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Sample records for increases er-mediated transcription

  1. The fidelity of transcription: RPB1 (RPO21) mutations that increase transcriptional slippage in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Strathern, Jeffrey; Malagon, Francisco; Irvin, Jordan; Gotte, Deanna; Shafer, Brenda; Kireeva, Maria; Lubkowska, Lucyna; Jin, Ding Jun; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2013-01-25

    The fidelity of RNA synthesis depends on both accurate template-mediated nucleotide selection and proper maintenance of register between template and RNA. Loss of register, or transcriptional slippage, is particularly likely on homopolymeric runs in the template. Transcriptional slippage can alter the coding capacity of mRNAs and is used as a regulatory mechanism. Here we describe mutations in the largest subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase II that substantially increase the level of transcriptional slippage. Alleles of RPB1 (RPO21) with elevated slippage rates were identified among 6-azauracil-sensitive mutants and were also isolated using a slippage-dependent reporter gene. Biochemical characterization of polymerase II isolated from these mutants confirms elevated levels of transcriptional slippage. PMID:23223234

  2. Decitabine Increases Fetal Hemoglobin in P. Anubis by Increasing γ-globin Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Akpan, Imo; Banzon, Virryan; Ibanez, Vinzon; Vaitkus, Kestis; DeSimone, Joseph; Lavelle, Donald

    2014-01-01

    1) Objective The mechanism responsible for increased fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels following decitabine treatment remains controversial. These experiments were performed to evaluate the role of transcriptional versus translational mechanisms in the ability of decitabine to increase HbF levels in vivo. 2) Methods Three normal, nonanemic baboons were treated with decitabine subcutaneously (0.5mg/kg/d) for 10 days. The effect of decitabine on globin chain synthesis and globin mRNA levels was measured in pre- and post-treatment bone marrow (BM) aspirates by biosynthetic radiolabelling with [3H] leucine followed by separation of globin chains by HPLC, and real time PCR, respectively. The effect on DNA methylation of the ε- and γ-globin gene promoters was determined by bisulfite sequence analysis. 3) Results Decitabine treatment of normal, nonanemic baboons induced similar increases in the γ/γ+β chain synthetic ratio and the γ/total β-like globin RNA ratio and also increased expression of ε-globin transcripts. Increased expression of ε- and γ-globin was associated with decreased DNA methylation of the ε- and γ-globin gene promoters. 4) Conclusion Decitabine increases HbF in vivo by transcriptional activation of the γ-globin gene. PMID:20713129

  3. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Workplace violence increases in medical settings

    MedlinePlus

    ... transcript061316.html To Your Health: NLM update Transcript Workplace violence increases in medical settings : 06/13/2016 ... use MedlinePlus to follow up on weekly topics. Workplace violence in health care settings is increasingly common ...

  4. Dexamethasone Enhances 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Effects by Increasing Vitamin D Receptor Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Alejandro A.; Deeb, Kristin K.; Pike, J. Wesley; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2011-01-01

    Calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D, in combination with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) has been shown to increase the antitumor effects of calcitriol in squamous cell carcinoma. In this study we found that pretreatment with Dex potentiates calcitriol effects by inhibiting cell growth and increasing vitamin D receptor (VDR) and VDR-mediated transcription. Treatment with actinomycin D inhibits Vdr mRNA synthesis, indicating that Dex regulates VDR expression at transcriptional level. Real time PCR shows that treatment with Dex increases Vdr transcripts in a time- and a dose-dependent manner, indicating that Dex directly regulates expression of Vdr. RU486, an inhibitor of glucocorticoids, inhibits Dex-induced Vdr expression. In addition, the silencing of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) abolishes the induction of Vdr by Dex, indicating that Dex increases Vdr transcripts in a GR-dependent manner. A fragment located 5.2 kb upstream of Vdr transcription start site containing two putative glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) was evaluated using a luciferase-based reporter assay. Treatment with 100 nm Dex induces transcription of luciferase driven by the fragment. Deletion of the GRE distal to transcription start site was sufficient to abolish Dex induction of luciferase. Also, chromatin immunoprecipitation reveals recruitment of GR to distal GRE with Dex treatment. We conclude that Dex increases VDR and vitamin D effects by increasing Vdr de novo transcription in a GR-dependent manner. PMID:21868377

  5. Bypassing the Requirements for Epigenetic Modifications in Gene Transcription by Increasing Enhancer Strength▿

    PubMed Central

    Koutroubas, George; Merika, Menie; Thanos, Dimitris

    2008-01-01

    Our current concept postulates that histone acetylation is required for the recruitment of bromodomain-containing transcription complexes, such as the chromatin-remodeling machine SWI/SNF and the basal transcription factor TFIID. We generated simple NF-κB-dependent enhancers of increasing transcriptional strengths and found that the histone acetylation requirements for activation of transcription depended on the strengths of these enhancers. All enhancers function by recruiting SWI/SNF and TFIID to induce nucleosome sliding, a prerequisite for transcriptional activation. However, histone acetylation, although it occurs, is dispensable for TFIID and SWI/SNF recruitment by the strong enhancers, indicating that strong activators can overcome the chromatin barrier by directly recruiting the necessary transcriptional complexes. Weak enhancers depend on histone acetylation for recruitment, and this requirement is independent of a histone acetylation code. Thus, the need for nucleosome modifications is imposed on genes and translated according to the quality and strengths of the activators. PMID:18025106

  6. Increase of a group of PTC(+) transcripts by curcumin through inhibition of the NMD pathway.

    PubMed

    Feng, Dairong; Su, Ruey-Chyi; Zou, Liping; Triggs-Raine, Barbara; Huang, Shangzhi; Xie, Jiuyong

    2015-08-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), an mRNA surveillance mechanism, eliminates premature termination codon-containing (PTC⁺) transcripts. For instance, it maintains the homeostasis of splicing factors and degrades aberrant transcripts of human genetic disease genes. Here we examine the inhibitory effect on the NMD pathway and consequent increase of PTC+ transcripts by the dietary compound curcumin. We have found that several PTC⁺ transcripts including that of serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1) were specifically increased in cells by curcumin. We also observed a similar curcumin effect on the PTC⁺ mutant transcript from a Tay-Sachs-causing HEXA allele or from a beta-globin reporter gene. The curcumin effect was accompanied by significantly reduced expression of the NMD factors UPF1, 2, 3A and 3B. Consistently, in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, curcumin specifically reduced the occupancy of acetyl-histone H3 and RNA polymerase II at the promoter region (-376 to -247nt) of human UPF1, in a time- and dosage-dependent way. Importantly, knocking down UPF1 abolished or substantially reduced the difference of PTC(+) transcript levels between control and curcumin-treated cells. The disrupted curcumin effect was efficiently rescued by expression of exogenous Myc-UPF1 in the knockdown cells. Together, our data demonstrate that a group of PTC⁺ transcripts are stabilized by a dietary compound curcumin through the inhibition of UPF factor expression and the NMD pathway. PMID:25934542

  7. Estradiol-17beta protects against hypoxia-induced hepatocyte injury through ER-mediated upregulation of Bcl-2 as well as ER-independent antioxidant effects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Young; Jung, Sun Chul; Lee, Jang Hern; Han, Ho Jae

    2008-04-01

    Although many previous studies have suggested that estrogen functions as a cytoprotective agent under oxidative stress conditions, the underlying mechanism by which this effect is exerted remains to be elucidated. This study assessed the effects of estradiol-17beta (E(2)) (10(-8) M) on hypoxia-induced cell injury and its related signaling in primary cultured chicken hepatocytes. Hypoxic conditions were found to augment the level of DNA damage and to reduce cell viability and the level of [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation, and these phenomena were prevented through treatment with E(2). Hypoxia also increased caspase-3 expression, but showed no evidence of an influence on the expression of Bcl-2. However, E(2) induced an increase in the level of Bcl-2 expression under hypoxic conditions and reduced the level of caspase-3 expression. The effects of E(2) on Bcl-2 and caspase expression were blocked by ICI 182780 (E(2) receptor (ER) antagonist, 10(-7) M). In addition, hypoxia resulted in an increase in the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated. These effects were blocked by E(2), but not by E(2)-BSA and ICI 182780. Hypoxia also activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), c-JUN N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK/SAPK) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB). These effects were blocked by E(2), but not by ICI 182780. The inhibition of p38 MAPK and JNK/SAPK blocked NF-kappaB activation. In conclusion, E(2) was found to protect against hypoxia-induced cell injury in chicken hepatocytes through ER-mediated upregulation of Bcl-2 expression and through reducing the activity of ROS-dependent p38 MAPK, JNK/SAPK and NF-kappaB. PMID:18379592

  8. Statins Increase Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Gene Transcription through a Pregnane X Receptor Regulated Element

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Frederick M.; Linder, Kathryn M.; Cardozo, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is a multifunctional protein that has important roles in inflammation and wound healing. Its aberrant regulation may contribute to many disease processes such as heart disease. The PAI-1 promoter is responsive to multiple inputs including cytokines, growth factors, steroids and oxidative stress. The statin drugs, atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin, increased basal and stimulated expression of the PAI-1 promoter 3-fold. A statin-responsive, nuclear hormone response element was previously identified in the PAI-1 promoter, but it was incompletely characterized. We characterized this direct repeat (DR) of AGGTCA with a 3-nucleotide spacer at -269/-255 using deletion and directed mutagenesis. Deletion or mutation of this element increased basal transcription from the promoter suggesting that it repressed PAI-1 transcription in the unliganded state. The half-site spacing and the ligand specificity suggested that this might be a pregnane X receptor (PXR) responsive element. Computational molecular docking showed that atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin were structurally compatible with the PXR ligand-binding pocket in its agonist conformation. Experiments with Gal4 DNA binding domain fusion proteins showed that Gal4-PXR was activated by statins while other DR + 3 binding nuclear receptor fusions were not. Overexpression of PXR further enhanced PAI-1 transcription in response to statins. Finally, ChIP experiments using Halo-tagged PXR and RXR demonstrated that both components of the PXR-RXR heterodimer bound to this region of the PAI-1 promoter. PMID:26379245

  9. SNAIL transcription factor increases the motility and invasive capacity of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    OSORIO, LUIS A.; FARFÁN, NANCY M.; CASTELLÓN, ENRIQUE A.; CONTRERAS, HÉCTOR R.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and mortality rates of prostate cancer (PCa) are increasing, and PCa is almost the second-leading cause of cancer-associated mortality in men. During tumor progression, epithelial cells decrease the number of adhesion molecules, change their polarity and position, rearrange their cytoskeleton and increase their migratory and invasive capacities. These changes are known under the concept of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). EMT is characterized by an upregulation of certain transcription factors, including SNAIL1, which represses genes that are characteristic of an epithelial phenotype, including E-cadherin, and indirectly increase the expression levels of genes, which are associated with the mesenchymal phenotype. It has been suggested that the transcription factor, SNAIL1, decreases the proliferation and increases the migratory and invasive capacities of PCa cell lines. The present study was performed using LNCaP and PC3 cell lines, in which the expression levels of SNAIL1 were increased or silenced through the use of lentiviral vectors. The expression levels of EMT markers were quantified using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. In addition, cell survival was analyzed using an MTS assay; cell proliferation was examined using an antibody targeting Ki-67; migration on plates with 8 µm pores to allow the passage of cells; and invasiveness was analyzed using a membrane chamber covered in dried basement membrane matrix solution. The levels of apoptosis were determined using a Caspase 3/7 assay containing a substrate modified by caspases 3 and 7. The results demonstrated that the overexpression and silencing of SNAIL1 decreased cell proliferation and survival. However, the overexpression of SNAIL1 decreased apoptosis, compared with cells with the SNAIL1-silenced cells, in which cell apoptosis increased. The migration and invasive capacities increased in the cells overexpressing SNAIL1, and

  10. Using Transcriptional Control To Increase Titers of Secreted Heterologous Proteins by the Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Kevin J.; Finnerty, Casey; Azam, Anum; Valdivia, Elias

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) encoded at the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) locus secretes protein directly from the cytosol to the culture media in a concerted, one-step process, bypassing the periplasm. While this approach is attractive for heterologous protein production, product titers are too low for many applications. In addition, the expression of the SPI-1 gene cluster is subject to native regulation, which requires culturing conditions that are not ideal for high-density growth. We used transcriptional control to increase the amount of protein that is secreted into the extracellular space by the T3SS of Salmonella enterica. The controlled expression of the gene encoding SPI-1 transcription factor HilA circumvents the requirement of endogenous induction conditions and allows for synthetic induction of the secretion system. This strategy increases the number of cells that express SPI-1 genes, as measured by promoter activity. In addition, protein secretion titer is sensitive to the time of addition and the concentration of inducer for the protein to be secreted and SPI-1 gene cluster. Overexpression of hilA increases secreted protein titer by >10-fold and enables recovery of up to 28 ± 9 mg/liter of secreted protein from an 8-h culture. We also demonstrate that the protein beta-lactamase is able to adopt an active conformation after secretion, and the increase in secreted titer from hilA overexpression also correlates to increased enzyme activity in the culture supernatant. PMID:25038096

  11. ZBTB2 increases PDK4 expression by transcriptional repression of RelA/p65

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Young; Koh, Dong-In; Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Jeong, Deok-yoon; Kim, Kyung-Sup; Kim, Kunhong; Kim, Se-Hoon; Hur, Man-Wook

    2015-01-01

    The NF-κB is found in almost all animal cell types and is involved in a myriad of cellular responses. Aberrant expression of NF-κB has been linked to cancer, inflammatory diseases and improper development. Little is known about transcriptional regulation of the NF-κB family member gene RelA/p65. Sp1 plays a key role in the expression of the RelA/p65 gene. ZBTB2 represses transcription of the gene by inhibiting Sp1 binding to a Sp1-binding GC-box in the RelA/p65 proximal promoter (bp, −31 to −21). Moreover, recent studies revealed that RelA/p65 directly binds to the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator1α (PGC1α) to decrease transcriptional activation of the PGC1α target gene PDK4, whose gene product inhibits pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), a key regulator of TCA cycle flux. Accordingly, we observed that RelA/p65 repression by ZBTB2 indirectly results in increased PDK4 expression, which inhibits PDH. Consequently, in cells with ectopic ZBTB2, the concentrations of pyruvate and lactate were higher than those in normal cells, indicating changes in glucose metabolism flux favoring glycolysis over the TCA cycle. Knockdown of ZBTB2 in mouse xenografts decreased tumor growth. ZBTB2 may increase cell proliferation by reprogramming glucose metabolic pathways to favor glycolysis by upregulating PDK4 expression via repression of RelA/p65 expression. PMID:25609694

  12. SNAIL transcription factor increases the motility and invasive capacity of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Luis A; Farfán, Nancy M; Castellón, Enrique A; Contreras, Héctor R

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and mortality rates of prostate cancer (PCa) are increasing, and PCa is almost the second‑leading cause of cancer‑associated mortality in men. During tumor progression, epithelial cells decrease the number of adhesion molecules, change their polarity and position, rearrange their cytoskeleton and increase their migratory and invasive capacities. These changes are known under the concept of epithelial‑mesenchymal transition (EMT). EMT is characterized by an upregulation of certain transcription factors, including SNAIL1, which represses genes that are characteristic of an epithelial phenotype, including E‑cadherin, and indirectly increase the expression levels of genes, which are associated with the mesenchymal phenotype. It has been suggested that the transcription factor, SNAIL1, decreases the proliferation and increases the migratory and invasive capacities of PCa cell lines. The present study was performed using LNCaP and PC3 cell lines, in which the expression levels of SNAIL1 were increased or silenced through the use of lentiviral vectors. The expression levels of EMT markers were quantified using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. In addition, cell survival was analyzed using an MTS assay; cell proliferation was examined using an antibody targeting Ki‑67; migration on plates with 8 µm pores to allow the passage of cells; and invasiveness was analyzed using a membrane chamber covered in dried basement membrane matrix solution. The levels of apoptosis were determined using a Caspase 3/7 assay containing a substrate modified by caspases 3 and 7. The results demonstrated that the overexpression and silencing of SNAIL1 decreased cell proliferation and survival. However, the overexpression of SNAIL1 decreased apoptosis, compared with cells with the SNAIL1‑silenced cells, in which cell apoptosis increased. The migration and invasive capacities increased in the cells overexpressing

  13. Increased transcription of Glutathione S-transferases in acaricide exposed scabies mites

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that Sarcoptes scabiei var. hominis mites collected from scabies endemic communities in northern Australia show increasing tolerance to 5% permethrin and oral ivermectin. Previous findings have implicated detoxification pathways in developing resistance to these acaricides. We investigated the contribution of Glutathione S-transferase (GST) enzymes to permethrin and ivermectin tolerance in scabies mites using biochemical and molecular approaches. Results Increased in vitro survival following permethrin exposure was observed in S. scabiei var. hominis compared to acaricide naïve mites (p < 0.0001). The addition of the GST inhibitor diethyl maleate restored in vitro permethrin susceptibility, confirming GST involvement in permethrin detoxification. Assay of GST enzymatic activity in mites demonstrated that S. scabiei var. hominis mites showed a two-fold increase in activity compared to naïve mites (p < 0.0001). Increased transcription of three different GST molecules was observed in permethrin resistant S. scabiei var. canis- mu 1 (p < 0.0001), delta 1 (p < 0.001), and delta 3 (p < 0.0001). mRNA levels of GST mu 1, delta 3 and P-glycoprotein also significantly increased in S. scabiei var. hominis mites collected from a recurrent crusted scabies patient over the course of ivermectin treatment. Conclusions These findings provide further support for the hypothesis that increased drug metabolism and efflux mediate permethrin and ivermectin resistance in scabies mites and highlight the threat of emerging acaricide resistance to the treatment of scabies worldwide. This is one of the first attempts to define specific genes involved in GST mediated acaricide resistance at the transcriptional level, and the first application of such studies to S. scabiei, a historically challenging ectoparasite. PMID:20482766

  14. GW8510 Increases Insulin Expression in Pancreatic Alpha Cells through Activation of p53 Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fomina-Yadlin, Dina; Kubicek, Stefan; Vetere, Amedeo; He, Kaihui Hu; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Wagner, Bridget K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Expression of insulin in terminally differentiated non-beta cell types in the pancreas could be important to treating type-1 diabetes. Previous findings led us to hypothesize involvement of kinase inhibition in induction of insulin expression in pancreatic alpha cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Alpha (αTC1.6) cells and human islets were treated with GW8510 and other small-molecule inhibitors for up to 5 days. Alpha cells were assessed for gene- and protein-expression levels, cell-cycle status, promoter occupancy status by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), and p53-dependent transcriptional activity. GW8510, a putative CDK2 inhibitor, up-regulated insulin expression in mouse alpha cells and enhanced insulin secretion in dissociated human islets. Gene-expression profiling and gene-set enrichment analysis of GW8510-treated alpha cells suggested up-regulation of the p53 pathway. Accordingly, the compound increased p53 transcriptional activity and expression levels of p53 transcriptional targets. A predicted p53 response element in the promoter region of the mouse Ins2 gene was verified by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Further, inhibition of Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase activities suppressed insulin induction by GW8510. Conclusions/Significance The induction of Ins2 by GW8510 occurred through p53 in a JNK- and p38-dependent manner. These results implicate p53 activity in modulation of Ins2 expression levels in pancreatic alpha cells, and point to a potential approach toward using small molecules to generate insulin in an alternative cell type. PMID:22242153

  15. Increased FOG-2 in failing myocardium disrupts thyroid hormone-dependent SERCA2 gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Rouf, Rosanne; Greytak, Sarah; Wooten, Eric C.; Wu, Jing; Boltax, Jay; Picard, Michael H.; Svensson, Eric C.; Dillmann, Wolfgang H.; Patten, Richard D.; Huggins, Gordon S.

    2009-01-01

    Reduced expression of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase-2 (SERCA2) and other genes in the adult cardiac gene program has raised consideration of an impaired responsiveness to thyroid hormone (T3) that develops in the advanced failing heart. Here we show that human and murine cardiomyopathy hearts have increased expression of Friend of GATA-2 (FOG-2), a cardiac nuclear hormone receptor co-repressor protein. Cardiac-specific overexpression of FOG-2 in transgenic mice led to depressed cardiac function, activation of the fetal gene program, congestive heart failure, and early death. SERCA2 transcript and protein levels were reduced in FOG-2 transgenic hearts, and FOG-2 overexpression impaired T3-mediated SERCA2 expression in cultured cardiomyocytes. FOG-2 physically interacts with thyroid hormone receptor-α1 and abrogated even high levels of T3-mediated SERCA2 promoter activity. These results demonstrate that SERCA2 is an important target of FOG-2 and that increased FOG-2 expression may contribute to a decline in cardiac function in end-stage heart failure by impaired T3 signaling. PMID:18658259

  16. Post-transcriptional regulation tends to attenuate the mRNA noise and to increase the mRNA gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Changhong; Wang, Shuqiang; Zhou, Tianshou; Jiang, Yiguo

    2015-10-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation is ubiquitous in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, but how it impacts gene expression remains to be fully explored. Here, we analyze a simple gene model in which we assume that mRNAs are produced in a constitutive manner but are regulated post-transcriptionally by a decapping enzyme that switches between the active state and the inactive state. We derive the analytical mRNA distribution governed by a chemical master equation, which can be well used to analyze the mechanism of how post-transcription regulation influences the mRNA expression level including the mRNA noise. We demonstrate that the mean mRNA level in the stochastic case is always higher than that in the deterministic case due to the stochastic effect of the enzyme, but the size of the increased part depends mainly on the switching rates between two enzyme states. More interesting is that we find that in contrast to transcriptional regulation, post-transcriptional regulation tends to attenuate noise in mRNA. Our results provide insight into the role of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling the transcriptional noise.

  17. DNazyme-mediated cleavage of Twist transcripts and increase in cellular apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Hjiantoniou, Eleni; Iseki, Sachiko; Uney, James B; Phylactou, Leonidas A

    2003-01-01

    DNazymes is a group of catalytic nucleic acids that can be designed to cleave target mRNA molecules in a base-specific way. Twist is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that is involved in the regulation of cellular differentiation and apoptosis. Moreover, it was shown to function in skull development and cause craniosynostosis. DZ-TWT DNazyme was designed to down-regulate Twist expression. The ability of DZ-TWT to cleave mouse Twist mRNA was first shown in a cell-free environment against full-length Twist mRNA. Following transfections of the DZ-TWT in C3H10T1/2 cells, a significant reduction of Twist mRNA levels was observed. This was accompanied by a significant rise in p21 mRNA levels. Finally, DZ-TWT transfections resulted in an increase of cellular apoptosis, demonstrating the importance of Twist in apoptotic pathways. These results prove the usefulness of DNazymes to characterize Twist gene function and further experiments in animals should demonstrate its complete physiological role. PMID:12480539

  18. Cocaine- and Amphetamine-regulated Transcript (CART) Protects Beta Cells against Glucotoxicity and Increases Cell Proliferation*

    PubMed Central

    Sathanoori, Ramasri; Olde, Björn; Erlinge, David; Göransson, Olga; Wierup, Nils

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is an islet peptide that promotes glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in beta cells via cAMP/PKA-dependent pathways. In addition, CART is a regulator of neuronal survival. In this study, we examined the effect of exogenous CART 55–102 on beta cell viability and dissected its signaling mechanisms. Evaluation of DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation revealed that CART 55–102 reduced glucotoxicity-induced apoptosis in both INS-1 (832/13) cells and isolated rat islets. Glucotoxicity in INS-1 (832/13) cells also caused a 50% reduction of endogenous CART protein. We show that CART increased proliferation in INS-1 (832/13) cells, an effect that was blocked by PKA, PKB, and MEK1 inhibitors. In addition, CART induced phosphorylation of CREB, IRS, PKB, FoxO1, p44/42 MAPK, and p90RSK in INS-1 (832/13) cells and isolated rat islets, all key mediators of cell survival and proliferation. Thus, we demonstrate that CART 55-102 protects beta cells against glucotoxicity and promotes proliferation. Taken together our data point to the potential use of CART in therapeutic interventions targeted at enhancing functional beta cell mass and long-term insulin secretion in T2D. PMID:23250745

  19. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) protects beta cells against glucotoxicity and increases cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Sathanoori, Ramasri; Olde, Björn; Erlinge, David; Göransson, Olga; Wierup, Nils

    2013-02-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is an islet peptide that promotes glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in beta cells via cAMP/PKA-dependent pathways. In addition, CART is a regulator of neuronal survival. In this study, we examined the effect of exogenous CART 55-102 on beta cell viability and dissected its signaling mechanisms. Evaluation of DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation revealed that CART 55-102 reduced glucotoxicity-induced apoptosis in both INS-1 (832/13) cells and isolated rat islets. Glucotoxicity in INS-1 (832/13) cells also caused a 50% reduction of endogenous CART protein. We show that CART increased proliferation in INS-1 (832/13) cells, an effect that was blocked by PKA, PKB, and MEK1 inhibitors. In addition, CART induced phosphorylation of CREB, IRS, PKB, FoxO1, p44/42 MAPK, and p90RSK in INS-1 (832/13) cells and isolated rat islets, all key mediators of cell survival and proliferation. Thus, we demonstrate that CART 55-102 protects beta cells against glucotoxicity and promotes proliferation. Taken together our data point to the potential use of CART in therapeutic interventions targeted at enhancing functional beta cell mass and long-term insulin secretion in T2D. PMID:23250745

  20. Increased Transcript Complexity in Genes Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Lackey, Lela; McArthur, Evonne; Laederach, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies aim to correlate genotype with phenotype. Many common diseases including Type II diabetes, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) are complex genetic traits with hundreds of different loci that are associated with varied disease risk. Identifying common features in the genes associated with each disease remains a challenge. Furthermore, the role of post-transcriptional regulation, and in particular alternative splicing, is still poorly understood in most multigenic diseases. We therefore compiled comprehensive lists of genes associated with Type II diabetes, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and COPD in an attempt to identify common features of their corresponding mRNA transcripts within each gene set. The SERPINA1 gene is a well-recognized genetic risk factor of COPD and it produces 11 transcript variants, which is exceptional for a human gene. This led us to hypothesize that other genes associated with COPD, and complex disorders in general, are highly transcriptionally diverse. We found that COPD-associated genes have a statistically significant enrichment in transcript complexity stemming from a disproportionately high level of alternative splicing, however, Type II Diabetes, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease genes were not significantly enriched. We also identified a subset of transcriptionally complex COPD-associated genes (~40%) that are differentially expressed between mild, moderate and severe COPD. Although the genes associated with other lung diseases are not extensively documented, we found preliminary data that idiopathic pulmonary disease genes, but not cystic fibrosis modulators, are also more transcriptionally complex. Interestingly, complex COPD transcripts are more often the product of alternative acceptor site usage. To verify the biological importance of these alternative transcripts, we used RNA-sequencing analyses to determine that COPD-associated genes are frequently expressed in

  1. Increased Transcript Complexity in Genes Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lackey, Lela; McArthur, Evonne; Laederach, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies aim to correlate genotype with phenotype. Many common diseases including Type II diabetes, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) are complex genetic traits with hundreds of different loci that are associated with varied disease risk. Identifying common features in the genes associated with each disease remains a challenge. Furthermore, the role of post-transcriptional regulation, and in particular alternative splicing, is still poorly understood in most multigenic diseases. We therefore compiled comprehensive lists of genes associated with Type II diabetes, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and COPD in an attempt to identify common features of their corresponding mRNA transcripts within each gene set. The SERPINA1 gene is a well-recognized genetic risk factor of COPD and it produces 11 transcript variants, which is exceptional for a human gene. This led us to hypothesize that other genes associated with COPD, and complex disorders in general, are highly transcriptionally diverse. We found that COPD-associated genes have a statistically significant enrichment in transcript complexity stemming from a disproportionately high level of alternative splicing, however, Type II Diabetes, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease genes were not significantly enriched. We also identified a subset of transcriptionally complex COPD-associated genes (~40%) that are differentially expressed between mild, moderate and severe COPD. Although the genes associated with other lung diseases are not extensively documented, we found preliminary data that idiopathic pulmonary disease genes, but not cystic fibrosis modulators, are also more transcriptionally complex. Interestingly, complex COPD transcripts are more often the product of alternative acceptor site usage. To verify the biological importance of these alternative transcripts, we used RNA-sequencing analyses to determine that COPD-associated genes are frequently

  2. Identification and use of zinc finger transcription factors that increase production of recombinant proteins in yeast and mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung-Soon; Seol, Wongi; Yang, Hyo-Young; Lee, Seong-Il; Kim, Sung Keun; Kwon, Ryuk Jun; Kim, Eui-Joong; Roh, Young-Hoon; Seong, Baik Lin; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2005-01-01

    Randomized ZFP-TF libraries could induce a specific phenotype without detailed knowledge about the phenotype of interest because, theoretically, the libraries could modulate any gene in the target organism. We have developed a novel method for enhancing the efficiency of recombinant protein production in mammalian and microbial cells using combinatorial libraries of zinc finger protein transcription factors. To this end, we constructed tens of thousands of zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) with distinct DNA-binding specificities and fused these ZFPs to either a transcriptional activation or repression domain to make transcriptional activators or repressors, respectively. Expression vectors that encode these artificial transcription factors were delivered into Saccharomyces cerevisiae or HEK 293 cells along with reporter plasmids that code for human growth hormone (hGH) or SEAP (secreted alkaline phosphatase) (for yeast or HEK, respectively). Expression of the reporter genes was driven by either the cytomegalovirus (CMV) or SV40 virus promoters. After transfection, we screened the cells for increased synthesis of the reporter proteins. From these cells, we then isolated several ZFP-transcription factors (ZFP-TFs) that significantly increased hGH or SEAP synthesis and subjected these regulatory proteins to further characterization. Our results show that randomized ZFP-TF libraries are useful tools for improving the yield of heterologous recombinant protein both in yeast and mammalian cells. PMID:15932240

  3. GATA1-Mediated Transcriptional Regulation of the γ-Secretase Activating Protein Increases Aβ Formation in Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jin; Wisniewski, Thomas; Praticò, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Because of an extra copy of the Aβ precursor protein gene on chromosome 21, Down syndrome (DS) individuals develop high levels of Aβ peptides and Alzheimer disease–like brain amyloidosis early in life. Here we show that the γ-secretase activating protein (GSAP), a key enzyme in amyloidogenesis, is increased in DS brains and specifically regulated at the transcriptional level by GATA1 transcription factor. The discovery of this novel pathway has translational implications for DS, because pharmacological inhibition of GSAP is an attractive and viable Aβ-lowering therapeutic strategy for this disorder. PMID:26448035

  4. Genome wide transcriptional profiling in breast cancer cells reveals distinct changes in hormone receptor target genes and chromatin modifying enzymes after proteasome inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kinyamu, H. Karimi; Collins, Jennifer B.; Grissom, Sherry F.; Hebbar, Pratibha B.; Archer, Trevor K.

    2010-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors, like glucocorticoid (GR) and estrogen receptors (ER), are master regulators of genes that control many biological processes implicated in health and disease. Gene expression is dependent on receptor levels which are tightly regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Previous studies have shown that proteasome inhibition increases GR, but decreases ER-mediated gene expression. At the gene expression level this divergent role of the proteasome in receptor-dependent transcriptional regulation is not well understood. We have used a genomic approach to examine the impact of proteasome activity on GR and ER-mediated gene expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with dexamethasone (DEX) or 17β-estradiol (E2), the proteasome inhibitor MG132 (MG) or MG132 and either hormone (MD or ME2) for 24h. Transcript profiling reveals that inhibiting proteasome activity modulates gene expression by GR and ER in a similar manner in that several GR and ER target genes are up-regulated and down-regulated after proteasome inhibition. In addition, proteasome inhibition modulates receptor-dependent genes involved in the etiology of a number of human pathological states, including multiple myeloma, leukemia, breast/prostate cancer, HIV/AIDS and neurodegenerative disorders. Importantly, our analysis reveals that a number of transcripts encoding histone and DNA modifying enzymes, prominently histone/DNA methyltransferases and demethylases, are altered after proteasome inhibition. As proteasome inhibitors are currently in clinical trials as therapy for multiple myeloma, HIV/AIDs and leukemia, the possibility that some of the target molecules are hormone regulated and by chromatin modifying enzymes is intriguing in this era of epigenetic therapy. PMID:18381591

  5. Increasing the efficiency of bacterial transcription simulations: When to exclude the genome without loss of accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Iafolla, Marco AJ; Dong, Guang Qiang; McMillen, David R

    2008-01-01

    Background Simulating the major molecular events inside an Escherichia coli cell can lead to a very large number of reactions that compose its overall behaviour. Not only should the model be accurate, but it is imperative for the experimenter to create an efficient model to obtain the results in a timely fashion. Here, we show that for many parameter regimes, the effect of the host cell genome on the transcription of a gene from a plasmid-borne promoter is negligible, allowing one to simulate the system more efficiently by removing the computational load associated with representing the presence of the rest of the genome. The key parameter is the on-rate of RNAP binding to the promoter (k_on), and we compare the total number of transcripts produced from a plasmid vector generated as a function of this rate constant, for two versions of our gene expression model, one incorporating the host cell genome and one excluding it. By sweeping parameters, we identify the k_on range for which the difference between the genome and no-genome models drops below 5%, over a wide range of doubling times, mRNA degradation rates, plasmid copy numbers, and gene lengths. Results We assess the effect of the simulating the presence of the genome over a four-dimensional parameter space, considering: 24 min <= bacterial doubling time <= 100 min; 10 <= plasmid copy number <= 1000; 2 min <= mRNA half-life <= 14 min; and 10 bp <= gene length <= 10000 bp. A simple MATLAB user interface generates an interpolated k_on threshold for any point in this range; this rate can be compared to the ones used in other transcription studies to assess the need for including the genome. Conclusion Exclusion of the genome is shown to yield less than 5% difference in transcript numbers over wide ranges of values, and computational speed is improved by two to 24 times by excluding explicit representation of the genome. PMID:18789148

  6. Leukemia patient-derived lymphoblastoid cell lines exhibit increased induction of leukemia-associated transcripts following high-dose irradiation.

    PubMed

    Spencer, A; Granter, N

    1999-09-01

    Improvement in diagnostic cytogenetic techniques has led to the recognition of an increasing number of leukemia-associated chromosomal translocations and inversions. These genetic lesions frequently are associated with the disruption of putative transcription factors and the production of hybrid transcripts that are implicated in leukemogenesis. Epidemiologic evidence suggests that some, but not all, individuals with a history of gamma-irradiation exposure are at increased risk of developing chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). CML is characterized by the Philadelphia chromosome and transcription of the resulting hybrid BCR-ABL gene. Utilizing the leukemia-associated BCR-ABL p210 transcript as a marker, we sought differences in the induction of illegitimate genetic recombination following high-dose gamma-irradiation of karyotypically normal lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) derived from individuals with and without a history of myeloid leukemias. Six LCL [4 leukemia patient derived [2 acute myeloid leukemia and 2 CML] and 2 from normal individuals were analyzed with reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for BCR-ABL under stringent conditions following exposure to 0, 50, or 100 Gy of LET gamma-irradiation delivered via a Varian linear accelerator at 4 MV. Transcripts identical to disease-associated b2a2 and b3a2 transcripts were detected both spontaneously (background illegitimate genetic recombination) and following gamma-irradiation. Background BCR-ABL positivity was demonstrable in 4 of the 6 LCL, with no significant difference in detection between leukemic- and nonleukemic-derived LCL. Overall, increasing gamma-irradiation dose resulted in an increased frequency of BCR-ABL transcript detection (0 Gy vs 50 Gy vs 100 Gy,p = 0.0023, Chi-square test). Within the leukemic- but not the nonleukemic-derived LCL there was significantly greater BCR-ABL positivity after gamma-irradiation compared to unirradiated equivalents. Furthermore, the BCR-ABL positivity of both

  7. Repeated transient mRNA bursts precede increases in transcriptional and mitochondrial proteins during training in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Christopher G R; Lally, James; Holloway, Graham P; Heigenhauser, George J F; Bonen, Arend; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2010-01-01

    Exercise training induces mitochondrial biogenesis, but the time course of molecular sequelae that accompany repetitive training stimuli remains to be determined in human skeletal muscle. Therefore, throughout a seven-session, high-intensity interval training period that increased (12%), we examined the time course of responses of (a) mitochondrial biogenesis and fusion and fission proteins, and (b) selected transcriptional and mitochondrial mRNAs and proteins in human muscle. Muscle biopsies were obtained 4 and 24 h after the 1st, 3rd, 5th and 7th training session. PGC-1α mRNA was increased >10-fold 4 h after the 1st session and returned to control within 24 h. This ‘saw-tooth’ pattern continued until the 7th bout, with smaller increases after each bout. In contrast, PGC-1α protein was increased 24 h after the 1st bout (23%) and plateaued at +30–40% between the 3rd and 7th bout. Increases in PGC-1β mRNA and protein were more delayed and smaller, and did not persist. Distinct patterns of increases were observed in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α and γ protein (1 session), PPAR β/δ mRNA and protein (5 sessions) and nuclear respiratory factor-2 protein (3 sessions) while no changes occurred in mitochondrial transcription factor A protein. Citrate synthase (CS) and β-HAD mRNA were rapidly increased (1 session), followed 2 sessions later (session 3) by increases in CS and β-HAD activities, and mitochondrial DNA. Changes in COX-IV mRNA (session 3) and protein (session 5) were more delayed. Training also increased mitochondrial fission proteins (fission protein-1, >2-fold; dynamin-related protein-1, 47%) and the fusion protein mitofusin-1 (35%) but not mitofusin-2. This study has provided the following novel information: (a) the training-induced increases in transcriptional and mitochondrial proteins appear to result from the cumulative effects of transient bursts in their mRNAs, (b) training-induced mitochondrial biogenesis appears to

  8. Hypoxia increases rate of transcription and stability of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells.

    PubMed

    Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Furnari, B A; Lawson, E E; Millhorn, D E

    1994-01-01

    Reduced arterial oxygen tension (i.e. hypoxia) is a powerful physiological stimulus that induces synthesis and release of dopamine from O2-sensitive (type I) cells in the mammalian carotid bodies. We reported recently that hypoxia stimulates gene expression for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine synthesis in type I cells of the carotid body. Efforts to identify the mechanisms regulating TH gene expression in O2-sensitive cells during hypoxia have been hampered by the lack of an appropriate model cell culture system. Here we report that TH gene expression in the rat pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12) is regulated during hypoxia in a manner similar to that measured in carotid body type I cells. PC12 cells might therefore be useful as an experimental model for identifying the molecular mechanisms that regulate TH gene expression during hypoxia. Nuclear runoff assays revealed that transcription of the wild type TH gene was enhanced during exposures to hypoxia lasting 12 h. Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assays with constructs that contained different fragments of TH promoter revealed that the regulatory sequences that mediate the hypoxia-induced increase in transcription are located between bases -272 and +27 of the TH gene. Findings from experiments in which transcription was inhibited either with actinomycin D or 5,6-dichloro-1-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, as well as pulse-chase experiments using 4-thiouridine showed that the half-life of TH mRNA was substantially increased during hypoxia. Thus, in the present paper we show that TH gene expression in PC12 cells during hypoxia is regulated by increases in both the rate of TH gene transcription and TH mRNA stability. PMID:7903970

  9. Forkhead Transcription Factor FOXO3a Levels Are Increased in Huntington Disease Because of Overactivated Positive Autofeedback Loop*

    PubMed Central

    Kannike, Kaja; Sepp, Mari; Zuccato, Chiara; Cattaneo, Elena; Timmusk, Tõnis

    2014-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a fatal autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by an increased number of CAG repeats in the HTT gene coding for huntingtin. Decreased neurotrophic support and increased mitochondrial and excitotoxic stress have been reported in HD striatal and cortical neurons. The members of the class O forkhead (FOXO) transcription factor family, including FOXO3a, act as sensor proteins that are activated upon decreased survival signals and/or increased cellular stress. Using immunocytochemical screening in mouse striatal Hdh7/7 (wild type), Hdh7/109 (heterozygous for HD mutation), and Hdh109/109 (homozygous for HD mutation) cells, we identified FOXO3a as a differentially regulated transcription factor in HD. We report increased nuclear FOXO3a levels in mutant Hdh cells. Additionally, we show that treatment with mitochondrial toxin 3-nitropropionic acid results in enhanced nuclear localization of FOXO3a in wild type Hdh7/7 cells and in rat primary cortical neurons. Furthermore, mRNA levels of Foxo3a are increased in mutant Hdh cells compared with wild type cells and in 3-nitropropionic acid-treated primary neurons compared with untreated neurons. A similar increase was observed in the cortex of R6/2 mice and HD patient post-mortem caudate tissue compared with controls. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and reporter assays, we demonstrate that FOXO3a regulates its own transcription by binding to the conserved response element in Foxo3a promoter. Altogether, the findings of this study suggest that FOXO3a levels are increased in HD cells as a result of overactive positive feedback loop. PMID:25271153

  10. Forkhead transcription factor FOXO3a levels are increased in Huntington disease because of overactivated positive autofeedback loop.

