Science.gov

Sample records for increased winter snowfall

  1. Impact of declining Arctic sea ice on winter snowfall

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiping; Curry, Judith A.; Wang, Huijun; Song, Mirong; Horton, Radley M.

    2012-01-01

    While the Arctic region has been warming strongly in recent decades, anomalously large snowfall in recent winters has affected large parts of North America, Europe, and east Asia. Here we demonstrate that the decrease in autumn Arctic sea ice area is linked to changes in the winter Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation that have some resemblance to the negative phase of the winter Arctic oscillation. However, the atmospheric circulation change linked to the reduction of sea ice shows much broader meridional meanders in midlatitudes and clearly different interannual variability than the classical Arctic oscillation. This circulation change results in more frequent episodes of blocking patterns that lead to increased cold surges over large parts of northern continents. Moreover, the increase in atmospheric water vapor content in the Arctic region during late autumn and winter driven locally by the reduction of sea ice provides enhanced moisture sources, supporting increased heavy snowfall in Europe during early winter and the northeastern and midwestern United States during winter. We conclude that the recent decline of Arctic sea ice has played a critical role in recent cold and snowy winters. PMID:22371563

  2. Impact of declining Arctic sea ice on winter snowfall.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiping; Curry, Judith A; Wang, Huijun; Song, Mirong; Horton, Radley M

    2012-03-13

    While the Arctic region has been warming strongly in recent decades, anomalously large snowfall in recent winters has affected large parts of North America, Europe, and east Asia. Here we demonstrate that the decrease in autumn Arctic sea ice area is linked to changes in the winter Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation that have some resemblance to the negative phase of the winter Arctic oscillation. However, the atmospheric circulation change linked to the reduction of sea ice shows much broader meridional meanders in midlatitudes and clearly different interannual variability than the classical Arctic oscillation. This circulation change results in more frequent episodes of blocking patterns that lead to increased cold surges over large parts of northern continents. Moreover, the increase in atmospheric water vapor content in the Arctic region during late autumn and winter driven locally by the reduction of sea ice provides enhanced moisture sources, supporting increased heavy snowfall in Europe during early winter and the northeastern and midwestern United States during winter. We conclude that the recent decline of Arctic sea ice has played a critical role in recent cold and snowy winters. PMID:22371563

  3. 21st century projections of snowfall and winter severity across central-eastern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notaro, M.; Lorenz, D. J.; Hoving, C.; Schummer, M.

    2014-12-01

    Statistically downscaled climate projections from nine global climate models (GCMs) are used to force a snow accumulation and ablation model (SNOW-17) across the central-eastern North American Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) to develop high-resolution projections of snowfall, snow depth, and winter severity index (WSI) by the mid- and late 21st century. Here, we use projections of a cumulative WSI (CWSI) known to influence autumn-winter waterfowl migration to demonstrate the utility of SNOW-17 results. The application of statistically downscaled climate data and a snow model leads to a better representation of lake processes in the Great Lakes Basin, topographic effects in the Appalachian Mountains, and spatial patterns of climatological snowfall, compared to the original GCMs. Annual mean snowfall is simulated to decline across the region, particularly in early winter (December-January), leading to a delay in the mean onset of the snow season. Due to a warming-induced acceleration of snowmelt, the percentage loss in snow depth exceeds that of snowfall. Across the Plains and Prairie Potholes LCC and Upper Midwest and Great Lakes LCC, daily snowfall events are projected to become less common, but more intense. The greatest reductions in the number of days per year with a present snowpack are expected close to the historical position of the -5C isotherm in DJFM, around 44N. The CWSI is projected to decline substantially during December-January, leading to increased likelihood of delays in timing and intensity of autumn-winter waterfowl migrations.

  4. Winter Snowfall Turns an Emerald White

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Ireland's climate is normally mild due to the nearby Gulf Stream, but the waning days of 2000 saw the Emerald Isle's green fields swathed in an uncommon blanket of white. The contrast between summer and winter is apparent in this pair of images of southwestern Ireland acquired by MISR's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera on August 23, 2000 (left) and December 29, 2000 (right). The corresponding Terra orbit numbers are 3628 and 5492, respectively.

    The year 2000 brought record-breaking weather to the British Isles. England and Wales experienced the wettest spring and autumn months since 1766. Despite being one of the warmest years in recent history, a cold snap arrived between Christmas and New Year's Day. According to the UK Meteorological Office, the 18 centimeters (7 inches) of snow recorded at Aldergrove, Northern Ireland, on December 27-28 was the deepest daily fall since 1930.

    Prominent geographical features visible in the MISR images include Galway Bay near the top left. Further south, the mouth of the River Shannon, the largest river in the British Isles, meets the Atlantic Ocean. In the lower portions of the images are the counties of Limerick, Kerry and Cork.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology

  5. Increased future ice discharge from Antarctica owing to higher snowfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, Ricarda; Levermann, Anders; Martin, Maria A.; Frieler, Katja

    2013-04-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is likely to cause continuing global sea-level rise, but some processes within the Earth system may mitigate the magnitude of the projected effect. Regional and global climate models simulate enhanced snowfall over Antarctica, which would provide a direct offset of the future contribution to global sea level rise from cryospheric mass loss and ocean expansion. Uncertainties exist in modelled snowfall, but even larger uncertainties exist in the potential changes of dynamic ice discharge from Antarctica. Here we show that snowfall and discharge are not independent, but that future ice discharge will increase by up to three times as a result of additional snowfall under global warming. Our results, based on an ice-sheet model forced by climate simulations through to the end of 2500, show that the enhanced discharge effect exceeds the effect of surface warming as well as that of basal ice-shelf melting, and is due to the difference in surface elevation change caused by snowfall on grounded versus floating ice. Although different underlying forcings drive ice loss from basal melting versus increased snowfall, similar ice dynamical processes are nonetheless at work in both; therefore results are relatively independent of the specific representation of the transition zone. In an ensemble of simulations designed to capture ice-physics uncertainty, the additional dynamic ice loss along the coastline compensates between 30 and 65 per cent of the ice gain due to enhanced snowfall over the entire continent. This results in a dynamic ice loss of up to 1.25 metres in the year 2500 for the strongest warming scenario.

  6. Increased future ice discharge from Antarctica owing to higher snowfall.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, R; Levermann, A; Martin, M A; Frieler, K

    2012-12-13

    Anthropogenic climate change is likely to cause continuing global sea level rise, but some processes within the Earth system may mitigate the magnitude of the projected effect. Regional and global climate models simulate enhanced snowfall over Antarctica, which would provide a direct offset of the future contribution to global sea level rise from cryospheric mass loss and ocean expansion. Uncertainties exist in modelled snowfall, but even larger uncertainties exist in the potential changes of dynamic ice discharge from Antarctica and thus in the ultimate fate of the precipitation-deposited ice mass. Here we show that snowfall and discharge are not independent, but that future ice discharge will increase by up to three times as a result of additional snowfall under global warming. Our results, based on an ice-sheet model forced by climate simulations through to the end of 2500 (ref. 8), show that the enhanced discharge effect exceeds the effect of surface warming as well as that of basal ice-shelf melting, and is due to the difference in surface elevation change caused by snowfall on grounded versus floating ice. Although different underlying forcings drive ice loss from basal melting versus increased snowfall, similar ice dynamical processes are nonetheless at work in both; therefore results are relatively independent of the specific representation of the transition zone. In an ensemble of simulations designed to capture ice-physics uncertainty, the additional dynamic ice loss along the coastline compensates between 30 and 65 per cent of the ice gain due to enhanced snowfall over the entire continent. This results in a dynamic ice loss of up to 1.25 metres in the year 2500 for the strongest warming scenario. The reported effect thus strongly counters a potential negative contribution to global sea level by the Antarctic Ice Sheet. PMID:23235878

  7. Increasing Great Lake-Effect Snowfall during the Twentieth Century: A Regional Response to Global Warming?.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Adam W.; Kirby, Matthew E.; Mullins, Henry T.; Patterson, William P.

    2003-11-01

    The influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on the climate of surrounding regions is significant, especially in leeward settings where lake-effect snowfall occurs. Heavy lake-effect snow represents a potential natural hazard and plays important roles in winter recreational activities, agriculture, and regional hydrology. Changes in lake-effect snowfall may represent a regional-scale manifestation of hemispheric-scale climate change, such as that associated with global warming. This study examines records of snowfall from several lake-effect and non-lake-effect sites throughout most of the twentieth century in order to 1) determine whether differences in snowfall trends exist between these settings and 2) offer possible linkages between lake-effect snow trends and records of air temperature, water temperature, and ice cover. A new, historic record of oxygen isotope [?18O(CaCO3)] data from the sediments of three eastern Finger Lakes in central New York is presented as a means of independently assessing changes in Great Lakes lake-effect snowfall. Results reveal a statistically significant increasing trend in snowfall for the lake-effect sites, whereas no trend is observed in the non-lake-effect settings. The Finger Lake oxygen isotope record reflects this increase in lake-effect snow through a statistically significant trend toward lower ?18O(CaCO3) values. Records of air temperature, water temperature, and lake ice suggest that the observed lake-effect snow increase during the twentieth century may be the result of warmer Great Lakes surface waters and decreased ice cover, both of which are consistent with the historic upward trend in Northern Hemispheric temperature due to global warming. Given projected increases in future global temperature, areas downwind of the Great Lakes may experience increased lake-effect snowfall for the foreseeable future.

  8. Winter snowfall and summer photosynthesis for the Great Basin Desert shrubs Artemisia tridentata and Purshia tridentata.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loik, M. E.; Griffith, A. B.; Alpert, H.; Concilio, A. L.; Martinson, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Snowfall provides the majority of soil water recharge in many western high-elevation North American ecosystems, but climate change may alter the magnitude and timing of snowfall and snow melt events thereby affecting ecosystem processes. Experiments were conducted to test hypotheses about multi-scale linkages of antecedent snow depth variation with soil water content and physiological performance of deeply-rooted shrubs in the western Great Basin Desert. Snow depth was manipulated using eight 50-year old snow fences near Mammoth Lakes, California, USA. Water potential and photosynthetic gas exchange were measured annually in early summer (1 - 2 mo following snowmelt), between 2004 and 2008 for Artemisia tridentata (Asteraceae) and Purshia tridentata (Rosaceae) on plots with increased ("+ snow"), decreased ("- snow") and ambient snow depth. Seasonal patterns were measured from May - September 2005, and four to five months after snowmelt in wet and dry years. Snow depth on +snow plots was about twice that of ambient-depth plots in most years. Depth was about 20% lower on -snow plots. Soil water content in May on +snow plots was roughly double that on ambient and 220% of that on -snow plots. Water potential patterns varied across daily, seasonal, and annual scales, but only on a few occasions was there a significant snow-depth effect. Stomatal conductance (gs) and CO2 assimilation (A) increased for several months after snowmelt in 2005, but there were only a few times when there was a snow depth effect. Photosynthetic gas exchange reflected inter-annual snow depth, but the magnitude of the variation was lower. There was a threshold response of A to October 1 - June 1 cumulative precipitation. For A. tridentata, A differed as a function of Snow Water Equivalents (SWE) across five years of measurements. Results suggest that plant water relations for these two deeply-rooted shrub species are resilient to variation in winter snow depth and subsequent spring soil water availability, and instantaneous photosynthesis may be more influenced by temperature and VPD.

  9. Synoptic Mechanisms Associated with Snowfall Increases to the Lee of Lakes Erie and Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leathers, Daniel J.; Ellis, Andrew W.

    1996-10-01

    Snowfall is a cyrospheric variable that impacts nearly every sector of society. Because of its societal importance, snowfall is a logical variable to be used as an indicator of potential global environmental change. This study investigates the mechanisms responsible for large observed snowfall increases across the eastern Great Lakes region of the USA. Results indicate that mean snowfall amounts across sections of western New York and north-western Pennsylvania have increased by up to 100 cm over the 60-year period encompassing the snowfall seasons 1930-1931 through to 1989-1990. A synoptic climatological approach is utilized to identify consistent synoptic-scale atmospheric patterns responsible for snowfall across the region. Nine synoptic types are identified as producing significan t snowfall in the study area; five with synoptic characteristics indicative of lake-effect snowfall and four evidencing characteristics of snowfall associated with cyclonic influence.An examination of the seasonal frequency of the nine synoptic types indicates a substantial increase in the frequency of the five lake-effect synoptic types and a long-term decrease in the numbers of cyclone synoptic types over the period 1950-1951 through to 1981-1982. Information concerning trends in the frequency and the intensity of each of the nine snowfall-producing synoptic types was combined to produce a modelled snowfall change due to frequency and intensity variations over the period. Trends in the frequency and intensity of the synoptic patterns associated with lake- effect snowfall explain the majority of the observed snowfall increase across the region. Variations in the synoptic types associated with cyclonically induced snowfall are shown to be unimportant to snowfall changes across the eastern Great Lakes area. Possible reasons for increases in the frequency and the intensity of the lake-effect synoptic types are discussed.

  10. Reduced winter snowfall damages the structure and function of wintergreen ferns.

    PubMed

    Tessier, Jack T

    2014-05-20

    • Premise of the study: The full impact of climate change on ecosystems and the humans that depend on them is uncertain. Anthropogenic climate change is resulting in winters with less snow than is historically typical. This deficit may have an impact on wintergreen ferns whose fronds lie prostrate under the snowpack and are thereby protected from frost.• Methods: Frost damage and ecophysiological traits were quantified for three species of wintergreen fern (Dryopteris intermedia, Dryopteris marginalis, and Polystichum acrostichoides) near Delhi, NY following the winters of 2012 (which had very little snowfall) and 2013 (which had typical snowfall).• Key results: Dryopteris intermedia was the most common species and had the highest percentage of frost-damaged fronds and the highest percentage of its cover damaged in 2012. Frost damage was significantly less in 2013 for all species. Polystichum acrostichoides had the highest vernal photosynthetic rate in undamaged fronds, and all three species had a negative net photosynthetic rate in frost-damaged fronds. The wintergreen fern community lost 36.69 ± 2.80% of its productive surface area to frost damage in 2012. Dryopteris intermedia had the thinnest leaves and this trait may have made it the most susceptible to frost damage.• Conclusions: These results demonstrate that repeated winters of little snow may have a significant impact on the structure and functioning of the wintergreen fern community, and species will respond to a reduced snowpack on an individual basis. PMID:24844709

  11. Carbon dioxide ice clouds, snowfalls, and baroclinic waves in the northern winter polar atmosphere of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Medvedev, Alexander S.; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Hartogh, Paul

    2013-04-01

    The formation of CO2 ice clouds in the northern winter polar atmosphere of Mars and their relation to baroclinic planetary waves, which dominate local dynamics, are studied using a general circulation model. The simulation shows that clouds are formed at altitudes of up to 40 km, and their occurrence correlates to a large degree with the cold phases of transient planetary waves. Ice particles formed up to 20 km can reach the surface in the form of snowfall in certain longitude regions, while in others, these particles likely sublimate in the lower warmer atmospheric layers. The simulation suggests that about a half of the seasonal ice cap is created by CO2 snow, while the remaining half by direct condensation on the surface. Thus, the occurrences of ice clouds and rates of deposition are closely linked to traveling planetary waves, indicating the possibility for the reliable forecasts of CO2 snow storms.

  12. Riming in winter alpine snowfall during CLACE 2014: polarimetric radar and in-situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazioli, J.; Lloyd, G.; Panziera, L.; Connolly, P. J.; Henneberger, J.; Berne, A.

    2015-07-01

    This study investigates the microphysics of winter alpine snowfall occurring in mixed-phase clouds in an inner-Alpine valley during January and February 2014. The available observations include high resolution polarimetric radar and in-situ measurements of the ice-phase and liquid-phase components of clouds and precipitation. Radar-based hydrometeor classification suggests that riming is a dominant factor leading to an efficient growth of the precipitating mass and to a large snow accumulation on the ground. The time steps during which rimed precipitation is dominant are analysed in terms of temporal evolution and vertical structure. In most cases, riming is the result of a turbulent phase, of limited duration, during which supercooled liquid water (SLW) is available. When this turbulent layer is stable in time and continuously provides SLW, riming can be sustained for many hours without SLW depletion, thus generating large accumulations of snow. The microphysical interpretation as well as the meteorological situation associated with one event with those characteristics are detailed in the manuscript. The vertical structure of polarimetric radar observations during intense rimed precipitation shows a peculiar maximum of specific differential phase shift Kdp, associated with large number concentrations and/or heavy riming of anisotropic crystals. Below this Kdp peak there is usually an enhancement in ZH, proportional to the Kdp enhancement and interpreted as aggregation of ice crystals.

  13. Projected changes in snowfall extremes and interannual variability of snowfall in the western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lute, A. C.; Abatzoglou, J. T.; Hegewisch, K. C.

    2015-02-01

    Projected warming will have significant impacts on snowfall accumulation and melt, with implications for water availability and management in snow-dominated regions. Changes in snowfall extremes are confounded by projected increases in precipitation extremes. Downscaled climate projections from 20 global climate models were bias-corrected to montane Snowpack Telemetry stations across the western United States to assess mid-21st century changes in the mean and variability of annual snowfall water equivalent (SFE) and extreme snowfall events, defined by the 90th percentile of cumulative 3 day SFE amounts. Declines in annual SFE and number of snowfall days were projected for all stations. Changes in the magnitude of snowfall event quantiles were sensitive to historical winter temperature. At climatologically cooler locations, such as in the Rocky Mountains, changes in the magnitude of snowfall events mirrored changes in the distribution of precipitation events, with increases in extremes and less change in more moderate events. By contrast, declines in snowfall event magnitudes were found for all quantiles in warmer locations. Common to both warmer and colder sites was a relative increase in the magnitude of snowfall extremes compared to annual SFE and a larger fraction of annual SFE from snowfall extremes. The coefficient of variation of annual SFE increased up to 80% in warmer montane regions due to projected declines in snowfall days and the increased contribution of snowfall extremes to annual SFE. In addition to declines in mean annual SFE, more frequent low-snowfall years and less frequent high-snowfall years were projected for every station.

  14. Simulated CO2 Snowfalls and Baroclinic Waves in the Northern Winter Polar Atmosphere on Mars: Feasibility of Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, T.; Medvedev, A. S.; Kasaba, Y.; Hartogh, P.

    2013-12-01

    The seasonal CO2 polar cap is formed from ice particles that have fallen from the atmosphere as well as those condensed directly on the surface. The possible occurrence of CO2 snowfall in the winter polar regions have been observed, and previous simulation studies have indicated that the longitudinal irregularities of CO2 ice clouds in the northern polar region seemed to be linked to local weather phenomena. Transient planetary waves are the prominent dynamical feature during northern winters in the martian atmosphere, and this study focuses on revealing the mechanism of how the dynamical influence of transient planetary waves affects the occurrences of CO2 ice clouds, snowfalls and formations of seasonal CO2 polar cap in high latitudes during northern winters. The DRAMATIC (Dynamics, RAdiation, MAterial Transport and their mutual InteraCtions) MGCM, which is used for this study, is based on a Japanese terrestrial model (CCSR/NIES/FRCGC MIROC) with a spectral solver for the three-dimensional primitive equations. In this simulation the horizontal resolution is set at about 5.6 5.6 (~333 km at equator), the vertical grid consists of 69 ?-levels with the top of the model at about 100 km. Realistic topography, albedo, thermal inertia and roughness data for the Mars surface are included. Radiative effects of CO2 gas (considering only LTE) and dust, in solar and infrared wavelengths, are taken into account. We have implemented a simple scheme representing the formation and transport of CO2 ice clouds into our MGCM, and investigated snowfall in high latitudes during northern winters. The MGCM simulations showed that the CO2 ice clouds are formed at altitudes of up to ~40 km in the northern polar region (northward of 70 N) during winter, which is consistent with the observations (MRO-MCS and MGS-MOLA). In addition, we found that the occurrence of the CO2 ice clouds correlated to a large degree with the cold phases of transient planetary waves. In the altitudes above ~15 km, the cloud formations are very much aligned with the baroclinic waves with zonal wavenumber of 1 and 5-6 sols period. In the lower altitudes the baroclinic waves components with shorter periods (~3 sols) also affect the cloud formations. The fate of ice particles during sedimentation depends on the thermal structure below because it takes ~0.2 sols for particles to descend from 25 km to the surface, which is much shorter than the periods of the transient waves. We found that ice particles formed up to ~20 km can reach the surface in the form of snowfall in certain longitude regions (in 30 W-60 E), while in others these particles likely sublimate in the lower warmer atmospheric layers. Given the regular nature of such atmospheric waves on Mars, the results of this study suggest that the snowstorms may be predicted several weeks in advance. It is simply impossible to predict the snowfall somewhere on Earth in such a long time ahead, but this may be different on Mars. For missions to Mars aiming to explore these regions with rovers, such weather forecasts would offer the possibility of choosing a route that avoids heavy snow storms.

  15. CO2 Snowfalls, seasonal ice cap formations and baroclinic waves in the winter polar atmosphere of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Medvedev, Alexander S.; Hartogh, Paul

    The seasonal CO _{2} polar cap is formed from ice particles that have fallen from the atmosphere as well as those condensed directly on the surface. The possible occurrence of CO _{2} snowfall in the winter polar regions have been observed, and previous simulation studies have indicated that the longitudinal irregularities of CO _{2} ice clouds in the northern polar region seemed to be linked to local weather phenomena. Transient planetary waves are the prominent dynamical feature during northern winters in the martian atmosphere, and this study focuses on revealing the mechanism of how the dynamical influence of transient planetary waves affects the occurrences of CO _{2} ice clouds, snowfalls and formations of seasonal CO _{2} polar cap in high latitudes during northern winters. The DRAMATIC (Dynamics, RAdiation, MAterial Transport and their mutual InteraCtions) MGCM, which is used for this study, is based on a Japanese terrestrial model (CCSR/NIES/FRCGC MIROC) with a spectral solver for the three-dimensional primitive equations. A simple scheme representing the formation and transport of CO _{2} ice clouds has been implemented into the MGCM. The simulation results showed that the CO _{2} ice clouds are formed at altitudes of up to 40 km in the northern polar region (northward of 70() N) during winter, which is consistent with the observations by the Mars Climate Sounder onboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. In addition, we found that the occurrence of the CO _{2} ice clouds correlated to a large degree with the cold phases of transient planetary waves. Ice particles formed up to 20 km can reach the surface in the form of snowfall in certain longitude regions (in 30() W-60() E), while in others these particles likely sublimate in the lower warmer atmospheric layers. Given the regular nature of such atmospheric waves on Mars, the results of this study suggest that the snowstorms may be predicted several weeks in advance. For missions to Mars aiming to explore these regions with rovers, such weather forecasts would offer the possibility of choosing a route that avoids heavy snow storms.

  16. Spatial and Temporal Trends of Snowfall in Central New York - A Lake Effect Dominated Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnett, Justin Joseph

    Central New York is located in one of the snowiest regions in the United States, with the city of Syracuse, New York the snowiest metropolis in the nation. Snowfall in the region generally begins in mid-November and lasts until late-March. Snow accumulation occurs from a multitude of conditions: frontal systems, mid-latitude cyclones, Nor'easters, and most notably lake-effect storms. Lake effect snowfall (LES) is a difficult parameter to forecast due to the isolated and highly variable nature of the storm. Consequently, studies have attempted to determine changes in snowfall for lake-effect dominated regions. Annual snowfall patterns are of particular concern as seasonal snowfall totals are vital for water resources, winter businesses, agriculture, government and state agencies, and much more. Through the use of snowfall, temperature, precipitation, and location data from the National Weather Service's Cooperative Observer Program (COOP), spatial and temporal changes in snowfall for Central New York were determined. In order to determine climatic changes in snowfall, statistical analyses were performed (i.e. least squares estimation, correlations, principal component analyses, etc.) and spatial maps analyzed. Once snowfall trends were determined, factors influencing the trends were examined. Long-term snowfall trends for CNY were positive for original stations (˜0.46 +/- 0.20 in. yr -1) and homogenously filtered stations (0.23 +/- 0.20 in. yr -1). However, snowfall trends for shorter time-increments within the long-term period were not consistent, as positive, negative, and neutral trends were calculated. Regional differences in snowfall trends were observed for CNY as typical lake-effect areas (northern counties, the Tug Hill Plateau and the Southern Hills) experienced larger snowfall trends than areas less dominated by LES. Typical lake-effect months (December - February) experienced the greatest snowfall trend in CNY compared to other winter months. The influence of teleconnections on seasonal snowfall in CNY was not pronounced; however, there was a slight significant (5%) correlation (< 0.35) with the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. It was not clear if changes in air temperature or changes in precipitation were the cause of variations in snowfall trends. It was also inconclusive if the elevation or distance from Lake Ontario resulted in increased snowfall trends. Results from this study will aid in seasonal snowfall forecasts in CNY, which can be used to predict future snowfall. Even though the study area is regionally specific, the methods may be applied to other lake effect dominated areas to determine temporal and spatial variations in snowfall. This study will enhance climatologists and operational forecasters' awareness and understanding of snowfall, especially lake effect snowfall in CNY.

  17. Comparisons of Snowfall Measurements in Complex Terrain Made During the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudala, Faisal S.; Isaac, George A.; Rasmussen, Roy; Cober, Stewart G.; Scott, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Solid precipitation (SP) intensity () using four automatic gauges, Pluvio, PARSIVEL (PArticle, SIze and VELocity), FD12P and POSS, and radar reflectivity factor () using the POSS and PARSIVEL were measured at a naturally sheltered station (VOA) located at high level (1,640 m) on the Whistler Mountain in British Colombia, Canada. The R s and other standard meteorological parameters were collected from March 2009, and from November 2009, to February 2010. The wind speed (ws) measured during this period ranged from 0 to 4.5 ms-1, with a mean value of 0.5 ms-1. The temperature varied from 4 to -17 C. The SP amount reported by the PARSIVEL was higher than that reported by the Pluvio by more than a factor of 2, while the FD12P and POSS measured relatively smaller amounts, but much closer to that reported by the Pluvio and manual measurements. The dependence of R s from the PARSIVEL on wind speed was examined, but no significant dependence was found. The PARSIVEL's precipitation retrieval algorithm was modified and tested using three different snow density size relationships ( ? s- D) reported in literature. It was found that after modification of the algorithm, the derived R s amounts using the raw data agreed reasonably well with the Pluvio. Statistical analysis shows that more than 95 % of data measured by POSS appears to correlates well with the reflectivity factors determined using the three ? s- D relationships. The automated Pluvio accumulation and manually determined daily SP amount (SPm) measured during five winter months were compared. The mean ratio (MR) and the mean difference (MD), and the correlation coefficient ( r) calculated using the data collected using the two methods, were found to be 0.96, 0.4 and 0.6 respectively, indicating respectable agreement between these two methods, with only the Pluvio underestimating the amount by about 4 %.

  18. Contrasting effects of warming and increased snowfall on Arctic tundra plant phenology over the past two decades.

    PubMed

    Bjorkman, Anne D; Elmendorf, Sarah C; Beamish, Alison L; Vellend, Mark; Henry, Gregory H R

    2015-12-01

    Recent changes in climate have led to significant shifts in phenology, with many studies demonstrating advanced phenology in response to warming temperatures. The rate of temperature change is especially high in the Arctic, but this is also where we have relatively little data on phenological changes and the processes driving these changes. In order to understand how Arctic plant species are likely to respond to future changes in climate, we monitored flowering phenology in response to both experimental and ambient warming for four widespread species in two habitat types over 21 years. We additionally used long-term environmental records to disentangle the effects of temperature increase and changes in snowmelt date on phenological patterns. While flowering occurred earlier in response to experimental warming, plants in unmanipulated plots showed no change or a delay in flowering over the 21-year period, despite more than 1 °C of ambient warming during that time. This counterintuitive result was likely due to significantly delayed snowmelt over the study period (0.05-0.2 days/yr) due to increased winter snowfall. The timing of snowmelt was a strong driver of flowering phenology for all species - especially for early-flowering species - while spring temperature was significantly related to flowering time only for later-flowering species. Despite significantly delayed flowering phenology, the timing of seed maturation showed no significant change over time, suggesting that warmer temperatures may promote more rapid seed development. The results of this study highlight the importance of understanding the specific environmental cues that drive species' phenological responses as well as the complex interactions between temperature and precipitation when forecasting phenology over the coming decades. As demonstrated here, the effects of altered snowmelt patterns can counter the effects of warmer temperatures, even to the point of generating phenological responses opposite to those predicted by warming alone. PMID:26216538

  19. Influences of Arctic Oscillation and Madden-Julian Oscillation on cold surges and heavy snowfalls over Korea: A case study for the winter of 2009-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Tae-Won; Ho, Chang-Hoi; Yang, Song; Jeong, Jee-Hoon

    2010-12-01

    In the winter of 2009-2010, frequent and long-lasting cold weather affected Korea. Four major cold surges and several heavy snowfall events were observed, including a record-breaking event on 4 January 2010. These four cold surges had distinct properties with regard to their relationships to the phases of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) and the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), suggesting the possible influences of the AO and MJO on the cold surges and heavy snowfalls. The four cold surges were of two distinct types: the wave train type and the blocking type, which were differentiated by their mechanisms. With regard to the relationships of the cold surges to the AO, three cold surges occurred during a strongly negative AO period, which lasted for more than 1 month. The Siberian High expanded from the Arctic high-pressure region to East Asia during the negative AO period. A cold surge occurred during a positive AO, with the expansion of the Siberian High across the Eurasian continent. An MJO-induced circulation, corresponding to strong tropical convection over the tropical Indian Ocean, seems to have reinforced the cold surges over East Asia. In addition, the active local Hadley circulation modulated by a convection center over the Indian Ocean tends to enhance midlatitude synoptic disturbances across East Asia and provides favorable conditions for upward motion over the region. In short, the effects of the AO and MJO, along with the existing low-level moisture supply, contributed to heavy snowfalls associated with strong cold surges over Korea during the winter of 2009-2010.

  20. Twenty-first century changes in snowfall climate in Northern Europe in ENSEMBLES regional climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räisänen, Jouni

    2016-01-01

    Changes in snowfall in northern Europe (55-71°N, 5-35°E) are analysed from 12 regional model simulations of twenty-first century climate under the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios A1B scenario. As an ensemble mean, the models suggest a decrease in the winter total snowfall in nearly all of northern Europe. In the middle of the winter, however, snowfall generally increases in the coldest areas. The borderline between increasing and decreasing snowfall broadly coincides with the -11 °C isotherm in baseline (1980-2010) monthly mean temperature, although with variation between models and grid boxes. High extremes of daily snowfall remain nearly unchanged, except for decreases in the mildest areas, where snowfall as a whole becomes much less common. A smaller fraction of the snow in the simulated late twenty-first century climate falls on severely cold days and a larger fraction on days with near-zero temperatures. Not only do days with low temperatures become less common, but they also typically have more positive anomalies of sea level pressure and less snowfall for the same temperature than in the present-day climate.

  1. The influence of snowfall, temperature and social relationships on sleeping clusters of Japanese monkeys during winter in Shiga Heights.

    PubMed

    Wada, Kazuo; Tokida, Eishi; Ogawa, Hideshi

    2007-04-01

    We studied Japanese monkeys (Macaca fuscata) of the Shiga A(1) troop at their sleeping sites in Shiga Heights, Japan, for 41 nights during 3 winters. Monkeys chose their sleeping sites in Japanese cedars and in deciduous broad-leaved forests on non-snowing nights and in Japanese cedar forests on snowing nights. We counted 399 sleeping clusters in which 2 or more monkeys remained in physical contact through the night and 43 solitary sleeping monkeys, though monkeys did not maintain physical contact with others in the daytime. We found 397 clusters on tree branches and 2 clusters on rocks. The mean size of huddling clusters was 3.06+/-1.22 SD. The cluster size (3.17+/-1.26 SD) at lower ambient temperatures between -7 and -4 degrees C was larger than that at higher temperatures between -2 and 4 degrees C (cluster size 2.88+/-1.13 SD). Most clusters were composed of kin. Females kept close to related females in the daytime and huddled with them at night. The highest-ranking male mainly huddled with his kin and his familiar females. Other males kept farther apart from each other in the daytime, probably to avoid social conflicts. Through cold winter nights, however, such males reduced inter-individual distances and huddled with other males. Japanese monkeys appear to recognize three types of inter-individual distances: an intimate distance less than 1 m, a personal distance of 1-3 m and a social distance of 3-20 m; they change their inter-individual distances according to social and ecological circumstances. PMID:16897193

  2. Snowfall Rate Retrieval Using Passive Microwave Measurements and Its Applications in Weather Forecast and Hydrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, Huan; Ferraro, Ralph; Kongoli, Cezar; Yan, Banghua; Zavodsky, Bradley; Zhao, Limin; Dong, Jun; Wang, Nai-Yu

    2015-01-01

    (AMSU), Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) and Advance Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS). ATMS is the follow-on sensor to AMSU and MHS. Currently, an AMSU and MHS based land snowfall rate (SFR) product is running operationally at NOAA/NESDIS. Based on the AMSU/MHS SFR, an ATMS SFR algorithm has also been developed. The algorithm performs retrieval in three steps: snowfall detection, retrieval of cloud properties, and estimation of snow particle terminal velocity and snowfall rate. The snowfall detection component utilizes principal component analysis and a logistic regression model. It employs a combination of temperature and water vapor sounding channels to detect the scattering signal from falling snow and derives the probability of snowfall. Cloud properties are retrieved using an inversion method with an iteration algorithm and a two-stream radiative transfer model. A method adopted to calculate snow particle terminal velocity. Finally, snowfall rate is computed by numerically solving a complex integral. The SFR products are being used mainly in two communities: hydrology and weather forecast. Global blended precipitation products traditionally do not include snowfall derived from satellites because such products were not available operationally in the past. The ATMS and AMSU/MHS SFR now provide the winter precipitation information for these blended precipitation products. Weather forecasters mainly rely on radar and station observations for snowfall forecast. The SFR products can fill in gaps where no conventional snowfall data are available to forecasters. The products can also be used to confirm radar and gauge snowfall data and increase forecasters' confidence in their prediction.

  3. Temporal and spatial variability of extreme snowfall indices over northern Xinjiang from 1959/1960 to 2008/2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. P.; Jiang, F. Q.; Hu, R. J.; Zhang, Y. W.

    2013-12-01

    Plentiful snowfall is an important resource in northern Xinjiang. However, extreme snowfall events can lead to destructive avalanches, traffic interruptions or even the collapse of buildings. The daily winter precipitation data from 18 stations in northern Xinjiang during 1959/1960-2008/2009 were selected for purpose of analyzing long-term variability of extreme snowfall events. Five extreme snowfall indices, Maximum 1 day snowfall amount (SX1day), Maximum 1-weather process snowfall amount (SX1process), Blizzard days (DSb), Consecutive snow days (DSc) and Blizzard weather processes (PSb), were defined and utilized to quantitatively describe the intensity and frequency of extreme snowfall events. Temporal trends of the five indices were analyzed by Mann-Kendall test and simple linear regression, and their trends were interpolated using universal kriging interpolation. Temporally, we found that most stations have upward trends in the five indices of extreme snowfall events, and over entire northern Xinjiang, they were all increasing at the 0.01 significance level (MK test), with the linear tendency rates of 0.49 mm (10 a)-1 (SX1day), 0.89 mm (10 a)-1 (SX1process), 0.024 days (10 a)-1 (DSb), 0.14 days (10 a)-1 (DSc), and 0.069 times (10 a)-1 (PSb) respectively. Meanwhile, obvious decadal fluctuations besides long-term increasing trends are identified. Trends in the intensity and frequency of extreme snowfall events show a~distinct difference spatially. In general, trends of five indices were found shifting from decreasing to increasing from the northeast to the southwest and from the north to the south of northern Xinjiang. Furthermore, the regions covered by increasing or decreasing extreme snowfall events were identified, implying the hot or cold spots for extreme snowfall events changes. These results may be helpful for northern Xinjiang on the regional and local resource and emergency planning.

  4. Role of extreme snowfall events in interannual variability of snowfall accumulation in the western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lute, A. C.; Abatzoglou, J. T.

    2014-04-01

    Water resources in the western United States are contingent on interannual variations in snowpack. Interannual snowpack variability has been attributed to large-scale climate patterns including the El Nio-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), however, the contribution of snowfall frequency and extreme snowfall events to this variability are less well quantified. Long-term records from Snowpack Telemetry and Cooperative Observer Program stations in the 11 western states were used to investigate these relationships by considering the number of snowfall days and snowfall water equivalent (SFE) of extreme snowfall events. The top decile of snowfall events contributed 20-38% of annual SFE, depending on the region. An average of 65% and 69% of the interannual variability in annual SFE was explained by snowfall days and SFE of top decile snowfall events, respectively, with extreme events being a more significant predictor at most stations. The latitudinal dipole in SFE during ENSO phases results from changes in snowfall frequency and extreme events. In the Pacific Northwest, above normal SFE during La Nia winters was a product of both larger contributions from extremes and more snowfall days, while below normal SFE during El Nio winters was primarily associated with a substantial reduction in extremes. Conversely, annual SFE during ENSO phases in the mountains of Arizona was more closely linked to fluctuations in snowfall days than extremes. Results indicate the importance of extreme snowfall events in shaping interannual variability in water resources and suggest that improved predictive ability may inform better water resource management now and in the coming decades.

  5. Variations in northern hemisphere snowfall: An analysis of historical trends and the projected response to anthropogenic forcing in the twenty-first century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasting, John P.

    Snowfall is an important feature of the Earth's climate system that has the ability to influence both the natural world and human activity. This dissertation examines past and future changes in snowfall related to increasing concentrations of anthropogenic greenhouse gases. Snowfall observations for North America, derived snowfall products for the Northern Hemisphere, and simulations performed with 13 coupled atmosphere-ocean global climate models are analyzed. The analysis of the spatial pattern of simulated annual trends on a grid point basis from 1951 to 1999 indicates that a transition zone exists above 60 N latitude across the Northern Hemisphere that separates negative trends in annual snowfall in the mid-latitudes and positive trends at higher latitudes. Regional analysis of observed annual snowfall indicates that statistically significant trends are found in western North America, Japan, and southern Russia. A majority of the observed historical trends in annual snowfall elsewhere in the Northern Hemisphere, however, are not statistically significant and this result is consistent with model simulations. Projections of future snowfall indicate the presence of a similar transition zone between negative and positive snowfall trends that corresponds with the area between the -10 to -15C isotherms of the multi-model mean temperature of the late twentieth century in each of the fall, winter, and spring seasons. Redistributions of snowfall throughout the entire snow season are likely -- even in locations where there is little change in annual snowfall. Changes in the fraction of precipitation falling as snow contribute to decreases in snowfall across most Northern Hemisphere regions, while changes in precipitation typically contribute to increases in snowfall. Snowfall events less than or equal to 5 cm are found to decrease in the future across most of the Northern Hemisphere, while snowfall events greater than or equal to 20 cm increase in some locations, such as northern Quebec. A signal-to-noise analysis reveals that the projected changes in snowfall are likely to become apparent during the twenty-first century for most locations in the Northern Hemisphere.

  6. Contrasting responses of mean and extreme snowfall to climate change.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, Paul A

    2014-08-28

    Snowfall is an important element of the climate system, and one that is expected to change in a warming climate. Both mean snowfall and the intensity distribution of snowfall are important, with heavy snowfall events having particularly large economic and human impacts. Simulations with climate models indicate that annual mean snowfall declines with warming in most regions but increases in regions with very low surface temperatures. The response of heavy snowfall events to a changing climate, however, is unclear. Here I show that in simulations with climate models under a scenario of high emissions of greenhouse gases, by the late twenty-first century there are smaller fractional changes in the intensities of daily snowfall extremes than in mean snowfall over many Northern Hemisphere land regions. For example, for monthly climatological temperatures just below freezing and surface elevations below 1,000 metres, the 99.99th percentile of daily snowfall decreases by 8% in the multimodel median, compared to a 65% reduction in mean snowfall. Both mean and extreme snowfall must decrease for a sufficiently large warming, but the climatological temperature above which snowfall extremes decrease with warming in the simulations is as high as -9 °C, compared to -14 °C for mean snowfall. These results are supported by a physically based theory that is consistent with the observed rain-snow transition. According to the theory, snowfall extremes occur near an optimal temperature that is insensitive to climate warming, and this results in smaller fractional changes for higher percentiles of daily snowfall. The simulated changes in snowfall that I find would influence surface snow and its hazards; these changes also suggest that it may be difficult to detect a regional climate-change signal in snowfall extremes. PMID:25164753

  7. Anchorage Receives Record Snowfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The forecast called for flurries, but the snow accumulated on the ground in Anchorage, Alaska, at the rate of 2 inches per hour (5 cm per hour) for much of Saturday, March 16, 2002. By the time the winter storm passed on Sunday afternoon, Anchorage had received 28.6 inches (72.6 cm) of snow, surpassing by far the previous record of 15.6 inches (39.6 cm) set on December 29, 1955. Flights were canceled and schools were closed as a result of the storm. This true-color image of Alaska was acquired by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), flying aboard the OrbView-2 satellite, on March 18. It appears another large, low-pressure system is heading toward the Anchorage region, which could bring substantially more snowfall. The low-pressure system can be identified by the characteristic spiral pattern of clouds located off Alaska's southwestern coast in this scene.

  8. Sunspots and Snowfall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starr, Richard R.

    1978-01-01

    Examination of the snowfall and total precipitation data for Rochester, New York, suggests a correlation with sunspot activity. Data from other locations tend to support the thesis, but the ability to predict yearly snowfall or total precipitation amounts from sunspot activity has yet to be developed. (Author/CP)

  9. Snowfall Retrivals Using a Video Disdrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, A. J.; Kucera, P. A.

    2004-12-01

    A video disdrometer has been recently developed at NASA/Wallops Flight Facility in an effort to improve surface precipitation measurements. One of the goals of the upcoming Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is to provide improved satellite-based measurements of snowfall in mid-latitudes. Also, with the planned dual-polarization upgrade of US National Weather Service weather radars, there is potential for significant improvements in radar-based estimates of snowfall. The video disdrometer, referred to as the Rain Imaging System (RIS), was deployed in Eastern North Dakota during the 2003-2004 winter season to measure size distributions, precipitation rate, and density estimates of snowfall. The RIS uses CCD grayscale video camera with a zoom lens to observe hydrometers in a sample volume located 2 meters from end of the lens and approximately 1.5 meters away from an independent light source. The design of the RIS may eliminate sampling errors from wind flow around the instrument. The RIS operated almost continuously in the adverse conditions often observed in the Northern Plains. Preliminary analysis of an extended winter snowstorm has shown encouraging results. The RIS was able to provide crystal habit information, variability of particle size distributions for the lifecycle of the storm, snowfall rates, and estimates of snow density. Comparisons with coincident snow core samples and measurements from the nearby NWS Forecast Office indicate the RIS provides reasonable snowfall measurements. WSR-88D radar observations over the RIS were used to generate a snowfall-reflectivity relationship from the storm. These results along with several other cases will be shown during the presentation.

  10. Decreased winter severity increases viability of a montane frog population.

    PubMed

    McCaffery, Rebecca M; Maxell, Bryce A

    2010-05-11

    Many proximate causes of global amphibian declines have been well documented, but the role that climate change has played and will play in this crisis remains ambiguous for many species. Breeding phenology and disease outbreaks have been associated with warming temperatures, but, to date, few studies have evaluated effects of climate change on individual vital rates and subsequent population dynamics of amphibians. We evaluated relationships among local climate variables, annual survival and fecundity, and population growth rates from a 9-year demographic study of Columbia spotted frogs (Rana luteiventris) in the Bitterroot Mountains of Montana. We documented an increase in survival and breeding probability as severity of winter decreased. Therefore, a warming climate with less severe winters is likely to promote population viability in this montane frog population. More generally, amphibians and other ectotherms inhabiting alpine or boreal habitats at or near their thermal ecological limits may benefit from the milder winters provided by a warming climate as long as suitable habitats remain intact. A more thorough understanding of how climate change is expected to benefit or harm amphibian populations at different latitudes and elevations is essential for determining the best strategies to conserve viable populations and allow for gene flow and shifts in geographic range. PMID:20421473

  11. Decreased winter severity increases viability of a montane frog population

    PubMed Central

    McCaffery, Rebecca M.; Maxell, Bryce A.

    2010-01-01

    Many proximate causes of global amphibian declines have been well documented, but the role that climate change has played and will play in this crisis remains ambiguous for many species. Breeding phenology and disease outbreaks have been associated with warming temperatures, but, to date, few studies have evaluated effects of climate change on individual vital rates and subsequent population dynamics of amphibians. We evaluated relationships among local climate variables, annual survival and fecundity, and population growth rates from a 9-year demographic study of Columbia spotted frogs (Rana luteiventris) in the Bitterroot Mountains of Montana. We documented an increase in survival and breeding probability as severity of winter decreased. Therefore, a warming climate with less severe winters is likely to promote population viability in this montane frog population. More generally, amphibians and other ectotherms inhabiting alpine or boreal habitats at or near their thermal ecological limits may benefit from the milder winters provided by a warming climate as long as suitable habitats remain intact. A more thorough understanding of how climate change is expected to benefit or harm amphibian populations at different latitudes and elevations is essential for determining the best strategies to conserve viable populations and allow for gene flow and shifts in geographic range. PMID:20421473

  12. Perennial Forage Kochia for Increased Production of Winter Grazed Pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grazing forage kochia (Kochia prostrata) during fall/winter has improved livestock health and reduced winter feeding costs. The objectives of this study were to compare forage production/quality and livestock performance of traditional winter pastures versus pastures with forage kochia. Two kochia...

  13. Future snowfall in western and central Europe projected with a high-resolution regional climate model ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vries, Hylke; Lenderink, Geert; Meijgaard, Erik

    2014-06-01

    Snowfall frequency and intensity are influenced strongly by climate change. Here we separate the basic frequency change resulting from a gradually warming climate, from the intensity changes, by focusing on snowfall on days where the mean temperature is below freezing (Hellmann days). Using an ensemble of simulations, obtained with the high-resolution regional climate model KNMI-RACMO2 driven by the EC-EARTH global climate model and RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 forcing scenarios, we show that in addition to the strong decrease in the number of Hellmann days, also a substantial reduction in the mean Hellmann-day snowfall can be expected over large parts of western and central Europe. Moreover, seasonal snowfall extremes display trends that are comparable or even larger. Projected intensity reductions are locally as large as -30% per degree warming, thus being in sharp contrast to mean winter precipitation, which increases in most future climate scenarios. Exceptions are the high Alps and parts of Scandinavia, which may see an increase of up to +10% per degree warming.

  14. NPP ATMS Snowfall Rate Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, Huan; Ferraro, Ralph; Kongoli, Cezar; Wang, Nai-Yu; Dong, Jun; Zavodsky, Bradley; Yan, Banghua

    2015-01-01

    Passive microwave measurements at certain high frequencies are sensitive to the scattering effect of snow particles and can be utilized to retrieve snowfall properties. Some of the microwave sensors with snowfall sensitive channels are Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) and Advance Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS). ATMS is the follow-on sensor to AMSU and MHS. Currently, an AMSU and MHS based land snowfall rate (SFR) product is running operationally at NOAA/NESDIS. Based on the AMSU/MHS SFR, an ATMS SFR algorithm has been developed recently. The algorithm performs retrieval in three steps: snowfall detection, retrieval of cloud properties, and estimation of snow particle terminal velocity and snowfall rate. The snowfall detection component utilizes principal component analysis and a logistic regression model. The model employs a combination of temperature and water vapor sounding channels to detect the scattering signal from falling snow and derive the probability of snowfall (Kongoli et al., 2015). In addition, a set of NWP model based filters is also employed to improve the accuracy of snowfall detection. Cloud properties are retrieved using an inversion method with an iteration algorithm and a two-stream radiative transfer model (Yan et al., 2008). A method developed by Heymsfield and Westbrook (2010) is adopted to calculate snow particle terminal velocity. Finally, snowfall rate is computed by numerically solving a complex integral. NCEP CMORPH analysis has shown that integration of ATMS SFR has improved the performance of CMORPH-Snow. The ATMS SFR product is also being assessed at several NWS Weather Forecast Offices for its usefulness in weather forecast.

  15. The annual cycle of snowfall at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, Benjamin B.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Hudak, David R.; Sheppard, Brian E.

    2015-07-01

    While snow accumulation over central Greenland has been extensively studied, interannual variability of snowfall in the region is not well understood due to a dearth of observations. The Integrated Characterization of Energy, Clouds, Atmospheric state and Precipitation at Summit (ICECAPS) project at Summit, Greenland, offers a unique, ground-based opportunity to study precipitation in central Greenland where the surface mass balance is positive. Combining data from a Precipitation Occurrence Sensor System (POSS), Millimeter-wavelength Cloud Radar (MMCR), and snow stake field, the annual cycle of precipitation at Summit is examined. Average daily snowfall is higher by a factor of 3 from June to October compared to November to May, while surface height change is only higher by 15% during the same timeframes. This reduced variability in surface height is explained by the seasonally varying nature of latent heat flux, compaction, and wind contributions. The ICECAPS remote sensors and stake field measurements do not agree as far as total annual water equivalent. This discrepancy is likely due to a low bias in the POSS and MMCR snowfall retrievals for Summit. To further examine the seasonal cycle, snowfall measurements by the POSS were linked to local meteorological parameters, including wind direction, liquid water path (LWP), 2 m temperature, and precipitable water vapor. An observed wind direction and moisture dependence are consistent with snowfall being linked to pulses of moist air that originate over nearby, ice-free ocean, a resource that becomes more readily available in summertime as the winter sea ice retreats. LWP is shown to have little relationship to snowfall, indicating that ice-phase precipitation processes are quite important for snowfall at Summit.

  16. Measuring Snowfall with Solar Panels

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Using the device pictured here, government scientists are measuring snowfall in remote areas with a bucket, a small windmill, and the sun -- all the while saving money, energy, and ultimately helping to save lives. ...

  17. A Snowfall Impact Scale Derived from Northeast Storm Snowfall Distributions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocin, Paul J.; Uccellini, Louis W.

    2004-02-01

    A Northeast snowfall impact scale (NESIS) is presented to convey a measure of the impact of heavy snowfall in the Northeast urban corridor, a region that extends from southern Virginia to New England. The scale is derived from a synoptic climatology of 30 major snowstorms in the Northeast urban corridor and applied to the snowfall distribution of 70 snowstorms east of the Rocky Mountains. NESIS is similar in concept to other meteorological scales that are designed to simplify complex phenomena into an easily understood range of values. The Fujita scale for tornadoes and the Saffir Simpson scale for hurricanes measure the potential for destruction to property and loss of life by wind-related damage (and storm surge for Saffir Simpson) through use of a categorical ranking (0 or 1 5).

  18. Trends in snowfall versus rainfall in the western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knowles, N.; Dettinger, M.D.; Cayan, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    The water resources of the western United States depend heavily on snowpack to store part of the wintertime precipitation into the drier summer months. A well-documented shift toward earlier runoff in recent decades has been attributed to 1) more precipitation falling as rain instead of snow and 2) earlier snowmelt. The present study addresses the former, documenting a regional trend toward smaller ratios of winter-total snowfall water equivalent (SFE) to winter-total precipitation (P) during the period 1949-2004. The trends toward reduce d SFE are a response to warming across the region, with the most significant reductions occurring where winter wet-day minimum temperatures, averaged over the study period, were warmer than -5??C. Most SFE reductions were associated with winter wet-day temperature increases between 0?? and +3??C over the study period. Warmings larger than this occurred mainly at sites where the mean temperatures were cool enough that the precipitation form was less susceptible to warming trends. The trends toward reduced SFE/P ratios w ere most pronounced in March regionwide and in January near the West Coast, corresponding, to widespread warming in these months. While mean temperatures in March were sufficiently high to allow the warming, trend to produce SFE/P declines across the study region, mean January temperatures were cooler. with the result that January SFE/P impacts were restricted to the lower elevations near the West Coast. Extending the analysis back to 1920 sho ws that although the trends presented here may be partially attributable to interdecadal climate variability associated with the Pacific decadal oscillation. they also appear to result from still longer-term climate shifts.

  19. An evaluation of the Wyoming gauge system for snowfall measurement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yang, D.; Kane, D.L.; Hinzman, L.D.; Goodison, B.E.; Metcalfe, J.R.; Louie, P.Y.T.; Leavesley, G.H.; Emerson, D.G.; Hanson, C.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Wyoming snow fence (shield) has been widely used with precipitation gauges for snowfall measurement at more than 25 locations in Alaska since the late 1970s. This gauge's measurements have been taken as the reference for correcting wind-induced gauge undercatch of snowfall in Alaska. Recently, this fence (shield) was tested in the World Meteorological Organization Solid Precipitation Measurement Intercomparison Project at four locations in the United States of America and Canada for six winter seasons. At the Intercomparison sites an octagonal vertical Double Fence with a Russian Tretyakov gauge or a Universal Belfort recording gauge was installed and used as the Intercomparison Reference (DFIR) to provide true snowfall amounts for this intercomparison experiment. The intercomparison data collected were compiled at the four sites that represent a variety of climate, terrain, and exposure. On the basis of these data sets the performance of the Wyoming gauge system for snowfall observations was carefully evaluated against the DFIR and snow cover data. The results show that (1) the mean snow catch efficiency of the Wyoming gauge compared with the DFIR is about 80-90%, (2) there exists a close linear relation between the measurements of the two gauge systems and this relation may serve as a transfer function to adjust the Wyoming gauge records to obtain an estimate of the true snowfall amount, (3) catch efficiency of the Wyoming gauge does not change with wind speed and temperature, and (4) Wyoming gauge measurements are generally compatible to the snowpack water equivalent at selected locations in northern Alaska. These results are important to our effort of determining true snowfall amounts in the high latitudes, and they are also useful for regional hydrologic and climatic analyses.

  20. MANAGEMENT TOOLS TO INCREASE THE EFFICIENCY OF WINTER WHEAT-STOCKER ENTERPRISES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over 23 million acres of winter wheat are planted in the southern Great Plains each year, and serves as the major feed resource used by regional stocker cattle enterprises. To increase the efficiency and productivity of winter wheat stocker enterprises, two constraints must be removed. First, length...

  1. Spatiotemporal Trends in Lake Effect and Continental Snowfall in the Laurentian Great Lakes, 1951-1980.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, D. C.; Bolsenga, S. J.

    1993-10-01

    A new raster-based monthly snowfall climatology was derived from 1951-1980 snowfall station data for the Laurentian Great Lakes. An automated methodology was used to obtain higher spatial resolution than previously obtained. The increase in resolution was attained by using all available monthly snowfall data from over 1230 stations per year combined with a monthly lime step to produce high-resolution grids. These monthly grids were combined to produce snow-year grids. Multiyear average grids were created and compared. This technique minimizes traditional problems associated with missing data and variable length station records.The three 10-year average distribution maps presented here indicate a period of increasing snowfall. Windowing of the 30 seasonal grids revealed that increasing snowfall was attributable to an increase in lake effect snowfall and not to continental snowfall. The Great Lakes drainage basin was evaluated for trends within and between monthly and seasonal average snowfall through windowing of all 240 monthly grids. The graphical and statistical evaluation of these trends indicates a strong natural variation in the region's snowfall and reveals an increasing trend during the study period.

  2. The North Atlantic Oscillation: Impact on Snowfall Conditions in the Northeastern U.S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budikova, D.; Widen, H.; Coleman, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is one of the main components of atmospheric circulation variability within the middle and high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere, particularly impacting winter weather patterns in northeastern United States. Previous research has indicated greater snowfall totals and higher frequency of snowfall days in the Northeast during a NAO negative phase due to repeated polar outbreaks; yet, the NAO positive phase has also been associated with extreme snowfall events in this region. This study examines the relationship between the NAO and winter (December - February) snowfall totals in northeastern U.S. between 1961 and 2010. Two case studies of recent winter events with differing NAO phases were evaluated to provide insight on how both NAO phases can produce significant snowfall in portions of the Northeast. The analysis revealed an inverse relationship between the NAO phase and seasonal snowfall, with positive (negative) NAO index years associated with lower (higher) average snowfall and snowfall days. Significantly greater snowfall during the NAO negative phase was mainly located along the East Coast as well as the interior southern half of the study region. A composite analysis of various tropospheric variables (e.g., 500-hPa heights) showed NAO negative years produced greater snowfall due to more extreme weather conditions affecting the Northeast, such as below normal sea level pressure, a deepened mid-tropospheric trough and weaker upper-level westerlies that permitted more frequent polar outbreaks. The intrusion of cold polar air into the interior U.S. generates more extreme temperature gradients and produces snowfall farther south than the NAO positive phase. In addition, the eastward displacement of the storms in the NAO negative phase along with the available moisture from the Atlantic Ocean creates more snowfall along the East Coast. These results correspond to the spatial distribution of snowfall that occurred during the February 2010 winter storms that produced significant snowfall throughout most of the Northeast, particularly around the mid-Atlantic. On the other hand, stations indicating no relationship between NAO and snowfall were mainly located in western and central New York, northern Vermont, and Maine. These regions of the Northeast correspond to those that receive snowfall in either NAO phase, as exhibited in the case studies, due to the effects of nearby lakes and higher terrain related to the storm tracks through these areas. Winter storms track over this northern region (of the Northeast) regardless of NAO phase whereas snowfall in the mid-Atlantic states is more dependent on a strong southerly track (i.e. Cape Hatteras/Nor'easter low) associated with the NAO negative phase. Since western New York and northwestern Pennsylvania border Lake Ontario and Lake Erie, the stations in these regions commonly receive lake-effect snow as a result of great fetch due to the west-east orientation of both lakes. Stations in central and northern New York receive lake-effect snow as additional lift is generated when the moist air reaches the Allegheny Plateau and the Adirondack Mountains.

  3. A Climatology of Mean Monthly Snowfall for the Conterminous United States: Temporal and Spatial Patterns.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, John A., Jr.; Cerveny, Randall S.; Dewey, Kenneth F.

    1987-08-01

    Mean monthly snowfall data for 216 stations across the conterminous United States were analyzed to produce a climatology that identifies statistical, spatial and intraseasonal aspects. Geographic variations in the length of the snowfall season are characterized using two statistics: the number of months of snow and the Snow Concentration Index (SCI).The annual distribution of mean monthly snowfall is also examined using harmonic analysis. Snowfall across the conterminous United States generally peaks in February; earlier snowfall maxima are found in the Great Lakes area and in the Pacific Northwest, whereas late February or March maxima occur in the western High Plains. Stations with relatively high amounts of variance explained by the second harmonic indicate 1) areas with a short snowfall season such as the southeastern United States, or 2) areas with a long snowfall season that have a tendency toward a bimodal distribution.A climatology of the changing monthly patterns of snowfall is identified through the mapping of station deviations from a national composite. This procedure produces contiguous regions that can be related to seasonal changes in the extent and positioning of the circumpolar vortex. The maps reveal that positive snowfall deviations predominate 1) in autumn in the northern and western Great Plains and the Rocky Mountains (with a full-latitude trough over the central United States and associated upslope precipitation); 2) in early winter in the Great Lakes (associated with lake-effect storms); 3) in late winter over the southern and western states (with a fully expanded circumpolar vortex); and 4) in spring in the western states (linked to seasonal changes in preferred locations of cyclogenesis and associated storm tracks).

  4. Improving Radar Snowfall Measurements Using a Video Disdrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, A. J.; Kucera, P. A.

    2005-05-01

    A video disdrometer has been recently developed at NASA/Wallops Flight Facility in an effort to improve surface precipitation measurements. The recent upgrade of the UND C-band weather radar to dual-polarimetric capabilities along with the development of the UND Glacial Ridge intensive atmospheric observation site has presented a valuable opportunity to attempt to improve radar estimates of snowfall. The video disdrometer, referred to as the Rain Imaging System (RIS), has been deployed at the Glacial Ridge site for most of the 2004-2005 winter season to measure size distributions, precipitation rate, and density estimates of snowfall. The RIS uses CCD grayscale video camera with a zoom lens to observe hydrometers in a sample volume located 2 meters from end of the lens and approximately 1.5 meters away from an independent light source. The design of the RIS may eliminate sampling errors from wind flow around the instrument. The RIS has proven its ability to operate continuously in the adverse conditions often observed in the Northern Plains. The RIS is able to provide crystal habit information, variability of particle size distributions for the lifecycle of the storm, snowfall rates, and estimates of snow density. This information, in conjunction with hand measurements of density and crystal habit, will be used to build a database for comparisons with polarimetric data from the UND radar. This database will serve as the basis for improving snowfall estimates using polarimetric radar observations. Preliminary results from several case studies will be presented.

  5. Climatological characterization of wind and snowfall in Minnesota and assessing the impacts of living snow fences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulski, Martha Elizabeth Durr

    Blowing and drifting snow on roadways is a common occurrence in Minnesota due to the topographic, vegetative, and winter climate characteristics of this area. Through proper road design and the use of snow fences this problem can be alleviated, however snowfall and wind climatological information must first be analyzed. Archived climatological records for locations in Minnesota were recently compiled. Snowfall time series data show a statistically significant increase of 28cm in the annual total since 1890. The increase is shown to occur for November--December while February and March show a decrease. This increase is largely due to an increase in the frequency of snow events less than 10cm. Wind data from federal observing sites in Minnesota show a correlation to landscape variability, with a high frequency of higher wind speeds in western and southern Minnesota. A snow relocation factor needed to quantify seasonal snow transport was calculated and shows a strong dependence on the wind speed distribution. A case study of the 2000--01 winter season allowed for examination of snow storage and agricultural implications of three living snow fence designs in southern Minnesota (two 8-row strips of corn, twin-row honeysuckle, single-row honeysuckle/red cedar). For a winter with high seasonal snowfall and spring rainfall, results of snow storage and modeled seasonal snow transport show good agreement for the two corn row strips. However, snow storage totaled approximately 50% of the modeled snow transport for the honeysuckle fence designs, which appeared to reach storage capacity prior to the end of the snow season. A key factor is the absence of a bottom gap, which promotes leeward displacement of the downwind drift and prevents snow deposition on the fence. Soil temperature and frost depth data show a moderation in temperatures and a decrease in freezing depth with an increase in associated snowpack depth. Post-season soil moisture shows no significant variability with respect to over-winter snowpack due to the anomalous rainfall received during and after snowmelt. Finally, crop yield samples show a 6%--36% reduction adjacent to the fence, but also show a relatively quick recovery.

  6. Seasonal small-scale spatial variability in alpine snowfall and snow accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scipión, D. E.; Mott, R.; Lehning, M.; Schneebeli, M.; Berne, A.

    2013-03-01

    In mountainous regions, snow accumulation on the ground is crucial for mountain hydrology and water resources. The present study investigates the link between the spatial variability in snowfall and in snow accumulation in the Swiss Alps. A mobile polarimetric X-band radar deployed in the area of Davos (Switzerland) collected valuable and continuous information on small-scale precipitation for the winter seasons of 2009/2010 and 2010/2011. Local measurements of snow accumulation were collected with airborne laser-scanning for the winters of 2007/2008 and 2008/2009. The spatial distribution of snow accumulation exhibits a strong interannual consistency that can be generalized over the winters in the area. This unique configuration makes the comparison of the variability in total snowfall amount estimated from radar and in snow accumulation possible over the diverse winter periods. As expected, the spatial variability, quantified by means of the variogram, is shown to be larger in snow accumulation than in snowfall. However, the variability of snowfall is also significant, especially over the mountain tops, leads to preferential deposition during snowfall and needs further investigation. The higher variability at the ground is mainly caused by snow transport.

  7. Microbial response to increasing temperatures during winter in arable soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukas, Stefan; Potthoff, Martin; Joergensen, Rainer Georg

    2014-05-01

    Climate scenarios predict increasing temperatures and higher precipitation rates in late fall to early spring, both holding the potential to modify carbon and nutrient dynamics in soils by altering snow pack thickness and soil frost events. When soils are frozen, a small amount of unfrozen water allows microorganisms to remain active at temperatures down to -10 C. We carried out a field experiment on the microbial use of maize straw. We compared soils of two different clay contents and used latitude as a proxy for climate. Microcosms with sieved soil were mixed with chopped maize leaf straw (C/N 17) at a rate of 1 mg C g-1 dry soil, un-amended microcosms served as control. Results indicated that C-mineralization rates were independent from clay content. However, the microbial use of maize derived nitrogen was only increased in the soil with 13% clay compared to 33% clay in the other soil. Microbial responses to climate changes can be expected to be very specific due to characteristics of the soil and/or the location.

  8. Temperature and snowfall trigger alpine vegetation green-up on the world's roof.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoqiu; An, Shuai; Inouye, David W; Schwartz, Mark D

    2015-10-01

    Rapid temperature increase and its impacts on alpine ecosystems in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, the world's highest and largest plateau, are a matter of global concern. Satellite observations have revealed distinctly different trend changes and contradicting temperature responses of vegetation green-up dates, leading to broad debate about the Plateau's spring phenology and its climatic attribution. Large uncertainties in remote-sensing estimates of phenology significantly limit efforts to predict the impacts of climate change on vegetation growth and carbon balance in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, which are further exacerbated by a lack of detailed ground observation calibration. Here, we revealed the spatiotemporal variations and climate drivers of ground-based herbaceous plant green-up dates using 72 green-up datasets for 22 herbaceous plant species at 23 phenological stations, and corresponding daily mean air temperature and daily precipitation data from 19 climate stations across eastern and southern parts of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau from 1981 to 2011. Results show that neither the continuously advancing trend from 1982 to 2011, nor a turning point in the mid to late 1990s as reported by remote-sensing studies can be verified by most of the green-up time series, and no robust evidence for a warmer winter-induced later green-up dates can be detected. Thus, chilling requirements may not be an important driver influencing green-up responses to spring warming. Moreover, temperature-only control of green-up dates appears mainly at stations with relatively scarce preseason snowfall and lower elevation, while coupled temperature and precipitation controls of green-up dates occur mostly at stations with relatively abundant preseason snowfall and higher elevation. The diversified interactions between snowfall and temperature during late winter to early spring likely determine the spatiotemporal variations of green-up dates. Therefore, prediction of vegetation growth and carbon balance responses to global climate change on the world's roof should integrate both temperature and snowfall variations. PMID:25906987

  9. Cold temperature increases winter fruit removal rate of a bird-dispersed shrub.

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Kwit; Douglas J. Levey; Cathryn H. Greenberg; Scott F. Pearson; John P. McCarty; Sarah Sargent

    2004-01-10

    Kwit, C., D. J. Levey; C. H. Greenberg, S. F. Pearson, J.P. McCarty, and S. Sargent. Cold temperature increases winter fruit removal rate of a bird-dispersed shrub. Oecologia. 139:30-34. Abstract: We tested the hypothesis that winter removal rates of fruits of wax myrtle, Myrica cerifera, are higher in colder winters. Over a 9-year period, we monitored M. cerifera fruit crops in 13 0.1-ha study plots in South Carolina, U.S.A. Peak ripeness occurred in November, whereas peak removal occurred in the coldest months, December and January. Mean time to fruit removal within study plots was positively correlated with mean winter temperatures, thereby supporting our hypothesis. This result, combined with the generally low availability of winter arthropods, suggests that fruit abundance may play a role in determining winter survivorship and distribution of permanent resident and short-distance migrant birds. From the plant's perspective, it demonstrates inter-annual variation in the temporal component of seed dispersal, with possible consequences for post-dispersal seed and seedling ecology.

  10. Winter Insulation By Snow Accumulation in a Subarctic Treeline Ecosystem Increases Summer Carbon Cycling Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, T.; Subke, J. A.; Wookey, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of snow accumulation on soil carbon and nutrient cycling is attracting substantial attention from researchers. We know that deeper snow accumulation caused by high stature vegetation increases winter microbial activity and therefore carbon and nitrogen flux rates. However, until now the effect of snow accumulation, by buffering winter soil temperature, on subsequent summer soil processes, has scarcely been considered. We carried out an experiment at an alpine treeline in subarctic Sweden in which soil monoliths, contained within PVC collars, were transplanted between forest (deep winter snow) and tundra heath (shallow winter snow). We measured soil CO2efflux over two growing seasons and quantified soil microbial biomass after the second winter. We showed that respiration rates of transplanted forest soil were significantly reduced compared with control collars (remaining in the forest) as a consequence of colder, but more variable, winter temperatures. We hypothesised that microbial biomass would be reduced in transplanted forests soils but found there was no difference compared to control. We therefore further hypothesised that the similarly sized microbial pool in the control is assembled differently to the transplant. We believe that the warmer winters in forests foster more active consortia of decomposer microbes as a result of different abiotic selection pressures. Using an ecosystem scale experimental approach, we have identified a mechanism that influences summer carbon cycling rates based solely on the amount of snow that accumulates the previous winter. We conclude that modification of snow depth as a consequence of changes in vegetation structure is an important mechanism influencing soil C stocks in ecosystems where snow persists for a major fraction of the year.

  11. Polarization Lidar Liquid Cloud Detection Algorithm for Winter Mountain Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhao, Hongjie

    1992-01-01

    We have collected an extensive polarization lidar dataset from elevated sites in the Tushar Mountains of Utah in support of winter storm cloud seeding research and experiments. Our truck-mounted ruby lidar collected zenith, dual-polarization lidar data through a roof window equipped with a wiper system to prevent snowfall accumulation. Lidar returns were collected at a rate of one shot every 1 to 5 min during declared storm periods over the 1985 and 1987 mid-Jan. to mid-Mar. Field seasons. The mid-barrier remote sensor field site was located at 2.57 km MSL. Of chief interest to weather modification efforts are the heights of supercooled liquid water (SLW) clouds, which must be known to assess their 'seedability' (i.e., temperature and height suitability for artificially increasing snowfall). We are currently re-examining out entire dataset to determine the climatological properties of SLW clouds in winter storms using an autonomous computer algorithm.

  12. Climate change projection of snowfall in the Colorado River Basin using dynamical downscaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wi, Sungwook; Dominguez, Francina; Durcik, Matej; Valdes, Juan; Diaz, Henry F.; Castro, Christopher L.

