quality assurance plan development. The main objectives were to identify: 1) the main production quality characteristics; 2) the process features for quality assurance; 3) the internal quality characteristics and their specification designs; 4) the quality control and process capability evaluation methods, and 5) the directions for further improvements and applications. The essential product quality characteristics were identified as fertility-related characteristics. Specification design which established the tolerance levels according to demand and process constraints was performed based on these quality characteristics. Meanwhile, to ensure integrity throughout the process, internal quality characteristics (characteristics at each quality control point within process) that could affect fertility-related quality characteristics were defined with specifications. Due to the process feature of 100% inspection (quality inspection of every fish), a specific calculation method, use of cumulative sum (CUSUM) control charts, was applied to monitor each quality characteristic. An index of overall process evaluation, process capacity, was analyzed based on in-control process and the designed specifications, which further integrates the quality assurance plan. With the established quality assurance plan, the process could operate stably and quality of products would be reliable. PMID:23872356

  6. Automatic truck dispatching: increasing productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    There are various levels of sophistication in haulage truck dispatching methodology, the most advanced of which is totally automatic. In this system, truck status and location data are automatically input to a computer. Dispatch decisions are then made by the computer and automatically transmitted to truck drivers. The dispatcher is free to handle non-routine situations by exception. The primary function of one of these systems, the Automatic Truck Identification and Dispatching (ATID) system is to increase the productivity of existing surface mining equipment (trucks, shovels, crushers), without significantly altering existing mine operating procedures. The system is distributed by AVM Systems Inc. The ATID system automatically determines and reports the location of all haulage trucks to a central processor and combines this information with other data in an optimum dispatch algorithm. This dispatch order developed by the algorithm is automatically transmitted to the truck driver. The system then provides the dispatcher with the capability to monitor each truck. AVM recommends a feasibility study of the system to mine operators before they commit to full scale implementation. Management can be thus assured that the investment made in the system will lower operational costs. It is claimed that, on the average, the system pays for itself in less than one year. The ATID system has three major subdivisions: automatic vehicle location and identification; communications; computation and display.

  7. Comparative responses of sperm cells and embryos of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) to exposure to metolachlor and its degradation products.

    PubMed

    Mai, Huong; Gonzalez, Patrice; Pardon, Patrick; Tapie, Nathalie; Budzinski, Hélène; Cachot, Jérôme; Morin, Bénédicte

    2014-02-01

    Metolachlor is one of the most intensively used chloroacetanilide herbicides in agriculture. Consequently, it has been frequently detected in coastal waters as well as its major degradation products, metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid (MESA) and metolachlor oxanilic acid (MOA) which are encountered at higher concentrations than metolachlor. Although a few studies of metolachlor toxicity have been conducted on marine organisms, little is known about the environmental toxicity of metolachlor degradation products. In this study, the deleterious effects of metolachlor and its degradation products on spermatozoa and embryos of Crassostrea gigas have been compared using biomarkers of developmental defects, DNA damage and gene transcription levels. After 24h exposure, significant increases in the percentage of abnormal D-larvae and DNA damage were observed from 0.01 μg L(-1) for S-metolachlor and 0.1 μg L(-1) for MESA and MOA. Results showed that S-metolachlor was more embryotoxic and genotoxic than its degradation products. Oyster sperm was also very sensitive to metolachlor exposure and followed the pattern: metolachlor (0.01 μg L(-1))>MOA (0.1 μg L(-1))>MESA (1 μg L(-1)). Metolachlor and MESA mainly triggered variations in the transcription level of genes encoding proteins involved in oxidative stress responses (mitochondrial superoxide dismutase and catalase). Overall, no significant variation in transcription levels could be detected in C. gigas embryos exposed to MOA. This study demonstrates that metolachlor and its main degradation products have the potential to impact several steps of oyster development and therefore recruitment in coastal areas exposed to chronic inputs of pesticides. PMID:24378469

  8. Effects of pulse-modulated microwave radiation and conventional heating on sperm production

    SciTech Connect

    Lebovitz, R.M.; Johnson, L.; Samson, W.K.

    1987-01-01

    The effects on testicular function of pulse-modulated microwave radiation (PM MWR, 1.3 GHz) and of conventional heating were studied in the rat. Anesthetized adult males (Sprague-Dawley, 400-500 g) were treated then killed at specific intervals with respect to the 13-day cycle of the seminiferous epithelium. PM MWR at 7.7 mW/g (90 min) yielded a modest decline in daily sperm production (DSP) that derived primarily from effects on primary spermatocytes. PM MWR at 4.2 mW/g was ineffective. The mean intratesticular temperature during the former reached 40 degrees C and did not exceed 38 degrees C during the latter. MWR considerably in excess of 7.7 mW/g yielded decrements in virtually all germ cell types, with primary spermatocytes again being most markedly affected. Using conventional heating, intratesticular temperatures in excess of 39 degrees C for 60 min were required for significant decrements in DSP. Levels of circulating follicle-stimulating hormone and of leutinizing hormone were resistant to either treatment. We conclude that the damage threshold and the differential sensitivity of immature germ cells to PM MWR can be adequately explained by the consequent macroscopic heating.

  9. Seminal fluid promotes invitro sperm-oviduct binding in the domestic cat (Felis catus).

    PubMed

    Henry, F; Eder, S; Reynaud, K; Schn, J; Wibbelt, G; Fontbonne, A; Mller, K

    2015-05-01

    From many endangered or threatened species which are expected to profit from assisted reproduction techniques, mainly epididymal sperm of dead or freshly castrated males are available. These sperm had contact to epididymal secretion products but not to seminal fluid components. Notably, products of accessory sex glands have been shown in domestic animals to condition sperm for fertilization, in particular by mediating sperm-oviduct interaction. We report for the first time that motile epididymal sperm from domestic cats are able to bind to fresh oviduct epithelial cell explants from preovulatory females (median [min, max] of 10 [8, 16] and 10 [8, 17] sperm per 0.01 mm(2) explant surface from both isthmic and ampullar regions, respectively). More sperm attach to the explants when epididymal sperm were preincubated for 30 minutes with seminal fluid separated from electroejaculates of mature tomcats (median [min, max] of 17 [13, 25] and 16 [12, 21] sperm per 0.01 mm(2) explant surface from isthmus and ampulla, respectively). The proportion of bound sperm increased from a median of 54% to 62% by seminal fluid treatment. Sperm-oviduct binding could be facilitated by the decelerated sperm motion which was observed in seminal fluid-treated samples or supported by seminal fluid proteins newly attached to the sperm surface. Seminal fluid had no effect on the proportion of sperm with active mitochondria. Extent and pattern of sperm interaction in vitro were independent of explant origin from isthmus or ampulla. Sperm were attached to both cilia and microvilli of the main epithelial cell types present in all explants. In contrast to published sperm-binding studies with porcine and bovine oviduct explants where predominantly the anterior head region of sperm was attached to ciliated cells, the tails of some cat sperm were firmly stuck to the oviduct cell surfaces, whereas the heads were wobbling. Whether this response is a preliminary step toward phagocytosis or a precondition to capacitation and fertilization remains to be determined. In conclusion, treatment of epididymal sperm with seminal fluid or particular protein components should be considered in future investigations for its potential to improve the outcome of artificial insemination in felids. PMID:25735636

  10. In vitro production of cattlexbuffalo hybrid embryos using cattle oocytes and African buffalo (Syncerus caffer caffer) epididymal sperm.

    PubMed

    Owiny, O D; Barry, D M; Agaba, M; Godke, R A

    2009-04-01

    Interspecies hybridization of bovids occurs between domestic cattle and at least three other species; American bison (Bison bison), yak (Bos grunniens) and banteng (Bos banteng). Birth of a cattlexbuffalo (Bubalus bubalis) hybrid has reportedly occurred in Russia and in China, but these reports were not authenticated. Such hybrids could be important in improving livestock production and management of diseases that impede production in tropical Africa. This study investigated hybridization between cattle and its closest African wild bovid relative, the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer caffer). In an attempt to produce cattlexbuffalo hybrid embryos in vitro, matured cattle oocytes were subjected to a standard in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedure with either homologous cattle (n=1166 oocytes) or heterologous African buffalo (n=1202 oocytes) frozen-thawed epididymal sperm. After IVF, 67.2% of the oocytes inseminated with the homologous cattle sperm cleaved. In contrast, fertilization with buffalo sperm resulted in only a 4.6% cleavage rate. The cleavage intervals were also slower in hybrid embryos than in the IVF-derived cattle embryos. Of the cleaved homologous cattle embryos 52.2% progressed to the morula stage compared with 12.7% for the buffalo hybrid embryos. No hybrid embryos developed beyond the early morula stage, while 40.1% of the cleaved cattlexcattle embryos developed to the blastocyst stage. Transfer of buffalo hybrid IVF embryos to domestic cattle surrogates resulted in no pregnancies at 60 days post-transfer. This study indicates that interspecies fertilization of cattle oocytes with African buffalo epididymal sperm can occur in vitro, and that a barrier to hybridization occurs in the early stages of embryonic development. Chromosomal disparity is likely the cause of the fertilization abnormalities, abnormal development and subsequent arrest impairing the formation of hybrid embryos beyond the early morula stage. Transfer of the buffalo hybrid embryos did not rescue the embryos from development arrest. PMID:19118889

  11. Sex-Sorted Boar Sperm - An Update on Related Production Methods.

    PubMed

    Rath, D; Tiedemann, D; Gamrad, L; Johnson, L A; Klein, S; Kues, W; Mancini, R; Rehbock, C; Taylor, U; Barcikowski, S

    2015-07-01

    As in other mammals, sex sorting of pig sperm is based on quantitative flow cytometry. A major disadvantage of the technique is the relatively low efficiency to produce enough sorted sperm for artificial insemination. However, several approaches are on the way to make sexed pig sperm available for commercial application. In this context, for example, the growing field of nanotechnology may significantly contribute to these developments, as it provides highly efficient bio-nanoprobes, for example, based on plasmonic nanoparticles. Independent of the method, further development requires enormous investments and set-up of logistics to get the technology into the practical pig market. Only global players will be able to establish the necessary research projects, but in the end, a significant shift of sex ratios will be available for pig producers as it is already the case for the dairy industry. PMID:26174920

  12. Off-axis effects on the multipulse structure of sperm whale usual clicks with implications for sound production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, Walter M. X.; Madsen, Peter T.; Teloni, Valeria; Johnson, Mark P.; Tyack, Peter L.

    2005-11-01

    Sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) produce multipulsed clicks with their hypertrophied nasal complex. The currently accepted view of the sound generation process is based on the click structure measured directly in front of, or behind, the whale where regular interpulse intervals (IPIs) are found between successive pulses in the click. Most sperm whales, however, are recorded with the whale in an unknown orientation with respect to the hydrophone where the multipulse structure and the IPI do not conform to a regular pulse pattern. By combining far-field recordings of usual clicks with acoustic and orientation information measured by a tag on the clicking whale, we analyzed clicks from known aspects to the whale. We show that a geometric model based on the bent horn theory for sound production can explain the varying off-axis multipulse structure. Some of the sound energy that is reflected off the frontal sac radiates directly into the water creating an intermediate pulse p1/2 seen in off-axis recordings. The powerful p1 sonar pulse exits the front of the junk as predicted by the bent-horn model, showing that the junk of the sperm whale nasal complex is both anatomically and functionally homologous to the melon of smaller toothed whales.

  13. Testis stereology, seminiferous epithelium cycle length, and daily sperm production in the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis).

    PubMed

    Silva, R C; Costa, G M J; Andrade, L M; Frana, L R

    2010-01-15

    Similar to most wild felids, the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) is an endangered species. However, knowledge regarding reproductive biology of the ocelot is very limited. Germ cell transplantation is an effective technique for investigating spermatogenesis and stem cell biology in mammals, and the morphologic characterization of germ cells and knowledge of cycle length are potential tools for tracking the development of transplanted germ cells. Our goal was to investigate basic aspects related to testis structure, particularly spermatogenesis, in the ocelot. Four adult males were used. After unilateral orchiectomy, testis samples were routinely prepared for histologic, stereologic, and autoradiographic analyses. Testis weight and the gonadosomatic index were 11+/-0.6g and 0.16+/-0.01%, respectively, whereas the volume density of seminiferous tubules and Leydig cells was 83.2+/-1.6% and 9.8+/-1.5%. Based on the acrosomic system, eight stages of spermatogenesis were characterized, and germ cell morphology was very similar to that of domestic cats. Each spermatogenic cycle lasted 12.5+/-0.4 d, and the entire spermatogenic process lasted 56.3+/-1.9 d. Individual Leydig cell volume was 2522mum(3), whereas the number of Leydig and Sertoli cells per gram of testis was 38+/-5x10(6) and 46+/-3x10(6). Approximately 4.5 spermatids were found per Sertoli cell, whereas daily sperm production per gram of testis was 18.3+/-1x10(6), slightly higher than values reported for other felids. The knowledge obtained in this study could be very useful to the preservation of the ocelot using domestic cat testes to generate and propagate the ocelot genome. PMID:19853903

  14. Laser radiation and motility patterns of human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Lenzi, A.; Claroni, F.; Gandini, L.; Lombardo, F.; Barbieri, C.; Lino, A.; Dondero, F. )

    1989-01-01

    Human sperm were exposed in vitro to laser radiation. An increase in progressive sperm motility was associated with a faster rate of sperm ATP consumption. Computer-assisted analysis of sperm motility confirmed the positive effect of laser irradiation on velocity and linearity of sperm.

  15. Production of viable piglets for the first time using sperm derived from ectopic testicular xenografts.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Michiko; Kaneko, Hiroyuki; Somfai, Tamas; Maedomari, Naoki; Ozawa, Manabu; Noguchi, Junko; Ito, Junya; Kashiwazaki, Naomi; Kikuchi, Kazuhiro

    2010-02-01

    Xenografting of testicular tissue into immunodeficient mice is known to be a valuable tool for facilitating the development of immature germ cells present in mammalian gonads. Spermatogenesis in xenografts and/or in vitro embryonic development to the blastocyst stage after ICSI of xenogeneic sperm has already been reported in large animals, including pigs; however, development of the embryos to term has not yet been confirmed. Therefore, in pigs, we evaluated the in vivo developmental ability of oocytes injected after ICSI of xenogeneic sperm. Testicular tissues prepared from neonatal piglets, which contain seminiferous cords consisting of only gonocytes/spermatogonia, were transplanted under the back skin of castrated nude mice. Between 133 and 280 days after xenografting, morphologically normal sperm were recovered, and a single spermatozoon was then injected into an in vitro matured porcine oocyte. After ICSI, the oocytes were electrostimulated and transferred into estrus-synchronized recipients. Two out of 23 recipient gilts gave birth to six piglets. Here, we describe for the first time that oocytes fertilized with a sperm from ectopic xenografts have the ability to develop to viable offspring in large mammals. PMID:20015869

  16. In boar sperm capacitation L-lactate and succinate, but not pyruvate and citrate, contribute to the mitochondrial membrane potential increase as monitored via safranine O fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Paventi, Gianluca; Lessard, Christian; Bailey, Janice L; Passarella, Salvatore

    2015-07-01

    Having ascertained using JC-1 as a probe that, in distinction with the controls, during capacitation boar sperm maintains high mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ), to gain some insight into the role of mitochondria in capacitation, we monitored ΔΨ generation due to externally added metabolites either in hypotonically-treated spermatozoa (HTS) or in intact cells by using safranine O as a probe. During capacitation, the addition to HTS of L-lactate and succinate but not those of pyruvate, citrate and ascorbate + TMPD resulted in increase of ΔΨ generation. Accordingly, the addition of L-lactate and succinate, but not that of citrate, to intact sperm resulted in ΔΨ generation increased in capacitation. PMID:25956060

  17. Experimental evolution of sperm count in protandrous self-fertilizing hermaphrodites.

    PubMed

    Murray, Rosalind L; Cutter, Asher D

    2011-05-15

    Sperm count evolution is driven by sexual selection, with an added role of selection on gamete resource allocation for hermaphrodite spermatogenesis. However, self-fertilization by hermaphrodites retards sexual selection and results in the evolution of reduced investment in sperm or pollen. In contrast to reproduction limited by female gametes (Bateman's Principle), self-fertilizing Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodites exhibit sperm-limited reproduction. Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodites are thought to experience a fitness trade-off between lifetime fecundity and generation time: longer sperm production decreases the risk of self-sperm depletion, but at the same time delays the onset of selfing and thus increases egg-to-egg generation time. Theory predicts that shorter larval development will favor lower sperm counts and longer development will favor more sperm. To investigate how developmental trajectories affect the evolution of sperm production, we performed experimental evolution by directly competing alleles controlling hermaphrodite sperm count, conducted under different environmental conditions that alter development time. Results are partially consistent with theory: rapid larval development generally favored alleles encoding production of few sperm. However, we identify some previously unrecognized simplifications of the theory and its application to our experimental system. In addition, we evaluated the generality of sperm limitation in C. elegans. Although optimal growth conditions yield sperm limitation, non-optimal conditions induce oocyte limitation, suggesting that this species might conform to Bateman's Principle under many natural settings. These findings demonstrate how developmental trajectories can shape the fitness landscape for the evolution of reproduction and sperm traits, even without sexual selection. PMID:21525321

  18. Production of donor-derived sperm after spermatogonial stem cell transplantation in the dog

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeunhee; Turner, Danielle; Nelson, Jacquelyn; Dobrinski, Ina; McEntee, Margaret; Travis, Alexander J.

    2009-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cell transplantation offers unique approaches to investigate spermatogonial stem cells (SSC) and to manipulate the male germline. We report here the first successful performance of this technique in the dog, which is an important model of human diseases. First, we investigated an irradiation protocol to deplete endogenous male germ cells in recipient testes. Histologic examination confirmed >95% depletion of endogenous spermatogenesis, but retention of normal testis architecture. Then, five month-old recipient dogs (n=5) were focally irradiated on their testes prior to transplantation with mixed seminiferous tubule cells [fresh (n=2) or after two weeks of culture (n=3)]. The dogs receiving cultured cells showed an immediate allergic response, which subsided quickly with palliative treatment. No such response was seen in the dogs receiving fresh cells, for which a different injection medium was used. 12 months post injection, recipients were castrated and sperm was collected from epididymides. We performed microsatellite analysis comparing DNA from the epididymal sperm with genomic DNA from both the recipients and the donors. We used 6 markers to demonstrate the presence of donor alleles in the sperm from one recipient of fresh mixed tubule cells. No evidence of donor alleles was detected in sperm from the other recipients. Using quantitative PCR based on single nucleotide polymorphisms, about 19.5% of sperm were shown to be donor-derived in the recipient. Our results demonstrate the first successful completion of SSCT in the dog, an important step toward transgenesis through the male germline in this valuable biomedical model. PMID:18768666

  19. In vitro production of haploid sperm cells from male germ cells of foetal cattle.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wu-Zi; Hua, Jin-Lian; Shen, Wen-Zheng; Dou, Zhong-Ying

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to isolate the foetal cattle male germ cells (mGCs) and then induce them into sperm cells. The mGCs were purified and enriched by a two-step plating method based on the different adherence velocities of mGCs and somatic cells. The percentage of the vasa and the c-kit positive cells were 95.34+/-2.25% and 53.3+/-1.03% by using flow cytometry analysis (FCA), respectively. In feeder-free culture system, the half-suspending cells appeared and formed a 16-cell rosary in medium after the mGCs were cultured for 6-8 days. On immunocytochemical staining during the second passage, some single cells adhering to the plate appeared to be both Oct-4 and alpha6-integrin positive. During the third passage, the mGCs were induced for 48 h by retinol acid (RA) on Sertoli cell-feeder layer, followed by 5-7 days culture in an RA-free medium. Some elongated sperm-like cells appeared in the medium at this stage. We found that the most effective concentration of RA for the inducement was 10(-7)moll(-1) (P<0.01). The haploid cells in suspension were identified by FCA. The elongated sperm-like cells showed proacrosome-like structure and the flagellum with fibre construct under electron microscopy. The mRNA of outer dense fibre-3 (ODF-3) and transcription protein-1 (TP-1) could be detected in the suspended cells by using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). About 23.1% bovine oocytes could be activated to perform cleavage by intracytoplasmic injection with the sperm-like cells, but embryos did not further develop. Our investigation further demonstrated that foetal cattle mGCs could be induced in vitro into haploid sperm in the short term. PMID:19632794

  20. Sperm preparation for ART

    PubMed Central

    Henkel, Ralf R; Schill, Wolf-Bernhard

    2003-01-01

    The onset of clinical assisted reproduction, a quarter of a century ago, required the isolation of motile spermatozoa. As the indication of assisted reproduction shifted from mere gynaecological indications to andrological indications during the years, this urged andrological research to understand the physiology of male germ cell better and develop more sophisticated techniques to separate functional spermatozoa from those that are immotile, have poor morphology or are not capable to fertilize oocytes. Initially, starting from simple washing of spermatozoa, separation techniques, based on different principles like migration, filtration or density gradient centrifugation evolved. The most simple and cheapest is the conventional swim-up procedure. A more sophisticated and most gentle migration method is migration-sedimentation. However, its yield is relatively small and the technique is therefore normally only limited to ejaculates with a high number of motile spermatozoa. Recently, however, the method was also successfully used to isolate spermatozoa for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Sperm separation methods that yield a higher number of motile spermatozoa are glass wool filtration or density gradient centrifugation with different media. Since Percoll® as a density medium was removed from the market in 1996 for clinical use in the human because of its risk of contamination with endotoxins, other media like IxaPrep®, Nycodenz, SilSelect®, PureSperm® or Isolate® were developed in order to replace Percoll®. Today, an array of different methods is available and the selection depends on the quality of the ejaculates, which also includes production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by spermatozoa and leukocytes. Ejaculates with ROS production should not be separated by means of conventional swim-up, as this can severely damage the spermatozoa. In order to protect the male germ cells from the influence of ROS and to stimulate their motility to increase the yield, a number of substances can be added to the ejaculate or the separation medium. Caffeine, pentoxifylline and 2-deoxyadenosine are substances that were used to stimulate motility. Recent approaches to stimulate spermatozoa include bicarbonate, metal chelators or platelet-activating factor (PAF). While the use of PAF already resulted in pregnancies in intrauterine insemination, the suitability of the other substances for the clinical use still needs to be tested. Finally, the isolation of functional spermatozoa from highly viscous ejaculates is a special challenge and can be performed enzymatically to liquefy the ejaculate. The older method, by which the ejaculate is forcefully aspirated through a narrow-gauge needle, should be abandoned as it can severely damage spermatozoa, thus resulting in immotile sperm. PMID:14617368

  1. Sperm competition: linking form to function

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Using information from physics, biomechanics and evolutionary biology, we explore the implications of physical constraints on sperm performance, and review empirical evidence for links between sperm length and sperm competition (where two or more males compete to fertilise a female's eggs). A common theme in the literature on sperm competition is that selection for increased sperm performance in polyandrous species will favour the evolution of longer, and therefore faster swimming, sperm. This argument is based on the common assumption that sperm swimming velocity is directly related to sperm length, due to the increased thrust produced by longer flagella. Results We critically evaluate the evidence for links between sperm morphology and swimming speed, and draw on cross-disciplinary studies to show that the assumption that velocity is directly related to sperm length will rarely be satisfied in the microscopic world in which sperm operate. Conclusion We show that increased sperm length is unlikely to be driven by selection for increased swimming speed, and that the relative lengths of a sperm's constituent parts, rather than their absolute lengths, are likely to be the target of selection. All else being equal, we suggest that a simple measure of the ratio of head to tail length should be used to assess the possible link between morphology and speed. However, this is most likely to be the case for external fertilizers in which females have relatively limited opportunity to influence a sperm's motility. PMID:19032741

  2. Variability in sperm form and function in the context of sperm competition risk in two Tupinambis lizards

    PubMed Central

    Blengini, Cecilia S; Sergio, Naretto; Gabriela, Cardozo; Giojalas, Laura C; Margarita, Chiaraviglio

    2014-01-01

    In polyandrous species, sperm morphometry and sperm velocity are under strong sexual selection. Although several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the role of sperm competition in sperm trait variation, this aspect is still poorly understood. It has been suggested that an increase in sperm competition pressure could reduce sperm size variation or produce a diversity of sperm to maximize male fertilization success. We aim at elucidating the variability of sperm morphometric traits and velocity in two Tupinambis lizards in the context of sperm competition risk. Sperm traits showed substantial variation at all levels examined: between species, among males within species, and within the ejaculate of individual males. Sperm velocity was found to be positively correlated with flagellum: midpiece ratio, with relatively longer flagella associated with faster sperm. Our results document high variability in sperm form and function in lizards. PMID:25505535

  3. An Extract of Pomegranate Fruit and Galangal Rhizome Increases the Numbers of Motile Sperm: A Prospective, Randomised, Controlled, Double-Blinded Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fedder, Maja D. K.; Jakobsen, Henrik B.; Giversen, Ina; Christensen, Lars P.; Parner, Erik T.; Fedder, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Pomegranate fruit (Punica granatum) and galangal (Alpinia galanga) have separately been shown to stimulate spermatogenesis and to increase sperm counts and motility in rodents. Within traditional medicine, pomegranate fruit has long been used to increase fertility, however studies on the effect on spermatogenesis in humans have never been published. With this study we investigated whether oral intake of tablets containing standardised amounts of extract of pomegranate fruit and powder of greater galangal rhizome (Punalpin) would increase the total number of motile spermatozoa. The study was designed as a prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blinded trial. Enrolment was based on the mean total number of motile spermatozoa of two ejaculates. The participants delivered an ejaculate after 4–8 days of tablet intake and two ejaculates just before they stopped taking the tablets. Seventy adult men with a semen quality not meeting the standards for commercial application at Nordic Cryobank, but without azoospermia, were included in the study. Participants were randomized to take tablets containing extract of pomegranate fruit (standardised with respect to punicalagin A+B, punicalin and ellagic acid) and freeze-dried rhizome of greater galangal (standardised with respect to 1′S-1′-acetoxychavicol acetate) or placebo on a daily basis for three months. Sixty-six participants completed the intervention (active treatment: n = 34; placebo: n = 32). After the intervention the total number of motile spermatozoa was increased in participants treated with plant extracts compared with the placebo group (p = 0.026). After three months of active treatment, the average total number of motile sperm increased by 62% (from 23.4 to 37.8 millions), while for the placebo group, the number of motile sperm increased by 20%. Sperm morphology was not affected by the treatment. Our findings may help subfertile men to gain an improved amount of motile ejaculated sperm by taking tablets containing preparations of pomegranate fruit extract and rhizome of greater galangal. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01357044 PMID:25275520

  4. Stress and dietary factors modify boar sperm for processing.

    PubMed

    Radomil, L; Pettitt, M J; Merkies, K M; Hickey, K D; Buhr, M M

    2011-09-01

    This paper reviews stresses boar sperm undergo during processing and presents preliminary results of dietary modification that minimize this damage. Processing for artificial insemination (AI) stresses boar sperm by osmotic effects; altering cell size, shape and membranes; intracellular ice formation; and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Sperm response to ROS is concentration-dependent, with low levels activating the ERK pathway to stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation (Tyr-P) and capacitation, but high concentrations or inappropriately timed onset of ROS pathways can harm sperm. Fresh boar sperm exposed to ROS increased intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H(2) O(2) ) phospholipase and lipid peroxidation, maintained viability but lost motility and underwent acrosome reactions (AR). Direct incorporation of lipids ± the antioxidant Vitamin E improves the survival of liquid- and frozen-stored semen. Boars fed dietary flaxseed for 8 weeks to increase n-3 fatty acids displayed improved sperm morphology (p < 0.05), increased membrane fluidity (p < 0.05) and better retention of motility and viability during 5-7 day storage (p < 0.05). Processes reducing oxidative damage to stored sperm should be evaluated. PMID:21884275

  5. The effects of four insect growth-regulating (IGR) insecticides on honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) colony development, queen rearing and drone sperm production.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Helen M; Wilkins, Selwyn; Battersby, Alastair H; Waite, Ruth J; Wilkinson, David

    2005-10-01

    This study assessed the effects of exposure to IGRs on the long-term development of the honeybee colony, viability of queens and sperm production in drones and integrated the data into a honeybee population model. Colonies treated with diflubenzuron resulted in a short-term reduction in the numbers of adult bees and brood. Colonies treated with fenoxycarb declined during the season earlier and started the season slower. The number of queens that successfully mated and laid eggs was affected in the fenoxycarb treatment group but there were no significant differences in the drone sperm counts between the colonies. An existing honeybee population model was modified to include exposure to IGRs. In the model, fenoxycarb reduced the winter size of the colony, with the greatest effects following a June or an August application. Assuming a 'larvae per nurse bee' ratio of 1.5 for brood rearing capability, the reduction in winter size of a colony following a fenoxycarb application was at its worst about 8%. However, even if only those bees reared within 2 weeks of the IGR being applied are subject to premature ageing, this might significantly reduce the size of over-wintering colonies, and increase the chance of the bee population dwindling and dying in late winter or early spring. PMID:16160749

  6. Diploid males, diploid sperm production, and triploid females in the ant Tapinoma erraticum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cournault, Laurent; Aron, Serge

    2009-12-01

    Under complementary sex determination (CSD), females of Hymenoptera arise from diploid, fertilized eggs and males from haploid, unfertilized eggs. Incidentally, fertilized eggs that inherit two identical alleles at the CSD locus will develop into diploid males. Diploid males are usually unviable or sterile. In a few species, however, they produce diploid sperm and father a triploid female progeny. Diploid males have been reported in a number of social Hymenoptera, but the occurrence of triploid females has hardly ever been documented. Here, we report the presence of triploid females, diploid males, and diploid sperm (produced by diploid males and stored in queen spermathecae) in the ant Tapinoma erraticum. Moreover, we show variations in the frequency of triploids among female castes: Triploid females are more frequent among workers than virgin queens; they are absent among mated, reproductive queens. The frequency of triploid workers also varies between populations and between nests within populations.

  7. Sperm studies in anesthesiologists

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Brodsky, J.; Gordon, l.; Moore, D.H., II; Watchmaker, G.; Cohen, E.N.

    1981-11-01

    Semen samples were collected from 46 anesthesiologists each of whom had worked a minimum of one year in hospital operating rooms ventilated with modern gas-scavenging devices. Samples collected from 26 beginning residents in anesthesiology served as controls. Concentrations of sperm and percentage of sperm having abnormal head shapes were determined for each sample. No significant differences were found between anesthesiologists and beginning residents. Limiting the analyses to men having no confounding factors (varicocele, recent illness, medications, heavy smoking, frequent sauna use) did not change the results. The sperm concentration and morphology in 13 men did not change signficantly after one year of exposure to anesthetic gases. However, the group of men who had one or more confounding factors (excluding exposure to anesthetic gases) showed significantly higher percentages of sperm abnormalities than did the group of men without such factors. These results suggest that limited exposure to anesthetic gases does not significantly affect sperm production as judged by changes in sperm concentration and morphology. These data are reassuring, but since the hospitals surveyed used modern gas-scavenging devices, men who are occupationally exposed to anesthetic gases without this protection should be studied for fuller assessment of the possible human spermatotoxic effects.

  8. Relationship between sperm quality parameters and the fatty acid composition of the muscle, liver and testis of European eel.

    PubMed

    Baeza, R; Mazzeo, I; Vílchez, M C; Gallego, V; Peñaranda, D S; Pérez, L; Asturiano, J F

    2015-03-01

    This study looks at the correlations that fatty acids have with different tissues in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.) during hormonally-induced sexual maturation, with different sperm quality parameters. In order to evaluate the different dynamics of the use of fatty acids, a categorization of the results from each sperm quality parameter (volume, concentration, motility and velocity) was performed. Low and moderate correlations were observed between muscle tissue and some sperm quality parameters but no high correlations were found. Eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n3, EPA) in the liver seems to have a role in determining the volume of sperm produced. This can be explained by the fact that EPA is a major requirement in the early phases of sperm production (probably as a component of the spermatozoal membrane). In addition, the levels of α-linolenic acid (18:3-n3, ALA) and linoleic acid (18:2-n6, LA) in the liver decreased when sperm motility increased. In all the tissues, a negative correlation was observed between arachidonic acid (20:4n-6, ARA) and the different sperm velocity parameters. The fact that an increase in the consumption of ARA coincides with an increase in the speed of spermatozoa, highlights the important role that this fatty acid plays not only in sperm production, but also in sperm velocity. All this information could prove useful in the development of suitable broodstock diets to improve sperm quality and subsequently, the larval development of this species. PMID:25483240

  9. Sperm shape abnormalities in carbaryl-exposed employees.

    PubMed

    Wyrobek, A J; Watchmaker, G; Gordon, L; Wong, K; Moore, D; Whorton, D

    1981-08-01

    Semen was collected from 50 men occupationally exposed to carbaryl (1-naphthyl methyl carbamate) in a produciton plant for durations of 1 to 18 years and compared to semen from a control group of 34 unexposed, newly-hired workers. Employment, fertility, health, personal data, and blood samples were collected for each individual. Semen samples were analyzed for changes in sperm count, morphology, and frequency of sperm carrying double flourescent bodies (YFF). As a group, the exposed workers showed a significantly higher proportion of sperm with abnormal head shapes than did the control group (p < 0.005). Age, smoking habits, and medical problems did not appear to affect this result. This finding appears to be limited to men working in the carbaryl production area at the time of sampling. Sperm count and YFF did not show similar differences, which may be because they are known to be statistically less sensitive to small changes. Formerly exposed workers (away from carbaryl for an average of 6.3 years) showed a marginally significant elevation in sperm abnormalities compared to controls (p < .05, one-tailed statistical analyses) suggesting that the increase in abnormal morphology may not be reversible. However, the question of reversibility is sensitive to confounding factors and small sample sizes and, therefore, requires further study. With these data a definitive link between carbaryl exposure and human seminal defects cannot be established. Although a distinct effect on sperm morphology was seen in the exposed group, the increases in sperm shape abnormalities were not related to exposure dose (estimated by number of years on the job or job classification during the year prior to semen collection). Inexplicably, the increases in sperm abnormalities were seen primarily in currently exposed men who had worked with carbaryl for less than approximately 6 years. These findings suggest the need for further study since other workplace-related factor(s) may be responsible for the elevated sperm abnormalities seen in this study. PMID:6791917

  10. Cryopreservation of Greenshell mussel (Perna canaliculus) sperm.

    PubMed

    Adams, Serean L; Smith, John F; Taylor, Jolene; McGowan, Lindsay T; Tervit, H Robin

    2015-01-01

    Cryopreservation is a valuable technique for aquaculture as it enables a library or bank of genetically valuable animals to be maintained in a cost-effective manner. Here, we describe a method to cryopreserve the sperm of the Greenshell mussel (Perna canaliculus) and how to use the sperm post-thawing to maximize larval production from thawed sperm in selective breeding. PMID:25428014

  11. Sperm (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... contains the DNA, which when combined with the egg's DNA, will create a new individual. The tip ... acrosome, which enables the sperm to penetrate the egg. The midpiece contains the mitochondria which supplies the ...

  12. Lipids and calcium uptake of sperm in relation to cold shock and preservation: a review.

    PubMed

    White, I G

    1993-01-01

    When sperm of the ram, bull, boar and stallion are cold-shocked by rapid cooling to near freezing point, motility and metabolic activity are irreversibly depressed and the acrosome and plasma membrane disrupted. Ram sperm become susceptible to cold shock in the proximal corpus region of the epididymis when the cytoplasmic droplet has moved backwards to the distal portion of the sperm midpiece. The membrane constituents phospholipids and cholesterol are important in cold shock which causes loss of lipid from sperm. The susceptibility of sperm to cold shock is linked with a high ratio of unsaturated:saturated fatty acids in the phospholipids and a low cholesterol content. The high unsaturated fatty acid content of sperm also makes them susceptible to damage from peroxidation which adversely affects motility, metabolism, ultrastructure and fertility. Hydroxynonenal, a product of fatty acid peroxidation, depresses the motility and oxygen uptake of ram sperm in vitro and may react with the -SH groups of the axonemal microtubules. High calcium concentrations in the external medium may decrease the motility and metabolism of sperm and 'calcium intoxication' may be a factor in cold shock. Lowering the environmental temperature increases calcium uptake by sperm and the effect is aggravated if the rate of cooling is rapid. Phospholipids, particularly those in egg yolk, protect sperm to some extent from cold shock and also prevent increased calcium flux into the sperm. Suggestions are made for increasing the life span of sperm during preservation and microencapsulation by adding agents that may stabilize membranes, counter peroxidation and decrease calcium uptake. PMID:9627725

  13. Leydig cell number and sperm production decrease induced by chronic ametryn exposure: a negative impact on animal reproductive health.

    PubMed

    Dantas, T A; Cancian, G; Neodini, D N R; Mano, D R S; Capucho, C; Predes, F S; Pulz, R Barbieri; Pigoso, A A; Dolder, H; Severi-Aguiar, G D C

    2015-06-01

    Ametryn is an herbicide used to control broadleaf and grass weeds and its acute and chronic toxicity is expected to be low. Since toxicological data on ametryn is scarce, the aim of this study was to evaluate rat reproductive toxicity. Thirty-six adult male Wistar rats (90days) were divided into three groups: Co (control) and T1 and T2 exposed to 15 and 30mg/kg/day of ametryn, respectively, for 56days. Testicular analysis demonstrated that ametryn decreased sperm number per testis, daily sperm production, and Leydig cell number in both treated groups, although little perceptible morphological change has been observed in seminiferous tubule structure. Lipid peroxidation was higher in group T2, catalase activity decreased in T1 group, superoxide dismutase activity diminished, and a smaller number of sulphydryl groups of total proteins were verified in both exposed groups, suggesting oxidative stress. These results showed negative ametryn influence on the testes and can compromise animal reproductive performance and survival. PMID:25561257

  14. Binding pattern and toxicological effects of lectins from genus Canavalia on bovine sperm.

    PubMed

    Kaefer, Cristian; Komninou, Eliza R; Campos, Vinicius F; de Leon, Priscila M; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe S; Nascimento, Kyria S; Teixeira, Edson H; Stefanello, Francielli M; Barschak, Aletha G; Deschamps, Joo Carlos; Seixas, Fabiana K; Cavada, Benildo S; Collares, Tiago

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the binding patterns of Canavalia ensiformis (ConA), Canavalia boliviana (ConBol) and Canavalia brasiliensis (ConBr) lectins to bovine sperm and their effects on sperm motility, viability, lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species production and fertilization ability. ConA bound to whole spermatozoa, with the exception of the equatorial segment, ConBol did not interact with the acrosome region and ConBr exhibited a fragmented binding pattern. The three lectins decreased sperm motility but did not affect cell viability or lipid peroxidation. Nevertheless, ROS production was increased in comparison to controls and a reduction in the cleavage and blastocyst ratio was induced in comparison to controls. In conclusion, this study determined that structurally similar lectins interact differently with bovine sperm and affect sperm motility, viability, lipid peroxidation, ROS production and fertilization ability in various ways. PMID:23524305

  15. No evidence for sperm priming responses under varying sperm competition risk or intensity in guppies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Jonathan P.

    2009-07-01

    Sperm competition theory predicts that males should tailor their investment in ejaculates according to the number of rival males competing to fertilize a females eggs. Research spanning several taxa supports this prediction by showing that males are often sensitive to the level of sperm competition and adjust their investment in sperm numbers accordingly. More recent work has revealed that males may also tailor the quality of sperm according to the number of males competing for fertilization. Here I test for both effects in guppies ( Poecilia reticulata) in an experiment that simultaneously evaluates the risk and intensity models of sperm competition. The experiment determined whether male guppies adjust the number (stripped ejaculate size) and quality (sperm velocity and viability) of sperm that are primed over a 3-day period according to experimental changes in the perceived level of sperm competition. A total of 136 focal males were initially stripped of all retrievable sperm and assayed for these sperm traits before being allocated at random to one of four treatments simulating different levels of sperm competition risk and intensity. During the 3-day treatment phase, focal males had visual and olfactory access to a sexually receptive (initially virgin) female maintained with different numbers of stimulus males to simulate variation in the risk and intensity of sperm competition. Following this, males were assayed again for the sperm traits. Contrary to predictions, there was no significant change in any of the measured variables among treatments, although qualitatively the patterns for sperm velocity and viability did conform to expectation. The lack of any trend for the number of sperm primed was unequivocal and future work examining the effects of sperm competition on sperm production should focus on whether males differentially allocate sperm numbers among matings that differ in the level of sperm competition.

  16. Increased Fertilization Rates after In Vitro Culture of Frozen-Thawed Testicular Immotile Sperm in Nonobstructive Azoospermic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nuez-Calonge, R.; Cortes, S.; Gago, M.; Lpez, P.; Caballero-Peregrin, P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To optimise the use of freeze/thaw testicular immotile spermatozoa from nonobstructive azoospermia patients and to analyse the outcome of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) of such spermatozoa. Methods. Testicular specimens were retrieved and cryopreserved from forty patients with nonobstructive azoospermia and underwent one cycle with thawed spermatozoa (Group I) that led to pregnancy in sixteen cases. Twenty-four patients of group I underwent treatment with the same batch of thawed spermatozoa (Group II). For the first ICSI attempt, injection was performed when motile spermatozoa were found. In group II, injection was performed when maximum motility was reached. We compared mean of fertilization rate, embryo quality, clinical pregnancy rate and embryo implantation rate. Results. The mean percentage of motility was significantly higher in the group II than in the group I (18, 6 versus 8, 2). Group I showed a significant decrease in fertilization rates when compared with cryopreserved testicular spermatozoa in group II (54% versus 72%, P < 0.05). No difference was noted between the cleavage rate, embryo quality, clinical pregnancy rates and implantation rates among group II and I. Conclusion. Fecundation rate can be significantly improved after in-vitro culture and sperm selection of frozen-thawed immotile testicular spermatozoa in patients with nonobstructive azoospermia. PMID:22567413

  17. Fracturing high-permeability reservoirs increases productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Dusterhoft, R.G. ); Chapman, B.J. )

    1994-06-20

    Hydraulic fracturing of high-permeability reservoirs has increased long-term hydrocarbon production and reduced sand production in many areas of the world. A key element is the reduction of near well bore drawdown during production. Drawdown, the difference between reservoir and production pressures, is the driving force for flow into the well bore. As drawdown increases because of higher production rates or depletion, formation instability may cause fines and sand to migrate into the well bore region. A greater well bore radius reduces both radial velocity and drawdown. Fracturing beyond the well bore region effectively bypasses the damaged zone, increasing the effective radius of the well bore and enabling higher flow rates with lower drawdown pressures. In essence, the reservoir energy is used more efficiently because the conductive proppant bed bypasses the near well bore restrictions. The paper discusses candidate well selection; proppant selection; sand control; minifrac procedures; spurt losses; fracture design; equipment; case histories in West Africa and offshore Louisiana.

  18. Sperm motility and MSP.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Harold

    2006-01-01

    Form follows function, and this maxim is particularly true for the nematode sperm cell. Motility is essential for fertilization, and the process of spermatogenesis culminates in the production of a crawling spermatozoon with an extended pseudopod. However, the morphological similarity to amoeboid cells of other organisms is not conserved at the molecular level. Instead of utilizing the actin cytoskeleton and motor proteins, the pseudopod moves via the regulated assembly and disassembly of filaments composed of the major sperm protein (MSP). The current work reviews the structure and dynamics of MSP filament formation, the critical role of pH in MSP assembly, and the recent identification of components that regulate this process. The combination of cytological, biochemical, and genetic approaches in this relatively simple system make nematode sperm an attractive model for investigating the mechanics of amoeboid cell motility. PMID:18050481

  19. Identification and validation of mouse sperm proteins correlated with epididymal maturation

    PubMed Central

    Ijiri, Takashi W.; Merdiushev, Tanya; Cao, Wenlei; Gerton, George L.

    2012-01-01

    Sperm need to mature in the epididymis to become capable of fertilization. To understand the molecular mechanisms of mouse sperm maturation, we conducted a proteomic analysis using saturation dye labeling to identify proteins of caput and cauda epididymal sperm that exhibited differences in amounts or positions on two-dimensional gels. Of eight caput epididymal sperm-differential proteins, three were molecular chaperones and three were structural proteins. Of nine cauda epididymal sperm-differential proteins, six were enzymes of energy metabolism. To validate these proteins as markers of epididymal maturation, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence analyses were performed. During epididymal transit, heat shock protein 2 was eliminated with the cytoplasmic droplet and smooth muscle ?-actin exhibited reduced fluorescence from the anterior acrosome while the signal intensity of aldolase A increased, especially in the principal piece. Besides these changes, we observed protein spots, such as glutathione S-transferase mu 5 and the E2 component of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, shifting to more basic isoelectric points, suggesting post-translational changes such dephosphorylation occur during epididymal maturation. We conclude that most caput epididymal sperm-differential proteins contribute to the functional modification of sperm structures and that many cauda epididymal sperm-differential proteins are involved in ATP production that promotes sperm functions such as motility. PMID:21805633

  20. Sperm competition games: the risk model can generate higher sperm allocation to virgin females.

    PubMed

    Ball, M A; Parker, G A

    2007-03-01

    We examine the risk model in sperm competition games for cases where female fertility increases significantly with sperm numbers (sperm limitation). Without sperm competition, sperm allocation increases with sperm limitation. We define 'average risk' as the probability q that females in the population mate twice, and 'perceived risk' as the information males gain about the sperm competition probability with individual females. If males obtain no information from individual females, sperm numbers increase with q unless sperm limitation is high and one of the two competing ejaculates is strongly disfavoured. If males can distinguish between virgin and mated females, greater sperm allocation to virgins is favoured by high sperm limitation, high q, and by the second male's ejaculate being disfavoured. With high sperm limitation, sperm allocation to virgins increases and to mated females decreases with q at high q levels. With perfect information about female mating pattern, sperm allocation (i) to virgins that will mate again exceeds that to mated females and to virgins that will mate only once, (ii) to virgins that mate only once exceeds that for mated females if q is high and there is high second male disadvantage and (iii) to each type of female can decrease with q if sperm limitation is high, although the average allocation increases at least across low q levels. In general, higher sperm allocation to virgins is favoured by: strong disadvantage to the second ejaculate, high sperm limitation, high average risk and increased information (perceived risk). These conditions may apply in a few species, especially spiders. PMID:17305842

  1. Decoding mechanisms of loss of fertilization ability of cryopreserved mouse sperm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Jeffrey Earl

    Cryopreservation of mouse sperm is an important technology for management of biomedical research resources. Dramatic progress has been made recently in the development of protocols that combat mouse-strain specific reduction of IVF after cryopreservation. Equal emphasis, however, has not been placed on investigating the biological mechanisms underlying these improvements to IVF. This dissertation broadly investigates the basic question of how mouse-strain specific reduction of IVF occurs after cryopreservation, and how recently developed protocols prevent this process. My research investigated the effects of antioxidants, the cholesterol-acceptor CD, reduced calcium media, and TYH capacitation media on sperm function and oxidative stress after cryopreservation in a variety of mouse strains. I found that reduced IVF was associated with loss of capacitation-dependent sperm function in three strains, B6/J, B6/N, and 129X1, and CD improved sperm function and IVF in all three strains. These findings suggest that cryopreservation inhibits cholesterol efflux resulting in reduced IVF of many mouse strains. I also found that cryopreservation induces uniquely high production of mitochondrial H2O2 by B6/J sperm. H2O2 present in other cellular compartments of B6/J sperm was not elevated compared to other strains. High levels of mitochondrial H2O2 were associated with lipid peroxidation of the sperm head and inability to acrosome react. Antioxidants reduced mitochondrial H2O2 production, decreased sperm head lipid peroxidation, and improved acrosome reaction. The cryopreservation-induced increase in mitochondrial H2O2 production of B6/J and B6129XF1 sperm was associated with elevation of intracellular calcium after cryopreservation and dependent on mitochondrial metabolic substrates. Reducing intracellular calcium levels or removing mitochondrial metabolic substrates decreased mitochondrial H2O2 production and increased IVF rates of cryopreserved B6/J sperm. Many of the strains I tested exhibited increased H2O2 production after cryopreservation, but cryopreservation-induced H2O2 only interfered with IVF of B6/J sperm. This dissertation describes two means to improve IVF of cryopreserved sperm, mitigation of oxidative stress in B6/J sperm and improvement of capacitation-dependent sperm function for several mouse strains.

  2. Fires increase Amazon forest productivity through increases in diffuse radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rap, A.; Spracklen, D. V.; Mercado, L.; Reddington, C. L.; Haywood, J. M.; Ellis, R. J.; Phillips, O. L.; Artaxo, P.; Bonal, D.; Restrepo Coupe, N.; Butt, N.

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric aerosol scatters solar radiation increasing the fraction of diffuse radiation and the efficiency of photosynthesis. We quantify the impacts of biomass burning aerosol (BBA) on diffuse radiation and plant photosynthesis across Amazonia during 1998-2007. Evaluation against observed aerosol optical depth allows us to provide lower and upper BBA emissions estimates. BBA increases Amazon basin annual mean diffuse radiation by 3.4-6.8% and net primary production (NPP) by 1.4-2.8%, with quoted ranges driven by uncertainty in BBA emissions. The enhancement of Amazon basin NPP by 78-156 Tg C a-1 is equivalent to 33-65% of the annual regional carbon emissions from biomass burning. This NPP increase occurs during the dry season and acts to counteract some of the observed effect of drought on tropical production. We estimate that 30-60 Tg C a-1 of this NPP enhancement is within woody tissue, accounting for 8-16% of the observed carbon sink across mature Amazonian forests.

  3. Adiponectin lowers glucose production by increasing SOGA.

    PubMed

    Cowherd, Rachael B; Cowerd, Rachael B; Asmar, Melissa M; Alderman, J McKee; Alderman, Elizabeth A; Garland, Alaina L; Busby, Walker H; Bodnar, Wanda M; Rusyn, Ivan; Medoff, Benjamin D; Tisch, Roland; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth; Swenberg, James A; Zeisel, Steven H; Combs, Terry P

    2010-10-01

    Adiponectin is a hormone that lowers glucose production by increasing liver insulin sensitivity. Insulin blocks the generation of biochemical intermediates for glucose production by inhibiting autophagy. However, autophagy is stimulated by an essential mediator of adiponectin action, AMPK. This deadlock led to our hypothesis that adiponectin inhibits autophagy through a novel mediator. Mass spectrometry revealed a novel protein that we call suppressor of glucose by autophagy (SOGA) in adiponectin-treated hepatoma cells. Adiponectin increased SOGA in hepatocytes, and siRNA knockdown of SOGA blocked adiponectin inhibition of glucose production. Furthermore, knockdown of SOGA increased late autophagosome and lysosome staining and the secretion of valine, an amino acid that cannot be synthesized or metabolized by liver cells, suggesting that SOGA inhibits autophagy. SOGA decreased in response to AICAR, an activator of AMPK, and LY294002, an inhibitor of the insulin signaling intermediate, PI3K. AICAR reduction of SOGA was blocked by adiponectin; however, adiponectin did not increase SOGA during PI3K inhibition, suggesting that adiponectin increases SOGA through the insulin signaling pathway. SOGA contains an internal signal peptide that enables the secretion of a circulating fragment of SOGA, providing a surrogate marker for intracellular SOGA levels. Circulating SOGA increased in parallel with adiponectin and insulin activity in both humans and mice. These results suggest that adiponectin-mediated increases in SOGA contribute to the inhibition of glucose production. PMID:20813965

  4. Differences in ATP Generation Via Glycolysis and Oxidative Phosphorylation and Relationships with Sperm Motility in Mouse Species.

    PubMed

    Tourmente, Maximiliano; Villar-Moya, Pilar; Rial, Eduardo; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2015-08-14

    Mouse sperm produce enough ATP to sustain motility by anaerobic glycolysis and respiration. However, previous studies indicated that an active glycolytic pathway is required to achieve normal sperm function and identified glycolysis as the main source of ATP to fuel the motility of mouse sperm. All the available evidence has been gathered from the studies performed using the laboratory mouse. However, comparative studies of closely related mouse species have revealed a wide range of variation in sperm motility and ATP production and that the laboratory mouse has comparatively low values in these traits. In this study, we compared the relative reliance on the usage of glycolysis or oxidative phosphorylation as ATP sources for sperm motility between mouse species that exhibit significantly different sperm performance parameters. We found that the sperm of species with higher oxygen consumption/lactate excretion rate ratios were able to produce higher amounts of ATP, achieving higher swimming velocities. Additionally, we show that the species with higher respiration/glycolysis ratios have a higher degree of dependence upon active oxidative phosphorylation. Moreover, we characterize for the first time two mouse species in which sperm depend on functional oxidative phosphorylation to achieve normal performance. Finally, we discuss that sexual selection could promote adaptations in sperm energetic metabolism tending to increase the usage of a more efficient pathway for the generation of ATP (and faster sperm). PMID:26048989

  5. Transcript levels of the soluble sperm factor protein phospholipase C zeta 1 (PLCζ1) increase through induced spermatogenesis in European eel.

    PubMed

    Morini, Marina; Peñaranda, David S; Vílchez, María C; Gallego, Víctor; Nourizadeh-Lillabadi, Rasoul; Asturiano, Juan F; Weltzien, Finn-Arne; Pérez, Luz

    2015-09-01

    Activation at fertilization of the vertebrate egg is triggered by Ca(2+) waves. Recent studies suggest the phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ), a sperm-specific protein, triggers egg activation by an IP3-mediated Ca(2+) release and allow Ca(2+) waves at fertilization. In the present study we cloned, characterized, and phylogenetically positioned the European eel PLCζ (PLCζ1). It is 1521 bp long, with 10 exons encoding an open reading frame of 506 amino acids. The amino acid sequence contains an EF-hand domain, X and Y catalytic domains, and a carboxy-terminal C2 domain, all typical of other PLCζ orthologous. The tissue distribution was studied, and the gene expression was determined in testis during induced sexual maturation at three different thermal regimes. Also, brain and pituitary expression was studied through sex maturation at constant temperature. plcζ1 was expressed in brain of male and female, in testis but not in ovaries. By first time in vertebrates, it is reported plcζ1 expression in the pituitary gland. Testis plcζ1 expression increased through spermatogenesis under all the thermal regimes, but being significantly elevated at lower temperatures. It was very low when testis contained only spermatogonia or spermatocytes, while maximum expression was found during spermiogenesis. These results support the hypothesis for an eel sperm-specific PLCζ1 inducing egg activation, similarly to mammals and some teleosts, but different from some other teleost species, which express this protein in ovaries, but not in testes. PMID:26051612

  6. Increasing productivity through Total Reuse Management (TRM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuler, M. P.

    1991-01-01

    Total Reuse Management (TRM) is a new concept currently being promoted by the NASA Langley Software Engineering and Ada Lab (SEAL). It uses concepts similar to those promoted in Total Quality Management (TQM). Both technical and management personnel are continually encouraged to think in terms of reuse. Reuse is not something that is aimed for after a product is completed, but rather it is built into the product from inception through development. Lowering software development costs, reducing risk, and increasing code reliability are the more prominent goals of TRM. Procedures and methods used to adopt and apply TRM are described. Reuse is frequently thought of as only being applicable to code. However, reuse can apply to all products and all phases of the software life cycle. These products include management and quality assurance plans, designs, and testing procedures. Specific examples of successfully reused products are given and future goals are discussed.

  7. Continued increases in Arctic Ocean primary production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrigo, Kevin R.; van Dijken, Gert L.

    2015-08-01

    Dramatic declines in sea-ice cover in the Arctic Ocean in recent decades have the potential to fundamentally alter marine ecosystems. Here we investigate changes in sea ice between the years 1998 and 2012 at regional and basin scales and how these have impacted rates of phytoplankton net primary production (NPP). Annual NPP increased 30% over the Arctic Ocean during our study period, with the largest increases on the interior shelves and smaller increases on inflow shelves. Increased annual NPP was often, but not always, associated with reduced sea-ice extent and a longer phytoplankton growing season (fewer days of ice cover). Spatial patterns of increased annual NPP suggest that increased nutrient fluxes may also play an important role. Outflow shelves either exhibited no change in annual NPP during our study period or a significant decline, perhaps indicating that nutrients had been consumed by increased NPP farther upstream.

  8. Production of androgenetic diploid loach by cold-shock of eggs fertilized with diploid sperm.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jilun; Fujimoto, Takafumi; Yamaha, Etsuro; Arai, Katsutoshi

    2013-07-15

    Diploid androgenotes were produced without egg irradiation in the loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus. Eggs of wild-type diploid females were fertilized with diploid sperm of a neo-tetraploid male and then cold-shock treated at 3 °C (range, ±0.5 °C) for 30 minutes just after fertilization to eliminate the female nucleus. After hatching, ploidy status of the hatched larvae was analyzed by flow cytometry, which revealed putative diploid androgenotes as well as larvae possessing other ploidies. Five independent microsatellite DNA markers were genotyped to confirm all-male inheritance of the resultant diploid larvae. The mean ± SD yield rate of diploid androgenetic larvae to total eggs used was 12.29 ± 3.25% in the cold-shock group and 22.23 ± 13.42% in the UV-irradiated group (P > 0.05). No diploid androgenetic larvae were detected in the intact control group. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating successful induction of diploid androgenotes without egg irradiation in fish. PMID:23602217

  9. Exploring Increased Productivity Through Employee Engagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Wayne K., Jr.

    Disengaged employees cost U.S. companies billions of dollars annually in lowered productivity, a cost which has been compounded by the difficult economic situations in the country. The potential for increasing productivity through increased employee engagement was examined in this study. Using personal engagement theory and the theory of planned behavior, the purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore how the experiences of salaried aerospace employees affected productivity and the financial performance of an organization. Interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 20 aerospace employees whose responses were codified and analyzed to identify themes. The analysis indicated that (a) the lived experiences of employees influenced employee engagement, (b) employee engagement affects organizational commitment and performance, and (c) trust and respect and leadership are essential components to keep employees engaged. Eighty percent of the participants indicated that as employee engagement increases so too does organizational performance. The implications for positive social change include new insights for leaders seeking to increase productivity and financial performance, and to support employee engagement for maintaining sustainability, retaining talent, increasing profits, and improving the economy.