    PubMed

    Kannike, Kaja; Sepp, Mari; Zuccato, Chiara; Cattaneo, Elena; Timmusk, Tõnis

    2014-11-21

    Huntington disease (HD) is a fatal autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by an increased number of CAG repeats in the HTT gene coding for huntingtin. Decreased neurotrophic support and increased mitochondrial and excitotoxic stress have been reported in HD striatal and cortical neurons. The members of the class O forkhead (FOXO) transcription factor family, including FOXO3a, act as sensor proteins that are activated upon decreased survival signals and/or increased cellular stress. Using immunocytochemical screening in mouse striatal Hdh(7/7) (wild type), Hdh(7/109) (heterozygous for HD mutation), and Hdh(109/109) (homozygous for HD mutation) cells, we identified FOXO3a as a differentially regulated transcription factor in HD. We report increased nuclear FOXO3a levels in mutant Hdh cells. Additionally, we show that treatment with mitochondrial toxin 3-nitropropionic acid results in enhanced nuclear localization of FOXO3a in wild type Hdh(7/7) cells and in rat primary cortical neurons. Furthermore, mRNA levels of Foxo3a are increased in mutant Hdh cells compared with wild type cells and in 3-nitropropionic acid-treated primary neurons compared with untreated neurons. A similar increase was observed in the cortex of R6/2 mice and HD patient post-mortem caudate tissue compared with controls. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and reporter assays, we demonstrate that FOXO3a regulates its own transcription by binding to the conserved response element in Foxo3a promoter. Altogether, the findings of this study suggest that FOXO3a levels are increased in HD cells as a result of overactive positive feedback loop. PMID:25271153

  11. Sarsasapogenin Increases Melanin Synthesis via Induction of Tyrosinase and Microphthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor Expression in Melan-a Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eunjung; Kim, Ae-Jung; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2012-01-01

    Sarsasapogenin (SAR) is a steroidal sapogenin that is used as starting material for the industrial synthesis of steroids. It has various pharmacological benefits, such as antitumor and antidepressant activities. Since its effect on melanin biosynthesis has not been reported, we used murine melanocyte melan-a cells to investigate whether SAR influences melanogenesis. In this study, SAR significantly increased the melanin content of the melan-a cells from 1 to 10 μM. Based on an enzymatic activity assay using melan-a cell lysate, SAR had no effect on tyrosinase and DOPAchrome tautomerase activities. It also did not affect the protein expression of tyrosinase-related protein 1 and DOPAchrome tautomerase. However, protein levels of tyrosinase and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor were strongly stimulated by treatment with SAR. Therefore, our reports suggest that SAR treatment may induce melanogenesis through the stimulation of tyrosinase and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor expression in melan-a cells. PMID:24130933

  12. Overexpression of aflR Leads to Upregulation of Pathway Gene Transcription and Increased Aflatoxin Production in Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, J. E.; Payne, G. A.

    1997-01-01

    The aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway regulatory gene, aflR, encodes a putative 47-kDa protein containing a zinc cluster DNA binding motif. It is required for the transcription of all of the characterized aflatoxin pathway genes in both Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of aflR overexpression on temporal gene expression, aflatoxin production, and nitrate inhibition of aflatoxin biosynthesis in A. flavus. An inducible expression construct was made by fusing the coding region of aflR to the promoter region of the A. flavus adh1 gene. This construct was transformed into A. flavus 656-2 (FGSC A1010), a strain mutated at the aflR locus. Strain 656-2 containing the adh1(p)::aflR construct had induced transcription of two early aflatoxin pathway genes, nor-1 and pksA, and produced wild-type concentrations of aflatoxin in a temporal pattern similar to that of wild-type strains of A. flavus. Strains 656-2 and 86-10 (FGSC A1009) an aflatoxigenic strain, were transformed with a construct containing the constitutive promoter gpdA driving aflR. Transformants of these strains constitutively expressed aflR, fas-1A, pksA, nor-1, and omtA but did not constitutively produce aflatoxin. Strain 86-10 containing the gpdA(p)::aflR construct produced 50 times more aflatoxin than 86-10, but the temporal pattern of aflatoxin production was the same as for 86-10, and aflatoxin production was also induced by sucrose. The addition of 10 g of nitrate per liter to sucrose low salts medium inhibited aflatoxin production by both strain 86-10 and a transformant of 86-10 containing the gpdA(p)::aflR construct, indicating that nitrate inhibition of aflatoxin biosynthesis does not occur solely at the level of aflR transcription. These studies show that constitutive overexpression of the pathway transcriptional regulatory gene aflR leads to higher transcript accumulation of pathway genes and increased aflatoxin production but that the

  13. PRDM8 internal promoter hyperhydroxymethylation correlates with increased expression of the corresponding transcript in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhaoning; Liu, Yanna; Ren, Zhaorui; Yan, Jingbin

    2016-08-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common form of intellectual disability associated with central nervous system abnormalities and results from an extra complete or partial copy of human chromosome 21. However, whether DNA hydroxymethylation is perturbed in a specific gene associated with DS phenotypes, or the alteration of DNA hydroxymethy-lation results in changes of gene expression in DS remains unidentified. The current study mapped 5‑methylcytosine and 5‑hydroxymethylcytosine at CpG islands of the PR domain containing 8 (PRDM8) in the peripheral blood of 16 DS and 19 normal samples by oxidative bisulfite-pyrosequencing. Furthermore, the association of the expression levels of the two transcripts and epigenetic modification in different genomic contexts of PRDM8 was analyzed. The results demonstrated hypermethylation and hyperhydroxymethylation at the internal promoter of PRDM8 in DS, and significantly increased the expression of PRDM8 transcript variant 2 in the DS patients (median 3.9 vs. 2.04; P=0.016), accompanied by a positive correlation between the expression of two PRDM8 transcripts and hydroxymethylation at the corresponding external and internal promoters in patients, although not in the controls. A similar association was observed between the expression of transcript variant 1 and intragenic methylation of PRDM8. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest a critical role for DNA hydroxymethylation and methylation in regulating abnormal PRDM8 overexpression in DS. PMID:27278638

  14. GLUT2 proteins and PPARγ transcripts levels are increased in liver of ovariectomized rats: reversal effects of resistance training

    PubMed Central

    Tomaz, Luciane M.; Barbosa, Marina R.; Farahnak, Zahra; Lagoeiro, Cristiani G.; Magosso, Natalia S.S; Lavoie, Jean-Marc; Perez, Sérgio E. A.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of ovariectomy (Ovx) and 12 weeks of resistance training (RT) on gene expression of GLUT2, the main glucose transporter in the liver, and on PPARγ, a transcription factor known to target GLUT2 expression. [Methods] Forty Holtzman rats were divided into 5 groups: Sham-sedentary (Sed), Sham- RT, Ovx-Sed, Ovx-RT, and Ovx-Sed with hormone replacement (E2). The RT protocol consisted of sessions held every 72 h for 12 weeks, during which the animals performed 4 to 9 vertical climbs (1.1 m) at 2 min intervals with progressively heavier weights (30 g after the fourth climb) tied to the tail. The E2 silastic capsule was inserted into the rats’ backs 48 hours before the first RT session. [Results] In addition to liver fat, GLUT2 protein levels and PPARγ transcripts were increased (P < 0.05) in Ovx compared to Sham-Sed animals, suggesting increased hepatic glucose uptake under estrogen deficient conditions. RT and E2 in Ovx rats decreased liver fat accumulation as well as GLUT2 and PPARγ gene expression to the level of Sham- Sed animals. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that liver GLUT2 as well as PPARγ expression in Ovx rats are accompanied by increased fat accumulation and glucose uptake, thus providing a substrate for increased de novo lipogenesis. RT appears to be an appropriate exercise model to circumvent these effects. PMID:27508154

  15. Transcript and metabolite alterations increase ganoderic acid content in Ganoderma lucidum using acetic acid as an inducer.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ang; Li, Xiong-Biao; Miao, Zhi-Gang; Shi, Liang; Jaing, Ai-Liang; Zhao, Ming-Wen

    2014-12-01

    Acetic acid at 5-8 mM increased ganoderic acid (GA) accumulation in Ganoderma lucidum. After optimization by the response surface methodology, the GA content reached 5.5/100 mg dry weight, an increase of 105% compared with the control. The intermediate metabolites of GA biosynthesis, lanosterol and squalene also increased to 47 and 15.8 μg/g dry weight, respectively, in response to acetic acid. Acetic acid significantly induced transcription levels of sqs, lano, hmgs and cyp51 in the GA biosynthesis pathway. An acetic acid-unregulated acetyl coenzyme A synthase (acs) gene was selected from ten candidate homologous acs genes. The results indicate that acetic acid alters the expression of genes related to acetic acid assimilation and increases GA biosynthesis and the metabolic levels of lanosterol, squalene and GA-a, thereby resulting in GA accumulation. PMID:25216642

  16. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Workplace violence increases in medical settings

    MedlinePlus

    ... now confronting steadily increasing rates of crime, including violent crimes such as assault, rape, and homicide' (end ... and less productivity among staff members after a violent incident occurs. Phillips notes the victims of workplace ...

  17. Transcriptional Slippage and RNA Editing Increase the Diversity of Transcripts in Chloroplasts: Insight from Deep Sequencing of Vigna radiata Genome and Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Ping; Ko, Chia-Yun; Kuo, Ching-I; Liu, Mao-Sen; Schafleitner, Roland; Chen, Long-Fang Oliver

    2015-01-01

    We performed deep sequencing of the nuclear and organellar genomes of three mungbean genotypes: Vigna radiata ssp. sublobata TC1966, V. radiata var. radiata NM92 and the recombinant inbred line RIL59 derived from a cross between TC1966 and NM92. Moreover, we performed deep sequencing of the RIL59 transcriptome to investigate transcript variability. The mungbean chloroplast genome has a quadripartite structure including a pair of inverted repeats separated by two single copy regions. A total of 213 simple sequence repeats were identified in the chloroplast genomes of NM92 and RIL59; 78 single nucleotide variants and nine indels were discovered in comparing the chloroplast genomes of TC1966 and NM92. Analysis of the mungbean chloroplast transcriptome revealed mRNAs that were affected by transcriptional slippage and RNA editing. Transcriptional slippage frequency was positively correlated with the length of simple sequence repeats of the mungbean chloroplast genome (R2=0.9911). In total, 41 C-to-U editing sites were found in 23 chloroplast genes and in one intergenic spacer. No editing site that swapped U to C was found. A combination of bioinformatics and experimental methods revealed that the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase-transcribed genes psbF and ndhA are affected by transcriptional slippage in mungbean and in main lineages of land plants, including three dicots (Glycine max, Brassica rapa, and Nicotiana tabacum), two monocots (Oryza sativa and Zea mays), two gymnosperms (Pinus taeda and Ginkgo biloba) and one moss (Physcomitrella patens). Transcript analysis of the rps2 gene showed that transcriptional slippage could affect transcripts at single sequence repeat regions with poly-A runs. It showed that transcriptional slippage together with incomplete RNA editing may cause sequence diversity of transcripts in chloroplasts of land plants. PMID:26076132

  18. Hsp90 induces increased genomic instability toward DNA-damaging agents by tuning down RAD53 transcription.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Nidhi; Laskar, Shyamasree; Bhattacharyya, Mrinal K; Bhattacharyya, Sunanda

    2016-08-01

    It is well documented that elevated body temperature causes tumors to regress upon radiotherapy. However, how hyperthermia induces DNA damage sensitivity is not clear. We show that a transient heat shock and particularly the concomitant induction of Hsp90 lead to increased genomic instability under DNA-damaging conditions. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model eukaryote, we demonstrate that elevated levels of Hsp90 attenuate efficient DNA damage signaling and dictate preferential use of the potentially mutagenic double-strand break repair pathway. We show that under normal physiological conditions, Hsp90 negatively regulates RAD53 transcription to suppress DNA damage checkpoint activation. However, under DNA damaging conditions, RAD53 is derepressed, and the increased level of Rad53p triggers an efficient DNA damage response. A higher abundance of Hsp90 causes increased transcriptional repression on RAD53 in a dose-dependent manner, which could not be fully derepressed even in the presence of DNA damage. Accordingly, cells behave like a rad53 loss-of-function mutant and show reduced NHEJ efficiency, with a drastic failure to up-regulate RAD51 expression and manifestly faster accumulation of CLN1 and CLN2 in DNA-damaged G1, cells leading to premature release from checkpoint arrest. We further demonstrate that Rad53 overexpression is able to rescue all of the aforementioned deleterious effects caused by Hsp90 overproduction. PMID:27307581

  19. Transcriptional increase and misexpression of 14-3-3 epsilon in sea urchin embryos exposed to UV-B

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Roberta; Zito, Francesca; Costa, Caterina; Bonaventura, Rosa

    2010-01-01

    Members of the 14-3-3 protein family are involved in many important cellular events, including stress response, survival and apoptosis. Genes of the 14-3-3 family are conserved from plants to humans, and some members are responsive to UV radiation. Here, we report the isolation of the complete cDNA encoding the 14-3-3 epsilon isoform from Paracentrotus lividus sea urchin embryos, referred to as Pl14-3-3ε, and the phylogenetic relationship with other homologues described in different phyla. Pl14-3-3ε mRNA levels were measured by QPCR during development and found to increase from the mesenchyme blastula to the prism stage. In response to UV-B (312 nm) exposure, early stage embryos collected 2 h later showed a 2.3-fold (at 400 J/m2) and a 2.7-fold (at 800 J/m2) increase in Pl14-3-3ε transcript levels compared with controls. The spatial expression of Pl14-3-3ε mRNA, detected by whole mount in situ hybridization in both control and UV-B exposed embryos, harvested at late developmental stages, showed transcripts to be located in the archenteron of gastrula stage and widely distributed in all germ layers, respectively. The Pl14-3-3ε mRNA delocalization parallels the failure in archenteron elongation observed morphologically, as well as the lack of specific endoderm markers, investigated by indirect immuno-fluorescence on whole mount embryos. Results confirm the involvement of 14-3-3ε in the stress response elicited by UV-B and demonstrate, for the first time, its contribution at the transcriptional level in the sea urchin embryo. PMID:20607471

  20. Increased expression of BDNF transcript with exon VI in hippocampi of patients with pharmaco-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Levy, G A; Rocha, L; Lubin, F D; Alonso-Vanegas, M A; Nani, A; Buentello-García, R M; Pérez-Molina, R; Briones-Velasco, M; Recillas-Targa, F; Pérez-Molina, A; San-Juan, D; Cienfuegos, J; Cruz-Fuentes, C S

    2016-02-01

    A putative role of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in epilepsy has emerged from in vitro and animal models, but few studies have analyzed human samples. We assessed the BDNF expression of transcripts with exons I (BDNFI), II (BDNFII), IV (BDNFIV) and VI (BDNFVI) and methylation levels of promoters 4 and 6 in the hippocampi of patients with pharmaco-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) (n=24). Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and pre-surgical pharmacological treatment were considered as clinical independent variables. A statistical significant increase for the BDNFVI (p<0.05) was observed in TLE patients compared to the autopsy control group (n=8). BDNFVI was also increased in anxiety/depression TLE (N=4) when compared to autopsies or to the remaining group of patients (p<0.05). In contrast, the use of the antiepileptic drug Topiramate (TPM) (N=3) was associated to a decrease in BDNFVI expression (p<0.05) when compared to the remaining group of patients. Methylation levels at the BDNF promoters 4 and 6 were similar between TLE and autopsies and in relation to the use of either Sertraline (SRT) or TPM. These results suggest an up-regulated expression of a specific BDNF transcript in patients with TLE, an effect that seems to be dependent on the use of specific drugs. PMID:26621122

  1. Increased levels of myelin basic protein transcripts in virus-induced demyelination.

    PubMed

    Kristensson, K; Holmes, K V; Duchala, C S; Zeller, N K; Lazzarini, R A; Dubois-Dalcq, M

    In multiple sclerosis, a demyelinating disease of young adults, there is a paucity of myelin repair in the central nervous system (CNS) which is necessary for the restoration of fast saltatory conduction in axons. Consequently, this relapsing disease often causes marked disability. In similar diseases of small rodents, however, remyelination can be quite extensive, as in the demyelinating disease caused by the A59 strain of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV-A59), a coronavirus of mice. To investigate when and where oligodendrocytes are first triggered to repair CNS myelin in such disease, we have used a complementary DNA probe specific for one major myelin protein gene, myelin basic protein (MBP), which hybridizes with the four forms of MBP messenger RNA in rodents. Using Northern blot and in situ hybridization techniques, we previously found that MBP mRNA is first detected at about 5 days after birth, peaks at 18 days and progressively decreases to 25% of the peak levels in the adult. We now report that in spinal cord sections of adult animals with active demyelination and inflammatory cells, in situ hybridization reveals a dramatic increase in probe binding to MBP-specific mRNA at 2-3 weeks after virus inoculation and before remyelination can be detected by morphological methods. This increase of MBP-specific mRNA is found at the edge of the demyelinating area and extends into surrounding areas of normal-appearing white matter. Thus, in situ hybridization with myelin-specific probes appears to be a useful method for detecting the timing, intensity and location of myelin protein gene reactivation preceding remyelination. This method could be used to elucidate whether such a reactivation occurs in multiple sclerosis brain tissue. Our results suggest that in mice, glial cells react to a demyelinating process with widespread MBP mRNA synthesis which may be triggered by a diffusible factor released in the demyelinated areas. PMID:2426599

  2. TRAP-5' stem loop interaction increases the efficiency of transcription termination in the Bacillus subtilis trpEDCFBA operon leader region.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Adam P; Bevilacqua, Philip C; Babitzke, Paul

    2007-11-01

    TRAP regulates expression of the Bacillus subtilis trpEDCFBA operon by a transcription attenuation mechanism in which tryptophan-activated TRAP binds to 11 (G/U)AG repeats in the nascent trp leader transcript. Bound TRAP blocks formation of an antiterminator structure and allows formation of an overlapping intrinsic terminator upstream of the trp operon structural genes. A 5' stem-loop (5'SL) structure located upstream of the triplet repeat region also interacts with TRAP. TRAP-5'SL RNA interaction participates in the transcription attenuation mechanism by preferentially increasing the affinity of TRAP for the nascent trp leader transcript during the early stages of transcription, when only a few triplet repeats have been synthesized. Footprinting assays indicated that the 5'SL contacts TRAP through two discrete groups of single-stranded nucleotides that lie in the hairpin loop and in an internal loop. Filter binding and in vivo expression assays of 5'SL mutants established that G7, A8, and A9 from the internal loop, and A19 and G20 from the hairpin loop are critical for proper 5'SL function. These nucleotides are conserved among certain other 5'SL-containing organisms. Single-round transcription results indicated that the 5'SL increases the termination efficiency when transcription is fast; however, the influence of the 5'SL was lost when transcription was slowed by reducing the ribonucleoside triphosphate concentration. Since there is a limited amount of time for TRAP to bind to the nascent transcript and promote termination, our data suggest that the contribution of TRAP-5'SL interaction increases the rate of TRAP binding, which, in turn, increases the efficiency of transcription termination. PMID:17881743

  3. Exposure of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis to Milk Oligosaccharides Increases Adhesion to Epithelial Cells and Induces a Substantial Transcriptional Response

    PubMed Central

    Kavanaugh, Devon W.; O’Callaghan, John; Buttó, Ludovica F.; Slattery, Helen; Lane, Jonathan; Clyne, Marguerite; Kane, Marian; Joshi, Lokesh; Hickey, Rita M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that milk oligosaccharides may contribute not only to selective growth of bifidobacteria, but also to their specific adhesive ability. Human milk oligosaccharides (3′sialyllactose and 6′sialyllactose) and a commercial prebiotic (Beneo Orafti P95; oligofructose) were assayed for their ability to promote adhesion of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697 to HT-29 and Caco-2 human intestinal cells. Treatment with the commercial prebiotic or 3′sialyllactose did not enhance adhesion. However, treatment with 6′sialyllactose resulted in increased adhesion (4.7 fold), while treatment with a mixture of 3′- and 6′-sialyllactose substantially increased adhesion (9.8 fold) to HT-29 intestinal cells. Microarray analyses were subsequently employed to investigate the transcriptional response of B. longum subsp. infantis to the different oligosaccharide treatments. This data correlated strongly with the observed changes in adhesion to HT-29 cells. The combination of 3′- and 6′-sialyllactose resulted in the greatest response at the genetic level (both in diversity and magnitude) followed by 6′sialyllactose, and 3′sialyllactose alone. The microarray data was further validated by means of real-time PCR. The current findings suggest that the increased adherence phenotype of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis resulting from exposure to milk oligosaccharides is multi-faceted, involving transcription factors, chaperone proteins, adhesion-related proteins, and a glycoside hydrolase. This study gives additional insight into the role of milk oligosaccharides within the human intestine and the molecular mechanisms underpinning host-microbe interactions. PMID:23805302

  4. Transcriptional Activation by NFκB Increases Perlecan/HSPG2 Expression in the Desmoplastic Prostate Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Curtis R.; Grindel, Brian J.; Francis, Lewis; Carson, Daniel D.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.

    2014-01-01

    Perlecan/HSPG2, a heparan sulfate proteoglycan typically found at tissue borders including those separating epithelia and connective tissue, increases near sites of invasion of primary prostatic tumors as previously shown for other proteins involved in desmoplastic tissue reaction. Studies of prostate cancer cells and stromal cells from both prostate and bone, the major site for prostate cancer metastasis, showed that cancer cells and a subset of stromal cells increased production of perlecan in response to cytokines present in the tumor microenvironment. In silico analysis of the HSPG2 promoter revealed two conserved NFκB binding sites, in addition to the previously reported SMAD3 binding sites. By systematically transfecting cells with a variety of reporter constructs including sequences up to 2.6 kb from the start site of transcription, we identified an active cis element in the distal region of the HSPG2 promoter, and showed that it functions in regulating transcription of HSPG2. Treatment with TNF-α and/or TGFβ1 identified TNF-α as a major cytokine regulator of perlecan production. TNF-α treatment also triggered p65 nuclear translocation and binding to the HSPG2 regulatory region in stromal cells and cancer cells. In addition to stromal induction of perlecan production in the prostate, we identified a matrix-secreting bone marrow stromal cell type that may represent the source for increases in perlecan in the metastatic bone marrow environment. These studies implicate perlecan in cytokine-mediated, innate tissue responses to cancer cell invasion, a process we suggest reflects a modified wound healing tissue response co-opted by prostate cancer cells. PMID:24700612

  5. Increased proteolytic processing of full-length Gli2 transcription factor reduces the Hedgehog pathway activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Wang, Chengbing; Pan, Yong; Bai, Zengliang; Wang, Baolin

    2011-01-01

    The proteolytic processing of Gli2 and Gli3 full-length transcription factors into repressors is a key step of the regulation in Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. The differential Gli2 and Gli3 processing is controlled by the processing determinant domain or PDD, but its significance is not clear. We generated a Gli2 mutant allele, Gli23PDD, in which the Gli3PDD substitutes for the Gli2PDD. As expected, Gli23PDD is processed more efficiently and at the different position as compared to Gli2, indicating that PDD also determines the extent and site of Gli2 and Gli3 processing in vivo. The increase in levels of the Gli2 repressor in Gli23PDD mutant reduces the Hh pathway activity. Gli23PDD processing is still regulated by Hh signaling. These results indicate that the proper balance between the Gli2 full-length activator and repressor is essential for Hh signaling. PMID:21337666

  6. A Wheat CCAAT Box-Binding Transcription Factor Increases the Grain Yield of Wheat with Less Fertilizer Input1

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Baoyuan; He, Xue; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Yanyan; Teng, Wan; Shao, An; Zhao, Xueqiang; Ma, Wenying; Wang, Junyi; Li, Bin; Li, Zhensheng; Tong, Yiping

    2015-01-01

    Increasing fertilizer consumption has led to low fertilizer use efficiency and environmental problems. Identifying nutrient-efficient genes will facilitate the breeding of crops with improved fertilizer use efficiency. This research performed a genome-wide sequence analysis of the A (NFYA), B (NFYB), and C (NFYC) subunits of Nuclear Factor Y (NF-Y) in wheat (Triticum aestivum) and further investigated their responses to nitrogen and phosphorus availability in wheat seedlings. Sequence mining together with gene cloning identified 18 NFYAs, 34 NFYBs, and 28 NFYCs. The expression of most NFYAs positively responded to low nitrogen and phosphorus availability. In contrast, microRNA169 negatively responded to low nitrogen and phosphorus availability and degraded NFYAs. Overexpressing TaNFYA-B1, a low-nitrogen- and low-phosphorus-inducible NFYA transcript factor on chromosome 6B, significantly increased both nitrogen and phosphorus uptake and grain yield under differing nitrogen and phosphorus supply levels in a field experiment. The increased nitrogen and phosphorus uptake may have resulted from the fact that that overexpressing TaNFYA-B1 stimulated root development and up-regulated the expression of both nitrate and phosphate transporters in roots. Our results suggest that TaNFYA-B1 plays essential roles in root development and in nitrogen and phosphorus usage in wheat. Furthermore, our results provide new knowledge and valuable gene resources that should be useful in efforts to breed crops targeting high yield with less fertilizer input. PMID:25489021

  7. Reduction of the neuroprotective transcription factor Npas4 results in increased neuronal necrosis, inflammation and brain lesion size following ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Choy, Fong Chan; Klarić, Thomas S; Leong, Wai Khay; Koblar, Simon A; Lewis, Martin D

    2016-08-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death and the most frequent cause of adult disability. Neuronal Per-Arnt-Sim domain protein 4 (Npas4) is an activity-dependent transcription factor whose expression is induced in various brain insults, including cerebral ischaemia. Although previous studies have demonstrated that Npas4 plays a critical role in protecting neurons against neurodegenerative insults, the neuroprotective effect of Npas4 in response to ischaemic brain injury remains unknown. In this study, we used a loss-of-function approach to examine the neuroprotective potential of Npas4 in the context of ischaemic damage. Using oxygen and glucose deprivation, we demonstrated that the knockdown of Npas4 in mouse cortical neurons resulted in increased susceptibility to cell death. The protective effect of Npas4 was further investigated in vivo using a photochemically-induced stroke model in mice. We found a significantly larger lesion size and increased neurodegeneration in Npas4 knockout mice as compared to wild-type mice. Moreover, we also showed that ablation of Npas4 caused an increase in activated astrocytes and microglia, pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor alpha levels and a switch from apoptotic to necrotic cell death. Taken together, these data suggest that Npas4 plays a neuroprotective role in ischaemic stroke by limiting progressive neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation. PMID:26661154

  8. Increase in cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) in specific areas of the mouse brain by acute caffeine administration.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jin Hee; Cho, Yun Ha; Kim, Hyo Young; Cha, Seung Ha; Ryu, Hyun; Jang, Wooyoung; Shin, Kyung Ho

    2015-04-01

    Caffeine produces a variety of behavioral effects including increased alertness, reduced food intake, anxiogenic effects, and dependence upon repeated exposure. Although many of the effects of caffeine are mediated by its ability to block adenosine receptors, it is possible that other neural substrates, such as cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), may be involved in the effects of caffeine. Indeed, a recent study demonstrated that repeated caffeine administration increases CART in the mouse striatum. However, it is not clear whether acute caffeine administration alters CART in other areas of the brain. To explore this possibility, we investigated the dose- and time-dependent changes in CART immunoreactivity (CART-IR) after a single dose of caffeine in mice. We found that a high dose of caffeine (100 mg/kg) significantly increased CART-IR 2 h after administration in the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh), dorsal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dBNST), central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN), arcuate hypothalamic nucleus (Arc), and locus coeruleus (LC), and returned to control levels after 8 h. But this increase was not observed in other brain areas. In addition, caffeine administration at doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg appears to produce dose-dependent increases in CART-IR in these brain areas; however, the magnitude of increase in CART-IR observed at a dose of 50 mg/kg was similar or greater than that observed at a dose of 100 mg/kg. This result suggests that CART-IR in AcbSh, dBNST, CeA, PVN, Arc, and LC is selectively affected by caffeine administration. PMID:25820086

  9. Melanogenesis-inducing effect of cirsimaritin through increases in microphthalmia-associated transcription factor and tyrosinase expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Kim, Il Soon; Dong, Yin; Lee, Ik-Soo; Kim, Jin Sook; Kim, Jong-Sang; Woo, Je-Tae; Cha, Byung-Yoon

    2015-01-01

    The melanin-inducing properties of cirsimaritin were investigated in murine B16F10 cells. Cirsimaritin is an active flavone with methoxy groups, which is isolated from the branches of Lithocarpus dealbatus. Tyrosinase activity and melanin content in murine B16F10 melanoma cells were increased by cirsimaritin in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis revealed that tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related protein (TRP) 1, TRP2 protein levels were enhanced after treatment with cirsimaritin for 48 h. Cirsimaritin also upregulated the expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) after 24 h of treatment. Furthermore, cirsimaritin induced phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element-binding protein (CREB) in a dose-dependent manner after treatment for 15 min. The cirsimaritin-mediated increase of tyrosinase activity was significantly attenuated by H89, a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A inhibitor. These findings indicate that cirsimaritin stimulates melanogenesis in B16F10 cells by activation of CREB as well as upregulation of MITF and tyrosinase expression, which was activated by cAMP signaling. Finally, the melanogenic effect of cirsimaritin was confirmed in human epidermal melanocytes. These results support the putative application of cirsimaritin in ultraviolet photoprotection and hair coloration treatments. PMID:25903150

  10. Phosphorylation of Transcription Factor Specificity Protein 4 Is Increased in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of First-Episode Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Fusté, Montserrat; Meléndez-Pérez, Iria; Villalta-Gil, Victoria; Haro, Josep Maria; Gill, Grace; Ramos, Belén

    2015-01-01

    Background Altered expression of transcription factor specificity protein 4 (SP4) has been found in the postmortem brain of patients with psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Reduced levels of SP4 protein have recently been reported in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in first-episode psychosis. Also, SP4 levels are modulated by lithium treatment in cultured neurons. Phosphorylation of SP4 at S770 is increased in the cerebellum of bipolar disorder subjects and upon inhibition of NMDA receptor signaling in cultured neurons. The aim of this study was to investigate whether SP4 S770 phosphorylation is increased in lymphocytes of first-episode psychosis patients and the effect of lithium treatment on this phosphorylation. Methods A cross-sectional study of S770 phosphorylation relative to total SP4 immunoreactivity using specific antibodies in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in first-episode psychosis patients (n = 14, treated with lithium or not) and matched healthy controls (n = 14) by immunoblot was designed. We also determined the effects of the prescribed drugs lithium, olanzapine or valproic acid on SP4 phosphorylation in rat primary cultured cerebellar granule neurons. Results We found that SP4 S770 phosphorylation was significantly increased in lymphocytes in first-episode psychosis compared to controls and decreased in patients treated with lithium compared to patients who did not receive lithium. Moreover, incubation with lithium but not olanzapine or valproic acid reduced SP4 phosphorylation in rat cultured cerebellar granule neurons. Conclusions The findings presented here indicate that SP4 S770 phosphorylation is increased in lymphocytes in first-episode psychosis which may be reduced by lithium treatment in patients. Moreover, our study shows lithium treatment prevents this phosphorylation in vitro in neurons. This pilot study suggests that S770 SP4 phosphorylation could be a peripheral biomarker of psychosis, and may

  11. Coniferyl Aldehyde Reduces Radiation Damage Through Increased Protein Stability of Heat Shock Transcriptional Factor 1 by Phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seo-Young; Lee, Hae-June; Nam, Joo-Won; Seo, Eun-Kyoung; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: We previously screened natural compounds and found that coniferyl aldehyde (CA) was identified as an inducer of HSF1. In this study, we further examined the protective effects of CA against ionizing radiation (IR) in normal cell system. Methods and Materials: Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction tests were performed to evaluate expression of HSF1, HSP27, and HSP70 in response to CA. Cell death and cleavage of PARP and caspase-3 were analyzed to determine the protective effects of CA in the presence of IR or taxol. The protective effects of CA were also evaluated using animal models. Results: CA increased stability of the HSF1 protein by phosphorylation at Ser326, which was accompanied by increased expression of HSP27 and HSP70. HSF1 phosphorylation at Ser326 by CA was mediated by EKR1/2 activation. Cotreatment of CA with IR or taxol in normal cells induced protective effects with phosphorylation- dependent patterns at Ser326 of HSF1. The decrease in bone marrow (BM) cellularity and increase of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling–positive BM cells by IR were also significantly inhibited by CA in mice (30.6% and 56.0%, respectively). A549 lung orthotopic lung tumor model indicated that CA did not affect the IR-mediated reduction of lung tumor nodules, whereas CA protected normal lung tissues from the therapeutic irradiation. Conclusions: These results suggest that CA may be useful for inducing HSF1 to protect against normal cell damage after IR or chemotherapeutic agents.

  12. Phenyl-1-Pyridin-2yl-Ethanone-Based Iron Chelators Increase IκB-α Expression, Modulate CDK2 and CDK9 Activities, and Inhibit HIV-1 Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Namita; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kovalskyy, Dmytro; Breuer, Denitra; Niu, Xiaomei; Lin, Xionghao; Xu, Min; Gavrilenko, Konstantin; Kashanchi, Fatah; Dhawan, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 transcription is activated by the Tat protein, which recruits CDK9/cyclin T1 to the HIV-1 promoter. CDK9 is phosphorylated by CDK2, which facilitates formation of the high-molecular-weight positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) complex. We previously showed that chelation of intracellular iron inhibits CDK2 and CDK9 activities and suppresses HIV-1 transcription, but the mechanism of the inhibition was not understood. In the present study, we tested a set of novel iron chelators for the ability to inhibit HIV-1 transcription and elucidated their mechanism of action. Novel phenyl-1-pyridin-2yl-ethanone (PPY)-based iron chelators were synthesized and examined for their effects on cellular iron, HIV-1 inhibition, and cytotoxicity. Activities of CDK2 and CDK9, expression of CDK9-dependent and CDK2-inhibitory mRNAs, NF-κB expression, and HIV-1- and NF-κB-dependent transcription were determined. PPY-based iron chelators significantly inhibited HIV-1, with minimal cytotoxicity, in cultured and primary cells chronically or acutely infected with HIV-1 subtype B, but they had less of an effect on HIV-1 subtype C. Iron chelators upregulated the expression of IκB-α, with increased accumulation of cytoplasmic NF-κB. The iron chelators inhibited CDK2 activity and reduced the amount of CDK9/cyclin T1 in the large P-TEFb complex. Iron chelators reduced HIV-1 Gag and Env mRNA synthesis but had no effect on HIV-1 reverse transcription. In addition, iron chelators moderately inhibited basal HIV-1 transcription, equally affecting HIV-1 and Sp1- or NF-κB-driven transcription. By virtue of their involvement in targeting several key steps in HIV-1 transcription, these novel iron chelators have the potential for the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:25155598

  13. Phenyl-1-Pyridin-2yl-ethanone-based iron chelators increase IκB-α expression, modulate CDK2 and CDK9 activities, and inhibit HIV-1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Namita; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kovalskyy, Dmytro; Breuer, Denitra; Niu, Xiaomei; Lin, Xionghao; Xu, Min; Gavrilenko, Konstantin; Kashanchi, Fatah; Dhawan, Subhash; Nekhai, Sergei

    2014-11-01

    HIV-1 transcription is activated by the Tat protein, which recruits CDK9/cyclin T1 to the HIV-1 promoter. CDK9 is phosphorylated by CDK2, which facilitates formation of the high-molecular-weight positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) complex. We previously showed that chelation of intracellular iron inhibits CDK2 and CDK9 activities and suppresses HIV-1 transcription, but the mechanism of the inhibition was not understood. In the present study, we tested a set of novel iron chelators for the ability to inhibit HIV-1 transcription and elucidated their mechanism of action. Novel phenyl-1-pyridin-2yl-ethanone (PPY)-based iron chelators were synthesized and examined for their effects on cellular iron, HIV-1 inhibition, and cytotoxicity. Activities of CDK2 and CDK9, expression of CDK9-dependent and CDK2-inhibitory mRNAs, NF-κB expression, and HIV-1- and NF-κB-dependent transcription were determined. PPY-based iron chelators significantly inhibited HIV-1, with minimal cytotoxicity, in cultured and primary cells chronically or acutely infected with HIV-1 subtype B, but they had less of an effect on HIV-1 subtype C. Iron chelators upregulated the expression of IκB-α, with increased accumulation of cytoplasmic NF-κB. The iron chelators inhibited CDK2 activity and reduced the amount of CDK9/cyclin T1 in the large P-TEFb complex. Iron chelators reduced HIV-1 Gag and Env mRNA synthesis but had no effect on HIV-1 reverse transcription. In addition, iron chelators moderately inhibited basal HIV-1 transcription, equally affecting HIV-1 and Sp1- or NF-κB-driven transcription. By virtue of their involvement in targeting several key steps in HIV-1 transcription, these novel iron chelators have the potential for the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:25155598

  14. Stabilization of the transcription factor Foxp3 by the deubiquitinase USP7 increases Treg-cell-suppressive capacity.

    PubMed

    van Loosdregt, Jorg; Fleskens, Veerle; Fu, Juan; Brenkman, Arjan B; Bekker, Cornelis P J; Pals, Cornelieke E G M; Meerding, Jenny; Berkers, Celia R; Barbi, Joseph; Gröne, Andrea; Sijts, Alice J A M; Maurice, Madelon M; Kalkhoven, Eric; Prakken, Berent J; Ovaa, Huib; Pan, Fan; Zaiss, Dietmar M W; Coffer, Paul J

    2013-08-22

    Stable Foxp3 expression is required for the development of functional regulatory T (Treg) cells. Here, we demonstrate that the expression of the transcription factor Foxp3 can be regulated through the polyubiquitination of multiple lysine residues, resulting in proteasome-mediated degradation. Expression of the deubiquitinase (DUB) USP7 was found to be upregulated and active in Treg cells, being associated with Foxp3 in the nucleus. Ectopic expression of USP7 decreased Foxp3 polyubiquitination and increased Foxp3 expression. Conversely, either treatment with DUB inhibitor or USP7 knockdown decreased endogenous Foxp3 protein expression and decreased Treg-cell-mediated suppression in vitro. Furthermore, in a murine adoptive-transfer-induced colitis model, either inhibition of DUB activity or USP7 knockdown in Treg cells abrogated their ability to resolve inflammation in vivo. Our data reveal a molecular mechanism in which rapid temporal control of Foxp3 expression in Treg cells can be regulated by USP7, thereby modulating Treg cell numbers and function. PMID:23973222

  15. Stabilization of the Transcription Factor Foxp3 by the Deubiquitinase USP7 Increases Treg-Cell-Suppressive Capacity

    PubMed Central

    van Loosdregt, Jorg; Fleskens, Veerle; Fu, Juan; Brenkman, Arjan B.; Bekker, Cornelis P.J.; Pals, Cornelieke E.G.M.; Meerding, Jenny; Berkers, Celia R.; Barbi, Joseph; Gröne, Andrea; Sijts, Alice J.A.M.; Maurice, Madelon M.; Kalkhoven, Eric; Prakken, Berent J.; Ovaa, Huib; Pan, Fan; Zaiss, Dietmar M.W.; Coffer, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Stable Foxp3 expression is required for the development of functional regulatory T (Treg) cells. Here, we demonstrate that the expression of the transcription factor Foxp3 can be regulated through the polyubiquitination of multiple lysine residues, resulting in proteasome-mediated degradation. Expression of the deubiquitinase (DUB) USP7 was found to be upregulated and active in Treg cells, being associated with Foxp3 in the nucleus. Ectopic expression of USP7 decreased Foxp3 polyubiquitination and increased Foxp3 expression. Conversely, either treatment with DUB inhibitor or USP7 knockdown decreased endogenous Foxp3 protein expression and decreased Treg-cell-mediated suppression in vitro. Furthermore, in a murine adoptive-transfer-induced colitis model, either inhibition of DUB activity or USP7 knockdown in Treg cells abrogated their ability to resolve inflammation in vivo. Our data reveal a molecular mechanism in which rapid temporal control of Foxp3 expression in Treg cells can be regulated by USP7, thereby modulating Treg cell numbers and function. PMID:23973222

  16. Broad H3K4me3 is associated with increased transcription elongation and enhancer activity at tumor suppressor genes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kaifu; Chen, Zhong; Wu, Dayong; Zhang, Lili; Lin, Xueqiu; Su, Jianzhong; Rodriguez, Benjamin; Xi, Yuanxin; Xia, Zheng; Chen, Xi; Shi, Xiaobing; Wang, Qianben; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppressors are mostly defined by inactivating mutations in tumors, yet little is known about their epigenetic features in normal cells. Through integrative analysis of 1,134 genome-wide epigenetic profiles, mutations from >8,200 tumor-normal pairs, and our experimental data from clinical samples, we discovered broad H3K4me3 (wider than 4 kb) as the first epigenetic signature for tumor suppressors in normal cells. Broad H3K4me3 is associated with increased transcription elongation and enhancer activity together leading to exceptionally high gene expression, and is distinct from other broad epigenetic features, such as super-enhancers. Broad H3K4me3 conserved across normal cells may represent pan-cancer tumor suppressors, such as P53 and PTEN, whereas cell-type-specific broad H3K4me3 may indicate cell-identity genes and cell-type-specific tumor suppressors. Furthermore, widespread shortening of broad H3K4me3 in cancers is associated with repression of tumor suppressors. Together, the broad H3K4me3 epigenetic signature provides mutation-independent information for the discovery and characterization of novel tumor suppressors. PMID:26301496

  17. Microbes & neurodevelopment--Absence of microbiota during early life increases activity-related transcriptional pathways in the amygdala.