    2012-05-01

    Recent observations show a decrease in the fraction of precipitation falling as snowfall in the western United States. In this work we evaluate a historical and future climate simulation over the Colorado River Basin using a 35 km continuous 111 year simulation (1969-2079) of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional climate model with boundary forcing from the Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research/Met Office's HadCM3 model with A2 emission scenario. The focus of this work is to (1) evaluate the simulated spatiotemporal variability of snowfall in the historical period when compared to observations and (2) project changes in snowfall and the fraction of precipitation that falls as snow during the 21st century. We find that the spatial variability in modeled snowfall in the historical period (1981-2005) is realistically represented when compared to observations. The trends of modeled snowfall are similar to the observed trends except at higher elevations. Examining the continuous 111 year simulation, we find the future projections show statistically significant increases in temperature with larger increases in the northern part of the basin. There are statistically insignificant increases in precipitation, while snowfall shows a statistically significant decrease throughout the period in all but the highest elevations and latitudes. The fraction of total precipitation falling as snow shows statistically significant declines in all regions. The strongest decrease in snowfall is seen at high elevations in the southern part of the basin and low elevations in the northern part of the basin. The regions of most intense decreases in snow experience a decline of approximately 50% in snowfall throughout the 111 year simulation period. The regions of strongest declines in snowfall roughly correspond to the region of migration of the zero degree Celsius line and emphasize snowfall dependence on both altitude and latitude.

  13. A Linkage of Recent Arctic Summer Sea Ice and Snowfall Variability of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, K.; Honda, M.; Ukita, J.

    2014-12-01

    In spite of its mid-latitude location, Japan has a markedly high amount of snowfall, which owes much to the presence of cold air-break from Siberia and thus depends on the strength of the Siberian high and the Aleutian low. With this background this study examines the relationship between interannual variability and spatial patterns of snowfall in Japan with large-scale atmospheric and sea ice variations. The lag regression map of the winter snowfall in Japan on the time series of the Arctic SIE from the preceding summer shows a seesaw pattern in the snowfall, suggesting an Arctic teleconnection to regional weather. From the EOF analyses conducted on the snowfall distribution in Japan, we identify two modes with physical significance. The NH SIC and SLP regressed on PC1 show a sea ice reduction in the Barents and Kara Seas and anomalous strength of the Siberia high as discussed in Honda et al. (2009) and other studies, which support the above notion that the snowfall variability of Japan is influenced by Arctic sea ice conditions. Another mode is related to the AO/NAO and the hemispheric scale double sea-ice seesaw centered over the sub-Arctic region: one between the Labrador and Nordic Seas in the Atlantic and the other between the Okhotsk and Bering Seas from the Pacific as discussed in Ukita et al. (2007). Together, observations point to a significant role of the sea-ice in determining mid-latitude regional climate and weather patterns.

  14. Summer Snowfall Impact on Greenland Ice Sheet SMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, B.; Van De Berg, W. J.; van Meijgaard, E.; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, the regional climate model RACMO2 has been updated to the version 2.3. The main physics update consists of an enhanced rainfall to snowfall conversion rate, favouring solid over liquid precipitation at higher temperatures, especially in summer. In the updated RACMO2.3 simulation, SMB anomalies are generated through a feedback mechanism involving increased summer snowfall, surface albedo rise as well as cloud cover reduction, resulting in a subsequent decrease of snowmelt and runoff. When compared against K-transect measurements in western Greenland, these updates improve the modelled surface energy balance and surface mass balance relative to the previous RACMO2 version. In addition, the heavier summer snowfall improves the simulated surface albedo in comparison with stations measurements. In recent years, the surface albedo close to the equilibrium line declined notably in summer due to a prolonged bare ice exposure and a decreasing ice albedo. RACMO2.3 results reveal that this rapid reduction in bare ice albedo is not exclusively driven by surface processes related to melt. A major summer snowfall reduction also plays a role in extending the period of bare ice exposure, in turn lowering surface albedo.

  15. When Elk are Excluded, Aspen Growth Dramatically Increases

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Climate change in the form of reduced snowfall in mountains  is causing powerful and cascading shifts in montane plant and bird communities through the increased ability of elk to stay at high elevations over winter and consume plants. Here, you can see an example of the difference in aspe...

  16. A nested modeling study of elevation-dependent climate change signals in California induced by increased atmospheric CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jinwon

    2001-06-04

    Dynamically downscaled climate change signals due to increased atmospheric CO2 are investigated for three California basins. The downscaled signals show strong elevation dependence, mainly due to elevated freezing levels in the increased CO2 climate. Below 2.5 km, rainfall increases by over 150% while snowfall decreases by 20-40% in the winter. Above 2.5 km, rainfall and snowfall both increase in the winter, as the freezing levels appear mostly below this level. Winter snowmelt increases in all elevations due to warmer temperatures in the increased CO2 climate. Reduced snowfall and enhanced snowmelt during the winter decreases snowmelt-driven spring runoff below the 2.5 km level, where the peak snowmelt occurs one month earlier in the increased CO2 climate. Above 2.5km, increased winter snowfall maintains snowmelt-driven runoff through most of the warm season. The altered hydrologic characteristics in the increased CO2 climate affect the diurnal temperature variation mainly via snow-albedo-soil moisture feedback.

  17. Synoptic Weather Patterns Leading to Snowfall in the Northeastern United States and the Resulting Spatial Distribution of Snowfall Amounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmosky, C. C.

    2006-05-01

    Frozen precipitation results in hazardous conditions in the densely populated northeastern United States, yet little attention has been given to the important relationship between synoptic weather patterns and snowfall amounts. Recent increases in total seasonal snowfall amounts in some parts of the region have been attributed to increases in the frequency and/or intensity of certain weather patterns. Direct accounts of synoptic weather patterns are rarely recorded in conjunction with standard meteorological observations, and, as such, they must be diagnosed after the fact. Given the difficulty in isolating consistent synoptic weather patterns from standard meteorological datasets, to date there has been no quantitative study on the amount of snow that falls from each of the distinct synoptic systems that affect the region (nor' easters, lake-effect storms, overrunning events, etc.). This study isolates distinct synoptic types using four-times daily synoptic weather data, principal components analysis and clustering analysis for several cities in the region stretching from Maine to southwestern Virginia. The results of this synoptic typing are specific to the city for which the analysis was performed, and are not necessarily directly comparable to neighboring cities. The algorithm used to delineate synoptic types does, however, take into consideration the temporal progression of synoptic weather patterns over each city and isolates days that are transitional from one synoptic pattern to another. The calendar of daily synoptic types generated in this study is joined to a relatively high resolution, gridded snowfall dataset to isolate areas where a given synoptic pattern is responsible for a given percentage of snowfall. The final product is a series of monthly and seasonal maps of snowfall distributions resulting from each of the individual synoptic patterns.

  18. Microwave signatures of snowfall using a combined modeling and multi-instrument observational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulie, M.; Hiley, M.; Bennartz, R.

    2011-12-01

    Microwave snowfall retrievals have received increased attention in recent years due to the upcoming launch of the joint NASA/JAXA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. GPM's core satellite will feature a dual-frequency Ku/Ka-band radar and multi-frequency passive microwave radiometer that will provide the first combined active/passive microwave observations of snowfall at higher latitudes. This study initially explores a GPM proxy observational dataset comprised of coincident CloudSat, AMSR-E, and higher frequency MHS microwave observations associated with frozen precipitation to illustrate the microwave scattering signature of different snowfall events. Multi-frequency microwave signatures of deeper, synoptic snowfall events will be compared to shallow, convective lake-effect snow events to illustrate the complexity of using scattering signatures for snowfall retrievals. Additionally, recent modeling work has highlighted potentially unique triple-frequency radar signatures of snowfall using non-spherical aggregate snowflake models. These modeling results will constrain the snowflake scattering properties, while the observational dataset will be used to assess multi-frequency microwave simulations using aggregate snowflake models. Particular attention will be focused on snowfall events with low columnar cloud liquid water contents to better isolate the scattering effects of frozen hydrometeors.

  19. Toward estimating snowfall from space: Microphysical constraints from intensive in situ surface observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, N. B.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Heymsfield, A.; Stephens, G. L.

    2010-12-01

    Representations of microphysical properties are necessary to the development of remote sensing algorithms for space-based observations of snowfall: to create radiative scattering and fallspeed models, to act as explicit a priori constraints, or to validate remote sensing results, for example. These representations, capturing properties such as mass, area, and shape that affect both microwave scattering and snowfall rate, would, ideally, be physically consistent and provide information about the uncertainties and environmental variability of these properties. Toward that end, a microphysical properties retrieval was developed for application to intensive, surface-based in situ observations of snowfall. The optimal estimation retrieval utilizes nearly-colocated observations of radar reflectivity, snowfall rate, size distribution and fallspeed, and produces estimates of the microphysical state. The state is represented by power law expressions giving particle mass and horizontally projected area as functions of particle size. The retrieval has been applied to four snowfall events from NH winter 2006-2007 which were observed during the Canadian CloudSat/CALIPSO Validation Project. The events consisted of both lake effect and synoptic snowfall. The retrieval was operated at moderately high time resolution in an attempt to capture the temporal variations in the microphysical properties. A rigorous assessment of measurement and forward model uncertainties was performed, and these uncertainties propagate into the retrieved states via the optimal estimation algorithm. Although significant uncertainties remain in the retrieved states, some microphysical differences between events are discernible. The retrievals additionally provide information about the multidimensional probability distribution of the state variables. Such information will likely be useful for constraining and for evaluating the uncertainty characteristics of space-based remote sensing algorithms for snowfall.

  20. Effects of extraordinary snowfall on traffic safety.

    PubMed

    Seeherman, Joshua; Liu, Yi

    2015-08-01

    Snowfall affects traffic safety by causing changes in roadway surface and visibility that result in crashes, spinouts, and breakdowns. Using data collected at a site that regularly receives nearly 1000 cm of snow during the snow season, this study examines the impact of snowfall quantity, gap between snow events, and weather conditions on crash and incident frequencies. Estimation results from regression analysis show that snowfall severity significantly impacts crashes and incidents but the impact diminishes marginally with each additional centimeter of snow. Gap has a significant fixed effect on crashes but its impact on incidents varies significantly across observations. The effect of the mixed precipitation condition is smaller in comparison to an all-snow condition. These results will help inform policy for snow removal and traffic enforcement in areas of high snowfall. PMID:26024836

  1. Variations of ice nuclei concentration induced by rain and snowfall within a local forested site in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Kazutaka; Maki, Teruya; Kobayashi, Fumihisa; Kakikawa, Makiko; Wada, Masashi; Matsuki, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Biological ice nuclei (IN) such as certain species of bacteria and fungi are believed to have impacts on ice nucleation in mixed-phase clouds at temperatures warmer than -15 °C. Recent studies have indicated that rain is closely related to increases of biological IN in the near-surface atmosphere. However, variations of IN concentrations during rain and snowfall have not been compared. In the present study, field measurements of atmospheric IN were carried out under fine, cloudy, rain and snow at a local forested site in Japan. IN concentrations at -7 °C in spring were dramatically increased by rain, and concentrations associated with rain (0.86-2.2 m-3) were greater than 2.6 times higher than the mean concentration during fine weather (0.33 m-3). In winter, concentrations associated with rain (1.6 to >5.7 m-3) were also higher than those under cloudy sky (1.1 m-3), but increases were not observed during snowfall (0.21-0.4 m-3). Detectable IN concentrations associated with rain considerably decreased after heat treatment at 90 °C, indicating that IN increased during rain were likely biological substances such as heat-sensitive ice nucleation active proteins. Consequently, different types of precipitation may have varying effects on IN concentration associated with biological substances.

  2. An exceptionally heavy snowfall in Northeast china: large-scale circulation anomalies and hindcast of the NCAR WRF model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huijun; Yu, Entao; Yang, Song

    2011-06-01

    In Northeast China (NEC), snowfalls usually occur during winter and early spring, from mid-October to late March, and strong snowfalls rarely occur in middle spring. During 12-13 April 2010, an exceptionally strong snowfall occurred in NEC, with 26.8 mm of accumulated water-equivalent snow over Harbin, the capital of the most eastern province in NEC. In this study, the major features of the snowfall and associated large-scale circulation and the predictability of the snowfall are analyzed using both observations and models. The Siberia High intensified and shifted southeastward from 10 days before the snowfall, resulting in intensifying the low-pressure system over NEC and strengthening the East Asian Trough during 12-13 April. Therefore, large convergence of water vapor and strong rising motion appeared over eastern NEC, resulting in heavy snowfall. Hindcast experiments were carried out using the NCAR Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in a two-way nesting approach, forced by NCEP Global Forecast System data sets. Many observed features including the large-scale and regional circulation anomalies and snowfall amount can be reproduced reasonably well, suggesting the feasibility of the WRF model in forecasting extreme weather events over NEC. A quantitative analysis also shows that the nested NEC domain simulation is even better than mother domain simulation in simulating the snowfall amount and spatial distribution, and that both simulations are more skillful than the NCEP Global Forecast System output. The forecast result from the nested forecast system is very promising for an operational purpose.

  3. Redistribution of Snowfall across a Mountain Range by Artificial Seeding: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, P V; Radke, L F

    1973-09-14

    Clouds over the western slopes of the Cascade Mountains were artificially seeded to reduce the riming and fall speeds of snow crystals and to divert snowfall across the crest. Aircraft observations showed that the clouds were glaciated by the seeding. The crystal habits and the degrees of riming of snow crystals reaching the target area were modified. Snowfall rates decreased at the crest and simultaneously increased 20 kilometers east of the crest. PMID:17731264

  4. Spatial Variability of alpine snowfall and snow accumulation from radar and lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scipion, D. E.; Mott, R.; Lehning, M.; Berne, A.

    2012-12-01

    A mobile polarimetric X-band radar (MXPol) deployed in the area of Davos (Switzerland) collected valuable and continuous information on small-scale precipitation for the winter seasons of 2009/2010 and 2010/2011. These data are compared to local measurements of the maximum snow accumulation over the season collected with Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) at the Wannengrat area (Davos, Switzerland). This unique configuration makes the comparison of the variability in snowfall (as seen by the radar) and in snow accumulation (from laser scans) possible over the entire winter seasons. The spatial variability, quantified by means of the variogram (related to autocorrelation), is shown to be larger in snow accumulation than in snowfall. This indicates that other factors (like wind and turbulence taking place close to the ground) induced by small-scale topographic features govern the snow deposition and accumulation at the ground level in mountainous areas. In order to further investigate this question, the domain covered by the radar is divided in two sub-domains over which the radar beam is either close or far from a mountain ridge. The variability in snowfall, as well as the turbulence intensity, appears consistently larger in the vicinity of the ridge than far from the ground, which confirms the influence of small-scale topography on snowfall.adar data snapshot from March 18, 2011 at 00:06:48 UTC. a) Reflectivity. b) Differential reflectivity. c) Doppler spectral width

  5. Circulation patterns governing October snowfalls in southern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednorz, Ewa; Wibig, Joanna

    2015-12-01

    This study is focused on early fall season in southern Siberia (50-60 N) and is purposed as a contribution to the discussion on the climatic relevance of October Eurasian snow cover. Analysis is based on the daily snow depth data from 43 stations from years 1980-2012, available in the database of All-Russian Research Institute of Hydrometeorological Information—World Data Centre. The snow cover season in southern Siberia starts in early autumn and the number of days with snowfall varies from less than 5 days in the southernmost zone along the parallel 50 N to more than 25 days in the northeastern part of the analyzed area. October snowfall in southern Siberia is associated with occurrence of negative anomalies of sea level pressure (SLP), usually spreading right over the place of recorded intense snowfall or extending eastward from it. Negative anomalies of air temperature at the 850 hPa geopotential level (T850) occurring with increased cyclonic activity are also observed. Negative T850 anomalies are located west or northwest of the SLP depressions. Counterclockwise circulation around low-pressure systems transports cold Arctic air from the north or even colder Siberian polar air from the east, to the west, and northwest parts of cyclones, and induces negative anomalies of temperature. The pattern of T850 anomalies during heavy snowfalls in the eastern part of the southern Siberia is shifted counterclockwise in regard to SLP anomalies: the strongest negative T850 anomalies are located west or northwest of the SLP depressions.

  6. Experimental Studies on Amount of Snowfall by Crystal Growth in an Artificial Snowfall Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Mitsuo; Umezawa, Kouichi; Abe, Osamu

    A series of experiments was conducted to estimate the amount of snowfall of dendrite-type crystals produced by an artificial snowfall device that uses the rotary ventilation mesh filter method. An expression is proposed in this paper for the amount of the snowfall. The amount of snowfall (Gs) can be expressed as Gs = ?s Vai ?W , where ?W is effective water content in the crystal growth, Vai is air mass flow and ?s is snowfall efficiency. The effective water content in the crystal growth (?W) is defined as the difference between the specific cloud water content and ice saturation vapor density. The rotary ventilation mesh filter method used in this work had a snowfall efficiency of about 90%. Even for a large amount of cloud water content, we observed only a very few super-cooled cloud droplets on snow crystals. Therefore, we can deduce that the cloud water content should contribute to crystal growth directly. We report here measurements of snowfall as a function of several input parameters and verify the validity of the proposed relationship.

  7. Decadal increase of organic compounds in winter and spring atmospheric aerosols in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, S.; Kawamura, K.; Kobayashi, M.; Tachibana, E.; Lee, M.; Jung, J.

    2014-12-01

    A rapid economic growth in China and other East Asian countries may have changed molecular level organic composition of atmospheric aerosols in East Asia. Molecular level composition is required to better evaluate the roles of organic aersols on climate, air quality and public health. Diacids and oxoacids account for a significant fraction of atmospheric organic matter and their secondary sources are more important than their primary sources. Atmospheric aerosol samples (n = 698) were collected during 2001-2008 at Gosan site in Jeju Island, South Korea. They were analyzed for saturated (C2-C10), unsaturated aliphatic (C4-C5), multifunctional (C3-C7) and aromatic (C8) diacids and oxoacids (C2-C9). According to monthly average concentration, oxalic acid (C2) is the most abundant followed by malonic acid (C3) and succinic acid (C4) in the homologous series of saturated diacids (C2-C10) whereas glyoxylic acid (ωC2) is most abundant in the homologous series of oxoacids (C2-C9). The monthly median, 25th percentile and 75th percentile concentrations of saturated and multifunctional diacids and oxoacids showed the highest in spring (March-May). In contrast, those concentrations for unsaturated aliphatic and aromatic diacids were observed the highest in winter (December-February). The monthly median and percentile (25th and 75th) concentrations of all diacids and oxoacids showed the second peak in the autumn (September-November) while those concentrations were recorded lowest in summer (June-August). A steady increment or decrement was not found in the monthly median and percentile (25th and 75th) concentrations of diacids and oxoacids in any month. However, the curve fitting of those concentrations over the study period shows an incremental trend for major diacids and oxoacids in winter and spring. For example, the monthly median, 25th percentile and 75th percentile concentrations of all major diacids and oxoacids increased up to 3 times from 2001 to 2008 in winter and spring. This study for the first time demonstrates the decadal increase of organic aerosols in East Asia and we discuss the bimodal seasonal variations and incremental trend of organic aerosols based on the annual behavior of ozone, carbon monoxide, and air mass transport pattern in East Asia.

  8. A Record Ohio Snowfall during 9-14 November 1996.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidlin, Thomas W.; Kosarik, James

    1999-06-01

    A 6-day lake effect snow event produced a reported 68.9 in. (175.0 cm) of snowfall in Hambden Township, Geauga County, Ohio, during 9-14 November 1996. This exceeded the previous Ohio single-storm snowfall record of 42 in. The purpose of this research is to describe the meteorological situation that caused the record snowfall, document the site of the record snow and the methods of the measurement, describe the societal impacts of the storm, and assess the validity of the record. A persistent deep trough in the midtroposphere provided cold advection across Lake Erie into northeast Ohio. This combined with a very unstable lower atmosphere to allow deep, moist convection and a prolonged period of heavy snowfall. The observer and site were selected in 1994 for a federal study of lake effect snowfalls and the observer was a snow spotter for the National Weather Service office in Cleveland in November 1996. A review of snowfall data from the event indicates the reported snowfall is consistent with respect to snow depths, nearby reported snowfall, the synoptic situation, and societal impacts of the snow. The authors suggest the 68.9 in. of snowfall should be accepted as a new state record single-storm snowfall. In addition, the 76.7 in. (195 cm) of snowfall recorded at this site in November 1996 is a new monthly snowfall record for Ohio.

  9. Cold temperature increases winter fruit removal rate of a bird-dispersed shrub.

    PubMed

    Kwit, Charles; Levey, Douglas J; Greenberg, Cathryn H; Pearson, Scott F; McCarty, John P; Sargent, Sarah

    2004-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that winter removal rates of fruits of wax myrtle, Myrica cerifera, are higher in colder winters. Over a 9-year period, we monitored M. cerifera fruit crops in 13 0.1-ha study plots in South Carolina, U.S.A. Peak ripeness occurred in November, whereas peak removal occurred in the coldest months, December and January. Mean time to fruit removal within study plots was positively correlated with mean winter temperatures, thereby supporting our hypothesis. This result, combined with the generally low availability of winter arthropods, suggests that fruit abundance may play a role in determining winter survivorship and distribution of permanent resident and short-distance migrant birds. From the plant's perspective, it demonstrates inter-annual variation in the temporal component of seed dispersal, with possible consequences for post-dispersal seed and seedling ecology. PMID:14716556

  10. Polarimetric radar and in situ observations of riming and snowfall microphysics during CLACE 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazioli, J.; Lloyd, G.; Panziera, L.; Hoyle, C. R.; Connolly, P. J.; Henneberger, J.; Berne, A.

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the microphysics of winter alpine snowfall occurring in mixed-phase clouds in an inner-Alpine valley during January and February 2014. The available observations include high-resolution polarimetric radar and in situ measurements of the ice-phase and liquid-phase components of clouds and precipitation. Radar-based hydrometeor classification suggests that riming is an important factor to favor an efficient growth of the precipitating mass and correlates with snow accumulation rates at ground level. The time steps during which rimed precipitation is dominant are analyzed in terms of temporal evolution and vertical structure. Snowfall identified as rimed often appears after a short time period during which the atmospheric conditions favor wind gusts and updrafts and supercooled liquid water (SLW) is available. When a turbulent atmospheric layer persists for several hours and ensures continuous SLW generation, riming can be sustained longer and large accumulations of snow at ground level can be generated. The microphysical interpretation and the meteorological situation associated with one such event are detailed in the paper. The vertical structure of polarimetric radar observations during intense snowfall classified as rimed shows a peculiar maximum of specific differential phase shift Kdp, associated with large number concentrations and riming of anisotropic crystals. Below this Kdp peak there is usually an enhancement in radar reflectivity ZH, proportional to the Kdp enhancement and interpreted as aggregation of ice crystals. These signatures seem to be recurring during intense snowfall.

  11. The 8th-10 th January 2009 snowfalls: a case of Mediterranean warm advection event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguado, F.; Ayensa, E.; Barriga, M.; Del Hoyo, J.; Fernández, A.; Garrido, N.; Martín, A.; Martín, F.; Roa, I. Martínez, A.; Pascual, R.

    2009-09-01

    From 8 th to 10 th of January 2009, significant snowfalls were reported in many areas of the Iberian Peninsula and the Balearic Islands. This relevant event was very important from the meteorological and social impact point of views. The snow affected many zones, especially the regions of Madrid, Castilla & León and Castilla-La Mancha (Spanish central plateau) with the persistence and thickness of solid precipitation. Up to twenty-five centimetres of snow were reported in some places. On 9th of January the snowfalls caused great social and media impact due to the fact that they took place in the early hours in the Madrid metropolitan areas, affecting both air traffic and land transport. The "Madrid-Barajas" airport was closed and the city was collapsed during several hours. A study of this situation appears in the poster. The snowstorm was characterized by the previous irruption of an European continental polar air mass, that subsequently interacted with a wet and warm air mass of Mediterranean origin, all preceded by low level easterly flows. This type of snowfall is called "warm advection". These winter situations are very efficient from precipitation point of view, generating significant snowfalls and affecting a lot of areas.

  12. Variability and trends of total precipitation and snowfall over the United States and Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Groisman, P.Y. ); Easterling, D.R. )

    1994-01-01

    The biases and large-scale inhomogeneities in the time series of measured precipitation and snowfall over the United States and Canada are discussed and analyzed. The spatial statistical characteristics of monthly and annual snowfall and total precipitation are investigated and parameterized. After adjustments and selection of the best' network, reliable first guess' estimates of North American snowfall and precipitation are obtained. Century-long time series of unbiased annual precipitation over the regions to the south of 55[degrees]N and 40-year time series of unbiased area-averaged annual precipitation and snowfall for all of North America are developed. The analysis of their trends shows the following. (1) During the last 100 years, annual precipitation has increased in southern Canada (south of 55[degrees]N) by 13% and in the contiguous United States by 4%; however, the main domain of this century-scale precipitation increase is eastern Canada and adjacent to it northern regions of the United States. (2) Up to a 20% increase has occurred in annual snowfall and rainfall during the last four decades in Canada north of 55[degrees]N. The relationships between century-long precipitation time series over North America with Northern Hemisphere surface air temperature and the South Oscillation index (SOI) are investigated. It is shown that ENSO (negative anomaly of SOI) is usually accompanied by an increase of precipitation whenever it affects the United States (especially in the southwestern region of the country).

  13. Effects of small temperature increase and subchronic acid stress on juvenile rainbow trout during winter

    SciTech Connect

    D`Cruz, L.M.; Morgan, I.J.; Wood, C.M.

    1995-12-31

    Increasing water temperatures, as predicted by global warming are potentially problematic to freshwater fish, whose body temperature is set by their environment. In addition, fish living in softwater lakes face the detrimental effects of acid rain. To determine the cost of living in a warmer climate, two ninety day exposures were conducted during the winter in softwater. In the first exposure, fish were fed to satiation twice daily, while in the second exposure, fish were fed 1% of their wet body weight every four days. Monthly sampling was conducted to determine while body energy reserves: protein, lipids and carbohydrates, and changes in plasma Na and Cl concentrations. Oxygen consumption and nitrogen waste excretion rates were also measured. Fish exposed to acid and fed to satiation showed no ionoregulatory disturbances, an atypical result. Moreover, fish exposed to pH 5.2 had increased appetites, resulting in increased growth. In comparison, fish in the second exposure that were fed a limited ration and exposed to pH 5.2 had a greater mortality rate and lower plasma Na and Cl concentrations, with greater detrimental effects observed in fish exposed to +2 C above ambient. The findings suggest that NaCl present in commercial fish food may compensate for bronchial ion loss during acid exposure, as a result of a stimulation of appetite.

  14. Lake-Effect Snowfall over Lake Michigan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braham, Roscoe R., Jr.; Dungey, Maureen J.

    1995-05-01

    Aircraft measurements of snow particle size spectra from 36 flights on 26 snowy days are used to estimate snow precipitation rates over Lake Michigan. Results show that average rates during 14 wind-parallel-type lake-effect storms increased from the upwind shore to about midlake and then were essentially uniform (1.5 2 mm day1, liquid water equivalent) to the downwind shore. Snow from midlake bands and shoreline bands maximized over the lake. The position of the maximum during these types of lake-effect storms depends on meteorological conditions. In any given case it may be near either shore or anywhere between them. This study combines 12 cases of midlake and shoreline bands. The resulting cross-lake snow profile shows a broad maximum reaching over 4 mm day1 near midlake. The single sample maximum snow precipitation rate encountered in this study was 77.7 mm day1. The average cross-lake profile from combining 26 cases of lake-effect storms shows that snowfall into the lake is considerably greater than one would expect from a linear interpolation between values measured along either shore.An attempt is made to estimate the average increase in snow over lake Michigan resulting from combined lake-effect and large-scale cyclonic storms. The result is interesting but not considered very reliable because it depends upon the relative frequencies of different types of lake-effect storms as well as overtake snow rates from large-scale cyclonic storms; neither is well known.

  15. Sensitivity of Lake-Enhanced Snowfall to Lake Ice Cover in the Great Lakes Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, D. M.; Posselt, D. J.; Steiner, A. L.

    2011-12-01

    The Great Lakes exert a significant influence on the regional climate of northern United States and southern Canada, including enhancement of cold-season precipitation on and downwind of the leeward shores. Lake-enhanced snowfall occurs when air that is significantly colder than the lake's surface temperature travels over the lake. Enhanced surface sensible and latent heat fluxes relative to the surrounding land surface result in moistening and destabilization of the atmosphere and subsequent development of low-level convection. In the Great Lakes region, lake-enhanced snow occurs during late fall through early winter, with decreasing numbers of events in the late winter due to the formation of widespread lake ice. Lake ice reduces both sensible and latent heat fluxes from the surface, thereby increasing atmospheric stability and reducing lake induced convection. The degree to which ice coverage may change in future climate scenarios is largely unknown, but it is clear that any change to the fraction and duration of lake ice coverage will have an effect on lake-atmosphere interaction and the development and intensity of lake-enhanced precipitation. This study uses the NCAR Weather, Research, and Forecasting (WRF) model to examine how changes in Great Lakes fractional ice coverage affect the presence, intensity, and quantity of lake-enhanced precipitation. Sensitivity studies are used to evaluate the evolution and change in intensity of lake-enhanced snowfall in the Great Lakes region for scenarios that include (1) lake ice cover obtained from analysis fields (control simulation), (2) ice-free lakes, and (3) 100% ice coverage. Distinct lake-effect snow bands were observed in both the control and ice-free simulations, with placement of these bands further to the south and propagating further inland in the ice-free case. Melted precipitation totals increased on the order of 10 mm for ice-free lakes along the southern edges of Lake Superior, Lake Erie, and the eastern coast of Lake Ontario, while complete ice coverage extinguished nearly all lake-effect snow bands.

  16. Climatic Warming Increases Winter Wheat Yield but Reduces Grain Nitrogen Concentration in East China

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Aixing; Song, Zhenwei; Zhang, Baoming; Zhang, Weijian

    2014-01-01

    Climatic warming is often predicted to reduce wheat yield and grain quality in China. However, direct evidence is still lacking. We conducted a three-year experiment with a Free Air Temperature Increase (FATI) facility to examine the responses of winter wheat growth and plant N accumulation to a moderate temperature increase of 1.5°C predicted to prevail by 2050 in East China. Three warming treatments (AW: all-day warming; DW: daytime warming; NW: nighttime warming) were applied for an entire growth period. Consistent warming effects on wheat plant were recorded across the experimental years. An increase of ca. 1.5°C in daily, daytime and nighttime mean temperatures shortened the length of pre-anthesis period averagely by 12.7, 8.3 and 10.7 d (P<0.05), respectively, but had no significant impact on the length of the post-anthesis period. Warming did not significantly alter the aboveground biomass production, but the grain yield was 16.3, 18.1 and 19.6% (P<0.05) higher in the AW, DW and NW plots than the non-warmed plot, respectively. Warming also significantly increased plant N uptake and total biomass N accumulation. However, warming significantly reduced grain N concentrations while increased N concentrations in the leaves and stems. Together, our results demonstrate differential impacts of warming on the depositions of grain starch and protein, highlighting the needs to further understand the mechanisms that underlie warming impacts on plant C and N metabolism in wheat. PMID:24736557

  17. Detecting snowfall over land by satellite high-frequency microwave observations: The lack of scattering signature and a statistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guosheng; Seo, Eun-Kyoung

    2013-02-01

    has been long believed that the dominant microwave signature of snowfall over land is the brightness temperature decrease caused by ice scattering. However, our analysis of multiyear satellite data revealed that on most of occasions, brightness temperatures are rather higher under snowfall than nonsnowfall conditions, likely due to the emission by cloud liquid water. This brightness temperature increase masks the scattering signature and complicates the snowfall detection problem. In this study, we propose a statistical method for snowfall detection, which is developed by using CloudSat radar to train high-frequency passive microwave observations. To capture the major variations of the brightness temperatures and reduce the dimensionality of independent variables, the detection algorithm is designed to use the information contained in the first three principal components resulted from Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis, which capture ~99% of the total variances of brightness temperatures. Given a multichannel microwave observation, the algorithm first transforms the brightness temperature vector into EOF space and then retrieves a probability of snowfall by using the CloudSat radar-trained look-up table. Validation has been carried out by case studies and averaged horizontal snowfall fraction maps. The result indicated that the algorithm has clear skills in identifying snowfall areas even over mountainous regions.

  18. Effects of Snowfall on Drifting Snow and Wind Structure Near a Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemoto, Masaki; Sato, Takeshi; Kosugi, Kenji; Mochizuki, Shigeto

    2014-09-01

    Wind-tunnel and numerical experiments were performed to investigate the effects of snowfall on the wind profile and the development of drifting snow. Wind profiles and mass-flux profiles of drifting snow were measured with and without artificial snowfall over a snow surface within the tunnel. Wind and shear-stress profiles and the impact speeds of the snowflakes during snowfall were also investigated numerically. During snowfall, snowflakes transfer part of their horizontal momentum to the air, which increases the stress close to the snow surface; however, the resultant modifications of the wind profiles are small. Because snowflakes have large momentum, the decomposed snow crystals that result from their collision with a surface can form a saltation layer, even over a hard snow surface where entrainment of the grains from the surface does not occur. Additionally, during snowfall, the threshold friction velocity can be lower than the impact threshold because snowflake fragmentation facilitates snow drifting. The broken crystals contribute to the increase in the number of drifting snow grains, even below the impact threshold.

  19. Increased winter soil temperature variability enhances nitrogen cycling and soil biotic activity in temperate heathland and grassland mesocosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuerings, J.; Jentsch, A.; Hammerl, V.; Lenz, K.; Henry, H. A. L.; Malyshev, A. V.; Kreyling, J.

    2014-12-01

    Winter air temperatures are projected to increase in the temperate zone, whereas snow cover is projected to decrease, leading to increased soil temperature variability, and potentially to changes in nutrient cycling. Here, we experimentally evaluated the effects of increased winter soil temperature variability on selected aspects of the N-cycle in mesocosms containing different plant community compositions. The experiment was replicated at two sites, a colder mountainous upland site with high snow accumulation and a warmer and drier lowland site. Increased soil temperature variability enhanced soil biotic activity for both sites during winter, as indicated by 35% higher nitrogen (N) availability in the soil solution, 40% higher belowground decomposition and a 25% increase in the potential activity of the enzyme cellobiohydrolase. The mobilization of N differed between sites, and the 15N signal in leaves was reduced by 31% in response to winter warming pulses, but only at the cold site, with significant reductions occurring for three of four tested plant species at this site. Furthermore, there was a trend of increased N leaching in response to the recurrent winter warming pulses. Overall, projected winter climate change in the temperate zone, with less snow and more variable soil temperatures, appears important for shifts in ecosystem functioning (i.e. nutrient cycling). While the effects of warming pulses on plant N mobilization did not differ among sites, reduced plant 15N incorporation at the colder temperate site suggests that frost damage may reduce plant N uptake in a warmer world, with important implications for nitrogen cycling and nitrogen losses from ecosystems.

  20. Effect of reduced winter precipitation and increased temperature on watershed solute flux, 1988-2002, Northern Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stottlemyer, R.; Toczydlowski, D.

    2006-01-01

    Since 1987 we have studied weekly change in winter (December-April) precipitation, snowpack, snowmelt, soil water, and stream water solute flux in a small (176-ha) Northern Michigan watershed vegetated by 65-85 year-old northern hardwoods. Our primary study objective was to quantify the effect of change in winter temperature and precipitation on watershed hydrology and solute flux. During the study winter runoff was correlated with precipitation, and forest soils beneath the snowpack remained unfrozen. Winter air temperature and soil temperature beneath the snowpack increased while precipitation and snowmelt declined. Atmospheric inputs declined for H+, NO 3- , NH 4+ , dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), and SO 42- . Replicated plot-level results, which could not be directly extrapolated to the watershed scale, showed 90% of atmospheric DIN input was retained in surface shallow (<15 cm deep) soils while SO 42- flux increased 70% and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) 30-fold. Most stream water base cation (C B), HCO 3- , and Cl- concentrations declined with increased stream water discharge, K+, NO 3- , and SO 42- remained unchanged, and DOC and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) increased. Winter stream water solute outputs declined or were unchanged with time except for NO 3- and DOC which increased. DOC and DIN outputs were correlated with the percentage of winter runoff and stream discharge that occurred when subsurface flow at the plot-level was shallow (<25 cm beneath Oi). Study results suggest that the percentage of annual runoff occurring as shallow lateral subsurface flow may be a major factor regulating solute outputs and concentrations in snowmelt-dominated ecosystems. ?? Springer 2006.

  1. WRF simulations of extreme snowfall events associated with extratropical cyclones over the Himalayas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, J.; Carvalho, L. V.; Jones, C.; Cannon, F.

    2014-12-01

    Two extreme snowfall events associated with extratropical cyclones interacting with the Himalaya Mountains are simulated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. These two events exemplify contrasting large-scale conditions typically observed in the winter and early spring. One event in January 1999 was characterized by a strong zonally oriented subtropical jet flowing directly over the mountains, with the cyclone becoming terrain-locked in the western-Himalayan "notch". Another event in March 2006 featured a deep longwave trough on the jet, facilitating cyclogenesis further south, with two successive cyclones passing along the entire Himalayan ridge. These features of the events are captured by the simulations, so that snowfall is confined to the western Himalaya in the January simulation, while a near-continuous band of accumulated snowfall along the Himalayan ridge forms in the March simulation. Satellite rainfall estimates (TRMM) and interpolated rain-gauge measurements (APHRODITE) largely validate these precipitation distributions, but highlight some possible shortcomings of the model when simulating such events. Snowfall rate throughout both simulations is largely determined by cross-barrier moisture flux, which is generally greatest wherever the cyclonic winds are convergent against the mountains at each time. However, the March 2006 simulation evolves in an environment with greater moisture transport towards the mountains than in the January 1999 event. Hence greater precipitation rates and more solid snowbands are generated in the March than in the January simulation. However, due to the terrain-locking of the cyclone in the January event, individual locations receive more persistent snowfall, so that the greatest accumulations are similar (about 150 mm) between the two events, although these accumulations are much more widespread in the March event.

  2. GCM response of northern winter stationary waves and storm tracks to increasing amounts of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, D.B.; Held, I.M. )

    1993-10-01

    The response of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) coupled ocean-atmosphere R15, 9-level GCM to gradually increasing CO[sub 2] amounts is analyzed with emphasis on the changes in the stationary waves and storm tracks in the Northern Hemisphere wintertime troposphere. A large part of the change is described by an equivalent-barotropic stationary wave with a high over eastern Canada and a low over southern Alaska. Consistent with this, the Atlantic jet weakens near the North American coast. Perpetual winter runs of an R15, nine-level atmospheric GCM with sea surface temperature, sea ice thickness, and soil moisture values prescribed from the coupled GCM results are able to reproduce the coupled model's response qualitatively. Consistent with the weakened baroclinicity associated with the stationary wave change, the Atlantic storm track weakens with increasing CO[sub 2] concentrations while the Pacific storm track does not change in strength substantially. An R15, nine-level atmospheric model linearized about the zonal time-mean state is used to analyze the contributions to the stationary wave response. With mountains, diabatic heating, and transient forcings the linear model gives a stationary wave change in qualitative agreement with the change seen in the coupled and perpetual models. Transients and diabatic heating appear to be the major forcing terms, while changes in zonal-mean basic state and topographic forcing play only a small role. A substantial part of the diabatic response is due to changes in tropical latent heating. 25 refs., 36 figs.

  3. Tuned perfect prognostication forecasts of mesoscale snowfall for southern Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, William R.

    1990-02-01

    A procedure for producing site-specific 1- and 2-day categorical forecasts of 24-hour accumulated snowfall by statistical forecast methods has been developed and tested for a small area of Ontario adjacent to southern Georgian Bay. A perfect prognosis ("perfect prog," or PP) method was used, with predictors designed to handle lake-effect and nonlake-effect snowfall. Predictors were selected from a basic set of potential predictors by a stepwise multiple discriminant analysis (MDA) procedure done in three stages, where the third stage involved adding functions of predictors already selected in the first two stages to the basic predictor set. The third stage appears to enhance the discriminating power of the original predictor set because the number of "hits" of snowfall forecasts made with independent data was significantly increased and the distribution of forecasts was brought closer to the observed distribution. A two-step, rule-based tuning procedure was applied to the PP-MDA forecasts to help compensate for errors that arise when the PP-MDA statistical equations are used with numerical weather prediction model data, and for errors that arise from the conservative nature of MDA forecasts. A rule-based nonparametric statistical classification procedure (CART) was used in the first step. When the rules for tuning forecasts were tested with independent data, CART was found to increase the skill of the tuned forecasts, particularly in the common categories (1,2), and to improve the reliability of category 1 forecasts at a majority of the stations. However, CART was unable to find rules for infrequent and rare snow categories. Step B of the tuning procedure, a semicomputerized manual search for additional rules not seen by CART, was undertaken in an attempt to "do something" about this problem. When tested with independent data, overall improvement was found in the skill of forecasts tuned by two-step procedure, but it was too small to make an appreciable difference. Several suggestions are made in regard to exploring methods that should result in significantly improved skill of snowfall forecasts for southern Ontario by statistical forecast methods.

  4. Elevated streamflows increase dam passage by juvenile coho salmon during winter: Implications of climate change in the Pacific Northwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kock, Tobias J.; Liedtke, Theresa L.; Rondorf, Dennis W.; Serl, John D.; Kohn, Mike; Bumbaco, Karin A.

    2012-01-01

    A 4-year evaluation was conducted to determine the proportion of juvenile coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch passing Cowlitz Falls Dam, on the Cowlitz River, Washington, during winter. River and reservoir populations of coho salmon parr were monitored using radiotelemetry to determine if streamflow increases resulted in increased downstream movement and dam passage. This was of interest because fish that pass downstream of Cowlitz Falls Dam become landlocked in Riffe Lake and are lost to the anadromous population. Higher proportions of reservoir-released fish (0.391-0.480) passed Cowlitz Falls Dam than did river-released fish (0.037-0.119). Event-time analyses demonstrated that streamflow increases were important predictors of dam passage rates during the study. The estimated effect of increasing streamflows on the risk of dam passage varied annually and ranged from 9% to 75% for every 28.3 m3/s increase in streamflow. These results have current management implications because they demonstrate the significance of dam passage by juvenile coho salmon during winter months when juvenile fish collection facilities are typically not operating. The results also have future management implications because climate change predictions suggest that peak streamflow timing for many watersheds in the Pacific Northwest will shift from late spring and early summer to winter. Increased occurrence of intense winter flood events is also expected. Our results demonstrate that juvenile coho salmon respond readily to streamflow increases and initiate downstream movements during winter months, which could result in increased passage at dams during these periods if climate change predictions are realized in the coming decades.

  5. Snowfall Rate Retrieval using NPP ATMS Passive Microwave Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, Huan; Ferraro, Ralph; Kongoli, Cezar; Wang, Nai-Yu; Dong, Jun; Zavodsky, Bradley; Yan, Banghua; Zhao, Limin

    2014-01-01

    Passive microwave measurements at certain high frequencies are sensitive to the scattering effect of snow particles and can be utilized to retrieve snowfall properties. Some of the microwave sensors with snowfall sensitive channels are Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) and Advance Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS). ATMS is the follow-on sensor to AMSU and MHS. Currently, an AMSU and MHS based land snowfall rate (SFR) product is running operationally at NOAA/NESDIS. Based on the AMSU/MHS SFR, an ATMS SFR algorithm has been developed recently. The algorithm performs retrieval in three steps: snowfall detection, retrieval of cloud properties, and estimation of snow particle terminal velocity and snowfall rate. The snowfall detection component utilizes principal component analysis and a logistic regression model. The model employs a combination of temperature and water vapor sounding channels to detect the scattering signal from falling snow and derive the probability of snowfall (Kongoli et al., 2014). In addition, a set of NWP model based filters is also employed to improve the accuracy of snowfall detection. Cloud properties are retrieved using an inversion method with an iteration algorithm and a two-stream radiative transfer model (Yan et al., 2008). A method developed by Heymsfield and Westbrook (2010) is adopted to calculate snow particle terminal velocity. Finally, snowfall rate is computed by numerically solving a complex integral. The ATMS SFR product is validated against radar and gauge snowfall data and shows that the ATMS algorithm outperforms the AMSU/MHS SFR.

  6. Controls of Global Snowfall Under a Changed Climate in the GFDL CM2.5 High-Resolution Coupled Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapnick, S. B.; Delworth, T. L.

    2012-12-01

    This study assesses the ability of a newly developed high-resolution coupled model from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory to simulate snowfall in the present climate, and examines its response to idealized climate change forcing. Output is assessed from a 280-yr control simulation based on 1990 atmospheric composition and an idealized 140-yr future simulation where atmospheric CO2 increases at a rate of 1% per yr until doubling in year 70 and then remains constant. The high resolution model has an approximate horizontal resolution of 50 km in the atmospheric component and 28 to 8 km in the oceanic component. When compared to a low-resolution model, the high-resolution model is found to better represent the geographic distribution of snowfall in the present climate. In response to idealized radiative forcing changes, both models produce similar global-scale responses where global-mean temperature and total precipitation increase while snowfall decreases. Zonally, snowfall tends to decrease in the low to mid latitudes and increase in the mid to high latitudes. At the regional scale, the high and low-resolution models sometimes diverge in the sign of projected snowfall changes; the high-resolution model exhibits future increases in a few select high altitude regions, notably the Himalaya region and small regions in the Andes and southwestern Yukon. Despite such local signals, there is an almost universal reduction in snowfall as a percent of total precipitation in both models. Using a simple multivariate model, temperature is shown to drive these trends by decreasing snowfall almost everywhere while precipitation increases snowfall in the high altitudes and mid to high latitudes. Mountainous regions of snowfall increases in the high-resolution model exhibit a unique local dominance of the positive contribution from precipitation over temperature. Snowfall can therefore increase in such regions despite a warming climate.

  7. UTDG -101, a late-maturing orchardgrass germplasm with increased winter hardiness and forage quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a need to identify novel germplasm that is late-maturing, winter hardy, and nutritious that can be incorporated into current orchardgrass breeding programs. The United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service announces the public release of a late-maturing orchardgr...

  8. Maize Debris Increases Barley Yellow Dwarf Virus Severity in North Carolina Winter Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the eastern U.S., wheat is often planted with minimal or no tillage into maize residues. We conducted a field experiment in the North Carolina Piedmont to compare the effects of three maize residue treatments (unchopped, chopped, and removed) on Fusarium head blight (FHB) in two winter wheat cul...

  9. Snowfall in the Himalayas: an uncertain future from a little-known past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viste, E.; Sorteberg, A.

    2015-01-01

    Snow and ice provide large amounts of meltwater to the Indus, Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers. This study combines present-day observations and reanalysis data with climate model projections to estimate the amount of snow falling over the basins today and in the last decades of the 21st century. Estimates of present-day snowfall based on a combination of temperature and precipitation from reanalysis data and observations, vary by factors of 2-4. The spread is large, not just between the reanalysis and the observations, but also between the different observational data sets. With the strongest anthropogenic forcing scenario (RCP 8.5), the climate models project reductions in annual snowfall by 30-50% in the Indus Basin, 50-60% in the Ganges Basin and 50-70% in the Brahmaputra Basin, by 2071-2100. The reduction is due to increasing temperatures, as the mean of the models show constant or increasing precipitation throughout the year in most of the region. With the strongest anthropogenic forcing scenario, the mean elevation where rain changes to snow - the rain/snow line - creeps upward by 400-900 m, in most of the region by 700-900 m. The largest relative change in snowfall is seen in the upper, westernmost sub-basins of the Brahmaputra. With the strongest forcing scenario, most of this region will have temperatures above freezing, especially in the summer. The projected reduction in annual snowfall is 65-75%. In the upper Indus, the effect of a warmer climate on snowfall is less extreme, as most of the terrain is high enough to have temperatures sufficiently far below freezing today. A 20-40% reduction in annual snowfall is projected.

  10. Snowfall in the Himalayas: an uncertain future from a little-known past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viste, E.; Sorteberg, A.; Renssen, H.

    2015-06-01

    Snow and ice provide large amounts of meltwater to the Indus, Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers. This study combines present-day observations and reanalysis data with climate model projections to estimate the amount of snow falling over the basins today and in the last decades of the 21st century. Estimates of present-day snowfall based on a combination of temperature and precipitation from reanalysis data and observations vary by factors of 2-4. The spread is large, not just between the reanalysis and the observations but also between the different observational data sets. With the strongest anthropogenic forcing scenario (RCP8.5), the climate models project reductions in annual snowfall by 30-50% in the Indus Basin, 50-60% in the Ganges Basin and 50-70% in the Brahmaputra Basin by 2071-2100. The reduction is due to increasing temperatures, as the mean of the models show constant or increasing precipitation throughout the year in most of the region. With the strongest anthropogenic forcing scenario, the mean elevation where rain changes to snow - the rain/snow line - creeps upward by 400-900 m, in most of the region by 700-900 meters. The largest relative change in snowfall is seen in the upper westernmost sub-basins of the Brahmaputra. With the strongest forcing scenario, most of this region will have temperatures above freezing, especially in the summer. The projected reduction in annual snowfall is 65-75%. In the upper Indus, the effect of a warmer climate on snowfall is less extreme, as most of the terrain is high enough to have temperatures sufficiently far below freezing today. A 20-40% reduction in annual snowfall is projected.

  11. Dissolved organic matter composition of winter flow in the Yukon River basin: Implications of permafrost thaw and increased groundwater discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, Jonathan A.; Aiken, George R.; Walvoord, Michelle A.; Butler, Kenna D.

    2012-12-01

    Groundwater discharge to rivers has increased in recent decades across the circumpolar region and has been attributed to thawing permafrost in arctic and subarctic watersheds. Permafrost-driven changes in groundwater discharge will alter the flux of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in rivers, yet little is known about the chemical composition and reactivity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) of groundwater in permafrost settings. Here, we characterize DOM composition of winter flow in 60 rivers and streams of the Yukon River basin to evaluate the biogeochemical consequences of enhanced groundwater discharge associated with permafrost thaw. DOC concentration of winter flow averaged 3.9 0.5 mg C L-1, yet was highly variable across basins (ranging from <1 to >20 mg C L-1). In comparison to the summer-autumn period, DOM composition of winter flow had lower aromaticity (as indicated by specific ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm, or SUVA254), lower hydrophobic acid content, and a higher proportion of hydrophilic compounds (HPI). Fluorescence spectroscopy and parallel factor analysis indicated enrichment of protein-like fluorophores in some, but not all, winter flow samples. The ratio of DOC to dissolved organic nitrogen, an indicator of DOM biodegradability, was positively correlated with SUVA254 and negatively correlated with the percentage of protein-like compounds. Using a simple two-pool mixing model, we evaluate possible changes in DOM during the summer-autumn period across a range of conditions reflecting possible increases in groundwater discharge. Across three watersheds, we consistently observed decreases in DOC concentration and SUVA254 and increases in HPI with increasing groundwater discharge. Spatial patterns in DOM composition of winter flow appear to reflect differences in the relative contributions of groundwater from suprapermafrost and subpermafrost aquifers across watersheds. Our findings call for more explicit consideration of DOC loss and stabilization pathways associated with changing subsurface hydrology in watersheds underlain by thawing permafrost.

  12. Altered snowfall and soil disturbance influence the early life stage transitions and recruitment of a native and invasive grass in a cold desert.

    PubMed

    Gornish, Elise S; Aanderud, Zachary T; Sheley, Roger L; Rinella, Mathew J; Svejcar, Tony; Englund, Suzanne D; James, Jeremy J

    2015-02-01

    Climate change effects on plants are expected to be primarily mediated through early life stage transitions. Snowfall variability, in particular, may have profound impacts on seedling recruitment, structuring plant populations and communities, especially in mid-latitude systems. These water-limited and frequently invaded environments experience tremendous variation in snowfall, and species in these systems must contend with harsh winter conditions and frequent disturbance. In this study, we examined the mechanisms driving the effects of snowpack depth and soil disturbance on the germination, emergence, and establishment of the native Pseudoroegnaria spicata and the invasive Bromus tectorum, two grass species that are widely distributed across the cold deserts of North America. The absence of snow in winter exposed seeds to an increased frequency and intensity of freeze-thaw cycles and greater fungal pathogen infection. A shallower snowpack promoted the formation of a frozen surface crust, reducing the emergence of both species (more so for P. spicata). Conversely, a deeper snowpack recharged the soil and improved seedling establishment of both species by creating higher and more stable levels of soil moisture availability following spring thaw. Across several snow treatments, experimental disturbance served to decrease the cumulative survival of both species. Furthermore, we observed that, regardless of snowpack treatment, most seed mortality (70-80%) occurred between seed germination and seedling emergence (November-March), suggesting that other wintertime factors or just winter conditions in general limited survival. Our results suggest that snowpack variation and legacy effects of the snowpack influence emergence and establishment but might not facilitate invasion of cold deserts. PMID:25539620

  13. Analysis of a snowfall event produced by mountains waves in Guadarrama Mountains (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascn, Estbaliz; Snchez, Jos Luis; Fernndez-Gonzlez, Sergio; Merino, Andrs; Lpez, Laura; Garca-Ortega, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    Heavy snowfall events are fairly uncommon precipitation processes in the Iberian Peninsula. When large amounts of snow accumulate in large cities with populations that are unaccustomed to or unprepared for heavy snow, these events have a major impact on their daily activities. On 16 January 2013, an extreme snowstorm occurred in Guadarrama Mountains (Madrid, Spain) during an experimental winter campaign as a part of the TECOAGUA Project. Strong northwesterly winds, high precipitation and temperatures close to 0C were detected throughout the whole day. During this episode, it was possible to continuously take measurements of different variables involved in the development of the convection using a multichannel microwave radiometer (MMWR). The significant increase in the cloud thickness observed vertically by the MMWR and registered precipitation of 43 mm in 24 hours at the station of Navacerrada (Madrid) led us to consider that we were facing an episode of strong winter convection. Images from the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite suggested that the main source of the convection was the formation of mountain waves on the south face of the Guadarrama Mountains. The event was simulated in high resolution using the WRF mesoscale model, an analysis of which is based on the observational simulations and data. Finally, the continuous measurements obtained with the MMWR allowed us to monitor the vertical situation above the Guadarrama Mountains with temporal resolution of 2 minutes. This instrument has a clear advantage in monitoring short-term episodes of this kind in comparison to radiosondes, which usually produce data at 0000 and 1200 UTC. Acknowledgements This study was supported by the following grants: GRANIMETRO (CGL2010-15930); MICROMETEO (IPT-310000-2010-22). The authors would like to thank the Regional Government of Castile-Len for its financial support through the project LE220A11-2.

  14. Characteristics of easterly-induced snowfall in Yeongdong and its relationship to air-sea temperature difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Hyoung-Gu; Kim, Byung-Gon; Han, Sang-Ok; Lee, Chulkyu; Lee, Seoung-Soo

    2014-08-01

    Characteristics of snowfall episodes have been investigated for the past ten years in order to study its association with lowlevel stability and air-sea temperature difference over the East Sea. In general, the selected snowfall episodes have similar synoptic setting such as the Siberian High extended to northern Japan along with the Low passing by the southern Korean Peninsula, eventually resulting in the easterly flow in the Yeongdong region. Especially in the heavy snowfall episodes, convective unstable layers have been identified over the East sea due to relatively warm sea surface temperature (SST) about 810C and specifically cold pool around 12 km above the surface level (ASL), which can be derived from Regional Data Assimilation and Prediction System (RDAPS), but that have not been clearly exhibited in the weak snowfall episodes. The basic mechanism to initiate snowfall around Yeongdong seems to be similar to that of lake-effect snowstorms around Great Lakes in the United States (Kristovich et al., 2003). Difference of equivalent potential temperature ( ? e ) between 850 hPa and surface as well as difference between air and sea temperatures altogether gradually began to increase in the pre-snowfall period and reached their maximum values in the course of the period, whose air (850 hPa) sea temperature difference and snowfall intensity in case of the heavy snowfall episodes are almost larger than 20C and 6 tims greater than the weak snowfall episodes, respectively. Interestingly, snowfall appeared to begin in case of an air-sea temperature difference exceeding over 15C. The current analysis is overall consistent with the previous finding (Lee et al., 2012) that an instabilityinduced moisture supply to the lower atmosphere from the East sea, being cooled and saturated in the lower layer, so to speak, East Sea-Effect Snowfall (SES), would make a low-level ice cloud which eventually moves inland by the easterly flow. In addition, a longlasting synoptic characteristics and convergence-induced invigoration also appear to play the important roles in the severe snowstorms. Improvements in our understanding of mesoscale sea-effect snowstorms require detailed in-situ and remote sensing observations over and around East Sea since observations of the concurrent thermodynamic and microphysical characteristics have not been available there and this study emphasizes the importance of low level stability as quantitative estimation of moist static energy generation over the East Sea.

  15. Measuring winter precipitation in a mountain catchment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measuring winter precipitation (principally snowfall) in a mountain catchment is difficult. The magnitude of gauge under catch is affected by variable density during deposition, wind speed and direction, and site conditions such as vegetation and topography. Though numerous studies have been condu...

  16. Changes in snowfall and snow on the ground in the Western Canadian Arctic and implications to streamflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, P.; Lesack, L.; Shi, X.; Yang, D.

    2014-12-01

    The climate of the Western Canadian Arctic has undergone dramatic warming of air temperature over the last 50 years. In addition, there have been apparent decreases in both snow depth on the ground at the end of winter and winter precipitation. However, there have been significant changes in methods used, including changes in snow on the ground observations, and snowfall measurements. This presentation will analyze the various existing data sets at the Environment Canada weather stations at Inuvik and Tuktoyaktuk, Northwest Territories, and at nearby long term research stations of Trail Valley and Havikpak Creeks to better consider changes in snowfall and snow on the ground. This paper will then consider the implications to runoff and will consider the possible implications of change in snow and the observed later, and reduced, snowmelt runoff observed at Trail Valley and Havikpak Creeks.

  17. [Distribution of PGEs contents and its factors in snowfall and snow cover over the arid region in Changji City].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Yan; Liu, Hao-Feng; Zhang, Lan

    2013-02-01

    This paper was to select a small-medium sized City, Changji city, over the arid region, study the distribution of platinum group metals(PGEs) contents and influencing factors in snowfall and snow cover. Samples were analysed by ICP-MS. The results revealed that the annual contents of Rh, Pd and Pt in snowfall were on the average value of 0.43 ng.L-1 ranging from not detected to 2.24 ng.L-1 , 60.07 ng.L-1 ranging from 46.66 to 84.25 ng.L-1 and 4.54 ng.L-1 ranging from 3.02 ng.L-1 to 6.38 ng.L-1 respectively. The difference of PGEs levels was found in different occurrences of snowfall, tended to increase before snowfall due to the longer arid days. PGEs contents maybe influenced by the amount of snowfall, the less snowfall, the higher PGEs contents reflected. The annual levels of Rh, Pd and Pt in snow cover were in the range of 2.50-18.80 ng.L-1 (av. 6.65 ng.L-1), 46.83-199.20 ng.L-1 (av. 83.45 ng.L-1) ,4. 27-13.78 ng.L-1 (av. 8.17 ng.L-1) respectively. PGEs content in snow cover were far higher than that of snowfall, PGEs in snowfall were only obtained from atmospheric PGEs rinsed by single time of snowfall, while PGEs were not only from the accumulation of PGEs in frequent times of snowfall and the snow cover under the long time exposure, but also continuously accepted the PGEs from atmospheric dry deposition. PGEs content of snow cover in all sampling sites were demonstrated as follows: traffic area > residential-culture-education district > square of park > suburban farmland. the input way of PGEs in snow cover was found a remarkable difference with the amount of input within different function areas, which was the main reason caused that PGEs content of snow cover in each function area varied and had a certain regularity. PMID:23668114

  18. Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) observations of increases in Asian aerosol in winter from 1979 to 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, Steven T.; Torres, O.; Smith, Steven J.

    2004-12-01

    Emission inventories indicate that the largest increases in SO{sub 2} emissions have occurred in Asia during the last 20 years. By inference, largest increases in aerosol, produced primarily by the conversion of SO{sub 2} to sulfate, should have occurred in Asia during the same time period. Decadal changes in regional aerosol optical depths are calculated by analyzing Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) vertical aerosol optical depths (converted to 550 nm) from 1979 to 2000 on a 1{sup o} by 1{sup o} global grid. The anthropogenic component of the TOMS aerosol record is maximized by examining the seasonal cycles of desert dust and Boreal fire smoke, and identifying the months of the year for which the desert dust and Boreal fire smoke are least conspicuous. Gobi and Taklimakan desert dust in Asia is prevalent in the TOMS record during spring, and eastern Siberian smoke from Boreal forest fires is prevalent during summer. Aerosol trends are calculated on a regional basis during winter (November-February) to maximize the anthropogenic component of the aerosol record. Large increases in aerosol optical depths between 1979 and 2000 are present over the China coastal plain and the Ganges river basin in India. Aerosol increased by 17% per decade during winter over the China coastal plain, while SO{sub 2} emissions over the same geographical region increased by 33% per decade.

  19. Comparison of two cases of strong increase in the bottom temperature in the Yellow Sea in winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L, Lian-Gang; Yang, Guang-Bing; Wang, Guansuo; Liu, Zong-Wei; Jiang, Ying; Yang, Chunmei; Zhang, Chao

    2015-09-01

    Mooring observations were carried out on the western slope of the southern Yellow Sea (YS) to observe the Yellow Sea Warm Current (YSWC). Strong increases in the bottom temperature (about 3C within 1 day) were observed at mooring M5 (shelf break) on 8 January 2007, and at mooring A2 (mid-slope) on 5 December 2008. The strong temperature increase of bottom water at M5 was closely related to the burst of the YSWC. The bottom temperature at mooring A2 increased and decreased alternately from 7 November to 14 December 2008, and the strong increase (about 3C within 1 day) occurring on 5 December was one of the four rises during that period. The significant semi-diurnal-oscillation during that period indicated that the thermal fronts outlining the Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass (YSCWM) boundary was very close to location A2. The notable rises in the bottom temperature at A2 were associated with bottom eastward currents, while the distinct falls in temperature coincide with bottom westward currents. The distinctive distribution in the bottom temperature associated with the YSCWM and the bottom eastward currents were mainly responsible for the strong increase in the bottom temperature at A2. The variations in the bottom temperature described here are valuable for understanding the time evolution of the YSWC in winter and the YSCWM from late autumn to early winter.

  20. Biogeochemical responses to late-winter storms in the Sargasso Sea, II: Increased rates of biogenic silica production and export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Jeffrey W.; Nelson, David M.; Lomas, Michael W.

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies measuring biogenic silica production in the Sargasso Sea, all conducted when no phytoplankton bloom was in progress, have reported a mean rate of 0.4 mmol Si m -2 d -1 and maximum rate of 0.9 mmol Si m -2 d -1, the lowest rates yet recorded in any ocean habitat. During February/March of 2004 and 2005 we studied the effects of late-winter storms prior to seasonal stratification on the production rate, standing stock and vertical export of biogenic silica in the Sargasso Sea. In 2004, alternating storm and stratification events provided pulsed input of nutrients to the euphotic zone. In contrast, nearly constant storm conditions in 2005 caused the mixed layer to deepen to 350 m toward the end of the cruise. Biogenic silica production rates in the upper 140 m were statistically indistinguishable between years, averaging 1.0 mmol Si m -2 d -1. In early March 2004, a storm event entrained nutrients into the euphotic zone and, upon stabilization, vertically integrated biogenic silica in the upper 140 m nearly doubled in 2 days. Within 4 days, 75-100% of the accumulated biogenic silica was exported, sustaining a flux to 200 m of 0.5 mmol Si m -2 d -1 (4 greater than export measured during February and March in the mid-1990s). In 2005, destabilization without stratification increased biogenic silica flux at 200 m up to two-fold above previously measured export in late winter, with little or no increase in water-column biogenic silica. Despite comprising <5% of total chlorophyll, diatoms accounted for an estimated 25-50% of the nitrate uptake in the upper 140 m and 35-97% of the particulate organic nitrogen export from the upper 200 m during both cruise periods. These previously unobserved brief episodes of diatom production and export in response to late-winter storms increase the estimated production and export of diatom-derived material in the Sargasso Sea in late winter by >150%, and increase estimated annual biogenic silica production in this region by 8%.

  1. Long-term continuous monitoring of mercury in the Russian arctic: winter increase of atmospheric mercury depletion events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratov, Fidel; Mahura, Alexander; Popov, Valentin; Katz, Oleg

    2014-05-01

    Among pollutants mercury is a major environmental concern due to its ecological hazard. The mercury can reside in the atmosphere for a long time high, and it is a reason of its global propagation in the Northern Hemisphere and elevated mercury concentrations are reported in the Arctic environment. First time, in 1995, the effect of atmospheric mercury depletion in the troposphere was found at the Canadian station Alert. This phenomenon (called the Atmospheric Mercury Depletion Event - AMDE) is observed during April-June, when the Polar sunrise starts till the end of the snowmelt. The same effect was reported for other polar stations situated to the north of 60° N. Long-term continuous monitoring of gaseous elemental mercury in the surface air at the polar station Amderma (69,720N; 61,620E) using the analyzer Tekran 2537A has been conducted from Jun 2001 to date. Individual measurements were collected every thirty minutes. It has been shown, that during eleven years of observations the AMDEs were observed every year, from the end of March till early June. For the winter period (Dec-Feb) these events of the atmospheric mercury depletion were registered from 2010 to 2013, which had not been observed before. A large number of hours during the day, when the concentration of mercury was recorded at level of below 1 ng/m3, was registered during Dec-Feb. The sun declination above the horizon is negative, and solar activity is still not enough to trigger the photochemical reactions. The these last 3 years confirmed a tendency to displacement of AMDEs to the winter season, which leads to an additional factor entry of mercury in various biological objects, due to the additional deposition of various forms of mercury on the snowpack. At the same time, especially during the winter seasons, there is a substantial increase (up to 8 times) of AMDEs, compared with the previous years. In particular, in winter 2013 the maximum number of AMDs reached 31 cases. The explanation can be the following: the withdrawal of elemental mercury from the atmosphere may be caused by deposition of mercury on marine aerosol particles. Marine aerosol concentration increases in the case of exemption from coastal ice (Kara Sea) and, simultaneously, at the time when the northern wind direction is dominating. When the southern wind direction is prevailing, the deposition of mercury on anthropogenic aerosols transported from the middle latitudes is taken place. Acknowledgement - Financial support for the monitoring program was provided by Environment Canada, AMAP Secretariate and Russian Federal Service for Hydrometeorology and Environmental Monitoring.

  2. Winter peaks of methylmercury in deposition to a remote Scottish mountain lake.

    PubMed

    Rose, Neil L; Munthe, John; McCartney, Alistair

    2013-01-01

    Depositional records of methylmercury (MeHg) are rare, especially for remote and mountainous areas. Our data from Lochnagar, a mountain lake in Scotland, covering a 7-year period from 2001-2008, show an unusual seasonal pattern in that elevated MeHg concentrations occur each winter while concentrations each summer fall below the limit of detection. To our knowledge this is the first time this seasonal pattern has been reported. Peak concentrations at the site in October 2006 (1.2 ng L(-1)) are amongst the highest reported depositional values in the literature. As the soils and lakes in the region are frozen or snow covered for much of each winter, we consider possible sources of this winter deposited MeHg to be either aqueous phase methylation in the atmosphere or marine evasion. However, the factor driving this seasonal pattern is likely to be scavenging by snow, as elevated concentrations in deposition coincide with periods of snowfall at the site. If this mechanism is correct, then predicted impacts of climate change, which will reduce annual snowfall at the site by between 50% and 100% by 2080, will effectively eliminate this input source. However, other climate-influenced inputs of mercury, such as remobilisation from catchment soils, are likely to increase and negate any benefit. PMID:23123118

  3. Social perceptions versus meteorological observations of snow and winter along the Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milligan, William James, IV

    This research aims to increase understanding of Front Range residents' perceptions of snow, winter and hydrologic events. This study also investigates how an individual's characteristics may shape perceptions of winter weather and climate. A survey was administered to determine if perceptions of previous winters align with observed meteorological data. The survey also investigated how individual characteristics influence perceptions of snow and winter weather. The survey was conducted primarily along the Front Range area of the state of Colorado in the United States of America. This is a highly populated semi-arid region that acts as an interface between the agricultural plains to the east that extend to the Mississippi River and the Rocky Mountains to the west. The climate is continental, and while many people recreate in the snowy areas of the mountains, most live where annual snowfall amounts are low. Precipitation, temperature, and wind speed datasets from selected weather stations were analyzed to determine correct survey responses. Survey analysis revealed that perceptions of previous winters do not necessarily align with observed meteorological data. The mean percentage of correct responses to all survey questions was 36.8%. Further analysis revealed that some individual characteristics (e.g. winter recreation, source of winter weather information) did influence correct responses to survey questions.

  4. Recent variations of snow cover and snowfall in North America and their relation to precipitation and temperature variations

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, T.R.; Groisman, P.Ya.; Knight, R.W.; Heim, R.R. Jr. )

    1993-07-01

    Contemporary large-scale changes in solid and total precipitation and satellite-derived snow cover were examined over the North American continent. Annual snow cover extent over the last 19 years decreased up to 6 [times] 10[sup 5] km[sub 2] relative to a 0.93[degrees]C (0.33[degrees]C) increase in North American (Northern Hemisphere) temperature. A strong correlation exists between snow cover and temperature where up to 78% of the variance in regional snow cover and snowfall is explained by the anomalies of monthly mean maximum temperature. Over the last two decades the decrease in snow cover during winter (December-March) has largely occurred through reduced frequency of snow cover in areas that typically have a high probability of snow on the ground with little change in the frequency of snow cover in other areas. Similar characteristics were observed during spring (April-May) in areas with high snow cover probability except for an expansion of the snow-free regions. Anomalies in these two seasons dominate the interannual variability (nearly three-fourths of the variance) of snow cover. 48 refs., 15 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Influence of projected snow and sea-ice changes on future climate in heavy snowfall region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, S.; Sato, T.