  10. Male-derived cuticular hydrocarbons signal sperm competition intensity and affect ejaculate expenditure in crickets.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Melissa L; Simmons, Leigh W

    2009-01-22

    Female sexual promiscuity can have significant effects on male mating decisions because it increases the intensity of competition between ejaculates for fertilization. Because sperm production is costly, males that can detect multiple matings by females and allocate sperm strategically will have an obvious fitness advantage. The presence of rival males is widely recognized as a cue used by males to assess sperm competition. However, for species in which males neither congregate around nor guard females, other more cryptic cues might be involved. Here, we demonstrate unprecedented levels of sperm competition assessment by males, which is mediated via the use of chemical cues. Using the cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus, we manipulated male perception of sperm competition by experimentally coating live unmated females with cuticular compounds extracted from males. We found that males adjusted their ejaculate allocation in response to these compounds: the viability of sperm contained within a male's ejaculate decreased as the number of male extracts applied to his virgin female partner was increased. We further show that males do not respond to the relative concentration of male compounds present on females, but rather to the number of distinct signature odours of individual males. Our results conform to sperm competition theory, and show for the first time, to our knowledge, that males can detect different intensities of sperm competition by using distinct chemical cues of individual males present on females. PMID:18854298

  11. Cryoprotective effect of phosphorous-containing phenolic anti-oxidant for the cryopreservation of beluga sperm.

    PubMed

    Osipova, V P; Kolyada, M N; Berberova, N T; Milaeva, E R; Ponomareva, E N; Belaya, M M

    2014-12-01

    A cryoprotective effect of an addition of a new synthetic antioxidant - a representative of phosphorus-containing sterically hindered phenols is presented. The efficiency of the compound was shown to exceed the effect of lipid-soluble antioxidants butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and trolox in the conditions of cryopreservation of beluga sperm in the presence of the modified Stein's medium. It was shown that the level of carbonyl oxidation by-products, which can react with thiobarbituric acid (TBARS), in beluga sperm was inversely proportional to the motility time of sperm cells. The fertility of beluga sperm increased 2 times upon the addition of phosphorus-containing phenol to a modified Stein's medium. The prospects of the new antioxidant application to improve cryoresistance of beluga sperm in the conditions of cryopreservation for its efficient protection from the peroxidation processes are discussed. PMID:25445463

  12. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhaps reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.

  13. Increasing the availability of national mapping products.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roney, J.I.; Ogilvie, B.C.

    1981-01-01

    A discussion of the means employed by the US Geological Survey to facilitate map usage, covering aspects of project Map Accessibility Program including special rolled and folded map packaging, new market testing, parks and campgrounds program, expanded map dealer program, new booklet-type State sales index and catalog and new USGS map reference code. The USGS is seen as the producer of a tremendous nation-wide inventory of topographic and related map products available in unprecedented types, formats and scales, and as endeavouring to increase access to its products. The new USGS map reference code is appended. -J.C.Stone

  14. Engineering Rhodosporidium toruloides for increased lipid production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuyan; Skerker, Jeffrey M; Rutter, Charles D; Maurer, Matthew J; Arkin, Adam P; Rao, Christopher V

    2016-05-01

    Oleaginous yeast are promising organisms for the production of lipid-based chemicals and fuels from simple sugars. In this work, we explored Rhodosporidium toruloides for the production of lipid-based products. This oleaginous yeast natively produces lipids at high titers and can grow on glucose and xylose. As a first step, we sequenced the genomes of two strains, IFO0880, and IFO0559, and generated draft assemblies and annotations. We then used this information to engineer two R. toruloides strains for increased lipid production by over-expressing the native acetyl-CoA carboxylase and diacylglycerol acyltransferase genes using Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation. Our best strain, derived from IFO0880, was able to produce 16.4 ± 1.1 g/L lipid from 70 g/L glucose and 9.5 ± 1.3 g/L lipid from 70 g/L xylose in shake-flask experiments. This work represents one of the first examples of metabolic engineering in R. toruloides and establishes this yeast as a new platform for production of fatty-acid derived products. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1056-1066. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26479039

  15. Sperm DNA fragmentation is related to sperm morphological staining patterns.

    PubMed

    Sá, Rosália; Cunha, Mariana; Rocha, Eduardo; Barros, Alberto; Sousa, Mário

    2015-10-01

    In this prospective comparative study, sperm DNA fragmentation (sDNAfrag) was compared at each step of a sequential semen preparation, with semen parameters according to their degree of severity. At each step (fractions) of the sequential procedure, sDNAfrag was determined: fresh (Raw), after gradient centrifugation, washing, and swim-up (SU) for 70 infertile men enrolled in intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles. sDNAfrag significantly (P = 0.04; P < 0.0001) decreased throughout the steps of semen preparation, with centrifugation and washing not increasing it. A negative correlation to sperm motility was observed in Raw and SU fractions, and a higher sDNAfrag was observed in samples with lower semen quality. Our results confirm that the steps of the sequential procedure do not compromise sperm DNA integrity and progressively decreased sDNAfrag regardless of the sperm abnormality and that semen parameters with lower quality present higher sDNAfrag. Four distinct patterns were observed, of which the entire sperm head staining was the pattern most expressed in all studied fractions. Additionally, the sperm head gene-rich region staining pattern was reduced by the procedure. This suggests that pattern quantification might be a useful adjunct when performing sDNAfrag testing for male infertility. PMID:26278809

  16. The effects of male age on sperm DNA damage in healthy non-smokers

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, T; Eskenazi, B; Baumgartner, A; Marchetti, F; Young, S; Weldon, R; Anderson, D; Wyrobek, A

    2006-03-08

    The trend for men to have children at older ages raises concerns that advancing age may increase the production of genetically defective sperm, increasing the risks of transmitting germ-line mutations. We investigated the associations between male age and sperm DNA damage and the influence of several lifestyle factors in a healthy non-clinical group of 80 non-smokers (age: 22-80) with no known fertility problems using the sperm Comet analyses. The average percent of DNA that migrated out of the sperm nucleus under alkaline electrophoresis increased with age (0.18% per year, p=0.006); but there was no age association for damage measured under neutral conditions (p=0.7). Men who consumed >3 cups coffee per day had {approx}20% higher % tail DNA under neutral but not alkaline conditions compared to men who consumed no caffeine (p=0.005). Our findings indicate that (a) older men have increased sperm DNA damage associated with alkali-labile sites or single-strand DNA breaks, and (b) independent of age, men with substantial daily caffeine consumption have increased sperm DNA damage associated with double-strand DNA breaks. DNA damage in sperm can be converted to chromosomal aberrations and gene mutations after fertilization increasing the risks for developmental defects and genetic diseases among offspring.

  17. Copulation Activity, Sperm Production and Conidia Transfer in Aedes aegypti Males Contaminated by Metarhizium anisopliae: A Biological Control Prospect

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Tanya L.; Braks, Marieta A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dengue is the most prevalent arboviral disease transmitted by Aedes aegypti worldwide, whose chemical control is difficult, expensive, and of inconsistent efficacy. Releases of Metarhizium anisopliaeexposed Ae. aegypti males to disseminate conidia among female mosquitoes by mating represents a promising biological control approach against this important vector. A better understanding of fungus virulence and impact on reproductive parameters of Ae. aegypti, is need before testing auto-dissemination strategies. Methodology/Principal Findings Mortality, mating competitiveness, sperm production, and the capacity to auto-disseminate the fungus to females up to the 5thcopulation, were compared between Aedes aegypti males exposed to 5.96 x 107 conidia per cm2 of M. anisopliae and uninfected males. Half (50%) of fungus-exposed males (FEMs) died within the first 4 days post-exposure (PE). FEMs required 34% more time to successively copulate with 5 females (165 3 minutes) than uninfected males (109 3 minutes). Additionally, fungus infection reduced the sperm production by 87% at 5 days PE. Some beneficial impacts were observed, FEMs were able to successfully compete with uninfected males in cages, inseminating an equivalent number of females (about 25%). Under semi-field conditions, the ability of FEMs to search for and inseminate females was also equivalent to uninfected males (both inseminating about 40% females); but for the remaining females that were not inseminated, evidence of tarsal contact (transfer of fluorescent dust) was significantly greater in FEMs compared to controls. The estimated conidia load of a female exposed on the 5th copulation was 5,200 mL-1 which was sufficient to cause mortality. Conclusion/Significance Our study is the first to demonstrate auto-dissemination of M. anisopliae through transfer of fungus from males to female Ae. aegypti during mating under semi-field conditions. Our results suggest that auto-dissemination studies using releases of FEMs inside households could successfully infect wild Ae. aegypti females, providing another viable biological control tool for this important the dengue vector. PMID:26473490

  18. Effect of sperm treatment on efficiency of EGFP-expressing porcine embryos produced by ICSI-SMGT.

    PubMed

    Garca-Vzquez, F A; Garca-Rosell, E; Gutirrez-Adn, A; Gadea, J

    2009-09-01

    Intracytoplasmic sperm injection-sperm-mediated gene transfer (ICSI-SMGT) is a useful tool for the production of transgenic mice but is still rather inefficient in farm animals. In the current study, we evaluated the effect of the sperm treatments on the efficiency for producing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing pig embryos by ICSI-SMGT. Four different sperm treatments were assayed: (1) fresh (control), (2) frozen-thawing (FT), (3) quick freezing without cryoprotectant agents (QF), and (4) Triton X-100 treatment (TX-100). First, we evaluated the DNA-binding ability and the viability of sperm under the different treatments coincubated with exogenous DNA (EGFP) by flow cytometry. Second, we evaluated the embryo production rate and the efficiency in transgene expression in embryos after using these spermatozoa to fertilize oocytes by ICSI. Sperm treatment significantly increased DNA-binding capacity but reduced sperm viability compared with that of the control group. Treatments damaging the spermatozoa's membranes (QF and TX-100) resulted in a greater capacity of sperm binding exogenous DNA than that after FT treatment (P<0.01). Similar rates of EGFP-expressing embryos were obtained from the control, FT, and TX-100 groups (37.04+/-3.52%, 43.54+/-5.41%, and 29.03+/-8.29%, respectively), but were significantly higher in the QF group (80.43+/-5.91%). These results demonstrate that the integrity of the sperm plasma membrane plays a critical role in DNA interaction, and altered plasma membranes facilitate interactions between an injected exogenous DNA and the sperm chromatin. However, severe sperm treatments such as QF and TX-100 may damage the sperm nucleus, induce DNA fragmentation, and/or lead to chromosomal breakage with a detrimental effect on further embryonic development. PMID:19501394

  19. Hypercholesterolemia increases endothelial superoxide anion production.

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Y; Peterson, T E; Harrison, D G

    1993-01-01

    Indirect evidence suggests accelerated degradation of endothelium-derived nitric oxide (ENDO) by superoxide anion (O2-) in hypercholesterolemic vessels (HV). To directly measure O2- production by normal vessels (NV) and HV, we used an assay for O2- based on the chemiluminescence (CL) of lucigenin (L). HV (1 mo cholesterol-fed rabbits) produced threefold more O2- than NV (1.47 +/- 0.20 nM/mg tissue/min, n = 7 vs. 0.52 +/- 0.05 nmol/mg tissue/min, n = 8, P < 0.001). Endothelial removal increased O2- production in NV (0.73 +/- 0.08, n = 6, P < 0.05), while decreasing it in HV (0.76 +/- 0.15, n = 5, P < 0.05). There was no difference between denuded HV and denuded NV. Oxypurinol, a noncompetitive inhibitor of xanthine oxidase, normalized O2- production in HV, but had no effect in NV. In separate isometric tension studies treatment with oxypurinol improved acetylcholine induced relaxations in HV, while having no effect on responses in normal vessels. Oxypurinol did not alter relaxations to nitroprusside. Thus, the endothelium is a source of O2- in hypercholesterolemia probably via xanthine oxidase activation. Increased endothelial O2- production in HV may inactivate endothelium-derived nitric oxide and provide a source for other oxygen radicals, contributing to the early atherosclerotic process. PMID:8390482

  20. Ejaculated Mouse Sperm Enter Cumulus-Oocyte Complexes More Efficiently In Vitro than Epididymal Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    The mouse is an established and popular animal model for studying reproductive biology. Epididymal mouse sperm, which lack exposure to secretions of male accessory glands and do not precisely represent ejaculated sperm for the study of sperm functions, have been almost exclusively used in studies. We compared ejaculated and epididymal sperm in an in vitro fertilization setting to examine whether ejaculated sperm enter cumulus-oocyte complexes more efficiently. In order to prepare sperm for fertilization, they were incubated under capacitating conditions. At the outset of incubation, ejaculated sperm stuck to the glass surfaces of slides and the incidences of sticking decreased with time; whereas, very few epididymal sperm stuck to glass at any time point, indicating differences in surface charge. At the end of the capacitating incubation, when sperm were added to cumulus-oocyte complexes, the form of flagellar movement differed dramatically; specifically, ejaculated sperm predominantly exhibited increased bending on one side of the flagellum (a process termed pro-hook hyperactivation), while epididymal sperm equally exhibited increased bending on one or the other side of the flagellum (pro-hook or anti-hook hyperactivation). This indicates that accessory sex gland secretions might have modified Ca2+ signaling activities in sperm, because the two forms of hyperactivation are reported to be triggered by different Ca2+ signaling patterns. Lastly, over time, more ejaculated than epididymal sperm entered the cumulus oocyte complexes. We concluded that modification of sperm by male accessory gland secretions affects the behavior of ejaculated sperm, possibly providing them with an advantage over epididymal sperm for reaching the eggs in vivo. PMID:25996155

  1. Competition drives cooperation among closely-related sperm of deer mice

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Heidi S.; Hoekstra, Hopi E.

    2009-01-01

    Among the extraordinary adaptations driven by sperm competition is the cooperative behaviour of spermatozoa1. By forming cooperative groups, sperm can increase their swimming velocity and thereby gain an advantage in intermale sperm competition1,2. Accordingly, selection should favour cooperation of the most closely related sperm to maximize fitness3. Here we show that sperm of deer mice (genus Peromyscus) form motile aggregations, then we use this system test predictions of sperm cooperation. We first show that sperm aggregate more often with conspecific than heterospecific sperm, suggesting that individual sperm can discriminate based on genetic relatedness. Next, we provide evidence that the cooperative behaviour of closely-related sperm is driven by sperm competition. In a monogamous species lacking sperm competition, P. polionotus, sperm indiscriminately group with unrelated conspecific sperm. In contrast, in the highly promiscuous deer mouse, P. maniculatus, sperm are significantly more likely to aggregate with those obtained from the same male than sperm from an unrelated conspecific donor. Even when we test sperm from sibling males, we continue to see preferential aggregations of related sperm in P. maniculatus. These results suggest that sperm from promiscuous deer mice discriminate among relatives and thereby cooperate with the most closely-related sperm, an adaptation likely driven by sperm competition. PMID:20090679

  2. Artificial insemination with donor sperm (AID): heterogeneity in sperm banking facilities in a single country (Belgium)

    PubMed Central

    Thijssen, A.; Dhont, N.; Vandormael, E.; Cox, A.; Klerkx, E.; Creemers, E.; Ombelet, W.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the high inflow of foreign patients seeking cross-border reproductive care in Belgium and the increased number of lesbian couples and single women who call for artificial insemination with donor sperm (AID), Belgian sperm banks nowadays face a shortage in donor sperm. However, since there is no central registration system for sperm donors in Belgium, no figures are currently available supporting this statement. Therefore a study was performed to obtain a detailed overview of the sperm banking facilities in Belgium. Questionnaires were sent to all Belgian centres for assisted reproduction with laboratory facilities (n?=?18) to report on their sperm banking methods. The results showed that 82% of the centres rely partially or completely on foreign donor sperm. Moreover, four of the thirteen centres that have their own sperm bank use imported donor sperm in >?95% AID cycles. Our results show that in 63% of the Belgian AID cycles imported Danish donor sperm is being used. Donor recruitment is mainly performed through the centres website (61%) or by distributing flyers in the centre (46%) and 9 to 180 potential donors have been recruited per centre in 2013. Eventually, 15 to 50% of these candidate donors were accepted. Different criteria for donor acceptance are handled by the centres: donor age limits range from 18-25 to 36-46 years old, and thresholds for sperm normality differ considerably. We can conclude that a wide variation in methods associated with sperm banking is observed in Belgian centres. PMID:25009728

  3. Recombinant Hamster Oviductin Is Biologically Active and Exerts Positive Effects on Sperm Functions and Sperm-Oocyte Binding

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaojing; Zhao, Yuewen; Yang, Xiaolong; Kan, Frederick W. K.

    2015-01-01

    Studies carried out in several mammalian species suggest that oviductin, also known as oviduct-specific glycoprotein or OVGP1, plays a key role in sperm capacitation, fertilization, and development of early embryos. In the present study, we used recombinant DNA technology to produce, for the first time, recombinant hamster OVGP1 (rHamOVGP1) in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. rHamOVGP1 secreted in the culture medium was purified by affinity chromatography. The resulting protein migrated as a poly-dispersed band of 160-350 kDa on SDS-PAGE corresponding to the molecular mass of the native HamOVGP1. Subsequent mass spectrometric analysis of the purified rHamOVGP1 confirmed its identity as HamOVGP1. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated binding of rHamOVGP1 to the mid-piece and head of hamster sperm and to the zona pellucida (ZP) of ovarian oocytes. In vitro functional experiments showed that addition of rHamOVGP1 in the capacitation medium further enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of two sperm proteins of approximately 75 kDa and 83 kDa in a time-dependent manner. After 3 hours of incubation in the presence of rHamOVGP1, a significant increase in acrosome reaction was measured. Pretreatment of either sperm or oocyte with 20 ?g/ml of rHamOVGP1 prior to sperm-egg binding assay significantly increased the number of sperm bound to the ZP. Addition of rHamOVGP1 in the medium during sperm-egg binding with either oocyte or sperm pretreated with rHamOVGP1 also saw an increase in the number of sperm bound to ZP. In all experimental conditions, the effect of rHamOVGP1 on sperm-oocyte binding was negated by the addition of monoclonal anti-HamOVGP1 antibody. The successful production and purification of a biologically active rHamOVGP1 will allow further exploration of the function of this glycoprotein in reproductive function. PMID:25849110

  4. Maturity stage and plasma testosterone levels are related to sperm production in blue catfish Ictalurus furcatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, the channel catfish, Ictalurus puntatus' X blue catfish, I.furcatus ' F1 hybrid has demonstrated good potential for commercial production compared to the commonly raised channel catfish. Efforts by researchers and commercial producers in the last 40 years have improved hybrid fry product...

  5. Sperm viability - Determination of sperm viability using fluorescence microscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the percentage of viable sperm in a semen sample using stains that differentiates viable (live) sperm from nonviable (dead) sperm. Viable sperm are detected by SYBR-14, which stains the sperm nuclei green. Nonviable sperm are detected by propidium iodide (PI), which stains the sperm red...

  6. Sperm motility patterns and metabolism in Catalonian donkey semen.

    PubMed

    Mir, J; Lobo, V; Quintero-Moreno, A; Medrano, A; Pea, A; Rigau, T

    2005-04-01

    The Sperm-Class Analyzer detected four subpopulations of spermatozoa with different motility characteristics in the ejaculate of the Catalonian donkey. Significant differences (P < 0.001) in the distribution of these subpopulations, as well as in total sperm number and percentage total motility, were seen in the diluted semen of four sampled donkeys. All the ejaculates evaluated showed excellent semen quality characteristics; the sperm they contained was more rapid than horse sperm. Principal components analysis showed sperm l-lactate production to be a good predictor of semen condition. This, plus the characteristics of the motility patterns of the different sperm subpopulations, provides an excellent overall indicator of semen quality. PMID:15763113

  7. Effect of cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) bark oil on heat stress-induced changes in sperm production, testicular lipid peroxidation, testicular apoptosis, and androgenic receptor density in developing Japanese quails.

    PubMed

    Trk, Gaffari; ?im?ek, lk G; eriba??, Ali O; eriba??, Songl; zer Kaya, ?eyma; Gven, Mehmet; ifti, Mehmet; Snmez, Mustafa; Yce, Abdurrauf; Bayrakdar, Ali; Yaman, Mine; Tonbak, Fadime

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cinnamon bark oil (CBO) on heat stress (HS)-induced changes in sperm production, testicular lipid peroxidation, testicular apoptosis, and androgenic receptor (AR) density in developing Japanese quails. Fifteen-day-old 90 male chicks were assigned to two main groups. The first group (45 chicks) was kept in a thermoneutral room at 22 C for 24 h/day. The second group (45 chicks) was kept in a room with high ambient temperature at 34 C for 8 h/day (from 9 AM-5 PM) and at 22 C for 16 h/day. Each of these two main groups was then divided into three subgroups (CBO groups 0, 250, 500 ppm) consisting of 15 chicks (six treatment groups in 2 3 factorial order). Each of subgroups was replicated for three times and each replicate included five chicks. Heat stress caused significant decreases in body weight, spermatid and testicular sperm numbers, the density of testicular Bcl-2 (antiapoptotic marker) and AR immunopositivity, and significant increases in testicular lipid peroxidation level, the density of testicular Bax (apoptotic marker) immunopositivity, and a Bax/Bcl-2 ratio along with some histopathologic damages. However, 250 and 500 ppm CBO supplementation provided significant improvements in HS-induced increased level of testicular lipid peroxidation, decreased number of spermatid and testicular sperm, decreased densities of Bcl-2 and AR immunopositivity, and some deteriorated testicular histopathologic lesions. In addition, although HS did not significantly affect the testicular glutathione level, addition of both 250 and 500 ppm CBO to diet of quails reared in both HS and thermoneutral conditions caused a significant increase when compared with quails without any consumption of CBO. In conclusion, HS-induced lipid peroxidation causes testicular damage in developing male Japanese quails and, consumption of CBO, which has antiperoxidative effect, protects their testes against HS. PMID:25913274

  8. Fire increases dust production from chaparral soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabet, Emmanuel J.

    2014-07-01

    By altering the physical and chemical properties of a landscape, fire may increase its vulnerability to erosive processes. Whereas sediment transport by surface runoff after fires has been often investigated, less is known about the role of wind erosion in burned terrain. To examine how fire might increase a soil's vulnerability to aeolian transport, intact soil samples were collected from a chaparral landscape in southern California and heated with a propane torch with temperatures ranging from 250 to 1025 °C and for durations of 5-60 min to simulate a variety of burn severities. The samples were then subjected to simulated wind and the amounts of eroded sediment were measured. Results indicate a linear increase in the production of wind-erodible sediment with applied heat up to ~ 10 MJ/m2. The increase was not due to a reduction in the threshold shear velocity of the soil surface but, instead, to the role of heat in detaching erodible material. In these soils, organic material may be an important binding agent destroyed at high temperatures. The relationship between fire and erodibility is complex, however, because heating may also help to aggregate soil particles. Experiments performed here also suggest a synergistic effect between fire and rain whereby heated soils are more vulnerable to the erosive power of raindrop impacts. Additionally, the soil heating experiments were used to measure and compare the thermal conductivities of intact and disturbed soils. Finally, it is concluded that soil heating may increase the emission of dust through the detachment of erodible particles, a result that may help in the anticipation of respiratory problems for those living downwind of burned areas.

  9. Evaluation of activation treatments for blastocyst production and birth of viable calves following bovine intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, T; Takada, N; Kikuchi, T; Numabe, T; Takenaka, M; Horiuchi, T

    2005-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of different methods of bovine oocyte activation following intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) in terms of oocyte cleavage and blastocyst rates, and calf production. Oocytes were harvested, post mortem, from the ovaries of Japanese Black heifers or cows. ICSI was carried out using a piezo-electric actuator. The injected or sham-injected oocytes that were assigned to three activation treatments, each replicated three times, were studied: (1) exposure to 5 microM ionomycin for 5 min (ionomycin); (2) exposure to 5 microM ionomycin for 5 min followed by culture in TCM199 for 3 h and a further 3h culture in 1.9 mM 6-dimethylaminopurine (DMAP-ionomycin+DMAP); (3) exposure to 7% ethanol in TCM199 for 5 min, 4 h after ICSI (ethanol). One or two blastocysts from the ionomycin+DMAP (8 recipients) and ethanol (17 recipients) oocyte activation treatments were non-surgically transferred into Holsteins for the study of calf production. The highest cleavage and blastocyst production rates were observed in the ionomycin+DMAP treatment (83.9% and 40.1%) by the ICSI. These rates were significantly (P<0.05) higher than those for the ionomycin oocyte activation treatment (57.6% and 18.2%) but did not differ from the ethanol treatment (75.6% and 29.4%). In the sham-injected, the highest blastocyst production rates were observed for the ionomycin+DMAP and ethanol treatments (10.7% and 11.3%). Pregnancy and birth rates for blastocysts derived from the ethanol oocyte activation treatment (58.8% and 47.4%) were significantly higher (P<0.05) than those of the ionomycin+DMAP treatment (12.5% and 9.2%). The results showed that post-ICSI oocyte activation with ethanol is more effective than activation with ionomycin alone or with ionomycin+DMAP for the production of viable blastocysts and calves. PMID:15766799

  10. Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate (EGCG) Reduces Rotenone Effect on Stallion Sperm-Zona Pellucida Heterologous Binding.

    PubMed

    Plaza Dvila, M; Bucci, D; Galeati, G; Pea, F J; Mari, G; Giaretta, E; Tamanini, C; Spinaci, M

    2015-12-01

    Stallion spermatozoa are highly dependent on oxidative phosphorylation for ATP production to achieve normal sperm function and to fuel the motility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of equine sperm under capacitating conditions to the inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by rotenone and to test whether epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a natural polyphenol component of green tea, could counteract this effect. After 2-h incubation of stallion spermatozoa in modified Tyrode's medium, rotenone (100 nm, 500 nm and 5 ?m) and EGCG (10, 20 and 60 ?m), alone or in combination, did not induce any significant difference on the percentage of viable cells, live sperm with active mitochondria and spermatozoa with intact acrosome. The inhibition of complex I of mitochondrial respiratory chain of stallion sperm with rotenone exerted a negative effect on heterologous ZP binding ability. EGCG at the concentrations of 10 and 20 ?m (but not of 60 ?m) induced a significant increase in the number of sperm bound to the ZP compared with that for control. Moreover, when stallion sperm were treated with rotenone 100 nm, the presence of EGCG at all the concentrations tested (10, 20 and 60 ?m) significantly increased the number of sperm bound to the ZP up to control levels, suggesting that this green tea polyphenol is able to reduce the toxicity of rotenone. PMID:26482419

  11. Sperm motility of externally fertilizing fish and amphibians.

    PubMed

    Browne, R K; Kaurova, S A; Uteshev, V K; Shishova, N V; McGinnity, D; Figiel, C R; Mansour, N; Agney, D; Wu, M; Gakhova, E N; Dzyuba, B; Cosson, J

    2015-01-01

    We review the phylogeny, sperm competition, morphology, physiology, and fertilization environments of the sperm of externally fertilizing fish and amphibians. Increased sperm competition in both fish and anurans generally increases sperm numbers, sperm length, and energy reserves. The difference between the internal osmolarity and iconicity of sperm cells and those of the aquatic medium control the activation, longevity, and velocity of sperm motility. Hypo-osmolarity of the aquatic medium activates the motility of freshwater fish and amphibian sperm and hyperosmolarity activates the motility of marine fish sperm. The average longevity of the motility of marine fish sperm (~550 seconds) was significantly (P < 0.05) greater than that of freshwater fish sperm (~150 seconds), with the longevities of both marine and freshwater fish being significantly (P < 0.05) lower than that of anuran sperm (~4100 seconds). The average velocity of anuran sperm (25 μm/s) was significantly (P < 0.05) lower than that of marine fish (140 μm/s) or freshwater fish (135 μm/s) sperm. The longevity of the sperm of giant salamanders (Cryptobranchoidea) of approximately 600 seconds was greater than that of freshwater fish sperm but much lower than anuran sperm. Our research and information from the literature showed that higher osmolarities promote greater longevity in anuran sperm, and some freshwater fish sperm, and that anuran and cryptobranchid sperm maintained membrane integrity long after the cessation of motility, demonstrating a preferential sharing of energy reserves toward the maintenance of membrane integrity. The maintenance of the membrane integrity of anuran sperm in fresh water for up to 6 hours showed an extremely high osmotic tolerance relative to fish sperm. The very high longevity and osmotic tolerance of anuran sperm and high longevity of cryptobranchid sperm, relative to those of freshwater fish, may reflect the complex fertilization history of amphibian sperm in general and anurans reversion from internal to external fertilization. Our findings provide a greater understanding of the reproductive biology of externally fertilizing fish and amphibians, and a biological foundation for the further development of reproduction technologies for their sustainable management. PMID:25442393

  12. Hypercholesterolemia Impaired Sperm Functionality in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Monclus, Maria A.; Cabrillana, Maria E.; Clementi, Marisa A.; Espínola, Leandro S.; Cid Barría, Jose L.; Vincenti, Amanda E.; Santi, Analia G.; Fornés, Miguel W.

    2010-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia represents a high risk factor for frequent diseases and it has also been associated with poor semen quality that may lead to male infertility. The aim of this study was to analyze semen and sperm function in diet-induced hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Twelve adult White New Zealand male rabbits were fed ad libitum a control diet or a diet supplemented with 0.05% cholesterol. Rabbits under cholesterol-enriched diet significantly increased total cholesterol level in the serum. Semen examination revealed a significant reduction in semen volume and sperm motility in hypercholesterolemic rabbits (HCR). Sperm cell morphology was seriously affected, displaying primarily a “folded head”-head fold along the major axe-, and the presence of cytoplasmic droplet on sperm flagellum. Cholesterol was particularly increased in acrosomal region when detected by filipin probe. The rise in cholesterol concentration in sperm cells was determined quantitatively by Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analyses. We also found a reduction of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in sperm incubated under capacitating conditions from HCR. Interestingly, the addition of Protein Kinase A pathway activators -dibutyryl-cyclic AMP and iso-butylmethylxanthine- to the medium restored sperm capacitation. Finally, it was also reported a significant decrease in the percentage of reacted sperm in the presence of progesterone. In conclusion, our data showed that diet-induced hypercholesterolemia adversely affects semen quality and sperm motility, capacitation and acrosomal reaction in rabbits; probably due to an increase in cellular cholesterol content that alters membrane related events. PMID:20976152

  13. Sperm Trajectories Form Chiral Ribbons

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ting-Wei; Choi, Inkyum; Feng, Jiawen; Huang, Kalvin; McLeod, Euan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of an entirely new three-dimensional (3D) swimming pattern observed in human and horse sperms. This motion is in the form of chiral ribbons, where the planar swing of the sperm head occurs on an osculating plane creating in some cases a helical ribbon and in some others a twisted ribbon. The latter, i.e., the twisted ribbon trajectory, also defines a minimal surface, exhibiting zero mean curvature for all the points on its surface. These chiral ribbon swimming patterns cannot be represented or understood by already known patterns of sperms or other micro-swimmers. The discovery of these unique patterns is enabled by holographic on-chip imaging of >33,700?sperm trajectories at >90140?frames/sec, which revealed that only ~1.7% of human sperms exhibit chiral ribbons, whereas it increases to ~27.3% for horse sperms. These results might shed more light onto the statistics and biophysics of various micro-swimmers' 3D motion. PMID:23588811

  14. Cytometry of mammalian sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Gledhill, B.L.

    1983-10-11

    Male germ cells respond dramatically to a variety of insults and are important reproductive dosimeters. Semen analyses are very useful in studies on the effects of drugs, chemicals, and environmental hazards on testicular function, male fertility and heritable germinal mutations. The accessibility of male cells makes them well suited for analytical cytology. We might automate the process of determining sperm morphology but should not do so solely for increased speed. Rather, richer tangible benefits will derive from cytometric evaluation through increased sensitivity, reduced subjectivity, standardization between investigators and laboratories, enhanced archival systems, and the benefits of easily exchanged standardized data. Inroads on the standardization of assays for motility and functional integrity are being made. Flow cytometric analysis of total DNA content of individual sperm is an insensitive means to detect exposure to reproductive toxins because of the small size and low frequency of the DNA content errors. Flow cytometry can be applied to determine the proportions of X- and Y-sperm in semen samples.

  15. The effect of sperm-oocyte incubation time on in vitro embryo development using sperm from a tetraparental chimeric bull.

    PubMed

    Sumantri, C; Boediono, A; Ooe, M; Murakami, M; Saha, S; Suzuki, T

    1997-08-01

    The present study was designed as 5 x 4 factorial to investigate the effects of using sperm from 5 bulls, and varied sperm-oocyte incubation times (5, 10, 15 and 20 h) on the fertilization, cleavage rates and blastocyst formation on an in vitro bovine embryo production system. The bulls included a tetraparental Chimera, its sires (Japanese Black and Limousin), its maternal grand-sires (Japanese Brown and Holstein). The proportion of polyspermy, 2-pronuclei formation, fertilization, cleavage and development to blastocyst were affected (P < 0.001) by the duration of sperm-oocyte incubation, as well as by the interaction between bulls and their corresponding sperm-oocyte incubation time. Blastocyst rate observed after 5 h in oocytes inseminated with Chimera, Japanese Black and Limousin were higher (p < 0.05) than those observed at 20 h incubation. The proportion of blastocysts from oocytes inseminated with Japanese Black observed at 10 h of incubation did not differ from that of Chimera, but both were higher (p < 0.05) than those observed for the Limousin, Japanese Brown and Holstein sires. The present study showed that there was an effect by the duration of sperm-oocyte incubation on in vitro embryo development. The optimal time of sperm-oocyte incubation for the Chimera was similar to that of its sires (Japanese Black and Limousin) but differed from its maternal grand-sires (Japanese Brown and Holstein). The fertilization rates for the sperm from the Holstein bull increased up to 15 h suggesting that this might be the only bull that would benefit from a long incubation period for insemination. PMID:9452872

  16. Does anonymous sperm donation increase the risk for unions between relatives and the incidence of autosomal recessive diseases due to consanguinity?

    PubMed

    Serre, Jean-Louis; Leutenegger, Anne-Louise; Bernheim, Alain; Fellous, Marc; Rouen, Alexandre; Siffroi, Jean-Pierre

    2014-03-01

    In France gamete donation and notably sperm donation are anonymous. It has been claimed that anonymous artificial insemination by donor (AID) could highly contribute to an increase in the level of consanguinity and the incidence of autosomal recessive diseases, due to the unions between offspring of anonymous donors, unaware of their biological kinship, with the special case of unions between half-siblings. The actual incidence of consanguinity due to AID was compared with that resulting from the two other main sources of consanguinity and recessive diseases, i.e. voluntary unions between related individuals or inadvertent unions between the offspring of a common unknown male ancestor (false paternity). From these data, we estimated that expected unions in France between half sibs per year are 0.12 between offspring of sperm donors (1.2 every 10 years) and 0.5 between offspring of common male ancestors through false paternity (5 every 10 years). More generally, the inadvertent unions between false paternity offspring are roughly four times more frequent than those resulting from anonymous AID. We estimated that in the future, when AID has been in practice for several generations, out the 820 000 annual births in France, respectively, 6 and 25 births will be consanguineous through an unknown common ancestor related to anonymous AID and to a false paternity, both of which are negligible when compared with the 1256 children born from first-degree cousins. About 672 children per year are born with a recessive genetic disease due to the panmictic risk and additional affected cases due to consanguinity would be 34.54 for first-cousin offspring, 0.33 for offspring of individuals related due to false paternity and 0.079 for offspring of individuals related due to anonymous AID. Anonymous AID would therefore be responsible for 0.46% of consanguineous births and for 0.01% of recessive diseases. Therefore, the effect of anonymous AID on half-sibling unions, consanguinity and recessive disease incidence can be regarded as marginal. PMID:24345578

  17. Protein and carbohydrate intake influence sperm number and fertility in male cockroaches, but not sperm viability

    PubMed Central

    Bunning, Harriet; Rapkin, James; Belcher, Laurence; Archer, C. Ruth; Jensen, Kim; Hunt, John

    2015-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that because males produce many, tiny sperm, they are cheap to produce. Recent work, however, suggests that sperm production is not cost-free. If sperm are costly to produce, sperm number and/or viability should be influenced by diet, and this has been documented in numerous species. Yet few studies have examined the exact nutrients responsible for mediating these effects. Here, we quantify the effects of protein (P) and carbohydrate (C) intake on sperm number and viability in the cockroach Nauphoeta cinerea, as well as the consequences for male fertility. We found the intake of P and C influenced sperm number, being maximized at a high intake of diets with a P : C ratio of 1 : 2, but not sperm viability. The nutritional landscapes for male fertility and sperm number were closely aligned, suggesting that sperm number is the major determinant of male fertility in N. cinerea. Under dietary choice, males regulate nutrient intake at a P : C ratio of 1 : 4.95, which is midway between the ratios needed to maximize sperm production and pre-copulatory attractiveness in this species. This raises the possibility that males regulate nutrient intake to balance the trade-off between pre- and post-copulatory traits in this species. PMID:25608881

  18. Protein and carbohydrate intake influence sperm number and fertility in male cockroaches, but not sperm viability.

    PubMed

    Bunning, Harriet; Rapkin, James; Belcher, Laurence; Archer, C Ruth; Jensen, Kim; Hunt, John

    2015-03-01

    It is commonly assumed that because males produce many, tiny sperm, they are cheap to produce. Recent work, however, suggests that sperm production is not cost-free. If sperm are costly to produce, sperm number and/or viability should be influenced by diet, and this has been documented in numerous species. Yet few studies have examined the exact nutrients responsible for mediating these effects. Here, we quantify the effects of protein (P) and carbohydrate (C) intake on sperm number and viability in the cockroach Nauphoeta cinerea, as well as the consequences for male fertility. We found the intake of P and C influenced sperm number, being maximized at a high intake of diets with a P : C ratio of 1 : 2, but not sperm viability. The nutritional landscapes for male fertility and sperm number were closely aligned, suggesting that sperm number is the major determinant of male fertility in N. cinerea. Under dietary choice, males regulate nutrient intake at a P : C ratio of 1 : 4.95, which is midway between the ratios needed to maximize sperm production and pre-copulatory attractiveness in this species. This raises the possibility that males regulate nutrient intake to balance the trade-off between pre- and post-copulatory traits in this species. PMID:25608881

  19. On-site evaluation of commercial-scale hybrid catfish production using cryopreserved blue catfish sperm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryopreservation is an effective tool for conservation of genetic resources and is becoming increasingly used worldwide with aquatic species. Broadening the application of this technology to a commercial scale through high-throughput approaches has become essential for use with aquatic species. This...

  20. Induced lipid peroxidation in ram sperm: semen profile, DNA fragmentation and antioxidant status.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Thais Rose Dos Santos; Castro, Letícia Signori de; Delgado, Juliana de Carvalho; de Assis, Patrícia Monken; Siqueira, Adriano Felipe Perez; Mendes, Camilla Mota; Goissis, Marcelo Demarchi; Muiño-Blanco, Teresa; Cebrián-Pérez, José Álvaro; Nichi, Marcílio; Visintin, José Antonio; D'Ávila Assumpção, Mayra Elena Ortiz

    2016-04-01

    Action of reactive oxygen species, protamination failures and apoptosis are considered the most important etiologies of sperm DNA fragmentation. This study evaluated the effects of induced lipid peroxidation susceptibility on native semen profile and identified the mechanisms involved in sperm DNA fragmentation and testicular antioxidant defense on Santa Ines ram sperm samples. Semen was collected from 12 adult rams (Ovis aries) performed weekly over a 9-week period. Sperm analysis (motility, mass motility, abnormalities, membrane and acrosome status, mitochondrial potential, DNA fragmentation, lipid peroxidation and intracellular free radicals production); protamine deficiency; PRM1, TNP1 and TNP2 gene expression; and determination of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase activity and immunodetection in seminal plasma were performed. Samples were distributed into four groups according to the sperm susceptibility to lipid peroxidation after induction with ascorbate and ferrous sulfate (low, medium, high and very high). The results were analyzed by GLM test and post hoc least significant difference. We observed an increase in native GPx activity and CAT immunodetection in groups with high susceptibility to induced lipid peroxidation. We also found an increase in total sperm defects, acrosome and membrane damages in the group with the highest susceptibility to induced lipid peroxidation. Additionally, the low mitochondrial membrane potential, susceptible to chromatin fragmentation and the PRM1 mRNA were increased in the group showing higher susceptibility to lipid peroxidation. Ram sperm susceptibility to lipid peroxidation may compromise sperm quality and interfere with the oxidative homeostasis by oxidative stress, which may be the main cause of chromatin damage in ram sperm. PMID:26811546

  1. Depletion of Intracellular Thiols and Increased Production of 4-Hydroxynonenal that Occur During Cryopreservation of Stallion Spermatozoa Lead to Caspase Activation, Loss of Motility, and Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Martin Muñoz, Patricia; Ortega Ferrusola, Cristina; Vizuete, Guillermo; Plaza Dávila, Maria; Rodriguez Martinez, Heriberto; Peña, Fernando J

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress has been linked to sperm death and the accelerated senescence of cryopreserved spermatozoa. However, the molecular mechanisms behind this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are considered relevant signaling molecules for sperm function, only becoming detrimental when ROS homeostasis is lost. We hereby hypothesize that a major component of the alteration of ROS homeostasis in cryopreserved spermatozoa is the exhaustion of intrinsic antioxidant defense mechanisms. To test this hypothesis, semen from seven stallions was frozen using a standard technique. The parameters of sperm quality (motility, velocity, and membrane integrity) and markers of sperm senescence (caspase 3, 4-hydroxynonenal, and mitochondrial membrane potential) were assessed before and after cryopreservation. Changes in the intracellular thiol content were also monitored. Cryopreservation caused significant increases in senescence markers as well as dramatic depletion of intracellular thiols to less than half of the initial values (P < 0.001) postthaw. Interestingly, very high and positive correlations were observed among thiol levels with sperm functionality postthaw: total motility (r = 0.931, P < 0.001), progressive motility (r = 0.904, P < 0.001), and percentage of live spermatozoa without active caspase 3 (r = 0.996, P < 0.001). In contrast, negative correlations were detected between active caspase 3 and thiol content both in living (r = -0.896) and dead (r = -0.940) spermatozoa; additionally, 4-hydroxynonenal levels were negatively correlated with thiol levels (r = -0.856). In conclusion, sperm functionality postthaw correlates with the maintenance of adequate levels of intracellular thiols. The accelerated senescence of thawed spermatozoa is related to oxidative and electrophilic stress induced by increased production of 4-hydroxynoneal in thawed samples once intracellular thiols are depleted. PMID:26536905

  2. Increasing efficiency in production of cloned piglets.

    PubMed

    Callesen, Henrik; Liu, Ying; Pedersen, Hanne S; Li, Rong; Schmidt, Mette

    2014-12-01

    The low efficiency in obtaining piglets after production of cloned embryos was challenged in two steps-first by performing in vitro culture for 5-6 days after cloning to obtain later-stage embryos for more precise selection for transfer, and second by reducing the number of embryos transferred per recipient sow. The data set consisted of combined results from a 4-year period where cloning was performed to produce piglets that were transgenic for important human diseases. For this, different transgenes and cell types were used, and the cloning work was performed by several persons using oocytes from different pig breeds, but following a standardized and optimized protocol. Results showed that in vitro culture is possible with a relatively stable rate of transferable embryos around 41% and a pregnancy rate around 90%. Furthermore, a reduction from around 80 embryos to 40 embryos transferred per recipient was possible without changing the efficiency of around 14% (piglets born out of embryos transferred). It was concluded that this approach can increase the efficiency in obtaining piglets by means of in vitro culture and selection of high-quality embryos with subsequent transfer into more recipients. Such changes can also reduce the need for personnel, time, and material when working with this technology. PMID:25333333

  3. LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF TRIETHYLENEMELAMINE EXPOSURE ON MOUSE TESTIS CELLS AND SPERM CHROMATIN STRUCTURE ASSAYED BY FLOW CYTOMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxic and potentially mutagenic actions of triethylenemelamine (TEM) on mouse body and testis weights, testicular cell kinetics, sperm production, sperm head morphology, and sperm chromatin structure were assessed in two experiments. he first experiment examined effects of fo...

  4. Time series analysis of sperm concentration in fertile men in Toulouse, France between 1977 and 1992.

    PubMed Central

    Bujan, L.; Mansat, A.; Pontonnier, F.; Mieusset, R.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether sperm production has changed during the past 16 years in the Toulouse area of France. DESIGN: Time series analysis of sperm donors' specimens between 1977 and 1992. SETTING: Sperm bank of university hospital in Toulouse, France. SUBJECTS: 302 healthy fertile men candidate sperm donors more than 20 and up to 45 years old and without any infertile brothers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Spermatozoa concentration. RESULTS: Donors' mean age at time of donation was 34.05 (SD 5.13), but this increased significantly (P<0.001) during the study, from 32.4 in 1977 to 36 in 1992. Mean sperm count of samples was 83.12x10(6)/ml (SD 68.42x10(6)/ml). Sperm concentration was positively linked to the year of donation (Pearson's coefficient r=0.12, P<0.05), but this correlaton disappeared after adjustment for age of donors (r=0.09,P>0.05). CONCLUSION: Sperm concentration has not changed with time in the Toulouse area. PMID:8597677

  5. Seasonal occurrence of sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) around Kelvin Seamount in the Sargasso Sea in relation to oceanographic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Sarah N. P.; Whitehead, Hal

    2014-09-01

    Sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) are widely distributed in all oceans, but they are clumped geographically, generally in areas associated with high primary and secondary productivity. The warm, clear waters of the Sargasso Sea are traditionally thought to be low in productivity, however recent surveys have found large numbers of sperm whales there. The New England Seamount Chain bisects the north-western portion of the Sargasso Sea, and might influence the mesoscale eddies associated with the Gulf Stream; creating areas of higher productivity within the Sargasso Sea. We investigated the seasonal occurrence of sperm whales over Kelvin Seamount (part of the New England Seamount Chain) and how it is influenced by oceanographic variables. An autonomous recording device was deployed over Kelvin Seamount from May to June 2006 and November 2006 to June 2007. A total of 6505 hourly two-minute recordings were examined for the presence of sperm whale echolocation clicks. Sperm whales were more prevalent around Kelvin in the spring (April to June: mean=51% of recordings contained clicks) compared to the winter (November to March: mean=16% of recordings contained clicks). Sperm whale prevalence at Kelvin was related to chlorophyll-a concentration four weeks previous, eddy kinetic energy and month. The mesoscale activity associated with the Gulf Stream and the Gulf Stream's interaction with the New England Seamount Chain likely play an important role in sperm whale occurrence in this area, by increasing productivity and perhaps concentration of cephalopod species.

  6. Metabolism, sperm and fluid production of the isolated perfused testis of the sheep and goat

    PubMed Central

    Linzell, J. L.; Setchell, B. P.

    1969-01-01

    1. A total of nineteen ram and three goat testes have been perfused in isolation at 34-35 C for 3-9 hr with heparinized blood and an added 5-HT antagonist (bromolysergic acid diethylamide) and their function compared with that of the normal ram testes in vivo. 2. The metabolism of the perfused testes and the testes in vivo was similar but blood flow through the perfused testes was two to three times normal. 3. Vasoconstriction was produced by adrenaline and noradrenaline (10-20 ?g I.A.) and by electrical stimulation of nerves in the spermatic cord or of the lumbar sympathetic chain; these responses were abolished or reduced by phenoxybenzamine. 4. Flow of fluid from the rete testis continued only if ischaemia was reduced to a minimum and glucose concentration in the blood perfusing the testis was kept above about 25 mg/100 ml.; the fluid secreted during perfusion was of normal composition. 5. The perfused testis showed no evidence of autoregulation and the flow of fluid was not affected by changes in perfusion pressure. 6. When the temperature of three testes was raised to 40 C for 2 hr, metabolism increased but blood flow was unaltered; the flow of fluid and the concentration of spermatozoa decreased during heating. 7. The testes perfused at normal scrotal temperatures (34-35 C) were histologically normal but some abnormalities were observed in the heated testes. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:5773547

  7. Epoxiconazole causes changes in testicular histology and sperm production in the Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica).

    PubMed

    Grote, Konstanze; Niemann, Lars; Selzsam, Britta; Haider, Wolfgang; Gericke, Christine; Herzler, Matthias; Chahoud, Ibrahim

    2008-11-01

    The fungicide epoxiconazole (Epox), a triazole, belongs to the group of azole compounds that are extensively used as fungicides in various fruit crops. The frequent use of agricultural lands for wintering by migrating birds can be the source of their increased dietary intake of agricultural pesticides. We investigated whether exposure to Epox causes effects on avian fertility and reproduction, using the Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) as a model species for the assessment of reproductive effects of pesticides in wild birds. Epox was administered to adult Japanese quail for three weeks at dietary levels of 10, 50, and 500 ppm, and possible effects on reproduction were investigated. Epox administration resulted in a significantly decreased number of spermatids in the 50- and 500-ppm dose groups. Histopathology showed a reduced number of testicular canaliculi with visible germ cells and a reduction in spermatid number. However, testis weight was not affected up to the highest dose level. No impact was observed on hormone levels, fertility, and reproductive outcome, as laying rate and percentage of fertile eggs were not altered. Likewise, treatment had no influence on the egg or chick parameters evaluated. A time- and dose-related transfer of Epox into the eggs was determined in all treatment groups. We conclude that dietary treatment of Japanese quail with 50 and 500 ppm of the triazole fungicide Epox resulted in a clear impact on the testis. The evaluation of the additional endpoints spermatid count and testicular histology have proven useful and are recommended for future studies on avian reproduction. PMID:18522476

  8. Technical progress and increasing production quality

    SciTech Connect

    Petrenko, V.G.; Antonov, A.V.

    1984-01-01

    Various developments aimed toward improved technology and laboratory control and improved production quality in the coking by-product industry over the past 20 years are highlighted. Different aspects of coal charges for coking, such as composition of charge, properties of coal(s) being used in charge, and effects of storage of coal, and the effect of these variables on coke quality are discussed briefly. The treatment of wastes from coking plants and purification of coking gas are also among subjects included.

  9. Production of lion (Panthera leo) blastocysts after in vitro maturation of oocytes and intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Lorena; Hribal, Romy; Stagegaard, Julia; Zahmel, Jennifer; Jewgenow, Katarina

    2015-04-01

    Assisted reproductive techniques are becoming widely applied to the breeding of endangered species, but establishing reliable protocols for the production of embryos in vitro is challenging because of the scarcity of sample material. In our study, we applied an assisted reproductive technique protocol for IVM and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), developed in the domestic cat, to oocytes retrieved from ovaries of four 2-year-old lionesses (Panthera leo) eight hours postmortem. In total, 68 cumulus-oocyte complexes of good quality were randomly distributed and cultured for 32 to 34 hours in two different maturation culture media, consisting of Medium 199 with Earle's salts, 3 mg/mL BSA, 0.1 mg/mL cysteine, 1.4 mg/mL sodium pyruvate, 0.6 mg/mL sodium lactate, 0.15 mg/mL l-glutamine, and 0.055 mg/mL gentamicin. Hormonal supplementation of IVM_1 was 0.02 IU/mL FSH and 0.05 IU/mL LH; IVM_2 consisted of 1.64 IU/mL FSH, 1.06 IU/mL LH, and 1 μg/mL 17ß-estradiol. Differences in hormonal supplementation did not produce significant differences in oocyte maturation rates, which were 39.4% in IVM_1 and 34.3% in IVM_2. Matured oocytes were microinjected with homologous frozen-thawed spermatozoa, and subsequent cleavage rates were 30.8% and 58.3%, respectively. Half of the embryos derived from oocytes matured in IVM_1 developed into blastocysts, whereas only 28.6% of embryos from oocytes matured in IVM_2 reached the blastocyst stage. Morula stages were present from Day 6 onward, and blastocyst stages from Day 9 on, indicating a slower developmental speed in comparison with domestic cats. This is the first report of in vitro-produced blastocysts using ICSI in the lion, and the results report that IVM and ICSI can be successfully performed with cumulus-oocyte complexes retrieved from ovaries after eight hours of shipping, obtaining competent embryos in culture. PMID:25586639

  10. Sperm chemotaxis and regulation of flagellar movement by Ca2+.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Manabu; Yoshida, Kaoru

    2011-08-01

    The chemotaxis of sperm towards eggs is a widespread phenomenon that occurs in most forms of life from lower plants to mammals and plays important roles in ensuring fertilization. In spermatozoa, the attractants act as beacons, indicating the path leading to the eggs from the same species. The existence of species-specific sperm chemotaxis has been demonstrated in marine invertebrates; thus, sperm chemotaxis may be involved in preventing crossbreeding, especially in marine invertebrates with external fertilization. However, the mechanisms of sperm chemotaxis in mammalian species differ from those of marine invertebrates. In mammals, the attractant source is not the egg, but follicular fluids or cumulus cells and chemotactic behaviour is shown only in small populations of sperm. Nevertheless, the fundamental mechanisms underlying sperm chemotaxis are likely to be common among all species. Among these mechanisms, intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) is an important factor for the regulation of chemotactic behaviour in spermatozoa. Sperm attractants induce the entry of extracellular Ca(2+), resulting in [Ca(2+)](i) increase in the sperm cells. Furthermore, [Ca(2+)](i) modulates sperm flagellar movement. However, the relationship between [Ca(2+)](i) and the chemotactic response of a sperm flagellum is not well known. Investigation of the dynamic responses of sperm cells to their attractants is important for our understanding of the regulation of fertilization. Here, we reviewed sperm chemotaxis focusing on the mechanisms that regulate sperm flagellar beating during the chemotactic response. PMID:21610215

  11. Experimental evolution of sperm competitiveness in a mammal

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background When females mate with multiple partners, sperm from rival males compete to fertilise the ova. Studies of experimental evolution have proven the selective action of sperm competition on male reproductive traits. However, while reproductive traits may evolve in response to sperm competition, this does not necessarily provide evidence that sperm competitive ability responds to selection. Indeed, a study of Drosophila failed to observe divergence in sperm competitive ability of males in lines selected for enhanced sperm offence and defence. Results Adopting the naturally polygamous house mouse (Mus domesticus) as our vertebrate model, we performed an experimental evolution study and observed genetic divergence in sperm quality; males from the polygamous selection lines produced ejaculates with increased sperm numbers and greater sperm motility compared to males from the monogamous lines. Here, after 12 generations of experimental evolution, we conducted competitive matings between males from lineages evolving under sperm competition and males from lineages subject to relaxed selection. We reduced variation in paternity arising from embryo mortality by genotyping embryos in utero at 14 days gestation. Our microsatellite data revealed a significant paternity bias toward males that evolved under the selective regime of sperm competition. Conclusion We provide evidence that the sperm competitiveness phenotype can respond to selection, and show that improved sperm quality translates to greater competitive fertilisation success in house mice. PMID:21251249

  12. Turkey Sperm Reside in the Tubular Glands in the Urodeum Following Artificial Insemination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A turkey hen in egg production requires 48 hr after the last insemination to maximize the number of sperm in the uterovaginal junction sperm-storage tubules. Where the sperm that continue to fill the oviductal sperm-storage sites during this 48 hr period reside remains unknown. Histological sectio...

  13. Antioxidant Effects of Brown Algae Sargassum on Sperm Parameters: CONSORT-Compliant Article.

    PubMed

    Sobhani, Alireza; Eftekhaari, Tasnim Eghbal; Shahrzad, Mohammad Esmaeil; Natami, Mohammad; Fallahi, Soghra

    2015-12-01

    The occurrence of oxidative stress during the sperm freeze-thaw cycles affects the sperm parameters and eventually leads to a decrease in its reproductive potential. Sperm protection against oxidative reactions during freezing is done by antioxidants. Since the selection of a suitable sperm cryopreservation bank is effective in maintaining acceptable reproductive potential and motility of sperm during cryopreservation.This study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant effects of different doses of the extract of brown algae Sargassum on oxidative stress and frozen human sperm parameters.We conducted a randomized controlled trial on the semen samples from 11 healthy men in the age group of 25 to 36 years. The samples were collected by masturbation after 3 to 5 days of abstinence from ejaculation. The specimens were divided into 3 equal parts, including 1 control group and 2 experimental groups.The 2 experimental groups were frozen using the rapid solidification technique with Sargassum extract at doses of 250 and 500??g/mL.Motility and morphology of sperms were measured using a computer system and CASA software and the amount of reactive oxygen species was determined using Oxisperm kit.Sargassum extract significantly decreased the amount of reactive oxygen species (P?increased the overall motility (P?sperms.The addition of ethanol extract of Sargassum prevents reactive oxygen species production during the solidification process and improves sperm motility at doses of 250 and 500??g/mL. PMID:26717354

  14. Pathway of sperm (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the testis and stores it several days. When ejaculation occurs, sperm is forcefully expelled from the tail ... the prostate and empties into the urethra. When ejaculation occurs, rhythmic muscle movements propel the sperm forward.

  15. Recovery and cryopreservation of epididymal sperm of plains bison (Bison bison bison) as a model for salvaging the genetics of wood bison (Bison bison athabascae).