    PubMed

    Stilling, Roman M; Ryan, Feargal J; Hoban, Alan E; Shanahan, Fergus; Clarke, Gerard; Claesson, Marcus J; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2015-11-01

    The mammalian amygdala is a key emotional brain region for eliciting social behaviour, critically involved in anxiety and fear-related behaviours, and hence a focus of research on neurodevelopmental and stress-related disorders such as autism and anxiety. Recently, increasing evidence implicates host-microbe interactions in the aetiology of these conditions. Germ-free (GF) mice, devoid of any microbiota throughout organismal maturation, are a well-established tool to study the effects of absence of the microbiota on host physiology. A growing body of independently replicated findings confirm that GF animals demonstrate altered anxiety-related behaviour and impaired social behaviour. However, the underlying mechanisms of this interaction and the nature of the pathways involved are only insufficiently understood. To further elucidate the molecular underpinnings of microbe-brain interaction, we therefore exploited unbiased genome-wide transcriptional profiling to determine gene expression in the amygdala of GF and GF mice that have been colonised after weaning. Using RNA-sequencing and a comprehensive downstream analysis pipeline we studied the amygdala transcriptome and found significant differences at the levels of differential gene expression, exon usage and RNA-editing. Most surprisingly, we noticed upregulation of several immediate early response genes such as Fos, Fosb, Egr2 or Nr4a1 in association with increased CREB signalling in GF mice. In addition, we found differential expression and recoding of several genes implicated in brain physiology processes such as neurotransmission, neuronal plasticity, metabolism and morphology. In conclusion, our data suggest altered baseline neuronal activity in the amygdala of germ-free animals, which is established during early life and may have implications for understanding development and treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:26184083

  18. Increased Expression of X-Linked Genes in Mammals Is Associated with a Higher Stability of Transcripts and an Increased Ribosome Density

    PubMed Central

    Faucillion, Marie-Line; Larsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian sex chromosomes evolved from the degeneration of one homolog of a pair of ancestral autosomes, the proto-Y. This resulted in a gene dose imbalance that is believed to be restored (partially or fully) through upregulation of gene expression from the single active X-chromosome in both sexes by a dosage compensatory mechanism. We analyzed multiple genome-wide RNA stability data sets and found significantly longer average half-lives for X-chromosome transcripts than for autosomal transcripts in various human cell lines, both male and female, and in mice. Analysis of ribosome profiling data shows that ribosome density is higher on X-chromosome transcripts than on autosomal transcripts in both humans and mice, suggesting that the higher stability is causally linked to a higher translation rate. Our results and observations are in accordance with a dosage compensatory upregulation of expressed X-linked genes. We therefore propose that differential mRNA stability and translation rates of the autosomes and sex chromosomes contribute to an evolutionarily conserved dosage compensation mechanism in mammals. PMID:25786432

  19. Voltage-gated Na+ Channel Activity Increases Colon Cancer Transcriptional Activity and Invasion Via Persistent MAPK Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Carrie D.; Wang, Bi-Dar; Ceniccola, Kristin; Williams, Russell; Simaan, May; Olender, Jacqueline; Patel, Vyomesh; Baptista-Hon, Daniel T.; Annunziata, Christina M.; Silvio Gutkind, J.; Hales, Tim G.; Lee, Norman H.

    2015-06-01

    Functional expression of voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) has been demonstrated in multiple cancer cell types where channel activity induces invasive activity. The signaling mechanisms by which VGSCs promote oncogenesis remain poorly understood. We explored the signal transduction process critical to VGSC-mediated invasion on the basis of reports linking channel activity to gene expression changes in excitable cells. Coincidentally, many genes transcriptionally regulated by the SCN5A isoform in colon cancer have an over-representation of cis-acting sites for transcription factors phosphorylated by ERK1/2 MAPK. We hypothesized that VGSC activity promotes MAPK activation to induce transcriptional changes in invasion-related genes. Using pharmacological inhibitors/activators and siRNA-mediated gene knockdowns, we correlated channel activity with Rap1-dependent persistent MAPK activation in the SW620 human colon cancer cell line. We further demonstrated that VGSC activity induces downstream changes in invasion-related gene expression via a PKA/ERK/c-JUN/ELK-1/ETS-1 transcriptional pathway. This is the first study illustrating a molecular mechanism linking functional activity of VGSCs to transcriptional activation of invasion-related genes.

  20. GABP and PU.1 compete for binding, yet cooperate to increase CD18 (beta 2 leukocyte integrin) transcription.

    PubMed

    Rosmarin, A G; Caprio, D G; Kirsch, D G; Handa, H; Simkevich, C P

    1995-10-01

    CD18 (beta 2 leukocyte integrin) is a leukocyte-specific adhesion molecule that plays a crucial role in immune and inflammatory responses. A 79-nucleotide fragment of the CD18 promoter is sufficient to direct myeloid transcription. The CD18 promoter is bound by the B lymphocyte- and myeloid-restricted ets factor, PU.1, and disruption of the PU.1-binding sites significantly reduces promoter activity. However, PU.1 alone cannot fully account for the leukocyte-specific and myeloid-inducible transcription of CD18. We identified a ubiquitously expressed nuclear protein complex of extremely low electrophoretic mobility that also binds to this region of the CD18 promoter. This binding complex is a heterotetramer composed of GABP alpha, and ets factor, and GABP beta, a subunit with homology to Drosophila Notch. GABP alpha competes with the lineage restricted factor, PU.1, for the same critical CD18 ets sites. The CD18 promoter is activated in myeloid cells by transfection with both GABP alpha and GABP beta together, but not by either factor alone. Transfection of non-hematopoietic cells with the two GABP subunits together with PU.1 is sufficient to activate CD18 transcription in otherwise non-permissive cells. Thus, GABP and PU.1 compete for the same binding sites but cooperate to activate CD18 transcription. PMID:7559529

  1. Emergence of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells involves a Chd1-dependent increase in total nascent transcription

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Fong Ming; Lizama, Carlos O.; Wong, Priscilla; Hawkins, John S.; Ramalho-Santos, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Lineage specification during development involves reprogramming of transcriptional states, but little is known about how this is regulated in vivo. The chromatin remodeler chomodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 1 (Chd1) promotes an elevated transcriptional output in mouse embryonic stem cells. Here we report that endothelial-specific deletion of Chd1 leads to loss of definitive hematopoietic progenitors, anemia, and lethality by embryonic day (E)15.5. Mutant embryos contain normal numbers of E10.5 intraaortic hematopoietic clusters that express Runx1 and Kit, but these clusters undergo apoptosis and fail to mature into blood lineages in vivo and in vitro. Hematopoietic progenitors emerging from the aorta have an elevated transcriptional output relative to structural endothelium, and this elevation is Chd1-dependent. In contrast, hematopoietic-specific deletion of Chd1 using Vav-Cre has no apparent phenotype. Our results reveal a new paradigm of regulation of a developmental transition by elevation of global transcriptional output that is critical for hemogenesis and may play roles in other contexts. PMID:25831528

  2. Emergence of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells involves a Chd1-dependent increase in total nascent transcription.

    PubMed

    Koh, Fong Ming; Lizama, Carlos O; Wong, Priscilla; Hawkins, John S; Zovein, Ann C; Ramalho-Santos, Miguel

    2015-04-01

    Lineage specification during development involves reprogramming of transcriptional states, but little is known about how this is regulated in vivo. The chromatin remodeler chomodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 1 (Chd1) promotes an elevated transcriptional output in mouse embryonic stem cells. Here we report that endothelial-specific deletion of Chd1 leads to loss of definitive hematopoietic progenitors, anemia, and lethality by embryonic day (E)15.5. Mutant embryos contain normal numbers of E10.5 intraaortic hematopoietic clusters that express Runx1 and Kit, but these clusters undergo apoptosis and fail to mature into blood lineages in vivo and in vitro. Hematopoietic progenitors emerging from the aorta have an elevated transcriptional output relative to structural endothelium, and this elevation is Chd1-dependent. In contrast, hematopoietic-specific deletion of Chd1 using Vav-Cre has no apparent phenotype. Our results reveal a new paradigm of regulation of a developmental transition by elevation of global transcriptional output that is critical for hemogenesis and may play roles in other contexts. PMID:25831528

  3. Increased accumulation of carbohydrates and decreased photosynthetic gene transcript levels in wheat grown at an elevated CO{sub 2} concentration in the field

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, G.; Hendrix, D.L.; Webber, A.N.

    1995-07-01

    Repression of photosynthetic genes by increased soluble carbohydrate concentrations may explain acclimation of photosynthesis to elevated CO{sub 2} concentration. This hypothesis was examined in a field crop of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown at both ambient (approximately 360 {mu}mol{sup -1}) and elevated (550 {mu}mol mol{sup -1}) atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations using free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment at Maricopa, Arizona. The correspondence of steady-state levels of mRNA transcripts (coding for the 83-kD photosystem 1 apoprotein, sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase, phosphoribulokinase, phosphoglcerodkinase, and the large and small subunits of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) with leaf carbohydrate concentrations (glucose-6-phosphate, glucose, fructose, sucrose, fructans, and starch) was examined at different stages of crop and leaf development and through the diurnal cycle. Overall only a weak correspondence between increased soluble carbohydrate concentrations and decreased levels for nuclear gene transcripts was found. The difference in soluble carbohydrate concentration between leaves grown at elevated and current ambient CO{sub 2} concentrations diminished with crop development, whereas the difference in transcript levels increased. In the flag leaf, soluble carbohydrate concentrations declined markedly with the onset of grain filling; yet transcript levels also declined. The results suggest that, many other factors modified its significance in this field wheat crop. 52 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Increasing the dynamic control space of mammalian transcription devices by combinatorial assembly of homologous regulatory elements from different bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Bacchus, William; Weber, Wilfried; Fussenegger, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory elements are widely utilized building blocks for constructing regulatory genetic circuits adapted for mammalian cells and have found their way into a broad range of biotechnological applications. Prokaryotic transcriptional repressors, fused to eukaryotic transactivation or repression domains, compose the transcription factor, which binds and adjusts transcription from chimeric promoters containing the repressor-specific operator sequence. Escherichia coli and Chlamydia trachomatis share common features in the regulatory mechanism of the biosynthesis of l-tryptophan. The repressor protein TrpR of C. trachomatis regulates the trpRBA operon and the TrpR of E. coli regulates the trpEDCBA operon, both requiring l-tryptophan as a co-repressor. Fusion of these bacterial repressors to the VP16 transactivation domain of Herpes simplex virus creates synthetic transactivators that could bind and activate chimeric promoters, assembled by placing repressor-specific operator modules adjacent to a minimal promoter, in an l-tryptophan-adjustable manner. Combinations of different transactivator and promoter variants from the same or different bacterial species resulted in a multitude of regulatory systems where l-tryptophan regulation properties, background noise, and maximal gene expression levels were significantly diverse. Different l-tryptophan analogues showed diverse regulatory capacity depending on the promoter/transactivator combination. We believe the systems approach to rationally choose promoters, transactivators and inducer molecules, to obtain desired and predefined genetic expression dynamics and control profiles, will significantly advance the design of new regulatory circuits as well as improving already existing ones. PMID:23178502

  5. A Mutation in a Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Gene (Rad3) Required for Nucleotide Excision Repair and Transcription Increases the Efficiency of Mismatch Correction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y.; Johnson, A. L.; Johnston, L. H.; Siede, W.; Friedberg, E. C.; Ramachandran, K.; Kunz, B. A.

    1996-01-01

    RAD3 functions in DNA repair and transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and particular rad3 alleles confer a mutator phenotype, possibly as a consequence of defective mismatch correction. We assessed the potential involvement of the Rad3 protein in mismatch correction by comparing heteroduplex repair in isogenic rad3-1 and wild-type strains. The rad3-1 allele increased the spontaneous mutation rate but did not prevent heteroduplex repair or bias its directionality. Instead, the efficiency of mismatch correction was enhanced in the rad3-1 strain. This surprising result prompted us to examine expression of yeast mismatch repair genes. We determined that MSH2, but not MLH1, is transcriptionally regulated during the cell-cycle like PMS1, and that rad3-1 does not increase the transcript levels for these genes in log phase cells. These observations suggest that the rad3-1 mutation gives rise to an enhanced efficiency of mismatch correction via a process that does not involve transcriptional regulation of mismatch repair. Interestingly, mismatch repair also was more efficient when error-editing by yeast DNA polymerase δ was eliminated. We discuss our results in relation to possible mechanisms that may link the rad3-1 mutation to mismatch correction efficiency. PMID:8889512

  6. Coordinate increase in major transcripts from the high pI alpha-amylase multigene family in barley aleurone cells stimulated with gibberellic acid.

    PubMed

    Rogers, J C; Milliman, C

    1984-10-10

    The purpose of this study was to identify specifically genes and transcripts for the high pI isozyme of barley alpha-amylase. From hybridization of coding sequence probes to blots of genomic DNA digested with restriction enzymes that do not cut within our cloned high pI alpha-amylase cDNA, it is estimated that about 7 alpha-amylase genes or pseudogenes exist. No difference could be detected between barley aleurone cell and sprout DNAs. Experiments using probes from the 5' and 3' untranslated sequences of the high pI alpha-amylase cDNA clone identified three HindIII fragments that probably carry high pI sequences. Primer extension experiments used as a primer the terminal 5' coding sequence from our cDNA clone; this primer would not cross-hybridize to low pI alpha-amylase transcripts. Two major transcripts were identified. These shared a conserved 23-base sequence immediately 5' to the ATG start codon, although a C----G transversion and a 3-base deletion were present within this sequence. An unusual 8-base pair GC palindrome was present in the conserved region immediately preceding the ATG start codon. Distal to the conserved sequence there was no apparent homology. One transcript carrying a 97-base untranslated region was identical to our high pI cDNA clone E. The gene for the other was recovered from a lambda phage genomic library. The 5' coding sequence was very similar, but not identical to clone E, demonstrating that these transcripts arise from separate genes. The two transcripts increased coordinately in aleurone cells stimulated with gibberellic acid. These data indicate that there is a high pI alpha-amylase multigene family with at least two active members, both of which are regulated in some manner by the plant hormone gibberellic acid. PMID:6090459

  7. Chemically induced oxidative stress increases polyamine levels by activating the transcription of ornithine decarboxylase and spermidine/spermine-N1-acetyltransferase in human hepatoma HUH7 cells.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Olga A; Isaguliants, Maria G; Hyvonen, Mervi T; Keinanen, Tuomo A; Tunitskaya, Vera L; Vepsalainen, Jouko; Alhonen, Leena; Kochetkov, Sergey N; Ivanov, Alexander V

    2012-09-01

    Biogenic polyamines spermine and spermidine participate in numerous cellular processes including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Specifically, they counteract oxidative stress, an alteration of cell redox balance involved in generation and progression of various pathological states including cancer. Here, we investigated how chemically induced oxidative stress affects polyamine metabolism, specifically the expression and activities of enzymes catalyzing polyamine synthesis (ornithine decarboxylase; ODC) and degradation (spermidine/spermine-N(1)-acetyltransferase; SSAT), in human hepatoma cells. Oxidative stress induced the up-regulation of ODC and SSAT gene transcription mediated by Nrf2, and in case of SSAT, also by NF-κB transcription factors. Activation of transcription led to the elevated intracellular activities of both enzymes. The balance in antagonistic activities of ODC and SSAT in the stressed hepatoma cells was shifted towards polyamine biosynthesis, which resulted in increased intracellular levels of putrescine, spermidine, and spermine. Accumulation of putrescine is indicating for accelerated degradation of polyamines by SSAT - acetylpolyamine oxidase (APAO) pathway generating toxic products that promote carcinogenesis, whereas accelerated polyamine synthesis via activation of ODC is favorable for proliferation of cells including those sub-lethally damaged by oxidative stress. PMID:22579641

  8. Increased levels of mitochondrial gene transcripts in the thermally selected rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) strain during embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Ikeguchi, Koki; Ineno, Toshinao; Itoi, Shiro; Kondo, Hidehiro; Kinoshita, Shigeharu; Watabe, Shugo

    2006-01-01

    To investigate molecular mechanisms involved in thermal resistance of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, embryos from thermally selected strain in various developmental stages were treated at 22 degrees C for 30 min and subsequently developed at 12 degrees C using the Donaldson strain as a reference. The embryos were evaluated for their hatching rate along with the ratio of embryos having an abnormal appearance and subjected to mRNA arbitrarily primed reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RAP RT-PCR). One of the genes dominantly expressed in the thermally selected strain (COX II) coded for cytochrome c oxidase subunit II. Northern blot analysis revealed that the accumulated levels of COX II transcripts were more abundant in embryos and unfertilized eggs from the thermally selected strain than those from the Donaldson strain. Furthermore, the differential expression patterns of the ATPase 6-8 gene were similar to those of the COX II gene, whereas the ATP synthase beta-subunit gene showed no significant differences between the two strains. PMID:16505978

  9. Interactions between the Class II Transactivator and CREB Binding Protein Increase Transcription of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Genes

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, Joseph D.; Kanazawa, Satoshi; Jean, Dickson; Peterlin, B. Matija

    1999-01-01

    Class II major histocompatibility (class II) genes are regulated in a B-cell-specific and gamma interferon-inducible fashion. The master switch for the expression of these genes is the class II transactivator (CIITA). In this report, we demonstrate that one of the functions of CIITA is to recruit the CREB binding protein (CBP) to class II promoters. Not only functional but also specific binding interactions between CIITA and CBP were demonstrated. Moreover, a dominant negative form of CBP decreased the activity of class II promoters and levels of class II determinants on the surface of cells. Finally, the inhibition of class II gene expression by the glucocorticoid hormone could be attributed to the squelching of CBP by the glucocorticoid receptor. We conclude that CBP, a histone acetyltransferase, plays an important role in the transcription of class II genes. PMID:9858618

  10. Overexpression of the yeast transcription activator Msn2 confers furfural resistance and increases the initial fermentation rate in ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Sasano, Yu; Watanabe, Daisuke; Ukibe, Ken; Inai, Tomomi; Ohtsu, Iwao; Shimoi, Hitoshi; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a promising source for bioethanol production, because it is abundant worldwide and has few competing uses. However, the treatment of lignocelllulosic biomass with weak acid to release cellulose and hemicellulose generates many kinds of byproducts including furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, which inhibit fermentation by yeast, because they generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells. In order to acquire high tolerance to oxidative stress in bioethanol yeast strains, we focused on the transcription activator Msn2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which regulates numerous genes involved in antioxidative stress responses, and constructed bioethanol yeast strains that overexpress Msn2 constitutively. The Msn2-overexpressing bioethanol strains showed tolerance to oxidative stress, probably due to the high-level expression of various antioxidant enzyme genes. Unexpectedly, these strains showed ethanol sensitivity compared with the control strain, probably due to imbalance of the expression level between Msn2 and Msn4. In the presence of furfural, the engineered strains exhibited reduced intracellular ROS levels, and showed rapid growth compared with the control strain. The fermentation test in the presence of furfural revealed that the Msn2-overexpressing strains showed improvement of the initial rate of fermentation. Our results indicate that overexpression of the transcription activator Msn2 in bioethanol yeast strains confers furfural tolerance by reducing the intracellular ROS levels and enhances the initial rate of fermentation in the presence of furfural, suggesting that these strains are capable of adapting rapidly to various compounds that inhibit fermentation by inducing ROS accumulation. Our results not only promise to improve bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass, but also provide novel insights for molecular breeding of industrial yeast strains. PMID:22178024

  11. Heterogenous ribonucleoprotein A18 (hnRNP A18) promotes tumor growth by increasing protein translation of selected transcripts in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Elizabeth T; Parekh, Palak R; Yang, Qingyuan; Nguyen, Duc M; Carrier, France

    2016-03-01

    The heterogenous ribonucleoprotein A18 (hnRNP A18) promotes tumor growth by coordinating the translation of selected transcripts associated with proliferation and survival. hnRNP A18 binds to and stabilizes the transcripts of pro-survival genes harboring its RNA signature motif in their 3'UTRs. hnRNP A18 binds to ATR, RPA, TRX, HIF-1α and several protein translation factor mRNAs on polysomes and increases de novo protein translation under cellular stress. Most importantly, down regulation of hnRNP A18 decreases proliferation, invasion and migration in addition to significantly reducing tumor growth in two mouse xenograft models, melanoma and breast cancer. Moreover, tissue microarrays performed on human melanoma, prostate, breast and colon cancer indicate that hnRNP A18 is over expressed in 40 to 60% of these malignant tissue as compared to normal adjacent tissue. Immunohistochemistry data indicate that hnRNP A18 is over expressed in the stroma and hypoxic areas of human tumors. These data thus indicate that hnRNP A18 can promote tumor growth in in vivo models by coordinating the translation of pro-survival transcripts to support the demands of proliferating cells and increase survival under cellular stress. hnRNP A18 therefore represents a new target to selectively inhibit protein translation in tumor cells. PMID:26824423

  12. Heterogenous ribonucleoprotein A18 (hnRNP A18) promotes tumor growth by increasing protein translation of selected transcripts in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Elizabeth T.; Parekh, Palak R.; Yang, Qingyuan; Nguyen, Duc M.; Carrier, France

    2016-01-01

    The heterogenous ribonucleoprotein A18 (hnRNP A18) promotes tumor growth by coordinating the translation of selected transcripts associated with proliferation and survival. hnRNP A18 binds to and stabilizes the transcripts of pro-survival genes harboring its RNA signature motif in their 3′UTRs. hnRNP A18 binds to ATR, RPA, TRX, HIF-1α and several protein translation factor mRNAs on polysomes and increases de novo protein translation under cellular stress. Most importantly, down regulation of hnRNP A18 decreases proliferation, invasion and migration in addition to significantly reducing tumor growth in two mouse xenograft models, melanoma and breast cancer. Moreover, tissue microarrays performed on human melanoma, prostate, breast and colon cancer indicate that hnRNP A18 is over expressed in 40 to 60% of these malignant tissue as compared to normal adjacent tissue. Immunohistochemistry data indicate that hnRNP A18 is over expressed in the stroma and hypoxic areas of human tumors. These data thus indicate that hnRNP A18 can promote tumor growth in in vivo models by coordinating the translation of pro-survival transcripts to support the demands of proliferating cells and increase survival under cellular stress. hnRNP A18 therefore represents a new target to selectively inhibit protein translation in tumor cells. PMID:26824423

  13. Effects of Zn Fertilization on Hordein Transcripts at Early Developmental Stage of Barley Grain and Correlation with Increased Zn Concentration in the Mature Grain

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Mohammad Nasir; Kaczmarczyk, Agnieszka; Vincze, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Zinc deficiency is causing malnutrition for nearly one third of world populations. It is especially relevant in cereal-based diets in which low amounts of mineral and protein are present. In biological systems, Zn is mainly associated with protein. Cereal grains contain the highest Zn concentration during early developmental stage. Although hordeins are the major storage proteins in the mature barley grain and suggested to be involved in Zn binding, very little information is available regarding the Zn fertilization effects of hordein transcripts at early developmental stage and possible incorporation of Zn with hordein protein of matured grain. Zinc fertilization experiments were conducted in a greenhouse with barley cv. Golden Promise. Zn concentration of the matured grain was measured and the results showed that the increasing Zn fertilization increased grain Zn concentration. Quantitative real time PCR showed increased level of total hordein transcripts upon increasing level of Zn fertilization at 10 days after pollination. Among the hordein transcripts the amount of B-hordeins was highly correlated with the Zn concentration of matured grain. In addition, protein content of the matured grain was analysed and a positive linear relationship was found between the percentage of B-hordein and total grain Zn concentration while C-hordein level decreased. Zn sensing dithizone assay was applied to localize Zn in the matured grain. The Zn distribution was not limited to the embryo and aleurone layer but was also present in the outer part of the endosperm (sub-aleurone layers) which known to be rich in proteins including B-hordeins. Increased Zn fertilization enriched Zn even in the endosperm. Therefore, the increased amount of B-hordein and decreased C-hordein content suggested that B-hordein upregulation or difference between B and C hordein could be one of the key factors for Zn biofortification of cereal grains due to the Zn fertilization. PMID:25250985

  14. Inherent properties not conserved in other tenuiviruses increase priming and realignment cycles during transcription of Rice stripe virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojuan; Xiong, Guihong; Qiu, Ping; Du, Zhenguo; Richard, Kormelink; Zheng, Luping; Zhang, Jie; Ding, Xinlun; Yang, Liang; Zhang, Songbai; Wu, Zujian

    2016-09-01

    Two tenuiviruses Rice stripe virus (RSV) and Rice grassy stunt virus (RGSV) were found to co-infect rice with the same reovirus Rice ragged stunt virus (RRSV). During the co-infection, both tenuiviruses recruited 10-21 nucleotides sized capped-RNA leaders from the RRSV. A total of 245 and 102 RRSV-RGSV and RRSV-RSV chimeric mRNA clones, respectively, were sequenced. An analysis of the sequences suggested a scenario consistent with previously reported data on related viruses, in which capped leader RNAs having a 3' end complementary to the viral template are preferred and upon base pairing the leaders prime processive transcription directly or after one to several cycles of priming and realignment (repetitive prime-and-realign). Interestingly, RSV appeared to have a higher tendency to use repetitive prime-and-realign than RGSV even with the same leader derived from the same RRSV RNA. Combining with relevant data reported previously, this points towards an intrinsic feature of RSV. PMID:27393974

  15. Chronic administration of cholesterol oximes in mice increases transcription of cytoprotective genes and improves transcriptome alterations induced by alpha-synuclein overexpression in nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Richter, Franziska; Gao, Fuying; Medvedeva, Vera; Lee, Patrick; Bove, Nicholas; Fleming, Sheila M; Michaud, Magali; Lemesre, Vincent; Patassini, Stefano; De La Rosa, Krystal; Mulligan, Caitlin K; Sioshansi, Pedrom C; Zhu, Chunni; Coppola, Giovanni; Bordet, Thierry; Pruss, Rebecca M; Chesselet, Marie-Françoise

    2014-09-01

    Cholesterol-oximes TRO19622 and TRO40303 target outer mitochondrial membrane proteins and have beneficial effects in preclinical models of neurodegenerative diseases leading to their advancement to clinical trials. Dopaminergic neurons degenerate in Parkinson's disease (PD) and are prone to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. In order to provide insights into the neuroprotective potential of TRO19622 and TRO40303 for dopaminergic neurons in vivo, we assessed their effects on gene expression in laser captured nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons of wildtype mice and of mice that over-express alpha-synuclein, a protein involved in both familial and sporadic forms of PD (Thy1-aSyn mice). Young mice were fed the drugs in food pellets or a control diet from 1 to 4months of age, approximately 10months before the appearance of striatal dopamine loss in this model. Unbiased weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) of transcriptional changes revealed effects of cholesterol oximes on transcripts related to mitochondria, cytoprotection and anti-oxidant response in wild-type and transgenic mice, including increased transcription of stress defense (e.g. Prdx1, Prdx2, Glrx2, Hspa9, Pink1, Drp1, Trak1) and dopamine-related (Th, Ddc, Gch1, Dat, Vmat2, Drd2, Chnr6a) genes. Even at this young age transgenic mice showed alterations in transcripts implicated in mitochondrial function and oxidative stress (e.g. Bcl-2, Bax, Casp3, Nos2), and both drugs normalized about 20% of these alterations. Young Thy1-aSyn mice exhibit motor deficits that differ from parkinsonism and are established before the onset of treatment; these deficits were not improved by cholesterol oximes. However, high doses of TRO40303 improved olfaction and produced the same effects as dopamine agonists on a challenging beam test, specifically an increase in footslips, an observation congruent with its effects on transcripts involved in dopamine synthesis. High doses of TRO19622 increased alpha

  16. Chronic administration of cholesterol oximes in mice increases transcription of cytoprotective genes and improves transcriptome alterations induced by alpha-synuclein overexpression in nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Franziska; Gao, Fuying; Medvedeva, Vera; Lee, Patrick; Bove, Nicholas; Fleming, Sheila M.; Michaud, Magali; Lemesre, Vincent; Patassini, Stefano; De La Rosa, Krystal; Mulligan, Caitlin K.; Sioshansi, Pedrom; Zhu, Chunni; Coppola, Giovanni; Bordet, Thierry; Pruss, Rebecca; Chesselet, Marie-Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol-oximes TRO19622 and TRO40303 target outer mitochondrial membrane proteins and have beneficial effects in preclinical models of neurodegenerative diseases leading to their advancement to clinical trials. Dopaminergic neurons degenerate in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and are prone to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. In order to provide insights into the neuroprotective potential of TRO19622 and TRO40303 for dopaminergic neurons in vivo, we assessed their effects on gene expression in laser captured nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons of wildtype mice and of mice that over-express alpha-synuclein, a protein involved in both familial and sporadic forms of PD (Thy1-aSyn mice). Young mice were fed the drugs in food pellets or a control diet from 1 to 4 months of age, approximately 10 months before the appearance of striatal dopamine loss in this model. Unbiased weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) of transcriptional changes revealed effects of cholesterol oximes on transcripts related to mitochondria, cytoprotection and anti-oxidant response in wild-type and transgenic mice, including increased transcription of stress defense (e.g. Prdx1, Prdx2, Glrx2, Hspa9, Pink1, Drp1, Trak1) and dopamine-related (Th, Ddc, Gch1, Dat, Vmat2, Drd2, Chnr6a) genes. Even at this young age transgenic mice showed alterations in transcripts implicated in mitochondrial function and oxidative stress (e.g. Bcl-2, Bax, Casp3, Nos2), and both drugs normalized about 20% of these alterations. Young Thy1-aSyn mice exhibit motor deficits that differ from parkinsonism and are established before the onset of treatment; these deficits were not improved by cholesterol oximes. However, high doses of TRO40303 improved olfaction and produced the same effects as dopamine agonists on a challenging beam test, specifically an increase in footslips, an observation congruent with its effects on transcripts involved in dopamine synthesis. High doses of TRO19622 increased

  17. An ABA-increased interaction of the PYL6 ABA receptor with MYC2 Transcription Factor: A putative link of ABA and JA signaling.

    PubMed

    Aleman, Fernando; Yazaki, Junshi; Lee, Melissa; Takahashi, Yohei; Kim, Alice Y; Li, Zixing; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Ecker, Joseph R; Schroeder, Julian I

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a plant hormone that mediates abiotic stress tolerance and regulates growth and development. ABA binds to members of the PYL/RCAR ABA receptor family that initiate signal transduction inhibiting type 2C protein phosphatases. Although crosstalk between ABA and the hormone Jasmonic Acid (JA) has been shown, the molecular entities that mediate this interaction have yet to be fully elucidated. We report a link between ABA and JA signaling through a direct interaction of the ABA receptor PYL6 (RCAR9) with the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor MYC2. PYL6 and MYC2 interact in yeast two hybrid assays and the interaction is enhanced in the presence of ABA. PYL6 and MYC2 interact in planta based on bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation of the proteins. Furthermore, PYL6 was able to modify transcription driven by MYC2 using JAZ6 and JAZ8 DNA promoter elements in yeast one hybrid assays. Finally, pyl6 T-DNA mutant plants show an increased sensitivity to the addition of JA along with ABA in cotyledon expansion experiments. Overall, the present study identifies a direct mechanism for transcriptional modulation mediated by an ABA receptor different from the core ABA signaling pathway, and a putative mechanistic link connecting ABA and JA signaling pathways. PMID:27357749

  18. An ABA-increased interaction of the PYL6 ABA receptor with MYC2 Transcription Factor: A putative link of ABA and JA signaling

    PubMed Central

    Aleman, Fernando; Yazaki, Junshi; Lee, Melissa; Takahashi, Yohei; Kim, Alice Y.; Li, Zixing; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Ecker, Joseph R.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a plant hormone that mediates abiotic stress tolerance and regulates growth and development. ABA binds to members of the PYL/RCAR ABA receptor family that initiate signal transduction inhibiting type 2C protein phosphatases. Although crosstalk between ABA and the hormone Jasmonic Acid (JA) has been shown, the molecular entities that mediate this interaction have yet to be fully elucidated. We report a link between ABA and JA signaling through a direct interaction of the ABA receptor PYL6 (RCAR9) with the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor MYC2. PYL6 and MYC2 interact in yeast two hybrid assays and the interaction is enhanced in the presence of ABA. PYL6 and MYC2 interact in planta based on bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation of the proteins. Furthermore, PYL6 was able to modify transcription driven by MYC2 using JAZ6 and JAZ8 DNA promoter elements in yeast one hybrid assays. Finally, pyl6 T-DNA mutant plants show an increased sensitivity to the addition of JA along with ABA in cotyledon expansion experiments. Overall, the present study identifies a direct mechanism for transcriptional modulation mediated by an ABA receptor different from the core ABA signaling pathway, and a putative mechanistic link connecting ABA and JA signaling pathways. PMID:27357749

  19. Prognostic value of increase in transcript levels of Tp73 DeltaEx2-3 isoforms in low-grade glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Wager, M; Guilhot, J; Blanc, J-L; Ferrand, S; Milin, S; Bataille, B; Lapierre, F; Denis, S; Chantereau, T; Larsen, C-J; Karayan-Tapon, L

    2006-10-23

    Glial tumours are a devastating, poorly understood condition carrying a gloomy prognosis for which clinicians sorely lack reliable predictive parameters facilitating a sound treatment strategy. Tp73, a p53 family member, expresses two main classes of isoforms--transactivatory activity (TA)p73 and DeltaTAp73--exhibiting tumour suppressor gene and oncogene properties, respectively. The authors examined their expression status in high- and low-grade adult gliomas. Isoform-specific real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used for the analysis of Tp73 isoform transcript expression in a series of 51 adult patients harbouring glial tumours, in order to compare tumour grades with each other, and with non-tumoural samples obtained from epileptic patients as well. Our data demonstrate increase of TAp73 and DeltaTAp73 transcript levels at onset and early stage of the disease. We also show that DeltaEx2-3 isoform expression in low-grade tumours anticipates clinical and imaging progression to higher grades, and correlates to the patients' survival. Expression levels of P1 promoter generated Tp73 isoforms--and particularly DeltaEx2-3--indeed allow for prediction of the clinical progression of low-grade gliomas in adults. Our data are the first such molecular biology report regarding low-grade tumours and as such should be of help for sound decision-making. PMID:17047653

  20. Herpes simplex virus virion stimulatory protein mRNA leader contains sequence elements which increase both virus-induced transcription and mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Blair, E D; Blair, C C; Wagner, E K

    1987-08-01

    To investigate the role of 5' noncoding leader sequence of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) mRNA in infected cells, the promoter for the 65,000-dalton virion stimulatory protein (VSP), a beta-gamma polypeptide, was introduced into plasmids bearing the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene together with various lengths of adjacent viral leader sequences. Plasmids containing longer lengths of leader sequence gave rise to significantly higher levels of CAT enzyme in transfected cells superinfected with HSV-1. RNase T2 protection assays of CAT mRNA showed that transcription was initiated from an authentic viral cap site in all VSP-CAT constructs and that CAT mRNA levels corresponded to CAT enzyme levels. Use of cis-linked simian virus 40 enhancer sequences demonstrated that the effect was virus specific. Constructs containing 12 and 48 base pairs of the VSP mRNA leader gave HSV infection-induced CAT activities intermediate between those of the leaderless construct and the VSP-(+77)-CAT construct. Actinomycin D chase experiments demonstrated that the longest leader sequences increased hybrid CAT mRNA stability at least twofold in infected cells. Cotransfection experiments with a cosmid bearing four virus-specified transcription factors (ICP4, ICP0, ICP27, and VSP-65K) showed that sequences from -3 to +77, with respect to the viral mRNA cap site, also contained signals responsive to transcriptional activation. PMID:3037112

  1. Increased Expression of Colonic Wnt9A through Sp1-mediated Transcriptional Effects involving Arylsulfatase B, Chondroitin 4-Sulfate, and Galectin-3

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Feferman, Leo; Tobacman, Joanne K.

    2014-01-01

    In cultured human colonic epithelial cells and mouse colonic tissue, exposure to the common food additive carrageenan leads to inflammation, activation of Wnt signaling, increased Wnt9A expression, and decline in the activity of the enzyme arylsulfatase B (ARSB; N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase). In this study, the novel transcriptional mechanism by which carrageenan and decline in ARSB increase Wnt9A expression in NCM460 and HT-29 human colonic epithelial cells and in mouse colon is presented. Increased expression of Wnt9A has been associated with multiple malignancies, including colon carcinoma, and with ectodermal and mesoendodermal morphogenesis. When ARSB activity was reduced by siRNA or by exposure to carrageenan (1 μg/ml for 24 h), degradation of chondroitin 4-sulfate (C4S) was inhibited, leading to accumulation of more highly sulfated C4S, which binds less galectin-3, a β-galactoside-binding protein. Nuclear galectin-3 increased and mediated increased binding of Sp1 to the Sp1 consensus sequence in the Wnt9A promoter, shown by oligonucleotide-binding assay and by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. When galectin-3 was silenced, the increases in Sp1 binding to the Wnt9A promoter and in Wnt9A expression, which followed carrageenan or ARSB silencing, were inhibited. Mithramycin A, a specific inhibitor of Sp1 oligonucleotide binding, and Sp1 siRNA blocked the carrageenan- and ARSB siRNA-induced increases in Wnt9A expression. These studies reveal how carrageenan exposure can lead to transcriptional events in colonic epithelial cells through decline in arylsulfatase B activity, with subsequent impact on C4S, galectin-3, Sp1, and Wnt9A and can exert significant effects on Wnt-initiated signaling and related vital cell processes. PMID:24778176

  2. Retinoic acid induces caspase-8 transcription via phospho-CREB and increases apoptotic responses to death stimuli in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Manrong; Zhu, Kejin; Grenet, Jose; Lahti, Jill M.

    2008-01-01

    Caspase-8 is frequently deleted or silenced in neuroblastoma and other solid tumor such as medulloblastoma and small cell lung carcinoma. Caspase-8 expression can be re-established in neuroblastoma cell lines by treatment with demethylating agents or with IFN-γ Here we show that four different retinoic acid (RA) derivatives also increase caspase-8 protein expression in neuroblastoma, medulloblastoma and small cell lung carcinoma cell lines. This increase in protein expression is mirrored by an increase in RNA expression in NB cells. However, the promoter region of the caspase-8 gene was not responsible for the induction of caspase-8 expression. Rather, we identified another intronic region containing a CREB binding site that was required for maximal induction of caspase-8 via RA. DNA-protein interaction assays revealed increased phospho-CREB binding to this response element in RA-treated NB cells. Furthermore, both mutation of the CREB binding site completely blocked caspase-8 induction in the luciferase reporter system assay and transfection of dominant-negative form of CREB repressed the up-regulation of caspase-8 by RA. Importantly, RA-released cells maintained caspase-8 expression for at least 2–5 days and were more sensitive to doxorubicin and TNFα. Thus, RA treatment in conjunction with TNFα and/or subsets of cytotoxic agents may have therapeutic benefits. PMID:18342014

  3. Adipose-Specific Disruption of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 Increases Body Weight and Adiposity

    PubMed Central

    Cernkovich, Erin R.; Deng, Jianbei; Bond, Michael C.; Combs, Terry P.; Harp, Joyce B.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the role of STAT3 in adipose tissue, we used Cre-loxP DNA recombination to create mice with an adipocyte-specific disruption of the STAT3 gene (ASKO mice). aP2-Cre-driven disappearance of STAT3 expression occurred on d 6 of adipogenesis, a time point when preadipocytes have already undergone conversion to adipocytes. Thus, this knockout model examined the role of STAT3 in mature but not differentiating adipocytes. Beginning at 9 wk of age, ASKO mice weighed more than their littermate controls and had increased adipose tissue mass, associated with adipocyte hypertrophy, but not adipocyte hyperplasia, hyperphagia, or reduced energy expenditure. Leptin-induced, but not isoproterenol-induced, lipolysis was impaired in ASKO adipocytes, which may partially explain the increased cell size. Despite reduced adiponectin and increased liver triacylglycerol, ASKO mice displayed normal glucose tolerance. Overall, these findings demonstrate that adipocyte STAT3 regulates body weight homeostasis in part through direct effects of leptin on adipocytes. PMID:18096662

  4. Rice and Bean Targets for Biofortification Combined with High Carotenoid Content Crops Regulate Transcriptional Mechanisms Increasing Iron Bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Desirrê Morais; de Castro Moreira, Maria Eliza; Gomes, Mariana Juste Contin; Lopes Toledo, Renata Celi; Nutti, Marilia Regini; Pinheiro Sant’Ana, Helena Maria; Martino, Hércia Stampini Duarte

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency affects thousands of people worldwide. Biofortification of staple food crops aims to support the reduction of this deficiency. This study evaluates the effect of combinations of common beans and rice, targets for biofortification, with high carotenoid content crops on the iron bioavailability, protein gene expression, and antioxidant effect. Iron bioavailability was measured by the depletion/repletion method. Seven groups were tested (n = 7): Pontal bean (PB); rice + Pontal bean (R + BP); Pontal bean + sweet potato (PB + SP); Pontal bean + pumpkin (PB + P); Pontal bean + rice + sweet potato (PB + R + P); Pontal bean + rice + sweet potato (PB + R + SP); positive control (Ferrous Sulfate). The evaluations included: hemoglobin gain, hemoglobin regeneration efficiency (HRE), gene expression of divalente metal transporter 1 (DMT-1), duodenal citocromo B (DcytB), ferroportin, hephaestin, transferrin and ferritin and total plasma antioxidant capacity (TAC). The test groups, except the PB, showed higher HRE (p < 0.05) than the control. Gene expression of DMT-1, DcytB and ferroportin increased (p < 0.05) in the groups fed with high content carotenoid crops (sweet potato or pumpkin). The PB group presented lower (p < 0.05) TAC than the other groups. The combination of rice and common beans, and those with high carotenoid content crops increased protein gene expression, increasing the iron bioavailability and antioxidant capacity. PMID:26610564

  5. Rice and Bean Targets for Biofortification Combined with High Carotenoid Content Crops Regulate Transcriptional Mechanisms Increasing Iron Bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Dias, Desirrê Morais; de Castro Moreira, Maria Eliza; Gomes, Mariana Juste Contin; Lopes Toledo, Renata Celi; Nutti, Marilia Regini; Pinheiro Sant'Ana, Helena Maria; Martino, Hércia Stampini Duarte

    2015-11-01

    Iron deficiency affects thousands of people worldwide. Biofortification of staple food crops aims to support the reduction of this deficiency. This study evaluates the effect of combinations of common beans and rice, targets for biofortification, with high carotenoid content crops on the iron bioavailability, protein gene expression, and antioxidant effect. Iron bioavailability was measured by the depletion/repletion method. Seven groups were tested (n = 7): Pontal bean (PB); rice + Pontal bean (R + BP); Pontal bean + sweet potato (PB + SP); Pontal bean + pumpkin (PB + P); Pontal bean + rice + sweet potato (PB + R + P); Pontal bean + rice + sweet potato (PB + R + SP); positive control (Ferrous Sulfate). The evaluations included: hemoglobin gain, hemoglobin regeneration efficiency (HRE), gene expression of divalente metal transporter 1 (DMT-1), duodenal citocromo B (DcytB), ferroportin, hephaestin, transferrin and ferritin and total plasma antioxidant capacity (TAC). The test groups, except the PB, showed higher HRE (p < 0.05) than the control. Gene expression of DMT-1, DcytB and ferroportin increased (p < 0.05) in the groups fed with high content carotenoid crops (sweet potato or pumpkin). The PB group presented lower (p < 0.05) TAC than the other groups. The combination of rice and common beans, and those with high carotenoid content crops increased protein gene expression, increasing the iron bioavailability and antioxidant capacity. PMID:26610564

  6. Diosgenin stimulates osteogenic activity by increasing bone matrix protein synthesis and bone-specific transcription factor Runx2 in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, Ethel H; Shin, Mee-Young; Sohn, Ho-Yong; Park, Youn-Moon; Kim, Taewan; Lim, Jae-Hwan; Jeong, Hyung-Jin; Kwon, Soon-Tae; Kwun, In-Sook

    2011-11-01

    Diosgenin, a steroid saponin extracted from the root of wild yam (Dioscorea villossa) is claimed to have osteogenic property. However, detailed studies providing evidence to this claim have not been fully undertaken. In this study, we investigated the effect of diosgenin on the osteogenesis of murine MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells. Cells were cultured with varying levels of diosgenin (0-10 μM) within 25 days of bone formation period. Diosgenin was found to stimulate proliferation within the range of 0.01-5 μM using MTT assay. The medium and cellular levels of Type 1 collagen and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), both of which are major bone matrix proteins, increased within the low range of diosgenin concentration (>0-3 μM), and this pattern was further confirmed by collagen and ALP staining of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The cellular protein expression of ALP and collagen Type 1 was also increased at 0.1-1 μM diosgenin treatment as analyzed by Western blot. Calcium deposition within the ECM also showed the same pattern as assessed by Alizarin Red S and Von Kossa staining. Bone-specific transcription factor runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Runx2-regulated osteopontin protein expressions were induced at low concentration (0.1-1 μM) and again decreased with high diosgenin concentrations. Based on our findings, our study suggests that diosgenin can enhance bone formation by stimulating the synthesis and secretion of Type 1 collagen and ALP and bone marker proteins Runx2 and osteopontin expression. The increased levels of these marker proteins, in turn, can increase the formation of calcium deposits within the ECM thereby increasing bone formation. PMID:21292464

  7. Progressive recruitment of cortical and striatal regions by inducible postsynaptic density transcripts after increasing doses of antipsychotics with different receptor profiles: insights for psychosis treatment.