    2011-12-01

    Snow/ice albedo and cloud feedbacks are critical for climate change projection in cryosphere regions. However, future snow and sea-ice distributions are significantly different in each GCM. Thus, surface albedo in cryosphere regions is one of the causes of the uncertainty for climate change projection. Northern Japan is one of the heaviest snowfall regions in the world. In particular, Hokkaido is bounded on the north by the Okhotsk Sea, where is the southernmost ocean in the Northern Hemisphere that is covered with sea ice during winter. Wintertime climate around Hokkaido is highly sensitive to fluctuations in snow and sea-ice. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of global warming on future climate around Hokkaido, using the Pseudo-Global-Warming method (PGW) by a regional climate model. The boundary conditions of the PGW run were obtained by adding the difference between the future (2090s) and past (1990s) climates simulated by coupled general circulation model (MIROC3.2 medres), which is from the CMIP3 multi-model dataset, into the 6-hourly NCEP reanalysis (R-2) and daily OISST data in the past climate (CTL) run. The PGW experiments show that snow depth significantly decreases over mountainous areas and snow cover mainly decreases over plain areas, contributing to higher surface warming due to the decreased snow albedo. Despite the snow reductions, precipitation mainly increases over the mountainous areas because of enhanced water vapor content. However, precipitation decreases over the Japan Sea and the coastal areas, indicating the weakening of a convergent cloud band, which is formed by convergence between cold northwesteries from the Eurasian continent and anticyclonic circulation over the Okhotsk Sea. These results suggest that Okhotsk sea-ice decline may change the atmospheric circulation and the resulting effect on cloud formation, resulting in changes in winter snow or precipitation. We will also examine another CMIP3 model (MRI-CGCM2.3.2), which sensitivity of surface albedo to surface air temperature is the lowest in the CMIP3 models.

  6. Snowfall induced severe pile-ups in southern Finland on 17 March 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juga, I.; Hippi, M.

    2009-09-01

    Weather has a great impact on road traffic and several studies have shown that accident risk increases especially during wintry weather conditions. Heavy snowfall, rain or sleet on an icy road surface and formation of hoar frost can make the driving conditions hazardous. Poor visibility, caused by snowfall or dense fog can increase the accident risk significantly and severe pile-ups on highways are possible. The risk for accidents increases, when many drivers can't adjust their speed to the worsening driving conditions even though the hazard is visible. This study presents a severe pile-up case that occurred in southern Finland near Helsinki city on Thursday 17 March 2005. Before this occasion, cold and clear weather prevailed for many days and the driving conditions were mostly fair. On 17 March a low pressure was approaching southern Finland from west. Light snowfall reached the Helsinki metropolitan area early in the morning and it was followed by a band of dense snowfall. During the rush hours, just before 0800 h, pile-ups occurred on four separate highways near Helsinki city almost at the same time (within about ten minutes). In total, almost 300 cars were crashed, 3 persons died and more than 60 persons got injured. The occurrence of dense snowfall during the rush hours had a great impact on driving conditions. The drivers heading towards Helsinki from north or northeast drove at first in clear, dry conditions, with only local light snowfall. But the sudden worsening of weather (and visibility) was a surprise for many although warnings for poor driving conditions were issued the previous evening on radio and TV. In addition to this, automatic vehicle speed measurements showed that the mean speed that morning was only a few km/h lower than on a normal day. When studying the weather situation, it appeared that near the surface there was a thin layer of cold air (2 m temperature being -5-8 degrees) and warmer air above it. In this kind of situation super cooled water can exist in the lower troposphere, and this was also supported by dual-polarization radar observations. This fact might have had a positive impact on the slipperiness of the roads, although freezing drizzle was mainly observed only just after the passage of the dense snowfall and occurrence of the crashes. Due to low surface temperature, preventative anti-icing with salting could not be carried out early that morning (except for the western part of the area). So the snow got packed on the road surface by traffic, causing slippery conditions. In a case like this, real-time warning methods and changing speed limits could be the main way to prevent massive accidents. Dense observation network consisting of road weather observations (including visibility) and radar data should be utilized in the real-time warnings. Dense snowfall is a substantial risk for traffic on highways and severe pile-ups have occurred lately for example in Czech Republic and Austria (during March 2008).

  7. Hemispheric and Interannual Comparisons of Polar Winter CO2 Clouds on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayne, P. O.; Kleinboehl, A.; Heavens, N. G.; Paige, D. A.; Schofield, J. T.; Kass, D. M.; Shirley, J. H.; McCleese, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Polar carbon dioxide snow clouds contribute substantial material to the seasonal caps of Mars, in addition to direct surface frost formation. Snow clouds also affect the polar heat budget through two primary mechanisms: 1) snow particles decrease polar infrared emissivity during winter, and 2) fine-grained snow deposits increase solar albedo during summer. These effects can strongly alter the seasonal cap mass budget, and possibly explain the existence of the perennial CO2 deposits near the Martian south pole. Mapping the distribution and quantifying the abundance of CO2 snowfall therefore has important implications for the study of Mars' present-day climate. The phenomenon of condensing martian air is of course also interesting in its own right, from an atmospheric science perspective. We used data primarily from the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to investigate the occurrence and properties (optical depth, particle size, altitude) of CO2 clouds in the winter polar regions. MCS retrieved temperature and aerosol opacity profiles now span four Mars years (MY28-MY31), allowing direct inter-annual comparisons for selected locations and seasons. Examples of observed inter-annual variability include decreased snowfall likely due to disruption of the northern polar vortex during the global dust storm of MY28. We also observe very distinct patterns of condensation in the northern and southern hemispheres, with cloud activity being much more intense in the northern hemisphere, but confined to higher latitudes, than in the south. Northern polar winter cloud activity is also distinctly bimodal in time, whereas southern winter cloud activity is evenly distributed over the winter season. In this presentation, we will present a summary of these observations and explore possible explanations for the variability in polar cloud phenomena.

  8. Body mass loss during adaptation to short winter-like days increases food foraging, but not food hoarding

    PubMed Central

    Teubner, Brett J.W.; Bartness, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Siberian hamsters markedly reduce their body/lipid mass (~2045%) in short winter-like days (SD). Decreases in body/lipid mass associated with food deprivation or lipectomy result in increases in foraging and food hoarding. When at their SD-induced body/lipid mass nadir, food hoarding is not increased despite their decreases in body/lipid mass, but hoarding was not tested during the dynamic period of body/lipid mass loss (first 56 weeks of SDs). Therefore, we tested for changes in foraging/hoarding during this initial period in Siberian hamsters housed in a simulated burrow with a wheel running-based foraging system and exposed to either long summer-like days (LD) or SDs. Two foraging effort conditions were used: 10 Revolutions/Pellet (pellet delivered after running 10 revolutions) and a Free Wheel/Free Food condition (wheel available, food pellets non-contingently available). Regardless of the foraging condition, body mass was significantly reduced across 8 weeks of SDs (~ 15%). Foraging increased after 7 weeks in SDs, but food hoarding did not increase compared to LDs. Instead food hoarding significantly decreased in SDs at Weeks 25 compared with Week 0 values, with the 10 Revolutions/Pellet foraging group returning to LD levels thereafter and the Free Wheel/Free Food group remaining reduced from Weeks 08. Collectively, we found that SDs decreased body mass, increased foraging after 7 weeks, and increased food hoarding, but only after an initial decrease and not above that seen in LDs. These data suggest that SD-induced body/lipid mass losses do not engender similar behavioral responses as seen with food deprivation or lipectomy. PMID:19224707

  9. Increase in body size is correlated to warmer winters in a passerine bird as inferred from time series data

    PubMed Central

    Bjrklund, Mats; Borras, Antoni; Cabrera, Josep; Senar, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is expected to affect natural populations in many ways. One way of getting an understanding of the effects of a changing climate is to analyze time series of natural populations. Therefore, we analyzed time series of 25 and 20years, respectively, in two populations of the citril finch (Carduelis citrinella) to understand the background of a dramatic increase in wing length in this species over this period, ranging between 1.3 and 2.9 phenotypic standard deviations. We found that the increase in wing length is closely correlated to warmer winters and in one case to rain in relation to temperature in the summer. In order to understand the process of change, we implemented seven simulation models, ranging from two nonadaptive models (drift and sampling), and five adaptive models with selection and/or phenotypic plasticity involved and tested these models against the time series of males and females from the two population separately. The nonadaptive models were rejected in each case, but the results were mixed when it comes to the adaptive models. The difference in fit of the models was sometimes not significant indicating that the models were not different enough. In conclusion, the dramatic change in mean wing length can best be explained as an adaptive response to a changing climate. PMID:25628864

  10. Increase in body size is correlated to warmer winters in a passerine bird as inferred from time series data.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Mats; Borras, Antoni; Cabrera, Josep; Senar, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is expected to affect natural populations in many ways. One way of getting an understanding of the effects of a changing climate is to analyze time series of natural populations. Therefore, we analyzed time series of 25 and 20 years, respectively, in two populations of the citril finch (Carduelis citrinella) to understand the background of a dramatic increase in wing length in this species over this period, ranging between 1.3 and 2.9 phenotypic standard deviations. We found that the increase in wing length is closely correlated to warmer winters and in one case to rain in relation to temperature in the summer. In order to understand the process of change, we implemented seven simulation models, ranging from two nonadaptive models (drift and sampling), and five adaptive models with selection and/or phenotypic plasticity involved and tested these models against the time series of males and females from the two population separately. The nonadaptive models were rejected in each case, but the results were mixed when it comes to the adaptive models. The difference in fit of the models was sometimes not significant indicating that the models were not different enough. In conclusion, the dramatic change in mean wing length can best be explained as an adaptive response to a changing climate. PMID:25628864

  11. Coupled Model Simulation of Snowfall Events Over the Black Hills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jianzhong; Hjelmfelt, M. R.; Capehart, W. J.

    2000-01-01

    Although many long-term simulations of snow accumulation and oblation have been made using stand-alone land surface models and surface models coupled with GCMs, less research has focused on short-term event simulations. Actually, accurate event simulations of snow-related processes are the basis for successful long-term simulation. Three advantages of event simulations of snowfall and snow melting are availability of: (1) intensive observation data from field experiments for validation; (2) more physically-realistic precipitation schemes for use in atmospheric models to simulate snowfall; and (3) a more detailed analysis of the snow melting processes. In addition to the complexities of snow related processes themselves, terrain-induced effects on snowfall/snow melting make simulations of snow events more difficult. Climatological observations indicate that terrain features such as the Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming can exert important effects on snow accumulation and snow oblation processes. One of the primary effects is that the orography causes forced uplift of airflow and causes atmospheric waves to form both upwind and downwind of it. Airflow often splits around the obstacle, converging on the lee side. This convergence may lead to precipitation enhancement. It also provides an elevated heat and moisture source that enhances atmospheric instability. During the period of April 5-May 5, 1999, the Upper Missouri River Basin Pilot Project (UMRBPP) made intensive observations on precipitation events occurring in the Black Hills. Two moderate snowfall events were captured during the period. The resulting high temporal and spatial resolution data provides opportunities to investigate terrain effects on snowfall amount, distribution, and melting. Successful simulation of snowfall amount, distribution, and evolution using atmospheric models is important to subsequent modeling of snow melting using snow sub-models in land surface schemes. In this paper, a coupled model system, consisting of an atmosphere model (ARPS) and a land-surface model (revised NCAR LSM), is used to simulate one of these UMRBPP cases.

  12. WRF simulations of two extreme snowfall events associated with contrasting extratropical cyclones over the western and central Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, J.; Carvalho, L. M. V.; Jones, C.; Cannon, F.

    2015-04-01

    Two extreme snowfall events associated with extratropical cyclones, one interacting with the western and one with the central Himalaya, are simulated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model over 8 days. One event in January 1999 was driven by a longwave trough over west Asia, with the cyclone becoming terrain-locked in the western Himalayan notch. Another event in March 2006 was driven by a trough further south and east, facilitating the passage of two successive cyclones along the entire Himalayan ridge, drawing moisture from warm tropical waters. These flow patterns are typical for extreme winter precipitation in the western and central Himalaya, respectively, but were amplified in these two cases. In the WRF simulations, snowfall is confined to the western Himalaya in the January simulation, while a near-continuous band of accumulated snowfall along the Himalayan ridge forms in the March simulation. Precipitation rate throughout both simulations is largely determined by cross-barrier moisture flux, which is generally greatest wherever the cyclonic winds converge on the mountains at each time. However, the March 2006 simulation evolves in an environment with greater convective instability upwind of and moisture transport toward the mountains than in the January 1999 event. Hence, greater precipitation rates and more solid snowbands are generated in the March than in the January simulation. However, due to the terrain-locking of the cyclone in the January event, individual locations receive more persistent snowfall, so that the greatest 8 day accumulations are similar between the two events, although these accumulations are more widespread in the March event.

  13. Determination of maritime snowfall from radar and microwave radiometer measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinman, James A.; Hakkarinen, Ida M.

    1990-01-01

    This study examines the effect of snowfall on high frequency microwave radiances measured from above the atmosphere by airborne radiometers. Attention is given to the analysis of a maritime snow storm so that snow accumulation on the surface would not introduce ambiguities into the analysis of the upwelling radiances.

  14. Estimating snowfall from temperature and precipitation in data-limited Himalayan watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viste, E.; Sorteberg, A.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change may affect the contribution of meltwater from snow and ice in the Himalayas to the great Asian rivers. Present contributions are reported to range from 10-20% of the annual discharge in the Ganges to 30-80% in the Indus. With few observations at higher elevations, the reality is that we do not know how much snow that is available for melting. To be able to understand the effect of future changes in climate, we need to know the present conditions, as well as how a change may be relevant for the parameters in question. In this study we have estimated 1) the amount of snow that falls over Himalaya/Hindukush/Karakoram today, and 2) in which parts of this region an increase in temperature alone may affect snowfall. There are few observations of weather and climate at higher elevations in the Himalayas, and even the annual precipitation varies greatly in the available gridded data sets. Aiming to estimate snowfall in the Indus, Ganges and Brahmaputra Basins, we thus combined several temperature and precipitation data sets in an ensemble. To be able to account for the diurnal cycle, we used the MERRA reanalysis as a basis, and then bias-corrected temperature and precipitation with data from CRU-TS, Aphrodite and TRMM, before calculating the amount of precipitation falling as snow every hour. The results deviate, with annual snowfall in one basin varying by a factor of 2-3, depending on the combination of input data. The spread is largely a result of precipitation differences, but temperature differences also affect the estimates. Whether an increase in temperature alone will influence snowfall and snowmelt, depends on the temperature in the region today. Regions where the temperature is currently near the freezing point, may be considered snow-critical. By finding the snow-critical range in each temperature data set, we have identified regions and elevations where the meltwater contribution is likely to be affected by a change in temperature. Any temperature increase in these regions will decrease the fraction of precipitation falling as snow, as well as increase snow- and ice-melt.

  15. Evaluating the Performance of Single and Double Moment Microphysics Schemes During a Synoptic-Scale Snowfall Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew L.

    2011-01-01

    Increases in computing resources have allowed for the utilization of high-resolution weather forecast models capable of resolving cloud microphysical and precipitation processes among varying numbers of hydrometeor categories. Several microphysics schemes are currently available within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, ranging from single-moment predictions of precipitation content to double-moment predictions that include a prediction of particle number concentrations. Each scheme incorporates several assumptions related to the size distribution, shape, and fall speed relationships of ice crystals in order to simulate cold-cloud processes and resulting precipitation. Field campaign data offer a means of evaluating the assumptions present within each scheme. The Canadian CloudSat/CALIPSO Validation Project (C3VP) represented collaboration among the CloudSat, CALIPSO, and NASA Global Precipitation Measurement mission communities, to observe cold season precipitation processes relevant to forecast model evaluation and the eventual development of satellite retrievals of cloud properties and precipitation rates. During the C3VP campaign, widespread snowfall occurred on 22 January 2007, sampled by aircraft and surface instrumentation that provided particle size distributions, ice water content, and fall speed estimations along with traditional surface measurements of temperature and precipitation. In this study, four single-moment and two double-moment microphysics schemes were utilized to generate hypothetical WRF forecasts of the event, with C3VP data used in evaluation of their varying assumptions. Schemes that incorporate flexibility in size distribution parameters and density assumptions are shown to be preferable to fixed constants, and that a double-moment representation of the snow category may be beneficial when representing the effects of aggregation. These results may guide forecast centers in optimal configurations of their forecast models for winter weather and identify best practices present within these various schemes.

  16. A statistical comparison of electronic weighing and tipping-bucket precipitation gauging for snowfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savina, M.; Schppi, B.; Molnar, P.; Burlando, P.; Sevruk, B.

    2010-05-01

    Rainfall and snowfall measurements are basic inputs for watershed modelling, natural hazard assessment, and generally for the evaluation of hydrological response. Although distributed radar precipitation fields are becoming routinely used in hydrological analyses, point observations remain fundamental as control points and best estimates of precipitation at the ground level. However, the problem with point precipitation measurements using common can-type gauges is that they are unreliable. Besides the observational, calibrating and construction errors, there are systematic errors consisting mainly of wind-induced errors, wetting and evaporation losses, all of which affect the accuracy of the measurement at the event scale. In this paper we evaluate the performance of two widely used measurement systems - the tipping-bucket and a modern electronic weighing system - with a special focus on snowfall and the errors (differences) caused by heating and the tipping mechanism. Data for the study were collected at the MeteoSwiss weather station field in Zermatt (Swiss Alps) in the winter 2009/2010. Our data demonstrate i) a delay of the tipping bucket gauge in recording the beginning of an event due to melting snow and filling of the first tip; ii) a general loss of water in the tipping bucket gauge due to higher evaporation loss because of a larger heated area; and iii) the effect of smoothening of the high resolution precipitation intensity by the different measurement mechanisms. Most notably, the tipping bucket gauge produced a total water loss of about 20% compared to the weighing gauge and showed a substantial delay (on the order of 20-30 min) in identifying the beginning of snowfall events, which also led to a disagreement in the duration of the events. We decomposed the delay into a delay due to the time needed to melt the first snow and direct the water to the outlet of the funnel (~10 min) and the time needed to fill the first tip (~20 min). The delay is an important factor if accurate event timing is required. Our results show that merging precipitation observations measured by different gauges (measurement systems) must take into account and correct not only for differences in the total rainfall depth, but also in the onset and timing of recorded events, especially if the data are to be used for the validation of radar precipitation fields.

  17. Numerical simulations of snowfall events: Sensitivity analysis of physical parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-González, S.; Valero, F.; Sánchez, J. L.; Gascón, E.; López, L.; García-Ortega, E.; Merino, A.

    2015-10-01

    Accurate estimation of snowfall episodes several hours or even days in advance is essential to minimize risks to transport and other human activities. Every year, these episodes cause severe traffic problems on the northwestern Iberian Peninsula. In order to analyze the influence of different parameterization schemes, 15 snowfall days were analyzed with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, defining three nested domains with resolutions of 27, 9, and 3 km. We implemented four microphysical parameterizations (WRF Single-Moment 6-class scheme, Goddard, Thompson, and Morrison) and two planetary boundary layer schemes (Yonsei University and Mellor-Yamada-Janjic), yielding eight distinct combinations. To validate model estimates, a network of 97 precipitation gauges was used, together with dichotomous data of snowfall presence/absence from snowplow requests to the emergency service of Spain and observatories of the Spanish Meteorological Agency. The results indicate that the most accurate setting of WRF for the study area was that using the Thompson microphysical parameterization and Mellor-Yamada-Janjic scheme, although the Thompson and Yonsei University combination had greater accuracy in determining the temporal distribution of precipitation over 1 day. Combining the eight deterministic members in an ensemble average improved results considerably. Further, the root mean square difference decreased markedly using a multiple linear regression as postprocessing. In addition, our method was able to provide mean ensemble precipitation and maximum expected precipitation,which can be very useful in the management of water resources. Finally, we developed an application that allows determination of the risk of snowfall above a certain threshold.

  18. An Evaluation of Satellite Retrievals of Snowfall in Regions of Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, K. A.; Nesbitt, S. W.; Kulie, M.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Wood, N.

    2013-12-01

    Snowfall in regions of complex terrain plays an important role in the global hydrologic cycle, and can have major physical and social implications ranging from water resource management, to flash flooding, to climate change impacts. Due to the diversity of impacts that can result from snowfall, the ability to directly observe and measure snowfall in real-time is of great importance. However, the physical limitations of ground-based radars particularly in complex terrain and the lack of spatially complete measurement networks in mountainous regions make high-resolution ground-based snowfall observations a challenging task. Spaceborne satellite retrievals of snowfall such as those that will be made possible by the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission offer the ability to make high spatial and temporal resolution measurements that are otherwise not possible using traditional ground-based methods. This study seeks to investigate the skill level of current spaceborne snowfall products over the complex terrain of the Rocky Mountains in the western United States. Satellite derived snowfall products from measurements obtained via instruments including the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR), EOS Aqua Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E), and GCOM-W1 Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) are evaluated using ground-based observations such as the Natural Resources Conservation Service Snow Telemetry (SNOTEL) data and the NCEP Stage IV data. Satellite derived snowfall variables including snowfall rate and snow water equivalent are compared to ground-based observations to determine the overall accuracy and skill level of current satellite derived snowfall products in the region of interest. An analysis is also done to determine how the accuracy and skill level change based on varying snowfall regimes such as light, moderate, and heavy snowfall events. The knowledge gained will be used to determine how satellite derived snowfall measurements in regions of complex terrain may be improved upon for future missions including GPM.

  19. Coupled Model Simulation of Snowfall Events over the Black Hills.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Hjelmfelt, M. R.; Capehart, W. J.; Farley, R. D.

    2003-06-01

    Numerical simulations of two snowfall events over the Black Hills of South Dakota are made to demonstrate the use and potential of a coupled atmospheric and land surface model. The Coupled Atmospheric-Hydrologic Model System was used to simulate a moderate topographic snowfall event of 10-11 April 1999 and a blizzard event of 18-23 April 2000. These two cases were chosen to provide a contrast of snowfall amounts, locations, and storm dynamics. The model configuration utilized a nested grid with an outer grid of 16-km spacing driven by numerical forecast model data and an inner grid of 4 km centered over the Black Hills region. Simulations for the first case were made with the atmospheric model, the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) alone, and with ARPS coupled with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Land Surface Model (LSM). Results indicated that the main features of the precipitation pattern were captured by ARPS alone. However, precipitation amounts were greatly overpredicted. ARPS coupled with LSM produced a very similar precipitation pattern, but with precipitation amounts much closer to those observed. The coupled model also permits simulation of the resulting snow cover and snowmelt. Simulated percentage snow melting occurred somewhat more rapidly than that of the observed. Snow-rain discrimination may be taken from the precipitation type falling out of the atmospheric model based on the microphysical parameterization, or by the use of a surface temperature criteria, as used in most large-scale models. The resulting snow accumulation patterns and amounts were nearly identical. The coupled model configuration was used to simulate the second case. In this case the simulated precipitation and snow depth maximum over the eastern Black Hills were biased to the east and north by about 24 km. The resulting spatial correlation of the simulated snowfall and observations was only 0.37. If this bias is removed, the shifted pattern over the Black Hills region has a correlation of 0.68. Snow-melting patterns for 21 and 22 April appeared reasonable, given the spatial bias in the snowfall simulation.

  20. Response of daily snowfall extremes to climate change: theory and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Gorman, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Snowfall is sensitive to climate change through changes in air temperature, humidity, and dynamics. Because of the sensitivity to temperature, annual-mean snowfall is expected to decrease in a warming climate except in very cold regions. However, it is shown here that CMIP5 models simulate smaller fractional changes in the intensities of daily snowfall extremes than in mean snowfall for many regions and months of the year. An asymptotic theory is introduced for snowfall extremes based on the temperature dependencies of the rain-snow transition and precipitation extremes. The theory accounts for the main features of the response of snowfall extremes to warming in the simulations. A variant of the theory that better accounts for the role of dynamics will also be discussed.

  1. Litter decomposition and soil respiration in response to increased rainfall variability, winter warming and altered cutting frequency in a temperate grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreyling, Juergen; Walter, Julia; Grant, Kerstin; Beierkuhnlein, Carl; Jentsch, Anke

    2013-04-01

    Climate change is likely to alter decomposition rates through direct effects on soil biotic activity and indirect effects on litter quality with possible impacts on the global carbon budget and nutrient cycling. Currently, there is an urgent need to study combined effects of various climatic drivers and of agricultural practise on decomposition. In an in-situ litter bag experiment, we studied effects of rainfall variability (including drought plus heavy rain pulses and regular irrigation) interacting with winter warming and increased winter precipitation and with changes in cutting frequency, on decomposition in a temperate grassland. Litter bags contained mixed and species-specific litter out of all different climate and land-use manipulations and were placed within the plots of litter origin. Moreover, we aimed to disentangle causes for altered decomposition by following two further approaches: To study effects of changed leaf chemicals due to the manipulations we placed litter out of the experiment that has been pre-exposed to the manipulations before on an untreated standard plot outside the experiment. To assess effects of changed soil faunal activity, we investigated decomposition of standard material under differing rainfall variability. We further compare the observed decomposition results with soil respiration data. Decomposition was reduced when litter bags were exposed to drought for six weeks within an 11 months period. Neither additional winter rain nor winter warming had an effect on decomposition, probably because winter warming reduced snow cover and increased variability of surface temperatures. Climate manipulations did not change litter quality. Further, decomposition on the untreated standard plot was not affected by the climate manipulations that the litter previously was exposed to. Thus, reduced decomposition under extreme rainfall variability and drought may be mainly caused by a decrease in soil biotic activity, as indicated by reduced decomposition of standard material during drought. More frequent cutting strongly stimulated decomposition, however, this stimulating effect was absent under extreme rainfall variability including drought. The stimulation of decomposition under more frequent cutting was attributed to changes in litter quality, namely a decrease in C/N ratio. Accordingly, litter from more frequently cut communities decomposed faster on the untreated control plot outside the experiment. Projected increases in drought frequency and increased rainfall variability under climate change may inhibit decomposition and alter nutrient and carbon cycling along with soil quality. Especially decomposition in frequently cut grassland appears vulnerable towards drought.

  2. Intercomparison of snowfall estimates derived from the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar and the ground based weather radar network over Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norin, L.; Devasthale, A.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Wood, N. B.; Smalley, M.

    2015-08-01

    To be able to estimate snowfall accurately is important for both weather and climate applications. Ground-based weather radars and space-based satellite sensors are often used as viable alternatives to rain-gauges to estimate precipitation in this context. The Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) onboard CloudSat is especially proving to be a useful tool to map snowfall globally, in part due to its high sensitivity to light precipitation and ability to provide near-global vertical structure. The importance of having snowfall estimates from CloudSat/CPR further increases in the high latitude regions as other ground-based observations become sparse and passive satellite sensors suffer from inherent limitations. Here we intercompared snowfall estimates from two observing systems, CloudSat and Swerad, the Swedish national weather radar network. Swerad offers one of the best calibrated data sets of precipitation amount at very high latitudes that are anchored to rain-gauges and that can be exploited to evaluate usefulness of CloudSat/CPR snowfall estimates in the polar regions. In total 7.2×105 matchups of CloudSat and Swerad over Sweden were inter-compared covering all but summer months (October to May) from 2008 to 2010. The intercomparison shows encouraging agreement between these two observing systems despite their different sensitivities and user applications. The best agreement is observed when CloudSat passes close to a Swerad station (46-82 km), when the observational conditions for both systems are comparable. Larger disagreements outside this range suggest that both platforms have difficulty with shallow snow but for different reasons. The correlation between Swerad and CloudSat degrades with increasing distance from the nearest Swerad station as Swerad's sensitivity decreases as a function of distance and Swerad also tends to overshoots low level precipitating systems further away from the station, leading to underestimation of snowfall rate and occasionally missing the precipitation altogether. Further investigations of various statistical metrics, such as the probability of detection, false alarm rate, hit rate, and the Hanssen-Kuipers skill scores, and the sensitivity of these metrics to snowfall rate and the distance from the radar station, were carried out. The results of these investigations highlight the strengths and the limitations of both observing systems at the lower and upper ends of snowfall distributions and the range of uncertainties that could be expected from these systems in the high latitude regions.

  3. Intercomparison of snowfall estimates derived from the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar and the ground-based weather radar network over Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norin, L.; Devasthale, A.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Wood, N. B.; Smalley, M.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate snowfall estimates are important for both weather and climate applications. Ground-based weather radars and space-based satellite sensors are often used as viable alternatives to rain gauges to estimate precipitation in this context. In particular, the Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) on board CloudSat is proving to be a useful tool to map snowfall globally, in part due to its high sensitivity to light precipitation and its ability to provide near-global vertical structure. CloudSat snowfall estimates play a particularly important role in the high-latitude regions as other ground-based observations become sparse and passive satellite sensors suffer from inherent limitations. In this paper, snowfall estimates from two observing systems - Swerad, the Swedish national weather radar network, and CloudSat - are compared. Swerad offers a well-calibrated data set of precipitation rates with high spatial and temporal resolution, at very high latitudes. The measurements are anchored to rain gauges and provide valuable insights into the usefulness of CloudSat CPR's snowfall estimates in the polar regions. In total, 7.2 × 105 matchups of CloudSat and Swerad observations from 2008 through 2010 were intercompared, covering all but the summer months (June to September). The intercomparison shows encouraging agreement between the two observing systems despite their different sensitivities and user applications. The best agreement is observed when CloudSat passes close to a Swerad station (46-82 km), where the observational conditions for both systems are comparable. Larger disagreements outside this range suggest that both platforms have difficulty with shallow snow but for different reasons. The correlation between Swerad and CloudSat degrades with increasing distance from the nearest Swerad station, as Swerad's sensitivity decreases as a function of distance. Swerad also tends to overshoot low-level precipitating systems further away from the station, leading to an underestimation of snowfall rate and occasionally to missing precipitation altogether. Several statistical metrics - including the probability of detection, false alarm rate, hit rate, and Pierce's skill score - are calculated. The sensitivity of these metrics to the snowfall rate, as well as to the distance from the nearest radar station, are summarised. This highlights the strengths and the limitations of both observing systems at the lower and upper ends of the snowfall distributions as well as the range of uncertainties that can be expected from these systems in high-latitude regions.

  4. Winters fuels report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-27

    The outlook for distillate fuel oil this winter is for increased demand and a return to normal inventory patterns, assuming a resumption of normal, cooler weather than last winter. With industrial production expected to grow slightly from last winter`s pace, overall consumption is projected to increase 3 percent from last winter, to 3.4 million barrels per day during the heating season (October 1, 1995-March 31, 1996). Much of the supply win come from stock drawdowns and refinery production. Estimates for the winter are from the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) 4th Quarter 1995 Short-Tenn Energy Outlook (STEO) Mid-World Oil Price Case forecast. Inventories in place on September 30, 1995, of 132 million barrels were 9 percent below the unusually high year-earlier level. Inventories of high-sulfur distillate fuel oil, the principal type used for heating, were 13 percent lower than a year earlier. Supply problems are not anticipated because refinery production and the ready availability of imports should be adequate to meet demand. Residential heating off prices are expected to be somewhat higher than last winter`s, as the effects of lower crude oil prices are offset by lower distillate inventories. Heating oil is forecast to average $0.92 per gallon, the highest price since the winter of 1992-93. Diesel fuel (including tax) is predicted to be slightly higher than last year at $1.13 per gallon. This article focuses on the winter assessment for distillate fuel oil, how well last year`s STEO winter outlook compared to actual events, and expectations for the coming winter. Additional analyses include regional low-sulfur and high-sulfur distillate supply, demand, and prices, and recent trends in distillate fuel oil inventories.

  5. Sorting out non-sorted circles: Effects of winter climate change on the Collembola community of cryoturbated subarctic tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krab, Eveline; Monteux, Sylvain; Becher, Marina; Blume-Werry, Gesche; Keuper, Frida; Klaminder, Jonatan; Kobayashi, Makoto; Lundin, Erik J.; Milbau, Ann; Roennefarth, Jonas; Teuber, Laurenz Michael; Weedon, James; Dorrepaal, Ellen

    2015-04-01

    Non-sorted circles (NSC) are a common type of cryoturbated (frost-disturbed) soil in the arctic and store large amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC) by the burial of organic matter. They appear as sparsely vegetated areas surrounded by denser tundra vegetation, creating patterned ground. Snowfall in the arctic is expected to increase, which will modify freezing intensity and freeze-thaw cycles in soils, thereby impacting on SOC dynamics. Vegetation, soil fauna and microorganisms, important drivers of carbon turnover, may benefit directly from the altered winter conditions and the resulting reduction in cryoturbation, but may also impact each other through trophic cascading. We investigated how Collembola, important decomposer soil fauna in high latitude ecosystems, are affected by increased winter insulation and vegetation cover. We subjected NSC in North-Swedish subarctic alpine tundra to two years of increased thermal insulation (snow fences or fiber cloth) in winter and spring, increasing soil temperatures and strongly reducing freeze-thaw frequency. From these NSC we sampled the Collembola community in: (i) the non-vegetated center, (ii) sparsely vegetated parts in the center and (iii) the vegetated domain surrounding NSC. To link changes in Collembola density and community composition to SOC dynamics, we included measurements of decomposer activity, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total extractable nitrogen (TN). We observed differences in Collembola density, community composition and soil fauna activity between the sampling points in the NSC. Specifically Collembola diversity increased with the presence of vegetation and density was higher in the vegetated outer domains. Increased winter insulation did not affect diversity but seemed to negatively affect density and decomposer activity in the vegetated outer domains. Interestingly, SOM distribution over NSC changed with snow addition (also to a lesser extent with fleece insulation) towards less SOM in the vegetated outer domains. This corresponded to a general decrease in Collembola density and activity and to alterations in carbon mobilization (a decrease in extractable DOC). Changing SOM distribution in shallower soil layers might be an important mechanism by which increased snowfall in winter will affect subarctic patterned soils and its carbon dynamics. Our results indicate that the bottom-up effects of altered SOM availability and the establishment of vegetation are more likely to drive the decomposer community and its activity than direct winter-warming effects. Eventually, the extent to which SOM will redistribute and vegetation will expand into the non-vegetated parts of NSC will determine the magnitude of effects on decomposers and their activity. The new balance between plant productivity, SOC burial and carbon released by decomposers, will determine the fate of the large amounts of carbon stored in cryoturbated soils.

  6. Chemical composition of fresh snowfalls at Palmer Station, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeFelice, T. P.

    A first time investigation was performed to establish a chemical baseline for snowfall at Palmer Station Antarctica (6446'S, 6405'W) since there was no such record. A chemical baseline for snow could be use to validate climate change studies based on ice core analyses. The snow samples contained (from high to low mass concentration) total organic carbon, chloride, inorganic carbon, sodium, sulfate, magnesium, calcium, potassium, fluoride, ammonium, and nitrate, excluding hydrogen and hydroxide. The pH of these samples ranged between 4.0-6.2. The relatively low nitrate and relatively high sulfate concentrations found in our samples are consistent with the results of other studies for this region of Antarctica. The ions and pH do not appear to favor a particular wind direction during this period. The total deposition of sulfate and flouride via snowfall between 10 January and 10 February is conservatively estimated to be 4.78 and 1.3 kg km -2, respectively.

  7. Sensitivity of an energy balance climate model with predicted snowfall rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, K. P.

    1985-01-01

    A snowfall parameterization and a polar-ice-sheet model are developed and applied to the two-level zonally averaged seasonal energy-balance climate model of Held and Suarez (1979), and sensitivity experiments involving changes in insolation are performed both with and without ice sheets. The results are presented in tables and graphs, and the hydrological-cycle response to insolation changes is found to be similar to that predicted by global-circulation models employing prescribed precipitation levels, with a somewhat higher sensitivity in the snow line. The area covered by ice sheets in the ice-sheet models is shown to be greater than that covered by permanent snow in the models without ice sheets, an effect attributed to lower surface temperatures over the ice. It is inferred that an increase in the solar constant can cause increased high-latitude precipitation but not an ice age.

  8. The social impact of the snowfall of 8 March 2010 in Catalonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro, J.; Llasat, M. C.; Aran, M.

    2010-09-01

    The snowfall of 8 March 2010 affected almost all Catalonia, but especially the northeast where snow thickness was between 20 and 30 cm, locally with higher values up to 60 cm. Strong winds followed the event, exceeding 90 km/h in some places. As a result, infrastructures and public services, also private properties were damaged. Thousands of people were left stranded by the circulatory collapse, suspensions of railway service and by falling branches or trees on road infrastructures blocking accesses to residential areas. The regional government approved funds of 21.4 millions of Euros to mitigate the damage caused by this event, mainly invested in forest cleanup operations and in repairing road damage. The social impact of this event has been so high that 210 news have been published in a newspaper until 23 April, 190 of them during the month of March. From the study of the characteristics of this episode it can be stated that in the coast and pre-costal area, temperature at the same moment of precipitation was between 0ºC and 2ºC and humidity was high. In these zones, the type of precipitation was wet snow. It has to be considered that the combination of wet snow and wind can be a risk because of the ice-weight accumulated on objects (trees, electricity pylons...). As a consequence important damage happened in power network with significant collateral effects and more than 450,000 customers were affected by a power outage during some days. In this study we will compare the consequences of this event with others by means of information published in press. As a result, some set of consequences that are repeated regardless of the magnitude of the phenomenon will be identified. Finally, this event is also an example of the incision of social networks. This snowfall has been classified by mass media as the first "snowfall 2.0": 81600 entrances in Google, 132 Facebook groups and 750 videos made by amateurs in internet. From this study, we will present some reflexions that could be useful to improve the snow emergency plan in Catalonia, released in 2004, and mitigating the effects of future snow storms. A campaign focused on motivate population in order to increase more social commitment in these events, seems to be necessary to prevent avoidable risks. Information campaigns and some educational tasks have to be carried out to make warnings and forecasts reports clearer to citizens and to increase population sensitivity in emergency situations.

  9. Winter Wonderlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Listening to people complain about the hardships of winter and the dreariness of the nearly constant gray sky prompted the author to help her sixth graders recognize and appreciate the beauty that surrounds them for nearly five months of the year in western New York. The author opines that if students could see things more artistically, the winter

  10. Winter Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkeland, Karl W.; Halfpenny, James C.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some of the ecological variables involved with plant and animal survival during the winter months. Addresses the effects of changing climatic conditions on habitats, foot-loading indexes, and the overall concept of adaptation. Provides some simple teaching activities dealing with winter survival. (TW)

  11. Mesoscale Frequencies and Seasonal Snowfalls for Different Types of Lake Michigan Snow Storms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Robert D.

    1986-03-01

    Members of the Cloud Physics Laboratory, University of Chicago, have identified three different mesoscale organization patterns of lake-effect snow storms over Lake Michigan: multiple wind-parallel bands, single midlake bands, and single shoreline bands. For the 70 snowfall seasons ending with 1980/81, Braham and Dungey estimated that lake-effect snows contributed 8% of the total snowfall along the west shore of the lake, and 39% along the east shore.In the present study daily GOES satellite images and daily snowfall records are used to find the seasonal snowfall in four geographical area from each type of lake-effect storm and from nonlake-effect storms, for the snowfall seasons 1978/79 and 1979/80. Over the two seasons, 176 snowfall days were identified. Of these, 52% were nonlake-effect and 48% were lake-effect days. Of the 84 lake-effect days, 51% had wind-parallel bands, 22% had midlake bands, 2% had shoreline bands, and 25% had undetermined lake-effect cloud types. Along the west shore of the lake, lake-effect snows contributed 29% of the total snowfall, primarily from midlake bands. Along the east shore, lake-effect storms contributed 50% of the total snowfall. About half of the lake-effect contribution on the east shore was from wind-parallel bands, with most of the remainder from midlake bands and undetermined convective types. Although individual shoreline bands may yield locally heavy snowfalls, their contribution in 1978/79 and 1979/80 was very small, probably due to their low frequency of occurrence and the localized nature of their snowfall.

  12. Future trends of snowfall days in northern Spain from ENSEMBLES regional climate projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pons, M. R.; Herrera, S.; Gutiérrez, J. M.

    2015-08-01

    In a previous study Pons et al. (Clim Res 54(3):197-207, 2010. doi: 10.3354/cr01117g) reported a significant decreasing trend of snowfall occurrence in the Northern Iberian Peninsula since the mid 70s. The study was based on observations of annual snowfall frequency (measured as the annual number of snowfall days NSD) from a network of 33 stations ranging from 60 to 1350 m. In the present work we analyze the skill of Regional Climate Models (RCMs) to reproduce this trend for the period 1961-2000 (using both reanalysis- and historical GCM-driven boundary conditions) and the trend and the associated uncertainty of the regional future projections obtained under the A1B scenario for the first half of the twenty-first century. In particular, we consider the regional simulation dataset from the EU-funded ENSEMBLES project, consisting of thirteen state-of-the-art RCMs run at 25 km resolution over Europe. While ERA40 severely underestimates both the mean NSD and its observed trend (-2.2 days/decade), the corresponding RCM simulations driven by the reanalysis appropriately capture the interannual variability and trends of the observed NSD (trends ranging from -3.4 to -0.7, -2.1 days/decade for the ensemble mean). The results driven by the GCM historical runs are quite variable, with trends ranging from -8.5 to 0.2 days/decade (-1.5 days/decade for the ensemble mean), and the greatest uncertainty by far being associated with the particular GCM used. Finally, the trends for the future 2011-2050 A1B runs are more consistent and significant, ranging in this case from -3.7 to -0.5 days/decade (-2.0 days/decade for the ensemble mean), indicating a future significant decreasing trend. These trends are mainly determined by the increasing temperatures, as indicated by the interannual correlation between temperature and NSD (-0.63 in the observations), which is preserved in both ERA40- and GCM-driven simulations.

  13. Nuclear Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Anne

    1984-01-01

    "Nuclear Winter" was recently coined to describe the climatic and biological effects of a nuclear war. These effects are discussed based on models, simulations, scenarios, and projections. Effects on human populations are also considered. (JN)

  14. Exploring Alternate Parameterizations for Snowfall with Validation from Satellite and Terrestrial Radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew L.; Petersen, Walter A.; Case, Jonathan L.; Dembek, Scott R.; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2009-01-01

    Increases in computational resources have allowed operational forecast centers to pursue experimental, high resolution simulations that resolve the microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation. These experiments are motivated by a desire to improve the representation of weather and climate, but will also benefit current and future satellite campaigns, which often use forecast model output to guide the retrieval process. Aircraft, surface and radar data from the Canadian CloudSat/CALIPSO Validation Project are used to check the validity of size distribution and density characteristics for snowfall simulated by the NASA Goddard six-class, single-moment bulk water microphysics scheme, currently available within the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) Model. Widespread snowfall developed across the region on January 22, 2007, forced by the passing of a midlatitude cyclone, and was observed by the dual-polarimetric, C-band radar King City, Ontario, as well as the NASA 94 GHz CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar. Combined, these data sets provide key metrics for validating model output: estimates of size distribution parameters fit to the inverse-exponential equations prescribed within the model, bulk density and crystal habit characteristics sampled by the aircraft, and representation of size characteristics as inferred by the radar reflectivity at C- and W-band. Specified constants for distribution intercept and density differ significantly from observations throughout much of the cloud depth. Alternate parameterizations are explored, using column-integrated values of vapor excess to avoid problems encountered with temperature-based parameterizations in an environment where inversions and isothermal layers are present. Simulation of CloudSat reflectivity is performed by adopting the discrete-dipole parameterizations and databases provided in literature, and demonstrate an improved capability in simulating radar reflectivity at W-band versus Mie scattering assumptions.

  15. Exploring Alternative Parameterizations for Snowfall with Validation from Satellite and Terrestrial Radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew L.; Petersen, Walter A.; Case, Jonathan L.; Dembek, Scott R.

    2009-01-01

    Increases in computational resources have allowed operational forecast centers to pursue experimental, high resolution simulations that resolve the microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation. These experiments are motivated by a desire to improve the representation of weather and climate, but will also benefit current and future satellite campaigns, which often use forecast model output to guide the retrieval process. The combination of reliable cloud microphysics and radar reflectivity may constrain radiative transfer models used in satellite simulators during future missions, including EarthCARE and the NASA Global Precipitation Measurement. Aircraft, surface and radar data from the Canadian CloudSat/CALIPSO Validation Project are used to check the validity of size distribution and density characteristics for snowfall simulated by the NASA Goddard six-class, single moment bulk water microphysics scheme, currently available within the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) Model. Widespread snowfall developed across the region on January 22, 2007, forced by the passing of a mid latitude cyclone, and was observed by the dual-polarimetric, C-band radar King City, Ontario, as well as the NASA 94 GHz CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar. Combined, these data sets provide key metrics for validating model output: estimates of size distribution parameters fit to the inverse-exponential equations prescribed within the model, bulk density and crystal habit characteristics sampled by the aircraft, and representation of size characteristics as inferred by the radar reflectivity at C- and W-band. Specified constants for distribution intercept and density differ significantly from observations throughout much of the cloud depth. Alternate parameterizations are explored, using column-integrated values of vapor excess to avoid problems encountered with temperature-based parameterizations in an environment where inversions and isothermal layers are present. Simulation of CloudSat reflectivity is performed by adopting the discrete-dipole parameterizations and databases provided in literature, and demonstrate an improved capability in simulating radar reflectivity at W-band versus Mie scattering assumptions.

  16. Modeling changes in extreme snowfall events in the Central Rocky Mountains Region with the Fully-Coupled WRF-Hydro Modeling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    gochis, David; rasmussen, Roy; Yu, Wei; Ikeda, Kyoko

    2014-05-01

    Modeling of extreme weather events often require very finely resolved treatment of atmospheric circulation structures in order to produce and localize large magnitudes of moisture fluxes that result in extreme precipitation. This is particularly true for cool season orographic precipitation processes where the representation of landform can significantly influence vertical velocity profiles and cloud moisture entrainment rates. In this work we report on recent progress in high resolution regional climate modeling of the Colorado Headwaters region using an updated version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and a hydrological extension package called WRF-Hydro. Previous work has shown that the WRF-Hydro modeling system forced by high resolution WRF model output can produce credible depictions of winter orographic precipitation and resultant monthly and annual river flows. Here we present results from a detailed study of an extreme springtime snowfall event that occurred along the Colorado Front Range in March of 2003. First an analysis of the simulated streamflows resulting from the melt out of that event are presented followed by an analysis of projected streamflows from the event where the atmospheric forcing in the WRF model is perturbed using the Psuedo-Global-Warming (PGW) perturbation methodology. Results from the impact of warming on total precipitation, snow-rain partitioning and surface hydrological fluxes (evapotranspiration and runoff) will be discussed in the context of how potential changes in temperature impact the amount of precipitation, the phase of precipitation (rain vs. snow) and the timing and amplitude of streamflow responses. It is shown that under the assumptions of the PGW method, intense precipitation rates increase during the event and, more importantly, that more precipitation falls as rain versus snow which significantly amplifies the runoff response from one where runoff is produced gradually to where runoff is more rapidly translated into streamflow values that approach significant flooding risks.

  17. Snowfall in the Northwest Iberian Peninsula: Synoptic Circulation Patterns and Their Influence on Snow Day Trends

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Andrés; Fernández, Sergio; Hermida, Lucía; López, Laura; Sánchez, José Luis; García-Ortega, Eduardo; Gascón, Estíbaliz

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, a decrease in snowfall attributed to the effects of global warming (among other causes) has become evident. However, it is reasonable to investigate meteorological causes for such decrease, by analyzing changes in synoptic scale patterns. On the Iberian Peninsula, the Castilla y León region in the northwest consists of a central plateau surrounded by mountain ranges. This creates snowfalls that are considered both an important water resource and a transportation risk. In this work, we develop a classification of synoptic situations that produced important snowfalls at observation stations in the major cities of Castilla y León from 1960 to 2011. We used principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster techniques to define four synoptic patterns conducive to snowfall in the region. Once we confirmed homogeneity of the series and serial correlation of the snowfallday records at the stations from 1960 to 2011, we carried out a Mann-Kendall test. The results show a negative trend at most stations, so there are a decreased number of snowfall days. Finally, variations in these meteorological variables were related to changes in the frequencies of snow events belonging to each synoptic pattern favorable for snowfall production at the observatory locations. PMID:25152912

  18. THE INFLUENCE ON EMERGENCY VEHICLE CAUSED BY THE GUERRILLA HEAVY SNOWFALL AND CONSIDERATION ABOUT MEASURES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masanori; Takayama, Jun-Ichi; Nakayama, Shoichiro

    In Nanao City, Ishikawa, it was a sudden snowfall (the following, "guerrilla heavy snowfall") in a short time in January, 2009, and a traffic jam occurred in the various places in city. Therefore, the snow removing was late, and the emergency transportation was late, too. So, Ishikawa Prefecture performed the review of the snow removing system with this guerrilla heavy snowfall as a lesson in the next year. As a result, in January, 2011, similar guerrilla heavy snowfall was generated, but the traffic jam in the city didn't occur that much, and the big hindrance didn't produce the delay of the emergency transportation either. Therefore, in this study, I analyzed the snowfall situation of the year before and after the snow removing system improvement, the traffic jam situation and snow removing dispatch data and compared the difference quantitatively. In addition, after guerrilla heavy snowfall, the study meeting the study meeting was held by prefecture, country, city, town and association of construction industry, and they built the area snow removing cooperation system, so I carried out an interview investigation about the real enforcement situation and progress.

  19. Snowfall in the northwest Iberian Peninsula: synoptic circulation patterns and their influence on snow day trends.

    PubMed

    Merino, Andrs; Fernndez, Sergio; Hermida, Luca; Lpez, Laura; Snchez, Jos Luis; Garca-Ortega, Eduardo; Gascn, Estbaliz

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, a decrease in snowfall attributed to the effects of global warming (among other causes) has become evident. However, it is reasonable to investigate meteorological causes for such decrease, by analyzing changes in synoptic scale patterns. On the Iberian Peninsula, the Castilla y Len region in the northwest consists of a central plateau surrounded by mountain ranges. This creates snowfalls that are considered both an important water resource and a transportation risk. In this work, we develop a classification of synoptic situations that produced important snowfalls at observation stations in the major cities of Castilla y Len from 1960 to 2011. We used principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster techniques to define four synoptic patterns conducive to snowfall in the region. Once we confirmed homogeneity of the series and serial correlation of the snowfallday records at the stations from 1960 to 2011, we carried out a Mann-Kendall test. The results show a negative trend at most stations, so there are a decreased number of snowfall days. Finally, variations in these meteorological variables were related to changes in the frequencies of snow events belonging to each synoptic pattern favorable for snowfall production at the observatory locations. PMID:25152912

  20. Winter Hydrographer

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Robert Bradley, a hydrologic technician with the Massachusetts USGS Office, headed to Maine to experience a winter ice measurement trip with Laura Flight, a hydrologic technician from the Maine USGS Office. Robert, originally from Florida, went to Aroostook County with Laura and got smacked in the f...

  1. Winter Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Outdoor Educators of Quebec, Montreal.

    Materials on 11 topics presented at a winter workshop for Quebec outdoor educators have been compiled into this booklet. Action story, instant replay, shoe factory, sound and action, and find an object to fit the description are described and recommended as group dynamic activities. Directions for five games (Superlative Selection; Data

  2. Winter Wonderlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Listening to people complain about the hardships of winter and the dreariness of the nearly constant gray sky prompted the author to help her sixth graders recognize and appreciate the beauty that surrounds them for nearly five months of the year in western New York. The author opines that if students could see things more artistically, the winter…

  3. Winter Games.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarbuth, Lawson, Comp.

    Educators may find activities for indoor and outdoor winter programs in the games of the traditional Eskimo. These games are dominated by few-step operations and low level structural organization. For the most part they are quickly organized, begun, terminated, and ready to be recommenced. All types of games can be found, including quiet ones,

  4. Why does Rhinopithecus bieti prefer the highest elevation range in winter? A test of the sunshine hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Quan, Rui-Chang; Ren, Guopeng; Behm, Jocelyn E; Wang, Lin; Huang, Yong; Long, Yongcheng; Zhu, Jianguo

    2011-01-01

    Environmental factors that affect spatiotemporal distribution patterns of animals usually include resource availability, temperature, and the risk of predation. However, they do not explain the counterintuitive preference of high elevation range in winter by the black-and-white snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus bieti). We asked whether variation of sunshine along with elevations is the key driving force. To test this hypothesis, we conducted field surveys to demonstrate that there was a statistically significant pattern of high elevation use during winter. We then asked whether this pattern can be explained by certain environmental factors, namely temperature, sunshine duration and solar radiation. Finally, we concluded with a possible ecological mechanism for this pattern. In this study, we employed GIS technology to quantify solar radiation and sunshine duration across the monkey's range. Our results showed that: 1) R. bieti used the high altitude range between 4100-4400 m in winter although the yearly home range spanned from 3500-4500 m; 2) both solar radiation and sunshine duration increased with elevation while temperature decreased with elevation; 3) within the winter range, the use of range was significantly correlated with solar radiation and sunshine duration; 4) monkeys moved to the areas with high solar radiation and duration following a snowfall, where the snow melts faster and food is exposed earlier. We concluded that sunshine was the main factor that influences selection of high elevation habitat for R. bieti in winter. Since some other endotherms in the area exhibit similar winter distributional patterns, we developed a sunshine hypothesis to explain this phenomenon. In addition, our work also represented a new method of integrating GIS models into traditional field ecology research to study spatiotemporal distribution pattern of wildlife. We suggest that further theoretical and empirical studies are necessary for better understanding of sunshine influence on wildlife range use. PMID:21915329

  5. Anomalous snowfall caused by natural-draft cooling towers

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, L.R.

    1980-05-01

    Scattered reports of significant amounts of snow anomalously produced by cooling-tower plumes suggest that this process may be of importance. This conclusion is supported by study of high-resolution satellite images. Tabulation of a number of aerial observations of plumes at subfreezing temperatures indicates that a plume is likely to produce measurable snow if its temperature is colder than -13/sup 0/C and the saturation deficit of the ambient air is less than 0.5 g m/sup -3/. These factors are important because they affect the rates of nucleation and growth of ice particles. The rate of mixing between plume and ambient air is also important because it affects the rate of evaporation within the plume, which in turn determines the length of time available for snow particles to grow large enough to fall out. These empirically derived criteria were tested using a numerical model of cloud microphysics that simulates the most important processes of transfer of water substance between vapor, liquid, and ice, including nucleation and development of particle-size spectra. Dynamic processes were specified, not modeled. Among the many quantities computed is the flux density of snow at the base of the plume. From this, together with average fallspeed and horizontal wind speed, one can compute the amount and pattern of snowfall at the ground.

  6. High Frequency Microwave-based Snowfall Rate Estimation using an Artificial Neural Network Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahraei, A.; Hernandez, C.; Mahani, S. E.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2012-12-01

    There are regions in the world with significant dependency on the melted water from accumulated snow to strive against freshwater resources scarcity. In the U.S, there are several states including California and Arizona where melting snow plays an important role to manage growing unmet freshwater demand. Nevertheless, an accurate estimate of snowfall is always a major challenge for water resources management communities. Arguably, ground-based gauges and radar have been utilized to measure snowfall. Considering the sparse network or lack of spatial coverage of ground-based instruments, it is required to deploy satellite-based technologies without existing ground-based sensors limitations and errors. Sensitivity of high frequency microwave (MW) range of electromagnetic to ice particles and snowflakes lead us to use satellite-based MW brightness temperature (BT) to estimate snowfall rate. To meet the main objective of this study that is using satellite-retrieved microwave signals to improve capability of snowfall rate estimation from space, we are developing a multi-frequency algorithm based on an artificial neural network (ANN) system. The developed algorithm will estimate snowfall rate using microwave frequencies from the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU)-B. The preliminary results show that any combination of MW channels including high frequency band of 1837 GHz is more related to snowfall amount than the ones without this channel. These results also reveal the promising performance of the ANN-based models in the estimation of snowfall in higher latitude and mountainous regions with average correlation coefficient of 0.55 for independent validation cases.

  7. Weather Support to Deicing Decision Making (WSDDM): A Winter Weather Nowcasting System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Roy; Dixon, Mike; Hage, Frank; Cole, Jeff; Wade, Chuck; Tuttle, John; McGettigan, Starr; Carty, Thomas; Stevenson, Lloyd; Fellner, Warren; Knight, Shelly; Karplus, Eli; Rehak, Nancy

    2001-04-01

    This paper describes a winter weather nowcasting system called Weather Support to Deicing Decision Making (WSDDM), designed to provide airline, airport, and air traffic users with winter weather information relevant to their operations. The information is provided on an easy to use graphical display and characterizes airport icing conditions for nonmeteorologists. The system has been developed and refined over a series of winter-long airport demonstrations at Denver's Stapleton International Airport, Chicago's O'Hare International Airport, and New York's LaGuardia Airport. The WSDDM system utilizes commercially available weather information in the form of Next Generation Weather Radar WSR-88D radar reflectivity data depicted as color coded images on a window of the display and Aviation Routine Weather Report (METAR) surface weather reports from Automated Surface Observating System stations and observers. METAR information includes wind speed and direction, air temperature, and precipitation type/rate, which are routinely updated on an hourly basis or more frequently if conditions are changing. Recent studies have shown that the liquid equivalent snowfall rate is the most important factor in determining the holdover time of a deicing fluid. However, the current operational snowfall intensity reported in METARs is based on visibility, which has been shown to give misleading information on liquid equivalent rates in many cases due to the wide variation in density and shape of snow. The particular hazard has been identified as high visibility-high snowfall conditions. The WSDDM system addresses this potentially hazardous condition through the deployment of snow gauges at an airport. These snow gauges report real-time estimates of the liquid equivalent snowfall rate once every minute to WSDDM users. The WSDDM system also provides 30-min nowcasts of liquid equivalent snowfall rate through the use of a real-time calibration of radar reflectivity and snow gauge snowfall rate. This paper discusses the development of the system, including the development of new wind shields for snow gauges to improve catch efficiency, as well as the development of the above mentioned real-time method to convert radar reflectivity to snowfall rate on the ground using snow gauges. In addition, we discuss results from a user evaluation of the system, as well as results from an efficiency and safety benefits study of the system.

  8. Snow climate baseline conditions and trends in Croatia relevant to winter tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaji?-?apka, M.

    2011-08-01

    The presence of snow along a portion of the Croatian highlands has enabled the development of winter tourism that is primarily oriented toward snow-related activities. Snow is more abundant and stays on the ground longer in the mountainous district of Gorski kotar (south eastern edge of the Alps) and on Mount Velebit (Dinaric Alps), which have elevations of up to 1,600 m and are close to the Adriatic coast than over the inland hilly region of north western Croatia where the summits are not more than approximately 1,000 m high. Basic information about the snow conditions at these locations was gathered for this study, including the annual cycle and probabilities for various snow parameters at different altitudes. As requested by the Croatian Ski Association, the relation between the air temperature and the relative humidity was investigated to determine the feasibility of artificial snowmaking. The snow parameters are highly correlated to air temperature, surface air pressure and precipitation, with certain differences occurring as a result of the altitude. Since the beginning of the second half of the twentieth century, winter warming and a significant increase in the mean air pressure (more anticyclonic situations) have been detected at all sites. Winter precipitation totals decreased at medium altitudes and increased at the summit of Mount Velebit, but these trends were not significant. The frequency of precipitation days and of snowfall decreased whereas an increasing fraction of the precipitation days at high altitudes involved solid precipitation. In contrast, a decreasing fraction of the precipitation days at medium altitudes involved solid precipitation, probably because of the different warming intensities at different altitudes. The mean daily snow depth and the duration of snow cover both slightly decreased at medium altitudes whereas the snow cover duration slightly increased at the mountainous summit of Mount Velebit.

  9. Satellite Perspectives on the Spatial Patterns of New Snowfall in the Southern Appalachian Mountains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Johnathan W.; Perry, L. Baker; Hall, Dorothy K.; Riggs, George A.; Badurek, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    The Southern Appalachian Mountains (SAM) are a heavily forested mid-latitude mountain region that provide an ideal location for assessing the suitability of satellite-derived snow maps and explicitly linking atmospheric circulation to the spatial patterns of new snowfall. Although a variety of synoptic-scale circulation regimes contribute to mean annual snowfall, which ranges from roughly 25 cm in the lowest valleys to over 250 cm at the highest elevations, atmospheric circulation processes have largely been absent from efforts seeking to quantify the spatial patterns of new snowfall. In this paper, we examine the suitability of fractional snow cover (FSC) maps from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and determine the spatial extent of snowfall according to synoptic-scale circulation. FSC maps are analysed after 122 snow events from 2006 to 2012 to provide a suitability analysis of MODIS products for use in the SAM. For each event, we calculate FSC distribution and total snowcovered area and compare it with available in situ observations. Results indicate that the SAM presents unique meteorological, physical, and spectral characteristics that are ideal for evaluating the suitability of MODIS for measuring snow cover. Out of 122 observed snow events, 63 are considered suitable for analysis with the FSC maps. The highest FSC values are observed after Gulf/Atlantic lows and south-eastward tracking clipper systems. We conclude that MODIS data can be successfully used to link broader atmospheric circulation processes of snowfall with the spatial patterns of snow cover.

  10. Regional shifts in snowfall, melt in the intermountain west

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-01-01

    The freshwater supplies of the American West rely, for the most part, on snow. The Colorado River, the Rio Grande, and other rivers in the intermountain westbounded by the Sierra Nevada and Cascade mountains to the west and the Rockies to the eastare the main sources of water for one of the driest parts of the continent, and their flows are predominantly fed by the springtime melt of snow accumulated over the winter. With winter mean temperatures rising in some places by as much as 2.5C in the past 2 decades, some scientists are concerned that the current hydrological regime of the region could be overthrown, with snow giving way to rain as the dominant form of precipitation. Decreasing snow accumulation and earlier snowmelt onset have been observed in Colorado. Whether these trends extend to the larger intermountain west region, however, is unknown.

  11. Development of Radar Reflectivity-Snowfall Rate Relationships at Multiple Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymsfield, Andrew; Bansemer, Aaron; Tanelli, Simone; Wood, Norm

    2015-04-01

    Development of Radar Reflectivity-Snowfall Rate Relationships at Multiple Wavelengths In-situ aircraft measurements of particle size distributions and both direct and indirect estimates of particle mass are used to calculate snowfall rates (S) from a number of NASA field programs. Simultaneously, and in close proximity and time to these measurements, there are direct measurements of the radar reflectivity (Z) at X, KU, KA and W bands from overflying aircraft or from the ground. From these observations, Z-S relationships are developed. In the process, a range of backscatter cross-section models are tested against the radar measurements. We expect these relationships to be very useful for CloudSat, GPM and EarthCARE-derived snowfall products.

  12. Total Lightning Observations within Electrified Snowfall using Polarimetric Radar, LMA, and NLDN Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Carey, Lawerence D.; Brunning, Eric C.; Blakeslee, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Four electrified snowfall cases are examined using total lightning measurements from lightning mapping arrays (LMAs), and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) from Huntsville, AL and Washington D.C. In each of these events, electrical activity was in conjunction with heavy snowfall rates, sometimes exceeding 5-8 cm hr-1. A combination of LMA, and NLDN data also indicate that many of these flashes initiated from tall communications towers and traveled over large horizontal distances. During events near Huntsville, AL, the Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR) C-band polarimetric radar was collecting range height indicators (RHIs) through regions of heavy snowfall. The combination of ARMOR polarimetric radar and VHF LMA observations suggested contiguous layer changes in height between sloping aggregate-dominated layers and horizontally-oriented crystals. These layers may have provided ideal conditions for the development of extensive regions of charge and resultant horizontal propagation of the lightning flashes over large distances.

  13. Observed relations between snowfall microphysics and triple-frequency radar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneifel, Stefan; Lerber, Annakaisa; Tiira, Jussi; Moisseev, Dmitri; Kollias, Pavlos; Leinonen, Jussi

    2015-06-01

    Recently published studies of triple-frequency radar observations of snowfall have demonstrated that naturally occurring snowflakes exhibit scattering signatures that are in some cases consistent with spheroidal particle models and in others can only be explained by complex aggregates. Until recently, no in situ observations have been available to investigate links between microphysical snowfall properties and their scattering properties. In this study, we investigate for the first time relations between collocated ground-based triple-frequency observations with in situ measurements of snowfall at the ground. The three analyzed snowfall cases obtained during a recent field campaign in Finland cover light to moderate snowfall rates with transitions from heavily rimed snow to open-structured, low-density snowflakes. The observed triple-frequency signatures agree well with the previously published findings from airborne radar observations. A rich spatiotemporal structure of triple-frequency observations throughout the cloud is observed during the three cases, which often seems to be related to riming and aggregation zones within the cloud. The comparison of triple-frequency signatures from the lowest altitudes with the ground-based in situ measurements reveals that in the presence of large (>5 mm) snow aggregates, a bending away in the triple-frequency space from the curve of classical spheroid scattering models is always observed. Rimed particles appear along an almost horizontal line in the triple-frequency space, which was not observed before. Overall, the three case studies indicate a close connection of triple-frequency signatures and snow particle structure, bulk snowfall density, and characteristic size of the particle size distribution.

  14. Analysis of the hazardous low-altitude snowfall, 8th March 2010, in Catalonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aran, M.; Rigo, T.; Bech, J.; Brucet, C.; Vilaclara, E.

    2010-09-01

    During winter season snow precipitation is quite frequent in the Pyrenees (north-east of the Iberian Peninsula). On average the total amount of fresh snow at 2200 metres is of 250 cm. However, important snow episodes at low latitudes are unlikely. From 1947 to 2009, 16 significant snow episodes took place in the Barcelona and 18 in Girona areas. On 8th March 2010, a severe wet snow event had a high social impact on these regions. One of the most remarkable features of this episode was the type of precipitation (wet snow) and the large amount of precipitation combined with strong wind gust that caused the collapse of electricity pylons and tree forests. The damage was very important in the north-eastern part and the regional government approved funds of 21.4 million to reduce the impact caused by this event. Although diagnosis of other low altitude snowfall events in Catalonia has been done previously, the analysis of this event can contribute to characterise a little bit better these snow episodes. In this study, we will present the synoptic framework characterised by the presence of a deep low in the north-east of Catalonia and moving through Ebro valley to the Catalan coast. To do this we will use ECMWF reanalyses and Meteosat images. The main features to predict this snow event and the critical point were the total amount of precipitation and snow level forecasted by mesoscale models (MM5, WRF). The model outputs for precipitation, temperature and wind will be compared with automatic weather, radar and radiosounding data. The snow level and the type of precipitation are compared with the information received from spotters. The main storm was characterised by moderate vertical development with tops of 8 km (4 km were the average height during the initial and final phase of the event). Also, lightning activity was observed, 310 intra-cloud and 128 cloud-to-ground. The type of precipitation at a specific location in the eastern zone temporally changed because of the advection of a warmer and wetter mass coming from the Mediterranean Sea and the total amount of precipitation (up to 100 mm in 24 hours in some places). As a result, its forecast was difficult and had an important impact on one of the most populated areas with higher vulnerability and exposure in Catalonia.

  15. Deuterium content of snow as an index to winter climate in the Sierra Nevada area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Smith, G.I.

    1972-01-01

    The winter of 1968-69 produced two to three times the amount of precipitation in the Sierra Nevada area, California and Nevada, as the winter of 1969-70. The deuterium content in snow cores collected at the end of each winter at the same sites, which represents the total snowfall of each interval, shows a depletion in 1968-69 of approximately 20 per mil. The higher snowfall in 1968-69 and the depletion of deuterium can be explained by an uncommonly strong westward flow of cold air over and down the western slopes of the Sierras, which interacted with an eastward flow of moist Pacific air that overrode and mixed with the cold air; this resulted in precipitation that occurred in greater than normal amounts and at a lower than normal temperature. Pluvial periods of the Pleistocene may have had the same shift in air-mass trajectory as the wet 1968-69 year. Snow cores collected in the normal 1970-71 winter have deuterium concentrations that resemble those of the normal 1969-70 winter. Small and nonsystematic differences in samples from these two normal winters are due to variations in climatic character as well as to factors inherent in the sampling sites.

  16. Relationship between the trajectory of mid-latitude cyclones in the eastern Pacific Ocean and the isotopic composition of snowfall in the Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, K. T.; Sickman, J. O.; Lucero, D. M.; Heard, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change has caused a change in the Sierra Nevada snowpack and the timing of its snowmelt, threatening a valuable water resource that provides for 25 million people and 5 million hectares of irrigated land. Understanding past and future variations in the snowpack is crucial in order to plan future water management. Of particular importance would be an archive of the variability of past snowfall, which can be recorded through the isotopic records found in local paleoproxies (e.g., diatoms). We propose to quantify the relationship between sources of atmospheric moisture in the Sierra Nevada and the isotopic composition of its snowpack to uncover whether isotopic variations recorded in paloearchives are a result of the isotopic composition of the precipitation, thereby showing whether these archives could serve as a reliable source of atmospheric moisture. Preliminary analysis conducted from December 2012 to March 2013 at Sequoia National Park resulted in statistically significant correlations between the isotopic composition of the winter snowfall and storm track trajectories. It was observed that storms originating from more northern latitudes had predominantly lighter isotopes (more negative ? 2H and ?18O) and sub-tropical/tropical Pacific storms showed more positive ? 2H and ?18O. This pattern reflects the isotopic gradient of the Pacific Ocean and can prove useful when interpreting the climatic significance of the ?2H and ?18O values in analyzed proxies. While our initial investigation was promising, the winter of 2012 -2013 was abnormally dry compared to long-term averages. Before directing our investigation to known paleoproxies, we aim to determine if the correlation between storm tracks and isotopic composition of precipitation holds in years with average and above average precipitation through analysis of archived samples from calendar years 2007 - 2011 from Giant Forest in Sequoia National Park (southern sierra) and Manzanita Lake in Lassen Volcanic National Park (northern sierra).