    PubMed

    Aurini, L C; Whiteside, D P; Elkin, B T; Thundathil, J C

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this study was to optimize recovery and cryopreservation of epididymal sperm from plains bison, as a model for wood bison. In Phase 1, cauda epididymides were recovered from bison (n = 14) immediately after slaughter, minced and incubated in Sp-TALPH buffer for 3 h at 36 degrees C. The resulting sperm suspensions were cryopreserved in Triladyl, using a protocol for bovine semen. In Phase 2, epididymal sperm were cryopreserved in either Triladyl or Andromed. The mean (+/-SD) estimated number of sperm recovered was 468 +/- 207 x 10(6). There was an increase (p < 0.05) in the proportion of sperm with normal morphology between initial recovery and after extension (52.4 +/- 4.6 vs 69.7 +/- 2.4%), with a concurrent decrease (p < 0.05) in the proportion of sperm with distal droplets. Median values for progressively motile sperm in post-thaw samples (60%) were lower (p < 0.05) than that after extension or after chilling (70% for both). The mean percentages of viable sperm and of sperm with an intact acrosome were lower (p < 0.05) for frozen-thawed samples (38.7 +/- 2.8 and 85.2 +/- 1.1) compared with extended (66.2 +/- 2.2 and 92.4 +/- 0.9) or chilled (63.7 +/- 2.5 and 90.0 +/- 1.0) samples. Rates of cleavage, morulae and blastocyst production were not significantly different for chilled (70.9, 38.7 and 8.0%) vs post-thaw sperm (73.0, 46.0 and 6.3%). There was no significant difference between extenders for most sperm characteristics. In conclusion, we developed a functional protocol for the recovery and cryopreservation of epididymal sperm from plains bison, which may have implications for the genetic preservation of wood bison. PMID:18811627

  16. Experience of mating rivals causes males to modulate sperm transfer in the fly Drosophila pseudoobscura.

    PubMed

    Price, Tom A R; Liz, Anne; Marcello, Marco; Bretman, Amanda

    2012-12-01

    Male responses to risk of sperm competition play an important role in sexual selection, sexual conflict, and the evolution of mating systems. Such responses can combine behavioural and physiological processes, and can be mediated through different components of the ejaculate such as sperm numbers and seminal proteins. An additional level of ejaculate complexity is sperm heteromorphism, with the inclusion of non-fertilising parasperm in the ejaculate. We now test the response to rivals in a sperm heteromorphic species, Drosophila pseudoobscura, measuring the behavioural response and sperm transfer and, crucially, relating these to short-term fitness. Males respond to exposure to conspecific rivals by increasing mating duration, but do not respond to heterospecific rivals. In addition, after exposure to a conspecific rival, males increased the transfer of fertilising eusperm, but not non-fertilising parasperm. Males exposed to a conspecific rival also achieve higher offspring production. This suggests that the evolution of parasperm in flies was not driven by sperm competition and adds to the increasing evidence that males can make extremely sophisticated responses to mating competition. PMID:23085556

  17. Flow cytometry of sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Gledhill, B.L.

    1987-09-21

    This brief paper summarizes automated flow cytometric determination of sperm morphology and flow cytometry/sorting of sperm with application to sex preselection. In the latter context, mention is made of results of karyotypic determination of sex chromosome ratios in albumin-processed human sperm. 23 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. OGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism interacts with cigarette smoking to increase oxidative DNA damage in human sperm and the risk of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Ji, Guixiang; Yan, Lifeng; Liu, Wei; Qu, Jianhua; Gu, Aihua

    2013-04-12

    8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1) plays an important role in repairing oxidative DNA damage induced by chemical agents, such as tobacco. This study examined the effects of OGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism and cigarette smoking, alone or combined, on sperm oxidative DNA damage and the risk of male infertility. A total of 620 idiopathic infertile subjects and 480 fertile controls were recruited in this study. Sperm 8-hydroxydeoxyguanine (8-OHdG) was measured by immunofluorescent assay using flow cytometry and genotypes were determined by OpenArray platform with a chip-based Taq-Man genotyping technology. Our results demonstrated that both cigarette smoking and OGG1 polymorphism can affect the sperm 8-OHdG levels. Individuals with variant Cys/Cys homozygote showed higher levels of sperm 8-OHdG than wide-type homozygote carriers (Ser/Ser). Stratified analysis found that the association between OGG1 polymorphism and sperm 8-OHdG levels was only observed among smokers with pack-years ?5 but not among those subjects with pack-years<5 (pack-years=packs smoked per dayyears as a smoker). Further analysis based on the case-control study revealed that variant allele (Cys) of OGG1 was significantly associated with male infertility risk in a dominant model (OR=1.35, 95% CI: 1.01-1.82; trend P<0.001). Furthermore, we found a significant gene-environment interaction between OGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism and cigarette smoking in relation to male infertility risk (Pinteration=0.0003). These findings provided the first evidence about potential interactive effects of OGG1 polymorphism and cigarette smoking on male infertility risk. PMID:23376476

  19. Autosensitization by Sperm in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Baum, J.; Boughton, Barbara; Mongar, J. L.; Schild, H. O.

    1961-01-01

    Guinea pigs injected intradermally with homologous sperm or testis in Freund's adjuvant developed the following manifestations of hypersensitivity: (a) histamine release from lung after treatment with antigen in vitro; (b) Schultz-Dale reactions (occasionally); (c) antibodies capable of passive sensitization in vitro (passive sensitization demonstrated by histamine release); (d) antibodies immobilizing sperm in presence of complement; (e) skin reactions with an immediate and a delayed component. Autologous and homologous guinea-pig sperm or testis were equally active as antigens in producing histamine release from sensitized lung. Boar and rat sperm and guinea-pig kidney and brain were inactive. Although living sperm acted as an effective antigen its activity increased after freezing and thawing, when most of the activity was present in the supernatant. The antigen in sperm is stable at 56 but appreciable inactivation, increasing with time, occurs at 100. Attempts to transmit the hypersensitivity by transference of lymph node cells into the skin of normal recipients have been unsuccessful. Some evidence was obtained that testis sensitized cells per se produce local reactions which are greater than those of normal cells. Fixation of antibody on the acrosomal portions of sperm was demonstrated by means of fluorescein tagged anti-globulin serum. The possibility is discussed that the antigenic activity of sperm may be due to a mucopolysaccharide. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 8 PMID:13687967

  20. Turbidity as a method of preparing sperm dilutions in the echinoid sperm/egg bioassay

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, T.J.; Haley, R.K.; Battan, K.J. )

    1993-11-01

    The use of turbidimeter for preparing sperm dilutions used in the echinoid sperm/egg bioassay was evaluated. Regression analyses of the relationship between sperm density and turbidity for the sea urchins Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis and the sand dollar Dendraster excentricus indicated that although there were slope differences for each species, each coefficient of determination was highly significant. For Dendraster excentricus, triplicate hemacytometer counts over a range of turbidities as well as repeated preparations of a single sperm turbidity indicated similar variability for each. The use of the turbidimeter has time-saving advantages over conventional hemacytometer methods without sacrificing precision. Sperm dilutions can be prepared rapidly, minimizing seawater sperm preactivation before test initiation, and may therefore contribute to increased test precision.

  1. Effects of the czech propolis on sperm mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Cedikova, Miroslava; Miklikova, Michaela; Stachova, Lenka; Grundmanova, Martina; Tuma, Zdenek; Vetvicka, Vaclav; Zech, Nicolas; Kralickova, Milena; Kuncova, Jitka

    2014-01-01

    Propolis is a natural product that honeybees collect from various plants. It is known for its beneficial pharmacological effects. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of propolis on human sperm motility, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and membrane potential. Semen samples from 10 normozoospermic donors were processed according to the World Health Organization criteria. Propolis effects on the sperm motility and mitochondrial activity parameters were tested in the fresh ejaculate and purified spermatozoa. Propolis preserved progressive motility of spermatozoa in the native semen samples. Oxygen consumption determined in purified permeabilized spermatozoa by high-resolution respirometry in the presence of adenosine diphosphate and substrates of complex I and complex II (state OXPHOSI+II) was significantly increased in the propolis-treated samples. Propolis also increased uncoupled respiration in the presence of rotenone (state ETSII) and complex IV activity, but it did not influence state LEAK induced by oligomycin. Mitochondrial membrane potential was not affected by propolis. This study demonstrates that propolis maintains sperm motility in the native ejaculates and increases activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes II and IV without affecting mitochondrial membrane potential. The data suggest that propolis improves the total mitochondrial respiratory efficiency in the human spermatozoa in vitro thereby having potential to improve sperm motility. PMID:25104965

  2. Effects of the Czech Propolis on Sperm Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Cedikova, Miroslava; Miklikova, Michaela; Stachova, Lenka; Grundmanova, Martina; Tuma, Zdenek; Vetvicka, Vaclav; Zech, Nicolas; Kralickova, Milena; Kuncova, Jitka

    2014-01-01

    Propolis is a natural product that honeybees collect from various plants. It is known for its beneficial pharmacological effects. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of propolis on human sperm motility, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and membrane potential. Semen samples from 10 normozoospermic donors were processed according to the World Health Organization criteria. Propolis effects on the sperm motility and mitochondrial activity parameters were tested in the fresh ejaculate and purified spermatozoa. Propolis preserved progressive motility of spermatozoa in the native semen samples. Oxygen consumption determined in purified permeabilized spermatozoa by high-resolution respirometry in the presence of adenosine diphosphate and substrates of complex I and complex II (state OXPHOSI+II) was significantly increased in the propolis-treated samples. Propolis also increased uncoupled respiration in the presence of rotenone (state ETSII) and complex IV activity, but it did not influence state LEAK induced by oligomycin. Mitochondrial membrane potential was not affected by propolis. This study demonstrates that propolis maintains sperm motility in the native ejaculates and increases activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes II and IV without affecting mitochondrial membrane potential. The data suggest that propolis improves the total mitochondrial respiratory efficiency in the human spermatozoa in vitro thereby having potential to improve sperm motility. PMID:25104965

  3. Detection of structural and numerical chomosomal abnormalities by ACM-FISH analysis in sperm of oligozoospermic infertility patients

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, T E; Brinkworth, M H; Hill, F; Sloter, E; Kamischke, A; Marchetti, F; Nieschlag, E; Wyrobek, A J

    2003-11-10

    Modern reproductive technologies are enabling the treatment of infertile men with severe disturbances of spermatogenesis. The possibility of elevated frequencies of genetically and chromosomally defective sperm has become an issue of concern with the increased usage of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), which can enable men with severely impaired sperm production to father children. Several papers have been published about aneuploidy in oligozoospermic patients, but relatively little is known about chromosome structural aberrations in the sperm of these patients. We examined sperm from infertile, oligozoospermic individuals for structural and numerical chromosomal abnormalities using a multicolor ACM FISH assay that utilizes DNA probes specific for three regions of chromosome 1 to detect human sperm that carry numerical chromosomal abnormalities plus two categories of structural aberrations: duplications and deletions of 1pter and 1cen, and chromosomal breaks within the 1cen-1q12 region. There was a significant increase in the average frequencies of sperm with duplications and deletions in the infertility patients compared with the healthy concurrent controls. There was also a significantly elevated level of breaks within the 1cen-1q12 region. There was no evidence for an increase in chromosome-1 disomy, or in diploidy. Our data reveal that oligozoospermia is associated with chromosomal structural abnormalities suggesting that, oligozoospermic men carry a higher burden of transmissible, chromosome damage. The findings raise the possibility of elevated levels of transmissible chromosomal defects following ICSI treatment.

  4. Coal liquefaction to increase jet fuel production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Processing concept that increases supply of jet fuel has been developed as part of study on methods for converting coal to hydrogen, methane, and jet fuel. Concept takes advantage of high aromatic content of coal-derived liquids to make high-octane gasoline, instead of destroying aromatics to make jet fuel.

  5. Predictive capacity of sperm quality parameters and sperm subpopulations on field fertility after artificial insemination in sheep.

    PubMed

    Santolaria, P; Vicente-Fiel, S; Palacín, I; Fantova, E; Blasco, M E; Silvestre, M A; Yániz, J L

    2015-12-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the relevance of several sperm quality parameters and sperm population structure on the reproductive performance after cervical artificial insemination (AI) in sheep. One hundred and thirty-nine ejaculates from 56 adult rams were collected using an artificial vagina, processed for sperm quality assessment and used to perform 1319 AI. Analyses of sperm motility by computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA), sperm nuclear morphometry by computer-assisted sperm morphometry analysis (CASMA), membrane integrity by acridine orange-propidium iodide combination and sperm DNA fragmentation using the sperm chromatin dispersion test (SCD) were performed. Clustering procedures using the sperm kinematic and morphometric data resulted in the classification of spermatozoa into three kinematic and three morphometric sperm subpopulations. Logistic regression procedures were used, including fertility at AI as the dependent variable (measured by lambing, 0 or 1) and farm, year, month of AI, female parity, female lambing-treatment interval, ram, AI technician and sperm quality parameters (including sperm subpopulations) as independent factors. Sperm quality variables remaining in the logistic regression model were viability and VCL. Fertility increased for each one-unit increase in viability (by a factor of 1.01) and in VCL (by a factor of 1.02). Multiple linear regression analyses were also performed to analyze the factors possibly influencing ejaculate fertility (N=139). The analysis yielded a significant (P<0.05) relationship between sperm viability and ejaculate fertility. The discriminant ability of the different semen variables to predict field fertility was analyzed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Sperm viability and VCL showed significant, albeit limited, predictive capacity on field fertility (0.57 and 0.54 Area Under Curve, respectively). The distribution of spermatozoa in the different subpopulations was not related to fertility. PMID:26507945

  6. Sensors Increase Productivity in Harsh Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    California's San Juan Capistrano-based Endevco Corporation licensed three patents covering high-temperature, harsh-environment silicon carbide (Si-C) pressure sensors from Glenn Research Center. The company is exploring their use in government markets, as well as in commercial markets, including commercial jet testing, deep well drilling applications where pressure and temperature increase with drilling depth, and in automobile combustion chambers.

  7. Female sperm use and storage between fertilization events drive sperm competition and male ejaculate allocation.

    PubMed

    Requena, Gustavo S; Alonzo, Suzanne H

    2014-12-01

    Sperm competition theory has traditionally focused on how male allocation responds to female promiscuity, when males compete to fertilize a single clutch of eggs. Here, we develop a model to ask how female sperm use and storage across consecutive reproductive events affect male ejaculate allocation and patterns of mating and paternity. In our model, sperm use (a single parameter under female control) is the main determinant of sperm competition, which alters the effect of female promiscuity on male success and, ultimately, male reproductive allocation. Our theory reproduces the general pattern predicted by existing theory that increased sperm competition favors increased allocation to ejaculates. However, our model predicts a negative correlation between male ejaculate allocation and female promiscuity, challenging the generality of a prevailing expectation of sperm competition theory. Early models assumed that the energetic costs of precopulatory competition and the level of sperm competition are both determined by female promiscuity, which leads to an assumed covariation between these two processes. By modeling precopulatory costs and sperm competition independently, our theoretical framework allows us to examine how male allocation should respond independently to variation in sperm competition and energetic trade-offs in mating systems that have been overlooked in the past. PMID:25307988

  8. In vitro embryo production in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) using sexed sperm and oocytes from ovum pick up.

    PubMed

    Liang, X W; Lu, Y Q; Chen, M T; Zhang, X F; Lu, S S; Zhang, M; Pang, C Y; Huang, F X; Lu, K H

    2008-04-15

    The objective was to explore the use of sexed sperm and OPU-derived oocytes in an IVP system to produce sex-preselected bubaline embryos. Oocytes were recovered from 20 fertile Murrah and Nili-Ravi buffalo cows by repeated (twice weekly) ultrasound-guided transvaginal ovum pick up (OPU), or by aspiration of abbatoir-derived bubaline ovaries, and subjected to IVF, using frozen-thawed sexed or unsexed bubaline semen. On average, 4.6 oocytes were retrieved per buffalo per session (70.9% were Grades A or B). Following IVF with sexed sperm, oocytes derived from OPU had similar developmental competence as those from abattoir-derived ovaries, in terms of cleavage rate (57.6 vs. 50.4%, P=0.357) and blastocyst development rate (16.0 vs. 23.9%, P=0.237). Furthermore, using frozen-thawed sexed versus unsexed semen did not affect rates of cleavage (50.5 vs. 50.9%, P=0.978) or blastocyst development (15.3 vs. 19.1%, P=0.291) after IVF using OPU-derived oocytes. Of the embryos produced in an OPU-IVP system, 9 of 34 sexed fresh embryos (26.5%) and 5 of 43 sexed frozen embryos (11.6%) transferred to recipients established pregnancies, whereas 7 of 26 unsexed fresh embryos (26.9%) and 6 out of 39 unsexed frozen embryos (15.4%) transferred to recipients established pregnancies. Eleven sex-preselected buffalo calves (10 females and one male) and 10 sexed buffalo calves (six females and four males) were born following embryo transfer. In the present study, OPU, sperm sexing technology, IVP, and embryo transfer, were used to produce sex-preselected buffalo calves. This study provided proof of concept for further research and wider field application of these technologies in buffalo. PMID:18336893

  9. Age-dependent changes in sperm production, semen quality, and testicular volume in the black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes).

    PubMed

    Wolf, K N; Wildt, D E; Vargas, A; Marinari, P E; Kreeger, J S; Ottinger, M A; Howard, J G

    2000-07-01

    The black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes), which was extirpated from its native North American prairie habitat during the 1980s, is being reintroduced to the wild because of a successful captive-breeding program. To enhance propagation, the reproductive biology of this endangered species is being studied intensively. The typical life span of the black-footed ferret is approximately 7 yr. Female fecundity declines after 3 yr of age, but the influence of age on male reproduction is unknown. In this study, testis volume, seminal traits, sperm morphology, and serum testosterone were compared in 116 males from 1 to 7 yr of age living in captivity. Results demonstrated that testes volume during the peak breeding season was similar (P > 0.05) among males 1 to 5 yr of age, reduced (P < 0.05) among males 6 yr of age, and further reduced (P < 0.05) among males 7 yr of age. Motile sperm/ejaculate was similar in males 1 to 6 yr of age but diminished (P < 0.05) in those 7 yr of age. Males at 6 and 7 yr of age produced fewer (P < 0.05) structurally normal sperm than younger counterparts; however, serum testosterone concentrations were not reduced (P > 0.05) in older males. Histological comparison of testicular/epididymal tissue from 5- and 7-yr-old black-footed ferrets confirmed that the interval between these two ages may represent a transitional period to reproductive senescence. In summary, functional reproductive capacity of male black-footed ferrets exceeds that of females by at least 2 yr. Testes and seminal quality are indistinguishable among males 1 to 5 yr of age, with progressive reproductive aging occurring thereafter. PMID:10859258

  10. Increasing Efficiency in Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, S.; Turner, J.

    2002-01-01

    Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production promises to be a renewable, clean, and efficient way of storing the sun's energy for use in hydrogen-powered fuel cells. We use p-type Ga.51In.49P semiconductor (henceforth as GaInP2) to absorb solar energy and produce a photocurrent. When the semiconductor is immersed in water, the photocurrent can break down water into hydrogen and oxygen. However, before the GaInP2 can produce hydrogen and oxygen, the conduction band and the Fermi level of the semiconductor must overlap the water redox potentials. In an unmodified system, the conduction band and Fermi level of GaInP2 do not overlap the water redox potentials. When light shines on the semiconductor, electrons build up on the surface, shifting the bandedges and Fermi level further away from overlap of the water redox potentials. We report on surface treatments with metallated porphyrins and transition metals that suppress bandedge migration and allow bandedge overlap to occur. Coating ruthenium octaethylporphyrin carbonyl (RuOEP CO) on the GaInP2 surface shifted bandedges in the positive direction by 270 mV on average, allowing the bandedges to frequently overlap the water redox potentials. Coating the GaInP2 surface with RuCl3 catalyzed charge transfer from the semiconductor to the water, lessening bandedge migration under light irradiation. Future work will focus on the long-term surface stability of these new treatments and quantitative applications of porphyrins.

  11. Sperm DNA fragmentation, recurrent implantation failure and recurrent miscarriage

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, Carol; Clarke, Helen; Cutting, Rachel; Saxton, Jane; Waite, Sarah; Ledger, William; Li, Tinchiu; Pacey, Allan A

    2015-01-01

    Evidence is increasing that the integrity of sperm DNA may also be related to implantation failure and recurrent miscarriage (RM). To investigate this, the sperm DNA fragmentation in partners of 35 women with recurrent implantation failure (RIF) following in vitro fertilization, 16 women diagnosed with RM and seven recent fathers (control) were examined. Sperm were examined pre- and post-density centrifugation by the sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD) test and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. There were no significant differences in the age of either partner or sperm concentration, motility or morphology between three groups. Moreover, there were no obvious differences in sperm DNA fragmentation measured by either test. However, whilst on average sperm DNA fragmentation in all groups was statistically lower in prepared sperm when measured by the SCD test, this was not seen with the results from the TUNEL assay. These results do not support the hypothesis that sperm DNA fragmentation is an important cause of RIF or RM, or that sperm DNA integrity testing has value in such patients. It also highlights significant differences between test methodologies and sperm preparation methods in interpreting the data from sperm DNA fragmentation tests. PMID:25814156

  12. Ovarian fluid of receptive females enhances sperm velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparini, Clelia; Andreatta, Gabriele; Pilastro, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    The females of several internal fertilizers are able to store sperm for a long time, reducing the risk of sperm limitation. However, it also means that males can attempt to mate outside females' receptive period, potentially increasing the level of sperm competition and exacerbating sexual conflict over mating. The guppy ( Poecilia reticulata), an internally fertilizing fish, is a model system of such competition and conflict. Female guppies accept courtship and mate consensually only during receptive periods of the ovarian cycle but receive approximately one (mostly forced) mating attempt per minute both during and outside their sexually receptive phase. In addition, females can store viable sperm for months. We expected that guppy females would disfavour sperm received during their unreceptive period, possibly by modulating the quality and/or quantity of the components present in the ovarian fluid (OF) over the breeding cycle. Ovarian fluid has been shown to affect sperm velocity, a determinant of sperm competition success in this and other fishes. We found that in vitro sperm velocity is slower in OF collected from unreceptive females than in OF from receptive females. Visual stimulation with a potential partner prior to collection did not significantly affect in vitro sperm velocity. These results suggest that sperm received by unreceptive females may be disfavoured as sperm velocity likely affects the migration process and the number of sperm that reach storage sites.

  13. Genome-wide Loci linked to non-obstructive azoospermia susceptibility may be independent of reduced sperm production in males with normozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenling; Liu, Yunqiang; Shen, Ying; Yan, Yuanlong; Wang, Xianding; Yang, Dong; Li, Lei; Ma, Yongxin; Tao, Dachang; Zhang, Sizhong; Yang, Yuan

    2015-02-01

    Non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) is a complex, multifactorial disease. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified eight NOA susceptibility loci at genome-wide significance of P < 5.0 10(-8) in Han Chinese from southeastern, northern, and central China. To better understand the role of the variants in conferring NOA risk, we selected four GWAS loci (HLA-DRA rs3129878, PRMT6 rs12097821, SOX5 rs10842262, and PEX10 rs2477686) that were reported before 2014 to investigate their association with NOA and their potential effects on sperm production in 1177 Han males from southwest China, including 545 patients with idiopathic NOA and 632 controls with normozoospermia. The results confirmed that the HLA-DRA rs3129878 was an NOA susceptibility locus in the present population. Along with our data, meta-analyses supported the association of the four GWAS-linked loci with NOA, whereas an additive effect of the four loci on NOA susceptibility was not found. Interestingly, the normozoospermic males with the risk genotypes of rs12097821 and rs3129878 + rs10842262 + rs12097821 were observed to have higher total sperm counts relative to non-risk genotypes, suggesting that the risk alleles of the genetic loci may not be via impairing spermatogenic ability to express susceptibility to NOA. These findings may advance our understanding of the role of the NOA susceptibility loci, although the results need to be confirmed in larger samples. PMID:25505198

  14. Immune activation decreases sperm viability in both sexes and influences female sperm storage.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Preethi; Fedorka, Kenneth M

    2012-09-01

    All animals are under the constant threat of pathogenic infection. However, little is known regarding the influence of acute infection on sperm viability, particularly in female insects. This information is crucial for our understanding of mating and immune system coevolution, considering that females store sperm and serve as the site of sperm competition. Using the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, we examined the influence of infection on sperm viability and storage. Twenty-four hours after haemocoel inoculation with a pathogen mimic (peptidoglycan, PGN) both sexes exhibited reduced sperm viability, indicating that systemic immune activation played a significant role in gamete survival. Surprisingly, sperm death did not appear to result from a reproductive-immune system trade-off, considering that sperm survived 24 h in vitro once removed from their somatic resources. Instead, our results are most consistent with death owing to immune effector collateral damage. We also examined the potential for sexually transmitted pathogens to influence sperm storage. Females mated with 'infected' males (created by dipping genitalia into a PGN solution) exhibited a higher proportion of empty sperm stores 48 h after mating compared to their controls. Remarkably, these data indicate that females may increase their fitness by removing 'infected' ejaculates from storage over time. PMID:22696524

  15. Immune activation decreases sperm viability in both sexes and influences female sperm storage

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Preethi; Fedorka, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    All animals are under the constant threat of pathogenic infection. However, little is known regarding the influence of acute infection on sperm viability, particularly in female insects. This information is crucial for our understanding of mating and immune system coevolution, considering that females store sperm and serve as the site of sperm competition. Using the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, we examined the influence of infection on sperm viability and storage. Twenty-four hours after haemocoel inoculation with a pathogen mimic (peptidoglycan, PGN) both sexes exhibited reduced sperm viability, indicating that systemic immune activation played a significant role in gamete survival. Surprisingly, sperm death did not appear to result from a reproductive-immune system trade-off, considering that sperm survived 24 h in vitro once removed from their somatic resources. Instead, our results are most consistent with death owing to immune effector collateral damage. We also examined the potential for sexually transmitted pathogens to influence sperm storage. Females mated with ‘infected’ males (created by dipping genitalia into a PGN solution) exhibited a higher proportion of empty sperm stores 48 h after mating compared to their controls. Remarkably, these data indicate that females may increase their fitness by removing ‘infected’ ejaculates from storage over time. PMID:22696524

  16. Increasing Labour Productivity in Agriculture and Its Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Ban, Anne

    2011-01-01

    In order to profit from the economic growth in their society farmers can (1) increase the yields of their crops and animals, (2) switch to the production of high value products for which there is an increasing demand in the market, (3) increase the labour productivity on their farm, (4) find non-farm sources of income for some or all of their…

  17. Increasing Labour Productivity in Agriculture and Its Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Ban, Anne

    2011-01-01

    In order to profit from the economic growth in their society farmers can (1) increase the yields of their crops and animals, (2) switch to the production of high value products for which there is an increasing demand in the market, (3) increase the labour productivity on their farm, (4) find non-farm sources of income for some or all of their

  18. The dynamics of sperm cooperation in a competitive environment

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Heidi S.; Giomi, Luca; Hoekstra, Hopi E.; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-01-01

    Sperm cooperation has evolved in a variety of taxa and is often considered a response to sperm competition, yet the benefit of this form of collective movement remains unclear. Here, we use fine-scale imaging and a minimal mathematical model to study sperm aggregation in the rodent genus Peromyscus. We demonstrate that as the number of sperm cells in an aggregate increase, the group moves with more persistent linearity but without increasing speed. This benefit, however, is offset in larger aggregates as the geometry of the group forces sperm to swim against one another. The result is a non-monotonic relationship between aggregate size and average velocity with both a theoretically predicted and empirically observed optimum of six to seven sperm per aggregate. To understand the role of sexual selection in driving these sperm group dynamics, we compared two sister-species with divergent mating systems. We find that sperm of Peromyscus maniculatus (highly promiscuous), which have evolved under intense competition, form optimal-sized aggregates more often than sperm of Peromyscus polionotus (strictly monogamous), which lack competition. Our combined mathematical and experimental study of coordinated sperm movement reveals the importance of geometry, motion and group size on sperm velocity and suggests how these physical variables interact with evolutionary selective pressures to regulate cooperation in competitive environments. PMID:25056618

  19. Summer flounder (Paralichthys dentatus) sperm cryopreservation and application in interspecific hybridization with olive flounder (P olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Liu, Q H; Ma, D Y; Xu, S H; Xiao, Z Z; Xiao, Y S; Song, Z C; Li, J

    2015-03-01

    The present study established an efficient technology for summer flounder (Paralichthys dentatus) sperm cryopreservation, and successfully applied the cryopreserved sperm into interspecific hybridization with olive flounder (P olivaceus). The best motility of postthaw sperm (78.004.70% and 76.607.90%), fertilization rates (95.703.60% and 79.405.20%), and hatching rates (93.104.00% and 77.202.90%) were achieved when using propylene glycol or DMSO as cryoprotectant. Furthermore, we have successfully improved the cryopreservation method from using 2-mL cryotube to 5-mL cryotube, and the dilution ratio has been increased to 4:1. By this method, the cryopreservation efficiency has been improved to 30 times of that with routine method. Computer-assisted sperm motion analysis showed the freezing-thawing process decreased the sperm speed but did not significantly change the sperm movement pattern, and the progressive linear motion still was the dominant movement pattern. The ultrastructural analysis showed 50% to 60% of the spermatozoa had normal morphology, 20% to 30% were slightly damaged, such as swelling or rupture of head, midpiece, and tail region, and 10% to 20% were severely damaged. In the artificial hybridization experiment, high fertilization rates and hatching rates were achieved when using 15% DMSO (95.73.6% and 79.45.2%, respectively) and 15% propylene glycol (93.14.0% and 77.22.9%, respectively), with no significant difference in comparison with control (94.72.6% and 72.56.5%, respectively). In addition, we found the embryos and larvae from postthaw sperm of P dentatus developed and grew normally. The results of the present study further validated the safety of the cryopreserved sperm in breeding production by assessing the fertilization capacity, embryo development, and larval growth. PMID:25476822

  20. Long-term effects of triethylenemelamine exposure on mouse testis cells and sperm chromatin structure assayed by flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Evenson, D.P.; Baer, R.K.; Jost, L.K. )

    1989-01-01

    The toxic and potentially mutagenic actions of triethylenemelamine (TEM) on mouse body and testis weights, testicular cell kinetics, sperm production, sperm head morphology, and sperm chromatin structure were assessed in two experiments. The first experiment examined effects of four dose levels of TEM, assayed 1, 4, or 10 wk after toxic exposure. In the second study, effects from five dosage levels were measured at 1, 4, and 10 wk, and the highest dosage level was evaluated over 44 wk. TEM produced an expected dose related loss of spermatogenic activity and subsequent recovery as determined by dual-parameter (DNA, RNA) flow cytometry (FCM) measurements of testicular cells. Both testicular weights and caudal sperm reserves remained generally below controls after 44 wk recovery following exposure to the highest dosage. Chromatin structure alterations, defined as increased susceptibility to DNA denaturation in situ, and sperm head morphology were highly correlated with dose and with each other. Sperm head morphology and sperm chromatic structure remained abnormal at 44 wk for the 1.0 mg/kg TEM dosage, suggesting that the abnormalities, present long after the initial toxic response, may be a result of mutation. This study demonstrates that flow cytometry provides a unique, rapid, and efficient means to measure effects of reproductive toxins and potential mutagens.

  1. Elevated frequencies of hyperhaploid sperm were detected in a man with a history of multiple aneuploid pregnancies

    SciTech Connect

    Chuu, Y.J.; Wyrobek, A.J.; Kidd, S.

    1997-10-01

    The goal of this research is to determine the heritable risk associated with elevations in the proportion of hyperhaploid human sperm. A case family presented with a history of four aneuploid pregnancies: two with autosomal trisomies (47,+ 22 and 47, +15) which were non-viable and two children with sex chromosomal aneuploidies (47, XYY and Klinefelter syndrome, 47, XXY). The father consumed {approximately}{1/2} pack of cigarettes and 1 alcoholic drink per day. He had no notable occupational or environmental exposures. Paternal origin of extra X chromosomes in the boy with Klinefelter syndrome was confirmed by DNA analyses of blood using polymorphic X-linked microsatellite markers. The inheritance pattern was established by {ge}2 informative loci using PCR products analyzed on an automatic DNA sequencer. Multi-probe sperm FISH was employed to determine the proportion of sperm with aneuploidies involving chromosome 21, X, and Y. Sperm aneuploidy frequencies of hyper-haploid sperm; XY ({approximately}6 fold, p < 0.001), 21-21 ({approximately}6 fold, p< 0.001), XX and YY ({approximately}2 fold, p<0.02). These findings suggest that elevated proportions of aneuploid sperm may be associated with an increased risk of fathering an aneuploid offspring. These findings are also relevant for future studies of heritable risk for men with elevations in sperm aneuploidy after exposures to therapeutic or environmental agents.

  2. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-S, a sperm-specific glycolytic enzyme, is required for sperm motility and male fertility.

    PubMed

    Miki, Kiyoshi; Qu, Weidong; Goulding, Eugenia H; Willis, William D; Bunch, Donna O; Strader, Lillian F; Perreault, Sally D; Eddy, Edward M; O'Brien, Deborah A

    2004-11-23

    Although glycolysis is highly conserved, it is remarkable that several unique isozymes in this central metabolic pathway are found in mammalian sperm. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-S (GAPDS) is the product of a mouse gene expressed only during spermatogenesis and, like its human ortholog (GAPD2), is the sole GAPDH isozyme in sperm. It is tightly bound to the fibrous sheath, a cytoskeletal structure that extends most of the length of the sperm flagellum. We disrupted Gapds expression by gene targeting to selectively block sperm glycolysis and assess its relative importance for in vivo sperm function. Gapds(-/-) males were infertile and had profound defects in sperm motility, exhibiting sluggish movement without forward progression. Although mitochondrial oxygen consumption was unchanged, sperm from Gapds(-/-) mice had ATP levels that were only 10.4% of those in sperm from WT mice. These results imply that most of the energy required for sperm motility is generated by glycolysis rather than oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, the critical role of glycolysis in sperm and its dependence on this sperm-specific enzyme suggest that GAPDS is a potential contraceptive target, and that mutations or environmental agents that disrupt its activity could lead to male infertility. PMID:15546993

  3. Epididymal sperm count.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yefan

    2003-02-01

    Making Epididymal Sperm Counts (Yefan Wang, TherImmune Research Corporation, Gaithersberg, Maryland). Epididymal sperm counts are a widely used, simple and sensitive method of assessing the effects of male reproductive toxicants on the epididymal and/or testicular site of action. After careful dissection of the tissues and further processing, the sperm suspensions are counted using a hemacytometer and analyzed for effect. PMID:20963758

  4. Seminal plasma effects on sex-sorting bovine sperm.

    PubMed

    Burroughs, C A; Graham, J K; Lenz, R W; Seidel, G E

    2013-02-01

    The objective was to determine which characteristics of bovine ejaculates affected efficacy of sex sorting bovine sperm by flow cytometry. The effects of first versus second ejaculates, seminal plasma content, addition of BSA, and seminal plasma from different bulls during staining were all studied, as was the effect of 8-hour storage with and without seminal plasma. Semen collected by artificial vagina was centrifuged at 1000 ×g for 15 minutes to separate sperm from seminal plasma; seminal plasma was clarified by 10 minutes of additional centrifugation at 2000 ×g. Sperm were rediluted to 160 × 10(6) sperm per mL with: Tyrode's medium plus albumin, lactate, and pyruvate (TALP) containing 0%, 5%, 10%, or 20% homologous seminal plasma, TALP containing 10% heterologous seminal plasma, or TALP containing 0.3% (control), 0.6%, or 1.2% BSA. After incubation with Hoechst 33342 for 45 minutes, an equal volume of TALP containing red food dye was added, and sperm were analyzed by flow cytometry/cell sorting to determine percent of live-oriented sperm, X sort rate, percent of membrane-impaired sperm, and split (degree of separation between X- and Y-bearing sperm populations). The percent of live-oriented sperm was higher for sperm incubated with 0% seminal plasma (64%) than for sperm incubated with 5%, 10%, or 20% seminal plasma (60%, 59%, and 58%, respectively; P < 0.05). The X sort rate was higher for sperm incubated with 0% seminal plasma than sperm with 20% seminal plasma (4.26 vs. 3.61 × 10(3) sperm per second). When seminal plasma was exchanged between bull ejaculates, only one bull had seminal plasma that was detrimental to sperm, resulting in 31% membrane-impaired sperm compared with a range of 16% to 19% for seminal plasmas from other bulls (P < 0.05). The addition of BSA did not affect sort efficiency at the concentrations studied. Sperm from six bulls stored for 8 hours without seminal plasma had more membrane-impaired sperm (which were discarded) during sorting (28%) than with seminal plasma (19%; P < 0.01), but higher postthaw motility postsorting (63%) than with seminal plasma (52%; P < 0.05). In conclusion, the presence of seminal plasma during staining and sorting decreased sort rates and percent of live-oriented sperm, and storing sperm without seminal plasma increased postthaw motility. PMID:23244767

  5. Microscopic analysis of MTT stained boar sperm cells

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, B.M.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of sperm cells to develop colored formazan by reduction of MTT was used earlier to develop a spectrophotometric assay to determine the viability of sperm cells for several mammalian species. It was the objective of the present study to visualize microscopically the location of the formazan in boar sperm cells. The MTT staining process of boar sperm cells can be divided into a series of morphological events. Incubation of the sperm cells in the presence of MTT resulted after a few min in a diffuse staining of the midpiece of the sperm cells. Upon further incubation the staining of the midpiece became more intense, and gradually the formation of packed formazan granules became more visible. At the same time, a small formazan stained granule appeared medially on the sperm head, which increased in size during further incubation. After incubation for about 1 h the midpiece granules were intensely stained and more clearly distinct as granules, while aggregation of sperm cells occurred. Around 90% of the sperm cells showed these staining events. At the end of the staining the formazan granules have disappeared from both the sperm cells and medium, whereas formazan crystals appeared as thin crystal threads, that became heavily aggregated in the incubation medium. It was concluded that formazan is taken up by lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. Further, the use of the MTT assay to test for sperm viability should be regarded as a qualitative assay, whereas its practical use at artificial insemination (AI) Stations is limited. PMID:26623368

  6. Sperm parameters: paradigmatic index of good health and longevity.

    PubMed

    Omu, Alexander E

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of spermatozoon by Anton van Leeuwenhoek in 1677, there has been an ever increasing understanding of its role in reproduction. Many factors adversely affect sperm quality, including varicocele, accessory gland infection, immunological factors, congenital abnormalities, and iatrogenic systemic and endocrine causes, such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and smoking. The mechanisms responsible for the association between poor sperm parameters and ill health may include oxidative stress, low-grade inflammation, low testosterone, and low sex-hormone-binding globulin. Oxidative stress in the testicular microenvironment may result in decreased spermatogenesis and sperm DNA damage, loss of sperm motility, and abnormal sperm morphology. Low testosterone caused by advanced age, visceral obesity, and inflammation is associated with the development of cardiovascular disease. Hence, semen analysis has an important role in the routine evaluation of idiopathic male infertility, usually manifested as low sperm counts, impaired sperm motility, or absence of sperm, and remains the most common single diagnostic tool. Several studies have shown an inverse relationship between semen quality and medical disorders. This review elucidates the effect of medical disorders and social habits on sperm quality, the mechanisms that are involved in the impairment of sperm quality, and whether or not sperm quality can be used as an index of good health and longevity in a man. PMID:24051979

  7. Rheotaxis guides mammalian sperm

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Kiyoshi; Clapham, David E

    2013-01-01

    Background In sea urchins, spermatozoan motility is altered by chemotactic peptides, giving rise to the assumption that mammalian eggs also emit chemotactic agents that guide spermatozoa through the female reproductive tract to the mature oocyte. Mammalian spermatozoa indeed undergo complex adaptations within the female (the process of capacitation) that are initiated by agents ranging from pH to progesterone, but these factors are not necessarily taxic. Currently, chemotaxis, thermotaxis, and rheotaxis have not been definitively established in mammals. Results Here, we show that positive rheotaxis, the ability of organisms to orient and swim against the flow of surrounding fluid, is a major taxic factor for mouse and human sperm. This flow is generated within 4 hours of sexual stimulation and coitus in female mice; prolactin-triggered oviductal fluid secretion clears the oviduct of debris, lowers viscosity, and generates the stream that guides sperm migration in the oviduct. Rheotaxic movement is demonstrated in capacitated and uncapacitated spermatozoa in low and high viscosity medium. Finally, we show that a unique sperm motion we quantify using the sperm head's rolling rate reflects sperm rotation that generates essential force for positioning the sperm in the stream. Rotation requires CatSper channels, presumably by enabling Ca2+ influx. Conclusions We propose that rheotaxis is a major determinant of sperm guidance over long distances in the mammalian female reproductive tract. Coitus induces fluid flow to guide sperm in the oviduct. Sperm rheotaxis requires rotational motion during CatSper channel-dependent hyperactivated motility. PMID:23453951

  8. Oxidative stress in zebrafish (Danio rerio) sperm.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, Mary; McCarthy, Megan; Carter, Virginia L; Meyers, Stuart A

    2012-01-01

    Laboratories around the world have produced tens of thousands of mutant and transgenic zebrafish lines. As with mice, maintaining all of these valuable zebrafish genotypes is expensive, risky, and beyond the capacity of even the largest stock centers. Because reducing oxidative stress has become an important aspect of reducing the variability in mouse sperm cryopreservation, we examined whether antioxidants might improve cryopreservation of zebrafish sperm. Four experiments were conducted in this study. First, we used the xanthine-xanthine oxidase (X-XO) system to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). The X-XO system was capable of producing a stress reaction in zebrafish sperm reducing its sperm motility in a concentration dependent manner (P<0.05). Second, we examined X-XO and the impact of antioxidants on sperm viability, ROS and motility. Catalase (CAT) mitigated stress and maintained viability and sperm motility (P>0.05), whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD) and vitamin E did not (P<0.05). Third, we evaluated ROS in zebrafish spermatozoa during cryopreservation and its effect on viability and motility. Methanol (8%) reduced viability and sperm motility (P<0.05), but the addition of CAT mitigated these effects (P>0.05), producing a mean 2.0 to 2.9-fold increase in post-thaw motility. Fourth, we examined the effect of additional cryoprotectants and CAT on fresh sperm motility. Cryoprotectants, 8% methanol and 10% dimethylacetamide (DMA), reduced the motility over the control value (P<0.5), whereas 10% dimethylformamide (DMF) with or without CAT did not (P>0.05). Zebrafish sperm protocols should be modified to improve the reliability of the cryopreservation process, perhaps using a different cryoprotectant. Regardless, the simple addition of CAT to present-day procedures will significantly improve this process, assuring increased and less variable fertilization success and allowing resource managers to dependably plan how many straws are needed to safely cryopreserve a genetic line. PMID:22724013

  9. Oxidative Stress in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Hagedorn, Mary; McCarthy, Megan; Carter, Virginia L.; Meyers, Stuart A.

    2012-01-01

    Laboratories around the world have produced tens of thousands of mutant and transgenic zebrafish lines. As with mice, maintaining all of these valuable zebrafish genotypes is expensive, risky, and beyond the capacity of even the largest stock centers. Because reducing oxidative stress has become an important aspect of reducing the variability in mouse sperm cryopreservation, we examined whether antioxidants might improve cryopreservation of zebrafish sperm. Four experiments were conducted in this study. First, we used the xanthine-xanthine oxidase (X-XO) system to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). The X-XO system was capable of producing a stress reaction in zebrafish sperm reducing its sperm motility in a concentration dependent manner (P<0.05). Second, we examined X-XO and the impact of antioxidants on sperm viability, ROS and motility. Catalase (CAT) mitigated stress and maintained viability and sperm motility (P>0.05), whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD) and vitamin E did not (P<0.05). Third, we evaluated ROS in zebrafish spermatozoa during cryopreservation and its effect on viability and motility. Methanol (8%) reduced viability and sperm motility (P<0.05), but the addition of CAT mitigated these effects (P>0.05), producing a mean 2.0 to 2.9-fold increase in post-thaw motility. Fourth, we examined the effect of additional cryoprotectants and CAT on fresh sperm motility. Cryoprotectants, 8% methanol and 10% dimethylacetamide (DMA), reduced the motility over the control value (P<0.5), whereas 10% dimethylformamide (DMF) with or without CAT did not (P>0.05). Zebrafish sperm protocols should be modified to improve the reliability of the cryopreservation process, perhaps using a different cryoprotectant. Regardless, the simple addition of CAT to present-day procedures will significantly improve this process, assuring increased and less variable fertilization success and allowing resource managers to dependably plan how many straws are needed to safely cryopreserve a genetic line. PMID:22724013

  10. Cryopreservation of Sperm from the Endangered Colorado Pikeminnow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiersch, T.R.; Figiel, C.R., Jr.; Wayman, W.R.; Williamson, J.H.; Gorman, O.T.; Carmichael, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    We developed methods for the cryopreservation of sperm of the endangered Colorado pikeminnow Ptychocheilus lucius. Sperm were collected from a captive broodstock population of Colorado pikeminnow reared and maintained at the Dexter National Fish Hatchery and Technology Center. Our objectives were to (1) evaluate the effects on sperm motility of 24-h storage in Hanks' balanced salt solution (HBSS); (2) characterize sperm motility and duration; (3) examine the relationship between sperm motility and osmotic pressure; (4) examine the effect of four cryoprotectants (dimethyl sulfoxide [DMSO], dimethyl acetamide [DMA], glycerol, and methanol [MeOH] at two concentrations [5% and 10%]) on postthaw motility; and (5) compare the effect of two cooling rates (40??C/ min and 4??C/min) on postthaw motility. The sperm samples diluted with HBSS retained higher motility (mean ??SD, 77 ?? 22%; n = 9) than did undiluted samples (12 ?? 30%; n = 9) after 24 h of storage. When exposed to HBSS at 274 mosmols/kg or more, few sperm became motile (???1%). Exposure to HBSS at 265 mosmols/kg elicited threshold activation (defined as 10% motility), and maximum motility (>95%) was observed at 93 mosmols/ kg. The maximum motility of sperm was observed within 10 s after activation with deionized water, and sperm remained motile for 57 s. The sperm that were cooled at a rate of 40??C/min and cryopreserved with 5% MeOH retained higher postthaw motility (56 ?? 13%) than did sperm cryopreserved with DMSO, DMA, or glycerol (at 5% and 10%). When the sperm samples were cooled at a rate of 4??C/min, sperm cryopreserved with MeOH (5% or 10%) or DMSO (5% or 10%) retained the highest postthaw motilities (???14%). The use of cryopreserved sperm can assist hatchery managers in the production of fish, provide for the long-term conservation of genetic resources, and assist in the recovery of endangered species such as the Colorado pikeminnow.

  11. Evaluation of Lasting Effects of Heat Stress on Sperm Profile and Oxidative Status of Ram Semen and Epididymal Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Thais Rose dos Santos; Mendes, Camilla Mota; de Castro, Letícia Signori; de Assis, Patrícia Monken; Siqueira, Adriano Felipe Perez; Delgado, Juliana de Carvalho; Goissis, Marcelo Demarchi; Muiño-Blanco, Teresa; Cebrián-Pérez, José Álvaro; Nichi, Marcílio; Visintin, José Antonio; Assumpção, Mayra Elena Ortiz D'Ávila

    2016-01-01

    Higher temperatures lead to an increase of testicular metabolism that results in spermatic damage. Oxidative stress is the main factor responsible for testicular damage caused by heat stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate lasting effects of heat stress on ejaculated sperm and immediate or long-term effects of heat stress on epididymal sperm. We observed decrease in motility and mass motility of ejaculated sperm, as well as an increase in the percentages of sperm showing major and minor defects, damaged plasma and acrosome membranes, and a decrease in the percentage of sperm with high mitochondrial membrane potential in the treated group until one spermatic cycle. An increased enzymatic activity of glutathione peroxidase and an increase of stressed cells were observed in ejaculated sperm of the treated group. A decrease in the percentage of epididymal sperm with high mitochondrial membrane potential was observed in the treated group. However, when comparing immediate and long-term effects, we observed an increase in the percentage of sperm with low mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, testicular heat stress induced oxidative stress that led to rescuable alterations after one spermatic cycle in ejaculated sperm and also after 30 days in epididymal sperm. PMID:26881013

  12. Male mammals respond to a risk of sperm competition conveyed by odours of conspecific males

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    delBarco-Trillo, Javier; Ferkin, Michael H.

    2004-09-01

    Sperm competition occurs when a female copulates with two or more males and the sperm of those males compete within the female's reproductive tract to fertilize her eggs. The frequent occurrence of sperm competition has forced males of many species to develop different strategies to overcome the sperm of competing males. A prevalent strategy is for males to increase their sperm investment (total number of sperm allocated by a male to a particular female) after detecting a risk of sperm competition. It has been shown that the proportion of sperm that one male contributes to the sperm pool of a female is correlated with the proportion of offspring sired by that male. Therefore, by increasing his sperm investment a male may bias a potential sperm competition in his favour. Here we show that male meadow voles, Microtus pennsylvanicus, increase their sperm investment when they mate in the presence of another male's odours. Such an increase in sperm investment does not occur by augmenting the frequency of ejaculations, but by increasing the amount of sperm in a similar number of ejaculations.

  13. An ARID Domain-Containing Protein within Nuclear Bodies Is Required for Sperm Cell Formation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Binglian; He, Hui; Zheng, Yanhua; Wu, Wenye; McCormick, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    In plants, each male meiotic product undergoes mitosis, and then one of the resulting cells divides again, yielding a three-celled pollen grain comprised of a vegetative cell and two sperm cells. Several genes have been found to act in this process, and DUO1 (DUO POLLEN 1), a transcription factor, plays a key role in sperm cell formation by activating expression of several germline genes. But how DUO1 itself is activated and how sperm cell formation is initiated remain unknown. To expand our understanding of sperm cell formation, we characterized an ARID (AT-Rich Interacting Domain)-containing protein, ARID1, that is specifically required for sperm cell formation in Arabidopsis. ARID1 localizes within nuclear bodies that are transiently present in the generative cell from which sperm cells arise, coincident with the timing of DUO1 activation. An arid1 mutant and antisense arid1 plants had an increased incidence of pollen with only a single sperm-like cell and exhibited reduced fertility as well as reduced expression of DUO1. In vitro and in vivo evidence showed that ARID1 binds to the DUO1 promoter. Lastly, we found that ARID1 physically associates with histone deacetylase 8 and that histone acetylation, which in wild type is evident only in sperm, expanded to the vegetative cell nucleus in the arid1 mutant. This study identifies a novel component required for sperm cell formation in plants and uncovers a direct positive regulatory role of ARID1 on DUO1 through association with histone acetylation. PMID:25057814

  14. Human sperm chromosome analysis after subzonal sperm insemination of hamster oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, J.

    1994-09-01

    Sperm microinjection techniques, subzonal sperm insemination (SUZI) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), have achieved a wide spread clinical application for the treatment of male infertility. To date, only one study has focused on sperm karyotypes after microinjection. Martin et al. reported a very high incidence of abnormal human sperm complements after ICSI into hamster oocytes. In the present study, are reported the first human sperm karyotypes after SUZI of hamster oocytes. Spermatozoa from two control donors were treated by calcium ionophore A23187 and injected under the zona of hamster eggs. The microinjected eggs were then cultured for cytogenetic analysis of the pronuclei. Out of 47 analyzed sperm chromosome metaphases, 5 (10.6%) were abnormal, 4 (8.5%) were hypohaploid and 1 (2.1%) had a structural abnormality. The sex ratio was not significantly different from the expected 1:1 ratio. Rates of chromosomal abnormalities in microinjected spermatozoa were similar to those observed in spermatozoa inseminated with zona free eggs, suggesting that SUZI procedure per se does not increase sperm chromosomal abnormalities.

  15. Ocean acidification impacts on sperm mitochondrial membrane potential bring sperm swimming behaviour near its tipping point.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Peter; Binet, Monique T; Havenhand, Jonathan N; Doyle, Christopher J; Williamson, Jane E

    2015-04-01

    Broadcast spawning marine invertebrates are susceptible to environmental stressors such as climate change, as their reproduction depends on the successful meeting and fertilization of gametes in the water column. Under near-future scenarios of ocean acidification, the swimming behaviour of marine invertebrate sperm is altered. We tested whether this was due to changes in sperm mitochondrial activity by investigating the effects of ocean acidification on sperm metabolism and swimming behaviour in the sea urchin Centrostephanus rodgersii. We used a fluorescent molecular probe (JC-1) and flow cytometry to visualize mitochondrial activity (measured as change in mitochondrial membrane potential, MMP). Sperm MMP was significantly reduced in ?pH -0.3 (35% reduction) and ?pH -0.5 (48% reduction) treatments, whereas sperm swimming behaviour was less sensitive with only slight changes (up to 11% decrease) observed overall. There was significant inter-individual variability in responses of sperm swimming behaviour and MMP to acidified seawater. We suggest it is likely that sperm exposed to these changes in pH are close to their tipping point in terms of physiological tolerance to acidity. Importantly, substantial inter-individual variation in responses of sperm swimming to ocean acidification may increase the scope for selection of resilient phenotypes, which, if heritable, could provide a basis for adaptation to future ocean acidification. PMID:25833135

  16. Foetal and post-natal exposure of sheep to sewage sludge chemicals disrupts sperm production in adulthood in a subset of animals

    PubMed Central

    Bellingham, M; McKinnell, C; Fowler, P A; Amezaga, M R; Zhang, Z; Rhind, S M; Cotinot, C; Mandon-Pepin, B; Evans, N P; Sharpe, R M

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to ubiquitous, environmental chemicals (ECs) has been hypothesized as a cause for declining male reproductive health. Understanding the long-term effects of EC exposure on reproductive health in humans requires animal models and exposure to real life, environmentally relevant, mixtures during development, a life stage of particular sensitivity to ECs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of in utero and post-natal exposure to environmentally relevant levels of ECs, via sewage sludge application to pasture, on the adult male sheep testis. Hormones, liver concentrations of candidate ECs and Sertoli and germ cell numbers in testes of adult rams that were exposed to ECs in sewage sludge in utero, and until weaning via maternal exposure, and post-weaning via grazing pastures fertilized with sewage sludge, were quantified. Evaluated as a single group, exposure to sludge ECs was without significant effect on most parameters. However, a more detailed study revealed that 5 of 12 sludge-exposed rams exhibited major spermatogenic abnormalities. These consisted of major reductions in germ cell numbers per testis or per Sertoli cell and more Sertoli cell-only tubules, when compared with controls, which did not show any such changes. The sludge-related spermatogenic changes in the five affected animals were significantly different from controls (p < 0.001); Sertoli cell number was unaffected. Hormone profiles and liver candidate EC concentrations were not measurably affected by exposure. We conclude that developmental exposure of male sheep to real-world mixtures of ECs can result in major reduction in germ cell numbers, indicative of impaired sperm production, in a proportion of exposed males. The individual-specific effects are presumed to reflect EC effects on a heterogeneous population in which some individuals may be more susceptible to adverse EC effects. Such effects of EC exposure in humans could have adverse consequences for sperm counts and fertility in some exposed males. PMID:22150464

  17. Differences in the fatty-acid composition of rodent spermatozoa are associated to levels of sperm competition

    PubMed Central

    delBarco-Trillo, Javier; Mateo, Rafael; Roldan, Eduardo R. S.

    2015-01-01

    Sperm competition is a prevalent phenomenon that drives the evolution of sperm function. High levels of sperm competition lead to increased metabolism to fuel higher sperm velocities. This enhanced metabolism can result in oxidative damage (including lipid peroxidation) and damage to the membrane. We hypothesized that in those species experiencing high levels of sperm competition there are changes in the fatty-acid composition of the sperm membrane that makes the membrane more resistant to oxidative damage. Given that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are the most prone to lipid peroxidation, we predicted that higher sperm competition leads to a reduction in the proportion of sperm PUFAs. In contrast, we predicted that levels of sperm competition should not affect the proportion of PUFAs in somatic cells. To test these predictions, we quantified the fatty-acid composition of sperm, testis and liver cells in four mouse species (genus Mus) that differ in their levels of sperm competition. Fatty-acid composition in testis and liver cells was not associated to sperm competition levels. However, in sperm cells, as predicted, an increase in sperm competition levels was associated with an increase in the proportion of saturated fatty-acids (the most resistant to lipid peroxidation) and by a concomitant decrease in the proportion of PUFAs. Two particular fatty acids were most responsible for this pattern (arachidonic acid and palmitic acid). Our findings thus indicate that sperm competition has a pervasive influence in the composition of sperm cells that ultimately may have important effects in sperm function. PMID:25795911

  18. Neurotensin enhances sperm capacitation and acrosome reaction in mice.

    PubMed

    Hiradate, Yuuki; Inoue, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Norio; Shirakata, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Yutaka; Gotoh, Aina; Roh, Sang-Gun; Uchida, Takafumi; Katoh, Kazuo; Yoshida, Manabu; Sato, Eimei; Tanemura, Kentaro

    2014-08-01

    Neurotensin (NT) has multiple functions, ranging from acting as a neurotransmitter to regulating intestinal movement. However, its function in reproductive physiology is unknown. Here, we confirmed the expression and localization of NT receptors (NTR1) in mouse epididymal spermatozoa and investigated the effect of NT on sperm function. Sperm protein tyrosine phosphorylation, one of the indices of sperm capacitation, was facilitated dose-dependently by NT administration. In addition, the acrosome reaction was promoted in capacitated spermatozoa, and addition of a selective antagonist of NTR1 and NTR2 blocked the induction. Furthermore, intracellular calcium mobilization by NT addition was observed. This showed that NT was an accelerator of sperm function via its functional receptors. The presence of NT was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and its localization was observed in epithelia of the uterus and oviduct isthmus and ampulla, which correspond to the fertilization route of spermatozoa. The NT mRNA level in ovulated cumulus cell was remarkably increased by treatment with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Using an in vitro maturation model, we analyzed the effects of FSH, epidermal growth factor (EGF), estradiol, and progesterone in NT production in cumulus cells. We found that FSH and EGF upregulated NT release and mRNA expression. Both FSH- and EGF-induced upregulation were inhibited by U0126, an MAPK kinase inhibitor, indicating that FSH and EGF regulate NT expression via a MAPK-dependent pathway. This evidence suggests that NT can act as a promoter of sperm capacitation and the acrosome reaction in the female reproductive tract. PMID:25031361

  19. Activity of the Na,K-ATPase ?4 isoform is regulated during sperm capacitation to support sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Tamara; Snchez, Gladis; Blanco, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    The ?4 polypeptide is a testis-specific isoform of the catalytic subunit of the Na,K-ATPase, which is essential for sperm motility and fertility. In the present study, we have investigated the regulation of activity of the ?4 isoform and the relevance of this event for sperm capacitation. We have performed this by taking advantage of the selective high affinity of ?4 for the inhibitor ouabain. Our results show that ouabain-sensitive hydrolysis of ATP and uptake of (86)Rb, corresponding to the enzymatic and ion transport activities of ?4, respectively, increased during sperm capacitation in a time-dependent manner. Specific labeling of ?4 with the fluorescent indicator bodipy-ouabain and immunoblot analysis of biotinylated and streptavidin-precipitated sperm plasma membrane proteins indicated a capacitation- and time-dependent rise in levels of active ?4 isoform at the sperm surface. Ouabain inhibition of ?4 blocked the increase in total sperm motility and the hyperactive motility pattern characteristic of sperm capacitation. Moreover, interference of ?4 activity with ouabain partially prevented the intracellular decrease in Na(+) and the plasma membrane hyperpolarization that typically accompany sperm capacitation. In contrast, ouabain inhibition of ?4 did not affect the spontaneous sperm acrosomal reaction following capacitation. Together, these results demonstrate that Na,K-ATPase ?4 activity is up-regulated during sperm capacitation through mechanisms that involve both increases in molecular activity and levels of ?4 at the sperm plasma membrane. This increase in ?4 activity helps maintain the changes in motility that are associated with sperm capacitation, emphasizing the biologic relevance of the Na,K-ATPase ?4 isoform in sustaining sperm function. PMID:22441762

  20. Sperm Patch-Clamp

    PubMed Central

    Lishko, Polina; Clapham, David E.; Navarro, Betsy; Kirichok, Yuriy

    2014-01-01

    Sperm intracellular pH and calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) are two central factors that control sperm activity within the female reproductive tract. As such, the ion channels of the sperm plasma membrane that alter intracellular sperm [Ca2+] and pH play important roles in sperm physiology and the process of fertilization. Indeed, sperm ion channels regulate sperm motility, control sperm chemotaxis toward the egg in some species, and may trigger the acrosome reaction. Until recently, our understanding of these important molecules was rudimentary due to the inability to patch-clamp spermatozoa and directly record the activity of these ion channels under voltage clamp. Recently, we overcame this technical barrier and developed a method for reproducible application of the patch-clamp technique to mouse and human spermatozoa. This chapter covers important aspects of application of the patch-clamp technique to spermatozoa, such as selection of the electrophysiological equipment, isolation of spermatozoa for patch-clamp experiments, formation of the gigaohm seal with spermatozoa, and transition into the whole-cell mode of recording. We also discuss potential pitfalls in application of the patch-clamp technique to flagellar ion channels. PMID:23522465

  1. State Policies and Planning to Increase Attainment, Quality, and Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingenfelter, Paul E.