    PubMed

    de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Iasevoli, Felice; Marmo, Federica; Buonaguro, Elisabetta F; Eramo, Anna; Rossi, Rodolfo; Avvisati, Livia; Latte, Gianmarco; Tomasetti, Carmine

    2015-04-01

    Antipsychotics may modulate the transcription of multiple gene programs, including those belonging to postsynaptic density (PSD) network, within cortical and subcortical brain regions. Understanding which brain region is activated progressively by increasing doses of antipsychotics and how their different receptor profiles may impact such an activation could be relevant to better correlate the mechanism of action of antipsychotics both with their efficacy and side effects. We analyzed the differential topography of PSD transcripts by incremental doses of two antipsychotics: haloperidol, the prototypical first generation antipsychotic with prevalent dopamine D2 receptors antagonism, and asenapine, a second generation antipsychotic characterized by multiple receptors occupancy. We investigated the expression of PSD genes involved in synaptic plasticity and previously demonstrated to be modulated by antipsychotics: Homer1a, and its related interacting constitutive genes Homer1b/c and PSD95, as well as Arc, C-fos and Zif-268, also known to be induced by antipsychotics administration. We found that increasing acute doses of haloperidol induced immediate-early genes (IEGs) expression in different striatal areas, which were progressively recruited by incremental doses with a dorsal-to-ventral gradient of expression. Conversely, increasing acute asenapine doses progressively de-recruited IEGs expression in cortical areas and increased striatal genes signal intensity. These effects were mirrored by a progressive reduction in locomotor animal activity by haloperidol, and an opposite increase by asenapine. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that antipsychotics may progressively recruit PSD-related IEGs expression in cortical and subcortical areas when administered at incremental doses and these effects may reflect a fine-tuned dose-dependent modulation of the PSD. PMID:25649681

  8. Ginsenoside Rg3 increases nitric oxide production via increases in phosphorylation and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase: Essential roles of estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and AMP-activated protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hien, Tran Thi; Kim, Nak Doo; Pokharel, Yuba Raj; Oh, Seok Jeong; Lee, Moo Yeol; Kang, Keon Wook

    2010-08-01

    We previously showed that ginsenosides increase nitric oxide (NO) production in vascular endothelium and that ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3) is the most active one among ginseng saponins. However, the mechanism for Rg3-mediated nitric oxide production is still uncertain. In this study, we determined whether Rg3 affects phosphorylation and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in ECV 304 human endothelial cells. Rg3 increased both the phosphorylation and the expression of eNOS in a concentration-dependent manner and a maximal effect was found at 10 {mu}g/ml of Rg3. The enzyme activities of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 kinase were enhanced as were estrogen receptor (ER)- and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent reporter gene transcriptions in Rg3-treated endothelial cells. Rg3-induced eNOS phosphorylation required the ER-mediated PI3-kinase/Akt pathway. Moreover, Rg3 activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) through up-regulation of CaM kinase II and Rg3-stimulated eNOS phosphorylation was reversed by AMPK inhibition. The present results provide a mechanism for Rg3-stimulated endothelial NO production.

  9. Hereditary cutaneous mucinosis in shar pei dogs is associated with increased hyaluronan synthase-2 mRNA transcription by cultured dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zanna, Giordana; Docampo, María J; Fondevila, Dolors; Bardagí, Mar; Bassols, Anna; Ferrer, Lluís

    2009-10-01

    Shar pei dogs are known for the distinctive feature of thick, wrinkled skin as a consequence of high dermal mucin content. Excessive dermal deposition of mucinous substance leading to severe skin folding, and/or to the more severe vesicular form characterized by dermal vesicles or bullae, is highly prevalent in this breed and is known as idiopathic mucinosis. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is the main component that accumulates in the dermis, and high levels of HA have also been detected in the serum of shar pei dogs. In this study, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying cutaneous mucinosis of shar pei dogs were investigated. Thirteen shar pei dogs and four control dogs of other breeds were included. In primary dermal fibroblast cultures, transcription of the family of hyaluronan synthases (HAS) involved in HA synthesis, and of hyaluronidases (HYAL) involved in HA degradation, were studied by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The location of HA in cell cultures was studied by immunofluorescence and confocal laser microscopy. Dermal fibroblasts transcribed HAS2, HAS3, HYAL1 and HYAL2, but no amplification for HAS1 was found. A higher transcription of HAS2 was demonstrated in shar pei dogs compared with control dogs. By confocal microscopy, HA was detected as a more diffuse and intense network-like pattern of green fluorescence in the fibroblast cells of shar pei dogs in comparison with control dogs. Together, these results provide additional evidence that hereditary cutaneous mucinosis in shar pei dogs may be a consequence of over-transcription or increased activity of HAS2. PMID:20178474

  10. Induced transcriptional profiling of phenylpropanoid pathway genes increased flavonoid and lignin content in Arabidopsis leaves in response to microbial products

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The production and use of biologically derived soil additives is one of the fastest growing sectors of the fertilizer industry. These products have been shown to improve crop yields while at the same time reducing fertilizer inputs to and nutrient loss from cropland. The mechanisms driving the changes in primary productivity and soil processes are poorly understood and little is known about changes in secondary productivity associated with the use of microbial products. Here we investigate secondary metabolic responses to a biologically derived soil additive by monitoring changes in the phenlypropanoid (PP) pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana. Results This study was designed to test the influence of one of these products (Soil Builder™-AF, SB) on secondary metabolism after being applied at different times. One time (TI) application of SB to Arabidopsis increased the accumulation of flavonoids compared to multiple (TII) applications of the same products. Fourteen phenolic compounds including flavonols and anothocyanins were identified by mass spectrometry. Kaempferol-3,7-O-bis-α-L-rhamnoside and quercetin 3,7-dirhamnoside, the major compounds, increased 3-fold and 4-fold, respectively compared to control in the TI treatment. The most abundant anthocyanin was cyanidin 3-rhamnoglucoside, which increased 3-fold and 2-fold in TI compared to the control and TII, respectively. Simultaneously, the expression of genes coding for key enzymes in the PP pathway (phenylalanine ammonia lyase, cinnamate 4-hydroxylase, chalcone synthase, flavonoid-3′-O-hydroxylase, flavonol synthase1 and dihydroflavonol-4-reductase) and regulatory genes (production of anthocyanin pigment2, MYB12, MYB113, MYB114, EGL3, and TT8) were up-regulated in both treatments (TI and TII). Furthermore, application of TI and TII induced expression of the lignin pathway genes (hydroxyl cinamyl transferase, caffeyl-CoA O-methyl transferase, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase, cinnamyl-CoA reductase

  11. An A643T mutation in the transcription factor Upc2p causes constitutive ERG11 upregulation and increased fluconazole resistance in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, Clemens J; Schneider, Sabrina; Barker, Katherine S; Rogers, P David; Morschhäuser, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    The zinc cluster transcription factor Upc2p mediates upregulation of ergosterol biosynthesis genes in response to ergosterol depletion in the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. One mechanism of acquired resistance to the antifungal drug fluconazole, which inhibits ergosterol biosynthesis, is constitutively increased expression of the ERG11 gene encoding the drug target enzyme. A G648D mutation in Upc2p has recently been shown to cause hyperactivity of the transcription factor, resulting in overexpression of ergosterol biosynthesis genes and increased fluconazole resistance. In order to investigate if gain-of-function mutations in Upc2p are a common mechanism of ERG11 upregulation and fluconazole resistance, we sequenced the UPC2 alleles of four ERG11-overexpressing, fluconazole-resistant C. albicans isolates and matched susceptible isolates from the same patients. In three of the isolate pairs, no differences in the UPC2 alleles were found, suggesting that mechanisms other than Upc2p mutations can cause ERG11 overexpression. One resistant isolate had become homozygous for a UPC2 allele containing a G1927A substitution that caused an alanine-to-threonine exchange at amino acid position 643 of Upc2p. Replacement of one of the endogenous UPC2 alleles in a fluconazole-susceptible strain by the UPC2(A643T) allele resulted in ERG11 overexpression and increased fluconazole resistance, which was further elevated when the A643T mutation was also introduced into the second UPC2 allele. These results further establish gain-of-function mutations in UPC2, which can be followed by loss of heterozygosity for the mutated allele, as a mechanism of ERG11 overexpression and increased fluconazole resistance in C. albicans, but other mechanisms of ERG11 upregulation also exist. PMID:19884367

  12. HOXC6 and HOXC11 increase transcription of S100β gene in BrdU-induced in vitro differentiation of GOTO neuroblastoma cells into Schwannian cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiuru; Hamada, Jun-ichi; Nishimoto, Arata; Takahashi, Yoko; Murai, Taichi; Tada, Mitsuhiro; Moriuchi, Tetsuya

    2007-01-01

    Abstract HOX genes encode transcription factors that play a key role in morphogenesis and cell differentiation during embryogenesis of animals. Human neuroblastoma cells are known to be chemically induced to differentiate into neuronal or Schwannian cells. In the present study, we investigated the roles of HOX genes in differentiation of GOTO neuroblastoma cells into Schwannian cells.When GOTO cells were grown in the presence of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU), they increased the expressions of two HOX genes (HOXC6 and HOXC11) and marker genes for Schwannian cells (S100β and myelin basic protein). Forced expression of HOXC11 alone or both HOXC6 isoform 1 and HOXC11 induced the expression of S100β in GOTO cells. In transient transfection experiments, the overexpression of HOXC6 and HOXC11 transactivated the S100β promoter-reporter construct. Taken together, our results suggest that HOXC6 and HOXC11 are associated with differentiation of GOTO cells into Schwannian cells through the transcriptional activation of S100β gene. PMID:17488478

  13. The group A Streptococcus small regulatory RNA FasX enhances streptokinase activity by increasing the stability of the ska mRNA transcript

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Peña, Esmeralda; Treviño, Jeanette; Liu, Zhuyun; Perez, Nataly; Sumby, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Summary Small RNA molecules play key regulatory roles in many bacterial species. However, little mechanistic data exists for the action of small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) in the human pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS). Here, we analyzed the relationship between a putative GAS sRNA and production of the secreted virulence factor streptokinase (SKA). SKA promotes GAS dissemination by activating conversion of host plasminogen into the fibrin-degrading protease plasmin. Homologues of the putative sRNA-encoding gene fibronectin/fibrinogen-binding/hemolytic-activity/streptokinase-regulator-X (fasX) were identified in four different pyogenic streptococcal species. However, despite 79% fasX nucleotide identity, a fasX allele from the animal pathogen Streptococcus zooepidemicus failed to complement a GAS fasX mutant. Using a series of precisely-constructed fasX alleles we discovered that FasX is a bona-fide sRNA that post-transcriptionally regulates SKA production in GAS. By base-pairing to the 5’ end of ska mRNA, FasX enhances ska transcript stability, resulting in a ~10-fold increase in SKA activity. Our data provide new insights into the mechanisms used by sRNAs to activate target mRNAs, and enhances our understanding of the regulation of a key GAS virulence factor. PMID:21143309

  14. Increased Energy Expenditure, Ucp1 Expression, and Resistance to Diet-induced Obesity in Mice Lacking Nuclear Factor-Erythroid-2-related Transcription Factor-2 (Nrf2).

    PubMed

    Schneider, Kevin; Valdez, Joshua; Nguyen, Janice; Vawter, Marquis; Galke, Brandi; Kurtz, Theodore W; Chan, Jefferson Y

    2016-04-01

    The NRF2 (also known as NFE2L2) transcription factor is a critical regulator of genes involved in defense against oxidative stress. Previous studies suggest thatNrf2plays a role in adipogenesisin vitro, and deletion of theNrf2gene protects against diet-induced obesity in mice. Here, we demonstrate that resistance to diet-induced obesity inNrf2(-/-)mice is associated with a 20-30% increase in energy expenditure. Analysis of bioenergetics revealed thatNrf2(-/-)white adipose tissues exhibit greater oxygen consumption. White adipose tissue showed a >2-fold increase inUcp1gene expression. Oxygen consumption is also increased nearly 2.5-fold inNrf2-deficient fibroblasts. Oxidative stress induced by glucose oxidase resulted in increasedUcp1expression. Conversely, antioxidant chemicals (such asN-acetylcysteine and Mn(III)tetrakis(4-benzoic acid)porphyrin chloride) and SB203580 (a known suppressor ofUcp1expression) decreasedUcp1and oxygen consumption inNrf2-deficient fibroblasts. These findings suggest that increasing oxidative stress by limitingNrf2function in white adipocytes may be a novel means to modulate energy balance as a treatment of obesity and related clinical disorders. PMID:26841864

  15. Diammonium phosphate stimulates transcription of L-lactate dehydrogenase leading to increased L-lactate production in the thermotolerant Bacillus coagulans strain.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lifan; Li, Yanfeng; Wang, Limin; Wang, Yanping; Yu, Bo

    2016-08-01

    Exploration of cost-effective fermentation substrates for efficient lactate production is an important economic objective. Although some organic nitrogen sources are also cheaper, inorganic nitrogen salts for lactate fermentation have additional advantages in facilitating downstream procedures and significantly improving the commercial competitiveness of lactate production. In this study, we first established an application of diammonium phosphate to replace yeast extract with a reduced 90 % nitrogen cost for a thermotolerant Bacillus coagulans strain. In vivo enzymatic and transcriptional analyses demonstrated that diammonium phosphate stimulates the gene expression of L-lactate dehydrogenase, thus providing higher specific enzyme activity in vivo and increasing L-lactic acid production. This new information provides a foundation for establishing a cost-effective process for polymer-grade L-lactic acid production in an industrial setting. PMID:26883345

  16. Increase in gene-transcript levels as indicators of up-regulation of the unfolded protein response in spontaneous canine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, Kirsten; MacDonald-Dickinson, Valerie; Linn, Kathleen; Simko, Elemir; Misra, Vikram

    2014-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR), a conserved cellular response to stressors such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation, is associated with angiogenesis and metastasis in tumor cells. This article discusses a pilot study conducted to determine whether components of the UPR could be identified in spontaneous canine tumors and whether they were up-regulated within tumor tissue compared with adjacent normal tissue. Tissue samples of various spontaneous canine neoplasms were taken from 13 dogs shortly after surgical excision or euthanasia; control samples were taken from adjacent normal tissue. RNA purification and real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction were done to measure the expression of 4 genes associated with the UPR (HERP, CHOP, GRP78, and XBP1s). The results indicated that UPR gene expression can be identified in spontaneous canine tumors and that the UPR is up-regulated, as indicated by significantly increased expression of CHOP and GRP78 within the tumor. PMID:24982546

  17. Increase of transcription factor EB (TFEB) and lysosomes in rat DRG neurons and their transportation to the central nerve terminal in dorsal horn after nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Jung, J; Uesugi, N; Jeong, N Y; Park, B S; Konishi, H; Kiyama, H

    2016-01-28

    In the spinal dorsal horn (DH), nerve injury activates microglia and induces neuropathic pain. Several studies clarified an involvement of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the microglial activation. However, the origin of ATP together with the release mechanism is unclear. Recent in vitro study revealed that an ATP marker, quinacrine, in lysosomes was released from neurite terminal of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons to extracellular space via lysosomal exocytosis. Here, we demonstrate a possibility that the lysosomal ingredient including ATP released from DRG neurons by lysosomal-exocytosis is an additional source of the glial activation in DH after nerve injury. After rat L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL), mRNA for transcription factor EB (TFEB), a transcription factor controlling lysosomal activation and exocytosis, was induced in the DRG. Simultaneously both lysosomal protein, LAMP1- and vesicular nuclear transporter (VNUT)-positive vesicles were increased in L5 DRG neurons and ipsilateral DH. The quinacrine staining in DH was increased and co-localized with LAMP1 immunoreactivity after nerve injury. In DH, LAMP1-positive vesicles were also co-localized with a peripheral nerve marker, Isolectin B4 (IB4) lectin. Injection of the adenovirus encoding mCherry-LAMP1 into DRG showed that mCherry-positive lysosomes are transported to the central nerve terminal in DH. These findings suggest that activation of lysosome synthesis including ATP packaging in DRG, the central transportation of the lysosome, and subsequent its exocytosis from the central nerve terminal of DRG neurons in response to nerve injury could be a partial mechanism for activation of microglia in DH. This lysosome-mediated microglia activation mechanism may provide another clue to control nociception and pain. PMID:26601776

  18. c-MYC Generates Repair Errors via Increased Transcription of Alternative-NHEJ Factors, LIG3 and PARP1, in Tyrosine Kinase-activated Leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Muvarak, Nidal; Kelley, Shannon; Robert, Carine; Baer, Maria R.; Perrotti, Danilo; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Civin, Curt; Scheibner, Kara; Rassool, Feyruz

    2015-01-01

    Leukemias expressing the constitutively activated tyrosine kinases (TKs) BCR-ABL1 and FLT3/ITD activate signaling pathways that increase genomic instability through generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and error-prone repair. The non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway is a major pathway for DSB repair and is highly aberrant in TK-activated-leukemias; an alternative form of NHEJ (ALT-NHEJ) predominates, evidenced by increased expression of DNA ligase IIIα (LIG3) and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP1), increased frequency of large genomic deletions, and repair using DNA sequence microhomologies. This study, for the first time, demonstrates that the TK target c-MYC plays a role in transcriptional activation and subsequent expression of LIG3 and PARP1 and contributes to the increased error-prone repair observed in TK-activated leukemias. c-MYC negatively regulates microRNAs miR-150 and miR-22 which demonstrate an inverse correlation with LIG3 and PARP1 expression in primary and cultured leukemia cells and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) human patient samples. Notably, inhibition of c-MYC and overexpression of miR-150 and -22 decreases ALT-NHEJ activity. Thus, BCR-ABL1 or FLT3/ITD induces c-MYC expression leads to genomic instability via augmented expression of ALT-NHEJ repair factors that generate repair errors. PMID:25828893

  19. Proteasome Inhibition Increases Recruitment of IκB Kinase β (IKKβ), S536P-p65, and Transcription Factor EGR1 to Interleukin-8 (IL-8) Promoter, Resulting in Increased IL-8 Production in Ovarian Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Singha, Bipradeb; Gatla, Himavanth Reddy; Manna, Subrata; Chang, Tzu-Pei; Sanacora, Shannon; Poltoratsky, Vladimir; Vancura, Ales; Vancurova, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Proinflammatory and pro-angiogenic chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8, CXCL8) contributes to ovarian cancer progression through its induction of tumor cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Proteasome inhibition by bortezomib, which has been used as a frontline therapy in multiple myeloma, has shown only limited effectiveness in ovarian cancer and other solid tumors. However, the responsible mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we show that proteasome inhibition dramatically increases the IL-8 expression and release in ovarian cancer cells. The responsible mechanism involves an increased nuclear accumulation of IκB kinase β (IKKβ) and an increased recruitment of the nuclear IKKβ, p65-phosphorylated at Ser-536, and the transcription factor early growth response-1 (EGR-1) to the endogenous IL-8 promoter. Coimmunoprecipitation studies identified the nuclear EGR-1 associated with IKKβ and with p65, with preferential binding to S536P-p65. Both IKKβ activity and EGR-1 expression are required for the increased IL-8 expression induced by proteasome inhibition in ovarian cancer cells. Interestingly, in multiple myeloma cells the IL-8 release is not increased by bortezomib. Together, these data indicate that the increased IL-8 release may represent one of the underlying mechanisms responsible for the decreased effectiveness of proteasome inhibition in ovarian cancer treatment and identify IKKβ and EGR-1 as potential new targets in ovarian cancer combination therapies. PMID:24337575

  20. Increased expression of bHLH transcription factor E2A (TCF3) in prostate cancer promotes proliferation and confers resistance to doxorubicin induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Divya; Chaudhary, Jaideep

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer E2A, considered as a tumor suppressor is highly expressed in prostate cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing of E2A attenuates cell proliferation and promotes apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer E2A regulates c-myc, Id1, Id3 and CDKN1A expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Loss of E2A promotes doxorubicin dependent apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results suggest that E2A acts as a tumor promoter at least in prostate cancer. -- Abstract: E2A (TCF3) is a multifunctional basic helix loop helix (bHLH), transcription factor. E2A regulates transcription of target genes by homo- or heterodimerization with cell specific bHLH proteins. In general, E2A promotes cell differentiation, acts as a negative regulator of cell proliferation in normal cells and cancer cell lines and is required for normal B-cell development. Given the diverse biological pathways regulated/influenced by E2A little is known about its expression in cancer. In this study we investigated the expression of E2A in prostate cancer. Unexpectedly, E2A immuno-histochemistry demonstrated increased E2A expression in prostate cancer as compared to normal prostate. Silencing of E2A in prostate cancer cells DU145 and PC3 led to a significant reduction in proliferation due to G1 arrest that was in part mediated by increased CDKN1A(p21) and decreased Id1, Id3 and c-myc. E2A silencing in prostate cancer cell lines also resulted in increased apoptosis due to increased mitochondrial permeability and caspase 3/7 activation. Moreover, silencing of E2A increased sensitivity to doxorubicin induced apoptosis. Based on our results, we propose that E2A could be an upstream regulator of Id1 and c-Myc which are highly expressed in prostate cancer. These results for the first time demonstrate that E2A could in fact acts as a tumor promoter at least in prostate cancer.

  1. [Cell-free DNA fragments increase transcription in human mesenchymal stem cells, activate TLR-dependent signal pathway and supress apoptosis].

    PubMed

    Kostiuk, S V; Malinovskaia, E M; Ermakov, A V; Smirnova, T D; Kameneva, L V; Chvartatskaia, O V; Loseva, P A; Ershova, E S; Liubchenko, L N; Veĭko, N N

    2012-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are now widely adopted in regenerative medicine. However, many questions on the role of different signaling pathways in the regulation of stem cell (SC) functional activity within the organism remain unaswered. In damaged regions the level of cell death increases and DNA fragments from dead cells (cell-free DNA, cfDNA) are accumulated in blood. We showed that in adipose-derived MSCs exposed in vitro to cfDNA fragments the transcription level increased (the total amount of cellular RNA and the rRNA amount rose). GC-rich CfDNA fragments (GC-DNA) activated the TLR9-dependent signal pathway: the expression of TLR9 and of TLR9-signaling pathway adapter--MyD88--was up-regulated. AT-rich DNA fragments did not increase the TLR9 expression, though, the MyD88 expression level rose. So we suggest that AT-DNA acts via some other receptors that nevertheless activate MyD88-dependent signalling in MSCs. We also showed that cfDNA fragments decreased the activity of caspase, an apoptotic enzyme. So, ctDNA can significantly influence the functional activity ofMSC by activating TLR9- and MyD88-dependent signal pathways and lowering the apoptosis level. PMID:23350199

  2. Protein–energy malnutrition increases activation of the transcription factor, nuclear factor κB, in the gerbil hippocampus following global ischemia☆

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Liang; Nazarali, Adil J.; Paterson, Phyllis G.

    2013-01-01

    Protein–energy malnutrition (PEM) exacerbates functional impairment caused by brain ischemia. This is correlated with reactive gliosis, which suggests an increased inflammatory response. The objective of the current study was to investigate if PEM increases hippocampal activation of nuclear factor κB (NFκB), a transcription factor that amplifies the inflammatory response involved in ischemic brain injury. Mongolian gerbils (11–12 weeks old) were randomly assigned to control diet (12.5% protein) or protein-deficient diet (2%) for 4 weeks. The 2% protein group had a 15% decrease in voluntary food intake (P<.001; unpaired t test), resulting in PEM. Body weight after 4 weeks was 20% lower in the PEM group (P<.001). Gerbils were then exposed to sham surgery or global ischemia induced by 5-min bilateral common carotid artery occlusion. PEM independently increased hippocampal NFκB activation detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assay at 6 h after surgery (P=.014; 2-factor ANOVA). Ischemia did not significantly affect NFκB activation nor was there interaction between diet and ischemia. Serum glucose and cortisol concentrations at 6 h postischemia were unaltered by diet or ischemia. A second experiment using gerbils of the same age and feeding paradigm demonstrated that PEM also increases hippocampal NFκB activation in the absence of surgery. These findings suggest that PEM, which exists in 16% of elderly patients at admission for stroke, may worsen outcome by increasing activation of NFκB. Since PEM increased NFκB activation independent of ischemia or surgery, the data also have implications for the inflammatory response of the many individuals affected globally by PEM. PMID:18430555

  3. MYB and bHLH transcription factor transgenes increase anthocyanin pigmentation in petunia and lisianthus plants, and the petunia phenotypes are strongly enhanced under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Schwinn, Kathy E; Boase, Murray R; Bradley, J Marie; Lewis, David H; Deroles, Simon C; Martin, Cathie R; Davies, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    Petunia line Mitchell [MP, Petunia axillaris × (P. axillaris × P. hybrida)] and Eustoma grandiflorum (lisianthus) plants were produced containing a transgene for over-expression of the R2R3-MYB transcription factor [TF; ROSEA1 (ROS1)] that up-regulates flavonoid biosynthesis in Antirrhinum majus. The petunia lines were also crossed with previously produced MP lines containing a Zea mays flavonoid-related basic helix-loop-helix TF transgene (LEAF COLOR, LC), which induces strong vegetative pigmentation when these 35S:LC plants are exposed to high-light levels. 35S:ROS1 lisianthus transgenics had limited changes in anthocyanin pigmentation, specifically, precocious pigmentation of flower petals and increased pigmentation of sepals. RNA transcript levels for two anthocyanin biosynthetic genes, chalcone synthase and anthocyanidin synthase, were increased in the 35S:ROS1 lisianthus petals compared to those of control lines. With MP, the 35S:ROS1 calli showed novel red pigmentation in culture, but this was generally not seen in tissue culture plantlets regenerated from the calli or young plants transferred to soil in the greenhouse. Anthocyanin pigmentation was enhanced in the stems of mature 35S:ROS1 MP plants, but the MP white-flower phenotype was not complemented. Progeny from a 35S:ROS1 × 35S:LC cross had novel pigmentation phenotypes that were not present in either parental line or MP. In particular, there was increased pigment in the petal throat region, and the anthers changed from yellow to purple pigmentation. An outdoor field trial was conducted with the 35S:ROS1, 35S:LC, 35S:ROS1 × 35S:LC and control MP lines. Field conditions rapidly induced intense foliage pigmentation in 35S:LC plants, a phenotype not observed in control MP or equivalent 35S:LC plants maintained in a greenhouse. No difference in plant stature, seed germination, or plant survival was observed between transgenic and control plants. PMID:25414715

  4. Interference with Activator Protein-2 transcription factors leads to induction of apoptosis and an increase in chemo- and radiation-sensitivity in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Activator Protein-2 (AP-2) transcription factors are critically involved in a variety of fundamental cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis and have also been implicated in carcinogenesis. Expression of the family members AP-2α and AP-2γ is particularly well documented in malignancies of the female breast. Despite increasing evaluation of single AP-2 isoforms in mammary tumors the functional role of concerted expression of multiple AP-2 isoforms in breast cancer remains to be elucidated. AP-2 proteins can form homo- or heterodimers, and there is growing evidence that the net effect whether a cell will proliferate, undergo apoptosis or differentiate is partly dependent on the balance between different AP-2 isoforms. Methods We simultaneously interfered with all AP-2 isoforms expressed in ErbB-2-positive murine N202.1A breast cancer cells by conditionally over-expressing a dominant-negative AP-2 mutant. Results We show that interference with AP-2 protein function lead to reduced cell number, induced apoptosis and increased chemo- and radiation-sensitivity. Analysis of global gene expression changes upon interference with AP-2 proteins identified 139 modulated genes (90 up-regulated, 49 down-regulated) compared with control cells. Gene Ontology (GO) investigations for these genes revealed Cell Death and Cell Adhesion and Migration as the main functional categories including 25 and 12 genes, respectively. By using information obtained from Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Systems we were able to present proven or potential connections between AP-2 regulated genes involved in cell death and response to chemo- and radiation therapy, (i.e. Ctgf, Nrp1, Tnfaip3, Gsta3) and AP-2 and other main apoptosis players and to create a unique network. Conclusions Expression of AP-2 transcription factors in breast cancer cells supports proliferation and contributes to chemo- and radiation-resistance of tumor cells by impairing the ability to

  5. MYB and bHLH transcription factor transgenes increase anthocyanin pigmentation in petunia and lisianthus plants, and the petunia phenotypes are strongly enhanced under field conditions

    PubMed Central

    Schwinn, Kathy E.; Boase, Murray R.; Bradley, J. Marie; Lewis, David H.; Deroles, Simon C.; Martin, Cathie R.; Davies, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    Petunia line Mitchell [MP, Petunia axillaris × (P. axillaris × P. hybrida)] and Eustoma grandiflorum (lisianthus) plants were produced containing a transgene for over-expression of the R2R3-MYB transcription factor [TF; ROSEA1 (ROS1)] that up-regulates flavonoid biosynthesis in Antirrhinum majus. The petunia lines were also crossed with previously produced MP lines containing a Zea mays flavonoid-related basic helix-loop-helix TF transgene (LEAF COLOR, LC), which induces strong vegetative pigmentation when these 35S:LC plants are exposed to high-light levels. 35S:ROS1 lisianthus transgenics had limited changes in anthocyanin pigmentation, specifically, precocious pigmentation of flower petals and increased pigmentation of sepals. RNA transcript levels for two anthocyanin biosynthetic genes, chalcone synthase and anthocyanidin synthase, were increased in the 35S:ROS1 lisianthus petals compared to those of control lines. With MP, the 35S:ROS1 calli showed novel red pigmentation in culture, but this was generally not seen in tissue culture plantlets regenerated from the calli or young plants transferred to soil in the greenhouse. Anthocyanin pigmentation was enhanced in the stems of mature 35S:ROS1 MP plants, but the MP white-flower phenotype was not complemented. Progeny from a 35S:ROS1 × 35S:LC cross had novel pigmentation phenotypes that were not present in either parental line or MP. In particular, there was increased pigment in the petal throat region, and the anthers changed from yellow to purple pigmentation. An outdoor field trial was conducted with the 35S:ROS1, 35S:LC, 35S:ROS1 × 35S:LC and control MP lines. Field conditions rapidly induced intense foliage pigmentation in 35S:LC plants, a phenotype not observed in control MP or equivalent 35S:LC plants maintained in a greenhouse. No difference in plant stature, seed germination, or plant survival was observed between transgenic and control plants. PMID:25414715

  6. Downhill running and exercise in hot environments increase leukocyte Hsp72 (HSPA1A) and Hsp90α (HSPC1) gene transcripts.

    PubMed

    Tuttle, James A; Castle, Paul C; Metcalfe, Alan J; Midgley, Adrian W; Taylor, Lee; Lewis, Mark P

    2015-04-15

    Stressors within humans and other species activate Hsp72 and Hsp90α mRNA transcription, although it is unclear which environmental temperature or treadmill gradient induces the largest increase. To determine the optimal stressor for priming the Hsp system, physically active but not heat-acclimated participants (19.8 ± 1.9 and 20.9 ± 3.6 yr) exercised at lactate threshold in either temperate (20°C, 50% relative humidity; RH) or hot (30°C, 50% RH) environmental conditions. Within each condition, participants completed a flat running (temperate flat or hot flat) and a downhill running (temperate downhill or hot downhill) experimental trial in a randomized counterbalanced order separated by at least 7 days. Venous blood samples were taken immediately before (basal), immediately after exercise, and 3 and 24 h postexercise. RNA was extracted from leukocytes and RT-quantitative PCR conducted to determine Hsp72 and Hsp90α mRNA relative expression. Leukocyte Hsp72 mRNA was increased immediately after exercise following downhill running (1.9 ± 0.9-fold) compared with flat running (1.3 ± 0.4-fold; P = 0.001) and in hot (1.9 ± 0.6-fold) compared with temperate conditions (1.1 ± 0.5-fold; P = 0.003). Leukocyte Hsp90α mRNA increased immediately after exercise following downhill running (1.4 ± 0.8-fold) compared with flat running (0.9 ± 0.6-fold; P = 0.002) and in hot (1.6 ± 1.0-fold) compared with temperate conditions (0.9 ± 0.6-fold; P = 0.003). Downhill running and exercise in hot conditions induced the largest stimuli for leukocyte Hsp72 and Hsp90α mRNA increases. PMID:25722377

  7. Elastin-derived peptides increase invasive capacities of lung cancer cells by post-transcriptional regulation of MMP-2 and uPA.

    PubMed

    Toupance, Simon; Brassart, Bertrand; Rabenoelina, Fanja; Ghoneim, Christelle; Vallar, Laurent; Polette, Myriam; Debelle, Laurent; Birembaut, Philippe

    2012-06-01

    Elastin-rich lung extracellular matrix is largely remodeled during tumor invasion. Elastin degradation produces peptides displaying a wide range of biological activities. These elastin derived peptides (EP) interact with the elastin receptor complex (ERC) but also bind to α(V)β(3) integrin and galectin-3. In this study, we explored the role of EP and their receptors in tumor progression of lung carcinomas. Non-invasive and invasive lung tumor cell lines were incubated in presence of kappa-elastin (κE) or with synthetic peptides displaying receptor-specific sequences (VGVAPG, GRKRK, AGVPGLGVG and AGVPGFGAG). Modified Boyden chamber assays revealed an increased invasive capacity of invasive cells induced by κE. EP treatment had no effect on cell proliferation but zymography analysis revealed an increase of pro-MMP-2 and uPA levels in the conditioned media of treated cells. Moreover, the active form of MMP-2 was increased in invasive cells. Interestingly, this regulation was not observed at the mRNA level and actinomycin D was unable to inhibit κE effects. We also observed that the regulation of proteases protein level following κE treatment was an early process detectable after 1 h. All these effects could not be inhibited by lactose and V14, two ERC antagonists, or by blocking antibodies against α(V)β(3) integrin and galectin-3. Finally, VGVAPG and GRKRK failed to reproduce κE effects whereas nonapeptides partially mimicked them. These results demonstrate that treatment with EP up-regulates invasiveness of lung tumor cells via the release of proteolytic enzymes. This modulation involves post-transcriptional mechanisms and a nonapeptide-receptor different from the ERC, α(V)β(3) integrin and galectin-3. PMID:22434583

  8. Broad H3K4me3 is associated with increased transcription elongation and enhancer activity at tumor-suppressor genes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kaifu; Chen, Zhong; Wu, Dayong; Zhang, Lili; Lin, Xueqiu; Su, Jianzhong; Rodriguez, Benjamin; Xi, Yuanxin; Xia, Zheng; Chen, Xi; Shi, Xiaobing; Wang, Qianben; Li, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Tumor suppressors are mostly defined by inactivating mutations in tumors, yet little is known about their epigenetic features in normal cells. Through integrative analysis of 1,134 genome-wide epigenetic profiles, mutations from >8,200 tumor-normal pairs and our experimental data from clinical samples, we discovered broad peaks for trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 (H3K4me3; wider than 4 kb) as the first epigenetic signature for tumor suppressors in normal cells. Broad H3K4me3 is associated with increased transcription elongation and enhancer activity, which together lead to exceptionally high gene expression, and is distinct from other broad epigenetic features, such as super-enhancers. Genes with broad H3K4me3 peaks conserved across normal cells may represent pan-cancer tumor suppressors, such as TP53 and PTEN, whereas genes with cell type-specific broad H3K4me3 peaks may represent cell identity genes and cell type-specific tumor suppressors. Furthermore, widespread shortening of broad H3K4me3 peaks in cancers is associated with repression of tumor suppressors. Thus, the broad H3K4me3 epigenetic signature provides mutation-independent information for the discovery and characterization of new tumor suppressors. PMID:26301496

  9. Loss of the transcription factor Meis1 prevents sympathetic neurons target-field innervation and increases susceptibility to sudden cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Bouilloux, Fabrice; Thireau, Jérôme; Ventéo, Stéphanie; Farah, Charlotte; Karam, Sarah; Dauvilliers, Yves; Valmier, Jean; Copeland, Neal G; Jenkins, Nancy A; Richard, Sylvain; Marmigère, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Although cardio-vascular incidents and sudden cardiac death (SCD) are among the leading causes of premature death in the general population, the origins remain unidentified in many cases. Genome-wide association studies have identified Meis1 as a risk factor for SCD. We report that Meis1 inactivation in the mouse neural crest leads to an altered sympatho-vagal regulation of cardiac rhythmicity in adults characterized by a chronotropic incompetence and cardiac conduction defects, thus increasing the susceptibility to SCD. We demonstrated that Meis1 is a major regulator of sympathetic target-field innervation and that Meis1 deficient sympathetic neurons die by apoptosis from early embryonic stages to perinatal stages. In addition, we showed that Meis1 regulates the transcription of key molecules necessary for the endosomal machinery. Accordingly, the traffic of Rab5+ endosomes is severely altered in Meis1-inactivated sympathetic neurons. These results suggest that Meis1 interacts with various trophic factors signaling pathways during postmitotic neurons differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11627.001 PMID:26857994

  10. The Nitrate-Inducible NAC Transcription Factor TaNAC2-5A Controls Nitrate Response and Increases Wheat Yield1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    He, Xue; Qu, Baoyuan; Li, Wenjing; Zhao, Xueqiang; Teng, Wan; Ma, Wenying; Ren, Yongzhe; Li, Bin; Li, Zhensheng; Tong, Yiping

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate is a major nitrogen resource for cereal crops; thus, understanding nitrate signaling in cereal crops is valuable for engineering crops with improved nitrogen use efficiency. Although several regulators have been identified in nitrate sensing and signaling in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the equivalent information in cereals is missing. Here, we isolated a nitrate-inducible and cereal-specific NAM, ATAF, and CUC (NAC) transcription factor, TaNAC2-5A, from wheat (Triticum aestivum). A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that TaNAC2-5A could directly bind to the promoter regions of the genes encoding nitrate transporter and glutamine synthetase. Overexpression of TaNAC2-5A in wheat enhanced root growth and nitrate influx rate and, hence, increased the root’s ability to acquire nitrogen. Furthermore, we found that TaNAC2-5A-overexpressing transgenic wheat lines had higher grain yield and higher nitrogen accumulation in aerial parts and allocated more nitrogen in grains in a field experiment. These results suggest that TaNAC2-5A is involved in nitrate signaling and show that it is an exciting gene resource for breeding crops with more efficient use of fertilizer. PMID:26371233

  11. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α Activates Human Multidrug Resistance Transporter 3/ATP-Binding Cassette Protein Subfamily B4 Transcription and Increases Rat Biliary Phosphatidylcholine Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Ghonem, Nisanne S.; Ananthanarayanan, Meenakshisundaram; Soroka, Carol J.; Boyer, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance transporter 3/ATP-binding cassette protein subfamily B4 (MDR3/ABCB4) is a critical determinant of biliary phosphatidylcholine (PC) secretion. Clinically, mutations and partial deficiencies in MDR3 result in cholestatic liver injury. Thus, MDR3 is a potential therapeutic target for cholestatic liver disease. Fenofibrate is a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α ligand that has antiinflammatory actions and regulates bile acid detoxification. Here we examined the mechanism by which fenofibrate regulates MDR3 gene expression. Fenofibrate significantly up-regulated MDR3 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression in primary cultured human hepatocytes, and stimulated MDR3 promoter activity in HepG2 cells. In silico analysis of 5′-upstream region of human MDR3 gene revealed a number of PPARα response elements (PPRE). Electrophoretic mobility shift (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays demonstrated specific binding of PPARα to the human MDR3 promoter. Targeted mutagenesis of three novel PPREs reduced inducibility of the MDR3 promoter by fenofibrate. In collagen sandwich cultured rat hepatocytes, treatment with fenofibrate increased secretion of fluorescent PC into bile canaliculi. Conclusion Fenofibrate transactivates MDR3 gene transcription by way of the binding of PPARα to three novel and functionally critical PPREs in the MDR3 promoter. Fenofibrate treatment further stimulates biliary phosphatidylcholine secretion in rat hepatocytes, thereby providing a functional correlate. We have established a molecular mechanism that may contribute to the beneficial use of fenofibrate therapy in human cholestatic liver disease. PMID:24122873

  12. Increases in iPS Transcription Factor (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc, and Klf4) Gene Expression after Modified Electroconvulsive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nishiguchi, Masaki; Kanazawa, Tetsufumi; Tsutsumi, Atsushi; Kaneko, Takao; Uenishi, Hiroyuki; Kawabata, Yasuo; Kawashige, Seiya; Koh, Jun; Yoneda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a reasonable option for intractable depression or schizophrenia, but a mechanism of action has not been established. One credible hypothesis is related to neural plasticity. Three genes (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc) involved in the induction of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are Wnt-target genes, which constitute a key gene group involved in neural plasticity through the TCF family. Klf4 is the other gene among Yamanaka's four transcription factors, and increases in its expression are induced by stimulation of the canonical Wnt pathway. Methods We compared the peripheral blood gene expression of the four iPS genes (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc, and Klf4) before and after modified ECT (specifically ECT with general anesthesia) of patients with intractable depression (n=6) or schizophrenia (n=6). Using Thymatron ten times the total bilateral electrical stimulation was evoked. Results Both assessments of the symptoms demonstrated significant improvement after mECT stimulation. Expression of all four genes was confirmed to increase after initial stimulation. The gene expression levels after treatment were significantly different from the initial gene expression in all twelve cases at the following treatment stages: at the 3rd mECT for Oct4; at the 6th and 10th mECT for Sox2; and at the 3rd, 6th and 10th mECT for c-Myc. Conclusion These significant differences were not present after correction for multiple testing; however, our data have the potential to explain the molecular mechanisms of mECT from a unique perspective. Further studie should be conducted to clarify the pathophysiological involvement of iPS-inducing genes in ECT. PMID:26508965

  13. Transient Co-Expression of Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing Suppressors for Increased in Planta Expression of a Recombinant Anthrax Receptor Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Arzola, Lucas; Chen, Junxing; Rattanaporn, Kittipong; Maclean, James M.; McDonald, Karen A.