  17. Effect of storm trajectories on snowfall chemistry in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, G.P.; Tonnessen, K.A.; Campbell, D.H.; Glass, B.R.; Torizzo, A.O.

    2001-01-01

    Snowfall samples from snowstorms lasting 1 to 4 days were collected near the Bear Lake snow telemetry (SnoTel) site in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado (ROMO), during the 1998-99 snowfall season to determine if storms moving in from different directions affect the chemistry of precipitation in the park. Storm pathways to Bear Lake during snowfall events were estimated using the HYSPLIT4 backward-trajectory model developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Deposition of acidic ions of nitrate and sulfate in snowfall during the study varied substantially (two- to threefold) depending on storm trajectory because air masses traversing the park originated from different surrounding areas, including some having large sources of emissions of nitrate and sulfate. Concentrations of nitrate and sulfate in samples were lowest when storms reached ROMO from north and east of the park and were elevated when air masses traveled from the west where a number of power plants are located. Concentrations were highest in storms reaching ROMO from the south, a region with urban areas including Metropolitan Denver.

  18. SeaWiFS: Snowfall in the mid-Atlantic States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Snowfall from the January 3, 2002 storm in the mid-Atlantic states is clearly evident in this SeaWiFS image collected on January 4, 2002. The snow covered area stretches from central eastern Alabama to southern Delaware. Credit: Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  19. Future increases in Arctic precipitation linked to local evaporation and sea-ice retreat.

    PubMed

    Bintanja, R; Selten, F M

    2014-05-22

    Precipitation changes projected for the end of the twenty-first century show an increase of more than 50 per cent in the Arctic regions. This marked increase, which is among the highest globally, has previously been attributed primarily to enhanced poleward moisture transport from lower latitudes. Here we use state-of-the-art global climate models to show that the projected increases in Arctic precipitation over the twenty-first century, which peak in late autumn and winter, are instead due mainly to strongly intensified local surface evaporation (maximum in winter), and only to a lesser degree due to enhanced moisture inflow from lower latitudes (maximum in late summer and autumn). Moreover, we show that the enhanced surface evaporation results mainly from retreating winter sea ice, signalling an amplified Arctic hydrological cycle. This demonstrates that increases in Arctic precipitation are firmly linked to Arctic warming and sea-ice decline. As a result, the Arctic mean precipitation sensitivity (4.5 per cent increase per degree of temperature warming) is much larger than the global value (1.6 to 1.9 per cent per kelvin). The associated seasonally varying increase in Arctic precipitation is likely to increase river discharge and snowfall over ice sheets (thereby affecting global sea level), and could even affect global climate through freshening of the Arctic Ocean and subsequent modulations of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. PMID:24805239

  20. A physical model to estimate snowfall over land using AMSU-B observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Weinman, J. A.; Olson, W. S.; Chang, D.-E.; Skofronick-Jackson, G.; Wang, J. R.

    2008-05-01

    In this study, we present a physical model to retrieve snowfall rate over land using brightness temperature observations from NOAA's Advanced Microwave Sounder Unit-B (AMSU-B) at 89 GHz, 150 GHz, 183.3 1 GHz, 183.3 3 GHz, and 183.3 7 GHz. The retrieval model is applied to the New England blizzard of 5 March 2001 which deposited about 75 cm of snow over much of Vermont, New Hampshire, and northern New York. In this physical model, prior retrieval assumptions about snowflake shape, particle size distributions, environmental conditions, and optimization methodology have been updated. Here, single scattering parameters for snow particles are calculated with the discrete-dipole approximation (DDA) method instead of assuming spherical shapes. Five different snow particle models are considered. Snow particle size distributions are assumed to vary with air temperature and to follow aircraft measurements described by previous studies. Brightness temperatures at AMSU-B frequencies for the New England blizzard are calculated using these DDA calculated single scattering parameters and particle size distributions. The vertical profiles of pressure, temperature, relative humidity and hydrometeors are provided by MM5 model simulations. These profiles are treated as the a priori database in the Bayesian retrieval algorithm. In algorithm applications to the blizzard data, calculated brightness temperatures associated with selected database profiles agree with AMSU-B observations to within about 5 K at all five frequencies. Retrieved snowfall rates compare favorably with the near-concurrent National Weather Service (NWS) radar reflectivity measurements. The relationships between the NWS radar measured reflectivities Ze and retrieved snowfall rate R for a given snow particle model are derived by a histogram matching technique. All of these Ze-R relationships fall in the range of previously established Ze-R relationships for snowfall. This suggests that the current physical model developed in this study can reliably estimate the snowfall rate over land using the AMSU-B measured brightness temperatures.

  1. Accounting for anthropic energy flux of traffic in winter urban road surface temperature simulations with the TEB model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, A.; Marchetti, M.; Bouilloud, L.; Martin, E.; Bues, M.; Chancibaut, K.

    2016-02-01

    Snowfall forecasts help winter maintenance of road networks, ensure better coordination between services, cost control, and a reduction in environmental impacts caused by an inappropriate use of de-icers. In order to determine the possible accumulation of snow on pavements, forecasting the road surface temperature (RST) is mandatory. Weather outstations are used along these networks to identify changes in pavement status, and to make forecasts by analyzing the data they provide. Physical numerical models provide such forecasts, and require an accurate description of the infrastructure along with meteorological parameters. The objective of this study was to build a reliable urban RST forecast with a detailed integration of traffic in the Town Energy Balance (TEB) numerical model for winter maintenance. The study first consisted in generating a physical and consistent description of traffic in the model with two approaches to evaluate traffic incidence on RST. Experiments were then conducted to measure the effect of traffic on RST increase with respect to non-circulated areas. These field data were then used for comparison with the forecast provided by this traffic-implemented TEB version.

  2. Accounting for anthropic energy flux of traffic in winter urban road surface temperature simulations with TEB model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, A.; Marchetti, M.; Bouilloud, L.; Martin, E.; Bues, M.; Chancibaut, K.

    2015-06-01

    A forecast of the snowfall helps winter coordination operating services, reducing the cost of the maintenance actions, and the environmental impacts caused by an inappropriate use of de-icing. In order to determine the possible accumulation of snow on pavement, the forecast of the road surface temperature (RST) is mandatory. Physical numerical models provide such forecast, and do need an accurate description of the infrastructure along with meteorological parameters. The objective of this study was to build a reliable urban RST forecast with a detailed integration of traffic in the Town Energy Balance (TEB) numerical model for winter maintenance. The study first consisted in generating a physical and consistent description of traffic in the model with all the energy interactions, with two approaches to evaluate the traffic incidence on RST. Experiments were then conducted to measure the traffic effect on RST increase with respect to non circulated areas. These field data were then used for comparison with forecast provided by this traffic-implemented TEB version.

  3. Remote sensing analysis of a Mediterranean thundersnow and low-altitude heavy snowfall event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Joan; Pineda, Nicolau; Rigo, Tomeu; Aran, Montserrat

    2013-04-01

    On the 8 of March 2010 a heavy snowfall accompanied by lightning occurred over Catalonia (NE Spain), in the Western Mediterranean. Total lightning observations included 101 cloud-to-ground flashes and 169 intra-cloud flashes. Precipitation amounts in 24 h exceeded 100 mm and snow depths over low altitude terrain, where snow is rare, surpassed 30 cm. Snow accumulations collapsed the regional communication transport network and the border with France was closed several hours. Occurrence of wet snow combined with increasingly strong winds caused widespread damage over large forest areas estimated in more than 20 MEur and affected dramatically the high voltage power line distribution grid due to ice accretion, particularly in NE Catalonia where 33 high power electrical towers were knocked down. The meteorological framework at synoptic scale was dominated at low levels by a northern flow over Iberia due to a blocking high pressure system on the British Isles, and an upper level cold trough, which favoured a rapid cyclogenesis over the Mediterranean (9.2 hPa drop in 12 h). Weather radar observations indicated predominance of stratiform precipitation and some low-topped convection, with maximum reflectivities and tops mostly below 40 dBZ and 4 km respectively. The presence of mesoscale gravity waves, caused by wind-shear instability, is suggested as a triggering element for convection and subsequent lightning. Comparison of accumulated precipitation and lightning maps indicated clusters of lightning data unrelated to precipitation maxima. Further investigation of total lightning characteristics and co-located radar observations suggested a triggering effect by tall telecommunication towers inducing cloud-to-ground flashes and subsequent intra-cloud lightning.

  4. Impacts of climatic change and variability on winter-road maintenance in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Noriyuki

    This study links the fields of applied climatology and transportation geography. Important climate variables and threshold values that are related to winter-road maintenance activities are used to derive trends spatially and temporally across all of North America. Historical climate data for the period of 1948--49 through 2003--04 winter seasons are used. The study introduces the concept of a response surface to view climate conditions with jointly-changing mean and variance with respect to the near-zero temperature (NZT) range. It also examines the conditional probability of snowfall events and mean air temperature. An additional analysis is carried out for the duration of spring thaw, which is a critical time period for highway pavement. Changing values of mean air temperature and its relationship with respect to the NZT range reveal a complex behavior in Potential Hazard Days (PHD, the number of days falling within the NZT range). Many climate stations in the Pacific Northwest exhibit negative trends in PHD, while those stations in the High Plains and Canadian Prairies show positive trends in PHD. These contrasting trends are induced by positive trends in the minimum air temperature, and thus it illustrates a complex relationship surrounding the mean and its behavior. The examination of severity and duration of the winter season shows that they are not necessarily correlated and have different impacts for the timing and duration of spring-thaw. A series of exploratory analyses identify potential regions where winter-road maintenance activities will likely be modified due to changing climate. Any change in the magnitude or frequency of snowfall events within a certain temperature range will have significant impacts on the type, magnitude, frequency, and timing of winter-road maintenance activities. The response surface and conditional probability of snowfall events provide additional tools for highway engineers and policy makers to assess their current practices under the conditions that changing climate will bring.

  5. Xanthophyll cycle pigment and antioxidant profiles of winter-red (anthocyanic) and winter-green (acyanic) angiosperm evergreen species.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Nicole M; Burkey, Kent O; Cavender-Bares, Jeannine; Smith, William K

    2012-03-01

    Leaves of many angiosperm evergreen species change colour from green to red during winter, corresponding with the synthesis of anthocyanin pigments. The ecophysiological function of winter colour change (if any), and why it occurs in some species and not others, are not yet understood. It was hypothesized that anthocyanins play a compensatory photoprotective role in species with limited capacity for energy dissipation. Seasonal xanthophyll pigment content, chlorophyll fluorescence, leaf nitrogen, and low molecular weight antioxidants (LMWA) of five winter-red and five winter-green angiosperm evergreen species were compared. Our results showed no difference in seasonal xanthophyll pigment content (V+A+Z g(-1) leaf dry mass) or LMWA between winter-red and winter-green species, indicating red-leafed species are not deficient in their capacity for non-photochemical energy dissipation via these mechanisms. Winter-red and winter-green species also did not differ in percentage leaf nitrogen, corroborating previous studies showing no difference in seasonal photosynthesis under saturating irradiance. Consistent with a photoprotective function of anthocyanin, winter-red species had significantly lower xanthophyll content per unit chlorophyll and less sustained photoinhibition than winter-green species (i.e. higher pre-dawn F(v)/F(m) and a lower proportion of de-epoxidized xanthophylls retained overnight). Red-leafed species also maintained a higher maximum quantum yield efficiency of PSII at midday (F'(v)/F'(m)) during winter, and showed characteristics of shade acclimation (positive correlation between anthocyanin and chlorophyll content, and negative correlation with chlorophyll a/b). These results suggest that the capacity for photon energy dissipation (photochemical and non-photochemical) is not limited in red-leafed species, and that anthocyanins more likely function as an alternative photoprotective strategy to increased VAZ/Chl during winter. PMID:22162871

  6. Relationship between the trajectory of mid-latitude cyclones in the eastern Pacific Ocean and the isotopic composition of snowfall in the Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, K. T.; Sickman, J. O.; Heard, A.; Lucero, D.

    2013-12-01

    Diatoms, preserved in lake sediments, provide a potential archive of snowfall variability in the Sierra Nevada through their sensitivity to changes in water chemistry (a proxy for runoff volume) and by recording the isotopic composition of snow-melt (potentially a proxy for sources of atmospheric moisture). In the Sierra Nevada, we hypothesize that the oxygen isotopic composition of diatom silica is principally controlled by snow and that the isotopic composition of snow varies as a function of the tracks of mid-latitude cyclonic storms in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Snow samples from discrete storms were collected from December 2012 to March 2013 at 2042 meters a.s.l. in Sequoia National Park. The ?18O and ?2H values of the snow samples were measured using a temperature-conversion elemental analyzer coupled to a Delta V isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The isotopic measurements were then coupled to 3, 5 and 7-day air mass back trajectories using the NOAA HYSPLIT model. The measured ?18O values ranged from -17.6 to -7.8 per mil and the ?2H ranged from -119.8 to -73.3 per mil. Both ?18O and ?2H were inversely related to the latitude of the storm origin (R^2 values of 0.67 and 0.57, respectively). Winter storms from the Gulf of Alaska were the most isotopically depleted while storms originating in the subtropical/tropical Pacific were the most isotopically enriched, reflecting the overall latitudinal pattern of ocean-water isotope composition in the Pacific Ocean. Our results suggest that the isotopic composition of Sierra Nevada snowfall is influenced by storm track trajectory and this relationship could be useful in interpreting the climatic significance of ?18O of diatom silica preserved in lake cores.

  7. Correcting basin-scale snowfall in a mountainous basin using a distributed snowmelt model and remote-sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, M.; Wang, L.; Koike, T.; Tsutsui, H.; Xue, Y.; Hirabayashi, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Adequate estimation of the spatial distribution of snowfall is critical in hydrologic modelling. However, this is a well-known problem in estimating basin-scale snowfall, especially in mountainous basins with data scarcity. This study focuses on correction and estimation of this spatial distribution, which considers topographic effects within the basin. A method is proposed that optimises an altitude-based snowfall correction factor (Cfsnow). This is done through multi-objective calibration of a spatially distributed, multilayer energy and water balance-based snowmelt model (WEB-DHM-S) with observed discharge and remotely sensed snow cover data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The Shuffled Complex Evolution-University of Arizona (SCE-UA) automatic search algorithm is used to obtain the optimal value of Cfsnow for minimum cumulative error in discharge and snow cover simulations. Discharge error is quantified by Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency and relative volume deviation, and snow cover error was estimated by pixel-by-pixel analysis. The study region is the heavily snow-fed Yagisawa Basin of the Upper Tone River in northeast Japan. First, the system was applied to one snow season (2002-2003), obtaining an optimised Cfsnow of 0.0007 m-1. For validation purposes, the optimised Cfsnow was implemented to correct snowfall in 2004, 2002 and 2001. Overall, the system was effective, implying improvements in correlation of simulated versus observed discharge and snow cover. The 4 yr mean of basin-average snowfall for the corrected spatial snowfall distribution was 1160 mm (780 mm before correction). Execution of sensitivity runs against other model input and parameters indicated that Cfsnow could be affected by uncertainty in shortwave radiation and setting of the threshold air temperature parameter. Our approach is suitable to correct snowfall and estimate its distribution in poorly gauged basins, where elevation dependence of snowfall amount is strong.

  8. Correcting basin-scale snowfall in a mountainous basin using a distributed snowmelt model and remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, M.; Wang, L.; Koike, T.; Tsutsui, H.; Xue, Y.; Hirabayashi, Y.

    2013-09-01

    Adequate estimation of the spatial distribution of snowfall is critical in hydrologic modeling. However, this is a well-known problem in estimating basin-scale snowfall, especially in mountainous basins with data scarcity. This study focuses on correction and estimation of this spatial distribution, which considers topographic effects within the basin. A method is proposed that optimizes an altitude-based snowfall correction factor (Cfsnow). This is done through multi-objective calibration of a spatially distributed, multilayer energy and water balance-based snowmelt model (WEB-DHM-S) with observed discharge and remotely sensed snow cover data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The Shuffled Complex Evolution - University of Arizona automatic search algorithm is used to obtain the optimal value of Cfsnow for minimum cumulative error in discharge and snow cover simulations. Discharge error is quantified by Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency and relative volume deviation, and snow cover error was estimated by pixel-by-pixel analysis. The study region is the heavily snow-fed Yagisawa Basin of the Upper Tone River in northeast Japan. First, the system was applied to one snow season (2002-2003), obtaining an optimized Cfsnow of 0.0007 m-1. For validation purposes, the optimized Cfsnow was implemented to correct snowfall in 2004, 2002 and 2001. Overall, the system was effective, implying improvements in correlation of simulated vs. observed discharge and snow cover. The 4 yr mean of basin-average snowfall for the corrected spatial snowfall distribution was 1160 mm (780 mm before correction). Execution of sensitivity runs against other model input and parameters indicated that Cfsnow could be affected by uncertainty in shortwave radiation and setting of the threshold air temperature parameter. Our approach is suitable to correct snowfall and estimate its distribution in poorly-gauged basins, where elevation dependence of snowfall amount is strong.

  9. A Physical Model to Determine Snowfall over Land by Microwave Radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, G.; Kim, M.-J.; Weinman, J. A.; Chang, D.-E.

    2003-01-01

    Because microwave brightness temperatures emitted by snow covered surfaces are highly variable, snowfall above such surfaces is difficult to observe using window channels that occur at low frequencies (v less than 100 GHz). Furthermore, at frequencies v less than or equal to 37 GHz, sensitivity to liquid hydrometeors is dominant. These problems are mitigated at high frequencies (v greater than 100 GHz) where water vapor screens the surface emission and sensitivity to frozen hydrometeors is significant. However the scattering effect of snowfall in the atmosphere at those higher frequencies is also impacted by water vapor in the upper atmosphere. This work describes the methodology and results of physically-based retrievals of snow falling over land surfaces. The theory of scattering by randomly oriented dry snow particles at high microwave frequencies appears to be better described by regarding snow as a concatenation of equivalent ice spheres rather than as a sphere with the effective dielectric constant of an air-ice mixture. An equivalent sphere snow scattering model was validated against high frequency attenuation measurements. Satellite-based high frequency observations from an Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-B) instrument during the March 5-6, 2001 New England blizzard were used to retrieve snowfall over land. Vertical distributions of snow, temperature and relative humidity profiles were derived from the Pennsylvania State University-National Center for Atmospheric Research (PSU-NCAR) fifth-generation Mesoscale Model (MM5). Those data were applied and modified in a radiative transfer model that derived brightness temperatures consistent with the AMSU-B observations. The retrieved snowfall distribution was validated with radar reflectivity measurements obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) ground-based radar network.

  10. Strong fluctuation theory for scattering, attenuation, and transmission of microwaves through snowfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Y.-Q.; Kong, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The strong fluctuation theory is applied to the study of the atmospheric snowfall which is modeled as a layer of random discrete-scatterers medium. As functions of size distribution, fractional volume, and radius of scatterers, the relationship is illustrated between the reflectivity factor and precipitation rate, the attenuation of the centimeter and millimeter waves, and the line-of-sight transmission of coherent and incoherent wave components. The theoretical results are shown to match favorably with experimental data.

  11. Rapid heat-flowing surveying of geothermal areas, utilizing individual snowfalls as calorimeters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Donald E.

    1969-01-01

    Local differences in rate of heat transfer in vapor and by conduction through the ground in hot spring areas are difficult and time-consuming to measure quantitatively. Individual heavy snowfalls provide a rapid low-cost means of measuring total heat flow from such ground. After a favorable snowfall (heavy, brief duration, little wind, air temperature near 0C), contacts between snow-covered and snow-free ground are mapped on a suitable base. Each mapped contact, as time elapses after a specific snowfall, is a heat-flow contour representing a decreasing rate of flow. Calibration of each mapped contact or snow line is made possible by the fact that snow remains on insulated surfaces (such as the boardwalks of Yellowstone's thermal areas) long after it has melted on adjacent warm ground. Heat-flow contours mapped to date range from 450 to 5500 ?cal/cm2 sec, or 300 to 3700 times the world average of conductive heat flow. The very high rates of heat flow (2000 to > 10,000 ?cal/cm2 sec) are probably too high, and the lower heat flows determinable by the method (2 sec) may be too low. Values indicated by the method are, however, probably within a factor of 2 of the total conductive and convective heat flow. Thermal anomalies from infrared imagery are similar in shape to heat-flow contours of a test area near Old Faithful geyser. Snowfall calorimetry provides a rapid means for evaluating the imagery and computer-derived products of the infrared data in terms of heat flow.

  12. Monitoring a convective winter episode of the Iberian Peninsula using a multichannel microwave radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascn, E.; Snchez, J. L.; Fernndez-Gonzlez, S.; Hermida, L.; Lpez, L.; Garca-Ortega, E.; Merino, A.

    2015-02-01

    On 4 March 2011, a heavy snowfall episode affected the central Iberian Peninsula. Under the TECOAGUA Project (aimed at the study of winter cloud masses that produce snow in the Guadarrama Mountains near Madrid), measurements using a ground-based multichannel microwave radiometer (MMWR) with vertical range 10 km recorded this episode of winter convection embedded within stratiform precipitation. In contrast to radiosondes, data retrieval from the MMWR has a clear advantage for identifying hazardous weather phenomena of short duration, such as winter convective episodes. From these continuous measurements, we analyzed the behavior of variables such as temperature, surface pressure, relative humidity, liquid water content, liquid water path, water vapor content, and integrated water vapor throughout the day. The continuous measurements also permitted construction of skew-T log-P profiles every 15 min during the convective episode, indicating vertical evolution of an event with an appearance similar to a "zipper" in which temperature and dew point temperature profiles are "closed" from the surface to 400 hPa and "reopen" at the end of the event. Finally, we selected six indices of stability most suitable for the study of winter convection, namely, the Showalter index, low-topped convection index, most unstable lifted index, most unstable convective available potential energy (MUCAPE), convective inhibition, and MUCAPE level of free convection. Each of these indices has been evaluated for their capacity to warn of meteorological conditions leading to a convective heavy snowfall event.

  13. Introducing winter canola to the winter wheat-fallow region of the Pacific Northwest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growers in the low-rainfall, winter wheat-fallow region of the Pacific Northwest are in need of an alternative crop to diversify their markets, manage pests, and increase wheat yields. Winter canola may be a viable crop option for growers in the region. However, agronomic research for winter canol...

  14. A Physical Model to Estimate Snowfall over Land using AMSU-B Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Weinman, J. A.; Olson, W. S.; Chang, D.-E.; Skofronick-Jackson, G.; Wang, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we present an improved physical model to retrieve snowfall rate over land using brightness temperature observations from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Advanced Microwave Sounder Unit-B (AMSU-B) at 89 GHz, 150 GHz, 183.3 +/- 1 GHz, 183.3 +/- 3 GHz, and 183.3 +/- 7 GHz. The retrieval model is applied to the New England blizzard of March 5, 2001 which deposited about 75 cm of snow over much of Vermont, New Hampshire, and northern New York. In this improved physical model, prior retrieval assumptions about snowflake shape, particle size distributions, environmental conditions, and optimization methodology have been updated. Here, single scattering parameters for snow particles are calculated with the Discrete-Dipole Approximation (DDA) method instead of assuming spherical shapes. Five different snow particle models (hexagonal columns, hexagonal plates, and three different kinds of aggregates) are considered. Snow particle size distributions are assumed to vary with air temperature and to follow aircraft measurements described by previous studies. Brightness temperatures at AMSU-B frequencies for the New England blizzard are calculated using these DDA calculated single scattering parameters and particle size distributions. The vertical profiles of pressure, temperature, relative humidity and hydrometeors are provided by MM5 model simulations. These profiles are treated as the a priori data base in the Bayesian retrieval algorithm. In algorithm applications to the blizzard data, calculated brightness temperatures associated with selected database profiles agree with AMSU-B observations to within about +/- 5 K at all five frequencies. Retrieved snowfall rates compare favorably with the near-concurrent National Weather Service (NWS) radar reflectivity measurements. The relationships between the NWS radar measured reflectivities Z(sub e) and retrieved snowfall rate R for a given snow particle model are derived by a histogram matching technique. All of these Z(sub e)-R relationships fall in the range of previously established Z(sub e)-R relationships for snowfall. This suggests that the current physical model developed in this study can reliably estimate the snowfall rate over land using the AMSU-B measured brightness temperatures.

  15. Synoptic variability of extreme snowfall in the St. Elias Mountains, Yukon, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andin, Caroline; Zdanowicz, Christian; Copland, Luke

    2015-04-01

    Glaciers in the Wrangell and St. Elias Mountains (Alaska and Yukon) are presently experiencing some of the highest regional wastage rates worldwide. While the effect of regional temperatures on glacier melt rates in this region has been investigated, comparatively little is known about how synoptic climate variations, for example in the position and strength of the Aleutian Low, modulate snow accumulation on these glaciers. Such information is needed to accurately forecast future wastage rates, glacier-water resource availability, and contributions to sea-level rise. Starting in 2000, automated weather stations (AWS) were established in the central St-Elias Mountains (Yukon) at altitudes ranging from 1190 to 5400 m asl, to collect climatological data in support of glaciological research. These data are the longest continuous year-round observations of surface climate ever obtained from this vast glaciated region. Here we present an analysis of snowfall events in the icefields of the St-Elias Mountains based on a decade-long series of AWS observations of snow accumulation. Specifically, we investigated the synoptic patterns and air mass trajectories associated with the largest snowfall events (> 25 cm/12 hours) that occurred between 2002 and 2012. Nearly 80% of these events occurred during the cold season (October-March), and in 74 % of cases the precipitating air masses originated from the North Pacific south of 50°N. Zonal air mass advection over Alaska, or from the Bering Sea or the Arctic Ocean, was comparatively rare (20%). Somewhat counter-intuitively, dominant surface winds in the St. Elias Mountains during high snowfall events were predominantly easterly, probably due to boundary-layer frictional drag and topographic funneling effects. Composite maps of sea-level pressure and 700 mb winds reveal that intense snowfall events between 2002 and 2012 were associated with synoptic situations characterized by a split, eastwardly-shifted or longitudinally-stretched Aleutian Low (AL) having an easternmost node near the Kenai Peninsula, conditions that drove a strong southwesterly upper airstream across the Gulf of Alaska towards the coast. Situations with a single-node, westerly-shifted AL were comparatively rare. The spatial configuration of the synoptic AL pressure pattern appears to play a greater role in determining snowfall amount in the central St. Elias Mountains than do pressure anomalies within the AL. The estimated snowfall gradient from coastal Alaska to the central St. Elias Mountains during intense snowfall events averaged +2.0 ± 0.7 mm/km (SWE), while the continental-side gradient from the mountains towards the Yukon plateau averaged -3.3 ± 0.9 mm/km (SWE). The findings presented here can better constrain the climatic interpretation of long proxy records of snow accumulation variations developed from glacier cores drilled in the St. Elias Mountains or nearby regions.

  16. Observed changes in extreme winter events in Europe with implication for transport system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajda, A.; Tuomenvirta, H.

    2010-09-01

    Extreme weather events, such as heavy rain and snow events, storms, strong winds, low visibility, hail and extreme temperatures can have negative impact on transport sector, causing severe damages and large economic losses. Weather and climate extremes have been changed over the last few decades and are likely to continue to change in the future due to the projected climate change. Consequences of changes may be both negative and positive for transportation. Extreme winter conditions have implications for the mobility and safety of operations, leading to significant transport disruptions, increased accident risk and costs of damage. In the present study we provide a comprehensive climatology of extreme winter weather events over the European continent relevant to the transport system with primary focus on recent decades (1971-2000). Individual phenomena, such as heavy snowfall, freezing temperatures, strong winds and wind gust and also their combinations, blizzard, freezing rain are considered. The estimation of the recent and past severe events is based on the observed data available from the meteorological services, from the E-OBS dataset and the ERA40 re-analysis dataset. The analysis of the relevant hazardous weather phenomena takes into account the ranking and impact threshold values defined from the viewpoint of different transport modes, such as road, rail, aviation, waterways and light, and infrastructure. A range of statistical methods are applied to define the features of these extremes, such as their probability, changes in the spatial extension, intensity and temporal duration. In order to assess the changes in regional extremes and their effects, a European regionalization regarding similar impacts on transport network is performed. The results of extreme weather and climate events classification are also shown through a set of geographical maps.

  17. The Influence of El Nio and La Nia on Winter Climate Conditions at 138 Ski Resorts in Western North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pidwirny, M. J.; Mei Turney, A.

    2014-12-01

    This research examines the effect El Nio and La Nia have on the climate conditions of 138 ski resorts in western North America. Using ClimateWNA, monthly values for snowfall and degree days < 0C (a measure of winter season coldness) were generated for the mid-slope elevation of the resorts for the primary ski season months of December, January, February, and March. From this data, composite values were computed by summing the four months analyzed for each of the two variables, with the December value coming from the previous year. Regression analysis was used to see if a relationship exists between the two climate variables and a summed composite of the monthly Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) for the same four months. Correlation coefficients were determined by regressing the observations for the time period 1935 to 2012. The correlation coefficients were then mapped using ARCGIS to display possible spatial patterns across the study area. Different map symbols were used to identify whether the correlation coefficient was positive or negative, and whether it fell within four levels of statistical significance: P ? 0.01, P < 0.01, P < 0.001, and P < 0.0001. Correlation coefficients with probability values equal to P ? 0.01 were considered not significant on the map. For the variable degree days < 0C, resorts located in British Columbia, Alberta, Washington, and coastal south Oregon generally had warmer than usual winters during El Nio events and colder winters when SOI values suggested the occurrence of La Nia. A single resort, Ski Apache in New Mexico showed the opposite trend. Snowfall was found to be higher during La Nia events and lower with El Nio events for a number of resorts above 42 N latitude. Further, the strength of these correlations generally decreased with distance from the coast. Resorts in New Mexico and Arizona generally had more snowfall with El Nio and less snowfall with La Nia.

  18. A Winter Survival Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    The article is a condensation of materials from the winter survival unit of a Canadian snow ecology course. The unit covers: cold physiology, frostbite, snowblindness, hypothermia, winter campout, and survival strategies. (SB)

  19. Winter Weather Emergencies

    MedlinePLUS

    Severe winter weather can lead to health and safety challenges. You may have to cope with Cold related health problems, including ... there are no guarantees of safety during winter weather emergencies, you can take actions to protect yourself. ...

  20. River chloride trends in snow-affected urban watersheds: increasing concentrations outpace urban growth rate and are common among all seasons.

    PubMed

    Corsi, Steven R; De Cicco, Laura A; Lutz, Michelle A; Hirsch, Robert M

    2015-03-01

    Chloride concentrations in northern U.S. included in this study have increased substantially over time with average concentrations approximately doubling from 1990 to 2011, outpacing the rate of urbanization in the northern U.S. Historical data were examined for 30 monitoring sites on 19 streams that had chloride concentration and flow records of 18 to 49 years. Chloride concentrations in most studied streams increased in all seasons (13 of 19 in all seasons; 16 of 19 during winter); maximum concentrations occurred during winter. Increasing concentrations during non-deicing periods suggest that chloride was stored in hydrologic reservoirs, such as the shallow groundwater system, during the winter and slowly released in baseflow throughout the year. Streamflow dependency was also observed with chloride concentrations increasing as streamflow decreased, a result of dilution during rainfall- and snowmelt-induced high-flow periods. The influence of chloride on aquatic life increased with time; 29% of sites studied exceeded the concentration for the USEPA chronic water quality criteria of 230 mg/L by an average of more than 100 individual days per year during 2006-2011. The rapid rate of chloride concentration increase in these streams is likely due to a combination of possible increased road salt application rates, increased baseline concentrations, and greater snowfall in the Midwestern U.S. during the latter portion of the study period. PMID:25514764

  1. Summer snowfall on the Greenland Ice Sheet: a study with the updated regional climate model RACMO2.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nol, B.; van de Berg, W. J.; van Meijgaard, E.; Kuipers Munneke, P.; van de Wal, R. S. W.; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2015-02-01

    We discuss Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) surface mass balance (SMB) differences between the updated polar version of the regional climate model RACMO2.3 and the previous version RACMO2.1. Among other revisions, the updated model includes an adjusted rainfall-to-snowfall conversion, producing exclusively snowfall under freezing conditions; this especially favours snowfall in summer when upper air temperatures reach the freezing point. Summer snowfall in the ablation zone of the GrIS has a pronounced effect on melt rates, affecting modelled GrIS SMB in two ways. By covering relatively dark ice with highly reflective fresh snow, these summer snowfall have the potential to locally reduce melt rates in the ablation zone of the GrIS through a snow-albedo-melt feedback. At larger scales, SMB changes are driven by differences in orographic precipitation following a shift in large-scale circulation, in combination with enhanced moisture to precipitation conversion for warm to moderately cold conditions. A detailed comparison of model output with long-term observations from automatic weather stations and ablation stakes in west Greenland shows that the model update generally improves the simulated SMB-elevation gradient as well as the representation of the surface energy balance, although significant biases remain.

  2. Evaluation of the updated regional climate model RACMO2.3: summer snowfall impact on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noël, B.; van de Berg, W. J.; van Meijgaard, E.; Kuipers Munneke, P.; van de Wal, R. S. W.; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2015-09-01

    We discuss Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) surface mass balance (SMB) differences between the updated polar version of the RACMO climate model (RACMO2.3) and the previous version (RACMO2.1). Among other revisions, the updated model includes an adjusted rainfall-to-snowfall conversion that produces exclusively snowfall under freezing conditions; this especially favours snowfall in summer. Summer snowfall in the ablation zone of the GrIS has a pronounced effect on melt rates, affecting modelled GrIS SMB in two ways. By covering relatively dark ice with highly reflective fresh snow, these summer snowfalls have the potential to locally reduce melt rates in the ablation zone of the GrIS through the snow-albedo-melt feedback. At larger scales, SMB changes are driven by differences in orographic precipitation following a shift in large-scale circulation, in combination with enhanced moisture to precipitation conversion for warm to moderately cold conditions. A detailed comparison of model output with observations from automatic weather stations, ice cores and ablation stakes shows that the model update generally improves the simulated SMB-elevation gradient as well as the representation of the surface energy balance, although significant biases remain.

  3. Effects of Snowfall on the Thickness and Stability of Mars' Seasonal Ice Caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayne, P. O.; Paige, D. A.; Aharonson, O.; Schofield, J. T.; Kass, D. M.; Kleinboehl, A.; Heavens, N. G.; Shirley, J. H.; McCleese, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    Seasonal exchange of carbon dioxide between the Martian atmosphere and ice caps is responsible for cyclical variations of ~30% in global atmospheric pressure, as well as for the growth and retreat of the seasonal ice caps. Energy balance and general circulation models have had limited success in reproducing the important aspects of this cycle, largely due to uncertainties in the radiative properties (albedo and emissivity) of the ice caps. Evidence from remote sensing by several different orbital investigations suggests that snowfall consisting primarily of solid CO2 contributes substantial material to the growing seasonal caps, strongly affecting their radiative properties. However, the mass of material deposited as snow, its spatial and temporal variation, and its effect on the energy budget, have all remained uncertain. Using data from the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS), we have quantified and mapped snow cloud formation and surface accumulation based on opacity profiles and calculated infrared cooling rates. We then compared the derived snowfall distribution to seasonal cap thicknesses derived from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) "crossover" data. Large variations in the occurrence, thickness, and timing of snow clouds are observed, with the most extensive and persistent clouds observed over the south polar residual cap (SPRC). We find a strong correlation between clouds, "cold spots" (regions of suppressed thermal emission), and seasonal cap thickness. Furthermore, some of these regions of high snow cloud activity also exhibit high solar albedo in the spring and summer. Together, these results suggest that granular deposits of CO2 snow: 1) are thicker (probably due to lower density) on average than "slab ice" formed by direct vapor deposition; 2) reduce energy loss by thermal emission during the polar night; and 3) reduce energy gain by reflecting solar radiation during spring and summer. As the snowiest place on Mars, the SPRC exhibits all of these properties. An outstanding question is whether the interannual preservation of the SPRC depends on the dominance of the albedo effect over its reduced wintertime emissivity caused by snowfall.

  4. Storage conditions affecting increase in falling number of soft red winter wheat grain and the impact on alpha-amylase activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Falling number (FN) of wheat grain, a measure of preharvest sprouting, tends to increase during storage; however, grain and storage conditions that impact FN changes are poorly understood. Wheat grain samples of varying FN from several cultivars were obtained by malting, by incubating wheat stalks,...

  5. Multisensor Observation and Simulation of Snowfall During the 2003 Wakasa Bay Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Benjamin T.; Petty, Grant W.; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Wang, James W.

    2005-01-01

    This research seeks to assess and improve the accuracy of microphysical assumptions used in satellite passive microwave radiative transfer models and retrieval algorithms by exploiting complementary observations from satellite radiometers, such as TRMM/AMSR-E/GPM, and coincident aircraft instruments, such as the next generation precipitation radar (PR-2). We focus in particular on aircraft data obtained during the Wakasa Bay field experiment, Japan 2003, pertaining to surface snowfall events. The observations of vertical profiles of reflectivity and Doppler-derived fall speeds are used in conjunction with the radiometric measurements to identify 1-D profiles of precipitation particle types, sizes, and concentrations that are consistent with the observations.

  6. Model and observational analysis of the Northeast's regional winter climate and its relationship to the PNA pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notaro, Michael

    A study was performed of the winter climate in the Northeast United States and its relationship to the large-scale circulation. Temperature, radiation, precipitation, and circulation features of the La Nina winter of 1998--1999 were analyzed through observations, NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis, and model simulations by SUNYA regional climate model (RCM). The relationship between the Pacific North American (PNA) pattern and regional winter climate of the Northeast was also investigated. Ten Decembers during the 1980s and 1990s were simulated, five with the most positive and five with the most negative PNA index. RCM reproduced the key climate features of the Northeast during the winter of 1998--1999. The model's circulation closely agreed with the reanalysis, particularly in the mid- and upper-troposphere, and with surface wind observations. Spatial and temporal patterns of temperature and precipitation agreed well with observations, despite a cold bias in the boundary layer (2--3C) and dry bias in precipitation. The use of six-hourly, rather than twelve-hourly, reanalysis boundary conditions improved the diurnal cycle and increased the success at capturing fast-moving systems, such as fronts, and reproducing hourly weather variations. The relationship of the PNA pattern, and other teleconnection patterns, to the Northeast winter climate was investigated. Positive PNA pattern was associated with a stronger, southeastward shifted jet and colder, drier conditions in the Northeast, while mild surface southerlies were more frequent with negative PNA pattern. In the positive PNA simulations, there was a large air-water thermal gradient over the Great Lakes, enhancing evaporation and fluxes of sensible and latent heat. Precipitation and clouds during positive PNA pattern were less abundant across the domain, although lake-effect maxima were well defined. The PDO (Pacific Decadal Oscillation), PNA, and ENSO (El Nino/Southern Oscillation) teleconnections significantly influenced the initial date, final date, and duration of the Great Lakes' ice season. Observed snowfall in the Northeast exhibited a stronger relationship to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) than PNA pattern. Frontal passages were most frequent under a negative PNA and positive NAO pattern, characterized by the jet stream centered over New York. Finally, the tracks of highly positive quasi-geostrophic potential vorticity anomalies were influenced by the modes of PNA and PDO.

  7. WINTER TRITICALE: A FORAGE FOR ALL SEASONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter Triticale (X Triticosecale Wittmack) is usually planted in late summer or early fall, grows vegetatively prior to vernalization by cold winter temperatures and develops reproductively the following spring. Earlier establishment could increase production of high quality forage by extending the...

  8. Winter cover biomass production and soil penetrability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter cover crops can benefit production systems in the southeastern US. Winter cover crops, such as rye (Secale cereale) can reduce weed pressure, increase water infiltration, and improve soil quality over a long period of time. Although several studies have focused on the effects of having a wi...

  9. Numerical diagnosis of a heavy snowfall event in the center of the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascn, E.; Snchez, J. L.; Charalambous, D.; Fernndez-Gonzlez, S.; Lpez, L.; Garca-Ortega, E.; Merino, A.

    2015-02-01

    On 4 March 2011, an exceptionally heavy snowfall event affected the Madrid region on the central Iberian Peninsula. At altitudes of 1200 m, snowfall reached a record of 34 cm in 24 h and produced considerable damage and disruption to electricity distribution and transport systems. Maximum intensity precipitation was identified between 1600 and 1800 UTC. Associated precipitation was particularly intense in the Guadarrama Mountains (at the center of the Peninsula, near Madrid). Analysis of Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite images revealed a dark area, generated by a stratospheric intrusion originating in the Atlantic and reaching the Iberian Peninsula. We studied synoptic conditions and mesoscale factors involved in the event, using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. This permitted analysis of the evolution of the dry intrusion caused by a tropopause fold, its movement, and frontogenesis-related mechanisms during its crossing of the Guadarrama Mountains. The blocking of a wet warm mass at altitude owing to a descent of the tropopause but mainly at low levels because of orographic effects, helped concentrate moisture and generate potential instability (PI). This was subsequently released in deep convection, owing to the formation of frontogenesis.

  10. Microwave Remote Sensing of Lake-Induced Snowfall: Observation, Modeling, and Cloud Microphysical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulie, M. S.; Bennartz, R.

    2006-05-01

    Combined passive and active microwave remote sensing instruments are utilized to study lake-induced snowfall at mid- to high-latitudes. Our research efforts will concentrate on the Baltic Sea region of northern Europe due to the availability of ground-based radar data that complement passive microwave data obtained from satellites. Observations using the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer -" Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) indicate that banded, mesoscale lake effect snowfall structures can be resolved with current passive microwave platforms. When confined to over-water observations, emission from supercooled cloud liquid water in the lower atmosphere produces an elevated brightness temperature signature, as well as noticeable depolarization effects, in various AMSR-E frequencies. In addition to successfully identifying these snow events using satellite data, we will also study whether lake-induced snow produces a consistently measurable microwave scattering signature due to frozen hydrometeors within the snowbands. Using radiative transfer modeling that is built upon a physically-based framework, we will assess cloud microphysical features that affect the proper detection and modeling of lake effect snow, as well as discuss the correction of biases that arise using our modeling methodology.

  11. Can we estimate precipitation rate during snowfall using a scanning terrestrial LiDAR?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeWinter, A. L.; Bair, E. H.; Davis, R. E.; Finnegan, D. C.; Gutmann, E. D.; Dozier, J.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate snowfall measurements in windy areas have proven difficult. To examine a new approach, we have installed an automatic scanning terrestrial LiDAR at Mammoth Mountain, CA. With this LiDAR, we have demonstrated effective snow depth mapping over a small study area of several hundred m2. The LiDAR also produces dense point clouds by detecting falling and blowing hydrometeors during storms. Daily counts of airborne detections from the LiDAR show excellent agreement with automated and manual snow water equivalent measurements, suggesting that LiDAR observations have the potential to directly estimate precipitation rate. Thus, we suggest LiDAR scanners offer advantages over precipitation radars, which could lead to more accurate precipitation rate estimates. For instance, uncertainties in mass-diameter and mass-fall speed relationships used in precipitation radar, combined with low reflectivity of snow in the microwave spectrum, produce errors of up to 3X in snowfall rates measured by radar. Since snow has more backscatter in the near-infrared wavelengths used by LiDAR compared to the wavelengths used by radar, and the LiDAR detects individual hydrometeors, our approach has more potential for directly estimating precipitation rate. A key uncertainty is hydrometeor mass. At our study site, we have also installed a Multi Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) to measure size, fallspeed, and mass of individual hydrometeors. By combining simultaneous MASC and LiDAR measurements, we can estimate precipitation density and rate.

  12. How does the spaceborne radar blind zone affect derived surface snowfall statistics in polar regions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maahn, Maximilian; Burgard, Clara; Crewell, Susanne; Gorodetskaya, Irina V.; Kneifel, Stefan; Lhermitte, Stef; Van Tricht, Kristof; Lipzig, Nicole P. M.

    2014-12-01

    Global statistics of snowfall are currently only available from the CloudSat satellite. But CloudSat cannot provide observations of clouds and precipitation within the so-called blind zone, which is caused by ground-clutter contamination of the CloudSat radar and covers the last 1200 m above land/ice surface. In this study, the impact of the blind zone of CloudSat on derived snowfall statistics in polar regions is investigated by analyzing three 12 month data sets recorded by ground-based Micro Rain Radar (MRR) at the Belgian Princess Elisabeth station in East Antarctica and at Ny-lesund and Longyearbyen in Svalbard, Norway. MRR radar reflectivity profiles are investigated in respect to vertical variability in the frequency distribution, changes in the number of observed snow events, and impacts on total precipitation. Results show that the blind zone leads to reflectivity being underestimated by up to 1 dB, the number of events being altered by 5% and the precipitation amount being underestimated by 9 to 11 percentage points. Besides investigating a blind zone of 1200 m, the impacts of a reduced blind zone of 600 m are also analyzed. This analysis will help in assessing future missions with a smaller blind zone. The reduced blind zone leads to improved representation of mean reflectivity but does not improve the bias in event numbers and precipitation amount.

  13. Remote Measurements of Snowfalls in Wakasa Bay, Japan with Airborne Millimeter- wave Imaging Radiometer and Cloud Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Austin, R.; Liu, G. S.; Racette, P. E.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we explore the application of combined millimeter-wave radar and radiometry to remotely measure snowfall. During January-February of 2003, a field campaign was conducted with the NASA P-3 aircraft in Wakasa Bay, Japan for the validation of the AMSRE microwave radiometer on board the Aqua satellite. Among the suite of instruments-on board the P-3 aircraft were the Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (MIR) from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the 94 GHz Airborne Cloud Radar (ACR) which is co-owned and operated by NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory/University of Massachusetts. MIR is a total power, across-track scanning radiometer that measures radiation at the frequencies of 89, 150, 183.3 +/- 1, 183.3 +/- 3, 183.3 +/-7, 220, and 340 GHz. The MIR has flown many successful missions since its completion in May 1992. ACR is a newer instrument and flew only a few times prior to the Wakasa Bay deployment. These two instruments which are particularly well suited for the detection of snowfall functioned normally during flights over snowfall and excellent data sets were acquired. On January 14, 28, and 29 flights were conducted over snowfall events. The MIR and ACR detected strong signals during periods of snowfall over ocean and land. Results from the analysis of these concurrent data sets show that (1) the scattering of millimeter-wave radiation as detected by the MIR is strongly correlated with ACR radar reflectivity profiles, and (2) the scattering is highly frequency-dependent, the higher the frequency the stronger the scattering. Additionally, the more transparent channels of the MIR (e.g., 89, 150, and 220 GHz) are found to display ambiguous signatures of snowfall because of their exposure to surface features. Thus, the snowfall detection and retrievals of snowfall parameters, such as the ice water path (IWP) and median mass diameter (D(me)) are best conducted at the more opaque channels near 183.3 GHz and 340 GHz. Retrievals of IWP and D(me) using the MIR measurements at 183.3 and 340 GHZ are currently in progress, and the results will be compared with those derived from the ACR reflectivity profiles. Implication from this comparison will be discussed.

  14. Influence of snowfall and melt timing on tree growth in subarctic Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaganov, E. A.; Hughes, M. K.; Kirdyanov, A. V.; Schweingruber, F. H.; Silkin, P. P.

    1999-07-01

    The causes of a reduced sensitivity of high-latitude tree growth to variations in summer temperature for recent decades,, compared to earlier this century, are unknown. This sensitivity change is problematic, in that relationships between tree-ring properties and temperature are widely used for reconstructing past climate. Here we report an analysis of tree-ring and climate data from the forest-tundra zone, in combination with a mechanistic model of tree-ring growth, to argue that an increasing trend of winter precipitation over the past century in many subarctic regions led to delayed snow melt in these permafrost environments. As a result, the initiation of cambial activity (necessary for the formation of wood cells) has been delayed relative to the pre-1960 period in the Siberian subarctic. Since the early 1960s, less of the growth season has been during what had previously been the period of maximal growth sensitivity to temperature. This shift results not only in slower growth, but also in a reduced correlation between growth and temperature. Our results suggest that changes in winter precipitation should be considered in seeking explanations for observed changes in the timing of the `spring greening' of high-latitude forests, and should be taken into account in the study of the role of the Siberian subarctic forest in the global carbon cycle.

  15. Winter and Specialty Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The two main commercial types of wheat are durum (Triticum durum L., 2n=4x= 28) and common (T. aestivum L, 2n=6x=42.) wheat, the latter being the more widely grown. Wheat has three growth habits, namely winter (wheats grown over the winter months that require vernalization and can withstand prolong...

  16. Bison in Winter

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A plains bison in winter at Yellowstone National Park. A bison's hump is useful as a snowplow in winter when the animal swings its head from side to side to brush aside the snow to reach food underneath. The hump is composed of muscles supported by long vertebrae....

  17. Winter Art Education Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jokela, Timo

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe how the Department of Art Education at the University of Lapland in Finland has developed winter art as a method of environmental and community-based art education. I will focus on the Snow Show Winter Art Education Project, a training project funded by the European Union and the State Provincial Office…

  18. Early Childhood: The World in Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Margaret, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Various winter activities and experiences for young children are suggested. These include a getting ready for winter walk in the fall, winter birds, winter clothing, traveling in winter, winter sky watch, and others. (JN)

  19. Radar observation of snowfall from a natural-draft cooling tower plume

    SciTech Connect

    Sauvageot, H.

    1987-11-01

    One of the potential atmospheric effects of energy dissipation at large power parks is the mesoscale modification of the precipitation field. Meteorological conditions favorable for such an influence mainly correspond to naturally precipitating atmospheres and make the identification of the anthropogenic components difficult. In this paper, millimetric Doppler radar data are used in order to analyze the three-dimensional structure of snowfalls associated, in a perturbed environment, with a natural-draft cooling tower park. The plumes observed spread out in the atmospheric boundary layer with spread angles of 15/sup 0/--30/sup 0/ over a distance of more than 20 km. Their main characteristics compare favorably with Koenig's numerical simulation results.

  20. Winter-to-winter variations in indoor radon.

    PubMed

    Mose, D G; Mushrush, G W; Kline, S W

    1989-01-01

    Indoor radon concentrations in northern Virginia and central Maryland show a strong dependence on weather. Winter tends to be associated with higher than average indoor radon, and summer with lower than average. However, compared to the winter of 1986-1987, the winter of 1987-1988 was warmer and drier. Consequently, winter-to-winter indoor radon decreased by about 25%. This winter-to-winter decrease is unexpectedly large, and simulates winter-to-summer variations that have been reported. PMID:2795698

  1. Winter precipitation mesoscale variability and its impact on SO{sub 2} deposition characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Bezukova, N.A.; Postnov, A.A.; Khalili, M.F.

    1996-12-31

    Wet deposition of the atmospheric pollutants in the middle-latitudes is known to occur mainly in the frontal precipitation zones. Since the latter are spatially and temporally inhomogeneous, the spot-like patterns of the pollutant fallouts are common. Thus, knowledge of frontal precipitation mesoscale structure is important for a correct description of the acid deposition patterns. This paper is based on digital radar observations of winter-time frontal precipitation features in 30 frontal zones in the Central European Russia. The observed features were mainly bands and cells. Quantitative characteristics of mesoscale snow intensity variability are given. The major contribution into precipitation amounts are made by intensities of 0.1-0.2 mm/h and 0.5-1.0 mm/h. Other precipitation intensities are less frequent and effective. The relative contributions of different snowfall intensities into total amount of snowfall depend on the type of front and related cyclone trajectory. Based on known theoretical and empirical relations, the data on precipitation variability have been used to assess the spatial inhomogeneity of SO{sub 2} scavenging coefficients and wet deposition rates for typical winter-time frontal situations and SO{sub 2} concentration in the Central European Russia.

  2. Effects of volcanic eruption and global warming on snowfall patterns in the Pacific Northwest: Survey of climate data from 36 stations

    SciTech Connect

    Chatelain, E.E.

    1996-09-01

    Patterns in short term annual snowfall totals and long term glacial mass-balance of glaciers in the Pacific Northwest are affected by episodic global volcanic eruptions and the cyclic appearances of the El Nino oceanic current. A comprehensive analysis of climatic data such as snowfall, snow depth, maximum and minimum temperatures, and total precipitation was undertaken for 18 stations in Oregon and Washington between 1948-1995, and for snow-water data from 18 other stations from 1980-1995. These data were also compared to demonstrate regional variations within a given year. Snowfall maxima and Temperature minima recorded in this period closely followed major volcanic events, whereas Snowfall minima and Temperature maxima recorded in the same period coincided with periodic El Nino patterns. Snowfall totals in El Nino years were uniformly sparse region wide, whereas snowfall patterns in other years displayed some regional variation. Of special interest is the cross-correlation of snow-water and snowfall depth/totals data for the period 1980-1995, which records the patterns before and after the eruptions of Mt. Pinatubo (1991-92).

  3. The Winter Is Past.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Phyllis S.

    1985-01-01

    Teacher, writer, and naturalist Phyllis S. Busch takes the reader on an early evening woodland walk in March, describing the many changes in plants and animals that are perceptible by sight, smell, and sound as nature awakens from winter. (NEC)

  4. Winter Weather Checklists

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Matters What's New Preparation & Planning Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis ... Weather Information on Specific Types of Emergencies Winter Weather Checklists Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ...

  5. Winter and Summer Views of the Salt Lake Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Magnificent views of the region surrounding Salt Lake City, Utah are captured in these winter and summer images from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. Salt Lake City, situated near the southeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake, is host to the 2002 Winter Olympic Games, which open Friday, February 8. Venues for five of the scheduled events are at city (indoor) locations, and five in mountain (outdoor) facilities. All ten can be found within the area contained in these images. Some of the outdoor events take place at Ogden, situated north of Salt Lake City and at Park City, located to the east. Salt Lake City is surrounded by mountains including the Wasatch Range to the east, and the temperature difference between the Great Salt Lake and the overlying atmosphere enhances the moisture content of winter storms. These factors, in combination with natural cloud seeding by salt crystals from the lake, are believed to result in greater snowfall in neighboring areas compared to more distant locales. In addition to the obvious difference in snow cover between the winter and summer views, water color changes in parts of the Great Salt Lake are apparent in these images. The distinctly different coloration between the northern and southern arms of the Great Salt Lake is the result of a rock-filled causeway built in 1953 to support a permanent railroad. The causeway has resulted in decreased circulation between the two arms and higher salinity on the northern side. The southern part of the lake includes the large Antelope Island, and at full resolution a bridge connecting it to the mainland can be discerned. These images are natural color views acquired on February 8, 2001 and June 16, 2001, respectively. Each image represents an area of about 220 kilometers x 285 kilometers. Image courtesy NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL, MISR Team.

  6. American woodcock winter distribution and fidelity to wintering areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diefenbach, D.R.; Derleth, E.L.; Vander Haegen, W.M.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    We examined winter distribution and fidelity to wintering areas for the American Woodcock (Scolopax minor), which exhibits reversed, sexual size dimorphism. Band-recovery data revealed no difference in winter distributions of different age/sex classes for woodcock from the same breeding areas. Similarly, band recoveries from woodcock banded on wintering grounds revealed no difference in fidelity to wintering sites. Males may winter north of a latitude that is optimal for survival based on physiological considerations, but they gain a reproductive advantage if they are among the first to arrive on the breeding grounds. This may explain our results, which indicate males and females have similar distribution patterns during winter.

  7. A physical model to estimate snowfall over land using microwave measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Jeong

    Falling snow is an important component of global precipitation in extratropical regions. This study describes the methodology and results of physically based retrievals of snow falling over land surfaces. Because microwave emitted by snow-covered surfaces are highly variable, precipitating snow above such surfaces is difficult to observe using window channels that occur at low frequencies (nu < 100 GHz). Furthermore, at frequencies nu < 37 GHz, sensitivity to liquid hydrometeors is dominant. These problems are mitigated at high frequencies (nu > 100 GHz) where water vapor screens the surface emission, and sensitivity to frozen hydrometeors is significant. However, the scattering effect of snowfall in the atmosphere at those higher frequencies is also impacted by water vapor and supercooled water in the upper atmosphere. The Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) method was employed to generate the single scattering parameters for nonspherical snow crystals. Comparisons show that neither equivalent spheres nor dielectric mixing theories could account for all measurements. Therefore, this study builds a look up table of the DDA calculated single scattering parameters and employs it in calculations directly. Comparisons show that DDA results calculated in this study were compatible with radar and radiometer measurements for the limited number of examples. The retrieval algorithm relied on a multi-parameter cloud model to generate the vertical structure of a snow cloud, including snow water content, snow particle effective diameter, supercooled water, and water vapor. A MM5 cloud simulation was used to provide useful statistics for generating those cloud characteristics. The snow cloud profiles and surface emissivities were then used in radiative transfer calculations that were optimized against AMSU-B observations at 89, 150, and 183.3 +/- 7, +/- 3, and +/- 1 GHz. Four variables used to adjust the snow water content, relative humidity, cloud liquid water content, and surface emissivity were sufficient to estimate snowfall rates consistent with NWS radar reflectivity measurements during the New England blizzard on March 5, 2001 and to yield a Ze-M relationship that was consistent with others reported in the literature.

  8. Winter mortality and its causes.

    PubMed

    Keatinge, W R

    2002-11-01

    In the 1970s scientific research focussed for the first time on dramatic rises in mortality every winter, and on smaller rises in unusually hot weather. Following the recent decline in influenza epidemics, approximately half of excess winter deaths are due to coronary thrombosis. These peak about two days after the peak of a cold spell. Approximately half the remaining winter deaths are caused by respiratory disease, and these peak about 12 days after peak cold. The rapid coronary deaths are due mainly to haemoconcentration resulting from fluid shifts during cold exposure; some later coronary deaths are secondary to respiratory disease. Heat related deaths often result from haemoconcentration resulting from loss of salt and water in sweat. With the possible exception of some tropical countries, global warming can be expected to reduce cold related deaths more than it increases the rarer heat related deaths, but statistics on populations in different climates suggest that, given time, people will adjust to global warming with little change in either mortality. Some measures may be needed to control insect borne diseases during global warming, but current indications are that cold will remain the main environmental cause of illness and death. Air pollution in cities may also still be causing some deaths, but these are hard to differentiate from the more numerous deaths due to associated cold weather, and clear identification of pollution deaths may need more extensive data than is currently available. PMID:12546188

  9. Rainfall and Snowfall Observations by the Airborne Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar during the Wakasa Bay Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanelli, Simone; Im, Eastwood; Durden, Stephen L.; Meagher, Jonathan P.

    2004-01-01

    Radar data obtained through the NASA/JPL Airborne Precipitation Radar APR-2 during the Wakasa Bay Experiment in January/February 2003 were processed to obtain calibrated reflectivity measurements, rainfall/snowfall velocity measurements, classification of the surface type and detection of the boundaries of the melting layer of precipitation. In this paper the processing approach is described together with an overview of the resulting data quality and known issues.

  10. Weak precipitation, warm winters and springs impact glaciers of south slopes of Mt. Everest (central Himalaya) in the last 2 decades (1994-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, F.; Guyennon, N.; Thakuri, S.; Viviano, G.; Romano, E.; Vuillermoz, E.; Cristofanelli, P.; Stocchi, P.; Agrillo, G.; Ma, Y.; Tartari, G.

    2015-06-01

    Studies on recent climate trends from the Himalayan range are limited, and even completely absent at high elevation (> 5000 m a.s.l.). This study specifically explores the southern slopes of Mt. Everest, analyzing the time series of temperature and precipitation reconstructed from seven stations located between 2660 and 5600 m a.s.l. during 1994-2013, complemented with the data from all existing ground weather stations located on both sides of the mountain range (Koshi Basin) over the same period. Overall we find that the main and most significant increase in temperature is concentrated outside of the monsoon period. Above 5000 m a.s.l. the increasing trend in the time series of minimum temperature (+0.072 °C yr-1) is much stronger than of maximum temperature (+0.009 °C yr-1), while the mean temperature increased by +0.044 °C yr-1. Moreover, we note a substantial liquid precipitation weakening (-9.3 mm yr-1) during the monsoon season. The annual rate of decrease in precipitation at higher elevations is similar to the one at lower elevations on the southern side of the Koshi Basin, but the drier conditions of this remote environment make the fractional loss much more consistent (-47% during the monsoon period). Our results challenge the assumptions on whether temperature or precipitation is the main driver of recent glacier mass changes in the region. The main implications are the following: (1) the negative mass balances of glaciers observed in this region can be more ascribed to a decrease in accumulation (snowfall) than to an increase in surface melting; (2) the melting has only been favoured during winter and spring months and close to the glaciers terminus; (3) a decrease in the probability of snowfall (-10%) has made a significant impact only at glacier ablation zone, but the magnitude of this decrease is distinctly lower than the observed decrease in precipitation; (4) the decrease in accumulation could have caused the observed decrease in glacier flow velocity and the current stagnation of glacier termini, which in turn could have produced more melting under the debris glacier cover, leading to the formation of numerous supraglacial and proglacial lakes that have characterized the region in the last decades.

  11. [Chemical characteristics and insoluble particulates' surface morphology of a snowfall process in the southeastern suburb of Urumqi].

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Wei, Wen-Shou; Cui, Cai-Xia; He, Qing; Wang, Yao

    2014-04-01

    In order to understand the composition and potential pollution of metal elements in precipitation in the southeastern suburb of Urumqi on February 21 to 23, 2012, soluble elements were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS); in addition, energy spectrum and morphological analysis were made for insoluble particulates. The results showed that the content of toxic heavy metals in snowfall was a little high; and the enrichment factors of Se, As and Cd were 124.65, 57.69 and 36.70, respectively, showing a typical coal pollution characteristic. The back trajectory cluster analysis suggested that the coal fly ash of snowfall mainly induced by air masses originated from the coal-fire power plant in the Southwestern sampling site. Morphology analyses conducted under an scan electron microscope demonstrated fly ash coming from coal burning process and irregular mineral are in the majority of insoluble particulates in snowfall, soot aggregates were compact, when the soot was wetted (the hygroscopic behaviour), and the morphology changed further. Insoluble particulates of the southeastern suburb of Urumqi were coal fly ash and insoluble soil minerals. PMID:24946568

  12. Winter Refuge for Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus Mosquitoes in Hanoi during Winter

    PubMed Central

    Tsunoda, Takashi; Cuong, Tran Chi; Dong, Tran Duc; Yen, Nguyen Thi; Le, Nguyen Hoang; Phong, Tran Vu; Minakawa, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    Dengue occurs throughout the year in Hanoi, Vietnam, despite winter low temperatures <10C. During July 2010 to March 2012, we surveyed monthly for Aedes larvae and pupae in 120 houses in 8 Hanoi districts. Aedes albopictus preferred discarded containers in summer and pupal density drastically decreased in winter. Aedes aegypti preferred concrete tanks and this preference increased in winter. Even in winter, the lowest water temperature found in concrete tanks was >14C, exceeding the developmental zero point of Ae. aegypti. Although jars, drums and concrete tanks were the dominant containers previously (199497) in Hanoi, currently the percentage of residences with concrete tanks was still high while jars and drums were quite low. Our study showed that concrete tanks with broken lids allowing mosquitoes access were important winter refuge for Ae. aegypti. We also indicate a concern about concrete tanks serving as foci for Ae. aegypti to expand their distribution in cooler regions. PMID:24752230

  13. Winter refuge for Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes in Hanoi during Winter.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Takashi; Cuong, Tran Chi; Dong, Tran Duc; Yen, Nguyen Thi; Le, Nguyen Hoang; Phong, Tran Vu; Minakawa, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    Dengue occurs throughout the year in Hanoi, Vietnam, despite winter low temperatures <10°C. During July 2010 to March 2012, we surveyed monthly for Aedes larvae and pupae in 120 houses in 8 Hanoi districts. Aedes albopictus preferred discarded containers in summer and pupal density drastically decreased in winter. Aedes aegypti preferred concrete tanks and this preference increased in winter. Even in winter, the lowest water temperature found in concrete tanks was >14°C, exceeding the developmental zero point of Ae. aegypti. Although jars, drums and concrete tanks were the dominant containers previously (1994-97) in Hanoi, currently the percentage of residences with concrete tanks was still high while jars and drums were quite low. Our study showed that concrete tanks with broken lids allowing mosquitoes access were important winter refuge for Ae. aegypti. We also indicate a concern about concrete tanks serving as foci for Ae. aegypti to expand their distribution in cooler regions. PMID:24752230

  14. Winter QPF Sensitivities to Snow Parameterizations and Comparisons to NASA CloudSat Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew; Haynes, John M.; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Lapenta, William M.

    2009-01-01

    Steady increases in computing power have allowed for numerical weather prediction models to be initialized and run at high spatial resolution, permitting a transition from larger scale parameterizations of the effects of clouds and precipitation to the simulation of specific microphysical processes and hydrometeor size distributions. Although still relatively coarse in comparison to true cloud resolving models, these high resolution forecasts (on the order of 4 km or less) have demonstrated value in the prediction of severe storm mode and evolution and are being explored for use in winter weather events . Several single-moment bulk water microphysics schemes are available within the latest release of the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model suite, including the NASA Goddard Cumulus Ensemble, which incorporate some assumptions in the size distribution of a small number of hydrometeor classes in order to predict their evolution, advection and precipitation within the forecast domain. Although many of these schemes produce similar forecasts of events on the synoptic scale, there are often significant details regarding precipitation and cloud cover, as well as the distribution of water mass among the constituent hydrometeor classes. Unfortunately, validating data for cloud resolving model simulations are sparse. Field campaigns require in-cloud measurements of hydrometeors from aircraft in coordination with extensive and coincident ground based measurements. Radar remote sensing is utilized to detect the spatial coverage and structure of precipitation. Here, two radar systems characterize the structure of winter precipitation for comparison to equivalent features within a forecast model: a 3 GHz, Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) based in Omaha, Nebraska, and the 94 GHz NASA CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar, a spaceborne instrument and member of the afternoon or "A-Train" of polar orbiting satellites tasked with cataloguing global cloud characteristics. Each system provides a unique perspective. The WSR-88D operates in a surveillance mode, sampling cloud volumes of Rayleigh scatterers where reflectivity is proportional to the sixth moment of the size distribution of equivalent spheres. The CloudSat radar provides enhanced sensitivity to smaller cloud ice crystals aloft, as well as consistent vertical profiles along each orbit. However, CloudSat reflectivity signatures are complicated somewhat by resonant Mie scattering effects and significant attenuation in the presence of cloud or rain water. Here, both radar systems are applied to a case of light to moderate snowfall within the warm frontal zone of a cold season, synoptic scale storm. Radars allow for an evaluation of the accuracy of a single-moment scheme in replicating precipitation structures, based on the bulk statistical properties of precipitation as suggested by reflectivity signatures.

  15. Synoptic climatological study on precipitation in the Hokuriku District of Central Japan associated with the cold air outbreak in early winter (With Comparison to that in midwinter for the 1983/1984 winter)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kuranoshin; Nishimura, Nanako; Haga, Yuichi

    2014-05-01

    In midwinter, heavy snowfall events are often brought in the Japan Sea side of the Japan Islands by the organized convective snowfall systems in the cold air outbreak situations. However, although the air temperature around the Japan Islands is still rather higher from November to early December ("early winter"), the "wintertime pressure pattern" often appears due to the considerable development of the Siberian high already in that season. Since the seasonal cycle in East Asia shows great variety with many rapid seasonal transitions influenced by the Asian monsoon system, detailed comparison of the daily precipitation climatology and the relating atmospheric processes in the cold air outbreak situations between early winter and midwinter would give us an interesting information for comprehending the overall aspects of such seasonal cycle there. Thus the present study firstly examined the daily precipitation climatology mainly at Takada, as an example for Hokuriku District, during the early to mid- winter of 1970/71 to 2009/10. Then the detailed analyses were made for the 1983/1984 winter (one of the coldest winters during that period) based on the operational meteorological data by JMA, including the ocean buoy data in the southern part of the Japan Sea for evaluating the sensible and the latent heat fluxes from the sea (referred to as SH and LH, respectively). The total precipitation at Takada in early winter was as large as in midwinter, although it was brought mainly not as snow but as rain. Such large climatological value was mainly reflected by the precipitation in the "wintertime pressure pattern" with large contribution of the days with more than 30 mm/day. Interestingly, mean daily precipitation in the "wintertime pressure pattern" in early winter was greater than in midwinter. It is noted that such features were generally found even in the latter half of the analysis period when the warmer winter years appeared more frequently than in the former half. According to the case study for 1983/84 winter, although the "wintertime pressure pattern" appeared rather frequently already from early November, each event of that pattern tended to persist only a several days. In addition, the organization of the shallow convective clouds in the cold air outbreak situation as often found in midwinter was not clearly observed. However, strong cold air advection in early winter as in midwinter over the warm underlying sea, at least in the mature stage of each "wintertime pressure situation", seems to enable the extremely huge amount of LH and the equivalently intense SH to that in midwinter, resulting in the large daily precipitation there through the enhancement of the air mass transformation process over the Japan Sea.

  16. Snowfall measurements using a combination of high spectral resolution lidar and radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eloranta, E.