    2007-01-01

    This article examines why state planning and policy for higher education are increasingly focused on increasing educational attainment, quality, and the productivity of the system. It presents four "stories" which illustrate initiatives to improve attainment, quality, and productivity, but fall far short of exhausting the available material.

  2. Mammalian Sperm Motility: Observation and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, E. A.; Gadlha, H.; Smith, D. J.; Blake, J. R.; Kirkman-Brown, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa motility is a subject of growing importance because of rising human infertility and the possibility of improving animal breeding. We highlight opportunities for fluid and continuum dynamics to provide novel insights concerning the mechanics of these specialized cells, especially during their remarkable journey to the egg. The biological structure of the motile sperm appendage, the flagellum, is described and placed in the context of the mechanics underlying the migration of mammalian sperm through the numerous environments of the female reproductive tract. This process demands certain specific changes to flagellar movement and motility for which further mechanical insight would be valuable, although this requires improved modeling capabilities, particularly to increase our understanding of sperm progression in vivo. We summarize current theoretical studies, highlighting the synergistic combination of imaging and theory in exploring sperm motility, and discuss the challenges for future observational and theoretical studies in understanding the underlying mechanics.

  3. Speract, a sea urchin egg peptide that regulates sperm motility, also stimulates sperm mitochondrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    García-Rincón, Juan; Darszon, Alberto; Beltrán, Carmen

    2016-04-01

    Sea urchin sperm have only one mitochondrion, that in addition to being the main source of energy, may modulate intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) to regulate their motility and possibly the acrosome reaction. Speract is a decapeptide from the outer jelly layer of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus egg that upon binding to its receptor in the sperm, stimulates sperm motility, respiration and ion fluxes, among other physiological events. Altering the sea urchin sperm mitochondrial function with specific inhibitors of this organelle, increases [Ca(2+)]i in an external Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]ext)-dependent manner (Ardón, et al., 2009. BBActa 1787: 15), suggesting that the mitochondrion is involved in sperm [Ca(2+)]i homeostasis. To further understand the interrelationship between the mitochondrion and the speract responses, we measured mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ) and NADH levels. We found that the stimulation of sperm with speract depolarizes the mitochondrion and increases the levels of NADH. Surprisingly, these responses are independent of external Ca(2+) and are due to the increase in intracellular pH (pHi) induced by speract. Our findings indicate that speract, by regulating pHi, in addition to [Ca(2+)]i, may finely modulate mitochondrial metabolism to control motility and ensure that sperm reach the egg and fertilize it. PMID:26772728

  4. Strategic sperm allocation under parasitic sex-ratio distortion

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Alison M; Andrews, Tara; Ingrey, Hannah; Riley, Joanna; Wedell, Nina

    2005-01-01

    Parasitic sex-ratio distorters are a major selective force in the evolution of host mating behaviour and mate choice. Here, we investigate sperm limitation in the amphipod Gammarus duebeni and the impact of the microsporidian sex-ratio distorter Nosema granulosis on sperm allocation strategies. We show that males become sperm limited after three consecutive matings and provide uninfected, high fecundity, females with more sperm than infected females. We show that sperm limitation leads to a decrease in female productivity. The outcome of sex-ratio distortion has been shown theoretically to be sensitive to the mating limits of males. Our results indicate that strategic sperm allocation under male rarity will have a greater impact on infected females and has the potential to regulate spread of parasitic feminisers in host populations. PMID:17148331

  5. China's success in increasing per capita food production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianhua

    2011-07-01

    China has to feed 20% of the global population with only about 5% of the planet's water resources and 7% of its arable land. With such limited natural conditions, however, China's grain production has increased from about 200 kg per capita in 1949 to about 400 kg in the early 1990s. Hunger as a social problem has largely disappeared after being prevalent in China for several thousand years with the rise and decline of dynasties. This achievement has been accompanied by a 2.5-fold increase in the population and a 4.5-fold increase in total grain production. Although total cropped land has increased slightly in some areas, land used for cropping has decreased from 0.18 hectare per capita in the 1950s to less than 0.1 hectare per capita today. Apparently, yield increase or improved land productivity is the major contributor to the increase of food production per capita. What are the major reasons for the unprecedented achievement in China's food production? Political decisions, good or bad, on land distribution and ownership changes, have caused unusual fluctuation in grain production. Technical progress, however, has maintained a long-term increasing trend. The semi-dwarf cultivars of rice and wheat, the use of heterosis in rice and maize, and the alleviation of salinized soil stress in the major grain-producing areas have all played significant roles in increasing China's food production capability. PMID:21551079

  6. Suprazero Cooling Rate, Rather Than Freezing Rate, Determines Post Thaw Quality Of Rhesus Macaque Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Martorana, Kelly; Klooster, Katie; Meyers, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Sperm become most sensitive to cold shock when cooled from 37C to 5C at rates that are too fast or too slow; cold shock increases the susceptibility to oxidative damage due to its influence on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production ([1]. ROS are significant stress factors that are generated during cooling and low temperature storage, and may be a main cause of decreased motility and fertility upon warming. ROS have been shown to change cellular function through the disruption of the sperm plasma membrane and through damage to proteins and DNA. The objective of this study was to determine which cryopreservation rates result in the lowest degree of oxidative damage and greatest sperm quality. In the rhesus model it has not been determined whether suprazero cooling or subzero freezing rates causes a significant amount of ROS damage to sperm. Semen samples were collected from male rhesus macaques, washed, and resuspended in TEST-yolk cryopreservation buffer to 100 x 106 sperm/mL. Sperm were frozen in 0.5mL straws at four different combinations of suprazero and subzero rates. Three different suprazero rates were used between 22C and 0C: 0.5C/min (Slow), 45C/min (Medium), and 93C/min (Fast). These suprazero rates were used in combination with two different subzero rates for temperatures 0C to ?110C: 42C/min (Medium) and 87C/min (Fast). The different freezing groups were as follows: Slow-Med (SM), Slow-Fast (SF), Med-Med (MM), and Fast-Fast (FF). Flow cytometry was used to detect lipid peroxidation (LPO), a result of ROS generation. Motility was evaluated using a computer assisted sperm motion analyzer. The MM and FF treated sperm had less viable (P < 0.0001) and motile sperm (P < 0.001) than the SM, SF, or fresh sperm. Sperm exposed to MM and FF treatments demonstrated significantly higher oxidative damage than SM, SF, or fresh sperm (P < 0.05). The SM and SF treated sperm showed decreased motility, membrane integrity, and LPO compared to fresh semen (P<0.001). Slow cooling from room temperature promotes higher membrane integrity and motility post thaw, compared to medium or fast cooling rates. Cells exposed to similar cooling rates with differing freezing rates were not different in motility and membrane integrity, whereas comparison of cells exposed to differing cooling rates with similar freezing rates indicated significant differences in motility, membrane integrity, and LPO. These data suggest that sperm quality appears to be more sensitive to the cooling, rather than freezing rate and highlight the role of the suprazero cooling rate in post thaw sperm quality. PMID:24239181

  7. CAD/CAM: improved design quality, increased productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, D.E.; England, J.

    1980-01-01

    Maintaining productivity levels while assuring the quality of engineering products grows increasingly more difficult and costly for industries such as the energy industry which are heavily committed to product design. The man/machine interface made possible through the development of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology can be applied to the design process as a tool for increased control to assure the quality of the final engineering product. The quality-control aspects of CAD/CAM technology are addressed in this presentation.

  8. Research Spotlight: Coastal cooling and marine productivity increasing off Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2011-05-01

    The upwelling system off Peru is of environmental and economic importance due to its high fish productivity. It has been suggested that global warming may be leading to increasing temperature differences between the coast and the ocean, causing increases in alongshore wind stress and coastal upwelling in this zone. Upwelling brings nutrients from deep waters toward the surface, increasing biological productivity. To confirm reported trends of increasing coastal cooling and rising biological productivity, Gutirrez et al. analyzed sediment records spanning the past 150 years as well as instrumental records from the main upwelling zone off Peru. They found that sea surface temperatures have been declining since the 1950s in the main upwelling zone. The cooling trend is likely linked to increased upwelling in spring, during which there is enhanced biological productivity. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2010GL046324, 2011)

  9. A sperm-activating peptide controls a cGMP-signaling pathway in starfish sperm.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Midori; Solzin, Johannes; Helbig, Annika; Hagen, Volker; Ueno, Sei-ichi; Kawase, Osamu; Maruyama, Yoshinori; Ogiso, Manabu; Godde, Matthias; Minakata, Hiroyuki; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Hoshi, Motonori; Weyand, Ingo

    2003-08-15

    Peptides released from eggs of marine invertebrates play a central role in fertilization. About 80 different peptides from various phyla have been isolated, however, with one exception, their respective receptors on the sperm surface have not been unequivocally identified and the pertinent signaling pathways remain ill defined. Using rapid mixing techniques and novel membrane-permeable caged compounds of cyclic nucleotides, we show that the sperm-activating peptide asterosap evokes a fast and transient increase of the cGMP concentration in sperm of the starfish Asterias amurensis, followed by a transient cGMP-stimulated increase in the Ca(2+) concentration. In contrast, cAMP levels did not change significantly and the Ca(2+) response evoked by photolysis of caged cAMP was significantly smaller than that using caged cGMP. By cloning of cDNA and chemical crosslinking, we identified a receptor-type guanylyl cyclase in the sperm flagellum as the asterosap-binding protein. Sperm respond exquisitely sensitive to picomolar concentrations of asterosap, suggesting that the peptide serves a chemosensory function like resact, a peptide involved in chemotaxis of sperm of the sea urchin Arbacia punctulata. A unifying principle emerges that chemosensory transduction in sperm of marine invertebrates uses cGMP as the primary messenger, although there may be variations in the detail. PMID:12921734

  10. STRATEGIES FOR INCREASING HERD MILK PRODUCTION THROUGH MORE FREQUENT MILKING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the most common ways for dairy producers to increase milk production is by increasing milking frequency. Frequent milking during early lactation may not only increase milk yield during the frequent milking period, but also produce carry-over effects that last well into lactation. Furthermore,...

  11. Assay of sperm motility to study the effects of metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Timourian, H.; Watchmaker, G.

    1984-01-01

    A method for quantitating sperm motility is applied here to study the effects of metal ions on animal cells. The quantitative technique is based on orienting sperm by subjecting them to flow and then measuring their capacity for returning to randomness when the orienting force is discontinued. The optical anisotropy of sperm permits determination of orientation with a spectrophotometer equipped with a flow cell. A wide range of concentrations of zinc, copper, and nickel ions were tested to determine their effects on the motility of sea-urchin sperm. Sea urchins are a ready and convenient source of sperm. Since energy production in sperm depends on their limited supply of endogenous substrate, this test system gives us a simple screening procedure for comparing the effects of various agents on the cell's capacity for utilizing energy. Nickel at concentrations higher than 10..pi../sup 5/M had an initial depressing effect on motility; however, this effect was eventually overcome, and in some cases overcompensation resulted in an increase motility. Zinc had either an enhancing or a depressing effect, depending not only on its concentration but on the time of exposure. At 10/sup -5/M it enhanced motility if present at the time the sperm were first shed in seawater, the time of high respiration. At 10..pi../sup 4/M it depressed motility only if present during the period of decreasing respiration, 1 to 2 hr after being shed into seawater. Copper depressed activity at 10..pi../sup 4/M to 10..pi../sup 6/M at all times tested.

  12. Supporters of sperm

    PubMed Central

    Lvlie, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    The Biology of Spermatozoa (BoS) meetings have run on a biannual basis since the early 1990s. They are dedicated to the fascinating research topic of sperm and their complicated route to fertilization. The BoS meetings focus on sperm, but they also explore additional supporting factors important in fertilization, such as those present in seminal and ovarian fluid, as well as the genomic bases of sperm biology. Here, I present a report of the recent BoS meeting, and showcase some of the highlights of this years meeting. PMID:25225623

  13. Sperm DNA oxidative damage and DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate DNA damage and adducts in sperm from coke oven workers who have been exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A longitudinal study was conducted with repeated measurements during spermatogenesis. Coke-oven workers (n=112) from a coke-oven plant served the PAH-exposed group, while administrators and security personnel (n=67) served the control. Routine semen parameters (concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology) were analyzed simultaneously; the assessment of sperm DNA integrity endpoints included DNA fragmentation, bulky DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo). The degree of sperm DNA fragmentation was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The PAH-exposed group had a significant increase in bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-dGuo compared to the control subjects (Ps=0.002 and 0.045, respectively). Coke oven workers' percentages of DNA fragmentation and denaturation from the PAH-exposed group were not significantly different from those of the control subjects (Ps=0.232 and 0.245, respectively). Routine semen parameters and DNA integrity endpoints were not correlated. Concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo were positively correlated with percentages of DNA fragmentation measured by both TUNEL and SCSA (Ps=0.045 and 0.034, respectively). However, the concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo and percentages of DNA fragmentation did not correlate with concentrations of bulky DNA adducts. In summary, coke oven workers with chronic exposure to PAHs experienced decreased sperm DNA integrity. Oxidative stress could contribute to the degree of DNA fragmentation. Bulky DNA adducts may be independent of the formation of DNA fragmentation and oxidative adducts in sperm. Monitoring sperm DNA integrity is recommended as a part of the process of assessing the impact of occupational and environmental toxins on sperm. PMID:26653986

  14. Membrane hyperpolarization during human sperm capacitation

    PubMed Central

    Lpez-Gonzlez, I.; Torres-Rodrguez, P.; Snchez-Carranza, O.; Sols-Lpez, A.; Santi, C.M.; Darszon, A.; Trevio, C.L.

    2014-01-01

    Sperm capacitation is a complex and indispensable physiological process that spermatozoa must undergo in order to acquire fertilization capability. Spermatozoa from several mammalian species, including mice, exhibit a capacitation-associated plasma membrane hyperpolarization, which is necessary for the acrosome reaction to occur. Despite its importance, this hyperpolarization event has not been adequately examined in human sperm. In this report we used flow cytometry to show that a subpopulation of human sperm indeed undergo a plasma membrane hyperpolarization upon in vitro capacitation. This hyperpolarization correlated with two other well-characterized capacitation parameters, namely an increase in intracellular pH and Ca2+ concentration, measured also by flow cytometry. We found that sperm membrane hyperpolarization was completely abolished in the presence of a high external K+ concentration (60 mM), indicating the participation of K+ channels. In order to identify, which of the potential K+ channels were involved in this hyperpolarization, we used different K+ channel inhibitors including charybdotoxin, slotoxin and iberiotoxin (which target Slo1) and clofilium (a more specific blocker for Slo3). All these K+ channel antagonists inhibited membrane hyperpolarization to a similar extent, suggesting that both members of the Slo family may potentially participate. Two very recent papers recorded K+ currents in human sperm electrophysiologically, with some contradictory results. In the present work, we show through immunoblotting that Slo3 channels are present in the human sperm membrane. In addition, we found that human Slo3 channels expressed in CHO cells were sensitive to clofilium (50 ?M). Considered altogether, our data indicate that Slo1 and Slo3 could share the preponderant role in the capacitation-associated hyperpolarization of human sperm in contrast to what has been previously reported for mouse sperm, where Slo3 channels are the main contributors to the hyperpolarization event. PMID:24737063

  15. Responses of primary productivity to increased temperature and phytoplankton diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowska, Aleksandra M.; Breithaupt, Petra; Hillebrand, Helmut; Hoppe, Hans-Georg; Jrgens, Klaus; Sommer, Ulrich

    2012-08-01

    In order to examine the effects of warming and diversity changes on primary productivity, we conducted a meta-analysis on six independent indoor mesocosm experiments with a natural plankton community from the Baltic Sea. Temperature effects on primary productivity changed with light intensity and zooplankton density and analysed pathways between temperature, diversity and productivity, elucidating direct and indirect effects of warming on primary productivity during the spring phytoplankton bloom. Our findings indicate that warming directly increased carbon specific primary productivity, which was more pronounced under low grazing pressure. On the other hand, primary productivity per unit water volume did not respond to increased temperature, because of a negative temperature effect on phytoplankton biomass. Moreover, primary productivity response to temperature changes depended on light limitation. Using path analysis, we tested whether temperature effects were direct or mediated by warming effects on phytoplankton diversity. Although phytoplankton species richness had a positive impact on both net primary productivity and carbon specific primary productivity - and evenness had a negative effect on net primary productivity - both richness and evenness were not affected by temperature. Thus, we suggest that diversity effects on primary productivity depended mainly on other factors than temperature like grazing, sinking or nutrient limitation, which themselves are temperature dependent.

  16. Increased polyamines may downregulate interleukin 2 production in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Flescher, E; Bowlin, T L; Ballester, A; Houk, R; Talal, N

    1989-01-01

    Polyamines downregulate immune reactivity. RA is associated with decreased IL 2 production. In this study, we present evidence to suggest that excessive polyamines can contribute to the IL 2 deficiency in RA. Blocking polyamine production with inhibitors of ornithine decarboxylase results in increased IL 2 production by RA PBMC. Moreover, polyamine oxidase (PAO) inhibitors and catalase also increase IL 2 production by RA PBMC. This effect of PAO inhibition is monocyte mediated. After 3 d in culture, RA PBMC produce three times more IL 2 than do normal PBMC. This rise is prevented by exogenous spermidine but only in the presence of monocytes. The concentration of polyamines in RA PBMC and synovial fluid MNC is 2-20-fold higher than in normal cells. Thus, polyamines and their oxidation products downregulate IL 2 production by RA PBMC and may account for the decreased T cell effector function seen in this disease. PMID:2784801

  17. Untapped opportunities for improving performance and increasing smelter production

    SciTech Connect

    Forberg, H.O.

    1996-10-01

    A review has been made of a large number of aluminum smelters concerning opportunities for improving performance and increasing production. Smelters have been grouped according to current efficiency. Opportunities for improvement of older and newer smelters are discussed. For older smelters to remain competitive and extend economic life, it is important to find new ways to increase production. These efforts have been going on for many years and the most successful producers have been able to stay viable. Opportunities are still available for many older facilities as further incremental increases of production wait to be harvested. Newer smelters are also interested in decreasing cost by increasing production. Even if the operating costs of newer plants are lower than those of older ones, it is important that newer plants make improvements that generate an acceptable rate of return on invested capital.

  18. Enhanced precipitation variability decreases grass- and increases shrub-productivity.

    PubMed

    Gherardi, Laureano A; Sala, Osvaldo E

    2015-10-13

    Although projections of precipitation change indicate increases in variability, most studies of impacts of climate change on ecosystems focused on effects of changes in amount of precipitation, overlooking precipitation variability effects, especially at the interannual scale. Here, we present results from a 6-y field experiment, where we applied sequences of wet and dry years, increasing interannual precipitation coefficient of variation while maintaining a precipitation amount constant. Increased precipitation variability significantly reduced ecosystem primary production. Dominant plant-functional types showed opposite responses: perennial-grass productivity decreased by 81%, whereas shrub productivity increased by 67%. This pattern was explained by different nonlinear responses to precipitation. Grass productivity presented a saturating response to precipitation where dry years had a larger negative effect than the positive effects of wet years. In contrast, shrubs showed an increasing response to precipitation that resulted in an increase in average productivity with increasing precipitation variability. In addition, the effects of precipitation variation increased through time. We argue that the differential responses of grasses and shrubs to precipitation variability and the amplification of this phenomenon through time result from contrasting root distributions of grasses and shrubs and competitive interactions among plant types, confirmed by structural equation analysis. Under drought conditions, grasses reduce their abundance and their ability to absorb water that then is transferred to deep soil layers that are exclusively explored by shrubs. Our work addresses an understudied dimension of climate change that might lead to widespread shrub encroachment reducing the provisioning of ecosystem services to society. PMID:26417095

  19. One-sided ejaculation of echidna sperm bundles.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S D; Smith, B; Pyne, M; Stenzel, D; Holt, W V

    2007-12-01

    We report for the first time an unusual ejaculatory mechanism in the short-beaked echidna in which each side of the bilaterally symmetrical, rosettelike glans penis is used alternately, with the other being shut down. This is unparalleled in mammals but is reminiscent of the use of hemipenes in squamate reptiles, providing further reproductive evidence of a sauropsidian lineage in the Monotremata. Further, we describe the occurrence of motile sperm bundles in ejaculated echidna semen and provide scanning electron micrographs of their morphology. Sperm bundling appears to confer increased sperm motility, which may provide the potential for sperm competition between males. PMID:18171162

  20. Dephosphorylation of sea urchin sperm guanylate cyclase during fertilization.

    PubMed

    Ward, G E; Moy, G W; Vacquier, V D

    1986-01-01

    Exposure of Arbacia punctulata spermatozoa to solubilized egg jelly results in the immediate dephosphorylation (within 3 sec) of an abundant 160,000 dalton (160 kDa) sperm membrane protein, and a simultaneous increase in its electrophoretic mobility to 150 kDa. The sperm phosphoprotein has been identified as guanylate cyclase. Correlated with the mobility shift of the cyclase is a decrease in its enzymatic activity. In this paper we will briefly review the work on the sperm guanylate cyclase, present new data on the role of ion fluxes in the control of its dephosphorylation, and discuss what role the dephosphorylation might play in successful sperm-egg interaction. PMID:2881431

  1. Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to the inside of the egg (cytoplasm), where fertilization takes place. Sometimes the sperm cannot penetrate the ... ICSI) can be done along with in vitro fertilization (IVF) to help fertilize the egg. During ICSI, ...

  2. Human Sperm Tail Proteome Suggests New Endogenous Metabolic Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Alexandra; Castillo, Judit; Estanyol, Josep Maria; Ballesc, Jos Lus; Ramalho-Santos, Joo; Oliva, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Proteomic studies are contributing greatly to our understanding of the sperm cell, and more detailed descriptions are expected to clarify additional cellular and molecular sperm attributes. The aim of this study was to characterize the subcellular proteome of the human sperm tail and, hopefully, identify less concentrated proteins (not found in whole cell proteome studies). Specifically, we were interested in characterizing the sperm metabolic proteome and gaining new insights into the sperm metabolism issue. Sperm were isolated from normozoospermic semen samples and depleted of any contaminating leukocytes. Tail fractions were obtained by means of sonication followed by sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation, and their purity was confirmed via various techniques. Liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry of isolated sperm tail peptides resulted in the identification of 1049 proteins, more than half of which had not been previously described in human sperm. The categorization of proteins according to their function revealed two main groups: proteins related to metabolism and energy production (26%), and proteins related to sperm tail structure and motility (11%). Interestingly, a great proportion of the metabolic proteome (24%) comprised enzymes involved in lipid metabolism, including enzymes for mitochondrial beta-oxidation. Unexpectedly, we also identified various peroxisomal proteins, some of which are known to be involved in the oxidation of very long chain fatty acids. Analysis of our data using Reactome suggests that both mitochondrial and peroxisomal pathways might indeed be active in sperm, and that the use of fatty acids as fuel might be more preponderant than previously thought. In addition, incubation of sperm with the fatty acid oxidation inhibitor etomoxir resulted in a significant decrease in sperm motility. Contradicting a common concept in the literature, we suggest that the male gamete might have the capacity to obtain energy from endogenous pools, and thus to adapt to putative exogenous fluctuations. PMID:23161514

  3. Effect of Phaleria macrocarpa on Sperm Characteristics in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Parhizkar, Saadat; Yusoff, Maryam Jamielah; Dollah, Mohammad Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Phaleria macrocarpa (PM) on male fertility by assessing its effect on the sperm characteristics which included the sperm count, motility, viability and morphology. Methods: Eighteen male rats were equally divided into three groups. Each group of rats was orally supplemented for 7 weeks either with PM aqueous extract (240 mg/kg), distilled water (0 mg/kg) or testosterone hormone, Andriol Testocaps (4 mg/kg) respectively. On the last day of supplementation period, the rats were sacrificed and sperm was obtained from cauda epididymis via orchidectomy. The sperm count, motility, viability and morphology were determined. Results: PM aqueous extract significantly increased (p<0.05) the percentage of sperm viability. However, there was no significant effect of PM on the percentage of both sperm motility and morphology. The mean of body weight declined significantly in rats supplemented with PM aqueous extract compared to control groups (p<0.05). Conclusion: The results showed that PM significantly increased sperm viability without changing the sperm motility and morphology. Hence, this study suggests that PM offers an alternative way to improve male fertility by improving the sperm quality. PMID:24312859

  4. Semiautomatic cold wire feeder systems increase GTA productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, M. )

    1995-01-01

    Often, the focus of attempts to increase GTA welding productivity is on studies to determine if justification exists for additional workstations, or for the investment in new fully automated dedicated welding fixtures. Often less costly and simpler solutions can bring about the necessary means to increase production rates and reduce operating costs. For short-run production applications, it is almost impossible to justify the substantial investment in a dedicated automatic fixture. Now, low cost GTA cold wire feeder systems are within the reach of even small shops. The paper views how cold wire equipment has been applied in several GTAW applications to improve results.

  5. Biodiversity increases the resistance of ecosystem productivity to climate extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isbell, Forest; Craven, Dylan; Connolly, John; Loreau, Michel; Schmid, Bernhard; Beierkuhnlein, Carl; Bezemer, T. Martijn; Bonin, Catherine; Bruelheide, Helge; de Luca, Enrica; Ebeling, Anne; Griffin, John N.; Guo, Qinfeng; Hautier, Yann; Hector, Andy; Jentsch, Anke; Kreyling, Jürgen; Lanta, Vojtěch; Manning, Pete; Meyer, Sebastian T.; Mori, Akira S.; Naeem, Shahid; Niklaus, Pascal A.; Polley, H. Wayne; Reich, Peter B.; Roscher, Christiane; Seabloom, Eric W.; Smith, Melinda D.; Thakur, Madhav P.; Tilman, David; Tracy, Benjamin F.; van der Putten, Wim H.; van Ruijven, Jasper; Weigelt, Alexandra; Weisser, Wolfgang W.; Wilsey, Brian; Eisenhauer, Nico

    2015-10-01

    It remains unclear whether biodiversity buffers ecosystems against climate extremes, which are becoming increasingly frequent worldwide. Early results suggested that the ecosystem productivity of diverse grassland plant communities was more resistant, changing less during drought, and more resilient, recovering more quickly after drought, than that of depauperate communities. However, subsequent experimental tests produced mixed results. Here we use data from 46 experiments that manipulated grassland plant diversity to test whether biodiversity provides resistance during and resilience after climate events. We show that biodiversity increased ecosystem resistance for a broad range of climate events, including wet or dry, moderate or extreme, and brief or prolonged events. Across all studies and climate events, the productivity of low-diversity communities with one or two species changed by approximately 50% during climate events, whereas that of high-diversity communities with 16-32 species was more resistant, changing by only approximately 25%. By a year after each climate event, ecosystem productivity had often fully recovered, or overshot, normal levels of productivity in both high- and low-diversity communities, leading to no detectable dependence of ecosystem resilience on biodiversity. Our results suggest that biodiversity mainly stabilizes ecosystem productivity, and productivity-dependent ecosystem services, by increasing resistance to climate events. Anthropogenic environmental changes that drive biodiversity loss thus seem likely to decrease ecosystem stability, and restoration of biodiversity to increase it, mainly by changing the resistance of ecosystem productivity to climate events.

  6. Biodiversity increases the resistance of ecosystem productivity to climate extremes.

    PubMed

    Isbell, Forest; Craven, Dylan; Connolly, John; Loreau, Michel; Schmid, Bernhard; Beierkuhnlein, Carl; Bezemer, T Martijn; Bonin, Catherine; Bruelheide, Helge; de Luca, Enrica; Ebeling, Anne; Griffin, John N; Guo, Qinfeng; Hautier, Yann; Hector, Andy; Jentsch, Anke; Kreyling, Jürgen; Lanta, Vojtěch; Manning, Pete; Meyer, Sebastian T; Mori, Akira S; Naeem, Shahid; Niklaus, Pascal A; Polley, H Wayne; Reich, Peter B; Roscher, Christiane; Seabloom, Eric W; Smith, Melinda D; Thakur, Madhav P; Tilman, David; Tracy, Benjamin F; van der Putten, Wim H; van Ruijven, Jasper; Weigelt, Alexandra; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Wilsey, Brian; Eisenhauer, Nico

    2015-10-22

    It remains unclear whether biodiversity buffers ecosystems against climate extremes, which are becoming increasingly frequent worldwide. Early results suggested that the ecosystem productivity of diverse grassland plant communities was more resistant, changing less during drought, and more resilient, recovering more quickly after drought, than that of depauperate communities. However, subsequent experimental tests produced mixed results. Here we use data from 46 experiments that manipulated grassland plant diversity to test whether biodiversity provides resistance during and resilience after climate events. We show that biodiversity increased ecosystem resistance for a broad range of climate events, including wet or dry, moderate or extreme, and brief or prolonged events. Across all studies and climate events, the productivity of low-diversity communities with one or two species changed by approximately 50% during climate events, whereas that of high-diversity communities with 16-32 species was more resistant, changing by only approximately 25%. By a year after each climate event, ecosystem productivity had often fully recovered, or overshot, normal levels of productivity in both high- and low-diversity communities, leading to no detectable dependence of ecosystem resilience on biodiversity. Our results suggest that biodiversity mainly stabilizes ecosystem productivity, and productivity-dependent ecosystem services, by increasing resistance to climate events. Anthropogenic environmental changes that drive biodiversity loss thus seem likely to decrease ecosystem stability, and restoration of biodiversity to increase it, mainly by changing the resistance of ecosystem productivity to climate events. PMID:26466564

  7. Increasing children's ASL classifier production: a multicomponent intervention.

    PubMed

    Beal-Alvarez, Jennifer S; Easterbrooks, Susan R

    2013-01-01

    The Authors examined classifier production during narrative retells by 10 deaf and hard of hearing students in grades 2-4 at a day school for the deaf following a 6-week intervention of repeated viewings of stories in American Sign Language (ASL) paired with scripted teacher mediation. Classifier production, documented through a multiple-baseline-across-participants design, was followed by visual analysis and calculation of the percentage of non-overlapping data (Scruggs, Mastropieri, & Casto, 1987). Following the intervention, most students increased specific elements within their classifier production during narrative retells of stories they had watched and showed improved performance from pre- to postintervention measures. Picture support and fading of teacher mediation during retells variably affected classifier production. The results suggest that students may benefit from tailored intervention, including repeated viewings of ASL models paired with teacher mediation and possibly picture support, to increase classifier production during narrative retells. PMID:24133957

  8. Impact of adrenalectomy and dexamethasone treatment on testicular morphology and sperm parameters in rats: insights into the adrenal control of male reproduction.

    PubMed

    Silva, E J R; Vendramini, V; Restelli, A; Bertolla, R P; Kempinas, W G; Avellar, M C W

    2014-11-01

    Here we investigated the hypothesis that normal levels of glucocorticoids, a class of adrenal steroid hormones, are required for normal testicular and epididymal functions. We examined the effects of the manipulation of glucocorticoid plasma levels by bilateral adrenalectomy (1, 2, 7 and 15days) alone or in combination with daily treatment with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (DEX; 5?g/kg, i.p., 6days) on the morphology of the testis and sperm parameters in rats. We showed that adrenalectomy led to a reduction in testicular sperm count and daily sperm production starting 2days after surgery and a differential decrease in sperm count in the epididymis, according to the region and time post-adrenalectomy analysed. In parallel, testes from 7-day adrenalectomized (ADX) rats displayed a higher frequency of damaged seminiferous tubules and the presence of elongated spermatids retained in the basal epithelial compartment in stages IX-XVII, which is indicative of defective spermiation. The alkaline comet assay revealed a late effect of adrenalectomy on epididymal sperm DNA fragmentation, which was increased only 15days after surgery. DEX treatment prevented the changes in testicular and epididymal sperm count observed in 7-day ADX rats, but failed to protect the testis from ADX-induced morphological abnormalities. Thus, our results indicated that glucocorticoids may be involved in events related to the maintenance of spermatogenesis and sperm maturation during adulthood. These findings provide new insights into the importance of adrenal steroids to male fertility. PMID:24925687

  9. Exposure to endosulfan influences sperm competition in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Misra, Snigdha; Kumar, Ajay; Ratnasekhar, Ch; Sharma, Vandana; Mudiam, Mohana Krishna Reddy; Ravi Ram, Kristipati

    2014-01-01

    Dwindling male fertility due to xenobiotics is of global concern. Accordingly, male reproductive toxicity assessment of xenobiotics through semen quality analysis in exposed males, and examining progeny production of their mates is critical. These assays, in part, are biased towards monogamy. Females soliciting multiple male partners (polyandry) is the norm in many species. Polyandry incites sperm competition and allows females to bias sperm use. However, consequences of xenobiotic exposure to the sperm in the light of sperm competition remain to be understood. Therefore, we exposed Drosophila melanogaster males to endosulfan, and evaluated their progeny production as well as the ability of their sperm to counter rival control sperm in the storage organs of females sequentially mated to control/exposed males. Endosulfan (2??g/ml) had no significant effect on progeny production and on the expression of certain genes associated with reproduction. However, exposed males performed worse in sperm competition, both as 1(st) and 2(nd) male competitors. These findings indicate that simple non-competitive measures of reproductive ability may fail to demonstrate the harmful effects of low-level exposure to xenobiotics on reproduction and advocate consideration of sperm competition, as a parameter, in the reproductive toxicity assessment of xenobiotics to mimic situations prevailing in the nature. PMID:25503806

  10. Exposure to endosulfan influences sperm competition in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Snigdha; Kumar, Ajay; Ratnasekhar, Ch.; Sharma, Vandana; Mudiam, Mohana Krishna Reddy; Ram, Kristipati Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Dwindling male fertility due to xenobiotics is of global concern. Accordingly, male reproductive toxicity assessment of xenobiotics through semen quality analysis in exposed males, and examining progeny production of their mates is critical. These assays, in part, are biased towards monogamy. Females soliciting multiple male partners (polyandry) is the norm in many species. Polyandry incites sperm competition and allows females to bias sperm use. However, consequences of xenobiotic exposure to the sperm in the light of sperm competition remain to be understood. Therefore, we exposed Drosophila melanogaster males to endosulfan, and evaluated their progeny production as well as the ability of their sperm to counter rival control sperm in the storage organs of females sequentially mated to control/exposed males. Endosulfan (2??g/ml) had no significant effect on progeny production and on the expression of certain genes associated with reproduction. However, exposed males performed worse in sperm competition, both as 1st and 2nd male competitors. These findings indicate that simple non-competitive measures of reproductive ability may fail to demonstrate the harmful effects of low-level exposure to xenobiotics on reproduction and advocate consideration of sperm competition, as a parameter, in the reproductive toxicity assessment of xenobiotics to mimic situations prevailing in the nature. PMID:25503806

  11. Coevolutionary Feedbacks between Female Mating Interval and Male Allocation to Competing Sperm Traits Can Drive Evolution of Costly Polyandry.

    PubMed

    Bocedi, Greta; Reid, Jane M

    2016-03-01

    Complex coevolutionary feedbacks between female mating interval and male sperm traits have been hypothesized to explain the evolution and persistence of costly polyandry. Such feedbacks could potentially arise because polyandry creates sperm competition and consequent selection on male allocation to sperm traits, while the emerging sperm traits could create female sperm limitation and, hence, impose selection for increased polyandry. However, the hypothesis that costly polyandry could coevolve with male sperm dynamics has not been tested. We built a genetically explicit individual-based model to simulate simultaneous evolution of female mating interval and male allocation to sperm number versus longevity, where these two sperm traits trade off. We show that evolution of competing sperm traits under polyandry can indeed cause female sperm limitation and, hence, promote further evolution and persistence of costly polyandry, particularly when sperm are costly relative to the degree of female sperm limitation. These feedbacks were stronger, and greater polyandry evolved, when postcopulatory competition for paternity followed a loaded rather than fair raffle and when sperm traits had realistically low heritability. We therefore demonstrate that the evolution of allocation to sperm traits driven by sperm competition can prevent males from overcoming female sperm limitation, thereby driving ongoing evolution of costly polyandry. PMID:26913946

  12. Immune Activation Reduces Sperm Quality in the Great Tit

    PubMed Central

    Losdat, Sylvain; Richner, Heinz; Blount, Jonathan D.; Helfenstein, Fabrice

    2011-01-01

    Mounting an immune response against pathogens incurs costs to organisms by its effects on important life-history traits, such as reproductive investment and survival. As shown recently, immune activation produces large amounts of reactive species and is suggested to induce oxidative stress. Sperm are highly susceptible to oxidative stress, which can negatively impact sperm function and ultimately male fertilizing efficiency. Here we address the question as to whether mounting an immune response affects sperm quality through the damaging effects of oxidative stress. It has been demonstrated recently in birds that carotenoid-based ornaments can be reliable signals of a male's ability to protect sperm from oxidative damage. In a full-factorial design, we immune-challenged great tit males while simultaneously increasing their vitamin E availability, and assessed the effect on sperm quality and oxidative damage. We conducted this experiment in a natural population and tested the males' response to the experimental treatment in relation to their carotenoid-based breast coloration, a condition-dependent trait. Immune activation induced a steeper decline in sperm swimming velocity, thus highlighting the potential costs of an induced immune response on sperm competitive ability and fertilizing efficiency. We found sperm oxidative damage to be negatively correlated with sperm swimming velocity. However, blood resistance to a free-radical attack (a measure of somatic antioxidant capacity) as well as plasma and sperm levels of oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation) remained unaffected, thus suggesting that the observed effect did not arise through oxidative stress. Towards the end of their breeding cycle, swimming velocity of sperm of more intensely colored males was higher, which has important implications for the evolution of mate choice and multiple mating in females because females may accrue both direct and indirect benefits by mating with males having better quality sperm. PMID:21765955

  13. Immune activation reduces sperm quality in the great tit.

    PubMed

    Losdat, Sylvain; Richner, Heinz; Blount, Jonathan D; Helfenstein, Fabrice

    2011-01-01

    Mounting an immune response against pathogens incurs costs to organisms by its effects on important life-history traits, such as reproductive investment and survival. As shown recently, immune activation produces large amounts of reactive species and is suggested to induce oxidative stress. Sperm are highly susceptible to oxidative stress, which can negatively impact sperm function and ultimately male fertilizing efficiency. Here we address the question as to whether mounting an immune response affects sperm quality through the damaging effects of oxidative stress. It has been demonstrated recently in birds that carotenoid-based ornaments can be reliable signals of a male's ability to protect sperm from oxidative damage. In a full-factorial design, we immune-challenged great tit males while simultaneously increasing their vitamin E availability, and assessed the effect on sperm quality and oxidative damage. We conducted this experiment in a natural population and tested the males' response to the experimental treatment in relation to their carotenoid-based breast coloration, a condition-dependent trait. Immune activation induced a steeper decline in sperm swimming velocity, thus highlighting the potential costs of an induced immune response on sperm competitive ability and fertilizing efficiency. We found sperm oxidative damage to be negatively correlated with sperm swimming velocity. However, blood resistance to a free-radical attack (a measure of somatic antioxidant capacity) as well as plasma and sperm levels of oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation) remained unaffected, thus suggesting that the observed effect did not arise through oxidative stress. Towards the end of their breeding cycle, swimming velocity of sperm of more intensely colored males was higher, which has important implications for the evolution of mate choice and multiple mating in females because females may accrue both direct and indirect benefits by mating with males having better quality sperm. PMID:21765955

  14. Increasing protein production by directed vector backbone evolution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant protein production in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms was a key enabling technology for the rapid development of industrial and molecular biotechnology. However, despite all progress the improvement of protein production is an ongoing challenge and of high importance for cost-effective enzyme production. With the epMEGAWHOP mutagenesis protocol for vector backbone optimization we report a novel directed evolution based approach to increase protein production levels by randomly introducing mutations in the vector backbone. In the current study we validate the epMEGAWHOP mutagenesis protocol for three different expression systems. The latter demonstrated the general applicability of the epMEGAWHOP method. Cellulase and lipase production was doubled in one round of directed evolution by random mutagenesis of pET28a(+) and pET22b(+) vector backbones. Protease production using the vector pHY300PLK was increased ~4-times with an average of ~1.25 mutations per kb vector backbone. The epMEGAWHOP does not require any rational understanding of the expression machinery and can generally be applied to enzymes, expression vectors and related hosts. epMEGAWHOP is therefore from our point of view a robust, rapid and straight forward alternative for increasing protein production in general and for biotechnological applications. PMID:23890095

  15. Sperm cryopreservation of a live-bearing fish, Xiphophorus couchianus: Male-to-male variation in post-thaw motility and production of F1 hybrid offspring☆

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huiping; Hazlewood, Leona; Walter, Ronald B.; Tiersch, Terrence R.

    2015-01-01

    Fishes of the genus Xiphophorus are well-studied biomedical research models, and some species, such as X. couchianus, are currently listed as endangered in the wild. Sperm cryopreservation in these live-bearing fishes has begun recently. Thus far, live young have been produced with cryopreserved sperm only in one species (Xiphophorus helleri). In this study, the goal was to develop a practical protocol for sperm cryopreservation of Xiphophorus couchianus, and to produce live young with cryopreserved sperm. Sperm were collected by crushing of testis in Hanks’ balanced salt solution at an osmolality of 500 mOsmol/kg (HBSS500), and were cryopreserved with 14% glycerol (v/v) as cryoprotectant at a cooling rate of 20 °C/min from 5 to −80 °C in 250-μL French straws. For artificial insemination, samples were thawed at 40 °C for 5 s in a water bath, washed once using fresh HBSS500 by centrifuging at 1000 g for 5 min at 4 °C, concentrated into ~5 μL, and injected into virgin females of Xiphophorus maculatus. The inseminated females were monitored for 90 days for subsequent discharge of live young. Results from 2006 and 2007 showed considerable male-to-male variation in post-thaw motility (from 1 to 70%). Offspring were produced by cryopreserved sperm in two tanks (of three) at 36 and 66 days after insemination in 2007. Paternity was confirmed via phenotypes (body color) and genotypes (microsatellite genetic marker) of the hybrid offspring. Overall, a practical protocol for sperm cryopreservation and artificial insemination is provided to preserve X. couchianus, which is an important biomedical research model, and also currently listed as an endangered species in the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) red list. PMID:19027087

  16. Oxidative phosphorylation is essential for felid sperm function, but is substantially lower in cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) compared to domestic cat (Felis catus) ejaculate.

    PubMed

    Terrell, Kimberly A; Wildt, David E; Anthony, Nicola M; Bavister, Barry D; Leibo, S P; Penfold, Linda M; Marker, Laurie L; Crosier, Adrienne E

    2011-09-01

    Compared with the normospermic domestic cat, sperm metabolic function is compromised in the teratospermic cat and cheetah, but the pathway(s) involved in this deficiency are unknown. Glycolysis is essential for sperm motility, yet it appears to function normally in spermatozoa of either species regardless of structural morphology. We conducted a comparative study to further understand the mechanisms of energy production in felid spermatozoa, with the hypothesis that oxidative phosphorylation is required for normal sperm function and is impaired in teratospermic ejaculates. Electroejaculates from both species were stained with MitoTracker to quantify mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) or were incubated to assess changes in sperm function (motility, acrosomal integrity, and lactate production) after mitochondrial inhibition with myxothiazol. Sperm midpiece dimensions also were quantified. Sperm mitochondrial fluorescence (directly proportional to MMP) was ~95% lower in the cheetah compared with the normospermic and teratospermic cat, despite the cheetah having a 10% longer midpiece. In both species, MMP was increased 5-fold in spermatozoa with retained cytoplasm compared with structurally normal cells. Inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation impaired sperm function in both species, but a 100-fold higher inhibitor concentration was required in the cat compared with the cheetah. Collectively, findings revealed that oxidative phosphorylation was required for sperm function in the domestic cat and cheetah. This pathway of energy production appeared markedly less active in the cheetah, indicating a species-specific vulnerability to mitochondrial dysfunction. The unexpected, cross-species linkage between retained cytoplasmic droplets and elevated MMP may reflect increased concentrations of metabolic enzymes or substrates in these structures. PMID:21593479

  17. Increasing productivity during grinding of high-alumina ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Belous, K.P.; Leptukha, V.P.

    1984-01-01

    The grinding of high-alumina ceramics involves specific problems as the effectiveness of the grinding is affected by the rate of material removal to ensure high productivity, the surface roughness, and the wear of the diamond tool. This study of the cutting processes in cylindrical and internal grinding was done to determine the optimum cutting parameters and specifications of the diamond grinding wheels, and the results helped increase productivity and reduce wheel consumption.

  18. Effect of sperm storage and selection techniques on sperm parameters.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rakesh; Kattoor, Ajoe John; Ghulmiyyah, Jana; Agarwal, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Sperm cryopreservation preserves the fertility of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, ensures sperm are available at the time of oocyte retrieval in assisted reproductive technology (ART) procedures and avoids the need for repeated sperm extraction surgeries in azoospermic patients. Conventional methods of cryopreservation involve storage in liquid nitrogen (LN2), which causes a significant decline in sperm parameters such as motility and viability and results in DNA damage. Newer methods of sperm cryopreservation such as the LN2 vapor method, vitrification, and experimental methods such as lyophilization, have significant advantages over the conventional methods in terms of cost effectiveness and ease of use. Density gradient centrifugation (DGC), swim up, and magnetic assisted cell sorting (MACS) can be used prior to or post-cryopreservation to improve post-thaw sperm quality. Cryopreservation in special carriers such as cryoloops and empty zona prevents the loss of small numbers of sperm during cryopreservation. This article will discuss these sperm preservation and selection techniques. PMID:25354153

  19. Increased monocyte TNF-alpha message stability contributes to trauma patients' increased TNF production.

    PubMed

    Furse, R K; Kodys, K; Zhu, D; Miller-Graziano, C L

    1997-10-01

    Post-trauma elevation of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) appears to be critical in mediating many symptoms of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), resulting in late mortality. Although increased monocyte (mphi) TNF-alpha production plays a pivotal role in this TNF-alpha elevation, the molecular mechanisms leading to increased mphi TNF-alpha production have yet to be elucidated. We demonstrate that, although TNF-alpha mRNA levels are increased in all trauma patients' mphi, which produce elevated levels of TNF-alpha protein, in the majority of patients, these increased TNF-alpha mRNA levels are under normal transcriptional and posttranscriptional control. Consequently, the increased TNF-alpha production by these patients' mphi is probably due to preactivation of these mphi by trauma-released mediators. However, a small minority of patients, whose mortality rate was 57%, produce TNF-alpha of primarily the membrane-associated type. The mphi TNF-alpha mRNA accumulation of these patients in response to in vitro stimulation is significantly augmented. All of these patients experienced SIRS. In this subset of patients' mphi, TNF-alpha mRNA stability was aberrantly increased. Such an increase in TNF-alpha mRNA stability could lead to devastatingly prolonged production of TNF-alpha protein. This demonstration of increased TNF-alpha mRNA stability in post-trauma mphi represents a novel correlation of elevated membrane-associated TNF-alpha protein, increased mortality, and a mechanism for this occurrence. PMID:9335324

  20. Reduced heterozygosity depresses sperm quality in wild rabbits, Oryctolagus cuniculus.

    PubMed

    Gage, Matthew J G; Surridge, Alison K; Tomkins, Joseph L; Green, Emma; Wiskin, Louise; Bell, Diana J; Hewitt, Godfrey M

    2006-03-21

    When close relatives are forced to reproduce, the resulting offspring inherit above average homozygosity and reduced fitness. Biologists now recognize inbreeding depression in the wild, a phenomenon that will probably increase as natural populations become depleted and fragmented. Inbreeding depression is most commonly expressed as compromised fertility and embryogenesis, but actual mechanisms remain poorly understood, especially for wild populations. Here, we examine how reduced heterozygosity influences spermatozoal and gonadal traits in wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) sampled across the United Kingdom. By using a suite of 29 microsatellite markers (analyzed to confirm representation of individual heterozygosity across our sample), we found a significant negative relationship between heterozygosity and the production of normal sperm; the relationship was significant both between (n = 12) and within (n = 91 [total males], 42 [island], 49 [mainland]) populations. Reduced heterozygosity was also associated with decreased testis size across males (n = 112), but no relationship was seen at the population level, suggesting environmental confounds. Our results show, for a wild mammal, that inbreeding is associated with decreased sperm quality, confirming suggestions of links between inbreeding and elevated sperm abnormalities in rare felids . These findings could explain why inbreeding depression so frequently arises via compromised fertility and embryogenesis . PMID:16546087

  1. An automatic system to study sperm motility and energetics

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Jaclyn M.; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Botvinick, Elliot L.; Berns, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    An integrated robotic laser and microscope system has been developed to automatically analyze individual sperm motility and energetics. The custom-designed optical system directs near-infrared laser light into an inverted microscope to create a single-point 3-D gradient laser trap at the focal spot of the microscope objective. A two-level computer structure is described that quantifies the sperm motility (in terms of swimming speed and swimming force) and energetics (measuring mid-piece membrane potential) using real-time tracking (done by the upper-level system) and fluorescent ratio imaging (done by the lower-level system). The communication between these two systems is achieved by a gigabit network. The custom-built image processing algorithm identifies the sperm swimming trajectory in real-time using phase contrast images, and then subsequently traps the sperm by automatically moving the microscope stage to relocate the sperm to the laser trap focal plane. Once the sperm is stably trapped (determined by the algorithm), the algorithm can also gradually reduce the laser power by rotating the polarizer in the laser path to measure the trapping power at which the sperm is capable of escaping the trap. To monitor the membrane potential of the mitochondria located in a sperms mid-piece, the sperm is treated with a ratiometrically-encoded fluorescent probe. The proposed algorithm can relocate the sperm to the center of the ratio imaging camera and the average ratio value can be measured in real-time. The three parameters, sperm escape power, sperm swimming speed and ratio values of the mid-piece membrane potential of individual sperm can be compared with respect to time. This two-level automatic system to study individual sperm motility and energetics has not only increased experimental throughput by an order of magnitude but also has allowed us to monitor sperm energetics prior to and after exposure to the laser trap. This system should have application in both the human fertility clinic and in animal husbandry. PMID:18299996

  2. Functional evidence for differences in sperm competition in humans and chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Matthew J; Chapman, Shannon J; Videan, Elaine N; Evans, Erika; Fritz, Jo; Stoinski, Tara S; Dixson, Alan F; Gagneux, Pascal

    2007-10-01

    Sperm competition occurs when the gametes of or more males compete for opportunities to fertilize a given set of ova. Previous studies have demonstrated that certain morphological characteristics are affected by sperm competition intensity (e.g. relative testes size and sperm midpiece volume). This study examined whether aspects of sperm energetics may also be affected by sexual selection. We compared the membrane potential of mitochondria in live sperm between H. sapiens (single partner mating system) and P. troglodytes (multiple partner mating system). Flow cytometry of sperm stained with the carbocyanine fluorescent dye JC-1 (an assay for mitochondrial membrane potential) revealed marked differences in red fluorescence intensity. P. troglodytes sperm showed significantly higher mitochondrial membrane potential. Mitochondria provide a substantial part of the energy required for sperm motility. A higher mitochondrial loading may therefore be associated with enhanced sperm motility and/or longevity. Additionally, examination of JC-1 red fluorescence levels before and after in vitro capacitation revealed further differences. Whereas chimpanzee sperm showed maintenance of membrane potential after capacitation (in some cases even an increase), sperm from humans consistently showed reduction in membrane potential. These results indicate that the sperm of human beings and chimpanzees exhibit marked differences in mitochondrial function, which are affected by selection pressures relating to sperm competition and that these pressures differ significantly between humans and chimpanzees. PMID:17632799

  3. Intramale variation in sperm size: functional significance in a polygynous mammal

    PubMed Central

    Pintus, Eliana; Garde, Jos Julin

    2015-01-01

    Studies concerning the relationships between sperm size and velocity at the intraspecific level are quite limited and often yielded contradictory results across the animal kingdom. Intramale variation in sperm size may represent a meaningful factor to predict sperm velocity, due to its relationship with the level of sperm competition among related taxa. Because sperm phenotype is under post-copulatory sexual selection, we hypothesized that a reduced intramale variation in sperm size is associated with sperm competitiveness in red deer. Our results show that low variation in sperm size is strongly related to high sperm velocity and normal sperm morphology, which in turn are good predictors of male fertility in this species. Furthermore, it is well known that the red deer show high variability in testicular mass but there is limited knowledge concerning the significance of this phenomenon at intraspecific level, even though it may reveal interesting processes of sexual selection. Thereby, as a preliminary result, we found that absolute testes mass is negatively associated with intramale variation in sperm size. Our findings suggest that sperm size variation in red deer is under a strong selective force leading to increase sperm function efficiency, and reveal new insights into sexual selection mechanisms. PMID:26664807

  4. Quantification of mammalian sperm morphology by slit-scan flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Benaron, D.A.; Gray, J.W.; Gledhill, B.L.; Lake, S.; Wyrobek, A.J.; Young, I.T.

    1982-03-01

    The head shapes of mammalian sperm have been measured by slit-scan flow cytometry (SSFCM). In this approach, the distribution of fluorescence along acriflavine stained mammalian sperm is recorded and used as a measure of head shape. Fluorescence profiles were measured for sperm from mice, rabbits, hamsters, and bulls, and for sperm from mice exposed to testicular x-irradiation from 0 to 900 rads. The profiles for sperm from nonirradiated animals were characteristic of each species and were reproducible from sperm to sperm. Some of the fluorescence profiles for sperm from the irradiated mice differed significantly from the profiles usually measured for sperm from exposed mice. An algorithm was developed to determine the frequency of these sperm. The estimated frequencies of atypical profiles correlated well (r . 0.99) with the frequencies of abnormally shaped sperm determined by microscopic scoring. The maximum SSFCM sensitivity (minimum detectable dose . 199 rad) was not as high as that for the visual assay (minimum detectable dose . 116 rad). However, only 100 profiles were measured by SSFCM at each dose while at least 500 sperm were scored visually at each dose. The sensitivity of the SSFCM assay should be increased substantially by measuring more profiles. The objective nature of SSFCM couple with the high correlation with results from the visually based assay of morphology suggests the use of SSFCM to measure frequencies of misshapen sperm when testing for mutagens or monitoring for effects of environmental contaminants.