    2011-01-01

    Potential epidemics of infectious diseases and the constant threat of bioterrorism demand rapid, scalable, and cost-efficient manufacturing of therapeutic proteins. Molecular farming of tobacco plants provides an alternative for the recombinant production of therapeutics. We have developed a transient production platform that uses Agrobacterium infiltration of Nicotiana benthamiana plants to express a novel anthrax receptor decoy protein (immunoadhesin), CMG2-Fc. This chimeric fusion protein, designed to protect against the deadly anthrax toxins, is composed of the von Willebrand factor A (VWA) domain of human capillary morphogenesis 2 (CMG2), an effective anthrax toxin receptor, and the Fc region of human immunoglobulin G (IgG). We evaluated, in N. benthamiana intact plants and detached leaves, the expression of CMG2-Fc under the control of the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter, and the co-expression of CMG2-Fc with nine different viral suppressors of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS): p1, p10, p19, p21, p24, p25, p38, 2b, and HCPro. Overall, transient CMG2-Fc expression was higher on intact plants than detached leaves. Maximum expression was observed with p1 co-expression at 3.5 days post-infiltration (DPI), with a level of 0.56 g CMG2-Fc per kg of leaf fresh weight and 1.5% of the total soluble protein, a ten-fold increase in expression when compared to absence of suppression. Co-expression with the p25 PTGS suppressor also significantly increased the CMG2-Fc expression level after just 3.5 DPI. PMID:21954339

  14. Bisphenol A increases aP2 expression in 3T3L1 by enhancing the transcriptional activity of nuclear receptors at the promoter

    PubMed Central

    Atlas, Ella; Pope, Louise; Wade, Mike G; Kawata, Alice; Boudreau, Adele; Boucher, Jonathan G

    2014-01-01

    Environmental pollutants, such as bisphenol A (BPA), have the potential to affect the differentiation processes and the biology of the adipose tissue. The 3T3-L1 model is one of the murine cell models used extensively for the investigation of the molecular events that govern the differentiation of adipocytes from a committed preadipocyte to a mature, lipid laden adipocyte. Most of the studies investigating the effects of BPA on preadipocyte differentiation have investigated the effects of this chemical in the presence of an optimal differentiation cocktail containing high concentrations of the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone, conditions that result in 90% to 100% of differentiated adipocytes. Our studies employed the 3T3-L1 cell model in the absence of exogenous glucocorticoids. We show that BPA is able to increase the differentiation of the 3T3-L1 cells under these conditions. Furthermore, the effect of BPA was observed in the absence of the synthetic glucocorticoid (dexamethasone), a hormone known to be required for the differentiation of the 3T3-L1 cells. In addition, BPA upregulated the mRNA expression and protein levels of the terminal marker of adipogenesis the fatty acid binding protein (aP2) in these cells. Interestingly, the known modulators of adipogenesis such as the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ or CCAAT enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) α were not elevated at the mRNA or protein level in response to BPA. Furthermore, BPA upregulated the expression levels of the marker of adipogenesis aP2, through an effect on the transcriptional activity of C/EBPδ and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) at its promoter. PMID:25068083

  15. Boosting transcription by transcription: enhancer-associated transcripts.

    PubMed

    Darrow, Emily M; Chadwick, Brian P

    2013-12-01

    Enhancers are traditionally viewed as DNA sequences located some distance from a promoter that act in cis and in an orientation-independent fashion to increase utilization of specific promoters and thereby regulate gene expression. Much progress has been made over the last decade toward understanding how these distant elements interact with target promoters, but how transcription is enhanced remains an object of active inquiry. Recent reports convey the prevalence and diversity of enhancer transcription and transcripts and support both as key factors with mechanistically distinct, but not mutually exclusive roles in enhancer function. Decoupling the causes and effects of transcription on the local chromatin landscape and understanding the role of enhancer transcripts in the context of long-range interactions are challenges that require additional attention. In this review, we focus on the possible functions of enhancer transcription by highlighting several recent enhancer RNA papers and, within the context of other enhancer studies, speculate on the role of enhancer transcription in regulating differential gene expression. PMID:24178450

  16. MCG101-induced cancer anorexia-cachexia features altered expression of hypothalamic Nucb2 and Cartpt and increased plasma levels of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptides.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Jonathan R; Iresjö, Britt-Marie; Smedh, Ulrika

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore central and peripheral host responses to an anorexia-cachexia producing tumor. We focused on neuroendocrine anorexigenic signals in the hypothalamus, brainstem, pituitary and from the tumor per se. Expression of mRNA for corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), nesfatin-1, thyrotropin (TSH) and the TSH receptor were explored. In addition, we examined changes in plasma TSH, CART peptides (CARTp) and serum amyloid P component (SAP). C57BL/6 mice were implanted with MCG101 tumors or sham-treated. A sham-implanted, pair‑fed (PF) group was included to delineate between primary tumor and secondary effects from reduced feeding. Food intake and body weight were measured daily. mRNA levels from microdissected mouse brain samples were assayed using qPCR, and plasma levels were determined using ELISA. MCG101 tumors expectedly induced anorexia and loss of body weight. Tumor-bearing (TB) mice exhibited an increase in nesfatin-1 mRNA as well as a decrease in CART mRNA in the paraventricular area (PVN). The CART mRNA response was secondary to reduced caloric intake whereas nesfatin-1 mRNA appeared to be tumor-specifically induced. In the pituitary, CART and TSH mRNA were upregulated in the TB and PF animals compared to the freely fed controls. Plasma levels for CARTp were significantly elevated in TB but not PF mice whereas levels of TSH were unaffected. The plasma CARTp response was correlated to the degree of inflammation represented by SAP. The increase in nesfatin-1 mRNA in the PVN highlights nesfatin-1 as a plausible candidate for causing tumor-induced anorexia. CART mRNA expression in the PVN is likely an adaptation to reduced caloric intake secondary to a cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome (CACS)‑inducing tumor. The MCG101 tumor did not express CART mRNA, thus the elevation of plasma CARTp is host derived and likely driven by inflammation. PMID:26780979

  17. Downstream regulatory elements increase acute and latent herpes simplex virus type 2 latency-associated transcript expression but do not influence recurrence phenotype or establishment of latency.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, T; Stanberry, L R; Bourne, N; Krause, P R

    1996-01-01

    The role of putative promoter or activator sequences downstream of the herpes simplex virus type 2 latency-associated transcript (LAT) promoter and upstream of the LAT intron was investigated in vivo by constructing and evaluating mutant viruses with deletions in this region. The deletion of LAT promoter sequences upstream of the primary LAT transcript reduced levels of LAT expression during productive infections, compared with the LAT expression level of wild-type virus, and abolished LAT expression during latency. The deletion of the putative downstream regulatory elements reduced but did not eliminate LAT expression during productive and latent infections. The deletion of both regions almost completely eliminated acute LAT transcription, although additional acute LAT-region transcription directed by sequences upstream of either region was detected by reverse transcriptase PCR. The deletion of the downstream elements did not influence the ability of the virus to reactivate from latently infected guinea pigs relative to the ability of the wild-type virus to reactivate; thus, decreased LAT expression did not affect the frequency of recurrence. The deletion of both regions did not affect the ability of the virus to establish latency. We conclude that downstream regulatory elements are necessary for maximal acute LAT expression but do not constitute an independent promoter during latency and do not play an obvious role in the establishment of our reactivation from latency. PMID:8627672

  18. Transcription Regulation in Archaea.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Alexandra M; Walker, Julie E; Santangelo, Thomas J

    2016-07-15

    The known diversity of metabolic strategies and physiological adaptations of archaeal species to extreme environments is extraordinary. Accurate and responsive mechanisms to ensure that gene expression patterns match the needs of the cell necessitate regulatory strategies that control the activities and output of the archaeal transcription apparatus. Archaea are reliant on a single RNA polymerase for all transcription, and many of the known regulatory mechanisms employed for archaeal transcription mimic strategies also employed for eukaryotic and bacterial species. Novel mechanisms of transcription regulation have become apparent by increasingly sophisticated in vivo and in vitro investigations of archaeal species. This review emphasizes recent progress in understanding archaeal transcription regulatory mechanisms and highlights insights gained from studies of the influence of archaeal chromatin on transcription. PMID:27137495

  19. The Transcriptional Response of Listeria monocytogenes during Adaptation to Growth on Lactate and Diacetate Includes Synergistic Changes That Increase Fermentative Acetoin Production▿†

    PubMed Central

    Stasiewicz, Matthew J.; Wiedmann, Martin; Bergholz, Teresa M.

    2011-01-01

    The organic acids lactate and diacetate are commonly used in combination in ready-to-eat foods because they show synergistic ability to inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenes. Full-genome microarrays were used to investigate the synergistic transcriptomic responses of two L. monocytogenes strains, H7858 (serotype 4b) and F6854 (serotype 1/2a), to these two organic acids under conditions representing osmotic and cold stress encountered in foods. Strains were exposed to brain heart infusion (BHI) broth at 7°C with 4.65% water-phase (w.p.) NaCl at pH 6.1 with (i) 2% w.p. potassium lactate, (ii) 0.14% w.p. sodium diacetate, (iii) the combination of both at the same levels, or (iv) no organic acids as a control. RNA was extracted 8 h after exposure, during lag phase, to capture gene transcription changes during adaptation to the organic acid stress. Significant differential transcription of 1,041 genes in H7858 and 640 genes in F6854 was observed in at least one pair of the 4 different treatments. The effects of combined treatment with lactate and diacetate included (i) synergistic transcription differences for 474 and 209 genes in H7858 and F6854, respectively, (ii) differential transcription of genes encoding cation transporters and ABC transporters of metals, and (iii) altered metabolism, including induction of a nutrient-limiting stress response, reduction of menaquinone biosynthesis, and a shift from fermentative production of acetate and lactate to energetically less favorable, neutral acetoin. These data suggest that additional treatments that interfere with cellular energy generation processes could more efficiently inhibit the growth of L. monocytogenes. PMID:21666015

  20. Nuclear F-actin enhances the transcriptional activity of β-catenin by increasing its nuclear localization and binding to chromatin.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Koji; de Lanerolle, Primal; Harata, Masahiko

    2016-04-01

    Actin plays multiple roles both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Cytoplasmic actin, in addition to its structural role in the cytoskeleton, also contributes to the subcellular localization of transcription factors by interacting with them or their partners. The transcriptional cofactor β-catenin, which acts as an intracellular transducer of canonical Wnt signaling, indirectly associates with the cytoplasmic filamentous actin (F-actin). Recently, it has been observed that F-actin is transiently formed within the nucleus in response to serum stimulation and integrin signaling, and also during gene reprogramming. Despite these earlier observations, information about the function of nuclear F-actin is poorly defined. Here, by facilitating the accumulation of nuclear actin artificially, we demonstrate that polymerizing nuclear actin enhanced the nuclear accumulation and transcriptional function of β-catenin. Our results also show that the nuclear F-actin colocalizes with β-catenin and enhances the binding of β-catenin to the downstream target genes of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, including the genes for the cell cycle regulators c-myc and cyclin D, and the OCT4 gene. Nuclear F-actin itself also associated with these genes. Since Wnt/β-catenin signaling has important roles in cell differentiation and pluripotency, our observations suggest that nuclear F-actin formed during these biological processes is involved in regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:26900020

  1. Plant transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Meshi, T; Iwabuchi, M

    1995-12-01

    Transcriptional regulation of gene expression relies on the recognition of promoter elements by transcription factors. In the past several years, a considerable number of (putative) transcription factors have been identified in plants. Some genes coding for these factors were isolated by south-western screening with oligonucleotides as a probe or by homology-based screening, and others were initially isolated by genetic means and subsequently identified as the genes for transcription factors. These transcription factors often form families of structurally related proteins with similar DNA-binding specificities and in addition, they are sometimes involved in related phenomena. Some groups of factors homo- and/or heterodimerize to increase the length and variability of the target sequences. Transcriptional activators, in general, comprise a modular activation domain. The activities of the transcription factors are controlled by post-translational modification, like phosphorylation and glycosylation, as well as at the levels of nuclear transport, oligomerization, etc. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of plant transcription factors to help understand the mechanistic aspects of the transcriptional regulation of genes. PMID:8589926

  2. Overexpression of the soybean GmERF3 gene, an AP2/ERF type transcription factor for increased tolerances to salt, drought, and diseases in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gaiyun; Chen, Ming; Li, Liancheng; Xu, Zhaoshi; Chen, Xueping; Guo, Jiaming; Ma, Youzhi

    2009-01-01

    A new member of the AP2/ERF transcription factor family, GmERF3, was isolated from soybean. Sequence analysis showed that GmERF3 contained an AP2/ERF domain of 58 amino acids and two putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) domains. It belonged to a group IV protein in the ERF (ethylene response factor) subfamily as typified by a conserved N-terminal motif [MCGGAI(I/L)]. Expression of GmERF3 was induced by treatments with high salinity, drought, abscisic acid (ABA), salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), ethylene (ET), and soybean mosaic virus (SMV), whereas there was no significant GmERF3 mRNA accumulation under cold stress treatment. GmERF3 could bind to the GCC box and DRE/CRT element, and was targeted to the nucleus when transiently expressed in onion epidermal cells. The GmERF3 protein fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain to activate transcription of reporter genes in yeast. Ectopic expression of the GmERF3 gene in transgenic tobacco plants induced the expression of some PR genes and enhanced resistance against infection by Ralstonia solanacearum, Alternaria alternata, and tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), and gave tolerance to high salinity and dehydration stresses. Furthermore, overexpression of GmERF3 in transgenic tobacco led to higher levels of free proline and soluble carbohydrates compared to wild-type plants under drought conditions. The overall results suggested that GmERF3 as an AP2/ERF transcription factor may play dual roles in response to biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. PMID:19602544

  3. Overexpression of a bHLH1 Transcription Factor of Pyrus ussuriensis Confers Enhanced Cold Tolerance and Increases Expression of Stress-Responsive Genes

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Cong; Huang, Xiao-San; Li, Kong-Qing; Yin, Hao; Li, Lei-Ting; Yao, Zheng-Hong; Zhang, Shao-Ling

    2016-01-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors are involved in arrays of physiological and biochemical processes. However, knowledge concerning the functions of bHLHs in cold tolerance remains poorly understood. In this study, a PubHLH1 gene isolated from Pyrus ussuriensis was characterized for its function in cold tolerance. PubHLH1 was upregulated by cold, salt, and dehydration, with the greatest induction under cold conditions. PubHLH1 had the transactivational activity and localized in the nucleus. Ectopic expression of PubHLH1 in transgenic tobacco conferred enhanced tolerance to cold stress. The transgenic lines had higher survival rates, higher chlorophyll, higher proline contents, lower electrolyte leakages and MDA when compared with wild type (WT). In addition, transcript levels of eight genes associated with ROS scavenging, regulation, and stress defense were higher in the transgenic plants relative to the WT under the chilling stress. Taken together, these results demonstrated that PubHLH1 played a key role in cold tolerance and, at least in part, contributed to activation of stress-responsive genes. PMID:27092159

  4. Overexpression of a bHLH1 Transcription Factor of Pyrus ussuriensis Confers Enhanced Cold Tolerance and Increases Expression of Stress-Responsive Genes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cong; Huang, Xiao-San; Li, Kong-Qing; Yin, Hao; Li, Lei-Ting; Yao, Zheng-Hong; Zhang, Shao-Ling

    2016-01-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors are involved in arrays of physiological and biochemical processes. However, knowledge concerning the functions of bHLHs in cold tolerance remains poorly understood. In this study, a PubHLH1 gene isolated from Pyrus ussuriensis was characterized for its function in cold tolerance. PubHLH1 was upregulated by cold, salt, and dehydration, with the greatest induction under cold conditions. PubHLH1 had the transactivational activity and localized in the nucleus. Ectopic expression of PubHLH1 in transgenic tobacco conferred enhanced tolerance to cold stress. The transgenic lines had higher survival rates, higher chlorophyll, higher proline contents, lower electrolyte leakages and MDA when compared with wild type (WT). In addition, transcript levels of eight genes associated with ROS scavenging, regulation, and stress defense were higher in the transgenic plants relative to the WT under the chilling stress. Taken together, these results demonstrated that PubHLH1 played a key role in cold tolerance and, at least in part, contributed to activation of stress-responsive genes. PMID:27092159

  5. Stochastic and nonstochastic post-transcriptional silencing of chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase genes involves increased RNA turnover-possible role for ribosome-independent RNA degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Holtorf, H; Schöb, H; Kunz, C; Waldvogel, R; Meins, F

    1999-01-01

    Stochastic and nonstochastic post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) in Nicotiana sylvestris plants carrying tobacco class I chitinase (CHN) and beta-1,3-glucanase transgenes differs in incidence, stability, and pattern of expression. Measurements with inhibitors of RNA synthesis (cordycepin, actinomycin D, and alpha-amanitin) showed that both forms of PTGS are associated with increased sequence-specific degradation of transcripts, suggesting that increased RNA turnover may be a general feature of PTGS. The protein synthesis inhibitors cycloheximide and verrucarin A did not inhibit degradation of CHN RNA targeted for PTGS, confirming that PTGS-related RNA degradation does not depend on ongoing protein synthesis. Because verrucarin A, unlike cycloheximide, dissociates mRNA from ribosomes, our results also suggest that ribosome-associated RNA degradation pathways may not be involved in CHN PTGS. PMID:10072405

  6. Overexpression of a Novel NAC Domain-Containing Transcription Factor Gene (AaNAC1) Enhances the Content of Artemisinin and Increases Tolerance to Drought and Botrytis cinerea in Artemisia annua.

    PubMed

    Lv, Zongyou; Wang, Shu; Zhang, Fangyuan; Chen, Lingxian; Hao, Xiaolong; Pan, Qifang; Fu, Xueqing; Li, Ling; Sun, Xiaofen; Tang, Kexuan

    2016-09-01

    The NAC (NAM, ATAF and CUC) superfamily is one of the largest plant-specific transcription factor families. NAC transcription factors always play important roles in response to various abiotic stresses. A NAC transcription factor gene AaNAC1 containing a complete open reading frame (ORF) of 864 bp was cloned from Artemisia annua. The expression of AaNAC1 could be induced by dehydration, cold, salicylic acid (SA) and methyl jasmonate (MJ), suggesting that it might be a key regulator of stress signaling pathways in A. annua. AaNAC1 was shown to be localized to the nuclei by transforming tobacco leaf epidermal cells. When AaNAC1 was overexpressed in A. annua, the content of artemisinin and dihydroartemisinic acid was increased by 79% and 150%, respectively. The expression levels of artemisinin biosynthetic pathway genes, i.e. amorpha-4,11-diene synthase (ADS), artemisinic aldehyde Δ11(13) reductase (DBR2) and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), were increased. Dual luciferase (dual-LUC) assays showed that AaNAC1 could activate the transcription of ADS in vivo. The transgenic A. annua exhibited increased tolerance to drought and resistance to Botrytis cinerea. When AaNAC1 was overexpressed in Arabidopsis, the transgenic Arabidopsis were markedly more tolerant to drought. The transgenic Arabidopsis showed increased resistance to B. cinerea. These results indicate that AaNAC1 can potentially be used in transgenic breeding for improving the content of artemisinin and drought tolerance in A. annua. PMID:27388340

  7. Increased PEA3/E1AF and decreased Net/Elk-3, both ETS proteins, characterize human NSCLC progression and regulate caveolin-1 transcription in Calu-1 and NCI-H23 NSCLC cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Karin A; Marquez, Hector A; Li, Jun; Cao, Yuxia; Hinds, Anne; O'Hara, Carl J; Kathuria, Satinder; Ramirez, Maria I; Williams, Mary C; Kathuria, Hasmeena

    2009-08-01

    Caveolin-1 protein has been called a 'conditional tumor suppressor' because it can either suppress or enhance tumor progression depending on cellular context. Caveolin-1 levels are dynamic in non-small-cell lung cancer, with increased levels in metastatic tumor cells. We have shown previously that transactivation of an erythroblastosis virus-transforming sequence (ETS) cis-element enhances caveolin-1 expression in a murine lung epithelial cell line. Based on high sequence homology between the murine and human caveolin-1 promoters, we proposed that ETS proteins might regulate caveolin-1 expression in human lung tumorigenesis. We confirm that caveolin-1 is not detected in well-differentiated primary lung tumors. Polyoma virus enhancer activator 3 (PEA3), a pro-metastatic ETS protein in breast cancer, is expressed at low levels in well-differentiated tumors and high levels in poorly differentiated tumors. Conversely, Net, a known ETS repressor, is expressed at high levels in the nucleus of well-differentiated primary tumor cells. In tumor cells in metastatic lymph node sites, caveolin-1 and PEA3 are highly expressed, whereas Net is now expressed in the cytoplasm. We studied transcriptional regulation of caveolin-1 in two human lung cancer cell lines, Calu-1 (high caveolin-1 expressing) and NCI-H23 (low caveolin-1 expressing). Chromatin immunoprecipitation-binding assays and small interfering RNA experiments show that PEA3 is a transcriptional activator in Calu-1 cells and that Net is a transcriptional repressor in NCI-H23 cells. These results suggest that Net may suppress caveolin-1 transcription in primary lung tumors and that PEA3 may activate caveolin-1 transcription in metastatic lymph nodes. PMID:19483189

  8. Mutation of a Nopp140 gene dao-5 alters rDNA transcription and increases germ cell apoptosis in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Lee, C-C; Tsai, Y-T; Kao, C-W; Lee, L-W; Lai, H-J; Ma, T-H; Chang, Y-S; Yeh, N-H; Lo, S J

    2014-01-01

    Human diseases of impaired ribosome biogenesis resulting from disruption of rRNA biosynthesis or loss of ribosomal components are collectively described as 'ribosomopathies'. Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS), a representative human ribosomopathy with craniofacial abnormalities, is attributed to mutations in the tcof1 gene that has a homologous gene called nopp140. Previous studies demonstrated that the dao-5 (dauer and aged animal overexpression gene 5) of Caenorhabditis elegans is a member of nopp140 gene family and plays a role in nucleogenesis in the early embryo. Here, we established a C. elegans model for studying Nopp140-associated ribosomopathy. A null dao-5 mutant ok542 with a semi-infertile phenotype showed a delay in gonadogenesis, as well as a higher incidence of germline apoptosis. These phenotypes in dao-5(ok542) are likely resulted from inefficient rDNA transcription that was observed by run-on analyses and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays measuring the RNA Pol I occupancy on the rDNA promoter. ChIP assays further showed that the modifications of acetylated histone 4 (H4Ac) and dimethylation at the lysine 9 of histone 3 (H3K9me2) around the rDNA promoter were altered in dao-5 mutants compared with the N2 wild type. In addition, activated CEP-1 (a C. elegans p53 homolog) activity was also linked to the loss of DAO-5 in terms of the transcriptional upregulation of two CEP-1 downstream effectors, EGL-1 and CED-13. We propose that the dao-5 mutant of C. elegans can be a valuable model for studying human Nopp140-associated ribosomopathy at the cellular and molecular levels. PMID:24722283

  9. Berry Phenolic Compounds Increase Expression of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-1α (HNF-1α) in Caco-2 and Normal Colon Cells Due to High Affinities with Transcription and Dimerization Domains of HNF-1α

    PubMed Central

    Real Hernandez, Luis M.; Fan, Junfeng; Johnson, Michelle H.; Gonzalez de Mejia, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α (HNF-1α) is found in the kidneys, spleen, thymus, testis, skin, and throughout the digestive organs. It has been found to promote the transcription of various proteins involved in the management of type II diabetes, including dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV). Phenolic compounds from berries and citrus fruits are known to inhibit DPP-IV, but have not been tested for their interactions with wild-type HNF-1α. By studying the interactions of compounds from berries and citrus fruits have with HNF-1α, pre-transcriptional mechanisms that inhibit the expression of proteins such as DPP-IV may be elucidated. In this study, the interactions of berry phenolic compounds and citrus flavonoids with the dimerization and transcriptional domains of HNF-1α were characterized using the molecular docking program AutoDock Vina. The anthocyanin delphinidin-3-O-arabinoside had the highest binding affinity for the dimerization domain as a homodimer (-7.2 kcal/mol) and transcription domain (-8.3 kcal/mol) of HNF-1α. Anthocyanins and anthocyanidins had relatively higher affinities than resveratrol and citrus flavonoids for both, the transcription domain and the dimerization domain as a homodimer. The flavonoid flavone had the highest affinity for a single unit of the dimerization domain (-6.5 kcal/mol). Nuclear expression of HNF-1α was measured in Caco-2 and human normal colon cells treated with blueberry and blackberry anthocyanin extracts. All extracts tested increased significantly (P < 0.05) the nuclear expression of HNF-1α in Caco-2 cells by 85.2 to 260% compared to a control. The extracts tested increased significantly (P < 0.02) the nuclear expression of HNF-1α in normal colon cells by 48.6 to 243%. It was confirmed that delphinidin-3-O-glucoside increased by 3-fold nuclear HNF-1α expression in Caco-2 cells (P < 0.05). Anthocyanins significantly increased nuclear HNF-1α expression, suggesting that these compounds might regulate the genes HNF-1

  10. Increased transcript level of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1) in human tricuspid compared with bicuspid aortic valves correlates with the stenosis severity

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Edit; Department of Cardiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm ; Caidahl, Kenneth; Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm ; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Department of Throracic Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm ; Baeck, Magnus; Department of Cardiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathomechanism of calcific aortic valve stenosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We assessed the transcript levels for PARP-1 (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase), acts as a DNA damage nick sensor in stenotic valves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Early stage of diseased tricuspid valves exhibited higher mRNA levels for PARP-1 compared to bicuspid valves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mRNA levels for PARP-1 inversely correlated with the clinical stenosis severity in tricuspid valves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our data demonstrated that DNA damage pathways might be associated with stenosis severity only in tricuspid valves. -- Abstract: Oxidative stress may contribute to the hemodynamic progression of aortic valve stenosis, and is associated with activation of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1. The aim of the present study was to assess the transcriptional profile and the topological distribution of PARP-1 in human aortic valves, and its relation to the stenosis severity. Human stenotic aortic valves were obtained from 46 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement surgery and used for mRNA extraction followed by quantitative real-time PCR to correlate the PARP-1 expression levels with the non invasive hemodynamic parameters quantifying the stenosis severity. Primary isolated valvular interstitial cells (VICs) were used to explore the effects of cytokines and leukotriene C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) on valvular PARP-1 expression. The thickened areas of stenotic valves with tricuspid morphology expressed significantly higher levels of PARP-1 mRNA compared with the corresponding part of bicuspid valves (0.501 vs 0.243, P = 0.01). Furthermore, the quantitative gene expression levels of PARP-1 were inversely correlated with the aortic valve area (AVA) (r = -0.46, P = 0.0469) and AVA indexed for body surface area (BSA) (r = -0.498; P = 0.0298) only in tricuspid aortic valves

  11. Overexpression of the Jatropha curcas JcERF1 gene coding an AP2/ERF-type transcription factor increases tolerance to salt in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Yu, Chuan; Yan, Jun; Wang, Xuehua; Chen, Fang; Zhao, Yun; Wei, Wei

    2014-11-01

    The JcERF1 gene, which is related to the ERF family (ethylene responsive factor coding genes), was isolated and characterized from the oil tree Jatropha curcas. The JcERF1 protein contains conserved an AP2/EREBP DNA-binding domain of 58 amino acid residues. The JcERF1 gene could be induced by abscisic acid, high salinity, hormones, and osmotic stress, suggesting that JcERF1 is regulated by certain components of the stress-signaling pathway. The full-length and C-terminus of JcERF1 driven by the GAL4 promoter functioned effectively as a transactivator in yeast, while its N-terminus was completely inactive. Transient expression analysis using a JcERF1-mGFP fusion gene in onion epidermal cells revealed that the JcERF1 protein is targeted to the nucleus. Transgenic tobacco plants carrying CaMV35S::JcERF1 fragments were shown to be much more salt tolerant compared to wild-type plants. Our results indicate that JcERF1 is a new member of the ERF transcription factors family that may play an important role in tolerance to environmental stress. PMID:25540008

  12. Knockdown of the T-box transcription factor Brachyury increases sensitivity of adenoid cystic carcinoma cells to chemotherapy and radiation in vitro: Implications for a new therapeutic principle

    PubMed Central

    KOBAYASHI, YOSUKE; SUGIURA, TSUYOSHI; IMAJYO, IKUMI; SHIMODA, MIYUKI; ISHII, KOTARO; AKIMOTO, NAONARI; YOSHIHAMA, NAOYA; MORI, YOSHIHIDE

    2014-01-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (AdCC) is highly metastatic and resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, we reported that the T-box transcription factor Brachyury is a potential regulator of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Specifically, growth of CSCs was found to be controlled by Brachyury knockdown in AdCC. Since CSCs are resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, this finding provides a new principle for therapies targeting CSCs. In the present study, we established that Brachyury knockdown suppresses chemoresistance and radioresistance in vitro. Brachyury was knocked down by transfecting Brachyury short hairpin RNA (shRNA) into the AdCC CSC cell line ACCS-M GFP. Brachyury knockdown significantly inhibited cell migration and invasion and suppressed chemoresistance. A quantitative PCR array of drug transporter genes revealed that knockdown of Brachyury caused downregulation of ATP-binding cassette transporter genes. Furthermore, ACCS-M GFP radioresistance was significantly suppressed by Brachyury knockdown. Knockdown of Brachyury significantly sensitized ACCS-M GFP cells to chemoradiotherapy. This study demonstrates that Brachyury knockdown reduces invasiveness and chemoresistance and radioresistance of CSCs in vivo. Therefore, Brachyury knockdown may be a useful therapeutic tool for sensitizing CSCs to conventional chemoradiotherapy. PMID:24504414

  13. Inactivation of the ampDE Operon Increases Transcription of algD and Affects Morphology and Encystment of Azotobacter vinelandii

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, Cinthia; Moreno, Soledad; Cárdenas, Luis; Soberón-Chávez, Gloria; Espín, Guadalupe

    2000-01-01

    Transcription of algD, encoding GDP-mannose dehydrogenase, the key enzyme in the alginate biosynthetic pathway, is highly regulated in Azotobacter vinelandii. We describe here the characterization of a Tn5 insertion mutant (AC28) which shows a higher level of expression of an algD::lacZ fusion. AC28 cells were morphologically abnormal and unable to encyst. The cloning and nucleotide sequencing of the Tn5-disrupted locus in AC28 revealed an operon homologous to the Escherichia coli ampDE operon. Tn5 was located within the ampD gene, encoding a cytosolic N-acetyl-anhydromuramyl-l-alanine amidase that participates in the intracellular recycling of peptidoglycan fragments. The ampE gene encodes a transmembrane protein, but the function of the protein is not known. We constructed strains carrying ampD or ampE mutations and one with an ampDE deletion. The strain with a deletion of the ampDE operon showed a phenotype similar to that of mutant AC28. The present work demonstrates that both alginate production and bacterial encystment are greatly influenced by the bacterial ability to recycle its cell wall. PMID:10940024

  14. Dexamethasone transcriptionally increases the expression of the pregnane X receptor and synergistically enhances pyrethroid esfenvalerate in the induction of cytochrome P450 3A23.

    PubMed

    Shi, Deshi; Yang, Dongfang; Yan, Bingfang

    2010-10-15

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) is recognized as a key regulator for the induction of a large number of genes in drug metabolism and transport. The transactivation of PXR is enhanced by the glucocorticoid dexamethasone and the enhancement is linked to the induction of PXR in humans and rats. The present study was undertaken to determine the mechanism for the induction and ascertain the synergistic effect on the expression of CYP3A23, a rat PXR target. In primary hepatocytes, significant induction of PXR was detected as early as 2h after the treatment and the maximal induction occurred at 1 microM dexamethasone. Similar induction kinetics was observed in the hepatoma line H4-II-E-C3. The induction was abolished by actinomycin D and dexamethasone efficaciously stimulated the rat PXR promoter. In addition, dexamethasone synergized esfenvalerate (an insecticide and a PXR activator) in inducing CYP3A23 and stimulating the CYP3A23 promoter. The full promoter of CYP3A23 (-1445/+74) was activated in a similar pattern as the changes in PXR mRNA in response to dexamethasone, esfenvalerate and co-treatment. In contrast, different responding patterns were detected on the stimulation of the CYP3A23 proximal promoter. Synergistic stimulation was also observed on the CYP3A4-DP-Luc reporter, the human counterpart of CYP3A23. These findings establish that transactivation is responsible for the induction of rat PXR and the induction presents potential interactions with insecticides in a species-conserved manner. The different responding patterns among CYP3A23 reporters point to an involvement of multiple transcriptional events in the regulation of CYP3A23 expression by dexamethasone, esfenvalerate and both. PMID:20599767

  15. Adiponectin promotes hyaluronan synthesis along with increases in hyaluronan synthase 2 transcripts through an AMP-activated protein kinase/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha}-dependent pathway in human dermal fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Yamane, Takumi; Kobayashi-Hattori, Kazuo; Oishi, Yuichi

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adiponectin promotes hyaluronan synthesis along with an increase in HAS2 transcripts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adiponectin also increases the phosphorylation of AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A pharmacological activator of AMPK increases mRNA levels of PPAR{alpha} and HAS2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adiponectin-induced HAS2 mRNA expression is blocked by a PPAR{alpha} antagonist. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adiponectin promotes hyaluronan synthesis via an AMPK/PPAR{alpha}-dependent pathway. -- Abstract: Although adipocytokines affect the functions of skin, little information is available on the effect of adiponectin on the skin. In this study, we investigated the effect of adiponectin on hyaluronan synthesis and its regulatory mechanisms in human dermal fibroblasts. Adiponectin promoted hyaluronan synthesis along with an increase in the mRNA levels of hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2), which plays a primary role in hyaluronan synthesis. Adiponectin also increased the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). A pharmacological activator of AMPK, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1{beta}-ribofuranoside (AICAR), increased mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}), which enhances the expression of HAS2 mRNA. In addition, AICAR increased the mRNA levels of HAS2. Adiponectin-induced HAS2 mRNA expression was blocked by GW6471, a PPAR{alpha} antagonist, in a concentration-dependent manner. These results show that adiponectin promotes hyaluronan synthesis along with increases in HAS2 transcripts through an AMPK/PPAR{alpha}-dependent pathway in human dermal fibroblasts. Thus, our study suggests that adiponectin may be beneficial for retaining moisture in the skin, anti-inflammatory activity, and the treatment of a variety of cutaneous diseases.

  16. Benzimidazoles diminish ERE transcriptional activity and cell growth in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Payton-Stewart, Florastina; Tilghman, Syreeta L.; Williams, LaKeisha G.; Winfield, Leyte L.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. They regulate the transcription of estrogen-responsive genes and mediate numerous estrogen related diseases (i.e., fertility, osteoporosis, cancer, etc.). As such, ERs are potentially useful targets for developing therapies and diagnostic tools for hormonally responsive human breast cancers. In this work, two benzimidazole-based sulphonamides originally designed to reduce proliferation in prostate cancer, have been evaluated for their ability to modulate growth in estrogen dependent and independent cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB 231) using cell viability assays. The molecules reduced growth in MCF-7 cells, but differed in their impact on the growth of MDA-MB 231 cells. Although both molecules reduced estrogen response element (ERE) transcriptional activity in a dose dependent manner, the contrasting activity in the MDA-MB-231 cells seems to suggest that the molecules may act through alternate ER-mediated pathways. Further, the methyl analog showed modest selectivity for the ERβ receptor in an ER gene expression array panel. However, the napthyl analog diminished gene expression. The molecules were docked in the ligand binding domains of the ERα-antagonist and ERβ-agonist crystal structures to evaluate the potential of the molecules to interact with the receptors. The computational analysis complimented the results obtained in the assay of transcriptional activity and gene expression suggesting that the molecules upregulate ERβ activity while down regulating that of ERα. PMID:24997336

  17. Non-Lethal Heat Shock Increased Hsp70 and Immune Protein Transcripts but Not Vibrio Tolerance in the White-Leg Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Loc, Nguyen Hong; MacRae, Thomas H.; Musa, Najiah; Bin Abdullah, Muhd Danish Daniel; Abdul Wahid, Mohd. Effendy; Sung, Yeong Yik

    2013-01-01

    Non-lethal heat shock boosts bacterial and viral disease tolerance in shrimp, possibly due to increases in endogenous heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and/or immune proteins. To further understand the mechanisms protecting shrimp against infection, Hsp70 and the mRNAs encoding the immune-related proteins prophenoloxidase (proPO), peroxinectin, penaeidin, crustin and hemocyanin were studied in post-larvae of the white-leg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, following a non-lethal heat shock. As indicated by RT-qPCR, a 30 min abrupt heat shock increased Hsp70 mRNA in comparison to non-heated animals. Immunoprobing of western blots and quantification by ELISA revealed that Hsp70 production after heat shock was correlated with enhanced Hsp70 mRNA. proPO and hemocyanin mRNA levels were augmented, whereas peroxinectin and crustin mRNA levels were unchanged following non-lethal heat shock. Penaeidin mRNA was decreased by all heat shock treatments. Thirty min abrupt heat shock failed to improve survival of post-larvae in a standardized challenge test with Vibrio harveyi, indicating that under the conditions of this study, L. vannamei tolerance to Vibrio infection was influenced neither by Hsp70 accumulation nor the changes in the immune-related proteins, observations dissimilar to other shrimp species examined. PMID:24039886

  18. Vitex Agnus Castus Extract Improves Learning and Memory and Increases the Transcription of Estrogen Receptor α in Hippocampus of Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Allahtavakoli, Mohammad; Honari, Najmeh; Pourabolli, Iran; Kazemi Arababadi, Mohammad; Ghafarian, Hossein; Roohbakhsh, Ali; Esmaeili Nadimi, Ali; Shamsizadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Lower level of estrogen hormone is considered as an important factor for loss of learning and memory in postmenopausal women. Although estrogen replacement therapy is used for compensation, but long-term usage of estrogen is associated with a higher risk of hormone-dependent cancers. Phytoestrogens, due to fewer side effects, have been proposed to prevent menopause-related cognitive decline. Methods: 24 female Wistar rats weighing 180–220 g were used in this study. The animals were ovariectomized and randomly divided into four groups including, control and two groups which received 8 and 80 mg/kg Vitex agnus castus (VAC) ethanolic extract orally. The last groups were treated with 40 μg/kg of estradiol valerat. Step-through passive avoidance (STPA) test was used for the evaluation of learning and memory. The hippocampal estrogen receptor α (ERα) expression was measured using Real-Time PCR. Results: The results demonstrated that VAC extract or estradiol had better performance on step-through passive avoidance test than control group (all P<0.05). Moreover, administration of either estradiol or VAC extract increased the hippocampal mRNA level of ERα and prevented the decrease in uterine weight of ovariectomized rats. Discussion: Based on our data, VAC extract improves learning and memory in ovariectomized rats. The positive effect of VAC extract on learning and memory is possibly associated with an increase in ERα gene expression in the hippocampal formation. PMID:26904176

  19. Modulation of PKCδ signaling alters the shear stress-mediated increases in endothelial nitric oxide synthase transcription: role of STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Neetu; Kumar, Sanjiv; Wedgwood, Stephen; Black, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    We have previously shown that the regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in endothelial cells isolated from fetal lamb under static conditions is positively regulated by PKCδ. In this study, we explore the role of PKCδ in regulating shear-induced upregulation of eNOS. We found that shear caused a decrease in PKCδ activation. Modulation of PKCδ before shear with a dominant negative mutant of PKCδ (DN PKCδ) or bryostatin (a known PKCδ activator) demonstrated that PKCδ inhibition potentiates the shear-mediated increases in eNOS expression and activity, while PKCδ activation inhibited these events. To gain insight into the mechanism by which PKCδ inhibits shear-induced eNOS expression, we examined activation of STAT3, a known target for PKCδ phosphorylation. We found that shear decreased the phosphorylation of STAT3. Further the transfection of cells with DN PKCδ reduced, while PKCδ activation enhanced, STAT3 phosphorylation in the presence of shear. Transfection of cells with a dominant negative mutant of STAT3 enhanced eNOS promoter activity and nitric oxide production in response to shear. Finally, we found that mutating the STAT3 binding site sequence within the eNOS promoter increased promoter activity in response to shear and that this was no longer inhibited by bryostatin. In conclusion, shear decreases PKCδ activity and, subsequently, reduces STAT3 binding to the eNOS promoter. This signaling pathway plays a previously unidentified role in the regulation of eNOS expression by shear stress. PMID:19118090

  20. Divergent effects of oxidatively induced modification to the C8 of 2'-deoxyadenosine on transcription factor binding: 8,5'(S)-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine inhibits the binding of multiple sequence specific transcription factors, while 8-oxo-2'-deoxyadenosine increases binding of CREB and NF-kappa B to DNA.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Jessy; Brooks, Philip J

    2011-05-01

    DNA is exposed to endogenous and environmental factors that can form stable lesions. If not repaired, these lesions can lead to transcription/replication blocking or mutagenic bypass. Our previous work has focused on 8,5'-cyclopurine 2'-deoxyribonucleosides, a unique class of oxidatively induced DNA lesions that are specifically repaired by the NER pathway (see Brooks PJ [2008]: DNA Repair 7:1168-1179). Here we used EMSA to monitor the ability of sequence-specific transcription factors, HSF1, CREB, and NF-kappaB and "architectural" transcription factor, HMGA, to bind to their target sequences when 8, 5'(S)-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine (cyclo-dAdo) is present within their recognition sequences. For comparison, we also tested the effect of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyadenosine (8-oxo-dAdo) in the same recognition sequences. The presence of a cyclo-dAdo lesion in the target sequence essentially eliminated the binding activity of HSF1, CREB, and NF-kappa B whereas HMGA retained some of its binding activity. In contrast, 8-oxo-dAdo had no obvious effect on the binding activity of HSF1 and HMGA in comparison to lesion-free DNA. Notably, though, CREB and NFκB binding increased when an 8-oxo-dAdo lesion was present in their target sequence. Competition EMSA showed about 2-3-fold increased affinity of both proteins for the 8-oxo-dAdo containing target sequence compared to lesion-free DNA. Molecular modeling of the lesions in the NF-kappaB sequence indicated that 8-oxo-dAdo may form an additional hydrogen bond with the protein, thereby strengthening the binding of NF-kappa B to its DNA target. The cyclo-dAdo lesion, in contrast, distorted the DNA structure, providing an explanation for the inhibition of NF-kappaB binding. PMID:20872830

  1. Increased Stability and DNA Site Discrimination of Single Chain Variants of the Dimeric beta-Barrel DNA Binding Domain of the Human Papillomavirus E2 Transcriptional Regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Dellarole,M.; Sanchez, I.; Freire, E.; de Prat-Gay, G.