    2009-04-01

    Aerodynamic flow around gauges and the horizontal transport of windblown snow along the surface produce errors in snowfall measurements. Comparisons between various snow gauges with and without wind shields show as much as as a factor of two difference between measurements(Yang et al., 1999). These problems are particularly significant in the high Arctic where snowfall amount are very low and blowing snow is frequent. This paper describes a lidar-radar based technique to measure the downward flux of snow at an altitude of ~100m. When particles are small compared to the wavelength, radar reflectivity is proportional to the number of snowflakes times the square of the mass of the average snowflake. For particles large compared to the wavelength, the lidar extinction cross section is equal to two times the number of snowflakes times the projected average area of the snowflakes. Donovan and Lammeren(2001) show that the ratio of radar to lidar cross sections can be used to define an effective-diameter-prime, which is proportional to the fourth root of the average mass-squared over the average projected area of the snowflakes. If one assumes a crystal shape this can be converted into an effective-diameter which is the average mass over the average area of the flakes. Multiplying the lidar measured projected area times the effective-diameter yields the mass of the particles. The product of this mass and the radar measured vertical velocity then provides the vertical flux of water. In past work we have tested this measurement approach with data acquired in the high Arctic at Eureka, Canada(80 N,90W). Measurements from the University of Wisconsin High Spectral Resolution Lidar and the NOAA 35 GHz cloud radar were used to compute the time-integrated flux of water at 100 m above the surface. This result was compared with Nipper gauge measurements of snowfall acquired as part of the Eureka weather station record. Best agreement was achieved when the crystals where assumed to be bullet-rosettes. However, because the conversion from effective-diameter-prime to effective-diameter is dependent on the ratio of crystal thickness to diameter, the results are strongly dependent on the assumed crystal morphology. In this paper we describe a lidar-radar measurement approach which derives the crystal aspect ratio through a comparison of the effective-diameter-prime and the radar measured fall velocity. This provides an aspect ratio measurement for each sample volume and removes the need to assume an ice crystal shape. Particle thickness is assumed to be related to particle diameter by a power law (Auer and Veal, 1970). For the purpose of computing radar and lidar cross sections and the particle fall velocity, our model represents snowflakes with an equivalent prolate spheroid having the same mass and cross sectional area as the equivalent snowflake. Fall velocities are related to particle projected area and particle mass using the power-law formulation due to Mitchell(1994). The lidar-radar results show reasonable agreement with the Eureka station record. Limitations of the method include inaccurate retrieval of particle sizes when the size distribution is bi-modal. This occurs when cloud water droplets are present along with snowflakes. Also vertical air motions produce errors in the radar measured fall velocity. This error can be somewhat reduced by time averaging. However, some of vertical motions occur on time scales too long to make this feasible. A technique using the radar spectrum to separate particle motion from air motion is described by Shupe et al.(2008). Initial attempts to apply this technique to our snowfall measurements will be presented. References: Yang, D., B. Goodison, J. Metcalfe, V. Golubev, R. Bates, T. Pangburn, and C. Hanson: 1998, Accuracy of the NWS 8" Standard Nonrecording precipitation Gauge: Results and application of WMO inter-comparison, J. Atmos. Tech., 15, 54-68. Donovan, D, and A. van Lammeren: 2001, Cloud effective particle size and water content profile retrievals using combined lidar and radar observa

  17. A coupled atmosphere-river flow simulation in California during the 1994-1995 winter

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.; Miller, N.L.

    1995-09-28

    Calculation of river flow is important for managing reservoirs and flood forecasting. In the western United States, a complex terrain which is characterized by steep slopes and narrow valleys often cause a substantial rise of river levels in a short period during heavy precipitation events. Since flood control is one of the major tasks of reservoir operation, inaccurate predictions of precipitation and river flow may cause flooding or waste of water resources. Accurate calculations of river flow need accurate liquid water input to the river system at scales of individual watersheds. Precipitation and snowmelt are the most important natural source of water for a river. Reservoir operations significantly affect river flow in the western United States. Factors such as instantaneous soil water content, vegetation cover, terrain slope and ground water table structure are also crucial for river flow calculation. There are two types of precipitation: rain and snowfall. River flow quickly responds to rainfall while snowfall does not directly affect river flow until it melts afterwards. Therefore, these two types of precipitation must be separately provided to the river flow model for correct calculation of river flows. A large portion of snowfall is accumulated at high terrain during winter months in the western United States. Accumulation of snow causes the river flow to respond to instantaneous precipitation with a certain amount of time lag. During warm springs, large amounts of snowmelt can even cause local flooding. Hence, accurate estimation of snowmelt is another important step for calculating river flows. River flows are affected many different atmospheric and land surface processes. Therefore, a well-designed numerical modeling system which includes atmospheric-surface-hydrologic processes and is coupled to large-scale atmospheric data is an important tool for predicting and diagnosing local river flows and water resources.

  18. Improving WEPP Winter Hydrology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Palouse area of the Northwestern Wheat and Range Region in southeastern Washington, northern Idaho, and north-eastern Oregon has serious winter erosion problems due to recurring rainfall and snowmelt runoff on freezing and thawing soil. The Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model has prove...

  19. Winter Here and Now.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlay, Joy

    This book contains a wide variety of winter-oriented ideas and activities that can be adapted to all elementary grade levels and can also be integrated into existing mathematics, science, social studies, and/or art programs. The activities aim to help students develop the skills of observation, appreciation, and problem solving as well as

  20. Mammals in Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wapner, Suzanne

    1985-01-01

    Mammals that tolerate the winter cold and stay active all year exploit the harsh northern climate to their advantage. By simple experiments and observation you can better understand their adaptations which include furry bodies, snowshoe feet, extra blubber, light coloration, and strategically distributed food caches. (JHZ)

  1. Teaching Ecology in Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing: Nature and Learning in the Pacific Northwest, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents ideas for teaching ecology in the winter. Suggested topic areas or units include snow insulation and density, snowflakes and snow crystals, goldenrod galls, bird behavior, survival techniques, bacteriology and decomposition, trees and keying, biomass and productivity, pollution, and soil organisms. A sample student activity sheet is…

  2. The News. Winter 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Ray, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This Winter 2007 quarterly newsletter from the Community College League of California includes: (1) Incumbents: Some Win, Some Lose in November Trustee Elections; (2) Voters Approve $2 Billion in Bonds; (3) Photos from the "Together We Can" conference; (4) Report, Media Criticize Transfer, Completion Rates and Colleges; (5) District Leader…

  3. Winter Playscape Dreaming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Rusty

    2006-01-01

    Winter, like all seasons, adds a new sense of mystery and discovery to the world of young children. It is the time when they can study snowflakes, find icicles, or observe the birds that share their yards. This article presents ideas and suggestions on how to plan a playscape. A playscape is a man-made seasonal playground for young children. It…

  4. Teaching Ecology in Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing: Nature and Learning in the Pacific Northwest, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents ideas for teaching ecology in the winter. Suggested topic areas or units include snow insulation and density, snowflakes and snow crystals, goldenrod galls, bird behavior, survival techniques, bacteriology and decomposition, trees and keying, biomass and productivity, pollution, and soil organisms. A sample student activity sheet is

  5. Carbon dioxide snow clouds on Mars: South polar winter observations by the Mars Climate Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayne, Paul O.; Paige, David A.; Schofield, John T.; Kass, David M.; Kleinbhl, Armin; Heavens, Nicholas G.; McCleese, Daniel J.

    2012-08-01

    We present south polar winter infrared observations from the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) and test three hypotheses concerning the origins of cold spots: regions of anomalously low infrared brightness temperatures, which could be due to enrichment in non-condensable gases, low-emissivity surface frost, or optically thick CO2 clouds. Clouds and surface frosts have been historically difficult to distinguish, but the unique limb sounding capability of MCS reveals extensive tropospheric CO2 clouds over the cold spots. We find that both clouds and surface deposits play a significant role in lowering the infrared emissivity of the seasonal ice cap, and the granular surface deposits are likely emplaced by snowfall. Surface temperatures indicate the polar winter atmosphere is enriched by a factor 5-7 in non-condensable gases relative to the annual average, consistent with earlier gamma ray spectrometer observations, but not enough to account for the low brightness temperatures. A large 500-km diameter cloud with visible optical depth 0.1-1.0 persists throughout winter over the south polar residual cap (SPRC). At latitudes 70-80S, clouds and low emission regions are smaller and shorter-lived, probably corresponding to large-grained channel 1 clouds observed by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter. Snowfall over the SPRC imparts the lowest emissivity in the south polar region, which paradoxically tends to reduce net accumulation of seasonal CO2 by backscattering infrared radiation. This could be compensated by the observed anomalously high summertime albedo of the SPRC, which may be related to small grains preserved in a rapidly formed snow deposit.

  6. The role of snowfall in forming the seasonal ice caps of Mars: Models and constraints from the Mars Climate Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayne, Paul O.; Paige, David A.; Heavens, Nicholas G.

    2014-03-01

    Wintertime observations of the martian polar regions by orbiting spacecraft have provided evidence for carbon dioxide clouds, which measurably alter the polar energy budget and the annual CO2 cycle. However, it has remained unclear whether snowfall contributes a substantial quantity to the accumulating seasonal ice caps. We develop models to constrain precipitation rates based on observations of south polar CO2 clouds by the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS), and show that snowfall contributes between 3% and 20% by mass to the seasonal deposits at latitudes 70-90S. The lower bound on this estimate depends on a minimum effective cloud particle size of ?50 ?m, derived by comparing the short lifetimes (less than a few hours) of some clouds with calculated sedimentation velocities. Separate constraints from infrared spectra measured by MCS suggest CO2 cloud particles in the size range 10-100 ?m. Snow particles are not likely to re-sublime before reaching the surface, because the lower atmosphere in this region remains near saturation with respect to CO2. Based on cooling rate calculations, snowfall originating below 4 km altitude likely contributes a comparable or greater amount to the seasonal deposits than the rest of the atmosphere. Due to the positive feedback between cloud particle number density and radiative cooling, CO2 snow clouds should propagate until they become limited by the availability of condensation nuclei or CO2 gas. Over the south polar residual cap, where cloud activity is greatest, atmospheric radiative cooling rates are high enough to offset heat advected into the polar regions and maintain consistent snowfall. At latitudes of 60-80S the lower atmosphere tends to be slightly sub-saturated and rapid cooling by mechanical lift driven by orography or convergent flow may be required to initiate a snowstorm, consistent with the more sporadic clouds observed by MCS in this region, and their correlation with topographic features. Snowfall and accumulation at the surface are found to be inevitable consequences of the polar energy budget, unless advection redistributes heat from lower latitudes in much greater quantities than expected.

  7. Titan's Winter Polar Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F.M.; Achterberg, R.K.; Schinder, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Titan's atmosphere has provided an interesting study in contrasts and similarities with Earth's. While both have N$_2$ as the dominant constituent and comparable surface pressures $\\sim1$ bar, Titan's next most abundant molecule is CH$_4$, not O$_2$, and the dissociative breakup of CH$_4$ and N$_2$ by sunlight and electron impact leads to a suite of hydrocarbons and nitriles, and ultimately the photochemical smog that enshrouds the moon. In addition, with a 15.95-day period, Titan is a slow rotator compared to Earth. While the mean zonal terrestrial winds are geostrophic, Titan's are mostly cyclostrophic, whipping around the moon in as little as 1 day. Despite the different dynamical regime, Titan's winter stratosphere exhibits several characteristics that should be familiar to terrestrial meteorologists. The cold winter pole near the 1 -mbar level is circumscribed by strong winds (up to 190 m/s) that act as a barrier to mixing with airmasses at lower latitudes. There is evidence of enhancement of several organic species over the winter pole, indicating subsidence. The adiabatic heating associated with this subsidence gives rise to a warm anomaly at the 0.01-mbar level, raising the stratopause two scale heights above its location at equatorial latitudes. Condensate ices have been detected in Titan's lower stratosphere within the winter polar vortex from infrared spectra. Although not always unambiguously identified, their spatial distribution exhibits a sharp gradient, decreasing precipitously across the vortex away from the winter pole. The interesting question of whether there is important heterogeneous chemistry occurring within the polar vortex, analogous to that occurring in the terrestrial polar stratospheric clouds in the ozone holes, has not been addressed. The breakup of Titan's winter polar vortex has not yet been observed. On Earth, the polar vortex is nonlinearly disrupted by interaction with large-amplitude planetary waves. Large-scale waves have not been identified in Titan's atmosphere, so the decay of its polar vortex may be more gradual than on Earth. Observations from an extended Cassini mission into late northern spring should provide critical data indicating whether the vortex goes away with a bang or just fades away.

  8. Deciduous Plant Twigs in Winter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Eloise

    1977-01-01

    Describing, via illustration and narrative, the winter twigs found in the U.S., this article presents a sophisticated discussion of: beech, white ash, aspen, sycamore, red oak, butternut, and other winter twigs. (JC)

  9. Winter Storms and Extreme Cold

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Flow Pandemic Severe Weather Thunderstorms & Lightning Tornadoes Tsunamis Volcanoes Wildfires Winter Storms & Extreme Cold Space Weather Prepare ... Flow Pandemic Severe Weather Thunderstorms & Lightning Tornadoes Tsunamis Volcanoes Wildfires Winter Storms & Extreme Cold Space Weather Main ...

  10. Modeling the winter-spring transition of first-year ice in the western Weddell Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, N.; Hunke, E. C.

    2014-09-01

    A new halodynamic scheme is coupled with the Los Alamos sea ice model to simulate western Weddell Sea ice during the winter-spring transition. One-dimensional temperature and salinity profiles are consistent with the warming and melt stages exhibited in first-year ice cores from the 2004 Ice Station POLarstern (ISPOL) expedition. Results are highly sensitive to snowfall. Simulations which use reanalysis precipitation data do not retain a snow cover beyond mid-December, and the warming transition occurs too rapidly. Model performance is greatly improved by prescribing a snowfall rate based on reported snow thicknesses. During ice growth prior to ISPOL, simulations indicate a period of thick snow and upper ice salinity enrichment. Gravity drainage model parameters impact the simulation immediately, while effects from the flushing parameter (snow porosity at the ice top) appear as the freeboard becomes negative. Simulations using a snow porosity of 0.3, consistent with that of wet snow, agree with salinity observations. The model does not include lateral sources of sea-water flooding, but vertical transport processes account for the high upper-ice salinities observed in ice cores at the start of the expedition. As the ice warms, a fresh upper-ice layer forms, and the high salinity layer migrates downward. This pattern is consistent with the early spring development stages of high-porosity layers observed in Antarctic sea ice that are associated with rich biological production. Future extensions of the model may be valuable in Antarctic ice-biogeochemical applications.

  11. Land Surface and Atmosphere Impacts on Spaceborne Passive Microwave Observations for Snowfall Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraatz, S. G.; Zahraei, A.; Mahani, S. E.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate global estimates of precipitation rate will lead to a better understanding of atmospheric circulation and to improve climatology, weather forecasting and climate change studies. Sensitivity of microwave (MW) range of electromagnetic spectra to ice particles and snowflakes might lead us to use satellite-based MW brightness temperature (BT) to study snowfall. However, MW-BT significantly varies in regards to atmosphere and ground conditions (e.g. land coverage). This study will address how remotely sensed MW-BT measurements are affected by ground surface (snow covered vs. no-snow) and atmospheric conditions (hydrometeors vs. clear sky). The study area is located in the Northeastern United States. Multi MW frequencies from the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), the NOAA-CREST in-situ snow measurement unit - CREST-SAFE (Snow Analysis and Field Experiment), ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology project), etc, will be used to show the interrelationship between satellite and ground-based retrieved MW observations. A statistical model has been developed to classify different ground and atmosphere scenarios, and derive relationships among different MW frequencies from satellite and in-situ measurements given ground and atmospheric conditions. We concluded that 89, 150, and 1837 GHz bands are less affected by atmosphere humidity and can be used to measure ground surface and hydrometeors (e.g. ice particles) impacts. While satellite-based 89 GHz has shown a robust relationship with ground conditions, 68% correlation between satellite and ground observations; 150 and 1837 GHz are 57% and 46% correlated with hydrometeors. Satellite-based 1831 GHz has the weakest correlation with ground and atmosphere conditions.

  12. Comparing Aircraft Observations of Snowfall to Forecasts Using Single or Two Moment Bulk Water Microphysics Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew L.

    2010-01-01

    High resolution weather forecast models with explicit prediction of hydrometeor type, size distribution, and fall speed may be useful in the development of precipitation retrievals, by providing representative characteristics of frozen hydrometeors. Several single or double-moment microphysics schemes are currently available within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, allowing for the prediction of up to three ice species. Each scheme incorporates different assumptions regarding the characteristics of their ice classes, particularly in terms of size distribution, density, and fall speed. In addition to the prediction of hydrometeor content, these schemes must accurately represent the vertical profile of water vapor to account for possible attenuation, along with the size distribution, density, and shape characteristics of ice crystals that are relevant to microwave scattering. An evaluation of a particular scheme requires the availability of field campaign measurements. The Canadian CloudSat/CALIPSO Validation Project (C3VP) obtained measurements of ice crystal shapes, size distributions, fall speeds, and precipitation during several intensive observation periods. In this study, C3VP observations obtained during the 22 January 2007 synoptic-scale snowfall event are compared against WRF model output, based upon forecasts using four single-moment and two double-moment schemes available as of version 3.1. Schemes are compared against aircraft observations by examining differences in size distribution, density, and content. In addition to direct measurements from aircraft probes, simulated precipitation can also be converted to equivalent, remotely sensed characteristics through the use of the NASA Goddard Satellite Data Simulator Unit. Outputs from high resolution forecasts are compared against radar and satellite observations emphasizing differences in assumed crystal shape and size distribution characteristics.

  13. Comparing Physics Scheme Performance for a Lake Effect Snowfall Event in Northern Lower Michigan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew; Arnott, Justin M.

    2012-01-01

    High resolution forecast models, such as those used to predict severe convective storms, can also be applied to predictions of lake effect snowfall. A high resolution WRF model forecast model is provided to support operations at NWS WFO Gaylord, Michigan, using a 12 ]km and 4 ]km nested configuration. This is comparable to the simulations performed by other NWS WFOs adjacent to the Great Lakes, including offices in the NWS Eastern Region who participate in regional ensemble efforts. Ensemble efforts require diversity in initial conditions and physics configurations to emulate the plausible range of events in order to ascertain the likelihood of different forecast scenarios. In addition to providing probabilistic guidance, individual members can be evaluated to determine whether they appear to be biased in some way, or to better understand how certain physics configurations may impact the resulting forecast. On January 20 ]21, 2011, a lake effect snow event occurred in Northern Lower Michigan, with cooperative observing and CoCoRaHS stations reporting new snow accumulations between 2 and 8 inches and liquid equivalents of 0.1 ]0.25 h. The event of January 21, 2011 was particularly well observed, with numerous surface reports available. It was also well represented by the WRF configuration operated at NWS Gaylord. Given that the default configuration produced a reasonable prediction, it is used here to evaluate the impacts of other physics configurations on the resulting prediction of the primary lake effect band and resulting QPF. Emphasis here is on differences in planetary boundary layer and cloud microphysics parameterizations, given their likely role in determining the evolution of shallow convection and precipitation processes. Results from an ensemble of seven microphysics schemes and three planetary boundary layer schemes are presented to demonstrate variability in forecast evolution, with results used in an attempt to improve the forecasts in the 2011 ]2012 lake effect season.

  14. Geometry of Winter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglietti, U. G.; Santini, P. M.

    2015-06-01

    By constructing the Riemann surface controlling the resonance structure of Winter model, we determine the limitations of perturbation theory. We then derive explicit non-perturbative results for various observables in the weak-coupling regime, in which the model has an infinite tower of long-lived resonant states. The problem of constructing proper initial wavefunctions coupled to single excitations of the model is also treated within perturbative and non-perturbative methods.

  15. Winter Wilderness Travel and Camping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilchrest, Norman

    Knowledge and skill are needed for safe and enjoyable travel and camping in the wilderness in winter. The beauty of snow and ice, reduced human use, and higher tolerance of animals toward humans make the wilderness attractive during winter. The uniqueness of winter travel presents several challenges that are not present in other seasons. Safety is…

  16. Retrieval of the ultraviolet effective snow albedo during 1998 winter campaign in the French Alps.

    PubMed

    Smolskaia, Irina; Masserot, Dominique; Lenoble, Jacqueline; Brogniez, Colette; de la Casinire, Alain

    2003-03-20

    A measurement campaign was carried out in February 1998 at Brianon Station, French Alps (44.9 degrees N, 6.65 degrees E, 1,310 m above sea level) in order to determine the UV effective snow albedo that was retrieved for both erythemal and UV-A irradiances from measurements and modeling enhancement factors. The results are presented for 15 cloudless days with very variable snow cover and a small snowfall in the middle of the campaign. Erythemal irradiance enhancement due to the surface albedo was found to decrease from approximately +15% to +5% with a jump to +22% after the snowfall, whereas UV-A irradiance enhancement decreased from 7% to 5% and increased to 15% after the snowfall. Thesevalues fit to effective surface albedos of 0.4, 0.1, and 0.5 for erythemal, and to effective albedos of 0.25, 0.1, and 0.4 for UV-A irradiances, respectively. An unexpected difference between the effective albedos retrieved in the two wavelength regions can be explained by the difference of the environment contribution. PMID:12665089

  17. Total Lightning Observations within Electrified Snowfall using Polarimetric Radar LMA, and NWN Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Bruning, Eric C.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Blakeslee, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Tall structures play and important role in development of winter time lightning flashes.To what extent still needs to be assessed. Tower initiated flashes typically occur as banded structures pass near/overhead. Hi resolution RHI s from polarimetric radar show that the lightning has a tendency to propagate through layered structures within these snowstorms.

  18. Lessons learned from the snow emergency management of winter season 2008-2009 in Piemonte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovo, Dr.; Pelosini, Dr.; Cordola, Dr.

    2009-09-01

    The winter season 2008-2009 has been characterized by heavy snowfalls over the whole Piemonte, in the Western Alps region. The snowfalls have been exceptional because of their earliness, persistence and intensity. The impact on the regional environment and territory has been relevant, also from the economical point of view, as well as the effort of the people involved in the forecasting, prevention and fighting actions. The environmental induced effects have been shown until late spring. The main critical situations have been arisen from the snowfalls earliness in season, the several snow precipitation events over the plains, the big amount of snow accumulation on the ground, as well as the anomaly with respect to the last 30 years climatic trend of snow conditions in Piemonte. The damage costs to the public property caused by the snowfalls have been estimated by the Regione Piemonte to be 470 million euros, giving evidence of the real emergency dimension of the event, never occurred during the last 20 years. The technical support from the Regional Agency for Environmental Protection of Regione Piemonte (Arpa Piemonte) to the emergency management allowed to analyse and highlight the direct and induced effects of the heavy snowfalls, outlining risk scenarios characterized by different space and time scales. The risk scenarios deployment provided a prompt recommendation list, both for the emergency management and for the natural phenomena evolution surveillance planning to assure the people and property safety. The risk scenarios related to the snow emergency are different according to the geographical and anthropic territory aspects. In the mountains, several natural avalanche releases, characterized frequently by a large size, may affect villages, but they may also interrupt the main and secondary roads both down in the valleys and small villages road access, requiring a long time for the complete and safe snow removal and road re-opening. The avalanches often cause the service breakdowns and damage the infrastructures in the built-up areas and the forest heritage. Critical situations due to the snow loading and the snow removal necessity involve all the mountain people directly. Over the plain and the hill country, where the new snow density is generally high giving rise to effects related to its load capacity, to the isolation of little residential and rural settlements, several damages on the secondary road system due to the tree and tree branch falls comes up , together with many public services interruptions (electric power and telephone), warehouse and barn collapses, determining a widespread critical situation. The urban and commuting traffic during the snow emergency enhances the difficulties related to the road management and traffic control over the whole road system in the plains, even with little snow accumulation on the ground. Critical situations may also arise from road frost and intense freezing spells. The operational implementation of the technical rules for the snow emergency management, tested the first time during the event in a dynamic way, pointed out its drawbacks and potentiality, highlighting the "emergency preparedness" importance at different institutional levels, with the population and stakeholder involvement. Some measures have to be especially underlined: the coordination of the snow monitoring over the territory performed by the local operators (avalanche activity and linked damages reporting) and the steps taken locally; the improvement of the tools for the snow pack evaluation to drive the avalanche artificial triggering off, in case of snow mass hazard assessment, and their regional coordination. Moreover it is important to define the standard, acknowledged and accepted prevention actions suited to minimize the heavy snowfall effects, with particular attention to the viableness,to the school systemopening/closing and to the preventive information care in order to avoid the missing perception of the risk. Special attention must be paid to the hydrogeological risk condition ass

  19. Evaluation of DFIR and Bush Gauge Snowfall Measurements at Boreal Forest Sites in Saskatchewan/Canada and Valdai/Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, D.; Smith, C.

    2013-12-01

    Snowfall is important to cold region climate and hydrology including Canada. Large uncertainties and biases exist in gauge-measured precipitation datasets and products. These uncertainties affect important decision-making, water resources assessments, climate change analyses, and calibrations of remote sensing algorithms and land surface models. Efforts have been made at both the national and international levels to quantity the errors/biases in precipitation measurements, such as the WMO Solid Precipitation Intercomparison Experiment (WMO-SPICE). Both the DFIR (double fence intercomparison reference) and the bush shielded gauge have been used in the past as a reference measurement for solid precipitation and they both have been selected as the references for the current SPICE project. Previous analyses of the DFIR vs. the bush (manual Tretyakov) gauge data collected at the Valdai station in Russia suggest DFIR undercatch of snowfall by up to 10% for high wind conditions. A regression relationship between the 2 systems was derived and used for the last WMO gauge intercomparison. Given the importance of the DFIR as the reference for the WMO SPICE project, it is necessary to re-examine and update the DFIR and bush gauge relationship. As part of Canada's contribution to the WMO SPICE project, a test site has been set up by EC/ASTD/WSDT in the southern Canadian Boreal forest to compare the DFIR and bush gauges. This site, called the Caribou Creek, has been installed within a modified young Jack Pine forest stand - north of Prince Albert in Saskatchewan. This study compiles and analyzes recent DFIR and bush gauge data from both the Valdai and Caribou Creek sites. This presentation summarizes the results of data analyses, and evaluates the performance of both references for snowfall observations in the northern regions. The methods and results of this research will directly support the WMO SPICE project and contribute to cold region hydrology and climate change research.

  20. Climate Change Effect and Natural Variability of Spring Precipitation, Snowfall, Snowmelt and Peak Runoff Timings over the Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zampieri, M.; Scoccimarro, E.; Gualdi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding of climatic and hydrological variability over the Alps is important both for natural ecosystems and society. In fact, about 40% of European freshwater is originated there. In this study, we characterize several features of the spring water cycle over the Alps. In particular, we discuss the observed decadal variability and the long-term trend of total precipitation, snowfall, and of the timing of maximum river discharge in the last 150 years. Finally, we provide an interpretation in terms of weather patterns frequency distribution that explains these aspects of the Alpine climate variability.

  1. Winter Frost and Fog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This somewhat oblique blue wide angle Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the 174 km (108 mi) diameter crater, Terby, and its vicinity in December 2004. Located north of Hellas, this region can be covered with seasonal frost and ground-hugging fog, even in the afternoon, despite being north of 30oS. The subtle, wavy pattern is a manifestation of fog.

    Location near: 28oS, 286oW Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  2. [Impact of temperature increment before the over-wintering period on growth and development and grain yield of winter wheat].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang-dong; Zhang, De-qi; Wang, Han-fang; Shao, Yun-hui; Fang, Bao-ting; Lyu, Feng-rong; Yue, Jun-qin; Ma, Fu-ju

    2015-03-01

    The effect of temperature increment before the over-wintering period on winter wheat development and grain yield was evaluated in an artificial climate chamber (TPG 1260, Australia) from 2010 to 2011. Winter wheat cultivar 'Zhengmai 7698' was used in this study. Three temperature increment treatments were involved in this study, i.e., temperature increment last 40, 50 and 60 days, respectively, before the over-wintering period. Control was not treated by temperature increment. The results showed that temperature increment before the over-wintering period had no significant effect on earlier phase spike differentiation. But an apparent effect on later phase spike differentiation was observed. High temperature effect on spike differentiation disappeared when the difference of effective accumulated temperature between the temperature increment treatment and the control was lower than 25 C. However, the foliar age at the jointing stage was enhanced more than 0.8, heading and physiological ripening were advanced 1 day each, when the effective accumulated temperature before the over-wintering period increased 60 C. Higher effective accumulated temperature before the over-wintering period accelerated winter wheat growth and development, which resulted in a short spike differentiation period. Winter wheat was easy to suffer freeze damage, which lead to floret abortion and spikelet death in spring under this situation. Meanwhile, higher effective accumulated temperature before the over-wintering period also reduced, photosynthetic capacity of flag leaf, shortened the grain filling period, and led to wheat grain yield reduction. PMID:26211067

  3. Patterns and controls of winter carbon dioxide emissions and microbial biomass C and N, in two arctic ecosystem types under varying snow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, K. S.

    2003-04-01

    In a manipulative study, snow fences were put up in sub arctic birch forest and dry heath areas near Abisko, Northern Sweden, increasing the natural snow-cover by 5-35 cm. In early March, CO2 fluxes were 77% and 157% higher in the snow-fenced areas (birch and heath, respectively) and in the snowmelt period from April to May there was a tendency to higher effluxes of CO2 in patches with increased snow-cover. This indicates that small increases in winter snowfall have the potential to increase the CO2 loss substantially from these ecosystems during the off-season. CO2 fluxes integrated over 22 days in April-May at the heath site constituted 8% of growing season net primary production at a nearby heath site, showing that a substantial part of annual CO2 loss may take place during the early spring. In a second study, measurements of CO2 emissions from birch and heath ecosystems situated across a natural snow-cover gradient were performed. The results of this study corroborates with the findings in the snow fence study, showing consistently higher fluxes from sites with higher snow depths. The microbial biomass N and P were determined in both studies and were consistently high in the sub nivean soils compared to summer estimates, indicating that microbes provide a significant buffer limiting the export of mineral nutrients in the snowmelt period. A significant decrease in microbial biomass was observed as plots became snow free at the heath site. Although such decreases have been suggested to be caused by freeze-thaw cycles, this cannot fully explain the observation in this study. The first spring thaw and the transition from constant, sub-zero temperatures and a constant water regime to more variable conditions, and possibly increased grazing by nematodes and protozoans, may also play and important role controlling the microbial population during and after snowmelt.

  4. The causes, variability and behavior in a warming world of the coldest winter-season Canadian temperatures and their associated Arctic air masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Jessica

    The coldest surface temperatures in Canada are associated with arctic air masses. These air masses form during the snow-covered and low-sunlight environment of the high-latitude northwest in the winter. This is a region that has been experiencing intense localized surface temperature warming that has not been well captured by climate models. The purpose of this study is to examine the arctic air masses of the region in detail, the larger synoptic context of changes in temperature intensity across Canada in which they are embedded, their thermodynamic properties, and secular changes that they may be experiencing. Trends in temperature anomalies relative to a 30-year running mean were examined, a measure of changes in intensity separated from changes in the mean. Trends towards decreasing variability were found in the southwest and northeast during the winter and trends in increasing variability in the Prairies, southern Ontario and Quebec during mid-winter and in the Atlantic stations in the early-spring. However, no trends were found in the variability of the northwest meaning that even though temperatures inside arctic air masses are increasing, their intensity relative to the 30-year running mean has not been changing. Ninety-three arctic air masses were isolated, using the anomalies calculated relative to the 30-year running mean, and examined. They were found to be deep-layer cold-air damming events associated with an intense anticyclone in the lee of the Canadian Rockies. Using a thermodynamic budget, we find the primary formation mechanism to be diabatic, with cold-air advection playing a small role, counter-balanced by subsidence warming. Sublimation cooling from snowfall at the start of the formation is one of the diabatic processes playing a role. A secular trend toward deeper events was found and decreased radiative cooling during the event, possibly owing to increased cloudiness. In a case study of an intense and long-lived event in February of 1979, moisture was found to be a crucial component in maintaining the cold air. Ice crystals radiatively cool the layer in which they are embedded but settle gravitationally over time or are brought to the ground through subsidence. Moisture must be replenished by precipitation if the air mass is to continue cooling. Moisture transport into the event region is primarily from the upper-levels, 700 hPa, from cyclones in the Gulf of Alaska and from the north over the pole, where it precipitates and falls into the lower-levels.

  5. Variation In Winter Hardiness Among Safflower Accessions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall planted safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) would provide management alternatives in crop rotations and potentially increase yield. Our objective was to relate several fall growth factors to winter survival in a diverse set of 11 safflower accessions grown at Central Ferry and Pullman WA, USA....

  6. The Winter Olympics--On Ice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Barbara G.

    1998-01-01

    Describes several science activities designed around the upcoming Winter Olympics ice skating events which demonstrate the scientific principles behind the sport. Students learn that increasing the pressure on ice will lead to the ice melting, the principle involved in the spinning swing, and the technology of skates and skating outfits. (PVD)

  7. Spirit's Winter Work Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Version

    This portion of an image acquired by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera shows the Spirit rover's winter campaign site. Spirit was parked on a slope tilted 11 degrees to the north to maximize sunlight during the southern winter season. 'Tyrone' is an area where the rover's wheels disturbed light-toned soils. Remote sensing and in-situ analyses found the light-toned soil at Tyrone to be sulfate rich and hydrated. The original picture is catalogued as PSP_001513_1655_red and was taken on Sept. 29, 2006.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project and built the spacecraft. The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment is operated by the University of Arizona, Tucson, and the instrument was built by Ball Aerospace and Technology Corp., Boulder, Colo.

  8. Winter and Summer Views of the Salt Lake Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Magnificent views of the region surrounding Salt Lake City, Utah are captured in these winter and summer images from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. Salt Lake City, situated near the southeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake, is host to the 2002 Winter Olympic Games, which open Friday, February 8. Venues for five of the scheduled events are at city (indoor) locations, and five in mountain (outdoor) facilities. All ten can be found within the area contained in these images. Some of the outdoor events take place at Ogden, situated north of Salt Lake City and at Park City, located to the east.

    Salt Lake City is surrounded by mountains including the Wasatch Range to the east, and the temperature difference between the Great Salt Lake and the overlying atmosphere enhances the moisture content of winter storms. These factors, in combination with natural cloud seeding by salt crystals from the lake, are believed to result in greater snowfall in neighboring areas compared to more distant locales.

    In addition to the obvious difference in snow cover between the winter and summer views, water color changes in parts of the Great Salt Lake are apparent in these images. The distinctly different coloration between the northern and southern arms of the Great Salt Lake is the result of a rock-filled causeway built in 1953 to support a permanent railroad. The causeway has resulted in decreased circulation between the two arms and higher salinity on the northern side. The southern part of the lake includes the large Antelope Island, and at full resolution a bridge connecting it to the mainland can be discerned.

    These images are natural color views acquired on February 8, 2001 and June 16, 2001, during Terra orbits 6093 and 7957, respectively. Each image represents an area of about 220 kilometers x 285 kilometers.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  9. Measuring Transpiration to Regulate Winter Irrigation Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelson, Lisa

    2006-11-08

    Periodic transpiration (monthly sums) in a young loblolly pine plantation between ages 3 and 6 was measured using thermal dissipation probes. Fertilization and fertilization with irrigation were better than irrigation alone in increasing transpiration of young loblolly pines during winter months, apparently because of increased leaf area in fertilized trees. Irrigation alone did not significantly increase transpiration compared with the non-fertilized and non-irrigated control plots.

  10. Yield and yield components of winter-type safflower

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) is a minor yet widely grown oil seed crop adapted to semi-arid regions. The nascent development of winter adapted safflower, allowing fall planting,could substantially increase seed production over spring planting. In this study four winter type safflower accessi...

  11. Tree-ring-based snowfall record for cold arid western Himalaya, India since A.D. 1460

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Ram R.; Bhutiyani, Mahendra R.

    2013-07-01

    Understanding snowfall variations in high-elevation cold arid regions of the western Himalaya is important as snowmelt water is the main source of water to meet the scores of socioeconomic needs. The ground-based observational data, though limited to the last two decades, show decreasing snowfall, raising the concern of looming water scarcity in the region. The tree-ring data of Himalayan cedar from a network of six moisture-stressed sites, where snowmelt water is the sole source of soil moisture for tree growth, were used to develop the November-April snow water equivalent (SWE) extending back to A.D. 1460. The reconstruction revealed persistent severe droughts in the 1780s followed by the 1480s and relatively lesser magnitude droughts in the 1540s-1560s, 1740s, and early twentieth century. The pluvial conditions observed in 1948-1958 and 1986-1996 stand out over any other period of such duration. The SWE reconstruction revealed large-scale spatial coherence with the corresponding month's Palmer Drought Severity Index over the western Himalayan region. Significant relationship observed between SWE reconstruction and January-March Chenab River flow revealed its potential utility in understanding water resource availability in the long-term perspective.

  12. The History of Winter: A Professional Development "Teacher as Scientist" Experiential Learning Field Experience.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrys, R. E.

    2007-12-01

    Each year since 2000, the NASA Goddard History of Winter (HOW) program has allowed teachers to develop an understanding of the consequences of one segment of the orbit of the tilted Earth in its path around the sun. Scientists from NASA, CRREL, and Michigan Tech, supported by the Whiteface Observatory, and the science program at Northwood School in Lake Placid, New York, use the weather and the stratigraphy in the ice and snow, consequences of the weather changes, as "teachers" in a team study of the winter record. Snow in the air and on the ground, ice, its crystal structure and axial orientation, and the ecosystem consequences of snow and ice constitute the weeklong content package. Teacher Professional Development Standards A, B, C, and D were the guiding principles in developing HOW with a content structure formulated as protocols to serve as inserts into lesson plans and inquiry guides. The concept of HOW within NASA is to provide understanding of the WHY? and WHAT? of satellite remote sensing. The content is appropriate ground validation in that techniques presented in protocols are identical to those used by professionals who study snow pits, evaluate features in snow metamorphism, and study thin sections of ice cores drilled in ice caps and glaciers. The HOW Teacher as scientist (TAS) model is a flexible model. HOW enables teachers who are required to use inquiry-based facilitation in the classroom to experience inquiry themselves. Teachers with little science content background as well as those with Science degrees have participated in HOW working alongside of the science team. Accommodations are made through differentiation of instruction so that each group leaves with a mastery of the content that is appropriate for the transition to presentation in the classroom. Each year builds on the previous year ensuring a time series record of the history of winter-by itself a learning experience. An offshoot of the NASA Goddard Center History of Winter (HOW) Program, the Global Snowflake Network (GSN) launched in the winter of 2006 engages an international audience including both formal and informal education groups. The goal is to provide an interactive online data resource in science and education for the characterization of snowfall and related weather systems. The Global Snowflake Network has been accepted as an education outreach proposal for the International Polar Year. Collaborations with other agencies and universities also with IPY-accepted proposals are now underway. HOW and the GSN are endorsed by the NASA Goddard Education Office and many of the Goddard Snow and Ice Team scientists. Together these programs offer a unique, sustainable, and proven outreach for the Cryosphere research program. Snowflakes are like frozen data points, their shape is a record of atmospheric conditions at the time of their formation. The shapes of snowflakes vary over the winter season, with the source of a weather system and over the course of a given snowfall. The objective of the Global Snowflake Network (GSN) is to create a global ground team of teachers, students, families, and researchers worldwide to identify snowflake types during the progress of snowfalls. The result is a unique and scientifically valid resource useful to meteorology and scientific modeling of Earth's Hydrosphere. The Global Snowflake Network (GSN), simultaneously a science program and an education program is presented as a simple, scientifically valid project that has the potential to spread the IPY message and produce a lasting resource to further scientific understanding of Earth's hydrology through the study of snow.

  13. Resilience of an intertidal infaunal community to winter stressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerwing, Travis G.; Drolet, David; Barbeau, Myriam A.; Hamilton, Diana J.; Allen Gerwing, Alyssa M.

    2015-03-01

    Disturbances can greatly affect densities and richness of biological communities. Given the relatively severe winters in Atlantic Canada, including on mudflats in the Bay of Fundy, winter may be an important structuring force for intertidal infaunal communities. Further, stressors may include effects of sub-zero temperatures, temperature variations, wind, different types of ice, scour, and low sediment oxygen content. We sampled 8 major mudflats in the Bay of Fundy (a macrotidal, temperate system) before (December) and after (March) winter over 2 years, to quantify the biotic community as well as various environmental variables related to both sediment conditions and winter severity. Infaunal communities exhibited significant, but small changes over winter. Furthermore, patterns were not consistent among years, sites or taxa: some taxa decreased in density, others did not change, and a few increased. Finally, the over-winter community change was only weakly correlated to winter stressors. Analysis of the multivariate correlation indicated that physical disturbance of sediments (i.e., scour density and depth, variance in drift ice cover) and sediment oxygen content have the potential to influence community structure. Overall, winter (strictly defined as the period with ice present in our study) did not greatly influence the infaunal community, and the mudflat infaunal community appears resilient to winter stressors.

  14. Winter fuels report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-02-03

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s; as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6-10 Day and 30-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

  15. Spirit Scans Winter Haven

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    At least three different kinds of rocks await scientific analysis at the place where NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit will likely spend several months of Martian winter. They are visible in this picture, which the panoramic camera on Spirit acquired during the rover's 809th sol, or Martian day, of exploring Mars (April 12, 2006). Paper-thin layers of light-toned, jagged-edged rocks protrude horizontally from beneath small sand drifts; a light gray rock with smooth, rounded edges sits atop the sand drifts; and several dark gray to black, angular rocks with vesicles (small holes) typical of hardened lava lie scattered across the sand.

    This view is an approximately true-color rendering that combines images taken through the panoramic camera's 753-nanometer, 535-nanometer, and 432-nanometer filters.

  16. Winter climate limits subantarctic low forest growth and establishment.

    PubMed

    Harsch, Melanie A; McGlone, Matt S; Wilmshurst, Janet M

    2014-01-01

    Campbell Island, an isolated island 600 km south of New Zealand mainland (52 °S, 169 °E) is oceanic (Conrad Index of Continentality  =  -5) with small differences between mean summer and winter temperatures. Previous work established the unexpected result that a mean annual climate warming of c. 0.6 °C since the 1940's has not led to upward movement of the forest limit. Here we explore the relative importance of summer and winter climatic conditions on growth and age-class structure of the treeline forming species, Dracophyllum longifolium and Dracophyllum scoparium over the second half of the 20th century. The relationship between climate and growth and establishment were evaluated using standard dendroecological methods and local climate data from a meteorological station on the island. Growth and establishment were correlated against climate variables and further evaluated within hierarchical regression models to take into account the effect of plot level variables. Winter climatic conditions exerted a greater effect on growth and establishment than summer climatic conditions. Establishment is maximized under warm (mean winter temperatures >7 °C), dry winters (total winter precipitation <400 mm). Growth, on the other hand, is adversely affected by wide winter temperature ranges and increased rainfall. The contrasting effect of winter warmth on growth and establishment suggests that winter temperature affects growth and establishment through differing mechanisms. We propose that milder winters enhance survival of seedlings and, therefore, recruitment, but increases metabolic stress on established plants, resulting in lower growth rates. Future winter warming may therefore have complex effects on plant growth and establishment globally. PMID:24691026

  17. Winter Climate Limits Subantarctic Low Forest Growth and Establishment

    PubMed Central

    Harsch, Melanie A.; McGlone, Matt S.; Wilmshurst, Janet M.

    2014-01-01

    Campbell Island, an isolated island 600 km south of New Zealand mainland (52S, 169E) is oceanic (Conrad Index of Continentality ?=??5) with small differences between mean summer and winter temperatures. Previous work established the unexpected result that a mean annual climate warming of c. 0.6C since the 1940's has not led to upward movement of the forest limit. Here we explore the relative importance of summer and winter climatic conditions on growth and age-class structure of the treeline forming species, Dracophyllum longifolium and Dracophyllum scoparium over the second half of the 20th century. The relationship between climate and growth and establishment were evaluated using standard dendroecological methods and local climate data from a meteorological station on the island. Growth and establishment were correlated against climate variables and further evaluated within hierarchical regression models to take into account the effect of plot level variables. Winter climatic conditions exerted a greater effect on growth and establishment than summer climatic conditions. Establishment is maximized under warm (mean winter temperatures >7 C), dry winters (total winter precipitation <400 mm). Growth, on the other hand, is adversely affected by wide winter temperature ranges and increased rainfall. The contrasting effect of winter warmth on growth and establishment suggests that winter temperature affects growth and establishment through differing mechanisms. We propose that milder winters enhance survival of seedlings and, therefore, recruitment, but increases metabolic stress on established plants, resulting in lower growth rates. Future winter warming may therefore have complex effects on plant growth and establishment globally. PMID:24691026

  18. Simulation of Annual Snowfall over Colorado using a High Resolution Mesoscale Model and some Impacts of Climate Change using the Pseudo Climate Simulation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, R.; Grubisic, V.

    2010-09-01

    Snowpack is the most important water resource in the Western United States, and widely regarded as the most vulnerable. It is thus critical to provide water managers the most accurate estimate of how that resource will evolve as the climate changes, including its societal impact. The headwaters region of Colorado that includes, among others, the Colorado, Platte, Rio Grande and Arkansas Rivers, is one of the key source regions for water in the Southwest as ~85% of the streamflow for the Colorado River comes from snowmelt in this region. This region is a particularly difficult area for global climate models to properly handle, with inconsistent snowpack trends in this region from different models despite consistent predictions of temperature increases in this region from all climate models from both the 3rd and 4th IPCC reports (2001, 2007). Observations over the past 50 years in the upper Colorado River basin also reflect the same increasing temperature trend but show no identifiable trends in snowpack (Edwards and Redmond, 2005, Colorado and California Water Users Conference publication). A recent analysis of the 2007 IPCC 4th Assessment global models by Hoerling and Eischeid (2006,Southwest Hydrology) indicates that the combination of increased temperature and weak to no trends in snowfall will produce unprecedented drought conditions over the next 50 years in the Southwest due to a strong increase in evapotranspiration associated with the increased temperature. While the above predictions based on global models indicate dire consequences for the Southwest, it should also be noted that the AR4 indicates that global models typically perform poorly in mountainous regions due to the poor depiction of terrain as well as significant uncertainty in detailed hydrometeorological processes (i.e. cloud/precipitation microphysics, embedded convection and cloud-scale circulations, snowpack and snow ablation, and runoff generation in complex terrain) that currently limit model simulation skill. Colorado's headwaters region is dominated by high altitude snow melt, so climate assessments in this region using global models are particularly uncertain. However, simple increases in model resolution without clearer understanding and representation of hydroclimatic processes controlling water resources will not be sufficient for improving model performance. It is therefore critical to examine climate impacts in this region using detailed coupled atmosphere-hydrology models in order to more realistically simulate precipitation, sublimation, and runoff processes, as well as their impact on managed water systems. This paper will present results of annual snowfall, snow/rain fraction, and snowpack over Colorado based on high resolution simulations of the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model running at 2 km horizontal resolution using the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) as initial and lateral boundary conditions. Four retrospective years will be shown. Results from four Pseudo Climate simulations (Hara et al. 2008) using the four retrospective runs as the baseline will also be presented. These simulations will be forced by the mean monthly climate signal difference between current (1995 - 2004) and 2045-2055 mean conditions. The NCAR CCSM3 A1B AR4 climate runs with 6 hourly output will be used for the current and future climate model forcings.

  19. Impacts of a changing winter precipitation regime on the Great Snowforest of British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsvig, H.; Dery, S. J.; Coxson, D.

    2012-12-01

    Rising air temperatures have profoundly impacted British Columbia (BC) mountain ecosystems, including its Interior Wetbelt. This region supports the sole Interior Temperate Rainforest (ITR), or perhaps more appropriately "snowforest", of North America. This snowforest encompasses about 30,500 km2 and contains Western redcedar (Thuja plicata) and western hemlock (Tsuga heteropylla) in excess of 1500 years old. This region is projected to be one of the more vulnerable biogeoclimatic zones in BC due to forest operations and climate change. Loss of snow as a storage medium has the potential to negatively affect the forest. A decrease in snow water equivalent (SWE) has the potential to decrease soil moisture values; impacts of decreased water availability in this region have the possibility to affect soil moisture storage, vegetative species composition, flora and fauna interdependence, and pathogen outbreaks. Given the projected climate change in high latitude and altitude areas, this project analyzes the contemporary and potential future climate of BC's Interior Wetbelt and explores the possible environmental and ecohydrological impacts of climate change on the snowforest. Models project an increase in air temperature and precipitation but a decrease in snowfall in this region. Analyses of the snow depth, SWE, and temperature from the Upper Fraser River Basin automated snow pillow sites of the BC River Forecast Centre (RFC) were conducted; snow depth, SWE, and temperature were also measured at the field site via automated weather stations and bi-monthly snow surveys. Surveys recorded depth and SWE after observed peak accumulation and continued until snowpack was depleted in 80% of the field site. To determine the influence of precipitation on the soil moisture levels in the ITR, soil moisture and water table levels were measured for the 2011-12 water year in addition to meteorological conditions; snow, spring water, and near surface ground water samples were collected and analyzed for the environmental isotopes of deuterium and oxygen-18. Analysis of the RFC's snow pillow data shows April 1 snow depth has been highly variable in the last 25 years with an overall decline in depth and SWE values. Soil moisture values at the study site were consistent through the year but showed a peak during spring melt and a decline during August, the driest month of summer in this region. Isotopic analysis on the water samples is on-going. The Upper Fraser River Basin experienced an above-normal to record snowpack the winter of 2011-12, thus observed values may not be indicative of the overall trend for this area. Trends in this interconnected ecosystem can assist in determining impacts of climate change to northern climates.

  20. Winter 1994 Weather and Ice Conditions for the Laurentian Great Lakes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assel, Raymond A.; Janowiak, John E.; Young, Sharolyn; Boyce, Daron

    1996-01-01

    The Laurentian Great Lakes developed their most extensive ice cover in over a decade during winter 1994 [December-February 1993/94 (DJF 94)]. Extensive midlake ice formation started the second half of January, about 2 weeks earlier than normal. Seasonal maximal ice extent occurred in early February, again about 2 weeks earlier than normal. Winter 1994 maximum (normal) ice coverages on the Great Lakes are Lake Superior 96% (75%), Lake Michigan 78% (45%), Lake Huron 95% (68%), Lake Erie 97% (90%), and Lake Ontario 67% (24%). Relative to the prior 31 winters (1963-93), the extent of seasonal maximal ice cover for winter 1994 for the Great Lakes taken as a unit is exceeded by only one other winter (1979); however, other winters for individual Great Lakes had similar maximal ice covers.Anomalously strong anticyclonic circulation over the central North Pacific (extending to the North Pole) and an abnormally strong polar vortex centered over northern Hudson Bay combined to produce a circulation pattern that brought frequent air masses of Arctic and polar origin to the eastern third of North America. New records were set for minimum temperatures on 19 January 1994 at many locations in the Great Lakes region. A winter severity index consisting of the average November-February air temperatures averaged over four sites on the perimeter of the Great Lakes (Duluth, Minnesota; Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan; Detroit, Michigan; and Buffalo, New York) indicates that winter 1994 was the 21st coldest since 1779. The unseasonably cold air temperatures produced much-above-normal ice cover over the Great Lakes and created problems for lake shipping. Numerous fatalities and injuries were attributed to the winter weather, which included several ice and snow storms. The much-below-normal air temperatures resulted in enhanced lake-effect snowfall along downwind lake shores, particularly during early to midwinter, prior to extensive ice formation in deeper lake areas. The low air temperatures were also responsible for record 1-day electrical usage and multimillion dollar costs associated with snow removal, U.S. and Canadian Coast Guard operational assistance to ships beset in ice, damage to ships by ice, damage to public and private property by river ice jams and associated flooding, frozen underground water pipes, and damage to fruit trees.

  1. High-Latitude Martian Impact Paleolakes: The Possible Contribution of Snowfall and Ancient Glaciers in the Lacustrine Activity Associated to Argyre and Hellas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrol, N. A.; Grin, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    Hellas and Argyre show impact crater paleolakes, which morphologies could have been associated to glacial and sub-glacial processes, implying the existence of snowfall and ancient glaciers. Some of them show as well a hydrothermal contribution related to the presence of volcanic centers. Additional information is contained in original extended abstract.

  2. Altered snowfall and soil disturbance influence the early life stage transitions and recruitment of a native and invasive grass in a cold desert

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Climate change effects on plants are expected to be primarily mediated through early life stage transitions. Snowfall variability, in particular, may have profound impacts on seedling recruitment; structuring plant populations and communities, especially in mid-latitude systems. These water-limi...

  3. High Resolution Simulation of Annual Snowfall and Snowpack over Colorado and some Impacts of Climate Change using the Pseudo Climate Simulation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, R.; Ikeda, K.; Liu, C.; Gochis, D.; Chen, F.; Tewari, M.; Dudhia, J.; Thompson, G.; Barlage, M. J.; Miller, K.; Yates, D.; Grubisic, V.; Arsenault, K.

    2009-12-01

    Snowpack is the most important water resource in the Western United States, and widely regarded as the most vulnerable. It is thus critical to provide water managers the most accurate estimate of how that resource will evolve as the climate changes, including its societal impact. The headwaters region of Colorado that includes, among others, the Colorado, Platte, Rio Grande and Arkansas Rivers, is one of the key source regions for water in the Southwest as ~85% of the streamflow for the Colorado River comes from snowmelt in this region. This region is a particularly difficult area for global climate models to properly handle, with inconsistent snowpack trends in this region from different models despite consistent predictions of temperature increases in this region from all climate models from both the 3rd and 4th IPCC reports (2001, 2007). A recent analysis of the 2007 IPCC 4th Assessment global models by Hoerling and Eischeid (2006,Southwest Hydrology) indicates that the combination of increased temperature and weak to no trends in snowfall will produce unprecedented drought conditions over the next 50 years in the Southwest due to a strong increase in evapotranspiration associated with the increased temperature. While the above predictions based on global models indicate dire consequences for the Southwest, it should also be noted that the AR4 indicates that global models typically perform poorly in mountainous regions due to the poor depiction of terrain as well as significant uncertainty in detailed hydrometeorological processes (i.e. cloud/precipitation microphysics, embedded convection and cloud-scale circulations, snowpack and snow ablation, and runoff generation in complex terrain) that currently limit model simulation skill. Colorado’s headwaters region is dominated by high altitude snow melt, so climate assessments in this region using global models are particularly uncertain. It is therefore critical to examine climate impacts in this region using detailed coupled atmosphere-hydrology models in order to more realistically simulate precipitation, sublimation, and runoff processes, as well as their impact on managed water systems. This paper will present results of annual snowfall, snow/rain fraction, and snowpack over Colorado based on high resolution simulations of the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model running at 2 km horizontal resolution using the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) as initial and lateral boundary conditions. Four retrospective years will be shown. Results from four Pseudo Climate simulations (Hara et al. 2008) using the four retrospective runs as the baseline will also be presented. These simulations will be forced by the mean monthly climate signal difference between current (1995 - 2004) and 2045-2055 mean conditions. The NCAR CCSM3 A1B AR4 climate runs with 6 hourly output will be used for the current and future climate model forcings.

  4. Winter fuels report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-27

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysis, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s, as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6-10 Day, 30-Day and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

  5. Winter fuels report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: Distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s; as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6-10 Day, 30-Day, and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

  6. Winter fuels report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-04

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition, underground storage, and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. This report will be published weekly by the EIA starting the first week in October 1990 and will continue until the first week in April 1991. The data will also be available electronically after 5:00 p.m. on Thursday during the heating season through the EIA Electronic Publication System (EPUB). 12 tabs.

  7. Winter chemistry of North Slope lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, M. K.; White, D. M.; Lilly, M. R.; Hinzman, L. D.; Hilton, K. M.; Busey, R.

    2006-12-01

    Lakes are important water resources on the North Slope of Alaska. Oilfield exploration and production requires water for facility use as well as transportation. Ice road construction requires winter extraction of fresh water. Since most North Slope lakes are relatively shallow, the quantity and quality of the water remaining under the ice by the end of the winter are important environmental management issues. Currently permits are based on the presence of overwintering fish populations and their sensitivity to low oxygen. Sampling during the winter of 2004 2005 sheds light on the winter chemistry of several pumped lakes and one unpumped lake on the North Slope. Dissolved oxygen, conductivity, pH, and temperature profiles were taken along with ice thickness and water depth measurements. Water samples were extracted and analyzed for Na, Ca, K, Mg, Fe, DOC, and alkalinity in the laboratory. Lake properties, rather than pumping activities, were the best predictors of oxygen depletion, with the highest levels of dissolved oxygen maintained in the lake with the least dissolved constituents. As would be expected, specific conductance increased with depth in the lake while dissolved oxygen decreased with depth. Dissolved oxygen and specific conductance data suggested that the lakes began to refresh in May. The summarized data provides a view of North Slope lake chemistry trends, while continued studies investigate the chemical impacts of pumping North Slope lakes through continued sampling and modeling efforts.

  8. Surgical Risks Associated with Winter Sport Tourism

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Stéphane; Payet, Cécile; Lifante, Jean-Christophe; Polazzi, Stéphanie; Chollet, François; Carty, Matthew J; Duclos, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Background Mass tourism during winter in mountain areas may cause significant clustering of body injuries leading to increasing emergency admissions at hospital. We aimed at assessing if surgical safety and efficiency was maintained in this particular context. Methods We selected all emergency admissions of open surgery performed in French hospitals between 2010 and 2012. After identifying mountain areas with increasing volume of surgical stays during winter, we considered seasonal variations in surgical outcomes using a difference-in-differences study design. We computed multilevel regressions to evaluate whether significant increase in emergency cases had an effect on surgical mortality, complications and length of stay. Clustering effect of patients within hospitals was integrated in analysis and surgical outcomes were adjusted for both patient and hospital characteristics. Results A total of 381 hospitals had 559,052 inpatient stays related to emergency open surgery over 3 years. Compared to other geographical areas, a significant peak of activity was noted during winter in mountainous hospitals (Alps, Pyrenees, Vosges), ranging 6-77% volume increase. Peak was mainly explained by tourists’ influx (+124.5%, 4,351/3,496) and increased need for orthopaedic procedures (+36.8%, 4,731/12,873). After controlling for potential confounders, patients did not experience increased risk for postoperative death (ratio of OR 1.01, 95%CI 0.89-1.14, p = 0.891), thromboembolism (0.95, 0.77-1.17, p = 0.621) or sepsis (0.98, 0.85-1.12, p = 0.748). Length of stay was unaltered (1.00, 0.99-1.02, p = 0.716). Conclusion Surgical outcomes are not compromised during winter in French mountain areas despite a substantial influx of major emergencies. PMID:25970625

  9. Jet streak circulations associated with a moderate snowfall event as diagnosed from NGM model output. [Nested Grid Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocin, Paul J.; Uccellini, Louis W.; Skillman, William C.; Grumm, Richard H.

    1989-01-01

    The existence, evolution, and interaction of vertical circulations associated with upper-level jet streaks during a moderate snowfall event are diagnosed using a nested grid model (NGM). The event itself is overviewed, and the diagnosis of transverse circulations utilizing NGM output is discussed. Focus is placed on the identification of the horizontal and vertical components of the circulation, the temporal evolution of the circulation, and the comparison of the circulation from successive model forecasts. A preliminary analysis of the model data indicates that the horizontal and vertical branches of the circulations can be diagnosed from the model output, and the horizontal and vertical components of the circulations may be identified and followed during an individual forecast cycle.

  10. The effects of phenotypic plasticity on photosynthetic performance in winter rye, winter wheat and Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Keshav; Kane, Khalil; Gadapati, Winona; Webb, Elizabeth; Savitch, Leonid V; Singh, Jasbir; Sharma, Pooja; Sarhan, Fathey; Longstaffe, Fred J; Grodzinski, Bernard; Hner, Norman P A

    2012-02-01

    The contributions of phenotypic plasticity to photosynthetic performance in winter (cv Musketeer, cv Norstar) and spring (cv SR4A, cv Katepwa) rye (Secale cereale) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) cultivars grown at either 20C [non-acclimated (NA)] or 5C [cold acclimated (CA)] were assessed. The 22-40% increase in light-saturated rates of CO? assimilation in CA vs NA winter cereals were accounted for by phenotypic plasticity as indicated by the dwarf phenotype and increased specific leaf weight. However, phenotypic plasticity could not account for (1) the differential temperature sensitivity of CO? assimilation and photosynthetic electron transport, (2) the increased efficiency and light-saturated rates of photosynthetic electron transport or (3) the decreased light sensitivity of excitation pressure and non-photochemical quenching between NA and NA winter cultivars. Cold acclimation decreased photosynthetic performance of spring relative to winter cultivars. However, the differences in photosynthetic performances between CA winter and spring cultivars were dependent upon the basis on which photosynthetic performance was expressed. Overexpression of BNCBF17 in Brassica napus generally decreased the low temperature sensitivity (Q??) of CO? assimilation and photosynthetic electron transport even though the latter had not been exposed to low temperature. Photosynthetic performance in wild type compared to the BNCBF17-overexpressing transgenic B. napus indicated that CBFs/DREBs regulate not only freezing tolerance but also govern plant architecture, leaf anatomy and photosynthetic performance. The apparent positive and negative effects of cold acclimation on photosynthetic performance are discussed in terms of the apparent costs and benefits of phenotypic plasticity, winter survival and reproductive fitness. PMID:21883254

  11. Phenological and ecological consequences of changes in winter snowpack in the Colorado Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inouye, D. W.; McKinney, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    The date the snowpack disappears in spring is an important seasonal event at high altitudes because it determines the beginning of the growing season, which in turn influences the phenology of plant growth and flowering, and thus the availability of these resources for animal consumers. At our study site at 2,900m in the Colorado Rocky Mountains, the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, snowmelt now averages two weeks earlier than in 1975. Earlier snowmelt results from a combination of lower snowfall (38 cm less since 1975), dust storms (increasing in frequency, which reduces the snowpack albedo), and warmer spring temperatures (April minimum temperature has increased 3.1°C since 1973; 2012 April mean temperature was 3.4°C above the 38-year mean). There is also a trend of increasing annual precipitation falling as rain instead of snow. We have monitored flowering phenology and abundance for about 100 species of plants in permanent plots since 1973, and use this record to look at how the change in timing of snowmelt has affected flowering. There is significant variation among years in flowering phenology (e.g., about six weeks difference between 2011 and 2012), with a mid-season decline in flowering abundance becoming apparent as the growing season starts earlier. The date of the last hard frost has not been changing in concert with the earlier growing season, with the consequence that many species now have flower buds developed that are then damaged or killed by frost. In 2012, snowmelt date was 23 April, and frost events on 27 May (-11.7°C) and 11 June (-5.6°C) did significant damage to vegetation of some species and to flower buds of many species. For example, flower abundance of the aspen sunflower Helianthella quinquenervis was 0.002% of 2011's flowering. In the absence of seed production, the demography of some plant species is likely being affected. Some animal species are also being affected by the changes in length and temperature of winter. New species of mammals, birds, and insects have begun to reproduce and overwinter at our field site in the past decade, and hibernators have changed the phenology of emergence from hibernation. Marmots now put on much more fat before entering hibernation. Interactions among species such as pollination and seed predation have also been affected by the changes in snowpack and phenology. For example, although both migratory hummingbirds and their floral resources are changing phenology, they are not changing at the same rate, leading to mismatches in their historical synchrony; hummingbirds now arrive well after their earliest food plant has begun to flower. A similar loss of synchrony appears to be affecting bumble bees as they emerge from overwintering underground, and one of their earliest nectar sources. Seed predator flies and moths, and their parasitoids, are probably being affected by the absence of seeds from species sensitive to frost. Thus many aspects of high-altitude ecological communities are being affected by the ongoing changes in depth of winter snowpack and the timing of its melting.

  12. Greater understanding is need of whether warmer and shorter winters associated with climate change could reduce winter mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebi, Kristie L.

    2015-11-01

    In temperate regions, mortality is higher during winter than summer seasons. Assuming this seasonality is associated with ambient temperature, assessments often conclude that climate change will likely reduce winter mortality. However, there has been limited evaluation of the extent to which cold temperatures are actually the proximal cause of winter mortality in temperate regions. Kinney et al (2015 Environ Res. Lett. 10 064016) analyzed multi-decadal data from 39 cities in the US and France and concluded that cold temperatures are not a primary driver of most winter excess mortality. These analyses suggest that increases in heat-related mortality with climate change will unlikely be balanced by reductions in winter mortality, reinforcing the importance of health systems continuing to ensure adequate health protection against cold temperatures even as temperatures warm.

  13. Winter Anomaly 1982/83 in Comparison with Earlier Winters (1960-82)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lastovicka, J.

    1984-01-01

    The winter anomaly in the winter of 1982/83 is compared with the winter anomalies of earlier winters (1960-82) from the point of view of amplitude and timing of the winter anomaly, and geomagnetic and dynamic activity influences. Some evidence of a negative influence of sudden stratospheric warnings on the winter anomaly is given.

  14. Nutritional condition of Pacific Black Brant wintering at the extremes of their range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, D.D.; Barboza, P.S.; Ward, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    Endogenous stores of energy allow birds to survive periods of severe weather and food shortage during winter. We documented changes in lipid, protein, moisture, and ash in body tissues of adult female Pacific Black Brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) and modeled the energetic costs of wintering. Birds were collected at the extremes of their winter range, in Alaska and Baja California, Mexico. Body lipids decreased over winter for birds in Alaska but increased for those in Baja California. Conversely, body protein increased over winter for Brant in Alaska and remained stable for birds in Baja California. Lipid stores likely fuel migration for Brant wintering in Baja California and ensure winter survival for those in Alaska. Increases in body protein may support earlier reproduction for Brant in Alaska. Predicted energy demands were similar between sites during late winter but avenues of expenditure were different. Birds in Baja California spent more energy on lipid synthesis while those in Alaska incurred higher thermoregulatory costs. Estimated daily intake rates of eelgrass were similar between sites in early winter; however, feeding time was more constrained in Alaska because of high tides and short photoperiods. Despite differences in energetic costs and foraging time, Brant wintering at both sites appeared to be in good condition. We suggest that wintering in Alaska may be more advantageous than long-distance migration if winter survival is similar between sites and constraints on foraging time do not impair body condition. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2006.

  15. The Challenge of Winter Backpacking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanaugh, Michael; Mapes, Alan

    1981-01-01

    Tips and techniques for safe and enjoyable winter backpacking are offered. Topics covered include cross county skis, snowshoes, clothing, footwear, shelter, sleeping bags, food, hypothermia prevention, as well as general rules and requirements. (CO)

  16. Winter Weather Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Matters What's New Preparation & Planning Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis ... Weather Information on Specific Types of Emergencies Winter Weather Frequently Asked Questions Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ...

  17. Lemming winter habitat choice: a snow-fencing experiment.

    PubMed

    Reid, Donald G; Bilodeau, Frdric; Krebs, Charles J; Gauthier, Gilles; Kenney, Alice J; Gilbert, B Scott; Leung, Maria C-Y; Duchesne, David; Hofer, Elizabeth

    2012-04-01

    The insulative value of early and deep winter snow is thought to enhance winter reproduction and survival by arctic lemmings (Lemmus and Dicrostonyx spp). This leads to the general hypothesis that landscapes with persistently low lemming population densities, or low amplitude population fluctuations, have a low proportion of the land base with deep snow. We experimentally tested a component of this hypothesis, that snow depth influences habitat choice, at three Canadian Arctic sites: Bylot Island, Nunavut; Herschel Island, Yukon; Komakuk Beach, Yukon. We used snow fencing to enhance snow depth on 9-ha tundra habitats, and measured the intensity of winter use of these and control areas by counting rodent winter nests in spring. At all three sites, the density of winter nests increased in treated areas compared to control areas after the treatment, and remained higher on treated areas during the treatment. The treatment was relaxed at one site, and winter nest density returned to pre-treatment levels. The rodents' proportional use of treated areas compared to adjacent control areas increased and remained higher during the treatment. At two of three sites, lemmings and voles showed significant attraction to the areas of deepest snow accumulation closest to the fences. The strength of the treatment effect appeared to depend on how quickly the ground level temperature regime became stable in autumn, coincident with snow depths near the hiemal threshold. Our results provide strong support for the hypothesis that snow depth is a primary determinant of winter habitat choice by tundra lemmings and voles. PMID:22042523

  18. Late Holocene Winter Temperatures in the Eastern Mediterranean and Their Relation to Cultural Changes: The Kocain Cave Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mert Gokturk, Ozan; Fleitmann, Dominik; Badertscher, Seraina; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Tuysuz, Okan

    2015-04-01

    Based on the δ13C profile of a stalagmite from the Kocain Cave in southern Turkey, we present a new proxy record of winter temperatures for the Eastern Mediterranean covering the last ~5500 years. In this region precisely-dated and highly-resolved paleoclimate records for the cold season are almost non-existent. The comparison of the most recent part of the Kocain record with meteorological observations reveals that stalagmite δ13C values correlate on decadal scale with the amount of snowfall above the cave, which correlates well with average winter temperatures. More negative δ13C values indicate higher drip rates in the cave due to more efficient infiltration during snowmelt above Kocain Cave, during colder winters. Cold periods in the rest of the record coincide with widespread glacier advances, especially with the ones in the Alps during the Bronze Age - Iron Age transition (from ~1000 BC on) and the late Little Ice Age (~1600 to 1850 AD). This further supports the interpretation of δ13C as a temperature proxy. Although winters during the Medieval Climate Anomaly were not continuously warm in the Eastern Mediterranean, winter warmth in the modern era was matched or exceeded several times in the last ~5700 years, especially during the time of Minoan civilization in Crete (~2700 to 1200 BC). Moreover, we provide evidence for the important role of winter cold and drought in the events leading to the unrest in the 16th century Anatolia during the Ottoman rule. Kocain Cave record brings insights into several climatically-induced historical changes in the Eastern Mediterranean, and has the potential to be a key record in a region with a long and vibrant history.