  5. Factors affecting porcine sperm mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Garca-Vzquez, Francisco Alberto; Ruiz, Salvador; Grulln, Luis Alberto; de Ondiz, Aitor; Gutirrez-Adn, Alfonso; Gadea, Joaqun

    2011-12-01

    "Sperm mediated gene transfer" (SMGT) is based on the ability of sperm cells to bind exogenous DNA. The main objective of this study was to improve the production of transgenic pigs by SMGT. Taking into account that there is a lack of repeatability in studies of SMGT and that the mechanism of binding and internalization of exogenous DNA is a question that has not been solved, different factors involved in the production of transgenic animals by SMGT method were evaluated. Here we set out to: (1) evaluate the sperm capacity to bind exogenous DNA after DMSO treatment; (2) determine the location of the transgene-spermatozoa interaction; and (3) evaluate the efficiency of production of transgenic piglets by deep intrauterine artificial insemination (AI) with sperm incubated with DNA. The percentage of DNA binding was higher than 30% after 2h of co-culture, but it was not affected by sperm treatment with DMSO (0.3% or 3%). The integrity of the sperm plasma membrane plays a critical role in DNA interaction, and altered plasma membranes facilitate interactions with exogenous DNA. DNA bound mainly to spermatozoa with reduced viability. DNA molecules were found to be mainly associated to the post-acrosomal region (61.9%). After deep intrauterine AI a total of 29 piglets were obtained, but none of them integrated the transgene. In conclusion, although it has been confirmed that DNA can associate with boar spermatozoa, the efficiency of producing transgenic pigs by AI was not confirmed by the present experiments, mainly due to a reduced DNA binding to functional spermatozoa. PMID:20980036

  6. Male sperm storage compromises sperm motility in guppies.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, Clelia; Kelley, Jennifer L; Evans, Jonathan P

    2014-11-01

    Sperm senescence can have important evolutionary implications due to its deleterious effects on sperm quality and offspring performance. Consequently, it has been argued that polyandry (female multiple mating) may facilitate the selection of younger, and therefore competitively superior, sperm when ejaculates from multiple males compete for fertilization. Surprisingly, however, unequivocal evidence that sperm ageing influences traits that underlie sperm competitiveness is lacking. Here, we used a paired experimental design that compares sperm quality between 'old' and 'young' ejaculates from individual male guppies (Poecilia reticulata). We show that older sperm exhibit significant reductions in sperm velocity compared with younger sperm from the same males. We found no evidence that the brightness of the male's orange (carotenoid) spots, which are thought to signal resistance to oxidative stress (and thus age-related declines in sperm fitness), signals a male's ability to withstand the deleterious effects of sperm ageing. Instead, polyandry may be a more effective strategy for females to minimize the likelihood of being fertilized by aged sperm. PMID:25392314

  7. Male sperm storage compromises sperm motility in guppies

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Clelia; Kelley, Jennifer L.; Evans, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Sperm senescence can have important evolutionary implications due to its deleterious effects on sperm quality and offspring performance. Consequently, it has been argued that polyandry (female multiple mating) may facilitate the selection of younger, and therefore competitively superior, sperm when ejaculates from multiple males compete for fertilization. Surprisingly, however, unequivocal evidence that sperm ageing influences traits that underlie sperm competitiveness is lacking. Here, we used a paired experimental design that compares sperm quality between old and young ejaculates from individual male guppies (Poecilia reticulata). We show that older sperm exhibit significant reductions in sperm velocity compared with younger sperm from the same males. We found no evidence that the brightness of the male's orange (carotenoid) spots, which are thought to signal resistance to oxidative stress (and thus age-related declines in sperm fitness), signals a male's ability to withstand the deleterious effects of sperm ageing. Instead, polyandry may be a more effective strategy for females to minimize the likelihood of being fertilized by aged sperm. PMID:25392314

  8. The 5'-AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Is Involved in the Augmentation of Antioxidant Defenses in Cryopreserved Chicken Sperm.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Mong Diep; Seigneurin, Franois; Froment, Pascal; Combarnous, Yves; Blesbois, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Semen cryopreservation is a unique tool for the management of animal genetic diversity. However, the freeze-thaw process causes biochemical and physical alterations which make difficult the restoration of sperm energy-dependent functions needed for fertilization. 5'-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor and regulator of intracellular energy metabolism. Mitochondria functions are known to be severely affected during sperm cryopreservation with deleterious oxidative and peroxidative effects leading to cell integrity and functions damages. The aim of this study was thus to examine the role of AMPK on the peroxidation/antioxidant enzymes defense system in frozen-thawed sperm and its consequences on sperm functions. Chicken semen was diluted in media supplemented with or without AMPK activators (AICAR or Metformin [MET]) or inhibitor (Compound C [CC]) and then cryopreserved. AMPK? phosphorylation, antioxidant enzymes activities, mitochondrial potential, ATP, citrate, viability, acrosome reaction ability (AR) and various motility parameters were negatively affected by the freeze-thaw process while reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and lactate concentration were dramatically increased. AICAR partially restored superoxide dismutase (SOD), Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx) and Glutathione Reductase (GR), increased ATP, citrate, and lactate concentration and subsequently decreased the ROS and LPO (malondialdehyde) in frozen-thawed semen. Motility parameters were increased (i.e., + 23% for motility, + 34% for rapid sperm) as well as AR (+ 100%). MET had similar effects as AICAR except that catalase activity was restored and that ATP and mitochondrial potential were further decreased. CC showed effects opposite to AICAR on SOD, ROS, LPO and AR and motility parameters. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that, upon freeze-thaw process, AMPK stimulated intracellular anti-oxidative defense enzymes through ATP regulation, thus reducing ROS and lipid peroxidation, and consequently partially restoring several essential sperm functions and leading to a better quality of cryopreserved sperm. PMID:26222070

  9. Effect of exogenous DNA on bovine sperm functionality using the sperm mediated gene transfer (SMGT) technique.

    PubMed

    Canovas, Sebastian; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso; Gadea, Joaquin

    2010-08-01

    Sperm mediated gene transfer (SMGT) could provide the opportunity to carry out transgenesis on a mass scale using spermatozoa as vectors for exogenous DNA. However, the efficiency of sperm-mediated DNA transfer is still questionable, and the mode of transmission to the egg has not yet been well understood. Our aim was to investigate the capacity of bovine spermatozoa to carry exogenous DNA and its relationship to sperm functionality. We studied these parameters using flow cytometry to measure viability (necrosis and apoptosis) and capacitation status, computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) to measure motility parameters and in vitro fertilization (IVF) to assess fertilizing capacity. Furthermore, we studied the effect of capacitation status on interaction with exogenous DNA, and the role of heparin supplementation in this process. Bull spermatozoa showed a high capacity to bind DNA quickly and reached a maximum after 30 min, with approximately half of the DNA-bound spermatozoa being viable. Incubation with exogenous DNA induced a decrease in sperm viability and motility and increased the proportion of apoptotic cells, but did not affect the cleavage rate in IVF assay. Heparin increased high-lipid disorder and the number of sperm with DNA bound (viable and dead). In conclusion, this study shows that live spermatozoa can bind exogenous DNA with a slight negative effect in some parameters of sperm function that in our opinion, would not drastically compromise fertility. PMID:20568297

  10. Chronic Ethanol Ingestion Increases Nitric Oxide Production in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Polikandriotis, John A.; Rupnow, Heidi L.; Brown, Lou Ann; Hart, C. Michael

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Chronic ethanol (EtOH) ingestion increases the incidence of the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). The mechanisms underlying EtOH-induced susceptibility to lung injury continue to be defined. This study examines the hypothesis that EtOH increases endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and activity in the lungs of a rat model of chronic EtOH ingestion. Methods: Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed liquid diets containing EtOH (36% of calories) or Maltose-dextrin as an isocaloric substitution for EtOH (Control) for 6 weeks. Selected animals were also treated with the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, lisinopril (3 mg/L in diet) for 6 weeks. At study completion, animals were sacrificed, and lung tissue was collected for assays of nitric oxide (NO) metabolism or pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (MVEC) were isolated for analysis of NO release. Results: Compared to the Control diet, chronic EtOH ingestion increased lung H2O2 production, eNOS expression and activity, lung cGMP content and levels of protein nitration and oxidation. MVEC from animals with chronic EtOH ingestion released greater amounts of NO. EtOH-induced increases in lung H2O2 production, eNOS expression and activity, cGMP content, protein nitration and oxidation, and MVEC NO production were all attenuated by treatment with lisinopril. Conclusions: Chronic EtOH ingestion stimulates ACE-dependent increases in NO production in the lung. These novel findings indicate that chronic EtOH ingestion increases reactive species production in the lung parenchyma and provide new insights into mechanisms by which EtOH causes phenotypic alterations in the lung and its response to inflammatory stimuli. PMID:17889307

  11. Egg Activation at Fertilization by a Soluble Sperm Protein.

    PubMed

    Swann, Karl; Lai, F Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The most fundamental unresolved issue of fertilization is to define how the sperm activates the egg to begin embryo development. Egg activation at fertilization in all species thus far examined is caused by some form of transient increase in the cytoplasmic free Ca(2+) concentration. What has not been clear, however, is precisely how the sperm triggers the large changes in Ca(2+) observed within the egg cytoplasm. Here, we review the studies indicating that the fertilizing sperm stimulates a cytosolic Ca(2+) increase in the egg specifically by delivering a soluble factor that diffuses into the cytosolic space of the egg upon gamete membrane fusion. Evidence is primarily considered in species of eggs where the sperm has been shown to elicit a cytosolic Ca(2+) increase by initiating Ca(2+) release from intracellular Ca(2+) stores. We suggest that our best understanding of these signaling events is in mammals, where the sperm triggers a prolonged series of intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations. The strongest empirical studies to date suggest that mammalian sperm-triggered Ca(2+) oscillations are caused by the introduction of a sperm-specific protein, called phospholipase C-zeta (PLCζ) that generates inositol trisphosphate within the egg. We will discuss the role and mechanism of action of PLCζ in detail at a molecular and cellular level. We will also consider some of the evidence that a soluble sperm protein might be involved in egg activation in nonmammalian species. PMID:26631595

  12. Sperm Motility in Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Juarez, Gabriel; Stocker, Roman

    2012-11-01

    A wide variety of plants and animals reproduce sexually by releasing motile sperm that seek out a conspecific egg, for example in the reproductive tract for mammals or in the water column for externally fertilizing organisms. Sperm are aided in their quest by chemical cues, but must also contend with hydrodynamic forces, resulting from laminar flows in reproductive tracts or turbulence in aquatic habitats. To understand how velocity gradients affect motility, we subjected swimming sperm to a range of highly-controlled straining flows using a cross-flow microfluidic device. The motion of the cell body and flagellum were captured through high-speed video microscopy. The effects of flow on swimming are twofold. For moderate velocity gradients, flow simply advects and reorients cells, quenching their ability to cross streamlines. For high velocity gradients, fluid stresses hinder the internal bending of the flagellum, directly inhibiting motility. The transition between the two regimes is governed by the Sperm number, which compares the external viscous stresses with the internal elastic stresses. Ultimately, unraveling the role of flow in sperm motility will lead to a better understanding of population dynamics among aquatic organisms and infertility problems in humans.

  13. Engineering the lactococcal mevalonate pathway for increased sesquiterpene production.

    PubMed

    Song, Adelene A; Abdullah, Janna Ong; Abdullah, Mohd P; Shafee, Norazizah; Othman, Roohaida; Noor, Normah Mohd; Rahim, Raha A

    2014-06-01

    Isoprenoids are a large, diverse group of secondary metabolites which has recently raised a renewed research interest due to genetic engineering advances, allowing specific isoprenoids to be produced and characterized in heterologous hosts. Many researches on metabolic engineering of heterologous hosts for increased isoprenoid production are focussed on Escherichia coli and yeasts. E. coli, as most prokaryotes, use the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway for isoprenoid production. Yeasts on the other hand, use the mevalonate pathway which is commonly found in eukaryotes. However, Lactococcus lactis is an attractive alternative host for heterologous isoprenoid production. Apart from being food-grade, this Gram-positive prokaryote uses the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid production instead of the MEP pathway. Previous studies have shown that L. lactis is able to produce sesquiterpenes through heterologous expression of plant sesquiterpene synthases. In this work, we analysed the gene expression of the lactococcal mevalonate pathway through RT-qPCR to successfully engineer L. lactis as an efficient host for isoprenoid production. We then overexpressed the mvk gene singly or co-expressed with the mvaA gene as an attempt to increase β-sesquiphellandrene production in L. lactis. It was observed that co-expression of mvk with mvaA doubled the amount of β-sesquiphellandrene produced. PMID:24828482

  14. Positive feedback between increasing atmospheric CO2 and ecosystem productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfand, I.; Hamilton, S. K.; Robertson, G. P.

    2009-12-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 will likely affect both the hydrologic cycle and ecosystem productivity. Current assumptions that increasing CO2 will lead to increased ecosystem productivity and plant water use efficiency (WUE) are driving optimistic predictions of higher crop yields as well as greater availability of freshwater resources due to a decrease in evapotranspiration. The plant physiological response that drives these effects is believed to be an increase in carbon uptake either by (a) stronger CO2 gradient between the stomata and the atmosphere, or by (b) reduced CO2 limitation of enzymatic carboxylation within the leaf. The (a) scenario will lead to increased water use efficiency (WUE) in plants. However, evidence for increased WUE is mostly based on modeling studies, and experiments producing a short duration or step-wise increase in CO2 concentration (e.g. free-air CO2 enrichment). We hypothesize that the increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration is having a positive effect on ecosystem productivity and WUE. To investigate this hypothesis, we analyzed meteorological, ANPP, and soil CO2 flux datasets together with carbon isotopic ratio (13C/12C) of archived plant samples from the long term ecological research (LTER) program at Kellogg Biological Station. The datasets were collected between 1989 and 2007 (corresponding to an increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration of ~33 ppmv at Mauna Loa). Wheat (Triticum aestivum) samples taken from 1989 and 2007 show a significant decrease in the C isotope discrimination factor (?) over time. Stomatal conductance is directly related to ?, and thus ? is inversely related to plant intrinsic WUE (iWUE). Historical changes in the 13C/12C ratio (?13C) in samples of a perennial forb, Canada goldenrod (Solidago canadensis), taken from adjacent successional fields, indicate changes in ? upon uptake of CO2 as well. These temporal trends in ? suggest a positive feedback between the increasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere, air temperature, and plant iWUE. This positive feedback is expressed by (a) nonparallel changes of ?13C signal of atmospheric CO2 (?a) and plant samples (?p), (b) negative correlation between the ? and average temperatures during the growth season, although only for temperatures up to 21C. The lack of effect at higher temperatures suggests a negative influence of growing season warming on the iWUE. These results suggest a complex feedback between atmospheric CO2 increase, plant physiology, ecosystem productivity, and soil CO2 fluxes. These complex effects support our hypothesis of a CO2 fertilization effect on plant productivity, and they raise additional questions regarding adaptation of plants to changing atmospheric CO2 and climate.

  15. Rationale and Procedures for Increasing the Productivity of Inexperienced Writers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Mary Ross

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a program that systematically increases the composition productivity of disabled students who are inexperienced writers. Program features include building discourse units, using student-generated language, and incorporating self-evaluation. Procedures for small group instruction focus on constructing and testing clauses,

  16. The healthy men study: an evaluation of exposure to disinfection by-products in tap water and sperm quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Chlorination of drinking water generates disinfection by-products (DBPs), which have been shown to disrupt spermatogenesis in rodents at high doses, suggesting that DBPs could pose a reproductive risk to men. In this study we assessed DBP exposure and testicular toxic...

  17. Future seagrass beds: can increased productivity lead to increased carbon storage?

    PubMed

    Russell, Bayden D; Connell, Sean D; Uthicke, Sven; Muehllehner, Nancy; Fabricius, Katharina E; Hall-Spencer, Jason M

    2013-08-30

    While carbon capture and storage (CCS) is increasingly recognised as technologically possible, recent evidence from deep-sea CCS activities suggests that leakage from reservoirs may result in highly CO2 impacted biological communities. In contrast, shallow marine waters have higher primary productivity which may partially mitigate this leakage. We used natural CO2 seeps in shallow marine waters to assess if increased benthic primary productivity could capture and store CO2 leakage in areas targeted for CCS. We found that the productivity of seagrass communities (in situ, using natural CO2 seeps) and two individual species (ex situ, Cymodocea serrulata and Halophila ovalis) increased with CO2 concentration, but only species with dense belowground biomass increased in abundance (e.g. C. serrulata). Importantly, the ratio of below:above ground biomass of seagrass communities increased fivefold, making seagrass good candidates to partially mitigate CO2 leakage from sub-seabed reservoirs, since they form carbon sinks that can be buried for millennia. PMID:23453889

  18. Oviducal sperm storage in poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hens are capable of fertilizing a daily succession of ovulated ova due to their ability to store sperm in the oviduct for several weeks. However, the precise biological mechanisms describing how sperm are selected and survive in the oviduct, and which sperm actually reach the site of fertilization c...

  19. Effect of sorafenib on sperm count and sperm motility in male Swiss albino mice

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Surekha Devadasa; Bairy, Laxminarayana Kurady

    2015-01-01

    The issue of male germ line mutagenesis and the effects on developmental defects in the next generation has become increasingly high profile over recent years. Mutagenic substance affects germinal cells in the testis. Since the cells are undergoing different phases of cell division and maturation, it is an ideal system to study the effect of chemotherapeutic agents. There are lacunae in the literature on the effect of sorafenib on gonadal function. With background, a study was planned to evaluate the effects of sorafenib on sperm count and sperm motility in male Swiss albino mice. Male Swiss albino mice were used for the study. The animals were segregated into control, positive control (PC) and three treatment groups. PC received oral imatinib (100 mg/kg body weight) and treatment groups received 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg body weight of sorafenib orally for 7 consecutive days at intervals of 24 h between two administrations. The control group remained in the home cage for an equal duration of time to match their corresponding treatment groups. The animals were sacrificed at the end of 1st, 2nd, 4th, 5th, 7th, and 10th weeks after the last exposure to drug, respectively. Sperm suspensions were prepared and introduced into a counting chamber. Total sperm count and motility were recorded. There was a significant decrease in sperm count and sperm motility by sorafenib which was comparable with the effect of PC imatinib. Sorafenib adversely affects sperm count and sperm motility which are reversible after discontinuation of treatment. PMID:26605157

  20. Effect of sorafenib on sperm count and sperm motility in male Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Surekha Devadasa; Bairy, Laxminarayana Kurady

    2015-01-01

    The issue of male germ line mutagenesis and the effects on developmental defects in the next generation has become increasingly high profile over recent years. Mutagenic substance affects germinal cells in the testis. Since the cells are undergoing different phases of cell division and maturation, it is an ideal system to study the effect of chemotherapeutic agents. There are lacunae in the literature on the effect of sorafenib on gonadal function. With background, a study was planned to evaluate the effects of sorafenib on sperm count and sperm motility in male Swiss albino mice. Male Swiss albino mice were used for the study. The animals were segregated into control, positive control (PC) and three treatment groups. PC received oral imatinib (100 mg/kg body weight) and treatment groups received 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg body weight of sorafenib orally for 7 consecutive days at intervals of 24 h between two administrations. The control group remained in the home cage for an equal duration of time to match their corresponding treatment groups. The animals were sacrificed at the end of 1(st), 2(nd), 4(th), 5(th), 7(th), and 10(th) weeks after the last exposure to drug, respectively. Sperm suspensions were prepared and introduced into a counting chamber. Total sperm count and motility were recorded. There was a significant decrease in sperm count and sperm motility by sorafenib which was comparable with the effect of PC imatinib. Sorafenib adversely affects sperm count and sperm motility which are reversible after discontinuation of treatment. PMID:26605157

  1. Sperm Proteasomes Degrade Sperm Receptor on the Egg Zona Pellucida during Mammalian Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Shawn W.; Manandhar, Gaurishankar; Yi, Young-Joo; Gupta, Satish K.; Sutovsky, Miriam; Odhiambo, John F.; Powell, Michael D.; Miller, David J.; Sutovsky, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the mechanism by which the fertilizing spermatozoon penetrates the mammalian vitelline membrane, the zona pellucida (ZP) remains one of the unexplained fundamental events of human/mammalian development. Evidence has been accumulating in support of the 26S proteasome as a candidate for echinoderm, ascidian and mammalian egg coat lysin. Monitoring ZP protein degradation by sperm during fertilization is nearly impossible because those few spermatozoa that penetrate the ZP leave behind a virtually untraceable residue of degraded proteins. We have overcome this hurdle by designing an experimentally consistent in vitro system in which live boar spermatozoa are co-incubated with ZP-proteins (ZPP) solubilized from porcine oocytes. Using this assay, mimicking sperm-egg interactions, we demonstrate that the sperm-borne proteasomes can degrade the sperm receptor protein ZPC. Upon coincubation with motile spermatozoa, the solubilized ZPP, which appear to be ubiquitinated, adhered to sperm acrosomal caps and induced acrosomal exocytosis/formation of the acrosomal shroud. The degradation of the sperm receptor protein ZPC was assessed by Western blotting band-densitometry and proteomics. A nearly identical pattern of sperm receptor degradation, evident already within the first 5 min of coincubation, was observed when the spermatozoa were replaced with the isolated, enzymatically active, sperm-derived proteasomes. ZPC degradation was blocked by proteasomal inhibitors and accelerated by ubiquitin-aldehyde(UBAL), a modified ubiquitin protein that stimulates proteasomal proteolysis. Such a degradation pattern of ZPC is consistent with in vitro fertilization studies, in which proteasomal inhibitors completely blocked fertilization, and UBAL increased fertilization and polyspermy rates. Preincubation of intact zona-enclosed ova with isolated active sperm proteasomes caused digestion, abrasions and loosening of the exposed zonae, and significantly reduced the fertilization/polyspermy rates after IVF, accompanied by en-mass detachment of zona bound sperm. Thus, the sperm borne 26S proteasome is a candidate zona lysin in mammals. This new paradigm has implications for contraception and assisted reproductive technologies in humans, as well as animals. PMID:21383844

  2. Do Pilea Microphylla Improve Sperm DNA Fragmentation and Sperm Parameters in Varicocelized Rats?

    PubMed

    Heidari, Reza; Alizadeh, Rafieh; Abbasi, Niloufar; Pasbakhsh, Parichehr; Hedayatpour, Azim; Farajpour, Mostafa; Khaleghi, Mohammad Reza; Abbasi, Mehdi; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2015-09-01

    Varicocele is one of the most common causes of primary male infertility. Pilea microphylla (PM) is being used as folk medicine. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of PM in a rat model of varicocele. A total of 30 male Wistar rats were divided into control, sham, varicocele, accessory varicocele and PM-treated groups. After 10 weeks of varicocele induction, sperm parameters and chromatin (Aniline blue, acridine orange and toluidine blue) were evaluated, except for the treated and accessory groups that received 50 mg/kg PM orally daily for 10 weeks and then were sacrificed. Sperm parameters significantly decreased in varicocele groups (P < 0.01). Moreover, there was a negative correlation between the DNA fragmentation and sperm parameters in varicocelized rats. Administration of PM led to significantly increased sperm parameters and AO staining (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that PM improves sperm parameters and DNA fragmentation in varicocelized rats. PM can reduce the damage to sperm DNA but not chromatin condensation. PMID:26553082

  3. Increasing loyalty to breastfeeding: investigating a product development strategy.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Joy; Russell-Bennett, Rebekah; Previte, Josephine

    2012-01-01

    This article demonstrates how social marketing insights were used to influence women's loyalty to breastfeeding. The article reports on a social marketing campaign undertaken by the Australian Breastfeeding Association and a government health department, which used a product development strategy in order to increase breastfeeding loyalty. Seeking new approaches to support breastfeeding behaviors is critical and timely, because while initiation rates of breastfeeding are high in developed countries such as the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, and the United States, duration rates are significantly lower. Results indicate that a product- focused strategy influences pregnant women's loyalty to exclusively breastfeeding. PMID:22905944

  4. Corticosteroids increase superoxide anion production by rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, D H; Ruhmann-Wennhold, A

    1975-01-01

    Superoxide anion production by liver microsomes from intact, adrenalectomized, and cortisoltreated adrenalectomized rats has been determined. The amount formed was roughly proportionate to the amount of cortisol given, and a similar response was seen in the activity of NADPH-cytochrome c reductase. The amount of measurable superoxide anion was markedly reduced by the addition of superoxide dismutase. The increased production of this potent free radical with cortisol therapy suggests that its formation may contribute to some of the harmful effects of corticosteroids given in more than physiologic amounts. PMID:239969

  5. Monitoring sperm mitochondrial respiration response in a laser trap using ratiometric fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Adrian; Botvinick, Elliot; Berns, Michael

    2005-08-01

    Sperm motility is an important area in understanding male infertility. Various techniques, such as the Computer Assisted Sperm Analysis (CASA), have been used to understand sperm motility. Sperm motility is related to the energy (ATP) production of sperm. ATP is produced by the depolarization of the membrane potential of the inner membrane of the mitochondria. In this study, a mitochondrial dye, JC-1, has been used to monitor the energetics of the mitochondria. This fluorescent dye can emit at two different wavelengths, depending on the membrane potential of the mitochondria. It can fluoresce green at low membrane potential and red at high membrane potential. The ratio of the two colors (red/green) allows for an accurate measurement of the change of membrane potential. Various experiments were conducted to quantify the behavior of the dye within the sperm and the reaction of the sperm to trap. Sperm were trapped using laser tweezers. Results have shown that the ratio drops dramatically when sperm are trapped, indicating a depolarization of the membrane. The physiological response to this depolarization is yet to be determined, but the studies indicate that the sperm could have been slightly damaged by the laser. However, knowing that sperm depolarizes their membrane when trapped can help understand how sperm react to their environment and consequently help treat male infertility.

  6. Increased elastin production in experimental granulomatous lung disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, T. J.; Crouch, E.; Roby, J. D.; Starcher, B.; Pierce, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    In the normal, healthy lung, elastin production is restricted to periods of development and growth. However, elastin expression in the adult lung has been observed in some forms of pulmonary injury, including pulmonary fibrosis. Here, we report that elastin production is significantly increased within precise interstitial compartments of the lung in an experimental model of granulomatous lung disease. An increase in the number and volume of elastic fibers within the alveolar walls was apparent on histological examination of Verhoeff-van Gieson-stained sections of silicotic rat lungs. Quantitation of mature elastin cross-links indicated that silicosis was accompanied by a 17-fold increase in lung elastin content when compared with values from saline-treated controls. In situ hybridization for tropoelastin mRNA revealed that elastin production was absent from granulomatous lesions yet was prominent at nonfibrotic alveolar septal tips, where a high density of elastic fibers is seen in the normal lung. Immunohistochemistry indicated tropoelastin was being expressed by alpha-smooth muscle actin-containing cells. Transforming growth factor-beta was immunolocalized to granulomatous regions of the silicotic lung but was absent from regions showing increased tropoelastin expression. These data indicate that the reinitiation of tropoelastin gene expression is associated with granulomatous lung disease, and this expression leads to the aberrant accumulation of mature elastin in the lung. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7573374

  7. Sperm-macrophage interaction in the mouse: a quantitative assay in vitro using 111indium oxine-labeled sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, D.L.; Weinberg, J.B.; Haney, A.F.

    1987-12-01

    The role of reproductive tract macrophages in contraception and reproductive failure has become widely recognized. However, in vitro analysis of sperm phagocytosis by macrophages has relied upon a semi-quantitative method of sperm counting that is of limited accuracy and reproducibility. We have developed an assay using murine sperm labeled with /sup 111/indium oxine, and results indicate the labeling to be rapid and efficient. Incorporation of /sup 111/indium into sperm increased the dose and sperm concentration and reached 90% maximal uptake after 15 min incubation, with maximal uptake occurring at 30 min. No decrease in sperm motility was noted with levels of oxine in excess of those required for significant labeling. Maximal labeling efficiency occurred in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), with Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) + 10% adult bovine serum (ABS) producing significantly less uptake. Label dissociation was detectable in PBS at room temperature, but at 37 degrees C in DMEM + 10% ABS, loss of label occurred at a rate of 23.5%/h. Addition of labeled sperm to murine macrophage monolayers under optimal conditions resulted in uptake of /sup 111/indium by macrophages, while free label was unincorporated. Results indicated assay specificity for macrophage-limited uptake, with insignificant label uptake by nonphagocytic murine fibroblasts and better sensitivity than sperm counting. Macrophages from Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)-infected mice resulted in a decrease in sperm uptake. Female macrophages showed greater capacity for sperm uptake than those of the male mouse. These initial studies demonstrated the utility of this model system in enhancing the understanding of sperm-macrophage interaction in the female reproductive tract.

  8. Role of calcium on the initiation of sperm motility in the European eel.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Luz; Vílchez, M Carmen; Gallego, Víctor; Morini, Marina; Peñaranda, David S; Asturiano, Juan F

    2016-01-01

    Sperm from European eel males treated with hCGrec was washed in a calcium free extender, and sperm motility was activated both in the presence (seawater, SW) and in the absence of calcium (NaCl+EDTA), and treated with calcium inhibitors or modulators. The sperm motility parameters were evaluated by a computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) system, and changes in the [Ca(2+)]i fluorescence (and in [Na(+)]i in some cases) were evaluated by flow cytometry. After sperm motility was activated in a medium containing Ca(2+) (seawater, SW) the intracellular fluorescence emitted by Ca(2+) increased 4-6-fold compared to the levels in quiescent sperm. However, while sperm activation in a Ca-free media (NaCl+EDTA) resulted in a percentage of motility similar to seawater, the [Ca(2+)]i levels did not increase at all. This result strongly suggests that increasing [Ca(2+)]i is not a pre-requisite for the induction of sperm motility in European eel sperm. Several sperm velocities (VCL, VSL, VAP) decreased when sperm was activated in the Ca-free activator, thus supporting the theory that Ca(2+) has a modulatory effect on sperm motility. The results indicate that a calcium/sodium exchanger (NCX) which is inhibited by bepridil and a calcium calmodulin kinase (inhibited by W-7), are involved in the sperm motility of the European eel. Our results indicate that the increase in [Ca(2+)]i concentrations during sperm activation is due to an influx from the external medium, but, unlike in most other species, it does not appear to be necessary for the activation of motility in European eel sperm. PMID:26459984

  9. Synchronous condenser helps double battery production without increasing electrical service

    SciTech Connect

    George, R.

    1998-12-01

    Installing a synchronous condenser at GNB Technologies, in Dallas, Texas, made it possible to significantly increase battery production without increasing electrical service. In the past, production was constrained by the number of battery chargers that could be operated on the existing 6000 kVA service. The synchronous condenser corrected the poor power factor caused by the nonlinear load of the chargers, freeing for use approximately 2500 additional kW without adding an additional transformer or switchgear. This additional power, when added to available power that GNB Dallas had not been able to use, made it possible to significantly improve battery charging capacity. The synchronous condenser also eliminated the risk that the utility company would begin charging for the reactive power that had previously been required.

  10. The increasing divergence of raw agricultural production from edible calories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, M.; Cassidy, E. S.; Ray, D. K.; Mueller, N. D.; Foley, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    As we look forward to 2050 and the need to dramatically increase agricultural production, we must first look to our recent past to see how changes in yields and area have helped to grow agricultural resources. However, those changes must not be viewed in a vacuum -- it is insufficient to assess advancements in agricultural productivity without converting resources to usable calories by humans and to put the supply in context of population changes. This study looks at major countries and growing regions to determine the availability of usable calories from agriculture from 1965 to 2005. We examine how rapid increases in agricultural supplies in the past have freed up resources for a growing number of non-food uses. We look at how this new competition and pressures from a changing climate might impact the resiliency of our agricultural system.

  11. A carbon sink pathway increases carbon productivity in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Oliver, John W K; Atsumi, Shota

    2015-05-01

    The burning of fossil reserves, and subsequent release of carbon into the atmosphere is depleting the supply of carbon-based molecules used for synthetic materials including plastics, oils, medicines, and glues. To provide for future society, innovations are needed for the conversion of waste carbon (CO2) into organic carbon useful for materials. Chemical production directly from photosynthesis is a nascent technology, with great promise for capture of CO2 using sunlight. To improve low yields, it has been proposed that photosynthetic capacity can be increased by a relaxation of bottlenecks inherent to growth. The limits of carbon partitioning away from growth within the cell and the effect of partitioning on carbon fixation are not well known. Here we show that expressing genes in a pathway between carbon fixation and pyruvate increases partitioning to 2,3-butanediol (23BD) and leads to a 1.8-fold increase in total carbon yield in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. Specific 2,3-butanediol production increases 2.4-fold. As partitioning increases beyond 30%, it leads to a steep decline in total carbon yield. The data suggests a local maximum for carbon partitioning from the Calvin Benson cycle that is scalable with light intensity. PMID:25777135

  12. A modular modulation method for achieving increases in metabolite production.

    PubMed

    Acerenza, Luis; Monzon, Pablo; Ortega, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the production of overproducing strains represents a great challenge. Here, we develop a modular modulation method to determine the key steps for genetic manipulation to increase metabolite production. The method consists of three steps: (i) modularization of the metabolic network into two modules connected by linking metabolites, (ii) change in the activity of the modules using auxiliary rates producing or consuming the linking metabolites in appropriate proportions and (iii) determination of the key modules and steps to increase production. The mathematical formulation of the method in matrix form shows that it may be applied to metabolic networks of any structure and size, with reactions showing any kind of rate laws. The results are valid for any type of conservation relationships in the metabolite concentrations or interactions between modules. The activity of the module may, in principle, be changed by any large factor. The method may be applied recursively or combined with other methods devised to perform fine searches in smaller regions. In practice, it is implemented by integrating to the producer strain heterologous reactions or synthetic pathways producing or consuming the linking metabolites. The new procedure may contribute to develop metabolic engineering into a more systematic practice. PMID:25683235

  13. Sequential male mate choice under sperm competition risk

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Male eagerness to mate is a central paradigm of sexual selection theory. However, limited sperm supplies mean that male sexual restraint might sometimes be favored under promiscuous mating. Here, we demonstrate dynamic plasticity in male mating effort when females are encountered sequentially under varying sperm competition risk. Rather than showing consistent eagerness to mate, male house mice (Mus musculus domesticus) instead tailor their mating effort according to likely reproductive payoffs. They are significantly less likely to mate when sperm competition is certain and potential reproductive payoffs low, but dramatically increase investment if they do choose to mate under such circumstances. By contrast, male mice are significantly more likely to mate in situations simulating extra-territorial copulations, where future risk of competition is high but so too are potential reproductive rewards. Differential mating propensity appears to be the primary mechanism by which male house mice allocate sperm adaptively under sperm competition risk because we find no evidence for facultative adjustment of sperm numbers per ejaculate or ejaculation frequency in response to female-related cues. We conclude that sequential male mate choice under sperm competition risk could be a widespread but often unappreciated mechanism of strategic sperm allocation. PMID:24822023

  14. Penicillamine prevents ram sperm agglutination in media that support capacitation.

    PubMed

    Leahy, T; Rickard, J P; Aitken, R J; de Graaf, S P

    2016-02-01

    Ram spermatozoa are difficult to capacitate in vitro. Here we describe a further complication, the unreported phenomenon of head-to-head agglutination of ram spermatozoa following dilution in the capacitation medium Tyrodes plus albumin, lactate and pyruvate (TALP). Sperm agglutination is immediate, specific and persistent and is not associated with a loss of motility. Agglutination impedes in vitro sperm handling and analysis. So the objectives of this study were to investigate the cause of sperm agglutination and potential agents which may reduce agglutination. The percentage of non-agglutinated, motile spermatozoa increased when bicarbonate was omitted from complete TALP suggesting that bicarbonate ions stimulate the agglutination process. d-penicillamine (PEN), a nucleophilic thiol, was highly effective at reducing agglutination. The inclusion of 250??M PEN in TALP reduced the incidence of motile, agglutinated spermatozoa from 76.72.7% to 2.81.4%. It was then assessed if PEN (1?mM) could be included in existing ram sperm capacitation protocols (TALP +1?mM dibutyryl cAMP, caffeine and theophylline) to produce spermatozoa that were simultaneously capacitated and non-agglutinated. This protocol resulted in a sperm population which displayed high levels of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins and lipid disordered membranes (merocyanine-540) while remaining motile, viable, acrosome-intact and non-agglutinated. In summary, PEN (1?mM) can be included in ram sperm capacitation protocols to reduce sperm agglutination and allow for the in vitro assessment of ram sperm capacitation. PMID:26705263

  15. Reliable single sperm cryopreservation in Cell Sleepers for azoospermia management.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, K; Ozgur, K; Berkkanoglu, M; Bulut, H; Isikli, A

    2016-03-01

    Conventional sperm freezing methods perform best when freezing sperm samples containing at least hundreds of spermatozoa. In this severe male factor infertility case series, we examined the reproductive outcomes in 12 intracytoplasmic sperm injection cases where spermatozoa used were frozen in Cell Sleepers. Cell Sleepers are novel devices in which individual spermatozoa can be frozen in microdroplets. The case series included five men with obstructive azoospermia, six with nonobstructive azoospermia and one with cryptozoospermia, in whom microscopic sperm retrievals from testicular sperm extraction (TESE), micro-TESE extracts and a centrifugation procedure resulted in less than 50 spermatozoa. A total of 304 microscopically retrieved spermatozoa were frozen in 20 Cell Sleepers using a rapid manual cryopreservation method. A total of 179 mature oocytes were injected with recovered thawed spermatozoa, resulting in a fertilisation rate of 65.9% (118 of 179), with no total fertilisation failures. In 10 cases, an embryo transfer was performed, three on day 3 and seven on day 5, resulting in a per cycle pregnancy rate of 58.3% (seven of 12). Four of the pregnancies have progressed past 20 gestation weeks. The recovery and use of spermatozoa that were frozen in Cell Sleepers was uncomplicated and effective and eliminated the need to perform any microscopic sperm retrieval procedures on the day of oocyte collection. Modification of the routine sperm cryopreservation methodology to include the use of Cell Sleepers increases the range of sperm samples that can be effectively cryopreserved, to include men with severe male factor fertility. PMID:25988980

  16. Sex preselection: high-speed flow cytometric sorting of X and Y sperm for maximum efficiency.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L A; Welch, G R

    1999-12-01

    Sex preselection that is based on flow-cytometric measurement of sperm DNA content to enable sorting of X- from Y-chromosome-bearing sperm has proven reproducible at various locations and with many species at greater than 90% purity. Offspring of the predetermined sex in both domestic animals and human beings have been born using this technology since its introduction in 1989. The method involves treating sperm with the fluorescent dye, Hoechst 33342, which binds to the DNA and then sorting them into X- and Y-bearing-sperm populations with a flow cytometer/cell sorter modified specifically for sperm. Sexed sperm are then used with differing semen delivery routes such as intra-uterine, intra-tubal, artificial insemination (deep-uterine and cervical), in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer, and intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Offspring produced at all locations using the technology have been morphologically normal and reproductively capable in succeeding generations. With the advent of high-speed cell sorting technology and improved efficiency of sorting by a new sperm orienting nozzle, the efficiency of sexed sperm production is significantly enhanced. This paper describes development of the these technological improvements in the Beltsville Sexing Technology that has brought sexed sperm to a new level of application. Under typical conditions the high-speed sperm sorter with the orienting nozzle (HiSON) results in purities of 90% of X- and Y-bearing sperm at 6 million sperm per h for each population. Taken to its highest performance level, the HiSON has produced X-bearing-sperm populations at 85 to 90% purity in the production of up to 11 million X-bearing-sperm per h of sorting. In addition if one accepts a lower purity (75 to 80%) of X, nearly 20 million sperm can be sorted per h. The latter represents a 30 to 60-fold improvement over the 1989 sorting technology using rabbit sperm. It is anticipated that with instrument refinements the production capacity can be improved even further. The application of the current technology has led to much wider potential for practical usage through conventional and deep-uterine artificial insemination of many species, especially cattle. It also opens the possibility of utilizing sexed sperm for artificial insemination in swine once low-sperm-dose methods are perfected. Sexed sperm on demand has become a reality through the development of the HiSON system. PMID:10735079

  17. Raman Spectroscopy of DNA Packaging in Individual Human Sperm Cells distinguishes Normal from Abnormal Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huser, T; Orme, C; Hollars, C; Corzett, M; Balhorn, R

    2009-03-09

    Healthy human males produce sperm cells of which about 25-40% have abnormal head shapes. Increases in the percentage of sperm exhibiting aberrant sperm head morphologies have been correlated with male infertility, and biochemical studies of pooled sperm have suggested that sperm with abnormal shape may contain DNA that has not been properly repackaged by protamine during spermatid development. We have used micro-Raman spectroscopy to obtain Raman spectra from individual human sperm cells and examined how differences in the Raman spectra of sperm chromatin correlate with cell shape. We show that Raman spectra of individual sperm cells contain vibrational marker modes that can be used to assess the efficiency of DNA-packaging for each cell. Raman spectra obtained from sperm cells with normal shape provide evidence that DNA in these sperm is very efficiently packaged. We find, however, that the relative protein content per cell and DNA packaging efficiencies are distributed over a relatively wide range for sperm cells with both normal and abnormal shape. These findings indicate that single cell Raman spectroscopy should be a valuable tool in assessing the quality of sperm cells for in-vitro fertilization.

  18. Effects of L-Carnitine and Pentoxifylline on Carbohydrate Distribution of Mouse Testicular Sperm Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Aliabadi, Elham; Karimi, Fatemeh; Talaei-Khozani, Tahereh

    2013-01-01

    Background: The glycoconjugate content of sperms indicates their physiological and fertility properties. Lectin reactivity is indicative of intact, capacitated, and acrosome-reacted sperms. In the epididymis, sperms experience maturation, glycoconjugate modification, and simultaneously, higher L-carnitine (LC) concentrations. The aim of this project was to evaluate the effects of LC and Pentoxifylline (PF) on the integrity, capacitation, and acrosomal reaction of sperms by studying their lectin reactivity. Methods: Mouse testicular sperm samples were divided into three parts. Each sample was added Hams F10 (control) or media containing 1.76 mM LC or PF. At 30 and 90 minutes after incubation, sperm motility was assessed. Peanut agglutinin (PNA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), and Concanavalin A (Con A) were used to detect non-acrosome-reacted, non-capacitated, and acrosome-reacted sperms, respectively and the frequency was evaluated by flow cytometry. Statistical analysis was performed using the ANOVA. Results: Sperm motility increased after 30 and 90 minutes of incubation in the LC- and PF-treated cultures (P=0.001). LC administration created a significant increase in the percentage of the non-acrosome-reacted sperms compared to the control sperms after 30 and 90 minutes (P=0.02 and P=0.03, respectively). The frequency of the non-capacitated sperms in the LC-treated group increased compared to the control sperms after 30 minutes significantly (P=0.01). Conclusion: Although the administration of LC and PF enhanced sperm motility, LC also impacted glycoconjugates on the sperm surface. Glycoconjugates are involved in the interaction between the sperm and the zona pellucida and subsequently fertilization, thereby probably influencing the male fertility state. PMID:23825890

  19. Polyandry in the medfly - shifts in paternity mediated by sperm stratification and mixing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly), Ceratitis capitata, a highly invasive agricultural pest species, polyandry, associated with sperm precedence, is a recurrent behaviour in the wild. The absence of tools for the unambiguous discrimination between competing sperm from different males in the complex female reproductive tract has strongly limited the understanding of mechanisms controlling sperm dynamics and use. Results Here we use transgenic medfly lines expressing green or red fluorescent proteins in the spermatozoa, which can be easily observed and unambiguously differentiated within the female fertilization chamber. In twice-mated females, one day after the second mating, sperm from the first male appeared to be homogenously distributed all over the distal portion of each alveolus within the fertilization chamber, whereas sperm from the second male were clearly concentrated in the central portion of each alveolus. This distinct stratified sperm distribution was not maintained over time, as green and red sperm appeared homogeneously mixed seven days after the second mating. This dynamic sperm storage pattern is mirrored by the paternal contribution in the progeny of twice-mated females. Conclusions Polyandrous medfly females, unlike Drosophila, conserve sperm from two different mates to fertilize their eggs. From an evolutionary point of view, the storage of sperm in a stratified pattern by medfly females may initially favour the fresher ejaculate from the second male. However, as the second male's sperm gradually becomes depleted, the sperm from the first male becomes increasingly available for fertilization. The accumulation of sperm from different males will increase the overall genetic variability of the offspring and will ultimately affect the effective population size. From an applicative point of view, the dynamics of sperm storage and their temporal use by a polyandrous female may have an impact on the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). Indeed, even if the female's last mate is sterile, an increasing proportion of sperm from a previous mating with a fertile male may contribute to sire viable progeny. PMID:25470981

  20. Changing rooster sperm membranes to facilitate cryopreservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryopreservation damages rooster sperm membranes. Part of this damage is due to membrane transitioning from the fluid to the gel state as temperature is reduced. This damage may be prevented by increasing membrane fluidity at low temperatures by incorporating cholesterol or unsaturated lipids into t...

  1. Role of the oviduct in sperm capacitation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Martinez, H

    2007-09-01

    Following insemination of spermatozoa pre-ovulation, the mammalian oviduct ensures, by the formation of a functional sperm reservoir (SR), that suitable (low) numbers of viable and potentially fertile spermatozoa are available for fertilization at the ampullary isthmic junction (AIJ). As ovulation approaches, a proportion of the SR-stored spermatozoa is continuously distributed towards the AIJ and individually activated leading to step-wise capacitation and the attainment of hyperactivated motility. This paper reviews in vivo changes in the intra-luminal milieu of the oviduct of pigs and cows, in particular the SR and the AIJ which relate to the modulation of sperm capacitation around spontaneous ovulation. In vivo, most viable spermatozoa in the pre-ovulatory SR are uncapacitated. Capacitation rates significantly increase after ovulation, apparently not massively but concurrent with the individual, continuous sperm dislocation from the SR. Bicarbonate, whose levels differ between the SR and the AIJ, appears as the common primary effector of the membrane destabilizing changes that encompasses the first stages of capacitation. Sperm activation can be delayed or even reversed by co-incubation with membrane proteins of the tubal lining, isthmic fluid or specific tubal glycosaminoglycans, such as hyaluronan. Although the pattern of response to in vitro induction of sperm activation - capacitation in particular - is similar for all spermatozoa, the capacity and speed of the response is very individual. Such diversity in responsiveness among spermatozoa insures full sperm viability before ovulation and the presence of spermatozoa at different stages of capacitation at the AIJ, thus maximizing the chances of normal fertilization. PMID:17452049

  2. Morphological study of boar sperm during their passage through the female genital tract

    PubMed Central

    GARCA-VZQUEZ, Francisco Alberto; HERNNDEZ-CARAVACA, Ivn; MATS, Carmen; SORIANO-BEDA, Cristina; ABRIL-SNCHEZ, Silvia; IZQUIERDO-RICO, Mara Jos

    2015-01-01

    Once deposited in the female tract, sperm face a series of challenges that must be overcome to ensure the presence of an adequate normal sperm population close to the site of fertilization. Our aim was to evaluate the influence of the uterine milieu on boar sperm morphology. In experiment 1, sperm morphology was evaluated in the backflow (60 min after insemination) and within the uterotubal junction (UTJ) (collected ~24 h after insemination) following intrauterine sperm deposition (n = 6) and compared with the morphology of the sperm in the insemination dose. In experiment 2, the influence of the uterine fluid (UF) on sperm morphological modifications was evaluated. For this purpose, ejaculated (n = 4) and epididymal (n = 4) sperm were in vitro incubated with or without UF for 2 and 24 h. In both experiments, sperm were classified as normal, having a cytoplasmic droplet (proximal or distal) or having tail defects. The results of experiment 1 pointed to an increase in morphologically abnormal sperm collected in the backflow (27.70%) and a reduction of the same in the UTJ (2.12%) compared with the insemination dose (17.75%) (P < 0.05). In experiment 2, incubation of ejaculated sperm with UF did not provoke any morphological modifications; however, when epididymal sperm were incubated with UF, a pronounced increase in the percentage of normal sperm was evident after 24 h compared with the initial dose (from 25.77% to 53.58%, P < 0.05), mainly due to distal cytoplasmatic droplet shedding (53.22 vs. 20.20%). In conclusion, almost all the sperm that colonize the UTJ had a normal morphology, with part of the abnormal sperm having been discarded in the backflow and part selected/modified on their way to the oviduct. UF seems to influence cytoplasmic distal droplet removal, as demonstrated previously in seminal plasma. PMID:26119829

  3. Industrial Assessment Centers - Small Manufacturers Reduce Energy & Increase Productivity

    SciTech Connect

    2015-11-06

    Since 1976, the Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs), administered by the US Department of Energy, have supported small and medium-sized American manufacturers to reduce energy use and increase their productivity and competitiveness. The 24 IACs, located at premier engineering universities around the country (see below), send faculty and engineering students to local small and medium-sized manufacturers to provide no-cost assessments of energy use, process performance and waste and water flows. Under the direction of experienced professors, IAC engineering students analyze the manufacturer’s facilities, energy bills and energy, waste and water systems, including compressed air, motors/pumps, lighting, process heat and steam. The IACs then follow up with written energy-saving and productivity improvement recommendations, with estimates of related costs and payback periods.

  4. Biogenesis and function of tRNA fragments during sperm maturation and fertilization in mammals.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Upasna; Conine, Colin C; Shea, Jeremy M; Boskovic, Ana; Derr, Alan G; Bing, Xin Y; Belleannee, Clemence; Kucukural, Alper; Serra, Ryan W; Sun, Fengyun; Song, Lina; Carone, Benjamin R; Ricci, Emiliano P; Li, Xin Z; Fauquier, Lucas; Moore, Melissa J; Sullivan, Robert; Mello, Craig C; Garber, Manuel; Rando, Oliver J

    2016-01-22

    Several recent studies link parental environments to phenotypes in subsequent generations. In this work, we investigate the mechanism by which paternal diet affects offspring metabolism. Protein restriction in mice affects small RNA (sRNA) levels in mature sperm, with decreased let-7 levels and increased amounts of 5' fragments of glycine transfer RNAs (tRNAs). In testicular sperm, tRNA fragments are scarce but increase in abundance as sperm mature in the epididymis. Epididymosomes (vesicles that fuse with sperm during epididymal transit) carry RNA payloads matching those of mature sperm and can deliver RNAs to immature sperm in vitro. Functionally, tRNA-glycine-GCC fragments repress genes associated with the endogenous retroelement MERVL, in both embryonic stem cells and embryos. Our results shed light on sRNA biogenesis and its dietary regulation during posttesticular sperm maturation, and they also link tRNA fragments to regulation of endogenous retroelements active in the preimplantation embryo. PMID:26721685

  5. Human secreted tau increases amyloid-beta production.

    PubMed

    Bright, Jessica; Hussain, Sami; Dang, Vu; Wright, Sarah; Cooper, Bonnie; Byun, Tony; Ramos, Carla; Singh, Andrew; Parry, Graham; Stagliano, Nancy; Griswold-Prenner, Irene

    2015-02-01

    The interaction of amyloid-beta (A?) and tau in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is a subject of intense inquiry, with the bulk of evidence indicating that changes in tau are downstream of A?. It has been shown however, that human tau overexpression in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice increases A? plaque deposition. Here, we confirm that human tau increases A? levels. To determine if the observed changes in A? levels were because of intracellular or extracellular secreted tau (eTau for extracellular tau), we affinity purified secreted tau from Alzheimer's disease patient-derived cortical neuron conditioned media and analyzed it by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We found the extracellular species to be composed predominantly of a series of N-terminal fragments of tau, with no evidence of C-terminal tau fragments. We characterized a subset of high affinity tau antibodies, each capable of engaging and neutralizing eTau. We found that neutralizing eTau reduces A? levels in vitro in primary human cortical neurons where exogenously adding eTau increases A? levels. In vivo, neutralizing human tau in 2 human tau transgenic models also reduced A? levels. We show that the human tau insert sequence is sufficient to cause the observed increase in A? levels. Our data furthermore suggest that neuronal hyperactivity may be the mechanism by which this regulation occurs. We show that neuronal hyperactivity regulates both eTau secretion and A? production. Electrophysiological analysis shows for the first time that secreted eTau causes neuronal hyperactivity. Its induction of hyperactivity may be the mechanism by which eTau regulates A? production. Together with previous findings, these data posit a novel connection between tau and A?, suggesting a dynamic mechanism of positive feed forward regulation. A? drives the disease pathway through tau, with eTau further increasing A? levels, perpetuating a destructive cycle. PMID:25442111

  6. PTX3 stimulates osteoclastogenesis by increasing osteoblast RANKL production.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Jin; Song, Da-Hyun; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Choi, Bongkun; Chung, Yeon-Ho; Kim, Sang-Min; Koh, Jung-Min; Yoon, Seung-Yong; Song, Youngsup; Kang, Sang-Wook; Chang, Eun-Ju

    2014-11-01

    Pentraxin-3 (PTX3), also known as tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene 14 (TSG-14), is produced by immune and vascular cells in response to pro-inflammatory signals and is therefore a multipotent inflammatory mediator. The present study showed that during human osteoblast (OB) differentiation, precursor OBs (pOBs), but not mature OB, highly expressed PTX3. TNF? treatment elevated the PTX3 expression of pOBs. When mice were injected with lipopolysaccharide, which induces an inflammatory osteolytic condition characterized by trabecular bone destruction and high osteoclastogenesis, their bone marrow cells expressed elevated levels of PTX3 protein. Exogenous PTX3 did not directly affect osteoclast (OC) or OB differentiation. However, when pOBs and precursor OCs were co-cultured, exogenous PTX3 significantly increased the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive multinucleated cells (i.e., OC cells) by increasing the pOB mRNA expression and protein secretion of RANK ligand (RANKL). This was accompanied with increased Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) expression in the pOBs. Knock-down of endogenous PTX3 with small-interfering RNA did not change the osteogenic potential of pOBs but suppressed their production of RANKL and reduced osteoclastogenesis. Finally, TNF? treatment of the co-culture elevated PTX3 expression by the pOBs and increased OC formation. This effect was suppressed by PTX3 knock-down by decreasing RANKL expression. Thus, the PTX3-driven increase in the osteoclastogenic potential of pOBs appears to be mediated by the effect of PTX3 on pOB RANKL production. These findings suggest that PTX3 is an inflammatory mediator that contributes to the deteriorating osteolytic condition of inflamed bone. J. Cell. Physiol. 229: 1744-1752, 2014. 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24664887

  7. Use of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) to generate transgenic animals.

    PubMed

    Moisyadi, Stefan; Kaminski, Joseph M; Yanagimachi, Ryuzo

    2009-03-01

    Even though intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has been widely used for the production of offspring in human infertility clinics and in reproductive research laboratories using mice, many researchers engaged in animal transgenesis still consider it somewhat cumbersome. The greatest advantage of ICSI-mediated transgenesis is that it allows introduction of very large DNA transgenes (e.g., yeast artificial chromosomes), with relatively high efficiency into the genomes of hosts, as compared to pronuclear injection. Recently, we have developed an active form of intracytoplasmic sperm injection-mediated transgenesis (ICSI-Tr) with fresh sperm utilizing transposons. The transgenic efficiencies rival all transgenic techniques except that of lentiviral methods. PMID:18691759

  8. Improvement of Stand Jig Sealer and Its Increased Production Capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soebandrija, K. E. N.; Astuti, S. W. D.

    2014-03-01

    This paper has the objective to prove that improvement of Stand Jig Sealer can lead to the cycle time target as part of Improvement efforts and its Productivity. Prior researches through prior journals both classics journal such as Quesnay (1766) and Solow (1957) and updated journal such as Reikard (2011) researches, are mentioned and elaborated. Precisely, the research is narrowed down and specified into automotive industry and eventually the software related of SPSS and Structural Equation Modeling ( SEM ). The analysis and its method are conducted through the calculation working time. The mentioned calculation are reinforced with the hypothesis test using SPSS Version 19 and involve parameters of production efficiency, productivity calculation, and the calculation of financial investments. The results obtained are augmented achievement of cycle time target ? 80 seconds posterior to improvement stand jig sealer. The result from calculation of SPSS-19 version comprise the following aspects: the one-sided hypothesis test is rejection of Ho:??80 seconds, the correlation rs=0.84, regression y = 0.159+0.642x, validity R table = 0.4438, reliability value of Cronbach's alpha = 0.885>0.70, independence (Chi Square) Asymp. Sig=0.028<0.05, 95% efficiency, increase productivity 11%, financial analysis (NPV 2,340,596>0, PI 2.04>1, IRR 45.56%>i=12.68%, PP=1.86). The Mentioned calculation results support the hypothesis and ultimately align with the objective of this paper to prove that improvement of Stand Jig Sealer and its relation toward the cycle time target. Precisely, the improvement of production capacity of PT. Astra Daihatsu Motor.

  9. Increasing cloudiness in Arctic damps the increase in phytoplankton primary production due to sea ice receding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanger, S.; Babin, M.; Tremblay, J.-E.

    2012-10-01

    The Arctic Ocean and its marginal seas are among the marine regions most affected by climate change. Here we present the results of a diagnostic model used to elucidate the main drivers of primary production (PP) trends over the 1998-2010 period at pan-Arctic and local (i.e. 9.28 km resolution) scales. Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) above and below the sea surface was estimated using precomputed look-up tables of spectral irradiance and satellite-derived cloud optical thickness and cloud fraction parameters from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) and sea ice concentration from passive microwaves data. A spectrally resolved PP model, designed for optically complex waters, was then used to produce maps of PP trends. Results show that incident PAR above the sea surface (PAR(0+)) has significantly decreased over the whole Arctic and sub-Arctic Seas, except over the perrennially sea ice covered waters of the Central Arctic Ocean. This fading of PAR(0+) (+8% decade-1) was caused by increasing cloudiness May and June. Meanwhile PAR penetrating the ocean (PAR(0-)) increased only along the sea ice margin over the large Arctic continental shelf where sea ice concentration declined sharply since 1998. Overall, PAR(0-) slightly increased in the Circum Arctic (+3.4% decade-1), while it decreased when considering both Arctic and sub-Arctic Seas (-3% decade-1). We showed that rising phytoplankton biomass (i.e. chlorophyll a) normalized by the diffuse attenuation of photosynthetically usable radiation (PUR) by phytoplankton accounted for a larger proportion of the rise in PP than did the increase in light availability due to sea-ice loss in several sectors and particularly in perrennially and seasonally open waters. Against a general backdrop of rising productivity over Arctic shelves, significant negative trends were observed in regions known for their great biological importance such as the coastal polynyas of Northern Greenland.