    2007-01-01

    Human papillomavirus infects millions of people worldwide and is a causal agent of cervical cancer in women. The HPV E2 protein controls the expression of all viral genes through binding of its dimeric C-terminal domain (E2C) to its target DNA site. We engineered monomeric versions of the HPV16 E2C, in order to probe the link of the dimeric {beta}-barrel fold to stability, dimerization, and DNA binding. Two single-chain variants, with 6 and 12 residue linkers (scE2C-6 and scE2C-12), were purified and characterized. Spectroscopy and crystallography show that the native structure is unperturbed in scE2C-12. The single chain variants are stabilized with respect to E2C, with effective concentrations of 0.6 to 6 mM. The early folding events of the E2C dimer and scE2C-12 are very similar and include formation of a compact species in the submillisecond time scale and a non-native monomeric intermediate with a half-life of 25 ms. However, monomerization changes the unfolding mechanism of the linked species from two-state to three-state, with a high-energy intermediate. Binding to the specific target site is up to 5-fold tighter in the single chain variants. Nonspecific DNA binding is up to 7-fold weaker in the single chain variants, leading to an overall 10-fold increased site discrimination capacity, the largest described so far for linked DNA binding domains. Titration calorimetric binding analysis, however, shows almost identical behavior for dimer and single-chain species, suggesting very subtle changes behind the increased specificity. Global analysis of the mechanisms probed suggests that the dynamics of the E2C domain, rather than the structure, are responsible for the differential properties. Thus, the plastic and dimeric nature of the domain did not evolve for a maximum affinity, specificity, and stability of the quaternary structure, likely because of regulatory reasons and for roles other than DNA binding played by partly folded dimeric or monomeric conformers.

  2. High tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected pregnant mice and increased TNF-alpha gene transcription in their offspring.

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, M T; Marques de Araujo, S; Lucas, R; Deman, J; Truyens, C; Defresne, M P; de Baetselier, P; Carlier, Y

    1995-01-01

    Since tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is known to be involved in the feto-maternal relationship, this cytokine was studied in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected pregnant BALB/c mice and their fetuses and offspring. Pregnant chronically infected mice displayed significantly higher levels of circulating TNF-alpha than animals either only infected or only pregnant. TNF-alpha was undetectable in sera of uninfected and nonpregnant mice as well as in breast milk obtained from infected and uninfected animals. Fetuses from infected mice exhibited significantly more cells containing TNF-alpha mRNA in their thymus than fetuses from uninfected mothers. When infected 2 months after birth, offspring born to infected and uninfected mothers displayed similar amounts of circulating TNF-alpha during chronic infection, whereas this cytokine was only weakly detectable during the acute phase of the disease. An intravenous injection of lipopolysaccharide during acute infection strongly increased the production of TNF-alpha in offspring born to infected mothers to levels higher than those in progeny from uninfected mice. These results suggest that TNF-alpha is an important cytokine in the feto-maternal relationship during T. cruzi infection and that fetuses and offspring of infected mothers are primed to produce elevated levels of TNF-alpha. PMID:7822027

  3. Transcript levels of the soluble sperm factor protein phospholipase C zeta 1 (PLCζ1) increase through induced spermatogenesis in European eel.

    PubMed

    Morini, Marina; Peñaranda, David S; Vílchez, María C; Gallego, Víctor; Nourizadeh-Lillabadi, Rasoul; Asturiano, Juan F; Weltzien, Finn-Arne; Pérez, Luz

    2015-09-01

    Activation at fertilization of the vertebrate egg is triggered by Ca(2+) waves. Recent studies suggest the phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ), a sperm-specific protein, triggers egg activation by an IP3-mediated Ca(2+) release and allow Ca(2+) waves at fertilization. In the present study we cloned, characterized, and phylogenetically positioned the European eel PLCζ (PLCζ1). It is 1521 bp long, with 10 exons encoding an open reading frame of 506 amino acids. The amino acid sequence contains an EF-hand domain, X and Y catalytic domains, and a carboxy-terminal C2 domain, all typical of other PLCζ orthologous. The tissue distribution was studied, and the gene expression was determined in testis during induced sexual maturation at three different thermal regimes. Also, brain and pituitary expression was studied through sex maturation at constant temperature. plcζ1 was expressed in brain of male and female, in testis but not in ovaries. By first time in vertebrates, it is reported plcζ1 expression in the pituitary gland. Testis plcζ1 expression increased through spermatogenesis under all the thermal regimes, but being significantly elevated at lower temperatures. It was very low when testis contained only spermatogonia or spermatocytes, while maximum expression was found during spermiogenesis. These results support the hypothesis for an eel sperm-specific PLCζ1 inducing egg activation, similarly to mammals and some teleosts, but different from some other teleost species, which express this protein in ovaries, but not in testes. PMID:26051612

  4. Cadmium, cobalt and lead cause stress response, cell cycle deregulation and increased steroid as well as xenobiotic metabolism in primary normal human bronchial epithelial cells which is coordinated by at least nine transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Glahn, Felix; Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Zellmer, Sebastian; Guthke, Reinhard; Wiese, Jan; Golka, Klaus; Hergenröder, Roland; Degen, Gisela H; Lehmann, Thomas; Hermes, Matthias; Schormann, Wiebke; Brulport, Marc; Bauer, Alexander; Bedawy, Essam; Gebhardt, Rolf; Hengstler, Jan G; Foth, Heidi

    2008-08-01

    Workers occupationally exposed to cadmium, cobalt and lead have been reported to have increased levels of DNA damage. To analyze whether in vivo relevant concentrations of heavy metals cause systematic alterations in RNA expression patterns, we performed a gene array study using primary normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Cells were incubated with 15 microg/l Cd(II), 25 microg/l Co(II) and 550 microg/l Pb(II) either with individual substances or in combination. Differentially expressed genes were filtered out and used to identify enriched GO categories as well as KEGG pathways and to identify transcription factors whose binding sites are enriched in a given set of promoters. Interestingly, combined exposure to Cd(II), Co(II) and Pb(II) caused a coordinated response of at least seven stress response-related transcription factors, namely Oct-1, HIC1, TGIF, CREB, ATF4, SRF and YY1. A stress response was further corroborated by up regulation of genes involved in glutathione metabolism. A second major response to heavy metal exposure was deregulation of the cell cycle as evidenced by down regulation of the transcription factors ELK-1 and the Ets transcription factor GABP, as well as deregulation of genes involved in purine and pyrimidine metabolism. A third and surprising response was up regulation of genes involved in steroid metabolism, whereby promoter analysis identified up regulation of SRY that is known to play a role in sex determination. A forth response was up regulation of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes, particularly of dihydrodiol dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (AKR1C1, AKR1C2). Incubations with individual heavy metals showed that the response of AKR1C1 and AKR1C2 was predominantly caused by lead. In conclusion, we have shown that in vivo relevant concentrations of Cd(II), Co(II) and Pb(II) cause a complex and coordinated response in normal human bronchial epithelial cells. This study gives an overview of the most responsive genes. PMID:18654764

  5. Severe psychosocial deprivation in early childhood is associated with increased DNA methylation across a region spanning the transcription start site of CYP2E1.

    PubMed

    Kumsta, R; Marzi, S J; Viana, J; Dempster, E L; Crawford, B; Rutter, M; Mill, J; Sonuga-Barke, E J S

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to adverse rearing environments including institutional deprivation and severe childhood abuse is associated with an increased risk for mental and physical health problems across the lifespan. Although the mechanisms mediating these effects are not known, recent work in rodent models suggests that epigenetic processes may be involved. We studied the impact of severe early-life adversity on epigenetic variation in a sample of adolescents adopted from the severely depriving orphanages of the Romanian communist era in the 1980s. We quantified buccal cell DNA methylation at ~400 000 sites across the genome in Romanian adoptees exposed to either extended (6-43 months; n=16) or limited duration (<6 months; n=17) of severe early-life deprivation, in addition to a matched sample of UK adoptees (n=16) not exposed to severe deprivation. Although no probe-wise differences remained significant after controlling for the number of probes tested, we identified an exposure-associated differentially methylated region (DMR) spanning nine sequential CpG sites in the promoter-regulatory region of the cytochrome P450 2E1 gene (CYP2E1) on chromosome 10 (corrected P=2.98 × 10(-5)). Elevated DNA methylation across this region was also associated with deprivation-related clinical markers of impaired social cognition. Our data suggest that environmental insults of sufficient biological impact during early development are associated with long-lasting epigenetic changes, potentially reflecting a biological mechanism linking the effects of early-life adversity to cognitive and neurobiological phenotypes. PMID:27271856

  6. Severe psychosocial deprivation in early childhood is associated with increased DNA methylation across a region spanning the transcription start site of CYP2E1

    PubMed Central

    Kumsta, R; Marzi, S J; Viana, J; Dempster, E L; Crawford, B; Rutter, M; Mill, J; Sonuga-Barke, E J S

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to adverse rearing environments including institutional deprivation and severe childhood abuse is associated with an increased risk for mental and physical health problems across the lifespan. Although the mechanisms mediating these effects are not known, recent work in rodent models suggests that epigenetic processes may be involved. We studied the impact of severe early-life adversity on epigenetic variation in a sample of adolescents adopted from the severely depriving orphanages of the Romanian communist era in the 1980s. We quantified buccal cell DNA methylation at ~400 000 sites across the genome in Romanian adoptees exposed to either extended (6–43 months; n=16) or limited duration (<6 months; n=17) of severe early-life deprivation, in addition to a matched sample of UK adoptees (n=16) not exposed to severe deprivation. Although no probe-wise differences remained significant after controlling for the number of probes tested, we identified an exposure-associated differentially methylated region (DMR) spanning nine sequential CpG sites in the promoter-regulatory region of the cytochrome P450 2E1 gene (CYP2E1) on chromosome 10 (corrected P=2.98 × 10−5). Elevated DNA methylation across this region was also associated with deprivation-related clinical markers of impaired social cognition. Our data suggest that environmental insults of sufficient biological impact during early development are associated with long-lasting epigenetic changes, potentially reflecting a biological mechanism linking the effects of early-life adversity to cognitive and neurobiological phenotypes. PMID:27271856

  7. Estrogen Signaling Multiple Pathways to Impact Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Maria; Galluzzo, Paola; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    Steroid hormones exert profound effects on cell growth, development, differentiation, and homeostasis. Their effects are mediated through specific intracellular steroid receptors that act via multiple mechanisms. Among others, the action mechanism starting upon 17β-estradiol (E2) binds to its receptors (ER) is considered a paradigmatic example of how steroid hormones function. Ligand-activated ER dimerizes and translocates in the nucleus where it recognizes specific hormone response elements located in or near promoter DNA regions of target genes. Behind the classical genomic mechanism shared with other steroid hormones, E2 also modulates gene expression by a second indirect mechanism that involves the interaction of ER with other transcription factors which, in turn, bind their cognate DNA elements. In this case, ER modulates the activities of transcription factors such as the activator protein (AP)-1, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and stimulating protein-1 (Sp-1), by stabilizing DNA-protein complexes and/or recruiting co-activators. In addition, E2 binding to ER may also exert rapid actions that start with the activation of a variety of signal transduction pathways (e.g. ERK/MAPK, p38/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC/PKC). The debate about the contribution of different ER-mediated signaling pathways to coordinate the expression of specific sets of genes is still open. This review will focus on the recent knowledge about the mechanism by which ERs regulate the expression of target genes and the emerging field of integration of membrane and nuclear receptor signaling, giving examples of the ways by which the genomic and non-genomic actions of ERs on target genes converge. PMID:18369406

  8. Increased neurovirulence and reactivation of the herpes simplex virus type 1 latency-associated transcript (LAT)-negative mutant dLAT2903 with a disrupted LAT miR-H2.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xianzhi; Brown, Don; Osorio, Nelson; Hsiang, Chinhui; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Wechsler, Steven L

    2016-02-01

    At least six microRNAs (miRNAs) appear to be encoded by the latency-associated transcript (LAT) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). The gene for ICP0, an important immediate early (IE) viral protein, is anti-sense to, and overlaps with, the region of LAT from which miRNA H2 (miR-H2) is derived. We recently reported that a mutant (McK-ΔH2) disrupted for miR-H2 on the wild-type HSV-1 strain McKrae genomic background has increased ICP0 expression, increased neurovirulence, and slightly more rapid reactivation. We report here that HSV-1 mutants deleted for the LAT promoter nonetheless make significant amounts of miR-H2 during lytic tissue culture infection, presumably via readthrough transcription from an upstream promoter. To determine if miR-H2 might also play a role in the HSV-1 latency/reactivation cycle of a LAT-negative mutant, we constructed dLAT-ΔH2, in which miR-H2 is disrupted in dLAT2903 without altering the predicted amino acid sequence of the overlapping ICP0 open reading frame. Similar to McK-ΔH2, dLAT-ΔH2 expressed more ICP0, was more neurovirulent, and had increased reactivation in the mouse TG explant-induced reactivation model of HSV-1 compared with its parental virus. Interestingly, although the increased reactivation of McK-ΔH2 compared with its parental wild-type (wt) virus was subtle and only detected at very early times after explant TG induced reactivation, the increased reactivation of dLAT-ΔH2 compared with its dLAT2903 parental virus appeared more robust and was significantly increased even at late times after induction. These results confirm that miR-H2 plays a role in modulating the HSV-1 reactivation phenotype. PMID:26069184

  9. Methyl protodioscin increases ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux while inhibiting gene expressions for synthesis of cholesterol and triglycerides by suppressing SREBP transcription and microRNA 33a/b levels.

    PubMed

    Ma, Weilie; Ding, Hang; Gong, Xiaohua; Liu, Zhen; Lin, Yalin; Zhang, Zhizhen; Lin, Guorong

    2015-04-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) regulate homeostasis of LDL, HDL and triglycerides. This study was aimed to determine if inhibition of SREBPs by methyl protodioscin (MPD) regulates downstream gene and protein expressions of lipid metabolisms. In THP-1 macrophages, MPD increases levels of ABCA1 mRNA and protein in dose- and time-dependent manners, and apoA-1-mediated cholesterol efflux. The underlying mechanisms for the effects is that MPD inhibits the transcription of SREBP1c and SREBP2, and decreases levels of microRNA 33a/b hosted in the introns of SREBPs, which leads to reciprocally increase ABCA1 levels. In HepG2 cells, MPD shows the same effects as these observed in THP-1 macrophages. MPD also decreases the gene expressions of HMGCR, FAS and ACC for cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis. MPD further promotes LDL receptor through reducing the PCSK9 level. Collectively, the study demonstrates that MPD potentially increase HDL cholesterol while reducing LDL cholesterol and triglycerides. PMID:25733328

  10. Silencing the Menkes Copper-Transporting ATPase (Atp7a) Gene in Rat Intestinal Epithelial (IEC-6) Cells Increases Iron Flux via Transcriptional Induction of Ferroportin 1 (Fpn1)123

    PubMed Central

    Gulec, Sukru; Collins, James F.

    2014-01-01

    The Menkes copper-transporting ATPase (Atp7a) gene is induced in rat duodenum during iron deficiency, consistent with copper accumulation in the intestinal mucosa and liver. To test the hypothesis that ATP7A influences intestinal iron metabolism, the Atp7a gene was silenced in rat intestinal epithelial (IEC-6) cells using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) technology. Perturbations in intracellular copper homeostasis were noted in knockdown cells, consistent with the dual roles of ATP7A in pumping copper into the trans-Golgi (for cuproenzyme synthesis) and exporting copper from cells. Intracellular iron concentrations were unaffected by Atp7a knockdown. Unexpectedly, however, vectorial iron (59Fe) transport increased (∼33%) in knockdown cells grown in bicameral inserts and increased further (∼70%) by iron deprivation (compared with negative control shRNA-transfected cells). Additional experiments were designed to elucidate the molecular mechanism of increased transepithelial iron flux. Enhanced iron uptake by knockdown cells was associated with increased expression of a ferrireductase (duodenal cytochrome b) and activity of a cell-surface ferrireductase. Increased iron efflux from knockdown cells was likely mediated via transcriptional activation of the ferroportin 1 gene (by an unknown mechanism). Moreover, Atp7a knockdown significantly attenuated expression of an iron oxidase [hephaestin (HEPH); by ∼80%] and membrane ferroxidase activity (by ∼50%). Cytosolic ferroxidase activity, however, was retained in knockdown cells (75% of control cells), perhaps compensating for diminished HEPH activity. This investigation has thus documented alterations in iron homeostasis associated with Atp7a knockdown in enterocyte-like cells. Alterations in copper transport, trafficking, or distribution may underlie the increase in transepithelial iron flux noted when ATP7A activity is diminished. PMID:24174620

  11. A Novel R2R3-MYB Transcription Factor BpMYB106 of Birch (Betula platyphylla) Confers Increased Photosynthesis and Growth Rate through Up-regulating Photosynthetic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chenguang; Li, Chenghao

    2016-01-01

    We isolated a R2R3-MYB transcription factor BpMYB106, which regulates photosynthesis in birch (Betula platyphylla Suk.). BpMYB106 mainly expresses in the leaf and shoot tip of birch, and its protein is localized in the nucleus. We further fused isolated a 1588 bp promoter of BpMYB106 and analyzed it by PLACE, which showed some cis-acting elements related to photosynthesis. BpMYB106 promoter β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter fusion studies gene, the result, showed the GUS reporter gene in transgenic birch with BpMYB106 promoter showed strong activities in shoot tip, cotyledon margins, and mature leaf trichomes. The overexpression of BpMYB106 in birch resulted in significantly increased trichome density, net photosynthetic rate, and growth rate as compared with the wild-type birch. RNA-Seq profiling revealed the upregulation of several photosynthesis-related genes in the photosynthesis and oxidative phosphorylation pathways in the leaves of transgenic plants. Yeast one-hybrid analysis, coupled with transient assay in tobacco, revealed that BpMYB106 binds a MYB binding site MYB2 in differentially expressed gene promoters. Thus, BpMYB106 may directly activate the expression of a range of photosynthesis related genes through interacting with the MYB2 element in their promoters. Our study demonstrating the overexpression of BpMYB106—a R2R3-MYB transcription factor—upregulates the genes of the photosynthesis and oxidative phosphorylation pathways to improve photosynthesis. PMID:27047502

  12. Transcriptional regulatory factor X6 (Rfx6) increases gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) expression in enteroendocrine K-cells and is involved in GIP hypersecretion in high fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kazuyo; Harada, Norio; Yamane, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Sasaki, Kazuki; Nasteska, Daniela; Joo, Erina; Shibue, Kimitaka; Harada, Takanari; Hamasaki, Akihiro; Toyoda, Kentaro; Nagashima, Kazuaki; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2013-01-18

    Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is an incretin released from enteroendocrine K-cells in response to nutrient ingestion. GIP potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and induces energy accumulation into adipose tissue, resulting in obesity. Plasma GIP levels are reported to be increased in the obese state. However, the molecular mechanisms of GIP secretion and high fat diet (HFD)-induced GIP hypersecretion remain unclear, primarily due to difficulties in separating K-cells from other intestinal epithelial cells in vivo. In this study, GIP-GFP knock-in mice that enable us to visualize K-cells by enhanced GFP were established. Microarray analysis of isolated K-cells from these mice revealed that transcriptional regulatory factor X6 (Rfx6) is expressed exclusively in K-cells. In vitro experiments using the mouse intestinal cell line STC-1 showed that knockdown of Rfx6 decreased mRNA expression, cellular content, and secretion of GIP. Rfx6 bound to the region in the gip promoter that regulates gip promoter activity, and overexpression of Rfx6 increased GIP mRNA expression. HFD induced obesity and GIP hypersecretion in GIP-GFP heterozygous mice in vivo. Immunohistochemical and flow cytometry analysis showed no significant difference in K-cell number between control fat diet-fed (CFD) and HFD-fed mice. However, GIP content in the upper small intestine and GIP mRNA expression in K-cells were significantly increased in HFD-fed mice compared with those in CFD-fed mice. Furthermore, expression levels of Rfx6 mRNA were increased in K-cells of HFD-fed mice. These results suggest that Rfx6 increases GIP expression and content in K-cells and is involved in GIP hypersecretion in HFD-induced obesity. PMID:23192339

  13. Electronic Transcripts: Past, Present, and Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Sarah; Hannah, Andrew; Stones, Dave; Morley, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Electronic transcripts are no longer a concept awaiting definition. They are here to stay. Although paper transcripts remain the standard--at least in terms of volume--an ever-increasing number and eventual majority of students and alumni will expect if not require electronic transcripts. College registrars and admissions officers' obligation to…

  14. The nuclear retention of transcription factor FOXO3a correlates with a DNA damage response and increased glutamine synthetase expression by astrocytes suggesting a neuroprotective role in the ageing brain

    PubMed Central

    Fluteau, Adeline; Ince, Paul G.; Minett, Thais; Matthews, Fiona E.; Brayne, Carol; Garwood, Claire J.; Ratcliffe, Laura E.; Morgan, Sarah; Heath, Paul R.; Shaw, Pamela J.; Wharton, Stephen B.; Simpson, Julie E.

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of reactive oxygen species leading to oxidative damage and cell death plays an important role in a number of neurodegenerative disorders. FOXO3a, the main isoform of FOXO transcription factors, mediates the cellular response to oxidative stress by regulating the expression of genes involved in DNA repair and glutamine metabolism, including glutamine synthetase (GS). Immunohistochemical investigation of the population-based neuropathology cohort of the Medical Research Council’s Cognitive Function and Ageing Study (MRC CFAS) demonstrates that nuclear retention of FOXO3a significantly correlates with a DNA damage response and with GS expression by astrocytes. Furthermore, we show that GS expression correlates with increasing Alzheimer-type pathology in this ageing cohort. Our findings suggest that in response to oxidative stress, the nuclear retention of FOXO3a in astrocytes upregulates expression of GS as a neuroprotective mechanism. However, the activity of GS may be compromised by increasing levels of oxidative stress in the ageing brain resulting in dysfunctional enzyme activity, neuronal excitotoxic damage and cognitive impairment. PMID:26455863

  15. Expression Pattern of Transcription Factors and Intracellular Cytokines Reveals That Clinically Cured Tuberculosis Is Accompanied by an Increase in Mycobacterium-Specific Th1, Th2, and Th17 Cells

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Marcos V.; Massaro Junior, Vladimir J.; Machado, Juliana R.; Silva, Djalma A. A.; Castellano, Lúcio R.; Alexandre, Patricia B. D.; Rodrigues, Denise B. R.; Rodrigues, Virmondes

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global health problem and is the second biggest cause of death by infectious disease worldwide. Here, we investigate in vitro the Th1, Th2, Th17, and Treg cytokines and transcriptional factors produced after Mycobacterium-specific antigen stimulation in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis, clinically cured pulmonary tuberculosis, and healthy donors with a positive tuberculin skin test (TST+). Together, our data indicate that clinical cure after treatment increases the percentages of Mycobacterium-specific Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells compared with those found in active-TB and TST+ healthy donors. These results show that the host-parasite equilibrium in latent TB breaks in favor of the microorganism and that the subsequent clinical recovery posttreatment does not return the percentage levels of such cells to those observed in latent tuberculosis. Additionally, our results indicate that rather than showing an increase in the percentage of Mycobacterium-specific Tregs, active-TB patients display lower Th1 : Treg and Th17 : Treg ratios. These data, together with lower Th1 : Th2 and Th17 : Th2 ratios, may indicate a mechanism by which the breakdown of the host-parasite equilibrium leads to active-TB and changes in the repertoire of Mycobacterium-specific Th cells that are associated with clinical cure after treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:26000298

  16. TBX21-1993T/C (rs4794067) polymorphism is associated with increased risk of chronic periodontitis and increased T-bet expression in periodontal lesions, but does not significantly impact the IFN-g transcriptional level or the pattern of periodontophatic bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Cavalla, Franco; Biguetti, Claudia Cristina; Colavite, Priscila Maria; Silveira, Elcia Varise; Martins, Walter; Letra, Ariadne; Trombone, Ana Paula Favaro; Silva, Renato Menezes; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier

    2015-01-01

    Th1-polarized host response, mediated by IFN-γ, has been associated with increased severity of periodontal disease as well as control of periodontal infection. The functional polymorphism TBX21-1993T/C (rs4794067) increases the transcriptional activity of the TBX21 gene (essential for Th1 polarization) resulting in a predisposition to a Th-1 biased immune response. Thus, we conducted a case-control study, including a population of healthy controls (H, n = 218), chronic periodontitis (CP, n = 197), and chronic gingivitis patients (CG, n = 193), to investigate if genetic variations in TBX21 could impact the development of Th1 responses, and consequently influence the pattern of bacterial infection and periodontitis outcome. We observed that the polymorphic allele T was significantly enriched in the CP patients compared to CG subjects, while the H controls demonstrated and intermediate genotype. Also, investigating the putative functionality TBX21-1993T/C in the modulation of local response, we observed that the transcripts levels of T-bet, but not of IFN-γ, were upregulated in homozygote and heterozygote polymorphic subjects. In addition, TBX21-1993T/C did not influence the pattern of bacterial infection or the clinical parameters of disease severity, being the presence/absence of red complex bacteria the main factor associated with the disease status and the subrogate variable probing depth (PD) in the logistic regression analysis. PMID:25832120

  17. A point mutation in the DNA-binding domain of HPV-2 E2 protein increases its DNA-binding capacity and reverses its transcriptional regulatory activity on the viral early promoter

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The human papillomavirus (HPV) E2 protein is a multifunctional DNA-binding protein. The transcriptional activity of HPV E2 is mediated by binding to its specific binding sites in the upstream regulatory region of the HPV genomes. Previously we reported a HPV-2 variant from a verrucae vulgaris patient with huge extensive clustered cutaneous, which have five point mutations in its E2 ORF, L118S, S235P, Y287H, S293R and A338V. Under the control of HPV-2 LCR, co-expression of the mutated HPV E2 induced an increased activity on the viral early promoter. In the present study, a series of mammalian expression plasmids encoding E2 proteins with one to five amino acid (aa) substitutions for these mutations were constructed and transfected into HeLa, C33A and SiHa cells. Results CAT expression assays indicated that the enhanced promoter activity was due to the co-expressions of the E2 constructs containing A338V mutation within the DNA-binding domain. Western blots analysis demonstrated that the transiently transfected E2 expressing plasmids, regardless of prototype or the A338V mutant, were continuously expressed in the cells. To study the effect of E2 mutations on its DNA-binding activity, a serial of recombinant E2 proteins with various lengths were expressed and purified. Electrophoresis mobility shift assays (EMSA) showed that the binding affinity of E2 protein with A338V mutation to both an artificial probe with two E2 binding sites or HPV-2 and HPV-16 promoter-proximal LCR sequences were significantly stronger than that of the HPV-2 prototype E2. Furthermore, co-expression of the construct containing A338V mutant exhibited increased activities on heterologous HPV-16 early promoter P97 than that of prototype E2. Conclusions These results suggest that the mutation from Ala to Val at aa 338 is critical for E2 DNA-binding and its transcriptional regulation. PMID:22333459

  18. A gain-of-function mutation in the transcription factor Upc2p causes upregulation of ergosterol biosynthesis genes and increased fluconazole resistance in a clinical Candida albicans isolate.

    PubMed

    Dunkel, Nico; Liu, Teresa T; Barker, Katherine S; Homayouni, Ramin; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Rogers, P David

    2008-07-01

    In the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans, the zinc cluster transcription factor Upc2p has been shown to regulate the expression of ERG11 and other genes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis upon exposure to azole antifungals. ERG11 encodes lanosterol demethylase, the target enzyme of this antifungal class. Overexpression of UPC2 reduces azole susceptibility, whereas its disruption results in hypersusceptibility to azoles and reduced accumulation of exogenous sterols. Overexpression of ERG11 leads to the increased production of lanosterol demethylase, which contributes to azole resistance in clinical isolates of C. albicans, but the mechanism for this has yet to be determined. Using genome-wide gene expression profiling, we found UPC2 and other genes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis to be coordinately upregulated with ERG11 in a fluconazole-resistant clinical isolate compared with a matched susceptible isolate from the same patient. Sequence analysis of the UPC2 alleles of these isolates revealed that the resistant isolate contained a single-nucleotide substitution in one UPC2 allele that resulted in a G648D exchange in the encoded protein. Introduction of the mutated allele into a drug-susceptible strain resulted in constitutive upregulation of ERG11 and increased resistance to fluconazole. By comparing the gene expression profiles of the fluconazole-resistant isolate and of strains carrying wild-type and mutated UPC2 alleles, we identified target genes that are controlled by Upc2p. Here we show for the first time that a gain-of-function mutation in UPC2 leads to the increased expression of ERG11 and imparts resistance to fluconazole in clinical isolates of C. albicans. PMID:18487346

  19. Benzimidazoles diminish ERE transcriptional activity and cell growth in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Payton-Stewart, Florastina; Tilghman, Syreeta L.; Williams, LaKeisha G.; Winfield, Leyte L.

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • The methyl-substituted benzimidazole was more effective at inhibiting growth in MDA-MB 231 cells. • The naphthyl-substituted benzimidazole was more effective at inhibiting growth in MCF-7 cells than ICI. • The benzimidazole molecules demonstrated a dose-dependent reduction in ERE transcriptional activity. • The benzimidazole molecules had binding mode in ERα and ERβ comparable to that of the co-crystallized ligand. - Abstract: Estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. They regulate the transcription of estrogen-responsive genes and mediate numerous estrogen related diseases (i.e., fertility, osteoporosis, cancer, etc.). As such, ERs are potentially useful targets for developing therapies and diagnostic tools for hormonally responsive human breast cancers. In this work, two benzimidazole-based sulfonamides originally designed to reduce proliferation in prostate cancer, have been evaluated for their ability to modulate growth in estrogen dependent and independent cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB 231) using cell viability assays. The molecules reduced growth in MCF-7 cells, but differed in their impact on the growth of MDA-MB 231 cells. Although both molecules reduced estrogen response element (ERE) transcriptional activity in a dose dependent manner, the contrasting activity in the MDA-MB-231 cells seems to suggest that the molecules may act through alternate ER-mediated pathways. Further, the methyl analog showed modest selectivity for the ERβ receptor in an ER gene expression array panel, while the naphthyl analog did not significantly alter gene expression. The molecules were docked in the ligand binding domains of the ERα-antagonist and ERβ-agonist crystal structures to evaluate the potential of the molecules to interact with the receptors. The computational analysis complimented the results obtained in the assay of transcriptional activity and gene expression suggesting that the molecules

  20. AthaMap, integrating transcriptional and post-transcriptional data

    PubMed Central

    Bülow, Lorenz; Engelmann, Stefan; Schindler, Martin; Hehl, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    The AthaMap database generates a map of predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) for the whole Arabidopsis thaliana genome. AthaMap has now been extended to include data on post-transcriptional regulation. A total of 403 173 genomic positions of small RNAs have been mapped in the A. thaliana genome. These identify 5772 putative post-transcriptionally regulated target genes. AthaMap tools have been modified to improve the identification of common TFBS in co-regulated genes by subtracting post-transcriptionally regulated genes from such analyses. Furthermore, AthaMap was updated to the TAIR7 genome annotation, a graphic display of gene analysis results was implemented, and the TFBS data content was increased. AthaMap is freely available at http://www.athamap.de/. PMID:18842622

  1. AthaMap, integrating transcriptional and post-transcriptional data.

    PubMed

    Bülow, Lorenz; Engelmann, Stefan; Schindler, Martin; Hehl, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    The AthaMap database generates a map of predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) for the whole Arabidopsis thaliana genome. AthaMap has now been extended to include data on post-transcriptional regulation. A total of 403,173 genomic positions of small RNAs have been mapped in the A. thaliana genome. These identify 5772 putative post-transcriptionally regulated target genes. AthaMap tools have been modified to improve the identification of common TFBS in co-regulated genes by subtracting post-transcriptionally regulated genes from such analyses. Furthermore, AthaMap was updated to the TAIR7 genome annotation, a graphic display of gene analysis results was implemented, and the TFBS data content was increased. AthaMap is freely available at http://www.athamap.de/. PMID:18842622

  2. Glyceollin I Enantiomers Distinctly Regulate ER-Mediated Gene Expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glyceollins (GLYs) are pterocarpan, phytoalexins elicited in high concentrations when soybeans are stressed. We have previously reported that the three most common glyceollin isomers (GLY I, II, and III) exhibit antiestrogenic properties, which may have significant biological effects following human...

  3. Folic acid supplementation increases survival and modulates high risk HPV-induced phenotypes in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells and correlates with p53 mRNA transcriptional down-regulation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the primary risk factors for developing oral cancers are well understood, less is known about the relationship among the secondary factors that may modulate the progression of oral cancers, such as high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and folic acid (FA) supplementation. This study examined high-risk HPV and FA supplementation effects, both singly and in combination, to modulate the proliferative phenotypes of the oral cancer cell lines CAL27, SCC25 and SCC15. Results Using a comprehensive series of integrated in vitro assays, distinct effects of HPV infection and FA supplementation were observed. Both high-risk HPV strains 16 and 18 induced robust growth-stimulating effects in CAL27 and normal HGF-1 cells, although strain-specific responses were observed in SCC25 and SCC15 cells. Differential effects were also observed with FA administration, which significantly altered the growth rate of the oral cancer cell lines CAL27, SCC15, and SCC25, but not HGF-1 cells. Unlike HPV, FA administration induced broad, general increases in cell viability among all cell lines that were associated with p53 mRNA transcriptional down-regulation. None of these cell lines were found to harbor the common C677T mutation in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), which can reduce FA availability and may increase oral cancer risk. Conclusion Increased FA utilization and DNA hypermethylation are common features of oral cancers, and in these cell lines, specifically. The results of this study provide further evidence that FA antimetabolites, such as Fluorouracil (f5U or 5-FU) and Raltitrexed, may be alternative therapies for tumors resistant to other therapies. Moreover, since the incidence of oral HPV infection has been increasing, and can influence oral cancer growth, the relationship between FA bioavailability and concomitant HPV infection must be elucidated. This study is among the first pre-clinical studies to evaluate FA- and HPV-induced effects in

  4. Effects of elongation delay in transcription dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Jin, Huiqin; Yang, Zhuoqin; Lei, Jinzhi

    2014-12-01

    In the transcription process, elongation delay is induced by the movement of RNA polymerases (RNAP) along the DNA sequence, and can result in changes in the transcription dynamics. This paper studies the transcription dynamics that involved the elongation delay and effects of cell division and DNA replication. The stochastic process of gene expression is modeled with delay chemical master equation with periodic coefficients, and is studied numerically through the stochastic simulation algorithm with delay. We show that the average transcription level approaches to a periodic dynamics over cell cycles at homeostasis, and the elongation delay can reduce the transcription level and increase the transcription noise. Moreover, the transcription elongation can induce bimodal distribution of mRNA levels that can be measured by the techniques of flow cytometry. PMID:25365608

  5. A Forum To Expand Advanced Placement Opportunities: Increasing Access and Improving Preparation in High Schools. Strategies To Overcome Challenges in Rural and Small Schools. Transcript of Proceedings (Washington, D.C., February 11, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    This transcript reproduces a Department of Education/College Board sponsored discussion on ways to expand advanced placement (AP) opportunities in high schools. The deliberations opened with a presentation by Phil Chavez, an assistant principal in San Antonio, Texas, who outlined the genesis and development of the AP program in his predominantly…

  6. Transcriptional profiling of Dictyostelium with RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Edward Roshan; Rot, Gregor; Toplak, Marko; Santhanam, Balaji; Curk, Tomaz; Shaulsky, Gad; Zupan, Blaz

    2014-01-01

    Summary Transcriptional profiling methods have been utilized in the analysis of various biological processes in Dictyostelium. Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing have increased the resolution and the dynamic range of transcriptional profiling. Here we describe the utility of RNA-sequencing with the Illumina technology for production of transcriptional profiles. We also describe methods for data mapping and storage as well as common and specialized tools for data analysis, both online and offline. PMID:23494306

  7. Transcription in archaea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyrpides, N. C.; Ouzounis, C. A.; Woese, C. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Using the sequences of all the known transcription-associated proteins from Bacteria and Eucarya (a total of 4,147), we have identified their homologous counterparts in the four complete archaeal genomes. Through extensive sequence comparisons, we establish the presence of 280 predicted transcription factors or transcription-associated proteins in the four archaeal genomes, of which 168 have homologs only in Bacteria, 51 have homologs only in Eucarya, and the remaining 61 have homologs in both phylogenetic domains. Although bacterial and eukaryotic transcription have very few factors in common, each exclusively shares a significantly greater number with the Archaea, especially the Bacteria. This last fact contrasts with the obvious close relationship between the archaeal and eukaryotic transcription mechanisms per se, and in particular, basic transcription initiation. We interpret these results to mean that the archaeal transcription system has retained more ancestral characteristics than have the transcription mechanisms in either of the other two domains.