  19. [Ecological benefits of planting winter rapeseed in western China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-fang; Sun, Wan-cang; Li, Fang; Kang, Yan-li; Pu, Yuan-yuan; Liu, Hong-xia; Zeng, Chao-wu; Fan, Chong-xiu

    2009-03-01

    To evaluate the ecological benefits of popularizing winter rapeseed planting in western China, a wind tunnel simulation test was conducted with four kinds of farmland surface, i.e., winter rapeseed, winter wheat, wheat stubble, and bare field just after spring sowing, collected from west Gansu in April. The results showed that winter rapeseed surface had a roughness of 4.08 cm and a threshold wind velocity as high as 14 m x s(-1), being more effective in blown sand control than the other three surfaces. Under the same experimental conditions, the wind erosion modulus and sand transportation rate of winter rapeseed surface were only 4.1% and 485% of those of the bare field just after spring sowing, and the losses of soil organic matter, alkali-hydrolyzed N, available P and K, catalase, urease, alkaline phosphatase, invertase, and microbes of winter rapeseed surface due to wind erosion were only 1.4%, 5.1%, 1.6%, 2.7%, 9.7%, 3.6%, 6.3%, 6.7% and 1.5% of those of the bare field, respectively. It was suggested that popularizing winter rapeseed planting in west China could control wind erosion, retain soil water and nutrients, increase multicropping index, and improve economic benefits of farmland. In addition, it could benefit the regional desertification control and ecological environment improvement. PMID:19637605

  20. Disturbance to wintering western snowy plovers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, K.D.

    2001-01-01

    In order to better understand the nature of disturbances to wintering snowy plovers, I observed snowy plovers and activities that might disturb them at a beach near Devereux Slough in Santa Barbara, California, USA. Disturbance (activity that caused plovers to move or fly) to wintering populations of threatened western snowy plovers was 16 times higher at a public beach than at protected beaches. Wintering plovers reacted to disturbance at half the distance (???40 m) as has been reported for breeding snowy plovers (???80 m). Humans, dogs, crows and other birds were the main sources of disturbance on the public beach, and each snowy plover was disturbed, on average, once every 27 weekend min and once every 43 weekday min. Dogs off leash were a disproportionate source of disturbance. Plovers were more likely to fly from dogs, horses and crows than from humans and other shorebirds. Plovers were less abundant near trail heads. Over short time scales, plovers did not acclimate to or successfully find refuge from disturbance. Feeding rates declined with increased human activity. I used data from these observations to parameterize a model that predicted rates of disturbance given various management actions. The model found that prohibiting dogs and a 30 m buffer zone surrounding a 400 m stretch of beach provided the most protection for plovers for the least amount of impact to beach recreation.

  1. Temporal trends of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in eggs of coastal and offshore birds: Increasing PFAS levels associated with offshore bird species breeding on the Pacific coast of Canada and wintering near Asia.

    PubMed

    Miller, Aroha; Elliott, John E; Elliott, Kyle H; Lee, Sandi; Cyr, Francois

    2015-08-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) such as perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs) and perfluoroalkyl sulfonates (PFSAs) have become virtually ubiquitous throughout the environment, and, based on laboratory studies, have known toxicological consequences. Various national and international voluntary phase-outs and restrictions on these compounds have been implemented over the last 10 to 15 years. In the present study, we examine trends (1990/1991-2010/2011) in aquatic birds (ancient murrelet, Synthliboramphus antiquus [2009 only]; Leach's storm-petrels, Oceanodroma leucorhoa; rhinoceros auklets, Cerorhinca monocerata; double-crested cormorants, Phalacrocorax auritus; and great blue herons, Ardea herodias). The PFCA, PFSA, and stable isotope (δ(15) N and δ(13) C) data collected from these species from the Pacific coast of Canada, ranging over 20 to 30 years, were used to investigate temporal changes in PFAS coupled to dietary changes. Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), the dominant PFSA compound in all 4 species, increased and subsequently decreased in auklet and cormorant eggs in line with the manufacturing phase-out of PFOS and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), but concentrations continuously increased in petrel eggs and remained largely unchanged in heron eggs. Dominant PFCA compounds varied between the offshore and coastal species, with increases seen in the offshore species and little or variable changes seen in the coastal species. Little temporal change was seen in stable isotope values, indicating that diet alone is not driving observed PFAS concentrations. PMID:25989421

  2. Cloud-resolving simulation of heavy snowfalls in Japan for late December 2005: application of ocean data assimilation to a snow disaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, M.; Ohigashi, T.; Tsuboki, K.; Hirose, N.

    2011-09-01

    We applied eddy-resolving ocean data assimilation to a cloud-resolving atmospheric simulation of a snow disaster and investigated the effects of mesoscale eddies on a heavy snowfall event in late December 2005. Ocean circulation model (OCM) data assimilation reproduces mesoscale sea surface temperature (SST) structures, which are smoothed out by optimum interpolation. This difference between OCM-assimilation and optimum-interpolation SSTs affects the atmospheric boundary layers over oceanic mesoscale eddies. The atmospheric response to the SST difference is complex at the cold tongue in the central Sea of Japan. Although the horizontal wind and turbulent mixing are quickly and locally affected by the low SST, the atmospheric temperature and water amounts are greatly affected by the upstream high SST via the northwesterly advection. In the heavy snowfall areas, the OCM assimilation greatly affects 10-day accumulated precipitation, though it does not largely influence 10-day mean vertical structures of wind, temperature and water vapor. Thus, we should recognize the significance of oceanic mesoscale eddies for heavy snowfall.

  3. Studless Winter Tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company developed a material for Johnson Space Center used as parachute shrouds to soft land the Vikings through the tenuous Martian atmosphere and has been adapted to new radial tire five times stronger than steel. Fiber has a chain-like molecular structure that gives it incredible strength in proportion to its weight. Material is expected to increase tread life by 10,000 miles.

  4. Features of air masses associated with the deposition of Pseudomonas syringae and Botrytis cinerea by rain and snowfall.

    PubMed

    Monteil, Caroline L; Bardin, Marc; Morris, Cindy E

    2014-11-01

    Clarifying the role of precipitation in microbial dissemination is essential for elucidating the processes involved in disease emergence and spread. The ecology of Pseudomonas syringae and its presence throughout the water cycle makes it an excellent model to address this issue. In this study, 90 samples of freshly fallen rain and snow collected from 2005-2011 in France were analyzed for microbiological composition. The conditions favorable for dissemination of P. syringae by this precipitation were investigated by (i) estimating the physical properties and backward trajectories of the air masses associated with each precipitation event and by (ii) characterizing precipitation chemistry, and genetic and phenotypic structures of populations. A parallel study with the fungus Botrytis cinerea was also performed for comparison. Results showed that (i) the relationship of P. syringae to precipitation as a dissemination vector is not the same for snowfall and rainfall, whereas it is the same for B. cinerea and (ii) the occurrence of P. syringae in precipitation can be linked to electrical conductivity and pH of water, the trajectory of the air mass associated with the precipitation and certain physical conditions of the air mass (i.e. temperature, solar radiation exposure, distance traveled), whereas these predictions are different for B. cinerea. These results are pertinent to understanding microbial survival, emission sources and atmospheric processes and how they influence microbial dissemination. PMID:24722630

  5. Trends and Variability of Snowfall and Snow Cover Across North America and Eurasia. Part 1: Data Quality and Homogeneity Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, R. R.; Robinson, D. A.

    2005-12-01

    Snow is a significant factor in the national economy and water resources of Northern Hemisphere countries. Snow also has an important role in climatology, both being an indicator of climatic changes and fluctuations, as well as exerting an influence on climate. The advent of satellite monitoring of weather and climate variables enabled scientists to develop and analyze hemispheric snow cover extent using a consistent database. Unfortunately, the satellite snow record goes back only some four decades. In situ observations of snow cover as well as snowfall are available for some stations going back to the beginning of the twentieth century. The in situ data have been analyzed by several researchers, but these analyses have largely been done independently on regional to national scales. The research presented in this paper and a companion contribution (cf. Robinson and Heim) includes a comprehensive analysis of in situ snow observations from stations in the United States, Canada, and the former Soviet Union using a consistent methodology applied to all of the stations. This paper discusses the first portion of the effort, and includes: 1) data sources and variables analyzed, 2) the quality control that was applied, 3) the snow indices that were computed from the daily snow observations, and 4) the double-mass analysis that was applied to assess the homogeneity of the data. The quality control, inventory, and homogeneity summary statistics were utilized to identify the best stations to use for Northern Hemisphere snow assessments.

  6. Trends and Variability of Snowfall and Snow Cover Across North America and Eurasia. Part 2: What the Data say

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, D. A.; Heim, R. R.

    2005-12-01

    Snow is a significant factor in the national economy and water resources of Northern Hemisphere countries. Snow also has an important role in climatology, both reflecting climatic changes and fluctuations as well as exerting an influence on climate. The advent of satellite monitoring of weather and climate variables enabled scientists to develop and analyze hemispheric snow cover extent using a consistent database. Unfortunately, the satellite snow record goes back only some four decades. In situ observations of snow cover as well as snowfall are available for some stations going back to the beginning of the Twentieth Century. The in situ data have been analyzed by several researchers, but these analyses have largely been done independently on regional to national scales. The research presented in this paper and a companion contribution (cf. Heim and Robinson) includes a comprehensive analysis of in situ snow observations from stations in the United States, Canada, and the Former Soviet Union using a consistent methodology applied to all of the stations. This paper discusses the second portion of the effort, and includes, 1) how the station snow indices were combined into national, continental, and hemispheric aggregates, 2) a summarization of the trends and variability of these aggregate indices over the Twentieth Century, and 3) a comparison of these results to other measures of snow variability derived from national in situ analyses and the hemispheric satellite snow cover record.

  7. Demographic effects of extreme winter weather in the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Altwegg, Res; Roulin, Alexandre; Kestenholz, Matthias; Jenni, Lukas

    2006-08-01

    Extreme weather events can lead to immediate catastrophic mortality. Due to their rare occurrence, however, the long-term impacts of such events for ecological processes are unclear. We examined the effect of extreme winters on barn owl (Tyto alba) survival and reproduction in Switzerland over a 68-year period (approximately 20 generations). This long-term data set allowed us to compare events that occurred only once in several decades to more frequent events. Winter harshness explained 17 and 49% of the variance in juvenile and adult survival, respectively, and the two harshest winters were associated with major population crashes caused by simultaneous low juvenile and adult survival. These two winters increased the correlation between juvenile and adult survival from 0.63 to 0.69. Overall, survival decreased non-linearly with increasing winter harshness in adults, and linearly in juveniles. In contrast, brood size was not related to the harshness of the preceding winter. Our results thus reveal complex interactions between climate and demography. The relationship between weather and survival observed during regular years is likely to underestimate the importance of climate variation for population dynamics. PMID:16645855

  8. Increases in snow season length due to earlier first snow and later last snow dates over north central and northwest Asia during 1937-94

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hengchun

    Trends of the first and last snow date and the length of snow season, defined by the time period between first and last snow date, during 1937-94 over northern Asia are examined. The length of snow season over North Central and Northwest Asia has increased by about 4 days per decade during the study period. The increased length of the snow season is due to earlier snowfalls at the beginning of the season and to a lesser extent to later last snowfalls at the end of the season.

  9. Distribution patterns during winter and fidelity to wintering areas of American black ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diefenbach, D.R.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The distribution patterns during winter of American black ducks were compared among age-sex classes using band recivery data. In addition, fidelity to wintering areas was compared between sexes and between coastal and inland wintering sites.

  10. Reducing winter injury in blackberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the combination of primocane training and cane positioning techniques using a rotatable cross-arm (RCA) trellis system and covering plants in winter to protect buds and canes from freezing temperatures in Apache, Boysenberry, Siskiyou, and Triple Crown blackberry. After tying p...

  11. Registration of Atlantic winter barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atlantic (Reg. No. CV-354, PI 665041), a six-row, hulled winter barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) tested as VA06B-19 by the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station, was released in March 2011. Atlantic was derived from the cross VA97B-176/VA92-44-279 using a modified bulk-breeding method. It was evalua...

  12. Game Plan: Save Lives, Winterize!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children & Animals, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Describes a learning center game which deals with the needs of dogs and cats in the winter months. Provides background information on the potential risks to pets during cold weather. Contains the game cards, along with assembly instructions and the rules of the games. (TW)

  13. Significant Warming of the Antarctic Winter Troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, J.; Lachlan-Cope, T. A.; Colwell, S.; Marshall, G. J.; Connolley, W. M.

    2006-03-01

    We report an undocumented major warming of the Antarctic winter troposphere that is larger than any previously identified regional tropospheric warming on Earth. This result has come to light through an analysis of recently digitized and rigorously quality controlled Antarctic radiosonde observations. The data show that regional midtropospheric temperatures have increased at a statistically significant rate of 0.5° to 0.7° Celcius per decade over the past 30 years. Analysis of the time series of radiosonde temperatures indicates that the data are temporally homogeneous. The available data do not allow us to unambiguously assign a cause to the tropospheric warming at this stage.

  14. [Effects of irrigation time on the growth and water- and fertilizer use efficiencies of winter wheat].

    PubMed

    Dang, Jian-You; Pei, Xue-Xia; Wang, Jiao-Ai; Zhang, Jing; Cao, Yong; Zhang, Ding-Yi

    2012-10-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the effects of irrigation time before wintering (November 10th, November 25th, and December 10th) and in spring (March 5th, re-greening stage; and April 5th, jointing stage) on the growth, dry matter translocation, water use efficiency (WUE), and fertilizer use efficiency (FUE) of winter wheat after returning corn straw into soil. The irrigation time before wintering mainly affected the wheat population size before wintering and at jointing stage, whereas the irrigation time in spring mainly affected the spike number, grain yield, dry matter translocation, WUE, and FUE. The effects of irrigation time before wintering to the yield formation of winter wheat were closely related to the irrigation time in spring. When the irrigation time in spring was at re-greening stage, the earlier the irrigation time before wintering, the larger the spike number and the higher the grain yield; when the irrigation time in spring was at jointing stage, the delay of the irrigation time before wintering made the spike number and grain yield decreased after an initial increase, the kernel number per plant increased, while the 1000-kernel mass was less affected. The WUE, nutrition uptake, and FUE all decreased with the delay of the irrigation time before wintering, but increased with the delay of the irrigation time in spring. Therefore, under the conditions of returning corn straw into soil and sowing when the soil had enough moisture, to properly advance the irrigation time before wintering could make the soil more compacted, promote the tillering and increase the population size before winter, and in combining the increased irrigation at jointing stage, could control the invalid tillering in early spring, increase the spiking rate, obtain stable kernel mass, and thus, increase the WUE and FUE, realizing water-saving and high efficiency for winter wheat cultivation. PMID:23359935

  15. Winter CO2 fluxes in a boreal forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winston, G.C.; Sundquist, E.T.; Stephens, B.B.; Trumbore, S.E.

    1997-01-01

    We measured soil respiration during two winters in three different ecotypes of the BOREAS northern study area. The production of CO2 was continuous throughout the winter and, when totaled for the winter of 1994-1995, was equivalent to the release of ???40-55 g C/m2 from the soil surface. As soils cooled in the early winter, the CO2 production rate decreased in a manner that appeared to be exponentially related to shallow soil temperatures. This exponential relationship was not observed when soils began to warm, possibly indicating that there may be additional or different processes responsible for increased CO2 production during winter warming events. We also measured CO2 concentrations in soil gas and the ??14C of the soil CO2. These measurements show that the CO2 produced in winter is not simply the return to the atmosphere of the carbon fixed during the previous growing season. We suggest that the wintertime production of CO2 originates, at least in part, from the decomposition of old organic carbon stored at depth in the soil.

  16. Wintering ecology of adult North American ospreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Washburn, Brian E.; Martell, Mark S.; Bierregaard, Richard O., Jr.; Henny, Charles J.; Dorr, Brian S.; Olexa, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    North American Ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) typically migrate long distances to their wintering grounds in the tropics. Beyond the general distribution of their wintering range (i.e., the Caribbean, South America, and Central America), very little is known about the wintering ecology of these birds. We used satellite telemetry to determine the duration of wintering period, to examine the characteristics of wintering areas used by Ospreys, and to quantify space use and activity patterns of wintering Ospreys. Adult Ospreys migrated to wintering sites and exhibited high wintering site fidelity among years. Overall, Ospreys wintered on river systems (50.6%) more than on lakes (19.0%), and use of coastal areas was (30.4%) intermediate. Ospreys remained on their wintering grounds for an average of 154 d for males and 167 d for females. Locations of wintering Ospreys obtained via GPS-capable satellite telemetry suggest these birds move infrequently and their movements are very localized (i.e., 2 and 1.4 km2, respectively. Overall, our findings suggest wintering adult North American Ospreys are very sedentary, demonstrating a pattern of limited daily movements and high fidelity to a few select locations (presumably roosts). We suggest this wintering strategy might be effective for reducing the risk of mortality and maximizing energy conservation.

  17. Late Holocene expansion of Siberian dwarf pine (Pinus pumila) in Kamchatka in response to increased snow cover as inferred from lacustrine oxygen-isotope records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammarlund, Dan; Klimaschewski, Andrea; St. Amour, Natalie A.; Andrén, Elinor; Self, Angela E.; Solovieva, Nadia; Andreev, Andrei A.; Barnekow, Lena; Edwards, Thomas W. D.

    2015-11-01

    Holocene records of cellulose-inferred lake-water δ18O were produced from two lake-sediment sequences obtained in central and northern Kamchatka, Russian Far East. The sediment records share similar fluctuations in δ18O during the interval of ca. 5000-800 cal yr BP that correspond (inversely) with changes in K+ content of the GISP2 ice-core record from Greenland, a proxy for the relative strength of the Siberian High, suggesting control by climate-related variability in δ18O of regional precipitation. The dramatic expansion of Siberian dwarf pine (Pinus pumila) in northern and central Kamchatka between ca. 5000 and 4000 cal yr BP, as inferred from pollen records from the same and neighbouring sites, appears to have occurred at a time of progressively declining δ18O of precipitation. This development is interpreted as reflecting a regional cooling trend accompanied by increasing winter snowfall related to gradual intensification of the Siberian High from ca. 5000 to ca. 3000 cal yr BP. A thicker and more long-lasting snow cover can be assumed to have favoured P. pumila by providing a competitive advantage over other boreal and subalpine tree and shrub species in the region during the later part of the Holocene. These results, which are the first of their kind from Kamchatka, provide novel insight into the Holocene vegetational and climatic development in easternmost Asia, as well as long-term atmospheric circulation dynamics in Beringia.

  18. Do High-elevation Lakes Record Variations in Snowfall and Atmospheric Rivers in the Sierra Nevada of California?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashford, J.; Sickman, J. O.; Lucero, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the underlying causes of interannual variation in snowfall and extreme hydrologic events in the Sierra Nevada is hampered by short instrumental records and the difficulties in reconstructing climate using a traditional paleo-record such as tree-rings. New paleo proxies are needed to provide a record of snowpack water content and extreme precipitation events over millennial timescales which can be used to test hypotheses regarding teleconnections between Pacific climate variability and water supply and flood risk in California. In October 2013 we collected sediment cores from Pear Lake (z = 27 m), an alpine lake in Sequoia National Park. The cores were split and characterized by P-wave velocity, magnetic susceptibility and density scanning. Radiocarbon dates indicate that the Pear Lake cores contain a 13.5K yr record of lake sediment. In contrast to other Sierra Nevada lakes previously cored by our group, high-resolution scanning revealed alternating light-dark bands (~1 mm to 5 mm thick) for most of the Pear Lake core length. This pattern was interrupted at intervals by homogenous clasts (up to 75 mm thick) ranging in grain size from sand to gravel up to 1 cm diameter. We hypothesize that the light-dark banding results from the breakdown of persistent hypolimnetic anoxia during spring snowmelt and autumn overturn. We speculate that the thicknesses of the dark bands are controlled by the duration of anoxia which in turn is controlled by the volume and duration of snowmelt. The sand to gravel sized clasts are most likely associated with extreme precipitation events resulting from atmospheric rivers intersecting the southern Sierra Nevada. We hypothesize that centimeter-sized clasts are deposited in large avalanches and that the sands are deposited in large rain events outside of the snow-cover period.

  19. Increasing biomass of winter wheat using sorghum biochars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fertility of highly weathered Ultisols in the southeastern Coastal Plain region of United States is low. In this region, intensive crop production depletes soil nutrients and reduces soil organic carbon (C). Application of crop residues in agricultural systems is an important factor in the contr...

  20. Modeling Winter Cereal Grain Canopies for Legume Intercrop Establishment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As energy demands continue to increase and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) prices remain high, more North Central U.S. corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] producers may convert some production acres to wheat. Including a winter cereal grain in the rotation increases the opportunity ...

  1. Winter cover crops influence Amaranthus palmeri establishment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter cover crops were evaluated for their effect on Palmer amaranth (PA) suppression in cotton production. Cover crops examined included rye and four winter legumes: narrow-leaf lupine, crimson clover, Austrian winter pea, and cahaba vetch. Each legume was evaluated alone and in a mixture with rye...

  2. Leadership in American Indian Communities: Winter Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metoyer, Cheryl A.

    2010-01-01

    Winter lessons, or stories told in the winter, were one of the ways in which tribal elders instructed and directed young men and women in the proper ways to assume leadership responsibilities. Winter lessons stressed the appropriate relationship between the leader and the community. The intent was to remember the power and purpose of that

  3. WINTER FORAGE STRATEGIES TO REDUCE FEED COSTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The major input in a cow/calf operation is cost associated with feeding harvested forages during the winter months. Producers can extend the grazing season into the fall and winter months with decreased dependence on stored or purchased feeds by overseeding winter annuals and (or) stockpiling forage...

  4. Spring grazing winter cereals in Montana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is widely utilized for winter pasture and grain production in the central and southern US plains. Under rainfed conditions in the northern Great Plains, winter wheat seldom achieves adequate fall biomass for grazing, and little is known about the impacts of grazi...

  5. Strong Costs and Benefits of Winter Acclimatization in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Schou, Mads Fristrup; Loeschcke, Volker; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard

    2015-01-01

    Studies on thermal acclimation in insects are often performed on animals acclimated in the laboratory under conditions that are not ecologically relevant. Costs and benefits of acclimation responses under such conditions may not reflect costs and benefits in natural populations subjected to daily and seasonal temperature fluctuations. Here we estimated costs and benefits in thermal tolerance limits in relation to winter acclimatization of Drosophila melanogaster. We sampled flies from a natural habitat during winter in Denmark (field flies) and compared heat and cold tolerance of these to that of flies collected from the same natural population, but acclimated to 25 °C or 13 °C in the laboratory (laboratory flies). We further obtained thermal performance curves for egg-to-adult viability of field and laboratory (25 °C) flies, to estimate possible cross-generational effects of acclimation. We found much higher cold tolerance and a lowered heat tolerance in field flies compared to laboratory flies reared at 25 °C. Flies reared in the laboratory at 13 °C exhibited the same thermal cost-benefit relations as the winter acclimatized flies. We also found a cost of winter acclimatization in terms of decreased egg-to-adult viability at high temperatures of eggs laid by winter acclimatized flies. Based on our findings we suggest that winter acclimatization in nature can induce strong benefits in terms of increased cold tolerance. These benefits can be reproduced in the laboratory under ecologically relevant rearing and testing conditions, and should be incorporated in species distribution modelling. Winter acclimatization also leads to decreased heat tolerance. This may create a mismatch between acclimation responses and the thermal environment, e.g. if temperatures suddenly increase during spring, under current and expected more variable future climatic conditions. PMID:26075607

  6. Soil compaction impacts from conservation-tillage in a stocker/winter wheat production system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter wheat grown in the southern Great Plains can be used in the fall and spring as forage for beef cattle. While fallow is a common summer practice associated with winter wheat, summer forage crop can extend the grazing season and increase profits. But little is known about the impact of increase...

  7. Exploring the severe winter haze in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, G. J.; Duan, F. K.; Ma, Y. L.; Cheng, Y.; Zheng, B.; Zhang, Q.; Huang, T.; Kimoto, T.; Chang, D.; Su, H.; Pschl, U.; Cheng, Y. F.; He, K. B.

    2014-07-01

    Extreme haze episodes repeatedly shrouded Beijing during the winter of 2012-2013, causing major environmental and health problems. To better understand these extreme events, we analyzed the hourly observation data of PM2.5 and its major chemical composition, with support of model simulations. Severe winter haze was shown to result from stable synoptic meteorological conditions over a large part of northeastern China, rather than from an abrupt increase in emissions. Build-up of secondary species, including organics, sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium, was the major driving force behind these polluted periods. The contribution of organic matter decreased with increasing pollution level while sulfate and nitrate contributions increased. Correspondingly, the ratio of secondary organic carbon to elemental carbon decreased and had a stable diurnal pattern during heavily polluted periods, indicating weakened photochemical activity due to the dimming effect of high loading of aerosol particles. Under such conditions, the strong increase in sulfate and nitrate contributions to PM2.5 was attributed to an elevated conversion ratio, reflecting more active heterogeneous reactions with gradually increasing relative humidity. Moreover, we found that high aerosol concentration was a regional phenomenon. The accumulation process of aerosol particles occurred successively from southeast cities to Beijing. The "apparent" sharp increase in PM2.5 concentration of up to several hundred ?g m-3 per hour recorded in Beijing represented rapid "recovery" from an "interruption" to the continuous pollution accumulation over the region, rather than purely local chemical production. This suggests that regional transport of pollutants played an important role during these severe pollution events.

  8. Responses of wintering bald eagles to boating activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knight, Richard L.; Knight, Susan K.

    1984-01-01

    Wintering populations of bald eagles show a close association with open water (Spencer 1976, Steenhof 1978). With the dramatic increase in the use of waterways for recreational activity in recent decades (Brockman and Merriam 1973, Jensen 1973), concern has arisen regarding the effects of boating activity on wintering eagles (Stalmaster 1980). Boating activity can be detrimental because it disrupts feeding activity and affects large areas in short periods of time (Skagen 1980, Stalmaster 1980). Disturbance may result in increased energy expenditures due to avoidance flights and decreased energy intake due to interference with feeding activity (Stalmaster 1980). In this paper we examine flushing responses and flight distances of wintering bald eagles to a canoe of two adjacent rivers with widely disparate levels of boating activity. We examine individual and interactive effects of eagle age, behavior, and social grouping.

  9. The impact of winter heating on air pollution in China.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qingyang; Ma, Zongwei; Li, Shenshen; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Fossil-fuel combustion related winter heating has become a major air quality and public health concern in northern China recently. We analyzed the impact of winter heating on aerosol loadings over China using the MODIS-Aqua Collection 6 aerosol product from 2004-2012. Absolute humidity (AH) and planetary boundary layer height (PBL) -adjusted aerosol optical depth (AOD*) was constructed to reflect ground-level PM2.5 concentrations. GIS analysis, standard statistical tests, and statistical modeling indicate that winter heating is an important factor causing increased PM2.5 levels in more than three-quarters of central and eastern China. The heating season AOD* was more than five times higher as the non-heating season AOD*, and the increase in AOD* in the heating areas was greater than in the non-heating areas. Finally, central heating tend to contribute less to air pollution relative to other means of household heating. PMID:25629878

  10. The Impact of Winter Heating on Air Pollution in China

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qingyang; Ma, Zongwei; Li, Shenshen; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Fossil-fuel combustion related winter heating has become a major air quality and public health concern in northern China recently. We analyzed the impact of winter heating on aerosol loadings over China using the MODIS-Aqua Collection 6 aerosol product from 20042012. Absolute humidity (AH) and planetary boundary layer height (PBL) -adjusted aerosol optical depth (AOD*) was constructed to reflect ground-level PM2.5 concentrations. GIS analysis, standard statistical tests, and statistical modeling indicate that winter heating is an important factor causing increased PM2.5 levels in more than three-quarters of central and eastern China. The heating season AOD* was more than five times higher as the non-heating season AOD*, and the increase in AOD* in the heating areas was greater than in the non-heating areas. Finally, central heating tend to contribute less to air pollution relative to other means of household heating. PMID:25629878

  11. Weak precipitation, warm winters and springs impact glaciers of south slopes of Mt. Everest (central Himalaya) in the last two decades (1994-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, F.; Guyennon, N.; Thakuri, S.; Viviano, G.; Romano, E.; Vuillermoz, E.; Cristofanelli, P.; Stocchi, P.; Agrillo, G.; Ma, Y.; Tartari, G.

    2014-12-01

    Studies on recent climate trends from the Himalayan range are limited, and even completely absent at high elevation. This contribution specifically explores the southern slopes of Mt. Everest (central Himalaya), analyzing the minimum, maximum, and mean temperature and precipitation time series reconstructed from seven stations located between 2660 and 5600m a.s.l. over the last twenty years (1994-2013). We complete this analysis with data from all the existing ground weather stations located on both sides of the mountain range (Koshi Basin) over the same period. Overall we observe that the main and more significant increase in temperature is concentrated outside of the monsoon period. At higher elevations minimum temperature (0.072 ± 0.011 °C a-1, p < 0.001) increased far more than maximum temperature (0.009 ± 0.012 °C a-1, p > 0.1), while mean temperature increased by 0.044 ± 0.008 °C a-1, p < 0.05. Moreover, we note a substantial precipitation weakening (9.3 ± 1.8mm a-1, p < 0.01 during the monsoon season). The annual rate of decrease at higher elevation is similar to the one at lower altitudes on the southern side of the Koshi Basin, but here the drier conditions of this remote environment make the fractional loss much more consistent (47% during the monsoon period). This study contributes to change the perspective on which climatic driver (temperature vs. precipitation) led mainly the glacier responses in the last twenty years. The main implications are the following: (1) the negative mass balances of glaciers observed in this region can be more ascribed to less accumulation due to weaker precipitation than to an increase of melting processes. (2) The melting processes have only been favored during winter and spring months and close to the glaciers terminus. (3) A decreasing of the probability of snowfall has significantly interested only the glaciers ablation zones (10%, p < 0.05), but the magnitude of this phenomenon is decidedly lower than the observed decrease of precipitation. (4) The lesser accumulation could be the cause behind the observed lower glacier flow velocity and the current stagnation condition of tongues, which in turn could have trigged melting processes under the debris glacier coverage, leading to the formation of numerous supraglacial and proglacial lakes that have characterized the region in the last decades. Without demonstrating the causes that could have led to the climate change pattern observed at high elevation, we conclude by listing the recent literature on hypotheses that accord with our observations.

  12. Physiological responses of Yellowstone bison to winter nutritional deprivation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DelGiudice, Glenn D.; Singer, Francis J.; Seal, Ulysses S.; Bowser, Gillian

    1994-01-01

    Because nutrition is critically related to other aspects of bison (Bison bison) ecology, and the winter ranges inhabited by bison in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) are ecologically diverse, it was important to determine if nutritional deprivation differences occurred among winter ranges. We used chemistry profiles of urine suspended in snow to compare nutritional deprivation of bison from January to April 1988 on 4 sampling areas of 3 winter ranges in YNP. Declining (P < 0.001) trends of urinary potassium: creatinine ratios in bison on all 4 sampling areas indicated progressive nutritional deprivation through late March. Concurrent increases (P ≤ 0.001) in mean urea nitrogen: creatinine ratios from late February through late march in 3 of 4 areas suggested that increased net catabolism was occurring. Diminished creatinine ratios of sodium and phosphorus reflected low dietary intake of these minerals throughout winter. Mean values and trends of urinary characteristics indicated nutritional deprivation varied among 3 winter ranges in YNP. Continued physiological monitoring of nutritional deprivation, along with detailed examination of other aspects of the bison's ecology, will provide greater insight into the role of ungulate nutrition in the dynamics of such a complex system and improve management.

  13. Mercury in wintering seabirds, an aggravating factor to winter wrecks?

    PubMed

    Fort, Jérôme; Lacoue-Labarthe, Thomas; Nguyen, Hanh Linh; Boué, Amélie; Spitz, Jérôme; Bustamante, Paco

    2015-09-15

    Every year, thousands of seabirds are cast ashore and are found dead along the coasts of North America and Western Europe. These massive mortality events called 'winter wrecks' have generally been attributed to harsh climatic conditions and prolonged storms which affect bird energy balance and impact their body condition. Nevertheless, additional stress factors, such as contaminant body burden, could potentially cumulate to energy constraints and actively contribute to winter wrecks. However, the role played by these additional factors in seabird massive winter mortality has received little attention to date. In February/March 2014, an unprecedented seabird wreck occurred along the Atlantic French coasts during which > 43,000 seabirds were found dead. By analyzing mercury (Hg) concentrations in various tissues collected on stranded birds, we tested the hypothesis that Hg played a significant role in this mortality. More specifically, we aimed to (1) describe Hg contamination in wintering seabirds found along the French coasts in 2014, and (2) determine if Hg concentrations measured in some vital organs such as kidney and brain reached toxicity thresholds that could have led to deleterious effects and to an enhanced mortality. We found some of the highest Hg levels ever reported in Atlantic puffins, common guillemots, razorbills and kittiwakes. Measured concentrations ranged from 0.8 to 3.6 μg · g(-1) of dry weight in brain, 1.3 to 7.2 μg · g(-1) in muscle, 2.5 to 13.5 μg · g(-1) in kidney, 2.9 to 18.6 μg · g(-1) in blood and from 3.1 to 19.5 μg · g(-1) in liver. Hg concentrations in liver and brain were generally below the estimated acute toxicity levels. However, kidney concentrations were not different than those measured in the liver, and above levels associated to renal sub-lethal effects, suggesting a potential Hg poisoning. We concluded that although Hg was not directly responsible for the high observed mortality, it has been a major aggravating stress factor for emaciated birds already on the edge. Importantly, this study also demonstrated that total blood, which can be non-lethally collected in seabirds, can be used as a predictor of Hg contamination in other tissues. PMID:25984703

  14. A comparison of winter mercury accumulation at forested and no-canopy sites measured with different snow sampling techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, S.J.; Johnson, K.B.; Weathers, K.C.; Loftin, C.S.; Fernandez, I.J.; Kahl, J.S.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric mercury (Hg) is delivered to ecosystems via rain, snow, cloud/fog, and dry deposition. The importance of snow, especially snow that has passed through the forest canopy (throughfall), in delivering Hg to terrestrial ecosystems has received little attention in the literature. The snowpack is a dynamic system that links atmospheric deposition and ecosystem cycling through deposition and emission of deposited Hg. To examine the magnitude of Hg delivery via snowfall, and to illuminate processes affecting Hg flux to catchments during winter (cold season), Hg in snow in no-canopy areas and under forest canopies measured with four collection methods were compared: (1) Hg in wet precipitation as measured by the Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) for the site in Acadia National Park, Maine, USA, (2) event throughfall (collected after snowfall cessation for accumulations of >8 cm), (3) season-long throughfall collected using the same apparatus for event sampling but deployed for the entire cold season, and (4) snowpack sampling. Estimates (mean ?? SE) of Hg deposition using these methods during the 91-day cold season in 2004-2005 at conifer sites showed that season-long throughfall Hg flux (1.80 ??g/m2) < snowpack Hg (2.38 ?? 0.68 ??g/m2) < event throughfall flux (5.63 ?? 0.38 ??g/m2). Mercury deposition at the MDN site (0.91 ??g/m2) was similar to that measured at other no-canopy sites in the area using the other methods, but was 3.4 times less than was measured under conifer canopies using the event sampling regime. This indicates that snow accumulated under the forest canopy received Hg from the overstory or exhibited less re-emission of Hg deposited in snow relative to open areas. The soil surface of field-scale plots were sprayed with a natural rain water sample that contained an Hg tracer (202Hg) just prior to the first snowfall to explore whether some snowpack Hg might be explained from soil emissions. The appearance of the 202Hg tracer in the snowpack (0-64% of the total Hg mass in the snowpack) suggests that movement of Hg from the soil into the snowpack is possible. However, as with any tracer study the 202Hg tracer may not precisely represent the reactivity and mobility of natural Hg in soils. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Glycogen, not dehydration or lipids, limits winter survival of side-blotched lizards (Uta stansburiana).

    PubMed

    Zani, Peter A; Irwin, Jason T; Rollyson, Mary E; Counihan, Jessica L; Healas, Sara D; Lloyd, Emily K; Kojanis, Lee C; Fried, Bernard; Sherma, Joseph

    2012-09-01

    Climate change is causing winters to become milder (less cold and shorter). Recent studies of overwintering ectotherms have suggested that warmer winters increase metabolism and decrease winter survival and subsequent fecundity. Energetic constraints (insufficient energy stores) have been hypothesized as the cause of winter mortality but have not been tested explicitly. Thus, alternative sources of mortality, such as winter dehydration, cannot be ruled out. By employing an experimental design that compared the energetics and water content of lizards that died naturally during laboratory winter with those that survived up to the same point but were then sacrificed, we attempt to distinguish among multiple possible causes of mortality. We test the hypothesis that mortality is caused by insufficient energy stores in the liver, abdominal fat bodies, tail or carcass or through excessive water loss. We found that lizards that died naturally had marginally greater mass loss, lower water content, and less liver glycogen remaining than living animals sampled at the same time. Periodically moistening air during winter reduced water loss, but this did not affect survival, calling into question dehydration as a cause of death. Rather, our results implicate energy limitations in the form of liver glycogen, but not lipids, as the primary cause of mortality in overwintering lizards. When viewed through a lens of changing climates, our results suggest that if milder winters increase the metabolic rate of overwintering ectotherms, individuals may experience greater energetic demands. Increased energy use during winter may subsequently limit individual survival and possibly even impact population persistence. PMID:22875774

  16. Origin of the F-Layer by ``Snowfall'' in the Earth's Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernlund, J. W.; Li, J.; Armentrout, M. M.; Buono, A. S.; Chen, B.; Durand, S.; Gaeman, J.; Pigott, J. S.; Waszek, L.; Zheng, Z.

    2010-12-01

    Recent seismological observations of phases reflecting (PKiKP), diffracting (PKPdiff), or going through the inner core (PKIKP) called for modification of PREM at the top of the Inner Core Boundary (ICB). Both the AK135 and PREM2 models proposed a flattened P-wave velocity gradient relative to PREM in the ~200 km region above the ICB, often referred to as the F-layer. This reduced velocity gradient implies density stratification, which may reflect a gradient in the light element concentration decreasing from the top of the F-layer to the ICB. Here we propose a mechanism to generate a chemical stratification in the F-layer through crystallization of solid iron “snow” at the top of the F-layer, which then precipitates, partially dissolves, and eventually accumulates at the ICB to produce the F-layer and contribute to the growth of the inner core. The formation of iron “snow” in the outer core (OC) requires that the core geotherm intercepts the FeX liquidus, where X is an alloying light element, to create a region of stability for solid iron at the base of the OC. This study examines two potential scenarios in which iron “snowfall” might occur in the F-layer. The first scenario involves the FeX liquidus gradient decreasing or even changing sign such that a region of solid stability is created at the top of the F-layer. This behavior is observed in the Fe-S binary system at lower pressures and has been proposed to cause “snowing” in the interiors of Mercury and Ganymede. In the second case, the outer core temperature may increase relative to the FeX liquidus near the ICB due to viscomagnetic heating. Results based on mineral physics calculations of an iron-sulfur binary system show that an F-layer composition ranging from 7.2 wt% S at the top of the F-layer to 5.7 wt% S at the ICB is sufficient to explain the Vp structure of the F-layer in AK135. In these calculations, the density and bulk modulus as a function of depth were determined using the 3rd order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state. Temperature was accounted for using the Mie-Grüneisen-Debye equation of state. Published experimental values for Fe-FeS solid and liquid end-members were used and those of intermediate compositions were determined using ideal solution theory. The crystal fraction was assumed to be small enough to allow approximation of a pure liquid composition in the F-layer. Comparison of our F-layer model to PREM results in a better fit to the observed travel time data. Comparison of normal mode eigenfrequencies from the two models shows subtle differences; therefore normal modes have been determined to be insensitive to the small-scale structure of the relatively thin F-layer

  17. Change in abundance of pacific brant wintering in alaska: evidence of a climate warming effect?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, D.H.; Dau, C.P.; Lee, T.; Sedinger, J.S.; Anderson, B.A.; Hines, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Winter distribution of Pacific Flyway brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) has shifted northward from lowtemperate areas to sub-Arctic areas over the last 42 years. We assessed the winter abundance and distribution of brant in Alaska to evaluate whether climate warming may be contributing to positive trends in the most northern of the wintering populations. Mean surface air temperatures during winter at the end of the Alaska Peninsula increased about 1??C between 1963 and 2004, resulting in a 23% reduction in freezing degree days and a 34% decline in the number of days when ice cover prevents birds from accessing food resources. Trends in the wintering population fluctuated with states of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, increasing during positive (warm) phases and decreasing during negative (cold) phases, and this correlation provides support for the hypothesis that growth in the wintering population of brant in Alaska is linked to climate warming. The size of the wintering population was negatively correlated with the number of days of strong northwesterly winds in November, which suggests that the occurrence of tailwinds favorable for migration before the onset of winter was a key factor in whether brant migrated from Alaska or remained there during winter. Winter distribution of brant on the Alaska Peninsula was highly variable and influenced by ice cover, particularly at the heavily used Izembek Lagoon. Observations of previously marked brant indicated that the Alaska wintering population was composed primarily of birds originating from Arctic breeding colonies that appear to be growing. Numbers of brant in Alaska during winter will likely increase as temperatures rise and ice cover decreases at high latitudes in response to climate warming. ?? The Arctic Institute of North America.

  18. Communicating Certainty About Nuclear Winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, A.

    2013-12-01

    I have been spending much of my time in the past several years trying to warn the world about the continuing danger of nuclear weapons, and that the solution is a rapid reduction in the nuclear arsenal. I feel that a scientist who discovers dangers to society has an ethical duty to issue a warning, even if the danger is so scary that it is hard for people to deal with. The debate about nuclear winter in the 1980s helped to end the nuclear arms race, but the planet still has enough nuclear weapons, even after reductions planned for 2017 under the New START treaty, to produce nuclear winter, with temperatures plunging below freezing in the summer in major agricultural regions, threatening the food supply for most of the planet. New research by myself, Brian Toon, Mike Mills, and colleagues over the past six years has found that a nuclear war between any two countries, such as India and Pakistan, using 50 atom bombs each of the size dropped on Hiroshima could produce climate change unprecedented in recorded human history, and a world food crisis because of the agricultural effects. This is much less than 1% of the current global arsenal. Communicating certainty - what we know for sure - has been much more effective than communicating uncertainty. The limited success I have had has come from persistence and serendipity. The first step was to do the science. We have published peer-reviewed articles in major journals, including Science, Nature, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Journal of Geophysical Research, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, Physics Today, and Climatic Change. But policymakers do not read these journals. Through fairly convoluted circumstances, which will be described in this talk, we were able to get papers published in Scientific American and the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists. I have also published several encyclopedia articles on the subject. As a Lead Author of Chapter 8 (Radiative Forcing) of the recently published Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), I inserted a paragraph pointing out that volcanic eruptions serve as an analog that supports new work on nuclear winter. This is the first time that nuclear winter has been in the IPCC report. I will tell the story of the discussions within our chapter, with review editors, and with the IPCC leadership that resulted in a box in Chapter 8 that discusses nuclear winter. We gave a briefing to John Holdren, the President's Science Advisor, about the work. Daniel Ellsberg, Fidel Castro, and Mikhail Gorbachev found out about our work, and used the results to appeal for nuclear abolition. In 2013 the work was featured at the Conference on the Humanitarian Impact of Nuclear Weapons in Oslo, Norway attended by 132 nations, and I gave a TEDx talk, I published an opinion piece on the CNN website, and I gave an invited public lecture in Nagasaki, Japan, all about the climatic consequences of nuclear war. I am now using Twitter and Facebook to communicate about nuclear winter. The threat that nuclear weapons pose to the planet is a much easier problem to solve than global warming. We need to eliminate nuclear weapons so we have the luxury of working on the global warming problem without the possibility of the existential global threat still posed by the global nuclear arsenal.

  19. Winter fog is decreasing in the fruit growing region of the Central Valley of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldocchi, Dennis; Waller, Eric

    2014-05-01

    The Central Valley of California is home to a variety of fruit and nut trees. These trees account for 95% of the U.S. production, but they need a sufficient amount of winter chill to achieve rest and quiescence for the next season's buds and flowers. In prior work, we reported that the accumulation of winter chill is declining in the Central Valley. We hypothesize that a reduction in winter fog is cooccurring and is contributing to the reduction in winter chill. We examined a 33 year record of satellite remote sensing to develop a fog climatology for the Central Valley. We find that the number of winter fog events, integrated spatially, decreased 46%, on average, over 32 winters, with much year to year variability. Less fog means warmer air and an increase in the energy balance on buds, which amplifies their warming, reducing their chill accumulation more.

  20. Natural snowfall reveals large-scale flow structures in the wake of a 2.5-MW wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jiarong; Toloui, Mostafa; Chamorro, Leonardo P.; Guala, Michele; Howard, Kevin; Riley, Sean; Tucker, James; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2014-06-01

    To improve power production and structural reliability of wind turbines, there is a pressing need to understand how turbines interact with the atmospheric boundary layer. However, experimental techniques capable of quantifying or even qualitatively visualizing the large-scale turbulent flow structures around full-scale turbines do not exist today. Here we use snowflakes from a winter snowstorm as flow tracers to obtain velocity fields downwind of a 2.5-MW wind turbine in a sampling area of ~\

  1. Daily movements of female mallards wintering in Southwestern Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, P.T.; Afton, A.D.; Cox, R.R., Jr.; Davis, B.E.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding daily movements of waterfowl is crucial to management of winter habitats, especially along the Gulf Coast where hunting pressure is high. Radio-telemetry was used to investigate movements of female Mallards (Anas platyrchychos) wintering in southwestern Louisiana. Movement distances were analyzed from 2,455 paired locations (diurnal and nocturnal) of 126 Mallards during winters 2004-2005 and 2005-2006 to assess effects of winter, female age, areas closed (Lacassine National Wildlife Refuge [LAC], Cameron Prairie National Wildlife Refuge [CAM], Amoco Pool [AMOCO] or open to hunting [OPEN]), and habitat type, including all interactions. Movement distances from the various land management categories were not consistent by age, date, or by winter. Flight distances from LAC increased with date, whereas those from CAM and OPEN did not vary significantly by date. Female Mallards moved short distances between diurnal and nocturnal sites (ranging from 3.1 to 15.0 km by land management category), suggesting that they are able to meet their daily energy requirements within a smaller area than Northern Pintails (Anas acuta, hereafter Pintails), and thus minimize transit energy costs.

  2. Winter stream temperature in the rain-on-snow zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, J. A.; Moore, R. D.

    2012-12-01

    Stream temperature is a principal determinant of aquatic ecosystem composition and productivity. There are increasing concerns that changes in land cover and climatic conditions could produce changes in stream thermal regimes that would be deleterious to existing aquatic communities. Most stream temperature research has focused on summer periods and few studies have examined winter periods despite the growing recognition of its biological importance. The winter thermal regimes of Pacific Northwest headwater streams, which provide vital winter habitat for salmonids and their food sources, may be particularly sensitive to changes in climate because they can remain ice-free throughout the year and are often located in rain-on-snow zones. This study examined winter stream temperature patterns and controls in small headwater catchments within the rain-on-snow zone at the Malcolm Knapp Research Forest, near Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Two working hypotheses were addressed by this study: (1) winter stream temperatures are primarily controlled by advective fluxes associated with runoff processes and (2) stream temperatures should be depressed during rain-on-snow events, compared to rain on bare ground, due to the cooling effect of rain passing through the snowpack prior to infiltrating the soil or being delivered to the stream as saturation-excess overland flow. These hypotheses were tested statistically using historical stream temperature data and modelled snowpack dynamics for a forested headwater catchment. When snow was not present, daily stream temperature during winter rain events tended to increase with increasing air temperature. However, when snow was present, stream temperature was capped at about 5 C, regardless of air temperature. This historical analysis was complemented with detailed field data collected during the winter of 2011-2012 from an ongoing field study in a partially logged catchment. Stream temperature response to a large rain-on-snow event was compared to a rain-only event of similar magnitude. During the rain-on-snow event, stream temperature exhibited less variation and was similar to soil temperature measured at a near-stream site known to produce substantial subsurface stormflow. Both the historical and field studies support our hypotheses. A key implication is that climate warming may generate higher winter stream temperatures in the rain-on-snow zone due to both increased rain temperature and reduced cooling effect of snow cover.

  3. Winter fuels report. Week ending, October 21, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Zitomer, M.; Griffith, A.; Zyren, J.

    1994-10-01

    Demand for distillate fuel oil is expected to show a slight decline this winter (October 1, 1994-March 31, 1995) from last, according to the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) 4th Quarter 1994 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Mid-World Oil Price Case forecast. EIA projects winter demand to decline one percent to 3.3 million barrels per day, assuming normal weather conditions. The effects of expected moderate growth in the economy and industrial production will likely be offset by much warmer temperatures than those a year ago. EIA projects prices for both residential heating oil and diesel fuel to be moderately higher than prices last winter. Increases are likely, primarily because crude oil prices are expected to be higher than they were a year earlier (Table FE5).

  4. Winter Lake Breezes near the Great Salt Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosman, Erik T.; Horel, John D.

    2015-12-01

    Case studies of lake breezes during wintertime cold air pools in Utah's Salt Lake Valley are examined. While summer breezes originating from the Great Salt Lake are typically deeper, of longer duration, and have higher wind speeds than winter breezes, the rate of inland penetration and cross-frontal temperature differences can be higher during the winter. The characteristics of winter breezes and the forcing mechanisms controlling them (e.g., snow cover, background flow, vertical stability profile, clouds, lake temperature, lake sheltering, and drainage pooling) are more complex and variable than those evident in summer. During the afternoon in the Salt Lake Valley, these lake breezes can lead to elevated pollution levels due to the transport of fine particle pollutants from over the Great Salt Lake, decreased vertical mixing depth, and increased vertical stability.

  5. Is the Cotton Winter Nursery appropriate for evaluating fiber quality?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers routinely use the Cotton Winter Nursery (CWN) in Tecoman, Colima, Mexico, for advancing breeding materials a generation and for seed increases of progeny lines. With little difficulty, fiber samples can be obtained from materials in the nursery and evaluation of fiber properties perform...

  6. Registration of 'NE01481' hard red winter wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'NE01481' (Reg. No. PI 659689) hard red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was developed cooperatively by the Nebraska Agricultural Experiment Station and the USDA-ARS and released in April, 2010. Nebraska wheat growers, in addition to superior agronomic performance, would like to have increased r...

  7. Small Grain Winter Cover Crops for Corn and Soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter cover crops are plants that cover the soil between harvest and planting of summer annual grain crops. While doing this, cover crops perform important environmental functions that include reducing soil erosion, accumulating nutrients, and increasing soil carbon. This educational module provide...

  8. KPI Graduate Executive Summary Report, Summer 2000-Winter 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan Coll. (Ontario).

    Summarizes findings from the Key Performance Indicator Satisfaction Survey administered by Sheridan College in the summer 2000, fall 2000, and winter 2001 terms. This survey was administered in compliance with the Ontario government's efforts to increase the accountability of the Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology through the measurement of

  9. Evapotranspiration of deficit irrigated sorghum and winter wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deficit irrigation commonly is used in regions with reduced or limited irrigation capacity to increase water use efficiency (WUE). This research measured winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) water use (ET) and yields so WUE could be determined. Two precision ...

  10. Snowfall in Southern Appalachia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The snowstorm which swept across the eastern United States on December 4 and 5 also brought the season's first snow to parts of the south and southern Appalachia. The extent of snow cover over central Kentucky, eastern Tennessee, western North Carolina and Virginia are apparent in this view from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). This natural-color image was captured by MISR's downward-looking (nadir) camera on December 7, 2002.

    The Appalachians are bounded by the Blue Ridge mountain belt along the east and the Appalachian Plateau along the west. Valleys and ridges between the higher elevation areas retain the green and reddish-brown hues of autumn, and many rivers and lakes appear blue and unfrozen. The highest peak in the eastern United States, Mount Mitchell, is found in North Carolina's western tip, near the Great Smoky Mountains (the dark-colored range at lower right).

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82 degrees north and 82 degrees south latitude. This data product was generated from a portion of the imagery acquired during Terra orbit 15805. The image covers an area of 347 kilometers x 279 kilometers, and utilizes data from blocks 60 to 62 within World Reference System-2 path 19.

  11. Midlatitude tropical interactions during winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    Pre-FGGE and FGGE/MONEX data are used to identify short term midlatitude tropical and longitudinal interactions during the winter monsoon. These interactions occur as cold surges, which develop over the East Asian continent and penetrate deep into the tropics with fast gravity wave speed. The observed interactions that occur after a surge include cyclogenesis and enhanced convection in the equatorial region, feedback from equatorial convection to midlatitude circulation systems, tropical east-west (Walker) circulations, and cross-equatorial influence. These interactions are also studied theoretically by analytical solutions of linearized shallow water equations. Response to transient forcing (monsoon surges) are mainly in Rossby and Kelvin modes. When the forcing time scale is short, significant gravity modes are also excited. The responses closely resemble observed winter monsoon flow. Responses to stationary forcing show that deep (barotropic) motions propagate energy away into high latitudes and that shallow (baroclinic) motions are trapped around the equator. It is shown that the barotropic teleconnection-type response to tropical sources found in previous numerical studies was due to the specified vertical wind shear and surface friction.

  12. Tillage Requirments for integrating winter-annual grazing in peanut production: Plant water status and productivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of crop rotation systems involving winter-annual grazing can help peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) producers increase profitability, although winter-annual grazing could result in excessive soil compaction, which can severely limit yields. We conducted a 3-yr field study on a Dothan loamy sand i...

  13. Scenario-based risk analysis of winter snowstorms in the German lowlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Wulffen, Anja

    2014-05-01

    The northern German lowlands are not especially known for a high frequency of snowfall events. Nevertheless under certain synoptic conditions Lake-Effect-like phenomena caused by the proximity especially of the Baltic Sea can lead to significantly reinforced snowfall intensities that are often accompanied by rather high wind speeds. This makes for infrequent but potentially disastrous snowstorms in a region less accustomed to snow impacts. One possible consequence of an infrastructure failure cascade resulting from severe and longer-lasting snowstorms is a regional disruption of the food supply chain. In the context of "just-in-time"-logistics and the accompanying decrease of storage capabilities, this poses a significant threat to the population's food security. Within the project NeuENV ("New strategies to ensure sufficient food supply in case of crisis in Germany") a snowstorm in the German lowlands involving widespread disruptions of the transportation infrastructure as well as power failures is therefore used as one model for future food supply chain disruptions. In order to obtain a reliable evaluation of the supply chain and crisis management resilience, a detailed snowstorm scenario is being developed. For this purpose, a database of impact reports of past snowstorm events is assembled and analysed to obtain a comprehensive overview of potential infrastructure impairments and failures. Examples of events analysed in this context include the winter 1978/79 with its disastrous snow drifts that commonly attained heights of 3m to 5m leading to a transportation infrastructure collapse across a wide area, the wet snow event in November 2005 in the Münsterland region that caused power failures for up to 250.000 homes, and more recent snowstorms such as Daisy in January 2010. A catalogue of thresholds for relevant parameters indicating when significant failures can be expected is then compiled through a comparison of impact reports with the detailed meteorological conditions. Based on these findings, an exemplary synoptic evolution of a snowstorm leading to representative infrastructure failure cascades is constructed. In a next step, an extrapolation of this obtained scenario to future climate and societal conditions as well as plausible more extreme but not yet observed meteorological conditions is planned in order to obtain a thorough analysis of possible threats to the German food distribution system and a strong foundation for future disaster mitigation planning efforts.

  14. Winter warming from large volcanic eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robock, Alan; Mao, Jianping

    1992-01-01

    An examination of the Northern Hemisphere winter surface temperature patterns after the 12 largest volcanic eruptions from 1883-1992 shows warming over Eurasia and North America and cooling over the Middle East which are significant at the 95 percent level. This pattern is found in the first winter after tropical eruptions, in the first or second winter after midlatitude eruptions, and in the second winter after high latitude eruptions. The effects are independent of the hemisphere of the volcanoes. An enhanced zonal wind driven by heating of the tropical stratosphere by the volcanic aerosols is responsible for the regions of warming, while the cooling is caused by blocking of incoming sunlight.

  15. Carbon dynamics and changing winter conditions: a review of current understanding and future research directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haei, M.; Laudon, H.

    2015-09-01

    Despite the important role of winters for northern ecosystems, it remains the least understood of all the seasons. Here, we summarize existing empirical studies on winter climate and carbon dynamics and highlight some important future research directions. The existing studies include field-scale snow-cover manipulation experiments representing extreme soil climate conditions, laboratory soil incubations studying the influential factors, and time-series of climate and carbon data showing long-term natural variations and existing trends. Most of the field and laboratory experiments indicate an increased soil organic carbon loss due to soil frost. Long-term data demonstrate temporal changes in winter CO2 efflux and its important contribution to the annual fluxes. A number of research priorities to improve our understanding of winter conditions include (i) ecosystem processes in the fall-winter and winter-spring shoulder seasons, (ii) extreme events, (iii) partitioning into organic- and inorganic carbon, (iv) carry-over effects of winter and growing season on each other, (v) long-term cumulative impacts, and (vi) improved winter process modelling. These areas of research would enable an improved understanding of the role of the snow covered period for carbon cycling, and provide a basis for more realistic models that include winter processes.

  16. Xanthophyll cycle pigment and antioxidant profiles of winter-red (anthocyanic) and winter-green (acyanic) angiosperm evergreen species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaves of many angiosperm evergreen species turn red during winter, corresponding with synthesis of anthocyanin pigments. The function of winter color change, and why it occurs in some species and not others, is not yet understood. We hypothesized that anthocyanins play a compensatory photoprotect...

  17. Abrupt Decline in the Arctic Winter Sea Ice Cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, Josefino C.

    2007-01-01

    Maximum ice extents in the Arctic in 2005 and 2006 have been observed to be significantly lower (by about 6%) than the average of those of previous years starting in 1979. Since the winter maxima had been relatively stable with the trend being only about -1.5% per decade (compared to about -10% per decade for the perennial ice area), this is a significant development since signals from greenhouse warming are expected to be most prominent in winter. Negative ice anomalies are shown to be dominant in 2005 and 2006 especially in the Arctic basin and correlated with winds and surface temperature anomalies during the same period. Progressively increasing winter temperatures in the central Arctic starting in 1997 is observed with significantly higher rates of increase in 2005 and 2006. The Atlantic Oscillation (AO) indices correlate weakly with the sea ice and surface temperature anomaly data but may explain the recent shift in the perennial ice cover towards the western region. Results suggest that the trend in winter ice is finally in the process of catching up with that of the summer ice cover.

  18. 33 CFR 100.109 - Winter Harbor Lobster Boat Race, Winter Harbor, ME.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Winter Harbor Lobster Boat Race, Winter Harbor, ME. 100.109 Section 100.109 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Lobster Boat Race, Winter Harbor, ME. (a) Regulated area. The regulated area includes all waters of...

  19. Effect of cold wave on winter visibility over eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Wenjun; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaoye; Yang, Zhifeng; Gao, Shanhong

    2015-03-01

    Considerable concern has been raised on the severe wintertime haze episodes over eastern China (ECN) where visibility (Vis) decline in winter is identified from 1973 to 2012 (-0.68 km per 10 years or -26% in 40 years). Based upon the analysis of daily Vis and weather records, cold wave (CW) originating from high latitudes is found to increase Vis by 2.7 km on average because of its relatively stronger wind and drier, cleaner air mass compared with the typical, stable midlatitude air over ECN in winter. However, the lessening frequency of CW occurrence and cold air activity in recent years and the accompanied decrease of surface wind speed (-0.15 m/s per 10 years or -18% in the 40 years) may have amplified the effect of increased anthropogenic emissions on Vis and consequently resulted in more substantial Vis decline. A comparison of Vis trends on the "normal wind" days and on all days in winter implies that the emission increase has contributed to about 79% of the declining Vis trend, while the meteorology change contributed 21%. Furthermore, the diurnal cycle of the boundary layer height is found to have weakened or in some cases disappeared in the winters with less CW, which probably contributed to the long-lasting characteristic of the wintertime low Vis events in this region. Hence, the effect of climate change, such as the decrease of CW occurrence, should be accounted as part of the interpretation for the steady decrease of winter Vis over ECN in the past four decades.

  20. Animals in Winter. Young Discovery Library Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Sairigne, Catherine

    This book is written for children 5 through 10. Part of a series designed to develop their curiosity, fascinate them and educate them, this volume introduces the habits of a variety of animals during the winter. Topics include: (1) surviving during winter, including concepts such as migration, hibernation, and skin color change; (2) changing…

  1. Animals in Winter. Young Discovery Library Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Sairigne, Catherine

    This book is written for children 5 through 10. Part of a series designed to develop their curiosity, fascinate them and educate them, this volume introduces the habits of a variety of animals during the winter. Topics include: (1) surviving during winter, including concepts such as migration, hibernation, and skin color change; (2) changing

  2. Nuclear Winter: Scientists in the Political Arena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badash, Lawrence

    2001-03-01

    The nuclear winter phenomenon is used to illustrate the many paths by which scientific advice reaches decision makers in the United States government. Because the Reagan administration was hostile to the strategic policy that the scientific discovery seemed to demand, the leading proponent of nuclear winter, Carl Sagan, used his formidable talent for popularization to reach a larger audience.

  3. A SIMPLE WINTER PROTECTION SYSTEM FOR BLACKBERRIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little commercial blackberry production exists in areas with severe winters (minimum winter temperatures below 18 degrees C and short growing seasons. In this study, we evaluated the combination of simple cultural practices, a modified rotatable cross-arm (RCA) trellis system, and covering plants ...

  4. A SIMPLE WINTER PROTECTION SYSTEM FOR BLACKBERRIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little commercial blackberry production exists in areas with severe winters (minimum winter temperatures below -12 degrees C and short growing seasons. In this study, we evaluated the combination of simple cultural practices, a modified rotatable cross-arm (RCA) trellis system, and covering plants w...

  5. 36 CFR 1002.19 - Winter activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Winter activities. 1002.19 Section 1002.19 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 1002.19 Winter activities. (a) Skiing, snowshoeing, ice skating, sledding,...

  6. 36 CFR 2.19 - Winter activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Winter activities. 2.19 Section 2.19 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.19 Winter activities. (a) Skiing, snowshoeing,...

  7. 36 CFR 1002.19 - Winter activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Winter activities. 1002.19 Section 1002.19 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 1002.19 Winter activities. (a) Skiing, snowshoeing, ice skating, sledding,...

  8. Shifting covariability of North American summer monsoon precipitation with antecedent winter precipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Clark, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that a general inverse relation exists between winter precipitation in the southwestern United states (US) and summer monsoon precipitation. In addition, it has been suggested that this inverse relation between winter precipitation and the magnitude of the southwestern US monsoon breaks down under certain climatic conditions that override the regional winter/monsoon precipitation relations. Results from this new study indicate that the winter/monsoon precipitation relations do not break down, but rather shift location through time. The strength of winter/monsoon precipitation relations, as indexed by 20-year moving correlations between winter precipitation and monsoon precipitation, decreased in Arizona after about 1970, but increased in New Mexico. The changes in these correlations appear to be related to an eastward shift in the location of monsoon precipitation in the southwestern US. This eastward shift in monsoon precipitation and the changes in correlations with winter precipitation also appear to be related to an eastward shift in July/August atmospheric circulation over the southwestern US that resulted in increased monsoon precipitation in New Mexico. Results also indicate that decreases in sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) in the central North Pacific Ocean also may be associated with th changes in correlations between winter and monsoon precipitation. Copyright ?? 2006 Royal Meteorological Society.

  9. Endothermic heat production in honeybee winter clusters.

    PubMed

    Stabentheiner, Anton; Pressl, Helga; Papst, Thomas; Hrassnigg, Norbert; Crailsheim, Karl

    2003-01-01

    In order to survive cold northern winters, honeybees crowd tightly together in a winter cluster. Present models of winter cluster thermoregulation consider the insulation by the tightly packed mantle bees as the decisive factor for survival at low temperatures, mostly ignoring the possibility of endothermic heat production. We provide here direct evidence of endothermic heat production by 'shivering' thermogenesis. The abundance of endothermic bees is highest in the core and decreases towards the surface. This shows that core bees play an active role in thermal control of winter clusters. We conclude that regulation of both the insulation by the mantle bees and endothermic heat production by the inner bees is necessary to achieve thermal stability in a winter cluster. PMID:12477904

  10. Short winters threaten temperate fish populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Troy M.; Marschall, Elizabeth A.; Dabrowski, Konrad; Ludsin, Stuart A.

    2015-07-01

    Although climate warming is expected to benefit temperate ectotherms by lengthening the summer growing season, declines in reproductive success following short, warm winters may counter such positive effects. Here we present long-term (1973-2010) field patterns for Lake Erie yellow perch, Perca flavescens, which show that failed annual recruitment events followed short, warm winters. Subsequent laboratory experimentation and field investigations revealed how reduced reproductive success following short, warm winters underlie these observed field patterns. Following short winters, females spawn at warmer temperatures and produce smaller eggs that both hatch at lower rates and produce smaller larvae than females exposed to long winters. Our research suggests that continued climate warming can lead to unanticipated, negative effects on temperate fish populations.

  11. Short winters threaten temperate fish populations

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Troy M.; Marschall, Elizabeth A.; Dabrowski, Konrad; Ludsin, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Although climate warming is expected to benefit temperate ectotherms by lengthening the summer growing season, declines in reproductive success following short, warm winters may counter such positive effects. Here we present long-term (1973–2010) field patterns for Lake Erie yellow perch, Perca flavescens, which show that failed annual recruitment events followed short, warm winters. Subsequent laboratory experimentation and field investigations revealed how reduced reproductive success following short, warm winters underlie these observed field patterns. Following short winters, females spawn at warmer temperatures and produce smaller eggs that both hatch at lower rates and produce smaller larvae than females exposed to long winters. Our research suggests that continued climate warming can lead to unanticipated, negative effects on temperate fish populations. PMID:26173734

  12. Mass dynamics of wintering Pacific Black Brant: Body, adipose tissue, organ, and muscle masses vary with location

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, D.D.; Barboza, P.S.; Ward, D.H.

    2007-01-01

    We compared body size and mass of the whole body, organs, adipose tissue, and muscles of adult Pacific Black Brant (Branta bernicla nigricans (Lawrence, 1846)) collected concurrently in Alaska and Baja California during the fall, winter, and spring of 2002-2003. Head and tarsal lengths of males were similar between sites and slightly larger for females in Alaska than in Baja California. Brant appear to operate under similar physiological bounds, but patterns of nutrient allocation differ between sites. Birds wintering in Alaska lost similar amounts of adipose tissue during early winter as birds in Baja California gained during late winter before migration. Masses of the body, adipose tissue, and flight muscles during mid-winter were similar between sites. Seasonal adipose tissue deposition may, therefore, equally favor winter residency or long-distance migration. Gonad and liver masses increased in late winter for birds in Alaska but not for those in Baja California, suggesting birds wintering in Baja may delay reproductive development in favor of allocating reserves needed for migration. Phenotypic flexibility allows Brant to use widely divergent wintering sites. The wintering location of Brant likely depends more upon changes in environmental conditions and food availability, than upon physiological differences between the two wintering populations. ?? 2007 NRC.

  13. QUANTITATIVE TRAIT LOCI FOR WINTER HARDINESS COMPONENT TRAITS IN OAT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter hardiness is an important limitation to winter oat (Avena byzantina and A. sativa) production in much of North America, but field evaluation of winter hardiness is difficult. The discovery of quantitative trait loci for winter hardiness should allow markers assisted selection for winter hard...

  14. a Comparison Between Spatial Winter Indices and Expenditure on Winter Road Maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornford, Dan; Thornes, John E.

    1996-03-01

    The relationship between winter road maintenance (WRM) expenditure and winter weather severity is examined for Scotland. Different approaches to calculating regional winter severity are compared (mean regional, Theissen polygon based, and kriging with external drift). Variables examined were mean winter maximum temperature, number of ground frosts, and number of days with snow lying at 09Z. These were also combined into a modified Hulme winter index (mHWI). A comparison of the regional winter severity with expenditure indicated that geostatistics produced the best estimates of regional winter severity. The geostatistical procedures are discussed and potential problems are highlighted. Cross-validation revealed that using kriging with altitude as external drift estimated maximum temperatures well, however the other variables could be better estimated. Results of the analysis of expenditure and winter severity for Scotland indicate that winter severity is a plausible secondary variable when attempting to explain temporal differences in regional expenditure. The relationship between regional expenditure and winter severity across regions is less significant, but still useful. Regional expenditure responds very differently to changes in winter severity for each region, and base levels of expenditure also vary widely.

  15. Descriptions of two new and one newly recorded enchytraeid species (Clitellata, Enchytraeidae) from the Ozegahara Mire, a heavy snowfall highmoor in Central Japan.