  10. Protective effect of royal jelly on the sperm parameters and testosterone level and lipid peroxidation in adult mice treated with oxymetholone

    PubMed Central

    Zahmatkesh, Ensieh; Najafi, Gholamreza; Nejati, Vahid; Heidari, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objectives : The aim of the present study was to evaluate protective effect of royal jelly on sperm parameters, testosterone level, and malondialdehyde (MDA) production in mice. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two adult male NMRI mice weighing 302 g were used. All the animals were divided into 4 groups. Control group: received saline 0.1 ml/mouse/day orally for 30 days. Royal jelly group (RJ): received royal jelly at dose of 100 mg/kg daily for 30 days orally. Oxymetholone group: the received Oxymetholone (OX) at dose of 5 mg/kg daily for 30 days orally. Royal jelly+Oxymetholone group: received royal jelly at dose of 100 mg/kg/day orally concomitant with OX administration. Sperm count, sperm motility, viability, maturity, and DNA integrity were analyzed. Furthermore, serum testosterone and MDA concentrations were determined. Results: In Oxymetholone group, sperm count, motility as well as testosterone concentration reduced significantly (p<0.05), while significant (p<0.05) increases in immature sperm, sperm with DNA damaged, and MDA concentration were announced in Oxymetholone group in comparison with control group and Royal jelly+Oxymetholone group. RJ caused partially amelioration in all of the above- mentioned parameters in Royal Jelly+Oxymetholone group. Conclusion: In conclusion, RJ may be used in combination with OX to improve OX-induced oxidative stress and male infertility. PMID:25050300

  11. Cryopreservation of rooster sperm.

    PubMed

    Buss, E G

    1993-05-01

    Successful cryopreservation of sperm requires: 1) selection of proper diluent; 2) selection of the best cryoprotectant; 3) determination of freezing and thawing rates for optimum retention of fertilization potential; and 4) removal of any materials deleterious to fertility (e.g., glycerol) before insemination. An economically useful process must allow recovery of sperm with sufficient fertilization capacity to enable maximum use of any given superior male. A series of experiments tested a novel semen freezing container (BioPore CryoCell container) having physical characteristics that permit reproducible freezing and thawing plus facile removal of glycerol from the sample after processing. Experiments tested the effect of: a) residual glycerol; b) initial glycerol concentrations on retention of fertility when samples were frozen and thawed at 6 C/min; c) Beltsville Poultry Semen Extender and Minnesota A buffers used during the dialysis procedure; and d) dialysis time. Respectively, the results were: a) .8% (vol/vol) reduced fertility by 5 to 10%; b) 12% glycerol was superior to 10% and 8% glycerol; c) no difference was observed between the two buffers; and d) 90 and 120 min were both superior to 60 min. Numerous pools of rooster sperm cryopreserved in CryoCell containers and dialyzed after thawing in a prototype BioStore environmental control chamber for 90 or 120 min resulted in a mean fertility of 55.6%. This mean fertility of frozen-thawed sperm was based on 3,263 eggs laid by 400 hens on Days +1 through 9 after inseminations on Days -1, 2, and 5. It is likely that broiler stocks might have lower fertility than that obtained from the Barred Plymouth Rock males and the Single Comb White Leghorn females used in these studies. Nevertheless, the procedure described is the first to consistently result in > 50% fertilized eggs as a result of conventional intravaginal insemination (< 200 x 10(6) sperm in 100 microL extender) of sperm processed after thawing by a procedure amenable to the scaleup required for commercial applications. PMID:8502616

  12. Increasing plant productivity in closed environments with inner canopy illumination.

    PubMed

    Stasiak, M A; Cote, R; Dixon, M; Grodzinski, B

    1998-01-01

    Due to the high cost of habitable real estate associated with space travel and colonization, and the ultimate use of plants as the primary method of life support, it is necessary to develop cultivation methods whereby the highest sustainable level of productivity is achieved within the least amount of space. It is well known that in a dense plant canopy, lower leaves become shaded from above and eventually no longer contribute to carbon gain. In fact, they contribute to net respiratory carbon losses. One method of improving biomass production is to introduce light of suitable quantity and quality to the inner canopy, thereby utilizing unused photosynthetic capacity. By coupling microwave-powered lights to 100-mm-diameter glass tubes lined with 3M Optical Lighting Film, light with a spectral quality similar to that of sunlight was delivered to the inner canopy of a developing soybean crop. Results indicated that increases in productivity of 23-87%, as measured by CO2 assimilation, can be achieved in dense plant canopies (LAI approximately 6) when overhead lighting (40O-1200 micromoles m-2 s-1) is supplemented with inner canopy illumination. PMID:11541674

  13. The protective effects of melatonin against cryopreservation-induced oxidative stress in human sperm.

    PubMed

    Karimfar, M H; Niazvand, F; Haghani, K; Ghafourian, S; Shirazi, R; Bakhtiyari, Salar

    2015-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and lipid peroxidation during cryopreservation harm sperm membrane and as a result reduce the recovery of motile sperm. The antioxidant effects of melatonin on different cells have been widely reported. This study was aimed to evaluate changes in post-thaw motility, viability, and intracellular ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA) in response to the addition of melatonin to human sperm freezing extender. Semen of 43 fertile men was collected and each sample was divided into eight equal aliquots. An aliquot was analyzed freshly for viability, motility, and intracellular ROS and MDA. Melatonin was added to the recommended human freezing extender to yield six different final concentrations: 0.001, 0.005, 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, and 1 mM. A control group without melatonin was also included. Two weeks after cryopreservation, samples were thawed and pre-freeze analyses repeated. Obtained results showed that cryopreservation significantly (P <0.05) reduces viability and motility, but increases intracellular ROS and MDA of human sperm. The semen extender supplemented with various doses of melatonin (except for 0.001 mM) significantly (P <0.05) increased motility and viability, but decreased intracellular ROS and MDA levels of cryopreserved sperm after the thawing process, as compared with the control group. We also found that the most effective concentration of melatonin in protecting human spermatozoa from cryopreservation injuries was 0.01 mM. These findings suggest that melatonin exerts its cryoprotective effects on spermatozoa possibly by counteracting intracellular ROS, and thereby reduces MDA generation. This finally leads to increase of post-thaw viability and motility of cryopreserved spermatozoa. PMID:25816408

  14. Evaluation of sperm nuclear integrity in patients with different percentages of decapitated sperm in ejaculates.

    PubMed

    Rondanino, Christine; Duchesne, Vronique; Escalier, Denise; Jumeau, Fanny; Verhaeghe, France; Peers, Marie-Claire; Mitchell, Valrie; Rives, Nathalie

    2015-07-01

    The decapitated sperm defect is a rare type of teratozoospermia responsible for male infertility. Spermatozoa from patients affected by this syndrome are used for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) although little is known about their DNA integrity. This study evaluated sperm nuclear alterations in four patients and ten fertile men (control group). Sperm samples were examined by light, transmission electron and high-magnification contrast microscopy and analysed after terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling, aniline blue staining and fluorescence in-situ hybridization. Spermatozoa from patients presented varying degrees of decapitation, along with morphological and ultrastructural head abnormalities. Whereas the proportion of spermatozoa with fragmented DNA and numerical chromosome abnormalities was similar in patients 1-3 and controls, the percentage of spermatozoa with hypocondensed chromatin was higher in patients 1-3 than in fertile men. Patient 4 presented a distinct phenotype, with an increased proportion of flagellated spermatozoa with DNA strand breaks as well as increased aneuploidy and diploidy rates compared with controls and with patients 1-3. No successful pregnancy resulted from ICSI although embryos were obtained for three patients. The morphological defects and the nuclear alterations observed in spermatozoa of patients with the decapitated sperm syndrome may have contributed to ICSI failures. PMID:26001636

  15. Dexamethasone therapy of infertile men with sperm autoantibodies: immunological and sperm follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    De Almeida, M; Jouannet, P

    1981-01-01

    A group of 14 infertile men with significant titres of anti-sperm antibodies in their sera and seminal plasma were treated with dexamethasone acetate at 2 of 3 mg/day for s13 or 9 weeks respectively. Response to the treatment was evaluated by the evolution of seminal and circulating anti-sperm antibodies and semen characteristics. An overall decline in the anti-sperm antibodies was observed. Serum spermotoxicity and seminal agglutinins decreased below detectable levels in 67 and 58% of the men respectively. The decrease in both kinds of antibodies was closely correlated. Serum sperm agglutination titres fell slightly (2 to 3 log2 dilutions) in most cases. The disappearance of antibodies from the semen was accompanied by decreased autoagglutination and increased percentages of progressively motile spermatozoa. In two oligozoospermic men a striking increase in the sperm count was observed. Pregnancies occurred in three couples at times when serum spermotoxic and seminal agglutinating antibodies were undetectable and semen characteristics were normal. PMID:7326866

  16. Increased of Brazilian productivity in the slaughterhouse sector: a review.

    PubMed

    Buzanello, Mrcia Rosngela; Moro, Antnio Renato Pereira

    2012-01-01

    Due to Brazil is a tropical country has activities in occupational exposure to cold restricted to few sectors especially the meatpacking industry. Taking into account that the country in 2010, was again the largest exporter of poultry meat in the world and consequently employing a large number of workers for their slaughter and processing. The search for greater productivity can result in an increase in work rate, as indicated in this sector as monotonous, repetitive and uncomfortable. According the Programa de Frigorfico it was found that within six years, about 20% of the six thousand workers in a slaughterhouse in southern Brazil, received welfare benefits due to musculoskeletal diseases. Adding to this, the lack of parameters for the Brazilian standardization concerning occupational activities carried out in cold. Although several epidemiological studies point to the cold as a risk factor for occurrence or aggravation of musculoskeletal disorders, research in this field is still limited and often contradictory conclusions. This article aims to review developments concerning the poultry industry and the fridge in Brazil, as well as raising the question about the increased productivity of the slaughterhouse, since it has already shown a high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders related to work. PMID:22317580

  17. Fertilization by proxy: rival sperm removal and translocation in a beetle

    PubMed Central

    Haubruge, E.; Arnaud, L.; Mignon, J.; Gage, M. J. G.

    1999-01-01

    Competition between different males' sperm for the fertilization of ova has led to the evolution of a diversity of characters in male reproductive behaviour, physiology and morphology. Males may increase sperm competition success either by enhancing the success of their own sperm or by negating or eliminating the success of rival sperm. Here, we find that in the flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, the second male to mate gains fertilization precedence over previous males' sperm and fertilizes approximately two-thirds of the eggs. It is not known what mechanism underlies this pattern of last-male sperm precedence; however, the elongate tubules of the female sperm storage organ may encourage a 'last-in, first-out' sperm use sequence. Here we present an additional or alternative mechanism of sperm precedence whereby previously deposited sperm are removed from the female tract by the mating male's genitalia. In addition to providing evidence for sperm removal in T. castaneum, we also show that removed, non-self sperm may be translocated back into the reproductive tracts of new, previously unmated females, where the translocated sperm go on to gain significant fertilization success. We found that, in 45 out of 204 crosses, sperm translocation occurred and in these 45 crosses over half of the offspring were sired by spermatozoa which had been translocated between females on the male genitalia. In the natural environment of stored food, reproductively active T. castaneum adults aggregate in dense mating populations where copulation is frequent (we show in three naturally occurring population densities that copula duration and intermating intervals across three subsequent matings average 1 to 2 min). Selection upon males to remove rival sperm may have resulted in counter-selection upon spermatozoa to survive removal and be translocated into new females where they go on to fertilize in significant numbers.

  18. Shedding light on the controversy surrounding the temporal decline in human sperm counts: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cocuzza, Marcello; Esteves, Sandro C

    2014-01-01

    We systematically examined the evidence of declining sperm counts and the hypothesis that an increased exposure to environmental pollutants is responsible for such decline. Search engines, including PUBMED, MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS, and Cochrane library, were used to identify epidemiologic studies published from 1985 to 2013. We concluded that there is no enough evidence to confirm a worldwide decline in sperm counts. Also, there seems to be no scientific truth of a causative role for endocrine disruptors in the temporal decline of sperm production. Such assumptions are based on few meta-analyses and retrospective studies, while other well-conducted researches could not confirm these findings. We acknowledge that difficult-to-control confounding factors in the highly variable nature of semen, selection criteria, and comparability of populations from different time periods in secular-trend studies, the quality of laboratory methods for counting sperm, and apparently geographic variations in semen quality are the main issues that complicate the interpretation of the available evidence. Owing to the importance of this subject and the uncertainties still prevailing, there is a need not only for continuing monitoring of semen quality, reproductive hormones, and xenobiotics, but also for a better definition of fecundity. PMID:24672311

  19. Shedding Light on the Controversy Surrounding the Temporal Decline in Human Sperm Counts: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cocuzza, Marcello; Esteves, Sandro C.

    2014-01-01

    We systematically examined the evidence of declining sperm counts and the hypothesis that an increased exposure to environmental pollutants is responsible for such decline. Search engines, including PUBMED, MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS, and Cochrane library, were used to identify epidemiologic studies published from 1985 to 2013. We concluded that there is no enough evidence to confirm a worldwide decline in sperm counts. Also, there seems to be no scientific truth of a causative role for endocrine disruptors in the temporal decline of sperm production. Such assumptions are based on few meta-analyses and retrospective studies, while other well-conducted researches could not confirm these findings. We acknowledge that difficult-to-control confounding factors in the highly variable nature of semen, selection criteria, and comparability of populations from different time periods in secular-trend studies, the quality of laboratory methods for counting sperm, and apparently geographic variations in semen quality are the main issues that complicate the interpretation of the available evidence. Owing to the importance of this subject and the uncertainties still prevailing, there is a need not only for continuing monitoring of semen quality, reproductive hormones, and xenobiotics, but also for a better definition of fecundity. PMID:24672311

  20. Germ-cell hub position in a heteropteran testis correlates with the sequence and location of spermatogenesis and production of elaborate sperm bundles.

    PubMed

    Ott, George J; Shirkey, Nicholas J; Haimo, Leah T; Cardullo, Richard A; Thaler, Catherine D

    2015-04-01

    In insects, spermatogonial cells undergo several mitotic divisions with incomplete cytokinesis, and then proceed through meiosis and spermatogenesis in synchrony. The cells derived from a single spermatogonial cell are referred to as a cyst. In the water strider Aquarius remigis, spermiogenesis occurs within two bi-lobed testes. In contrast to most insects, in which the germ-cell hub is located apically and sequential stages of spermatogenesis can be seen moving toward the base of the testis, each lobe of the water strider testis contains a single germ-cell hub located medially opposite to the efferent duct of the lobe; the developing cysts are displaced toward the distal ends of the lobe as spermiogenesis proceeds. Water strider sperm have both a long flagellum and an unusually long acrosome. The water strider spermatids elongate most of the flagellum prior to morphogenesis of the acrosome, and exhibit several stages of nuclear remodeling before the final, mature sperm nucleus is formed. The maturing sperm are aligned in register in the cyst, and the flagella fold into a coiled bundle while their acrosomes form a rigid helical process that extends from the cyst toward the efferent duct. PMID:25735541

  1. Sperm storage mediated by cryptic female choice for nuptial gifts.

    PubMed

    Albo, Maria J; Bilde, Trine; Uhl, Gabriele

    2013-12-01

    Polyandrous females are expected to discriminate among males through postcopulatory cryptic mate choice. Yet, there is surprisingly little unequivocal evidence for female-mediated cryptic sperm choice. In species in which nuptial gifts facilitate mating, females may gain indirect benefits through preferential storage of sperm from gift-giving males if the gift signals male quality. We tested this hypothesis in the spider Pisaura mirabilis by quantifying the number of sperm stored in response to copulation with males with or without a nuptial gift, while experimentally controlling copulation duration. We further assessed the effect of gift presence and copulation duration on egg-hatching success in matings with uninterrupted copulations with gift-giving males. We show that females mated to gift-giving males stored more sperm and experienced 17% higher egg-hatching success, compared with those mated to no-gift males, despite matched copulation durations. Uninterrupted copulations resulted in both increased sperm storage and egg-hatching success. Our study confirms the prediction that the nuptial gift as a male signal is under positive sexual selection by females through cryptic sperm storage. In addition, the gift facilitates longer copulations and increased sperm transfer providing two different types of advantage to gift-giving in males. PMID:24266042

  2. Sperm storage in male elasmobranchs: a description and survey.

    PubMed

    Pratt, H L; Tanaka, S

    1994-03-01

    Two basic types of spermatozoan aggregates, spermatophores and spermatozeugmata, found in 14 different species of sharks, one species of skate, and one species of chimaera (holocephalan), were investigated using light and scanning electron microscopy. Spermatophores, aggregates (usually 1,000-6,000 microns in diameter and larger) of randomly clumped sperm embedded in and surrounded by an eosinophilic matrix, were found in Alopias superciliosus, Odontaspis taurus, Carcharodon carcharias, Isurus oxyrinchus, and Lamna nasus. Three types of spermatozeugmata, sperm structures without a surrounding capsule or matrix, are described. The first, clumps of 60-200 sperm unbound in a supporting matrix, are found in Squalus acanthias and Hydrolagus colliei. In the second type, single-layered spheres are formed of sperm clumps with the sperm heads bound in a common supporting matrix. These are found in Carcharhinus limbatus and Carcharhinus plumbeus. The third type of spermatozeugmata are large multilayered, compound structures formed by the accretion of several single-layered aggregates. These multilayered structures characteristically are found in Carcharhinus falciformis, C. limbatus, Carcharhinus obscurus, C. plumbeus, Carcharhinus porosus, Prionace glauca, Rhizoprionodon terraenovae, and Sphyrna lewini. Sperm aggregates of all types are stored between the septa and in the lumen of the terminal ampulla of the epididymis. In their various forms they are the final product of the mature male elasmobranch reproductive tract. In a male with mature claspers, the presence of sperm aggregates is a more reliable indicator of maturity and sexual activity than is clasper condition alone. PMID:8169955

  3. Turbulence of swarming sperm.

    PubMed

    Creppy, Adama; Praud, Olivier; Druart, Xavier; Kohnke, Philippa L; Plourabou, Franck

    2015-09-01

    Collective motion of self-sustained swarming flows has recently provided examples of small-scale turbulence arising where viscous effects are dominant. We report the first observation of universal enstrophy cascade in concentrated swarming sperm consistent with a body of evidence built from various independent measurements. We found a well-defined k^{-3} power-law decay of a velocity field power spectrum and relative dispersion of small beads consistent with theoretical predictions in 2D turbulence. Concentrated living sperm displays long-range, correlated whirlpool structures of a size that provides an integral scale of turbulence. We propose a consistent explanation for this quasi-2D turbulence based on self-structured laminated flow forced by steric interactions and alignment, a state of active matter that we call "swarming liquid crystal." We develop scaling arguments consistent with this interpretation. PMID:26465513

  4. Turbulence of swarming sperm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creppy, Adama; Praud, Olivier; Druart, Xavier; Kohnke, Philippa L.; Plouraboué, Franck

    2015-09-01

    Collective motion of self-sustained swarming flows has recently provided examples of small-scale turbulence arising where viscous effects are dominant. We report the first observation of universal enstrophy cascade in concentrated swarming sperm consistent with a body of evidence built from various independent measurements. We found a well-defined k-3 power-law decay of a velocity field power spectrum and relative dispersion of small beads consistent with theoretical predictions in 2D turbulence. Concentrated living sperm displays long-range, correlated whirlpool structures of a size that provides an integral scale of turbulence. We propose a consistent explanation for this quasi-2D turbulence based on self-structured laminated flow forced by steric interactions and alignment, a state of active matter that we call "swarming liquid crystal." We develop scaling arguments consistent with this interpretation.

  5. Current Status of Sperm Cryopreservation in Biomedical Research Fish Models: Zebrafish, Medaka, and Xiphophorus*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huiping; Tiersch, Terrence R.

    2009-01-01

    Aquarium fishes are becoming increasingly important because of their value in biomedical research and the ornamental fish trade, and because many have become threatened or endangered in the wild. This review summarizes the current status of sperm cryopreservation in three fishes widely used in biomedical research: zebrafish, medaka, and live-bearing fishes of the genus Xiphophorus, and will focus on the needs and opportunities for future research and application of cryopreservation in aquarium fish. First, we summarize the basic biological characteristics regarding natural habitat, testis structure, spermatogenesis, sperm morphology, and sperm physiology. Second, we compare protocol development of sperm cryopreservation. Third, we emphasize the importance of artificial fertilization in sperm cryopreservation to evaluate the viability of thawed sperm. We conclude with a look to future research directions for sperm cryopreservation and the application of this technique in aquarium species. PMID:18691673

  6. Methamidophos alters sperm function and DNA at different stages of spermatogenesis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Urióstegui-Acosta, Mayrut; Hernández-Ochoa, Isabel; Sánchez-Gutiérrez, Manuel; Piña-Guzmán, Belem; Rafael-Vázquez, Leticia; Solís-Heredia, M.J.; Martínez-Aguilar, Gerardo; Quintanilla-Vega, Betzabet

    2014-09-15

    Methamidophos (MET) is a highly toxic organophosphate (OP) pesticide that is widely used in developing countries. MET has male reproductive effects, including decreased fertility. We evaluated MET effects on sperm quality, fertilization and DNA integrity, exploring the sensitivity of different stages of spermatogenesis. Adult male mice received MET (3.75 or 5 mg/kg-bw/ip/day/4 days) and were euthanized 1, 28 or 45 days post-treatment (dpt) to evaluate MET's effects on epididymal maturation, meiosis or mitosis, respectively. Spermatozoa were obtained from the cauda epididymis–vas deferens and were evaluated for sperm quality, acrosome reaction (AR; Coomassie staining), mitochondrial membrane potential (by JC-1), DNA damage (comet assay), oxidative damage (malondialdehyde (MDA) production), in vitro fertilization and protein phosphorylation (immunodetection), and erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. At 1-dpt, MET inhibited AChE (43–57%) and increased abnormal cells (6%). While at 28- and 45-dpt, sperm motility and viability were significantly reduced with an increasing MET dose, and abnormal morphology increased at 5 mg/kg/day/4 days. MDA and mitochondrial activity were not affected at any dose or time. DNA damage (OTM and %DNA) was observed at 5 mg/kg/day/4 days in a time-dependent manner, whereas both parameters were altered in cells from mice exposed to 3.75 mg/kg/day/4 days only at 28-dpt. Depending on the time of collection, initial-, spontaneous- and induced-AR were altered at 5 mg/kg/day/4 days, and the fertilization capacity also decreased. Sperm phosphorylation (at serine and tyrosine residues) was observed at all time points. Data suggest that meiosis and mitosis are the more sensitive stages of spermatogenesis for MET reproductive toxicity compared to epididymal maturation. - Highlights: • Methamidophos alters sperm cell function at different stages of spermatogenesis. • Testicular stages of spermatogenesis are more sensitive to methamidophos toxicity. • Methamidophos causes sperm DNA damage at mitosis, meiosis and epididymal maturation. • Sperm cell damage by methamidophos exposure may be related to protein phosphorylation.

  7. Sperm function test

    PubMed Central

    Talwar, Pankaj; Hayatnagarkar, Suryakant

    2015-01-01

    With absolute normal semen analysis parameters it may not be necessary to shift to specialized tests early but in cases with borderline parameters or with history of fertilization failure in past it becomes necessary to do a battery of tests to evaluate different parameters of spermatozoa. Various sperm function tests are proposed and endorsed by different researchers in addition to the routine evaluation of fertility. These tests detect function of a certain part of spermatozoon and give insight on the events in fertilization of the oocyte. The sperms need to get nutrition from the seminal plasma in the form of fructose and citrate (this can be assessed by fructose qualitative and quantitative estimation, citrate estimation). They should be protected from the bad effects of pus cells and reactive oxygen species (ROS) (leukocyte detection test, ROS estimation). Their number should be in sufficient in terms of (count), structure normal to be able to fertilize eggs (semen morphology). Sperms should have intact and functioning membrane to survive harsh environment of vagina and uterine fluids (vitality and hypo-osmotic swelling test), should have good mitochondrial function to be able to provide energy (mitochondrial activity index test). They should also have satisfactory acrosome function to be able to burrow a hole in zona pellucida (acrosome intactness test, zona penetration test). Finally, they should have properly packed DNA in the nucleus to be able to transfer the male genes (nuclear chromatic decondensation test) to the oocyte during fertilization. PMID:26157295

  8. Increasing cloudiness in Arctic damps the increase in phytoplankton primary production due to sea ice receding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanger, S.; Babin, M.; Tremblay, J.-.

    2013-06-01

    The Arctic Ocean and its marginal seas are among the marine regions most affected by climate change. Here we present the results of a diagnostic model used to assess the primary production (PP) trends over the 1998-2010 period at pan-Arctic, regional and local (i.e. 9.28 km resolution) scales. Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) above and below the sea surface was estimated using precomputed look-up tables of spectral irradiance, taking as input satellite-derived cloud optical thickness and cloud fraction parameters from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) and sea ice concentration from passive microwaves data. A spectrally resolved PP model, designed for optically complex waters, was then used to assess the PP trends at high spatial resolution. Results show that PP is rising at a rate of +2.8 TgC yr-1 (or +14% decade-1) in the circum-Arctic and +5.1 TgC yr-1 when sub-Arctic seas are considered. In contrast, incident PAR above the sea surface (PAR(0+)) has significantly decreased over the whole Arctic and sub-Arctic Seas, except over the perennially sea-ice covered waters of the Central Arctic Ocean. This fading of PAR(0+) (-8% decade-1) was caused by increasing cloudiness during summer. Meanwhile, PAR penetrating the ocean (PAR(0-)) increased only along the sea ice margin over the large Arctic continental shelf where sea ice concentration declined sharply since 1998. Overall, PAR(0-) slightly increased in the circum-Arctic (+3.4% decade-1), while it decreased when considering both Arctic and sub-Arctic Seas (-3% decade-1). We showed that rising phytoplankton biomass (i.e. chlorophyll a) normalized by the diffuse attenuation of photosynthetically usable radiation (PUR), accounted for a larger proportion of the rise in PP than did the increase in light availability due to sea-ice loss in several sectors, and particularly in perennially and seasonally open waters. Against a general backdrop of rising productivity over Arctic shelves, significant negative PP trends and the timing of phytoplankton spring-summer bloom were observed in regions known for their great biological importance such as the coastal polynyas of northern Greenland.

  9. Methods for increasing the production of ethanol from microbial fermentation

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, James L.; Arora, Dinesh K.; Ko, Ching-Whan; Phillips, John Randall; Basu, Rahul; Wikstrom, Carl V.; Clausen, Edgar C.

    2007-10-23

    A stable continuous method for producing ethanol from the anaerobic bacterial fermentation of a gaseous substrate containing at least one reducing gas involves culturing a fermentation bioreactor anaerobic, acetogenic bacteria in a liquid nutrient medium; supplying the gaseous substrate to the bioreactor; and manipulating the bacteria in the bioreactor by reducing the redox potential, or increasing the NAD(P)H TO NAD(P) ratio, in the fermentation broth after the bacteria achieves a steady state and stable cell concentration in the bioreactor. The free acetic acid concentration in the bioreactor is maintained at less than 5 g/L free acid. This method allows ethanol to be produced in the fermentation broth in the bioreactor at a productivity greater than 10 g/L per day. Both ethanol and acetate are produced in a ratio of ethanol to acetate ranging from 1:1 to 20:1.

  10. Application of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) for fertilization and development in birds.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Kiyoshi; Ono, Tamao; Mizushima, Shusei

    2014-01-15

    Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) technology in birds has been hampered due to opacity of oocyte. We developed ICSI-assisted fertilization and gene transfer in quail. This paper reviews recent advances of our ICSI experiments. The oocyte retrieved from the oviduct and a quail sperm was injected into the oocyte under a stereomicroscope. The oocyte was cultured for 24h at 41C under 5% CO2 in air. The fertilization and development was assessed by microscopic observation. The fertility rate ranged 12-18% and development varied from stage II to V in trials. To improve the fertility rate, phospholipase C (PLC) zeta was injected with a sperm. It was increased to 37-50%. Furthermore, injection of inositol trisphosphate increased to over 85%. Quail oocyte can be fertilized with chicken sperm and so can testicular elongated spermatid. To extend embryonic development, chicken eggshell was used as a surrogate culture at 37C after the 24h incubation at 41C under 5% CO2 in air. It survived up to 2days thereafter. Finally, gene transfer was attempted in quail egg. The sperm membrane was disrupted with Triton X-100 (TX-100) and was injected with PLCzeta cRNA and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene in oocyte. The GFP expression was evaluated at 24h incubation at 41C under 5% CO2 in air in the embryos. While the expression was not detected in the control oocytes, the experimental treatment induced blastoderm development (44%) of the oocytes and 86% of blastoderm showed fluorescent emission. In addition, PCR analysis detected EGFP fragments in 50% of GFP-expressing blastoderm. Our ICSI method may be the first step toward the production of transgenic birds. PMID:24239795

  11. Effect of cholesterol-loaded-cyclodextrin on sperm viability and acrosome reaction in boar semen cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Seung; Lee, Seunghyung; Lee, Sang-Hee; Yang, Boo-Keun; Park, Choon-Keun

    2015-08-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect of cholesterol-loaded-cyclodextrin (CLC) on boar sperm viability and spermatozoa cryosurvival during boar semen cryopreservation, and methyl-?-cyclodextrin (MBCD) was treated for comparing with CLC. Boar semen treated with CLC and MBCD before freezing process to monitor the effect on survival and capacitation status by flow cytometry with appropriate fluorescent probes. Sperm viability was higher in 1.5mg CLC-treated sperm (76.91.01%, P<0.05) than un-treated and MBCD-treated sperm before cryopreservation (58.71.31% and 60.30.31%, respectively). For CTC patterns, F-pattern was higher in CLC treated sperm than MBCD-treated sperm, for B-pattern was higher in CLC-treated sperm than fresh sperm (P<0.05). For AR pattern (an acrosome-reacted sperm) was lower in CLC-treated sperm than MBCD-treated sperm (P<0.05). Moreover, we examined in vitro development of porcine oocytes after in vitro fertilization using CLC-treated frozen-thawed semen, in which CLC treatment prior to freezing and thawing increased the development of oocytes to blastocyst stage in vitro. In conclusion, CLC could protect the viability of spermatozoa from cryodamage prior to cryopreservation in boar semen. PMID:26091957

  12. Effects of environment factors on initiation of sperm motility in sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Li; Shao, Mingyu; Bao, Zhenmin; Hu, Jingjie; Zhang, Zhifeng

    2011-06-01

    Sperm of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka) were quiescent in electrolyte NaCl solution and artificial seawater (ASW) and nonelectrolyte glucose and mannitol solutions when the osmolality was less than 200 mOsm kg-1. The sperm started to be motile as a result of increased osmolality, indicating an osmolality-dependent initiation of sperm motility in sea cucumber. After a brief incubation in hypotonic NaCl and glucose solutions with osmolalities of 200 and 400 mOsm kg-1, sperm lost partial motile ability. Sperm became immobilized when pH was 6.0 in NaCl, glucose and mannitol solutions, suggesting that an H+ release is involved in sperm activation. The decreased pH had no effect on the percentage of motile sperm in ASW, whereas it delayed the time period to reach the maximum motility (motilitymax). Extracellular Ca2+ in electrolyte solutions was not essential for motility stimulation but shortened the time of reaching motilitymax. When Ca2+ was mixed in nonelectrolyte solutions the sperm motility was completely suppressed. The K+ channel blocker, quinine, suppressed the sperm motility in electrolyte solution, showing a possible involvement of K+ transport in the process. High K+ concentration did not affect the sperm motility in NaCl solution, but decreased it in ASW and almost entirely suppressed it in nonelectrolyte solutions. The different effects of pH and K+ in ASW and NaCl solution indicate that external ions may also regulate sperm motility.

  13. Zn2+ Increases Siderophore Production in Azotobacter vinelandii

    PubMed Central

    Huyer, Marianne; Page, William J.

    1988-01-01

    When Azotobacter vinelandii was grown in the presence of low levels of iron, the addition of 20 or 40 ?M ZnSO4 caused earlier production of the catechol siderophores and a dramatic increase in the amount of azotobactin. The level of cellular iron was not significantly lowered in Zn2+ -grown cells, which suggested that Zn2+ was not causing more severe, or earlier, iron limitation. Also, Zn2+ did not appear to affect production of the high-molecular-weight outer membrane iron-repressible proteins that presumably function as ferrisiderophore receptors. Spectrophotometric examination of ion binding to the siderophores revealed that while the siderophores appeared to bind Zn2+, only in the case of azotochelin was iron unable to completely overcome any Zn2+ -induced changes in the absorption spectra. This appeared to rule out direct competition of Zn2+ with iron for binding to the siderophores. 55Fe uptake was depressed both in Zn2+ -grown cells and in Zn2+ -free cells to which Zn2+ was added during the uptake assay, except with azotobactin, with which the level of 55Fe uptake by Zn2+ -grown cells was close to control levels. These results suggested two possible sites where Zn2+ could be acting, one involving the biosynthesis of siderophores and possibly the genetic regulation of the iron assimilation system and the other involving an internal point common to iron assimilation by both high- and low-affinity iron uptake. Images PMID:16347766

  14. Postcoital Sperm Assessment Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Pelekanos, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    This postcoital sperm assessment study was performed over a 10 month time period (November 2014-August 2015). Fifteen couples enrolled in the study. The study was a non-blinded, non-randomized, single-center comparison study comparing The Stork OTC (Rinovum Women's Health, Monroeville, PA) to natural intercourse (NI), using the subjects as their own control/baseline. This was an efficacy study designed to compare the number of sperm in the cervical mucus following the use of The Stork OTC conception aid with the number of sperm in the cervical mucus following natural intercourse. Subjects used both The Stork OTC conception system and the natural intercourse method to evaluate concentrations of sperm in the cervical mucus. Post-coital test (PCT) data was collected demonstrating higher concentrations of sperm within the cervical mucus with The Stork OTC conception system versus natural intercourse for 85% of test subjects in this study. Of the 15 couples enrolled in the study, 2 were lost to follow-up. Mean age for male subjects was 31.7 +/ 5.4 years of age and mean age for female subjects was 29.7+/- 5.4. The average sperm score value of the 85% of test subjects with higher sperm concentrations from The Stork OTC was 3.23 times the score value of sperm concentration compared to natural intercourse. The remaining 15% of test subjects showed no change in sperm score value between The Stork OTC and natural intercourse. PMID:26680394

  15. Cryopreservation of epididymal stallion sperm.

    PubMed

    Olaciregui, M; Gil, L; Montn, A; Luo, V; Jerez, R A; Mart, J I

    2014-02-01

    Any event that makes semen collection or mating impossible, such as death, castration, or injury, may terminate a stallion's breeding career. Fortunately, stallion sperm which are capable of fertilization can be harvested from the epididymis, and frozen for future use. However, the fertility of frozen-thawed epididymal sperm has been found to be lower than that of ejaculated sperm. Therefore, this study aimed to optimize the fertility of frozen epididymal stallion sperm by investigating the effects of different cryoprotectants and freezing protocols on sperm quality. Dimethylformamide was tested alone or combination with pasteurized egg yolk as substitute of fresh egg yolk. In addition, the effect of the pre-freeze stabilization on sperm quality was analyzed. Heterospermic samples obtained from stallion epididymis were collected and cryopreserved in lactose-egg-yolk extender or in the same extender with varying content of cryoprotectant and content of egg yolk, stabilized and no-stabilized. Sperm motility, viability, hypoosmotic swelling test (HOST) and acrosome integrity were evaluated post-thawing. No improvement was observed on the replacement of fresh yolk by pasteurized egg yolk, whereas the results suggest that dimethylformamide is a cryoprotectant suitable for cryopreservation of equine epididymal semen, even better than glycerol. In addition, we found that the stabilization before freezing on epididymal stallion sperm, can improve sperm quality parameters. PMID:24412395

  16. Effect of different monosaccharides and disaccharides on boar sperm quality after cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Gmez-Fernndez, Jos; Gmez-Izquierdo, Emilio; Toms, Cristina; Moc, Eva; de Mercado, Eduardo

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cryoprotectant effect of different non-permeating sugars for boar sperm. Pooled semen from three boars was used for the experiments. In the first experiment, the sperm quality of boar sperm cryopreserved with an egg-yolk based extender supplemented with different monosaccharides (glucose, galactose or fructose) was compared to a control cryopreserved in lactose-egg yolk extender. In the second experiment, the effect of five disaccharides (lactose, sucrose, lactulose, trehalose or melibiose) on boar sperm cryosurvival was studied. Several sperm quality parameters were assessed by flow cytometry in samples incubated for 30 and 150 min at 37C after thawing: percentages of sperm with intact plasma membrane (SIPM), sperm presenting high plasma membrane fluidity (HPMF), sperm with intracellular reactive oxygen substances production (IROSP) and apoptotic sperm (AS). In addition, the percentages of total motile (TMS) and progressively motile sperm (PMS) were assessed at the same incubation times with a computer-assisted sperm analysis system. Freezing extenders supplemented with each of the monosaccharide presented smaller cryoprotective effect than the control extender supplemented with lactose (P<0.05). However, from the three monosaccharides tested, glucose provided the best sperm quality after freezing-thawing. With respect to the disaccharides studied, samples frozen with the extender supplemented with lactulose exhibited in general the lowest sperm quality, except for the percentage of capacitated sperm, which was highest (P<0.05) in the samples cryopreserved with the trehalose extender. Our results suggest that disaccharides have higher cryoprotective effect than monosaccharides, although the monosaccharide composition of the disaccharides is also important, since the best results were obtained with those disaccharides presenting glucose in their composition. PMID:22771077

  17. Sperm motility-activating complex formed by t-complex distorters.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kazuo; Inaba, Kazuo

    2003-10-31

    Transmission ratio distortion is a dramatic example of non-Mendelian transmission. In mice, t-haplotype males produce dysfunctional +-sperm and normal t-sperm, leading to transmission in favor of t-sperm. Genetic studies have indicated that the t-complex responder locus, Tcr, rescues t-sperm but not +-sperm from defective products of t-complex distorter loci, Tcds. Light chain 1 (LC1) and LC3 from sea urchin sperm outer arm dynein have sequence similarities to Tctex2 and Tctex1, respectively, both of which are wild-type products of Tcds. We show here that LC1 and LC3 are able to make a 1:1 complex. Since Tcr is a member of the Smok (sperm motility kinase) family and LC1 is phosphorylated at the activation of sperm motility in a cAMP-dependent manner, this complex in a dynein motor molecule might be a direct target of Smok/Tcr kinase in a signal cascade that regulates sperm motility. Thus, we designate it as Smoac (sperm motility activating complex). PMID:14559236

  18. Predictive factors of successful microdissection testicular sperm extraction.

    PubMed

    Bernie, Aaron M; Ramasamy, Ranjith; Schlegel, Peter N

    2013-01-01

    Azoospermia in men requires microsurgical reconstruction or a procedure for sperm retrieval with assisted reproduction to allow fertility. While the chance of successful retrieval of sperm in men with obstructive azoospermia approaches >90%, the chances of sperm retrieval in men with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) are not as high. Conventional procedures such as fine needle aspiration of the testis, testicular biopsy and testicular sperm extraction are successful in 20-45% of men with NOA. With microdissection testicular sperm extraction (micro-TESE), the chance of successful retrieval can be up to 60%. Despite this increased success, the ability to counsel patients preoperatively on their probability of successful sperm retrieval has remained challenging. A combination of variables such as age, serum FSH and inhibin B levels, testicular size, genetic analysis, history of Klinefelter syndrome, history of cryptorchidism or varicocele and histopathology on diagnostic biopsy have provided some insight into the chance of successful sperm retrieval in men with NOA. The goal of this review was to evaluate the preoperative factors that are currently available to predict the outcome for success with micro-TESE. PMID:25763186

  19. Earthworms increase plant production: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    van Groenigen, Jan Willem; Lubbers, Ingrid M; Vos, Hannah M J; Brown, George G; De Deyn, Gerlinde B; van Groenigen, Kees Jan

    2014-01-01

    To meet the challenge of feeding a growing world population with minimal environmental impact, we need comprehensive and quantitative knowledge of ecological factors affecting crop production. Earthworms are among the most important soil dwelling invertebrates. Their activity affects both biotic and abiotic soil properties, in turn affecting plant growth. Yet, studies on the effect of earthworm presence on crop yields have not been quantitatively synthesized. Here we show, using meta-analysis, that on average earthworm presence in agroecosystems leads to a 25% increase in crop yield and a 23% increase in aboveground biomass. The magnitude of these effects depends on presence of crop residue, earthworm density and type and rate of fertilization. The positive effects of earthworms become larger when more residue is returned to the soil, but disappear when soil nitrogen availability is high. This suggests that earthworms stimulate plant growth predominantly through releasing nitrogen locked away in residue and soil organic matter. Our results therefore imply that earthworms are of crucial importance to decrease the yield gap of farmers who can't -or won't- use nitrogen fertilizer. PMID:25219785

  20. Comparison of sperm quality and DNA integrity in mouse sperm exposed to various cooling velocities and osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Cengiz; Law, Napoleon; Ottaviani, Palma; Jarvi, Keith; McKerlie, Colin

    2010-11-01

    The first objective was to compare sperm quality following conventional manual sperm freezing (cryovials held 1, 2, 3, and 4 cm, respectively, above liquid nitrogen (LN(2)) for 10 min, resulting in cooling velocities of approximately -14.9, -10.1, -6.6, and -5.1 C/min, respectively), and cooling velocities of -5, -20, -40, and -100 C/min in a programmed automated freezer, for sperm recovered from CD-1, B6129SF1, and C57BL/6NCrlBR mice. Furthermore, using these strains, as well as 129S/SvPaslco, and DBA/2NCrlBR mice, the second objective was to determine the effects on DNA integrity of sperm exposed to hyposmotic (1 mOsm/L) and hyperosmotic (2400 mOsm/L) solutions, compared to an isosmotic control (300 mOsm/L). For freezing above LN(2) or in an automated freezer, 2 cm above LN(2) and -100 C/min, respectively, were optimal (P < 0.05-0.01), with no significant differences between these two approaches for post-thaw progressive motility, DNA integrity, and in vitro rates of fertilization and blastocyst formation. Both manual and automated freezing techniques increased post-thaw sperm DNA fragmentation (P < 0.01); the DNA integrity of post-thaw sperm was significantly affected by cooling velocity and strain background. Relative to isosmotic controls, a hyposmotic solution was more deleterious (P < 0.05-0.01) to sperm DNA integrity than a hyperosmotic solution for CD-1, B6129SF1, C57BL/6, and DBA mice (there were strain-dependent differences). In conclusion, optimization of freezing distance and cooling velocity (manual and automated freezing, respectively) were significant factors for efficient cryopreservation and re-derivation of mice from frozen-thawed sperm. Additionally, osmotically-driven volume changes in mouse sperm increased DNA fragmentation, with susceptibility affected by background strain. PMID:20728931

  1. Mating system does not predict permanent sperm depletion in black widow spiders.

    PubMed

    Modanu, Maria; Michalik, Peter; Andrade, Maydianne C B

    2013-05-01

    Variation in sperm production is strongly influenced by mating system across taxa. Recent work in spiders suggests that males of some species show termination of spermatogenesis before their adult molt and thus an inability to produce sperm after maturation. This permanent sperm depletion (PSD) has been hypothesized to co-occur with monogyny, genital mutilation, or sexual cannibalism because the maintenance of continual sperm supplies is not necessary for species where males can expect only one mating opportunity. Here we test this hypothesis in two congeners exhibiting genital mutilation: the sexually cannibalistic, monogynous Australian redback spider Latrodectus hasselti and the polygynous Western black widow Latrodectus hesperus. We report that PSD does not occur in adult males of either species, and show that males transfer sperm into their copulatory organs multiple times as adults. These data suggest evolutionary links between mating system and investment in sperm production may be more complex than currently appreciated. PMID:23607304

  2. Trigonellae Semen Enhances Sperm Motility and the Expression of the Cation Sperm Channel Proteins in Mouse Testes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Rim; Kim, Hyu Young; Kim, Ha Young; Chang, Mun Seog; Park, Seong Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic defects during spermatogenesis can lead to a reduction in sperm motility and cause male infertility. The cation channels of sperm (CatSper) play a role in the regulation of hyperactivated sperm motility in mouse testes. The effect of Trigonellae Semen (TS) on the male reproductive system and CatSper protein in mouse testes during spermatogenesis was examined. C57BL/c mice were divided into the following five groups: normal, cyclophosphamide- (CP-) only treated (control group), and three groups treated with varying concentrations of TS with CP (100, 500, and 1000?mg/kg TS and 100?mg/kg CP). Real-time PCR, western blot analysis, and a testosterone immunoassay were performed to assess CatSper protein levels in the five groups. Additionally, sperm cell counts and motility were examined. Results indicate that sperm motility and sperm counts increased in the TS treated groups in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.01). CatSper levels were also significantly higher in the TS treated groups compared to that of the control group (p < 0.001). Therefore, TS treatment could enhance sperm function by promoting spermatogenesis and the expression of CatSper proteins in mouse testes. PMID:26539234

  3. The 5’-AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Is Involved in the Augmentation of Antioxidant Defenses in Cryopreserved Chicken Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi Mong Diep; Seigneurin, François; Froment, Pascal; Combarnous, Yves; Blesbois, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Semen cryopreservation is a unique tool for the management of animal genetic diversity. However, the freeze-thaw process causes biochemical and physical alterations which make difficult the restoration of sperm energy-dependent functions needed for fertilization. 5’-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor and regulator of intracellular energy metabolism. Mitochondria functions are known to be severely affected during sperm cryopreservation with deleterious oxidative and peroxidative effects leading to cell integrity and functions damages. The aim of this study was thus to examine the role of AMPK on the peroxidation/antioxidant enzymes defense system in frozen-thawed sperm and its consequences on sperm functions. Chicken semen was diluted in media supplemented with or without AMPK activators (AICAR or Metformin [MET]) or inhibitor (Compound C [CC]) and then cryopreserved. AMPKα phosphorylation, antioxidant enzymes activities, mitochondrial potential, ATP, citrate, viability, acrosome reaction ability (AR) and various motility parameters were negatively affected by the freeze-thaw process while reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and lactate concentration were dramatically increased. AICAR partially restored superoxide dismutase (SOD), Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx) and Glutathione Reductase (GR), increased ATP, citrate, and lactate concentration and subsequently decreased the ROS and LPO (malondialdehyde) in frozen-thawed semen. Motility parameters were increased (i.e., + 23% for motility, + 34% for rapid sperm) as well as AR (+ 100%). MET had similar effects as AICAR except that catalase activity was restored and that ATP and mitochondrial potential were further decreased. CC showed effects opposite to AICAR on SOD, ROS, LPO and AR and motility parameters. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that, upon freeze-thaw process, AMPK stimulated intracellular anti-oxidative defense enzymes through ATP regulation, thus reducing ROS and lipid peroxidation, and consequently partially restoring several essential sperm functions and leading to a better quality of cryopreserved sperm. PMID:26222070

  4. Role of carbonic anhydrase IV in the bicarbonate-mediated activation of murine and human sperm.

    PubMed

    Wandernoth, Petra M; Raubuch, Michael; Mannowetz, Nadja; Becker, Holger M; Deitmer, Joachim W; Sly, William S; Wennemuth, Gunther

    2010-01-01

    HCO(3) (-) is the signal for early activation of sperm motility. In vivo, this occurs when sperm come into contact with the HCO(3) (-) containing fluids in the reproductive tract. The activated motility enables sperm to travel the long distance to the ovum. In spermatozoa HCO(3) (-) stimulates the atypical sperm adenylyl cyclase (sAC) to promote the cAMP-mediated pathway that increases flagellar beat frequency. Stimulation of sAC may occur when HCO(3) (-) enters spermatozoa either directly by anion transport or indirectly via diffusion of CO(2) with subsequent hydration by intracellular carbonic anhydrase (CA). We here show that murine sperm possess extracellular CA IV that is transferred to the sperm surface as the sperm pass through the epididymis. Comparison of CA IV expression by qRT PCR analysis confirms that the transfer takes place in the corpus epididymidis. We demonstrate murine and human sperm respond to CO(2) with an increase in beat frequency, an effect that can be inhibited by ethoxyzolamide. Comparing CA activity in sperm from wild-type and CA IV(-/-) mice we found a 32.13% reduction in total CA activity in the latter. The CA IV(-/-) sperm also have a reduced response to CO(2). While the beat frequency of wild-type sperm increases from 2.860.12 Hz to 6.870.34 Hz after CO(2) application, beat frequency of CA IV(-/-) sperm only increases from 3.060.20 Hz to 5.290.47 Hz. We show, for the first time, a physiological role of CA IV that supplies sperm with HCO(3) (-), which is necessary for stimulation of sAC and hence early activation of spermatozoa. PMID:21124840

  5. Hyperoxia increases hepatic arginase expression and ornithine production in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Malleske, Daniel T.; Rogers, Lynette K.; Velluci, Sean M.; Young, Tamara L.; Park, Min S.; Long, Donald W.; Welty, Stephen E.; Smith, Charles V.; Nelin, Leif D. . E-mail: NelinL@pediatrics.ohio-state.edu

    2006-08-15

    Hyperoxic exposure affects the levels and activities of some hepatic proteins. We tested the hypothesis that hyperoxic exposure would result in greater hepatic .NO concentrations. C3H/HeN mice were exposed to >95% O{sub 2} for 72 or 96 h and compared to room air-breathing controls. In contrast to our working hypothesis, exposure to >95% O{sub 2} for 96 h decreased hepatic nitrite/nitrate NO {sub X} concentrations (10.9 {+-} 2.2 nmol/g liver versus 19.3 {+-} 2.4 nmol/g liver in room air, P < 0.05). The hepatic levels of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS) proteins were not different among the groups. The arginases, which convert L-arginine to urea and L-ornithine, may affect hepatic NOS activities by decreasing L-arginine bioavailability. Hepatic ornithine concentrations were greater in hyperoxic animals than in controls (318 {+-} 18 nmol/g liver in room air, and 539 {+-} 64, and 475 {+-} 40 at 72 and 96 h of hyperoxia, respectively, P < 0.01). Hepatic arginase I protein levels were greater in hyperoxic animals than in controls. Hepatic carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) protein levels and activities were not different among groups. These results indicate that increases in hepatic levels of arginase I in mice exposed to hyperoxia may diminish .NO production, as reflected by lower liver levels of NO {sub X}. The resultant greater hepatic ornithine concentrations may represent a mechanism to facilitate tissue repair, by favoring the production of polyamines and/or proline.

  6. A simulation study of sperm motility hydrodynamics near fish eggs and spheres.

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Kenta; Cosson, Jacky; Gaffney, Eamonn A

    2016-01-21

    For teleost fish fertilisation, sperm must proceed through a small opening on the egg surface, referred to as the micropyle. In this paper, we have used boundary element simulations to explore whether the hydrodynamic attraction between sperm and a fish egg can be a sperm guidance cue. Hydrodynamical egg-sperm interactions alone do not increase the chances of an egg encounter, nor do they induce surface swimming for virtual turbot fish sperm across smooth spheres with a diameter of 1mm, which is representative of a turbot fish egg. When a repulsive surface force between the virtual turbot sperm and the egg is introduced, as motivated by surface charge and van-der-Waals interactions for instance, we find that extended surface swimming of the virtual sperm across a model turbot egg occurs, but ultimately the sperm escapes from the egg. This is due to the small exit angle of the scattering associated with the initial sperm-egg interaction at the egg surface, leading to a weak drift away from the egg, in combination with a weak hydrodynamical attraction between both gametes, though the latter is not sufficient to prevent eventual escape. The resulting transience is not observed experimentally but is a detailed quantitative difference between theory and observation in that stable surface swimming is predicted for eggs with radii larger than about 1.8mm. Regardless, the extended sperm swimming trajectory across the egg constitutes a two-dimensional search for the micropyle and thus the egg is consistently predicted to provide a guidance cue for sperm once they are sufficiently close. In addition, the observation that the virtual turbot sperm swims stably next to a flat plane given repulsive surface interactions, but does not swim stably adjacent to a turbot-sized egg, which is extremely large by sperm-lengthscales, also highlights that the stability of sperm swimming near a boundary is very sensitive to geometry. PMID:26542943

  7. Increasing transcurium production efficiency through direct resonance shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Hogle, Susan L; Maldonado, G Ivan; Alexander, Charles W

    2013-01-01

    The Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is the world s leader in production of 252Cf. This and other heavy actinides are produced by irradiation of mixed curium/americium targets in the High Flux Isotope Reactor. Due to the strong dependence of isotopic cross sections upon incoming neutron energy, the efficiency with which an isotope is transmuted is highly dependent upon the neutron flux energy spectrum and intensities. There are certain energy ranges in which the rate of fissions in feedstock materials can be minimized relative to the rate of (n, ) absorptions. It is shown that by perturbing the flux spectrum, it is possible to alter the net consumption of curium feedstock, as well as the yields of key isotopes for the heavy element research program, such as 249Bk and 252Cf. This flux spectrum perturbation is accomplished by means of focused resonance shielding through the use of filter materials. It is further shown that these perturbations can alter the target yields in a significant way, increasing the amount of 252Cf produced per unit curium consumption by over 40%.

  8. New stimulation technique improves frac recovery and increases production

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, A.M.; Wilson, W.J.

    1984-09-01

    A technique for improving stimulation fluid recovery has been developed in the laboratory and has proven effective in field applications. The method involves improving proppant pack drainage and minimizing capillary pressure in the formation through the judicious application of surface active agents. The technique is particularly applicable in low pressure oil wells and tight gas reservoirs, and may be used in all aqueous fracturing treatments. These include slick and gelled water, as well as foamed and crosslinked systems. The technique involves the use of a solvent in the pad fluids and a surfactant system throughout the entire fracturing treatment. This combination improves sand pack drainage and minimizes capillary water blocks in the invaded formation, while maintaining the water-wet condition of both the proppant pack and formation. The results of field applications using this technique have shown great improvement in the recovery of aqueous stimulation fluids in both sand and limestone formations. Increases in initial hydrocarbon production have also resulted. Case histories are presented from both oil and gas wells in a variety of formations.

  9. Molecular markers of sperm quality.

    PubMed

    Sutovsky, P; Lovercamp, K

    2010-01-01

    Light microscopic semen evaluation provides useful information about a given sperm sample, but due to its subjective nature has limited prognostic value for the reproductive performance of males or the outcome of assisted fertilization. Cryptic sperm abnormalities (occurring at the molecular level) are not easily detectable by light microscopy, but can be revealed by an array of biomarkers. The latter include fluorescent markers of acrosomal status, fluorochromes detecting altered sperm chromatin or DNA integrity, vital dyes revealing sperm mitochondrial activity, probes detecting apoptotic events, and antibodies detecting proteins that are either up- or down-regulated in defective spermatozoa. Many of the above biomarkers are best tested by flow cytometry, permitting rapid, automated, high throughput, objective measurement of the relative abundance of these biomarkers in semen. This review summarizes a strategy for the identification of novel male fertility/sperm quality biomarkers based on proteomic, biochemical and immunocytochemical analyses of defective spermatozoa. This approach identifies proteins or ligands uniquely associated with defective spermatozoa, regardless of whether they carry gross morphological defects or subtle, but critical hidden defects (e.g. DNA strand breaks) not detected with conventional, light microscopic analysis. Such markers, including ubiquitin, sperm thioredoxin SPTRX3/TXNDC8, 15LOX, and Lewis(y)-terminated N-glycans, are associated with poor semen quality and reduced fertility, warranting a designation of "negative" markers of fertility. The significance of sperm cytoplasmic droplet, a structure that accumulates several of the discussed biomarker proteins, is also discussed with regard to sperm quality and fertility. PMID:21755677

  10. Subpopulation distribution of motile sperm relative to activation medium in steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Kanuga, M K; Drew, R E; Wilson-Leedy, J G; Ingermann, R L

    2012-03-15

    In the present study, steelhead sperm were activated in artificial tap water, ovarian fluid, activating saline, or in combinations of these media, and motility characteristics were determined using computer-assisted sperm analysis. Motility characteristics of individual sperm were then assessed to test the hypothesis that motile sperm are distributed among discrete subpopulations and that their distribution is influenced by the activation medium. Analysis with k-means clustering detected three discrete motile sperm subpopulations in steelhead semen, regardless of the activation medium. Based on multivariate analysis of variance, proportions of these subpopulations did not differ between sperm activated with ovarian fluid and activating saline, or any combination of these two media. However, subpopulation distributions for sperm activated with either ovarian fluid or activating saline were influenced by the level of dilution of these media in artificial tap water. There was an increase in the number of sperm in high velocity (curvilinear), high straightness, and high wobble subpopulation with increased levels of ovarian fluid or activating saline. The change in sperm motility characteristics with a change in activation medium may play a role in normal fertilization, as discharged sperm pass from seminal plasma and water through ovarian fluid en route to the egg. PMID:22225678

  11. Increase in hospital purchase of hand hygiene products: The importance of focusing on the right product.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Manisha; Prasad, Amber; Dhaliwal, Navneet; Gupta, A K; Taneja, Neelam

    2015-07-01

    Alcohol-based handrub (AHR) consumption is positively correlated with increases in hand hygiene (HH) compliance. In our 2,000-bed hospital in India, multiple awareness drives have been conducted to promote HH. This study aimed to determine the quantitative effect of these campaigns on use of HH products (soap and AHR) in the hospital. Over the last 6 years, bar soap consumption has increased by 389.15%, whereas that of AHR increased by 146.7%. We also evaluated microbial contamination of 99bar soap and 60 liquid soap samples in our hospital for a year. Of the samples, 61 (61.6%) of the bar soaps and 2 (3.3%) of the liquid soaps were found to be contaminated with various organisms (P<.0002). To conclude, the focus should be to increase the right kind of HH product so that hospitals in developing countries procure liquid soaps instead of bar soaps for handwashing purposes. PMID:25920704

  12. In vitro production of multigene transgenic blastocysts via sperm-mediated gene transfer allows rapid screening of constructs to be used in xenotransplantation experiments.

    PubMed

    Vargiolu, A; Manzini, S; de Cecco, M; Bacci, M L; Forni, M; Galeati, G; Cerrito, M G; Busnelli, M; Lavitrano, M; Giovannoni, R

    2010-01-01

    Multigene transgenic pigs would be of benefit for large animal models and in particular for xenotransplantation, where extensive genetic manipulation of donor pigs is required to make them suitable for organ grafting to humans. We have previously produced multitransgenic pigs via sperm-mediated gene transfer (SMGT) using integrative constructs expressing 3 different reporter genes. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of using 3 integrative constructs carrying 3 different human genes involved in the modulation of inflammatory responses. We developed an in vitro fertilization system to demonstrate that SMGT can be used to efficiently produce multigene transgenic embryos through a 1-step genetic modification using multiple integrative constructs each carrying a different human gene involved in the modulation of inflammatory processes (hHO1, hCD39, and hCD73). The results suggest that this system allowed an effective preliminary test of transgenesis optimization, greatly reducing the number of animals used in the experiments and fulfilling important ethical issues. We performed 5 in vitro fertilization experiments using sperm cells preincubated with all 3 integrative constructs. A total of 1,498 oocytes were fertilized to obtain 775 embryos, among which 340 further developed into blastocysts. We did not observe any toxicity related to the transgenesis procedure that affected normal embryo development. We observed 68.5% transgenesis efficiency. Blastocysts were 48% single, 31% double, and 21% triple transgenic. PMID:20692428

  13. Enforced ATP futile cycling increases specific productivity and yield of anaerobic lactate production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hädicke, Oliver; Bettenbrock, Katja; Klamt, Steffen

    2015-10-01

    The manipulation of cofactor pools such as ATP or NAD(P)H has for long been recognized as key targets for metabolic engineering of microorganisms to improve yields and productivities of biotechnological processes. Several works in the past have shown that enforcing ATP futile cycling may enhance the synthesis of certain products under aerobic conditions. However, case studies demonstrating that ATP wasting may also have beneficial effects for anaerobic production processes are scarce. Taking lactic acid as an economically relevant product, we demonstrate that induction of ATP futile cycling in Escherichia coli leads to increased yields and specific production rates under anaerobic conditions, even in the case where lactate is already produced with high yields. Specifically, we constructed a high lactate producer strain KBM10111 (= MG1655 ΔadhE::Cam ΔackA-pta) and implemented an IPTG-inducible overexpression of ppsA encoding for PEP synthase which, together with pyruvate kinase, gives rise to an ATP consuming cycle. Under induction of ppsA, KBM10111 exhibits a 25% higher specific lactate productivity as well as an 8% higher lactate yield. Furthermore, the specific substrate uptake rate was increased by 14%. However, trade-offs between specific and volumetric productivities must be considered when ATP wasting strategies are used to shift substrate conversion from biomass to product synthesis and we discuss potential solutions to design optimal processes. In summary, enforced ATP futile cycling has great potential to optimize a variety of production processes and our study demonstrates that this holds true also for anaerobic processes. PMID:25899755

  14. Principles for maintaining or increasing breast milk production.

    PubMed

    Kent, Jacqueline C; Prime, Danielle K; Garbin, Catherine P

    2012-01-01

    Breastfeeding rates in many developed countries remain low, and maternal perception of insufficient milk production is a major contributing factor. Mothers with a perception of insufficient milk should be advised that normal breastfeeding frequencies, suckling times, and amounts are very variable. If objective assessment confirms insufficient milk production, mothers should ensure optimal milk removal frequency and thorough breast drainage. In addition, galactogogues can be prescribed. Understanding physiological principles underlying milk production will help clinicians reassure and assist mothers. PMID:22150998

  15. Increasing Children's ASL Classifier Production: A Multicomponent Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beal-Alvarez, Jennifer S.; Easterbrooks, Susan R.