  8. A Successful Automated Online Transcript System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnfather, Tony; Rosmanitz, Fred

    1981-01-01

    The academic transcript system at the University of Calgary, a successful application that combines online and batch processing to generate student transcripts, is described. In addition to improved service to students and alumni, the registrar's operating budget has been reduced and productivity has increased. (Author/MLW)

  9. Transcriptional activators in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic transcription activation domains (ADs) are not well defined on the proteome scale. We systematicallly tested ∼6000 yeast proteins for transcriptional activity using a yeast one-hybrid system and identified 451 transcriptional activators. We then determined their transcription activation strength using fusions to the Gal4 DNA-binding domain and a His3 reporter gene which contained a promoter with a Gal4-binding site. Among the 132 strongest activators 32 are known transcription factors while another 35 have no known function. Although zinc fingers, helix–loop–helix domains and several other domains are highly overrepresented among the activators, only few contain characterized ADs. We also found some striking correlations: the stronger the activation activity, the more acidic, glutamine-rich, proline-rich or asparagine-rich the activators were. About 29% of the activators have been found previously to specifically interact with the transcription machinery, while 10% are known to be components of transcription regulatory complexes. Based on their transcriptional activity, localization and interaction patterns, at least six previously uncharacterized proteins are suggested to be bona fide transcriptional regulators (namely YFL049W, YJR070C, YDR520C, YGL066W/Sgf73, YKR064W and YCR082W/Ahc2). PMID:16464826

  10. WRKY transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Madhunita; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators found exclusively in plants. They have diverse biological functions in plant disease resistance, abiotic stress responses, nutrient deprivation, senescence, seed and trichome development, embryogenesis, as well as additional developmental and hormone-controlled processes. WRKYs can act as transcriptional activators or repressors, in various homo- and heterodimer combinations. Here we review recent progress on the function of WRKY transcription factors in Arabidopsis and other plant species such as rice, potato, and parsley, with a special focus on abiotic, developmental, and hormone-regulated processes. PMID:24492469

  11. Transcriptional activation in yeast cells lacking transcription factor IIA.

    PubMed Central

    Chou, S; Chatterjee, S; Lee, M; Struhl, K

    1999-01-01

    The general transcription factor IIA (TFIIA) forms a complex with TFIID at the TATA promoter element, and it inhibits the function of several negative regulators of the TATA-binding protein (TBP) subunit of TFIID. Biochemical experiments suggest that TFIIA is important in the response to transcriptional activators because activation domains can interact with TFIIA, increase recruitment of TFIID and TFIIA to the promoter, and promote isomerization of the TFIID-TFIIA-TATA complex. Here, we describe a double-shut-off approach to deplete yeast cells of Toa1, the large subunit of TFIIA, to <1% of the wild-type level. Interestingly, such TFIIA-depleted cells are essentially unaffected for activation by heat shock factor, Ace1, and Gal4-VP16. However, depletion of TFIIA causes a general two- to threefold decrease of transcription from most yeast promoters and a specific cell-cycle arrest at the G2-M boundary. These results indicate that transcriptional activation in vivo can occur in the absence of TFIIA. PMID:10581267

  12. Divergent RNA transcription

    PubMed Central

    Naughton, Catherine; Corless, Samuel; Gilbert, Nick

    2013-01-01

    New approaches using biotinylated-psoralen as a probe for investigating DNA structure have revealed new insights into the relationship between DNA supercoiling, transcription and chromatin compaction. We explore a hypothesis that divergent RNA transcription generates negative supercoiling at promoters facilitating initiation complex formation and subsequent promoter clearance. PMID:23863199

  13. Stochastic Model of Supercoiling-Dependent Transcription.

    PubMed

    Brackley, C A; Johnson, J; Bentivoglio, A; Corless, S; Gilbert, N; Gonnella, G; Marenduzzo, D

    2016-07-01

    We propose a stochastic model for gene transcription coupled to DNA supercoiling, where we incorporate the experimental observation that polymerases create supercoiling as they unwind the DNA helix and that these enzymes bind more favorably to regions where the genome is unwound. Within this model, we show that when the transcriptionally induced flux of supercoiling increases, there is a sharp crossover from a regime where torsional stresses relax quickly and gene transcription is random, to one where gene expression is highly correlated and tightly regulated by supercoiling. In the latter regime, the model displays transcriptional bursts, waves of supercoiling, and up regulation of divergent or bidirectional genes. It also predicts that topological enzymes which relax twist and writhe should provide a pathway to down regulate transcription. PMID:27419594

  14. Transcription and Recombination: When RNA Meets DNA

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Andrés; Gaillard, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    A particularly relevant phenomenon in cell physiology and proliferation is the fact that spontaneous mitotic recombination is strongly enhanced by transcription. The most accepted view is that transcription increases the occurrence of double-strand breaks and/or single-stranded DNA gaps that are repaired by recombination. Most breaks would arise as a consequence of the impact that transcription has on replication fork progression, provoking its stalling and/or breakage. Here, we discuss the mechanisms responsible for the cross talk between transcription and recombination, with emphasis on (1) the transcription–replication conflicts as the main source of recombinogenic DNA breaks, and (2) the formation of cotranscriptional R-loops as a major cause of such breaks. The new emerging questions and perspectives are discussed on the basis of the interference between transcription and replication, as well as the way RNA influences genome dynamics. PMID:25085910

  15. Stochastic Model of Supercoiling-Dependent Transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackley, C. A.; Johnson, J.; Bentivoglio, A.; Corless, S.; Gilbert, N.; Gonnella, G.; Marenduzzo, D.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a stochastic model for gene transcription coupled to DNA supercoiling, where we incorporate the experimental observation that polymerases create supercoiling as they unwind the DNA helix and that these enzymes bind more favorably to regions where the genome is unwound. Within this model, we show that when the transcriptionally induced flux of supercoiling increases, there is a sharp crossover from a regime where torsional stresses relax quickly and gene transcription is random, to one where gene expression is highly correlated and tightly regulated by supercoiling. In the latter regime, the model displays transcriptional bursts, waves of supercoiling, and up regulation of divergent or bidirectional genes. It also predicts that topological enzymes which relax twist and writhe should provide a pathway to down regulate transcription.

  16. ASTP Onboard Voice Transcription

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The transcription is presented of the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project voice communications as recorded on the command module data storage equipment. Data from this recorder are telemetered (dumped) to Space Tracking and Data Network sites for retransmission to the Johnson Space Center. The transcript is divided into three columns -- time, speaker, and text. The Greenwich mean time column consists of three two-digit numbers representing hours, minutes, and seconds (e.g., 22 34 14) for the Julian dates shown at the top of the page on which a new day begins. The speaker column indicates the source of a transmission; the text column contains the verbatim transcript of the communications.

  17. Constraints on transcriptional activator function contribute to transcriptional quiescence during early Xenopus embryogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Almouzni, G; Wolffe, A P

    1995-01-01

    We have examined the cause of transcriptional quiescence prior to the mid-blastula transition (MBT) in Xenopus laevis. We have found distinct requirements for transcription of class II and class III genes. An artificial increase of the amount of DNA present within the embryo over that found at the MBT allows precocious transcription of tRNA genes, but not of the adenovirus E4 or human cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoters. Thus titration of an inhibitor by exogenous DNA determines class III but not class II gene activation. We demonstrate that the action of the inhibitor depends on the association of core histones with DNA. The addition of exogenous TBP, together with an increase in the amount of DNA within the embryo, allows significant basal transcription of class II genes prior to the MBT, whereas it does not increase transcription of tRNA genes. To examine the activation of transcription above basal levels, we used a defined minimal promoter containing five Gal4 binding sites and the activator Gal4-VP16. Precocious transcriptional activation is directed by Gal4-VP16 prior to the MBT, demonstrating that a functional transcriptional machinery exists at this early developmental stage. Furthermore, since this activation can occur in the absence of exogenous TBP or chromatin titration, a transcription factor that can penetrate chromatin is sufficient for recruitment of this machinery to a promoter. Our results support the hypothesis that the temporal regulation of transcription during early embryogenesis in Xenopus reflects not only a titration of inhibitors by DNA, but also a deficiency in the activity of transcriptional activators prior to the MBT. Images PMID:7737126

  18. Transcription regulates telomere dynamics in human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Rajika; Brun, Catherine M.; Azzalin, Claus M.

    2012-01-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein structures capping the physical ends of linear eukaryotic chromosomes. Although largely heterochromatic, telomeres are transcribed into telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA) molecules by RNA polymerase II. The functions associated with telomere transcription and TERRA remain ill defined. Here we show that the transcriptional activity of human telomeres directly regulates their movement during interphase. We find that chemical inhibition of global transcription dampens telomere motion, while global stimulation promotes it. Likewise, when DNA methyltransferase enzymes are deleted to augment telomere transcription, we observe increased telomere movement. Finally, using a cell line engineered with a unique transcriptionally inducible telomere, we show that transcription of one specific telomere stimulates only its own dynamics without overtly affecting its stability or its length. We reveal a new and unforeseen function for telomere transcription as a regulator of telomere motion, and speculate on the intriguing possibility that transcription-dependent telomere motion sustains the maintenance of functional and dysfunctional telomeres. PMID:22357912

  19. Increases in CYP3A Expression and Glucocorticoid-Inducibility in Liver of Rats Fed Soy Protein Isolate (SPI) Involves Post-Transcriptional Effects on mRNA Processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We analyzed a time course of dexamethasone (DEX)-induction at PND25 and PND60 in male and female rats fed soy protein isolate (SPI) or casein (CAS) based AIN93G diets throughout development to examine molecular mechanisms underlying increased CYP3A expression and inducibility after SPI-feeding. At ...

  20. On schemes of combinatorial transcription logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchler, Nicolas E.; Gerland, Ulrich; Hwa, Terence

    2003-04-01

    Cells receive a wide variety of cellular and environmental signals, which are often processed combinatorially to generate specific genetic responses. Here we explore theoretically the potentials and limitations of combinatorial signal integration at the level of cis-regulatory transcription control. Our analysis suggests that many complex transcription-control functions of the type encountered in higher eukaryotes are already implementable within the much simpler bacterial transcription system. Using a quantitative model of bacterial transcription and invoking only specific protein-DNA interaction and weak glue-like interaction between regulatory proteins, we show explicit schemes to implement regulatory logic functions of increasing complexity by appropriately selecting the strengths and arranging the relative positions of the relevant protein-binding DNA sequences in the cis-regulatory region. The architectures that emerge are naturally modular and evolvable. Our results suggest that the transcription regulatory apparatus is a "programmable" computing machine, belonging formally to the class of Boltzmann machines. Crucial to our results is the ability to regulate gene expression at a distance. In bacteria, this can be achieved for isolated genes via DNA looping controlled by the dimerization of DNA-bound proteins. However, if adopted extensively in the genome, long-distance interaction can cause unintentional intergenic cross talk, a detrimental side effect difficult to overcome by the known bacterial transcription-regulation systems. This may be a key factor limiting the genome-wide adoption of complex transcription control in bacteria. Implications of our findings for combinatorial transcription control in eukaryotes are discussed. Abbreviations: TF, transcription factor RNAP, RNA polymerase DNF, disjunctive normal form CNF, conjunctive normal form

  1. Transcription cofactor PC4 plays essential roles in collaboration with the small subunit of general transcription factor TFIIE.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Seiji; Iida, Satoshi; Hirose, Yutaka; Tanaka, Aki; Hanaoka, Fumio; Ohkuma, Yoshiaki

    2014-12-01

    In eukaryotes, positive cofactor 4 (PC4) stimulates activator-dependent transcription by facilitating transcription initiation and the transition from initiation to elongation. It also forms homodimers and binds to single-stranded DNA and various transcriptional activators, including the general transcription factor TFIIH. In this study, we further investigated PC4 from Homo sapiens and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (hPC4 and cePC4, respectively). hPC4 strongly stimulated transcription on a linearized template, whereas it alleviated transcription on a supercoiled template. Transcriptional stimulation by PC4 was also alleviated by increasing the amount of TFIID. GST pull-down studies with general transcription factors indicated that both hPC4 and cePC4 bind strongly to TFIIB, TFIIEβ, TFIIFα, TFIIFβ and TFIIH XPB subunits and weakly to TBP and TFIIH p62. However, only hPC4 bound to CDK7. The effect of each PC4 on transcription was studied in combination with TFIIEβ. hPC4 stimulated both basal and activated transcription, whereas cePC4 primarily stimulated activated transcription, especially in the presence of TFIIEβ from C. elegans. Finally, hPC4 bound to the C-terminal region of hTFIIEβ adjacent to the basic region. These results indicate that PC4 plays essential roles in the transition step from transcription initiation to elongation by binding to melted DNA in collaboration with TFIIEβ. PMID:25308091

  2. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe. PMID:22458515

  3. The transcription factor encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Zhang, Xiao Yu Cindy; Dickman, Christopher T D; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Ramos, Oscar H P; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda S C; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma D C; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam W Z; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter John; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Héligon, Christophe; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa Cathleen; Millen, Kathleen Joyce; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe. PMID:22458515

  4. Canine Distemper Virus Infection Leads to an Inhibitory Phenotype of Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells In Vitro with Reduced Expression of Co-Stimulatory Molecules and Increased Interleukin-10 Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Herder, Vanessa; Stein, Veronika M.; Tipold, Andrea; Urhausen, Carola; Günzel-Apel, Anne-Rose; Rohn, Karl; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Beineke, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) exhibits a profound lymphotropism that causes immunosuppression and increased susceptibility of affected dogs to opportunistic infections. Similar to human measles virus, CDV is supposed to inhibit terminal differentiation of dendritic cells (DCs), responsible for disturbed repopulation of lymphoid tissues and diminished antigen presenting function in dogs. In order to testify the hypothesis that CDV-infection leads to an impairment of professional antigen presenting cells, canine DCs have been generated from peripheral blood monocytes in vitro and infected with CDV. Virus infection was confirmed and quantified by transmission electron microscopy, CDV-specific immunofluorescence, and virus titration. Flow cytometric analyses revealed a significant down-regulation of the major histocompatibility complex class II and co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 in CDV-infected DCs, indicative of disturbed antigen presenting capacity. Molecular analyses revealed an increased expression of the immune inhibitory cytokine interleukin-10 in DCs following infection. Results of the present study demonstrate that CDV causes phenotypical changes and altered cytokine expression of DCs, which represent potential mechanisms to evade host immune responses and might contribute to immune dysfunction and virus persistence in canine distemper. PMID:24769532

  5. Mapping Yeast Transcriptional Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Timothy R.; de Boer, Carl G.

    2013-01-01

    The term “transcriptional network” refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face. For most yeast TFs, data have been collected on their sequence preferences, in vivo promoter occupancy, and gene expression profiles in deletion mutants. These systematic studies have led to the identification of new regulators of numerous cellular functions and shed light on the overall organization of yeast gene regulation. However, many yeast TFs appear to be inactive under standard laboratory growth conditions, and many of the available data were collected using techniques that have since been improved. Perhaps as a consequence, comprehensive and accurate mapping among TF sequence preferences, promoter binding, and gene expression remains an open challenge. We propose that the time is ripe for renewed systematic efforts toward a complete mapping of yeast transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. PMID:24018767

  6. Automatic Music Transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapuri, Anssi; Virtanen, Tuomas

    Written musical notation describes music in a symbolic form that is suitable for performing a piece using the available musical instruments. Traditionally, musical notation indicates the pitch, target instrument, timing, and duration of each sound to be played. The aim of music transcription either by humans or by a machine is to infer these musical parameters, given only the acoustic recording of a performance.

  7. Proofreading of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Voliotis, Margaritis; Cohen, Netta; Molina-París, Carmen; Liverpool, Tanniemola B

    2012-06-01

    The accuracy of DNA transcription is crucial for the proper functioning of the cell. Although RNA polymerases demonstrate selectivity for correct nucleotides, additional active mechanisms of transcriptional error correction are required to achieve observed levels of fidelity. Recent experimental findings have shed light on a particular mechanism of transcriptional error correction involving: (i) diffusive translocation of the RNA polymerase along the DNA (backtracking) and (ii) irreversible RNA cleavage. This mechanism achieves preferential cleavage of misincorporated nucleotides by biasing the local rates of translocation. Here, we study how misincorporated nucleotides affect backtracking dynamics and how this effect determines the level of transcriptional fidelity. We consider backtracking as a diffusive process in a periodic, one-dimensional energy landscape, which at a coarse-grained level gives rise to a hopping process between neighboring local minima. We propose a model for how misincorporated nucleotides deform this energy landscape and hence affect the hopping rates. In particular, we show that this model can be used to derive both the theoretical limit on the fidelity (i.e. the minimum fraction of misincorporated nucleotides) and the actual fidelity relative to this optimum, achieved for specific combinations of the cleavage and polymerization rates. Finally, we study how external factors influencing backtracking dynamics affect transcriptional fidelity. We show that biologically relevant loads, similar to those exerted by nucleosomes or other transcriptional barriers, increase error correction. PMID:22643861

  8. Proofreading of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Voliotis, Margaritis; Cohen, Netta; Molina-París, Carmen; Liverpool, Tanniemola B

    2012-06-01

    The accuracy of DNA transcription is crucial for the proper functioning of the cell. Although RNA polymerases demonstrate selectivity for correct nucleotides, additional active mechanisms of transcriptional error correction are required to achieve observed levels of fidelity. Recent experimental findings have shed light on a particular mechanism of transcriptional error correction involving: (i) diffusive translocation of the RNA polymerase along the DNA (backtracking) and (ii) irreversible RNA cleavage. This mechanism achieves preferential cleavage of misincorporated nucleotides by biasing the local rates of translocation. Here, we study how misincorporated nucleotides affect backtracking dynamics and how this effect determines the level of transcriptional fidelity. We consider backtracking as a diffusive process in a periodic, one-dimensional energy landscape, which at a coarse-grained level gives rise to a hopping process between neighbouring local minima. We propose a model for how misincorporated nucleotides deform this energy landscape and hence affect the hopping rates. In particular, we show that this model can be used to derive both the theoretical limit on the fidelity (i.e. the minimum fraction of misincorporated nucleotides) and the actual fidelity relative to this optimum, achieved for specific combinations of the cleavage and polymerization rates. Finally, we study how external factors influencing backtracking dynamics affect transcriptional fidelity. We show that biologically relevant loads, similar to those exerted by nucleosomes or other transcriptional barriers, increase error correction. PMID:22551978

  9. The effects of cocaine on HIV transcription.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Mudit; Weber, Jaime; Bukrinsky, Michael; Simon, Gary L

    2016-06-01

    Illicit drug users are a high-risk population for infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A strong correlation exists between prohibited drug use and an increased rate of HIV transmission. Cocaine stands out as one of the most frequently abused illicit drugs, and its use is correlated with HIV infection and disease progression. The central nervous system (CNS) is a common target for both drugs of abuse and HIV, and cocaine intake further accelerates neuronal injury in HIV patients. Although the high incidence of HIV infection in illicit drug abusers is primarily due to high-risk activities such as needle sharing and unprotected sex, several studies have demonstrated that cocaine enhances the rate of HIV gene expression and replication by activating various signal transduction pathways and downstream transcription factors. In order to generate mature HIV genomic transcript, HIV gene expression has to pass through both the initiation and elongation phases of transcription, which requires discrete transcription factors. In this review, we will provide a detailed analysis of the molecular mechanisms that regulate HIV transcription and discuss how cocaine modulates those mechanisms to upregulate HIV transcription and eventually HIV replication. PMID:26572787

  10. Can medical transcription be taught in the classroom?

    PubMed

    Moisio, M

    1994-03-01

    The results of the concentrated transcription program provided objective information that gives credibility to both sides of the transcriptionist training debate. In addition, the results provided the objective data needed to support changes in the curriculum. Students who are exposed to solid classroom teaching, coupled with enough opportunities to develop and practice transcription skills, have a better chance for success than those who rely solely on classroom instruction or solely on experience or on-the-job training. It is clear that increasing the number of hours of actual transcription results in an increase in the productivity and accuracy of the student's medical transcription. PMID:10132192

  11. Negative regulation of mitochondrial transcription by mitochondrial topoisomerase I

    PubMed Central

    Sobek, Stefan; Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Pommier, Yves; Bornholz, Beatrice; Kalfalah, Faiza; Zhang, Hongliang; Wiesner, Rudolf J.; von Kleist-Retzow, Jürgen-Christoph; Hillebrand, Frank; Schaal, Heiner; Mielke, Christian; Christensen, Morten O.; Boege, Fritz

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial topoisomerase I is a genetically distinct mitochondria-dedicated enzyme with a crucial but so far unknown role in the homeostasis of mitochondrial DNA metabolism. Here, we present data suggesting a negative regulatory function in mitochondrial transcription or transcript stability. Deficiency or depletion of mitochondrial topoisomerase I increased mitochondrial transcripts, whereas overexpression lowered mitochondrial transcripts, depleted respiratory complexes I, III and IV, decreased cell respiration and raised superoxide levels. Acute depletion of mitochondrial topoisomerase I triggered neither a nuclear mito-biogenic stress response nor compensatory topoisomerase IIβ upregulation, suggesting the concomitant increase in mitochondrial transcripts was due to release of a local inhibitory effect. Mitochondrial topoisomerase I was co-immunoprecipitated with mitochondrial RNA polymerase. It selectively accumulated and rapidly exchanged at a subset of nucleoids distinguished by the presence of newly synthesized RNA and/or mitochondrial RNA polymerase. The inactive Y559F-mutant behaved similarly without affecting mitochondrial transcripts. In conclusion, mitochondrial topoisomerase I dampens mitochondrial transcription and thereby alters respiratory capacity. The mechanism involves selective association of the active enzyme with transcriptionally active nucleoids and a direct interaction with mitochondrial RNA polymerase. The inhibitory role of topoisomerase I in mitochondrial transcription is strikingly different from the stimulatory role of topoisomerase I in nuclear transcription. PMID:23982517

  12. Vaccinia virus transcription.

    PubMed

    Broyles, Steven S

    2003-09-01

    Vaccinia virus replication takes place in the cytoplasm of the host cell. The nearly 200 kbp genome owes part of its complexity to encoding most of the proteins involved in genome and mRNA synthesis. The multisubunit vaccinia virus RNA polymerase requires a separate set of virus-encoded proteins for the transcription of the early, intermediate and late classes of genes. Cell fractionation studies have provided evidence for a role for host cell proteins in the initiation and termination of vaccinia virus intermediate and late gene transcription. Vaccinia virus resembles nuclear DNA viruses in the integration of viral and host proteins for viral mRNA synthesis, yet is markedly less reliant on host proteins than its nuclear counterparts. PMID:12917449

  13. Filling and Transcription Behavior of Molten Polymer Coating on Microstructures in Melt-Transcription-Molding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Satoh, Isao; Saito, Takushi; Yakemoto, Kazutoshi

    To clarify the fabrication mechanism of molten polymer coating on microstructures such as optical display parts and bio-tip in Melt-Transcription-Molding (MTM) process, the transcription experiments between a metal stamper engraved with microstructures and a molten polymer (PC: polycarbonate and COC: cyclo-olefin copolymer) were carried out under various molding conditions (mold temperature, polymer temperature, polymer pressure and coating speed) and transcript results were evaluated from the dimensional aspect. In this study the complete transcription of the microstructures was obtained at mold temperature of 170°C for COC and 175°C for PC, respectively. However, the rim height of the microstructure was increased and its center depth was decreased, when lower mold temperatures were applied. From these experimental results, it was suggested that the adhesion force between a molten polymer filled with the microstructure and the metal mold surface plays an important role in fixing the transcript shape of the microstructure against the elastic recovery force and/or shrinkage by cooling. Furthermore, a model to explain the filling and transcription behavior of molten polymers was proposed from viscoelastic properties of each polymer, and it was confirmed that predicted microstructure geometries deduced with the model are well fitted with the transcript results which were experimentally obtained under various mold temperatures.

  14. Intrinsic disorder in transcription factors†

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiangang; Perumal, Narayanan B.; Oldfield, Christopher J.; Su, Eric W.; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Dunker, A. Keith

    2008-01-01

    Intrinsic disorder (ID) is highly abundant in eukaryotes, which reflect the greater need for disorder-associated signaling and transcriptional regulation in nucleated cells. Although several well-characterized examples of intrinsically disordered proteins in transcriptional regulation have been reported, no systematic analysis has been reported so far. To test for a general prevalence of intrinsic disorder in transcriptional regulation, we used the Predictor Of Natural Disorder Regions (PONDR) to analyze the abundance of intrinsic disorder in three transcription factor datasets and two control sets. This analysis revealed that from 94.13% to 82.63% of transcription factors posses extended regions of intrinsic disorder, relative to 54.51% and 18.64% of the proteins in two control datasets, which indicates the significant prevalence of intrinsic disorder in transcription factors. This propensity of transcription factors for intrinsic disorder was confirmed by cumulative distribution function analysis and charge-hydropathy plots. The amino acid composition analysis showed that all three transcription factor datasets were substantially depleted in order-promoting residues, and significantly enriched in disorder-promoting residues. Our analysis of the distribution of disorder within the transcription factor datasets revealed that: (a) The AT-hooks and basic regions of transcription factor DNA-binding domains are highly disordered; (b) The degree of disorder in transcription factor activation regions is much higher than that in DNA-binding domains; (c) The degree of disorder is significantly higher in eukaryotic transcription factors than in prokaryotic transcription factors; (d) The level of α-MoRFs (molecular recognition feature) prediction is much higher in transcription factors. Overall, our data reflected the fact that the eukaryotes with well-developed gene transcription machinery require transcription factor flexibility to be more efficient. PMID:16734424

  15. Respiratory gases and the regulation of transcription.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Eoin P; Keogh, Ciara E

    2016-08-01

    What is the topic of this review? This review highlights the transcriptional consequences for decreased cellular O2 levels (hypoxia) and increased cellular CO2 levels (hypercapnia). What advances does it highlight? We discuss recent advances in our understanding of the cellular response to hypoxia and consider the potential cross-talk between O2 - and CO2 -dependent transcriptional regulation. Oxygen and carbon dioxide are the substrate and product of aerobic metabolism, respectively. Thus, the levels of these physiological gases are inextricably linked in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Increased mitochondrial consumption of O2 (to produce ATP) will produce more CO2 . Furthermore, in lung pathologies such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sleep apnoea and central hypoventilation syndrome, hypoxia and hypercapnia are co-incident. Acute responses to hypoxia involve carotid body-mediated changes in the rate and depth of breathing. Chronic adaptation to hypoxia involves a multitude of changes on a transcriptional level, which simultaneously increases oxygen utilization (via hypoxia-inducible factor and others), while suppressing superfluous energy-demanding processes. Acute responses to CO2 affect breathing primarily via central chemoreceptors. The nature of hypercapnia-dependent transcriptional regulation is an emerging area of research, but at present the mechanisms underpinning this response are not fully characterized and understood. Thus, given the juxtaposition of hypoxia and hypercapnia in health and disease, this manuscript reviews the current evidence for transcriptional responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia. Finally, we discuss the potential cross-talk between hypoxia and hypercapnia on a transcriptional level. PMID:27474261

  16. Gene transcription and electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    Our overall aim is to obtain sufficient information to allow us to ultimately determine whether ELF EM field exposure is an initiating factor in neoplastic transformation and/or if exposure can mimic characteristics of the second-step counterpart in neoplastic disease. This aim is based on our previous findings that levels of some transcripts are increased in cells exposed to EM fields. While the research is basic in nature, the ramifications have bearing on the general safety of exposure to EM fields in industrial and everyday life. A large array of diverse biological effects are reported to occur as the result of exposure to elf EM fields, suggesting that the cell response to EM fields is at a basic level, presumably initiated by molecular and/or biophysical events at the cell membrane. The hypothesized route is a signal transduction pathway involving membrane calcium fluxes. Information flow resulting from signal transduction can mediate the induction of regulatory factors in the cell, and directly affect how transcription is regulated.

  17. TRANSCRIPTIONAL INDUCTION OF THIOREDOXIN REDUCTASE (TR)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously our lab has demonstrated in-vitro and in-vivo induction of TR activity by sulforaphane (SF) purified from broccoli. Luciferase reporter constructs were built using the TR promoter sequence. TR constructs transfected into HepG2 cells showed a dose dependent increase in transcription when...

  18. Cooperative activation of Xenopus rhodopsin transcription by paired-like transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In vertebrates, rod photoreceptor-specific gene expression is regulated by the large Maf and Pax-like transcription factors, Nrl/LNrl and Crx/Otx5. The ubiquitous occurrence of their target DNA binding sites throughout rod-specific gene promoters suggests that multiple transcription factor interactions within the promoter are functionally important. Cooperative action by these transcription factors activates rod-specific genes such as rhodopsin. However, a quantitative mechanistic explanation of transcriptional rate determinants is lacking. Results We investigated the contributions of various paired-like transcription factors and their cognate cis-elements to rhodopsin gene activation using cultured cells to quantify activity. The Xenopus rhodopsin promoter (XOP) has a bipartite structure, with ~200 bp proximal to the start site (RPP) coordinating cooperative activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 and the adjacent 5300 bp upstream sequence increasing the overall expression level. The synergistic activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 also occurred when XOP was stably integrated into the genome. We determined that Crx/Otx5 synergistically activated transcription independently and additively through the two Pax-like cis-elements, BAT1 and Ret4, but not through Ret1. Other Pax-like family members, Rax1 and Rax2, do not synergistically activate XOP transcription with Nrl/LNrl and/or Crx/Otx5; rather they act as co-activators via the Ret1 cis-element. Conclusions We have provided a quantitative model of cooperative transcriptional activation of the rhodopsin promoter through interaction of Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl at two paired-like cis-elements proximal to the NRE and TATA binding site. Further, we have shown that Rax genes act in cooperation with Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl as co-activators of rhodopsin transcription. PMID:24499263

  19. The Smad3 linker region contains a transcriptional activation domain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guannan; Long, Jianyin; Matsuura, Isao; He, Dongming; Liu, Fang

    2005-02-15

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta)/Smads regulate a wide variety of biological responses through transcriptional regulation of target genes. Smad3 plays a key role in TGF-beta/Smad-mediated transcriptional responses. Here, we show that the proline-rich linker region of Smad3 contains a transcriptional activation domain. When the linker region is fused to a heterologous DNA-binding domain, it activates transcription. We show that the linker region physically interacts with p300. The adenovirus E1a protein, which binds to p300, inhibits the transcriptional activity of the linker region, and overexpression of p300 can rescue the linker-mediated transcriptional activation. In contrast, an adenovirus E1a mutant, which cannot bind to p300, does not inhibit the linker-mediated transcription. The native Smad3 protein lacking the linker region is unable to mediate TGF-beta transcriptional activation responses, although it can be phosphorylated by the TGF-beta receptor at the C-terminal tail and has a significantly increased ability to form a heteromeric complex with Smad4. We show further that the linker region and the C-terminal domain of Smad3 synergize for transcriptional activation in the presence of TGF-beta. Thus our findings uncover an important function of the Smad3 linker region in Smad-mediated transcriptional control. PMID:15588252

  20. The Transcription Unit Architecture of the Escherichia Coli Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Byung-Kwan; Zengler, Karsten; Qiu, Yu; Park, Young S.; Knight, Eric M.; Barrett, Christian; Gao, Yuan; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2009-11-01

    Under EMSL User Proposal 25660, the authors reported that bacterial genomes are organized by structural and functional elements, including promoters, transcription start and termination sites, open reading frames, regulatory noncoding regions, untranslated regions and transcription units. Here, we iteratively integrate high-throughput, genome-wide measurements of RNA polymerase binding locations and mRNA transcript abundance, 5' sequences and translation into proteins to determine the organizational structure of the Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 genome. Integration of the organizational elements provides an experimentally annotated transcription unit architecture, including alternative transcription start sites, 5' untranslated region, boundaries and open reading frames of each transcription unit. A total of 4,661 transcription units were identified, representing an increase of >530% over current knowledge. This comprehensive transcription unit architecture allows for the elucidation of condition-specific uses of alternative sigma factors at the genome scale. Furthermore, the transcription unit architecture provides a foundation on which to construct genome-scale transcriptional and translational regulatory networks.

  1. Coupling pre-mRNA processing to transcription on the RNA factory assembly line

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuo-Ming; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2013-01-01

    It has been well-documented that nuclear processing of primary transcripts of RNA polymerase II occurs co-transcriptionally and is functionally coupled to transcription. Moreover, increasing evidence indicates that transcription influences pre-mRNA splicing and even several post-splicing RNA processing events. In this review, we discuss the issues of how RNA polymerase II modulates co-transcriptional RNA processing events via its carboxyl terminal domain, and the protein domains involved in coupling of transcription and RNA processing events. In addition, we describe how transcription influences the expression or stability of mRNAs through the formation of distinct mRNP complexes. Finally, we delineate emerging findings that chromatin modifications function in the regulation of RNA processing steps, especially splicing, in addition to transcription. Overall, we provide a comprehensive view that transcription could integrate different control systems, from epigenetic to post-transcriptional control, for efficient gene expression. PMID:23392244

  2. Transcription bypass of DNA lesions enhances cell survival but attenuates transcription coupled DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wentao; Selvam, Kathiresan; Ko, Tengyu; Li, Shisheng

    2014-01-01

    Transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR) is a subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER) dedicated to rapid removal of DNA lesions in the transcribed strand of actively transcribed genes. The precise nature of the TCR signal and how the repair machinery gains access to lesions imbedded in stalled RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) complexes in eukaryotic cells are still enigmatic. RNAP II has an intrinsic capacity for transcription bypass of DNA lesions by incorporation or misincorporation of nucleotides across the lesions. It has been suggested that transcription bypass of lesions, which exposes the lesions, may be required for TCR. Here, we show that E1103G mutation of Rpb1, the largest subunit of RNAP II, which promotes transcription bypass of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), increases survival of UV irradiated yeast cells but attenuates TCR. The increased cell survival is independent of any NER subpathways. In contrast, G730D mutation of Rpb1, which impairs transcription bypass of CPDs, enhances TCR. Our results suggest that transcription bypass of lesions attenuates TCR but enhances cell tolerance to DNA lesions. Efficient stalling of RNAP II is essential for efficient TCR. PMID:25389266

  3. Hematopoietic transcription factor mutations and inherited platelet dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Songdej, Natthapol

    2015-01-01

    The molecular and genetic mechanisms in most patients with inherited platelet dysfunction are unknown. There is increasing evidence that mutations in hematopoietic transcription factors are major players in the pathogenesis of defective megakaryopoiesis and platelet dysfunction in patients with inherited platelet disorders. These hematopoietic transcription factors include RUNX1, FLI1, GATA-1, and GFI1B. Mutations involving these transcription factors affect diverse aspects of platelet production and function at the genetic and molecular levels, culminating in clinical manifestations of thrombocytopenia and platelet dysfunction. This review focuses on these hematopoietic transcription factors in the pathobiology of inherited platelet dysfunction. PMID:26097739

  4. A relational database of transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, D

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of eukaryotic gene regulation have produced an extensive body of transcriptionally-related sequence information in the biological literature, and have created a need for computing structures that organize and manage this information. The 'relational model' represents an approach that is finding increasing application in the design of biological databases. This report describes the compilation of information regarding eukaryotic transcription factors, the organization of this information into five tables, the computational applications of the resultant relational database that are of theoretical as well as experimental interest, and possible avenues of further development. PMID:2186365

  5. Transcriptional Regulatory Elements in Fungal Secondary Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wenbing; Keller, Nancy P.

    2013-01-01

    Filamentous fungi produce a variety of secondary metabolites of diverse beneficial and detrimental activities to humankind. The genes encoding the enzymatic machinery required to make these metabolites are typically clustered in fungal genomes. There is considerable evidence that secondary metabolite gene regulation is, in part, by transcriptional control through hierarchical levels of transcriptional regulatory elements involved in secondary metabolite cluster regulation. Identification of secondary metabolism regulatory elements could potentially provide a means of increasing production of beneficial metabolites, decreasing production of detrimental metabolites, aid in the identification of ‘silent’ natural products and also contribute to a broader understanding of molecular mechanisms by which secondary metabolites are produced. This review summarizes regulation of secondary metabolism associated on transcriptional regulatory elements from a broad view as well as tremendous advances in discovery of cryptic or novel secondary metabolites by genomic mining in the basis of this knowledge. PMID:21717315

  6. Single Molecule Transcription Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Galburt, Eric A.; Grill, Stephan W.; Bustamante, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Single molecule optical trapping assays have now been applied to a great number of macromolecular systems including DNA, RNA, cargo motors, restriction enzymes, DNA helicases, chromosome remodelers, DNA polymerases and both viral and bacterial RNA polymerases. The advantages of the technique are the ability to observe dynamic, unsynchronized molecular processes, to determine the distributions of experimental quantities and to apply force to the system while monitoring the response over time. Here, we describe the application of these powerful techniques to study the dynamics of transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:19426807

  7. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Endometriosis linked to heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... transcript052316.html To Your Health: NLM update Transcript Endometriosis linked to heart disease : 05/23/2016 To ... use MedlinePlus to follow up on weekly topics. Endometriosis significantly increases the risk of developing heart disease ...

  8. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Salt linked to heart disease among CKD patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... transcript072516.html To Your Health: NLM update Transcript Salt linked to heart disease among CKD patients : 07/ ... kidney disease - and eat a diet high in salt - comparatively increase their odds of a heart attack ...

  9. Transcription factors of Lotus: regulation of isoflavonoid biosynthesis requires coordinated changes in transcription factor activity.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Dale; Stranne, Maria; Mikkelsen, Lisbeth; Pakseresht, Nima; Welham, Tracey; Hiraka, Hideki; Tabata, Satoshi; Sato, Shusei; Paquette, Suzanne; Wang, Trevor L; Martin, Cathie; Bailey, Paul

    2012-06-01

    Isoflavonoids are a class of phenylpropanoids made by legumes, and consumption of dietary isoflavonoids confers benefits to human health. Our aim is to understand the regulation of isoflavonoid biosynthesis. Many studies have shown the importance of transcription factors in regulating the transcription of one or more genes encoding enzymes in phenylpropanoid metabolism. In this study, we coupled bioinformatics and coexpression analysis to identify candidate genes encoding transcription factors involved in regulating isoflavonoid biosynthesis in Lotus (Lotus japonicus). Genes encoding proteins belonging to 39 of the main transcription factor families were examined by microarray analysis of RNA from leaf tissue that had been elicited with glutathione. Phylogenetic analyses of each transcription factor family were used to identify subgroups of proteins that were specific to L. japonicus or closely related to known regulators of the phenylpropanoid pathway in other species. R2R3MYB subgroup 2 genes showed increased expression after treatment with glutathione. One member of this subgroup, LjMYB14, was constitutively overexpressed in L. japonicus and induced the expression of at least 12 genes that encoded enzymes in the general phenylpropanoid and isoflavonoid pathways. A distinct set of six R2R3MYB subgroup 2-like genes was identified. We suggest that these subgroup 2 sister group proteins and those belonging to the main subgroup 2 have roles in inducing isoflavonoid biosynthesis. The induction of isoflavonoid production in L. japonicus also involves the coordinated down-regulation of competing biosynthetic pathways by changing the expression of other transcription factors. PMID:22529285

  10. Transcriptional interference among the murine β-like globin genes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao; Eszterhas, Susan; Pallazzi, Nicolas; Bouhassira, Eric E.; Fields, Jennifer; Tanabe, Osamu; Gerber, Scott A.; Bulger, Michael; Engel, James Douglas; Groudine, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian β-globin loci contain multiple genes that are activated at different developmental stages. Studies have suggested that the transcription of one gene in a locus can influence the expression of the other locus genes. The prevalent model to explain this transcriptional interference is that all potentially active genes compete for locus control region (LCR) activity. To investigate the influence of transcription by the murine embryonic genes on transcription of the other β-like genes, we generated mice with deletions of the promoter regions of Ey and βh1 and measured transcription of the remaining genes. Deletion of the Ey and βh1 promoters increased transcription of βmajor and βminor 2-fold to 3-fold during primitive erythropoiesis. Deletion of Ey did not affect βh1 nor did deletion of βh1 affect Ey, but Ey deletion uniquely activated transcription from βh0, a β-like globin gene immediately downstream of Ey. Protein analysis showed that βh0 encodes a translatable β-like globin protein that can pair with alpha globin. The lack of transcriptional interference between Ey and βh1 and the gene-specific repression of βh0 did not support LCR competition among the embryonic genes and suggested that direct transcriptional interference from Ey suppressed βh0. PMID:17077320

  11. Imaging Transcription in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Darzacq, Xavier; Yao, Jie; Larson, Daniel R.; Causse, Sebastien Z.; Bosanac, Lana; de Turris, Valeria; Ruda, Vera M.; Lionnet, Timothee; Zenklusen, Daniel; Guglielmi, Benjamin; Tjian, Robert; Singer, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    The advent of new technologies for the imaging of living cells has made it possible to determine the properties of transcription, the kinetics of polymerase movement, the association of transcription factors, and the progression of the polymerase on the gene. We report here the current state of the field and the progress necessary to achieve a more complete understanding of the various steps in transcription. Our Consortium is dedicated to developing and implementing the technology to further this understanding. PMID:19416065

  12. Transcriptional Regulation: a Genomic Overview

    PubMed Central

    Riechmann, José Luis

    2002-01-01

    The availability of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence allows a comprehensive analysis of transcriptional regulation in plants using novel genomic approaches and methodologies. Such a genomic view of transcription first necessitates the compilation of lists of elements. Transcription factors are the most numerous of the different types of proteins involved in transcription in eukaryotes, and the Arabidopsis genome codes for more than 1,500 of them, or approximately 6% of its total number of genes. A genome-wide comparison of transcription factors across the three eukaryotic kingdoms reveals the evolutionary generation of diversity in the components of the regulatory machinery of transcription. However, as illustrated by Arabidopsis, transcription in plants follows similar basic principles and logic to those in animals and fungi. A global view and understanding of transcription at a cellular and organismal level requires the characterization of the Arabidopsis transcriptome and promoterome, as well as of the interactome, the localizome, and the phenome of the proteins involved in transcription. PMID:22303220

  13. Deregulated transcription factors in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shima, Yutaka; Kitabayashi, Issay

    2011-08-01

    Specific chromosomal translocations and other mutations associated with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) often involve transcription factors and transcriptional coactivators. Such target genes include AML1, C/EBPα, RARα, MOZ, p300/CBP, and MLL, all of which are important in the regulation of hematopoiesis. The resultant fusion or mutant proteins deregulate the transcription of the affected genes and disrupt their essential role in hematopoiesis, causing differentiation block and abnormal proliferation and/or survival. This review focuses on such transcription factors and coactivators, and describes their roles in leukemogenesis and hematopoiesis. PMID:21823042

  14. Acetyl Coenzyme A Stimulates RNA Polymerase II Transcription and Promoter Binding by Transcription Factor IID in the Absence of Histones

    PubMed Central

    Galasinski, Shelly K.; Lively, Tricia N.; Grebe de Barron, Alexandra; Goodrich, James A.