    PubMed

    Torii, Takaaki

    2015-01-01

    Three species of semi-aquatic freshwater Enchytraeidae of the genera Mesenchytraeus Eisen, 1878, Chamaedrilus Friend, 1913 and Globulidrilus Christensen & Dzsa-Farkas, 2012 are described from stream, wet soil or snow habitats in the Ozegahara Mire, an extensive high moor in heavy snowfall area in central Japan. Among Mesenchytraeus speies, Mesenchytraeus nivalis sp. nov. is distinguished by not having enlarged chaetae and spermathecal diverticula, vas deferens with atrial glands 3 or 4 in number and club-shaped, spermathecal ental duct short, with sperm bundles in the sperm sack. Chamaedrilus ozensis sp. nov. closely resembles C. floridae, but the length of the sperm funnel and character of the coelomocytes are different. Globulidrilus helgei Christensen & Dzsa-Farkas, 2012 is recorded for the first time from Japan. PMID:26623738

  16. Increased snow facilitates plant invasion in mixedgrass prairie.

    PubMed

    Blumenthlal, D; Chimner, R A; Welker, J M; Morgan, J A

    2008-07-01

    Although global change is known to influence plant invasion, little is known about interactions between altered precipitation and invasion. In the North American mixedgrass prairie, invasive species are often abundant in wet and nitrogen (N)-rich areas, suggesting that predicted changes in precipitation and N deposition could exacerbate invasion. Here, this possibility was tested by seeding six invasive species into experimental plots of mixedgrass prairie treated with a factorial combination of increased snow, summer irrigation, and N addition. Without added snow, seeded invasive species were rarely observed. Snow addition increased average above-ground biomass of Centaurea diffusa from 0.026 to 66 g m(-2), of Gypsophila paniculata from 0.1 to 7.3 g m(-2), and of Linaria dalmatica from 5 to 101 g m(-2). Given added snow, summer irrigation increased the density of G. paniculata, and N addition increased the density and biomass of L. dalmatica. Plant density responses mirrored those of plant biomass, indicating that increases in biomass resulted, in part, from increases in recruitment. In contrast to seeded invasive species, resident species did not respond to snow addition. These results suggest that increases in snowfall or variability of snowfall may exacerbate forb invasion in the mixedgrass prairie. PMID:19086291

  17. Mercury in breeding and wintering Nelson's Sparrows (Ammodramus nelsoni).

    PubMed

    Winder, V L; Emslie, S D

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to increase our understanding of Hg exposure in birds with obligate ties to coastal salt marsh and inland wetland systems. Many species filling such niches are of conservation concern because of reduced size and quality of vital habitats. We used Nelson's Sparrow (Ammodramus nelsoni) as an indicator of regional mercury (Hg) availability in its breeding and wintering salt marsh and wetland habitats. Blood, breast feathers and the first primary feather were sampled from Nelson's Sparrows wintering in North Carolina coastal salt marshes and breeding in wetland systems in North Dakota (A. n. nelsoni) and Ontario, Canada (A. n. alterus). Wintering Nelson's Sparrow breast feathers contained 3.0 times as much Hg as birds breeding in North Dakota and 2.4 times as much Hg as those breeding in Ontario. Breeding Nelson's Sparrows in North Dakota exhibited blood Hg levels 4.9 times as high as those from birds breeding along James Bay and 7.6 times as high as those wintering in North Carolina. These results provide significant insight on the timing of molt in this species as well as how Hg exposure varies regionally and seasonally for these birds. Further, our results provide a better understanding of how and where Hg exposure may be a threat to Nelson's Sparrows and other birds with obligate ties to aquatic systems. PMID:21082242

  18. a Climatology of Extreme Minimum Winter Temperatures in Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgell, Dennis Joe

    The Extreme Minimum Winter Temperature (EMWT) is the coldest temperature recorded each winter at a given weather station. This variable is a measure of winter temperature stress. Extreme cold influences the geographic distribution of plants, and is a prime control for the production of some valuable fruit crops grown in Ohio. EMWT values are often used to map plant hardiness zones, however the magnitude of EMWT and the date that it occurs has varied widely from year to year. Climatic variables rarely remain constant over time, and the plant hardiness zones could shift significantly if the climate changes and there is a trend towards warmer EMWTs. Plants that have their present geographic ranges limited by cold winter temperatures could increase their spatial extent. Furthermore, EMWT has impacts on human health and has applications for architecture. EMWTs at eighty-nine weather stations in Ohio were analyzed. Summary statistics and return period intervals for critical EMWTs are tabulated and mapped. Return period maps may be more useful for environmental planning than plant hardiness zone maps based on average EMWT, especially in a variable climate. Graphical methods, curve fitting and a probability model for the mean were utilized to examine the long term trend. The EMWT has not warmed during the known climatic record of this variable in Ohio. This study demonstrates the need for more applied climatological studies based on the observed climate record, not obscured by the assumptions of the global warming paradigm.

  19. Natural snowfall reveals large-scale flow structures in the wake of a 2.5-MW wind turbine.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiarong; Toloui, Mostafa; Chamorro, Leonardo P; Guala, Michele; Howard, Kevin; Riley, Sean; Tucker, James; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2014-01-01

    To improve power production and structural reliability of wind turbines, there is a pressing need to understand how turbines interact with the atmospheric boundary layer. However, experimental techniques capable of quantifying or even qualitatively visualizing the large-scale turbulent flow structures around full-scale turbines do not exist today. Here we use snowflakes from a winter snowstorm as flow tracers to obtain velocity fields downwind of a 2.5-MW wind turbine in a sampling area of ~36 36?m(2). The spatial and temporal resolutions of the measurements are sufficiently high to quantify the evolution of blade-generated coherent motions, such as the tip and trailing sheet vortices, identify their instability mechanisms and correlate them with turbine operation, control and performance. Our experiment provides an unprecedented in situ characterization of flow structures around utility-scale turbines, and yields significant insights into the Reynolds number similarity issues presented in wind energy applications. PMID:24960397

  20. Changes in winter warming events in the Nordic Arctic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikhamar-Schuler, Dagrun; Isaksen, Ketil; Haugen, Jan Erik; Bjerke, Jarle Werner; Tømmervik, Hans

    2015-04-01

    In recent years winter warming events are frequently reported from Arctic areas. Extraordinarily warm weather episodes, occasionally combined with intense rainfall, cause severe ecological disturbance and great challenges for Arctic infrastructure. For example, the formation of ground ice due to winter rain or melting prevents reindeer from grazing, leads to vegetation browning, and impacts soil temperatures. The infrastructure may be affected by avalanches and floods resulting from intense snowmelt. The aim of our analysis is to study changes in warm spells during winter in the Nordic Arctic Region, here defined as the regions in Norway, Sweden and Finland north of the Arctic circle (66.5°N), including the Arctic islands Svalbard and Jan Mayen. Within this study area we have selected the longest available high quality observation series with daily temperature and precipitation. For studying future climate we use available regionally downscaled scenarios. We analyse three time periods: 1) the past 50-100 years, 2) the present (last 15 years, 2000-2014) and 3) the future (next 50-100 years). We define an extended winter season (October-April) and further divide it into three subseasons: 1) Early winter (October and November), 2) Mid-winter (December, January and February) and 3) Late-winter (March and April). We identify warm spells using two different classification criteria: a) days with temperature above 0°C (the melting temperature); and b) days with temperature in excess of the 90th percentile of the 1985-2014 temperature for each subseason. Both wet and dry warm spells are analysed. We compare the results for the mainland stations (maritime and inland stations) with the Arctic islands. All stations have very high frequency of warm weather events in the period 1930-1940s and for the last 15 years (2000-2014). For the most recent period the largest increase in number of warm spells are observed at the northernmost stations. We also find a continuation of this pattern with a strong increase in warm spells for the next 50 years.

  1. Eurasian winter cooling in the warming hiatus of 1998-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Stevens, Bjorn; Marotzke, Jochem

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the relative magnitudes of the contributions of surface temperature trends from different latitude bands to the recent warming hiatus. We confirm from five different global data sets that the global-mean surface temperature trend in the period 1998-2012 is strongly influenced by a pronounced Eurasian winter cooling trend. To understand the drivers of this winter cooling trend, we perform three 20-member ensembles of simulations with different prescribed sea surface temperature and sea ice in the atmospheric model ECHAM6. Our experimental results suggest that the Arctic sea ice loss does not drive systematic changes in the Northern Hemisphere large-scale circulation in the past decades. The observed Eurasian winter cooling trend over 1998-2012 arises essentially from atmospheric internal variability and constitutes an extreme climate event. However, the observed reduction in Arctic sea ice enhances the variability of Eurasian winter climate and thus increases the probability of an extreme Eurasian winter cooling trend.

  2. The impacts of surface ozone pollution on winter wheat productivity in China - An econometric approach.

    PubMed

    Yi, Fujin; Jiang, Fei; Zhong, Funing; Zhou, Xun; Ding, Aijun

    2016-01-01

    The impact of surface ozone pollution on winter wheat yield is empirically estimated by considering socio-economic and weather determinants. This research is the first to use an economic framework to estimate the ozone impact, and a unique county-level panel is employed to examine the impact of the increasing surface ozone concentration on the productivity of winter wheat in China. In general, the increment of surface ozone concentration during the ozone-sensitive period of winter wheat is determined to be harmful to its yield, and a conservative reduction of ozone pollution could significantly increase China's wheat supply. PMID:26552518

  3. Sleep in fall/winter seasonal affective disorder: effects of light and changing seasons.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J L; Rosen, L N; Mendelson, W B; Jacobsen, F M; Skwerer, R G; Joseph-Vanderpool, J R; Duncan, C C; Wehr, T A; Rosenthal, N E

    1994-05-01

    Disturbances of sleep are a hallmark of seasonal affective disorders (SAD), as they are of other mood disorders. Fall/winter SAD patients most often report hypersomnia. Among responses of 293 SAD patients on a symptom questionnaire, complaints of winter hypersomnia (80%) greatly exceeded insomnia (10%), hypersomnia plus insomnia (5%), or no sleep difficulty (5%). Increased sleep length in fall/winter is not unique to SAD. Among 1571 individuals across four latitudes surveyed at random from the general population, winter sleep increases of < or = 2 hr/day relative to summer were reported by nearly half. However, hypersomnia had a low correlation (r = 0.29) with the total number of other SAD symptoms that were reported in this sample. Ten SAD patients kept daily sleep logs across 1 yr that showed increases in fall and winter (sleeping most in October; least in May) whose maximum averaged 2.7 hr per day more weekend sleep than in spring and summer. These winter increases might have been somewhat attenuated since most received light therapy during part of the winter. Nocturnal EEG recordings of depressed SAD patients in winter showed decreased sleep efficiency, decreased delta sleep percentage, and increased REM density (but normal REM latency) in comparison with recordings: (1) from themselves in summer; (2) from themselves after > or = 9 days of light therapy; or (3) from age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Thus, the extent of fall/winter oversleeping recorded by our SAD patients did not differ dramatically from that reported by the general population, but sleep complaints of our SAD patients have been accompanied by features of sleep architecture that are different from healthy controls and are reversed by summer or by bright-light therapy. PMID:8064650

  4. Climate warming will not decrease winter mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staddon, Philip L.; Montgomery, Hugh E.; Depledge, Michael H.

    2014-03-01

    It is widely assumed by policymakers and health professionals that the harmful health impacts of anthropogenic climate change will be partially offset by a decline in excess winter deaths (EWDs) in temperate countries, as winters warm. Recent UK government reports state that winter warming will decrease EWDs. Over the past few decades, however, the UK and other temperate countries have simultaneously experienced better housing, improved health care, higher incomes and greater awareness of the risks of cold. The link between winter temperatures and EWDs may therefore no longer be as strong as before. Here we report on the key drivers that underlie year-to-year variations in EWDs. We found that the association of year-to-year variation in EWDs with the number of cold days in winter ( <5 °C), evident until the mid 1970s, has disappeared, leaving only the incidence of influenza-like illnesses to explain any of the year-to-year variation in EWDs in the past decade. Although EWDs evidently do exist, winter cold severity no longer predicts the numbers affected. We conclude that no evidence exists that EWDs in England and Wales will fall if winters warm with climate change. These findings have important implications for climate change health adaptation policies.

  5. Predictability of northern Adriatic winter conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supi?, Nastjenjka; Kraus, Romina; Kuzmi?, Milivoj; Paschini, Elio; Precali, Robert; Russo, Aniello; Vilibi?, Ivica

    2012-02-01

    Presented results indicate that a long-term (several months ahead) forecast of the winter northern Adriatic conditions is possible and that it can be based on the analysis of meteorological conditions and geostrophic circulation fields of the previous autumn. Using 1981-2007 February data we show that in winters of the type A, salinity in the northern Adriatic is lower and production of phytoplankton higher than in the B type winters. This indicates that the impact of the Po River waters on the northern Adriatic is more pronounced during the A type winters. The two types, A and B, have already been identified on the basis of the bottom density differences between eastern and western part of the northern Adriatic but more precise definition is given here. Based on the data collected during hydrographic cruises in 2000 (type B conditions) and 2001 (type A conditions), we found that the two winters differed in geostrophic circulation patterns as well. Eastward of the Po River delta there was a large cyclonic gyre in 2000 and a large anticyclonic gyre in 2001. Circulation patterns were highly dependent on autumn conditions, with bottom density changes as the most likely triggering cause. Strong surface heat losses and many bora episodes preceded the winter of 2000, while moderate cooling and sirocco events preceded the winter of 2001.

  6. Density- and Size-Dependent Winter Mortality and Growth of Late Chaoborus flavicans Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Arne

    2013-01-01

    Winter processes such as overwinter survival and growth of individuals can have wide-ranging consequences for population dynamics and communities within and across seasons. In freshwater organisms winter processes have been mainly studied in fish despite that invertebrates also have substantial impacts on lake and pond food webs. One of the major invertebrate consumers in lake and ponds is the planktonic larvae of the dipteran insect Chaoborus spec. However, while much is known about Chaoborus feeding ecology, behaviour and structuring role in food webs, its winter ecology and how it affects its populations are poorly understood. Here size- and density-dependent winter mortality and body growth of late Chaoborus flavicans larvae were quantified over naturally occurring size and density ranges in autumn and under natural winter conditions using two field enclosure experiments. Winter mortality increased with autumn density but decreased with autumn body size while winter growth rates decreased with autumn density and body sizes. There was also a density- and size-independent background mortality component. The proportion of pupae found in spring decreased strongly and exponentially with autumn density. These results may explain the commonly observed univoltine life cycle and multi-annual density fluctuations in northern Chaoborus populations. They further demonstrate the relevance of winter processes and conditions for freshwater invertebrates and ecosystems. PMID:24124517

  7. Assessing winter cover crop nutrient uptake efficiency using a water quality simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, I.-Y.; Lee, S.; Sadeghi, A. M.; Beeson, P. C.; Hively, W. D.; McCarty, G. W.; Lang, M. W.

    2013-11-01

    Winter cover crops are an effective conservation management practice with potential to improve water quality. Throughout the Chesapeake Bay Watershed (CBW), which is located in the Mid-Atlantic US, winter cover crop use has been emphasized and federal and state cost-share programs are available to farmers to subsidize the cost of winter cover crop establishment. The objective of this study was to assess the long-term effect of planting winter cover crops at the watershed scale and to identify critical source areas of high nitrate export. A physically-based watershed simulation model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), was calibrated and validated using water quality monitoring data and satellite-based estimates of winter cover crop species performance to simulate hydrological processes and nutrient cycling over the period of 1991-2000. Multiple scenarios were developed to obtain baseline information on nitrate loading without winter cover crops planted and to investigate how nitrate loading could change with different winter cover crop planting scenarios, including different species, planting times, and implementation areas. The results indicate that winter cover crops had a negligible impact on water budget, but significantly reduced nitrate leaching to groundwater and delivery to the waterways. Without winter cover crops, annual nitrate loading was approximately 14 kg ha-1, but it decreased to 4.6-10.1 kg ha-1 with winter cover crops resulting in a reduction rate of 27-67% at the watershed scale. Rye was most effective, with a potential to reduce nitrate leaching by up to 93% with early planting at the field scale. Early planting of winter cover crops (~30 days of additional growing days) was crucial, as it lowered nitrate export by an additional ~2 kg ha-1 when compared to late planting scenarios. The effectiveness of cover cropping increased with increasing extent of winter cover crop implementation. Agricultural fields with well-drained soils and those that were more frequently used to grow corn had a higher potential for nitrate leaching and export to the waterways. This study supports the effective implement of winter cover crop programs, in part by helping to target critical pollution source areas for winter cover crop implementation.

  8. Assessing winter cover crop nutrient uptake efficiency using a water quality simulation model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yeo, In-Young; Lee, Sangchui; Sadeghi, Ali M.; Beeson, Peter C.; Hively, W. Dean; McCarty, Greg W.; Lang, Megan W.

    2013-01-01

    Winter cover crops are an effective conservation management practice with potential to improve water quality. Throughout the Chesapeake Bay Watershed (CBW), which is located in the Mid-Atlantic US, winter cover crop use has been emphasized and federal and state cost-share programs are available to farmers to subsidize the cost of winter cover crop establishment. The objective of this study was to assess the long-term effect of planting winter cover crops at the watershed scale and to identify critical source areas of high nitrate export. A physically-based watershed simulation model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), was calibrated and validated using water quality monitoring data and satellite-based estimates of winter cover crop species performance to simulate hydrological processes and nutrient cycling over the period of 1991–2000. Multiple scenarios were developed to obtain baseline information on nitrate loading without winter cover crops planted and to investigate how nitrate loading could change with different winter cover crop planting scenarios, including different species, planting times, and implementation areas. The results indicate that winter cover crops had a negligible impact on water budget, but significantly reduced nitrate leaching to groundwater and delivery to the waterways. Without winter cover crops, annual nitrate loading was approximately 14 kg ha−1, but it decreased to 4.6–10.1 kg ha−1 with winter cover crops resulting in a reduction rate of 27–67% at the watershed scale. Rye was most effective, with a potential to reduce nitrate leaching by up to 93% with early planting at the field scale. Early planting of winter cover crops (~30 days of additional growing days) was crucial, as it lowered nitrate export by an additional ~2 kg ha−1 when compared to late planting scenarios. The effectiveness of cover cropping increased with increasing extent of winter cover crop implementation. Agricultural fields with well-drained soils and those that were more frequently used to grow corn had a higher potential for nitrate leaching and export to the waterways. This study supports the effective implement of winter cover crop programs, in part by helping to target critical pollution source areas for winter cover crop implementation.

  9. Explaining unusual winter lightning in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindo, Takatoshi; Ishii, Masaru; Williams, Earle

    2011-11-01

    Third International Symposium on Winter Lightning; Sapporo, Japan, 15-16 June 2011 Japan's meteorological setting in winter is unusual: It is an island in a relatively warm sea frequently overswept by colder air from Siberia. This sets up appreciable atmospheric instability in the fringe of the land adjacent to the Sea of Japan. Heavy snowstorms overlap the edge of the island and produce extraordinarily energetic lightning flashes that initiate from points on the ground (known as ground-to-cloud (GC) strokes) and wreak havoc on power lines and, more recently, wind turbines. These troublesome and costly conditions set the stage for the third in a series of conferences on winter lightning.

  10. Understanding of changes in winter runoff across Eurasian pan-Arctic using new observational data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiklomanov, Alexander; Markov, Mikhail; Tokarev, Igor

    2015-04-01

    There are many evidences of increasing river runoff in Eurasian pan-Arctic. In some regions the winter river flow has increased over 50% when compared to multi-year means. Due to the extensive freeze of surface hydrology, river runoff during the winter is mostly defined by groundwater drainage. The possible causes of winter discharge increase include growth of precipitation in summer-fall and increase in active layer thickness and permafrost thaw. These causes, however, cannot explain consistent increase in discharge throughout the entire winter. We assume that the potential cause of increased winter river runoff is the reduction of barriers between subsurface water reservoirs and surface runoff due to improved drainage pathways as the result of increasing winter air temperature and decreasing river ice thickness. To check this hypothesis we evaluated the long-term relationships over 1960-2012 between air temperature, river ice thickness and river discharge for 32 small and medium size rivers located in different regions of Eurasian pan-Arctic with various climatic conditions and land cover. Preliminary analysis has shown better relationships between river ice thickness and river discharge in regions with no underlying permafrost implying stronger influence of river ice on surface and ground water exchange in these areas.

  11. An analysis of US propane markets, winter 1996-1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    In late summer 1996, in response to relatively low inventory levels and tight world oil markets, prices for crude oil, natural gas, and products derived from both began to increase rapidly ahead of the winter heating season. Various government and private sector forecasts indicated the potential for supply shortfalls and sharp price increases, especially in the event of unusually severe winter weather. Following a rapid runup in gasoline prices in the spring of 1996, public concerns were mounting about a possibly similar situation in heating fuels, with potentially more serious consequences. In response to these concerns, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) participated in numerous briefings and meetings with Executive Branch officials, Congressional committee members and staff, State Energy Offices, and consumers. EIA instituted a coordinated series of actions to closely monitor the situation and inform the public. This study constitutes one of those actions: an examination of propane supply, demand, and price developments and trends.

  12. Impacts of winter storms on air-sea gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiqing; Perrie, Will; Vagle, Svein

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate air-sea gas exchange during winter storms, using field measurements from Ocean Station Papa in the Northeast Pacific (50N, 145W). We show that increasing gas transfer rates are coincident with increasing winds and deepening depth of bubble penetration, and that this process depends on sea state. Wave-breaking is shown to be an important factor in the gas transfer velocity during the peaks of the storms, increasing the flux rates by up to 20%. Gas transfer rates and concentrations can exhibit asymmetry, reflecting a sudden increase with the onset of a storm, and gradual recovery stages.

  13. Herbivory on shoalgrass by wintering redheads in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, C.A.; Custer, T.W.; Zwank, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    An estimated 80% of redheads (Aythya americana) winter on the Laguna Madre of south Texas and Mexico and feed almost exclusively on shoalgrass (Halodule wrightii) rhizomes. Shoalgrass abundance has decreased by 60% over the past 30 years, and because the effects of shoalgrass loss on wintering redheads are unknown, we initiated a study to define habitat selection criteria and document the effect of wintering redheads on shoalgrass in the lower Laguna Madre, Texas. Redheads consumed an average of 75% of shoalgrass rhizome biomass at collection sites each winter. When rhizome biomass was grazed to a mean biomass of ltoreq 0.18 g dry mass/core (approximately 10 g dry mass/ml), shoalgrass did not recover to its previous level the following growing season. Thirty-three percent of the sites (10) were grazed below 0.18 g dry mass/core during both years of the study, while 64% (19) were grazed below 0.18 g during 1 or the other of the 2 winters. Ramet number was positively correlated (P lt 0.001, r-2 = 0.54) with rhizome biomass; however, this relationship was influenced by grazing intensity. Heavy grazing reduced the amount of rhizome attached to each ramet compared with ungrazed ramets. Grazing had no effect on root biomass (P = 0.388), rhizome moisture content (P = 0.553), or soil magnesium, phosphorous, and potassium (P = 0.102, 0.499, 0.162, respectively). Redhead presence increased (P = 0.042) soil nitrogen levels. Foraging areas selected by redheads within the lower Laguna Madre had lower (P = 0.026) salinities (24 ppt) than areas not selected (35 ppt). Redheads did not select foraging areas in relation to crude protein levels in rhizomes. Shoalgrass habitat in the Laguna Madre should be protected from further losses and enhanced where possible.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Baraitser-Winter syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... eyelids (ptosis), high-arched eyebrows, a broad nasal bridge and tip of the nose, a long space ... Where can I find information about diagnosis or management of Baraitser-Winter syndrome? These resources address the ...

  15. How to Find Insects Weathering the Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Jane

    1979-01-01

    Discusses how and where to find insects and other invertebrates in winter, as well as how to collect samples in order to watch those animals reappear in spring. Includes crickets, honey bees, mosquitoes, house flies, and butterflies and moths. (MA)

  16. ENSO and winter storms in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cayan, D.R.; Bromirski, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The frequency and intensity of North Pacific winter storms that penetrate the California coast drives the winds, sea level, precipitation and streamflow that are crucial influences on coastal processes. There is considerable variability of these storm characteristics, in large part owing to the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO} phenomenon. There is a great contrast of the storm characteristics during the El Nino phase vs. the La Nina phase, with the largest scale, southerly extensive winter storms generated during El Nino.

  17. Key areas for wintering North American herons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mikuska, T.; Kushlan, J.A.; Hartley, S.

    1998-01-01

    Nearly all North American heron populations are migratory, but details of where they winter are little known. Locations where North American herons winter were identified using banding recovery data. North American herons winter from Canada through northern South America but especially in eastern North America south of New York, Florida, California, Louisiana, Texas, Mexico and Cuba, these areas accounting for 63% of winter recoveries. We identified regions where recoveries for various species clustered as "key areas." These forty-three areas constitute a network of areas that hold sites that likely are important to wintering North American herons. Within each area, we identify specific sites that are potentially important to wintering herons. The relative importance of each area and site within the network must be evaluated by further on the ground inventory. Because of biases inherent in the available data, these hypothesized key areas are indicative rather than exhaustive. As a first cut, this network of areas can serve to inform further inventory activities and can provide an initial basis to begin planning for the year-round conservation of North American heron populations.

  18. Some policy implications of nuclear winter

    SciTech Connect

    Gertler, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The theory of nuclear winter has had as checkered a history as any new idea since Darwin published The Origin of Species. There have been questions of its scientific validity, reviews both laudatory and damning, pleas for arms reductions, hosannahs for a newfound hope that nuclear war has at least been rendered completely unthinkable, and frustration that two generations of human toil in weapons laboratories and think tanks have been rendered by a natural doomsday machine. Some have even suggested that nuclear winter might be used as an offensive weapon. Disturbingly, a substantial number of commentators have concluded that nuclear winter carries no immediate implications for policy, because to their way of thinking, nuclear winter is a (a) just one more of the many undesirable effects of nuclear war; (b) the ulimate deterrent to nuclear use, and therefore should be welcomed rather than compensated for; or (c) an unproven theory, meaning that consideration of policy questions is premature. Those who overlook the policy questions are following a dangerous path. The nuclear winter theory contains serious short- and long-term implications for United States foreign and strategic policy. Although the theory may never be confirmed or refuted, discussion of these policy questions should begin now because many of the potential effects of nuclear winter - particularly in foreign policy - will come about regardless of whether or not the phenomenon can actually exist.

  19. Near cessation of Eighteen Degree Water renewal in the western North Atlantic in the warm winter of 2011-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billheimer, Sam; Talley, Lynne D.

    2013-12-01

    The winter of 2011-2012 was a particularly weak season for the renewal of "Eighteen Degree Water" (EDW), the Subtropical Mode Water of the western North Atlantic, as demonstrated by Argo and repeat hydrography. Weak, late winter buoyancy forcing produced shallower than usual winter mixed layers throughout the subtropical gyre, failing to thoroughly ventilate the underlying mode water, and can likely be attributed to the coinciding high, positive phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The only region where EDW was renewed was in the far northeastern Sargasso Sea where it is understood that the Gulf Stream plays a central role in formation; no EDW formed over the large regions of the gyre where deep winter mixed layers driven by surface buoyancy loss normally create EDW. The present investigation evaluates 2011-2012 winter buoyancy content anomalies, surface buoyancy fluxes, and advection of buoyancy via the Gulf Stream and compares them with the previous seven winters that exhibited more vigorous EDW formation. The weak 2011-2012 formation did not result from increased Gulf Stream heat advection, and was also not driven by preconditioning as the buoyancy content of the region prior to the onset of winter forcing was not unusually high. Rather, the weak formation resulted from climatologically weak surface cooling late in winter. The winter of 2007-2008 also experienced particularly weak EDW formation under similar conditions, including a high NAO and weak late winter surface cooling.

  20. The transformation of frequency distributions of winter precipitation to spring streamflow probabilities in cold regions; case studies from the Canadian Prairies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shook, Kevin; Pomeroy, John; van der Kamp, Garth

    2015-02-01

    Hydrological processes alter the states and/or locations of water, and so they can be regarded as being transformations of the properties of the time series of input variables to those of output variables, such as the transformation of precipitation to streamflow. Semi-arid cold regions such as the Canadian Prairies have extremely low annual streamflow efficiencies because of high infiltration rates, large surface water storage capacities, high evaporation rates and strong climate seasonality. As a result snowfall produces the majority of streamflow. It is demonstrated that the probability distributions of Prairie spring streamflows are controlled by three frequency transformations. The first is the transformation of snowfall by wind redistribution and ablation over the winter to form the spring snowpack. The second transformation is the melt of the spring snowpack to produce runoff over frozen agricultural soils. The third is the transformation of runoff to streamflow by the filling and spilling of depressional storage by connecting fields, ponds, wetlands and lakes. Each transformation of the PDF of the input variable to that of the output variable is demonstrated at a number of locations in the Canadian Prairies and is explained in terms of the hydrological processes causing the transformation. The resulting distributions are highly modified from that of precipitation, and the modification depends on which processes dominate streamflow formation in each basin. The results demonstrate the need to consider the effect of the interplay among hydrological processes, climate and basin characteristics in transforming precipitation frequency distributions into those of streamflow for the design of infrastructure and for water management.

  1. Ambient concentrations, scavenging ratios, and source regions of acid related compounds and trace metals during winter in northern michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadle, Steven H.; VandeKopple, Robert; Mulawa, Patricia A.; Dasch, Jean Muhlbaier

    Daily measurements the atmospheric cocnentrations of HNO 3, NO 3-, NO 2, SO 2, SO 42-, NH 4+, and several trace metals were made at the University of Michigan Biological Station over a 124-day period during the 1984-1985 winter. The composition of the daily precipitation was also determined. The relative contributions of scavenged NO 3- and HNO 3 to the precipitation was estimated by assuming that the NO 3- scavenging ratio was the same as that of trace metals with a similar particle size. Similarly, the SO 42- and SO 2 contributions were based on the scavenging ratios of NH 4+ and trace metals. On this basis, it was determined that the event median NO 3- and HNO 3 scavenging ratios were 500 and 3500, respectively. HNO 3 scavenging accounted for 83% of the total scavenged NO 3-. Scavenging of SO 42- accounted for all the snow SO 42- in 67% of the events. In the remaining events, some SO 2 was scavenged, with a median scavenging ratio of 219. Overall, 67% of the snowfall acidity appeared to be due to HNO 3 scavenging. Backward air-mass trajectories that were calculated for each event were used to determine the general source regions of the acidic species. Snow associated with air masses from the south and west accounted for 81 and 75% of the deposited NO 3- and SO 42-, respectively.

  2. [Photo-thermal characteristics of a non-photosensitive and extra-premature winter wheat variety].

    PubMed

    Bake, Batur; Zheng, Dawei; van Keulen, Herman; Verhagen, Jan; Wu, Funing; Zeng, Xiaoguang

    2005-07-01

    In a sowing by stages test with winter wheat variety Jingdong 8 (JD8) as reference, this paper studied the photothermal characteristics of a non-photosensitive and extra- premature winter wheat variety Dongzao 5 (DZ5), and the effects of sowing stages on its growth and yield. The results showed that the harvest date of DZ5 was 4-5 days earlier than that of JD8, and its yield with standard sowing date increased by 43.4%. In addition, DZ5 had a shorter thermoperiod for ear differentiation, and didn't need strict vernalization process and photoperiod, which could be sown either before or after winter. PMID:16252864

  3. Do wintering Harlequin Ducks forage nocturnally at high latitudes?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rizzolo, D.J.; Esler, Daniel; Roby, D.D.; Jarvis, R.L.

    2005-01-01

    We monitored radio-tagged Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) to determine whether nocturnal feeding was part of their foraging strategy during winter in south-central Alaska. Despite attributes of our study site (low ambient temperatures, harsh weather, short day length) and study species (small body size, high daytime foraging rates) that would be expected to favor nocturnal foraging, we found no evidence of nocturnal dive-feeding. Signals from eight radio-tagged Harlequin Ducks never exhibited signal loss due to diving during a total of 780 minutes of nocturnal monitoring. In contrast, the same eight birds exhibited signal loss during 62 ?? 7% (SE) of 5-minute diurnal monitoring periods (total of 365 minutes of monitoring). Our results suggest that Harlequin Ducks in south-central Alaska face a stringent time constraint on daytime foraging during midwinter. Harlequin Ducks wintering at high latitudes, therefore, may be particularly sensitive to factors that increase foraging requirements or decrease foraging efficiency.

  4. Red spruce decline---Winter injury and air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, T.M. )

    1989-10-01

    There has been a widespread decline in growth of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) since 1960 in the eastern United States. There is evidence that this decline is at least partly attributable to age- and density-related growth patterns, particularly at lower elevations. Mortality has been severe at high elevation sites where similar episodes have occasionally occurred in the last 100 years. At these sites, periods of low growth preceding 1960 were related to periods with warm late summers and cold early winters. Since 1960, this relationship no longer holds, although there is an association with unusual deviations from mean temperatures. There are field reports that one of the main causes of reduced growth and mortality is apical dieback induced by severe winter conditions. Preliminary observations suggest that high elevation red spruce may not be sufficiently hardened to tolerate low autumn temperatures. However, appearance of injury in the spring, association of injury with wind exposure and correlation of provenance susceptibility with cuticular transpiration rates, including the importance of desiccation injury. Sensitivity to both types of winter injury may be increased by air pollutants (particularly ozone and less probably, acid mist or excess nitrogen deposition). Nutrient deficiency (particularly magnesium and to a lesser extent potassium) may also increase cold sensitivity. The nature and extent of these interactions are being actively researched for red spruce. 48 refs.

  5. Evidence of a change in water chemistry in Canada's subarctic associated with enhanced winter streamflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, C.; Kokelj, S. V.; Kokelj, S. A.; McCluskie, M.; Hedstrom, N.

    2015-01-01

    winter streamflow is a characteristic of a nival/pluvial regime that has emerged in parts of the subarctic Canadian Shield because of increasingly common late summer rains. This phenomenon is part of a widespread trend toward higher winter streamflow in watersheds across the circumpolar north. There may be implications for biogeochemical systems as streamflow regimes undergo these types of changes associated with climate warming. Streamflow and geochemical fluxes were observed over 2 years with different winter flow conditions in a subarctic Canadian Shield catchment. Results show that higher wintertime loads of carbon and solutes associated with enhanced winter streamflow were in association with an expansion of contributing areas to run off over what would have existed during typical winter recession. Furthermore, the wet fall conditions that lead to enhanced winter streamflow require water tables close to the topographic surface in highly conductive organic soil layers, which is a similar to the condition during the spring melt. Fall rainfall-runoff leaves an ample volume of water in the lakes that are ubiquitous in this landscape. This water maintains winter streamflow during a time when it traditionally would have ceased. A slowing of biological activity under lake ice increases net mineralization and nitrification rates. This convergence of nitrogen cycling and winter streamflow produced a disproportionate flux of inorganic nitrogen from the study catchment. A conceptual model of how enhanced winter streamflow changes water chemistry in a lake-dominated shield landscape is proposed and may be used as a benchmark to guide hypotheses of process interactions, change in other landscapes, or across scales.

  6. Thermodynamic modelling predicts energetic bottleneck for seabirds wintering in the northwest Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Fort, Jrme; Porter, Warren P; Grmillet, David

    2009-08-01

    Studying the energetics of marine top predators such as seabirds is essential to understand processes underlying adult winter survival and its impact on population dynamics. Winter survival is believed to be the single most important life-history trait in long-lived species but its determinants are largely unknown. Seabirds are inaccessible during this season, so conventional metabolic studies are extremely challenging and new approaches are needed. This paper describes and uses a state-of-the-art mechanistic model, Niche Mapper, to predict energy expenditure and food requirements of the two main seabird species wintering in the northwest Atlantic. We found that energy demand increased throughout the winter phase in both species. Across this period, mean estimated daily energy requirements were 1306 kJ day(-1) for Brnnich's guillemots (Uria lomvia) and 430 kJ day(-1) for little auks (Alle alle) wintering off Greenland and Newfoundland. Mean estimated daily food requirements were 547 g wet food day(-1) for Brnnich's guillemots, and 289 g wet food day(-1) for little auks. For both species and both wintering sites, our model predicts a sharp increase in energy expenditure between November and December, primarily driven by climatic factors such as air temperature and wind speed. These findings strongly suggest the existence of an energetic bottleneck for North Atlantic seabirds towards the end of the year, a challenging energetic phase which might explain recurrent events of winter mass-mortality, so called 'seabird winter wrecks'. Our study therefore emphasizes the relevance of thermodynamics/biophysical modelling for investigating the energy balance of wintering marine top predators and its interplay with survival and population dynamics in the context of global change. PMID:19617442

  7. Changing number of Canada geese wintering in different regions of the Atlantic Flyway

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hestbeck, J.B.

    1998-01-01

    During the past 40 years, profound changes have occurred in the number of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) wintering in different regions of the Atlantic Flyway. To explain the declining number of wintering geese in the Chesapeake and Carolina regions and the increasing number in the mid-Atlantic region from 1984 to 1989, I tested several hypotheses concerning regional differences in production, survival, and movement. The observation of migratory geese neckbanded in northern Quebec and throughout the winter grounds, and the lack of a regional difference in the proportion of young in the harvest, indicated that regional differences in production on the breeding grounds was unlikely to explain the observed changes in mid-winter number. Average annual survival rates were highest for geese in the Chesapeake and lowest for geese in the mid-Atlantic indicating that differential survival between regions did not cause the large changes in mid-winter numbers between regions. Geese were more likely to move to, and remain in, the Chesapeake than any other region. Estimated movement patterns did not match observed changes in mid-winter counts. Consequently, the observed changes in number of wintering geese from 1984 to 1989 could not be explained by my analyses of differential production, survival, or movement. The survival and movement analyses, however, were based largely on data from migratory, northern breeding geese. In the aerial Midwinter Waterfowl Survey, migratory, northern-breeding geese cannot be distinguished from local, southern-breeding geese. The changes in mid-winter numbers may result from declining numbers of migratory, northern-breeding geese wintering in the Chesapeake and Carolinas and increasing numbers of local, southem-breeding geese remaining in the mid-Atlantic.

  8. Relations between winter 700-mb height anomalies and mass balance of South Cascade Glacier, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, G.J.; Fountain, A.G.

    1995-12-31

    The yearly net mass balance of South Cascade Glacier, Washington, decreased during the mid-1970`s. Results show that the decrease is primarily caused by a significant decrease in the winter mass balance. The decrease in winter mass balance is caused, in part, by changes in winter mean atmospheric circulation that began during the mid-1970`s. Since the mid-1970`s, there has been an increase in winter mean atmospheric pressure over western Canada and the northern western contiguous US and a decrease in winter mean atmospheric pressure in the eastern North Pacific Ocean centered near the Aleutian islands. These changes in atmospheric circulation indicate a decrease in the movement of storms and moisture from the Pacific Ocean into the western contiguous US. In addition, the increase in atmospheric pressure over western Canada and the northern western contiguous US indicates an increase in subsidence, which results in a warming and drying of the air that further reduces precipitation and also increases the ratio of rain to snow during the cold season. These factors contribute to below-average winter mass balances.

  9. Excess Winter Mortality and Cold Temperatures in a Subtropical City, Guangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Chau, Patsy Yuen-Kwan; Yang, Lin; Chen, Ping-Yan; Wong, Chit-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Background A significant increase in mortality was observed during cold winters in many temperate regions. However, there is a lack of evidence from tropical and subtropical regions, and the influence of ambient temperatures on seasonal variation of mortality was not well documented. Methods This study included 213,737 registered deaths from January 2003 to December 2011 in Guangzhou, a subtropical city in Southern China. Excess winter mortality was calculated by the excess percentage of monthly mortality in winters over that of non-winter months. A generalized linear model with a quasi-Poisson distribution was applied to analyze the association between monthly mean temperature and mortality, after controlling for other meteorological measures and air pollution. Results The mortality rate in the winter was 26% higher than the average rate in other seasons. On average, there were 1,848 excess winter deaths annually, with around half (52%) from cardiovascular diseases and a quarter (24%) from respiratory diseases. Excess winter mortality was higher in the elderly, females and those with low education level than the young, males and those with high education level, respectively. A much larger winter increase was observed in out-of-hospital mortality compared to in-hospital mortality (45% vs. 17%). We found a significant negative correlation of annual excess winter mortality with average winter temperature (rs=-0.738, P=0.037), but not with air pollution levels. A 1 C decrease in monthly mean temperature was associated with an increase of 1.38% (95%CI:0.34%-2.40%) and 0.88% (95%CI:0.11%-1.64%) in monthly mortality at lags of 0-1 month, respectively. Conclusion Similar to temperate regions, a subtropical city Guangzhou showed a clear seasonal pattern in mortality, with a sharper spike in winter. Our results highlight the role of cold temperature on the winter mortality even in warm climate. Precautionary measures should be strengthened to mitigate cold-related mortality for people living in warm climate. PMID:24116214

  10. Solar Impacts on SST, Atmospheric Circulations and Extreme Climate Background in Boreal Winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, H.

    2010-12-01

    The impacts of solar activity on sea-surface temperature (SST), atmospheric circulations and extreme climate conditions in boreal winter are explored by data analysis. The sunspot number (SSN), SST and pressure-level climate variables with their respective available data records up to the 2009/2010 winter are used. Wavelet decomposition shows that warming or cooling trends in global SST on certain time periods are very likely to be influenced by the interaction and interference among various timescales of climate variables. These timescales are mainly resulted from the nonlinear resonance of the climate system to the multi-scale solar forcing. Based on the observed SSN and SST, as well as on the predicted weaker Solar Cycle 24, the global SST is very likely to be cooling in the coming decades with ups and downs on the interannual timescales. Composite analysis for pressure-level air temperature and winds for six solar minima (SCmin) and six solar maxima (SCmax) on the 11yr timescale during past six decades shows their distinct features in 3D space (up to 10hPa in pressure level). For SCmin, the easterly wind phase of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in both tropical and polar stratosphere, the warm phase of El Nio-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the negative phase of the Arctic Oscillation (AO), and the stratospheric polar warming that sometimes connects to a blocking situation in the high-lat lower troposphere, are more likely to be enhanced by SCmin than SCmax. Besides, in the tropical stratosphere, there is an anomalously cold layer between 100-50hPa around the tropics, except for the Pacific region where the continuity is broken due to strong updraft during the warm phase of ENSO. However, for SCmax an anomalously warm layer between 50-20hPa is found around the tropics without apparent discontinuity. Walker circulation and zonally averaged meridional circulations are also apparently different between SCmin and SCmax. It is very likely that the zonally averaged meridional temperature gradient is enhanced for SCmin while weakened for SCmax. Thus, the mid-lat circulation has larger wave activity for SCmin than for SCmax. The combination of these anomalous circulations for SCmin or SCmax could lead to extreme climate background conditions. The anomalous 2009/2010 winter is such a case for SCmin. This winter seems to be influenced by both the prolonged solar minimum right before the start of Solar Cycle 24 and the negative phase of the current 88yr cycle, which has not reached its grand minimum yet. The climate background during such a low solar activity period favors large-amplitude negative phase of the AO and the stratospheric polar warming, which correspond to anomalously large meridional wind components causing strong north-south exchange in heat and moisture. The strong northerly wind components bring anomalously cold air to the mid-latitudes, causing record-breaking low temperature in many places. The central equatorial Pacific warming during the El Nio (Modoki) supplied abundant moisture to higher latitudes through abnormaly shifted meridional circulations causing many record-breaking snowfall events in mid-latitudes during the winter.

  11. Winter Survival of Individual Honey Bees and Honey Bee Colonies Depends on Level of Varroa destructor Infestation

    PubMed Central

    van Dooremalen, Coby; Gerritsen, Lonne; Cornelissen, Bram; van der Steen, Jozef J. M.; van Langevelde, Frank; Blacquire, Tjeerd

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent elevated winter loss of honey bee colonies is a major concern. The presence of the mite Varroa destructor in colonies places an important pressure on bee health. V. destructor shortens the lifespan of individual bees, while long lifespan during winter is a primary requirement to survive until the next spring. We investigated in two subsequent years the effects of different levels of V. destructor infestation during the transition from short-lived summer bees to long-lived winter bees on the lifespan of individual bees and the survival of bee colonies during winter. Colonies treated earlier in the season to reduce V. destructor infestation during the development of winter bees were expected to have longer bee lifespan and higher colony survival after winter. Methodology/Principal Findings Mite infestation was reduced using acaricide treatments during different months (July, August, September, or not treated). We found that the number of capped brood cells decreased drastically between August and November, while at the same time, the lifespan of the bees (marked cohorts) increased indicating the transition to winter bees. Low V. destructor infestation levels before and during the transition to winter bees resulted in an increase in lifespan of bees and higher colony survival compared to colonies that were not treated and that had higher infestation levels. A variety of stress-related factors could have contributed to the variation in longevity and winter survival that we found between years. Conclusions/Significance This study contributes to theory about the multiple causes for the recent elevated colony losses in honey bees. Our study shows the correlation between long lifespan of winter bees and colony loss in spring. Moreover, we show that colonies treated earlier in the season had reduced V. destructor infestation during the development of winter bees resulting in longer bee lifespan and higher colony survival after winter. PMID:22558421

  12. First records of winter sea ice concentration in the southwest Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, Alexander J.; Crosta, Xavier; Quilty, Patrick G.; Fink, David; Howard, William; Armand, Leanne K.

    2015-11-01

    We use a Generalized Additive Model (GAM) to provide the first winter sea ice concentration record from two cores located within the southwest Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean. To compliment the application of GAM, a time series analysis on satellite records of sea ice concentration data was used to extend the standard 13.25 year time series used for paleoceanography. After comparing GAM sea ice estimates with previously published paleo sea ice data we then focus on a new paleo winter sea ice record for marine sediment core E27-23 (5937.1'S, 15514.3'E), allowing us to provide a more comprehensive view of winter sea ice dynamics for the southwest Pacific Ocean. The paleo winter sea ice concentration estimates provide the first suggestion that winter sea ice within the southwestern Pacific might have expanded during the Antarctic Cold Reversal. Throughout the Holocene, core E27-23 documents millennial scale variability in paleo winter sea ice coverage within the southwest Pacific. Holocene winter sea ice expansion may have resulted from the Laurentide Ice Sheet deglaciation, increased intensity of the westerly winds, as well as a northern migration of the Subtropical and/or Sub-Antarctic Fronts. Brief consideration is given to the development of a paleo summer sea ice proxy. We conclude that there is no evidence that summer sea ice ever existed at core sites SO136-111 and E27-23 over the last 220 and 52,000 years, respectively.

  13. A metagenomic assessment of winter and summer bacterioplankton from Antarctica Peninsula coastal surface waters

    PubMed Central

    Grzymski, Joseph J; Riesenfeld, Christian S; Williams, Timothy J; Dussaq, Alex M; Ducklow, Hugh; Erickson, Matthew; Cavicchioli, Ricardo; Murray, Alison E

    2012-01-01

    Antarctic surface oceans are well-studied during summer when irradiance levels are high, sea ice is melting and primary productivity is at a maximum. Coincident with this timing, the bacterioplankton respond with significant increases in secondary productivity. Little is known about bacterioplankton in winter when darkness and sea-ice cover inhibit photoautotrophic primary production. We report here an environmental genomic and small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) analysis of winter and summer Antarctic Peninsula coastal seawater bacterioplankton. Intense inter-seasonal differences were reflected through shifts in community composition and functional capacities encoded in winter and summer environmental genomes with significantly higher phylogenetic and functional diversity in winter. In general, inferred metabolisms of summer bacterioplankton were characterized by chemoheterotrophy, photoheterotrophy and aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis while the winter community included the capacity for bacterial and archaeal chemolithoautotrophy. Chemolithoautotrophic pathways were dominant in winter and were similar to those recently reported in global ‘dark ocean' mesopelagic waters. If chemolithoautotrophy is widespread in the Southern Ocean in winter, this process may be a previously unaccounted carbon sink and may help account for the unexplained anomalies in surface inorganic nitrogen content. PMID:22534611

  14. Temperature characteristics of winter roost-sites for birds and mammals: tree cavities and anthropogenic alternatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grüebler, Martin U.; Widmer, Silv; Korner-Nievergelt, Fränzi; Naef-Daenzer, Beat

    2014-07-01

    The microclimate of potential roost-sites is likely to be a crucial determinant in the optimal roost-site selection of endotherms, in particular during the winter season of temperate zones. Available roost-sites for birds and mammals in European high trunk orchards are mainly tree cavities, wood stacks and artificial nest boxes. However, little is known about the microclimatic patterns inside cavities and thermal advantages of using these winter roost-sites. Here, we simultaneously investigate the thermal patterns of winter roost-sites in relation to winter ambient temperature and their insulation capacity. While tree cavities and wood stacks strongly buffered the daily cycle of temperature changes, nest boxes showed low buffering capacity. The buffering effect of tree cavities was stronger at extreme ambient temperatures compared to temperatures around zero. Heat sources inside roosts amplified Δ T (i.e., the difference between inside and outside temperatures), particularly in the closed roosts of nest boxes and tree cavities, and less in the open wood stacks with stronger circulation of air. Positive Δ T due to the installation of a heat source increased in cold ambient temperatures. These results suggest that orchard habitats in winter show a spatiotemporal mosaic of sites providing different thermal benefits varying over time and in relation to ambient temperatures. At cold temperatures tree cavities provide significantly higher thermal benefits than nest boxes or wood stacks. Thus, in winter ecology of hole-using endotherms, the availability of tree cavities may be an important characteristic of winter habitat quality.

  15. Variability of Winter Air Temperature in Mid-Latitude Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.; Ardizzone, J.; Atlas, R.; Bungato, D.; Cierniewski, J.; Jusem, J. C.; Przybylak, R.; Schubert, S.; Starr, D.; Walczewski, J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to report extreme winter/early-spring air temperature (hereinafter temperature) anomalies in mid-latitude Europe, and to discuss the underlying forcing to these interannual fluctuations. Warm advection from the North Atlantic in late winter controls the surface-air temperature, as indicated by the substantial correlation between the speed of the surface southwesterlies over the eastern North Atlantic (quantified by a specific Index Ina) and the 2-meter level air temperatures (hereinafter Ts) over Europe, 45-60 deg N, in winter. In mid-March and subsequently, the correlation drops drastically (quite often it is negative). This change in the relationship between Ts and Ina marks a transition in the control of the surface-air temperature: absorption of insolation replaces the warm advection as the dominant control. This forcing by maritime-air advection in winter was demonstrated in a previous publication, and is re-examined here in conjunction with extreme fluctuations of temperatures in Europe. We analyze here the interannual variability at its extreme by comparing warm-winter/early-spring of 1989/90 with the opposite scenario in 1995/96. For these two December-to-March periods the differences in the monthly mean temperature in Warsaw and Torun, Poland, range above 10 C. Short-term (shorter than a month) fluctuations of the temperature are likewise very strong. We conduct pentad-by-pentad analysis of the surface-maximum air temperature (hereinafter Tmax), in a selected location, examining the dependence on Ina. The increased cloudiness and higher amounts of total precipitable water, corollary effects to the warm low-level advection. in the 1989/90 winter, enhance the positive temperature anomalies. The analysis of the ocean surface winds is based on the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) dataset; ascent rates, and over land wind data are from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF); maps of 2-m temperature, cloud cover and precipitable water are from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Reanalysis.

  16. Large stratospheric sudden warming in Antarctic late winter and shallow ozone hole in 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Kanzawa, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Sadao )

    1990-01-01

    There occurred a large stratospheric sudden warming in the southern hemisphere in late winter of 1988 which competes in suddenness and size with major mid-winter warmings in the northern hemisphere. Associated with the dynamical phenomenon of the sudden warming, total ozone increased over the eastern hemispheric part of Antarctica. The sudden warming as well as other warmings which followed it made the 1988 Antarctic ozone hole shallow in depth and small in area.

  17. Dissolved oxygen in the Tualatin River, Oregon, during winter flow conditions, 1991 and 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, V.J.

    1996-01-01

    Throughout the winter period, November through April, wastewater treatment plants in the Tualatin River Basin discharge from 10,000 to 15,000 pounds per day of biochemical oxygen demand to the river. These loads often increase substantially during storms when streamflow is high. During the early winter season, when streamflow is frequently less than the average winter flow, the treatment plants discharge about 2,000 pounds per day of ammonia. This study focused on the capacity of the Tualatin River to assimilat oxygen-demanding loads under winter streamflow conditions during the 1992 water year, with an emphasis on peak-flow conditions in the river, and winter-base-flow conditions during November 1992. Concentrations of dissolved oxygen throughout the main stem of the river during the winter remained generally high relative to the State standard for Oregon of 6 milligrams per liter. The most important factors controlling oxygen consumption during winter-low-flow conditions were carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand and input of oxygen-depleted waters from tributaries. During peak-flow conditions, reduced travel time and increased dilution associated with the increased streamflow minimized the effect of increased oxygen-demanding loads. During the base-flow period in November 1992, concentrations of dissolved oxygen were consistently below 6 milligrams per liter. A hydrodynamic water-quality model was used to identify the processes depleting dissolved oxygen, including sediment oxygen demand, nitrification, and carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand. Sediment oxygen demand was the most significant factor; nitrification was also important. Hypothetical scenarios were posed to evaluate the effect of different wastewater treatment plant loads during winter-base-flow conditions. Streamflow and temperature were significant factors governing concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the main-stem river.

  18. Prairie Winter Play Patterns: (b) Winter and Play. Research Project 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomsen, Charles H.; Borowiecka, Alexandra

    This guidebook provides an empirically-based set of planning and design guidelines for the construction of winter play facilities for Canadian youth residing in locations where outdoor play in winter is curtailed for approximately 4 months of the year. Information used in developing the guidelines was derived from field observations, a literature

  19. Key areas for wintering North American herons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mikuska, T.; Kushlan, J.A.; Hartley, S.

    1998-01-01

    Nearly all North American heron populations are migratory, but details of where they winter are little known. Locations where North American herons winter were identified using banding recovery data. North American herons winter from Canada through northern South America but especially in eastern North America south of New York, Florida, California, Louisiana, Texas, Mexico and Cuba, these areas accounting for 63% of winter recoveries. We identified regions where recoveries for various species clustered as 'key areas.' These forty-three areas constitute a network of areas that hold sites that likely are important to wintering herons. The relative importance of each area and site within the network must be evaluated by further on the ground inventory. Because of biases inherent in the available data, these hypothesized key areas are indicative rather than exhaustive. As a first cut, this network of areas can serve to inform further inventory activities and can provide an initial basis to begin planning for the year-round conservation of North American heron populations.

  20. Winter distribution of willow flycatcher subspecies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, E.H.; Unitt, P.; Sogge, M.K.; Whitfield, M.; Keim, P.

    2011-01-01

    Documenting how different regions across a species' breeding and nonbreeding range are linked via migratory movements is the first step in understanding how events in one region can influence events in others and is critical to identifying conservation threats throughout a migratory animal's annual cycle. We combined two studies that evaluated migratory connectivity in the Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii), one using mitochondrial DNA sequences from 172 flycatchers sampled throughout their winter range, and another which examined morphological characteristics of 68 museum specimens collected in the winter range. Our results indicate that the four subspecies occupy distinct but overlapping regions of the winter range. Connectivity between specific breeding and winter grounds appears to be moderate to strong, with distributions that suggest migration patterns of both the chain and leap-frog types connecting the breeding and nonbreeding grounds. The Pacific lowlands of Costa Rica appear to be a key winter location for the endangered Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (E. t. extimus), although other countries in Central America may also be important for the subspecies. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2011.

  1. Comparison of snowpack and winter wet-deposition chemistry in the Rocky Mountains, USA: Implications for winter dry deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, D.W.; Ingersoll, G.P.; Mast, M.A.; Turk, J.T.; Campbell, D.H.

    2002-01-01

    Depth-integrated snowpack chemistry was measured just prior to maximum snowpack depth during the winters of 1992-1999 at 12 sites co-located with National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trend Network (NADP/NTN) sites in the central and southern Rocky Mountains, USA. Winter volume-weighted mean wet-deposition concentrations were calculated for the NADP/NTN sites, and the data were compared to snowpack concentrations using the paired t-test and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. No statistically significant differences were indicated in concentrations of SO42- or NO3- (p>0.1). Small, but statistically significant differences (p???0.03) were indicated for all other solutes analyzed. Differences were largest for Ca2+ concentrations, which on average were 2.3??eql-1 (43%) higher in the snowpack than in winter NADP/NTN samples. Eolian carbonate dust appeared to influence snowpack chemistry through both wet and dry deposition, and the effect increased from north to south. Dry deposition of eolian carbonates was estimated to have neutralized an average of 6.9??eql-1 and a maximum of 12??eql-1 of snowpack acidity at the southernmost sites. The good agreement between snowpack and winter NADP/NTN SO42- and NO3- concentrations indicates that for those solutes the two data sets can be combined to increase data density in high-elevation areas, where few NADP/NTN sites exist. This combination of data sets will allow for better estimates of atmospheric deposition of SO42- and NO3- across the Rocky Mountain region.

  2. [Epidemiology of winter sport injuries].

    PubMed

    Heim, D; Weymann, A; Loeliger, U; Matter, P

    1993-01-01

    The region Davos/Klosters is a big wintersport area in Switzerland, where more than 5 million kilometers of vertical drop are skied per year. Over the last 20 years 28,777 patients with wintersport accidents have been treated in the 100-bed hospital of Davos, 85% of these patients have sustained their accident while skiing. An analysis of these datas show an increase of ski accidents as well as an increase of the distance skied. Especially an increase in snowboard accidents is noted over the last few years with a preponderance of lesions of the upper extremity. Injuries of the head, the trunk and simple skin lacerations remain stable over that period. Injuries of the upper extremity are increasing, whereas lower extremity lesions are slightly decreasing. There is a significant decrease of fractures of the leg, while at the same time an important increase of knee injuries is noted. Young patients below 20 years and those between 31 and 40 years of age sustained less accidents over the last 20 years, while the rest of the alpine skiers remain more or less stable in their accident incidence. PMID:8123326

  3. Winter survival of Eurasian woodcock Scolopax rusticola in central Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aradis, A.; Miller, M.W.; Landucci, G.; Ruda, P.; Taddei, S.; Spina, F.

    2008-01-01

    The Eurasian woodcock Scolopax rusticola is a popular game bird in much of Europe. However, little is known about its population dynamics. We estimated winter survival of woodcock in a protected area with no hunting in central Italy. We radio-tagged 68 woodcocks with battery-powered radio-transmitters during 2001-2005. Woodcocks were captured in fields at night from November through February and fitted with radios. Birds were classified on capture as juveniles or adults using plumage characteristics. Woodcocks were relocated daily through March of each year or until they died, disappeared from the study area, or until their radio failed. We constructed a set of eight competing models of daily survival for the period 1 December - 28 February. Estimates of survival were obtained using the program SURVIV and Akaike's Information Criteria. The best model suggested daily survival was a constant 0.9985 (95% CI = 0.9972-0.9998), corresponding to a survival rate of 0.88 (SE = 0.05) for the 90-day winter study period. Our estimate of juvenile survival is higher than previously reported, and may reflect the protected status of the study area. Our estimates of winter survival may be helpful in managing harvested woodcock populations as well as in conserving populations in an increasingly urbanised environment. ?? Wildlife Biology (2008).

  4. Impact of the winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) on the Western Pacific (WP) pattern in the following winter through Arctic sea ice and ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachibana, Yoshihiro; Oshika, Miki; Nakamura, Tetsu

    2015-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that Asian weather and climate in a given winter can be predicted 1 year in advance. On the basis of a 51-year statistical analysis of reanalysis data, we propose for the first time that the positive phase of the Western Pacific (WP) pattern in the winter is linked to the negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) in the previous winter, and vice versa. We show that there are two possible mechanisms responsible for this interannual remote linkage. One is an Arctic mechanism. Extensive Arctic sea ice in the summer after a negative NAO acts as a bridge to the positive phase of the WP in the next winter. The negative (positive) phase of the winter NAO changes oceanic currents in the North Atlantic and weakens (strengthens) oceanic heat transport into the Arctic. This weakened (strengthened) heat transport also slows down (speeds up) the reduction of sea ice in the spring. A condition of more (less) ice than normal then persists until the season of ice freezing in autumn. In winter, all of the Arctic Ocean is covered by sea ice, regardless of the autumn ice area. Less (more) ice production during the freezing season reduces (increases) the heat released from the ocean to the atmosphere in the Arctic. An anomalously small (large) heat flux excites stationary Rossby wave propagation, which induces warm (cold) advection to Japan. The other mechanism involves the tropics. An El Niño occurrence after a negative winter NAO acts as another bridge to the positive phase of the WP in the following winter. The timescale of the Arctic route is nearly decadal, whereas that of the tropical route is about 3-5 years. The tropical mechanism indicates that the NAO remotely excites an El Niño in the second half of the following year. A process perhaps responsible for the El Niño occurrence was investigated statistically. A negative NAO in the winter increases Eurasian snow cover. This anomalous snow cover then intensifies the cold air outbreak from Asia to the western tropical Pacific. This outbreak can intensify the westerly wind burst and excite El Niño in the following year. We suggest that the phase of the NAO in the winter could be a predictor of the WP in the following year. Detailed is in Oshika, Tachibana and Nakamura in Climate Dynamics (2014), DOI: 10.1007/s00382-014-2384-1.

  5. Winter climate change effects on soil C and N cycles in urban grasslands.

    PubMed

    Durán, Jorge; Rodríguez, Alexandra; Morse, Jennifer L; Groffman, Peter M

    2013-09-01

    Despite growing recognition of the role that cities have in global biogeochemical cycles, urban systems are among the least understood of all ecosystems. Urban grasslands are expanding rapidly along with urbanization, which is expected to increase at unprecedented rates in upcoming decades. The large and increasing area of urban grasslands and their impact on water and air quality justify the need for a better understanding of their biogeochemical cycles. There is also great uncertainty about the effect that climate change, especially changes in winter snow cover, will have on nutrient cycles in urban grasslands. We aimed to evaluate how reduced snow accumulation directly affects winter soil frost dynamics, and indirectly greenhouse gas fluxes and the processing of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) during the subsequent growing season in northern urban grasslands. Both artificial and natural snow reduction increased winter soil frost, affecting winter microbial C and N processing, accelerating C and N cycles and increasing soil : atmosphere greenhouse gas exchange during the subsequent growing season. With lower snow accumulations that are predicted with climate change, we found decreases in N retention in these ecosystems, and increases in N2 O and CO2 flux to the atmosphere, significantly increasing the global warming potential of urban grasslands. Our results suggest that the environmental impacts of these rapidly expanding ecosystems are likely to increase as climate change brings milder winters and more extensive soil frost. PMID:23630015

  6. Nuclear winter: the continuing debate. Student essay

    SciTech Connect

    Nida, A.V.

    1987-03-23

    This essay examines the debate over the climatic consequences of global nuclear war as related in the so-called Nuclear Winter hypothesis. This review examines the major components of the theory and traces development of the scientific knowledge leading to a second phase of the controversy two years after the first hypothesis. The conclusions of the essay are that the original nuclear winter findings have been altered by later scientific study and, therefore, the political conclusions drawn by Carl Sagan in 1983 can no longer be supported by theory or facts. Continued use of the Crutzen-Birks (Ambio, 1982) and TTAPS (Science, December 1983) studies worst-case evidence from NCAR (Foreign Affairs, Summer 86) represents selective science. Arguing for strategic policy changes based on nuclear winter risks constitutes anti-nuclear rhetoric and not scientific reasoning.

  7. BOREAS HYD-5 Winter Surface Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Richard; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl Fred (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS HYD-5 team collected tower flux, surface meteorological, and surface temperature data on a frozen lake (Namekus Lake) and in a mature jack pine forest in the Beartrap Creek watershed. Both sites were located in the BOREAS SSA. The objective of this study was to characterize the winter energy and water vapor fluxes, as well as related properties (such as snow density, depth, temperature, and melt) for forested and nonforested areas of the boreal forest. Data were collected on Namekus Lake in the winters of 1994 and 1996, and at Beartrap Creek in the winter of 1994 only. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  8. Focus. No. 7, Winter, 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Health Services Research and Development (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    One of a series of periodical reports from the Center, the document summarizes the research and development program of the Center's third year. The research program is directed at creating and testing the essential components of comprehensive community health care delivery systems that will increase the supply of services where they are most

  9. Small rodent winter survival: snow conditions limit access to food resources.

    PubMed

    Korslund, Lars; Steen, Harald

    2006-01-01

    1. In Fennoscandia during winter small rodents spend most of their time in the subnivean space, between the snow cover and the ground. The subnivean space is probably not a uniform habitat, but broken into accessible and inaccessible patches by ice covering the vegetation. This might reduce access to otherwise available food resources. 2. To test whether ice formations reduce access to food and thus limit winter survival of small rodents, we conducted an experiment where we increased subnivean space by adding corrugated aluminium sheets on the ground before onset of winter. The sheets prevented ice formation, thus mimicking natural occurring subnivean space, and providing more room for animals living in the subnivean space to forage. 3. During the experiment 142 Microtus oeconomus were passive induced transponder (PIT)-tagged, and a system consisting of fixed tube-shaped antennas and PIT-tag readers were used to provide data to analyse winter survival and individual subnivean space use. The extent of winter grazing was measured after snow melt by examining percentage area grazed. 4. The treatment resulted in increased survival which corresponded well with significantly higher space use and more grazing under the sheets. 5. Females showed a positive correlation between probability of survival and body mass while no such effect was observed in males. 6. The results suggest that the snow cover reduces survival in winter by physically enclosing the vegetation in ice and thus reducing access to otherwise available food resources. The amount of ice and its configuration might vary between years due to changing weather patterns. Our results offer a mechanistic explanation for variations in winter survival and suggest incorporating climate variables in future small rodent models. 7. Directional and long-term changes in climate might result in increased ice formation in the subnivean system. Such deterioration may lead to reduced winter survival and act by stabilizing population dynamics and dampening vole cyclicity. PMID:16903053

  10. Summer hot snaps and winter conditions: modelling white syndrome outbreaks on Great Barrier Reef corals.

    PubMed

    Heron, Scott F; Willis, Bette L; Skirving, William J; Eakin, C Mark; Page, Cathie A; Miller, Ian R

    2010-01-01

    Coral reefs are under increasing pressure in a changing climate, one such threat being more frequent and destructive outbreaks of coral diseases. Thermal stress from rising temperatures has been implicated as a causal factor in disease outbreaks observed on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, and elsewhere in the world. Here, we examine seasonal effects of satellite-derived temperature on the abundance of coral diseases known as white syndromes on the Great Barrier Reef, considering both warm stress during summer and deviations from mean temperatures during the preceding winter. We found a high correlation (r(2) = 0.953) between summer warm thermal anomalies (Hot Snap) and disease abundance during outbreak events. Inclusion of thermal conditions during the preceding winter revealed that a significant reduction in disease outbreaks occurred following especially cold winters (Cold Snap), potentially related to a reduction in pathogen loading. Furthermore, mild winters (i.e., neither excessively cool nor warm) frequently preceded disease outbreaks. In contrast, disease outbreaks did not typically occur following warm winters, potentially because of increased disease resistance of the coral host. Understanding the balance between the effects of warm and cold winters on disease outbreak will be important in a warming climate. Combining the influence of winter and summer thermal effects resulted in an algorithm that yields both a Seasonal Outlook of disease risk at the conclusion of winter and near real-time monitoring of Outbreak Risk during summer. This satellite-derived system can provide coral reef managers with an assessment of risk three-to-six months in advance of the summer season that can then be refined using near-real-time summer observations. This system can enhance the capacity of managers to prepare for and respond to possible disease outbreaks and focus research efforts to increase understanding of environmental impacts on coral disease in this era of rapidly changing climate. PMID:20808912

  11. Multistate proteomics analysis reveals novel strategies used by a hibernator to precondition the heart and conserve ATP for winter heterothermy

    PubMed Central

    Grabek, Katharine R.; Karimpour-Fard, Anis; Epperson, L. Elaine; Hindle, Allyson; Hunter, Lawrence E.

    2011-01-01

    The hibernator's heart functions continuously and avoids damage across the wide temperature range of winter heterothermy. To define the molecular basis of this phenotype, we quantified proteomic changes in the 13-lined ground squirrel heart among eight distinct physiological states encompassing the hibernator's year. Unsupervised clustering revealed a prominent seasonal separation between the summer homeotherms and winter heterotherms, whereas within-season state separation was limited. Further, animals torpid in the fall were intermediate to summer and winter, consistent with the transitional nature of this phase. A seasonal analysis revealed that the relative abundances of protein spots were mainly winter-increased. The winter-elevated proteins were involved in fatty acid catabolism and protein folding, whereas the winter-depleted proteins included those that degrade branched-chain amino acids. To identify further state-dependent changes, protein spots were re-evaluated with respect to specific physiological state, confirming the predominance of seasonal differences. Additionally, chaperone and heat shock proteins increased in winter, including HSPA4, HSPB6, and HSP90AB1, which have known roles in protecting against ischemia-reperfusion injury and apoptosis. The most significant and greatest fold change observed was a disappearance of phospho-cofilin 2 at low body temperature, likely a strategy to preserve ATP. The robust summer-to-winter seasonal proteomic shift implies that a winter-protected state is orchestrated before prolonged torpor ensues. Additionally, the general preservation of the proteome during winter hibernation and an increase of stress response proteins, together with dephosphorylation of cofilin 2, highlight the importance of ATP-conserving mechanisms for winter cardioprotection. PMID:21914784

  12. Meso-scale modelling and radiative transfer simulations of a snowfall event over France at microwaves for passive and active modes and evaluation with satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galligani, V. S.; Prigent, C.; Defer, E.; Jimenez, C.; Eriksson, P.; Pinty, J.-P.; Chaboureau, J.-P.

    2015-03-01

    Microwave passive and active radiative transfer simulations are performed with the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS) for a mid-latitude snowfall event, using outputs from the Meso-NH mesoscale cloud model. The results are compared to the corresponding microwave observations available from MHS and CloudSat. The spatial structures of the simulated and observed brightness temperatures show an overall agreement since the large-scale dynamical structure of the cloud system is reasonably well captured by Meso-NH. However, with the initial assumptions on the single-scattering properties of snow, there is an obvious underestimation of the strong scattering observed in regions with large frozen hydrometeor quantities. A sensitivity analysis of both active and passive simulations to the microphysical parametrizations is conducted. Simultaneous analysis of passive and active calculations provides strong constraints on the assumptions made to simulate the observations. Good agreements are obtained with both MHS and CloudSat observations when the single-scattering properties are calculated using the "soft sphere" parametrization from Liu (2004), along with the Meso-NH outputs. This is an important step toward building a robust data set of simulated measurements to train a statistically based retrieval scheme.

  13. Characterization of an unexpected snowfall event in Iqaluit, Nunavut, and surrounding area during the Storm Studies in the Arctic field project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargey, S.; Henson, W.; Hanesiak, J.; Goodson, R.