    2013-01-01

    The Authors examined classifier production during narrative retells by 10 deaf and hard of hearing students in grades 2-4 at a day school for the deaf following a 6-week intervention of repeated viewings of stories in American Sign Language (ASL) paired with scripted teacher mediation. Classifier production, documented through a

  16. Increasing cropping system diversity balances productivity, profitability and environmental health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Balancing productivity, profitability, and environmental health is a key challenge for agricultural sustainability. Most crop production systems in the United States are characterized by low species and management diversity, high use of fossil energy and agrichemicals, and can have large negative im...

  17. Sperm mitochondria in reproduction: good or bad and where do they go?

    PubMed

    Luo, Shi-Ming; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2013-11-20

    The mitochondrion is the major energy provider to power sperm motility. In mammals, aside from the nuclear genome, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) also contributes to oxidative phosphorylation to impact production of ATP by coding 13 polypeptides. However, the role of sperm mitochondria in fertilization and its final fate after fertilization are still controversial. The viewpoints that sperm bearing more mtDNA will have a better fertilizing capability and that sperm mtDNA is actively eliminated during early embryogenesis are widely accepted. However, this may be not true for several mammalian species, including mice and humans. Here, we review the sperm mitochondria and their mtDNA in sperm functions, and the mechanisms of maternal mitochondrial inheritance in mammals. PMID:24238608

  18. Ejaculate Oxidative Stress Is Related with Sperm DNA Fragmentation and Round Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iommiello, Valeria Maria; Albani, Elena; Di Rosa, Alessandra; Marras, Alessandra; Menduni, Francesca; Morreale, Giovanna; Levi, Shanti Lia; Pisano, Benedetta; Levi-Setti, Paolo Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) plays an essential role in male infertility aetiology by affecting sperm quality, function, and also the integrity of sperm DNA. The assessment of oxidative stress in semen may be an important tool to improve the evaluation of sperm reproductive capacity. The purpose of this study was the evaluation of any possible relation between the unbalance of oxidative stress caused by superoxide anion in the ejaculate with the presence of sperm DNA fragmentation and high concentration of round cells. 56 semen samples from males from couples suffering from infertility were evaluated according to World Health Organisation (WHO) 2010 guidelines. Oxidative stress levels from N1 (low) to N4 (high) were assessed in ejaculates using oxiSperm; DFI (sperm DNA fragmentation index) as assessed by the SCSA (Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay) was used for evaluation of sperm chromatin integrity. Our data show that high oxidative stress (N3-N4 levels) correlated positively with a DFI ≥ 30% (P = 0.0379) and round cells ≥1.500.000/mL (P = 0.0084). In conclusion, OS increases sperm DNA damage. Thus evaluation of semen OS extent of sperm DNA damage in infertile man could be useful to develop new therapeutic strategies and improve success of assisted reproduction techniques (ART). PMID:25802519

  19. Carbonic anhydrases and their functional differences in human and mouse sperm physiology.

    PubMed

    Jos, O; Torres-Rodrguez, P; Forero-Quintero, L S; Chvez, J C; De la Vega-Beltrn, J L; Carta, F; Supuran, C T; Deitmer, J W; Trevio, C L

    2015-12-25

    Fertilization is a key reproductive event in which sperm and egg fuse to generate a new individual. Proper regulation of certain parameters (such as intracellular pH) is crucial for this process. Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are among the molecular entities that control intracellular pH dynamics in most cells. Unfortunately, little is known about the function of CAs in mammalian sperm physiology. For this reason, we re-explored the expression of CAI, II, IV and XIII in human and mouse sperm. We also measured the level of CA activity, determined by mass spectrometry, and found that it is similar in non-capacitated and capacitated mouse sperm. Importantly, we found that CAII activity accounts for half of the total CA activity in capacitated mouse sperm. Using the general CA inhibitor ethoxyzolamide, we studied how CAs participate in fundamental sperm physiological processes such as motility and acrosome reaction in both species. We found that capacitated human sperm depend strongly on CA activity to support normal motility, while capacitated mouse sperm do not. Finally, we found that CA inhibition increases the acrosome reaction in capacitated human sperm, but not in capacitated mouse sperm. PMID:26551457

  20. Transport, Distribution and Elimination of Mammalian Sperm Following Natural Mating and Insemination.

    PubMed

    Klle, S

    2015-09-01

    The integrity of transport, distribution and elimination of sperm in the female genital tract plays a pivotal role for successful reproduction in mammals. At coitus, millions or billions of sperm are deposited either into the anterior vagina (human, primates), the cervix (most mammalian species) or the uterus (pig). In most species, the first anatomical barrier is the cervix, where spermatozoa with poor morphology and motility are filtered out by sticking to the cervical mucus. The second anatomical barrier is the uterotubal junction (UTJ) with its tortuous and narrow lumen. Finally, only a few thousand sperm enter the oviduct and less than 100 sperm reach the site of fertilization. As soon as the sperm enter the oviduct, they form a sperm reservoir enabling them to stay vital and maintain fertilizing capacity for 3-4 days (cow, horse) up to several months (bats). After ovulation, mammalian sperm show hyperactivation which allows them to detach from the tubal epithelium and migrate to the site of fertilization. This review will focus on recent insights of sperm transport, sperm storage and sperm-oviduct interaction in mammals which have been gained by live cell imaging in cows and mice under near in vivo conditions. Detailed knowledge of the biology of spermatozoa within the female genital tract creates the basis for new therapeutic concepts for male subfertility and infertility - an essential prerequisite to increase success rates in assisted reproduction. PMID:26382022

  1. Fertilization Is Not a New Beginning: The Relationship between Sperm Longevity and Offspring Performance

    PubMed Central

    Crean, Angela J.; Dwyer, John M.; Marshall, Dustin J.

    2012-01-01

    Sperm are the most diverse cell type known: varying not only among- and within- species, but also among- and within-ejaculates of a single male. Recently, the causes and consequences of variability in sperm phenotypes have received much attention, but the importance of within-ejaculate variability remains largely unknown. Correlative evidence suggests that reduced within-ejaculate variation in sperm phenotype increases a males fertilization success in competitive conditions; but the transgenerational consequences of within-ejaculate variation in sperm phenotype remain relatively unexplored. Here we examine the relationship between sperm longevity and offspring performance in a marine invertebrate with external fertilization, Styela plicata. Offspring sired by longer-lived sperm had higher performance compared to offspring sired by freshly-extracted sperm of the same ejaculate, both in the laboratory and the field. This indicates that within-ejaculate differences in sperm longevity can influence offspring fitness a source of variability in offspring phenotypes that has not previously been considered. Links between sperm phenotype and offspring performance may constrain responses to selection on either sperm or offspring traits, with broad ecological and evolutionary implications. PMID:23155458

  2. Oral antioxidant treatment partly improves integrity of human sperm DNA in infertile grade I varicocele patients.

    PubMed

    Gual-Frau, Josep; Abad, Carlos; Amengual, María J; Hannaoui, Naim; Checa, Miguel A; Ribas-Maynou, Jordi; Lozano, Iris; Nikolaou, Alexandros; Benet, Jordi; García-Peiró, Agustín; Prats, Juan

    2015-09-01

    Infertile males with varicocele have the highest percentage of sperm cells with damaged DNA, compared to other infertile groups. Antioxidant treatment is known to enhance the integrity of sperm DNA; however, there are no data on the effects in varicocele patients. We thus investigated the potential benefits of antioxidant treatment specifically in grade I varicocele males. Twenty infertile patients with grade I varicocele were given multivitamins (1500 mg L-Carnitine, 60 mg vitamin C, 20 mg coenzyme Q10, 10 mg vitamin E, 200 μg vitamin B9, 1 μg vitamin B12, 10 mg zinc, 50 μg selenium) daily for three months. Semen parameters including total sperm count, concentration, progressive motility, vitality, and morphology were determined before and after treatment. In addition, sperm DNA fragmentation and the amount of highly degraded sperm cells were analyzed by Sperm Chromatin Dispersion. After treatment, patients showed an average relative reduction of 22.1% in sperm DNA fragmentation (p = 0.02) and had 31.3% fewer highly degraded sperm cells (p = 0.07). Total numbers of sperm cells were increased (p = 0.04), but other semen parameters were unaffected. These data suggest that sperm DNA integrity in grade I varicocele patients may be improved by oral antioxidant treatment. PMID:26090928

  3. Quantitative evaluation of radiation-induced changes in sperm morphology and chromatin distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Aubele, M.; Juetting, U.R.; Rodenacker, K.; Gais, P.; Burger, G.; Hacker-Klom, U. )

    1990-01-01

    Sperm head cytometry provides a useful assay for the detection of radiation-induced damage in mouse germ cells. Exposure of the gonads to radiation is known to lead to an increase of diploid and higher polyploid sperm and of sperm with head shape abnormalities. In the pilot studies reported here quantitative analysis of the total DNA content, the morphology, and the chromatin distribution of mouse sperm was performed. The goal was to evaluate the discriminative power of features derived by high resolution image cytometry in distinguishing sperm of control and irradiated mice. Our results suggest that besides the induction of the above mentioned variations in DNA content and shape of sperm head, changes of the nonhomogeneous chromatin distribution within the sperm may also be used to quantify the radiation effect on sperm cells. Whereas the chromatin distribution features show larger variations for sperm 21 days after exposure (dpr), the shape parameters seem to be more important to discriminate sperm 35 dpr. This may be explained by differentiation processes, which take place in different stages during mouse spermatogenesis.

  4. Quantification of mammalian sperm morphology by slit-scan flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Benaron, D.A.; Gray, J.W.; Gledhill, B.L.; Lake, S.; Wyrobek, A.J.; Young, I.T.

    1982-01-01

    The head shapes of mammalian sperm were measured by slit-scan flow cytometry (SSFCM). Fluorescence profiles were measured for sperm from mice, rabbits, hamsters, and bulls, and for sperm from mice, rabbits, hamsters, and bulls, and for sperm from mice exposed to testicular x-irradiation from 0 to 900 rads. Some of the fluorescence profiles for sperm from the irradiated mice differed significantly from the profiles usually measured for sperm from unexposed mice. An algorithm was developed to determine the frequency of these sperm. The estimated frequencies of atypical profiles correlated well with the frequencies of abnormally shaped sperm determined by microscopic scoring. The maximum SSFCM sensitivity was not as high as that for the visual assay. However, only 100 profiles were measured by SSFCM at each dose while at least 500 sperm were scored visually at each dose. The sensitivity of the SSFCM assay should be increased substantially by measuring more profiles. The objective nature of SSFCM coupled with the high correlation with results from the visually based assay of morphology suggests the use of SSFCM to measure frequencies of misshapen sperm when testing for mutagens or monitoring for effects of environmental contaminants.

  5. A nonsemen copulatory fluid influences the outcome of sperm competition in Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Finseth, F R; Iacovelli, S R; Harrison, R G; Adkins-Regan, E K

    2013-09-01

    Sperm competition is a powerful and widespread evolutionary force that drives the divergence of behavioural, physiological and morphological traits. Elucidating the mechanisms governing differential fertilization success is a fundamental question of sperm competition. Both sperm and nonsperm ejaculate components can influence sperm competition outcomes. Here, we investigate the role of a nonsemen copulatory fluid in sperm competition. Male Japanese quail possess a gland that makes meringue-like foam. Males produce and store foam independent of sperm and seminal fluid, yet transfer foam to females during copulation. We tested whether foam influenced the outcome of sperm competition by varying foam state and mating order in competitive matings. We found that the presence of foam from one male decreased the relative fertilization success of a rival, and that foam from a given male increased the probability he obtained any fertilizations. Mating order also affected competitive success. Males mated first fertilized proportionally more eggs in a clutch and had more matings with any fertilizations than subsequent males. We conclude that the function of foam in sperm competition is mediated through the positive interaction of foam with a male's sperm, and we speculate whether the benefit is achieved through improving sperm storage, fertilizing efficiency or retention. Our results suggest males can evolve complex strategies to gain fertilizations at the expense of rivals as foam, a copulatory fluid not required for fertilization, nevertheless, has important effects on reproductive performance under competition. PMID:23890178

  6. Behavioral mechanisms of mammalian sperm guidance

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Cerezales, Serafín; Boryshpolets, Sergii; Eisenbach, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, sperm guidance in the oviduct appears essential for successful sperm arrival at the oocyte. Hitherto, three different potential sperm guidance mechanisms have been recognized: thermotaxis, rheotaxis, and chemotaxis, each of them using specific stimuli – a temperature gradient, fluid flow, and a chemoattractant gradient, respectively. Here, we review sperm behavioral in these mechanisms and indicate commonalities and differences between them. PMID:25999361

  7. The relationship between sperm quality in cool-shipped semen and embryo recovery rate in horses.

    PubMed

    Love, C C; Noble, J K; Standridge, S A; Bearden, C T; Blanchard, T L; Varner, D D; Cavinder, C A

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between the quality of cool-shipped stallion semen and fertility has not been adequately described. This study evaluated sperm quality of cool-shipped semen from 459 ejaculates (N=130 stallions) that were used for insemination of 196 embryo donor mares (n=496 estrous cycles). Embryo recovery rate (ERR; %) increased, as all sperm measures (e.g., motility, viability, DNA quality, morphology, concentration, and total number) increased. Threshold values are reported for each sperm quality measure (e.g., total sperm motility?65%) that separate two ERR groups (e.g., average: ?50% ERR; high: ?65% ERR). PMID:26363735

  8. Effect of caffeine on motility and vitality of sperm and in vitro fertilization of outbreed mouse in T6 and M16 media

    PubMed Central

    Nabavi, Narges; Todehdehghan, Fatemeh; Shiravi, Abdollhossein

    2013-01-01

    Background: Caffeine increases the CAMP production that stimulates spermatozoa movement. Caffeine is also used for induction of in vitro acrosome reaction in mammalian spermatozoa, an important step in achieving fertilization. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of caffeine on sperm's motility, vitality and laboratory fertilization rates in mouse in two T6 and M16 media. Materials and Methods: Epididymal mouse sperms were collected and treated by caffine in T6 and M16 media and their motility and vitality rates were evaluated. The pretreated sperms were added to oocytes in T6 and M16 media with and without caffeine and fertilization rates were recorded after 24 hours incubation. Results: Sperm's motility (81.71.67%) and vitality (88.71.33%) rates and percentage of fertilized oocytes (67.528.16%) in T6 medium plus caffeine compare to control group have increased and shown significant differences at p?0.01. While the percentages of these parameters in M16 medium supplemented with caffeine were 68.36.01%, 786.11%, and 42.612.96 respectively and in comparison to control group (M16 without caffeine) have not shown significant differences. Conclusion: Addition of caffeine to T6 medium promotes the sperm's motility and vitality and enhances fertilization and early in vitro development of mouse embryos. This article extracted from M.Sc. thesis. (Narges Navabi) PMID:24639814

  9. A Systematic Analysis of a Deep Mouse Epididymal Sperm Proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvin, Theodore; Xie, Fang; Liu, Tao; Nicora, Carrie D.; Yang, Feng; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Roberts, Kenneth P.

    2012-12-21

    Spermatozoa are highly specialized cells that, when mature, are capable of navigating the female reproductive tract and fertilizing an oocyte. The sperm cell is thought to be largely quiescent in terms of transcriptional and translational activity. As a result, once it has left the male reproductive tract, the sperm cell is essentially operating with a static population of proteins. It is therefore theoretically possible to understand the protein networks contained in a sperm cell and to deduce its cellular function capabilities. To this end we have performed a proteomic analysis of mouse sperm isolated from the cauda epididymis and have confidently identified 2,850 proteins, which is the most comprehensive sperm proteome for any species reported to date. These proteins comprise many complete cellular pathways, including those for energy production via glycolysis, β-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation, protein folding and transport, and cell signaling systems. This proteome should prove a useful tool for assembly and testing of protein networks important for sperm function.

  10. Biodiversity increases the productivity and stability of phytoplankton communities.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Alina A; Boeing, Wiebke J

    2012-01-01

    Global biodiversity losses provide an immediate impetus to elucidate the relationships between biodiversity, productivity and stability. In this study, we quantified the effects of species richness and species combination on the productivity and stability of phytoplankton communities subject to predation by a single rotifer species. We also tested one mechanism of the insurance hypothesis: whether large, slow-growing, potentially-defended cells would compensate for the loss of small, fast-growing, poorly-defended cells after predation. There were significant effects of species richness and species combination on the productivity, relative yield, and stability of phytoplankton cultures, but the relative importance of species richness and combination varied with the response variables. Species combination drove patterns of productivity, whereas species richness was more important for stability. Polycultures containing the most productive single species, Dunaliella, were consistently the most productive. Yet, the most species rich cultures were the most stable, having low temporal variability in measures of biomass. Polycultures recovered from short-term negative grazing effects, but this recovery was not due to the compensation of large, slow-growing cells for the loss of small, fast-growing cells. Instead, polyculture recovery was the result of reduced rotifer grazing rates and persisting small species within the polycultures. Therefore, although an insurance effect in polycultures was found, this effect was indirect and unrelated to grazing tolerance. We hypothesize that diverse phytoplankton assemblages interfered with efficient rotifer grazing and that this "interference effect" facilitated the recovery of the most productive species, Dunaliella. In summary, we demonstrate that both species composition and species richness are important in driving patterns of productivity and stability, respectively, and that stability in biodiverse communities can result from an alteration in consumer functioning. Our findings underscore the importance of predator-prey dynamics in determining the relationships between biodiversity, productivity and stability in producer communities. PMID:23173059

  11. Quality Control of Boar Sperm Processing: Implications from European AI Centres and Two Spermatology Reference Laboratories.

    PubMed

    Riesenbeck, A; Schulze, M; Rdiger, K; Henning, H; Waberski, D

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, increased automatization has resulted in a higher efficiency of boar semen processing in AI laboratories. Sophisticated laboratory management and efficient quality control programmes are needed for current tendencies in major pork-producing countries to reduce the sperm number per AI dose, to lengthen semen storage times and to adopt responsible methods for bacterial control and prevention of the development of multiresistant bacteria. The objective of the present review was to outline current trends in boar semen production and the critical steps in semen processing which affect sperm quality. In addition, integrated elements of a quality assurance programme in use by thirty European AI centres in association with the two German spermatology reference laboratories are described. PMID:26174912

  12. Use of Androcoll-S after thawing improves the quality of electroejaculated and epididymal sperm samples from red deer.

    PubMed

    Anel-Lpez, L; Martnez-Rodrguez, C; Soler, A J; Fernndez-Santos, M R; Garde, J J; Morrell, J M

    2015-07-01

    Single Layer Centrifugation is a useful technique to select sperm with good quality. The use of selection methods such as Androcoll could become an important tool to improve the quality of sperm samples and therefore to improve other artificial reproductive techniques such as sperm sex sorting, in vitro fertilization or AI. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a Single Layer Centrifugation with Androcoll-S on the sperm quality of red deer sperm samples of two different origins, electroejaculated samples and epididymal samples obtained post-mortem, after thawing and after an incubation for 2h at 37C. Sperm motility, viability, membrane permeability, mitochondrial activity, acrosomal status and DNA fragmentation were determined for all samples. The samples selected by Androcoll-S showed an improvement in sperm kinematics compared to unselected samples after thawing and after incubation. The same effect was observed in parameters such as viability, mitochondrial activity or acrosomal status which were improved after the selection. In contrast, no difference was found in DNA fragmentation between selected and unselected samples within the same sperm type. We conclude that sperm selection by SLC with Androcoll-S after thawing for red deer sperm of both types is a suitable technique that allows sperm quality in both types of sperm samples to be improved, thereby improving other assisted reproductive techniques. Further studies (IVF and in vivo fertilization) are required to determine whether this improvement can increase fertility, as has been shown for other species. PMID:26002696

  13. Proteins Involved in Motility and Sperm-Egg Interaction Evolve More Rapidly in Mouse Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Vicens, Alberto; Lüke, Lena; Roldan, Eduardo R. S.

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic studies of spermatozoa have identified a large catalog of integral sperm proteins. Rapid evolution of these proteins may underlie adaptive changes of sperm traits involved in different events leading to fertilization, although the selective forces underlying such rapid evolution are not well understood. A variety of selective forces may differentially affect several steps ending in fertilization, thus resulting in a compartmentalized adaptation of sperm proteins. Here we analyzed the evolution of genes associated to various events in the sperm’s life, from sperm formation to sperm-egg interaction. Evolutionary analyses were performed on gene sequences from 17 mouse strains whose genomes have been sequenced. Four of these are derived from wild Mus musculus, M. domesticus, M. castaneus and M. spretus. We found a higher proportion of genes exhibiting a signature of positive selection among those related to sperm motility and sperm-egg interaction. Furthermore, sperm proteins involved in sperm-egg interaction exhibited accelerated evolution in comparison to those involved in other events. Thus, we identified a large set of candidate proteins for future comparative analyses of genotype-phenotype associations in spermatozoa of species subjected to different sexual selection pressures. Adaptive evolution of proteins involved in motility could be driven by sperm competition, since this selective force is known to increase the proportion of motile sperm and their swimming velocity. On the other hand, sperm proteins involved in gamete interaction could be coevolving with their egg partners through episodes of sexual selection or sexual conflict resulting in species-specific sperm-egg interactions and barriers preventing interspecies fertilization. PMID:24608277

  14. Sperm bundle and reproductive organs of carabid beetles tribe Pterostichini (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasakawa, Kôji

    2007-05-01

    The morphological characteristics of sperm and reproductive organs may offer clues as to how reproductive systems have evolved. In this paper, the morphologies of the sperm and male reproductive organs of carabid beetles in the tribe Pterostichini (Coleoptera: Carabidae) are described, and the morphological associations among characters are examined. All species form sperm bundles in which the head of the sperm was embedded in a rod-shaped structure, i.e., spermatodesm. The spermatodesm shape (left-handed spiral, right-handed spiral, or without conspicuous spiral structure) and the condition of the sperm on the spermatodesm surface (with the tail free-moving or forming a thin, sheetlike structure) vary among species. In all species, the spiral directions of the convoluted seminal vesicles and vasa deferentia are the same on both sides of the body; that is, they show an asymmetric structure. The species in which the sperm bundle and the seminal vesicles both have a spiral structure could be classified into two types, with significant differences in sperm-bundle length between the two types. The species with a sperm-bundle spiral and seminal-vesicle spiral of almost the same diameter have longer sperm bundles than the species with a sperm-bundle spiral and seminal-vesicle tube of almost the same diameter. In the former type, the spiral directions of the sperm bundles and seminal vesicles are inevitably the same, whereas they differ in some species with the later type. Therefore, increased sperm bundle length appears to have been facilitated by the concordance of the sperm bundle’s coiling direction with the coiling direction of the seminal vesicle.

  15. Comparative sperm ultrastructure in Nemertea.

    PubMed

    von Dhren, J; Beckers, P; Vogeler, R; Bartolomaeus, T

    2010-07-01

    Although the monophyly of Nemertea is strongly supported by unique morphological characters and results of molecular phylogenetic studies, their ingroup relationships are largely unresolved. To contribute solving this problem we studied sperm ultrastructure of 12 nemertean species that belong to different subtaxa representing the commonly recognized major monophyletic groups. The study yielded a set of 26 characters with an unexpected variation among species of the same genus (Tubulanus and Procephalothrix species), whereas other species varied in metric values or only one character state (Ramphogordius). In some species, the sperm nucleus has grooves (Zygonemertes virescens, Amphiporus imparispinosus) that may be twisted and give a spiral shape to the sperm head (Paranemertes peregrina, Emplectonema gracile). To make the characters from sperm ultrastructure accessible for further phylogenetic analyses, they were coded in a character matrix. Published data for eight species turned out to be sufficiently detailed to be included. Comparative evaluation of available information on the sperm ultrastructure suggests that subtaxa of Heteronemertea and Hoplonemertea are supported as monophyletic by sperm morphology. However, the data do not provide information on the existing contradictions regarding the internal relationships of "Palaeonemertea." Nevertheless, our study provides evidence that sperm ultrastructure yields numerous potentially informative characters that will be included in upcoming phylogenetic analyses. PMID:20544873

  16. Sperm status and DNA dose play key roles in sperm/ICSI-mediated gene transfer in caprine.

    PubMed

    Shadanloo, Farshad; Najafi, Mohammad Hasan; Hosseini, Sayed Morteza; Hajian, Mehdi; Forouzanfar, Mohsen; Ghaedi, Kamran; Abedi, Parvaneh; Ostadhosseini, Somaye; Hosseini, Laleh; Eskandari-Nasab, Morad-Pasha; Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein Nasr

    2010-10-01

    In relation to the growing recent interest in the establishment of sperm-mediated gene transfer (SMGT) technology as a convenient and effective method for the simple production of transgenic animals, in this study the possibility of using SMGT to produce transgenic caprine embryos was investigated for the first time. Buck sperm were directly incubated with different concentrations (0-500 ng) of pcDNA/his/Lac-Z plasmid and used for IVF or ICSI. Sperm used for ICSI were categorized into motile or live-immotile group before being injected into oocytes. In a separate experiment, dead sperm prepared by repeated freezing/thawing were used for DNA-incubation before ICSI. Sham injection was carried out by intracytoplasmic injection of approximately the same volume of media containing different doses of DNA using an ICSI needle. Transgene expression and transmission were detected by X-Gal staining and PCR analysis of developed embryos, respectively. A reasonable blastocyst rate was observed in all the groups. Only embryos in the sham group were negative for transgene transmission. Transgene expression was completely dependent on the delivery technique and status of sperm, and was only observed in the live-immotile and dead ICSI groups. The results of this study showed that the technique (IVF vs. ICSI vs. sham injection), sperm status (motile vs. live-immotile vs. dead) and to some extent DNA concentration affect embryo development, transgene transmission and expression. PMID:20737474

  17. Use of serrated sickle to increase farmer's productivity.

    PubMed

    Sutjana, D P

    2000-12-01

    The sickle is still an ultimate choice hand tool for harvesting the new variety of rice. This preference continues. The sickles used by Balinese harvester are usually nonserrated. The sharpness of nonserrated sickles is reduced quickly, so the harvester needs time to sharpen them frequently, which mean time loss and productivity reduction. To solve this problem, research has been conducted using experimental treatment by subject design. Thirty-three harvesters voluntarily joined the study at the "Subak Yeh Ge" District of Kediri Tabanan Regency, using serrated and nonserrated sickles. The productivity was measured by dividing the number of paddy stalks cut every 15 minutes by increment of heart rate over the resting value. The opinions of harvesters about sickle performance were also collected. The results are as follows: 1. The sharpness of serrated sickles is more stable than nonserrated ones. 2. The use of serrated sickles reduces the workload and work time loss. 3. The productivity of harvesters using serrated sickles is always higher than those using nonserrated sickles, but significant productivity differences begin to appear from the second to the eighth 15-minute period (p < 0.05). 4. Decreased productivity in both groups occurred from the first 15-minute period, but significant differences occurred from the fourth period in the group using nonserrated sickles and at the eighth period in the group using serrated sickles. 5. By use of the heart rate and the WBGT index, it is shown that harvesting can be continuously done over an 8-hour period. PMID:12696316

  18. Semen characterization, seasonality of production, and in vitro sperm quality after chilled storage and cryopreservation in the king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus).

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Justine K; Robeck, Todd R

    2014-01-01

    Research was conducted to examine seasonal seminal traits and to establish short-term and long-term sperm preservation methods in the king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) for use in genome banking and artificial insemination (AI). Spermic ejaculates (n?=?87) obtained using a cooperative method were collected across multiple (n?=?6, Male 1) and a single (Male 2) breeding season(s). Non-contaminated ejaculates (n?=?69) were 0.36??0.32?ml at 56.3??62.7??10(7) ?sperm/ml with 85.3??10.6% total motility (TMot), 52.5??12.9% progressive motility (PMot), 86.6??24.3?m/sec average path velocity (VAP) and 92.3??3.7% plasma membrane intact. In vitro quality of chilled semen was best maintained over 48?hr at 5C than 21C, with decreased (P?

  19. Chemotactic Motility of Sperm in Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Riffell, Jeffrey A.; Zimmer, Richard K.; Stocker, Roman

    2011-11-01

    Chemical gradients are utilized by plants and animals in sexual reproduction to guide swimming sperm cells toward the egg. This process (``chemotaxis''), which can greatly increase the success of fertilization, is subject to interference by fluid flow, both in the bodily conduits of internal fertilizers (e.g. mammals) and in the aquatic environment of external fertilizers (e.g. benthic invertebrates). We studied the biomechanics of chemotaxing sea urchin spermatozoa using microfluidic devices, which allow for the precise and independent control of attractant gradients and fluid shear. We captured swimming trajectories and flagellar beat patterns using high-speed video-microscopy, to detect chemotactic responses and measure the effect of fluid forces on swimming. This work will ultimately help us to understand how swimming sperm cells actively navigate natural chemoattractant gradients for successful fertilization.

  20. The sperm donor programme over 11 years at Newcastle Fertility Centre.

    PubMed

    Gudipati, Madhavi; Pearce, Kim; Prakash, Alka; Redhead, Gillian; Hemingway, Victoria; McEleny, Kevin; Stewart, Jane

    2013-12-01

    The UK national sperm donor shortage is well known. We aimed to analyse the trends in various aspects of the sperm donor programme at Newcastle Fertility Centre (NFC) between 2000 and 2010. A retrospective review of the assisted conception treatments with donor sperm was performed. A decline in the numbers of donors recruited alongside a declining trend in the number of patients treated with donor sperm and donor insemination (DI) treatment cycles carried out was apparent. There was an accompanying rising trend in donor IVF cycles and in same-sex couples and single women coming for treatment. The transfer of sperm to local peripheral centres ceased during this time and an increasing number of patients imported sperm from overseas commercial sperm banks. A waiting list for treatment was set up in 2007 with a gradual increase in waiting time to 18 months in 2010. Overall, there was a significant change in the sperm donor programme at NFC with fewer donors recruited, fewer patients receiving treatment, increasing sperm import and longer waiting times for treatment over the study period. PMID:23905905

  1. Effect of Ubiquinol Therapy on Sperm Parameters and Serum Testosterone Levels in Oligoasthenozoospermic Infertile Men

    PubMed Central

    Littarru, Gian Paolo; Funahashi, Iwao; Painkara, Umeshwar Singh; Dange, Narendra Shriram; Chauhan, Prabha

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The male sperm counts decline due to environmental factors, such as pesticides, heavy metals and exogenous estrogens causing negative impact on spermatogenesis. The low testosterone levels are associated with lower levels of antioxidants that protect against free radical damage to glands that produce testosterone. The earlier studies showed that the supplementation of vitamins and antioxidants including 10mg Ubiquinol per-day increases in sperm count and motility. Materials and Methods The Ubiquinol is strong antioxidant, hence in view of the above study 150 mg/day Ubiquinol was supplemented to 60 men with age group of 20-40 years. The patients were supplemented for six months, the testosterone level and sperm parameters were analysed before and after supplementation of Ubiquinol every month up to six months. The total sperm count increased by 53% (p<0.05). Results The total sperm motility was observed 26% (p<0.05) high after supplementations. Out of total motility, the quantity of rapidly motile sperm increased 41% (p<0.05). The number of sluggish motile sperm was decreased approximate 29% (p<0.05). The non motile sperm count was also decreased up to 55% (p<0.05). Conclusion The testosterone level is maintained during the study and morphology of flagella of sperm has improved. The finding suggests that the supplementation of Ubiquinol may be beneficial for oligospermic patients. PMID:26500895

  2. Mass sperm motility is associated with fertility in sheep.

    PubMed

    David, Ingrid; Kohnke, Philippa; Lagriffoul, Gilles; Praud, Olivier; Plouarbou, Franck; Degond, Pierre; Druart, Xavier

    2015-10-01

    The study was to focus on the relationship between wave motion (mass sperm motility, measured by a mass sperm motility score, manually assessed by artificial insemination (AI) center operators) and fertility in male sheep. A dataset of 711,562 artificial inseminations performed in seven breeds by five French AI centers during the 2001-2005 time period was used for the analysis. Factors influencing the outcome of the insemination, which is a binary response observed at lambing of either success (1) or failure (0), were studied using a joint model within each breed and AI center (eight separate analyses). The joint model is a multivariate model where all information related to the female, the male and the insemination process were included to improve the estimation of the factor effects. Results were consistent for all analyses. The male factors affecting AI results were the age of the ram and the mass motility. After correction for the other factors of variation, the lambing rate increased quasi linearly from three to more than ten points with the mass sperm motility score depending on the breed and the AI center. The consistency of the relationship for all breeds indicated that mass sperm motility is predictive of the fertility resulting when sperm are used from a specific ejaculate. Nonetheless, predictability could be improved if an objective measurement of mass sperm motility were available as a substitute for the subjective scoring currently in use in AI centers. PMID:26364125

  3. Radiation-induced DNA content variability in mouse sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkel, D.; Gledhill, B.L.; van Dilla, M.A.; Lake, S.; Wyrobek, A.J.

    1983-09-01

    Mouse sperm collected from the cauda epididymidis 35 days after acute testicular x-ray exposure and fluorescently stained for DNA show dose-dependent increases in the coefficient of variation (CV) of flow cytometrically obtained fluorescence distributions. By comparing dose-response curves obtained with three protocols which overcome the optical and cytochemical difficulties of sperm measurement in different ways we conclude the response is due to x-ray-induced DNA content variability. Computer modeling of the shapes of the fluorescence distributions show that at 600 rad 30 to 40% of the sperm have abnormal DNA content. Some have errors as large as two whole chromosomes, but it is not clear whether they are due to whole chromosome nondisjunction or a finer fragmentation of the genome. Exposures to benzo(a)pyrene and mitomycin C cause no detectable DNA content variability. We conclude mouse sperm DNA content measurements are not sensitive to small amounts of aneuploidy and as such will only be useful in detecting agents that produce substantial DNA content variability. Another animal with a smaller number of chromosomes might be more favorable. These sperm measurement techniques may find additional application in other areas of reproductive biology, such as the determination of the relative numbers of X and Y chromosome-bearing sperm in semen that may be artifically enriched in one population.

  4. Regulation of mouse gamete interaction by a sperm tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Leyton, L; LeGuen, P; Bunch, D; Saling, P M

    1992-01-01

    A 95-kDa mouse sperm protein has been previously identified as a putative receptor involved in the sperm-egg interactions that lead to fertilization. The ligand for this receptor is the zona pellucida glycoprotein ZP3. This constituent of the oocyte-specific extracellular matrix mediates not only sperm binding to the zona but also triggers acrosomal exocytosis. The latter, also termed the acrosome reaction, is a key regulatory event upon which fertilization is absolutely dependent. Previously, we showed that the 95-kDa protein that binds ZP3 is a substrate for tyrosine kinase, and its phosphotyrosine content increases after sperm-zona pellucida binding. Here, we show the presence of protein tyrosine kinase activity in sperm plasma membranes and in electroeluted 95-kDa protein. The tyrosine kinase activity of the isolated protein is stimulated by solubilized zona pellucida and inhibited by tyrphostin RG-50864, a membrane-permeable tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Furthermore, tyrphostin inhibits zona-triggered acrosomal exocytosis in a dose-dependent manner. These findings indicate that the 95-kDa protein participates in a critical regulatory event of gamete interaction; moreover, our experiments suggest that sperm protein tyrosine kinase may be an excellent target for the control of fertility. Images PMID:1281543

  5. Nanomedicine and mammalian sperm: Lessons from the porcine model.

    PubMed

    Barkalina, Natalia; Jones, Celine; Coward, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Biomedical nanotechnology allows us to engineer versatile nanosized platforms that are comparable in size to biological molecules and intracellular organelles. These platforms can be loaded with large amounts of biological cargo, administered systemically and act at a distance, target specific cell populations, undergo intracellular internalization via endogenous uptake mechanisms, and act as contrast agents or release cargo for therapeutic purposes. Over recent years, nanomaterials have been increasingly viewed as favorable candidates for intragamete delivery. Particularly in the case of sperm, nanomaterial-based approaches have been shown to improve the efficacy of existing techniques such as sperm-mediated gene transfer, loading sperm with exogenous proteins, and tagging sperm for subsequent sex- or function-based sorting. In this short review, we provide an outline of the current state of nanotechnology for biomedical applications in reproductive biology and present highlights from a series of our studies evaluating the use of specialized silica nanoparticles in boar sperm as a potential delivery vehicle into mammalian gametes. The encouraging data obtained already from the porcine model in our laboratory have formed the basis for ethical approval of similar experiments in human sperm, thereby bringing us a step closer toward the potential use of this novel technology in the clinical environment. PMID:26116055

  6. Sperm Proteome Maturation in the Mouse Epididymis

    PubMed Central

    Skerget, Sheri; Rosenow, Matthew A.; Petritis, Konstantinos; Karr, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, transit through the epididymis, which involves the acquisition, loss and modification of proteins, is required to confer motility and fertilization competency to sperm. The overall dynamics of maturation is poorly understood, and a systems level understanding of the complex maturation process will provide valuable new information about changes occurring during epididymal transport. We report the proteomes of sperm collected from the caput, corpus and cauda segments of the mouse epididymis, identifying 1536, 1720 and 1234 proteins respectively. This study identified 765 proteins that are present in sperm obtained from all three segments. We identified 1766 proteins that are potentially added (732) or removed (1034) from sperm during epididymal transit. Phenotypic analyses of the caput, corpus and cauda sperm proteomes identified 60 proteins that have known sperm phenotypes when mutated, or absent from sperm. Our analysis indicates that as much as one-third of proteins with known sperm phenotypes are added to sperm during epididymal transit. GO analyses revealed that cauda sperm are enriched for specific functions including sperm-egg recognition and motility, consistent with the observation that sperm acquire motility and fertilization competency during transit through the epididymis. In addition, GO analyses revealed that the immunity protein profile of sperm changes during sperm maturation. Finally, we identified components of the 26S proteasome, the immunoproteasome, and a proteasome activator in mature sperm. PMID:26556802

  7. The coevolution of ova defensiveness with sperm competitiveness in house mice.

    PubMed

    Firman, Rene C; Gomendio, Montserrat; Roldan, Eduardo R S; Simmons, Leigh W

    2014-04-01

    Theoretical models have suggested that sperm competition can lead to increased ova resistance to fertilization. While there is some comparative evidence that this might be true, there is no experimental evidence to show that ova defensiveness evolves in response to sperm competition. We performed a series of in vitro fertilization assays to gauge the fertilizability of ova produced by female house mice from experimental populations that evolved either with or without sperm competition. Our analysis revealed that after 24 generations of experimental evolution, females that evolved under a polygamous regime produced more defensive ova than females that evolved under a monogamous regime. We therefore provide the first direct line of evidence that sperm competition can generate sexual conflict at the gametic level and lead to asymmetries in fertilization rates among populations. Our results show that females respond to sperm competition via fertilization barriers that have the potential to mediate sperm entry. PMID:24642500

  8. Bicarbonate is required for migration of sperm epididymal protein DE (CRISP-1) to the equatorial segment and expression of rat sperm fusion ability.

    PubMed

    Da Ros, Vanina G; Munuce, María J; Cohen, Débora J; Marín-Briggiler, Clara I; Busso, Dolores; Visconti, Pablo E; Cuasnicú, Patricia S

    2004-05-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that sperm capacitation is a bicarbonate-dependent process. In the rat, capacitation has not been studied as much as in other species, mainly because of the difficulties in carrying out functional assays with this animal model. In the present study, we have examined the influence of bicarbonate in the overall rat sperm capacitation process by analyzing involvement of the anion in 1) protein tyrosine phosphorylation, 2) migration of epididymal protein DE (also known as CRISP-1) from the dorsal region to the equatorial segment of the sperm head that occurs during capacitation, and 3) ability of sperm to fuse with the egg. Incubation of sperm under capacitating conditions produced a time-dependent increase in protein tyrosine phosphorylation. This phosphorylation did not occur in the absence of HCO3- and rapidly increased by either exposure of sperm to HCO3- or replacement of the anion by a cAMP analog (dibutyryl-cAMP) and a phosphodiesterase inhibitor (pentoxifylline). The absence of HCO3- also produced a significant decrease in the percentage of cells showing migration of DE to the equatorial segment. This parameter was completely restored by addition of the anion, but dibutyryl-cAMP and pentoxifylline were not sufficient to overcome the decrease in DE migration. Sperm capacitated in the absence of HCO3- were unable to penetrate zona-free eggs independent of the presence of the anion during gamete coincubation. Exposure of these sperm to bicarbonate, or replacement of the anion by dibutyryl-cAMP and pentoxifylline, only partially restored the sperm fusion ability. Altogether, these results indicate that, in addition to its influence on protein tyrosine phosphorylation, bicarbonate is required to support other rat sperm capacitation- associated events, such as migration of DE to the equatorial segment, and expression of the ability of sperm to fuse with the egg. PMID:14711787

  9. Environmental Implications of Increased Bioenergy Production on Midwest Soil Landscapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prairie soil landscapes encompass over 16 million acres in Missouri and surrounding states. Much of this area has been degraded by erosion but is still used for grain production. Erosion has caused variable topsoil depth within fields which in turn has resulted in greater within-field variability of...

  10. Perennial Forage Kochia for Increased Production of Winter Grazed Pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grazing forage kochia (Kochia prostrata) during fall/winter has improved livestock health and reduced winter feeding costs. The objectives of this study were to compare forage production/quality and livestock performance of traditional winter pastures versus pastures with forage kochia. Two kochia...

  11. Disrupting Faculty Service: Using Technology to Increase Academic Service Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, Perry; Shemroske, Kenneth; Khayum, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Scholarly attention regarding faculty involvement has primarily focused on faculty opinions of shared governance and faculty influence on institutional decision-making. There has been limited attention given to academic service productivity and the effectiveness of traditional approaches toward the accomplishment of faculty service requirements.…

  12. An effective increase in milk production through triticale feeding.

    PubMed

    Derbal, Nora; Benbelkacem, A; Dib, Y

    2014-01-01

    Since the first studies in Algeria in 1999, 2002 and 2005, triticale has been used in arid and semi-arid areas mainly for livestock production. Efforts have been done for the utilization of triticale as hay, silage and hole grain to feed dairy cattle and small ruminants (sheep). Studies have shown that triticale could be easily integrated in the existing crop-livestock system of northern Algeria. In spite of the good results in the yield performance and adaptation to diverse environments, decision makers are not giving the necessary attention to triticale. Dairy cattle holders that tested the crop have adopted it quickly and developed it in an informal way. Now, more than 90% of the triticale seed business is in the hands of private farmers without any help or subsidies nor a good price policy to develop strongly this crop. The utilization of triticale in Algeria is roughly as follow: human consumption 5%, forage crop (hay or silage) 60% and 30% as feed grain, the remaining 5% are kept for sowing seed. In our studies we have compared different feed sources (barley, triticale, concentrate diet and mixtures) to dairy cattle and sheep. Triticale showed highly significantly better results for meat production and gave also an amazing response for dairy and sheep milk production in Algeria. Milk production of animals fed with triticale over exceeded the other feed sources by 26% to 53%; mean weight gain exhibited the same rates. PMID:26072583

  13. Sustainable Harvests Through Increased Utilization of Salmon By-Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The growing demand for fish meals and oils has produced a steady rise in the market price garnered by these commodities. However, the practice of discarding fish-processing wastes is still widespread. Alaskas fishing industry generates over one million metric tons of fish by-products each year, muc...

  14. Sunscreen products increase virus production through prophage induction in marine bacterioplankton.

    PubMed

    Danovaro, R; Corinaldesi, C

    2003-02-01

    Classical pollutants (e.g., hydrocarbon, pesticides) have been recently recognized to induce lytic cycle in lysogenic bacteria, but information on micro-pollutants is almost completely lacking. We investigated the effects of cosmetic sun products (sunscreen and solar oil) on viral abundance and bacterial activity. We found that both sunscreen and solar oil acted as pollutants, inducing viral development and controlling bacterial abundance and production, thus leading to an increase of the virus to bacterium ratio. Short-term experiments revealed that sunscreen supplementation induced the lytic cycle in a large fraction of total bacterial abundance (13-24% of bacteria, at low and high concentrations, respectively), whereas solar oil had a lower impact (6-9%). A synchronized development of the phage-host system was observed only after sunscreen addition. The addition of sunscreen, even at low concentrations, had a significant impact on all enzymatic activities (aminopeptidase, glucosidase, and phosphatase), which increased significantly. However, when enzymatic activities were normalized per cell, a selective enhancement was observed for certain enzymes (e.g., aminopeptidase) and inhibition for others (e.g., glucosidase). These results indicate that sunscreen products can modify C, N, and P biogeochemical cycling in seawater and increase virus abundance through prophage induction in marine bacterioplankton. PMID:12545312

  15. Methods for Cryopreservation of Guinea Fowl Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Vradi, va; Vgi, Barbara; Lipti, Krisztina; Barna, Judit

    2013-01-01

    Conservation of indigenous poultry species is an important part of the new Hungarian agricultural strategy. Semen cryopreservation is the most practical method for the long term storage of poultry genetic material. The objective was to compare four protocols for cryopreservation of guinea fowl sperm (slow and fast programmable, freezing in nitrogen vapor, and pellet) and three cryoprotectants (10% ethylene glycol, 6% dimethyl-formamide and 6% dimethyl-acetamide). The efficiency of the methods was examined by in vitro tests (subjective motility scoring, sperm concentration, morphological and live/dead sperm analysis with eosin-aniline staining). Thereafter, the two most promising methods were tested by artificial insemination of frozen-thawed semen (3 times a week for 3 weeks using 300 million spermatozoa/hen), followed by candling of incubated eggs, assessment of fertilization, embryonic death, and hatching rate. The survival rate of live, intact spermatozoa was greatest (p?0.05) in pellet method and the slow programmable protocol (with 10% ethylene glycol) (28.6 and 23.5%). The two best protocols (based on in vitro assessment of post-thaw semen quality) were subsequently tested in vivo with artificial insemination. The pellet method yielded a 64% fertility rate compared to slow protocol with only 30% fertility. Regardless, both freezing protocols significantly increased embryonic deaths compared to the control group (16,7; 9,1 and 8,3%, respectively). During the 3-week in vivo trial, fertility increased and early embryonic death decreased over time. According to the results the guinea fowl sperm could tolerate the fast freezing in pellet better than the slower freezing rates and resulted acceptable fertility rate. PMID:23658648

  16. Physiological hypercortisolemia increases proteolysis, glutamine, and alanine production

    SciTech Connect

    Darmaun, D.; Matthews, D.E.; Bier, D.M. Cornell Univ. Medical College, New York, NY )

    1988-09-01

    Physiological elevations of plasma cortisol levels, as are encountered in stress and severe trauma, were produced in six normal subjects by infusing them with hydrocortisone for 64 h. Amino acid kinetics were measured in the postabsorptive state using three 4-h infusions of L-(1-{sup 13}C)leucine, L-phenyl({sup 2}H{sub 5})phenylalanine, L-(2-{sup 15}N)glutamine, and L-(1-{sup 13}C)alanine tracers (1) before, (2) at 12 h, and (3) at 60 h of cortisol infusion. Before and throughout the study, the subjects ate a normal diet of adequate protein and energy intake. The cortisol infusion raised plasma cortisol levels significantly from 10 {plus minus} 1 to 32 {plus minus} 4 {mu}g/dl, leucine flux from 83 {plus minus} 3 to 97 {plus minus} 3 {mu}mol{center dot}kg{sup {minus}1}{center dot}h{sup {minus}1}, and phenylalanine flux from 34 {plus minus} 1 to 39 {plus minus} 1 (SE) {mu}mol{center dot}kg{sup {minus}1}{center dot}h{sup {minus}1} after 12 h of cortisol infusion. These increases were maintained until the cortisol infusion was terminated. These nearly identical 15% increases in two different essential amino acid appearance rates are reflective of increased whole body protein breakdown. Glutamine flux rose by 12 h of cortisol infusion and remained elevated at the same level at 64 h. The increase in flux was primarily due to a 55% increase in glutamine de novo synthesis. Alanine flux increased with acute hypercortisolemia and increased further at 60 h of cortisol infusion, a result primarily of increased alanine de novo synthesis. Insulin, alanine, and lactate plasma levels responded similarly with significant rises between the acute and chronic periods of cortisol infusion. Thus hypercortisolemia increases both protein breakdown and the turnover of important nonessential amino acids for periods of up to 64 h.

  17. Comprehensive meiotic segregation analysis of a 4-breakpoint t(1;3;6) complex chromosome rearrangement using single sperm array comparative genomic hybridization and FISH.

    PubMed

    Hornak, Miroslav; Vozdova, Miluse; Musilova, Petra; Prinosilova, Petra; Oracova, Eva; Linkova, Vlasta; Vesela, Katerina; Rubes, Jiri

    2014-10-01

    Complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCR) represent rare structural chromosome abnormalities frequently associated with infertility. In this study, meiotic segregation in spermatozoa of an infertile normospermic carrier of a 4-breakpoint t(1;3;6) CCR was analysed. A newly developed array comparative genomic hybridization protocol was used, and all chromosomes in 50 single sperm cells were simultaneously examined. Three-colour FISH was used to analyse chromosome segregation in 1557 other single sperm cells. It was also used to measure an interchromosomal effect; sperm chromatin structure assay was used to measure chromatin integrity. A high-frequency of unbalanced spermatozoa (84%) was observed, mostly arising from the 3:3 symmetrical segregation mode. Array comparative genomic hybridization was used to detect additional aneuploidies in two out of 50 spermatozoa (4%) in chromosomes not involved in the complex chromosome rearrangement. Significantly increased rates of diploidy and XY disomy were found in the CCR carrier compared with the control group (P < 0.001). Defective condensation of sperm chromatin was also found in 22.7% of spermatozoa by sperm chromatin structure assay. The results indicate that the infertility in the man with CCR and normal spermatozoa was caused by a production of chromosomally unbalanced, XY disomic and diploid spermatozoa and spermatozoa with defective chromatin condensation. PMID:25154015

  18. Sperm DNA quality evaluated by comet assay and sperm chromatin structure assay in stallions after unilateral orchiectomy.

    PubMed

    Serafini, R; Varner, D D; Bissett, W; Blanchard, T L; Teague, S R; Love, C C

    2015-09-15

    Unilateral orchiectomy (UO) may interfere with thermoregulation of the remaining testis caused by inflammation surrounding the incision site, thus altering normal spermatogenesis and consequently sperm quality. Two measures of sperm DNA quality (neutral comet assay and the sperm chromatin structure assay [SCSA]) were compared before UO (0 days) and at 14, 30, and 60 days after UO to determine whether sperm DNA changed after a mild testis stress (i.e., UO). The percent DNA in the comet tail was higher at 14 and 60 days compared to 0 days (P < 0.05) after UO. All other comet tail measures (i.e., length, moment, migration) were higher at all time periods after UO compared to 0 days (P < 0.05). Two SCSA measures (mean-αt, mode-αt) increased at 14 days after UO (P < 0.05), whereas two measures (SD-αt and COMP-αt) did not change. This study identified a decrease in sperm DNA quality using both the neutral comet assay and the SCSA, which was not identified using traditional measures of sperm quality. PMID:26104544

  19. Viewing death on television increases the appeal of advertised products.

    PubMed

    Dar-Nimrod, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    References to death abound in many television programs accessible to most people. Terror Management Theory postulates that existential anxiety, which death reminders activate, may reinforce materialistic tendencies. The current article explores the effect of a death reminder in television shows on the desirability of advertised products. Consistent with Terror Management Theory's predictions, in two studies participants show greater desire for products, which were advertised immediately following clips from programs that featured a death scene, compared with programs that did not. Cognitive accessibility of death predicted the appeal difference while changes in affect or interest in the show did not. The findings are discussed in light on affective and existential theories which make opposite predictions. Implications and future directions are considered. PMID:22468421

  20. Potential strategies for increasing drug-discovery productivity.

    PubMed

    Cumming, John G; Finlay, M Raymond V; Giordanetto, Fabrizio; Hemmerling, Martin; Lister, Troy; Sanganee, Hitesh; Waring, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    The productivity challenge facing the pharmaceutical industry is well documented. Strategies to improve productivity have mainly focused on enhancing efficiency, such as the application of Lean Six Sigma process improvement methods and the introduction of modeling and simulation in place of 'wet' experiments. While these strategies have their benefits, the real challenge is to improve effectiveness by reducing clinical failure rates. We advocate redesigning the screening cascade to identify and optimize novel compounds with improved efficacy against disease, not just with improved potency against the target. There should be greater use of disease-relevant phenotypic screens in conjunction with target-based assays to drive medicinal chemistry optimization. An opportunistic approach to polypharmacology is recommended. There should also be more emphasis on optimization of the molecular mechanism of action incorporating understanding of binding kinetics, consideration of covalent drug strategies and targeting allosteric modulators. PMID:24649955

  1. Viewing Death on Television Increases the Appeal of Advertised Products

    PubMed Central

    DAR-NIMROD, ILAN

    2012-01-01

    References to death abound in many television programs accessible to most people. Terror Management Theory (TMT) postulates that existential anxiety, which death reminders activate, may reinforce materialistic tendencies. The current paper explores the effect of a death reminder in television shows on the desirability of advertised products. Consistent with TMT's predictions, in two studies participants show greater desire for products, which were advertised immediately following clips from programs that featured a death scene, compared with programs that did not. Cognitive accessibility of death predicted the appeal difference while changes in affect or interest in the show did not. The findings are discussed in light on affective and existential theories which make opposite predictions. Implications and future directions are considered. PMID:22468421

  2. Methamidophos alters sperm function and DNA at different stages of spermatogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Uristegui-Acosta, Mayrut; Hernndez-Ochoa, Isabel; Snchez-Gutirrez, Manuel; Pia-Guzmn, Belem; Rafael-Vzquez, Leticia; Sols-Heredia, M J; Martnez-Aguilar, Gerardo; Quintanilla-Vega, Betzabet

    2014-09-15

    Methamidophos (MET) is a highly toxic organophosphate (OP) pesticide that is widely used in developing countries. MET has male reproductive effects, including decreased fertility. We evaluated MET effects on sperm quality, fertilization and DNA integrity, exploring the sensitivity of different stages of spermatogenesis. Adult male mice received MET (3.75 or 5mg/kg-bw/ip/day/4 days) and were euthanized 1, 28 or 45 days post-treatment (dpt) to evaluate MET's effects on epididymal maturation, meiosis or mitosis, respectively. Spermatozoa were obtained from the cauda epididymis-vas deferens and were evaluated for sperm quality, acrosome reaction (AR; Coomassie staining), mitochondrial membrane potential (by JC-1), DNA damage (comet assay), oxidative damage (malondialdehyde (MDA) production), in vitro fertilization and protein phosphorylation (immunodetection), and erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. At 1-dpt, MET inhibited AChE (43-57%) and increased abnormal cells (6%). While at 28- and 45-dpt, sperm motility and viability were significantly reduced with an increasing MET dose, and abnormal morphology increased at 5mg/kg/day/4 days. MDA and mitochondrial activity were not affected at any dose or time. DNA damage (OTM and %DNA) was observed at 5mg/kg/day/4 days in a time-dependent manner, whereas both parameters were altered in cells from mice exposed to 3.75 mg/kg/day/4 days only at 28-dpt. Depending on the time of collection, initial-, spontaneous- and induced-AR were altered at 5mg/kg/day/4 days, and the fertilization capacity also decreased. Sperm phosphorylation (at serine and tyrosine residues) was observed at all time points. Data suggest that meiosis and mitosis are the more sensitive stages of spermatogenesis for MET reproductive toxicity compared to epididymal maturation. PMID:24998973

  3. Increasing Cropping System Diversity Balances Productivity, Profitability and Environmental Health

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Adam S.; Hill, Jason D.; Chase, Craig A.; Johanns, Ann M.; Liebman, Matt

    2012-01-01

    Balancing productivity, profitability, and environmental health is a key challenge for agricultural sustainability. Most crop production systems in the United States are characterized by low species and management diversity, high use of fossil energy and agrichemicals, and large negative impacts on the environment. We hypothesized that cropping system diversification would promote ecosystem services that would supplement, and eventually displace, synthetic external inputs used to maintain crop productivity. To test this, we conducted a field study from 2003–2011 in Iowa that included three contrasting systems varying in length of crop sequence and inputs. We compared a conventionally managed 2-yr rotation (maize-soybean) that received fertilizers and herbicides at rates comparable to those used on nearby farms with two more diverse cropping systems: a 3-yr rotation (maize-soybean-small grain + red clover) and a 4-yr rotation (maize-soybean-small grain + alfalfa-alfalfa) managed with lower synthetic N fertilizer and herbicide inputs and periodic applications of cattle manure. Grain yields, mass of harvested products, and profit in the more diverse systems were similar to, or greater than, those in the conventional system, despite reductions of agrichemical inputs. Weeds were suppressed effectively in all systems, but freshwater toxicity of the more diverse systems was two orders of magnitude lower than in the conventional system. Results of our study indicate that more diverse cropping systems can use small amounts of synthetic agrichemical inputs as powerful tools with which to tune, rather than drive, agroecosystem performance, while meeting or exceeding the performance of less diverse systems. PMID:23071739

  4. Sea urchin sperm antigens mediating the acrosome reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Trimmer, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    The study of sea urchin sperm antigens mediating the acrosome reactions (AR) has been undertaken. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been isolated reacting with a number of sperm surface antigens. These mAbs have been used in functional assays to attempt to infer the roles of these proteins in the induction of the AR. These mAbs have also been used to isolate protein for biochemical characterization and reconstitution studies. mAbs reacting with a 210 kD protein of the sea urchin sperm plasma membrane have been used to identify this protein as playing a role in the regulation of ion fluxes during the induction of the AR. mAbs reacting with certain extracellular regions inhibit the induction of: the AR, the long duration {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake into the mitochondrion, and H{sup +} efflux. Addition of these same mAbs, however, induces an increase in sperm (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} to levels much higher than those induced by FSG, as monitored by the fluorescent Ca{sup 2+} indicators fura 2 and indo 1. This (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} increase occurs without an increase in pH{sub i}, and thus allows for the first time the analysis of the effects of increasing sperm (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} ion the absence of increased pH{sub i}.