    2000-01-01

    Protein acetylation has emerged as a means of controlling levels of mRNA synthesis in eukaryotic cells. Here we report that acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) stimulates RNA polymerase II transcription in vitro in the absence of histones. The effect of acetyl-CoA on basal and activated transcription was studied in a human RNA polymerase II transcription system reconstituted from recombinant and highly purified transcription factors. Both basal and activated transcription were stimulated by the addition of acetyl-CoA to transcription reaction mixtures. By varying the concentrations of general transcription factors in the reaction mixtures, we found that acetyl-CoA decreased the concentration of TFIID required to observe transcription. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting revealed that acetyl-CoA increased the affinity of the general transcription factor TFIID for promoter DNA in a TBP-associated factor (TAF)-dependent manner. Interestingly, acetyl-CoA also caused a conformational change in the TFIID-TFIIA-promoter complex as assessed by DNase I footprinting. These results show that acetyl-CoA alters the DNA binding activity of TFIID and indicate that this biologically important cofactor functions at multiple levels to control gene expression. PMID:10688640

  15. Global effects of the CSR-1 RNA interference pathway on the transcriptional landscape.

    PubMed

    Cecere, Germano; Hoersch, Sebastian; O'Keeffe, Sean; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Grishok, Alla

    2014-04-01

    Argonaute proteins and their small RNA cofactors short interfering RNAs are known to inhibit gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the Argonaute CSR-1 binds thousands of endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs) that are antisense to germline transcripts. However, its role in gene expression regulation remains controversial. Here we used genome-wide profiling of nascent RNA transcripts and found that the CSR-1 RNA interference pathway promoted sense-oriented RNA polymerase II transcription. Moreover, a loss of CSR-1 function resulted in global increase in antisense transcription and ectopic transcription of silent chromatin domains, which led to reduced chromatin incorporation of centromere-specific histone H3. On the basis of these findings, we propose that the CSR-1 pathway helps maintain the directionality of active transcription, thereby propagating the distinction between transcriptionally active and silent genomic regions. PMID:24681887

  16. Circadian Transcription Contributes to Core Period Determination in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kadener, Sebastian; Menet, Jerome S; Schoer, Rebecca; Rosbash, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Clock–Cycle (CLK–CYC) heterodimer constitutes a key circadian transcription complex in Drosophila. CYC has a DNA-binding domain but lacks an activation domain. Previous experiments also indicate that most of the transcriptional activity of CLK–CYC derives from the glutamine-rich region of its partner CLK. To address the role of transcription in core circadian timekeeping, we have analyzed the effects of a CYC–viral protein 16 (VP16) fusion protein in the Drosophila system. The addition of this potent and well-studied viral transcriptional activator (VP16) to CYC imparts to the CLK–CYC-VP16 complex strongly enhanced transcriptional activity relative to that of CLK–CYC. This increase is manifested in flies expressing CYC-VP16 as well as in S2 cells. These flies also have increased levels of CLK–CYC direct target gene mRNAs as well as a short period, implicating circadian transcription in period determination. A more detailed examination of reporter gene expression in CYC-VP16–expressing flies suggests that the short period is due at least in part to a more rapid transcriptional phase. Importantly, the behavioral effects require a period (per) promoter and are therefore unlikely to be merely a consequence of generally higher PER levels. This indicates that the CLK–CYC-VP16 behavioral effects are a consequence of increased per transcription. All of this also suggests that the timing of transcriptional activation and not the activation itself is the key event responsible for the behavioral effects observed in CYC-VP16-expressing flies. The results taken together indicate that circadian transcription contributes to core circadian function in Drosophila. PMID:18494558

  17. Mechanosensitive mechanisms in transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Mammoto, Akiko; Mammoto, Tadanori; Ingber, Donald E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Transcriptional regulation contributes to the maintenance of pluripotency, self-renewal and differentiation in embryonic cells and in stem cells. Therefore, control of gene expression at the level of transcription is crucial for embryonic development, as well as for organogenesis, functional adaptation, and regeneration in adult tissues and organs. In the past, most work has focused on how transcriptional regulation results from the complex interplay between chemical cues, adhesion signals, transcription factors and their co-regulators during development. However, chemical signaling alone is not sufficient to explain how three-dimensional (3D) tissues and organs are constructed and maintained through the spatiotemporal control of transcriptional activities. Accumulated evidence indicates that mechanical cues, which include physical forces (e.g. tension, compression or shear stress), alterations in extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanics and changes in cell shape, are transmitted to the nucleus directly or indirectly to orchestrate transcriptional activities that are crucial for embryogenesis and organogenesis. In this Commentary, we review how the mechanical control of gene transcription contributes to the maintenance of pluripotency, determination of cell fate, pattern formation and organogenesis, as well as how it is involved in the control of cell and tissue function throughout embryogenesis and adult life. A deeper understanding of these mechanosensitive transcriptional control mechanisms should lead to new approaches to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:22797927

  18. Nuclear positional control of HIV transcription in 4D

    PubMed Central

    Dhir, Somdutta; Dieudonné, Mariacarolina

    2010-01-01

    Retroviruses integrate their genome into the chromatin of the host cell and are subject to the same control mechanisms governing transcription in the nucleus. There is increasing evidence that the spatial position of a gene within the nucleus in time affects its activity. Therefore it becomes important to study the chromatin environment in space and time of the HIV-1 provirus, particularly in cells where a tight transcriptional control allows the virus to hide away from antiviral treatment and immune response. We recently showed that the HIV-1 provirus is found at the nuclear periphery of latently infected lymphocytes associated in trans with centromeric heterochromatin. After induction of transcription, this association was lost, although the location of the transcribing provirus remained peripheral. Our results reveal a novel mechanism of transcriptional silencing involved in HIV-1 post-transcriptional latency and open wider perspectives for the general organization of chromatin in the nucleus. PMID:21327098

  19. Structural basis of transcription activation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yu; Zhang, Yu; Ebright, Richard H

    2016-06-10

    Class II transcription activators function by binding to a DNA site overlapping a core promoter and stimulating isomerization of an initial RNA polymerase (RNAP)-promoter closed complex into a catalytically competent RNAP-promoter open complex. Here, we report a 4.4 angstrom crystal structure of an intact bacterial class II transcription activation complex. The structure comprises Thermus thermophilus transcription activator protein TTHB099 (TAP) [homolog of Escherichia coli catabolite activator protein (CAP)], T. thermophilus RNAP σ(A) holoenzyme, a class II TAP-dependent promoter, and a ribotetranucleotide primer. The structure reveals the interactions between RNAP holoenzyme and DNA responsible for transcription initiation and reveals the interactions between TAP and RNAP holoenzyme responsible for transcription activation. The structure indicates that TAP stimulates isomerization through simple, adhesive, stabilizing protein-protein interactions with RNAP holoenzyme. PMID:27284196

  20. Mitotic bookmarking by transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mitosis is accompanied by dramatic changes in chromatin organization and nuclear architecture. Transcription halts globally and most sequence-specific transcription factors and co-factors are ejected from mitotic chromatin. How then does the cell maintain its transcriptional identity throughout the cell division cycle? It has become clear that not all traces of active transcription and gene repression are erased within mitotic chromatin. Many histone modifications are stable or only partially diminished throughout mitosis. In addition, some sequence-specific DNA binding factors have emerged that remain bound to select sites within mitotic chromatin, raising the possibility that they function to transmit regulatory information through the transcriptionally silent mitotic phase, a concept that has been termed “mitotic bookmarking.” Here we review recent approaches to studying potential bookmarking factors with regards to their mitotic partitioning, and summarize emerging ideas concerning the in vivo functions of mitotically bound nuclear factors. PMID:23547918

  1. Nascent transcription affected by RNA polymerase IV in Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Erhard, Karl F; Talbot, Joy-El R B; Deans, Natalie C; McClish, Allison E; Hollick, Jay B

    2015-04-01

    All eukaryotes use three DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RNAPs) to create cellular RNAs from DNA templates. Plants have additional RNAPs related to Pol II, but their evolutionary role(s) remain largely unknown. Zea mays (maize) RNA polymerase D1 (RPD1), the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV), is required for normal plant development, paramutation, transcriptional repression of certain transposable elements (TEs), and transcriptional regulation of specific alleles. Here, we define the nascent transcriptomes of rpd1 mutant and wild-type (WT) seedlings using global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) to identify the broader targets of RPD1-based regulation. Comparisons of WT and rpd1 mutant GRO-seq profiles indicate that Pol IV globally affects transcription at both transcriptional start sites and immediately downstream of polyadenylation addition sites. We found no evidence of divergent transcription from gene promoters as seen in mammalian GRO-seq profiles. Statistical comparisons identify genes and TEs whose transcription is affected by RPD1. Most examples of significant increases in genic antisense transcription appear to be initiated by 3'-proximal long terminal repeat retrotransposons. These results indicate that maize Pol IV specifies Pol II-based transcriptional regulation for specific regions of the maize genome including genes having developmental significance. PMID:25653306

  2. Nascent Transcription Affected by RNA Polymerase IV in Zea mays

    PubMed Central

    Erhard, Karl F.; Talbot, Joy-El R. B.; Deans, Natalie C.; McClish, Allison E.; Hollick, Jay B.

    2015-01-01

    All eukaryotes use three DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RNAPs) to create cellular RNAs from DNA templates. Plants have additional RNAPs related to Pol II, but their evolutionary role(s) remain largely unknown. Zea mays (maize) RNA polymerase D1 (RPD1), the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV), is required for normal plant development, paramutation, transcriptional repression of certain transposable elements (TEs), and transcriptional regulation of specific alleles. Here, we define the nascent transcriptomes of rpd1 mutant and wild-type (WT) seedlings using global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) to identify the broader targets of RPD1-based regulation. Comparisons of WT and rpd1 mutant GRO-seq profiles indicate that Pol IV globally affects transcription at both transcriptional start sites and immediately downstream of polyadenylation addition sites. We found no evidence of divergent transcription from gene promoters as seen in mammalian GRO-seq profiles. Statistical comparisons identify genes and TEs whose transcription is affected by RPD1. Most examples of significant increases in genic antisense transcription appear to be initiated by 3ʹ-proximal long terminal repeat retrotransposons. These results indicate that maize Pol IV specifies Pol II-based transcriptional regulation for specific regions of the maize genome including genes having developmental significance. PMID:25653306

  3. Direct Transcriptional Consequences of Somatic Mutation in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shlien, Adam; Raine, Keiran; Fuligni, Fabio; Arnold, Roland; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Dronov, Serge; Mamanova, Lira; Rosic, Andrej; Ju, Young Seok; Cooke, Susanna L; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Davies, Helen R; Tarpey, Patrick S; Van Loo, Peter; Wedge, David C; Jones, David R; Martin, Sancha; Marshall, John; Anderson, Elizabeth; Hardy, Claire; Barbashina, Violetta; Aparicio, Samuel A J R; Sauer, Torill; Garred, Øystein; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Mariani, Odette; Boyault, Sandrine; Fatima, Aquila; Langerød, Anita; Borg, Åke; Thomas, Gilles; Richardson, Andrea L; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Polyak, Kornelia; Stratton, Michael R; Campbell, Peter J

    2016-08-16

    Disordered transcriptomes of cancer encompass direct effects of somatic mutation on transcription, coordinated secondary pathway alterations, and increased transcriptional noise. To catalog the rules governing how somatic mutation exerts direct transcriptional effects, we developed an exhaustive pipeline for analyzing RNA sequencing data, which we integrated with whole genomes from 23 breast cancers. Using X-inactivation analyses, we found that cancer cells are more transcriptionally active than intermixed stromal cells. This is especially true in estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors. Overall, 59% of substitutions were expressed. Nonsense mutations showed lower expression levels than expected, with patterns characteristic of nonsense-mediated decay. 14% of 4,234 rearrangements caused transcriptional abnormalities, including exon skips, exon reusage, fusions, and premature polyadenylation. We found productive, stable transcription from sense-to-antisense gene fusions and gene-to-intergenic rearrangements, suggesting that these mutation classes drive more transcriptional disruption than previously suspected. Systematic integration of transcriptome with genome data reveals the rules by which transcriptional machinery interprets somatic mutation. PMID:27498871

  4. RNA polymerase and the regulation of transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Reznikoff, W.S.; Gross, C.A.; Burgess, R.R.; Record, M.T.; Dahlberg, J.E.; Wickens, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of eight sections, each containing several papers. The section titles are: RNA Polymerases; Transcription Initiation - Bacterial; Regulation of Bacterial Transcription Initiation; Stable RNA Synthesis in Eukaryotes: Chromatin Structure; Promoters; Enhancers; and the Global Control of Eukaryotic Transcription; Specific Eukaryotic Transcription Factors; Termination of Transcription; and Short Communications.

  5. A transcription map of a yeast centromere plasmid: unexpected transcripts and altered gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Marczynski, G T; Jaehning, J A

    1985-01-01

    YCp19 is a yeast centromere plasmid capable of autonomous replication in both yeast and E. coli (J. Mol. Biol., 158: 157-179, 1982). It is stably maintained as a single copy in the yeast cell and is therefore a model yeast "minichromosome" and cloning vector. We have located the positions and measured the abundance of the in vivo yeast transcripts from YCp19. Transcripts from the selectable marker genes TRP1 and URA3 were present at increased levels relative to chromosomal copies of the genes. Unanticipated transcripts from the yeast CEN4 and E. coli pBR322 sequences were also found. Although much of the plasmid vector is actively transcribed in vivo, the regions around the most useful cloning sites (BamHI, EcoRI, SalI) are free of transcripts. We have analyzed transcription of BamHI inserts containing promoter variants of the HIS3 gene and determined that although initiation events are accurate, plasmid context may alter levels of gene expression. Images PMID:3909105

  6. Swinger RNA self-hybridization and mitochondrial non-canonical swinger transcription, transcription systematically exchanging nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2016-06-21

    Stem-loop hairpins punctuate mitochondrial post-transcriptional processing. Regulation of mitochondrial swinger transcription, transcription producing RNAs matching the mitogenome only assuming systematic exchanges between nucleotides (23 bijective transformations along 9 symmetric exchanges X<>Y, e.g. A<>G, and 14 asymmetric exchanges X>Y>Z>X, e.g. A>G>C>A) remains unknown. Does swinger RNA self-hybridization regulate swinger, as regular, transcription? Groups of 8 swinger transformations share canonical self-hybridization properties within each group, group 0 includes identity (regular) transcription. The human mitogenome has more stem-loop hairpins than randomized sequences for all groups. Group 2 transformations reveal complementarity of the light strand replication origin (OL) loop and a neighboring tRNA gene, detecting the longtime presumed OL/tRNA homology. Non-canonical G=U pairings in hairpins increases with swinger RNA detection. These results confirm biological relevancy of swinger-transformed DNA/RNA, independently of, and in combination with, previously detected swinger DNA/RNA and swinger peptides. Swinger-transformed mitogenomes include unsuspected multilayered information. PMID:27079465

  7. Epigenetic hereditary transcription profiles II, aging revisited

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Johannes WIM

    2007-01-01

    Background Previously, we have shown that deviations from the average transcription profile of a group of functionally related genes can be epigenetically transmitted to daughter cells, thereby implicating nuclear programming as the cause. As a first step in further characterizing this phenomenon it was necessary to determine to what extent such deviations occur in non-tumorigenic tissues derived from normal individuals. To this end, a microarray database derived from 90 human donors aged between 22 to 87 years was used to study deviations from the average transcription profile of the proteasome genes. Results Increase in donor age was found to correlate with a decrease in deviations from the general transcription profile with this decline being gender-specific. The age-related index declined at a faster rate for males although it started from a higher level. Additionally, transcription profiles from similar tissues were more alike than those from different tissues, indicating that deviations arise during differentiation. Conclusion These findings suggest that aging and differentiation are related to epigenetic changes that alter the transcription profile of proteasomal genes. Since alterations in the structure and function of the proteasome are unlikely, such changes appear to occur without concomitant change in gene function. These findings, if confirmed, may have a significant impact on our understanding of the aging process. Open peer review This article was reviewed by Nathan Bowen (nominated by I. King Jordan), Timothy E. Reddy (nominated by Charles DeLisi) and by Martijn Huynen. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers'comments section. PMID:18163906

  8. Transcriptional regulation of the human biglycan gene.

    PubMed

    Ungefroren, H; Krull, N B

    1996-06-28

    The small leucine-rich proteoglycan biglycan is involved in several physiological and pathophysiological processes through the ability of its core protein to interact with other extracellular matrix molecules and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). To learn more about the regulation of biglycan core protein expression, we have cloned and sequenced 1218 base pairs from the 5'-flanking region of the human biglycan gene, demonstrated functional promoter activity, and investigated the molecular mechanisms through which various agents modulate its transcriptional activity. Sequencing revealed the presence of several cis-acting elements including multiple AP-2 sites and interleukin-6 response elements, a NF-kappaB site, a TGF-beta negative element, and an E-box. The TATA and CAAT box-lacking promoter possesses many features of a growth-related gene, e.g. a GC-rich immediate 5' region, many Sp1 sites, and the use of multiple transcriptional start sites. Transient transfections of the tumor cell lines MG-63, SK-UT-1, and T47D with various biglycan 5'-flanking region-luciferase reporter gene constructs showed that the proximal 78 base pairs are sufficient for full promoter activity. Several agents among them interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. were capable of altering biglycan promoter activity. However, in MG-63 cells, TGF-beta1 failed to increase either activity of the biglycan promoter constructs or specific transcription from the endogenous biglycan gene. Since TGF-beta1 also did not alter the stability of cytoplasmic biglycan mRNA as determined from Northern analysis after inhibition of transcription with 5,6-dichloro-1beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, an as yet unidentified nuclear post-transcriptional mechanism was considered responsible for the TGF-beta effect in this cell type. These results might help to elucidate the molecular pathways leading to pathological alterations of biglycan expression observed in atherosclerosis, glomerulonephritis

  9. Transcription of Trypanosoma brucei maxicircles

    SciTech Connect

    Michelotti, E.F.; Hajduk, S.L.

    1987-05-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite which developmentally regulates mitochondrial activity. In the mammal T. brucei produces ATP entirely by glycolysis while cytochrome mediated respiration resumes in the life-stage in the midgut of the insect vector. Using quantitative S1 nuclease protection assays two types of regulation of the steady state levels of the mitochondrial transcripts were found. Transcription of cytochrome b, cytochrome oxidase, and the rRNA genes is repressed in early bloodstream developmental stages, undergoes dramatic activation in later bloodstream stages, and finally a lesser activation in the insect developmental stage. Transcription of NADH dehydrogenase genes, however, is unregulated. Mitochondrial transcripts with a 5' triphosphate terminus, representing the site of transcription initiation, were capped using guanylyl transferase. The in vitro capped RNA hybridized to only one of eight mitochondrial restriction fragments on a Southern blot, however, hybridization of Southern blots with RNA from ..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P-UTP pulsed mitochondria labelled all restriction fragments equally. These results suggest that each DNA strand has a single promoter which directs the transcription of a full-length RNA which is subsequently processed. Different mitochondrial genes, despite being expressed on the same precursor RNA molecule, are independently regulated by both transcription initiation and RNA processing.

  10. Zinc triggers a complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the metal homeostasis gene FRD3 in Arabidopsis relatives

    PubMed Central

    Charlier, Jean-Benoit; Polese, Catherine; Nouet, Cécile; Carnol, Monique; Bosman, Bernard; Krämer, Ute; Motte, Patrick; Hanikenne, Marc

    2015-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, FRD3 (FERRIC CHELATE REDUCTASE DEFECTIVE 3) plays a central role in metal homeostasis. FRD3 is among a set of metal homeostasis genes that are constitutively highly expressed in roots and shoots of Arabidopsis halleri, a zinc hyperaccumulating and hypertolerant species. Here, we examined the regulation of FRD3 by zinc in both species to shed light on the evolutionary processes underlying the evolution of hyperaccumulation in A. halleri. We combined gene expression studies with the use of β-glucuronidase and green fluorescent protein reporter constructs to compare the expression profile and transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of FRD3 in both species. The AtFRD3 and AhFRD3 genes displayed a conserved expression profile. In A. thaliana, alternative transcription initiation sites from two promoters determined transcript variants that were differentially regulated by zinc supply in roots and shoots to favour the most highly translated variant under zinc-excess conditions. In A. halleri, a single transcript variant with higher transcript stability and enhanced translation has been maintained. The FRD3 gene thus undergoes complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation in Arabidopsis relatives. Our study reveals that a diverse set of mechanisms underlie increased gene dosage in the A. halleri lineage and illustrates how an environmental challenge can alter gene regulation. PMID:25900619

  11. Transcription induces gyration of the DNA template in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, N; Bossi, L

    1988-01-01

    We show that transcription modulation of a plasmid sequence in exponentially growing Escherichia coli cells leads to a rapid change in the linking number of plasmid DNA. Activation of transcription is accompanied by an increase in the plasmid's level of negative supercoiling. The added superhelical turns, whose number is proportional to the strength of the promoter and to the length of the transcript, are promptly removed when transcription is turned off. The transcription-induced increase of template supercoiling can still be detected in the presence of an inhibitor of ATP-dependent DNA gyrase [DNA topoisomerase (ATP-hydrolyzing), EC 5.99.1.3]. Altogether, our results indicate that, in addition to being under a general control, DNA superhelicity can be modulated locally in response to the topological perturbations associated with DNA tracking processes. We discuss a model in which supercoiling changes are produced by differential swiveling activities on the opposite sides of a transcriptional flow during transcriptional modulation. Images PMID:2849103

  12. Negative elongation factor NELF controls transcription of immediate early genes in a stimulus-specific manner

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Piuz, Isabelle; Schlegel, Werner

    2009-01-15

    The transcription rate of immediate early genes (IEGs) is controlled directly by transcription elongation factors at the transcription elongation step. Negative elongation factor (NELF) and 5,6-dichloro-1-{beta}-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) sensitivity-inducing factor (DSIF) stall RNA polymerase II (pol II) soon after transcription initiation. Upon induction of IEG transcription, DSIF is converted into an accelerator for pol II elongation. To address whether and how NELF as well as DSIF controls overall IEG transcription, its expression was reduced using stable RNA interference in GH4C1 cells. NELF knock-down reduced thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-induced transcription of the IEGs c-fos, MKP-1, and junB. In contrast, epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced transcription of these IEGs was unaltered or even slightly increased by NELF knock-down. Thus, stable knock-down of NELF affects IEG transcription stimulation-specifically. Conversely, DSIF knock-down reduced both TRH- and EGF-induced transcription of the three IEGs. Interestingly, TRH-induced activation of the MAP kinase pathway, a pathway essential for transcription of the three IEGs, was down-regulated by NELF knock-down. Thus, stable knock-down of NELF, by modulating intracellular signaling pathways, caused stimulation-specific loss of IEG transcription. These observations indicate that NELF controls overall IEG transcription via multiple mechanisms both directly and indirectly.

  13. Dynamics of Transcription Factor Binding Site Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Tuğrul, Murat; Paixão, Tiago; Barton, Nicholas H.; Tkačik, Gašper

    2015-01-01

    Evolution of gene regulation is crucial for our understanding of the phenotypic differences between species, populations and individuals. Sequence-specific binding of transcription factors to the regulatory regions on the DNA is a key regulatory mechanism that determines gene expression and hence heritable phenotypic variation. We use a biophysical model for directional selection on gene expression to estimate the rates of gain and loss of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in finite populations under both point and insertion/deletion mutations. Our results show that these rates are typically slow for a single TFBS in an isolated DNA region, unless the selection is extremely strong. These rates decrease drastically with increasing TFBS length or increasingly specific protein-DNA interactions, making the evolution of sites longer than ∼ 10 bp unlikely on typical eukaryotic speciation timescales. Similarly, evolution converges to the stationary distribution of binding sequences very slowly, making the equilibrium assumption questionable. The availability of longer regulatory sequences in which multiple binding sites can evolve simultaneously, the presence of “pre-sites” or partially decayed old sites in the initial sequence, and biophysical cooperativity between transcription factors, can all facilitate gain of TFBS and reconcile theoretical calculations with timescales inferred from comparative genomics. PMID:26545200

  14. Antioxidant-induced changes of the AP-1 transcription complex are paralleled by a selective suppression of human papillomavirus transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Rösl, F; Das, B C; Lengert, M; Geletneky, K; zur Hausen, H

    1997-01-01

    Considering the involvement of a redox-regulatory pathway in the expression of human papillomaviruses (HPVs), HPV type 16 (HPV-16)-immortalized human keratinocytes were treated with the antioxidant pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamate (PDTC). PDTC induces elevated binding of the transcription factor AP-1 to its cognate recognition site within the viral regulatory region. Despite of increased AP-1 binding, normally indispensable for efficient HPV-16 transcription, viral gene expression was selectively suppressed at the level of initiation of transcription. Electrophoretic mobility supershift assays showed that the composition of the AP-1 complex, predominantly consisting of Jun homodimers in untreated cells, was altered. Irrespective of enhanced c-fos expression, c-jun was phosphorylated and became primarily heterodimerized with fra-1, which was also induced after PDTC incubation. Additionally, there was also an increased complex formation between c-jun and junB. Because both fra-1 and junB overexpression negatively interferes with c-jun/c-fos trans-activation of AP-1-responsive genes, our results suggest that the observed block in viral transcription is mainly the consequence of an antioxidant-induced reconstitution of the AP-1 transcription complex. Since expression of the c-jun/c-fos gene family is tightly regulated during cellular differentiation, defined reorganization of a central viral transcription factor may represent a novel mechanism controlling the transcription of pathogenic HPVs during keratinocyte differentiation and in the progression to cervical cancer. PMID:8985358

  15. The transcriptional foundation of pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Ian; Tomlinson, Simon R

    2009-07-01

    A fundamental goal in biology is to understand the molecular basis of cell identity. Pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cell identity is governed by a set of transcription factors centred on the triumvirate of Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog. These proteins often bind to closely localised genomic sites. Recent studies have identified additional transcriptional modulators that bind to chromatin near sites occupied by Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog. This suggests that the combinatorial control of gene transcription might be fundamental to the ES cell state. Here we discuss how these observations advance our understanding of the transcription factor network that controls pluripotent identity and highlight unresolved issues that arise from these studies. PMID:19542351

  16. Transcriptional Regulation of Hepatic Lipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhui; Viscarra, Jose; Kim, Sun-Joong; Sul, Hei Sook

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid and fat synthesis in liver is a highly regulated metabolic pathway critical for energy distribution. Having common features at their promoter regions, lipogenic genes are coordinately regulated at the transcription level. Transcription factors, such as USF, SREBP-1c, LXR and ChREBP play critical roles in this process. Recently, insights have been gained into how various signaling pathways regulate these transcription factors. After feeding, high blood glucose and insulin induce lipogenic genes through several pathways, including DNA-PK, aPKC and Akt-mTOR. Various transcription factors and coregulators undergo specific modifications, such as phosphorylation, acetylation, or ubiquitination, which affect their function, stability, or localization. Dysregulation of lipogenesis can contribute to hepatosteatosis, which is associated with obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:26490400

  17. Zooming in on Transcription Preinitiation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kapil; Sari-Ak, Duygu; Haffke, Matthias; Trowitzsch, Simon; Berger, Imre

    2016-06-19

    Class II gene transcription commences with the assembly of the Preinitiation Complex (PIC) from a plethora of proteins and protein assemblies in the nucleus, including the General Transcription Factors (GTFs), RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II), co-activators, co-repressors, and more. TFIID, a megadalton-sized multiprotein complex comprising 20 subunits, is among the first GTFs to bind the core promoter. TFIID assists in nucleating PIC formation, completed by binding of further factors in a highly regulated stepwise fashion. Recent results indicate that TFIID itself is built from distinct preformed submodules, which reside in the nucleus but also in the cytosol of cells. Here, we highlight recent insights in transcription factor assembly and the regulation of transcription preinitiation. PMID:27067110

  18. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  19. Forcing FAK into Transcriptional Activity.

    PubMed

    Lietha, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) has known signaling roles in cytoplasmic adhesion structures, but was recently shown to act as a transcriptional regulator in the nucleus. In this issue of Structure, Cardoso et al. (2016) report that mechanical forces translocate FAK to the nucleus of cardiomyocytes, and provide structural insights into how FAK interacts with the MEF2 transcription factor to control cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27486913

  20. Vespucci: a system for building annotated databases of nascent transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Karmel A.; Kaikkonen, Minna U.; Gaasterland, Terry; Glass, Christopher K.

    2014-01-01

    Global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) is a recent addition to the series of high-throughput sequencing methods that enables new insights into transcriptional dynamics within a cell. However, GRO-sequencing presents new algorithmic challenges, as existing analysis platforms for ChIP-seq and RNA-seq do not address the unique problem of identifying transcriptional units de novo from short reads located all across the genome. Here, we present a novel algorithm for de novo transcript identification from GRO-sequencing data, along with a system that determines transcript regions, stores them in a relational database and associates them with known reference annotations. We use this method to analyze GRO-sequencing data from primary mouse macrophages and derive novel quantitative insights into the extent and characteristics of non-coding transcription in mammalian cells. In doing so, we demonstrate that Vespucci expands existing annotations for mRNAs and lincRNAs by defining the primary transcript beyond the polyadenylation site. In addition, Vespucci generates assemblies for un-annotated non-coding RNAs such as those transcribed from enhancer-like elements. Vespucci thereby provides a robust system for defining, storing and analyzing diverse classes of primary RNA transcripts that are of increasing biological interest. PMID:24304890

  1. Genetic Regulation of Transcriptional Variation in Natural Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions

    PubMed Central

    Zan, Yanjun; Shen, Xia; Forsberg, Simon K. G.; Carlborg, Örjan

    2016-01-01

    An increased knowledge of the genetic regulation of expression in Arabidopsis thaliana is likely to provide important insights about the basis of the plant’s extensive phenotypic variation. Here, we reanalyzed two publicly available datasets with genome-wide data on genetic and transcript variation in large collections of natural A. thaliana accessions. Transcripts from more than half of all genes were detected in the leaves of all accessions, and from nearly all annotated genes in at least one accession. Thousands of genes had high transcript levels in some accessions, but no transcripts at all in others, and this pattern was correlated with the genome-wide genotype. In total, 2669 eQTL were mapped in the largest population, and 717 of them were replicated in the other population. A total of 646 cis-eQTL-regulated genes that lacked detectable transcripts in some accessions was found, and for 159 of these we identified one, or several, common structural variants in the populations that were shown to be likely contributors to the lack of detectable RNA transcripts for these genes. This study thus provides new insights into the overall genetic regulation of global gene expression diversity in the leaf of natural A. thaliana accessions. Further, it also shows that strong cis-acting polymorphisms, many of which are likely to be structural variations, make important contributions to the transcriptional variation in the worldwide A. thaliana population. PMID:27226169

  2. Abscisic acid represses the transcription of chloroplast genes*

    PubMed Central

    Yamburenko, Maria V.; Zubo, Yan O.; Börner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown effects of abscisic acid (ABA) on nuclear genes encoding chloroplast-localized proteins. ABA effects on the transcription of chloroplast genes, however, have not been investigated yet thoroughly. This work, therefore, studied the effects of ABA (75 μM) on transcription and steady-state levels of transcripts in chloroplasts of basal and apical segments of primary leaves of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Basal segments consist of young cells with developing chloroplasts, while apical segments contain the oldest cells with mature chloroplasts. Exogenous ABA reduced the chlorophyll content and caused changes of the endogenous concentrations not only of ABA but also of cytokinins to different extents in the basal and apical segments. It repressed transcription by the chloroplast phage-type and bacteria-type RNA polymerases and lowered transcript levels of most investigated chloroplast genes drastically. ABA did not repress the transcription of psbD and a few other genes and even increased psbD mRNA levels under certain conditions. The ABA effects on chloroplast transcription were more pronounced in basal vs. apical leaf segments and enhanced by light. Simultaneous application of cytokinin (22 μM 6-benzyladenine) minimized the ABA effects on chloroplast gene expression. These data demonstrate that ABA affects the expression of chloroplast genes differentially and points to a role of ABA in the regulation and coordination of the activities of nuclear and chloroplast genes coding for proteins with functions in photosynthesis. PMID:24078671

  3. Gene transcription and chromosome replication in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, P; Bogan, J A; Welch, K; Pickett, S R; Wang, H J; Zaritsky, A; Helmstetter, C E

    1997-01-01

    Transcript levels of several Escherichia coli genes involved in chromosome replication and cell division were measured in dnaC2(Ts) mutants synchronized for chromosome replication by temperature shifts. Levels of transcripts from four of the genes, dam, nrdA, mukB, and seqA, were reduced at a certain stage during chromosome replication. The magnitudes of the decreases were similar to those reported previously ftsQ and ftsZ (P. Zhou and C. E. Helmstetter, J. Bacteriol. 176:6100-6106, 1994) but considerably less than those seen with dnaA, gidA, and mioC (P. W. Theisen, J. E. Grimwade, A. C. Leonard, J. A. Bogan, and C. E. Helmstetter, Mol. Microbiol. 10:575-584, 1993). The decreases in transcripts appeared to correlate with the estimated time at which the genes replicated. This same conclusion was reached in studies with synchronous cultures obtained with the baby machine in those instances in which periodicities in transcript levels were clearly evident. The transcriptional levels for two genes, minE and tus, did not fluctuate significantly, whereas the transcripts for one gene, iciA, appeared to increase transiently. The results support the idea that cell cycle timing in E. coli is not governed by timed bursts of gene expression, since the overall findings summarized in this report are generally consistent with cell cycle-dependent transient inhibitions of transcription rather than stimulations. PMID:8981994

  4. Regulation of transcription by synthetic DNA-bending agents.

    PubMed

    Bednarski, David; Firestine, Steven M

    2006-11-01

    Gene expression is regulated by a complex interplay between binding and the three-dimensional arrangement of transcription factors with RNA polymerase and DNA. Previous studies have supported a direct role for DNA bending and conformation in gene expression, which suggests that agents that induce bends in DNA might be able to control gene expression. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effect of triple-helix-forming oligonucleotide (TFO) bending agents on the transcription of luciferase in an in vitro transcriptional/translational system. We find that transcription is regulated only by a TFO that induces a bend in the DNA. Related TFOs that do not induce bends in DNA have no effect on transcription. Reporter expression can be increased by as much as 80 % or decreased by as much as 50 % depending on the phasing of the upstream bend relative to the promoter. We interpret the results as follows: when the bend is positioned such that the upstream DNA is curved toward the RNA polymerase on the same DNA face, transcription is enhanced. When the upstream DNA is curved away, transcription is attenuated. These results support the hypothesis that DNA-bending agents might have the capability to regulate gene expression, thereby opening up a previously undervalued avenue in research on the artificial control of gene expression. PMID:17004274

  5. Vespucci: a system for building annotated databases of nascent transcripts.

    PubMed

    Allison, Karmel A; Kaikkonen, Minna U; Gaasterland, Terry; Glass, Christopher K

    2014-02-01

    Global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) is a recent addition to the series of high-throughput sequencing methods that enables new insights into transcriptional dynamics within a cell. However, GRO-sequencing presents new algorithmic challenges, as existing analysis platforms for ChIP-seq and RNA-seq do not address the unique problem of identifying transcriptional units de novo from short reads located all across the genome. Here, we present a novel algorithm for de novo transcript identification from GRO-sequencing data, along with a system that determines transcript regions, stores them in a relational database and associates them with known reference annotations. We use this method to analyze GRO-sequencing data from primary mouse macrophages and derive novel quantitative insights into the extent and characteristics of non-coding transcription in mammalian cells. In doing so, we demonstrate that Vespucci expands existing annotations for mRNAs and lincRNAs by defining the primary transcript beyond the polyadenylation site. In addition, Vespucci generates assemblies for un-annotated non-coding RNAs such as those transcribed from enhancer-like elements. Vespucci thereby provides a robust system for defining, storing and analyzing diverse classes of primary RNA transcripts that are of increasing biological interest. PMID:24304890

  6. TATA-binding protein and transcription factor IIB induce transcript slipping during early transcription by RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Benjamin; Drullinger, Linda F; Kugel, Jennifer F; Goodrich, James A

    2009-04-01

    To better understand the mechanism of steps in early transcription by RNA polymerase II (pol II), we investigated the molecular determinants of transcript slipping within complexes assembled on promoters containing a pre-melted transcription bubble from -9 to +3. Transcript slippage occurs when an RNA transcript contains a repetitive sequence that allows the transcript to slip back and pair with the template strand of the DNA at a new register before transcription continues. We established the contributions of individual transcription factors, DNA elements, and RNA length to slipping on a heteroduplex template using a highly purified human pol II transcription system. We found that transcripts slip at a very defined point in the transcription reaction, after pol II completes phosphodiester bond synthesis at register +5. This point is set by the position of the polymerase active site on the DNA template, as opposed to the length of the transcript, as well as by a repetitive CUCU sequence that must occur from +2 to +5. Interestingly, slipping at this juncture is induced by TATA-binding protein and transcription factor IIB and requires a TATA box but not a transcription factor IIB recognition sequence. We propose a model in which transcribing complexes, upon completing phosphodiester bond synthesis at register +5, enter one of two branches in which they either complete productive synthesis of the transcript or undergo multiple rounds of transcript slipping. PMID:19193635

  7. Demonstration of transcriptional regulation of specific genes by phytochrome action

    PubMed Central

    Silverthorne, Jane; Tobin, Elaine M.

    1984-01-01

    We have developed an in vitro transcription system that uses nuclei isolated from Lemna gibba G-3. The in vitro transcripts include sequences homologous to hybridization probes for the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase [3-phospho-D-glycerate carboxy-lyase (dimerizing), EC 4.1.1.39], the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein, and rRNA. Light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein sequences are transcribed to a greater extent in nuclei isolated from plants grown in darkness with 2 min of red light every 8 hr than in nuclei isolated from dark-treated plants. Furthermore, the amount of these transcripts measured in plants given a single minute of red light after dark treatment is increased over the amount measured in dark-treated plants. The effect of red light is at least partially reversible by 10 min of far-red light given immediately after the red light pulse. Transcription of both rRNA and small subunit sequences is also stimulated by a single minute of red light as compared to dark-treated tissue. However, the relative magnitudes of the increases compared to the dark levels are smaller than the increase seen for the chlorophyll a/b-protein, possibly because of the higher level of transcription of these sequences in the dark. The effect of red light on the transcription of small subunit and rRNA sequences is also reversible by immediate treatment with 10 min of far-red light. Pulse chase studies of dark-treated nuclei for up to 110 min do not show substantial turnover of in vitro labeled small subunit and chlorophyll a/b-protein transcripts. We therefore conclude that phytochrome action has induced specific changes in transcription of these genes. Images PMID:16593420

  8. HIPK2: a multitalented partner for transcription factors in DNA damage response and development.

    PubMed

    Rinaldo, Cinzia; Prodosmo, Andrea; Siepi, Francesca; Soddu, Silvia

    2007-08-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a widely diffuse and versatile post-translational modification that controls many cellular processes, from signal transduction to gene transcription. The homeodomain-interacting protein kinases (HIPKs) belong to a new family of serine-threonine kinases first identified as corepressors for homeodomain transcription factors. Different screenings for the identification of new partners of transcription factors have indicated that HIPK2, the best characterized member of the HIPK family, is a multitalented coregulator of an increasing number of transcription factors and cofactors. The aim of this review is to describe the different mechanisms through which HIPK2 regulates gene transcription. PMID:17713576

  9. Glucocorticoid regulation of human BMP-6 transcription.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunshan; Titus, Louisa; Barghouthi, Mejd; Viggeswarapu, Manjula; Hair, Gregory; Boden, Scott D

    2004-09-01

    Addition of dexamethasone (Dex) to human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) resulted in a 16-fold increase in human bone morphogenetic protein-6 (hBMP-6) mRNA levels 24 h after treatment. Evaluation of luciferase expression after transfection of HeLa cells with hBMP-6 promoter/luciferase reporter constructs indicated that the hBMP-6 promoter activity was contained in a 268-bp region (-1051 to -784 where +1 is the translation start site) over 600 bases 5' to that previously published. It further showed that the promoter activity is regulated by glucocorticoid treatment. Analysis of RNA from hMSCs and HeLa cells by primer extension, RNase protection, and 5' RACE further narrowed the location of the transcription start site to an 84-bp region (-940 to -857). To determine whether this start site was regulated in hMSCs, hBMP-6 mRNA levels in control and Dex-treated cells were quantitated by RT-PCR using one primer set in the translated region of the gene and one located just 3' of the 84-bp region. Both primer sets showed hBMP-6 mRNA levels approximately 16- to 22-fold higher in the Dex-treated cells, demonstrating that hBMP-6 transcription is being regulated by glucocorticoids in the pluripotent hMSCs at the upstream transcription start site. PMID:15336603

  10. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Trigger Hypoxia-Induced Transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandel, N. S.; Maltepe, E.; Goldwasser, E.; Mathieu, C. E.; Simon, M. C.; Schumacker, P. T.

    1998-09-01

    Transcriptional activation of erythropoietin, glycolytic enzymes, and vascular endothelial growth factor occurs during hypoxia or in response to cobalt chloride (CoCl2) in Hep3B cells. However, neither the mechanism of cellular O2 sensing nor that of cobalt is fully understood. We tested whether mitochondria act as O2 sensors during hypoxia and whether hypoxia and cobalt activate transcription by increasing generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Results show (i) wild-type Hep3B cells increase ROS generation during hypoxia (1.5% O2) or CoCl2 incubation, (ii) Hep3B cells depleted of mitochondrial DNA (ρ 0 cells) fail to respire, fail to activate mRNA for erythropoietin, glycolytic enzymes, or vascular endothelial growth factor during hypoxia, and fail to increase ROS generation during hypoxia; (iii) ρ 0 cells increase ROS generation in response to CoCl2 and retain the ability to induce expression of these genes; and (iv) the antioxidants pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and ebselen abolish transcriptional activation of these genes during hypoxia or CoCl2 in wild-type cells, and abolish the response to CoCl2 in ρ 0 cells. Thus, hypoxia activates transcription via a mitochondria-dependent signaling process involving increased ROS, whereas CoCl2 activates transcription by stimulating ROS generation via a mitochondria-independent mechanism.