    2014-05-01

    Small accumulation precipitation events are critical for the high-latitude hydrological cycle. They contribute to more than 50% of total accumulation in the area and occur at a greater frequency than high-accumulation events. Despite their importance, the processes controlling them have not been investigated in sufficient detail. This study characterizes an unexpected high-latitude snowfall event at Iqaluit, Nunavut, and surrounding area during the Storm Studies in the Arctic field project. High-resolution data collected, from both ground based and airborne Doppler radar, along with upper air and surface observations, provided the basis for analysis of the conditions that led to the event and offer some insight as to why it was not well forecast by the Canadian operational model. Several factors worked in concert to produce this event. Low-level convection and upslope processes were important in cloud and precipitation generation over the orography upstream. When combined with additional lift from the passing of a weak trough, cloud and precipitation production were enhanced, allowing these features to penetrate over the terrain and resulted in precipitation at Iqaluit. Analysis of the global environmental multiscale limited area model (2.5 km resolution) suggests that upstream convection and upslope processes were affected by model errors. As a consequence, precipitation onset was delayed, and the total accumulation was 50% lower than the observations. Results indicate that the complexity of precipitation events in the region represents a significant challenge for predicting and modeling and understanding their role in the region's hydrological cycle.

  14. Meso-scale modeling and radiative transfer simulations of a snowfall event over France at microwaves for passive and active modes and evaluation with satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galligani, V. S.; Prigent, C.; Defer, E.; Jimenez, C.; Eriksson, P.; Pinty, J.-P.; Chaboureau, J.-P.

    2014-07-01

    Microwave passive and active radiative transfer simulations are performed with the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS) for a mid-latitude snowfall event, using outputs from the Meso-NH mesoscale cloud model. The results are compared to the corresponding microwave observations available from MHS and CloudSat. The spatial structures of the simulated and observed brightness temperatures show an overall agreement since the large-scale dynamical structure of the cloud system is reasonably well captured by Meso-NH. However, with the initial assumptions on the single scattering properties of snow, there is an obvious underestimation of the strong scattering observed in regions with large frozen hydrometeor quantities. A sensitivity analysis of both active and passive simulations to the microphysical parameterizations is conducted. Simultaneous analysis of passive and active calculations provides strong constraints on the assumptions made to simulate the observations. Good agreements are obtained with both MHS and CloudSat observations when the single scattering properties are calculated using the "soft sphere" parameterization from Liu (2004), along with the Meso-NH outputs. This is an important step toward building a robust dataset of simulated measurements to train a statistically-based retrieval scheme.

  15. Implanting radio transmitters in wintering canvasbacks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Dein, F.J.; Haramis, G.M.; Jorde, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    To conduct telemetry studies of wintering canvasbacks (Aythya valisineria) on Chesapeake Bay, we needed to devise a suitable method of radio transmitter attachment. We describe an aseptic, intra-abdominal surgical technique, using the inhalation anesthetic isoflurane, to implant 20-g radio transmitters in free-ranging canvasbacks. We evaluated the technique over 3 winters (1987-89), when an annual average of 83 female canvasbacks received implant surgery during a 9-day period in mid-December. Of 253 ducks, 248 (98%) were implanted successfully, and 200 (80.6%) completed the 70-day study until early March. No mortality or abnormal behavior from surgery was identified post-release.

  16. Nuclear winter: The evidence and the risks

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, O.

    1985-01-01

    Global concern over nuclear extinction, centered on the holocaust itself, now has turned to the more terrifying consequences of a post-war nuclear winter: ''the long-term effects - destruction of the environment, spread of epidemic diseases, contamination by radioactivity, and ... collapse of agriculture-(that) would spread famine and death to every country.'' Nuclear Winter, the latest in a series of studies by a number of different groups is clinical, analytical, systematic, and detailed. Two physicists and biologist analyze the effects on the climate, plants, animals, and living systems; the human costs; the policy implications.

  17. Responses of the photosynthetic apparatus to winter conditions in broadleaved evergreen trees growing in warm temperate regions of Japan.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Chizuru; Nakano, Takashi; Yamazaki, Jun-Ya; Maruta, Emiko

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic characteristics of two broadleaved evergreen trees, Quercus myrsinaefolia and Machilus thunbergii, were compared in autumn and winter. The irradiance was similar in both seasons, but the air temperature was lower in winter. Under the winter conditions, net photosynthesis under natural sunlight (Anet) in both species dropped to 4 μmol CO2 m(-2) s(-1), and the quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry in dark-adapted leaves (Fv/Fm) also dropped to 0.60. In both species the maximum carboxylation rates of Rubisco (V(cmax)) decreased, and the amount of Rubisco increased in winter. A decline in chlorophyll (Chl) concentration and an increase in the Chl a/b ratio in winter resulted in a reduction in the size of the light-harvesting antennae. From measurements of Chl a fluorescence parameters, both the relative fraction and the energy flux rates of thermal dissipation through other non-photochemical processes were markedly elevated in winter. The results indicate that the photosynthetic apparatus in broadleaved evergreen species in warm temperate regions responds to winter through regulatory mechanisms involving the downregulation of light-harvesting and photosynthesis coupled with increased photoprotective thermal energy dissipation to minimize photodamage in winter. These mechanisms aid a quick restart of photosynthesis without the development of new leaves in the following spring. PMID:25500451

  18. Charred Forests Increase Snow Albedo Decay: Watershed-Scale Implications of the Postfire Snow Albedo Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, K. E.; Nolin, A. W.

    2014-12-01

    Recent work shows that after a high severity forest fire, approximately 60% more solar radiation reaches the snow surface due to the reduction in canopy density. Also, significant amounts of black carbon (BC) particles and larger burned woody debris (BWD) are shed from standing charred trees, which concentrate on the snowpack, darken its surface, and reduce snow albedo by 50% during ablation. The postfire forest environment drives a substantial increase in net shortwave radiation at the snowpack surface, driving earlier and more rapid melt, however hydrologic models do not explicitly incorporate forest fire disturbance effects to snowpack dynamics. In this study we characterized, parameterized, and validated the postfire snow albedo effect: how the deposition and concentration of charred forest debris decreases snow albedo, increases snow albedo decay rates, and drives an earlier date of snow disappearance. For three study sites in the Oregon High Cascade Mountains, a 2-yr old burned forest, a 10-yr burned forest, and a nearby unburned forest, we used a suite of empirical data to characterize the magnitude and duration of the postfire effect to snow albedo decay. For WY 2012, WY2013, and WY2014 we conducted spectral albedo measurements, snow surface sampling, in-situ snow and meteorological monitoring, and snow energy balance modeling. From these data we developed a new parameterization which represents the postfire effect to snow albedo decay as a function of days-since-snowfall. We validated our parameterization using a physically-based, spatially-distributed snow accumulation and melt model, in-situ snow monitoring, net snowpack radiation, and remote sensing data. We modeled snow dynamics across the extent of all burned area in the headwaters of the McKenzie River Basin and validated the watershed-scale implications of the postfire snow albedo effect using in-situ micrometeorological and remote sensing data. This research quantified the watershed scale postfire effects to snow albedo and snow melt in the Oregon High Cascades, and provided a new parameterization of forest fire effects to high elevation winter water storage.

  19. Record low total ozone during northern winters of 1992 and 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Bojkov, R.D. )

    1993-07-09

    The authors look at recorded ozone data over the northern hemisphere during the winters of 1992 and 1993. They use data from the World Meteorological Organization data base. During both of these winter, there have been marked decreases in the column ozone levels over North America, Europe, and Siberia, in the latitude belt from 45[degrees]N to 65[degrees]N. During these winters there have been ten times as many days with ozone levels deviated more than 2[sigma] below the 35 year average. They seek explanations for these observations by looking at meterological information. Evidences indicate that there was transport of ozone deficient air masses during these winters. In addition cold air masses with excess ClO show evidence of having transported into the more southern latitudes. The authors conclude there is evidence for both displacement of large air masses, and increased chemical destruction potential, to have contributed to these observed decreases.

  20. Field Investigations of Winter Transmission of Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Andrea M.; Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D.; Hassan, Hassan K.; McClure, Christopher J. W.; Unnasch, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Studies investigating winter transmission of Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) were conducted in Hillsborough County, Florida. The virus was detected in Culiseta melanura and Anopheles quadrimaculatus in February 2012 and 2013, respectively. During the winter months, herons were the most important avian hosts for all mosquito species encountered. In collections carried out in the summer of 2011, blood meals taken from herons were still common, but less frequently encountered than in winter, with an increased frequency of mammalian- and reptile-derived meals observed in the summer. Four wading bird species (Black-crowned Night Heron [Nycticorax nycticorax], Yellow-crowned Night Heron [Nyctanassa violacea], Anhinga [Anhinga anhinga], and Great Blue Heron [Ardea herodias]) were most frequently fed upon by Cs. melanura and Culex erraticus, suggesting that these species may participate in maintaining EEEV during the winter in Florida. PMID:25070997

  1. Field investigations of winter transmission of eastern equine encephalitis virus in Florida.

    PubMed

    Bingham, Andrea M; Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D; Hassan, Hassan K; McClure, Christopher J W; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2014-10-01

    Studies investigating winter transmission of Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) were conducted in Hillsborough County, Florida. The virus was detected in Culiseta melanura and Anopheles quadrimaculatus in February 2012 and 2013, respectively. During the winter months, herons were the most important avian hosts for all mosquito species encountered. In collections carried out in the summer of 2011, blood meals taken from herons were still common, but less frequently encountered than in winter, with an increased frequency of mammalian- and reptile-derived meals observed in the summer. Four wading bird species (Black-crowned Night Heron [Nycticorax nycticorax], Yellow-crowned Night Heron [Nyctanassa violacea], Anhinga [Anhinga anhinga], and Great Blue Heron [Ardea herodias]) were most frequently fed upon by Cs. melanura and Culex erraticus, suggesting that these species may participate in maintaining EEEV during the winter in Florida. PMID:25070997

  2. Predictable climate dynamics of abnormal East Asian winter monsoon: once-in-a-century snowstorms in 2007/2008 winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhiwei; Li, Jianping; Jiang, Zhihong; He, Jinhai

    2011-10-01

    In 2008 (January-February), East Asia (EA) experiences the most severe and long-persisting snowstorm in the past 100 years. Results in this study show that 2007/2008 winter is dominant by the third principal mode of the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM) which explains 8.7% of the total surface air temperature variance over EA. Significantly distinguished from the first two leading modes, the third mode positive phase features an increased surface pressure over the northwestern EA, an enhanced central Siberian high (CSH), a strengthened and northwestward extended western Pacific subtropical high (WPSH) and anomalously strong moisture transport from western Pacific, Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal to EA. It also exhibits an intimate linkage with the sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTAs) in the Arctic Ocean areas adjacent to northern Eurasian continent, central North Pacific and northeastern Pacific. Such SSTAs emerge in prior autumn and persist through ensuing winter, signifying precursory conditions for the anomalous third EAWM mode. Numerical experiments with a simple general circulation model demonstrate that the Arctic SSTAs excite geo-potential height anomalies over northern Eurasian continent and impacts on the CSH, while the extra-tropical Pacific SSTAs deform the WPSH. Co-effects of them play crucial roles on origins of the third EAWM mode. Based on these results, an empirical model is established to predict the third mode of the EAWM. Hindcast is performed for the 1957-2008 period, which shows a quite realistic prediction skill in general and good prediction ability in the extreme phase of the third mode of the EAWM such as 2007/2008 winter. Since all these predictors can be readily monitored in real time, this empirical model provides a real time forecast tool and may facilitate the seasonal prediction of high-impact weather associated with the abnormal EAWM.

  3. Intraseasonal SST variations in the South China Sea during boreal winter and impacts of the East Asian winter monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Renguang; Chen, Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Present study documents the intraseasonal variability of sea surface temperature (SST) in the South China Sea (SCS) during boreal winter and its association with the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM) variability. In northern Tropics, the largest intraseasonal variability of SST during boreal winter is found in the SCS, with two localized regions of large standard deviation, one extending westward from the Luzon Strait and the other extending southward from the coast of central Vietnam. Correspondingly, large intraseasonal variability in surface heat fluxes is observed in the above regions. Analysis shows that the formation of large intraseasonal SST anomalies in these regions is attributed largely to wind-related surface latent heat flux changes, with supplementary contribution from cloud-related surface shortwave radiation changes. Wind-induced Ekman advection has a negative effect, and the Ekman upwelling pattern differs from the intraseasonal SST anomaly pattern. The intraseasonal variations of SST in the SCS display a close association with the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM) change with a time lag of 3-5 days. In a weak (strong) phase of the EAWM, decrease (increase) in surface wind speed and suppression (enhancement) in surface latent heat flux lead to intraseasonal SST warming (cooling). This intraseasonal SST signal displays a southward propagation with the SST change in northern SCS leading that in southern SCS by about 2 days. A similar southward propagation is seen in surface wind speed and latent heat flux anomalies. The southward propagation of cloud and shortwave radiation anomalies is limited to northern part of the SCS.

  4. Winter weather versus group thermoregulation: what determines survival in hibernating mammals?

    PubMed

    Patil, V P; Morrison, S F; Karels, T J; Hik, D S

    2013-09-01

    For socially hibernating mammals, the effectiveness of huddling as a means of energy conservation should increase with group size. However, group size has only been linked to increased survival in a few hibernating species, and the relative importance of social structure versus winter conditions during hibernation remains uncertain. We studied the influence of winter weather conditions, social group composition, age-structure, and other environmental factors and individual attributes on the overwinter survival of hoary marmots (Marmota caligata) in the Yukon Territory, Canada. Juvenile hoary marmot survival was negatively correlated with the mean winter (November to May) Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) index. Survival in older age-classes was negatively correlated with PDO lagged by 1 year. Social group size and structure were weakly correlated with survival in comparison to PDO. The relationship between winter PDO and survival was most likely due to the importance of snowpack as insulation during hibernation. The apparent response of hoary marmots to changing winter conditions contrasted sharply with those of other marmot species and other mammalian alpine herbivores. In conclusion, the severity of winter weather may constrain the effectiveness of group thermoregulation in socially hibernating mammals. PMID:23456241

  5. Spatial and temporal variations of winter discharge under climate change: Case study of rivers in European Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telegina, E. A.

    2015-05-01

    An important problem in hydrology is the re-evaluation of the current resources of surface and underground waters in the context of ongoing climate changes. The main feature of the present-day changes in water regime in the major portion of European Russia (ER) is the substantial increase in low-water runoff, especially in winter. In this context, some features of the spatial-temporal variations of runoff values during the winter low-water period are considered. Calculations showed that the winter runoff increased at more than 95% of hydrological gauges. Changes in the minimum and average values of runoff during winter low-water period and other characteristics are evaluated against the background of climate changes in the recent decades. The spatial and temporal variability of winter runoff in European Russia is evaluated for the first time.

  6. Warmer winters modulate life history and energy storage but do not affect sensitivity to a widespread pesticide in an aquatic insect.

    PubMed

    Arambourou, Hélène; Stoks, Robby

    2015-10-01

    Despite the increased attention for the effects of pesticides under global warming no studies tested how winter warming affects subsequent sensitivity to pesticides. Winter warming is expected to cause delayed negative effects when it increases metabolic rates and thereby depletes energy reserves. Using a common-garden experiment, we investigated the combined effect of a 4 °C increase in winter temperature and subsequent exposure to chlorpyrifos in the aquatic larvae of replicated low- and high-latitude European populations of the damselfly Ischnura elegans. The warmer winter (8 °C) resulted in a higher winter survival and higher growth rates compared to the cold winter (4 °C) commonly experienced by European high-latitude populations. Low-latitude populations were better at coping with the warmer winter, indicating thermal adaptation to the local winter temperatures. Subsequent chlorpyrifos exposure at 20 °C induced strong negative effects on survival, growth rate, lipid content and acetylcholinesterase activity while phenoloxidase activity increased. These pesticide effects were not affected by winter warming. Our results suggest that for species where winter warming has positive effects on life history, no delayed effects on the sensitivity to subsequent pesticide exposure should be expected. PMID:26261878

  7. Ecosystem Greenhouse Gas Fluxes Respond Directly to Weather Not Climate: A Case Study on the Relationship of Global Atmospheric Circulation, Foehn Frequency, and Winter Weather to Northern Alps Regional Grassland Phenology and Carbon Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, A. R.; Wohlfahrt, G.; Zeeman, M. J.; Katata, G.; Mauder, M.; Schmid, H. P. E.

    2014-12-01

    The impact of climate change on regional ecosystem structure and biogeochemical cycling has two important aspects that require better elaboration to improve projections of these effects. The first is that ecosystems don't respond directly to climate, but indirectly via frequency and occurrence of weather systems, which are driven by climatic shifts in global circulation and radiative processes. The second is that many responses of ecosystems to these weather patterns and extremes are lagged in time. Here, we examine these aspects for northern Alpine grasslands. Long-term eddy covariance flux tower and phenology observations in Austria and Germany and biophysical models reveal a strong influence of winter air temperature, snowfall, and snowmelt frequency on winter grass mortality and spring grassland carbon uptake. Further, the mode of climate variability that drives winter air temperature and snow depth patterns is primarily the frequency of strong regional southerly Foehn flow that promotes warm, dry conditions in winter. Finally, we demonstrate that much of the interannual variance in Foehn frequency and southerly flow is driven by statistics and climatic trends of 500 hPa pressure patterns in Greenland, part of the Arctic Oscillation. However, a few years, including the unusually warm and dry winter of 2013-2014 appear to have secondary, possibly local thermotopographic circulation factors that promoted its weather conditions regionally, which also included primarily cool and wet conditions in northern Europe and the southern Alps. These findings demonstrate that the regional response of ecosystems to climate change is modulated by how large-scale circulation patterns influence local meteorology and topographic flows both during and outside the growing season and provides a framework for future assessment and climate model improvements of linkages of climate change, weather patterns, and ecosystem responses.

  8. Winter in Northern Europe (WINE) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonzahn, U.

    1982-01-01

    The scientific aims, work plan, and organization of the Middle Atmosphere Program winter in northern Europe (MAP/WINE) are described. Proposed contributions to the MAP/WINE program from various countries are enumerated. Specific atmospheric parameters to be examined are listed along with the corresponding measurement technique.

  9. Registration of Anton Hard White Winter Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Anton’ (Reg. No. CV PI 651043) hard white winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was developed by the USDA-ARS and the Nebraska Agricultural Experiment Station and released in December, 2007. "Anton" was selected from the cross WA691213-27/N86L177//‘Platte’. Anton primarily was released for its lo...

  10. Music Activities for Lemonade in Winter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardany, Audrey Berger

    2014-01-01

    "Lemonade in Winter: A Book About Two Kids Counting Money" is a children's book about math; however, when sharing it in the music classroom, street cries and clapping games emerge. Jenkins' and Karas' book provides a springboard to lessons addressing several music elements, including form, tempo, and rhythm, as well as…

  11. Nuclear winter - Physics and physical mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.; Pollack, J. B.; Ackerman, T. P.; Sagan, C.

    1991-01-01

    The basic physics of the environmental perturbations caused by multiple nuclear detonations is explored, summarizing current knowledge of the possible physical, chemical, and biological impacts of nuclear war. Emphasis is given to the impact of the bomb-generated smoke (soot) particles. General classes of models that have been used to simulate nuclear winter are examined, using specific models as examples.

  12. Hulless winter barley for ethanol production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hulless barley is viable feedstock alternative to corn for ethanol production in areas where small grains are produced. The first barley-based ethanol plant in the US is currently under construction by Osage BioEnergy LLC in Hopewell, VA. New hulless winter barley varieties developed by Virginia T...

  13. Cryopreservation of Salix sp. dormant winter buds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In cryopreservation, using dormant winter buds (DB) as source plant materials is economically advantageous over tissue culture options (TC). Processing DB does not require aseptic conditions and elaborate cryopreservation procedures. However, the DB approach is only feasible for cryopreserving a sel...

  14. Winter Secrets: An Instant Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collyer, Cam

    1997-01-01

    Outdoor lesson plan aims to stimulate student interest in animals' adaptations to winter and the various signs and clues to animal behavior. Includes questions for class discussion, tips for guiding the hike, and instructions for two games that illustrate the predator-prey relationship. Notes curriculum connections to the East York (Ontario) Board

  15. HARVESTING WINTER FORAGES TO EXTRACT MANURE NUTRIENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Harvested hay captures soil manure nutrients which, if not utilized, could cause pollution of surface water or aquifer. This study determined yields of hay and N,P,K,Mg,Mn,Ca,Fe,Zn, and Cu of three winter forages in five harvesting systems. Dormant bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.)Pers.] sod regul...

  16. Registration of 'Windham' Winter Feed Pea.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter legumes offer a unique opportunity for producers to establish a legume crop in the fall and transfer a significant portion of field preparation to the fall avoiding undesirable field conditions in the spring, and yet maintain the benefits of including a legume in the crop rotation. ‘Windham’ ...

  17. Clouds in the Winter Arctic Tropopause Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Selkirk, Henry; Anderson, Bruce; Podolske, James; Sachse, Glen; Avery, Melody; Schoeberl, Mark; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Water vapor in the winter arctic tropopause region is important because, after the tropical tropopause region, the winter arctic tropopause has the coldest temperatures in the tropospheric northern hemisphere. This suggests the potential for cloud formation that can remove water vapor from a part of the atmosphere where radiatively active gases (such as water) exert a disproportionate influence on the earth's radiation budget. Previous work by the same authors has shown that this cloud formation extends into the stratosphere, with 20% of the parcels having ozone values of 300-350 ppbv experiencing ice saturation in any given 10 day period period during the late winter. In fact, temperatures are cold enough that 5-10% of the parcels experience saturation even if the water content is below the prevailing stratospheric value of 5 ppmv. This work describes a case study of clouds observed by aircraft near the winter arctic tropopause during the SAGE Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE). This provided a unique opportunity to examine dehydration processes in this region since in situ water, tracer, cloud particle, and meteorological data were all available simultaneously. During this period, temperatures were cold enough at the tropopause to produce saturation mixing ratios of 3-4 ppmv. Thus, clouds were actually observed within the stratosphere. Back trajectories indicate that the air in these clouds came from lower latitudes and altitudes. The study describes the nature of the clouds, the history of the air, and the possible implications for the upper tropospheric water budget.

  18. Registration of 'Dan' winter hulless barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dan (Reg. No. CV- , PI 659066) six-rowed winter hulless barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) was developed and released by the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station in March 2009. Dan was derived from the cross VA96-41-17 / SC872143. It was released for production in the eastern United States, as a poten...

  19. Winter Park Florida Sinkhole of 1981

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    This collection is a group of 15 images (digitized slides) showing the sinkhole that opened late in the evening of May 8, 1981 near the intersection of South Denning Drive and West Fairbanks Avenue, Winter Park, Florida, USA. The sequence of images, primarily taken on May 9th, shows the enlargement ...

  20. Outing Activities and Winter Sports Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knierim, Helen, Ed.; Hobson, Barbara B., Ed.

    This guide contains articles on outdoor recreational activities and official winter sports rules for girls and women. The articles on outdoor activities include the techniques, teaching, and organization of camping, canoeing, competitive cycling, and riflery. Four pages of references on nature and outdoor activities are presented along with two

  1. INTERCROPPING WINTER CEREAL GRAINS AND RED CLOVER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Energy, economic, environmental, and pest issues are leading some crop producers to diversity beyond the corn/soybean rotation dominant in Iowa. Research by Iowa State University and the United States Department of Agriculture’s National Soil Tilth Laboratory indicates intercropping of winter cereal...

  2. IMPACT OF OZONE ON WINTER WHEAT YIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wheat is one of the more important agricultural crops in the USA, and the major production areas may be subjected to potentially damaging concentrations of ozone (O3). Since no information was available regarding the O3 sensitivity of winter wheat cultivars grown in the Midwest, ...

  3. Overview of Spirit's Mars Winter Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvidson, R.

    2006-12-01

    On sol 805 (April 2006) the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit reached its Low Ridge winter campaign site within Gusev Crater's Columbia Hills. The site, with its 11.5 degree tilt to the north, was chosen to maximize the probability that the rover would receive enough solar energy to be able to continue operations through the martian winter (southern winter solstice occurred in August 2006) and be able to drive away to explore additional terrains during the ensuing spring. Winter campaign experiments were designed to monitor atmospheric and surface (i.e., aeolian) dynamics and to survey the surrounding rocks and soils using the Pancam multispectral (0.44 to 1 micrometer) and Mini-TES hyperspectral (5 to 29 micrometers) capabilities. This included the collection of a Pancam 360 degree 13 filter McMurdo Panorama of the surface and rover deck over a period of several months. Further, a number of long-duration observations were conducted using the Alpha Particle X-Ray and Moessbauer Spectrometers on rock and soil targets within the work volume of the Instrument Deployment Device. Operations associated with the campaign will be updated during the presentation, and selected scientific highlights will be summarized and placed in an overall context for understanding the evolution of Mars and the role of water.

  4. Music Activities for Lemonade in Winter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardany, Audrey Berger

    2014-01-01

    "Lemonade in Winter: A Book About Two Kids Counting Money" is a children's book about math; however, when sharing it in the music classroom, street cries and clapping games emerge. Jenkins' and Karas' book provides a springboard to lessons addressing several music elements, including form, tempo, and rhythm, as well as

  5. REGISTRATION OF 'NE422T' WINTER TRITICALE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NE422T triticale (X.Triticosecale rimpaui Wittm.) was developed cooperatively by the Nebraska Agricultural Experiment Station and the USDA-ARS. NE422T is an F3-derived F4 line that was released primarily for its superior forage production in rainfed winter cereal production systems in the central G...

  6. Appalachia's Winter Secret: Downhill on the Mountains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Randy

    1991-01-01

    Describes ski-industry and winter-tourism growth in Appalachia. Sketches ski-resort developments in Maryland, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, and West Virginia. Describes economic threats to industry, its economic impact on Appalachian states and region, resorts' general qualities, and ski industry's promotional efforts. (TES)

  7. Overview of climatic effects of nuclear winter

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.M.; Malone, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    A general description of the climatic effects of a nuclear war are presented. This paper offers a short history of the subject, a discussion of relevant parameters and physical processes, and a description of plausible nuclear winter scenario. 9 refs. (ACR)

  8. Registration of Snowglenn Winter Durum Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Snowglenn (Reg. No. CV-#####, PI ######) winter durum wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum) developed and tested as VA05WD-40 by the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station was released in March 2008. Snowglenn was derived from the three-way cross N1291-86 / N1439-83 // Alidur. Snowglenn is a f...

  9. Winter Video Series Coming in January | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Scientific Library’s annual Summer Video Series was so successful that it will be offering a new Winter Video Series beginning in January. For this inaugural event, the staff is showing the eight-part series from National Geographic titled “American Genius.” 

  10. Registration of 'Eve' winter hulless barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Eve’ (Reg. No. CV- PI 659067 ), a six-row winter hulless barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) developed and tested as VA01H-68 by the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station was released in May 2007. Eve was derived from the cross SC860974 / VA94-42-13. Eve is widely adapted and provides producers with ...

  11. Dynamic interactions of snow and plants in the boreal forest, winter 2011-2012 revealed by time-lapse photography and LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filhol, S. V.; Sturm, M.

    2012-12-01

    The winter blanket of snow in the boreal forest is anything but still. In winter 2011-2012 we followed the evolution of a snowpack on a boreal forest plot (0.5 ha) from first snowfall to the beginning of the melt in springtime. We used multiple methods such as time-lapse ground-based LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging), time-lapse photography, imagery from a suspended cableway, snow-depth sensors, and frequent manual snow-pits. The experimental site is located near Fairbanks, Alaska, a typical boreal forest underlain by permafrost with sparse black spruce, larch, willow, and dwarf birch. We observed snowpack properties to be greatly affected by the vegetation substrate. Interactions between snow and plants are mainly dependent on falling snow properties (rate, wetness), plant heights and stiffness, plant canopy structure (leaves, number of branches, density), succession of weather events (wind before or after snow, thaw events) and pre-existing snow depth. Time-lapse imagery shows interception of snow by trees and shrubs controlled by air-temperature and wind events. LiDAR and snow pit measurements show one class of flexible shrubs (i.e. dwarf birch) bending under load, while a second class (willows) were far stiffer and resisted bending. Where dwarf birch branches were dense, it prevented snow from reaching the ground, leaving a significant air space under the snowpack. This vertical air gap can be as high as 10% of the total snow depth by the end of winter. Improving our understanding of the dynamic relationships between plants and snow is a fundamental key for studying boreal snow physics and snow ecology.

  12. Evolution of microwave limb sounder ozone and the polar vortex during winter

    SciTech Connect

    Manney, G.L.; Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J.W.; Zurek, R.W.

    1995-02-01

    The evolution of polar ozone observed by the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) is described for the northern hemisphere (NH) winters of 1991/1992, 1992/1993, and 1993/1994 and the southern hemisphere (SH) winters of 1992 and 1993. Imterannual and interhemispheric variability in polar ozone evolution are closely related to differences in the polar vortex and to the frequency, duration and strength of stratospheric sudden warmings. Ozone in the midstratospheric vortices increases during the winter, with largest increases associated with stratospheric warmings and a much larger increase in the NH than in the SH. A smaller NH increase was observed in 1993/1994, when the middle stratospheric vortex was stronger. During strong stratospheric warmings in the NH, the upper stratospheric vortex may be so much eroded that it presents little barrier to poleward transport; in contrast, the SH vortex remains strong throughout the stratosphere during wintertime warmings, and ozone increases only below the mixing ratio peak, due to enhanced diabatic descent. Ozone mixing ratios decrease rapidly in the lower stratosphere in both SH late winters, as expected from chemical destruction due to enhanced reactive chlorine. The interplay between dynamics and chemistry is more complex in the NH lower stratosphere and interannual variability is greater. Evidence has previously been shown for chemical ozone destruction in the 1991/1992 and 1992/1993 winters.

  13. Impact of change in winter strategy of one parasitoid species on the diversity and function of a guild of parasitoids.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Thiago Oliveira; Krespi, Liliane; Bonnardot, Valérie; van Baaren, Joan; Outreman, Yannick

    2016-03-01

    The rise of temperatures may enable species to increase their activities during winter periods and to occupy new areas. In winter, resource density is low for most species and an increased number of active consumers during this season may produce heightened competitive pressure. In Western France, the aphid parasitoid species Aphidius avenae Haliday has been known to adopt a winter diapausing strategy adjacent to newly sown cereal crops, until recent reports of active winter populations in cereal crops. We investigate how the addition of this species to the winter guild of parasitoids may change the structure of the aphid-parasitoid food web and the host-exploitation strategies of previously occurring parasitoids. We showed that in winter, Aphidius avenae was mostly associated with two aphid species, Sitobion avenae Fabricius and Metopolophium dirhodum Walker, while the generalist species Aphidius rhopalosiphi was restricted to the aphid species Rhopalosiphum padi L. in the presence of Aphidius avenae. Due to this new competition, winter food webs present a higher degree of compartmentalization and lower proportional similarity index values than spring ones. Parasitoid and aphid abundances responded significantly to changes in daily high temperatures, suggesting that the host-parasitoid community structure can be partly predicted by climate. This study demonstrates how a change in the winter strategy of one species of a guild can modify complex interspecific relationships in host-parasitoid systems. PMID:26558625

  14. Nuclear Winter: Implications for civil defense

    SciTech Connect

    Chester, C.V.; Perry, A.M.; Hobbs, B.F.

    1988-05-01

    ''Nuclear Winter'' is the term given to the cooling hypothesized to occur in the Northern Hemisphere following a nuclear war as the result of the injection of smoke from burning cities into the atmosphere. The voluminous literature on this subject produced since the paper was published in 1983 by Turco, Toon, Ackerman, Pollack, and Sagen (TTAPS) has been reviewed. Three-dimensional global circulation models have resulted in reduced estimates of cooling---15 to 25/degree/C for a summer war and a few degrees for a winter war. More serious may be the possibility of suppression of convective precipitation by the altered temperature profiles in the atmosphere. However, very large uncertainties remain in input parameters, the models, and the results of calculations. We believe the state of knowledge about nuclear winter is sufficiently developed to conclude: Neither cold nor drought is likely to be a direct threat to human survival for populations with the wherewithal to survive normal January temperatures. The principal threat from nuclear winter is to food production, and this could present problems to third parties who are without food reserves. Loss of a crop year is neither a new nor an unexpected threat from nuclear war to the United States and the Soviet Union. Both have at least a year's food reserve at all times. Both face formidable organizational problems in distributing their reserves in a war-damaged environment. The consequences of nuclear winter could be expected to fall more heavily on the Soviet Union than the United States due to its higher latitude and less productive agriculture. This may be especially true if disturbances of rainfall amounts and distribution persist for more than a year.

  15. Nuclear Winter: The implications for civil defense

    SciTech Connect

    Chester, C.V.; Perry, A.M.; Hobbs, B.F.

    1987-01-01

    ''Nuclear Winter'' is the term given to hypothesized cooling in the northern hemisphere following a nuclear war due to injection of smoke from burning cities into the atmosphere. The voluminous literature on this subject produced since the original paper in 1983 by Turco, Toon, Ackerman, Pollack, and Sagen (TTAPS) has been reviewed. The widespread use of 3-dimensional global circulation models have resulted in reduced estimates of cooling; 15 to 25/sup 0/C for a summer war and a few degrees for a winter war. More serious may be the possibility of suppression of convective precipitation by the altered temperature profiles in the atmosphere. However, very large uncertainties remain in input parameters, the models, and the results of calculations. We believe the state of knowledge about nuclear winter is sufficiently developed to conclude: Neither cold nor drought are likely to be direct threats to human survival for populations with the wherewithal to survive normal January temperatures; The principal threat from nuclear winter is to food production, and could present problems to third parties without food reserves; and Loss of a crop year is neither a new nor unexpected threat from nuclear war to the US and the Soviet Union. Both have at least a year's food reserve at all times. Both face formidable organizational problems in distributing their reserves in a war-damaged environment. The consequences of nuclear winter could be expected to fall more heavily on the Soviet Union than the US due to its higher latitude and less productive agriculture. This may be especially true if disturbances of rainfall amounts and distribution persist for more than a year. 6 refs.

  16. Improving winter river flow forecasts for the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, Cecilia; Bell, Victoria A.; Brookshaw, Anca; Scaife, Adam A.; Mackay, Jonathan D.; Jackson, Christopher R.; Arribas, Alberto; Williams, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Winter is the main season for recharge of groundwater and reservoirs in the United Kingdom (UK), and therefore influences the water availability during the rest of the year. Whereas hydrological predictions on timescales of days are comparatively successful, predictability on a seasonal scale is still limited and is mainly a result of the strong dependence of the flow on initial water storage conditions in the catchments. Seasonal river flow and groundwater predictions on a national, year-round scale have recently become available for the UK through the Hydrological Outlooks (http://www.hydoutuk.net/). For winter (December to February) mean river flows, these forecasts tend to be less skilful in the northwest than the southeast. Here we demonstrate new methodologies which take advantage of the remarkable geographical complementarity between the regional geological variations and regional meteorology, enabling increased skill in long range forecasts of winter river flows across the UK. Forecasts made at the start of winter show significant skill, which derives mainly from the geological memory of antecedent conditions in southern and eastern parts of the UK and from greater long range predictability of seasonal rainfall in northern and western areas of the UK. Many river catchments in lowland (southern and eastern) UK have a permeable geology and therefore a runoff regime dominated by slowly released groundwater. In contrast, catchments in the northwest are generally less permeable and therefore faster responding to rainfall events, making good seasonal rainfall forecasts essential for successful river flow forecasts. Winter rainfall in this region is primarily controlled by the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and forecast methods are presented which take advantage of recent improvements in the predictability of the sea level pressure field over the North Atlantic by the GloSea5 seasonal climate prediction system. Two river flow forecast methods are presented. The first consists of at-site linear regression forecasts using the preceding November's river flow and the December-February forecast of the NAO index as predictors. Second, a grid-based hydrological model is run using NAO-adjusted rainfall forecasts from GloSea5 as input. These rainfall forecasts lead to improved river flow forecasts in the northwest compared to using non-adjusted rainfall forecasts. Results for groundwater modelling are mixed, partly because most aquifers are located in the south and east rather than the northwest, and are therefore less affected by the NAO. But the slow response times of groundwater stores also mean that the resulting groundwater levels are complex aggregates of rainfall, evaporation and soil moisture over a longer time period than just the forecast period.

  17. Total ozone during the 88-89 Northern Hemisphere winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul; Stolarski, Richard; Schoeberl, Mark; Lait, Leslie R.; Krueger, Arlin

    1990-01-01

    Total ozone values measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer during January, February, and March 1989 are analyzed. During this period, polar total ozone values did not reveal clear depletions, although average winter total ozone values indicate that a 2-6 percent ozone reduction has occurred in northern mid to high latitudes over the last 10 years. Rapid total ozone increases were seen during mid-February, resulting from a wave 2 major stratospheric warming. In order to track polar air over the warming period, total ozone trends are further analyzed using Ertel's potential vorticity.

  18. [Effects of different irrigation modes in winter wheat growth season on the grain yield and water use efficiency of winter wheat-summer maize].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-xia; Li, Yu-yi; Ren, Tian-zhi; Pang, Huan-cheng

    2011-07-01

    Three irrigation modes in winter wheat growth season were carried out in Heilonggang basin of North China Plain to investigate their effects on the grain yield, water consumption, and water use efficiency (WUE) of winter wheat-summer maize. The three irrigation modes included irrigation before sowing (75 mm, W1), irrigation before sowing and at jointing stage (75 mm + 90 mm, W2), and irrigation before sowing, at jointing stage, and at filling stage (75 mm + 90 mm + 60 mm, W3). With the irrigation modes W2 and W3, the increment of the annual yield of winter wheat-summer maize was 8.7% and 12.5% higher than that with W1, respectively. The water consumption in winter wheat growth season decreased with increasing irrigation amount, while that in summer maize growth season increased with the increasing irrigation amount in winter wheat growth season. The WUE of winter wheat with the irrigation mode W2 was 11.1% higher than that with W3, but the WUE of summer maize had less difference between irrigation modes W2 and W3. The annual WUE (WUE(T)) of W2 and W1 was 21.28 and 21.60 kg(-1) x mm x hm(-2), being 7.8% and 9.4% higher than that of W3, respectively. Considering the annual yield, water consumption, and WUE, irrigation mode W2 could be the advisable mode for water-saving and high-yielding. PMID:22007452

  19. Cryopreservation of winter-dormant apple buds: I -Variation in recovery with cultivar and winter conditions.

    PubMed

    Vogiatzi, C; Grout, B W W; Wetten, A; Toldam-Andersen, T B

    2011-01-01

    The widely-adopted protocol for the cryopreservation of winter buds of fruit trees, such as Malus and Pyrus, was developed in a region with a continental climate, that provides relatively hard winters with a consequent effect on adaptive plant hardiness. In this study the protocol was evaluated in a typical maritime climate (eastern Denmark) where milder winters can be expected. The survival over two winters was evaluated, looking at variation between seasons and cultivars together with the progressive reduction in survival due to individual steps in the protocol. The study confirms that under such conditions significant variation in survival can be expected and that an extended period of imposed dehydration at -4 degree C is critical for bud survival. The occurrence of freezing events during this treatment suggests that cryodehydration may be involved, as well as evaporative water loss. To optimize the protocol for maritime environments, further investigation into the water status of the explants during cryopreservation is proposed. PMID:22020415

  20. Northern pintail body condition during wet and dry winters in the Sacramento Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    Body weights and carcass composition of male and female adult northern pintails (Anas acuta) were investigated in the Sacramento Valley, California, from August to March 1979-82. Pintails were lightweight, lean, and had reduced breast, leg, and heart muscles during August-September. Ducks steadily gained weight after arrival; and body, carcass (body wt minus feathers and gastrointestinal content), fat protein, and muscle weights peaked in October-November. Fat-free dry weight remained high but variable the rest of the winter, whereas body and carcass weight and fat content declined to lows in December or January, then increased again in February or March. Gizzard weights declined from early fall to March. Males were always heavier than females, but females were fatter (percentage) than males during mid-winter. Mid-winter body weight, carcass fat, and protein content were significantly (P < 0.01) lower in the dry winter of 1980-81 than in 2 wet winters (1979-80 and 1981-82). Changes in pintail body weight and composition during winter are probably adaptations to mild climate, predictable food supplies, and requirements for pair formation and molt.

  1. Winter Ecology of the Western Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia hypugaea) in Southern Texas 1999-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodin, Marc C.; Skoruppa, Mary K.; Hickman, Graham C.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the winter ecology of the western burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia hypugaea) in five Texas counties surrounding Corpus Christi, in southern Texas. There is a substantial gap in information on the owl's life cycle during migration and non-breeding winter months; almost all previous research on western burrowing owls has been conducted during the breeding season. The western burrowing owl currently is federally threatened in Mexico, federally endangered in Canada, and in the United States is considered a National Bird of Conservation Concern by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Topics investigated included status, effectiveness of public outreach, roost sites and use of culverts and artificial burrows, roost site fidelity, diet, contaminant burdens, body mass, and ectoparasites. Early ornithological reports and a museum egg set revealed that burrowing owls once bred in southern Texas and were common in winter; however, since the 1950's they have been reported in relatively low numbers and only during winter. In this study, public outreach increased western burrowing owl detections by 68 percent. Owls selected winter roost sites with small-diameter openings, including culverts less than or equal to 16 centimeters and artificial burrows of 15 centimeters, probably because the small diameters deterred mammalian predators. Owls showed strong roost site fidelity; 15 banded birds stayed at the same roost sites within a winter, and 8 returned to the same site the following winter. The winter diet was over 90 percent insects, with crickets the primary prey. Analyses of invertebrate prey and regurgitated pellets showed that residues of all but 3 of 28 carbamate and organophosphate pesticides were detected at least once, but all were below known lethal concentrations. Mean body mass of western burrowing owls was 168 grams and was highest in midwinter. Feather lice were detected in low numbers on a few owls, but no fleas or other ectoparasites were found.

  2. Does Day Length Affect Winter Bird Distribution? Testing the Role of an Elusive Variable

    PubMed Central

    Carrascal, Luis M.; Santos, Toms; Tellera, Jos L.

    2012-01-01

    Differences in day length may act as a critical factor in bird biology by introducing time constraints in energy acquisition during winter. Thus, differences in day length might operate as a main determinant of bird abundance along latitudinal gradients. This work examines the influence of day length on the abundance of wintering crested tits (Lophophanes cristatus) in 26 localities of Spanish juniper (Juniperus thurifera) dwarf woodlands (average height of 5 m) located along a latitudinal gradient in the Spanish highlands, while controlling for the influence of food availability, minimum night temperature, habitat structure and landscape characteristics. Top regression models in the AIC framework explained 56% of variance in bird numbers. All models incorporated day length as the variable with the highest magnitude effect. Food availability also played an important role, although only the crop of ripe juniper fruits, but not arthropods, positively affected crested tit abundance. Differences in vegetation structure across localities had also a strong positive effect (average tree height and juniper tree density). Geographical variation in night temperature had no influence on crested tit distribution, despite the low winter temperatures reached in these dwarf forests. This paper demonstrates for the first time that winter bird abundance increases with day length after controlling for the effect of other environmental variables. Winter average difference in day length was only 10.5 minutes per day along the 147? latitudinal interval (190 km) included in this study. This amount of time, which reaches 13.5 h accumulated throughout the winter season, appears to be large enough to affect the long-term energy budget of small passerines during winter and to shape the distribution of winter bird abundance under restrictive environmental conditions. PMID:22393442

  3. The response of a Kansas winter bird community to weather, photoperiod, and year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stapanian, M.A.; Smith, C.C.; Finck, E.J.

    1999-01-01

    We conducted a bird census along the same route nearly each week for 14 winters (194 censuses), and compared the mean number of species per station and the total number of species recorded on the census with the length of photoperiod and weather variables. We found significant differences among winters for both indicators of species richness. This result is consistent with previous studies in which abundance of food was measured in the same general area. Both indicators of species richness were negatively associated with the number of days after 1 November. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that wintering species dependent on nonrenewed food resources lose individuals to mortality or emigration. Further, there was a positive relationship between photoperiod and both indicators of species richness. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that the detection of individuals in the early morning hours increases with the amount of daylight they have available for foraging and social behaviors. Wind speed and temperature had negative and positive relationships, respectively, to species richness. The number of species per station was greatest on days when the ground was covered with dew and least on days when snow depth was more than 15 cm. When the 'winters' were divided into four 30-day 'quarters', most of the 61 species were recorded with equal frequency in each quarter. Eight species were detected less frequently at the end of winter than in the beginning. Four species exhibited the reverse pattern. Two species were recorded more frequently at the beginning and at the end of the winter than during the middle. Temperature, wind, photoperiod, successive winter day, year, and species-specific evolutionary history all affect winter bird species richness.

  4. Pinatubo eruption winter climate effects: Model versus observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, HANS-F.; Kirchner, Ingo; Schult, Ingrid; Robock, Alan

    1992-01-01

    Large volcanic eruptions, in addition to the well-known effect of producing global cooling for a year or two, have been observed to produce shorter-term responses in the climate system involving non-linear dynamical processes. In this paper, we use the ECHAM2 general circulation model forced with stratospheric aerosols to test some of these ideas. Run in a perpetual-January mode, with tropical stratospheric heating from the volcanic aerosols typical of the 1982 El Chichon eruption or the 1991 Pinatubo eruption, we find a dynamical response with an increased polar night jet in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and stronger zonal winds which extended down into the troposphere. The Azores High shifts northward with increased tropospheric westerlies at 60N and increased easterlies at 30N. Surface temperatures are higher both in northern Eurasia and North America, in agreement with observations for the NH winters or 1982-83 and 1991-92 as well as the winters following the other 10 largest volcanic eruptions since 1883.

  5. Pinatubo eruption winter climate effects: Model versus observations

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, H.F.; Kirchner, I.; Schult, I.

    1993-11-01

    Large volcanic eruptions, in addition to the well-known effect of producing global cooling for a year or two, have been observed to produce shorter-term responses in the climate system involving non-linear dynamical processes. In this study, we use the ECHAM2 general circulation model forced with stratospheric aerosols to test some of these ideas. Run in a perpetual-January mode, with tropical stratospheric heating from the volcanic aerosols typical of the 1982 EL Chichon eruption or the 1991 Pinatubo eruption, we find a dynamical response with an increased polar night jet in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and stronger zonal winds which extend down into the troposphere. The Azores High shifts northward with increased tropospheric westerlies at 60{degrees}N and increased easterlies at 30{degrees}N. Surface temperatures are higher both in northern Eurasia and North America, in agreement with observations for the NH winters of 1982-83 and 1991-92 as well as the winters following the other 10 largest volcanic eruptions since 1883. 27 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Attribution of UK Winter Floods to Anthropogenic Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, N.; Alison, K.; Sparrow, S. N.; Otto, F. E. L.; Massey, N.; Vautard, R.; Yiou, P.; van Oldenborgh, G. J.; van Haren, R.; Lamb, R.; Huntingford, C.; Crooks, S.; Legg, T.; Weisheimer, A.; Bowery, A.; Miller, J.; Jones, R.; Stott, P.; Allen, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    Many regions of southern UK experienced severe flooding during the 2013/2014 winter. Simultaneously, large areas in the USA and Canada were struck by prolonged cold weather. At the time, the media and public asked whether the general rainy conditions over northern Europe and the cold weather over North America were caused by climate change. Providing an answer to this question is not trivial, but recent studies show that probabilistic event attribution is feasible. Using the citizen science project weather@home, we ran over 40'000 perturbed initial condition simulations of the 2013/2014 winter. These simulations fall into two categories: one set aims at simulating the world with climate change using observed sea surface temperatures while the second set is run with sea surface temperatures corresponding to a world that might have been without climate change. The relevant modelled variables are then downscaled by a hydrological model to obtain river flows. First results show that anthropogenic climate change led to a small but significant increase in the fractional attributable risk for 30-days peak flows for the river Thames. A single number can summarize the final result from probabilistic attribution studies indicating, for example, an increase, decrease or no change to the risk of the event occurring. However, communicating this to the public, media and other scientists remains challenging. The assumptions made in the chain of models used need to be explained. In addition, extreme events, like the UK floods of the 2013/2014 winter, are usually caused by a range of factors. While heavy precipitation events can be caused by dynamic and/or thermodynamic processes, floods occur only partly as a response to heavy precipitation. Depending on the catchment, they can be largely due to soil properties and conditions of the previous months. Probabilistic attribution studies are multidisciplinary and therefore all aspects need to be communicated properly.

  7. Sustainability of winter tourism in a changing climate over Kashmir Himalaya.

    PubMed

    Dar, Reyaz Ahmad; Rashid, Irfan; Romshoo, Shakil Ahmad; Marazi, Asif

    2014-04-01

    Mountain areas are sensitive to climate change. Implications of climate change can be seen in less snow, receding glaciers, increasing temperatures, and decreasing precipitation. Climate change is also a severe threat to snow-related winter sports such as skiing, snowboarding, and cross-country skiing. The change in climate will put further pressure on the sensitive environment of high mountains. Therefore, in this study, an attempt has been made to know the impact of climate change on the snow precipitation, water resources, and winter tourism in the two famous tourist resorts of the Kashmir Valley. Our findings show that winters are getting prolonged with little snow falls on account of climate change. The average minimum and maximum temperatures are showing statistically significant increasing trends for winter months. The precipitation is showing decreasing trends in both the regions. A considerable area in these regions remains under the snow and glacier cover throughout the year especially during the winter and spring seasons. However, time series analysis of LandSat MODIS images using Normalized Difference Snow Index shows a decreasing trend in snow cover in both the regions from past few years. Similarly, the stream discharge, comprising predominantly of snow- and glacier-melt, is showing a statistically significant declining trend despite the melting of these glaciers. The predicted futuristic trends of temperature from Predicting Regional Climates for Impact Studies regional climate model are showing an increase which may enhance snow-melting in the near future posing a serious threat to the sustainability of winter tourism in the region. Hence, it becomes essential to monitor the changes in temperature and snow cover depletion in these basins in order to evaluate their effect on the winter tourism and water resources in the region. PMID:24318957

  8. Field Demonstration of Automated Demand Response for Both Winter and Summer Events in Large Buildings in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Dudley, Junqiao H.

    2011-11-11

    There are growing strains on the electric grid as cooling peaks grow and equipment ages. Increased penetration of renewables on the grid is also straining electricity supply systems and the need for flexible demand is growing. This paper summarizes results of a series of field test of automated demand response systems in large buildings in the Pacific Northwest. The objective of the research was two fold. One objective was to evaluate the use demand response automation technologies. A second objective was to evaluate control strategies that could change the electric load shape in both winter and summer conditions. Winter conditions focused on cold winter mornings, a time when the electric grid is often stressed. The summer test evaluated DR strategies in the afternoon. We found that we could automate both winter and summer control strategies with the open automated demand response communication standard. The buildings were able to provide significant demand response in both winter and summer events.

  9. Space-time clustering of, and risk factors for, farmer-diagnosed winter dysentery in dairy cattle

    PubMed Central

    White, Maurice E.; Schukken, Ynte Hein; Tanksley, Beth

    1989-01-01

    We used two statistical techniques for space-time cluster analysis, the Knox and the Mantel regression methods, for an analysis of whether herd outbreaks of farmer-diagnosed winter dysentery during the winter of 1987-1988 were clustered in space and time more than would be expected by chance. Using the Knox method, there was significant space-time clustering of outbreaks of winter dysentery within a 30 day time and a 5.5 km radius. There was also significant space-time clustering by the Mantel regression method. Logistic regression was used to study risk factors for herd outbreaks of winter dysentery. Large herds (>60 cows) and herds with a history of an outbreak prior to 1987 had increased chances of an outbreak occurring in 1987-1988. These results are compatible with an infectious cause for winter dysentery. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:17423474

  10. GOES Satellite Movie of 2014 Winter Storms - Duration: 82 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    This new animation of NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery shows the movement of winter storms from January 1 to March 24 making for a snowier-than-normal winter along the U.S. East coast and Midwest...

  11. Is winter worse for stressed fish? The consequences of exogenous cortisol manipulation on over-winter survival and condition of juvenile largemouth bass.

    PubMed

    Binder, Thomas R; O'Connor, Constance M; McConnachie, Sarah H; Wilson, Samantha M; Nannini, Michael A; Wahl, David H; Cooke, Steven J

    2015-09-01

    Over-winter mortality is an important selective force for warm-water fish (e.g., centrarchids) that live in temperate habitats. Inherent challenges faced by fish during winter may be compounded by additional stressors that activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal axis, either before or during winter, leading to negative sub-lethal impacts on fish health and condition, and possibly reducing chance of survival. We used experimental cortisol manipulation to test the hypothesis that juvenile largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) exposed to semi-chronic elevation in cortisol prior to winter would experience higher levels of over-winter mortality, physiological alterations and impaired immune status relative to control and sham-treated bass. Over-winter survival in experimental ponds was high, averaging 83%, and did not differ among treatment groups. Over the study period, bass exhibited an average increase in mass of 19.4%, as well as a slight increase in Fulton's condition factor, but neither measure differed among groups. Hepatosomatic index in cortisol-treated bass was 23% lower than in control fish, suggesting lower energy status, but white muscle lipid content was similar across all groups. Lastly, there was no difference in spleen somatic index or parasite load among treatment groups, indicating no long-term immune impairment related to our cortisol manipulation. The current study adds to a growing body of literature on glucocorticoid manipulations where field-based findings are not consistent with laboratory-based conceptual understanding of multiple stressors. This suggests that field conditions may provide fish with opportunities to mitigate negative effects of some stressors. PMID:26006297

  12. Effects of winter atmospheric circulation on temporal and spatial variability in annual streamflow in the western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Winter mean 700-hectoPascal (hPa) height anomalies, representing the average atmospheric circulation during the snow season, are compared with annual streamflow measured at 140 streamgauges in the western United States. Correlation and anomaly pattern analyses are used to identify relationships between winter mean atmospheric circulation and temporal and spatial variability in annual streamflow. Results indicate that variability in winter mean 700-Hpa height anomalies accounts for a statistically significant portion of the temporal variability in annual streamflow in the western United States. In general, above-average annual streamflow is associated with negative winter mean 700-Hpa height anomalies over the eastern North Pacific Ocean and/or the western United States. The anomalies produce an anomalous flow of moist air from the eastern North Pacific Ocean into the western United States that increases winter precipitation and snowpack accumulations, and subsequently streamflow. Winter mean 700-hPa height anomalies also account for statistically significant differences in spatial distributions of annual streamflow. As part of this study, winter mean atmospheric circulation patterns for the 40 years analysed were classified into five winter mean 700-hPa height anomaly patterns. These patterns are related to statistically significant and physically meaningful differences in spatial distributions of annual streamflow.

  13. Individual inconsistencies in basal and summit metabolic rate highlight flexibility of metabolic performance in a wintering passerine.

    PubMed

    Corts, Pablo Andrs; Petit, Magali; Lewden, Agns; Milbergue, Myriam; Vzina, Franois

    2015-03-01

    Resident passerines inhabiting high latitude environments are faced with strong seasonal changes in thermal conditions and energy availability. Summit metabolic rate (maximal metabolic rate elicited by shivering during cold exposure: M(sum)) and basal metabolic rate (BMR) vary in parallel among seasons and increase in winter due to cold acclimatization, and these adjustments are thought to be critical for survival. Wintering individuals expressing consistently higher M(sum) and BMR could therefore be seen as better performers with higher chances of winter survival than those exhibiting lower metabolic performance. In this study, we calculated repeatability to evaluate temporal consistency of body mass, BMR and M(sum) within and across three consecutives winters in black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus). We found that body mass was significantly repeatable both within and across winters (R 0.51-0.90). BMR (R 0.29-0.47) was only repeatable within winter while M(sum) was repeatable both among (R 0.33-0.49) and within winters (R 0.33-0.49) with the magnitude and significance of repeatability in both variables depending on the year and whether they were corrected for body mass or body size. The patterns of repeatability observed among years also differed between the two variables. Our findings suggest that the relative ranking of individuals in winter metabolic performance is affected by local ecological conditions and can change within relatively short periods of time. PMID:25690265

  14. Winter climate change and coastal wetland foundation species: salt marshes vs. mangrove forests in the southeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osland, Michael J.; Day, Richard H.; Doyle, Thomas W.; Enwright, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    We live in an era of unprecedented ecological change in which ecologists and natural resource managers are increasingly challenged to anticipate and prepare for the ecological effects of future global change. In this study, we investigated the potential effect of winter climate change upon salt marsh and mangrove forest foundation species in the southeastern United States. Our research addresses the following three questions: (1) What is the relationship between winter climate and the presence and abundance of mangrove forests relative to salt marshes; (2) How vulnerable are salt marshes to winter climate change-induced mangrove forest range expansion; and (3) What is the potential future distribution and relative abundance of mangrove forests under alternative winter climate change scenarios? We developed simple winter climate-based models to predict mangrove forest distribution and relative abundance using observed winter temperature data (19702000) and mangrove forest and salt marsh habitat data. Our results identify winter climate thresholds for salt marshmangrove forest interactions and highlight coastal areas in the southeastern United States (e.g., Texas, Louisiana, and parts of Florida) where relatively small changes in the intensity and frequency of extreme winter events could cause relatively dramatic landscape-scale ecosystem structural and functional change in the form of poleward mangrove forest migration and salt marsh displacement. The ecological implications of these marsh-to-mangrove forest conversions are poorly understood, but would likely include changes for associated fish and wildlife populations and for the supply of some ecosystem goods and services.

  15. Variety and N management effect on grain yield and quality of winter barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter malting barley is a potential alternative crop for the dryland region of the Pacific Northwest. Nitrogen fertilization can increase grain yield but may also increase lodging and grain protein and reduce test weight. The objectives of this research were to determine the effect of N application...

  16. Sharp View of Gullies in Southern Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    20 November 2006 Crisp details in a suite of mid-latitude gullies on a crater wall are captured in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) view obtained in southern winter on 12 October 2006. During southern winter, shadows are more pronounced and the atmosphere is typically quite clear. These gullies, which may have formed in relatively recent martian history by erosion caused by flowing, liquid water, are located in a crater on the east rim of Newton Crater near 40.4oS, 155.3oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left. The picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide; the crater rim is on the right side of the image, the crater floor is on the left. North is toward the top/upper left.

  17. NHS' annual scramble to avert winter crisis.

    PubMed

    Peate, Ian

    The NHS is facing its toughest ever winter. There are fears that trusts may be forced to use beds in private nursing homes, reopen wards that have been disused and create new ones to enhance capacity. Trusts are attempting to recruit nurses from abroad to address staff shortages in a bid to cope with the expected impact of flu, norovirus and predicted bad weather. PMID:24406488

  18. Tillage requirements for vegetables following winter annual grazing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Alabama, over 400,000 ac of winter annuals are grazed prior to planting summer row crops. Previous research indicates that cattle grazed on ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.) pastures over the winter months in Alabama can be profitable, but winter grazing creates excessive compaction, which advers...

  19. Livable Winter Cities--Leisure Attitudes and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Larry; Coles, Roger, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    The nine articles included in this feature emphasize how leisure, recreation, health and physical activities make winter cities more livable. Specific topics include techniques for teaching about cold weather safety and cold related injuries, Arctic Winter Games, and results of a study on winter recreation in large North American communities. (IAH)

  20. 76 FR 73503 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Winters, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... controlled airspace at Winters Municipal Airport (76 FR 53354) Docket No. FAA-2011-0608. Interested parties.... Decommissioning of the Winters NDB and cancellation of the NDB approach at Winters Municipal Airport, as well as...'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not...

  1. Sources and contributions of wood smoke during winter in London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crilley, Leigh; Bloss, William; Yin, Jianxin; Beddows, David; Harrison, Roy; Zotter, Peter; Prevot, Andre; Green, David

    2014-05-01

    Determining the contribution of wood smoke in large urban centres such as London is becoming increasingly important with the changing nature of domestic heating partly due to the installation of biomass burning heaters to meet renewable energy targets imposed by the EU and also a rise in so-called recreational burning for aesthetic reasons (Fuller et al., 2013). Recent work in large urban centres (London, Paris and Berlin) has demonstrated an increase in the contribution of wood smoke to ambient particles during winter that can at times exceed traffic emissions. In Europe, biomass burning has been identified as a major cause of exceedances of European air quality limits during winter (Fuller et al., 2013). In light of the changing nature of emissions in urban areas there is a need for on-going measurements to assess the impact of biomass burning in cities like London. Therefore we aimed to determine quantitatively the contribution of biomass burning in London and surrounding rural areas. We also aimed to determine whether local emissions or regional sources were the main source of biomass burning in London. Sources of wood smoke during winter in London were investigated at an urban background site (North Kensington) and two surrounding rural sites (Harwell and Detling) by analysing selected wood smoke chemical tracers. Concentrations of levoglucosan, elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC) and K+ were generally well correlated, indicating a similar source of these species at the three sites. Based on the conversion factor for levoglucosan, mean wood smoke mass at Detling, North Kensington and Harwell was 0.78, 0.87 and 1.0 µg m-3, respectively. At all the sites, biomass burning was found to be a source of OC and EC, with the largest source of OC and EC found to be secondary organic aerosols and traffic emissions, respectively. Peaks in levoglucosan concentrations at the sites were observed to coincide with low ambient temperature, suggesting domestic heating as a contributing source in London. Overall, the source of biomass burning in London was likely a background regional source from mainland Europe overlaid by high contributions from local domestic burning emissions. This could have implications when considering future control strategies during winter. References Fuller, G.W., Sciare, J., Lutz, M., Moukhtar, S., Wagener, S., 2013. New Directions: Time to tackle urban wood burning? Atmospheric Environment 68, 295-296.

  2. Dehydration in the Winter Arctic Tropopause Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Jensen, Eric; Podolske, James; Selkirk, Henry; Anderson, Bruce; Avery, Melody; Diskin. Glenn

    2004-01-01

    Recent work has shown that limited amounts of tropospheric air can penetrate as much as 1 km into the middleworld stratosphere during the arctic winter. This, coupled with temperatures that are cold enough to produce saturation mixing ratios of less than 5 ppmv at the tropopause, results in stratospheric cloud formation and upper tropospheric dehydration. Even though these "cold outbreaks" occupy only a small portion of the area in the arctic (1-2%), their importance is magnified by an order of magnitude because of the air flow through them. This is reinforced by evidence of progressive drying through the winter measured during SOLVE-1. The significance of this process lies in its effect on the upper tropospheric water content of the middle and high latitude tropopause region, which plays an important role in regulating the earth's radiative balance. There appears to be significant year-to-year variability in the incidence of the cold outbreaks. This work has two parts. First, we describe case studies of dehydration taken from the SOLVE and SOLVE2 aircraft sampling missions during the Arctic winters of 2000 and 2003 respectively. Trajectory based microphysical modeling is employed to examine the sensitivity of the dehydration to microphysical parameters and the nature of sub-grid scale temperature fluctuations. We then examine the year-to-year variations in potential dehydration using a trajectory climatology.

  3. Monitoring Gully Activity in Martian Winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dundas, C. M.; Diniega, S.; Hansen, C. J.; Byrne, S.; McEwen, A. S.

    2012-12-01

    Recent work has shown that Martian gullies are active in the present climate, on sand dunes and on crater walls and other slopes. Observations include large-scale channel incision (particularly in dune gullies), transport of boulders, alcove collapse and extensive deposition on aprons. Hence, we find that all of the major morphological features of gullies are evolving today and that current processes do not merely degrade features formed under past orbital and climate conditions. This is particularly clear for gullies on sand dunes, which have been observed to form on smooth slopes and remain morphologically pristine despite active eolian sand transport; morphological similarities suggest that the same processes are involved in formation of gullies on non-dune slopes. Channel incision is particularly intriguing since this has been taken as evidence for liquid water in the past. In addition to the scope of changes, the other striking feature of present-day gully activity is seasonality. Changes are concentrated in the winter, suggesting an association with seasonal CO2 frost or defrosting activity; it is difficult to generate volumes of liquid water that might play a relevant role in the large-scale gully changes observed. We are conducting a campaign to monitor activity in the current Martian southern winter using the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera. Partway through the winter, indications of activity have already been observed in multiple gullies. We will present results from this monitoring campaign and compare this season's activity with observations from previous years.

  4. Flowering time control in European winter wheat

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Simon M.; Longin, C. Friedrich H.; Würschum, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Flowering time is an important trait in wheat breeding as it affects adaptation and yield potential. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic architecture of flowering time in European winter bread wheat cultivars. To this end a population of 410 winter wheat varieties was evaluated in multi-location field trials and genotyped by a genotyping-by-sequencing approach and candidate gene markers. Our analyses revealed that the photoperiod regulator Ppd-D1 is the major factor affecting flowering time in this germplasm set, explaining 58% of the genotypic variance. Copy number variation at the Ppd-B1 locus was present but explains only 3.2% and thus a comparably small proportion of genotypic variance. By contrast, the plant height loci Rht-B1 and Rht-D1 had no effect on flowering time. The genome-wide scan identified six QTL which each explain only a small proportion of genotypic variance and in addition we identified a number of epistatic QTL, also with small effects. Taken together, our results show that flowering time in European winter bread wheat cultivars is mainly controlled by Ppd-D1 while the fine tuning to local climatic conditions is achieved through Ppd-B1 copy number variation and a larger number of QTL with small effects. PMID:25346745

  5. Characteristics of foraging sites and protein status in wintering muskoxen: Insights from isotopes of nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gustine, D.D.; Barboza, P.S.; Lawler, J.P.; Arthur, S.M.; Shults, B.S.; Persons, K.; Adams, L.G.

    2011-01-01

    Identifying links between nutritional condition of individuals and population trajectories greatly enhances our understanding of the ecology, conservation, and management of wildlife. For northern ungulates, the potential impacts of a changing climate to populations are predicted to be nutritionally mediated through an increase in the severity and variance in winter conditions. Foraging conditions and the availability of body protein as a store for reproduction in late winter may constrain productivity in northern ungulates, yet the link between characteristics of wintering habitats and protein status has not been established for a wild ungulate. We used a non-invasive proxy of protein status derived from isotopes of N in excreta to evaluate the influence of winter habitats on the protein status of muskoxen in three populations in Alaska (2005-2008). Multiple regression and an information-theoretic approach were used to compare models that evaluated the influence of population, year, and characteristics of foraging sites (components of diet and physiography) on protein status for groups of muskoxen. The observed variance in protein status among groups of muskoxen across populations and years was partially explained (45%) by local foraging conditions that affected forage availability. Protein status improved for groups of muskoxen as the amount of graminoids in the diet increased (-0.430 ?? 0.31, ???? 95% CI) and elevation of foraging sites decreased (0.824 ?? 0.67). Resources available for reproduction in muskoxen are highly dependent upon demographic, environmental, and physiographic constraints that affect forage availability in winter. Due to their very sedentary nature in winter, muskoxen are highly susceptible to localized foraging conditions; therefore, the spatial variance in resource availability may exert a strong effect on productivity. Consequently, there is a clear need to account for climate-topography effects in winter at multiple scales when predicting the potential impacts of climatic shifts on population trajectories of muskoxen. ?? 2011 The Authors.

  6. Assessing solar energy and water use efficiencies in winter wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asrar, G.; Hipps, L. E.; Kanemasu, E. T.

    1982-01-01

    The water use and solar energy conversion efficiencies of two cultivars of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L., vars, Centurk and Newton) planted at three densities, were examined during a growing season. Water use, based on soil moisture depletion, was the lowest under the light, and the highest under the heavy planting densities of both cultivars. Water use efficiency of medium and heavy planting densities were greater than the light planting densities in both cultivars. The canopy radiation extinction coefficients of both cultivars increased with increases in planting density. Efficiency of operation interception of photosynthetically active radiation by both cultivars improved from the time of jointing until anthesis, and then decreased during senescence. The efficiency of the conversion of intercepted radiation to dry matter (biochemical efficiency) decreased throughout the growing season both cultivars. The interception, biochemical, and photosynthetic efficiencies improved as planting density increased.

  7. Effects of winter road grooming on bison in YNP

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bjornlie, Daniel D; Garrott, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of winter recreation—specifically snowmobiling—on wildlife in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) have become high-profile management issues. The road grooming needed to support oversnow travel in YNP is also being examined for its effects on bison (Bison bison) ecology. Data were collected from November 1997 through May 1998 and from December 1998 through May 1999 on the effects of road grooming on bison in Madison–Gibbon–Firehole (MGF) area of YNP Peak bison numbers occurred during late March—early April and were strongly correlated with the snow water equivalent measurements in the Hayden Valley area (1997–1998: r* = 0.62, p:0.001: 1998–1999: r2 = 0.64, P-0.001). Data from an infrared trail monitor on the Mary Mountain trail between the Hayden and Firehole valleys suggest that this trail is the sole corridor for major bison distributional shifts between these locations. Of the 28,293 observations of individual bison made during the study, 8% were traveling and 69% were foraging. These percentages were nearly identical during the period of winter road grooming (7% and 68%, respectively). During this period, 77% of bison foraging activity and 12% of bison traveling activity involved displacing snow. Most travel took place off roads (P<0.001), Bison utilized geothermal features, a network of trails they established, and river and stream banks for travel. Bison road use was negatively correlated with road grooming, with peak use in April and lowest use during the road-grooming period. Bison in the MGF area of YNF neither seek out nor avoid groomed roads. The minimal use of roads compared to off-road areas, the short distances traveled on the roads, the decreased use of roads during the over snow vehicle (OSV) season, and the increased costs of negative interactions with OSVs suggest that grooming roads during winter does not have a major influence on bison ecology.

  8. Blood chemistry of black bears from Pennsylvania during winter dormancy.

    PubMed

    Storm, G L; Alt, G L; Matula, G J; Nelson, R A

    1988-07-01

    Twenty-four serum chemistries were measured in blood samples collected from 20 adult female black bears (Ursus americanus) and their offspring, including 14 yearlings and 37 cubs, in northeastern Pennsylvania during winter 1984. Four other captive adult females were bled before, during, and after they were subjected to unseasonably warm temperatures during February. Levels of serum urea nitrogen (SUN) and creatinine were lower (P less than 0.05), and iron was higher (P less than 0.05) in male cubs compared to female cubs; serum chemistries were similar (P greater than or equal to 0.05) between sexes for yearlings. Total protein, albumin and creatinine levels increased with age of bears, whereas chloride, alkaline phosphatase, potassium, inorganic phosphorus and SUN/creatinine were higher (P less than 0.05) i