  5. Cryopreservation and sperm DNA integrity.

    PubMed

    Gandini, L; Lombardo, F; Lenzi, A; Span, M; Dondero, F

    2006-01-01

    Cryopreservation of sperm is an extremely important issue in the field of male infertility as freezing can have detrimental effects on a variety of sperm functions, some of them not accessible to the traditional semen quality analysis. In this study, chromatin structure variations in human spermatozoa in semen were studied with the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA), both before and after cryopreservation. Samples were divided into two aliquots: the first was analysed without further treatment, while the second was stored in liquid nitrogen at -196 degrees C using standard cryopreservation techniques. The fresh and thawed aliquots were also assessed by light and fluorescence microscopy (after Acridine Orange staining, AO), and computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) of motility. Overall sperm quality was found to deteriorate after cryopreservation. When thawed spermatozoa were subjected to an extra swim-up round, a general improvement in nuclear maturity was seen in post-rise spermatozoa. PMID:16732411

  6. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors (FGFRs) in Human Sperm: Expression, Functionality and Involvement in Motility Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Saucedo, Lucía; Buffa, Gabriela N.; Rosso, Marina; Guillardoy, Tomás; Góngora, Adrian; Munuce, María J.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors receptors (FGFRs) have been widely characterized in somatic cells, but there is scarce evidence of their expression and function in mammalian gametes. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the expression of FGFRs in human male germ cells, to determine sperm FGFR activation by the FGF2 ligand and their participation in the regulation of sperm motility. The expression of FGFR1, 2, 3 and 4 mRNAs and proteins in human testis and localization of these receptors in germ cells of the seminiferous epithelium was demonstrated. In ejaculated sperm, FGFRs were localized to the acrosomal region and flagellum. Sperm exposure to FGF2 caused an increase in flagellar FGFR phosphorylation and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and protein kinase B (PKB or Akt) signaling pathways. Incubation with FGF2 led to a significant increase in the percentage of total and progressive sperm motility, as well as in sperm kinematics. All responses were prevented by sperm preincubation with BGJ398, a specific inhibitor of FGFR tyrosine kinase activity. In addition to confirming the expression of FGFRs in germ cells of the human testis, our study describes for the first time the presence, localization and functionality of human sperm FGFRs, and provides evidence of the beneficial effect of FGF2 upon sperm motility. PMID:25970615

  7. Dimethyl formamide improves the postthaw characteristics of sex-sorted and nonsorted stallion sperm.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Z; Morris, L H A; Maxwell, W M C; Grupen, C G

    2013-04-15

    Cryopreserved, sex-sorted stallion sperm has been shown to have poor fertility. During this study, the effects of cryoprotectant (glycerol [GLY] and dimethyl formamide [DMF]), cryoprotectant equilibration time (0, 30, 60, 90, or 120 minutes), and cryoprotectant concentration (2%, 3%, or 4% vol/vol) on stored sex-sorted and stored nonsorted stallion sperm were evaluated. Total motility, viability, and DNA integrity (determined using sperm chromatin structure assay) of sperm were assessed after thawing. Equilibration for 90 minutes improved total motility (33.8%) compared with 0 (28.5%) or 120 minutes (29.8%; P < 0.05), though viability was higher after 120 minutes (33.1%) compared with 0 (30.5%) or 30 minutes (31.0%; P < 0.01). The viability of nonsorted sperm decreased as cryoprotectant concentration increased (P < 0.001), and total motility of nonsorted sperm was higher when DMF alone was used (15.8%, 16.6%, and 24.0% for GLY, GLY and DMF, and DMF respectively; P < 0.001). Sex sorting was detrimental to the postthaw quality of sperm; at 45 minutes after thawing, total motility of nonsorted sperm was higher than that of sex-sorted sperm (37.4% vs. 5.6%; P < 0.001), the viability of sex-sorted sperm was lower than that of nonsorted sperm (12.4% vs. 30.0%; P < 0.001, averaged over postthaw time), and sex-sorted sperm had higher detectable DNA fragmentation index (DFI) (63.6% vs. 11.3%, P < 0.001) and mean DFI (285.1 vs. 211.3, P < 0.001) than nonsorted sperm. The viability of sex-sorted sperm was improved by GLY and DMF or DMF compared with GLY (22.6%, 25.3%, and 19.3%, respectively; P < 0.05), and the DNA integrity of sex-sorted sperm was improved by the use of DMF compared with GLY (detectable DFI, 60.2 vs. 66.8, P < 0.05; and mean DFI, 280.9 vs. 289.2, P < 0.05, respectively). In conclusion, postthaw characteristics of stored sex-sorted and stored nonsorted stallion sperm were improved by the use of DMF as a cryoprotectant, though the parameters to benefit differed between sorted and nonsorted sperm. PMID:23453787

  8. Sperm aggregations in female Agkistrodon piscivorus (Reptilia:Squamata): a histological and ultrastructural investigation.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Dustin S; Sever, David M

    2008-02-01

    Upon copulation in female Agkistrodon piscivorus, sperm migrate up the oviduct to sperm storage tubules (SSTs) in the posterior infundibulum. The epithelium of the SSTs is composed of ciliated and secretory cells and differs ultrastructurally from that of the epithelium lining the lumen of the posterior infundibulum. Sperm pass through an area composed primarily of ciliated cells at the opening of each gland before aligning themselves in parallel arrays with their nuclei facing an area composed primarily of secretory cells at the base of the tubules. Sperm are also found embedded inter- and intracellularly in the SSTs. The secretory vacuoles in the SSTs become highly electron dense after the start of the fall mating season along with the synthesis of lipid droplets. Histochemical analysis reveals that the alteration in secretory material density is caused by the production of neutral carbohydrates. Some sperm remain in aggregates in the nonglandular section of the posterior uterus until the time of ovulation. However, ultrastructural evidence indicates these sperm degrade before ovulation. Therefore, sperm in posterior aggregates have no role in fertilization of ovulated ova. The data presented here support the hypothesis that infundibular sperm storage is the mode that snakes utilize to sequester viable sperm until ovulation. PMID:17935196

  9. Sulfate addition increases methylmercury production in an experimental wetland.

    PubMed

    Jeremiason, Jeff D; Engstrom, Daniel R; Swain, Edward B; Nater, Edward A; Johnson, Brian M; Almendinger, James E; Monson, Bruce A; Kolka, Randy K

    2006-06-15

    Atmospheric mercury is the dominant Hg source to fish in northern Minnesota and elsewhere. However, atmospherically derived Hg must be methylated prior to accumulating in fish. Sulfate-reducing bacteria are thought to be the primary methylators of Hg in the environment. Previous laboratory and field mesocosm studies have demonstrated an increase in methylmercury (MeHg) levels in sediment and peatland porewaters following additions of sulfate. In the current ecosystem-scale study, sulfate was added to half of an experimental wetland at the Marcell Experimental Forest located in northeastern Minnesota, increasing annual sulfate load by approximately four times relative to the control half of the wetland. Sulfate was added on four separate occasions during 2002 and delivered via a sprinkler system constructed on the southeast half (1.0 ha) of the S6 experimental wetland. MeHg levels were monitored in porewater and in outflow from the wetland. Prior to the first sulfate addition, MeHg concentrations (filtered, 0.7 microm) were not statistically different between the control (0.47 +/- 0.10 ng L(-1), n = 12; mean +/- one standard error) and experimental 0.52 +/- 0.05 ng L(-1), n = 18) halves. Following the first addition in May 2002, MeHg porewater concentrations increased to 1.63 +/- 0.27 ng L(-1) two weeks after the addition, a 3-fold increase. Subsequent additions in July and September 2002 did not raise porewater MeHg, but the applied sulfate was not observed in porewaters 24 h after addition. MeHg concentrations in outflow from the wetland also increased leading to an estimated 2.4x increase of MeHg flux from the wetland. Our results demonstrate enhanced methylation and increased MeHg concentrations within the wetland and in outflow from the wetland suggesting that decreasing sulfate deposition rates would lower MeHg export from wetlands. PMID:16830545

  10. Rapid increases in tropospheric ozone production and export from China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, Willem W.; Neu, Jessica L.; Williams, Jason E.; Bowman, Kevin W.; Worden, John R.; Boersma, K. Folkert

    2015-09-01

    Rapid population growth and industrialization have driven substantial increases in Asian ozone precursor emissions over the past decade, with highly uncertain impacts on regional and global tropospheric ozone levels. According to ozonesonde measurements, tropospheric ozone concentrations at two Asian sites have increased by 1 to 3% per year since 2000, an increase thought to contribute to positive trends in the ozone levels observed at North America’s West Coast. However, model estimates of the Asian contribution to North American ozone levels are not well-constrained by observations. Here we interpret Aura satellite measurements of tropospheric concentrations of ozone and its precursor NO2, along with its largest natural source, stratospheric ozone, using the TM5 global chemistry-transport model. We show that tropospheric ozone concentrations over China have increased by about 7% between 2005 and 2010 in response to two factors: a rise in Chinese emissions by about 21% and increased downward transport of stratospheric ozone. Furthermore, we find that transport from China of ozone and its precursors has offset about 43% of the 0.42 DU reduction in free-tropospheric ozone over the western United States that was expected between 2005 and 2010 as a result of emissions reductions associated with federal, state and local air quality policies. We conclude that global efforts may be required to address regional air quality and climate change.

  11. Effects of Adding Sodium Nitroprusside to Semen Diluents on Motility, Viability and Lipid Peroxidation of Sperm in Holstein Bulls

    PubMed Central

    Khodaei, Hamidreza; Chamani, Mohammad; Mahdavi, Behnaz; Akhondi, Ali Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Background Nitric oxide (NO) that plays important role in all sexual activities of animals is made from the amino acid L-arginine by the enzymatic action of NO synthase (NOS). NO makes a band with sulfur-iron complexes, but due to production of steroid sexual hormones related to the enzymes involved in this complex, NO can change the activity of these enzymes. NO affects many cells including vein endothelial cells, macrophages and mast cells. These cells are also found in Leydig cells; therefore, they are important source of NO in testis tissue. Therefore, minimizing damages to sperm at the time of freezing thawing process are really important. The aim of this study was to determine the appropriate NO concentration to be added to the freezing extender to improve the quality of thawed sperm. Materials and Methods In this experimental randomized study, sperms of four Holstein bulls with an average age of 4 were collected twice a week for 3 weeks. They received sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in concentrations of 0, 10, 50 and 100 nmol/ml. Data analysis was performed using the special issue and static (SAS) 98 software. Also, mean comparison was done using Duncan’s multiple ranges test (P<0.05).This research was conducted at the laboratory of Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran at spring and summer of 2013. Results All concentrations of SNP used was found to increase motility and viability of spermatozoa at 1, 2 and 3 hours after thawing, significantly (P<0.05), but there was no significant difference at zero time. Different concentrations of SNP reduced the membrane lipid peroxidation level of sperm and increased acrosome membranes integrity, implying that SNP generally improved samples membranes, especially in 50 and 100 nmol/ml concentrations. Conclusion According to the obtained results, addition of SNP to semen diluents increases motility and viability of spermatozoa. Also, it reduces membrane lipid peroxidation level that leads to improved sperm function. PMID:26985340

  12. Acrosome markers of human sperm.

    PubMed

    Ito, Chizuru; Toshimori, Kiyotaka

    2016-03-01

    Molecular biomarkers that can assess sperm acrosome status are very useful for evaluating sperm quality in the field of assisted reproductive technology. In this review, we introduce and discuss the localization and function of acrosomal proteins that have been well studied. Journal databases were searched using keywords, including "human acrosome", "localization", "fertilization-related protein", "acrosomal membrane", "acrosomal matrix", "acrosome reaction", "knockout mouse", and "acrosome marker". PMID:26748928

  13. The relationship between paternal age, sex ratios, and aneuploidy frequencies in human sperm, as assessed by multicolor FISH

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.; Spriggs, E. |; Ko, E.

    1995-12-01

    We studied the frequencies of X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm, diploidy and disomy for chromosomes 1, 12, X, and Y in sperm from 10 normal men aged 21 - 52 years, to determine whether there was any relationship between donor age and any of these variables. Multicolor FISH was used to control for lack of probe hybridization and to distinguish diploid sperm from disomic sperm. A minimum of 10,000 sperm per donor was evaluated for each chromosome, for a total of 225,846 sperm studied. Sperm were considered disomic if two fluorescent signals were separated by a minimal distance of one signal domain. The mean frequencies of X- and Y-bearing sperm were 50.1% and 49.0%, respectively; not significantly different from 50%. There was no correlation between paternal age and {open_quotes}sex ratio {close_quotes} in sperm. Similarly, there was no association between the frequency of diploid sperm (mean, .16%; range, .06%-.42%) and donor age. For disomy frequencies, there was no relationship between donor age and disomy 12 (mean, .16%; range, .10%-.25%), XX (mean, .07%; range, .03%-.17%), and XY sperm (mean, .16%; range, .08%-.24%). There was a significant increase in the frequency of YY sperm (P = .04; mean, .18%; range, .10%-.43%) and disomy 1 sperm (P = .01; mean, .11%; range, .05%-.18%) with donor age. In summary, our results do not support a correlation between paternal age and sex ratio or diploidy. A relationship between paternal age and disomy was observed for disomy 1 and YY sperm but not for disomy 12, XX or XY sperm. 37 refs., 3 tabs.

  14. Effect of aracnotoxin from Latrodectus mactans on bovine sperm function: modulatory action of bovine oviduct cells and their secretions.

    PubMed

    Gmez, P N; Alvarez, J G; Parodi, J; Romero, F; Snchez, R

    2012-05-01

    Latrodectus mactans' aracnotoxin (Atx) induces changes in sperm function that could be used as a co-adjuvant in male contraceptive barrier methods. This effect includes the suppression of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), an event necessary for capacitation, chemotaxis and acrosome reaction (AR). The sperm that are not trapped by the barrier method can reach the oviduct before fertilisation and be exposed to the secretions of the oviducts. This study evaluated the effect of bovine tubal explants (TU) and conditioned media (CM) from the ampullar and isthmal regions on spermatozoa exposed to Atx. Thawed bovine sperm were incubated with Atx, TU and CM from the ampullar and isthmal regions for 4 h and then DNA integrity, intracellular ROS and lysophosphatidylcholine-induced AR were determined. Spermatozoa exposed to Atx and co-incubated with TU and CM for 4 h produced an increase in sperm DNA damage, a decrease in ROS production and a decrease in %AR, compared with the control. A similar result was obtained from the co-incubation of spermatozoa with Atx. In conclusion, the effect of Atx is not modified by tubal cells or their secretions and this opens the door to future studies to evaluate the application of synthetic peptides obtained from Atx as a co-adjuvant of contraceptive barrier methods. PMID:22211875

  15. Golbal Economic and Environmental Impacts of Increased Bioenergy Production

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace Tyner

    2012-05-30

    The project had three main objectives: to build and incorporate an explicit biomass energy sector within the GTAP analytical framework and data base; to provide an analysis of the impact of renewable fuel standards and other policies in the U.S. and E.U, as well as alternative biofuel policies in other parts of the world, on changes in production, prices, consumption, trade and poverty; and to evaluate environmental impacts of alternative policies for bioenergy development. Progress and outputs related to each objective are reported.

  16. The increasing importance of herbicides in worldwide crop production.

    PubMed

    Gianessi, Leonard P

    2013-10-01

    Herbicide use is increasingly being adopted around the world. Many developing countries (India, China, Bangladesh) are facing shortages of workers to hand weed fields as millions of people move from rural to urban areas. In these countries, herbicides are far cheaper and more readily available than labor for hand weeding. History shows that in industrializing countries in the past, including the United States, Germany, Japan and South Korea, the same phenomenon has occurred-as workers have left agriculture, herbicides have been adopted. It is inevitable that herbicide use will increase in sub-Saharan Africa, not only because millions of people are leaving rural areas, creating shortages of hand weeders, but also because of the need to increase crop yields. Hand weeding has never been a very efficient method of weed control-often performed too late and not frequently enough. Uncontrolled weeds have been a major cause of low crop yields in sub-Saharan Africa for a long time. In many parts of the world, herbicides are being increasingly used to replace tillage in order to improve environmental conditions. In comparison with tillage, herbicide use reduces erosion, fuel use, greenhouse gas emissions and nutrient run-off and conserves water. PMID:23794176

  17. Increasing Your Productivity with Web-Based Surveys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wissmann, Mary; Stone, Brittney; Schuster, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Web-based survey tools such as Survey Monkey can be used in many ways to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of Extension professionals. This article describes how Survey Monkey has been used at the state and county levels to collect community and internal staff information for the purposes of program planning, administration, evaluation and

  18. Increased calf production in cattle selected for twin ovulations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of increasing fetal numbers and their distribution between the left and right uterine horns on calf survival, calf BW at birth and weaning, gestation length, dystocia, and calf sex ratio were evaluated for single (n = 1,587), twin (n = 2,440), and triplet calves (n = 147) born to primipa...

  19. Increasing Your Productivity with Web-Based Surveys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wissmann, Mary; Stone, Brittney; Schuster, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Web-based survey tools such as Survey Monkey can be used in many ways to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of Extension professionals. This article describes how Survey Monkey has been used at the state and county levels to collect community and internal staff information for the purposes of program planning, administration, evaluation and…

  20. Heat Shock Protein 90 Has Roles in Intracellular Calcium Homeostasis, Protein Tyrosine Phosphorylation Regulation, and Progesterone-Responsive Sperm Function in Human Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aijun; Jiang, Youfang; Xie, Haifeng; Shi, Qixian; Zhang, Songying; Ni, Ya

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 plays critical roles in client protein maturation, signal transduction, protein folding and degradation, and morphological evolution; however, its function in human sperm is not fully understood. Therefore, our objective in this study was to elucidate the mechanism by which heat shock protein 90 exerts its effects on human sperm function. By performing indirect immunofluorescence staining, we found that heat shock protein 90 was localized primarily in the neck, midpiece, and tail regions of human sperm, and that its expression increased with increasing incubation time under capacitation conditions. Geldanamycin, a specific inhibitor of heat shock protein 90, was shown to inhibit this increase in heat shock protein 90 expression in western blotting analyses. Using a multifunctional microplate reader to examine Fluo-3 AM-loaded sperm, we observed for the first time that inhibition of heat shock protein 90 by using geldanamycin significantly decreased intracellular calcium concentrations during capacitation. Moreover, western blot analysis showed that geldanamycin enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins, including heat shock protein 90, in a dose-dependent manner. The effects of geldanamycin on human sperm function in the absence or presence of progesterone was evaluated by performing chlortetracycline staining and by using a computer-assisted sperm analyzer. We found that geldanamycin alone did not affect sperm capacitation, hyperactivation, and motility, but did so in the presence of progesterone. Taken together, these data suggest that heat shock protein 90, which increases in expression in human sperm during capacitation, has roles in intracellular calcium homeostasis, protein tyrosine phosphorylation regulation, and progesterone-stimulated sperm function. In this study, we provide new insights into the roles of heat shock protein 90 in sperm function. PMID:25541943

  1. Writing Retreat Increases Productivity And Community For Women Geoscientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, S.; Holmes, M.

    2011-12-01

    Five, weeklong geoscientist writing retreats have been completed with an NSF ADANCE PAID grant. During the five nights and four and a half days, eight to twenty-four academics have gathered in a rural setting outside of Boston to get to focus on writing papers and proposals while getting to know each other. Participants range in age and experience from graduate students to emeritus professors. Over twenty papers and proposals acknowledge their production, in part to this writing retreat. Impact extends beyond papers as informal mentoring and discussions at meals and in the evenings centers on succeeding in academia. Research and teaching are foremost in the conversation. Post-docs learn strategies for applying for jobs and grants, and senior professors discuss strategies for working with academic administrations, running departments and mentoring students. They also learn new technologies and perspectives from younger participants. Particularly helpful are discussions on work-life balance. Networking opportunities extend beyond the retreat as participants join each other at their home institutions to give seminars, develop research projects and mentor each other's students. All weeks follow the same format. Participants arrive Sunday and meet during an evening welcome reception. Monday is devoted to writing. Tuesday a writing coach is available. In the morning, using examples from the scientific literature, she discusses strategies and techniques for writing clearly at a group session. During the afternoon, participants work with the coach individually or in small groups to improve their own writing projects. Wednesday evening a skill session is offered on a topic of interest. These have included undergraduate research, NSF funding, productive techniques for dealing with conflict, and generational characteristics and attitudes, which can hamper communication. A Thursday evening wrap-up session prepares participants for Friday's departure. We believe that this model is replicable to other regions or to single institutions. All that is really required is space, meals, and a writing coach or a journal editor. Costs are very reasonable, considering the positive lifelong impact on this most necessary skill for the productive scientist.

  2. Science Video Journals to Increase Productivity in Research and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, K. M.

    2013-12-01

    Research in both the physical and biological sciences chronically suffers from the low productivity and reproducibility of experimental studies. This is due in part because the traditional text-based format of science journals cannot provide an adequate description of complex research procedures. This creates a critical 'bottleneck' problem of knowledge transfer for research and education. Addressing this challenge, a new generation of science journals employs online video to provide a systematic visualized publication of experimental studies. This presentation will provide an overview of the growing field of video publication and discuss its technical challenges, implications for scholarly communication and acceptance in the academic and library community. Results and recently conducted case studies will be shown in support of video publications as a valid communication venue in scientific publishing.

  3. Cinnamic Acid Increases Lignin Production and Inhibits Soybean Root Growth

    PubMed Central

    Salvador, Victor Hugo; Lima, Rogrio Barbosa; dos Santos, Wanderley Dantas; Soares, Anderson Ricardo; Bhm, Paulo Alfredo Feitoza; Marchiosi, Rogrio; Ferrarese, Maria de Lourdes Lucio; Ferrarese-Filho, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    Cinnamic acid is a known allelochemical that affects seed germination and plant root growth and therefore influences several metabolic processes. In the present work, we evaluated its effects on growth, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) oxidase and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) activities and lignin monomer composition in soybean (Glycine max) roots. The results revealed that exogenously applied cinnamic acid inhibited root growth and increased IAA oxidase and C4H activities. The allelochemical increased the total lignin content, thus altering the sum and ratios of the p-hydroxyphenyl (H), guaiacyl (G), and syringyl (S) lignin monomers. When applied alone or with cinnamic acid, piperonylic acid (PIP, a quasi-irreversible inhibitor of C4H) reduced C4H activity, lignin and the H, G, S monomer content compared to the cinnamic acid treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that exogenously applied cinnamic acid can be channeled into the phenylpropanoid pathway via the C4H reaction, resulting in an increase in H lignin. In conjunction with enhanced IAA oxidase activity, these metabolic responses lead to the stiffening of the cell wall and are followed by a reduction in soybean root growth. PMID:23922685

  4. Butyrate increases IL-23 production by stimulated dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Bradford E.; Zhang, Min; Owyang, Stephanie Y.; Cole, Tyler S.; Wang, Teresa W.; Luther, Jay; Veniaminova, Natalia A.; Merchant, Juanita L.; Chen, Chun-Chia; Huffnagle, Gary B.

    2012-01-01

    The gut microbiota is essential for the maintenance of intestinal immune homeostasis and is responsible for breaking down dietary fiber into short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Butyrate, the most abundant bioactive SCFA in the gut, is a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi), a class of drug that has potent immunomodulatory properties. This characteristic of butyrate, along with our previous discovery that conventional dendritic cells (DCs) are required for the development of experimental colitis, led us to speculate that butyrate may modulate DC function to regulate gut mucosal homeostasis. We found that butyrate, in addition to suppressing LPS-induced bone marrow-derived DC maturation and inhibiting DC IL-12 production, significantly induced IL-23 expression. The upregulation of mRNA subunit IL-23p19 at the pretranslational level was consistent with the role of HDACi on the epigenetic modification of gene expression. Furthermore, the mechanism of IL-23p19 upregulation was independent of Stat3 and ZBP89. Coculture of splenocytes with LPS-stimulated DCs pretreated with or without butyrate was performed and showed a significant induction of IL-17 and IL-10. We demonstrated further the effect of butyrate in vivo using dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis and found that the addition of butyrate in the drinking water of mice worsened DSS-colitis. This is in contrast to the daily intraperitoneal butyrate injection of DSS-treated mice, which mildly improved disease severity. Our study highlights a novel effect of butyrate in upregulating IL-23 production of activated DCs and demonstrates a difference in the host response to the oral vs. systemic route of butyrate administration. PMID:23086919

  5. Increased root production in soybeans grown under space flight conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, H. G.; Piastuch, W. C.

    The GENEX ({Gen}e {Ex}pression) spaceflight experiment (flown on STS-87) was developed to investigate whether direct and/or indirect effects of microgravity are perceived as an external stimulus for soybean seedling response. Protocols were designed to optimize root and shoot formation, gas exchange and moisture uniformity. Six surface sterilized soybean seeds (Glycine max cv McCall) were inserted into each of 32 autoclaved plastic seed growth pouches containing an inner germination paper sleeve (for a total of 192 seeds). The pouches were stowed within a mid-deck locker until Mission Flight Day 10, at which time an astronaut added water to each pouch (thereby initiating the process of seed germination on-orbit), and subsequently transferred them to four passive, light-tight aluminum canisters called BRIC-60s (Biological Research In Canisters). We report here on the morphological characteristics of: (1) the recovered flight material, (2) the corresponding ground control population, plus (3) additional controls grown on the ground under clinostat conditions. No significant growth differences were found between the flight, ground control and clinorotated treatments for either the cotyledons or hypocotyls. There were, however, significantly longer primary roots produced in the flight population relative to the ground control population, which in turn had significantly longer primary roots than the clinorotated population. This same pattern was observed relative to the production of lateral roots (flight > control > clinorotated). Taken together with previous literature reports, we believe that there is now sufficient evidence to conclude that plants grown under conditions of microgravity will generally exhibit enhanced root production relative to their ground control counterparts. The mechanism underlying this phenomenon is open to speculation. Funded under NASA Contract NAS10-12180.

  6. Assessment of chromosomal abnormalities in sperm of infertile men using sperm karyotyping and multicolour fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Moosani, N.; Martin, R.H.

    1994-09-01

    Individuals with male factor infertility resulting from idiopathic oligo-, astheno- or teratozoospermia are frequently offered IVF in an attempt to increase their chances of having a child. A concern remains whether these infertile males have an elevated risk of transmitting chromosomal abnormalities to their offspring. Sperm chromosomal complements from these men were assayed using the human sperm/hamster oocyte fusion system and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on sperm nuclei. For each of 5 infertile patients, 100 sperm karyotypes were analyzed and multicolour FISH analysis was performed on a minimum of 10,000 sperm nuclei for each chromosome-specific DNA probe for chromosomes 1 (pUC1.77), 12 (D12Z3), X (XC) and Y (DYZ3). As a group, the infertile patients showed increased frequencies of both numerical ({chi}{sup 2}=17.26, {proportional_to} <0.001) and total abnormalities ({chi}{sup 2}=7.78, {proportional_to} <0.01) relative to control donors when assessed by sperm karyotypes. Analysis of sperm nuclei by FISH indicated a significant increase in the frequency of disomy for chromosome 1 in three of the five patients as compared to control donors ({chi}{sup 2}>8.35, {proportional_to} <0.005). In addition, the frequency of XY disomy was significantly higher in four of the five patients studied by FISH ({chi}{sup 2}>10.58, {proportional_to}<0.005), suggesting that mis-segregation caused by the failure of the XY bivalent to pair may play a role in idiopathic male infertility.

  7. Sperm-Specific Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase - An Evolutionary Acquisition of Mammals.

    PubMed

    Muronetz, V I; Kuravsky, M L; Barinova, K V; Schmalhausen, E V

    2015-12-01

    This review is focused on the mammalian sperm-specific glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDS). GAPDS plays the major role in the production of energy required for sperm cell movement and does not perform non-glycolytic functions that are characteristic of the somatic isoenzyme of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The GAPDS sequence is composed of 408 amino acid residues and includes an additional N-terminal region of 72 a.a. that binds the protein to the sperm tail cytoskeleton. GAPDS is present only in the sperm cells of mammals and lizards, possibly providing them with certain evolutionary advantages in reproduction. In this review, studies concerning the problems of GAPDS isolation, its catalytic properties, and its structural features are described in detail. GAPDS is much more stable compared to the somatic isoenzyme, perhaps due to the necessity of maintaining the enzyme function in the absence of protein expression. The site-directed mutagenesis approach revealed the two GAPDS-specific proline residues, as well as three salt bridges, which seem to be the basis of the increased stability of this protein. As distinct from the somatic isoenzyme, GAPDS exhibits positive cooperativity in binding of the coenzyme NAD+. The key role in transduction of structural changes induced by NAD+ is played by the salt bridge D311-H124. Disruption of this salt bridge cancels GAPDS cooperativity and twofold increases its enzymatic activity instead. The expression of GAPDS was detected in some melanoma cells as well. Its role in the development of certain pathologies, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, is discussed. PMID:26878573

  8. Beyond Testis Size: Links between Spermatogenesis and Sperm Traits in a Seasonal Breeding Mammal

    PubMed Central

    Pintus, Eliana; Ros-Santaella, José Luis; Garde, José Julián

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a costly process that is expected to be under selection to maximise sperm quantity and quality. Testis size is often regarded as a proxy measure of sperm investment, implicitly overlooking the quantitative assessment of spermatogenesis. An enhanced understanding of testicular function, beyond testis size, may reveal further sexual traits involved in sperm quantity and quality. Here, we first estimated the inter-male variation in testicular function and sperm traits in red deer across the breeding and non-breeding seasons. Then, we analysed the relationships between the testis mass, eight parameters of spermatogenic function, and seven parameters of sperm quality. Our findings revealed that the Sertoli cell number and function parameters vary greatly between red deer males, and that spermatogenic activity co-varies with testis mass and sperm quality across the breeding and non-breeding seasons. For the first time in a seasonal breeder, we found that not only is the Sertoli cell number important in determining testis mass (r = 0.619, p = 0.007 and r = 0.248, p = 0.047 for the Sertoli cell number assessed by histology and cytology, respectively), but also sperm function (r = 0.703, p = 0.002 and r = 0.328, p = 0.012 for the Sertoli cell number assessed by histology and cytology, respectively). Testicular histology also revealed that a high Sertoli cell number per tubular cross-section is associated with high sperm production (r = 0.600, p = 0.009). Sperm production and function were also positively correlated (r = 0.384, p = 0.004), suggesting that these traits co-vary to maximise sperm fertilisation ability in red deer. In conclusion, our findings contribute to the understanding of the dynamics of spermatogenesis, and reveal new insights into the role of testicular function and the Sertoli cell number on testis size and sperm quality in red deer. PMID:26430740

  9. Mating systems and protein–protein interactions determine evolutionary rates of primate sperm proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Julia; Rosenkranz, David; Herlyn, Holger

    2014-01-01

    To assess the relative impact of functional constraint and post-mating sexual selection on sequence evolution of reproductive proteins, we examined 169 primate sperm proteins. In order to recognize potential genome-wide trends, we additionally analysed a sample of altogether 318 non-reproductive (brain and postsynaptic) proteins. Based on cDNAs of eight primate species (Anthropoidea), we observed that pre-mating sperm proteins engaged in sperm composition and assembly show significantly lower incidence of site-specific positive selection and overall lower non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates (dN/dS) across sites as compared with post-mating sperm proteins involved in capacitation, hyperactivation, acrosome reaction and fertilization. Moreover, database screening revealed overall more intracellular protein interaction partners in pre-mating than in post-mating sperm proteins. Finally, post-mating sperm proteins evolved at significantly higher evolutionary rates than pre-mating sperm and non-reproductive proteins on the branches to multi-male breeding species, while no such increase was observed on the branches to unimale and monogamous species. We conclude that less protein–protein interactions of post-mating sperm proteins account for lowered functional constraint, allowing for stronger impact of post-mating sexual selection, while the opposite holds true for pre-mating sperm proteins. This pattern is particularly strong in multi-male breeding species showing high female promiscuity. PMID:24307672

  10. Optical tweezers and non-ratiometric fluorescent-dye-based studies of respiration in sperm mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Timothy; Shi, Linda Z.; Zhu, Qingyuan; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Berns, Michael W.

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how the mitochondrial membrane potential affects sperm motility using laser tweezers and a non-ratiometric fluorescent probe, DiOC6(3). A 1064 nm Nd:YVO4 continuous wave laser was used to trap motile sperm at a power of 450 mW in the trap spot. Using customized tracking software, the curvilinear velocity (VCL) and the escape force from the laser tweezers were measured. Human (Homo sapiens), dog (Canis lupis familiaris) and drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) sperm were treated with DiOC6(3) to measure the membrane potential in the mitochondria-rich sperm midpieces. Sperm from all three species exhibited an increase in fluorescence when treated with the DiOC6(3). When a cyanide inhibitor (CCCP) of aerobic respiration was applied, sperm of all three species exhibited a reduction in fluorescence to pre-dye levels. With respect to VCL and escape force, the CCCP had no effect on dog or human sperm, suggesting a major reliance upon anaerobic respiration (glycolysis) for ATP in these two species. Based on the preliminary study on drill sperm, CCCP caused a drop in the VCL, suggesting potential reliance on both glycolysis and aerobic respiration for motility. The results demonstrate that optical trapping in combination with DiOC6(3) is an effective way to study sperm motility and energetics.

  11. No Experimental Evidence for Sneaking in a West African Cichlid Fish with Extremely Long Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Langen, Kathrin; Thnken, Timo; Bakker, Theo C. M.

    2013-01-01

    Alternative reproductive tactics are widespread in fishes, increasing the potential for sperm competition. Sperm competition has enormous impact on both variation in sperm numbers and sperm size. In cichlids, the sperm competition risk is very divergent and longer sperm are usually interpreted as adaptation to sperm competition. Here we examined whether sneaking tactics exist in Pelvicachromis taeniatus, a socially monogamous cichlid with biparental brood care from West Africa. The small testis indicates low gonadal investment which is typical for genetically monogamous species. In contrast, sperm length with up to 85??m is extraordinarily long. We examined the reproductive behaviour of ten groups with a male-biased sex ratio under semi-natural conditions via continuous video recording. We recorded spawning site preferences and correlates of reproductive success and conducted paternity tests using microsatellites. Safe breeding sites that could be successfully defended were preferred. All offspring could be assigned to their parents and no multiple paternities were detected. Body size of spawning pairs predicted their spawning probability and offspring hatching rate suggesting benefits from mating with large individuals. Our study suggests low risk of sperm competition under the given conditions in P. taeniatus and thus first evidence for genetic monogamy in a substrate breeding cichlid. PMID:24386589

  12. Store-operated calcium channel regulates the chemotactic behavior of ascidian sperm.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Manabu; Ishikawa, Makiko; Izumi, Hiroko; De Santis, Rosaria; Morisawa, Masaaki

    2003-01-01

    The sperm-activating and -attracting factor released from the eggs of the ascidians Ciona intestinalis and Ciona savignyi requires extracellular Ca(2+) for activating sperm motility and eliciting chemotactic behavior of the activated sperm toward the egg. Here, we show that modulators of the store-operated Ca(2+) channel, SK&F96365, Ni(2+), 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane, and thapsigargin inhibit the chemotactic behavior of the ascidian sperm; on the other hand, blockers of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels did not inhibit the chemotaxis, even though they inhibited the sperm activation operated by voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels. The blockers of store-operated Ca(2+) channels also inhibited the asymmetrical flagellar beating and turning movements of the ascidian sperm, which are typical signs of sperm chemotaxis. Depletion of internal Ca(2+) stores by thapsigargin induced capacitative Ca(2+) entry into the sperm, which was blocked by SK&F96365. These results suggest that the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration increase through the store-operated Ca(2+) channels induces asymmetrical flagellar movements to establish the chemotactic behavior of the sperm. PMID:12518063

  13. Pronuclear epigenetic modification of protamine deficient human sperm following injection into mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Hoda; Mohseni-Kouchesfehani, Homa; Mohammadi-Sangcheshmeh, Abdollah; Farifteh-Nobijari, Fattaneh; Salehi, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    Epigenetic abnormalities and abnormal chromatin structure in sperm may lead to male infertility. Protamine deficiency is among the disorders of chromatin structure in sperm. The study of epigenetic changes in male pronuclei is necessary since abnormal sperm is sometimes used to create embryos using assisted reproductive techniques. The present study was carried out to compare epigenetic global marks in male pronuclei derived from normal and protamine deficient sperm cells. To do so, interspecies fertilization was used to obtain the male pronucleus. Normal and protamine deficient sperm cells, which were identified by chromomycin A3 staining, were injected into mouse oocytes. Oocytes were cultured until pronuclear formation and were then labeled with different antibodies (anti 5-methylcytosine, anti 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, and anti acetyl H4K12). Based on the fluorescence intensity, the level of each of these epigenetic factors was determined and they revealed a significant relationship between the level of sperm protamine deficiency and sperm epigenetic factors. Protamine deficiency was found to be associated with an increased methylation (p=0) and decreased hydroxymethylation rate (p=0.015) of the male pronucleus chromatin. However, no association was found between protamine deficiency and the level of H4K12 acetylation (p=0.548). Also, the efficiency of fertilization in protamine deficient sperm cells was less than normal. These results suggest that protamine deficient sperm cells lead to the formation of epigenetically altered pronuclei. PMID:26901234

  14. Sperm Competition in Humans: Mate Guarding Behavior Negatively Correlates with Ejaculate Quality

    PubMed Central

    Leivers, Samantha; Rhodes, Gillian; Simmons, Leigh W.

    2014-01-01

    In species where females mate with multiple males, the sperm from these males must compete to fertilise available ova. Sexual selection from sperm competition is expected to favor opposing adaptations in males that function either in the avoidance of sperm competition (by guarding females from rival males) or in the engagement in sperm competition (by increased expenditure on the ejaculate). The extent to which males may adjust the relative use of these opposing tactics has been relatively neglected. Where males can successfully avoid sperm competition from rivals, one might expect a decrease in their expenditure on tactics for the engagement in sperm competition and vice versa. In this study, we examine the relationship between mate guarding and ejaculate quality using humans as an empirical model. We found that men who performed fewer mate guarding behaviors produced higher quality ejaculates, having a greater concentration of sperm, a higher percentage of motile sperm and sperm that swam faster and less erratically. These effects were found independent of lifestyle factors or factors related to male quality. Our findings suggest that male expenditure on mate guarding and on the ejaculate may represent alternative routes to paternity assurance in humans. PMID:25250582

  15. Successful Long-Term Preservation of Rat Sperm by Freeze-Drying

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Takehito; Serikawa, Tadao

    2012-01-01

    Background Freeze-drying sperm has been developed as a new preservation method where liquid nitrogen is no longer necessary. An advantage of freeze-drying sperm is that it can be stored at 4C and transported at room temperature. Although the successful freeze-drying of sperm has been reported in a number of animals, the possibility of long-term preservation using this method has not yet been studied. Methodology/Principal Findings Offspring were obtained from oocytes fertilized with rat epididymal sperm freeze-dried using a solution containing 10 mM Tris and 1 mM EDTA adjusted to pH 8.0. Tolerance of testicular sperm to freeze-drying was increased by pre-treatment with diamide. Offspring with normal fertility were obtained from oocytes fertilized with freeze-dried epididymal sperm stored at 4C for 5 years. Conclusions and Significance Sperm with SS cross-linking in the thiol-disulfide of their protamine were highly tolerant to freeze-drying, and the fertility of freeze-dried sperm was maintained for 5 years without deterioration. This is the first report to demonstrate the successful freeze-drying of sperm using a new and simple method for long-term preservation. PMID:22496889

  16. Store-operated calcium channel regulates the chemotactic behavior of ascidian sperm

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Manabu; Ishikawa, Makiko; Izumi, Hiroko; De Santis, Rosaria; Morisawa, Masaaki

    2003-01-01

    The sperm-activating and -attracting factor released from the eggs of the ascidians Ciona intestinalis and Ciona savignyi requires extracellular Ca2+ for activating sperm motility and eliciting chemotactic behavior of the activated sperm toward the egg. Here, we show that modulators of the store-operated Ca2+ channel, SK&F96365, Ni2+, 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane, and thapsigargin inhibit the chemotactic behavior of the ascidian sperm; on the other hand, blockers of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels did not inhibit the chemotaxis, even though they inhibited the sperm activation operated by voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. The blockers of store-operated Ca2+ channels also inhibited the asymmetrical flagellar beating and turning movements of the ascidian sperm, which are typical signs of sperm chemotaxis. Depletion of internal Ca2+ stores by thapsigargin induced capacitative Ca2+ entry into the sperm, which was blocked by SK&F96365. These results suggest that the intracellular Ca2+ concentration increase through the store-operated Ca2+ channels induces asymmetrical flagellar movements to establish the chemotactic behavior of the sperm. PMID:12518063

  17. Correlation between sperm ultrastructure in infertile patients with abnormal sperm morphology and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    He, M; Tan, L

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the correlation between sperm ultrastructure in infertile patients with abnormal sperm morphology and DNA damage. Three unusual sperm morphologies were selected for the experimental group namely case 1 (95% headless sperm), case 2 (98% headless sperm), and case 3 (100% headless sperm), and the control group consisted of 2 subjects (20 and 15% headless sperm). For case 1, the patient was negative for sexually transmitted diseases and had normal semen plasma biochemistry, reproductive hormones, peripheral blood chromosomes, and azoospermia factor (AZF). The aneuploid rate of sperm chromosomes was 0.6%, and DNA damage index of sperm nuclei was 84.4%. The partner of this patient did not get pregnant after artificial reproductive technology assistance. For case 2, the aneuploid rate of sperm chromosomes was 0.8% and DNA damage index of sperm nuclei was 95%. This patient and his spouse did not choose assisted reproduction. For case 3, reproductive hormones, peripheral blood chromosomes and AZF were normal and the aneuploid rate of sperm chromosomes was 0.2%. The wife of this patient gave birth to a healthy baby after ova removal, fertilization and transplantation. For the control group, the aneuploid rate of sperm chromosomes and DNA damage index of sperm nuclei were approximately 0.3 and 30%, respectively. To sum up, sperm ultrastructure of infertile patients suffering from unusual sperm morphology is associated with DNA damage to some extent and can cause infertility. However, pregnancy is still possible through intracytoplasmic sperm injection. PMID:26681047

  18. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark (Warrenville, IL); Millard, Cynthia S. (Plainfield, IL); Stols, Lucy (Woodridge, IL)

    2002-01-01

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  19. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark (Warrenville, IL); Millard, Cynthia S. (Plainfield, IL); Stols, Lucy (Woodridge, IL)

    1998-01-01

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which as been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  20. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, M.; Millard, C.S.; Stols, L.

    1998-06-23

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which as been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria. 2 figs.

  1. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    2001-09-25

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  2. Role of glucocorticoids in increased muscle glutamine production in starvation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Marc E.; Henriksen, Erik J.; Cook, Paul H.

    1988-01-01

    The role of glucocorticoids in the synthesis of muscle glutamine during starvation was investigated in adrenalectomized fasted rats injected with cortisol (1 mg/100 g body weight). It was found that administration of cortisol in vivo increased (compared to nontreated starved adrenalectomized controls) the glutamine/glutamate ratio and the activity of glutamine synthetase in the diaphragm and the extensor digitorum muscles, and that these effects were abolished by prior treatment with actinomycin D or proflavine. The results obtained in in vitro experiments, using fresh-frozen soleus, extensor digitorum longus, and diaphragm muscle preparations, supported the in vivo indications of the cortisol-enhanced glutamine synthesis and protein turnover in starved adrenalectomized animals.

  3. Nitric oxide production increases during Toxoplasma gondii encephalitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Dincel, Gungor Cagdas; Atmaca, Hasan Tarik

    2015-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular parasite with the potential of causing severe encephalitis among immunocompromised human and animals. The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the immunomodulatory and immunopathological role of nitric oxide (NO) in central nervous systems and to identify any correlation between toxoplasmosis neuropathology and investigate the consequences of the cellular responses protect against T. gondii. Mice were infected with ME49 strain T. gondii and levels of endothelial, neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, nNOS, iNOS), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and neurofilament (NF) were examined in brain tissues by immunohistochemistry, during the development and establishment of a chronic infection at 10 30 and 60 days post infection. Results of the study revealed that the levels of eNOS (p<0.05), nNOS (p<0.05), iNOS (p<0.005), GFAP (p<0.005) and NF (p<0.005) were remarkably higher in T. gondii-infected mice than in uninfected control. The most prominent finding from our study was 10 and 30 days after inoculation data indicating that increased levels of NO not only a potential neuroprotective role for immunoregulatory and immunopathological but also might be a molecular trigger of bradyzoite development. Furthermore, this findings were shown that high expressed NO origin was not only inducible nitric oxide synthase but also endothelial and neuronal. We demonstrated that activation of astrocytes and microglia/macrophages is a significant event in toxoplasma encephalitis (TE). The results also clearly indicated that increased levels of NO might contribute to neuropathology related with TE. Furthermore, expression of NF might gives an idea of the progress and critical for diagnostic significance of this disease. PMID:26115941

  4. STABLE VARIANTS OF SPERM ANEUPLOIDY AMONG HEALTHY MEN SHOW ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN GERMINAL AND SOMATIC ANEUPLOIDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable variants of sperm aneuploidy among healthy men show associations between germinal and somatic aneuploidy

    The purpose of this study was to identify healthy men who reproducibly produced increased frequencies of sperm with numerical chromosomal abnormalities and to d...

  5. Process for increasing Bright Stock raffinate oil production

    SciTech Connect

    Bristow, D.J.; Achia, B.U.; Evers, L.J.

    1986-06-03

    A process is described for increasing the amount of Bright Stock raffinate oil derived from the solvent extraction of deasphalted lube oil involving the steps of: (a) extracting a vacuum residuum with a low molecular weight alkane hydrocarbon solvent resulting in a deasphalted lube oil solution and asphaltic residue; (b) separating the deasphalted lube oil and the residue; (c) separating the hydrocarbon solvent from the deasphalted lube oil; (d) extracting the deasphalted lube oil obtained from step (c) with an aromatics solvent resulting in a Bright Stock raffinate oil solution and a extract oil solution, the extract oil solution comprised of dissolved aromatics and recoverable raffinate; (e) separating the raffinate solution from the extract oil solution obtained from step (d); and (f) separating the aromatics solvent from the extract oil solution obtained from step (e); in which the improvement comprises the steps of: (g) recycling the extract oil from which the aromatics solvent has been removed, obtained from step (f), to step (a) and combining the extract oil with the vacuum residuum in a 10-20 LV %, based on the residuum, prior to the deasphalting.

  6. Temperature controlled centrifugation improves sperm retrieval.

    PubMed

    Franken, D R; van Wyk, R; Stoumann, C; Avari, K

    2011-06-01

    Sperm retrieval techniques form an integral part of the assisted reproductive programme. The success of sperm separation is measured by the number of motile sperm retrieved from a given semen sample. The study aimed to evaluate the effect of temperature during sperm preparation events on the number and percentage motile sperm retrieved following a double wash swim-up procedure. Thirty semen samples were obtained from 10 normozoospermic donors. After collection samples were divided into two aliquots, one aliquot was placed in an incubator at 34 C, while the second aliquot was left at room temperature (25 C). Sperm motility assessments were recorded with a computer assisted sperm analyser. Motile sperm fractions were retrieved from the semen samples following a double wash swim-up technique. Two tubes were prepared for each experiment. Tubes were placed in two different centrifuges: (i) SpermFuge (Shivani Industries, India) with temperature centrifuge control (34 C) and (ii) Sigma with no temperature control facilities. Both centrifuges were set at 484 g for 5 min. Following the second wash, sperm pellets were layered with culture medium, and sperm was allowed to swim up. Supernatants were removed and analysed for sperm concentration and motility values. Percentage motile sperm was transformed to ARCSIN values and results of the two centrifugation methods at 34 C and room temperature were compared with Mann-Whitney test for independent samples. The mean sperm concentration retrieved at 34 C was 43.8 50 (SpermFuge) and 32.7 21 (Sigma) (P < 0.05), compared to retrieved concentration at room temperature namely, 30.9 33 (SpermFuge) and 30.6 17 (Sigma) (P ? 0.05). The mean percentage motile sperm at 34 C was 64.0 19 (SpermFuge) and 44.2 24 (Sigma) (P = 0.02), while at room temperature the percentage motile sperm was 54.7 17 (SpermFuge) compared to 46.5 14 (Sigma) (P ? 0.05). Centrifuge temperature and incubation temperature significantly influenced the percentage retrieved motile sperm. The use of temperature-controlled sperm preparation might have clinical value for men with poor sperm motility values. PMID:21561464

  7. Environmental toxicants cause sperm DNA fragmentation as detected by the Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA[reg])

    SciTech Connect

    Evenson, Donald P. . E-mail: scsa@brookings.net; Wixon, Regina

    2005-09-01

    Studies over the past two decades have clearly shown that reproductive toxicants cause sperm DNA fragmentation. This DNA fragmentation can usually be detected prior to observing alterations of metaphase chromosomes in embryos. Thus, Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA)-detected DNA damage is viewed as the molecular precursor to later gross chromosome damage observed under the light microscope. SCSA measurements of animal or human sperm consist of first obtaining a fresh or flash frozen neat semen sample in LN2 or dry ice. Samples are then sent to a SCSA diagnostic laboratory where the samples are thawed, diluted to {approx}1-2 x 106 sperm/ml, treated for 30 s with a pH 1.2 detergent buffer and then stained with acridine orange (AO). The low pH partially denatures DNA at the sites of DNA strand breaks and the AO-ssDNA fluoresces red while the AO-dsDNA fluoresces green. Flow cytometry measurements of 5000 sperm/sample provide statistically robust data on the ratio of red to green sperm, the extent of the DNA fragmentation and the standard deviations of measures. Numerous experiments on rodents treated with reproductive toxicants clearly showed that SCSA measures are highly dose responsive and have a very low CV. Different agents that act on germ cells at various stages of development usually showed sperm DNA fragmentation when that germ cell fraction arrived in the epididymis or ejaculate. Some of these treated samples were capable of successful in vitro fertilization but with frequent embryo failure. A 2-year longitudinal study of men living a valley town with a reported abnormal level of infertility and spontaneous miscarriages and also a seasonal atmospheric smog pollution, showed, for the first time, that SCSA measurements of human sperm DNA fragmentation were detectable and correlated with dosage of air pollution while the classical semen measures were not correlated. Also, young men spraying pesticides without protective gear are at an increased risk for elevated sperm DNA fragmentation. Extensive DNA fragmentation probably cannot be repaired by the egg and the spontaneous abortion rate is {approx}2x higher if a man has more than 30% of sperm showing DNA fragmentation. DNA fragmentation is an excellent marker for exposure to potential reproductive toxicants and a diagnostic/prognostic tool for potential male infertility.

  8. DNA integrity of canine spermatozoa during chill storage assessed by the sperm chromatin dispersion test using bright-field or fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, M; Urbano, M; Ortiz, I; Demyda-Peyras, S; Murabito, M R; Glvez, M J; Dorado, J

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of chill storage on canine sperm DNA fragmentation assessed by the sperm chromatin dispersion test using bright-field microscopy with Wright solution (sDF-B) or fluorescence microscopy with propidium iodide (sDF-F). The relationship and agreement between the results obtained with both staining methods were analyzed. The values of DNA fragmentation indexes (sDF-F and sDF-B) were compared at each time of chill storage (0, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours). Additionally, the sperm DNA fragmentation rate (slope) was compared between the methods during chill storage. Good agreement and no significant differences between values obtained with both staining procedures were observed. Finally, the effect of chill storage for up to 96 hours was assessed on sperm motility parameters and DNA fragmentation indexes. Significant differences were found after 48 hours of chill storage, obtaining greater values of fragmented DNA. Progressive sperm motility was lower just after 96 hours of chill storage, and no effect was found in total sperm motility. In conclusion, the Sperm-Halomax kit, developed for canine semen and based on the sperm chromatin dispersion test, can be used accurately under bright-field or fluorescence microscopy to assess the sperm DNA integrity of canine semen during chill storage. The sperm DNA fragmentation index increased after 48 hours of chill storage, thereby detecting sperm damage earlier than other routine sperm parameters, such as sperm motility. PMID:25963130

  9. A mutant gene that increases gibberellin production in Brassica

    SciTech Connect

    Rood, S.B. ); Williams, P.H. ); Pearce, D.; Pharis, R.P. ); Murofushi, Noboru ); Mander, L.N. )

    1990-07-01

    A single gene mutant (elongated internode (ein/ein)) with accelerated shoot elongation was identified from a rapid cycling line of Brassica rapa. Relative to normal plants, mutant plants had slightly accelerated floral development, greater stem dry weights, and particularly, increased internode and inflorescence elongation. The application of the triazole plant growth retardant, paclobutrazol, inhibited shoot elongation, returning ein to a more normal phenotype. Conversely, exogenous gibberellin A{sub 3} (GA{sub 3}) can convert normal genotypes to a phenotype resembling ein. The content of endogenous GA{sub 1} and GA{sub 3} were estimated by gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring using ({sup 2}H)GA{sub 1} as a quantitative internal standard and at day 14 were 1.5- and 12.1-fold higher per stem, respectively, in ein than in normal plants, although GA concentrations were more similar. The endogenous levels of GA{sub 20} and GA{sub 1}, and the rate of GA{sub 19} metabolism were simultaneously analyzed. Levels of GA{sub 1} and GA{sub 20} were 4.6- and 12.9-fold higher, respectively, and conversions to GA{sub 20} and GA{sub 1} were 8.3 and 1.3 times faster in ein than normal plants. Confirming the enhanced rate of GA{sub 1} biosynthesis in ein, the conversion of ({sup 3}H)GA{sub 20} to ({sup 3}H) GA{sub 1} was also faster in ein than in the normal genotype. Thus, the ein allele results in accelerated GA{sub 1} biosynthesis and an elevated content of endogenous GAs, including the dihydroxylated GAs A{sub 1} and A{sub 3}.

  10. New insights into transduction pathways that regulate boar sperm function.

    PubMed

    Hurtado de Llera, A; Martin-Hidalgo, D; Gil, M C; Garcia-Marin, L J; Bragado, M J

    2016-01-01

    Detailed molecular mechanisms mediating signal transduction cascades that regulate boar sperm function involving Ser/Thr and tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins have been reviewed previously. Therefore, this review will focus in those kinase pathways identified recently (<10 years) in boar spermatozoa that regulate different functional spermatozoa processes. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cell energy sensor kinase that was first identified in mammalian spermatozoa in 2012, and since then it has emerged as an essential regulator of boar sperm function. Signaling pathways leading to AMPK activation in boar sperm are highlighted in this review (PKA, CaMKK?/?, and PKC as well as Ca(2+) and cAMP messengers as upstream regulators). Interestingly, stimuli considered as cell stress (hyperosmotic stress, inhibition of mitochondrial activity, absence of intracellular Ca(2+)) markedly activate AMPK in boar spermatozoa. Moreover, AMPK plays a remarkable and necessary regulatory role in mammalian sperm function, controlling essential boar sperm functional processes such as motility, viability, mitochondrial membrane potential, organization and fluidity of plasma membrane, and outer acrosome membrane integrity. These mentioned processes are all required under fluctuating environment of spermatozoa when transiting through the female reproductive tract to achieve fertilization. An applied role of AMPK in artificial insemination techniques is also suggested as during boar seminal doses preservation at 17 C, physiological levels of AMPK activity markedly increase (maximum on Day 7) and result essential to maintain the aforementioned fundamental sperm processes. Moreover, regulation of sperm function exerted by the glycogen synthase kinase 3 and Src family kinase pathways is summarized. PMID:26074068

  11. Does Rbmy have a role in sperm development in mice?

    PubMed

    Szot, M; Grigoriev, V; Mahadevaiah, S K; Ojarikre, O A; Tour, A; von Glasenapp, E; Rattigan, A; Turner, J M A; Elliott, D J; Burgoyne, P S

    2003-01-01

    The Y(d1) deletion in mice removes most of the multi-copy Rbmy gene cluster that is located adjacent to the centromere on the Y short arm (Yp). XY(d1) mice develop as females because Sry is inactivated, probably because it is now juxtaposed to centromeric heterochromatin. We have previously produced XY(d1)Sry transgenic males and found that they have a substantially increased frequency of abnormal sperm. Staining of testis sections with a polyclonal anti-RBMY antibody appeared to show a marked decrease of RBMY protein in the spermatids of XY(d1)Sry males compared to control males, which led us to suggest that this may be responsible for the increase in sperm anomalies. In the current study we sought to determine whether augmenting Rbmy expression specifically in the spermatids of XY(d1)Sry males would ameliorate the sperm defects. An expressing Rbmy transgene driven by the spermatid-specific mouse protamine 1 promotor (mP1Rbmy) was therefore introduced into XY(d1)Sry males. This failed to reduce the frequency of abnormal sperm. In the course of this study, a new RBMY antibody was generated that, in con